Science.gov

Sample records for inland hypersaline lakes

  1. Trophic status of inland lakes from LANDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, L. T.; Scarpace, F. L.

    1975-01-01

    A first-cut assessment of the trophic status of inland lakes in Wisconsin was obtained from LANDSAT data. To satisfy the criteria of the project, a large and versatile computer program was developed to gain access to LANDSAT data. This analysis technique has proven to be a cost-effective method of classifying inland lakes in Wisconsin.

  2. Microbial response to salinity change in Lake Chaka, a hypersaline lake on Tibetan plateau.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongchen; Dong, Hailiang; Yu, Bingsong; Liu, Xinqi; Li, Yiliang; Ji, Shanshan; Zhang, Chuanlun L

    2007-10-01

    Previous investigations of the salinity effects on the microbial community composition have largely been limited to dynamic estuaries and coastal solar salterns. In this study, the effects of salinity and mineralogy on microbial community composition was studied by using a 900-cm sediment core collected from a stable, inland hypersaline lake, Lake Chaka, on the Tibetan Plateau, north-western China. This core, spanning a time of 17,000 years, was unique in that it possessed an entire range of salinity from freshwater clays and silty sands at the bottom to gypsum and glauberite in the middle, to halite at the top. Bacterial and archaeal communities were studied along the length of this core using an integrated approach combining mineralogy and geochemistry, molecular microbiology (16S rRNA gene analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction), cultivation and lipid biomarker analyses. Systematic changes in microbial community composition were correlated with the salinity gradient, but not with mineralogy. Bacterial community was dominated by the Firmicutes-related environmental sequences and known species (including sulfate-reducing bacteria) in the freshwater sediments at the bottom, but by halophilic and halotolerant Betaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes in the hypersaline sediments at the top. Succession of proteobacterial groups along the salinity gradient, typically observed in free-living bacterial communities, was not observed in the sediment-associated community. Among Archaea, the Crenarchaeota were predominant in the bottom freshwater sediments, but the halophilic Halobacteriales of the Euryarchaeota was the most important group in the hypersaline sediments. Multiple isolates were obtained along the whole length of the core, and their salinity tolerance was consistent with the geochemical conditions. Iron-reducing bacteria were isolated in the freshwater sediments, which were capable of reducing structural Fe(III) in the Fe(III)-rich clay minerals

  3. Bacterial Dormancy Is More Prevalent in Freshwater than Hypersaline Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Aanderud, Zachary T.; Vert, Joshua C.; Lennon, Jay T.; Magnusson, Tylan W.; Breakwell, Donald P.; Harker, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria employ a diverse array of strategies to survive under extreme environmental conditions but maintaining these adaptations comes at an energetic cost. If energy reserves drop too low, extremophiles may enter a dormant state to persist. We estimated bacterial dormancy and identified the environmental variables influencing our activity proxy in 10 hypersaline and freshwater lakes across the Western United States. Using ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios as an indicator for bacterial activity, we found that the proportion of the community exhibiting dormancy was 16% lower in hypersaline than freshwater lakes. Based on our indicator variable multiple regression results, saltier conditions in both freshwater and hypersaline lakes increased activity, suggesting that salinity was a robust environmental filter structuring bacterial activity in lake ecosystems. To a lesser degree, higher total phosphorus concentrations reduced dormancy in all lakes. Thus, even under extreme conditions, the competition for resources exerted pressure on activity. Within the compositionally distinct and less diverse hypersaline communities, abundant taxa were disproportionately active and localized in families Microbacteriaceae (Actinobacteria), Nitriliruptoraceae (Actinobacteria), and Rhodobacteraceae (Alphaproteobacteria). Our results are consistent with the view that hypersaline communities are able to capitalize on a seemingly more extreme, yet highly selective, set of conditions and finds that extremophiles may need dormancy less often to thrive and survive. PMID:27375575

  4. USEPA Inland HAB Risk Management - Lake Harsha

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater inland lakes and reservoirs supply approximately 70% of the nation’s drinking water and industrial needs. These are typically open ecological systems and susceptible to Harmful algal blooms (HABs) which are increasing in frequency, intensity, and geographic range. I...

  5. Uranium Geochemistry in Hypersaline Soda Lakes in Eastern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linhoff, B. S.; Bennett, P.; Puntsag, T.

    2007-12-01

    Extremely high concentrations of uranium were discovered in water samples from hypersaline soda lakes in eastern Mongolia. The origin and fate of uranium in these lakes was examined using geochemical analyses and modeling, using samples collected from five lakes, six wells and one stream. Samples were analyzed for strontium and uranium isotopes, cations and trace metals, anions, alkalinity, and unstable field parameters. The lakes are small, shallow (<1Km2, <1m) and terminal; their size fluctuates seasonally and they periodically completely desiccate. The region is characterized by rolling semi arid grassland steppe covered by a thick loess deposit of unknown thickness that is underlain by Neogene rhyolite. A typical groundwater in the field area is alkaline (pH = 7.9, 10.7 meq alk/L), 4.4 ° C, with an average T.D.S. of 1500 and low calcium concentration (20 ppm). A strong linear correlation was found between groundwater and lake water chlorine to bromine ratios implying groundwater discharges to lake water and is subsequently evaporated. Evaporation is intense with lake waters having average chlorine concentrations 300 times that of well waters. Uranium in well samples is higher than typical for shallow groundwaters (7-101ppb) suggesting discharging groundwater as a probable source of uranium in lake water. Concentrations of uranium in lake water ranges from 57-14,900ppb making these lakes possibly the highest naturally occurring uranium concentration reported. Lake water alkalinity is strongly correlated to uranium abundance suggesting uranium is complexed with carbonate as the aqueous species UO2CO3. Consequently, the extremely high alkalinity of the most alkaline lake (pH = 9.8, 1288.8 meq alk/L) also has the highest uranium concentrations. Stable strontium isotopes were used to assess the degree of water rock interactions and the presence of 90Sr was checked for to test the possibility of input of nuclear fallout. 90Sr was not detected in lake water samples

  6. Geo- and Biogeochemical Processes in a Heliothermal Hypersaline Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, John M.; Moran, James J.; Resch, Charles T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Cory, Alexandra B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2016-03-17

    Water chemical variations were investigated over three annual hydrologic cycles in hypersaline, heliothermal, meromictic Hot Lake in north-central Washington State, USA. The lake, originally studied by Anderson (1958), contains diverse biota with dramatic zonation related to salinity and redox state. Water samples were collected at 10 cm depth intervals through the shallow lake (2.4 m) at a consistent location during 2012-2014, with comprehensive monitoring performed in 2013. Inorganic salt species, total dissolved solids (TDS), dissolved carbon forms (DOC, DIC), oxygen, sulfide, and methane were analyzed in lake water samples. Depth sonde measurements of pH and temperature were also performed to track their seasonal variations. A bathymetric survey of the lake was conducted to enable lake water volume and solute inventory calculations. Sediment cores were collected at low water and analyzed by x-ray diffraction to investigate sediment mineralogy. The primary dissolved salt in Hot Lake water was Mg2+-SO42- while sediments were dominated by gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O). Lake water concentrations increased with depth to reach saturation with epsomite that was exposed at lake bottom. At maximum volume in spring, Hot Lake exhibited a relatively dilute mixolimnion containing phyto- and zooplankton; a lower saline metalimnion with stratified oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthetic microbiologic communities; and a stable, hypersaline monimolimnion, separated from above layers by a chemocline, containing high levels of sulfide and methane. The thickness of the mixolimnion regulates a heliothermal effect which creates temperatures in excess of 60 oC in the underlying metalimnion and monimolimnion. The mixolimnion was dynamic and actively mixed. It displayed large pH variations, in-situ calcium carbonate precipitation, and large evaporative volume losses. The depletion of this ephemeral layer by fall allowed deeper mixing into the volume-stable lower mixolimnion, more rapid heat

  7. Geo- and biogeochemical processes in a heliothermal hypersaline lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachara, John M.; Moran, James J.; Resch, Charles T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Cory, Alexandra B.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2016-05-01

    Water chemical variations were investigated over three annual hydrologic cycles in hypersaline, heliothermal, meromictic Hot Lake in north-central Washington State, USA. The lake contains diverse biota with dramatic zonation related to salinity and redox state. Water samples were collected at 10-cm depth intervals through the shallow lake (2.4 m) during 2012-2014, with comprehensive monitoring performed in 2013. Inorganic salt species, dissolved carbon forms (DOC, DIC), oxygen, sulfide, and methane were analyzed in lake water samples. Depth sonde measurements of pH and temperature were also performed to track their seasonal variations. A bathymetric survey of the lake was conducted to enable lake water volume and solute inventory calculations. Sediment cores were collected at low water and analyzed by X-ray diffraction to investigate sediment mineralogy. The primary dissolved salt in Hot Lake water was Mg2+-SO42- whereas sediments were dominated by gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O). Lake water concentrations increased with depth, reaching saturation with epsomite (MgSO4·7H2O) that was exposed at lake bottom. At maximum volume in spring, Hot Lake exhibited a relatively dilute mixolimnion; a lower saline metalimnion with stratified oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthetic microbiological communities; and a stable, hypersaline monimolimnion, separated from above layers by a chemocline, containing high levels of sulfide and methane. The thickness of the mixolimnion regulates a heliothermal effect that creates temperatures in excess of 60 °C in the underlying metalimnion and monimolimnion. The mixolimnion was dynamic in volume and actively mixed. It displayed large pH variations, in-situ calcium carbonate precipitation, and large evaporative volume losses. The depletion of this layer by fall allowed deeper mixing into the metalimnion, more rapid heat exchange, and lower winter lake temperatures. Solubility calculations indicate seasonal biogenic and thermogenic aragonite

  8. Characterization of eukaryotic microbial diversity in hypersaline Lake Tyrrell, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Heidelberg, Karla B.; Nelson, William C.; Holm, Johanna B.; Eisenkolb, Nadine; Andrade, Karen; Emerson, Joanne B.

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the community structure of the microbial eukaryotic community from hypersaline Lake Tyrrell, Australia, using near full length 18S rRNA sequences. Water samples were taken in both summer and winter over a 4-year period. The extent of eukaryotic diversity detected was low, with only 35 unique phylotypes using a 97% sequence similarity threshold. The water samples were dominated (91%) by a novel cluster of the Alveolate, Apicomplexa Colpodella spp., most closely related to C. edax. The Chlorophyte, Dunaliella spp. accounted for less than 35% of water column samples. However, the eukaryotic community entrained in a salt crust sample was vastly different and was dominated (83%) by the Dunaliella spp. The patterns described here represent the first observation of microbial eukaryotic dynamics in this system and provide a multiyear comparison of community composition by season. The lack of expected seasonal distribution in eukaryotic communities paired with abundant nanoflagellates suggests that grazing may significantly structure microbial eukaryotic communities in this system. PMID:23717306

  9. Calcium Biomineralization in Sediment of Lake Acigol, an Hypersaline Lake in SW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik Balci, Nurgul; Menekse, Meryem; Sonmez, Seref; Gul Karaguler, Nevin

    2010-05-01

    The study of biomineralization in (hyper) saline environments is important for two reasons, 1-it can extend our knowledge about the earliest microbial life on Earth which may have been halophilic 2-because of the presence of hypersaline conditions on Mars, the analog environments in Earth may have implications for the possibility of life on Mars. We examine calcium biomineralization in Lake Acigol, a unique hypersaline lake in southwest Turkey by integrating geochemical and microbiological approaches. Lake Acigol is a perennial lake with a maximum salinity of about 200 g/L and covers an area of 55-60 km2and is one of the main salt reservoirs of Turkey. Water, sediment and core samples were taken from the lake and salty ponds around the lake during the field excursion. The water chemistry revealed relatively high Na and SO4 concentrations both in the lake (30 gr/L, 33.36 gr/L), and the ponds (100 mg/L, 123 mg/L). The mineralogical analyses of sediments showed gypsum, halite, carbonate (aragonite, huntite) precipitation in the lake and ponds. We employed culture-dependent (16s rRNA cloning method, enrichment culture), and -independent techniques to study microbial diversity in Lake Aci gol. Sediment samples were used to isolate Halophilic sp. (e.g. salinicoccus roseus , Dunella sp.) under salinities that were similar to those measured in the lake water to further use in the laboratory Ca-precipitation experiments. For the precipitation experiments, liquid and solid culture media with various salinities ( 6-25 %) in addition to one similar to the lake water were prepared. In order to determine effect of Mg2+-Ca2+ molar ratio on mineralogy and the rate of precipitation, media with different Ca2+and Mg2+ concentrations were also prepared. Our preliminary results indicate that the halophilic bacteria play active role in the precipitation of Ca-minerals but the geochemical conditions are clearly influential. The results also point out that in the Lake Aci gol C, N, P, Ca

  10. Brackish to hypersaline lake dolostones of the Mississippian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Carys; Kearsey, Timothy; Davies, Sarah; Millward, David; Marshall, John

    2016-04-01

    , and 9% of all dolostone beds in the Norham Core are pedogenically altered. The isotopic composition of dolomite beds is δ18O -3.6‰ to -1.7‰ and δ13C -2.6‰ to 1.6‰ which is consistent with a brackish as opposed to marine origin. The dolostones are categorised by their sedimentary composition: Facies 1: Cemented siltstone and sandstone; Facies 2: Homogeneous micrite to micro-crystaline dolomite, within a clay matrix; Facies 3: Bedded dolomite and siltstone; Facies 4: Mixed calcite and dolomite; Facies 5: Dolomite with gypsum and anhydrite. Formation processes are diverse, and include diagenetic cementation (Facies 1), deposition in saline (brackish) lakes (Facies 2), deposition in saline lakes with clastic sediment input (Facies 3), lagoonal to shallow-marine carbonate deposition (Facies 4), and hypersaline lake to sabkha environments (Facies 5). 60% of the beds are facies 2 or 3 and their sedimentology, fauna, ichnofauna and isotopic composition indicate a brackish-water origin. Other Mississippian dolostones from around the world also contain a fairly restricted fauna and have been interpreted as brackish water deposits. The mechanism of dolomite formation under these conditions is discussed. These dolostones provided extensive coastal lakes that may have been an important habitat for tetrapods and other transitional groups during the Mississippian.

  11. Anaerobic Halo-Alkaliphilic Baterial Community of Athalassic, Hypersaline Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Marsic, Damien; Ng, Joseph D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The microorganisms of soda Mono Lake and other similar athalassic hypersaline alkaline soda lakes are of significance to Astrobiology. The microorganisms of these regimes represent the best known terrestrial analogs for microbial life that might have inhabited the hypersaline alkaline lakes and evaporites confined within closed volcanic basins and impact craters during the late Noachian and early Hesperian epochs (3.6 - 4.2 Gya) of ancient Mars. We have investigated the anaerobic microbiota of soda Mono Lake in northern California. In this paper we discuss the astrobiological significance of these ecosystems and describe several interesting features of two novel new species of anaerobic halo-alkaliphilic bacteria (Spirochaeta americana, sp. nov. and Desulfonatronum paiuteum, sp. nov) that we have isolated from Mono Lake.

  12. Characterization of basidiomycetous yeasts in hypersaline soils of the Urmia Lake National Park, Iran.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarnejad, Lachin; Arzanlou, Mahdi; Babai-Ahari, Asadollah; Di Mauro, Simone; Onofri, Andrea; Buzzini, Pietro; Turchetti, Benedetta

    2016-11-01

    Urmia Lake, located in northwest Iran, is an oligotrophic and extremely hypersaline habitat that supports diverse forms of life. Owing to its unique biodiversity and special environmental conditions, Urmia Lake National Park has been designated as one of the biosphere reserves by UNESCO. This study was aimed to characterize basidiomycetous yeasts in hypersaline soils surrounding the Urmia Lake National Park using a polyphasic combination of molecular and physiological data. Soil samples were collected from eight sites in Lake Basin and six islands insides the lake. Yeast strains were identified by sequencing the D1/D2 domains of the 26S rRNA gene. When D1/D2 domain sequencing did not resolve the identity of the species, strain identification was obtained by ITS 1 & 2 sequencing. Twenty-one species belonging to the genera Cystobasidium, Holtermanniella, Naganishia, Rhodotorula, Saitozyma, Solicoccozyma, Tausonia, Vanrija, and Vishniacozyma were identified. Solicoccozyma aeria represented the dominant species. The ability of isolates to grow at 10 and 15 % of NaCl was checked; about two-thirds of the strains grew at 10 %, while about 13 % of the isolates grew in medium with 15 % NaCl. this study is the first study on the culturable yeast diversity in hypersaline soils surrounding an Asian lake.

  13. Geologically controlled bi-directional exchange of groundwater with a hypersaline lake in the Canadian prairies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Laurence R.; Hayashi, Masaki; Zimmerman, Elena P.; Holmden, Chris; Kelley, Lynn I.

    2016-06-01

    Hypersaline lakes occur in hydrologically closed basins due to evaporitic enrichment of dissolved salts transported to the lakes by surface water and groundwater. At the hypersaline Lydden Lake in Saskatchewan, Canada, groundwater/lake-water interaction is strongly influenced by the geological heterogeneity of glacial deposits, whereby a highly permeable glaciofluvial sand/gravel deposit is underlain by glaciolacustrine deposits consisting of dense clay interspersed with silt/sand lenses. Pressure head distribution in a near shore area indicates a bi-directional flow system. It consists of topographically driven flow of fresh groundwater towards the lake in the sand/gravel aquifer and density-driven, landward flow of saline groundwater in the underlying glaciolacustrine deposits. Electrical resistivity tomography, and chemical and isotopic composition of groundwater clearly show the landward intrusion of saline water in the heterogeneous unit. The feasibility of bi-directional flow and transport is supported by numerical simulations of density-coupled groundwater flow and transport. The results suggest that the geologically controlled groundwater exchange processes have substantial influences on both inputs and outputs of dissolved minerals in hypersaline lakes in closed basins.

  14. Contrasting taxonomic stratification of microbial communities in two hypersaline meromictic lakes.

    PubMed

    Andrei, Adrian-Ştefan; Robeson, Michael S; Baricz, Andreea; Coman, Cristian; Muntean, Vasile; Ionescu, Artur; Etiope, Giuseppe; Alexe, Mircea; Sicora, Cosmin Ionel; Podar, Mircea; Banciu, Horia Leonard

    2015-12-01

    Hypersaline meromictic lakes are extreme environments in which water stratification is associated with powerful physicochemical gradients and high salt concentrations. Furthermore, their physical stability coupled with vertical water column partitioning makes them important research model systems in microbial niche differentiation and biogeochemical cycling. Here, we compare the prokaryotic assemblages from Ursu and Fara Fund hypersaline meromictic lakes (Transylvanian Basin, Romania) in relation to their limnological factors and infer their role in elemental cycling by matching taxa to known taxon-specific biogeochemical functions. To assess the composition and structure of prokaryotic communities and the environmental factors that structure them, deep-coverage small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rDNA) amplicon sequencing, community domain-specific quantitative PCR and physicochemical analyses were performed on samples collected along depth profiles. The analyses showed that the lakes harbored multiple and diverse prokaryotic communities whose distribution mirrored the water stratification patterns. Ursu Lake was found to be dominated by Bacteria and to have a greater prokaryotic diversity than Fara Fund Lake that harbored an increased cell density and was populated mostly by Archaea within oxic strata. In spite of their contrasting diversity, the microbial populations indigenous to each lake pointed to similar physiological functions within carbon degradation and sulfate reduction. Furthermore, the taxonomy results coupled with methane detection and its stable C isotope composition indicated the presence of a yet-undescribed methanogenic group in the lakes' hypersaline monimolimnion. In addition, ultrasmall uncultivated archaeal lineages were detected in the chemocline of Fara Fund Lake, where the recently proposed Nanohaloarchaeota phylum was found to thrive.

  15. Contrasting taxonomic stratification of microbial communities in two hypersaline meromictic lakes

    PubMed Central

    Andrei, Adrian-Ştefan; Robeson, Michael S; Baricz, Andreea; Coman, Cristian; Muntean, Vasile; Ionescu, Artur; Etiope, Giuseppe; Alexe, Mircea; Sicora, Cosmin Ionel; Podar, Mircea; Banciu, Horia Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Hypersaline meromictic lakes are extreme environments in which water stratification is associated with powerful physicochemical gradients and high salt concentrations. Furthermore, their physical stability coupled with vertical water column partitioning makes them important research model systems in microbial niche differentiation and biogeochemical cycling. Here, we compare the prokaryotic assemblages from Ursu and Fara Fund hypersaline meromictic lakes (Transylvanian Basin, Romania) in relation to their limnological factors and infer their role in elemental cycling by matching taxa to known taxon-specific biogeochemical functions. To assess the composition and structure of prokaryotic communities and the environmental factors that structure them, deep-coverage small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rDNA) amplicon sequencing, community domain-specific quantitative PCR and physicochemical analyses were performed on samples collected along depth profiles. The analyses showed that the lakes harbored multiple and diverse prokaryotic communities whose distribution mirrored the water stratification patterns. Ursu Lake was found to be dominated by Bacteria and to have a greater prokaryotic diversity than Fara Fund Lake that harbored an increased cell density and was populated mostly by Archaea within oxic strata. In spite of their contrasting diversity, the microbial populations indigenous to each lake pointed to similar physiological functions within carbon degradation and sulfate reduction. Furthermore, the taxonomy results coupled with methane detection and its stable C isotope composition indicated the presence of a yet-undescribed methanogenic group in the lakes' hypersaline monimolimnion. In addition, ultrasmall uncultivated archaeal lineages were detected in the chemocline of Fara Fund Lake, where the recently proposed Nanohaloarchaeota phylum was found to thrive. PMID:25932617

  16. Exploration of Microbial Diversity and Community Structure of Lonar Lake: The Only Hypersaline Meteorite Crater Lake within Basalt Rock

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Dhiraj; Kumbhare, Shreyas V.; Mhatre, Snehit S.; Chowdhury, Somak P.; Shetty, Sudarshan A.; Marathe, Nachiket P.; Bhute, Shrikant; Shouche, Yogesh S.

    2016-01-01

    Lonar Lake is a hypersaline and hyperalkaline soda lake and the only meteorite impact crater in the world situated in basalt rocks. Although culture-dependent studies have been reported, a comprehensive understanding of microbial community composition and structure in Lonar Lake remains elusive. In the present study, microbial community structure associated with Lonar Lake sediment and water samples was investigated using high-throughput sequencing. Microbial diversity analysis revealed the existence of diverse, yet largely consistent communities. Proteobacteria (30%), Actinobacteria (24%), Firmicutes (11%), and Cyanobacteria (5%) predominated in the sequencing survey, whereas Bacteroidetes (1.12%), BD1-5 (0.5%), Nitrospirae (0.41%), and Verrucomicrobia (0.28%) were detected in relatively minor abundances in the Lonar Lake ecosystem. Within the Proteobacteria phylum, the Gammaproteobacteria represented the most abundantly detected class (21–47%) within sediment samples, but only a minor population in the water samples. Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were found at significantly higher abundance (p ≥ 0.05) in sediment samples, whereas members of Actinobacteria, Candidate division TM7 and Cyanobacteria (p ≥ 0.05) were significantly abundant in water samples. Compared to the microbial communities of other hypersaline soda lakes, those of Lonar Lake formed a distinct cluster, suggesting a different microbial community composition and structure. Here we report for the first time, the difference in composition of indigenous microbial communities between the sediment and water samples of Lonar Lake. An improved census of microbial community structure in this Lake ecosystem provides a foundation for exploring microbial biogeochemical cycling and microbial function in hypersaline lake environments. PMID:26834712

  17. Exploration of Microbial Diversity and Community Structure of Lonar Lake: The Only Hypersaline Meteorite Crater Lake within Basalt Rock.

    PubMed

    Paul, Dhiraj; Kumbhare, Shreyas V; Mhatre, Snehit S; Chowdhury, Somak P; Shetty, Sudarshan A; Marathe, Nachiket P; Bhute, Shrikant; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2015-01-01

    Lonar Lake is a hypersaline and hyperalkaline soda lake and the only meteorite impact crater in the world situated in basalt rocks. Although culture-dependent studies have been reported, a comprehensive understanding of microbial community composition and structure in Lonar Lake remains elusive. In the present study, microbial community structure associated with Lonar Lake sediment and water samples was investigated using high-throughput sequencing. Microbial diversity analysis revealed the existence of diverse, yet largely consistent communities. Proteobacteria (30%), Actinobacteria (24%), Firmicutes (11%), and Cyanobacteria (5%) predominated in the sequencing survey, whereas Bacteroidetes (1.12%), BD1-5 (0.5%), Nitrospirae (0.41%), and Verrucomicrobia (0.28%) were detected in relatively minor abundances in the Lonar Lake ecosystem. Within the Proteobacteria phylum, the Gammaproteobacteria represented the most abundantly detected class (21-47%) within sediment samples, but only a minor population in the water samples. Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were found at significantly higher abundance (p ≥ 0.05) in sediment samples, whereas members of Actinobacteria, Candidate division TM7 and Cyanobacteria (p ≥ 0.05) were significantly abundant in water samples. Compared to the microbial communities of other hypersaline soda lakes, those of Lonar Lake formed a distinct cluster, suggesting a different microbial community composition and structure. Here we report for the first time, the difference in composition of indigenous microbial communities between the sediment and water samples of Lonar Lake. An improved census of microbial community structure in this Lake ecosystem provides a foundation for exploring microbial biogeochemical cycling and microbial function in hypersaline lake environments.

  18. Preserving the World Second Largest Hypersaline Lake under Future Irrigation and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadkam, Somayeh; Ludwig, Fulco; van Vliet, Michelle; Pastor, Amandine; Kabat, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Urmia Lake, the world second largest hypersaline lake, has been largely desiccated over the last two decades resulting in socio-environmental consequences similar or even larger than the Aral Sea disaster. To rescue the lake a new water management plan has been proposed, a rapid 40% decline in irrigation water use replacing a former plan which intended to develop reservoirs and irrigation. However, none of these water management plans, which have large socio-economic impacts, have been assessed under future changes in climate and water availability. By adapting a method of environmental flow requirements (EFRs) for hypersaline lakes, we estimated annually 3.9•109 m3 water is needed to preserve Urmia Lake. Then, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model was forced with bias-corrected climate model outputs for both the lowest (RCP2.6) and highest (RCP8.5) greenhouse-gas concentration scenarios to estimate future water availability and impacts of water management strategies. Results showed a 10% decline in future water availability in the basin under RCP2.6 and 27% under RCP8.5. Our results showed that if future climate change is highly limited (RCP2.6) inflow can be just enough to meet the EFRs by implementing the reduction irrigation plan. However, under more rapid climate change scenario (RCP8.5) reducing irrigation water use will not be enough to save the lake and more drastic measures are needed. Our results showed that future water management plans are not robust under climate change in this region. Therefore, an integrated approach of future land-water use planning and climate change adaptation is therefore needed to improve future water security and to reduce the desiccating of this hypersaline lake.

  19. Preserving the world second largest hypersaline lake under future irrigation and climate change.

    PubMed

    Shadkam, Somayeh; Ludwig, Fulco; van Vliet, Michelle T H; Pastor, Amandine; Kabat, Pavel

    2016-07-15

    Iran Urmia Lake, the world second largest hypersaline lake, has been largely desiccated over the last two decades resulting in socio-environmental consequences similar or even larger than the Aral Sea disaster. To rescue the lake a new water management plan has been proposed, a rapid 40% decline in irrigation water use replacing a former plan which intended to develop reservoirs and irrigation. However, none of these water management plans, which have large socio-economic impacts, have been assessed under future changes in climate and water availability. By adapting a method of environmental flow requirements (EFRs) for hypersaline lakes, we estimated annually 3.7·10(9)m(3) water is needed to preserve Urmia Lake. Then, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model was forced with bias-corrected climate model outputs for both the lowest (RCP2.6) and highest (RCP8.5) greenhouse-gas concentration scenarios to estimate future water availability and impacts of water management strategies. Results showed a 10% decline in future water availability in the basin under RCP2.6 and 27% under RCP8.5. Our results showed that if future climate change is highly limited (RCP2.6) inflow can be just enough to meet the EFRs by implementing the reduction irrigation plan. However, under more rapid climate change scenario (RCP8.5) reducing irrigation water use will not be enough to save the lake and more drastic measures are needed. Our results showed that future water management plans are not robust under climate change in this region. Therefore, an integrated approach of future land-water use planning and climate change adaptation is therefore needed to improve future water security and to reduce the desiccating of this hypersaline lake.

  20. The comparative osmoregulatory ability of two water beetle genera whose species span the fresh-hypersaline gradient in inland waters (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae, Hydrophilidae).

    PubMed

    Pallarés, Susana; Arribas, Paula; Bilton, David T; Millán, Andrés; Velasco, Josefa

    2015-01-01

    A better knowledge of the physiological basis of salinity tolerance is essential to understanding the ecology and evolutionary history of organisms that have colonized inland saline waters. Coleoptera are amongst the most diverse macroinvertebrates in inland waters, including saline habitats; however, the osmoregulatory strategies they employ to deal with osmotic stress remain unexplored. Survival and haemolymph osmotic concentration at different salinities were examined in adults of eight aquatic beetle species which inhabit different parts of the fresh-hypersaline gradient. Studied species belong to two unrelated genera which have invaded saline waters independently from freshwater ancestors; Nebrioporus (Dytiscidae) and Enochrus (Hydrophilidae). Their osmoregulatory strategy (osmoconformity or osmoregulation) was identified and osmotic capacity (the osmotic gradient between the animal's haemolymph and the external medium) was compared between species pairs co-habiting similar salinities in nature. We show that osmoregulatory capacity, rather than osmoconformity, has evolved independently in these different lineages. All species hyperegulated their haemolymph osmotic concentration in diluted waters; those living in fresh or low-salinity waters were unable to hyporegulate and survive in hyperosmotic media (> 340 mosmol kg(-1)). In contrast, the species which inhabit the hypo-hypersaline habitats were effective hyporegulators, maintaining their haemolymph osmolality within narrow limits (ca. 300 mosmol kg(-1)) across a wide range of external concentrations. The hypersaline species N. ceresyi and E. jesusarribasi tolerated conductivities up to 140 and 180 mS cm(-1), respectively, and maintained osmotic gradients over 3500 mosmol kg(-1), comparable to those of the most effective insect osmoregulators known to date. Syntopic species of both genera showed similar osmotic capacities and in general, osmotic responses correlated well with upper salinity levels occupied by

  1. The Comparative Osmoregulatory Ability of Two Water Beetle Genera Whose Species Span the Fresh-Hypersaline Gradient in Inland Waters (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae, Hydrophilidae)

    PubMed Central

    Pallarés, Susana; Arribas, Paula; Bilton, David T.; Millán, Andrés; Velasco, Josefa

    2015-01-01

    A better knowledge of the physiological basis of salinity tolerance is essential to understanding the ecology and evolutionary history of organisms that have colonized inland saline waters. Coleoptera are amongst the most diverse macroinvertebrates in inland waters, including saline habitats; however, the osmoregulatory strategies they employ to deal with osmotic stress remain unexplored. Survival and haemolymph osmotic concentration at different salinities were examined in adults of eight aquatic beetle species which inhabit different parts of the fresh—hypersaline gradient. Studied species belong to two unrelated genera which have invaded saline waters independently from freshwater ancestors; Nebrioporus (Dytiscidae) and Enochrus (Hydrophilidae). Their osmoregulatory strategy (osmoconformity or osmoregulation) was identified and osmotic capacity (the osmotic gradient between the animal’s haemolymph and the external medium) was compared between species pairs co-habiting similar salinities in nature. We show that osmoregulatory capacity, rather than osmoconformity, has evolved independently in these different lineages. All species hyperegulated their haemolymph osmotic concentration in diluted waters; those living in fresh or low-salinity waters were unable to hyporegulate and survive in hyperosmotic media (> 340 mosmol kg-1). In contrast, the species which inhabit the hypo-hypersaline habitats were effective hyporegulators, maintaining their haemolymph osmolality within narrow limits (ca. 300 mosmol kg-1) across a wide range of external concentrations. The hypersaline species N. ceresyi and E. jesusarribasi tolerated conductivities up to 140 and 180 mS cm-1, respectively, and maintained osmotic gradients over 3500 mosmol kg-1, comparable to those of the most effective insect osmoregulators known to date. Syntopic species of both genera showed similar osmotic capacities and in general, osmotic responses correlated well with upper salinity levels occupied by

  2. Morphological characterization of viruses in the stratified water column of alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake.

    PubMed

    Brum, Jennifer R; Steward, Grieg F

    2010-10-01

    Concentrations of viruses and prokaryotes in the alkaline, moderately hypersaline, seasonally stratified Mono Lake are among the highest reported for a natural aquatic environment. We used electron microscopy to test whether viral morphological characteristics differed among the epilimnion, metalimnion, and the anoxic hypolimnion of the lake and to determine how the properties of viruses in Mono Lake compare to other aquatic environments. Viral capsid size distributions were more similar in the metalimnion and hypolimnion of Mono Lake, while viral tail lengths were more similar in the epilimnion and metalimnion. The percentage of tailed viruses decreased with depth and the relative percentages of tailed phage families changed with depth. The presence of large (>125 nm capsid), untailed viruses in the metalimnion and hypolimnion suggests that eukaryotic viruses are produced in these suboxic and anoxic, hypersaline environments. Capsid diameters of viruses were larger on average in Mono Lake compared to other aquatic environments, and no lemon-shaped or filamentous viruses were found, in contrast to other high-salinity or high-altitude lakes and seas. Our data suggest that the physically and chemically distinct layers of Mono Lake harbor different viral assemblages, and that these assemblages are distinct from other aquatic environments that have been studied. Furthermore, we found that filtration of a sample through a 0.22-µm pore-size filter significantly altered the distribution of viral capsid diameters and tail lengths, resulting in a relative depletion of viruses having larger capsids and longer tails. This observation highlights the potential for bias in molecular surveys of viral diversity, which typically rely on filtration through 0.2- or 0.22-µm pore-size membrane filters to remove bacteria during sample preparation.

  3. Alkaline Hypersaline Lakes as Analogs for Ancient Microbial Habitats on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, G. D.; Tsapin, A. I.; Storrie-Lombardi, M. C.; Nealson, K. H.; Brinton, K. L. F.; Sun, H.; Venkateswaren, K.; Tsapin, I.; Melack, J.; Jellison, R.

    1999-01-01

    As the climate of ancient Mars became colder and drier with time, open bodies of water would have entered a regime in which evaporation exceeded input from precipitation or runoff. This would have resulted in increases in salinity and perhaps pH. The last open water on Mars was most likely found in alkaline hypersaline lakes, and these lakes would have been the last surface aquatic habitats for life on Mars. It follows, then, that the biomarkers most likely to be found in ancient sedimentary basins on Mars are those left by organisms adapted to high salt and high pH environments. We have begun to investigate the nature of biological diversity and adaptation to these environments, and the potential for biomarker preservation in them, using Mono Lake as a terrestrial analog environment. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Nitrate attenuation potential of hypersaline lake sediments in central Spain: flow-through and batch experiments.

    PubMed

    Carrey, R; Rodríguez-Escales, P; Otero, N; Ayora, C; Soler, A; Gómez-Alday, J J

    2014-08-01

    Complex lacustrine systems, such as hypersaline lakes located in endorheic basins, are exposed to nitrate (NO3(-)) pollution. An excellent example of these lakes is the hypersaline lake located in the Pétrola basin (central Spain), where the lake acts as a sink for NO3(-) from agricultural activities and from sewage from the surrounding area. To better understand the role of the organic carbon (Corg) deposited in the bottom sediment in promoting denitrification, a four-stage flow-through experiment (FTR) and batch experiments using lake bottom sediment were performed. The chemical, multi-isotopic and kinetic characterization of the outflow showed that the intrinsic NO3(-) attenuation potential of the lake bottom sediment was able to remove 95% of the NO3(-) input over 296days under different flow conditions. The NO3(-) attenuation was mainly linked with denitrification but some dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium was observed at early days favored by the high C/N ratio and salinity. Sulfate reduction could be neither confirmed nor discarded during the experiments because the sediment leaching masked the chemical and isotopic signatures of this reaction. The average nitrogen reduction rate (NRR) obtained was 1.25mmold(-1)kg(-1) and was independent of the flow rate employed. The amount of reactive Corg from the bottom sediment consumed during denitrification was 28.8mmol, representing approximately 10% of the total Corg of the sediment (1.2%). Denitrification was produced coupled with an increase in the isotopic composition of both δ(15)N and δ(18)O. The isotopic fractionations (ε of (15)N-NO3(-) and (18)O-NO3(-)) produced during denitrification were calculated using batch and vertical profile samples. The results were -14.7‰ for εN and -14.5‰ for εO.

  5. Electricity generation by anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from hypersaline soda lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from soda lakes produced electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). No electricity was generated in the absence of bacterial metabolism. Arsenate respiring bacteria isolated from moderately hypersaline Mono Lake (Bacillus selenitireducens), and salt-saturated Searles Lake, CA (strain SLAS-1) oxidized lactate using arsenate as the electron acceptor. However, these cultures grew equally well without added arsenate using the MFC anode as their electron acceptor, and in the process oxidized lactate more efficiently. The decrease in electricity generation by consumption of added alternative electron acceptors (i.e. arsenate) which competed with the anode for available electrons proved to be a useful indicator of microbial activity and hence life in the fuel cells. Shaken sediment slurries from these two lakes also generated electricity, with or without added lactate. Hydrogen added to sediment slurries was consumed but did not stimulate electricity production. Finally, electricity was generated in statically incubated "intact" sediment cores from these lakes. More power was produced in sediment from Mono Lake than from Searles Lake, however microbial fuel cells could detect low levels of metabolism operating under moderate and extreme conditions of salt stress. ?? 2008 US Government.

  6. Electricity generation by anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from hypersaline soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurence G; Oremland, Ronald S

    2008-11-01

    Anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from soda lakes produced electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). No electricity was generated in the absence of bacterial metabolism. Arsenate respiring bacteria isolated from moderately hypersaline Mono Lake (Bacillus selenitireducens), and salt-saturated Searles Lake, CA (strain SLAS-1) oxidized lactate using arsenate as the electron acceptor. However, these cultures grew equally well without added arsenate using the MFC anode as their electron acceptor, and in the process oxidized lactate more efficiently. The decrease in electricity generation by consumption of added alternative electron acceptors (i.e. arsenate) which competed with the anode for available electrons proved to be a useful indicator of microbial activity and hence life in the fuel cells. Shaken sediment slurries from these two lakes also generated electricity, with or without added lactate. Hydrogen added to sediment slurries was consumed but did not stimulate electricity production. Finally, electricity was generated in statically incubated "intact" sediment cores from these lakes. More power was produced in sediment from Mono Lake than from Searles Lake, however microbial fuel cells could detect low levels of metabolism operating under moderate and extreme conditions of salt stress.

  7. Ecophysiological Distinctions of Haloarchaea from a Hypersaline Antarctic Lake as Determined by Metaproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Tschitschko, Bernhard; Williams, Timothy J.; Allen, Michelle A.; Zhong, Ling; Raftery, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Deep Lake in the Vestfold Hills is hypersaline and the coldest system in Antarctica known to support microbial growth (temperatures as low as −20°C). It represents a strong experimental model because the lake supports a low-complexity community of haloarchaea, with the three most abundant species totaling ∼72%. Moreover, the dominant haloarchaea are cultivatable, and their genomes are sequenced. Here we use metaproteomics linked to metagenome data and the genome sequences of the isolates to characterize the main pathways, trophic strategies, and interactions associated with resource utilization. The dominance of the most abundant member, Halohasta litchfieldiae, appears to be predicated on competitive utilization of substrates (e.g., starch, glycerol, and dihydroxyacetone) produced by Dunaliella, the lake's primary producer, while also possessing diverse mechanisms for acquiring nitrogen and phosphorus. The second most abundant member, strain DL31, is proficient in degrading complex proteinaceous matter. Hht. litchfieldiae and DL31 are inferred to release labile substrates that are utilized by Halorubrum lacusprofundi, the third most abundant haloarchaeon in Deep Lake. The study also linked genome variation to specific protein variants or distinct genetic capacities, thereby identifying strain-level variation indicative of specialization. Overall, metaproteomics revealed that rather than functional differences occurring at different lake depths or through size partitioning, the main lake genera possess major trophic distinctions, and phylotypes (e.g., strains of Hht. litchfieldiae) exhibit a more subtle level of specialization. This study highlights the extent to which the lake supports a relatively uniform distribution of taxa that collectively possess the genetic capacity to effectively exploit available nutrients throughout the lake. IMPORTANCE Life on Earth has evolved to colonize a broad range of temperatures, but most of the biosphere (∼85

  8. Metagenomic insights into strategies of carbon conservation and unusual sulfur biogeochemistry in a hypersaline Antarctic lake

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Sheree; Lauro, Federico M; Williams, Timothy J; DeMaere, Matthew Z; Brown, Mark V; Rich, John; Gibson, John AE; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Organic Lake is a shallow, marine-derived hypersaline lake in the Vestfold Hills, Antarctica that has the highest reported concentration of dimethylsulfide (DMS) in a natural body of water. To determine the composition and functional potential of the microbial community and learn about the unusual sulfur chemistry in Organic Lake, shotgun metagenomics was performed on size-fractionated samples collected along a depth profile. Eucaryal phytoflagellates were the main photosynthetic organisms. Bacteria were dominated by the globally distributed heterotrophic taxa Marinobacter, Roseovarius and Psychroflexus. The dominance of heterotrophic degradation, coupled with low fixation potential, indicates possible net carbon loss. However, abundant marker genes for aerobic anoxygenic phototrophy, sulfur oxidation, rhodopsins and CO oxidation were also linked to the dominant heterotrophic bacteria, and indicate the use of photo- and lithoheterotrophy as mechanisms for conserving organic carbon. Similarly, a high genetic potential for the recycling of nitrogen compounds likely functions to retain fixed nitrogen in the lake. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) lyase genes were abundant, indicating that DMSP is a significant carbon and energy source. Unlike marine environments, DMSP demethylases were less abundant, indicating that DMSP cleavage is the likely source of high DMS concentration. DMSP cleavage, carbon mixotrophy (photoheterotrophy and lithoheterotrophy) and nitrogen remineralization by dominant Organic Lake bacteria are potentially important adaptations to nutrient constraints. In particular, carbon mixotrophy relieves the extent of carbon oxidation for energy production, allowing more carbon to be used for biosynthetic processes. The study sheds light on how the microbial community has adapted to this unique Antarctic lake environment. PMID:23619305

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Halobonum tyrrellensis" Strain G22, Isolated from the Hypersaline Waters of Lake Tyrrell, Australia.

    PubMed

    Ugalde, Juan A; Narasingarao, Priya; Kuo, Sidney; Podell, Sheila; Allen, Eric E

    2013-12-12

    We report the draft 3.675-Mbp genome sequence of "Candidatus Halobonum tyrrellensis" strain G22, a novel halophilic archaeon isolated from the surface hypersaline waters of Lake Tyrrell, Australia. The availability of the first genome from the "Candidatus Halobonum" genus provides a new genomic resource for the comparative genomic analysis of halophilic Archaea.

  10. Egg banks in hypersaline lakes of the South-East Europe

    PubMed Central

    Moscatello, Salvatore; Belmonte, Genuario

    2009-01-01

    The cyst banks of 6 coastal hypersaline lakes of South-East Europe have been investigated. The study concerned the bottom sediments of Khersonesskoe and Koyashskoe lakes in the Crimea (Ukraine), Nartë saltworks (Albania), Vecchia Salina at Torre Colimena (Apulia, Italy), Pantano Grande and Pantano Roveto at Vendicari (Sicily, Italy). A total of 19 cyst types were recognised. The cyst banks of lakes were found to be well separated in the representation derived from a statistical multivariate data analysis. For all the lakes examined a comparison was possible between the resting community in sediments (cyst bank) and the active one in the water. The cyst banks contained more species than those recorded over a multi-year sampling effort in the water column. The study of cyst hatching, performed on 5 cyst types under lab conditions, demonstrated that cysts do not hatch under the same conditions. Furthermore, each cyst type shows a wide range of preferential hatching conditions, which allow us to confirm the ecological generalism of salt lake species. PMID:19292906

  11. FACTORS AFFECTING ENHANCED MERCURY BIOACCUMULATION IN INLAND LAKES OF ISLE ROYALE NATIONAL PARK, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent results have shown that 6 of the 43 inland lakes of Isle Royale National Park, the largest island in Lake Superior, contain northen pike with mercury concentrations exceeding health conxumption advisory levels (> 500 ng/g ww). Standard length (550 mm) pike in advisory lake...

  12. Virus-Host and CRISPR Dynamics in Archaea-Dominated Hypersaline Lake Tyrrell, Victoria, Australia

    DOE PAGES

    Emerson, Joanne B.; Andrade, Karen; Thomas, Brian C.; ...

    2013-01-01

    The study of natural archaeal assemblages requires community context, namely, a concurrent assessment of the dynamics of archaeal, bacterial, and viral populations. Here, we use filter size-resolved metagenomic analyses to report the dynamics of 101 archaeal and bacterial OTUs and 140 viral populations across 17 samples collected over different timescales from 2007–2010 from Australian hypersaline Lake Tyrrell (LT). All samples were dominated by Archaea (75–95%). Archaeal, bacterial, and viral populations were found to be dynamic on timescales of months to years, and different viral assemblages were present in planktonic, relative to host-associated (active and provirus) size fractions. Analyses of clusteredmore » regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) regions indicate that both rare and abundant viruses were targeted, primarily by lower abundance hosts. Although very few spacers had hits to the NCBI nr database or to the 140 LT viral populations, 21% had hits to unassembled LT viral concentrate reads. This suggests local adaptation to LT-specific viruses and/or undersampling of haloviral assemblages in public databases, along with successful CRISPR-mediated maintenance of viral populations at abundances low enough to preclude genomic assembly. This is the first metagenomic report evaluating widespread archaeal dynamics at the population level on short timescales in a hypersaline system.« less

  13. Virus-host and CRISPR dynamics in Archaea-dominated hypersaline Lake Tyrrell, Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Joanne B; Andrade, Karen; Thomas, Brian C; Norman, Anders; Allen, Eric E; Heidelberg, Karla B; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-01-01

    The study of natural archaeal assemblages requires community context, namely, a concurrent assessment of the dynamics of archaeal, bacterial, and viral populations. Here, we use filter size-resolved metagenomic analyses to report the dynamics of 101 archaeal and bacterial OTUs and 140 viral populations across 17 samples collected over different timescales from 2007-2010 from Australian hypersaline Lake Tyrrell (LT). All samples were dominated by Archaea (75-95%). Archaeal, bacterial, and viral populations were found to be dynamic on timescales of months to years, and different viral assemblages were present in planktonic, relative to host-associated (active and provirus) size fractions. Analyses of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) regions indicate that both rare and abundant viruses were targeted, primarily by lower abundance hosts. Although very few spacers had hits to the NCBI nr database or to the 140 LT viral populations, 21% had hits to unassembled LT viral concentrate reads. This suggests local adaptation to LT-specific viruses and/or undersampling of haloviral assemblages in public databases, along with successful CRISPR-mediated maintenance of viral populations at abundances low enough to preclude genomic assembly. This is the first metagenomic report evaluating widespread archaeal dynamics at the population level on short timescales in a hypersaline system.

  14. Comparison of chitinolytic enzymes from an alkaline, hypersaline lake and an estuary.

    PubMed

    LeCleir, Gary R; Buchan, Alison; Maurer, John; Moran, Mary Ann; Hollibaugh, James T

    2007-01-01

    We examined the genetic and physiological characteristics of chitin degrading enzymes expressed by fosmids cloned from two strains of chitinolytic gammaproteobacteria isolated from alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake, California; and from a metagenomic library derived from an estuarine bacterial community (Dean Creek, Sapelo Island, GA, USA). The Mono Lake chitinolytic enzymes presented unique adaptations in terms of halo- and alkalitolerance. The sequence from one of the Mono Lake isolates (strain 12A) was a conventional family 18 glycosyl hydrolase; however, the expressed protein had a novel secondary activity peak at pH 10. We obtained a novel family 20 glycosyl hydrolase sequence from Mono Lake strain AI21. The activity of the expressed protein had a pH optimum of 10, several pH units higher than any other enzyme currently assigned to this family, and the enzyme retained 80% of its activity at pH 11. The enzyme was also halotolerant, retaining activity in salt solutions of up to 225 g l(-1). Sequence analysis indicated a molecular weight of approximately 90 kDa for the protein, and that it contained two active sites. Culture supernatant contained two chitinolytic proteins, 45 and 31 kDa, suggesting possible post-expression modification of the gene product. In contrast, the sequence found in the estuarine metagenomic library and the functional characteristics of the protein expressed from it were those of a conventional family 18 glycosyl hydrolase.

  15. The sources and evolution of sulfur in the hypersaline Lake Lisan (paleo-Dead Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torfstein, Adi; Gavrieli, Ittai; Stein, Mordechai

    2005-07-01

    δ34S values in gypsum are used to evaluate the fate of sulfur in the hypersaline Lake Lisan, the late Pleistocene precursor of the Dead Sea (70-14 ka BP), and applied as a paleo-limnological tracer. The Ca-chloride Lake Lisan evolved through meromictic periods characterized by precipitation of authigenic aragonite and holomictic episodes characterized by enhanced gypsum precipitation. The lake deposited two major gypsum units: the "Lower Gypsum unit" (deposited at ˜56 ka) showing δ34S values of 18-20‰, and the "Upper Gypsum unit" (deposited at 17 ka) displaying significantly higher δ34S values of 26-28‰. Laminated and disseminated gypsum, residing within the aragonite, exhibit δ34S values in the range of - 26‰ to 1‰. The isotopic composition of the gypsum was dictated by freshwater sulfate input that replenished the upper layer of the lake (the mixolimnion), bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) that occurred under the anoxic conditions of the lower brine (the monimolimnion), and mixing between these two layers. During meromictic periods, the sulfate reservoir in the lower brine was replenished by precipitation of gypsum from the upper layer, and its subsequent dissolution due to sulfate deficiency induced by BSR activity. This process describes a "sulfur pump" mechanism and its effect on δ34S in the water can be modeled by a modified Rayleigh distillation equation. Steady state δ34S values (˜40‰) were reached in the lower brine after long meromictic periods. Following overturn episodes, induced by diminishing freshwater input and lake level decline, large quantities of δ34S enriched gypsum precipitated. The negative δ34S values in laminated and disseminated gypsum provide evidence for BSR activity in the lower brine that removed isotopically depleted sulfides from the water column, causing significant isotopic enrichment of remaining sulfate. Following the lake desiccation, the sediments were exposed and the latter sulfides oxidized and re

  16. Estimation of a Trophic State Index for selected inland lakes in Michigan, 1999–2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Lori M.; Jodoin, Richard S.

    2016-03-11

    A 15-year estimated Trophic State Index (eTSI) for Michigan inland lakes is available, and it spans seven datasets, each representing 1 to 3 years of data from 1999 to 2013. On average, 3,000 inland lake eTSI values are represented in each of the datasets by a process that relates field-measured Secchi-disk transparency (SDT) to Landsat satellite imagery to provide eTSI values for unsampled inland lakes. The correlation between eTSI values and field-measured Trophic State Index (TSI) values from SDT was strong as shown by R2 values from 0.71 to 0.83. Mean eTSI values ranged from 42.7 to 46.8 units, which when converted to estimated SDT (eSDT) ranged from 8.9 to 12.5 feet for the datasets. Most eTSI values for Michigan inland lakes are in the mesotrophic TSI class. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Level III Ecoregions were used to illustrate and compare the spatial distribution of eTSI classes for Michigan inland lakes. Lakes in the Northern Lakes and Forests, North Central Hardwood Forests, and Southern Michigan/Northern Indiana Drift Plains ecoregions are predominantly in the mesotrophic TSI class. The Huron/Erie Lake Plains and Eastern Corn Belt Plains ecoregions, had predominantly eutrophic class lakes and also the highest percent of hypereutrophic lakes than other ecoregions in the State. Data from multiple sampling programs—including data collected by volunteers with the Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program (CLMP) through the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ), and the 2007 National Lakes Assessment (NLA)—were compiled to compare the distribution of lake TSI classes between each program. The seven eTSI datasets are available for viewing and download with eSDT from the Michigan Lake Water Clarity Interactive Map Viewer at http://mi.water.usgs.gov/projects/RemoteSensing/index.html.

  17. Abundance, distribution, and diversity of viruses in alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake, California.

    PubMed

    Jiang, S; Steward, G; Jellison, R; Chu, W; Choi, S

    2004-01-01

    Mono Lake is a large (180 km2), alkaline (pH approximately 10), moderately hypersaline (70-85 g kg(-1)) lake lying at the western edge of the Great Basin. An episode of persistent chemical stratification (meromixis) was initiated in 1995 and has resulted in depletion of oxygen and accumulation of ammonia and sulfide beneath the chemocline. Although previous studies have documented high bacterial abundances and marked seasonal changes in phytoplankton abundance and community composition, there have been no previous reports on the occurrence of viruses in this unique lake. Based on the high concentrations and diversity of microbial life in this lake, we hypothesized that planktonic viruses are also abundant and diverse. To examine the abundance and distribution of viruses and bacteria, water samples were collected from four stations along 5 to 15 vertical depths at each station. Viral abundance ranged from 1 x 10(8) to 1 x 10(9) mL(-1), among the highest observed in any natural aquatic system examined so far. Increases (p < 0.1) in viral densities were observed in the anoxic bottom water at multiple stations. However, regression analysis indicated that viral abundance could not be predicted by any single environmental parameter. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis revealed a diverse viral community in Mono Lake with genome sizes ranging from approximately 14 to >400 kb with most of the DNA in the 30 to 60 kb size range. Cluster analysis grouped the anoxic bottom-water viral community into a unique cluster differentiating it from surface and mid-water viral communities. A hybridization study using an indigenous viral isolate as a probe revealed an episodic pattern of temporal phage distribution with strong niche stratification between oxic and anoxic waters.

  18. Vertical distribution of nitrogen-fixing phylotypes in a meromictic, hypersaline lake.

    PubMed

    Steward, G F; Zehr, J P; Jellison, R; Montoya, J P; Hollibaugh, J T

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the diversity of nitrogenase genes in the alkaline, moderately hypersaline Mono Lake, California to determine (1) whether nitrogen-fixing (diazotrophic) populations were similar to those in other aquatic environments and (2) if there was a pattern of distribution of phylotypes that reflected redox conditions, as well as (3) to identify populations that could be important in N dynamics in this nitrogen-limited lake. Mono Lake has been meromictic for almost a decade and has steep gradients in oxygen and reduced compounds that provide a wide range of aerobic and anaerobic habitats. We amplified a fragment of the nitrogenase gene (nifH) from planktonic DNA samples collected at three depths representing oxygenated surface waters, the oxycline, and anoxic, ammonium-rich deep waters. Forty-three percent of the 90 sequences grouped in nifH Cluster I. The majority of clones (57%) grouped in Cluster III, which contains many known anaerobic bacteria. Cluster I and Cluster III sequences were retrieved at every depth indicating little vertical zonation in sequence types related to the prominent gradients in oxygen and ammonia. One group in Cluster I was found most often at every depth and accounted for 29% of all the clones. These sequences formed a subcluster that contained other environmental clones, but no cultivated representatives. No significant nitrogen fixation was detected by the 15N2 method after 48 h of incubation of surface, oxycline, or deep waters, suggesting that pelagic diazotrophs were contributing little to nitrogen fluxes in the lake. The failure to measure any significant nitrogen fixation, despite the detection of diverse and novel nitrogenase genes throughout the water column, raises interesting questions about the ecological controls on diazotrophy in Mono Lake and the distribution of functional genes in the environment.

  19. Organic osmolytes in aerobic bacteria from mono lake, an alkaline, moderately hypersaline environment.

    PubMed

    Ciulla, R A; Diaz, M R; Taylor, B F; Roberts, M F

    1997-01-01

    The identity and concentrations of intracellular organic solutes were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for two strains of aerobic, gram-negative bacteria isolated from Mono Lake, Calif., an alkaline, moderately hypersaline lake. Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid) was the major endogenous solute in both organisms. Concentrations of ectoine varied with external NaCl levels in strain ML-D but not in strain ML-G, where the level was high but invariant from 1.5 to 3.0 M NaCl. Hydroxyectoine also occurred in strain ML-D, especially at elevated NaCl concentrations (2.5 and 3.0 M), but at levels lower than those of ectoine. Exogenous organic solutes that might occur in Mono Lake were examined for their effects on the de novo synthesis of ectoine. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) (0.1 or 1 mM) did not significantly lower ectoine levels in either isolate, and only strain ML-G showed any capacity for DMSP accumulation. With nitrogen limitation, however, DMSP (0.1 mM) substituted for ectoine in strain ML-G and became the main organic solute. Glycine betaine (GB) was more effective than DMSP in affecting ectoine levels, principally in strain ML-D. Strain ML-D accumulated GB to 50 or 67% of its organic solute pool at 2.5 M NaCl, at an external level of 0.1 or 1 mM GB, respectively. Strain ML-D also accumulated arsenobetaine. The methylated zwitterionic compounds, probably metabolic products of phytoplankton (DMSP and GB) or brine shrimps (arsenobetaine) in Mono Lake, may function as osmolytes for indigenous bacteria when present at high concentrations or under conditions of nitrogen limitation or salt stress.

  20. Utilization of ERTS-1 data to monitor and classify eutrophication of inland lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, P. E.; Reed, L.; Smith, V. E.

    1973-01-01

    A technique is being developed for use of ERTS in estimating and monitoring trophic levels of inland lakes. Preliminary findings are that Michigan lakes and ponds of one acre or more are resolvable in bands 5, 6 and 7 of NASA MSS imagery under fair conditions (haze and 70% cloud cover). In processed imagery (CCT) smaller features, including water color patterns, are evident within some lakes of 40 acres or more. Image distortion of lake size, shape, orientation, etc. is minimal; discrimination of lakes and ponds from various wetlands is good. Subsequent ERTS and aircraft imagery will be correlated with detailed ground truth of water color and quality in eutrophic test lakes.

  1. Mineralogy and Microbial Diversity of the Microbialites in the Hypersaline Storr's Lake, the Bahamas.

    PubMed

    Paul, Varun G; Wronkiewicz, David J; Mormile, Melanie R; Foster, Jamie S

    2016-04-01

    Microbialites found in the low-light-intensity, hypersaline waters of Storr's Lake (SL), San Salvador Island, the Bahamas, were investigated with respect to their morphology, mineralogy, and microbial diversity. Previously described microbialite morphologies, as well as a newly identified "multi-cuspate" morphology, were observed at various depths. Electron microscopy analysis revealed the presence of angular, blocky, and needle-shaped crystals with mineralized cyanobacterial filaments and remains of exopolymeric substances. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the presence of both Mg-calcite and aragonite in the plateau-mushroom and pinnacle mound microbialites, whereas only Mg-calcite was identified in the other microbialite morphotypes. A comprehensive molecular analysis using barcoded pyrosequencing of five different microbial mat communities identified at least 12 dominant bacterial phyla. Cyanobacteria were generally low in abundance and ranged from ∼0.01% in the deeper pinnacle mounds to ∼3.2% in the shallow calcareous knobs. Other photosynthetic members included green nonsulfur bacteria of the phylum Chloroflexi and purple sulfur bacteria of the class Gammaproteobacteria. All mat types contained significant amounts of sulfate-reducing and dehalogenating bacteria. The low light intensity reaching the deeper microbialites, the lack of dominant cyanobacteria, and the abundance of sulfate reducers and Chloroflexi collectively suggest that sulfate reduction and anoxygenic photosynthetic processes influence the carbonate biomineralization process in these systems.

  2. Mineralogy and Microbial Diversity of the Microbialites in the Hypersaline Storr's Lake, the Bahamas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Varun G.; Wronkiewicz, David J.; Mormile, Melanie R.; Foster, Jamie S.

    2016-04-01

    Microbialites found in the low-light-intensity, hypersaline waters of Storr's Lake (SL), San Salvador Island, the Bahamas, were investigated with respect to their morphology, mineralogy, and microbial diversity. Previously described microbialite morphologies, as well as a newly identified "multi-cuspate" morphology, were observed at various depths. Electron microscopy analysis revealed the presence of angular, blocky, and needle-shaped crystals with mineralized cyanobacterial filaments and remains of exopolymeric substances. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the presence of both Mg-calcite and aragonite in the plateau-mushroom and pinnacle mound microbialites, whereas only Mg-calcite was identified in the other microbialite morphotypes. A comprehensive molecular analysis using barcoded pyrosequencing of five different microbial mat communities identified at least 12 dominant bacterial phyla. Cyanobacteria were generally low in abundance and ranged from ˜0.01% in the deeper pinnacle mounds to ˜3.2% in the shallow calcareous knobs. Other photosynthetic members included green nonsulfur bacteria of the phylum Chloroflexi and purple sulfur bacteria of the class Gammaproteobacteria. All mat types contained significant amounts of sulfate-reducing and dehalogenating bacteria. The low light intensity reaching the deeper microbialites, the lack of dominant cyanobacteria, and the abundance of sulfate reducers and Chloroflexi collectively suggest that sulfate reduction and anoxygenic photosynthetic processes influence the carbonate biomineralization process in these systems.

  3. New approaches indicate constant viral diversity despite shifts in assemblage structure in an Australian hypersaline lake.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Joanne B; Thomas, Brian C; Andrade, Karen; Heidelberg, Karla B; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-11-01

    It is widely stated that viruses represent the most significant source of biodiversity on Earth, yet characterizing the diversity of viral assemblages in natural systems remains difficult. Viral diversity studies are challenging because viruses lack universally present, phylogenetically informative genes. Here, we developed an approach to estimate viral diversity using a series of functional and novel conserved genes. This approach provides direct estimates of viral assemblage diversity while retaining resolution at the level of individual viral populations in a natural system. We characterized viral assemblages in eight samples from hypersaline Lake Tyrrell (LT), Victoria, Australia, using 39,636 viral contigs. We defined viral operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in two ways. First, we used genes with three different functional predictions that were abundantly represented in the data set. Second, we clustered proteins of unknown function based on sequence similarity, and we chose genes represented by three clusters with numerous members to define OTUs. In combination, diversity metrics indicated between 412 and 735 sampled populations, and the number of populations remained relatively constant across samples. We determined the relative representation of each viral OTU in each sample and found that viral assemblage structures correlate with salinity and solution chemistry. LT viral assemblages were near-replicates from the same site sampled a few days apart but differed significantly on other spatial and temporal scales. The OTU definition approach proposed here paves the way for metagenomics-based analyses of viral assemblages using ecological models previously applied to bacteria and archaea.

  4. New Approaches Indicate Constant Viral Diversity despite Shifts in Assemblage Structure in an Australian Hypersaline Lake

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Brian C.; Andrade, Karen; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-01-01

    It is widely stated that viruses represent the most significant source of biodiversity on Earth, yet characterizing the diversity of viral assemblages in natural systems remains difficult. Viral diversity studies are challenging because viruses lack universally present, phylogenetically informative genes. Here, we developed an approach to estimate viral diversity using a series of functional and novel conserved genes. This approach provides direct estimates of viral assemblage diversity while retaining resolution at the level of individual viral populations in a natural system. We characterized viral assemblages in eight samples from hypersaline Lake Tyrrell (LT), Victoria, Australia, using 39,636 viral contigs. We defined viral operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in two ways. First, we used genes with three different functional predictions that were abundantly represented in the data set. Second, we clustered proteins of unknown function based on sequence similarity, and we chose genes represented by three clusters with numerous members to define OTUs. In combination, diversity metrics indicated between 412 and 735 sampled populations, and the number of populations remained relatively constant across samples. We determined the relative representation of each viral OTU in each sample and found that viral assemblage structures correlate with salinity and solution chemistry. LT viral assemblages were near-replicates from the same site sampled a few days apart but differed significantly on other spatial and temporal scales. The OTU definition approach proposed here paves the way for metagenomics-based analyses of viral assemblages using ecological models previously applied to bacteria and archaea. PMID:23995931

  5. Spatial and temporal trends of mercury loadings to Michigan inland lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew J. Parsons; David T. Long; Sharon S. Yohn; John P. Giesy

    2007-08-15

    Several studies of chronologies of mercury (Hg) in inland lake sediments have demonstrated that Hg accumulation decreased in recent decades. However, episodic mercury accumulation events were recorded in some of these lakes, but not investigated in detail. Recent decreases had been attributed to the reduction of regional Hg consumption and secondary removal during process waste treatment. In addition to regional sources, local sources, including watershed disturbance, might significantly contribute to Hg loading. Here, mercury chronologies of Hg loadings based on dated sediment cores are presented for 26 inland Michigan lakes. Although spatial trends of anthropogenic inventories suggest a regional pattern dominated by human activities, sub-regional to local scale sources are also found to be significant. Temporal trends show episodic Hg accumulation events superimposed on a more general, long-term trend. Episodic increases common to lakes suggest a common source or processes common to lakes. Episodic increases unique to a lake indicate a more local scale source. Similar Hg profiles from lakes that are geographically proximal provide evidence for sub-regional to regional scale sources. Local sources and pathways for mercury to inland lakes need to be more fully understood to effectively reduce Hg loading to the environment. 48 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Organic osmolytes in aerobic bacteria from Mono Lake, an alkaline, moderately hypersaline environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ciulla, R.A.; Roberts, M.F.; Diaz, M.R.; Taylor, B.F.

    1997-01-01

    The identity and concentrations of intracellular organic solutes were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for two strains of aerobic, gram-negative bacteria isolated from Mono Lake, California, an alkaline, moderately hypersaline lake. Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid) was the major endogenous solute in both organisms. Concentrations of ectoine varied with external NaCl levels in strain ML-D but not in strain ML-G, where the level was high but invariant from 1.5 to 3.0 M NaCl. Hydroxyectoine also occurred in strain ML-D, especially at elevated NaCl concentrations (2.5 and 3.0 M), but at levels lower than those of ectoine. Exogenous organic solutes that might occur in Mono Lake were examined for their effects on the de novo synthesis of ectoine. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) (0.1 or 1 mM) did not significantly lower ectoine levels in either isolate, and only strain ML-G showed any capacity for DMSP accumulation. With nitrogen limitation, however, DMSP (0.1 mM) substituted for ectoine in strain ML-G showed any capacity for DMSP accumulation. With nitrogen limitation, however, DMSP (0.1 mM) substituted for ectoine in strain ML-G and became the main organic solute. Glycine betaine (GB) was more effective than DMSP in affecting ectoine levels, principally in strain ML-D. Strain ML-D accumulated GB to 50 or 67% of its organic solute pool at 2.5 M NaCl, at an external level of 0.1 or 1 mM GB, respectively. Strain ML-D also accumulated arsenobetaine. The methylated zwitterionic compounds, probably metabolic products of phytoplankton (DMSP and GB) or brine shrimps (arsenobetaine) in Mono Lake, may function as osmolytes for indigenous bacteria when present at high concentrations or under conditions of nitrogen limitation or salt stress. 33 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Chemical, crystallographic and stable isotopic properties of alunite and jarosite from acid-Hypersaline Australian lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alpers, C.N.; Rye, R.O.; Nordstrom, D.K.; White, L.D.; King, B.-S.

    1992-01-01

    Chemical, crystallographic and isotopic analyses were made on samples containing alunite and jarosite from the sediments of four acid, hypersaline lakes in southeastern and southwestern Australia. The alunite and jarosite are K-rich with relatively low Na contents based on chemical analysis and determination of unit cell dimensions by powder X-ray diffraction. Correcting the chemical analyses of fine-grained mineral concentrates from Lake Tyrrell, Victoria, for the presence of halite, silica and poorly crystalline aluminosilicates, the following formulas indicate best estimates for solid-solution compositions: for alunite, K0.87Na0.04(H3O)0.09(Al 0.92Fe0.08)3(SO4)2(OH) 6 and for jarosite, K0.89Na0.07(H3O)0.04(Fe 0.80Al0.20)3(SO4)2(OH) 6. The ??D-values of alunite are notably larger than those for jarosite from Lake Tyrrell and it appears that the minerals have closely approached hydrogen isotope equilibrium with the acidic regional groundwaters. The ??D results are consistent with a fractionation ???60-70??? between alunite and jarosite observed in other areas. However, interpretation of ??D results is complicated by large variability in fluid ??DH2O from evaporation, mixing and possible ion hydration effects in the brine. ??D-values of water derived from jarosite by step-wise heating tend to be smaller at 250??C, at which temperature hydronium and other non-hydroxyl water is liberated, than at 550??C, where water is derived from the hydroxyl site, but the differences are not sufficiently different to invalidate measurements of total ??D obtained by conventional, single-step heating methods. ??34S-values for alunite and jarosite from the four lakes (+19.7 to +21.2??? CDT) and for aqueous sulfate from Lake Tyrrell (+18.3 to +19.8???) are close to the values for modern evaporites (+21.5 ??0.3???) and seawater (+20??0.5???) and are probably typical of seawater-derived aerosols in arid coastal environments. ??34-S-values slightly smaller than that for seawater may

  8. Dormant stages of crustaceans as a mechanism of propagation in the extreme and unpredictable environment in the Crimean hypersaline lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadrin, Nickolai V.; Anufriieva, Elena V.; Amat, Francisco; Eremin, Oleg Yu.

    2015-11-01

    A pool of dormant stages of planktonic organisms in saline lakes is a substantial component in the plankton communities; we need to take it into account to understand plankton dynamics. Hypersaline water bodies in Crimea, the largest peninsula in the Black Sea, constitute a very characteristic and peculiar habitat type in the region. We examined the presence of crustacean resting stages in sediments of dried up sites of the Crimean hypersaline lakes. Sediment samples were taken in 9 different lakes. Experiments performed on the hatching of these resting stages showed the presence of Moina salina (Cladocera), parthenogenetic Artemia and Artemia urmiana (Anostraca), Eucypris mareotica ( inflata) (Ostracoda), and Cletocamptus retrogressus (Harpacticoida). Comparing the experimental results obtained with clean dried brine shrimp cysts and those kept in sediment samples, it was noted that clean cysts hatched much faster than those from sediments did. Some components in bottom sediments slow down and desynchronize hatching from resting eggs in different groups of crustaceans. The sediments of different lakes inhibited the nauplii output from Artemia and ostracod resting eggs to different degrees. More data are needed before we can discuss the reasons of this inhibition. The nonsynchronous output of active stages from the bottom resting ones may be an adaptation that allows crustacean species to exist in extreme and unpredictably changing environments, avoiding the risk that all may emerge at once under unsuitable conditions.

  9. Metagenomic Insights into the Uncultured Diversity and Physiology of Microbes in Four Hypersaline Soda Lake Brines

    PubMed Central

    Vavourakis, Charlotte D.; Ghai, Rohit; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Muyzer, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Soda lakes are salt lakes with a naturally alkaline pH due to evaporative concentration of sodium carbonates in the absence of major divalent cations. Hypersaline soda brines harbor microbial communities with a high species- and strain-level archaeal diversity and a large proportion of still uncultured poly-extremophiles compared to neutral brines of similar salinities. We present the first “metagenomic snapshots” of microbial communities thriving in the brines of four shallow soda lakes from the Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) covering a salinity range from 170 to 400 g/L. Both amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA fragments and direct metagenomic sequencing showed that the top-level taxa abundance was linked to the ambient salinity: Bacteroidetes, Alpha-, and Gamma-proteobacteria were dominant below a salinity of 250 g/L, Euryarchaeota at higher salinities. Within these taxa, amplicon sequences related to Halorubrum, Natrinema, Gracilimonas, purple non-sulfur bacteria (Rhizobiales, Rhodobacter, and Rhodobaca) and chemolithotrophic sulfur oxidizers (Thioalkalivibrio) were highly abundant. Twenty-four draft population genomes from novel members and ecotypes within the Nanohaloarchaea, Halobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were reconstructed to explore their metabolic features, environmental abundance and strategies for osmotic adaptation. The Halobacteria- and Bacteroidetes-related draft genomes belong to putative aerobic heterotrophs, likely with the capacity to ferment sugars in the absence of oxygen. Members from both taxonomic groups are likely involved in primary organic carbon degradation, since some of the reconstructed genomes encode the ability to hydrolyze recalcitrant substrates, such as cellulose and chitin. Putative sodium-pumping rhodopsins were found in both a Flavobacteriaceae- and a Chitinophagaceae-related draft genome. The predicted proteomes of both the latter and a Rhodothermaceae-related draft genome were indicative of a “salt-in” strategy of

  10. Metagenomic Insights into the Uncultured Diversity and Physiology of Microbes in Four Hypersaline Soda Lake Brines.

    PubMed

    Vavourakis, Charlotte D; Ghai, Rohit; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Tringe, Susannah G; Hugenholtz, Philip; Muyzer, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Soda lakes are salt lakes with a naturally alkaline pH due to evaporative concentration of sodium carbonates in the absence of major divalent cations. Hypersaline soda brines harbor microbial communities with a high species- and strain-level archaeal diversity and a large proportion of still uncultured poly-extremophiles compared to neutral brines of similar salinities. We present the first "metagenomic snapshots" of microbial communities thriving in the brines of four shallow soda lakes from the Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) covering a salinity range from 170 to 400 g/L. Both amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA fragments and direct metagenomic sequencing showed that the top-level taxa abundance was linked to the ambient salinity: Bacteroidetes, Alpha-, and Gamma-proteobacteria were dominant below a salinity of 250 g/L, Euryarchaeota at higher salinities. Within these taxa, amplicon sequences related to Halorubrum, Natrinema, Gracilimonas, purple non-sulfur bacteria (Rhizobiales, Rhodobacter, and Rhodobaca) and chemolithotrophic sulfur oxidizers (Thioalkalivibrio) were highly abundant. Twenty-four draft population genomes from novel members and ecotypes within the Nanohaloarchaea, Halobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were reconstructed to explore their metabolic features, environmental abundance and strategies for osmotic adaptation. The Halobacteria- and Bacteroidetes-related draft genomes belong to putative aerobic heterotrophs, likely with the capacity to ferment sugars in the absence of oxygen. Members from both taxonomic groups are likely involved in primary organic carbon degradation, since some of the reconstructed genomes encode the ability to hydrolyze recalcitrant substrates, such as cellulose and chitin. Putative sodium-pumping rhodopsins were found in both a Flavobacteriaceae- and a Chitinophagaceae-related draft genome. The predicted proteomes of both the latter and a Rhodothermaceae-related draft genome were indicative of a "salt-in" strategy of osmotic

  11. FACTORS AFFECTING ENHANCED MERCURY BIOACCUMULATION IN INLAND LAKES OF ISLE ROYALE NATIONAL PARK, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated factors causing mercury (Hg) concentrations in northern pike to exceed the consumption advisory level in some inland lakes of Isle Royale National Park. Using Hg-clean techniques, we collected water, zooplankton, macroinvertebrates, and fishes in 1998 and 1999 fro...

  12. Tracking human footprints in Antarctica through passive sampling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in inland lakes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yao; Meng, Xiang-Zhou; Wu, Chen-Chou; Bao, Lian-Jun; Wang, Feng; Wu, Feng-Chang; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-06-01

    Freely dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were monitored in seven inland lakes of Antarctica by a polyethylene (PE)-based passive sampling technique, with the objective of tracking human footprints. The measured concentrations of PAHs were in the range of 14-360 ng L(-1) with the highest values concentrated around the Russian Progress II Station, indicating the significance of human activities to the loading of PAHs in Antarctica. The concentrations of PAHs in the inland lakes were in the upper part of the PAHs levels in aquatic environments from remote and background regions across the globe. The composition profiles of PAHs indicated that PAHs in the inland lakes were derived mainly from local oil spills, which was corroborated by a large number of fuel spillage reports from ship and plane crash incidents in Antarctica during recent years. Clearly, local human activities, rather than long-range transport, are the dominant sources of PAH contamination to the inland lakes. Finally, the present study demonstrates the efficacy of PE-based passive samplers for investigating PAHs in the aquatic environment of Antarctica under complex field conditions.

  13. Seasonal fluctuations in ionic concentrations drive microbial succession in a hypersaline lake community.

    PubMed

    Podell, Sheila; Emerson, Joanne B; Jones, Claudia M; Ugalde, Juan A; Welch, Sue; Heidelberg, Karla B; Banfield, Jillian F; Allen, Eric E

    2014-05-01

    Microbial community succession was examined over a two-year period using spatially and temporally coordinated water chemistry measurements, metagenomic sequencing, phylogenetic binning and de novo metagenomic assembly in the extreme hypersaline habitat of Lake Tyrrell, Victoria, Australia. Relative abundances of Haloquadratum-related sequences were positively correlated with co-varying concentrations of potassium, magnesium and sulfate, but not sodium, chloride or calcium ions, while relative abundances of Halorubrum, Haloarcula, Halonotius, Halobaculum and Salinibacter-related sequences correlated negatively with Haloquadratum and these same ionic factors. Nanohaloarchaea and Halorhabdus-related sequence abundances were inversely correlated with each other, but not other taxonomic groups. These data, along with predicted gene functions from nearly-complete assembled population metagenomes, suggest different ecological phenotypes for Nanohaloarchaea and Halorhabdus-related strains versus other community members. Nucleotide percent G+C compositions were consistently lower in community metagenomic reads from summer versus winter samples. The same seasonal G+C trends were observed within taxonomically binned read subsets from each of seven different genus-level archaeal groups. Relative seasonal abundances were also linked to percent G+C for assembled population genomes. Together, these data suggest that extreme ionic conditions may exert selective pressure on archaeal populations at the level of genomic nucleotide composition, thus contributing to seasonal successional processes. Despite the unavailability of cultured representatives for most of the organisms identified in this study, effective coordination of physical and biological measurements has enabled discovery and quantification of unexpected taxon-specific, environmentally mediated factors influencing microbial community structure.

  14. Rhodococcus sovatensis sp. nov., an actinomycete isolated from the hypersaline and heliothermal Lake Ursu.

    PubMed

    Táncsics, András; Máthé, István; Benedek, Tibor; Tóth, Erika M; Atasayar, Ewelina; Spröer, Cathrin; Márialigeti, Károly; Felföldi, Tamás; Kriszt, Balázs

    2017-02-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, strictly aerobic, mesophilic bacterium, designated H004T, was isolated from a water sample of the hypersaline and heliothermal Lake Ursu, Sovata, Romania. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain H004T formed a distinct phyletic lineage within the genus Rhodococcus. It shared the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Rhodococcus yunnanensis YIM 70056T (98.80 %), followed by Rhodococcus fascians LMG 3623T (98.73 %), Rhodococcus cercidiphylli YIM 65003T (98.73 %), Rhodococcus cerastii C5T (98.58 %) and Rhodococcus kyotonensis DS472T (98.53 %). The alkB-based phylogenetic analysis further confirmed that this strain constitutes a highly unique lineage within the genus. Chemotaxonomic characteristics, including the predominant fatty acids acids C15 : 0, C18 : 1ω9c, C19 : 1ω11c/C19 : 1ω9c and C16 : 1ω7c/iso-C15 : 0 2-OH, the major quinone MK-8(H2), the presence of mycolic acids and cell-wall chemotype IV were also consistent with the properties of members of the genus Rhodococcus. The DNA G+C content of strain H004T was 65.4 mol%. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization analyses with the closest relatives, in combination with the alkB-based phylogenetic analysis, as well as the chemotaxonomic and physiological data, demonstrated that isolate H004T represents a novel species of the genus Rhodococcus, for which the name Rhodococcus sovatensissp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is H004T (=DSM 102881T=NCAIM B.02632T).

  15. Seasonal fluctuations in ionic concentrations drive microbial succession in a hypersaline lake community

    PubMed Central

    Podell, Sheila; Emerson, Joanne B; Jones, Claudia M; Ugalde, Juan A; Welch, Sue; Heidelberg, Karla B; Banfield, Jillian F; Allen, Eric E

    2014-01-01

    Microbial community succession was examined over a two-year period using spatially and temporally coordinated water chemistry measurements, metagenomic sequencing, phylogenetic binning and de novo metagenomic assembly in the extreme hypersaline habitat of Lake Tyrrell, Victoria, Australia. Relative abundances of Haloquadratum-related sequences were positively correlated with co-varying concentrations of potassium, magnesium and sulfate, but not sodium, chloride or calcium ions, while relative abundances of Halorubrum, Haloarcula, Halonotius, Halobaculum and Salinibacter-related sequences correlated negatively with Haloquadratum and these same ionic factors. Nanohaloarchaea and Halorhabdus-related sequence abundances were inversely correlated with each other, but not other taxonomic groups. These data, along with predicted gene functions from nearly-complete assembled population metagenomes, suggest different ecological phenotypes for Nanohaloarchaea and Halorhabdus-related strains versus other community members. Nucleotide percent G+C compositions were consistently lower in community metagenomic reads from summer versus winter samples. The same seasonal G+C trends were observed within taxonomically binned read subsets from each of seven different genus-level archaeal groups. Relative seasonal abundances were also linked to percent G+C for assembled population genomes. Together, these data suggest that extreme ionic conditions may exert selective pressure on archaeal populations at the level of genomic nucleotide composition, thus contributing to seasonal successional processes. Despite the unavailability of cultured representatives for most of the organisms identified in this study, effective coordination of physical and biological measurements has enabled discovery and quantification of unexpected taxon-specific, environmentally mediated factors influencing microbial community structure. PMID:24335829

  16. Sodium toxicity and pathology associated with exposure of waterfowl to hypersaline playa lakes of southeast New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, C.U.; Dubielzig, R.D.; Dein, F.J.; Baeten, L.A.; Moore, M.K.; Jehl, J.R.; Wesenberg, K.E.

    1997-01-01

    Cause of mortality was studied in waterfowl in hypersaline playa lakes of southeast New Mexico during spring and fall migration. Mortality was not common in wild ducks resting on the playas during good weather. However, when birds remained on the lakes for prolonged periods of time, such as during experimental trials and stormy weather, a heavy layer of salt precipitated on their feathers. Sodium toxicity was the cause of death for all experimental mallards housed on playa water and for 50% of the wild waterfowl found moribund or dead during the spring of 1995. Gross lesions included heavy salt precipitation on the feathers, ocular lens opacities, deeply congested brains, and dilated, thin-walled, fluid-filled cloacae. Microscopic lesions in the more severely affected birds included liquefaction of ocular lens cortex with lens fiber swelling and multifocal to diffuse ulcerative conjunctivitis with severe granulocytic inflammation, edema, and granulocytic vasculitis resulting in thrombosis. Inflammation similar to that seen in the conjunctiva occasionally involved the mucosa of the mouth, pharynx, nasal turbinates, cloaca, and bursa. Transcorneal movement of water in response to the hypersaline conditions on the playa lakes or direct contact with salt crystals could induce anterior segment dehydration of the aqueous humor and increased osmotic pressure on the lens, leading to cataract formation.

  17. Syntrophic associations from hypersaline soda lakes converting organic acids and alcohols to methane at extremely haloalkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Abbas, Ben; Geleijnse, Mitchell; Kolganova, Tatjana V; Kleerebezem, Robbert; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2016-09-01

    Until now anaerobic oxidation of VFA at high salt-pH has been demonstrated only at sulfate-reducing conditions. Here, we present results of a microbiological investigation of anaerobic conversion of organic acids and alcohols at methanogenic conditions by syntrophic associations enriched from hypersaline soda lakes in Central Asia. Sediment incubation experiments showed active, albeit very slow, methane formation from acetate, propionate, butyrate and C2 C4 alcohols at pH 10 and various levels of salinity. Enrichments of syntrophic associations using hydrogenotrophic members of the genus Methanocalculus from soda lakes as partners resulted in several highly enriched cultures converting acetate, propionate, butyrate, benzoate and EtOH to methane. Most syntrophs belonged to Firmicutes, while the propionate-oxidizer formed a novel lineage within the family Syntrophobacteraceae in the Deltaproteobacteria. The acetate-oxidizing syntroph was identified as 'Ca. Syntrophonatronum acetioxidans' previously found to oxidize acetate at sulfate-reducing conditions up to salt-saturating concentrations. Butyrate and a benzoate-degrading syntrophs represent novel genus-level lineages in Syntrophomonadales which are proposed as Candidatus taxons 'Syntrophobaca', 'Syntrophocurvum' and 'Syntropholuna'. Overall, despite very slow growth, the results indicated the presence of a functionally competent syntrophic community in hypersaline soda lakes, capable of efficient oxidation of fermentation products to methane at extremely haloalkaline conditions.

  18. Microbial source tracking markers at three inland recreational lakes in Ohio, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, Donna S.; Stelzer, Erin A.

    2012-01-01

    During the 2011 recreational season, samples were collected for E. coli and microbial source tracking (MST) marker concentrations to begin to understand potential sources of fecal contamination at three inland recreational lakes in Ohio - Buckeye, Atwood, and Tappan Lakes. The results from 32 regular samples, 4 field blanks, and 7 field replicates collected at 5 sites are presented in this report. At the three lakes, the ruminant-associated marker was found most often (57-73 percent of samples) but at estimated quantities, followed by the dog-associated marker (30-43 percent of samples). The human-associated marker was found in 14 and 50 percent of samples from Atwood and Tappan Lakes, respectively, but was not found in any samples from the two Buckeye Lake sites. The gull-associated marker was detected in only two samples, both from Tappan Lake.

  19. Characterization of Sporohalobacter salinus sp. nov., an anaerobic, halophilic, fermentative bacterium isolated from a hypersaline lake.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdallah, Manel; Karray, Fatma; Mhiri, Najla; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Tholozan, Jean-Luc; Alazard, Didier; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-02-01

    Halophilic, obligately anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative bacterial strains were isolated from a sediment sample taken from under the salt crust of El-Jerid hypersaline lake in southern Tunisia by using tryptone or glucose as the substrate. One strain, CEJFT1B(T), was characterized phenotypically and phylogenetically. Cells were non-motile, non-spore-forming, short rods. Strain CEJFT1B(T) was able to grow in the presence of 5-30 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 20 %) and at 30-60 °C (optimum 45 °C). It grew at pH 5.5-7.8 and the optimum pH for growth was 6.8. The isolate required yeast extract for growth. Substrates utilized by strain CEJFT1B(T) as the sole carbon source included glucose, fructose, sucrose, pyruvate, Casamino acids and starch. Individual amino acids such as glutamate, lysine, methionine, serine, tyrosine, and amino acid mixtures formed by the Stickland reaction such as alanine-glycine, valine-proline, leucine-proline, isoleucine-proline were also utilized. Products of glucose fermentation were acetate (major product), butyrate, H2 and CO2. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain CEJFT1B(T) was 32.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain CEJFT1B(T) should be assigned to the genus Sporohalobacter. The sequence similarity between strain CEJFT1B(T) and Sporohalobacter lortetii was 98.5 %, but DNA-DNA hybridization between the two strains revealed a relatedness value of 56.4 %, indicating that they are not related at the species level. The combination of phylogenetic analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization data, and differences in substrate utilization support the view that strain CEJFT1B(T) represents a novel species of the genus Sporohalobacter, for which the name Sporohalobacter salinus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CEJFT1B(T) ( = DSM 26781(T) = JCM 19279(T)).

  20. 46 CFR 30.01-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes Routes-TB/OC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great... VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Administration § 30.01-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes Routes—TB/OC. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or unlimited coastwise...

  1. 46 CFR 188.05-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 188.05-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or unlimited...

  2. 46 CFR 90.05-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 90.05-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or...

  3. 46 CFR 167.01-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS General Provisions § 167.01-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or...

  4. 46 CFR 188.05-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 188.05-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or unlimited...

  5. 46 CFR 188.05-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 188.05-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or unlimited...

  6. 46 CFR 167.01-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS General Provisions § 167.01-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or...

  7. 46 CFR 70.05-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes Routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...) PASSENGER VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 70.05-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes Routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or unlimited coastwise...

  8. 46 CFR 167.01-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS General Provisions § 167.01-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or...

  9. 46 CFR 70.05-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes Routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...) PASSENGER VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 70.05-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes Routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or unlimited coastwise...

  10. 46 CFR 30.01-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes Routes-TB/OC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great... VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Administration § 30.01-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes Routes—TB/OC. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or unlimited coastwise...

  11. 46 CFR 90.05-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 90.05-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or...

  12. 46 CFR 70.05-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes Routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...) PASSENGER VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 70.05-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes Routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or unlimited coastwise...

  13. 46 CFR 167.01-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS General Provisions § 167.01-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or...

  14. 46 CFR 90.05-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 90.05-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or...

  15. 46 CFR 30.01-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes Routes-TB/OC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great... VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Administration § 30.01-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes Routes—TB/OC. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or unlimited coastwise...

  16. 46 CFR 70.05-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes Routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...) PASSENGER VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 70.05-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes Routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or unlimited coastwise...

  17. 46 CFR 188.05-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 188.05-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or unlimited...

  18. 46 CFR 188.05-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 188.05-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or unlimited...

  19. 46 CFR 70.05-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes Routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...) PASSENGER VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 70.05-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes Routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or unlimited coastwise...

  20. 46 CFR 90.05-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 90.05-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or...

  1. 46 CFR 30.01-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes Routes-TB/OC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great... VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Administration § 30.01-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes Routes—TB/OC. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or unlimited coastwise...

  2. 46 CFR 167.01-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS General Provisions § 167.01-7 Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or...

  3. 46 CFR 11.442 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... inland steam or motor vessels of not more than 1600 gross tons. 11.442 Section 11.442 Shipping COAST... Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than 1600 gross tons. The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for an endorsement as master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor...

  4. 46 CFR 11.442 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... inland steam or motor vessels of not more than 1600 gross tons. 11.442 Section 11.442 Shipping COAST... Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than 1600 gross tons. The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for an endorsement as master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor...

  5. 46 CFR 11.442 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... inland steam or motor vessels of not more than 1600 gross tons. 11.442 Section 11.442 Shipping COAST... Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than 1600 gross tons. The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for an endorsement as master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor...

  6. Water level variation of Inland lakes on the southeasten of Tibetan Plateau in 1972-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Lei, L.

    2014-12-01

    Lake water level variation directly records the process of water storage balance in the basin, which is a quite sensitive response to the climate change. We obtained the long-time lake area and level series of the five typical lakes from 1972 to 2012 in the Tibetan Plateau, and analyzed the variation of lake levels in recent 40 years, using the multi-source remote sensing data. The results show that the lake level of three inland lakes ( Pumo Yumco , Taro Co, Zhari Namco)have rose 0.89m, 0.70m,0.40m respectively ,while the two lakes (Peiku Co, Mapang Yumco) showed decreasing tendency, the changes is -1.696m,-0,153m. On the whole, the five lakes have experienced more remarkable changes in 2000-2012 than 1976-1999. In terms of spatial variations, the three lakes which located in south Tibetan Plateau, Peiku Co and Mapang Yumco, have show the consistent variation trend, as well as the other two lakes, Taro Co and Zhari Namco.

  7. Climate change driven water budget dynamics of a Tibetan inland lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Binquan; Zhang, Jianyun; Yu, Zhongbo; Liang, Zhongmin; Chen, Li; Acharya, Kumud

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the hydrologic processes of inland lake basins in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) could provide insights into the responses of Tibetan lake dynamics to climate change. An efficient approach for this purpose is to represent complex hydrologic behaviors of such Tibetan lake watersheds with plausible hydrologic models. In this study, water level fluctuations of Lake Nam Co, an inland lake in the central TP, were investigated using a lumped lake-watershed model. The degree-day factor method was introduced to improve the model applicability in glacier-covered basins. The model simulated the hydrologic processes as well as the lake water budget. Remote sensing images (Landsat MSS, TM, ETM + and OLI) from 1972 to 2015 were used to identify the glacier and lake boundaries. Multisource climate data (e.g., ground point observation, 0.25o gridded APHRODITE and TRMM 3B42 v7 precipitation products) were used to drive the hydrologic model at a monthly time step. Results of trend analysis showed that basin-wide annual air temperature increased by the rate 0.04 °C/yr from 1961 to 2015. Mean annual precipitation slowly increased from 1961 to the mid-1990s, and then rapidly increased from the late-1990s to the mid-2000s, and finally obviously decreased after the mid-2000s. As a response to climate change, glaciers decreased by 62.69 km2 (29%) and lake area increased by 91.83 km2 (4.7%) from 1972 to 2015. The analysis of lake water budget suggested that, the total basin runoff and on-lake precipitation contributed 1.36 km3/yr (66%) and 0.7 km3/yr (34%), respectively, to mean annual water gain of the lake. Glacier runoff was 14% of the basin runoff and 10% of the total water gain of the lake. The percentages of lake evaporation, water seepage and water surplus were 65%, 20% and 15%, respectively. Lake level increased with the rate of 0.14 m/yr for the study period 1961-2015. It could be concluded that precipitation was the dominant controlling factor for the different

  8. Genome sequence of Sphingomonas sp. S17, isolated from an alkaline, hyperarsenic, and hypersaline volcano-associated lake at high altitude in the Argentinean Puna.

    PubMed

    Farias, Maria Eugenia; Revale, Santiago; Mancini, Estefania; Ordoñez, Omar; Turjanski, Adrian; Cortez, Néstor; Vazquez, Martin P

    2011-07-01

    The high-altitude Andean lakes (HAAL) in the Argentinean Puna-high Andes region represent an almost unexplored ecosystem exposed to extreme conditions (high UV irradiation, hypersalinity, drastic temperature changes, desiccation, and high pH). Here we present the first genome sequence, a Sphingomonas sp., isolated from this extreme environment.

  9. Genome Sequence of Sphingomonas sp. S17, Isolated from an Alkaline, Hyperarsenic, and Hypersaline Volcano-Associated Lake at High Altitude in the Argentinean Puna ▿

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Maria Eugenia; Revale, Santiago; Mancini, Estefania; Ordoñez, Omar; Turjanski, Adrian; Cortez, Néstor; Vazquez, Martin P.

    2011-01-01

    The high-altitude Andean lakes (HAAL) in the Argentinean Puna-high Andes region represent an almost unexplored ecosystem exposed to extreme conditions (high UV irradiation, hypersalinity, drastic temperature changes, desiccation, and high pH). Here we present the first genome sequence, a Sphingomonas sp., isolated from this extreme environment. PMID:21602338

  10. Phylogenetic Analysis of a Microbialite-Forming Microbial Mat from a Hypersaline Lake of the Kiritimati Atoll, Central Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Dominik; Arp, Gernot; Reimer, Andreas; Reitner, Joachim; Daniel, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    On the Kiritimati atoll, several lakes exhibit microbial mat-formation under different hydrochemical conditions. Some of these lakes trigger microbialite formation such as Lake 21, which is an evaporitic, hypersaline lake (salinity of approximately 170‰). Lake 21 is completely covered with a thick multilayered microbial mat. This mat is associated with the formation of decimeter-thick highly porous microbialites, which are composed of aragonite and gypsum crystals. We assessed the bacterial and archaeal community composition and its alteration along the vertical stratification by large-scale analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences of the nine different mat layers. The surface layers are dominated by aerobic, phototrophic, and halotolerant microbes. The bacterial community of these layers harbored Cyanobacteria (Halothece cluster), which were accompanied with known phototrophic members of the Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria. In deeper anaerobic layers more diverse communities than in the upper layers were present. The deeper layers were dominated by Spirochaetes, sulfate-reducing bacteria (Deltaproteobacteria), Chloroflexi (Anaerolineae and Caldilineae), purple non-sulfur bacteria (Alphaproteobacteria), purple sulfur bacteria (Chromatiales), anaerobic Bacteroidetes (Marinilabiacae), Nitrospirae (OPB95), Planctomycetes and several candidate divisions. The archaeal community, including numerous uncultured taxonomic lineages, generally changed from Euryarchaeota (mainly Halobacteria and Thermoplasmata) to uncultured members of the Thaumarchaeota (mainly Marine Benthic Group B) with increasing depth. PMID:23762495

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of a microbialite-forming microbial mat from a hypersaline lake of the Kiritimati atoll, Central Pacific.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Dominik; Arp, Gernot; Reimer, Andreas; Reitner, Joachim; Daniel, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    On the Kiritimati atoll, several lakes exhibit microbial mat-formation under different hydrochemical conditions. Some of these lakes trigger microbialite formation such as Lake 21, which is an evaporitic, hypersaline lake (salinity of approximately 170‰). Lake 21 is completely covered with a thick multilayered microbial mat. This mat is associated with the formation of decimeter-thick highly porous microbialites, which are composed of aragonite and gypsum crystals. We assessed the bacterial and archaeal community composition and its alteration along the vertical stratification by large-scale analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences of the nine different mat layers. The surface layers are dominated by aerobic, phototrophic, and halotolerant microbes. The bacterial community of these layers harbored Cyanobacteria (Halothece cluster), which were accompanied with known phototrophic members of the Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria. In deeper anaerobic layers more diverse communities than in the upper layers were present. The deeper layers were dominated by Spirochaetes, sulfate-reducing bacteria (Deltaproteobacteria), Chloroflexi (Anaerolineae and Caldilineae), purple non-sulfur bacteria (Alphaproteobacteria), purple sulfur bacteria (Chromatiales), anaerobic Bacteroidetes (Marinilabiacae), Nitrospirae (OPB95), Planctomycetes and several candidate divisions. The archaeal community, including numerous uncultured taxonomic lineages, generally changed from Euryarchaeota (mainly Halobacteria and Thermoplasmata) to uncultured members of the Thaumarchaeota (mainly Marine Benthic Group B) with increasing depth.

  12. Monitoring variations of inland lakes in the arid region of Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jie; Chen, Xi; Yang, Liao; Fang, Hui

    2012-06-01

    Inland lakes are the major surface water resource in the arid regions of Central Asia. Therefore, the surface area changes in inland lakes have been a sensitive indicator of climate changes and human activities, and have often been the focus of ecological and environmental research. This study aimed to monitor the changes in surface area of nine major lakes over a 32-year period. The water body was extracted from MSS images from the mid-1970s, TM images from the early 1990s, ETM + images in the late 1990s, and TM images in 2007. The results indicated that the total surface area of these nine lakes had decreased over time to 50.38% of the area, from 91402.06 km2 in 1975 to 46049.23 km2 in 2007. As the surface area of lakes in the western part of Central Asia was larger than that in the eastern part, the shrinking trend of lake area was more significant in the west than in the east. There was a varied reduction of closed lakes in flat regions. The most substantial decrease was in the surface area of closed lakes in flat regions. Most significantly, the area of the Aral Sea was reduced by 75.7% from its original area in 1975. The area of alpine lakes remained relatively stable; the change in surface area was less than 0.7% during the period 1975-2007. The area change in opened lakes with outlets was notably different from the other two types. The area of Zaysan had increased sharply by 5.85%, and that of Bosten had decreased by 9.1%. Sasykkol had hardly any changes in this period. Due to global climate warming, vapor transfer to the south via westerly winds had been blocked, resulting in a decrease of much-needed precipitation in the western parts of Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Kazakhstan between 1970 and 2000. The decrease in precipitation and the increase in water consumption for agricultural irrigation resulted in the decrease of river runoff. Consequently, the area of inland lakes in Central Asia shrank over the past 32 years.

  13. Utilization of ERTS-1 data to monitor and classify eutrophication of inland lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, P. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Channel 7 is highly useful in surveying surface water in lakes, rivers, and large marshes. It is likely to miss detection of elliptically shaped bodies of 4 acres or less. Further, it is possible that the bodies are distorted and displaced because of lack of correction for sensor response time. These errors might not be critical because:(1) location accuracy is not essential to a surface water survey; and (2) an obviously distorted image is often not in error in excess of 5% The finding that Orchard Lake and other lakes in Oakland County have different densities in channels 4, 5, 6, and 7 is important because it implies that the lake wide water color average is different in the separate channels. Channels 6 and 7 were constant in tonal quality among all the lakes while channels 4 and 5 varied from lake to lake and in various parts of Orchard Lake. These findings are significant because it means that small inland lake color differences are recorded by the MSS even on a cloudy or hazy day. It also confirms that ERTS-1 is performing well enough to be used for correlation to ground truth and aircraft underflights.

  14. Hydrochemical and isotopes studies in a hypersaline wetland to define the hydrogeological conceptual model: Fuente de Piedra Lake (Malaga, Spain).

    PubMed

    Montalván, F J; Heredia, J; Ruiz, J M; Pardo-Igúzquiza, E; García de Domingo, A; Elorza, F J

    2017-01-15

    The Fuente de Piedra lake is a hypersaline wetland of great extension (13.5km(2)) and rich in aquatic birds and other species. It became therefore the third Spanish wetland to be included in the Ramsar convention and has been a "nature reserve" since 1984. The lake has an endorheic basin (150km(2)) with variable-density flows dominated by complex hydrogeological conditions. The traditional conceptualization of endorheic basins in semiarid climates considered that the brine in this hydric system was exclusively of evaporative origin and was placed only in the lake and its surrounding discharge area in the basin. Previous geophysical and hydrochemical studies identified different types of waters and brines. In this work, natural tracers (Cl(-), Br(-), Na(+), Mg(2+)) and environmental isotopes ((18)O, (2)H, (14)C, (13)C and (3)H) were employed to a) discriminate different types of brines according to their degree of evaporation and genesis, and b) to estimate residence times of brine waters and identify recharge areas of the different flow subsystems. A conceptual model of the hydrogeological system of the lake basin and its links to a regional karst system is proposed.

  15. New insights into microbially induced sedimentary structures in alkaline hypersaline El Beida Lake, Wadi El Natrun, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher, Amany G.; Abdel-Motelib, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Microbially induced sedimentary structures (MISS) were studied in detail in the alkaline hypersaline El Beida Lake of Wadi El Natrun in the western desert sector of Egypt, based on field observations and sampling performed in 2013 and 2014. Geomorphologically, the lake can be subdivided into three zones, each with characteristic sedimentary and biosedimentary structures. The marginal elevated zone that borders the lake is characterized by thick blocky crusts devoid of microbial mats. The middle-lower supratidal zone has luxuriant microbial mats associated with knotty surfaces, mat cracks and wrinkle structures. A zone of ephemeral shallow pools and channels is characterized by reticulate surfaces, pinnacle mats, sieve-like surfaces, gas domes and mat chips. In the microbial mats, authigenic minerals include thenardite Na2SO4, trona Na3(CO3)(HCO3)•2H2O and halite NaCl. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses revealed that the minerals are closely associated with the MISS, suggesting some influence of microorganisms on mineral precipitation. Complex interactions between regional hydrological cycles and diagenetic processes imply low preservation potential. MISS signatures of such saline lakes can serve as key analogues for interpreting the geologic record.

  16. An estimate of glacier melting contribution to inland lakes on Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Q.; Moholdt, G.; Yao, T.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    As it is known that continental glacier melting dramatically in a warmer climate and its mass loss contribute to the sea level rise, however, there are lots of inland lakes that receives glacier melting contributions to some extent, it is still not known how much melting water from glaciers to lakes overall on a global and regional view. On the Tibetan Plateau, there are four inland basins in contrast to six external catchments at the marginal plateau. With the same reference system, co-registration and bias/offsets correction, DEMs and ICESat/GLAS data were used to calculate glacier surface elevation changes, which includes the historical DEM at 1:250,000 in 1970s, SRTM DEM and ICESat/GLAS over the whole Tibetan Plateau. According to the 1st glacier inventory database by each glacier in different basins, glacier surface elevation changes were calculated, and glacier mass changes were evaluated. It shows that, for external catchments, glacier mass change was totalled by -9.5 ± 3.6 Gt a-1 during 1970s-2000, it was more negative during 2003-2009 (-14.9 ± 6.9 Gt a-1). It shows more melting glacier water runs into the sea in recent decade. However, it was obviously less than some previous studies in HMA, e.g. Gardner et al., 2013, glacier contributed to sea level rise by 26±12 Gt a-1 .While for internal basins overall, glacier mass change was totalled by -7.6 ± 2.3 Gt a-1 during 1970s-2000, however, it was less negative during 2003-2009 (-3.05± 1.4 Gt a-1). It seems that precipitation has increased in inland Tibet and there might be less glacier melting mass runs into inland lakes in recent decade.

  17. Heterotrophic denitrification at extremely high salt and pH by haloalkaliphilic Gammaproteobacteria from hypersaline soda lakes

    PubMed Central

    Shapovalova, A. A.; Khijniak, T. V.; Tourova, T. P.; Muyzer, G.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe denitrification at extremely high salt and pH in sediments from hypersaline alkaline soda lakes and soda soils. Experiments with sediment slurries demonstrated the presence of acetate-utilizing denitrifying populations active at in situ conditions. Anaerobic enrichment cultures at pH 10 and 4 M total Na+ with acetate as electron donor and nitrate, nitrite and N2O as electron acceptors resulted in the dominance of Gammaproteobacteria belonging to the genus Halomonas. Both mixed and pure culture studies identified nitrite and N2O reduction as rate-limiting steps in the denitrification process at extremely haloalkaline conditions. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00792-008-0166-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18452025

  18. Complete genome sequence of Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus strain AHT2(T), a haloalkaliphilic sulfidogen from Egyptian hypersaline alkaline lakes.

    PubMed

    Melton, Emily Denise; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Overmars, Lex; Chertkov, Olga; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Shapiro, Nicole; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja; Lapidus, Alla L; Muyzer, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus strain AHT2(T) is a strictly anaerobic sulfidogenic haloalkaliphile isolated from a composite sediment sample of eight hypersaline alkaline lakes in the Wadi al Natrun valley in the Egyptian Libyan Desert. D. alkaliphilus AHT2(T) is Gram-negative and belongs to the family Desulfobulbaceae within the Deltaproteobacteria. Here we report its genome sequence, which contains a 3.10 Mbp chromosome. D. alkaliphilus AHT2(T) is adapted to survive under highly alkaline and moderately saline conditions and therefore, is relevant to the biotechnology industry and life under extreme conditions. For these reasons, D. alkaliphilus AHT2(T) was sequenced by the DOE Joint Genome Institute as part of the Community Science Program.

  19. 46 CFR 11.433 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and... Professional Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.433 Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland... endorsement as master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons is: (a) One year...

  20. 46 CFR 11.455 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and... Professional Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.455 Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland... applicant for an endorsement as master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

  1. 46 CFR 11.452 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and... Professional Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.452 Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland... applicant for an endorsement as master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

  2. Desulfonatronobacter acetoxydans sp. nov.,: a first acetate-oxidizing, extremely salt-tolerant alkaliphilic SRB from a hypersaline soda lake.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, D Y; Chernyh, N A; Poroshina, M N

    2015-09-01

    Recent intensive microbiological investigation of sulfidogenesis in soda lakes did not result in isolation of any pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) able to directly oxidize acetate. The sulfate-dependent acetate oxidation at haloalkaline conditions has, so far, been only shown in two syntrophic associations of novel Syntrophobacteraceae members and haloalkaliphilic hydrogenotrophic SRB. In the course of investigation of one of them, obtained from a hypersaline soda lake in South-Western Siberia, a minor component was observed showing a close relation to Desulfonatronobacter acidivorans--a "complete oxidizing" SRB from soda lakes. This organism became dominant in a secondary enrichment with propionate as e-donor and sulfate as e-acceptor. A pure culture, strain APT3, was identified as a novel member of the family Desulfobacteraceae. It is an extremely salt-tolerant alkaliphile, growing with butyrate at salinity up to 4 M total Na(+) with a pH optimum at 9.5. It can grow with sulfate as e-acceptor with C3-C9 VFA and also with some alcohols. The most interesting property of strain APT3 is its ability to grow with acetate as e-donor, although not with sulfate, but with sulfite or thiosulfate as e-acceptors. The new isolate is proposed as a new species Desulfonatronobacter acetoxydans.

  3. Pyrosequencing analysis of bacterial communities in Lake Bosten, a large brackish inland lake in the arid northwest of China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Gao, Guang; Tang, Xiangming; Shao, Keqiang; Gong, Yi

    2016-06-01

    The bacteria inhabiting brackish lake environments are poorly known, and there are few studies on the microbial diversity of these environments. Lake Bosten, a large brackish inland lake, is the largest lake in Xinjiang Province in northwestern China. Because sediments record past limnic changes, the analysis of sedimentary bacteria in Lake Bosten may help elucidate bacterial responses to environmental change. We employed 454 pyrosequencing to investigate the diversity and bacterial community composition in Lake Bosten. A total of 48 230 high-quality sequence reads with 16 314 operational taxonomic units were successfully obtained from the 4 selected samples, and they were numerically dominated by members of the Deltaproteobacteria (17.1%), Chloroflexi (16.1%), Betaproteobacteria (12.6%), Bacteroidetes (6.6%), and Firmicutes (5.7%) groups, accounting for more than 58.1% of the bacterial sequences. The sediment bacterial communities and diversity were consistently different along the 2 geographic environmental gradients: (i) freshwater-brackish water gradient and (ii) oligotrophic-mesotrophic habitat gradient. Deltaproteobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Betaproteobacteria were amplified throughout all of the sampling sites. More Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were found near the Kaidu River estuary (site 14). Our investigation showed that Proteobacteria did not display any systematic change along the salinity gradient, and numerous 16S rRNA sequences could not be identified at the genus level. Our data will provide a better understanding of the diversity and distribution of bacteria in arid region brackish lakes.

  4. Water-quality characteristics of Michigan's inland lakes, 2001-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, L.M.; Taricska, C.K.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) jointly monitored for selected water-quality constituents and properties of inland lakes during 2001–10 as part of Michigan's Lake Water-Quality Assessment program. During 2001–10, 866 lake basins from 729 inland lakes greater than 25 acres were monitored for baseline water-quality conditions and trophic status. This report summarizes the water-quality characteristics and trophic conditions of the monitored lakes throughout the State; the data include vertical-profile measurements, nutrient measurements at three discrete depths, Secchi-disk transparency (SDT) measurements, and chlorophyll a measurements for the spring and summer, with major ions and other chemical indicators measured during the spring at mid-depth and color during the summer from near-surface samples. In about 75 percent of inland lake deep basins (index stations), trophic characteristics were associated with oligotrophic or mesotrophic conditions; 5 percent or less were categorized as hypereutrophic, and 80 percent of hypereutrophic lakes had a maximum depth of 30 feet or less. Comparison of spring and summer measurements shows that water clarity based on SDT measurements were clearer in the spring than in the summer for 63 percent of lakes. For near-surface measurements made in spring, 97 percent of lakes can be considered phosphorus limited and less than half a percent nitrogen limited; for summer measurements, 96 percent of lakes can be considered phosphorus limited and less than half a percent nitrogen limited. Spatial patterns of major ions, alkalinity, and hardness measured in the spring at mid-depth all showed lower values in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and a southward increase toward the southern areas of the Lower Peninsula, though the location of increase varied by constituent. A spatial analysis of the data based on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Level III Ecoregions separated potassium

  5. Reconstruction of atmospheric soot history in inland regions from lake sediments over the past 150 years

    PubMed Central

    Han, Y. M.; Wei, C.; Huang, R.-J.; Bandowe, B. A. M.; Ho, S. S. H.; Cao, J. J.; Jin, Z. D.; Xu, B. Q.; Gao, S. P.; Tie, X. X.; An, Z. S.; Wilcke, W.

    2016-01-01

    Historical reconstruction of atmospheric black carbon (BC, in the form of char and soot) is still constrained for inland areas. Here we determined and compared the past 150-yr records of BC and polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in sediments from two representative lakes, Huguangyan (HGY) and Chaohu (CH), in eastern China. HGY only receives atmospheric deposition while CH is influenced by riverine input. BC, char, and soot have similar vertical concentration profiles as PACs in both lakes. Abrupt increases in concentrations and mass accumulation rates (MARs) of soot have mainly occurred since ~1950, the establishment of the People’s Republic of China, when energy usage changed to more fossil fuel contributions reflected by the variations in the concentration ratios of char/soot and individual PACs. In HGY, soot MARs increased by ~7.7 times in the period 1980–2012 relative to the period 1850–1950. Similar increases (~6.7 times) were observed in CH. The increase in soot MARs is also in line with the emission inventory records in the literature and the fact that the submicrometer-sized soot particles can be dispersed regionally. The study provides an alternative method to reconstruct the atmospheric soot history in populated inland areas. PMID:26750586

  6. Comparing rapid and culture indicator bacteria methods at inland lake beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, Donna S.; Bushon, Rebecca N.; Brady, Amie M.G.; Kephart, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    A rapid method, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), for quantifying indicator bacteria in recreational waters is desirable for public health protection. We report that replacing current Escherichia coli standards with new US Environmental Protection Agency beach action values (BAVs) for enterococci by culture or qPCR may result in more advisories being posted at inland recreational lakes. In this study, concentrations of E. coli and enterococci by culture methods were compared to concentrations of Enterococcus spp. by qPCR at 3 inland lake beaches in Ohio. The E. coli and enterococci culture results were significantly related at all beaches; however, the relations between culture results and Enterococcus spp. qPCR results were not always significant and differed among beaches. All the qPCR results exceeded the new BAV for Enterococcus spp. by qPCR, whereas only 23.7% of culture results for E. coli and 79% of culture results for enterococci exceeded the current standard for E. coli or BAV for enterococci.

  7. Reconstruction of atmospheric soot history in inland regions from lake sediments over the past 150 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y. M.; Wei, C.; Huang, R.-J.; Bandowe, B. A. M.; Ho, S. S. H.; Cao, J. J.; Jin, Z. D.; Xu, B. Q.; Gao, S. P.; Tie, X. X.; An, Z. S.; Wilcke, W.

    2016-01-01

    Historical reconstruction of atmospheric black carbon (BC, in the form of char and soot) is still constrained for inland areas. Here we determined and compared the past 150-yr records of BC and polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in sediments from two representative lakes, Huguangyan (HGY) and Chaohu (CH), in eastern China. HGY only receives atmospheric deposition while CH is influenced by riverine input. BC, char, and soot have similar vertical concentration profiles as PACs in both lakes. Abrupt increases in concentrations and mass accumulation rates (MARs) of soot have mainly occurred since ~1950, the establishment of the People’s Republic of China, when energy usage changed to more fossil fuel contributions reflected by the variations in the concentration ratios of char/soot and individual PACs. In HGY, soot MARs increased by ~7.7 times in the period 1980–2012 relative to the period 1850–1950. Similar increases (~6.7 times) were observed in CH. The increase in soot MARs is also in line with the emission inventory records in the literature and the fact that the submicrometer-sized soot particles can be dispersed regionally. The study provides an alternative method to reconstruct the atmospheric soot history in populated inland areas.

  8. 46 CFR 11.437 - Service requirements for mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... steam or motor vessels of any gross tons. 11.437 Section 11.437 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.437 Service requirements for mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor... mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons is: (1) Three years of...

  9. 46 CFR 11.437 - Service requirements for mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... steam or motor vessels of any gross tons. 11.437 Section 11.437 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.437 Service requirements for mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor... mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons is: (1) Three years of...

  10. 46 CFR 11.437 - Service requirements for mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... steam or motor vessels of any gross tons. 11.437 Section 11.437 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.437 Service requirements for mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor... mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons is: (1) Three years of...

  11. 46 CFR 11.437 - Service requirements for mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... steam or motor vessels of any gross tons. 11.437 Section 11.437 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.437 Service requirements for mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor... mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons is: (1) Three years of...

  12. 46 CFR 11.456 - Service requirements for limited master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Service requirements for limited master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than 100 gross tons. 11.456 Section 11.456 Shipping... master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than 100 gross tons. Limited...

  13. 46 CFR 11.456 - Service requirements for limited master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service requirements for limited master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than 100 gross tons. 11.456 Section 11.456 Shipping... master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than 100 gross tons. Limited...

  14. 46 CFR 11.456 - Service requirements for limited master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Service requirements for limited master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than 100 gross tons. 11.456 Section 11.456 Shipping... master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than 100 gross tons. Limited...

  15. 46 CFR 11.456 - Service requirements for limited master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service requirements for limited master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than 100 gross tons. 11.456 Section 11.456 Shipping... master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than 100 gross tons. Limited...

  16. Predicting lake trophic state by relating Secchi-disk transparency measurements to Landsat-satellite imagery for Michigan inland lakes, 2003-05 and 2007-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, L.M.; Jodoin, R.S.; Minnerick, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    Inland lakes are an important economic and environmental resource for Michigan. The U.S. Geological Survey and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment have been cooperatively monitoring the quality of selected lakes in Michigan through the Lake Water Quality Assessment program. Sampling for this program began in 2001; by 2010, 730 of Michigan’s 11,000 inland lakes are expected to have been sampled once. Volunteers coordinated by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment began sampling lakes in 1974 and continue to sample (in 2010) approximately 250 inland lakes each year through the Michigan Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program. Despite these sampling efforts, it still is impossible to physically collect measurements for all Michigan inland lakes; however, Landsat-satellite imagery has been used successfully in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, and elsewhere to predict the trophic state of unsampled inland lakes greater than 20 acres by producing regression equations relating in-place Secchi-disk measurements to Landsat bands. This study tested three alternatives to methods previously used in Michigan to improve results for predicted statewide Trophic State Index (TSI) computed from Secchi-disk transparency (TSI (SDT)). The alternative methods were used on 14 Landsat-satellite scenes with statewide TSI (SDT) for two time periods (2003– 05 and 2007–08). Specifically, the methods were (1) satellitedata processing techniques to remove areas affected by clouds, cloud shadows, haze, shoreline, and dense vegetation for inland lakes greater than 20 acres in Michigan; (2) comparison of the previous method for producing a single open-water predicted TSI (SDT) value (which was based on an area of interest (AOI) and lake-average approach) to an alternative Gethist method for identifying open-water areas in inland lakes (which follows the initial satellite-data processing and targets the darkest pixels, representing the deepest water

  17. Changes in the area of inland lakes in arid regions of central Asia during the past 30 years.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jie; Chen, Xi; Li, Junli; Yang, Liao; Fang, Hui

    2011-07-01

    Inland lakes are major surface water resource in arid regions of Central Asia. The area changes in these lakes have been proved to be the results of regional climate changes and recent human activities. This study aimed at investigating the area variations of the nine major lakes in Central Asia over the last 30 years. Firstly, multi-temporal Landsat imagery in 1975, 1990, 1999, and 2007 were used to delineate lake extents automatically based on Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) threshold segmentation, then lake area variations were detailed in three decades and the mechanism of these changes was analyzed with meteorological data and hydrological data. The results indicated that the total surface areas of these nine lakes had decreased from 91,402.06 km(2) to 46,049.23 km(2) during 1975-2007, accounting for 49.62% of their original area of 1975. Tail-end lakes in flat areas had shrunk dramatically as they were induced by both climate changes and human impacts, while alpine lakes remained relatively stable due to the small precipitation variations. With different water usage of river outlets, the variations of open lakes were more flexible than those of other two types. According to comprehensive analyses, different types of inland lakes presented different trends of area changes under the background of global warming effects in Central Asia, which showed that the increased human activities had broken the balance of water cycles in this region.

  18. Characterization of thermo-solvent stable protease from Halobacillus sp. CJ4 isolated from Chott Eldjerid hypersaline lake in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Lobna; Jlidi, Mouna; Hmani, Houda; Hadj Brahim, Adel; El Arbi, Mahdi; Ben Ali, Mamdouh

    2017-02-01

    About 110 newly isolated halophilic and halotolerant bacteria were screened for protease production. A moderately halophilic strain (CJ4), isolated from Chott Eldjerid Hypersaline lake in Tunisia, showed the highest activity on agar plate and was then selected. The biochemical and physiological characterization of the isolate along with the 16S rRNA sequence analysis placed it in the genus Halobacillus. Protease production was maximal at 120 g/L NaCl (2 M) and it started from the post-exponential phase reaching a maximum level at the early decline phase of bacterial growth. Protease activity was optimal at 0.4 M NaCl, pH 9 and 45 °C. It showed an excellent stability over wide ranges of temperatures (30-60 °C), NaCl concentrations (0-5 M), and pH values (5-10), which make it a good candidate for industrial applications at harsh conditions. Crude protease was strongly inhibited by PMSF revealing the dominance of serine proteases. Protease activity exhibited high stability in the presence of several organic solvents and detergent additives. These findings make Halobacillus sp. CJ4 protease with a great interest for many biotechnological applications at high salt or low water content such as peptide synthesis and detergent formulation.

  19. Dissimilatory arsenate and sulfate reduction in sediments of two hypersaline, arsenic-rich soda lakes: Mono and Searles Lakes, California.

    PubMed

    Kulp, T R; Hoeft, S E; Miller, L G; Saltikov, C; Murphy, J N; Han, S; Lanoil, B; Oremland, R S

    2006-10-01

    A radioisotope method was devised to study bacterial respiratory reduction of arsenate in sediments. The following two arsenic-rich soda lakes in California were chosen for comparison on the basis of their different salinities: Mono Lake (approximately 90 g/liter) and Searles Lake (approximately 340 g/liter). Profiles of arsenate reduction and sulfate reduction were constructed for both lakes. Reduction of [73As]arsenate occurred at all depth intervals in the cores from Mono Lake (rate constant [k] = 0.103 to 0.04 h(-1)) and Searles Lake (k = 0.012 to 0.002 h(-1)), and the highest activities occurred in the top sections of each core. In contrast, [35S]sulfate reduction was measurable in Mono Lake (k = 7.6 x10(4) to 3.2 x 10(-6) h(-1)) but not in Searles Lake. Sediment DNA was extracted, PCR amplified, and separated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to obtain phylogenetic markers (i.e., 16S rRNA genes) and a partial functional gene for dissimilatory arsenate reduction (arrA). The amplified arrA gene product showed a similar trend in both lakes; the signal was strongest in surface sediments and decreased to undetectable levels deeper in the sediments. More arrA gene signal was observed in Mono Lake and was detectable at a greater depth, despite the higher arsenate reduction activity observed in Searles Lake. A partial sequence (about 900 bp) was obtained for a clone (SLAS-3) that matched the dominant DGGE band found in deeper parts of the Searles Lake sample (below 3 cm), and this clone was found to be closely related to SLAS-1, a novel extremophilic arsenate respirer previously cultivated from Searles Lake.

  20. Dissimilatory arsenate and sulfate reduction in sediments of two hypersaline, arsenic-rich soda lakes: Mono and Searles Lakes, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulp, T.R.; Hoeft, S.E.; Miller, L.G.; Saltikov, C.; Murphy, J.N.; Han, S.; Lanoil, B.; Oremland, R.S.

    2006-01-01

    A radioisotope method was devised to study bacterial respiratory reduction of arsenate in sediments. The following two arsenic-rich soda lakes in California were chosen for comparison on the basis of their different salinities: Mono Lake (???90 g/liter) and Searles Lake (???340 g/liter). Profiles of arsenate reduction and sulfate reduction were constructed for both lakes. Reduction of [73As] arsenate occurred at all depth intervals in the cores from Mono Lake (rate constant [k] = 0.103 to 0.04 h-1) and Searles Lake (k = 0.012 to 0.002 h-1), and the highest activities occurred in the top sections of each core. In contrast, [35S] sulfate reduction was measurable in Mono Lake (k = 7.6 ?? 104 to 3.2 ?? 10-6 h-1) but not in Searles Lake. Sediment DNA was extracted, PCR amplified, and separated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to obtain phylogenetic markers (i.e., 16S rRNA genes) and a partial functional gene for dissimilatory arsenate reduction (arrA). The amplified arrA gene product showed a similar trend in both lakes; the signal was strongest in surface sediments and decreased to undetectable levels deeper in the sediments. More arrA gene signal was observed in Mono Lake and was detectable at a greater depth, despite the higher arsenate reduction activity observed in Searles Lake. A partial sequence (about 900 bp) was obtained for a clone (SLAS-3) that matched the dominant DGGE band found in deeper parts of the Searles Lake sample (below 3 cm), and this clone was found to be closely related to SLAS-1, a novel extremophilic arsenate respirer previously cultivated from Searles Lake. Copyright ?? 2006, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Predicting water quality by relating secchi-disk transparency and chlorophyll a measurements to Landsat satellite imagery for Michigan inland lakes, 2001-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, L.M.; Minnerick, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The State of Michigan has more than 11,000 inland lakes; approximately 3,500 of these lakes are greater than 25 acres. The USGS, in cooperation with the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ), has been monitoring the quality of inland lakes in Michigan through the Lake Water Quality Assessment monitoring program. Approximately 100 inland lakes will be sampled per year from 2001 to 2015. Volunteers coordinated by MDEQ started sampling lakes in 1974, and continue to sample to date approximately 250 inland lakes each year through the Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program (CLMP), Michigan’s volunteer lakes monitoring program. Despite this sampling effort, it is still impossible to physically collect the necessary water-quality measurements for all 3,500 Michigan inland lakes. Therefore, a technique was used by USGS, modeled after Olmanson and others (2001), in cooperation with MDEQ that uses satellite remote sensing to predict water quality in unsampled inland lakes greater than 25 acres. Water-quality characteristics that are associated with water clarity can be predicted for Michigan inland lakes by relating sampled measurements of secchi-disk transparency (SDT) and chlorophyll a concentrations (Chl-a), to satellite imagery. The trophic state index (TSI) which is an indicator of the biological productivity can be calculated based on SDT measurements, Chl-a concentrations, and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations measured near the lake’s surface. Through this process, unsampled inland lakes within the fourteen Landsat satellite scenes encompassing Michigan can be translated into estimated TSI from either predicted SDT or Chl-a (fig. 1).

  2. The influence of salinity on D/H fractionation in dinosterol and brassicasterol from globally distributed saline and hypersaline lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Daniel B.; Sachs, Julian P.

    2014-05-01

    Salinity, growth rate, growth stage, nutrient limitation and temperature have all been shown to influence the magnitude of D/H fractionation in algal lipids through laboratory and field studies. Of these factors, salinity has been studied most extensively in the field, but to date all such investigations have focused on transect studies within specific and isolated environments. Here we test the relationship between salinity and the magnitude of D/H fractionation in algal lipids through paired analyses of sedimentary and particulate lipid and water hydrogen isotope values at a wide range of continental and coastal lake sites spanning salinities from 0 to 117 ppt. Our results demonstrate broad consistency between D/H fractionations in dinosterol and brassicasterol with those obtained from previous work, with salinity changes of 1 ppt resulting in lipid δD changes of 0.7-1‰. Although our results also show variability in D/H fractionation between sites that is not related to salinity, the fact that any relationship emerges above the influences of other factors suggests that the salinity effect is dominant for some lipids in the majority of saline to hypersaline environments. This improved understanding of D/H fractionation in dinosterol and brassicasterol synthesis supports the use of these compounds as paleohydrologic indicators. When combined with D/H measurements from a second lipid or oxygen isotope measurements from carbonate, quantitative reconstructions of salinity and lake water isotope changes are possible. Extending the number of algal lipids within which a consistent relationship between D/H fractionation and salinity has been identified also supports the notion that the relationship is widespread among unicellular photoautotrophs.

  3. First survey of fungi in hypersaline soil and water of Mono Lake area (California).

    PubMed

    Steiman, Régine; Ford, Larry; Ducros, Véronique; Lafond, Jean-Luc; Guiraud, Pascale

    2004-01-01

    Mono Lake is a closed lake located in central California, east of the Sierra Nevada mountains. It contains dissolved carbonates, sulfates and chlorides at high concentrations. Due to its high salinity, Mono Lake was sometimes compared to the Dead Sea. However, it appears that Mono Lake water and vicinity abound with life. In this work, the fungal flora living in this extreme ecosystem was studied for the first time. Soil, tufa, water and sediment samples were also analyzed for their mineral and salt composition. Results showed that water was particularly rich in sodium, potassium, phosphorus and boron. Soil and sediments contained very high levels of calcium and magnesium, but also barium, boron and strontium. Sodium, phosphorus and iron levels varied in a large extent from one to another sample. Neutral to very alkaline pH were recorded. Water samples were found sterile in the conditions chosen for fungi isolation, while sediment, soil and tufa samples led to the isolation of a total of 67 fungal species (from 23 samples), belonging to various taxonomic groups. From our results no clear effects of the chemical parameters of the samples were observed on fungal life apart from the pH. The methods chosen did not allow the isolation of extremely halotolerant species. We isolated in this work a series of ubiquitous species, suggesting that a selection of resistant and/or adaptable strains of some common species could have occurred. Depending on the medium and the temperature of isolation, it can be hypothesized that some species were present as dormant structures, while some others, isolated at pH 8 on a medium enriched in Na and Ca, could be in a growing form adapted to alkaline and saline conditions. This work contributes to a better knowledge of the mycobiota present in the Mono Lake's ecosystem.

  4. Methylohalomonas lacus gen. nov., sp. nov. and Methylonatrum kenyense gen. nov., sp. nov., methylotrophic gammaproteobacteria from hypersaline lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Trotsenko, Yuri A; Doronina, Nina V; Tourova, Tatjana P; Galinski, Erwin A; Kolganova, Tatjana V; Muyzer, Gerard

    2007-12-01

    Aerobic enrichment at 4 M NaCl, pH 7.5, with methanol as carbon and energy source from sediments of hypersaline chloride-sulfate lakes in Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) resulted in the isolation of a moderately halophilic and obligately methylotrophic bacterium, strain HMT 1(T). The bacterium grew with methanol and methylamine within a pH range of 6.8-8.2 with an optimum at pH 7.5 and at NaCl concentrations of 0.5-4 M with an optimum at 2 M. In addition to methanol and methylamine, it can oxidize ethanol, formate, formaldehyde and dimethylamine. Carbon is assimilated via the serine pathway. The main compatible solute is glycine betaine. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis placed the isolate as a new lineage in the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae (Gammaproteobacteria). It is proposed, therefore, to accommodate this bacterium within a novel genus and species, Methylohalomonas lacus gen. nov., sp. nov., with HMT 1(T) (=DSM 15733(T) =NCCB 100208(T) =UNIQEM U237(T)) as the type strain. Two strains were obtained in pure culture from sediments of soda lake Magadi in Kenya and the Kulunda Steppe (Russia) on a mineral medium at pH 10 containing 0.6 M total Na(+) using methanol as a substrate. Strain AMT 1(T) was enriched with methanol, while strain AMT 3 originated from an enrichment culture with CO. The isolates are restricted facultative methylotrophs, capable of growth with methanol, formate and acetate as carbon and energy sources. With methanol, the strains grew within a broad salinity range from 0.3 to 3.5-4 M total Na(+), with an optimum at 0.5-1 M. The pH range for growth was between 8.3 and 10.5, with an optimum at pH 9.5, which characterized the soda lake isolates as obligate haloalkaliphiles. Carbon is assimilated autotrophically via the Calvin-Benson cycle. Sequence analysis of the gene coding for the key enzyme RuBisCO demonstrated that strain AMT 1(T) possessed a single cbbL gene of the 'green' form I, clustering with members of the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae

  5. Growth-dependent hydrogen isotopic fractionation of algal lipid biomarkers in hypersaline Isabel Lake (México)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Viana, Lidia; Kienel, Ulrike; Wilkes, Heinz; Sachse, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the potential of the hydrogen isotopic composition of algal lipid biomarkers as a proxy for past hydroclimatic variability in hypersaline Isabel Lake, Mexico (Eastern Pacific). We compared rainfall variability recorded in the region over the last 65 years with changes in δD values of the most abundant compounds preserved in the uppermost 16 cm of lake sediment. Changes in δD values of the 1,15-C32 diol (δDdiol), a specific biomarker of algal populations, were related to rainfall variability; specifically, n-alkyl diols were more deuterium-enriched (depleted) during wetter (drier) periods. Strikingly, neither the magnitude of lipid biomarker isotopic changes over interannual timescales (of up to 70-80‰) nor the direction of that variability can be explained by changes in δD values of the water source or salinity fluctuations (approximately 30 on the practical salinity scale) controlled by seasonal rainfall. However, changes in sedimentary biomarker composition, higher total organic carbon content and less negative δ13C values of the 1,15-C32 diol indicate enhanced algal growth during wetter periods. We find that these conditions result in less negative δD values of n-alkyl diols. We hypothesize that due to higher lipid demand during enhanced algal growth, an increasing proportion of hydrogen for lipid synthesis is derived from the cytosol via oxidation of polysaccharides, which may cause a deuterium enrichment of the acetogenic compounds. This study has significant implications for paleohydrological reconstructions using algal lipid δD values, particularly in highly seasonal environments such as Isabel Lake. In such environments, δD values of specific algal lipid biomarkers may not record the full seasonal cycle in source water δD but appear to be mainly controlled by the physiological state of algal populations. Our data provide the first evidence that changes in D/H fractionation due to algal growth conditions can be recorded

  6. An Equation of State for Hypersaline Water in Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, D.L.; Millero, F.J.; Jones, B.F.; Green, W.R.

    2011-01-01

    Great Salt Lake (GSL) is one of the largest and most saline lakes in the world. In order to accurately model limnological processes in GSL, hydrodynamic calculations require the precise estimation of water density (??) under a variety of environmental conditions. An equation of state was developed with water samples collected from GSL to estimate density as a function of salinity and water temperature. The ?? of water samples from the south arm of GSL was measured as a function of temperature ranging from 278 to 323 degrees Kelvin (oK) and conductivity salinities ranging from 23 to 182 g L-1 using an Anton Paar density meter. These results have been used to develop the following equation of state for GSL (?? = ?? 0.32 kg m-3): ?? - ??0 = 184.01062 + 1.04708 * S - 1.21061*T + 3.14721E - 4*S2 + 0.00199T2 where ??0 is the density of pure water in kg m-3, S is conductivity salinity g L-1, and T is water temperature in degrees Kelvin. ?? 2011 U.S. Government.

  7. 46 CFR 11.433 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons. 11.433 Section 11.433 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... steam or motor vessels of any gross tons. The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for an endorsement as master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons is: (a) One year...

  8. 46 CFR 11.446 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... inland steam or motor vessels of not more than 500 gross tons. 11.446 Section 11.446 Shipping COAST GUARD... steam or motor vessels of not more than 500 gross tons. The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for an endorsement as master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

  9. 46 CFR 11.446 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... inland steam or motor vessels of not more than 500 gross tons. 11.446 Section 11.446 Shipping COAST GUARD... steam or motor vessels of not more than 500 gross tons. The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for an endorsement as master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

  10. 46 CFR 11.433 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons. 11.433 Section 11.433 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... steam or motor vessels of any gross tons. The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for an endorsement as master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons is: (a) One year...

  11. 46 CFR 11.433 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons. 11.433 Section 11.433 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... steam or motor vessels of any gross tons. The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for an endorsement as master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons is: (a) One year...

  12. 46 CFR 11.446 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... inland steam or motor vessels of not more than 500 gross tons. 11.446 Section 11.446 Shipping COAST GUARD... steam or motor vessels of not more than 500 gross tons. The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for an endorsement as master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

  13. Denitrification in a hypersaline lake-aquifer system (Pétrola Basin, Central Spain): the role of recent organic matter and Cretaceous organic rich sediments.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Alday, J J; Carrey, R; Valiente, N; Otero, N; Soler, A; Ayora, C; Sanz, D; Muñoz-Martín, A; Castaño, S; Recio, C; Carnicero, A; Cortijo, A

    2014-11-01

    Agricultural regions in semi-arid to arid climates with associated saline wetlands are one of the most vulnerable environments to nitrate pollution. The Pétrola Basin was declared vulnerable to NO3(-) pollution by the Regional Government in 1998, and the hypersaline lake was classified as a heavily modified body of water. The study assessed groundwater NO3(-) through the use of multi-isotopic tracers (δ(15)N, δ(34)S, δ(13)C, δ(18)O) coupled to hydrochemistry in the aquifer connected to the eutrophic lake. Hydrogeologically, the basin shows two main flow components: regional groundwater flow from recharge areas (Zone 1) to the lake (Zone 2), and a density-driven flow from surface water to the underlying aquifer (Zone 3). In Zones 1 and 2, δ(15)NNO3 and δ(18)ONO3 suggest that NO3(-) from slightly volatilized ammonium synthetic fertilizers is only partially denitrified. The natural attenuation of NO3(-) can occur by heterotrophic reactions. However, autotrophic reactions cannot be ruled out. In Zone 3, the freshwater-saltwater interface (down to 12-16 m below the ground surface) is a reactive zone for NO3(-) attenuation. Tritium data suggest that the absence of NO3(-) in the deepest zones of the aquifer under the lake can be attributed to a regional groundwater flow with long residence time. In hypersaline lakes the geometry of the density-driven flow can play an important role in the transport of chemical species that can be related to denitrification processes.

  14. Quantity and quality of groundwater discharge in a hypersaline lake environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R.B.; Naftz, D.L.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Henderson, R.D.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Stolp, B.J.; Jewell, P.

    2014-01-01

    Geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted to understand groundwater discharge to Great Salt Lake (GSL) and assess the potential significance of groundwater discharge as a source of selenium (Se). Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) focusing below the sediment/water interface and fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) surveys were conducted along the south shore of GSL. FO-DTS surveys identified persistent cold-water temperature anomalies at 10 separate locations. Seepage measurements were conducted at 17 sites (mean seepage rate = 0.8 cm/day). High resistivity anomalies identified by the CRP survey were likely a mirabilite (Na2SO4·10H2O) salt layer acting as a semi-confining layer for the shallow groundwater below the south shore of the lake. Positive seepage rates measured along the near-shore areas of GSL indicate that a ∼1-m thick oolitic sand overlying the mirabilite layer is likely acting as a shallow, unconfined aquifer. Using the average seepage rate of 0.8 cm/day over an area of 1.6 km2, an annual Se mass loading to GSL of 23.5 kg was estimated. Determination of R/Ra values (calculated 3He/4He ratio over the present-day atmospheric 3He/4He ratio) 34S and δ18O isotopic values in samples of dissolved sulfate from the shallow groundwater below the mirabilite are almost identical to the isotopic signature of the mirabilite core material. The saturation index calculated for groundwater samples using PHREEQC indicates the water is at equilibrium with mirabilite. Water samples collected from GSL immediately off shore contained Se concentrations that were 3–4 times higher than other sampling sites >25 km offshore from the study site and may be originating from less saline groundwater seeps mixing with the more saline water from GSL. Additional evidence for mixing with near shore seeps is found in the δD and δ18O isotopic values and Br:Cl ratios. Geochemical modeling for a water sample collected in the vicinity of the study area

  15. Abundance, Distribution, and Activity of Fe(II)-Oxidizing and Fe(III)-Reducing Microorganisms in Hypersaline Sediments of Lake Kasin, Southern Russia

    PubMed Central

    Emmerich, Maren; Bhansali, Ankita; Lösekann-Behrens, Tina; Schröder, Christian; Kappler, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The extreme osmotic conditions prevailing in hypersaline environments result in decreasing metabolic diversity with increasing salinity. Various microbial metabolisms have been shown to occur even at high salinity, including photosynthesis as well as sulfate and nitrate reduction. However, information about anaerobic microbial iron metabolism in hypersaline environments is scarce. We studied the phylogenetic diversity, distribution, and metabolic activity of iron(II)-oxidizing and iron(III)-reducing Bacteria and Archaea in pH-neutral, iron-rich salt lake sediments (Lake Kasin, southern Russia; salinity, 348.6 g liter−1) using a combination of culture-dependent and -independent techniques. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries for Bacteria and Archaea revealed a microbial community composition typical for hypersaline sediments. Most-probable-number counts confirmed the presence of 4.26 × 102 to 8.32 × 103 iron(II)-oxidizing Bacteria and 4.16 × 102 to 2.13 × 103 iron(III)-reducing microorganisms per gram dry sediment. Microbial iron(III) reduction was detected in the presence of 5 M NaCl, extending the natural habitat boundaries for this important microbial process. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that 16S rRNA gene copy numbers of total Bacteria, total Archaea, and species dominating the iron(III)-reducing enrichment cultures (relatives of Halobaculum gomorrense, Desulfosporosinus lacus, and members of the Bacilli) were highest in an iron oxide-rich sediment layer. Combined with the presented geochemical and mineralogical data, our findings suggest the presence of an active microbial iron cycle at salt concentrations close to the solubility limit of NaCl. PMID:22504804

  16. Quantity and quality of groundwater discharge in a hypersaline lake environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. B.; Naftz, D. L.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Henderson, R. D.; Rosenberry, D. O.; Stolp, B. J.; Jewell, P.

    2014-05-01

    Geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted to understand groundwater discharge to Great Salt Lake (GSL) and assess the potential significance of groundwater discharge as a source of selenium (Se). Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) focusing below the sediment/water interface and fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) surveys were conducted along the south shore of GSL. FO-DTS surveys identified persistent cold-water temperature anomalies at 10 separate locations. Seepage measurements were conducted at 17 sites (mean seepage rate = 0.8 cm/day). High resistivity anomalies identified by the CRP survey were likely a mirabilite (Na2SO4·10H2O) salt layer acting as a semi-confining layer for the shallow groundwater below the south shore of the lake. Positive seepage rates measured along the near-shore areas of GSL indicate that a ∼1-m thick oolitic sand overlying the mirabilite layer is likely acting as a shallow, unconfined aquifer. Using the average seepage rate of 0.8 cm/day over an area of 1.6 km2, an annual Se mass loading to GSL of 23.5 kg was estimated. Determination of R/Ra values (calculated 3He/4He ratio over the present-day atmospheric 3He/4He ratio) <1 and tritium activities of 1.2-2.0 tritium units in groundwater within and below the mirabilite layer indicates a convergence of regional and local groundwater flow paths discharging into GSL. Groundwater within and below the mirabilite layer obtains its high sulfate salinity from the dissolution of mirabilite. The δ34S and δ18O isotopic values in samples of dissolved sulfate from the shallow groundwater below the mirabilite are almost identical to the isotopic signature of the mirabilite core material. The saturation index calculated for groundwater samples using PHREEQC indicates the water is at equilibrium with mirabilite. Water samples collected from GSL immediately off shore contained Se concentrations that were 3-4 times higher than other sampling sites >25 km offshore from

  17. A new method of quantifying discharge of small rivers into lakes and inland seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osadchiev, Alexander; Zavialov, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Continental discharge is an important component of the global hydrological cycle, providing the majority of the input part of the ocean water balance. Buoyant inflow usually causes surface density stratification at the large shelf areas, and plays a significant role in physical, chemical, and biological processes there that is especially important for the lakes and inland seas. Although there is a lack of discharge data for most of rivers in a global scale. Regular direct measurements of discharge are performed only for a relatively small number of rivers, generally the biggest ones or ones that flow through densely populated areas. Within this problem an indirect method of assuming a volume of river discharge was developed. The general idea of the method is the following. Firstly, the spatial surface spread of the plume generated by the considered river discharge is identified using high resolution satellite imagery of the coastal zone adjacent to the river estuary. Secondly, a series of numerical simulations of the river runoff spread is performed under various prescribed external forcing conditions which include the discharge rate. Varying forcing conditions we iteratively improve the accordance between simulated and observed river plumes therefore consequentially specifying the value of river discharge. The developed method was applied and validated against in situ date for several rivers feeding the Black Sea. Practical importance of this work consists in the fact, that the suggested method is an alternative for the expensive and laborious direct measurements of the river discharge, which are used nowadays.

  18. Historical and anthropogenic factors affecting the population genetic structure of Ontario's inland lake populations of Walleye (Sander vitreus).

    PubMed

    Walter, Ryan P; Cena, Christopher J; Morgan, George E; Heath, Daniel D

    2012-01-01

    Populations existing in formerly glaciated areas often display composite historical and contemporary patterns of genetic structure. For Canadian freshwater fishes, population genetic structure is largely reflective of dispersal from glacial refugia and isolation within drainage basins across a range of scales. Enhancement of sport fisheries via hatchery stocking programs and other means has the potential to alter signatures of natural evolutionary processes. Using 11 microsatellite loci genotyped from 2182 individuals, we analyzed the genetic structure of 46 inland lake walleye (Sander vitreus) populations spanning five major drainage basins within the province of Ontario, Canada. Population genetic analyses coupled with genotype assignment allowed us to: 1) characterize broad- and fine-scale genetic structure among Ontario walleye populations; and 2) determine if the observed population divergence is primarily due to natural or historical processes, or recent anthropogenic events. The partitioning of genetic variation revealed higher genetic divergence among lakes than among drainage basins or proposed ancestries-indicative of relatively high isolation among lakes, study-wide. Walleye genotypes were clustered into three major groups, likely reflective of Missourian, Mississippian, and Atlantic glacial refugial ancestry. Despite detectable genetic signatures indicative of anthropogenic influences, province-wide spatial genetic structure remains consistent with the hypothesis of dispersal from distinct glacial refugia and subsequent isolation of lakes within primary drainage basins. Our results provide a novel example of minimal impacts from fishery enhancement to the broad-scale genetic structure of inland fish populations.

  19. Halobellus rarus sp. nov., a halophilic archaeon from an inland salt lake of China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Jiao; Han, Dong; Qiu, Xing-Xing; Zhao, Mei-Lin; Mou, Yun-Zhuang; Cui, Heng-Lin; Li, Zheng-Rong

    2013-09-01

    Two halophilic archaeal strains, YC21(T) and YC77, were isolated from an inland salt lake of China. Both have pleomorphic rod-shaped cells that lyse in distilled water, stain Gram-negative and form red-pigmented colonies. They are neutrophilic, require at least 2.1 M NaCl for growth under the optimum growth temperature of 37 °C. The major polar lipids of the two strains were phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester (PGP-Me), phosphatidylglycerol sulfate (PGS), two major glycolipids (GL1 and GL2) chromatographically identical to sulfated mannosyl glucosyl diether (S-DGD-1) and mannosyl glucosyl diether (DGD-1), respectively. Trace amounts of two unidentified lipids (GL0-1 and GL0-2) were also detected. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the two strains are 99.9 % identical, show 94.0-98.9 % similarity to the closest relative members of Halobellus of the family Halobacteriaceae. The rpoB' gene similarity between strains YC21(T) and YC77 is 99.8 % and show 90.3-95.3 % similarity to the closest relative members of Halobellus. The DNA G+C content of strains YC21(T) and YC77 were 66.1 and 66.2 mol%, respectively. The DNA-DNA hybridization value between strain YC20(T) and strain YC77 was 89 %, and the two strains showed low DNA-DNA relatedness with Halobellus limi TBN53(T), the most related member of Halobellus. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties suggest that strains YC21(T) and YC77 represent a novel species of the genus Halobellus, for which the name Halobellus rarus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YC21(T) (=CGMCC 1.12121(T) = JCM 18362(T)).

  20. 46 CFR 11.442 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and... ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.442 Service requirements for master of Great... to qualify an applicant for an endorsement as master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor...

  1. State and regional water-quality characteristics and trophic conditions of Michigan's inland lakes, 2001-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, L.M.; Minnerick, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality are jointly monitoring selected water-quality constituents of inland lakes through 2015 as part of Michigan’s Lake Water Quality Assessment program. During 2001–2005, 433 lake basins from 364 inland lakes were monitored for baseline water-quality conditions and trophic status. This report summarizes the water-quality characteristics and trophic conditions of those monitored lake basins throughout the State. Regional variation of water quality in lake basins was examined by grouping on the basis of the five Omernik level III ecoregions within Michigan. Concentrations of most constituents measured were significantly different between ecoregions. Less regional variation of phosphorus concentrations was noted between Northern Lakes and Forests (50) and North Central Hardwoods (51) ecoregions during summer possibly because water samples were collected when lake productivity was high; hence the utilization of the limited amount of phosphorus by algae and macrophytes may have resulted in the more uniform concentrations between these two ecoregions. Concentrations of common ions (calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chloride, and sulfate) measured in the spring typically were higher in the Michigan southern Lower Peninsula in the Eastern Corn Belt Plains (55), Southern Michigan/Northern Indiana Drift Plains (56), and Huron/Erie Lake Plains (57) ecoregions. Most ions whose concentrations were less than the minimum reporting levels or were nondetectable were from lakes in the Michigan northern Lower Peninsula and the Upper Peninsula in the Northern Lakes and Forests (50) and North Central Hardwoods (51) ecoregions. Chlorophyll a concentrations followed a similar distribution pattern. Measured properties such as pH and specific conductance (indicative of dissolved solids) also showed a regional relation. The lakes with the lowest pH and specific conductance were generally in the western

  2. Evaluation of chlorophyll-a retrieval algorithms based on MERIS bands for optically varying eutrophic inland lakes.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Heng; Li, Xiaojun; Wang, Yannan; Jin, Qi; Cao, Kai; Wang, Qiao; Li, Yunmei

    2015-10-15

    Fourteen field campaigns were conducted in five inland lakes during different seasons between 2006 and 2013, and a total of 398 water samples with varying optical characteristics were collected. The characteristics were analyzed based on remote sensing reflectance, and an automatic cluster two-step method was applied for water classification. The inland waters could be clustered into three types, which we labeled water types I, II and III. From water types I to III, the effect of the phytoplankton on the optical characteristics gradually decreased. Four chlorophyll-a retrieval algorithms for Case II water, a two-band, three-band, four-band and SCI (Synthetic Chlorophyll Index) algorithm were evaluated for three water types based on the MERIS bands. Different MERIS bands were used for the three water types in each of the four algorithms. The four algorithms had different levels of retrieval accuracy for each water type, and no single algorithm could be successfully applied to all water types. For water types I and III, the three-band algorithm performed the best, while the four-band algorithm had the highest retrieval accuracy for water type II. However, the three-band algorithm is preferable to the two-band algorithm for turbid eutrophic inland waters. The SCI algorithm is recommended for highly turbid water with a higher concentration of total suspended solids. Our research indicates that the chlorophyll-a concentration retrieval by remote sensing for optically contrasted inland water requires a specific algorithm that is based on the optical characteristics of inland water bodies to obtain higher estimation accuracy.

  3. Trends and stability of inland fishery resources in Japanese lakes: introduction of exotic piscivores as a driver.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Shin-ichiro S; Kadoya, Taku

    2015-07-01

    Although many studies have focused on marine resources, few studies have considered the resources of inland fisheries. Inland fishery resources are typically either monitored on the basis of catch data alone or are not assessed quantitatively at all, despite their social, economic, and ecological importance. Because freshwater ecosystems have been severely degraded by human activities, evaluating the trends and current status of fishery resources and assessing their drivers are urgent tasks. We compiled long-term data on the annual catch, fishing effort, and fishing power of 23 Japanese lakes, using two sets of government statistics that date back to the 1950s, which were previously neglected because of the large number of missing values. Using Bayesian state-space models, we examined the trajectories of the catch per unit effort (CPUE) of entire communities, considering changes in fishing effort and fishing power, and quantified both changes in the CPUE over the 10-, 20-, and 30-year periods preceding 2008 and the temporal detrended stability of the CPUE over the three periods. We also investigated the relationships among the CPUE changes and stability, anthropogenic drivers, and lake morphometric characteristics. The CPUE declined in 17, 19, and 15 of the 23 lakes over the past 10-, 20-, and 30-year periods, respectively. Our macroecological analyses demonstrate that the functional group richness of exotic piscivores was the most important predictor of changes in the CPUE among the drivers we considered. The stability of the CPUE was positively related to lake area; larger lakes have more stable CPUE. The functional group richness of exotic piscivores also negatively affected the stability of the CPUE. The effect of overfishing was considered to be small because both fishing effort and power declined in almost all of the lakes. Thus, our findings suggest that increasing exotic piscivore species may diminish the resources and their stability, particularly in

  4. Predictive models for Escherichia coli concentrations at inland lake beaches and relationship of model variables to pathogen detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, Donna S.; Stelzer, Erin A.; Duris, Joseph W.; Brady, Amie M.G.; Harrison, John H.; Johnson, Heather E.; Ware, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Predictive models, based on environmental and water quality variables, have been used to improve the timeliness and accuracy of recreational water quality assessments, but their effectiveness has not been studied in inland waters. Sampling at eight inland recreational lakes in Ohio was done in order to investigate using predictive models for Escherichia coli and to understand the links between E. coli concentrations, predictive variables, and pathogens. Based upon results from 21 beach sites, models were developed for 13 sites, and the most predictive variables were rainfall, wind direction and speed, turbidity, and water temperature. Models were not developed at sites where the E. coli standard was seldom exceeded. Models were validated at nine sites during an independent year. At three sites, the model resulted in increased correct responses, sensitivities, and specificities compared to use of the previous day's E. coli concentration (the current method). Drought conditions during the validation year precluded being able to adequately assess model performance at most of the other sites. Cryptosporidium, adenovirus, eaeA (E. coli), ipaH (Shigella), and spvC (Salmonella) were found in at least 20% of samples collected for pathogens at five sites. The presence or absence of the three bacterial genes was related to some of the model variables but was not consistently related to E. coli concentrations. Predictive models were not effective at all inland lake sites; however, their use at two lakes with high swimmer densities will provide better estimates of public health risk than current methods and will be a valuable resource for beach managers and the public.

  5. Predictive Models for Escherichia coli Concentrations at Inland Lake Beaches and Relationship of Model Variables to Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Stelzer, Erin A.; Duris, Joseph W.; Brady, Amie M. G.; Harrison, John H.; Johnson, Heather E.; Ware, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Predictive models, based on environmental and water quality variables, have been used to improve the timeliness and accuracy of recreational water quality assessments, but their effectiveness has not been studied in inland waters. Sampling at eight inland recreational lakes in Ohio was done in order to investigate using predictive models for Escherichia coli and to understand the links between E. coli concentrations, predictive variables, and pathogens. Based upon results from 21 beach sites, models were developed for 13 sites, and the most predictive variables were rainfall, wind direction and speed, turbidity, and water temperature. Models were not developed at sites where the E. coli standard was seldom exceeded. Models were validated at nine sites during an independent year. At three sites, the model resulted in increased correct responses, sensitivities, and specificities compared to use of the previous day's E. coli concentration (the current method). Drought conditions during the validation year precluded being able to adequately assess model performance at most of the other sites. Cryptosporidium, adenovirus, eaeA (E. coli), ipaH (Shigella), and spvC (Salmonella) were found in at least 20% of samples collected for pathogens at five sites. The presence or absence of the three bacterial genes was related to some of the model variables but was not consistently related to E. coli concentrations. Predictive models were not effective at all inland lake sites; however, their use at two lakes with high swimmer densities will provide better estimates of public health risk than current methods and will be a valuable resource for beach managers and the public. PMID:23291550

  6. Predicting water quality by relating secchi-disk transparency and chlorophyll a measurements to satellite imagery for Michigan Inland Lakes, August 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, L.M.; Aichele, S.S.; Minnerick, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Inland lakes are an important economic and environmental resource for Michigan. The U.S. Geological Survey and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality have been cooperatively monitoring the quality of selected lakes in Michigan through the Lake Water Quality Assessment program. Through this program, approximately 730 of Michigan's 11,000 inland lakes will be monitored once during this 15-year study. Targeted lakes will be sampled during spring turnover and again in late summer to characterize water quality. Because more extensive and more frequent sampling is not economically feasible in the Lake Water Quality Assessment program, the U.S. Geological Survey and Michigan Department of Environmental Quality investigate the use of satellite imagery as a means of estimating water quality in unsampled lakes. Satellite imagery has been successfully used in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and elsewhere to compute the trophic state of inland lakes from predicted secchi-disk measurements. Previous attempts of this kind in Michigan resulted in a poorer fit between observed and predicted data than was found for Minnesota or Wisconsin. This study tested whether estimates could be improved by using atmospherically corrected satellite imagery, whether a more appropriate regression model could be obtained for Michigan, and whether chlorophyll a concentrations could be reliably predicted from satellite imagery in order to compute trophic state of inland lakes. Although the atmospheric-correction did not significantly improve estimates of lake-water quality, a new regression equation was identified that consistently yielded better results than an equation obtained from the literature. A stepwise regression was used to determine an equation that accurately predicts chlorophyll a concentrations in northern Lower Michigan.

  7. Potential effects of climate change on inland glacial lakes and implications for lake-dependent biota in Wisconsin: final report April 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, Michael W.; Walker, John F.; Kenow, Kevin P.; Rasmussen, Paul W.; Garrison, Paul J.; Hanson, Paul C.; Hunt, Randall J.

    2013-01-01

    F statewide, and an increase in precipitation of 1”–2”. However, summer precipitation in the northern part of the state is expected to be less and winter precipitation will be greater. By the end of the 21st century, the magnitude of changes in temperature and precipitation are expected to intensify. Such climatic changes have altered, and would further alter hydrological, chemical, and physical properties of inland lakes. Lake-dependent wildlife sensitive to changes in water quality, are particularly susceptible to lake quality-associated habitat changes and are likely to suffer restrictions to current breeding distributions under some climate change scenarios. We have selected the common loon (Gavia immer) to serve as a sentinel lake-dependent piscivorous species to be used in the development of a template for linking primary lake-dependent biota endpoints (e.g., decline in productivity and/or breeding range contraction) to important lake quality indicators. In the current project, we evaluate how changes in freshwater habitat quality (specifically lake clarity) may impact common loon lake occupancy in Wisconsin under detailed climate-change scenarios. In addition, we employ simple land-use/land cover and habitat scenarios to illustrate the potential interaction of climate and land-use/land cover effects. The methods employed here provide a template for studies where integration of physical and biotic models is used to project future conditions under various climate and land use change scenarios. Findings presented here project the future conditions of lakes and loons within an important watershed in northern Wisconsin – of importance to water resource managers and state citizens alike.

  8. Identification of sources and seasonal variability of organic matter in Lake Sihwa and surrounding inland creeks, South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeonjung; Hong, Seongjin; Kim, Min-Seob; Kim, Dahae; Choi, Bo-Hyung; Hur, Jin; Khim, Jong Seong; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2017-06-01

    Coastal areas are subjected to significant allochthonous organic matter deposits from surrounding areas; however, limited information is available on the source and delivery of this organic matter. In this study, to assess seasonal changes in the sources of organic matter in Lake Sihwa (Korea), biodegradability, fluorescence property, and stable isotopic compositions (carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur) of the organic matter were determined. Water samples were collected from the inner lake (n = 9) and inland creeks (n = 10) in five separate events, from November 2012 to October 2013. Organic matter originating from rural, urban, and industrial areas was examined as the potential sources. The organic matter contents and biodegradability in the industrial area were the highest, whereas low concentrations and poor biodegradability of organic matter were found in the rural area, and moderate properties were observed in the urban area. In Lake Sihwa, a large concentration of total organic matter and enhanced biodegradability were observed during March and August. However, main source of organic matter differed between the sampling events. The largest contribution of organic matter, deriving from marine phytoplankton, was found in March. On the other hand, in August, the organic matter originating from the industrial area, which is characterized by high levels of heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants, was significantly increased. Our results could be useful to enhance the management of water bodies aimed at reducing the organic matter concentrations and improving the water quality of Lake Sihwa, and even that of the Yellow Sea.

  9. Ecosystem Alterations and Species Range Shifts: An Atlantic-Mediterranean Cephalaspidean Gastropod in an Inland Egyptian Lake

    PubMed Central

    Malaquias, Manuel António E.

    2016-01-01

    The eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean marine Cephalaspidea gastropod Haminoea orbignyana was collected from Lake Qarun (Fayoum, Egypt), a landlocked lake that has undergone a shift from freshwater to estuarine conditions in the past 100 years. Species identity was confirmed by both morphological (anatomical dissection and scanning electron microscopy) and molecular methods (COI gene phylogeny). Observations suggested a robust population of H. orbignyana in the lake with a density of ca. 64 individuals/m2 and ca. 105 egg masses/m2 during surveys conducted in the summer of 2013. The vast majority of snails and egg masses were found under rocks. Observations of egg masses in the lab showed a gradual change from whitish to yellow-green as the eggs matured and the release of veliger larvae alone after about a week. Although adult cephalaspideans readily consumed filamentous red and green algae, and cyanobacteria, laboratory trials showed that they consumed significantly more of the red alga Ceramium sp., than of the green alga Cladophora glomerata, with consumption of Oscillatoria margaritifera being similar to those on the two algae. When grown on these resources for 16 days, H. orbignyana maintained their mass on the rhodophyte and cyanobacterium, but not in starvation controls. No cephalaspideans grew over the course of this experiment. Lake Qarun has been periodically restocked with Mediterranean fishes and prawns since the 1920s to maintain local fisheries, which represents a possible route of colonization for H. orbignyana. Yet, based on literature records, it seems more likely that invasion of the lake by this gastropod species has occurred only within the last 20 years. As human activities redistribute species through direct and indirect means, the structure of the community of this inland lake has become unpredictable and the long-term effects of these recent introductions are unknown. PMID:27248835

  10. Is China's fifth-largest inland lake to dry-up? Incorporated hydrological and satellite-based methods for forecasting Hulun lake water levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zuansi; Jin, Taoyong; Li, Changyou; Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Zhang, Sheng; Ding, Aizhong; Li, Jiancheng

    2016-08-01

    Hulun Lake, China's fifth-largest inland lake, experienced severe declines in water level in the period of 2000-2010. This has prompted concerns whether the lake is drying up gradually. A multi-million US dollar engineering project to construct a water channel to transfer part of the river flow from a nearby river to maintain the water level was completed in August 2010. This study aimed to advance the understanding of the key processes controlling the lake water level variation over the last five decades, as well as investigate the impact of the river transfer engineering project on the water level. A water balance model was developed to investigate the lake water level variations over the last five decades, using hydrological and climatic data as well as satellite-based measurements and results from land surface modelling. The investigation reveals that the severe reduction of river discharge (-364 ± 64 mm/yr, ∼70% of the five-decade average) into the lake was the key factor behind the decline of the lake water level between 2000 and 2010. The decline of river discharge was due to the reduction of total runoff from the lake watershed. This was a result of the reduction of soil moisture due to the decrease of precipitation (-49 ± 45 mm/yr) over this period. The water budget calculation suggests that the groundwater component from the surrounding lake area as well as surface run off from the un-gauged area surrounding the lake contributed ∼ net 210 Mm3/yr (equivalent to ∼ 100 mm/yr) water inflows into the lake. The results also show that the water diversion project did prevent a further water level decline of over 0.5 m by the end of 2012. Overall, the monthly water balance model gave an excellent prediction of the lake water level fluctuation over the last five decades and can be a useful tool to manage lake water resources in the future.

  11. The LANDSAT-1 multispectral scanner as a tool in the classification of inland lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boland, D. H. P.; Blackwell, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Relationships between LANDSAT-1 multispectral scanner (MSS) data and the trophic status of a group of lakes in the north-northeastern part of the United States were studied by predicting the magnitudes of two trophic state indicators, estimating lake position on a multivariate trophic scale, and automatically classifying lakes according to their trophic state. Initially, the principal component ordination was employed with 100 lakes. MSS data for some 20 lakes was then extracted from computer-compatible tapes (CCT) using a binary marking technique. The output was in the form of descriptive statistics and photographic concatenations. Color ratios were incorporated into regression models for the prediction of Secchi disc transparency, chlorophyll a, and lake position on the tropic scale. Results indicate that the LANDSAT-1 system, although handicapped by low spectral and spatial resolutions as well as excessive cloud cover, can be used as a supplemental data source in lake survey programs.

  12. 46 CFR 11.448 - Service requirements for mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... steam or motor vessels of not more than 500 gross tons. 11.448 Section 11.448 Shipping COAST GUARD... steam or motor vessels of not more than 500 gross tons. The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for an endorsement as mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

  13. 46 CFR 11.448 - Service requirements for mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... steam or motor vessels of not more than 500 gross tons. 11.448 Section 11.448 Shipping COAST GUARD... steam or motor vessels of not more than 500 gross tons. The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for an endorsement as mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

  14. 46 CFR 11.448 - Service requirements for mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... steam or motor vessels of not more than 500 gross tons. 11.448 Section 11.448 Shipping COAST GUARD... steam or motor vessels of not more than 500 gross tons. The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for an endorsement as mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

  15. 46 CFR 11.448 - Service requirements for mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... steam or motor vessels of not more than 500 gross tons. 11.448 Section 11.448 Shipping COAST GUARD... steam or motor vessels of not more than 500 gross tons. The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for an endorsement as mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

  16. Utilization of ERTS-1 data to monitor and classify eutrophication of inland lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, R. H.; Smith, V. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Significant findings are: (1) one-acre lakes and one-acre islands are detectable; (2)removal of atmospheric parameters derived from RPMI measurements show test lakes to have reflectances of 3.1 to 5.5% in band 4 and 0.3 to 2.3% in band 5; (3) failure to remove reflectance caused by atmosphere results in errors up to 500% in computing lake reflectance from ERTS-1 data; (4) in band 4, up to seven reflectance levels were observed in test lakes; (5) reflectance patterns have been displayed on a color-coded TV monitor and on computer-generated gray scales; (6) deep and shallow water can be separated by a trained photointerpreter and automatic machine processing, with estimates of water depth possible in some cases; (7) RPMI provides direct spectral signature measurements of lakes and lake features such as algal scums and floating plants; (8) a method is reported for obtaining lake color, as estimated by Forel-Ule standards, from ERTS-1 data; (9) a strong correlation between browner water color, diminishing water transparency; and (10) classifying lake eutrophication by observation of surface scums or macrophytes in shallow water seems straightforward.

  17. Utilization of ERTS-1 data to monitor and classify eutrophication of inland lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, P. E.; Smith, V. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Significant findings are: (1) one acre lakes and one acre islands are detectable; (2) circular lakes of 7.5 acres and greater reach full density; (3) long channels 100 ft wide are detectable; (4) orientation of lakes is independent of scan direction; (5) lake features are observable in enlargements of CCT imagery produced in the Bendix Earth Resources Data Center; and (6) a decision surface water outline map is presented that was produced from ERTS-1 CCT. A water color literature review, baseline water quality data of the test lakes, and a discussion of geometric corrections of the CCT decision water surface outline map are also presented.

  18. Controls on the pH of hyper-saline lakes - A lesson from the Dead Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golan, Rotem; Gavrieli, Ittai; Ganor, Jiwchar; Lazar, Boaz

    2016-01-01

    The pH of aqueous environments is determined by the dominant buffer systems of the water, defined operationally as total alkalinity (TA). The major buffer systems in the modern ocean are carbonic and boric acids of which the species bicarbonate, carbonate and borate make up about 77%, 19% and 4% of the TA, respectively. During the course of seawater evaporation (e.g. lagoons) the residual brine loses considerable portion of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and carbonate alkalinity (CA) already at the early stages of evaporation. DIC and CA decrease due to massive precipitation of CaCO3, while total boron (TB) increases conservatively, turning borate to the dominant alkalinity species in marine derived brines. In the present work we assess the apparent dissociation constant value of boric acid (KB‧) in saline and hypersaline waters, using the Dead Sea (DS) as a case study. We explain the DS low pH (∼6.3) and the effect of the boric and carbonic acid pK‧-s on the behavior of the brine's buffer system, including the pH increase that results from brine dilution.

  19. EVALUATING PERTUBATIONS AND DEVELOPING RESTORATION STRATEGIES FOR INLAND WETLANDS IN THE GREAT LAKES BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetland coverage and type distributions vary systematically by ecoregion across the Great Lakes Basin. Land use and subsequent changes in wetland type distributions also vary among ecoregions. Incidence of wetland disturbance varies significantly within ecoregions but tends to i...

  20. Total- and methyl-mercury concentrations and methylation rates across the freshwater to hypersaline continuum of the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, William P.; Swanson, Neil; Black, Brooks; Rudd, Abigail; Carling, Gregory; Fernandez, Diego P.; Luft, John; Van Leeuwen, Jim; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    We examined mercury (Hg) speciation in water and sediment of the Great Salt Lake and surrounding wetlands, a locale spanning fresh to hypersaline and oxic to anoxic conditions, in order to test the hypothesis that spatial and temporal variations in Hg concentration and methylation rates correspond to observed spatial and temporal trends in Hg burdens previously reported in biota. Water column, sediment, and pore water concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg) and total mercury (THg), as well as related aquatic chemical parameters were examined. Inorganic Hg(II)-methylation rates were determined in selected water column and sediment subsamples spiked with inorganic divalent mercury (204Hg(II)). Net production of Me204Hg was expressed as apparent first-order rate constants for methylation (kmeth), which were also expanded to MeHg production potential (MPP) rates via combination with tin reducible ‘reactive’ Hg(II) (Hg(II)R) as a proxy for bioavailable Hg(II). Notable findings include: 1) elevated Hg concentrations previously reported in birds and brine flies were spatially proximal to the measured highest MeHg concentrations, the latter occurring in the anoxic deep brine layer (DBL) of the Great Salt Lake; 2) timing of reduced Hg(II)-methylation rates in the DBL (according to both kmeth and MPP) coincides with reduced Hg burdens among aquatic invertebrates (brine shrimp and brine flies) that act as potential vectors of Hg propagation to the terrestrial ecosystem; 3) values ofkmeth were found to fall within the range reported by other studies; and 4) MPP rates were on the lower end of the range reported in methodologically comparable studies, suggesting the possibility that elevated MeHg in the anoxic deep brine layer results from its accumulation and persistence in this quasi-isolated environment, due to the absence of light (restricting abiotic photo demethylation) and/or minimal microbiological demethylation.

  1. Total- and methyl-mercury concentrations and methylation rates across the freshwater to hypersaline continuum of the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA.

    PubMed

    Johnson, William P; Swanson, Neil; Black, Brooks; Rudd, Abigail; Carling, Greg; Fernandez, Diego P; Luft, John; Van Leeuwen, Jim; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark

    2015-04-01

    We examined mercury (Hg) speciation in water and sediment of the Great Salt Lake and surrounding wetlands, a locale spanning fresh to hypersaline and oxic to anoxic conditions, in order to test the hypothesis that spatial and temporal variations in Hg concentration and methylation rates correspond to observed spatial and temporal trends in Hg burdens previously reported in biota. Water column, sediment, and pore water concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg) and total mercury (THg), as well as related aquatic chemical parameters were examined. Inorganic Hg(II)-methylation rates were determined in selected water column and sediment subsamples spiked with inorganic divalent mercury (204Hg(II)). Net production of Me204Hg was expressed as apparent first-order rate constants for methylation (kmeth), which were also expanded to MeHg production potential (MPP) rates via combination with tin reducible 'reactive' Hg(II) (Hg(II)R) as a proxy for bioavailable Hg(II). Notable findings include: 1) elevated Hg concentrations previously reported in birds and brine flies were spatially proximal to the measured highest MeHg concentrations, the latter occurring in the anoxic deep brine layer (DBL) of the Great Salt Lake; 2) timing of reduced Hg(II)-methylation rates in the DBL (according to both kmeth and MPP) coincides with reduced Hg burdens among aquatic invertebrates (brine shrimp and brine flies) that act as potential vectors of Hg propagation to the terrestrial ecosystem; 3) values of kmeth were found to fall within the range reported by other studies; and 4) MPP rates were on the lower end of the range reported in methodologically comparable studies, suggesting the possibility that elevated MeHg in the anoxic deep brine layer results from its accumulation and persistence in this quasi-isolated environment, due to the absence of light (restricting abiotic photo demethylation) and/or minimal microbiological demethylation.

  2. Automatic classification of eutrophication of inland lakes from spacecraft data. [Oakland County, Michigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, R. H. (Principal Investigator); Reed, L. E.; Shah, N. J.; Smith, V. E.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Spacecraft data and computer techniques can be used to rapidly map and store onto digital tapes watershed land use information. Software is now available by which this land use information can be rapidly and economically extracted from the tapes and related to coliform counts and other lake contaminants (e.g. phosphorus). These tools are basic elements for determining those land use factors and sources of nutrients that accelerate eutrophication in lakes and reservoirs.

  3. Archaeal and bacterial communities respond differently to environmental gradients in anoxic sediments of a California hypersaline lake, the Salton Sea.

    PubMed

    Swan, Brandon K; Ehrhardt, Christopher J; Reifel, Kristen M; Moreno, Lilliana I; Valentine, David L

    2010-02-01

    Sulfidic, anoxic sediments of the moderately hypersaline Salton Sea contain gradients in salinity and carbon that potentially structure the sedimentary microbial community. We investigated the abundance, community structure, and diversity of Bacteria and Archaea along these gradients to further distinguish the ecologies of these domains outside their established physiological range. Quantitative PCR was used to enumerate 16S rRNA gene abundances of Bacteria, Archaea, and Crenarchaeota. Community structure and diversity were evaluated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), quantitative analysis of gene (16S rRNA) frequencies of dominant microorganisms, and cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA. Archaea were numerically dominant at all depths and exhibited a lesser response to environmental gradients than that of Bacteria. The relative abundance of Crenarchaeota was low (0.4 to 22%) at all depths but increased with decreased carbon content and increased salinity. Salinity structured the bacterial community but exerted no significant control on archaeal community structure, which was weakly correlated with total carbon. Partial sequencing of archaeal 16S rRNA genes retrieved from three sediment depths revealed diverse communities of Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota, many of which were affiliated with groups previously described from marine sediments. The abundance of these groups across all depths suggests that many putative marine archaeal groups can tolerate elevated salinity (5.0 to 11.8% [wt/vol]) and persist under the anaerobic conditions present in Salton Sea sediments. The differential response of archaeal and bacterial communities to salinity and carbon patterns is consistent with the hypothesis that adaptations to energy stress and availability distinguish the ecologies of these domains.

  4. Halanaerobium sehlinense sp. nov., an extremely halophilic, fermentative, strictly anaerobic bacterium from sediments of the hypersaline lake Sehline Sebkha.

    PubMed

    Abdeljabbar, Hedi; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Sadfi, Najla; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2013-06-01

    A strictly anaerobic, extremely halophilic, Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacterium was isolated from the hypersaline (>20% NaCl) surface sediments of Sehline Sebkha in Tunisia. The strain, designated 1Sehel(T), was strictly halophilic and proliferated at NaCl concentrations of between 5% and 30% (saturation), with optimal growth at 20% NaCl. Strain 1Sehel(T) was non-spore-forming, non-motile, appearing singly or in pairs, or occasionally as long chains and measured 0.5-0.8 µm by 3-10 µm. Strain 1Sehel(T) grew optimally at pH values of 7.4 but had a very broad pH range for growth (pH 5.2-9.4). It grew at temperatures between 20 and 50 °C with an optimum at 43 °C. Strain 1Sehel(T) required yeast extract for growth. The isolate fermented glucose, galactose, fructose, glycerol, mannose, maltose, ribose, pyruvate and sucrose. The fermentation products from glucose utilization were lactate, acetate, formate, ethanol, CO2 and H2. The G+C ratio of the DNA was 32.7 mol%. The major fatty acids were C15:1ω6c/7c, C16:1ω7c, C16:0 and C15:0. On the basis of phylogenetic and physiological properties, strain 1Sehel(T) (=DSM 25582(T)=JCM 18213(T)) is proposed as the type strain of Halanaerobium sehlinense sp. nov., within the family Halanaerobiaceae.

  5. Utilization of ERTS-1 data to monitor and classify eutrophication of inland lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, P. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Bands 6 and 7 have fine structure as obtained by proper selection of digital levels in processing the CCT's. This is contrary to the imagery density received. This means that the small lakes can be classified in IR for different types of water masses. At least four distinct water masses have been determined for test lakes. They are shoreline, shallow water, and two deep waters. One deep water is patchy and presents difficulty in training set selection. The excellent weather and a completely successful field test form a significant happening. It required 12 orbits over the test area before perfect weather occurred.

  6. Carbonate Biogenic Structures in Storrs Lake, Bahamas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, Monica; Morris, Penny A.; Wentworth, Susan J.; Brigmon, Robin L.; McKay, David S.

    2001-01-01

    Storr's Lake, an inland hypersaline lake on San Salvador Island, Bahamas, contains calcium carbonate-rich lithified mats of filamentous microorganisms, diatoms, associated photosynthetic and chemotrophic bacteria, and trapped sediment. In addition, 16S rRNA analysis indicates the presence of five sulfur-reducing genera of bacteria. These microbes are potential modern-day analogs to some ancient stromatolitic structures. The goals of this study are to identify unique compositional and biogenic features, possibly correlating some of these with some of the sulfate-reducing bacteria. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Immune factors and fatty acid composition in human milk from river/lake, coastal and inland regions of China.

    PubMed

    Urwin, Heidi J; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Yixiong; Wang, Chunrong; Li, Lixiang; Song, Pengkun; Man, Qingqing; Meng, Liping; Frøyland, Livar; Miles, Elizabeth A; Calder, Philip C; Yaqoob, Parveen

    2013-06-01

    Breast milk fatty acid composition may be affected by the maternal diet during gestation and lactation. The influence of dietary and breastmilk fatty acids on breast milk immune factors is poorly defined. We determined the fatty acid composition and immune factor concentrations of breast milk from women residing in river/lake, coastal and inland regions of China, which differ in their consumption of lean fish and oily fish. Breast milk samples were collected on days 3–5 (colostrum), 14 and 28 post-partum (PP) and analysed for soluble CD14 (sCD14), transforming growth factor (TGF)-b1, TGF-b2, secretory IgA (sIgA) and fatty acids. The fatty acid composition of breast milk differed between the regions and with time PP. The concentrations of all four immune factors in breast milk decreased over time, with sCD14, sIgA and TGF-b1 being highest in the colostrum in the river and lake region. Breast milk DHA and arachidonic acid (AA) were positively associated, and g-linolenic acid and EPA negatively associated, with the concentrations of each of the four immune factors. In conclusion, breast milk fatty acids and immune factors differ between the regions in China characterised by different patterns of fish consumption and change during the course of lactation. A higher breast milk DHA and AA concentration is associated with higher concentrations of immune factors in breast milk, suggesting a role for these fatty acids in promoting gastrointestinal and immune maturation of the infant.

  8. Depth Distribution of Archaeal Diversity and Community Composition Across Steep Geochemical Gradients in Anoxic Sediments of a Hypersaline Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, B. K.; Valentine, D. L.

    2006-12-01

    Patterns in Archaeal diversity and community composition were investigated in the anoxic sediments of the Salton Sea, California's largest lake. The sediments of this lake contain strong gradients in salinity and organic carbon, which provide a natural setting to examine the influence of these gradients on Archaeal communities. Measurements of sediment and porewater geochemistry and Archaeal diversity were made within the top 33cm of sediment. Porewater sulfate and total salinity, organic carbon and mineral content of the bulk sediment were measured at 1-cm intervals; Archaeal diversity was determined at 2-cm intervals using T-RFLP analysis to identify unique phylotypes. To examine Archaeal community composition 16S rDNA clone libraries were constructed at three depth intervals across the gradients. Between 4-23 Archaeal phylotypes were identified across the gradients, and the number of phylotypes was negatively correlated with organic carbon content. 16S rDNA clone libraries revealed the presence of members within the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota groups. The biogeochemical role of these uncultured anaerobic Archaea remains unknown, but we hypothesize that the high-salt and low organic carbon conditions that exist in the deeper sediments provide an environmental niche that Archaea exploit to compete with the Bacterial community.

  9. Comparative functional ultrastructure of two hypersaline submerged cyanobacterial mats - Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico, and Solar Lake, Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amelio, Elisa D'antoni; Des Marais, David J.; Cohen, Jehuda

    1989-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the submerged microbial mat from the Solar Lake (SL), Egypt, was compared to that of samples from the Guerrero Negro (GN), Mexico, salt pans. The locations and distributions of the main organisms were determined light microscopy, and the corresponding ultrathin sections were examined under TEM; chemical microprofile analyses were carried out on the day of sampling for microscopic studies. Both communities were found to be dominated by Microleus chthonoplastes, although several morphological species found in the GN mat were absent from the SL mat, including the Tropica nigra and the 'big' Microleus chthonoplastes component. The chemical microprofiles of oxygen, sulfide, pH, and the oxygenic photosynthesis in the two mats were virtually identical. In both mats, the photic zone was restricted to the upper 800 microns of the mat, and oxygenic photosynthesis was detected down to 600 microns.

  10. Geophysical, isotopic, and hydrogeochemical tools to identify potential impacts on coastal groundwater resources from Urmia hypersaline Lake, NW Iran.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Vahab; Nakhaei, Mohammad; Lak, Razyeh; Kholghi, Majid

    2016-08-01

    Measurements of major ions, trace elements, water-stable isotopes, and geophysical soundings were made to examine the interaction between Urmia Aquifer (UA) and Urmia Lake (UL), northwest Iran. The poor correlation between sampling depth and Cl(-) concentrations indicated that the position of freshwater-saltwater interface is not uniformly distributed in the study area, and this was attributed to aquifer heterogeneities. The targeted coastal wells showed B/Cl and Br/Cl molar ratios in the range of 0.0022-2.43 and 0.00032-0.28, respectively. The base-exchange index (BEI) and saturation index (SI) calculations showed that the salinization process followed by cation-exchange reactions mainly controls changes in the chemical composition of groundwater. All groundwater samples are depleted with respect to δ(18)O (-11.71 to -9.4 ‰) and δD (-66.26 to -48.41 ‰). The δ(18)O and δD isotope ratios for surface and groundwater had a similar range and showed high deuterium excess (d-excess) (21.11 to 31.16 ‰). The high d-excess in water samples is because of incoming vapors from the UL mixed with an evaporated moisture flux from the Urmia mainland and incoming vapors from the west (i.e., Mediterranean Sea). Some saline samples with low B/Cl and Br/Cl ratios had depleted δ(18)O and δD. In this case, due to freshwater flushing, the drilled wells in the coastal playas and salty sediments could have more depleted isotopes, more Cl(-), and consequently smaller B/Cl and Br/Cl ratios. Moreover, the results of hydrochemical facies evolution (HFE) diagram showed that because of the existence fine-grained sediments saturated with high density saltwater in the coastal areas that act as a natural barrier, increasing the groundwater exploitation leads to movement of freshwaters from recharge zones in the western mountains not saltwater from UL. The highly permeable sediments at the junction of the rivers to the lake are characterized by low hydraulic gradient and high

  11. [The new bacteriochlorophyll a-containing bacterium Roseinatronobacter monicus sp. nov. from the hypersaline soda Mono Lake (California, United States)].

    PubMed

    Boldareva, E N; Briantseva, I A; Tsapin, A; Nelson, K; Sorokin, D Iu; Turova, T P; Boĭchenko, V A; Stadnichuk, I N; Gorlenko, V M

    2007-01-01

    Two strains of pink-colored aerobic bacteriochlorophyll a-containing bacteria were isolated from aerobic (strain ROS 10) and anaerobic (strain ROS 35) zones of the water column of Mono Lake (California, United States). Cells of the bacteria were nonmotile oval gram-negative rods multiplying by binary fission by means of a constriction. No intracellular membranes were detected. Polyphosphates and poly-1-hydroxybutyric acid were the storage compounds. Pigments were represented by bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids of the spheroidene series. The strains were obligately aerobic, mesophilic (temperature optimum of 25-30 degrees C), alkaliphilic (pH optimum of 8.5-9.5), and halophilic (optimal NaCl concentration of 40-60 g/l). They were obligately heterotrophic and grew aerobically in the dark and in the light. Respiration was inhibited by light at wavelengths corresponding to the absorption of the cellular pigments. The substrate utilization spectra were strain-specific. In the course of organotrophic growth, the bacteria could oxidize thiosulfate to sulfate; sulfide and polysulfide could also be oxidized. The DNA G+C content was 59.4 mol % in strain ROS 10 and 59 mol % in strain ROS 35. In their phenotypic properties, the new strains were close but not identical to the alkaliphilic bacterium Roseinatronobacter thiooxidans. The distinctions in the nucleotide sequences of the 16S rRNA genes (2%) and low DNA-DNA hybridization level with Rna. thiooxidans (22-25%) allow the new strains to be assigned to a new species of the genus Roseinatronobacter, Roseinatronobacter monicus sp. nov.

  12. Eco-morphological differentiation in Lake Magadi tilapia, an extremophile cichlid fish living in hot, alkaline and hypersaline lakes in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Kavembe, Geraldine D; Kautt, Andreas F; Machado-Schiaffino, Gonzalo; Meyer, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Ecological diversification through divergent selection is thought to be a major force during the process of adaptive radiations. However, the large sizes and complexity of most radiations such as those of the cichlids in the African Great Lakes make it impossible to infer the exact evolutionary history of any population divergence event. The genus Alcolapia, a small cichlid lineage endemic to Lakes Magadi and Natron in East Africa, exhibits phenotypes similar to some of those found in cichlids of the radiations of the African Great Lakes. The simplicity within Alcolapia makes it an excellent model system to investigate ecological diversification and speciation. We used an integrated approach including population genomics based on RAD-seq data, geometric morphometrics and stable isotope analyses to investigate the eco-morphological diversification of tilapia in Lake Magadi and its satellite lake Little Magadi. Additionally, we reconstructed the demographic history of the species using coalescent simulations based on the joint site frequency spectrum. The population in Little Magadi has a characteristically upturned mouth--possibly an adaptation to feeding on prey from the water surface. Eco-morphological differences between populations within Lake Magadi are more subtle, but are consistent with known ecological differences between its lagoons such as high concentrations of nitrogen attributable to extensive guano deposits in Rest of Magadi relative to Fish Springs Lagoon. All populations diverged simultaneously only about 1100 generations ago. Differences in levels of gene flow between populations and the effective population sizes have likely resulted in the inferred heterogeneous patterns of genome-wide differentiation.

  13. Halorientalis brevis sp. nov., Isolated from an Inland Salt Lake of China.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Pan-Pan; Yin, Shuai; Han, Dong; Zhang, Wen-Jiao; Cui, Heng-Lin

    2015-09-01

    Halophilic archaeal strain YC89(T) was isolated from Yuncheng salt lake in Shanxi, China. Cells from strain YC89(T) were short rods, lysed in distilled water, stained Gram-negative and formed red-pigmented colonies on agar plate. Strain YC89(T) was able to grow at 25-50°C (optimum 37°C), at 1.4-4.8 M NaCl (optimum 2.6-3.1 M), at 0-1.0 M MgCl2 (optimum 0.3 M) and at pH 6.0-9.5 (optimum pH 7.5). The major polar lipids are phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, sulfated mannosyl glucosyl diether and two unknown glycolipids. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that strain YC89(T) was phylogenetically related to Halorientalis persicus D108(T) (95.6% nucleotide identity) and H. regularis TNN28(T) (95.3% nucleotide identity). The rpoB' gene similarities between strain YC89(T) and H. persicus IBRC-M 10043(T) and H. regularis TNN28(T) were 88.1 and 88.0%, respectively. The DNA G+C content of strain YC89(T) was determined to be 61.3 mol%. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties suggested that strain YC89(T) (=CGMCC 1.12125(T) = JCM 18366(T)) represents a new species of Halorientalis, for which the name H. brevis sp. nov. is proposed.

  14. Inland capture fisheries

    PubMed Central

    Welcomme, Robin L.; Cowx, Ian G.; Coates, David; Béné, Christophe; Funge-Smith, Simon; Halls, Ashley; Lorenzen, Kai

    2010-01-01

    The reported annual yield from inland capture fisheries in 2008 was over 10 million tonnes, although real catches are probably considerably higher than this. Inland fisheries are extremely complex, and in many cases poorly understood. The numerous water bodies and small rivers are inhabited by a wide range of species and several types of fisher community with diversified livelihood strategies for whom inland fisheries are extremely important. Many drivers affect the fisheries, including internal fisheries management practices. There are also many drivers from outside the fishery that influence the state and functioning of the environment as well as the social and economic framework within which the fishery is pursued. The drivers affecting the various types of inland water, rivers, lakes, reservoirs and wetlands may differ, particularly with regard to ecosystem function. Many of these depend on land-use practices and demand for water which conflict with the sustainability of the fishery. Climate change is also exacerbating many of these factors. The future of inland fisheries varies between continents. In Asia and Africa the resources are very intensely exploited and there is probably little room for expansion; it is here that resources are most at risk. Inland fisheries are less heavily exploited in South and Central America, and in the North and South temperate zones inland fisheries are mostly oriented to recreation rather than food production. PMID:20713391

  15. Inland capture fisheries.

    PubMed

    Welcomme, Robin L; Cowx, Ian G; Coates, David; Béné, Christophe; Funge-Smith, Simon; Halls, Ashley; Lorenzen, Kai

    2010-09-27

    The reported annual yield from inland capture fisheries in 2008 was over 10 million tonnes, although real catches are probably considerably higher than this. Inland fisheries are extremely complex, and in many cases poorly understood. The numerous water bodies and small rivers are inhabited by a wide range of species and several types of fisher community with diversified livelihood strategies for whom inland fisheries are extremely important. Many drivers affect the fisheries, including internal fisheries management practices. There are also many drivers from outside the fishery that influence the state and functioning of the environment as well as the social and economic framework within which the fishery is pursued. The drivers affecting the various types of inland water, rivers, lakes, reservoirs and wetlands may differ, particularly with regard to ecosystem function. Many of these depend on land-use practices and demand for water which conflict with the sustainability of the fishery. Climate change is also exacerbating many of these factors. The future of inland fisheries varies between continents. In Asia and Africa the resources are very intensely exploited and there is probably little room for expansion; it is here that resources are most at risk. Inland fisheries are less heavily exploited in South and Central America, and in the North and South temperate zones inland fisheries are mostly oriented to recreation rather than food production.

  16. Brazilian inland water bio-optical dataset to support carbon budget studies in reservoirs as well as anthropogenic impacts in Amazon floodplain lakes: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, C.; Novo, E.; Ferreira, R.; Carvalho, L.; Cairo, C.; Lopes, F.; Stech, J.; Alcantara, E.

    2015-04-01

    This work presents ongoing efforts and preliminary results for building a dataset that represents the first and most comprehensive bio-optical information available on Brazilian inland waters to support the development of remote sensing algorithms for monitoring aquatic systems. From 2012 to 2014 optical and limnological data was gathered along thirteen field campaigns in five Brazilian reservoirs, in an irrigation and domestic water supply reservoir located in semi-arid northeast of the country and in Amazonian floodplain lakes, thus covering the diversity of Brazilian inland waters. At each site 20 stations, on average, were sampled to acquire profiles of the following optical variables: absorption, attenuation, scattering, and backscattering coefficients and radiances/irradiances spectra above and in-water. Alongside these measurements, water samples were collected for determining concentrations of chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), Total Suspended Solid (TSS), Total Dissolved Carbon (TDC) and its organic/inorganic fractions, CDOM absorption, phytoplankton specific absorption [aph*] and Non-Algal Particles absorption [aNAP*]. Preliminary results show that Chl-a concentrations ranged from 0.6 to 243μg/L in reservoirs and 0.90 to 92μg/L in Amazonian lakes, while TSS concentrations ranged from 0.3 to 31mg/L in reservoirs and 0.5 to 162mg/L in Amazonian lakes. In situ beam attenuation coefficients ranged from 1.4 to 16m-1 in reservoirs and 12.5 to 38m-1 in Amazonian lakes, while diffuse attenuation coefficients of downwelling irradiance over the Photosynthetically Active Radiation (Kd(PAR)) extended from 0.35 to 4.5m-1 in reservoirs and 1.69 to 13.30m-1 in Amazonian lakes. Our research group is building this dataset anticipating future demands for algorithm validation regarding OLI/Landsat8 data and ESA Sentinel missions to be launched as of 2015.

  17. Response of Glacier and Lake Dynamics in Four Inland Basins to Climate Change at the Transition Zone between the Karakorum And Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiguo; Fan, Kuangsheng; Tian, Lide; Shi, Benlin; Zhang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jingjing

    2015-01-01

    Inland glacier and lake dynamics on the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and its surroundings over recent decades are good indicators of climate change and have a significant impact on the local water supply and ecosystem. The glacier and lake changes in Karakoram are quite different from those of the Himalayas. The mechanisms of the complex and regionally heterogeneous behavior of the glacier and lake changes between the Karakorum and Himalayas are poorly understood. Based on satellite images and meteorological data of Shiquanhe, Hetian, and Yutian stations, we demonstrate that the overall retreat of glaciers and increase of lake area at the transition zone between the Karakoram and Himalayas (TKH) have occurred since 1968 in response to a significant global climate change. Glacial areas in the Songmuxi Co basin, Zepu Co basin, Mang Co basin and Unnamed Co decreased by -1.98 ± 0.02 km2, -5.39 ± 0.02 km2, -0.01 ± 0.02 km2, and -0.12 ± 0.02 km2 during the study period, corresponding to losses of -1.42%, -2.86%, -1.54%, and -1.57%, respectively. The lake area of the Songmuxi Co, Zepu Co, Mang Co and Unnamed Co increased by 7.57 ± 0.02 km2, 8.53 ± 0.02 km2, 1.35 ± 0.02 km2, and 0.53 ± 0.02 km2, corresponding to growths of 30.22%, 7.55%, 11.39%, and 8.05%, respectively. Increases in temperature was the main reason for glacier retreat, whereas decreases in potential evapotranspiration of lakes, increases in precipitation, and increases in melt water from glaciers and frozen soil all contributed to lake area expansion.

  18. Chemical pollution in inland shallow lakes in the Mediterranean region (NW Spain): PAHs, insecticides and herbicides in water and sediments.

    PubMed

    Hijosa-Valsero, María; Bécares, Eloy; Fernández-Aláez, Camino; Fernández-Aláez, Margarita; Mayo, Rebeca; Jiménez, Juan José

    2016-02-15

    The possible effect of land uses and human-related geographic patterns (presence of roads and urban settlements) on chemical pollution was evaluated in the waters and sediments of fifty-three Mediterranean shallow lakes. The presence of fifty-nine pollutants (belonging to PAHs, insecticides and herbicides groups) was analysed in these lakes by GC-MS. The studied lakes had similar pollutant concentrations to other lakes worldwide. The distribution of the compounds between water and sediment compartments was strongly influenced by log K(ow) values (an average of 3.61 for compounds found in water and of 4.69 for compounds found in sediments). A multivariate analysis suggested that the concentration of PAHs in water could be related to agricultural activities and not related to local road traffic. When assessing nutrient levels in the lakes, it was observed that eutrophicated lakes [>300 μg L(-1) total phosphorus (TP)] appeared in areas affected by urban or industrial use (at least 2% urban use in a 1-km radius around the lake), whilst lakes with lower TP concentrations were placed in forest areas (60% of forest use in a 1-km radius); in addition, the aqueous concentrations of Σ(PAH) were lower in lakes with higher TP concentrations (>150 μg L(-1) TP), which could be related to the adsorption capacity of PAHs onto suspended matter which is present in mesotrophic and eutrophic lakes, thus being removed from the aqueous phase.

  19. Monitoring Inland Water Turbidity: Contribution of SPOT5 Take5 to Health Hazard Monitoring in West Africa (Bagre Lake, Burkina Faso)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Elodie; Grippa, Manuela; Kergoat, Laurent; Martinez, Jean-Michel; Pinet, Sylvain; Somdecoste, Tom; Gal, Laetitia

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring turbidity and Surface Suspended Sediment Concentration (SSSC) of inland waters in tropics is essential to assess human health risks, in particular the diarrheal disease risk. In this study, we explore the use of Spot5 time series acquired for the Spot5Take5 Program to monitor turbidity and SSSC on the Bagre Lake (Burkina Faso). Field measurements (turbidity, SSSC, radiometry) are used to evaluate different radiometric indices. The combination of the NIR with a visible band (R or G) is found to be the best suited to retrieve SSSC and turbidity from Spot5 images. Large differences between upstream and downstream areas of the lake are well capture by the Spot5 time series, with large difference in the seasonal maximum both for absolute values and timing. A large sediment transport is observed from upstream to downstream between June and September caused by surface runoff and erosion. The high turbidity values observed suggest that the associated health hazard is potentially high, especially at the beginning of the rainy season and in the upstream areas of the lake.

  20. A physico-chemical survey of inland lakes and saline ponds: Christmas Island (Kiritimati) and Washington (Teraina) Islands, Republic of Kiribati

    PubMed Central

    Saenger, Casey; Miller, Michael; Smittenberg, Rienk H; Sachs, Julian P

    2006-01-01

    The equatorial Pacific Ocean atoll islands of Kiritimati and Teraina encompass great physical, chemical and biological variability within extreme lacustrine environments. Surveys of lake chemistry and sediments revealed both intra- and inter-island variability. A survey of more than 100 lakes on Kiritimati found salinities from nearly fresh to 150 ppt with the highest values occurring within the isolated, inland portions of the island away from the influence of groundwater or extreme tides. Dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH values also showed considerable variability with a less regular spatial pattern, but were both generally inversely related to salinity. Series of lakes, progressively more isolated from marine communication, present a modern analog to the chemical and morphologic evolution of presently isolated basins. Sediments on both islands consist of interbedded red and green silt, possibly degraded bacterial mat, overlying white, mineralogenic silt precipitate. Variability may be indicative of shifts in climatological parameters such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) or the Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). PMID:16817958

  1. Hydrocarbon Biodegradation in Hypersaline Environments

    PubMed Central

    Ward, David M.; Brock, T. D.

    1978-01-01

    When mineral oil, hexadecane, and glutamate were added to natural samples of varying salinity (3.3 to 28.4%) from salt evaporation ponds and Great Salt Lake, Utah, rates of metabolism of these compounds decreased as salinity increased. Rate limitations did not appear to relate to low oxygen levels or to the availability of organic nutrients. Some oxidation of l-[U-14C]glutamic acid occurred even at extreme salinities, whereas oxidation of [1-14C]hexadecane was too low to be detected. Gas chromatographic examination of hexane-soluble components of tar samples from natural seeps at Rozel Point in Great Salt Lake demonstrated no evidence of biological oxidation of isoprenoid alkanes subject to degradation in normal environments. Some hexane-soluble components of the same tar were altered by incubation in a low-salinity enrichment culture inoculated with garden soil. Attempts to enrich for microorganisms in saline waters able to use mineral oil as a sole source of carbon and energy were successful below, but not above, about 20% salinity. This study strongly suggests a general reduction of metabolic rate at extreme salinities and raises doubt about the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments. PMID:16345276

  2. Inland Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Area Cooperative Educational Services, New Haven, CT. Environmental Education Center.

    This material includes student guide sheets, reference materials, and tape script for the audio-tutorial unit on Inland Wetlands. A set of 35mm slides and an audio tape are used with the material. The material is designed for use with Connecticut schools, but it can be adapted to other localities. The materials emphasize characteristics of inland…

  3. Hydrogeochemical evolution of inland lakes' water: A study of major element geochemistry in the Wadi El Raiyan depression, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Essam A; El-Kammar, Ahmed M; Yehia, Mohamed M; Abu Salem, Hend S

    2015-11-01

    Wadi El Raiyan is a great depression located southwest of Cairo in the Western Desert of Egypt. Lake Qarun, located north of the study area, is a closed basin with a high evaporation rate. The source of water in the lake is agricultural and municipal drainage from the El Faiyum province. In 1973, Wadi El Raiyan was connected with the agricultural wastewater drainage system of the Faiyum province and received water that exceeded the capacity of Lake Qarun. Two hydrogeological regimes have been established in the area: (i) higher cultivated land and (ii) lower Wadi El Raiyan depression lakes. The agricultural drainage water of the cultivated land has been collected in one main drain (El Wadi Drain) and directed toward the Wadi El Raiyan depression, forming two lakes at different elevations (upper and lower). In the summer of 2012, the major chemical components were studied using data from 36 stations distributed over both hydrogeological regimes in addition to one water sample collected from Bahr Youssef, the main source of freshwater for the Faiyum province. Chemical analyses were made collaboratively. The major ion geochemical evolution of the drainage water recharging the El Raiyan depression was examined. Geochemically, the Bahr Youssef sample is considered the starting point in the geochemical evolution of the studied surface water. In the cultivated area, major-ion chemistry is generally influenced by chemical weathering of rocks and minerals that are associated with anthropogenic inputs, as well as diffuse urban and/or agricultural drainage. In the depression lakes, the water chemistry generally exhibits an evaporation-dependent evolutionary trend that is further modified by cation exchange and precipitation of carbonate minerals.

  4. Cruise report RV Inland Surveyer Cruise IS-98; the bathymetry of Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada, August 2 through August 17, 1998, Lake Tahoe, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, James V.; Mayer, Larry A.; Hughes-Clarke, John

    1998-01-01

    The major objective of cruise IS-98 was to map the bathymetry of Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada (Fig. 1) to fulfill a commitment made during the Lake Tahoe Presidential Forum in 1997. The only existing bathymetry of Lake Tahoe, collected in 1923, was recently compiled by Rowe and Stone (1997), but the data density is inadequate for the level of scientific studies ongoing and anticipated in the near future for Lake Tahoe. Recent advances in marine multibeam-sonar capabilities now permit a cost-effective way, to precisely map the bathymetry of large areas of the ocean floor with 100% coverage. Cruise IS-98 applied this state-of-the-art ocean technology to Lake Tahoe. The newest of these high-resolution multibeam mapping systems also simultaneously collects backscatter (similar to sidescan sonar) imagery that results in a complimentary and co-registered data set that is related to the distribution of lake-floor materials and textures. The two types of maps that resulted from this cruise provide the multidisiplinary Lake Tahoe research community an unprecedented set of base maps upon which to build their studies. This report describes the high-resolution multibeam mapping system used at Lake Tahoe, outlines the data-processing steps used to produce the maps, and includes the daily log of the cruise.

  5. Cyanotoxins in inland lakes of the continental United States: Photic Zone Occurrence and potential recreational health risks in the 2007 Survey of the Nation's lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The largest spatial survey of cylindrospermosins, microcystins, and saxitoxins in the United States was conducted as part of the 2007 U.S. Survey of the Nation’s Lakes. Integrated photic zone samples were collected from 1,161 lakes during May-September 2007. Cyanotoxin, cya...

  6. Cyanotoxins in Inland Lakes of the United States: Occurrence and Potential Recreational Health Risks in the EPA National Lakes Assessment 2007

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large nation-wide survey or cyanotoxlns (1161 lakes)in the United States (U.S.) was conducted dunng the EPA National Lakes Assessment 2007. Cyanotoxin data were compared with cyanobacteria abundance- and chlorophyll-based World Health Organization (WHO) thresholds and mouse to...

  7. 77 FR 62435 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 162 RIN 1625-AB84 Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations AGENCY: Coast... Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations (77 FR 27007). We received 1 comment. Specifically, Lake Carriers... 33 CFR 162.138(a)(1)(ii) will lessen navigation restrictions on the public and on private...

  8. Characterization of Halanaerobaculum tunisiense gen. nov., sp. nov., a new halophilic fermentative, strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from a hypersaline lake in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Hedi, Abdeljabbar; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Sadfi, Najla; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Ollivier, Bernard; Cayol, Jean-Luc

    2009-03-01

    A new halophilic anaerobe was isolated from the hypersaline surface sediments of El-Djerid Chott, Tunisia. The isolate, designated as strain 6SANG, grew at NaCl concentrations ranging from 14 to 30%, with an optimum at 20-22%. Strain 6SANG was a non-spore-forming, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterium, appearing singly, in pairs, or occasionally as long chains (0.7-1 x 4-13 microm) and showed a Gram-negative-like cell wall pattern. It grew optimally at pH values between 7.2 and 7.4, but had a very broad pH range for growth (5.9-8.4). Optimum temperature for growth was 42 degrees C (range 30-50 degrees C). Strain 6SANG required yeast extract for growth on sugars. Glucose, sucrose, galactose, mannose, maltose, cellobiose, pyruvate, and starch were fermented. The end products from glucose fermentation were acetate, butyrate, lactate, H(2), and CO(2). The G + C ratio of the DNA was 34.3 mol%. Strain 6SANG exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of 91-92% with members of the genus Halobacteroides, H. halobius being its closest phylogenetic relative. Based on phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, we propose that this bacterium be classified as a novel species of a novel genus, Halanaerobaculum tunisiense gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain is 6SANG(T) (=DSM 19997(T)=JCM 15060(T)).

  9. Traces of microbial activity in the deep sediment of the Dead Sea: How is life influencing the sedimentary record of this hypersaline lake ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Camille; Ebert, Yael; Kiro, Yael; Stein, Mordechai; Ariztegui, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    As part of the ICDP-sponsored Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project (DSDDP), a multi-disciplinary study has been carried out to understand the influence that microbial communities can have on the Dead Sea sedimentary record. Organic matter (lipids) and DNA extraction have been performed along the main core retrieved from the center of the modern Dead Sea. They revealed different associations of microbial communities, influenced by changing climatic and limnological regimes during sedimentation. Moreover, imaging and chemical characterization of authigenic iron-sulfur minerals have revealed the unexpected presence of an active sulfur cycle in the sediment. In particular, their morphology and Fe/S ratios are coherent with incomplete sulfate reduction, limited by sulfur reduction, and often resulting in the preservation of greigite. In glacial period intervals, pyritization may be complete, indicating full sulfate reduction probably allowed by significant accumulation of organic matter in the alternating aragonite and detritus (aad) facies. The DSDDP core provides a unique opportunity to investigate deep diagenetic processes and to assess the role of microbial activity in the Dead Sea hypersaline sediment. Our study shows that this microbial activity influences the carbon and sulfur phases, as well as magnetic fractions, potentially affecting proxies used for paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic reconstructions.

  10. Environmental geochemistry of dissolved and biogenic silicon and its nutrient limitation effects in an inland lake, China.

    PubMed

    Lü, Changwei; He, Jiang; Wang, Bing; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Wei; Fan, Mingde

    2015-07-01

    Silicon (Si) processing and retention play a key role in nutrients biogeochemistry cycling in aquatic environment. In order to interpret the possibility of Si limitation, multivariate analysis was performed based on stoichiometric nutrients balance, distribution characteristics of dissolved silicon (DSi) and biogenic silica (BSi), adsorption behavior, and response relation of BSi with paleoenvironment in water-sediment system of Lake Daihai. The spatial distributions of DSi and BSi in the water-sediment system indicated that terrigenous inputs (such as the weathering of rock and soil in the drainage basin) was the main sources of Si. Meanwhile, grain sizes of sediments, water hydrogeochemistry, and space competition between diatoms and submergent or emerging plants also played important roles in regulating BSi spatial distributions. The sediments from the lake presented obvious releasing trend of Si at low initial concentrations (≤ 3 mg/L) in adsorption experiments, indicating that the sediments were the source of Si to the overlying water. Furthermore, the good response relation between BSi and paleoenvironment observed in the sediment profiles from Lake Daihai indicated that the main reasons for Si limitation to siliceous plankton were different during different periods. The multi-evidences of distribution characteristics, stoichiometric nutrient balance, adsorption behaviors, and response to paleoenvironment were jointly indicative of Si limitation on the primary production of siliceous plankton in Lake Daihai.

  11. Remotely sensed surface temperature variation of an inland saline lake over the central Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Linghong; Song, Chunqiao

    2014-12-01

    Research on surface water temperature (SWT) variations in large lakes over the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) has been limited by lack of in situ measurements. By taking advantage of the increased availability of remotely sensed observations, this study investigated SWT variation of Siling Co in central QTP by processing complete MODIS Land surface temperature (LST) images over the lake covering from 2001 to 2013. The temporal (diurnal, intra-annul and inter-annul) variations of Siling Co SWT as well as the spatial patterns were analyzed. The results show that on average from late December to mid-April the lake is in a mixing state of water and ice and drastic diurnal temperature differences occur, especially along the shallow shoreline areas. The extent of spatial variations in monthly SWT ranges from 1.25 °C to 3.5 °C, and particularly large at nighttime and in winter months. The spatial patterns of annual average SWT were likely impacted by the cooling effect of river inflow from the west and east side of the lake. The annual cycle of spatial pattern of SWT is characterized by seasonal reversions between the shallow littoral regions and deep parts due to different heat capacity. Compared to the deep regions, the littoral shallow shoreline areas warms up quickly in spring and summer, and cool down drastically in autumn and winter, showing large diurnal and seasonal variation amplitudes of SWT. Two cold belt zones in the western and eastern side of the lake and warm patches along the southwestern and northeastern shorelines are shaped by the combined effects of the lakebed topography and river runoff. Overall, the lake-averaged SWT increased at a rate of 0.26 °C/decade during 2001-2013. Faster increase of temperature was found at nighttime (0.34 °C/decade) and in winter and spring, consistent with the asymmetric warming pattern over land areas reported in prior studies. The rate of temperature increase over Siling Co is remarkably lower than that over Bangoin

  12. Recent Inland Water Temperature Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Simon; Healey, Nathan; Lenters, John; O'Reilly, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    We are using thermal infrared satellite data in conjunction with in situ measurements to produce water temperatures for all the large inland water bodies in North America and the rest of the world for potential use as climate indicator. Recent studies have revealed significant warming of inland waters throughout the world. The observed rate of warming is - in many cases - greater than that of the ambient air temperature. These rapid, unprecedented changes in inland water temperatures have profound implications for lake hydrodynamics, productivity, and biotic communities. Scientists are just beginning to understand the global extent, regional patterns, physical mechanisms, and ecological consequences of lake warming. As part of our work we have collected thermal infrared satellite data from those satellite sensors that provide long-term and frequent spaceborne thermal infrared measurements of inland waters including ATSR, AVHRR, and MODIS and used these to examine trends in water surface temperature for approximately 169 of the largest inland water bodies in the world. We are now extending this work to generate temperature time-series of all North American inland water bodies that are sufficiently large to be studied using 1km resolution satellite data for the last 3 decades, approximately 268 lakes. These data are then being related to changes in the surface air temperature and compared with regional trends in water surface temperature derived from CMIP5/IPCC model simulations/projections to better predict future temperature changes. We will discuss the available datasets and processing methodologies together with the patterns they reveal based on recent changes in the global warming, with a particular focus on the inland waters of the southwestern USA.

  13. High Genetic Diversity and Novelty in Eukaryotic Plankton Assemblages Inhabiting Saline Lakes in the Qaidam Basin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiali; Wang, Fang; Chu, Limin; Wang, Hao; Zhong, Zhiping; Liu, Zhipei; Gao, Jianyong; Duan, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    Saline lakes are intriguing ecosystems harboring extremely productive microbial communities in spite of their extreme environmental conditions. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the genetic diversity (18S rRNA gene) of the planktonic microbial eukaryotes (nano- and picoeukaryotes) in six different inland saline lakes located in the Qaidam Basin. The novelty level are high, with about 11.23% of the whole dataset showing <90% identity to any previously reported sequence in GenBank. At least 4 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in mesosaline lakes, while up to eighteen OTUs in hypersaline lakes show very low CCM and CEM scores, indicating that these sequences are highly distantly related to any existing sequence. Most of the 18S rRNA gene sequence reads obtained in investigated mesosaline lakes is closely related to Holozoa group (48.13%), whereas Stramenopiles (26.65%) and Alveolates (10.84%) are the next most common groups. Hypersaline lakes in the Qaidam Basin are also dominated by Holozoa group, accounting for 26.65% of the total number of sequence reads. Notably, Chlorophyta group are only found in high abundance in Lake Gasikule (28.00%), whereas less represented in other hypersaline lakes such as Gahai (0.50%) and Xiaochaidan (1.15%). Further analysis show that the compositions of planktonic eukaryotic assemblages are also most variable between different sampling sites in the same lake. Out of the parameters, four show significant correlation to this CCA: altitude, calcium, sodium and potassium concentrations. Overall, this study shows important gaps in the current knowledge about planktonic microbial eukaryotes inhabiting Qaidam Basin (hyper) saline water bodies. The identified diversity and novelty patterns among eukaryotic plankton assemblages in saline lake are of great importance for understanding and interpreting their ecology and evolution. PMID:25401703

  14. High genetic diversity and novelty in eukaryotic plankton assemblages inhabiting saline lakes in the Qaidam basin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiali; Wang, Fang; Chu, Limin; Wang, Hao; Zhong, Zhiping; Liu, Zhipei; Gao, Jianyong; Duan, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    Saline lakes are intriguing ecosystems harboring extremely productive microbial communities in spite of their extreme environmental conditions. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the genetic diversity (18S rRNA gene) of the planktonic microbial eukaryotes (nano- and picoeukaryotes) in six different inland saline lakes located in the Qaidam Basin. The novelty level are high, with about 11.23% of the whole dataset showing <90% identity to any previously reported sequence in GenBank. At least 4 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in mesosaline lakes, while up to eighteen OTUs in hypersaline lakes show very low CCM and CEM scores, indicating that these sequences are highly distantly related to any existing sequence. Most of the 18S rRNA gene sequence reads obtained in investigated mesosaline lakes is closely related to Holozoa group (48.13%), whereas Stramenopiles (26.65%) and Alveolates (10.84%) are the next most common groups. Hypersaline lakes in the Qaidam Basin are also dominated by Holozoa group, accounting for 26.65% of the total number of sequence reads. Notably, Chlorophyta group are only found in high abundance in Lake Gasikule (28.00%), whereas less represented in other hypersaline lakes such as Gahai (0.50%) and Xiaochaidan (1.15%). Further analysis show that the compositions of planktonic eukaryotic assemblages are also most variable between different sampling sites in the same lake. Out of the parameters, four show significant correlation to this CCA: altitude, calcium, sodium and potassium concentrations. Overall, this study shows important gaps in the current knowledge about planktonic microbial eukaryotes inhabiting Qaidam Basin (hyper) saline water bodies. The identified diversity and novelty patterns among eukaryotic plankton assemblages in saline lake are of great importance for understanding and interpreting their ecology and evolution.

  15. Evidence that sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) complete their life cycle within a tributary of the Laurentian Great Lakes by parasitizing fishes in inland lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Nicholas; Twohey, Michael B.; Miehls, Scott M.; Cwalinski, Tim A; Godby, Neal A; Lochet, Aude; Slade, Jeffrey W.; Jubar, Aaron K.; Siefkes, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) invaded the upper Laurentian Great Lakes and feeds on valued fish. The Cheboygan River, Michigan, USA, is a large sea lamprey producing tributary to Lake Huron and despite having a renovated dam 2 km from the river mouth that presumably blocks sea lamprey spawning migrations, the watershed upstream of the dam remains infested with larval sea lamprey. A navigational lock near the dam has been hypothesized as the means of escapement of adult sea lampreys from Lake Huron and source of the upper river population (H1). However, an alternative hypothesis (H2) is that some sea lampreys complete their life cycle upstream of the dam, without entering Lake Huron. To evaluate the alternative hypothesis, we gathered angler reports of lamprey wounds on game fishes upstream of the dam, and captured adult sea lampreys downstream and upstream of the dam to contrast abundance, run timing, size, and statolith microchemistry. Results indicate that a small population of adult sea lampreys (n < 200) completed their life cycle upstream of the dam during 2013 and 2014. This is the most comprehensive evidence that sea lampreys complete their life history within a tributary of the upper Great Lakes, and indicates that similar landlocked populations could occur in other watersheds. Because the adult sea lamprey population upstream of the dam is small, complete elimination of the already low adult escapement from Lake Huron might allow multiple control tactics such as lampricides, trapping, and sterile male release to eradicate the population.

  16. Northeast sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet to undergo the greatest inland expansion of supraglacial lakes during the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignéczi, Ádám.; Sole, Andrew J.; Livingstone, Stephen J.; Leeson, Amber A.; Fettweis, Xavier; Selmes, Nick; Gourmelen, Noel; Briggs, Kate

    2016-09-01

    The formation and rapid drainage of supraglacial lakes (SGL) influences the mass balance and dynamics of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS). Although SGLs are expected to spread inland during the 21st century due to atmospheric warming, less is known about their future spatial distribution and volume. We use GrIS surface elevation model and regional climate model outputs to show that at the end of the 21st century (2070-2099) approximately 9.8 ± 3.9 km3 (+113% compared to 1980-2009) and 12.6 ± 5 km3 (+174%) of meltwater could be stored in SGLs under moderate and high representative concentration pathways (RCP 4.5 and 8.5), respectively. The largest increase is expected in the northeastern sector of the GrIS (191% in RCP 4.5 and 320% in RCP 8.5), whereas in west Greenland, where the most SGLs are currently observed, the future increase will be relatively moderate (55% in RCP 4.5 and 68% in RCP 8.5).

  17. [Landscape ecological risk assessment and its spatio-temporal variations in Ebinur Lake region of inland arid area].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Fei; Zhou, Mei; Li, Xiao-hang; Ren, Yan; Wang, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The typical region of the Ebinur Lake Basin was chosen as study area. Landsat TM/OLI images for 1998, 2011 and 2013 were obtained. In the study area, landscape was classified into six types, including cropland, woodland, grassland, water body, bare lake bed, salinized land and unutilized land. Landscape indices and ecological risk index were calculated and spatially interpolated for the whole region, which was divided into five different risk zones: extremely low, low, moderate, high and extremely high ecological risk. They were carried out for assessing the spatio-temporal changes in ecological risk for each landscape pattern. The results showed that the regional landscape patterns had experienced significant changes, and the increase in the area of croplands was the main trend in landscape evolution from 1998-2013. The main part of the regional ecosystem faced extremely high risk in 1998, high risk in 2011 and low risk in 2013. The ecological risk level of the study area was significantly decreased in the overall period, and the total area of change from high to low risk was much greater than those from low to high risk.

  18. [Three wavelengths factor model of chlorophyll concentrations inversion based on different spectral dominating factors for inland lake].

    PubMed

    Shi, Kun; Li, Yun-Mei; Liu, Zhong-Hua; Xu, Yi-Fan; Xu, Xini; Wu, Chuan-Qing; Zhu, Li

    2010-12-01

    A hierarchical cluster analysis is applied to the data set of R(rs) spectra. Combing the inherent optical and measured water color characteristics, we determine factors of the variability for each class of R(rs) spectra. The R(rs) measured from Lake Taihu, Chaohu, Dianchi and Three Gorges Reservoir can be divided into three spectrally distinct classes: class 1, class 2 and class 3. Class 1 is associated with water optical property dominated by total suspended matter and phytoplankton. Class 2 is associated with water optical property dominated by phytoplankton. And Class 3 is associated with water optical property dominated by total suspended matter. The three wavelengths factor Chlorophyll a concentration inversion models were developed according to different class water optical characteristics, which means relative error and RMSE are 23.8% and 8.5 mg/m3, and have higher accuracy than the model developed without classification.

  19. Land use change and its effects on water quality in typical inland lake of arid area in China.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hong; Zhou, Xiaode; Guo, Mengjing; Wei, Wu

    2016-07-01

    Land-use change is very important for determining and assessing the influence of human activity on aquatic environment of rivers and lakes. The present work with Bosten River basin as the subject, analyzes features of dynamic land-use change of the basin from 1993 to 2013, in order to study the influence of land-use pattern change on the basin water quality, according to the land-use/land-cover(LUCC) chart from 2000 to 2013 made by ArcGIS and ENVI. It shows cultivated land, wetland and forestland constitute most of Bosten River basin, taking up over 41.7% of the total; from 1993-2000, LUCC of the basin is relatively small, with an increase of cultivated land, residential-industry land, water wetlands by 15.09%-18.33%,most of which are transformed from forestland, grassland and unused land; from 2000-2013, LUCC of the basin is relatively significant, with a continuing and bigger increase of cultivated land and Residential-industry area, most of which are transformed from water wetlands and unused land. Based on analysis of landuse pattern and water quality index, it can be told that water pollution is positively correlated to cultivated land and residential-industry area and negatively correlated to water and grassland. Also, the influence of land-use pattern change on water quality has been discussed, whose finding can serve as the scientific evidence for land-use optimization and water pollution control.

  20. Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum sp. nov. and Thioalkalivibrio jannaschii sp. nov., novel species of haloalkaliphilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from hypersaline alkaline Mono Lake (California).

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Gorlenko, Vladimir M; Tourova, Tat'yana P; Tsapin, Alexandre I; Nealson, Kenneth H; Kuenen, Gijs J

    2002-05-01

    Two strains of haloalkaliphilic, obligately autotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were isolated from the oxygen-sulfide interface water layer of stratified alkaline and saline Mono Lake, California, USA. Strain ALM 1T was a dominant species in enrichment on moderate-saline, carbonate-buffered medium (0.6 M total Na+, pH 10) with thiosulfate as an energy source and nitrate as a nitrogen source. Cells of ALM 1T are open ring-shaped and are non-motile. It has a high growth rate and activity of thiosulfate and sulfide oxidation and very low sulfur-oxidizing activity. Genetic comparison and phylogenetic analysis suggested that ALM 1T (= DSM 14477T = JCM 11371T) represents a new species of the genus Thioalkalimicrobium in the gamma-Proteobacteria, for which the name Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum sp. nov. is proposed. Another Mono Lake isolate, strain ALM 2T, dominated in enrichment on a medium containing 2 M total Na+ (pH 10). It is a motile vibrio which tolerates up to 4 M Na+ and produces a membrane-bound yellow pigment. Phylogenetic analysis placed ALM 2T as a member of genus Thioalkalivibrio in the gamma-Proteobacteria, although its DNA hybridization with the representative strains of this genus was only about 30%. On the basis of genetic and phenotypic properties, strain ALM 2T (= DSM 14478T = JCM 11372T) is proposed as Thioalkalivibrio jannaschii sp. nov..

  1. Isolation and characterization of an indigenous isolate of Dunaliella sp. for beta-carotene and glycerol production from a hypersaline lake in India.

    PubMed

    Phadwal, Kanchan; Singh, P K

    2003-01-01

    Dunaliella, a green alga grows in a wide range of marine and freshwater habitats such as oceans, brine lakes, salt marshes and salt-water ditches near the sea, predominantly in water bodies containing more than 10% salt. Sambhar salt lake, Rajasthan (India) was found as one of the natural habitat of Dunaliella sp. The species was isolated and screened for accumulation of beta-carotene and glycerol. It was studied for the growth attributes like total protein, optical density, total chlorophyll, total carotenoid, beta-carotene and glycerol. Under unstressed physico-chemical conditions the maximum beta-carotene and glycerol observed was 1.15 pg/cell and 94.26 pg/cell respectively. The stress (salt stress (NaCl), high light intensities and continuous light) allowed the alga to accumulate high beta-carotene (approximately 4.21 pg/cell under 118.18 micromole m(-2) s(-1) of light intensity) without massive reduction in biomass content. This opens up new avenues for exploring this strain for future research and its commercial exploitation.

  2. Fishing farmers or farming fishers? Fishing typology of inland small-scale fishing households and fisheries management in singkarak lake, west sumatra, indonesia.

    PubMed

    Yuerlita; Perret, Sylvain Roger; Shivakoti, Ganesh P

    2013-07-01

    Technical and socio-economic characteristics are known to determine different types of fishers and their livelihood strategies. Faced with declining fish and water resources, small-scale fisheries engage into transformations in livelihood and fishing practices. The paper is an attempt to understand these changes and their socio-economic patterns, in the case of Singkarak Lake in West Sumatra, Indonesia. Based upon the hypothesis that riparian communities have diverse, complex yet structured and dynamic livelihood systems, the paper's main objective is to study, document and model the actual diversity in livelihood, practices and performance of inland small-scale fisheries along the Singkarak Lake, to picture how households are adapted to the situation, and propose an updated, workable model (typology) of those for policy. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis were used to develop a typology of fishing households. The results show that small-scale fishers can be classified into different types characterized by distinct livelihood strategies. Three household types are identified, namely "farming fishers" households (type I, 30 %), "fishing farmers" households (type II, 30 %), and "mainly fishers" households (type III, 40 %). There are significant differences among these groups in the number of boats owned, annual fishing income, agriculture income and farming experience. Type I consists of farming fishers, well equipped, with high fishing costs and income, yet with the lowest return on fishing assets. They are also landowners with farming income, showing the lowest return on land capital. Type II includes poor fishing farmers, landowners with higher farming income; they show the highest return on land asset. They have less fishing equipment, costs and income. Type III (mainly fishers) consists of poorer, younger fishers, with highest return on fishing assets and on fishing costs. They have little land, low farming income, and diversified livelihood

  3. Fishing Farmers or Farming Fishers? Fishing Typology of Inland Small-Scale Fishing Households and Fisheries Management in Singkarak Lake, West Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuerlita; Perret, Sylvain Roger; Shivakoti, Ganesh P.

    2013-07-01

    Technical and socio-economic characteristics are known to determine different types of fishers and their livelihood strategies. Faced with declining fish and water resources, small-scale fisheries engage into transformations in livelihood and fishing practices. The paper is an attempt to understand these changes and their socio-economic patterns, in the case of Singkarak Lake in West Sumatra, Indonesia. Based upon the hypothesis that riparian communities have diverse, complex yet structured and dynamic livelihood systems, the paper's main objective is to study, document and model the actual diversity in livelihood, practices and performance of inland small-scale fisheries along the Singkarak Lake, to picture how households are adapted to the situation, and propose an updated, workable model (typology) of those for policy. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis were used to develop a typology of fishing households. The results show that small-scale fishers can be classified into different types characterized by distinct livelihood strategies. Three household types are identified, namely "farming fishers" households (type I, 30 %), "fishing farmers" households (type II, 30 %), and "mainly fishers" households (type III, 40 %). There are significant differences among these groups in the number of boats owned, annual fishing income, agriculture income and farming experience. Type I consists of farming fishers, well equipped, with high fishing costs and income, yet with the lowest return on fishing assets. They are also landowners with farming income, showing the lowest return on land capital. Type II includes poor fishing farmers, landowners with higher farming income; they show the highest return on land asset. They have less fishing equipment, costs and income. Type III (mainly fishers) consists of poorer, younger fishers, with highest return on fishing assets and on fishing costs. They have little land, low farming income, and diversified livelihood

  4. Cyanotoxins in inland lakes of the United States: Occurrence and potential recreational health risks in the EPA National Lakes Assessment 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loftin, Keith A.; Graham, Jennifer; Elizabeth Hilborn,; Sarah Lehmann,; Meyer, Michael T.; Dietze, Julie E.; Griffith, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    A large nation-wide survey of cyanotoxins (1161 lakes) in the United States (U.S.) was conducted during the EPA National Lakes Assessment 2007. Cyanotoxin data were compared with cyanobacteria abundance- and chlorophyll-based World Health Organization (WHO) thresholds and mouse toxicity data to evaluate potential recreational risks. Cylindrospermopsins, microcystins, and saxitoxins were detected (ELISA) in 4.0, 32, and 7.7% of samples with mean concentrations of 0.56, 3.0, and 0.061 mg/L, respectively (detections only). Co-occurrence of the three cyanotoxin classes was rare (0.32%) when at least one toxin was detected. Cyanobacteria were present and dominant in 98 and 76% of samples, respectively. Potential anatoxin-, cylindrospermopsin-, microcystin-, and saxitoxin-producing cyanobacteria occurred in 81, 67, 95, and 79% of samples, respectively. Anatoxin-a and nodularin-R were detected (LC/MS/MS) in 15 and 3.7% samples (n = 27). The WHO moderate and high risk thresholds for microcystins, cyanobacteria abundance, and total chlorophyll were exceeded in 1.1, 27, and 44% of samples, respectively. Complete agreement by all three WHO microcystin metrics occurred in 27% of samples. This suggests that WHO microcystin metrics based on total chlorophyll and cyanobacterial abundance can overestimate microcystin risk when compared to WHO microcystin thresholds. The lack of parity among the WHO thresholds was expected since chlorophyll is common amongst all phytoplankton and not all cyanobacteria produce microcystins.

  5. Bacteriophage in polar inland waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Säwström, Christin; Lisle, John; Anesio, A.M.; Priscu, John C.; Laybourn-Parry, J.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophages are found wherever microbial life is present and play a significant role in aquatic ecosystems. They mediate microbial abundance, production, respiration, diversity, genetic transfer, nutrient cycling and particle size distribution. Most studies of bacteriophage ecology have been undertaken at temperate latitudes. Data on bacteriophages in polar inland waters are scant but the indications are that they play an active and dynamic role in these microbially dominated polar ecosystems. This review summarises what is presently known about polar inland bacteriophages, ranging from subglacial Antarctic lakes to glacial ecosystems in the Arctic. The review examines interactions between bacteriophages and their hosts and the abiotic and biotic variables that influence these interactions in polar inland waters. In addition, we consider the proportion of the bacteria in Arctic and Antarctic lake and glacial waters that are lysogenic and visibly infected with viruses. We assess the relevance of bacteriophages in the microbial loop in the extreme environments of Antarctic and Arctic inland waters with an emphasis on carbon cycling.

  6. Analysis of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from hypersaline Mono Lake, California, on the basis of 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Ward, B B; Martino, D P; Diaz, M C; Joye, S B

    2000-07-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were detected by PCR amplification of DNA extracted from filtered water samples throughout the water column of Mono Lake, California. Ammonia-oxidizing members of the beta subdivision of the division Proteobacteria (beta-subdivision Proteobacteria) were detected using previously characterized PCR primers; target sequences were detected by direct amplification in both surface water and below the chemocline. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis indicated the presence of at least four different beta-subdivision ammonia oxidizers in some samples. Subsequent sequencing of amplified 16S rDNA fragments verified the presence of sequences very similar to those of cultured Nitrosomonas strains. Two separate analyses, carried out under different conditions (different reagents, locations, PCR machines, sequencers, etc.), 2 years apart, detected similar ranges of sequence diversity in these samples. It seems likely that the physiological diversity of nitrifiers exceeds the diversity of their ribosomal sequences and that these sequences represent members of the Nitrosomonas europaea group that are acclimated to alkaline, high-salinity environments. Primers specific for Nitrosococcus oceanus, a marine ammonia-oxidizing bacterium in the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria, did not amplify target from any samples.

  7. Resilience of estuarine phytoplankton and their temporal variability along salinity gradients during drought and hypersalinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nche-Fambo, F. A.; Scharler, U. M.; Tirok, K.

    2015-06-01

    In South African estuaries, there is no knowledge on the resilience and variability in phytoplankton communities under conditions of hypersalinity, extended droughts and reverse salinity gradients. Phytoplankton composition, abundance and biomass vary with changes in environmental variables and taxa richness declines specifically under hypersaline conditions. This research thus investigated the phytoplankton community composition, its resilience and variability under highly variable and extreme environmental conditions in an estuarine lake system (Lake St. Lucia, South Africa) over one year. The lake system was characterised by a reverse salinity gradient with hypersalinity furthest from the estuarine inlet during the study period. During this study, 78 taxa were recorded: 56 diatoms, eight green algae, one cryptophyte, seven cyanobacteria and six dinoflagellates. Taxon variability and resilience depended on their ability to tolerate high salinities. Consequently, the phytoplankton communities as well as total abundance and biomass differed along the salinity gradient and over time with salinity as the main determinant. Cyanobacteria were dominant in hypersaline conditions, dinoflagellates in marine-brackish salinities, green algae and cryptophytes in lower salinities (brackish) and diatoms were abundant in marine-brackish salinities but survived in hypersaline conditions. Total abundance and biomass ranged from 3.66 × 103 to 1.11 × 109 Cells/L and 1.21 × 106 to 1.46 × 1010 pgC/L respectively, with the highest values observed under hypersaline conditions. Therefore, even under highly variable, extreme environmental conditions and hypersalinity the phytoplankton community as a whole was resilient enough to maintain a relatively high biomass throughout the study period. The resilience of few dominant taxa, such as Cyanothece, Spirulina, Protoperidinium and Nitzschia and the dominance of other common genera such as Chlamydomonas, Chroomonas, Navicula, Gyrosigma

  8. 46 CFR 11.446 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) An applicant holding a license or MMC endorsement as master of ocean, near coastal, or Great Lakes... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and... Professional Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.446 Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and...

  9. 46 CFR 11.455 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... gross tons is one year of total service in the deck department of steam or motor, sail, or auxiliary sail vessels. To obtain authority to serve on the Great Lakes, three months of the required service... the United States (excluding the Great Lakes). (b) In order to obtain an endorsement for sail...

  10. 46 CFR 11.455 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... gross tons is one year of total service in the deck department of steam or motor, sail, or auxiliary sail vessels. To obtain authority to serve on the Great Lakes, three months of the required service... the United States (excluding the Great Lakes). (b) In order to obtain an endorsement for sail...

  11. 46 CFR 11.455 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... gross tons is one year of total service in the deck department of steam or motor, sail, or auxiliary sail vessels. To obtain authority to serve on the Great Lakes, three months of the required service... the United States (excluding the Great Lakes). (b) In order to obtain an endorsement for sail...

  12. Anaerobic bacteria from hypersaline environments.

    PubMed Central

    Ollivier, B; Caumette, P; Garcia, J L; Mah, R A

    1994-01-01

    Strictly anaerobic halophiles, namely fermentative, sulfate-reducing, homoacetogenic, phototrophic, and methanogenic bacteria are involved in the oxidation of organic carbon in hypersaline environments. To date, six anaerobic fermentative genera, containing nine species, have been described. Two of them are homoacetogens. Six species belong to the family Haloanaerobiaceae, as indicated by their unique 16S rRNA oligonucleotide sequences. Desulfohalobium retbaense and Desulfovibrio halophilus represent the only two moderately halophilic sulfate reducers so far reported. Among anoxygenic phototrophic anaerobes, a few purple bacteria with optimal growth at salinities between 6 and 11% NaCl have been isolated from hypersaline habitats. They belong to the genera Rhodospirillum, Chromatium, Thiocapsa, and Ectothiorhodospira. The commonest organisms isolated so far are Chromatium salexigens, Thiocapsa halophila, and Rhodospirillum salinarum. Extremely halophilic purple bacteria have most commonly been isolated from alkaline brines and require about 20 to 25% NaCl for optimal growth. They belong to the family Ectothiorodhospiraceae. Their osmoregulation involves synthesis or uptake of compatible solutes such as glycine-betaine that accumulate in their cytoplasm. The existence of methanogens in hypersaline environments is related to the presence of noncompetitive substrates such as methylamines, which originate mainly from the breakdown of osmoregulatory amines. Methanogenesis probably does not contribute to the mineralization of carbohydrates at NaCl concentrations higher than 15%. Above this concentration, sulfate reduction is probably the main way to oxidize H2 (although at rates too low to use up all the H2 formed) and occupies a terminal function kn the degradation of carbohydrates. Three genera and five species of halophilic methylotrophic methanogens have been reported. A bloom of phototrophic bacteria in the marine salterns of Salins-de-Giraud, located on the

  13. Hypersaline cyanobacterial mats as indicators of elevated tropical hurricane activity and associated climate change.

    PubMed

    Paerl, Hans W; Steppe, Timothy F; Buchan, Kenneth C; Potts, Malcolm

    2003-03-01

    The Atlantic hurricanes of 1999 caused widespread environmental damage throughout the Caribbean and US mid-Atlantic coastal regions. However, these storms also proved beneficial to certain microbial habitats; specifically, cyanobacteria-dominated mats. Modern mats represent the oldest known biological communities on earth, stromatolites. Contemporary mats are dominant biological communities in the hypersaline Bahamian lakes along the Atlantic hurricane track. We examined the impacts of varying levels of hypersalinity on 2 processes controlling mat growth, photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation, in Salt Pond, San Salvador Island, Bahamas. Hypersalinity (> 5 times seawater salinity) proved highly inhibitory to these processes. Freshwater input from Hurricane Floyd and other large storms alleviated this salt-inhibition. A predicted 10 to 40 year increase in Atlantic hurricane activity accompanied by more frequent "freshening" events will enhance mat productivity, CO2 sequestration and nutrient cycling. Cyanobacterial mats are sensitive short- and long-term indicators of climatic and ecological changes impacting these and other waterstressed environments.

  14. 46 CFR 11.452 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the Great Lakes). (b) In order to obtain an endorsement for sail or auxiliary sail vessels, the applicant must have six months of service on sail or auxiliary sail vessels. The required six months...

  15. 46 CFR 11.452 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the Great Lakes). (b) In order to obtain an endorsement for sail or auxiliary sail vessels, the applicant must have six months of service on sail or auxiliary sail vessels. The required six months...

  16. 46 CFR 11.452 - Service requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the Great Lakes). (b) In order to obtain an endorsement for sail or auxiliary sail vessels, the applicant must have six months of service on sail or auxiliary sail vessels. The required six months...

  17. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Luiz Fernando; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2012-01-01

    Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review. PMID:24031900

  18. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments.

    PubMed

    Martins, Luiz Fernando; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2012-07-01

    Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review.

  19. Extractable organic halogens (EOX) in sediments from selected Polish rivers and lakes--a measure of the quality of the inland water environment.

    PubMed

    Niemirycz, Elzbieta; Kaczmarczyk, Anna; Błazejowski, Jerzy

    2005-09-01

    EOX in sediments from the two main Polish rivers (the Vistula and the Oder/Odra) as well as five lakes was assayed coulometrically and its values examined with respect to the location of the sample collection points. EOX values were found to increase near industrial areas and large urban agglomerations, although mean values--comparable for rivers and lakes--were similar to those recorded elsewhere. EOX tends to rise as TOC does so. On the other hand, the EOX:TOC ratio decreases sharply in the case of lakes, since TOC values there are roughly one order of magnitude higher than in rivers. Furthermore, the contents of selected polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides are directly related to EOX values. These relationships constitute a basis for the application of EOX as a parameter reflecting the level of organochlorine compounds in environmental quality evaluation.

  20. 46 CFR 11.454 - Service requirements for mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... gross tons is six months of service in the deck department of steam or motor, sail, or auxiliary sail... United States (excluding the Great Lakes). (b) In order to obtain an endorsement for sail or auxiliary sail vessels, the applicant must submit evidence of three months of service on sail or auxiliary...

  1. 46 CFR 11.454 - Service requirements for mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... gross tons is six months of service in the deck department of steam or motor, sail, or auxiliary sail... United States (excluding the Great Lakes). (b) In order to obtain an endorsement for sail or auxiliary sail vessels, the applicant must submit evidence of three months of service on sail or auxiliary...

  2. 46 CFR 11.454 - Service requirements for mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... gross tons is six months of service in the deck department of steam or motor, sail, or auxiliary sail... United States (excluding the Great Lakes). (b) In order to obtain an endorsement for sail or auxiliary sail vessels, the applicant must submit evidence of three months of service on sail or auxiliary...

  3. 46 CFR 11.455 - Requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland self-propelled vessels of less than 100 GRT.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 1 year of total service in the deck department of self-propelled, sail, or auxiliary sail vessels... (excluding the Great Lakes). (b) To obtain an endorsement for sail or auxiliary sail vessels, the applicant must submit evidence of 6 months of service on sail or auxiliary sail vessels. The required 6 months...

  4. 46 CFR 11.454 - Service requirements for mate of Great Lakes and inland steam or motor vessels of not more than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... gross tons is six months of service in the deck department of steam or motor, sail, or auxiliary sail... United States (excluding the Great Lakes). (b) In order to obtain an endorsement for sail or auxiliary sail vessels, the applicant must submit evidence of three months of service on sail or auxiliary...

  5. [Remote Sensing Estimation of Chlorophyll-a Concentration in Inland Lakes Based on GOCI Image and Optical Classification of Water Body].

    PubMed

    Feng, Chi; Jin, Qi; Wang, Yan-nan; Zhao, Li-na; Lu, Heng; Li, Yun-mei

    2015-05-01

    Chlorophyll-a as one of the important water quality parameters is often used as a measure of the level of water eutrophication. The 326 measured data collected from Lake Taihu and Lake Dongting were classified based on their measured values of remote sensing reflectance spectra using an automatic clustering algorithm-two-step method, and three water types were finally classified. According to the location and width of GOCI satellite bands, the specific algorithm to estimate chlorophyll-a concentration for different water body types was developed. The bands at 490 nm and 555 nm were used for water body type I , while bands at 660 nm and 443 nm were selected for water body type II and bands at 745 nm and 680 nm were applied for water body type III. The accuracy assessment showed that the mean relative error decreased from 49. 78% to 38. 91% , 24. 19% and 22. 90% for water body type I , II and III, respectively, while the root mean square error decreased from 14.10 µg · L(-1) to 4.87 µg · L(-1), 8.13 µg · L(-1) and 11.66 µg · L(-1) for water body type I, II and III, respectively. The overall mean relative error decreased from 49. 78% to 29. 59% after classification, while the overall root mean square error was reduced from 14.10 µg · L(-1) to 9.29 µg · L(-1) after classification. The retrieval accuracy was significantly improved after classification. The chlorophyll-a concentration in Lake Taihu was retrieved using the GOCI image on May 13, 2013. The results showed that there was a significantly diurnal variation in the concentration of chllorophyll-a on May 13, 2013, and the regions with higher chlorophyll-a concentration were mainly distributed in the Zhushan Bay, Meiliang Bay and Gonghu Bay, while the regions with lower values were mainly located in the centre of the lake and the southern region. The chlorophyll-a concentration reduced significantly after 10:00 in the southwestern region of Lake Taihu. This method of retrieving, after classification

  6. A multi-sensor approach to monitor the desiccation of Lake Urmia in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javad Tourian, Mohammad; Elmi, Omid; Sneeuw, Nico

    2013-04-01

    Lake Urmia, a hypersaline lake in northwestern Iran is under the threat of drying up. The high importance of the lake's watershed for agricultural purposes demands a comprehensive monitoring of the watershed's behaviour. Spaceborne sensors provide a number of novel ways to monitor the hydrological cycle and its interannual changes. The use of GRACE gravity data allows to determine continental water storage changes and to close the water budget on short time scales. Satellite altimetry can be used as a tool for monitoring inland water surface elevations. Optical satellite imagery and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) provide the opportunity to monitor the spatial change in coastline, which can serv as a way to determine the water extent repeatedly in an appropriate time interval. In this study, water storage change from GRACE, surface water level over different parts of the lake from satellite altimetry together with surface water extent estimation from SAR and optical imagery are used and assimilated to monitor the lake's hydrological cycle. In addition to the spaceborne data, in situ observation of precipitation, groundwater level and temperature together with model based actual evapotranspiration are also employed for assimilation. A linear dynamic system consisting of a stochastic process model and observation equations is developed to assimilate the data from different sources. The dynamic system is solved by a Kalman filter to achieve an unbiased estimation with minimum variance. The results of the assimilation allow us to monitor the hydrological cycle with quantified error budgets over the lake.

  7. Hypersaline Microbial Mat Lipid Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsegereda; Turk, Kendra A.; Summons, Roger E.

    2002-01-01

    Lipid biomarkers and compound specific isotopic abundances are powerful tools for studies of contemporary microbial ecosystems. Knowledge of the relationship of biomarkers to microbial physiology and community structure creates important links for understanding the nature of early organisms and paleoenvironments. Our recent work has focused on the hypersaline microbial mats in evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Specific biomarkers for diatoms, cyanobacteria, archaea, green nonsulfur (GNS), sulfate reducing, sulfur oxidizing and methanotrophic bacteria have been identified. Analyses of the ester-bound fatty acids indicate a highly diverse microbial community, dominated by photosynthetic organisms at the surface. The delta C-13 of cyanobacterial biomarkers such as the monomethylalkanes and hopanoids are consistent with the delta C-13 measured for bulk mat (-10%o), while a GNS biomarker, wax esters (WXE), suggests a more depleted delta C-13 for GNS biomass (-16%o). This isotopic relationship is different than that observed in mats at Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park (YSNP) where GNS appear to grow photoheterotrophic ally. WXE abundance, while relatively low, is most pronounced in an anaerobic zone just below the cyanobacterial layer. The WXE isotope composition at GN suggests that these bacteria utilize photoautotrophy incorporating dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) via the 3-hydroxypropionate pathway using H2S or H2.

  8. Do copepods inhabit hypersaline waters worldwide? A short review and discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anufriieva, Elena V.

    2015-11-01

    A small number of copepod species have adapted to an existence in the extreme habitat of hypersaline water. 13 copepod species have been recorded in the hypersaline waters of Crimea (the largest peninsula in the Black Sea with over 50 hypersaline lakes). Summarizing our own and literature data, the author concludes that the Crimean extreme environment is not an exception: copepod species dwell in hypersaline waters worldwide. There are at least 26 copepod species around the world living at salinity above 100; among them 12 species are found at salinity higher than 200. In the Crimea Cletocamptus retrogressus is found at salinity 360×10-3 (with a density of 1 320 individuals/m3) and Arctodiaptomus salinus at salinity 300×10-3 (with a density of 343 individuals/m3). Those species are probably the most halotolerant copepod species in the world. High halotolerance of osmoconforming copepods may be explained by exoosmolyte consumption, mainly with food. High tolerance to many factors in adults, availability of resting stages, and an opportunity of long-distance transportation of resting stages by birds and/or winds are responsible for the wide geographic distribution of these halophilic copepods.

  9. Global carbon dioxide emissions from inland waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raymond, Peter A.; Hartmann, Jens; Lauerwald, Ronny; Sobek, Sebastian; McDonald, Cory P.; Hoover, Mark; Butman, David; Striegl, Robert G.; Mayorga, Emilio; Humborg, Christoph; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Durr, Hans H.; Meybeck, Michel; Ciais, Philippe; Guth, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) transfer from inland waters to the atmosphere, known as CO2 evasion, is a component of the global carbon cycle. Global estimates of CO2 evasion have been hampered, however, by the lack of a framework for estimating the inland water surface area and gas transfer velocity and by the absence of a global CO2 database. Here we report regional variations in global inland water surface area, dissolved CO2 and gas transfer velocity. We obtain global CO2 evasion rates of 1.8   petagrams of carbon (Pg C) per year from streams and rivers and 0.32  Pg C yr−1 from lakes and reservoirs, where the upper and lower limits are respectively the 5th and 95th confidence interval percentiles. The resulting global evasion rate of 2.1 Pg C yr−1 is higher than previous estimates owing to a larger stream and river evasion rate. Our analysis predicts global hotspots in stream and river evasion, with about 70 per cent of the flux occurring over just 20 per cent of the land surface. The source of inland water CO2 is still not known with certainty and new studies are needed to research the mechanisms controlling CO2 evasion globally.

  10. Global carbon dioxide emissions from inland waters.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Peter A; Hartmann, Jens; Lauerwald, Ronny; Sobek, Sebastian; McDonald, Cory; Hoover, Mark; Butman, David; Striegl, Robert; Mayorga, Emilio; Humborg, Christoph; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Dürr, Hans; Meybeck, Michel; Ciais, Philippe; Guth, Peter

    2013-11-21

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) transfer from inland waters to the atmosphere, known as CO2 evasion, is a component of the global carbon cycle. Global estimates of CO2 evasion have been hampered, however, by the lack of a framework for estimating the inland water surface area and gas transfer velocity and by the absence of a global CO2 database. Here we report regional variations in global inland water surface area, dissolved CO2 and gas transfer velocity. We obtain global CO2 evasion rates of 1.8(+0.25)(-0.25)  petagrams of carbon (Pg C) per year from streams and rivers and 0.32(+0.52)(-0.26)  Pg C yr(-1) from lakes and reservoirs, where the upper and lower limits are respectively the 5th and 95th confidence interval percentiles. The resulting global evasion rate of 2.1 Pg C yr(-1) is higher than previous estimates owing to a larger stream and river evasion rate. Our analysis predicts global hotspots in stream and river evasion, with about 70 per cent of the flux occurring over just 20 per cent of the land surface. The source of inland water CO2 is still not known with certainty and new studies are needed to research the mechanisms controlling CO2 evasion globally.

  11. Inland water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The work is reported of the panel concerning the application of space technology to the improved management of the nation's inland resources. The progress since the 1967-68 study is briefly reviewed. The data needed for the management of inlet water ways, and the potential benefits of better management are discussed along with 16 proposed demonstration projects.

  12. Biocoenosis response to hydrological variability in Southern Africa during the last 84 ka BP: A study of lipid biomarkers and compound-specific stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes from the hypersaline Lake Tswaing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, F.; Oberhänsli, H.; Wilkes, H.

    2014-01-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) changes in the SW Indian and SE South Atlantic Ocean are proposed to have controlled environmental changes at the southern tip of the African continent during the past. For a better understanding of the hydrological variations and their environmental impact during the past 84 ka before present (BP), we analyzed lipid biomarkers and their stable carbon (δ13C) and hydrogen (δD) isotopic compositions in sediments from Lake Tswaing (25°24‧30″ S, 28°04‧59″ E). δD values of long-chain n-alkanes from higher plants varied between - 155 and - 82‰ and matched well with SST gradient changes between the tropical and subtropical SW Indian Ocean. Increased SSTs correlate with deuterium-depleted δD values of n-alkanes and indicate a higher convection transporting more moisture across South Africa in the time from 84 to 80 ka BP, during the marine isotope stage (MIS) 4 and from 50 to 39 ka BP. During these humid periods high amounts of organic matter (up to 9.8% total organic carbon (TOC)) were deposited in Lake Tswaing. Periods with deuterium-enriched δD values of n-alkanes (76 ka BP, 73 to 69 ka BP, 55 to 51 ka BP, and 31.4 to 12.6 ka BP), indicating dry climate and increased lake water salinity, were associated with lower TOC contents and a higher degradation state of the terrestrial organic matter. We occasionally detected algae-derived C37- and C38-alkenones in the core, particularly in times when lake salinity and alkalinity were elevated. The disappearance of alkenones around 25 ka BP was accompanied by highly depleted δD values of n-alkanes from aquatic organisms (- 180‰ for n-C23) indicating a substantial freshening of the lake water. The vegetation surrounding Lake Tswaing during the last 84 ka BP consisted mainly of savanna-type plants, such as trees and shrubs with varying contributions from C4 grasses. The latter predominated particularly at the end of MIS 5 and during arid climatic conditions in MIS 3. We show that

  13. Monitoring Change in Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naftz, David; Angeroth, Cory; Freeman, Michael; Rowland, Ryan; Carling, Gregory

    2013-08-01

    Great Salt Lake is the largest hypersaline lake in the Western Hemisphere and the fourth largest terminal lake in the world (Figure 1). The open water and adjacent wetlands of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem support millions of migratory waterfowl and shorebirds from throughout the Western Hemisphere [Aldrich and Paul, 2002]. In addition, the area is of important economic value: Brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) residing in Great Salt Lake support an aquaculture shrimp cyst industry with annual revenues as high as $60 million.

  14. Landsat Thematic Mapper monitoring of turbid inland water quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, Richard G., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This study reports on an investigation of water quality calibration algorithms under turbid inland water conditions using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) multispectral digital data. TM data and water quality observations (total suspended solids and Secchi disk depth) were obtained near-simultaneously and related using linear regression techniques. The relationships between reflectance and water quality for Green Bay and Lake Michigan were compared with results for Yellowstone and Jackson Lakes, Wyoming. Results show similarities in the water quality-reflectance relationships, however, the algorithms derived for Green Bay - Lake Michigan cannot be extrapolated to Yellowstone and Jackson Lake conditions.

  15. Water Quality, Cyanobacteria, and Environmental Factors and Their Relations to Microcystin Concentrations for Use in Predictive Models at Ohio Lake Erie and Inland Lake Recreational Sites, 2013-14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, Donna S.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Stelzer, Erin A.; Ecker, Christopher D.; Brady, Amie M G.; Pam Struffolino,; Loftin, Keith A.

    2015-11-06

    The results of this study showed that water-quality and environmental variables are promising for use in site-specific daily or long-term predictive models. In order to develop more accurate models to predict toxin concentrations at freshwater lake sites, data need to be collected more frequently and for consecutive days in future studies.

  16. Virus-bacterium interactions in water and sediment of West African inland aquatic systems.

    PubMed

    Bettarel, Yvan; Bouvy, Marc; Dumont, Claire; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore

    2006-08-01

    The ecology of virioplankton in tropical aquatic ecosystems is poorly documented, and in particular, there are no references concerning African continental waters in the literature. In this study, we examined virus-bacterium interactions in the pelagic and benthic zones of seven contrasting shallow inland waters in Senegal, including one hypersaline lake. SYBR Gold-stained samples revealed that in the surface layers of the sites, the numbers of viruses were in the same range as the numbers of viruses reported previously for productive temperate systems. Despite high bacterial production rates, the percentages of visibly infected cells (as determined by transmission electron microscopy) were similar to the lowest percentages (range, 0.3 to 1.1%; mean, 0.5%) found previously at pelagic freshwater or marine sites, presumably because of the local environmental and climatic conditions. Since the percentages of lysogenic bacteria were consistently less than 8% for pelagic and benthic samples, lysogeny did not appear to be a dominant strategy for virus propagation at these sites. In the benthic samples, viruses were highly concentrated, but paradoxically, no bacteria were visibly infected. This suggests that sediment provides good conditions for virus preservation but ironically is an unfavorable environment for proliferation. In addition, given the comparable size distributions of viruses in the water and sediment samples, our results support the paradigm that aquatic viruses are ubiquitous and may have moved between the two compartments of the shallow systems examined. Overall, this study provides additional information about the relevance of viruses in tropical areas and indicates that the intensity of virus-bacterium interactions in benthic habitats may lower than the intensity in the adjacent bodies of water.

  17. Virus-Bacterium Interactions in Water and Sediment of West African Inland Aquatic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bettarel, Yvan; Bouvy, Marc; Dumont, Claire; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore

    2006-01-01

    The ecology of virioplankton in tropical aquatic ecosystems is poorly documented, and in particular, there are no references concerning African continental waters in the literature. In this study, we examined virus-bacterium interactions in the pelagic and benthic zones of seven contrasting shallow inland waters in Senegal, including one hypersaline lake. SYBR Gold-stained samples revealed that in the surface layers of the sites, the numbers of viruses were in the same range as the numbers of viruses reported previously for productive temperate systems. Despite high bacterial production rates, the percentages of visibly infected cells (as determined by transmission electron microscopy) were similar to the lowest percentages (range, 0.3 to 1.1%; mean, 0.5%) found previously at pelagic freshwater or marine sites, presumably because of the local environmental and climatic conditions. Since the percentages of lysogenic bacteria were consistently less than 8% for pelagic and benthic samples, lysogeny did not appear to be a dominant strategy for virus propagation at these sites. In the benthic samples, viruses were highly concentrated, but paradoxically, no bacteria were visibly infected. This suggests that sediment provides good conditions for virus preservation but ironically is an unfavorable environment for proliferation. In addition, given the comparable size distributions of viruses in the water and sediment samples, our results support the paradigm that aquatic viruses are ubiquitous and may have moved between the two compartments of the shallow systems examined. Overall, this study provides additional information about the relevance of viruses in tropical areas and indicates that the intensity of virus-bacterium interactions in benthic habitats may lower than the intensity in the adjacent bodies of water. PMID:16885276

  18. Phenotypic characterization and 16S rDNA identification of culturable non-obligate halophilic bacterial communities from a hypersaline lake, La Sal del Rey, in extreme South Texas (USA)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background La Sal del Rey ("the King's Salt") is one of several naturally-occurring salt lakes in Hidalgo County, Texas and is part of the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge. The research objective was to isolate and characterize halophilic microorganisms from La Sal del Rey. Water samples were collected from the lake and a small creek that feeds into the lake. Soil samples were collected from land adjacent to the water sample locations. Sample salinity was determined using a refractometer. Samples were diluted and cultured on a synthetic saline medium to grow halophilic bacteria. The density of halophiles was estimated by viable plate counts. A collection of isolates was selected, gram-stained, tested for catalase, and characterized using API 20E® test strips. Isolates were putatively identified by sequencing the 16S rDNA. Carbon source utilization by the microbial community from each sample site was examined using EcoPlate™ assays and the carbon utilization total activity of the community was determined. Results Results showed that salinity ranged from 4 parts per thousand (ppt) at the lake water source to 420 ppt in water samples taken just along the lake shore. The density of halophilic bacteria in water samples ranged from 1.2 × 102 - 5.2 × 103 colony forming units per ml (cfu ml-1) whereas the density in soil samples ranged from 4.0 × 105 - 2.5 × 106 colony forming units per gram (cfu g-1). In general, as salinity increased the density of the bacterial community decreased. Microbial communities from water and soil samples were able to utilize 12 - 31 carbon substrates. The greatest number of substrates utilized was by water-borne communities compared to soil-based communities, especially at lower salinities. The majority of bacteria isolated were gram-negative, catalase-positive, rods. Biochemical profiles constructed from API 20E® test strips showed that bacterial isolates from low-salinity water samples (4 ppt) showed the greatest

  19. Inland Water Temperature and the recent Global Warming Hiatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, S. J.; Healey, N.; Lenters, J. D.; O'Reilly, C.

    2015-12-01

    We are using thermal infrared satellite data in conjunction with in situ measurements to produce water temperatures for all the large inland water bodies in North America and the rest of the world for potential use as climate indicator. Recent studies have revealed significant warming of inland waters throughout the world. The observed rate of warming is - in many cases - greater than that of the ambient air temperature. These rapid, unprecedented changes in inland water temperatures have profound implications for lake hydrodynamics, productivity, and biotic communities. Scientists are just beginning to understand the global extent, regional patterns, physical mechanisms, and ecological consequences of lake warming. As part of our earlier studies we have collected thermal infrared satellite data from those satellite sensors that provide long-term and frequent spaceborne thermal infrared measurements of inland waters including ATSR, AVHRR, and MODIS and used these to examine trends in water surface temperature for approximately 169 of the largest inland water bodies in the world. We are now extending this work to generate temperature time-series of all North American inland water bodies that are sufficiently large to be studied using 1km resolution satellite data for the last 3 decades, approximately 268 lakes. These data are then being related to changes in the surface air temperature and compared with regional trends in water surface temperature derived from CMIP5/IPCC model simulations/projections to better predict future temperature changes. We will discuss the available datasets and processing methodologies together with the patterns they reveal based on recent changes in the global warming, with a particular focus on the inland waters of the southwestern USA.

  20. Insights of Phage-Host Interaction in Hypersaline Ecosystem through Metagenomics Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Motlagh, Amir Mohaghegh; Bhattacharjee, Ananda S.; Coutinho, Felipe H.; Dutilh, Bas E.; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Goel, Ramesh K.

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages, as the most abundant biological entities on Earth, place significant predation pressure on their hosts. This pressure plays a critical role in the evolution, diversity, and abundance of bacteria. In addition, phages modulate the genetic diversity of prokaryotic communities through the transfer of auxiliary metabolic genes. Various studies have been conducted in diverse ecosystems to understand phage-host interactions and their effects on prokaryote metabolism and community composition. However, hypersaline environments remain among the least studied ecosystems and the interaction between the phages and prokaryotes in these habitats is poorly understood. This study begins to fill this knowledge gap by analyzing bacteriophage-host interactions in the Great Salt Lake, the largest prehistoric hypersaline lake in the Western Hemisphere. Our metagenomics analyses allowed us to comprehensively identify the bacterial and phage communities with Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes as the most dominant bacterial species and Siphoviridae, Myoviridae, and Podoviridae as the most dominant viral families found in the metagenomic sequences. We also characterized interactions between the phage and prokaryotic communities of Great Salt Lake and determined how these interactions possibly influence the community diversity, structure, and biogeochemical cycles. In addition, presence of prophages and their interaction with the prokaryotic host was studied and showed the possibility of prophage induction and subsequent infection of prokaryotic community present in the Great Salt Lake environment under different environmental stress factors. We found that carbon cycle was the most susceptible nutrient cycling pathways to prophage induction in the presence of environmental stresses. This study gives an enhanced snapshot of phage and prokaryote abundance and diversity as well as their interactions in a hypersaline complex ecosystem, which can pave the way for

  1. Assembly-driven community genomics of a hypersaline microbial ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Podell, Sheila; Ugalde, Juan A; Narasingarao, Priya; Banfield, Jillian F; Heidelberg, Karla B; Allen, Eric E

    2013-01-01

    Microbial populations inhabiting a natural hypersaline lake ecosystem in Lake Tyrrell, Victoria, Australia, have been characterized using deep metagenomic sampling, iterative de novo assembly, and multidimensional phylogenetic binning. Composite genomes representing habitat-specific microbial populations were reconstructed for eleven different archaea and one bacterium, comprising between 0.6 and 14.1% of the planktonic community. Eight of the eleven archaeal genomes were from microbial species without previously cultured representatives. These new genomes provide habitat-specific reference sequences enabling detailed, lineage-specific compartmentalization of predicted functional capabilities and cellular properties associated with both dominant and less abundant community members, including organisms previously known only by their 16S rRNA sequences. Together, these data provide a comprehensive, culture-independent genomic blueprint for ecosystem-wide analysis of protein functions, population structure, and lifestyles of co-existing, co-evolving microbial groups within the same natural habitat. The "assembly-driven" community genomic approach demonstrated in this study advances our ability to push beyond single gene investigations, and promotes genome-scale reconstructions as a tangible goal in the quest to define the metabolic, ecological, and evolutionary dynamics that underpin environmental microbial diversity.

  2. Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    The lake is blue black and deep. It is a glaciated finger lake, clawed out of rock when ice retracted across Nova Scotia in a northerly direction during the last ice age. The lake is narrow, a little over a mile long, and deep, 90 to 190 feet in places according to local lore, off the charts in others. The author loves to swim there, with a sense…

  3. Heterotrophic Protists in Hypersaline Microbial Mats and Deep Hypersaline Basin Water Columns

    PubMed Central

    Edgcomb, Virginia P.; Bernhard, Joan M.

    2013-01-01

    Although hypersaline environments pose challenges to life because of the low water content (water activity), many such habitats appear to support eukaryotic microbes. This contribution presents brief reviews of our current knowledge on eukaryotes of water-column haloclines and brines from Deep Hypersaline Anoxic Basins (DHABs) of the Eastern Mediterranean, as well as shallow-water hypersaline microbial mats in solar salterns of Guerrero Negro, Mexico and benthic microbialite communities from Hamelin Pool, Shark Bay, Western Australia. New data on eukaryotic diversity from Shark Bay microbialites indicates eukaryotes are more diverse than previously reported. Although this comparison shows that eukaryotic communities in hypersaline habitats with varying physicochemical characteristics are unique, several groups are commonly found, including diverse alveolates, strameonopiles, and fungi, as well as radiolaria. Many eukaryote sequences (SSU) in both regions also have no close homologues in public databases, suggesting that these environments host unique microbial eukaryote assemblages with the potential to enhance our understanding of the capacity of eukaryotes to adapt to hypersaline conditions. PMID:25369746

  4. Database for Hydrological Time Series of Inland Waters (DAHITI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwatke, Christian; Dettmering, Denise

    2016-04-01

    Satellite altimetry was designed for ocean applications. However, since some years, satellite altimetry is also used over inland water to estimate water level time series of lakes, rivers and wetlands. The resulting water level time series can help to understand the water cycle of system earth and makes altimetry to a very useful instrument for hydrological applications. In this poster, we introduce the "Database for Hydrological Time Series of Inland Waters" (DAHITI). Currently, the database contains about 350 water level time series of lakes, reservoirs, rivers, and wetlands which are freely available after a short registration process via http://dahiti.dgfi.tum.de. In this poster, we introduce the product of DAHITI and the functionality of the DAHITI web service. Furthermore, selected examples of inland water targets are presented in detail. DAHITI provides time series of water level heights of inland water bodies and their formal errors . These time series are available within the period of 1992-2015 and have varying temporal resolutions depending on the data coverage of the investigated water body. The accuracies of the water level time series depend mainly on the extent of the investigated water body and the quality of the altimeter measurements. Hereby, an external validation with in-situ data reveals RMS differences between 5 cm and 40 cm for lakes and 10 cm and 140 cm for rivers, respectively.

  5. Vacuolated Beggiatoa-like filaments from different hypersaline environments form a novel genus.

    PubMed

    Hinck, Susanne; Mussmann, Marc; Salman, Verena; Neu, Thomas R; Lenk, Sabine; Beer, Dirk de; Jonkers, Henk M

    2011-12-01

    In this study, members of a specific group of thin (6-14 µm filament diameter), vacuolated Beggiatoa-like filaments from six different hypersaline microbial mats were morphologically and phylogenetically characterized. Therefore, enrichment cultures were established, filaments were stained with fluorochromes to show intracellular structures and 16S rRNA genes were sequenced. Morphological characteristics of Beggiatoa-like filaments, in particular the presence of intracellular vacuoles, and the distribution of nucleic acids were visualized. In the intracellular vacuole nitrate reached concentrations of up to 650 mM. Fifteen of the retrieved 16S rRNA gene sequences formed a monophyletic cluster and were phylogenetically closely related (≥ 94.4% sequence identity). Sequences of known filamentous sulfide-oxidizing genera Beggiatoa and Thioploca that comprise non-vacuolated and vacuolated filaments from diverse habitats clearly delineated from this cluster. The novel monophyletic cluster was furthermore divided into two sub-clusters: one contained sequences originating from Guerrero Negro (Mexico) microbial mats and the other comprised sequences from five distinct Spanish hypersaline microbial mats from Ibiza, Formentera and Lake Chiprana. Our data suggest that Beggiatoa-like filaments from hypersaline environments displaying a thin filament diameter contain nitrate-storing vacuoles and are phylogenetically separate from known Beggiatoa. Therefore, we propose a novel genus for these organisms, which we suggest to name 'Candidatus Allobeggiatoa'.

  6. Organismal and spatial partitioning of energy and macronutrient transformations within a hypersaline mat.

    PubMed

    Mobberley, Jennifer M; Lindemann, Stephen R; Bernstein, Hans C; Moran, James J; Renslow, Ryan S; Babauta, Jerome; Hu, Dehong; Beyenal, Haluk; Nelson, William C

    2017-03-15

    Phototrophic mat communities are model ecosystems for studying energy cycling and elemental transformations because complete biogeochemical cycles occur over millimeter-to-centimeter scales. Characterization of energy and nutrient capture within hypersaline phototrophic mats has focused on specific processes and organisms, however little is known about community-wide distribution of and linkages between these processes. To investigate energy and macronutrient capture and flow through a structured community, the spatial and organismal distribution of metabolic functions within a compact hypersaline mat community from Hot Lake have been broadly elucidated through species-resolved metagenomics and geochemical, microbial diversity, and metabolic gradient measurements. Draft reconstructed genomes of 34 abundant organisms revealed three dominant cyanobacterial populations differentially distributed across the top layers of the mat suggesting niche separation along light and oxygen gradients. Many organisms contained diverse functional profiles, allowing for metabolic response to changing conditions within the mat. Organisms with partial nitrogen and sulfur metabolisms were widespread indicating dependence upon metabolite exchange. In addition, changes in community spatial structure were observed over the diel. These results indicate that organisms within the mat community have adapted to the temporally dynamic environmental gradients in this hypersaline mat through metabolic flexibility and fluid syntrophic interactions, including shifts in spatial arrangements.

  7. Use of an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) to Measure Hypersaline Bidirectional Discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, K.K.; Loving, B.L.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey measures the exchange of flow between the north and south parts of Great Salt Lake, Utah, as part of a monitoring program. Turbidity and bidirectional flow through the breach in the causeway that divides the lake into two parts makes it difficult to measure discharge with conventional streamflow techniques. An acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be used to more accurately define the angles of flow and the location of the interface between the layers of flow. Because of the high salinity levels measured in Great Salt Lake (60-280 parts per thousand), special methods had to be developed to adjust ADCP-computed discharges for the increased speed of sound in hypersaline waters and for water entrained at the interface between flow layers.

  8. Investigations of Methane Production in Hypersaline Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad M.

    2015-01-01

    The recent reports of methane in the atmosphere of Mars, as well as the findings of hypersaline paleo-environments on that planet, have underscored the need to evaluate the importance of biological (as opposed to geological) trace gas production and consumption. Methane in the atmosphere of Mars may be an indication of life but might also be a consequence of geologic activity and/or the thermal alteration of ancient organic matter. Hypersaline environments have now been reported to be extremely likely in several locations in our solar system, including: Mars, Europa, and Enceladus. Modern hypersaline microbial mat communities, (thought to be analogous to those present on the early Earth at a period of time when Mars was experiencing very similar environmental conditions), have been shown to produce methane. However, very little is known about the physical and/or biological controls imposed upon the rates at which methane, and other important trace gases, are produced and consumed in these environments. We describe here the results of our investigations of methane production in hypersaline environments, including field sites in Chile, Baja California Mexico, California, USA and the United Arab Emirates. We have measured high concentrations of methane in bubbles of gas produced both in the sediments underlying microbial mats, as well as in areas not colonized by microbial mats in the Guerrero Negro hypersaline ecosystem, Baja California Mexico, in Chile, and in salt ponds on the San Francisco Bay. The carbon isotopic (d13C) composition of the methane in the bubbles exhibited an extremely wide range of values, (ca. -75 per mille ca. -25 per mille). The hydrogen isotopic composition of the methane (d2H) ranged from -60 to -30per mille and -450 to -350per mille. These isotopic values are outside of the range of values normally considered to be biogenic, however incubations of the sediments in contact with these gas bubbles reveals that the methane is indeed being

  9. Substrate limitation for methanogenesis in hypersaline environments.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Cheryl A; Poole, Jennifer A; Tazaz, Amanda M; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Bebout, Brad M

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by the increasingly abundant evidence for hypersaline environments on Mars and reports of methane in its atmosphere, we examined methanogenesis in hypersaline ponds in Baja California Sur, Mexico, and in northern California, USA. Methane-rich bubbles trapped within or below gypsum/halite crusts have δ¹³C values near -40‰. Methane with these relatively high isotopic values would typically be considered thermogenic; however, incubations of crust samples resulted in the biological production of methane with similar isotopic composition. A series of measurements aimed at understanding the isotopic composition of methane in hypersaline systems was therefore undertaken. Methane production rates, as well as the concentrations and isotopic composition of the particulate organic carbon (POC), were measured. Methane production was highest from microbial communities living within gypsum crusts, whereas POC content at gypsum/halite sites was low, generally less than 1% of the total mass. The isotopic composition of the POC ranged from -26‰ to -10‰. To determine the substrates used by the methanogens, ¹³C-labeled methylamines, methanol, acetate, and bicarbonate were added to individual incubation vials, and the methane produced was monitored for ¹³C content. The main substrates used by the methanogens were the noncompetitive substrates, the methylamines, and methanol. When unlabeled trimethylamine (TMA) was added to incubating gypsum/halite crusts in increasing concentrations, the isotopic composition of the methane produced became progressively lower; the lowest methane δ¹³C values occurred when the most TMA was added (1000 μM final concentration). This decrease in the isotopic composition of the methane produced with increasing TMA concentrations, along with the high in situ methane δ¹³C values, suggests that the methanogens within the crusts are operating at low substrate concentrations. It appears that substrate limitation is decreasing

  10. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Sandoval-Yuriar, Alonso; Jiménez-Bueno, Norma G; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc

    2015-01-01

    In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (EC) ranging from 0.7 to 157.2 dS/m and pH from 8.5 to 10.5 were explored. Archaeal communities in the 0.7 dS/m pH 8.5 soil had the lowest alpha diversity values and were dominated by a limited number of phylotypes belonging to the mesophilic Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Diversity and species richness were higher in the soils with EC between 9.0 and 157.2 dS/m. The majority of OTUs detected in the hypersaline soil were members of the Halobacteriaceae family. Novel phylogenetic branches in the Halobacteriales class were detected in the soil, and more abundantly in soil with the higher pH (10.5), indicating that unknown and uncharacterized Archaea can be found in this soil. Thirteen different genera of the Halobacteriaceae family were identified and were distributed differently between the soils. Halobiforma, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, and Natronomonas were found in all soil samples. Methanogenic archaea were found only in soil with pH between 10.0 and 10.3. Retrieved methanogenic archaea belonged to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales orders. The comparison of the archaeal community structures considering phylogenetic information (UniFrac distances) clearly clustered the communities by pH.

  11. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E.; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Sandoval-Yuriar, Alonso; Jiménez-Bueno, Norma G.; Marsch, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (EC) ranging from 0.7 to 157.2 dS/m and pH from 8.5 to 10.5 were explored. Archaeal communities in the 0.7 dS/m pH 8.5 soil had the lowest alpha diversity values and were dominated by a limited number of phylotypes belonging to the mesophilic Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Diversity and species richness were higher in the soils with EC between 9.0 and 157.2 dS/m. The majority of OTUs detected in the hypersaline soil were members of the Halobacteriaceae family. Novel phylogenetic branches in the Halobacteriales class were detected in the soil, and more abundantly in soil with the higher pH (10.5), indicating that unknown and uncharacterized Archaea can be found in this soil. Thirteen different genera of the Halobacteriaceae family were identified and were distributed differently between the soils. Halobiforma, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, and Natronomonas were found in all soil samples. Methanogenic archaea were found only in soil with pH between 10.0 and 10.3. Retrieved methanogenic archaea belonged to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales orders. The comparison of the archaeal community structures considering phylogenetic information (UniFrac distances) clearly clustered the communities by pH. PMID:26074731

  12. 46 CFR 11.435 - Service requirements for master of inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service requirements for master of inland steam or motor... Deck Officers § 11.435 Service requirements for master of inland steam or motor vessels of any gross... (excluding the Great Lakes) steam or motor vessels of any gross tons is: (a) One year of service as...

  13. 46 CFR 11.435 - Service requirements for master of inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Service requirements for master of inland steam or motor... Deck Officers § 11.435 Service requirements for master of inland steam or motor vessels of any gross... (excluding the Great Lakes) steam or motor vessels of any gross tons is: (a) One year of service as...

  14. 46 CFR 11.435 - Service requirements for master of inland steam or motor vessels of any gross tons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Service requirements for master of inland steam or motor... Deck Officers § 11.435 Service requirements for master of inland steam or motor vessels of any gross... (excluding the Great Lakes) steam or motor vessels of any gross tons is: (a) One year of service as...

  15. Microbial Fuel Cell as Life Detector: Arsenic Cycling in Hypersaline Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. G.; Blum, J. S.; Oremland, R. S.

    2006-12-01

    Detection of extant life on Mars or Europa is a future goal of exobiology. For the present, biosignatures arising from life in extreme environments on Earth suggest how to search for life elsewhere. One such biosignature is the electrical current derived from the metabolic activity of microorganisms, which may be measured using microbial fuel cells (MFCs). MFCs generate electricity by coupling bacterially mediated redox transformations to electrochemical reactions through a circuit. Our laboratory fuel cell employs solid graphite electrodes and uses a proton exchange membrane to separate anode (anaerobic) and cathode (aerobic) chambers. Mineral salts media are circulated by peristaltic pump through the chambers and through temperature-controlled reservoirs that are sparged with nitrogen (anode) or oxygen (cathode). In experiments with pure cultures, bacteria reduced arsenate to arsenite in the anode chamber, and produced electrical power in the process. Power production was sustained in the MFC only while bacteria were active. An arsenate respiring bacterium, Bacillus selenitireducens, isolated from moderately-hypersaline Mono Lake, CA grew on lactate using arsenate as the electron acceptor and also grew without arsenate, using the anode as the electron acceptor. Power densities (per unit area of anode surface) of 60 μW m-2 were achieved during growth without arsenate. Less power (3 μW m-2) was produced when arsenate was available because arsenate acted as an alternate electron acceptor to the anode. Another arsenate respiring bacterium, strain SLAS-1, isolated from extremely-hypersaline Searles Lake, CA respired lactate and reduced arsenate in the MFC, albeit more slowly. An arsenite oxidizing bacterium, Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii, isolated from Mono Lake will also be tested for its ability to generate electricity before proceeding to an examination of biocurrent production using natural sediments and waters from Mono Lake and Searles Lake.

  16. Development of a Halotolerant Community in the St. Lucia Estuary (South Africa) during a Hypersaline Phase

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Nicola K.; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2012-01-01

    Background The St. Lucia Estuary, Africa's largest estuarine lake, is currently experiencing unprecedented freshwater deprivation which has resulted in a northward gradient of drought effects, with hypersaline conditions in its northern lakes. Methodology/Principal Findings This study documents the changes that occurred in the biotic communities at False Bay from May 2010 to June 2011, in order to better understand ecosystem functioning in hypersaline habitats. Few zooplankton taxa were able to withstand the harsh environmental conditions during 2010. These were the flatworm Macrostomum sp., the harpacticoid copepod Cletocamptus confluens, the cyclopoid copepod Apocyclops cf. dengizicus and the ciliate Fabrea cf. salina. In addition to their exceptional salinity tolerance, they were involved in a remarkably simple food web. In June 2009, a bloom of an orange-pigmented cyanobacterium (Cyanothece sp.) was recorded in False Bay and persisted uninterruptedly for 18 months. Stable isotope analysis suggests that this cyanobacterium was the main prey item of F. cf. salina. This ciliate was then consumed by A. cf. dengizicus, which in turn was presumably consumed by flamingos as they flocked in the area when the copepods attained swarming densities. On the shore, cyanobacteria mats contributed to a population explosion of the staphylinid beetle Bledius pilicollis. Although zooplankton disappeared once salinities exceeded 130, many taxa are capable of producing spores or resting cysts to bridge harsh periods. The hypersaline community was disrupted by heavy summer rains in 2011, which alleviated drought conditions and resulted in a sharp increase in zooplankton stock and diversity. Conclusions/Significance Despite the current freshwater deprivation crisis, the False Bay region has shown to be resilient, harboring a unique biodiversity with species that are capable of enduring harsh environmental conditions. However, further freshwater deprivation may extend beyond the

  17. "The Effect of Alternative Representations of Lake ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lakes can play a significant role in regional climate, modulating inland extremes in temperature and enhancing precipitation. Representing these effects becomes more important as regional climate modeling (RCM) efforts focus on simulating smaller scales. When using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to downscale future global climate model (GCM) projections into RCM simulations, model users typically must rely on the GCM to represent temperatures at all water points. However, GCMs have insufficient resolution to adequately represent even large inland lakes, such as the Great Lakes. Some interpolation methods, such as setting lake surface temperatures (LSTs) equal to the nearest water point, can result in inland lake temperatures being set from sea surface temperatures (SSTs) that are hundreds of km away. In other cases, a single point is tasked with representing multiple large, heterogeneous lakes. Similar consequences can result from interpolating ice from GCMs to inland lake points, resulting in lakes as large as Lake Superior freezing completely in the space of a single timestep. The use of a computationally-efficient inland lake model can improve RCM simulations where the input data is too coarse to adequately represent inland lake temperatures and ice (Gula and Peltier 2012). This study examines three scenarios under which ice and LSTs can be set within the WRF model when applied as an RCM to produce 2-year simulations at 12 km gri

  18. Groundwater-Lake Interaction in the Dead Sea Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiro, Y.; Weinstein, Y.; Starinsky, A.; Yechieli, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Dead Sea hypersaline water system is unique in terms of its unusual geochemical composition, rapid lake level changes and water composition of the brines discharging along its shoreline. The Dead Sea can be used as a natural lab for studying groundwater-seawater interaction and saline water hydrological circulation along the aquifer-sea boundary. It provides an opportunity to follow the geochemical processes along a flow path from the lake into the aquifer and back into the lake. The lake level has been dropping since the 1960's due to human interference in its water budget, reaching a rate of 1 m/yr in recent years. Saline water circulation in coastal aquifers may be a major process that governs trace element mass balances in coastal areas. This study uses radium isotopes in order to quantify the lake water circulation in the Dead Sea aquifer. There are four naturally-occurring radium isotopes, with half-lives ranging from 3.7 days to 1600 years which are chain products of uranium and thorium isotopes. Radium isotopes are usually enriched in saline groundwater and therefore are good candidates for estimating seawater or hypersaline lake water circulation in the aquifer. Compared to most natural water bodies, the Dead Sea is extremely enriched in radium and barium, where both 226Ra and 228Ra activities and Ba concentration (145, 1-2 dpm/L and 5 mg/L, respectively) are 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than in ocean water, whereas the salinity of the Dead Sea is only 10 times higher. Circulated Dead Sea water in the aquifer contains decreased concentrations of 226Ra (60 dpm/L), Ba (1.5 mg/L), Sr (300 relative to 340 mg/L in the Dead Sea) and Sulfate (250 relative to 392 mg/L). We suggest that the low 226Ra and Ba concentrations are due to precipitation of barite and celestine from the supersaturated Dead Sea water on entering the aquifer. 228Ra and the shorter-lived 224Ra and 223Ra, which have much lower activities in the Dead Sea (up to 1.8, 3 and 0.8 dpm

  19. Sensitivity of a GCM simulation to inclusion of inland water surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bonan, G.B.

    1995-11-01

    A land surface model that includes a subgrid parameterization for inland water (lake, swamp, marsh) was coupled to a modified version of the NCAR CCM2. The coupled model was run for 5 yr with and without inland water subgrid points to determine the importance of inland water for global climate simulation. In July, the inclusion of these water bodies resulted in a spatially consistent signal in which high inland water regions were 2{degrees}-3{degrees}C cooler, had increased latent heat flux (10-45 W m{sup -2}), and decreased sensible heat flux (5-30 W m{sup -2}) compared to the simulation without these water bodies. These changes were statistically significant in the lake region of northwest Canada, the Great Lakes region of North America, the swamp and marsh region of the Siberian lowlands, and the lake region of East Africa, but were not significantly different in the swamp and marsh region of Finland and northwest Russia. The effect on Northern Hemisphere January air temperature was difficult to interpret due to large interannual variability. In tropical lake regions (East Africa), the response to lakes was less in the rainy season (January) than in the dry season (July). Precipitation was unchanged in both months except for the Great Lakes region where precipitation increased in January. These changes in temperature, precipitation, and surface fluxes were consistent with mesoscale modeling studies of the effects of lakes on climate and tended to bring the model closer to observations. In particular, the summer cooling in North America helped reduce a large warm temperature bias in the model, but did not eliminate the bias. The lakes had little effect on atmospheric moisture, radiation, or zonal circulation. These results show that subgrid-scale inland water bodies can be successfully added to global land surface models for use with GCMs. 35 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Analysis of fae and fhcD genes in Mono Lake, California.

    PubMed

    Nercessian, Olivier; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G; Joye, Samantha B; Lidstrom, Mary E; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2005-12-01

    Genes for two enzymes of the tetrahydromethanopterin-linked C(1) transfer pathway (fae and fhcD) were detected in hypersaline, hyperalkaline Mono Lake (California), via PCR amplification and analysis. Low diversity for fae and fhcD was noted, in contrast to the diversity previously detected in a freshwater lake, Lake Washington (Washington).

  1. Temperature Trends in Montane Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melack, J. M.; Sadro, S.; Jellison, R.

    2014-12-01

    Long-term temperature trends in lakes integrate hydrological and meteorological factors. We examine temperature trends in a small montane lake with prolonged ice-cover and large seasonal snowfall and in a large saline lake. Emerald Lake, located in the Sierra Nevada (California), is representative of high-elevation lakes throughout the region. No significant trend in outflow temperature was apparent from 1991to 2012. Snowfall in the watershed accounted for 93% of the variability in average summer lake temperatures. Mono Lake (California) lies in a closed, montane basin and is hypersaline and monomictic or meromictic. Temperature profiles have been collected from 1982 to 2010. In the upper water column, the July-August-September water temperatures increased 0.8-1.0°C over the 29 years. This rate of warming is less than published estimates based on satellite-derived skin temperatures and will discussed in the context of general limnological interpretation of temperature trends.

  2. Viruses Occur Incorporated in Biogenic High-Mg Calcite from Hypersaline Microbial Mats

    PubMed Central

    De Wit, Rutger; Gautret, Pascale; Bettarel, Yvan; Roques, Cécile; Marlière, Christian; Ramonda, Michel; Nguyen Thanh, Thuy; Tran Quang, Huy; Bouvier, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Using three different microscopy techniques (epifluorescence, electronic and atomic force microscopy), we showed that high-Mg calcite grains in calcifying microbial mats from the hypersaline lake “La Salada de Chiprana”, Spain, contain viruses with a diameter of 50–80 nm. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer analysis revealed that they contain nitrogen and phosphorus in a molar ratio of ~9, which is typical for viruses. Nucleic acid staining revealed that they contain DNA or RNA. As characteristic for hypersaline environments, the concentrations of free and attached viruses were high (>1010 viruses per g of mat). In addition, we showed that acid treatment (dissolution of calcite) resulted in release of viruses into suspension and estimated that there were ~15 × 109 viruses per g of calcite. We suggest that virus-mineral interactions are one of the possible ways for the formation of nano-sized structures often described as “nanobacteria” and that viruses may play a role in initiating calcification. PMID:26115121

  3. 75 FR 11870 - Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... Transportation System (IMTS) Investment Strategy Team activities, as well as the status of the funding for inland navigation projects and studies and the status of the Inland Waterways Trust Fund. FOR FURTHER...

  4. 78 FR 72070 - Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... scheduled to adjourn at approximately 1:00 p.m. Agenda: The agenda will include the status of funding for inland navigation projects and studies, the status of the Inland Waterways Trust Fund, funding for...

  5. Pyruvate: A key Nutrient in Hypersaline Environments?

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Aharon

    2015-01-01

    Some of the most commonly occurring but difficult to isolate halophilic prokaryotes, Archaea as well as Bacteria, require or prefer pyruvate as carbon and energy source. The most efficient media for the enumeration and isolation of heterotrophic prokaryotes from natural environments, from freshwater to hypersaline, including the widely used R2A agar medium, contain pyruvate as a key ingredient. Examples of pyruvate-loving halophiles are the square, extremely halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi and the halophilic gammaproteobacterium Spiribacter salinus. However, surprisingly little is known about the availability of pyruvate in natural environments and about the way it enters the cell. Some halophilic Archaea (Halorubrum saccharovorum, Haloarcula spp.) partially convert sugars and glycerol to pyruvate and other acids (acetate, lactate) which are excreted to the medium. Pyruvate formation from glycerol was also shown during a bloom of halophilic Archaea in the Dead Sea. However, no pyruvate transporters were yet identified in the genomes of halophilic Archaea, and altogether, our understanding of pyruvate transport in the prokaryote world is very limited. Therefore, the preference for pyruvate by fastidious and often elusive halophiles and the empirically proven enhanced colony recovery on agar media containing pyruvate are still poorly understood. PMID:27682096

  6. Hypersalinity drives physiological and morphological changes in Limia perugiae (Poeciliidae)

    PubMed Central

    Tello, Oscar; Krieger, Jonathan; Marmolejo, Arlen; Weaver, Kathleen F.; Garcia, Jerome V.; Cruz, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A fundamental question in biology is how an organism's morphology and physiology are shaped by its environment. Here, we evaluate the effects of a hypersaline environment on the morphology and physiology of a population of livebearing fish in the genus Limia (Poeciliidae). We sampled from two populations of Limia perugiae (one freshwater and one hypersaline) in the southwest Dominican Republic. We evaluated relative abundance of osmoregulatory proteins using western blot analyses and used a geometric morphometric approach to evaluate fine-scale changes to size and shape. Our data show that gill tissue isolated from hypersaline fish contained approximately two and a half times higher expression of Na+/K+ ATPase proteins. We also show evidence for mitochondrial changes within the gills, with eight times more complex I and four times higher expression of ATP synthase within the gill tissue from the hypersaline population. The energetic consequences to Limia living in saline and hypersaline environments may be a driver for phenotypic diversity, reducing the overall body size and changing the relative size and shape of the head, as well as impeding the growth of secondary sex features among the males. PMID:27402966

  7. Inland surface water: Chapter 18

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baron, J.S.; Driscoll, C.T.; Stoddard, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater aquatic ecosystems include rivers and streams, large and small lakes, reservoirs, and ephemeral ponds. Wetlands are defi ned and discussed in Chapter 17 of this report. It is estimated that there are 123,400 lakes with a surface area greater than 4 ha in the United States. Most lakes, however, are smaller than 4 ha; small lakes account for the majority of lake surface area both globally and in the United States (Table 18.1; Downing et al. 2006). Th e density of lakes varies greatly by region of the country, from 8.4 lakes per 100 km2 in the upper Midwest and 7.8 lakes per 100 km2 in Florida, to much lower values in other areas of the country (e.g., mid-Atlantic, Southeast, and West <1.0 lakes per 100 km2 ) ( Eilers and Selle 1991). Th e cumulative surface area of these lakes is approximately 9.5 million ha. Th e U.S. Geologic Survey's National Hydrographic Dataset (NHD) estimates that there are approximately 1.1 million km of perennial fl owing streams in the United States. Of these about 91 percent are fi rst through fourth order (“wadeable”) (US EPA 2006).

  8. Microbial diversity in hypersaline wastewater: the example of tanneries.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, O; Vasudevan, N; Thanasekaran, K; Moletta, R; Godon, J J

    2006-12-01

    In contrast to conventional wastewater treatment plants and saline environments, little is known regarding the microbial diversity of hypersaline wastewater. In this study, the microbial communities of a hypersaline tannery effluent, and those of three treatment systems operating with the tannery effluent, were investigated using 16S rDNA phylogenetic markers. The comparative analysis of 377 bacterial sequences revealed the high diversity of this type of hypersaline environment, clustering within 193 phylotypes (> or = 97% similarity) and covering 14 of the 52 divisions of the bacterial domain, i.e. Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Chlorobi, Planctomycetes, Spirochaetes, Synergistes, Chloroflexi, Thermotogae, Verrucomicrobia, OP3, OP11 and TM7. Most of the phylotypes were related to halophilic and pollutant-degrading bacteria. Using statistical analysis, the diversity of this type of environment was compared to that of other environmental samples selected on the basis of their salinity, oxygen content and organic load.

  9. Cyanotoxin occurrence associated with cyanoHAB events on an inland reservoir

    EPA Science Inventory

    A monitoring approach combining wet chemistry and high frequency (HF) water quality sensors was employed to improve our understanding of the ecology of an inland reservoir with a history of cyanoHAB events. The study was conducted with samples collected from Lake Harsha, is a mul...

  10. Biomass production from inland brines

    SciTech Connect

    Reach, C.D. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing inland saline waters to produce biomass through the application of marine aquaculture was investigated. From available data, the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum and the crustacea Artemia salina were selected as the experimental marine organisms. The proposed diatom served to establish primary productivity and concurrently provide a food source for the herbivorus crustacea. The objective of the first phase research was to investigate the ability of P. tricornutum and A. salina to survive in the inland saline environment. Clarified activated sludge and anaerobic digester effluents were evaluated as nutrient sources for the diatom cultures. Experimental results indicated that diatom and crustacea growth in the inland brine was equivalent to control cultures utilizing seawater. Wastewater effluents were successful as nutrient sources for the diatom cultures. Bioassay experiments conducted with petroleum related brines yielded mixed results respect to the survival and growth of the P. tricornutum and A. salina organisms. A second series of experiments involved cholornaphthalene, chlorophenanthene, and chlorophenanthrene, and chloroanthracene as the experimental hydrocarbons. Results of the diatom studies show chloroanthracene to induce toxic effects at a concentration of 500 ug/L. Artemia studies showed no acutely toxic effects relative to the test hydrocarbons at 50 and 100 ug/L.

  11. The enigma of prokaryotic life in deep hypersaline anoxic basins.

    PubMed

    van der Wielen, Paul W J J; Bolhuis, Henk; Borin, Sara; Daffonchio, Daniele; Corselli, Cesare; Giuliano, Laura; D'Auria, Giuseppe; de Lange, Gert J; Huebner, Andreas; Varnavas, Sotirios P; Thomson, John; Tamburini, Christian; Marty, Danielle; McGenity, Terry J; Timmis, Kenneth N

    2005-01-07

    Deep hypersaline anoxic basins in the Mediterranean Sea are a legacy of dissolution of ancient subterranean salt deposits from the Miocene period. Our study revealed that these hypersaline basins are not biogeochemical dead ends, but support in situ sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and heterotrophic activity. A wide diversity of prokaryotes was observed, including a new, abundant, deeply branching order within the Euryarchaeota. Furthermore, we demonstrated the presence of a unique, metabolically active microbial community in the Discovery basin, which is one of the most extreme terrestrial saline environments known, as it is almost saturated with MgCl2 (5 M).

  12. amoA-encoding archaea and thaumarchaeol in the lakes on the northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Jiang, Hongchen; Dong, Hailiang; Wang, Huanye; Wu, Geng; Hou, Weiguo; Liu, Weiguo; Zhang, Chuanlun; Sun, Yongjuan; Lai, Zhongping

    2013-01-01

    All known ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) belong to the phylum Thaumarchaeota within the domain Archaea. AOA possess the diagnostic amoA gene (encoding the alpha subunit of ammonia monooxygenase) and produce lipid biomarker thaumarchaeol. Although the abundance and diversity of amoA gene-encoding archaea (AEA) in freshwater lakes have been well-studied, little is known about AEA ecology in saline/hypersaline lakes. In this study, the distribution of the archaeal amoA gene and thaumarchaeol were investigated in nine Qinghai–Tibetan lakes with a salinity range from freshwater to salt-saturation (salinity: 325 g L-1). The results showed that the archaeal amoA gene was present in hypersaline lakes with salinity up to 160 g L-1. The archaeal amoA gene diversity in Tibetan lakes was different from those in other lakes worldwide, suggesting Tibetan lakes (high elevation, strong ultraviolet, and dry climate) may host a unique AEA population of different evolutionary origin from those in other lakes. Thaumarchaeol was present in all of the studied hypersaline lakes, even in those where no AEA amoA gene was observed. Future research is needed to determine the ecological function of AEA and possible sources of thaumarchaeol in the Qinghai–Tibetan hypersaline lakes. PMID:24273535

  13. Establishment of microbial eukaryotic enrichment cultures from a chemically stratified antarctic lake and assessment of carbon fixation potential.

    PubMed

    Dolhi, Jenna M; Ketchum, Nicholas; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M

    2012-04-20

    Lake Bonney is one of numerous permanently ice-covered lakes located in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The perennial ice cover maintains a chemically stratified water column and unlike other inland bodies of water, largely prevents external input of carbon and nutrients from streams. Biota are exposed to numerous environmental stresses, including year-round severe nutrient deficiency, low temperatures, extreme shade, hypersalinity, and 24-hour darkness during the winter (1). These extreme environmental conditions limit the biota in Lake Bonney almost exclusively to microorganisms (2). Single-celled microbial eukaryotes (called "protists") are important players in global biogeochemical cycling (3) and play important ecological roles in the cycling of carbon in the dry valley lakes, occupying both primary and tertiary roles in the aquatic food web. In the dry valley aquatic food web, protists that fix inorganic carbon (autotrophy) are the major producers of organic carbon for organotrophic organisms (4, 2). Phagotrophic or heterotrophic protists capable of ingesting bacteria and smaller protists act as the top predators in the food web (5). Last, an unknown proportion of the protist population is capable of combined mixotrophic metabolism (6, 7). Mixotrophy in protists involves the ability to combine photosynthetic capability with phagotrophic ingestion of prey microorganisms. This form of mixotrophy differs from mixotrophic metabolism in bacterial species, which generally involves uptake dissolved carbon molecules. There are currently very few protist isolates from permanently ice-capped polar lakes, and studies of protist diversity and ecology in this extreme environment have been limited (8, 4, 9, 10, 5). A better understanding of protist metabolic versatility in the simple dry valley lake food web will aid in the development of models for the role of protists in the global carbon cycle. We employed an enrichment culture approach to isolate potentially

  14. Metagenomic and lipid analyses reveal a diel cycle in a hypersaline microbial ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Karen; Logemann, Jörn; Heidelberg, Karla B; Emerson, Joanne B; Comolli, Luis R; Hug, Laura A; Probst, Alexander J; Keillar, Angus; Thomas, Brian C; Miller, Christopher S; Allen, Eric E; Moreau, John W; Brocks, Jochen J; Banfield, Jillian F

    2015-01-01

    Marine microbial communities experience daily fluctuations in light and temperature that can have important ramifications for carbon and nutrient cycling. Elucidation of such short time scale community-wide dynamics is hindered by system complexity. Hypersaline aquatic environments have lower species richness than marine environments and can be well-defined spatially, hence they provide a model system for diel cycle analysis. We conducted a 3-day time series experiment in a well-defined pool in hypersaline Lake Tyrrell, Australia. Microbial communities were tracked by combining cultivation-independent lipidomic, metagenomic and microscopy methods. The ratio of total bacterial to archaeal core lipids in the planktonic community increased by up to 58% during daylight hours and decreased by up to 32% overnight. However, total organism abundances remained relatively consistent over 3 days. Metagenomic analysis of the planktonic community composition, resolved at the genome level, showed dominance by Haloquadratum species and six uncultured members of the Halobacteriaceae. The post 0.8 μm filtrate contained six different nanohaloarchaeal types, three of which have not been identified previously, and cryo-transmission electron microscopy imaging confirmed the presence of small cells. Notably, these nano-sized archaea showed a strong diel cycle, with a pronounced increase in relative abundance over the night periods. We detected no eukaryotic algae or other photosynthetic primary producers, suggesting that carbon resources may derive from patchily distributed microbial mats at the sediment-water interface or from surrounding land. Results show the operation of a strong community-level diel cycle, probably driven by interconnected temperature, light abundance, dissolved oxygen concentration and nutrient flux effects. PMID:25918833

  15. Sunlight-induced carbon dioxide emissions from inland waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Birgit; Landelius, Tomas; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.; Machida, Nanako; Tranvik, Lars J.

    2014-07-01

    The emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from inland waters are substantial on a global scale. Yet the fundamental question remains open which proportion of these CO2 emissions is induced by sunlight via photochemical mineralization of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), rather than by microbial respiration during DOC decomposition. Also, it is unknown on larger spatial and temporal scales how photochemical mineralization compares to other C fluxes in the inland water C cycle. We combined field and laboratory data with atmospheric radiative transfer modeling to parameterize a photochemical rate model for each day of the year 2009, for 1086 lakes situated between latitudes from 55°N to 69°N in Sweden. The sunlight-induced production of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) averaged 3.8 ± 0.04 g C m-2 yr-1, which is a flux comparable in size to the organic carbon burial in the lake sediments. Countrywide, 151 ± 1 kt C yr-1 was produced by photochemical mineralization, corresponding to about 12% of total annual mean CO2 emissions from Swedish lakes. With a median depth of 3.2 m, the lakes were generally deep enough that incoming, photochemically active photons were absorbed in the water column. This resulted in a linear positive relationship between DIC photoproduction and the incoming photon flux, which corresponds to the absorbed photons. Therefore, the slope of the regression line represents the wavelength- and depth-integrated apparent quantum yield of DIC photoproduction. We used this relationship to obtain a first estimate of DIC photoproduction in lakes and reservoirs worldwide. Global DIC photoproduction amounted to 13 and 35 Mt C yr-1 under overcast and clear sky, respectively. Consequently, these directly sunlight-induced CO2 emissions contribute up to about one tenth to the global CO2 emissions from lakes and reservoirs, corroborating that microbial respiration contributes a substantially larger share than formerly thought, and generate annual C fluxes similar in

  16. Partial reline of Inland`s No. 7 blast furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrance, K.F. II; Johansson, J.; Carter, W.L.

    1995-10-01

    The background for the decision to partially reline No. 7 blast furnace that would achieve the same results as a complete reline is discussed. This approach was designed to reduce actual downtime on the furnace at a critical production period. Areas of work included the hearth, stack, stoves, gas cleaning and furnace top. Highlights of the project execution were: schedules; blowdown; salamander tap; quench; dig out/descale; scaffolding used; and brick installation. The furnace was blown-in 29 days after the blowdown and producing in excess of 9,000 tons/day after 12 days of operation. Inland has adopted a new definition for establishing campaign life based on refractory wear that includes a hearth monitoring system.

  17. 75 FR 57264 - Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ....m. Agenda: The Board will consider its project investment priorities for the next year, will hear the status of the implementation of the Inland Marine Transportation System (IMTS) Investment Strategy Team recommendations, as well as the status of the funding for inland navigation projects and...

  18. Employing the Disadvantaged: Inland Steel's Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Ralph

    1969-01-01

    Among the various approaches used by the Inland Steel Company in training ghetto youth for jobs, greatest promise has been shown by the Work Experience and Training Program initiated in 1965 at the Joseph T. Ryerson and Son plant, an Inland subsidiary located in the Lawndale (West Side) area of Chicago near the scene of the 1966 riots. Results…

  19. 78 FR 24697 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 162 RIN 1625-AB84 Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations AGENCY: Coast... the Federal Register. Basis and Purpose 33 CFR 162.117 prescribes inland navigation rules for the St... small entities for the following reason: This proposed amendment will lessen navigation restrictions...

  20. DAHITI - An Innovative Approach for Estimating Water Level Time Series over Inland Water using Multi-Mission Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwatke, Christian; Dettmering, Denise

    2016-04-01

    Satellite altimetry has been designed for sea level monitoring over open ocean areas. However, for some years, this technology has also been used to retrieve water levels from lakes, reservoirs, rivers, wetlands and in general any inland water body. In this contribution, a new approach for the estimation of inland water level time series is presented. The method is the basis for the computation of time series of rivers and lakes available through the web service 'Database for Hydrological Time Series over Inland Water' (DAHITI). It is based on an extended outlier rejection and a Kalman filter approach incorporating cross-calibrated multi-mission altimeter data from Envisat, ERS-2, Jason-1, Jason-2, Topex/Poseidon, and SARAL/AltiKa, including their uncertainties. The new approach yields RMS differences with respect to in situ data between 4 cm and 36 cm for lakes and 8 cm and 114 cm for rivers, respectively. Within this presentation, the new approach will be introduced and examples for water level time series for a variety of lakes and rivers will be shown featuring different characteristics such as shape, lake extent, river width, and data coverage. A comprehensive validation is performed by comparisons with in situ gauge data and results from external inland altimeter databases.

  1. DAHITI - an innovative approach for estimating water level time series over inland waters using multi-mission satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwatke, C.; Dettmering, D.; Bosch, W.; Seitz, F.

    2015-10-01

    Satellite altimetry has been designed for sea level monitoring over open ocean areas. However, for some years, this technology has also been used to retrieve water levels from reservoirs, wetlands and in general any inland water body, although the radar altimetry technique has been especially applied to rivers and lakes. In this paper, a new approach for the estimation of inland water level time series is described. It is used for the computation of time series of rivers and lakes available through the web service "Database for Hydrological Time Series over Inland Waters" (DAHITI). The new method is based on an extended outlier rejection and a Kalman filter approach incorporating cross-calibrated multi-mission altimeter data from Envisat, ERS-2, Jason-1, Jason-2, TOPEX/Poseidon, and SARAL/AltiKa, including their uncertainties. The paper presents water level time series for a variety of lakes and rivers in North and South America featuring different characteristics such as shape, lake extent, river width, and data coverage. A comprehensive validation is performed by comparisons with in situ gauge data and results from external inland altimeter databases. The new approach yields rms differences with respect to in situ data between 4 and 36 cm for lakes and 8 and 114 cm for rivers. For most study cases, more accurate height information than from other available altimeter databases can be achieved.

  2. Spatially-resolved stable isotope analysis of a hypersaline microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J.; Cory, A. B.; Lindemann, S. R.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    Hot Lake is a hypersaline, meromictic lake located in north-central Washington. High rates of evapotranspiration coupled with its location in an endorrheic basin contribute to the lake's high salinity. The predominant dissolved salt is magnesium sulfate; hypolimnion waters may seasonally exceed 2 M magnesium sulfate concentrations. In addition to extreme salinity, horizons within the lake seasonally exceed 50 °C, in part due to the enhanced light absorption by magnesium sulfate-saturated water. Despite extreme and highly variable seasonal conditions (salinity, temperature, photon flux), dense benthic microbial mats composed of cyanobacteria and bacterial heterotroph populations develop annually at the lake. These mats may exceed 5 mm in thickness and display stratification observable by eye associated with dominant bacterial phototrophic pigments. Typical mat stratification includes an orange surface layer followed by green and purple layers at increasing depth into the mat. Carbonates including aragonite and magnesite are observed within the mat and their formation is likely induced or influenced by microbial activities. While not exclusively limited to the green stratum in the mat, maximum carbonate content is within this layer. We are exploring the role Hot Lake's microbial mats play in carbon cycling within the system. Namely, we seek to understand the rates of carbon accumulation in the mat and associated sediments and the various forms this carbon takes (organic or inorganic species). We are assessing mat development, community composition, and carbon accumulation in pre-cleaned devices installed at the lake as they are colonized by native mat. We are using laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LA-IRMS) to provide spatially-resolved stable isotope analysis of mat cross-sections. Currently, this technique permits isotope analysis at the 50 μm scale, and can provide multiple isotope analyses within the thickness of each major layer of the mat. We

  3. Winter Lake Breezes near the Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosman, Erik T.; Horel, John D.

    2016-05-01

    Case studies of lake breezes during wintertime cold air pools in Utah's Salt Lake Valley are examined. While summer breezes originating from the Great Salt Lake are typically deeper, of longer duration, and have higher wind speeds than winter breezes, the rate of inland penetration and cross-frontal temperature differences can be higher during the winter. The characteristics of winter breezes and the forcing mechanisms controlling them (e.g., snow cover, background flow, vertical stability profile, clouds, lake temperature, lake sheltering, and drainage pooling) are more complex and variable than those evident in summer. During the afternoon in the Salt Lake Valley, these lake breezes can lead to elevated pollution levels due to the transport of fine particle pollutants from over the Great Salt Lake, decreased vertical mixing depth, and increased vertical stability.

  4. Transboundary Fisheries Science: Meeting the Challenges of Inland Fisheries Management in the 21st Century

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Midway, Stephen R.; Wagner, Tyler; Zydlewski, Joseph D.; Irwin, Brian J.; Paukert, Craig P.

    2016-01-01

    Managing inland fisheries in the 21st century presents several obstacles, including the need to view fisheries from multiple spatial and temporal scales, which usually involves populations and resources spanning sociopolitical boundaries. Though collaboration is not new to fisheries science, inland aquatic systems have historically been managed at local scales and present different challenges than in marine or large freshwater systems like the Laurentian Great Lakes. Therefore, we outline a flexible strategy that highlights organization, cooperation, analytics, and implementation as building blocks toward effectively addressing transboundary fisheries issues. Additionally, we discuss the use of Bayesian hierarchical models (within the analytical stage), due to their flexibility in dealing with the variability present in data from multiple scales. With growing recognition of both ecological drivers that span spatial and temporal scales and the subsequent need for collaboration to effectively manage heterogeneous resources, we expect implementation of transboundary approaches to become increasingly critical for effective inland fisheries management.

  5. Wet Tropospheric Corrections over Inland Water- Getting Ready for Sentinel-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, M. Joana; Lazaro, Clara

    2015-12-01

    This study addresses the problems associated to the retrieval of the wet tropospheric correction (WTC) for Sentinel-3 over inland water regions. Based on the experience acquired with the development of algorithms to improve the WTC retrieval over the open and coastal ocean, applied to the main altimetric missions, techniques for the estimation of improved WTC for Sentinel-3 over inland waters are being developed at the University of Porto (U.Porto). The potential of these techniques to generate continuous altimeter profiles over inland waters are illustrated with Envisat data over Lake Victoria (Africa). First results show that improved continuous WTC can be obtained, preserving the good MWR values, leading to a decrease in the water surface anomaly variance both with respect to the baseline MWR-derived WTC and ERA Interim model.

  6. Ophiuroids Discovered in the Middle Triassic Hypersaline Environment

    PubMed Central

    Salamon, Mariusz A.; Niedźwiedzki, Robert; Lach, Rafał; Brachaniec, Tomasz; Gorzelak, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Echinoderms have long been considered to be one of the animal phyla that is strictly marine. However, there is growing evidence that some recent species may live in either brackish or hypersaline environments. Surprisingly, discoveries of fossil echinoderms in non-(open)marine paleoenvironments are lacking. In Wojkowice Quarry (Southern Poland), sediments of lowermost part of the Middle Triassic are exposed. In limestone layer with cellular structures and pseudomorphs after gypsum, two dense accumulations of articulated ophiuroids (Aspiduriella similis (Eck)) were documented. The sediments with ophiuroids were formed in environment of increased salinity waters as suggested by paleontological, sedimentological, petrographical and geochemical data. Discovery of Triassic hypersaline ophiuroids invalidates the paleontological assumption that fossil echinoderms are indicators of fully marine conditions. Thus caution needs to be taken when using fossil echinoderms in paleoenvironmental reconstructions. PMID:23185442

  7. An Investigation of Summertime Inland Water Body Temperatures in California and Nevada (USA): Recent Trends and Future Projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healey, Nathan; Hook, Simon; Piccolroaz, Sebastiano; Toffolon, Marco; Radocinski, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Inland water body temperature has been identified as an ideal indicator of potential climate change. Understanding inland water body temperature trends is important for forecasting impacts to limnological, biological, and hydrological resources. Many inland water bodies are situated in remote locations with incomplete data records of in-situ monitoring or lack in-situ observations altogether. Thus, the utilization of satellite data is essential for understanding the behavior of global inland water body temperatures. Part of this research provides an analysis of summertime (July-September) temperature trends in the largest California/Nevada (USA) inland water bodies between 1991 and 2015. We examine satellite temperature retrievals from ATSR (ATSR-1, ATSR-2, AATSR), MODIS (Terra and Aqua), and VIIRS sensors. Our findings indicate that inland water body temperatures in the western United States were rapidly warming between 1991 and 2009, but since then trends have been decreasing. This research also includes implementation of a model called air2water to predict future inland water body surface temperature through the sole input of air temperature. Using projections from CMIP5-CCSM4 output, our model indicates that Lake Tahoe (USA) is expected to experience an increase of roughly 3 °C by 2100.

  8. Water: Wisconsin lakes, streams and wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wisconsin has a tremendous diversity of aquatic habitat: headwater streams, large rivers, inland lakes, and two Great Lakes. Knowing the fundamentals of aquatic ecosystem science is critical to understand how these ecosystems function and to predict how they will respond to human...

  9. 27 CFR 9.83 - Lake Erie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Colden, New York, exactly 12 statute miles inland from any point on the shore of Lake Erie. (3) The... 1:250,000 (1956, revised 1972); (3) “Erie,” scale 1:250,000 (1959, revised 1972); and (4) “Buffalo... on the islands of Lake Erie across the States of New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio. The...

  10. 40 CFR 35.1605-2 - Freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Freshwater lake. 35.1605-2 Section 35... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements for Protecting and Restoring Publicly Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-2 Freshwater lake. Any inland pond, reservoir, impoundment, or other similar body...

  11. Isolated history of the coastal plant Lathyrus japonicus (Leguminosae) in Lake Biwa, an ancient freshwater lake

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Tatsuo; Kaneko, Yuko; Setoguchi, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims Lake Biwa is one of the world's few ancient lakes. Formed ∼4 million years ago, the lake harbours many coastal species that commonly inhabit seashores. The beach pea Lathyrus japonicus is a typical coastal species of this freshwater lake, but its inland populations are faced with the threat of extinction. Here, we investigated the phylogeographical and population structures of both inland and coastal populations of L. japonicus. We also elucidated the historical isolation of the Lake Biwa population. Methodology In total, 520 individuals from 50 L. japonicus populations were sampled throughout the species distribution in Japan. Chloroplast haplotyping using intergenic spacers psbA–trnH and atpI–atpH was performed to investigate the phylogeographical structure as well as the genetic diversity of L. japonicus. Six nuclear microsatellite markers were also used to analyse the population structure. Principal results Population structure analyses of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA) identified inland and coastal groups. Based on the genetic differentiation, inland populations exhibited a single cpDNA haplotype and significantly lower values of HS, AR and FIS than coastal populations. In addition to the presence of a bottleneck, the lack of gene flow among inland populations was supported by estimates of recent migration rates between subpopulations. Conclusions Our data revealed that inland populations have been isolated in Lake Biwa as ‘landlocked’ populations since the predecessor lake was isolated from sea. This was also seen in a previous study of Calystegia soldanella. However, the high genetic differentiation, accompanied by a lack of gene flow among the Lake Biwa populations (according to the BAYESASS+ analysis), contradicts the results with C. soldanella. We conclude that because of the presence of a bottleneck and low genetic diversity of the inland populations, self-sustaining population persistence may be difficult in

  12. Plumbing the global carbon cycle: Integrating inland waters into the terrestrial carbon budget

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, J.J.; Prairie, Y.T.; Caraco, N.F.; McDowell, W.H.; Tranvik, L.J.; Striegl, R.G.; Duarte, C.M.; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Downing, J.A.; Middelburg, J.J.; Melack, J.

    2007-01-01

    Because freshwater covers such a small fraction of the Earth's surface area, inland freshwater ecosystems (particularly lakes, rivers, and reservoirs) have rarely been considered as potentially important quantitative components of the carbon cycle at either global or regional scales. By taking published estimates of gas exchange, sediment accumulation, and carbon transport for a variety of aquatic systems, we have constructed a budget for the role of inland water ecosystems in the global carbon cycle. Our analysis conservatively estimates that inland waters annually receive, from a combination of background and anthropogenically altered sources, on the order of 1.9 Pg C y-1 from the terrestrial landscape, of which about 0.2 is buried in aquatic sediments, at least 0.8 (possibly much more) is returned to the atmosphere as gas exchange while the remaining 0.9 Pg y-1 is delivered to the oceans, roughly equally as inorganic and organic carbon. Thus, roughly twice as much C enters inland aquatic systems from land as is exported from land to the sea. Over prolonged time net carbon fluxes in aquatic systems tend to be greater per unit area than in much of the surrounding land. Although their area is small, these freshwater aquatic systems can affect regional C balances. Further, the inclusion of inland, freshwater ecosystems provides useful insight about the storage, oxidation and transport of terrestrial C, and may warrant a revision of how the modern net C sink on land is described. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  13. High Frequency monitoring of cyanoHABs and cyanotoxin production to characterize periods of greatest risk on an inland reservoir

    EPA Science Inventory

    A monitoring approach combining wet chemistry and high frequency (HF) water quality sensors has been employed to improve our understanding of the ecology of an inland reservoir with a history of cyanoHAB events. Lake Harsha is a multi-use reservoir managed by the USACE in southwe...

  14. Kalman filter approach for estimating water level time series over inland water using multi-mission satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwatke, C.; Dettmering, D.; Bosch, W.; Seitz, F.

    2015-05-01

    Satellite altimetry has been designed for sea level monitoring over open ocean areas. However, since some years, this technology is also used for observing inland water levels of lakes and rivers. In this paper, a new approach for the estimation of inland water level time series is described. It is used for the computation of time series available through the web service "Database for Hydrological Time Series over Inland Water" (DAHITI). The method is based on a Kalman filter approach incorporating multi-mission altimeter observations and their uncertainties. As input data, cross-calibrated altimeter data from Envisat, ERS-2, Jason-1, Jason-2, Topex/Poseidon, and SARAL/AltiKa are used. The paper presents water level time series for a variety of lakes and rivers in North and South America featuring different characteristics such as shape, lake extent, river width, and data coverage. A comprehensive validation is performed by comparison with in-situ gauge data and results from external inland altimeter databases. The new approach yields RMS differences with respect to in-situ data between 4 and 38 cm for lakes and 12 and 139 cm for rivers, respectively. For most study cases, more accurate height information than from available other altimeter data bases can be achieved.

  15. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Mercury Accumulation in Lacustrine Sediments Across the Laurentian Great Lakes Region

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data from 103 sediment cores from the Great Lakes and inland lakes of the Great Lakes airshed were compiled to examine and provide a synthesis of patterns of historical and recent changes in mercury (Hg) deposition. Limited data from the lower Laurentian Great Lakes shows a lega...

  16. 76 FR 11216 - Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ....m. Agenda: The Board will be provided the status of the funding for inland navigation projects and...) Investment Strategy report recommendations, as well as be updated on the work being performed by...

  17. The operational use of Landsat for lake quality assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpace, F. L.; Fisher, L. T.

    1980-01-01

    A cooperative program between the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and the University of Wisconsin for the assessment, with Landsat data, of the trophic status of all the significant inland lakes in Wisconsin is described. The analysis technique is a semiautomatic data acquisition and handling system which, in conjunction with an analytical categorization scheme, can be used for classifying inland lakes into one of seven categories of eutrophication and one of four problem types.

  18. 46 CFR 11.450 - Tonnage limitations and qualifying requirements for endorsements as master or mate of Great Lakes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... endorsements as master or mate of Great Lakes and inland vessels of not more than 200 gross tons. 11.450... and qualifying requirements for endorsements as master or mate of Great Lakes and inland vessels of... master or mate of vessels of not more than 200 gross tons are issued in 50 ton increments based on...

  19. Organic volatile sulfur compounds in inland aquatic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    The speciation, concentration, and fluxes of organic volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in a wide variety of inland aquatic systems wee studied. Dissolved VSCs were sparged from water samples, trapped cryogenically, and quantified by gas chromatograph equipped with a flame photometric detector. Species detected and mean surface water concentrations were: carbonyl sulfide (COS), 0.091-7.6 nM; methanethiol (MSH), undetected-180 nM; dimethyl sulfide (DMS), 0.48-1290 nM; carbon disulfide (CS[sub 2]), undetected-69 nM; dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), undetected-68 nM. The range in surface water concentrations of over five orders of magnitude was influenced principally by lake depth and sulfate concentration ([SO[sub 4][sup 2[minus

  20. 33 CFR 162.132 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; communications rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; communications rules. 162.132 Section 162.132 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND...

  1. 33 CFR 162.140 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules. 162.140 Section 162.140 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND...

  2. 33 CFR 162.140 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules. 162.140 Section 162.140 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND...

  3. Fungal communities of young and mature hypersaline microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Sharon A; Tkavc, Rok; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina; Zalar, Polona; Acevedo, Manuel; Báez-Félix, Claribel

    2013-01-01

    Microbial mats are a laminated organic-sedimentary ecosystem, found in a wide range of habitats. Fluctuating diel and seasonal physicochemical gradients characterize these ecosystems, resulting in both strata and microenvironments that harbor specific microbial communities. This study was undertaken to compare two types of microbial mats across seasons to further understand the structure of fungal communities in hypersaline microbial mats and their seasonal dynamics. The structure and diversity of fungal communities was documented in young transient and mature hypersaline microbial mats from a tropical region (Puerto Rico) using one culture-dependent and three culture-independent molecular techniques based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of ribosomal DNA: terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and clone libraries. Two microbial mats (one young and transient, one mature) were sampled in Nov 2007 (wet season), Jan 2008 (intermediate season) and Mar 2008 (dry season) in the Cabo Rojo Solar Salterns on the southwestern coast of Puerto Rico. Traditional and molecular techniques revealed strong spatial and temporal heterogeneities in both microbial mats. Higher abundance of isolates and phylotypes were observed during the wet season, and diversity decreased from the top (oxic) to the bottom (anoxic) layers in both seasons. Some of the species isolated belong to the genera Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Hortaea, Pichia and Wallemia, which often are isolated from hypersaline environments. The most abundant clones belong to Acremonium strictum and Cladosporium halotolerans, which were not isolated in pure culture. The differences observed using culture-based and molecular techniques demonstrates the need of combining methods to study the diversity of fungi in a given substrate.

  4. Spatial distribution of Chloroflexus-like bacteria in the hypersaline artificial microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachar, A.; Polerecky, L.; Vamvakopoulos, K.; de Beer, D.; Jonkers, H. M.

    An artificial microbial mat grown in a mesocosm originated from the Hypersaline Lake of La Salada de Chiprana NE Spain was examined with respect to its organism s spatial distribution via high resolution methods A special attention was given to the elucidative Chloroflexus -like bacteria on which spatial distribution data is not available We have characterized this thick 1cm and developed mat for photopigments HPLC and obtained the general pigment distribution pattern Furthermore fiberoptic and photosynthetic microsensor measurements gave inner light attenuations and flux rates of oxygen within the different layers respectively Using fluorescence and spectral imaging we were able to detect characteristic pigmentation in the different layers FISH probes targeting Chloroflexus -like bacteria confirmed the visualization techniques and showed a single hybridized layer below the cyanobacterial layer as did the HPLC fiberoptic microsensor and fluorescence imaging We conclude that Chloroflexus -like bacteria are located below the cyanobacterial layer and above the purple sulfur bacteria and for the firs time we are able to show it by different independent state of the art techniques These approaches can be important for rapid community investigations within a millimeter scale microniches

  5. Sulfur cycling and methanogenesis primarily drive microbial colonization of the highly sulfidic Urania deep hypersaline basin.

    PubMed

    Borin, Sara; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Mapelli, Francesca; D'Auria, Giuseppe; Brusa, Tullio; Marzorati, Massimo; Rizzi, Aurora; Yakimov, Michail; Marty, Danielle; De Lange, Gert J; Van der Wielen, Paul; Bolhuis, Henk; McGenity, Terry J; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Malinverno, Elisa; Giuliano, Laura; Corselli, Cesare; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2009-06-09

    Urania basin in the deep Mediterranean Sea houses a lake that is >100 m deep, devoid of oxygen, 6 times more saline than seawater, and has very high levels of methane and particularly sulfide (up to 16 mM), making it among the most sulfidic water bodies on Earth. Along the depth profile there are 2 chemoclines, a steep one with the overlying oxic seawater, and another between anoxic brines of different density, where gradients of salinity, electron donors and acceptors occur. To identify and differentiate the microbes and processes contributing to the turnover of organic matter and sulfide along the water column, these chemoclines were sampled at a high resolution. Bacterial cell numbers increased up to a hundredfold in the chemoclines as a consequence of elevated nutrient availability, with higher numbers in the upper interface where redox gradient was steeper. Bacterial and archaeal communities, analyzed by DNA fingerprinting, 16S rRNA gene libraries, activity measurements, and cultivation, were highly stratified and metabolically more active along the chemoclines compared with seawater or the uniformly hypersaline brines. Detailed analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that in both chemoclines delta- and epsilon-Proteobacteria, predominantly sulfate reducers and sulfur oxidizers, respectively, were the dominant bacteria. In the deepest layers of the basin MSBL1, putatively responsible for methanogenesis, dominated among archaea. The data suggest that the complex microbial community is adapted to the basin's extreme chemistry, and the elevated biomass is driven largely by sulfur cycling and methanogenesis.

  6. Algal fossils from a late precambrian, hypersaline lagoon.

    PubMed

    Oehler, D Z; Oehler, J H; Stewart, A J

    1979-07-27

    Organically preserved algal microfossils from the Ringwood evaporite deposit in the Gillen Member of the Bitter Springs Formation (late Precambrian of central Australia) are of small size, low diversity, and probable prokaryotic affinities. These rather primitive characteristics appear to reflect the stressful conditions that prevailed in a periodically stagnant, hypersaline lagoon. This assemblage (especially in comparison with the much more diverse assemblages preserved in the Loves Creek Member of the same formation) illustrates the potential utility of Proterozoic microbiotas for basin analysis and local stratigraphic correlation and demonstrates the need to base evolutionary considerations and Precambrian intercontinental biostratigraphy on biotas that inhabited less restricted environments.

  7. Climate change in Brazil: perspective on the biogeochemistry of inland waters.

    PubMed

    Roland, F; Huszar, V L M; Farjalla, Vf; Enrich-Prast, A; Amado, A M; Ometto, J P H B

    2012-08-01

    Although only a small amount of the Earth's water exists as continental surface water bodies, this compartment plays an important role in the biogeochemical cycles connecting the land to the atmosphere. The territory of Brazil encompasses a dense river net and enormous number of shallow lakes. Human actions have been heavily influenced by the inland waters across the country. Both biodiversity and processes in the water are strongly driven by seasonal fluvial forces and/or precipitation. These macro drivers are sensitive to climate changes. In addition to their crucial importance to humans, inland waters are extremely rich ecosystems, harboring high biodiversity, promoting landscape equilibrium (connecting ecosystems, maintaining animal and plant flows in the landscape, and transferring mass, nutrients and inocula), and controlling regional climates through hydrological-cycle feedback. In this contribution, we describe the aquatic ecological responses to climate change in a conceptual perspective, and we then analyze the possible climate-change scenarios in different regions in Brazil. We also indentify some potential biogeochemical signals in running waters, natural lakes and man-made impoundments. The possible future changes in climate and aquatic ecosystems in Brazil are highly uncertain. Inland waters are pressured by local environmental changes because of land uses, landscape fragmentation, damming and diversion of water bodies, urbanization, wastewater load, and level of pollutants can alter biogeochemical patterns in inland waters over a shorter term than can climate changes. In fact, many intense environmental changes may enhance the effects of changes in climate. Therefore, the maintenance of key elements within the landscape and avoiding extreme perturbation in the systems are urgent to maintain the sustainability of Brazilian inland waters, in order to prevent more catastrophic future events.

  8. Spatially-resolved carbon flow through a hypersaline phototrophic microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J.; Lindemann, S. R.; Cory, A. B.; Courtney, S.; Cole, J. K.; Fredrickson, J.

    2013-12-01

    Hot Lake is a hypersaline, meromictic lake located in an endorheic basin in north-central Washington. Low annual rainfall and high evaporation rates contribute to the lake's high salinity. The predominant dissolved salt is magnesium sulfate, of which monimolimnion waters may seasonally exceed 2 M concentrations. Induced by its high salinity and meromictic nature, Hot Lake displays an inverse thermal gradient with deep horizons seasonally exceeding 50 °C. Despite extreme conditions, dense benthic microbial mats composed of cyanobacteria, anoxygenic photoheterotrophs, and bacterial heterotroph populations develop in the lake. These mats can exceed 1 cm in thickness and display vertical stratification in color due to bacterial pigmentation. Typical mat stratification includes an orange surface layer underlain by green and purple layers at increasing depth. Carbonates, including aragonite and magnesite, are observed within the mat and their formation is likely induced or influenced by microbial metabolic activities and associated pH excursions. We are exploring the role Hot Lake's microbial mats play in carbon cycling. Cyanobacteria are the dominant CO2-fixing organisms in the mat and we seek to understand the spatial and metabolic controls on how the carbon initially fixed by mat cyanobacteria is transferred to associated heterotrophic populations spread throughout the mat strata. Secondly, we seek to understand the overall net carbon balance of the mat through a growing season. We are using a stable isotope probing approach for assessing carbon uptake and migration through representative mat samples. We performed a series of ex situ incubations of freshly harvested mat samples in lake water amended with 13C-labeled bicarbonate or substrates commonly consumed by heterotrophs (including acetate and glucose) and using multiple stable isotope techniques to track label uptake, residence time, remineralization, and location within the mat. In addition to bulk isotope

  9. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in hypersaline cold seep sediments.

    PubMed

    Maignien, Loïs; Parkes, R John; Cragg, Barry; Niemann, Helge; Knittel, Katrin; Coulon, Stephanie; Akhmetzhanov, Andrey; Boon, Nico

    2013-01-01

    Life in hypersaline environments is typically limited by bioenergetic constraints. Microbial activity at the thermodynamic edge, such as the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulphate reduction (SR), is thus unlikely to thrive in these environments. In this study, carbon and sulphur cycling was investigated in the extremely hypersaline cold seep sediments of Mercator mud volcano. AOM activity was partially inhibited but still present at salinity levels of 292 g L(-1) (c. eightfold sea water concentration) with rates of 2.3 nmol cm(-3) day(-1) and was even detectable under saturated conditions. Methane and evaporite-derived sulphate comigrated in the ascending geofluids, which, in combination with a partial activity inhibition, resulted in AOM activity being spread over unusually wide depth intervals. Up to 79% of total cells in the AOM zone were identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as anaerobic methanotrophs of the ANME-1. Most ANME-1 cells formed monospecific chains without any attached partner. At all sites, AOM activity co-occurred with SR activity and sometimes significantly exceeded it. Possible causes of these unexpected results are discussed. This study demonstrates that in spite of a very low energy yield of AOM, microorganisms carrying this reaction can thrive in salinity up to halite saturation.

  10. Lipid Biomarkers for a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsege; Turk, Kendra A.

    2003-01-01

    The use of lipid biomarkers and their carbon isotopic compositions are valuable tools for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. As witnessed by the stromatolite record, benthic microbial mats grew in shallow water lagoonal environments where microorganisms had virtually no competition apart from the harsh conditions of hypersalinity, desiccation and intense light. Today, the modern counterparts of these microbial ecosystems find appropriate niches in only a few places where extremes eliminate eukaryotic grazers. Answers to many outstanding questions about the evolution of microorganisms and their environments on early Earth are best answered through study of these extant analogs. Lipids associated with various groups of bacteria can be valuable biomarkers for identification of specific groups of microorganisms both in ancient organic-rich sedimentary rocks (geolipids) and contemporary microbial communities (membrane lipids). Use of compound specific isotope analysis adds additional refinement to the identification of biomarker source, so that it is possible to take advantage of the 3C-depletions associated with various functional groups of organisms (i.e. autotrophs, heterotrophs, methanotrophs, methanogens) responsible for the cycling of carbon within a microbial community. Our recent work has focused on a set of hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico which support the abundant growth of Microcoleus-dominated microbial mats. Specific biomarkers for diatoms, cyanobacteria, archaea, green nonsulfur (GNS), sulfate reducing, and methanotrophic bacteria have been identified. Analyses of the ester-bound fatty acids indicate a highly diverse microbial community, dominated by photosynthetic organisms at the surface.

  11. Methanogenesis in hypersaline environments -Analogs for Ancient Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, Brad; Chanton, Jeff; Kelley, Cheryl; Tazaz, Amanda; Poole, Jennifer; García Maldonado, José Q.; López Cortés, Alejandro

    The recent findings of evidence of large bodies of hypersaline water which existed in the past on Mars have underscored the need to investigate those environments for evidence of past, as well as extant, life. Methane, a key biomarker gas, has been reported in the atmosphere of Mars, and is known to be produced by microbial mats which are present in most hypersaline environments on Earth. Modern microbial mat communities are thought to be extant analogues of communities which were present early in Earth's geologic history, when environmental condition on Earth and Mars were similar. Because methane may be an indication of life (biogenic methane) but might also be a consequence of geologic activity (abiotic methane) and/or the thermal alteration of ancient organic matter (thermogenic methane), the stable isotopic composition of methane (both carbon and hydrogen) will be a key criterion for determining whether or not the methane on Mars is biologically produced, and if so, how recently (i.e., biogenic vs. thermogenic methane). The goals of our study are: a) to document the range of the stable isotopic composition of methane (both carbon and hydrogen) in hypersaline environments, and b) to understand the role of biology in generating that stable isotopic composition. Our results will help provide a framework for the interpretation of methane stable isotopic data from Mars. We have measured high concentrations of methane in bubbles of gas present in the Guerrero Negro hypersaline ecosystem, Baja California Mexico and in salt ponds on the San Francisco Bay. These bubbles are present both in sediments underlying microbial mats (including one site where methane constitutes nearly 40% by volume of the bubbles), as well as in areas not colonized by microbial mats; layers of evaporitic minerals in some areas trap gas containing high concentrations of methane. The carbon isotopic (δ 13 C) composition of the methane in collected bubbles exhibited an extremely wide range of

  12. Holocene Depositional History of Shad Pond, a Hypersaline Coastal Lagoon, Eleuthera, Bahamas and Its Influence on Lucayan Occupation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boush, L. E.; Fentress, S.; Conroy, M.; Cook, A.; Miseridina, D.; Buynevich, I. V.; Myrbo, A.; Brown, E. T.; Berman, M.; Gnivecki, P.; Kjellmark, E.; Savarese, M.; Brady, K.

    2013-12-01

    Shad Pond, an enclosed hypersaline lagoon on the southeastern tip of Eleuthera, Bahamas reveals a ~5000-year record of hurricane activity, as well as sea-level and climate change history. Three sediment cores recovered 1.04-2.54 m of sediment over bedrock along a transect perpendicular to shoreline. Sediment composition and grain size, loss on ignition, X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements of the cores along with dune transects and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) profiles adjacent to the lake provide a comprehensive dataset to interpret the history of this coastal basin. The sedimentary sequence was composed of alternating lithofacies that included microbial mats, sand, and peat. Laminated mats often alternated with sandy layers in thin to medium-bedded units. Two peat layers were found in the basal part of the shore-distal core (Site 1) between 1.82-2.40 m and 2.53-2.54 m and were separated by a 13-cm-thick gray mud layer. In general, organic matter and carbonate content tracked granulometry and composition in all cores. High-resolution XRF scans of Ca and Sr at Site 1 show elevated levels ~3,700 cal yBP, which correlate with the top of the peat layer, but these elemental concentrations vary at Site 3. XRF measurements of Fe indicate a dust flux that has been recorded regionally throughout the Caribbean. Dune transects and GPR profiles indicate a phased history of the pond, beginning with initial stages as an open lagoon dominated by red mangrove, with black mangrove and buttonwood also present. The lake likely closed at approximately 3,700 cal yBP indicated by the transition between the upper peat and microbial mat layers. This could have been due to increased storm events in a regime of rising sea level. Aeolian aggradation continued to heighten the barrier between the bedrock headlands to its present position. Hurricane overwash deposits punctuated the algal mat accumulation throughout this time period. Present-day hypersaline conditions sustain algal mats

  13. Impacts of hypersaline acclimation on the acute toxicity of the organophosphate chlorpyrifos to salmonids.

    PubMed

    Maryoung, Lindley A; Lavado, Ramon; Schlenk, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Acclimation to hypersaline conditions enhances the acute toxicity of certain thioether organophosphate and carbamate pesticides in some species of euryhaline fish. As the organophosphate chlorpyrifos is commonly detected in salmonid waterways, the impacts of hypersaline conditions on its toxicity were examined. In contrast to other previously examined pesticides, time to death by chlorpyrifos was more rapid in freshwater than in hypersaline water (16ppth). The median lethal time (LT50) after 100μg/L chlorpyrifos exposure was 49h (95% CI: 31-78) and 120h (95% CI: 89-162) for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in freshwater and those acclimated to hypersaline conditions, respectively. Previous studies with hypersaline acclimated fish indicated induction of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes that may detoxify chlorpyrifos. In the current study, chlorpyrifos metabolism was unaltered in liver and gill microsomes of freshwater and hypersaline acclimated fish. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition in brain and bioavailability of chlorpyrifos from the aqueous exposure media were also unchanged. In contrast, mRNA expression of neurological targets: calcium calmodulin dependent protein kinase II delta, chloride intracellular channel 4, and G protein alpha i1 were upregulated in saltwater acclimated fish, consistent with diminished neuronal signaling which may protect animals from cholinergic overload associated with acetylcholinesterase inhibition. These results indicate targets other than acetylcholinesterase may contribute to the altered toxicity of chlorpyrifos in salmonids under hypersaline conditions.

  14. Rehabilitating China's largest inland river.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiqing; Chen, Yaning; Zhang, Yaoqi; Xia, Yang

    2009-06-01

    Wetlands are particularly important for conserving China's biodiversity but riparian wetlands in the Tarim River basin in western China have been reduced by 46% during the last 3 decades. The world's largest habitat for Populus euphratica, which is in the Tarim River basin, significantly shrank. To protect and restore the deteriorated ecosystems along the Tarim River and its associated wetlands, China's government initiated a multimillion dollar river restoration project to release water from upper dams to the dried-up lower reaches of the Tarim River starting in 2000. We monitored the responses of groundwater and vegetation to water recharge in the lower reaches of the river from 2000 to 2006 by establishing nine 1000-m-long transects perpendicular to the river at intervals of 20-45 km along the 320-km river course below the Daxihaizi Reservoir, the source of water conveyance, to Lake Taitema, the terminus of the Tarim River. Water recharges from the Daxihaizi Reservoir to the lower reaches of the Tarim River significantly increased groundwater levels and vegetation coverage at all monitoring sites along the river. The mean canopy size of the endangered plant species P. euphratica doubled after 6 years of water recharge. Some rare migrating birds returned to rest on the restored wetlands in summer along the lower reaches of the Tarim River. The biggest challenge facing decision makers, however, is to balance water allocation and water rights between agricultural and natural ecosystems in a sustainable way. A large number of inhabitants in the Tarim Basin depend on these limited water resources for a living. At the same time, the endangered ecosystems need to be protected. Given the ecological, socioeconomic, and sociopolitical realities in the Tarim Basin, adaptive water policies and strategies are needed for water allocation in these areas of limited water resources.

  15. 77 FR 44222 - Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... and the FY 2013 budget, status of the Olmsted Locks and Dam Project, and the Board will consider its project investment recommendations for the next year. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Mark R. Pointon...:00 p.m. Agenda: The agenda will include the status of funding for inland navigation projects...

  16. 77 FR 26522 - Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    .... Name of Committee: Inland Waterways Users Board (Board). Date: June 6, 2012. Location: The OMNI William Penn Hotel, 530 William Penn Place, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 at 412-281-7100 or 1-800-843-6664 or www.omnihotels.com/FindAHotel/PittsburghWilliamPenn.aspx . Time: Registration will begin at 8:30 a.m. and...

  17. 75 FR 41987 - Inland Navigation Rules; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AB43 Inland Navigation Rules; Correction ACTION: Final rule... Navigation Rules into the Code of Federal Regulations. That publication contained an error in...

  18. 77 FR 28825 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 162 RIN 1625-AB84 Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking; Correction of Preamble. SUMMARY: This document...

  19. 77 FR 27007 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 162 RIN 1625-AB84 Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations AGENCY: Coast... waterways navigation regulations. Specifically, this rule proposes to redefine the geographical points which... navigation restrictions on the public and private industry. If you think that your business, organization,...

  20. Anammox bacterial populations in deep marine hypersaline gradient systems.

    PubMed

    Borin, Sara; Mapelli, Francesca; Rolli, Eleonora; Song, Bongkeun; Tobias, Craig; Schmid, Markus C; De Lange, Gert J; Reichart, Gert J; Schouten, Stefan; Jetten, Mike; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2013-03-01

    To extend the knowledge of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) habitats, bacterial communities were examined in two hypersaline sulphidic basins in Eastern Mediterranean Sea. The 2 m thick seawater-brine haloclines of the deep anoxic hypersaline basins Bannock and L'Atalante were sampled in intervals of 10 cm with increasing salinity. (15)N isotope pairing incubation experiments showed the production of (29)N2 and (30)N2 gases in the chemoclines, ranging from 6.0 to 9.2 % salinity of the L'Atalante basin. Potential anammox rates ranged from 2.52 to 49.65 nmol N2 L(-1) day(-1) while denitrification was a major N2 production pathway, accounting for more than 85.5 % of total N2 production. Anammox-related 16S rRNA genes were detected along the L'Atalante and Bannock haloclines up to 24 % salinity, and the amplification of the hydrazine synthase genes (hzsA) further confirmed the presence of anammox bacteria in Bannock. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes identified representatives of the marine anammox genus 'Candidatus Scalindua' and putatively new operational taxonomic units closely affiliated to sequences retrieved in marine environments that have documented anammox activity. 'Scalindua brodae' like sequences constituted up to 84.4 % of the sequences retrieved from Bannock. The anammox community in L'Atalante was different than in Bannock and was stratified according to salinity increase. This study putatively extends anammox bacterial habitats to extremely saline sulphidic ecosystems.

  1. 77 FR 52175 - Changes to the Inland Navigation Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    .... Changes to the Inland Navigation Rules; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77 , No. 167 / Tuesday..., 85, 86, 87, and 88 RIN 1625-AB88 Changes to the Inland Navigation Rules AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard proposes to amend the inland...

  2. 78 FR 23849 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulation: Sacramento River, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 162 RIN 1625-AB95 Inland Waterways Navigation Regulation: Sacramento River... entitled, ``Inland Waterways Navigation Regulation: Sacramento River, CA'' in the Federal Register (78 FR 4785). That rule announced our intent to update the inland waterways navigation regulations by...

  3. Urmia Lake (Northwest Iran): a brief review

    PubMed Central

    Eimanifar, Amin; Mohebbi, Feridon

    2007-01-01

    Lake Urmia (or Ormiyeh) is one of the largest hypersaline lakes in the world and the habitat of a unique bisexual Artemia species (A. urmiana). Despite this, and several other values of the lake, little literature on it has been published. The present paper is an attempt to provide a brief review on various aspects of the lake. Urmia Lake, located in northwestern Iran, is an oligotrophic lake of thalassohaline origin with a total surface area between 4750 and 6100 km2 and a maximum depth of 16 m at an altitude of 1250 m. The lake is divided into north and south parts separated by a causeway in which a 1500-m gap provides little exchange of water between the two parts. Due to drought and increased demands for agricultural water in the lake's basin, the salinity of the lake has risen to more than 300 g/L during recent years, and large areas of the lake bed have been desiccated. Therefore, management and conservation of this incomparable ecosystem should be considered to improve the current condition by fisheries research institutes. PMID:17506897

  4. Improved inland water levels from SAR altimetry using novel empirical and physical retrackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villadsen, Heidi; Deng, Xiaoli; Andersen, Ole B.; Stenseng, Lars; Nielsen, Karina; Knudsen, Per

    2016-06-01

    Satellite altimetry has proven a valuable resource of information on river and lake levels where in situ data are sparse or non-existent. In this study several new methods for obtaining stable inland water levels from CryoSat-2 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) altimetry are presented and evaluated. In addition, the possible benefits from combining physical and empirical retrackers are investigated. The retracking methods evaluated in this paper include the physical SAR Altimetry MOde Studies and Applications (SAMOSA3) model, a traditional subwaveform threshold retracker, the proposed Multiple Waveform Persistent Peak (MWaPP) retracker, and a method combining the physical and empirical retrackers. Using a physical SAR waveform retracker over inland water has not been attempted before but shows great promise in this study. The evaluation is performed for two medium-sized lakes (Lake Vänern in Sweden and Lake Okeechobee in Florida), and in the Amazon River in Brazil. Comparing with in situ data shows that using the SAMOSA3 retracker generally provides the lowest root-mean-squared-errors (RMSE), closely followed by the MWaPP retracker. For the empirical retrackers, the RMSE values obtained when comparing with in situ data in Lake Vänern and Lake Okeechobee are in the order of 2-5 cm for well-behaved waveforms. Combining the physical and empirical retrackers did not offer significantly improved mean track standard deviations or RMSEs. Based on these studies, it is suggested that future SAR derived water levels are obtained using the SAMOSA3 retracker whenever information about other physical properties apart from range is desired. Otherwise we suggest using the empirical MWaPP retracker described in this paper, which is both easy to implement, computationally efficient, and gives a height estimate for even the most contaminated waveforms.

  5. 33 CFR 162.120 - Harbors on Lake Michigan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Harbors on Lake Michigan. 162.120 Section 162.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.120 Harbors on Lake...

  6. 33 CFR 162.120 - Harbors on Lake Michigan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Harbors on Lake Michigan. 162.120 Section 162.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.120 Harbors on Lake...

  7. Comprehensive lake dynamics mapping at continental scales using Landsat 8

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inland lakes, important water resources, play a crucial role in the global water cycle and are sensitive to global warming and human activities. There clearly is a pressing need to understand temporal and spatial variations of lakes at global and continental scales. The recent operation of Landsat...

  8. MILLIMETER-SCALE GENETIC GRADIENTS AND COMMUNITY-LEVEL MOLECULAR CONVERGENCE IN A HYPERSALINE MICROBIAL MAT

    SciTech Connect

    Fenner, Marsha W; Kunin, Victor; Raes, Jeroen; Harris, J. Kirk; Spear, John R.; Walker, Jeffrey J.; Ivanova, Natalia; Mering, Christian von; Bebout, Brad M.; Pace, Norman R.; Bork, Peer; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-04-30

    To investigate the extent of genetic stratification in structured microbial communities, we compared the metagenomes of 10 successive layers of a phylogenetically complex hypersaline mat from Guerrero Negro, Mexico. We found pronounced millimeter-scale genetic gradients that are consistent with the physicochemical profile of the mat. Despite these gradients, all layers displayed near identical and acid-shifted isoelectric point profiles due to a molecular convergence of amino acid usage indicating that hypersalinity enforces an overriding selective pressure on the mat community.

  9. Inland Water Temperature: An Ideal Indicator for the National Climate Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, S. J.; Lenters, J. D.; O'Reilly, C.; Healey, N. C.

    2014-12-01

    NASA is a significant contributor to the U.S. National Climate Assessment (NCA), which is a central component of the 2012-2022 U.S. Global Change Research Program Strategic Plan. The NCA has identified the need for indicators that provide a clear, concise way of communicating to NCA audiences about not only the status and trends of physical drivers of the climate system, but also the ecological and socioeconomic impacts, vulnerabilities, and responses to those drivers. We are using thermal infrared satellite data in conjunction with in situ measurements to produce water temperatures for all the large inland water bodies in North America for potential use as an indicator for the NCA. Recent studies have revealed significant warming of inland waters throughout the world. The observed rate of warming is - in many cases - greater than that of the ambient air temperature. These rapid, unprecedented changes in inland water temperatures have profound implications for lake hydrodynamics, productivity, and biotic communities. Scientists are just beginning to understand the global extent, regional patterns, physical mechanisms, and ecological consequences of lake warming. As part of our earlier studies we have collected thermal infrared satellite data from those satellite sensors that provide long-term and frequent spaceborne thermal infrared measurements of inland waters including ATSR, AVHRR, and MODIS and used these to examine trends in water surface temperature for approximately 100 of the largest inland water bodies in the world. We are now extending this work to generate temperature time-series of all North American inland water bodies that are sufficiently large to be studied using 1km resolution satellite data for the last 3 decades. These data are then being related to changes in the surface air temperature and compared with regional trends in water surface temperature derived from CMIP5/IPCC model simulations/projections to better predict future temperature changes

  10. SICS: the Southern Inland and Coastal System interdisciplinary project of the USGS South Florida Ecosystem Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2011-01-01

    State and Federal agencies are working jointly on structural modifications and improved water-delivery strategies to reestablish more natural surface-water flows through the Everglades wetlands and into Florida Bay. Changes in the magnitude, duration, timing, and distribution of inflows from the headwaters of the Taylor Slough and canal C-111 drainage basins have shifted the seasonal distribution and extent of wetland inundation, and also contributed to the development of hypersaline conditions in nearshore embayments of Florida Bay. Such changes are altering biological and vegetative communities in the wetlands and creating stresses on aquatic habitat. Affected biotic resources include federally listed species such as the Cape Sable seaside sparrow, American crocodile, wood stork, and roseate spoonbill. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is synthesizing scientific findings from hydrologic process studies, collecting data to characterize the ecosystem properties and functions, and integrating the results of these efforts into a research tool and management model for this Southern Inland and Coastal System(SICS). Scientists from all four disciplinary divisions of the USGS, Biological Resources, Geology, National Mapping, and Water Resources are contributing to this interdisciplinary project.

  11. Michigan lakes: An assessment of water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minnerick, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Michigan has more than 11,000 inland lakes, that provide countless recreational opportunities and are an important resource that makes tourism and recreation a $15-billion-dollar per-year industry in the State (Stynes, 2002). Knowledge of the water-quality characteristics of inland lakes is essential for the current and future management of these resources.Historically the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) jointly have monitored water quality in Michigan's lakes and rivers. During the 1990's, however, funding for surface-water-quality monitoring was reduced greatly. In 1998, the citizens of Michigan passed the Clean Michigan Initiative to clean up, protect, and enhance Michigan's environmental infrastructure. Because of expanding water-quality-data needs, the MDEQ and the USGS jointly redesigned and implemented the Lake Water-Quality Assessment (LWQA) Monitoring Program (Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, 1997).

  12. "The Effect of Alternative Representations of Lake Temperatures and Ice on WRF Regional Climate Simulations"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lakes can play a significant role in regional climate, modulating inland extremes in temperature and enhancing precipitation. Representing these effects becomes more important as regional climate modeling (RCM) efforts focus on simulating smaller scales. When using the Weathe...

  13. Tracking and predicting barges on inland waterways

    SciTech Connect

    Randeniya, Duminda I; Hilliard, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    We present a non-linear, probabilistic prediction model developed and implemented to track spatial location and other navigation characteristics of a barge traveling on the inland waterway system. A pre-filter, to check the validity of the measurements, a non-linear speed estimation process, and a Kalman filter to predict the navigation solution of the barge is developed in this work. Due to the complex dynamics involved in the system, a non-linear stochastic model was developed in state space using system dynamics to represent the process and measurement systems while maintaining the fidelity of an actual system. The algorithm was verified using actual measurements obtained from multiple barges on multiple rivers acquired from different sensors. The results show a reliable and robust prediction algorithm for tracking inland waterway barges.

  14. Lipid Biomarkers for a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda; Orphan, Victoria; Embaye, Tsegereda; Turk, Kendra; Kubo, Mike; Summons, Roger

    2004-01-01

    The use of lipid biomarkers and their carbon isotopic compositions are valuable tools for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. Various lipids associated with specific microbial groups can serve as biomarkers for establishing organism source and function in contemporary microbial ecosystems (membrane lipids), and by analogy, potential relevance to ancient organic-rich sedimentary rocks (geolipids). As witnessed by the stromatolite record, benthic microbial mats grew in shallow water lagoonal environments. Our recent work has focused on lipid biomarker analysis of a potential analogue for such ancient mats growing in a set of hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The aerobic, surface layer of this mat (0 to 1 mm) contained a variety of ester-bound fatty acids (FA) representing a diverse bacterial population including cyanobacteria, sulphate reducers (SRB) and heterotrophs. Biomarkers for microeukaryotes detected in this layer included sterols, C-20 polyunsaturated FA and a highly branched isoprenoid, diagnostic for diatoms. Cyanobacteria were also indicated by the presence of a diagnostic set of mid-chain methylalkanes. C-28, to C-34 wax esters (WXE) present in relatively small amounts in the upper 3 mm of the mat are considered biomarkers for green non-sulphur bacteria. Ether-bound isoprenoids were also identified although in considerably lower abundance than ester-bound FA (approx. 1:l0). These complex ether lipids included archatol, hydroxyarchaeol and a C-40 tetraether, all in small amounts. After ether cleavage with boron tribromide, the major recovered isoprenyl was a C-30:1. This C(sub 30;1) yelded squalane after hydrogenation, a known geobiomarker for hypersaline environments in ancient oils and sediments. In this mat, it represents the dominant Archaeal population. The carbon isotopic composition of biomarker lipids were generally depleted relative to the bulk organic material (delta C-13 TOC -10%). Most

  15. Dynamics of absorption properties along a latitudinal gradient: sources of absorption in Australian inland waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hestir, E. L.; Campbell, G.; Malthus, T. J.; Dekker, A.; Botha, E.

    2013-12-01

    Australian inland waters are optically complex and vary spatially and temporally. Inversion of optical remote sensing data for the retrieval of optically active water quality constituents (chlorophyll, colored dissolved organic matter and total suspended solids) is impeded by the scarcity of inherent optical property (IOP) data sets. In 2012 a major measurement program commenced to improve understanding of IOPs in Australia. Seven large lakes were sampled along a latitudinal gradient in Eastern Australia; in situ observations were made of the absorption properties of the water quality during two epochs (wet and dry season). This study documents the seasonal, inter & intra lake variability of the absorption budget of Australian lakes. These data reveal the sources of biogeochemical constituents determining the light climate of lakes. Optically active water quality constituents (total suspended solids, chlorophyll-a, and colored dissolved organic matter) varied significantly between wet and dry season and between lakes. The primary contribution to the absorption budget was from non-algal particulate matter (NAP; 10-60%), followed by colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM; 20-80%). Absorption from phytoplankton contributed only 0-30% of the total budget. This indicates that these lakes are primarily light limited, though the limitation comes from multiple sources. The contribution of NAP to the total absorption budget showed the greatest amount of variance between wet and dry seasons. Examination of the organic matter and estimated phytoplankton biomass contributions to TSS reveal that chlorophyll is not the primary source of organic matter in Australian lakes: allochthonous inputs are the primary trophic driver. Finally, there is strong regional and seasonal variation in the IOPs of the lakes, with the exception of the slope of CDOM. The slope of CDOM was not significantly different between seasons (p=0.94). Non-parametric stepwise multiple comparisons showed the

  16. Late quaternary sediments, minerals, and inferred geochemical history of Didwana Lake, Thar Desert, India

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wasson, R.J.; Smith, G.I.; Agrawal, D.P.

    1984-01-01

    Variations in clastic sediment texture, mineralogy of both evaporites formed at the surface and precipitates formed below the lake floor, and the relative chemical activities of the major dissolved components of the chemical precipitates, have allowed reconstruction of the history of salinity and water-level changes in Didwana Lake, Thar Desert, India. Hypersaline conditions prevailed at about the Last Glacial Maximum, with little evidence of clastic sediments entering the lake. Between ca. 13,000 and 6000 B.P. the lake level fluctuated widely, the lake alternately hypersaline and fresh, and clastic sediments were delivered to the lake at a low rate. Deep-water conditions occurred ca. 6000 B.P. and clastic influx increased abruptly. The water level dropped towards 4000 B.P. when the lake dried briefly. Since 4000 B.P. the lake has been ephemeral with a lowered rate of sedimentation and mildly saline conditions rather like those of today. This sequence of changes documented in the lake parallels changes in vegetation recorded in published pollen diagrams from both the Thar and the Arabian Sea. Correlation of the various lines of evidence suggests that the climate of the Last Glacial Maximum at Didwana was dry and windy with a weak monsson circulation. The monsson was re-established between ca. 13,000 and a little before 6000 B.P., and, when winter rainfall increased ca. 6000 B.P., the lake filled to its maximum depth. ?? 1984.

  17. Halotaxis of cyanobacteria in an intertidal hypersaline microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Kohls, Katharina; Abed, Raeid M M; Polerecky, Lubos; Weber, Miriam; de Beer, Dirk

    2010-03-01

    An intertidal hypersaline cyanobacterial mat from Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates) exhibited a reversible change in its surface colour within several hours upon changes in salinity of the overlying water. The mat surface was orange-reddish at salinities above 15% and turned dark green at lower salinities. We investigated this phenomenon using a polyphasic approach that included denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, microscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, hyperspectral imaging, absorption spectroscopy, oxygen microsensor measurements and modelling of salinity dynamics. Filaments of Microcoleus chthonoplastes, identified based on 16S rRNA sequencing and morphology, were found to migrate up and down when salinity was decreased below or increased above 15%, respectively, causing the colour change of the mat uppermost layer. Migration occurred in light and in the dark, and could be induced by different salts, not only NaCl. The influence of salinity-dependent and independent physico-chemical parameters, such as water activity, oxygen solubility, H2S, gravity and light, was excluded, indicating that the observed migration was due to a direct response to salt stress. We propose to term this salinity-driven cyanobacterial migration as 'halotaxis', a process that might play a vital role in the survival of cyanobacteria in environments exposed to continuous salinity fluctuations such as intertidal flats.

  18. Schistosomiasis in Lake Malaŵi villages.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Henry; Bloch, Paul; Makaula, Peter; Phiri, Happy; Furu, Peter; Stauffer, Jay R

    2011-06-01

    Historically, open shorelines of Lake Malaŵi were free from schistosome, Schistosoma haematobium, transmission, but this changed in the mid-1980s, possibly as a result of over-fishing reducing density of molluscivore fishes. Very little information is available on schistosome infections among people in lake-shore communities and therefore we decided to summarise data collected from 1998 to 2007. Detailed knowledge of the transmission patterns is essential to design a holistic approach to schistosomiasis control involving the public health, fisheries and tourism sectors. On Nankumba Peninsula, in the southern part of the lake, inhabitants of villages located along the shores of Lake Malaŵi have higher prevalence of S. haematobium infection than those living in inland villages. Overall prevalence (all age classes combined) of urinary schistosomiasis in 1998/1999 ranged from 10.2% to 26.4% in inland villages and from 21.0% to 72.7% in lakeshore villages; for school children prevalence of infection ranged from 15.3% to 57.1% in inland schools and from 56.2% to 94.0% in lakeshore schools. Inhabitants on the islands, Chizumulu and Likoma, also have lower prevalence of infection than those living in lakeshore villages on Nankumba Peninsula. This increased prevalence in lakeshore villages is not necessarily linked to transmission taking place in the lake itself, but could also be due to the presence of more numerous typical inland transmission sites (e.g., streams, ponds) being close to the lake. Temporal data witness of intense transmission in some lakeshore villages with 30-40% of children cleared from infection becoming reinfected 12 months later (also lakeshore village). The level of S. mansoni infection is low in the lakeshore communities. Findings are discussed in relation to fishing in the lake.

  19. Mechanisms of fenthion activation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to hypersaline environments

    SciTech Connect

    Lavado, Ramon Rimoldi, John M.; Schlenk, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies in rainbow trout have shown that acclimation to hypersaline environments enhances the toxicity to thioether organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. In order to determine the role of biotransformation in this process, the metabolism of the thioether organophosphate biocide, fenthion was evaluated in microsomes from gills, liver and olfactory tissues in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to freshwater and 17 per mille salinity. Hypersalinity acclimation increased the formation of fenoxon and fenoxon sulfoxide from fenthion in liver microsomes from rainbow trout, but not in gills or in olfactory tissues. NADPH-dependent and independent hydrolysis was observed in all tissues, but only NADPH-dependent fenthion cleavage was differentially modulated by hypersalinity in liver (inhibited) and gills (induced). Enantiomers of fenthion sulfoxide (65% and 35% R- and S-fenthion sulfoxide, respectively) were formed in liver and gills. The predominant pathway of fenthion activation in freshwater appears to be initiated through initial formation of fenoxon which may be subsequently converted to the most toxic metabolite fenoxon R-sulfoxide. However, in hypersaline conditions both fenoxon and fenthion sulfoxide formation may precede fenoxon sulfoxide formation. Stereochemical evaluation of sulfoxide formation, cytochrome P450 inhibition studies with ketoconazole and immunoblots indicated that CYP3A27 was primarily involved in the enhancement of fenthion activation in hypersaline-acclimated fish with limited contribution of FMO to initial sulfoxidation.

  20. The ICESat-2 Inland Water Height Data Product: Evaluation of Water Profiles Using High Altitude Photon Counting Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, M. F.; Stoll, J.; Cook, W. B.; Arp, C. D.; Birkett, C. M.; Brunt, K. M.; Harding, D. J.; Jones, B. M.; Markus, T.; Neumann, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) on the Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat-2), scheduled to launch in 2017, is a low energy, high repetition rate, short pulse width, 532 nm lidar. Although primarily designed for icecap and sea ice monitoring, ATLAS also will record dense observations over Pan-Arctic inland water bodies throughout its designed three year life span. These measurements will offer improved understanding of the linkages between climate variability and Arctic hydrology including closure of the Pan-Arctic water balance. An ICESat-2 Inland Water Body Height Data Product is being developed consisting of along-track water surface height, slope, and roughness for each ATLAS strong beam, and also aspect and slope between adjacent beams. The data product will be computed for all global inland water bodies that are traversed by ICESat-2 during clear to moderately clear atmospheric conditions. While the domain of the ATL13 data product is global, the focus is on high-latitude terrestrial regions where the convergence of the ICESat-2 orbits will provide spatially dense observations. Water bodies will be identified primarily through the use of an "Inland Water Body Shape Mask". In preparation for the mission, the Multiple Beam Altimeter Lidar Experimental Lidar (MABEL), was built and flown during numerous high altitude experiments, observing a wide range of water targets. The current analysis examines several MABEL inland and near coastal coastal targets during 2012 to 2015, focusing on along track surface water height, light penetration into water under a range of atmospheric and water conditions. Sites include several Alaska lakes, the Chesapeake Bay, and the near shore Atlantic coast. Results indicate very good capability for retrieving along track surface water height and standard deviation and penetration depth. Overall, the MABEL data and subsequent analyses have demonstrated the feasibility of the ATL13 algorithm for

  1. Inland sea as a unit for environmental history: East Asian inland seas from prehistory to future.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Kati; Uchiyama, Junzo

    2012-04-01

    The boundaries of landscape policies often coincide with political or economic boundaries, thus creating a situation where a unit of landscape protection or management reflects more its present political status than its historico-geographical situation, its historical function and formation. At the same time, it is evident that no unit can exist independently of the context that has given birth to it and that environmental protection in isolated units cannot be very effective. The present paper will discuss inland sea as a landscape unit from prehistory to modern days and its implications for future landscape planning, using EastAsian inland sea (Japan Sea and East China Sea) rim as an example. Historically an area of active communication, EastAsian inland sea rim has become a politically very sharply divided area. The authors will bring examples to demonstrate how cultural communication on the inland sea level has influenced the formation of several landscape features that are now targets for local or national landscape protection programs, and how a unified view could benefit the future of landscape policies in the whole region.

  2. The biodiversity and ecology of Antarctic lakes: models for evolution.

    PubMed

    Laybourn-Parry, Johanna; Pearce, David A

    2007-12-29

    Antarctic lakes are characterised by simplified, truncated food webs. The lakes range from freshwater to hypersaline with a continuum of physical and chemical conditions that offer a natural laboratory in which to study evolution. Molecular studies on Antarctic lake communities are still in their infancy, but there is clear evidence from some taxonomic groups, for example the Cyanobacteria, that there is endemicity. Moreover, many of the bacteria have considerable potential as sources of novel biochemicals such as low temperature enzymes and anti-freeze proteins. Among the eukaryotic organisms survival strategies have evolved, among which dependence on mixotrophy in phytoflagellates and some ciliates is common. There is also some evidence of evolution of new species of flagellate in the marine derived saline lakes of the Vestfold Hills. Recent work on viruses in polar lakes demonstrates high abundance and high rates of infection, implying that they may play an important role in genetic exchange in these extreme environments.

  3. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase genes as a functional marker for chemolithoautotrophic halophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in hypersaline habitats.

    PubMed

    Tourova, Tatjana P; Kovaleva, Olga L; Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Muyzer, Gerard

    2010-07-01

    The presence and diversity of the cbb genes encoding the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) (a key enzyme of the Calvin-Benson cycle of autotrophic CO(2) assimilation) were investigated in pure cultures of seven genera of halophilic chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) and in sediments from a hypersaline lake in which such bacteria have been recently discovered. All of the halophilic SOB strains (with the exception of Thiohalomonas nitratireducens) possessed the cbbL gene encoding RuBisCO form I, while the cbbM gene encoding RuBisCO form II was detected only in some of the pure cultures. The general topologies of the CbbL/CbbM trees and the 16S rRNA gene tree were different, but both markers showed that the halophilic SOB genera formed independent lineages in the Gammaproteobacteria. In some cases, such as with several strains of the genus Thiohalospira and with Thioalkalibacter halophilus, the cbbL clustering was incongruent with the positions of these strains on the ribosomal tree. In the cbbM tree, the clustering of Thiohalospira and Thiohalorhabdus strains was incongruent with their branching in both cbbL and 16S rRNA gene trees. cbbL and cbbM genes related to those found in the analysed halophilic SOB were also detected in a sediment from a hypersaline lake in Kulunda Steppe (Russia). Most of the cbbL and cbbM genes belonged to members of the genus Thiohalorhabdus. In the cbbL clone library, sequences related to those of Halothiobacillus and Thiohalospira were detected as minor components. Some of the environmental cbbM sequences belonged to as yet unknown phylotypes, representing deep lineages of halophilic autotrophs.

  4. Biogeography of Nocardiopsis strains from hypersaline environments of Yunnan and Xinjiang Provinces, western China

    PubMed Central

    He, Song-Tao; Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Jiang, Hongchen; Yang, Ling-Ling; Wu, Jin-Yuan; Zhang, Yong-Guang; Hozzein, Wael N.; Li, Wen-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The genus Nocardiopsis is a widespread group within the phylum Actinobacteria and has been isolated from various salty environments worldwide. However, little is known about whether biogeography affects Nocardiopsis distribution in various hypersaline environments. Such information is essential for understanding the ecology of Nocardiopsis. Here we analyzed 16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and sodA genes of 78 Nocardiopsis strains isolated from hypersaline environments in Yunnan and Xinjiang Provinces of western China. The obtained Nocardiopsis strains were classified into five operational taxonomic units, each comprising location-specific phylo- and genotypes. Statistical analyses showed that spatial distance and environmental factors substantially influenced Nocardiopsis distribution in hypersaline environments: the former had stronger influence at large spatial scales, whereas the latter was more influential at small spatial scales. PMID:26289784

  5. Hypersalinity toxicity thresholds for nine California ocean plan toxicity test protocols.

    PubMed

    Voorhees, Jennifer P; Phillips, Bryn M; Anderson, Brian S; Siegler, Katie; Katz, Scott; Jennings, Lydia; Tjeerdema, Ron S; Jensen, Joanna; de la Paz Carpio-Obeso, Maria

    2013-11-01

    Currently, several desalination facilities have been proposed to operate or are actually operating in California. These facilities' use of reverse osmosis (RO) may discharge hypersaline reject brine into the marine environment. The risks, if any, this brine would pose to coastal receiving waters are unknown. To test the toxicity of hypersaline brine in the absence of any additional toxic constituents, we prepared brine and tested it with the seven toxicity test organisms listed in the 2009 California Ocean Plan. The most sensitive protocols were the marine larval development tests, whereas the most tolerant to increased salinities were the euryhaline topsmelt, mysid shrimp, and giant kelp tests. Reject brines from the Monterey Bay Aquarium's RO desalination facility were also tested with three species. The effects of the aquarium's brine effluent on topsmelt, mussels, and giant kelp were consistent with those observed in the salinity tolerance experiments. This information will be used by regulators to establish receiving water limitations for hypersaline discharges.

  6. Diel Metagenomics and Metatranscriptomics of Elkhorn Slough Hypersaline Microbial Mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Detweiler, A. M.; Everroad, R. C.; Bebout, L. E.; Weber, P. K.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Bebout, B.

    2014-12-01

    To understand the variation in gene expression associated with the daytime oxygenic phototrophic and nighttime fermentation regimes seen in hypersaline microbial mats, a contiguous mat piece was subjected to sampling at regular intervals over a 24-hour diel period. Additionally, to understand the impact of sulfate reduction on biohydrogen consumption, molybdate was added to a parallel experiment in the same run. 4 metagenome and 12 metatranscriptome Illumina HiSeq lanes were completed over day / night, and control / molybdate experiments. Preliminary comparative examination of noon and midnight metatranscriptomic samples mapped using bowtie2 to reference genomes has revealed several notable results about the dominant mat-building cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes PCC 7420. Dominant cyanobacterium M. chthonoplastes PCC 7420 shows expression in several pathways for nitrogen scavenging, including nitrogen fixation. Reads mapped to M. chthonoplastes PCC 7420 shows expression of two starch storage and utilization pathways, one as a starch-trehalose-maltose-glucose pathway, another through UDP-glucose-cellulose-β-1,4 glucan-glucose pathway. The overall trend of gene expression was primarily light driven up-regulation followed by down-regulation in dark, while much of the remaining expression profile appears to be constitutive. Co-assembly of quality-controlled reads from 4 metagenomes was performed using Ray Meta with progressively smaller K-mer sizes, with bins identified and filtered using principal component analysis of coverages from all libraries and a %GC filter, followed by reassembly of the remaining co-assembly reads and binned reads. Despite having relatively similar abundance profiles in each metagenome, this binning approach was able to distinctly resolve bins from dominant taxa, but also sulfate reducing bacteria that are desired for understanding molybdate inhibition. Bins generated from this iterative assembly process will be used for downstream

  7. Viral Induced Microbial Mortality in Arctic Hypersaline Spring Sediments.

    PubMed

    Colangelo-Lillis, Jesse; Wing, Boswell A; Raymond-Bouchard, Isabelle; Whyte, Lyle G

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are a primary influence on microbial mortality in the global ocean. The impacts of viruses on their microbial hosts in low-energy environments are poorly explored and are the focus of this study. To investigate the role of viruses in mediating mortality in low-energy environments where contacts between viruses and microbes are infrequent, we conducted a set of in situ time series incubations in the outlet and channel sediments of two cold, hypersaline springs of the Canadian High Arctic. We found microbial and viral populations in dynamic equilibrium, indicating approximately equal birth and death rates for each population. In situ rates of microbial growth were low (0.5-50 × 10(3) cells cm(-3) h(-1)) as were rates of viral decay (0.09-170 × 10(4) virions cm(-3) h(-1)). A large fraction of the springs' viral communities (49-100%) were refractory to decay over the timescales of our experiments. Microcosms amended with lactate or acetate exhibited increased microbial growth rates (up to three-fold) indicating organic carbon as one limiting resource for the microbial communities in these environments. A substantial fraction (15-71%) of the microbial populations contained inducible proviruses that were released- occasionally in multiple pulses- over the eight monitored days following chemical induction. Our findings indicate that viruses in low-energy systems maintain low rates of production and activity, have a small but notable impact on microbial mortality (8-29% attenuation of growth) and that successful viral replication may primarily proceed by non-lethal strategies. In cold, low biomass marine systems of similar character (e.g., subsurface sediments), viruses may be a relatively minor driver of community mortality compared to less energy-limited environments such as the marine water column or surface sediments.

  8. Chemical modeling for precipitation from hypersaline hydrofracturing brines.

    PubMed

    Zermeno-Motante, Maria I; Nieto-Delgado, Cesar; Cannon, Fred S; Cash, Colin C; Wunz, Christopher C

    2016-10-15

    Hypersaline hydrofracturing brines host very high salt concentrations, as high as 120,000-330,000 mg/L total dissolved solids (TDS), corresponding to ionic strengths of 2.1-5.7 mol/kg. This is 4-10 times higher than for ocean water. At such high ionic strengths, the conventional equations for computing activity coefficients no longer apply; and the complex ion-interactive Pitzer model must be invoked. The authors herein have used the Pitzer-based PHREEQC computer program to compute the appropriate activity coefficients when forming such precipitates as BaSO4, CaSO4, MgSO4, SrSO4, CaCO3, SrCO3, and BaCO3 in hydrofracturing waters. The divalent cation activity coefficients (γM) were computed in the 0.1 to 0.2 range at 2.1 mol/kg ionic strength, then by 5.7 mol/kg ionic strength, they rose to 0.2 for Ba(2+), 0.6 for Sr(2+), 0.8 for Ca(2+), and 2.1 for Mg(2+). Concurrently, the [Formula: see text] was 0.02-0.03; and [Formula: see text] was 0.01-0.02. While employing these Pitzer-derived activity coefficients, the authors then used the PHREEQC model to characterize precipitation of several of these sulfates and carbonates from actual hydrofracturing waters. Modeled precipitation matched quite well with actual laboratory experiments and full-scale operations. Also, the authors found that SrSO4 effectively co-precipitated radium from hydrofracturing brines, as discerned when monitoring (228)Ra and other beta-emitting species via liquid scintillation; and also when monitoring gamma emissions from (226)Ra.

  9. Viral Induced Microbial Mortality in Arctic Hypersaline Spring Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo-Lillis, Jesse; Wing, Boswell A.; Raymond-Bouchard, Isabelle; Whyte, Lyle G.

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are a primary influence on microbial mortality in the global ocean. The impacts of viruses on their microbial hosts in low-energy environments are poorly explored and are the focus of this study. To investigate the role of viruses in mediating mortality in low-energy environments where contacts between viruses and microbes are infrequent, we conducted a set of in situ time series incubations in the outlet and channel sediments of two cold, hypersaline springs of the Canadian High Arctic. We found microbial and viral populations in dynamic equilibrium, indicating approximately equal birth and death rates for each population. In situ rates of microbial growth were low (0.5–50 × 103 cells cm-3 h-1) as were rates of viral decay (0.09–170 × 104 virions cm-3 h-1). A large fraction of the springs’ viral communities (49–100%) were refractory to decay over the timescales of our experiments. Microcosms amended with lactate or acetate exhibited increased microbial growth rates (up to three-fold) indicating organic carbon as one limiting resource for the microbial communities in these environments. A substantial fraction (15–71%) of the microbial populations contained inducible proviruses that were released- occasionally in multiple pulses- over the eight monitored days following chemical induction. Our findings indicate that viruses in low-energy systems maintain low rates of production and activity, have a small but notable impact on microbial mortality (8–29% attenuation of growth) and that successful viral replication may primarily proceed by non-lethal strategies. In cold, low biomass marine systems of similar character (e.g., subsurface sediments), viruses may be a relatively minor driver of community mortality compared to less energy-limited environments such as the marine water column or surface sediments. PMID:28167930

  10. Geochemistry and Mineralogy of Western Australian Salt Lake Sediments: Implications for Meridiani Planum on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruecker, A.; Schröder, C.; Byrne, J.; Weigold, P.; Behrens, S.; Kappler, A.

    2016-07-01

    Hypersaline lakes are characteristic for Western Australia and display a rare combination of geochemical and mineralogical properties that make these lakes potential analogues for past conditions on Mars. In our study, we focused on the geochemistry and mineralogy of Lake Orr and Lake Whurr. While both lakes are poor in organic carbon (<1%), the sediments' pH values differ and range from 3.8 to 4.8 in Lake Orr and from 5.4 to 6.3 in Lake Whurr sediments. Lake Whurr sediments were dominated by orange and red sediment zones in which the main Fe minerals were identified as hematite, goethite, and tentatively jarosite and pyrite. Lake Orr was dominated by brownish and blackish sediments where the main Fe minerals were goethite and another paramagnetic Fe(III)-phase that could not be identified. Furthermore, a likely secondary Fe(II)-phase was observed in Lake Orr sediments. The mineralogy of these two salt lakes in the sampling area is strongly influenced by events such as flooding, evaporation, and desiccation, processes that explain at least to some extent the observed differences between Lake Orr and Lake Whurr. The iron mineralogy of Lake Whurr sediments and the high salinity make this lake a suitable analogue for Meridiani Planum on Mars, and in particular the tentative identification of pyrite in Lake Whurr sediments has implications for the interpretation of the Fe mineralogy of Meridiani Planum sediments.

  11. Preservation of ancestral Cretaceous microflora recovered from a hypersaline oil reservoir.

    PubMed

    Gales, Grégoire; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas; Neria, Isabel; Alazard, Didier; Coulon, Stéphanie; Lomans, Bart P; Morin, Dominique; Ollivier, Bernard; Borgomano, Jean; Joulian, Catherine

    2016-03-11

    Microbiology of a hypersaline oil reservoir located in Central Africa was investigated with molecular and culture methods applied to preserved core samples. Here we show that the community structure was partially acquired during sedimentation, as many prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from the extracted DNA are phylogenetically related to actual Archaea inhabiting surface evaporitic environments, similar to the Cretaceous sediment paleoenvironment. Results are discussed in term of microorganisms and/or DNA preservation in such hypersaline and Mg-rich solutions. High salt concentrations together with anaerobic conditions could have preserved microbial/molecular diversity originating from the ancient sediment basin wherein organic matter was deposited.

  12. Preservation of ancestral Cretaceous microflora recovered from a hypersaline oil reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gales, Grégoire; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas; Neria, Isabel; Alazard, Didier; Coulon, Stéphanie; Lomans, Bart P.; Morin, Dominique; Ollivier, Bernard; Borgomano, Jean; Joulian, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    Microbiology of a hypersaline oil reservoir located in Central Africa was investigated with molecular and culture methods applied to preserved core samples. Here we show that the community structure was partially acquired during sedimentation, as many prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from the extracted DNA are phylogenetically related to actual Archaea inhabiting surface evaporitic environments, similar to the Cretaceous sediment paleoenvironment. Results are discussed in term of microorganisms and/or DNA preservation in such hypersaline and Mg-rich solutions. High salt concentrations together with anaerobic conditions could have preserved microbial/molecular diversity originating from the ancient sediment basin wherein organic matter was deposited.

  13. Preservation of ancestral Cretaceous microflora recovered from a hypersaline oil reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Gales, Grégoire; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas; Neria, Isabel; Alazard, Didier; Coulon, Stéphanie; Lomans, Bart P.; Morin, Dominique; Ollivier, Bernard; Borgomano, Jean; Joulian, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Microbiology of a hypersaline oil reservoir located in Central Africa was investigated with molecular and culture methods applied to preserved core samples. Here we show that the community structure was partially acquired during sedimentation, as many prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from the extracted DNA are phylogenetically related to actual Archaea inhabiting surface evaporitic environments, similar to the Cretaceous sediment paleoenvironment. Results are discussed in term of microorganisms and/or DNA preservation in such hypersaline and Mg-rich solutions. High salt concentrations together with anaerobic conditions could have preserved microbial/molecular diversity originating from the ancient sediment basin wherein organic matter was deposited. PMID:26965360

  14. Hypersaline Subsurface Microbial Communities from the Dead Sea Viewed from Their Metagenomes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Ionescu, D.; Ariztegui, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project (DSDDP) is an international research initiative aiming to reconstruct the paleoenvironmental and paleoseismic history of the Dead Sea Basin (DSB) in the Levantine region. Within this framework, analysis of microbial communities intend to qualify the extent of life in this extreme environment, the factors allowing its development and their contribution to the sedimentary and geochemical record. The extreme chemistry of the Dead Sea prevents the use of common in situ imaging techniques leaving little information on the general activity of the subsurface biosphere. Cloning and metagenomic techniques have however been implemented at different levels of a 457 m deep core. Results suggest a differential development or survival of the microbial community along the sedimentary column. Reasons for such distribution remain unclear but cannot only be imparted to salinity. Poorly known communities (e.g. Candidate Divisions MSBL1 and KB1) with strong potential for adaptations to anoxic hypersaline environments are recovered in some intervals. Halobacteria classes generally dominate the assemblages. Metagenomic data allowed characterizing their presence in two evaporitic facies of the core (aragonite at 2.7 m and gypsum at 90.6 m below lake floor), where they exhibit both salt-in and salt-out strategies to cope with the high salinities of the Dead Sea. Metabolisms are also adapted to the high heavy metal concentrations and low nutrient availability in the sediment. Although more work is needed in order to infer the impact of these microorganisms on the sediment and element cycles, indices of methanogenesis, fermentation and sulfate reducing activity imply influence on the carbon and sulfur cycle of the Dead Sea subsurface. This is highlighted by traces of microbial degradation of organic matter viewed under SEM, and by the formation of euhedral Fe-S mineralizations as a result of reduction of sulfur. Overall, this work calls for the importance

  15. Productivity Estimation of Hypersaline Microbial Mat Communities - Diurnal Cycles of Dissolved Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Less, G.; Cohen, Y.; Luz, B.; Lazar, B.

    2002-05-01

    Hypersaline microbial mat communities (MMC) are the modern equivalents of the Archean stromatolities, the first photosynthetic organisms on Earth. An estimate of their oxygen production rate is important to the understanding of oxygen evolution on Earth ca. 2 b.y.b.p. Here we use the diurnal cycle of dissolved oxygen, O2/Ar ratio and the isotopic composition of dissolved oxygen to calculate net and gross primary productivity of MMC growing in a large scale (80 m2) experimental pan. The pan is inoculated with MMC taken from the Solar Lake, Sinai, Egypt and filled with 90\\permil evaporated Red Sea water brine up to a depth of ca. 0.25 m. It is equipped with computerized flow through system that is programmed to pump pan water at selected time intervals into a sampling cell fitted with dissolved oxygen, pH, conductivity and temperature sensors connected to a datalogger. Manual brine samples were taken for calibrating the sensors, mass spectrometric analyses and for measurements of additional relevant parameters. Dissolved oxygen concentrations fluctuate during the diurnal cycle being highly supersaturated except for the end of the night. The O2 curve varies seasonally and has a typical "shark fin" shape due to the MMC metabolic response to the shape of the diurnal light curve. The dissolved oxygen data were fitted to a smooth curve that its time derivative (dO2 /dt) is defined as: Z dO2 /dt=GP-R-k(O2(meas)- O2(sat)) where z is the depth (m); GP and R are the MMC gross production and respiration (mol m-2 d-1), respectively; k is the gas exchange coefficient (m d-1); O2(meas) and O2(sat) (mol L-1) are the measured and equilibrium dissolved oxygen concentrations, respectively. The high resolution sampling of the automated system produces O2 curves that enable the calculation of smooth and reliable time derivatives. The calculations yield net production values that vary between 1,000 10-6 to -100 10-6 mol O2 m-2 h-1 and day respiration rates between 60 10-6 to 30 10

  16. Microplastics pollution in inland freshwaters of China: A case study in urban surface waters of Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenfeng; Ndungu, Anne Wairimu; Li, Zhen; Wang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Microplastics have been considered as an emerging pollutant in the aquatic environment. However, research about microplastic pollution in inland freshwaters of China is insufficient. The present study investigated the levels of microplastics in surface water of 20 urban lakes and urban reaches of the Hanjiang River and Yangtze River of Wuhan, the largest city in central China. Microplastic concentrations ranged from 1660.0±639.1 to 8925±1591n/m(3) for the studied waters, with the highest concentration found in Bei Lake. Microplastic abundance in lakes varied markedly in space, and negatively correlated with the distance from the city center (p<0.001), which confirmed the important role of anthropogenic factors in microplastic distribution. Urban reaches of the Hanjiang River and Yangtze River were found to have relatively lower levels of microplastics than most of the studied lakes. The major type of microplastics among the studied waters was colored plastic, with fiber being the most frequent shape. More than 80% of microplastics in number had a size of <2mm. Polyethylene terephthalate and polypropylene were the dominant polymer-types of microplastics analyzed. This study provided important reference for better understanding microplastic levels in inland freshwaters.

  17. Salinivibrio costicola GL6, a Novel Isolated Strain for Biotransformation of Caffeine to Theobromine Under Hypersaline Conditions.

    PubMed

    Ashengroph, Morahem

    2017-01-01

    The present study has been conducted towards isolation of moderately halophilic bacteria capable of transforming caffeine into theobromine. A total of 45 caffeine-degrading moderate halophiles were enriched from hypersaline lakes and examined for the biotransformation of caffeine to theobromine by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses. Strain GL6, giving the highest yield of theobromine, was isolated from the Hoz Soltan Lake, 20 % w/v salinity, central Iran, and identified as Salinivibrio costicola based on morphological and biochemical features as well as its 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis (GeneBank Accession No. KT378066) and DNA-DNA relatedness. The biotransformation of caffeine with strain GL6 leads to the formation of two metabolites, identified as theobromine and paraxanthine, but the yield of paraxanthine was much lower. Further study on the production of theobromine from caffeine under resting cell experiment was carried out subsequently. The optimal yield of theobromine (56 %) was obtained after a 32-h incubation using 5 mM of caffeine and 15 g l(-1) (wet weight) of biomass in 0.1 M saline phosphate buffer (pH 7.0 and 10 % w/v NaCl) under agitation 180 rpm at 30 °C. The biotransformed theobromine was purified by preparative TLC and subjected to FTIR and mass spectroscopy for chemical identification. This is the first evidence for biotransformation of caffeine into theobromine by strains of the genus Salinivibrio.

  18. Meromixis in hypersaline Mono Lake, California. 3. Biogeochemical response to stratification and overturn

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Jellison, R.; Oremland, R.S.; Culbertson, C.W.

    1993-01-01

    The monimolimnion remained anoxic and nearly isothermal, while the upper mixolimnion was well oxygenated and exhibited a seasonal thermal regime. Dissolved sulfide and methane increased in the monimolimnion as a result of diffusive flux from the sediments. Winter mixing down to the chemocline distributed sulfide and methane throughout the mixolimnion. Lakewide inventories of dissolved sulfide and methane reflected the balance between increased concentrations and decreased monimolimnion volume over time. At overturn, the entire water column was isothermal and anoxic. Dissolved sulfide (380 ?? 106 mol) was oxidized in one week by molecular oxygen. Methane (12 ?? 106 mol) was removed more slowly by microbial oxidation and ventilation across the air-water interface. -from Authors

  19. Citizen science shows systematic changes in the temperature difference between air and inland waters with global warming

    PubMed Central

    Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.; Mackay, Murray; Stockwell, Jason D.; Thiery, Wim; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Augusto-Silva, Pétala B.; Baulch, Helen M.; de Eyto, Elvira; Hejzlar, Josef; Kangur, Külli; Kirillin, Georgiy; Pierson, Don C.; Rusak, James A.; Sadro, Steven; Woolway, R. Iestyn

    2017-01-01

    Citizen science projects have a long history in ecological studies. The research usefulness of such projects is dependent on applying simple and standardized methods. Here, we conducted a citizen science project that involved more than 3500 Swedish high school students to examine the temperature difference between surface water and the overlying air (Tw-Ta) as a proxy for sensible heat flux (QH). If QH is directed upward, corresponding to positive Tw-Ta, it can enhance CO2 and CH4 emissions from inland waters, thereby contributing to increased greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. The students found mostly negative Tw-Ta across small ponds, lakes, streams/rivers and the sea shore (i.e. downward QH), with Tw-Ta becoming increasingly negative with increasing Ta. Further examination of Tw-Ta using high-frequency temperature data from inland waters across the globe confirmed that Tw-Ta is linearly related to Ta. Using the longest available high-frequency temperature time series from Lake Erken, Sweden, we found a rapid increase in the occasions of negative Tw-Ta with increasing annual mean Ta since 1989. From these results, we can expect that ongoing and projected global warming will result in increasingly negative Tw-Ta, thereby reducing CO2 and CH4 transfer velocities from inland waters into the atmosphere. PMID:28262715

  20. Citizen science shows systematic changes in the temperature difference between air and inland waters with global warming.

    PubMed

    Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A; Mackay, Murray; Stockwell, Jason D; Thiery, Wim; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Augusto-Silva, Pétala B; Baulch, Helen M; de Eyto, Elvira; Hejzlar, Josef; Kangur, Külli; Kirillin, Georgiy; Pierson, Don C; Rusak, James A; Sadro, Steven; Woolway, R Iestyn

    2017-03-06

    Citizen science projects have a long history in ecological studies. The research usefulness of such projects is dependent on applying simple and standardized methods. Here, we conducted a citizen science project that involved more than 3500 Swedish high school students to examine the temperature difference between surface water and the overlying air (Tw-Ta) as a proxy for sensible heat flux (QH). If QH is directed upward, corresponding to positive Tw-Ta, it can enhance CO2 and CH4 emissions from inland waters, thereby contributing to increased greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. The students found mostly negative Tw-Ta across small ponds, lakes, streams/rivers and the sea shore (i.e. downward QH), with Tw-Ta becoming increasingly negative with increasing Ta. Further examination of Tw-Ta using high-frequency temperature data from inland waters across the globe confirmed that Tw-Ta is linearly related to Ta. Using the longest available high-frequency temperature time series from Lake Erken, Sweden, we found a rapid increase in the occasions of negative Tw-Ta with increasing annual mean Ta since 1989. From these results, we can expect that ongoing and projected global warming will result in increasingly negative Tw-Ta, thereby reducing CO2 and CH4 transfer velocities from inland waters into the atmosphere.

  1. Citizen science shows systematic changes in the temperature difference between air and inland waters with global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.; Mackay, Murray; Stockwell, Jason D.; Thiery, Wim; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Augusto-Silva, Pétala B.; Baulch, Helen M.; de Eyto, Elvira; Hejzlar, Josef; Kangur, Külli; Kirillin, Georgiy; Pierson, Don C.; Rusak, James A.; Sadro, Steven; Woolway, R. Iestyn

    2017-03-01

    Citizen science projects have a long history in ecological studies. The research usefulness of such projects is dependent on applying simple and standardized methods. Here, we conducted a citizen science project that involved more than 3500 Swedish high school students to examine the temperature difference between surface water and the overlying air (Tw-Ta) as a proxy for sensible heat flux (QH). If QH is directed upward, corresponding to positive Tw-Ta, it can enhance CO2 and CH4 emissions from inland waters, thereby contributing to increased greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. The students found mostly negative Tw-Ta across small ponds, lakes, streams/rivers and the sea shore (i.e. downward QH), with Tw-Ta becoming increasingly negative with increasing Ta. Further examination of Tw-Ta using high-frequency temperature data from inland waters across the globe confirmed that Tw-Ta is linearly related to Ta. Using the longest available high-frequency temperature time series from Lake Erken, Sweden, we found a rapid increase in the occasions of negative Tw-Ta with increasing annual mean Ta since 1989. From these results, we can expect that ongoing and projected global warming will result in increasingly negative Tw-Ta, thereby reducing CO2 and CH4 transfer velocities from inland waters into the atmosphere.

  2. Radiocarbon analysis of halophilic microbial lipids from an Australian salt lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, P. Sargent; Jones, Claudia M.; Fallon, Stewart J.; Brocks, Jochen J.; George, Simon C.

    2012-01-01

    Assigning accurate dates to hypersaline sediments opens important terrestrial records of local and regional paleoecologies and paleoclimatology. However, as of yet no conventional method of dating hypersaline systems has been widely adopted. Biomarker, mineralogical, and radiocarbon analyses of sediments and organic extracts from a shallow (13 cm) core from a hypersaline playa, Lake Tyrrell, southeastern Australia, produce a coherent age-depth curve beginning with modern microbial mats and extending to ~ 7500 cal yr BP. These analyses are furthermore used to identify and constrain the timing of the most recent change in hydrological regime at Lake Tyrrell, a shift from a clay deposit to the precipitation of evaporitic sands occurring at some time between ~ 4500 and 7000 yr. These analyses show the potential for widespread dating of hypersaline systems integrating the biomarker approach, reinforce the value of the radiocarbon content of biomarkers in understanding the flow of carbon in modern ecologies, and validate the temporal dimension of data provided by biomarkers when dating late Quaternary sediments.

  3. Ecosystem approach to inland fisheries: research needs and implementation strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beard, T. Douglas; Arlinghaus, Robert; Cooke, Steven J.; McIntyre, Peter B.; De Silva, Sena; Bartley, Devin M.; Cowx, Ian G.

    2011-01-01

    Inland fisheries are a vital component in the livelihoods and food security of people throughout the world, as well as contributing huge recreational and economic benefits. These valuable assets are jeopardized by lack of research-based understanding of the impacts of fisheries on inland ecosystems, and similarly the impact of human activities associated with inland waters on fisheries and aquatic biodiversity. To explore this topic, an international workshop was organized in order to examine strategies to incorporate fisheries into ecosystem approaches for management of inland waters. To achieve this goal, a new research agenda is needed that focuses on: quantifying the ecosystem services provided by fresh waters; quantifying the economic, social and nutritional benefits of inland fisheries; improving assessments designed to evaluate fisheries exploitation potential; and examining feedbacks between fisheries, ecosystem productivity and aquatic biodiversity. Accomplishing these objectives will require merging natural and social science approaches to address coupled social–ecological system dynamics.

  4. Ecosystem approach to inland fisheries: Research needs and implementation strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beard, T.D.; Arlinghaus, R.; Cooke, S.J.; McIntyre, P.B.; De Silva, S.; Bartley, D.; Cowx, I.G.

    2011-01-01

    Inland fisheries are a vital component in the livelihoods and food security of people throughout the world, as well as contributing huge recreational and economic benefits. These valuable assets are jeopardized by lack of research-based understanding of the impacts of fisheries on inland ecosystems, and similarly the impact of human activities associated with inland waters on fisheries and aquatic biodiversity. To explore this topic, an international workshop was organized in order to examine strategies to incorporate fisheries into ecosystem approaches for management of inland waters. To achieve this goal, a new research agenda is needed that focuses on: quantifying the ecosystem services provided by fresh waters; quantifying the economic, social and nutritional benefits of inland fisheries; improving assessments designed to evaluate fisheries exploitation potential; and examining feedbacks between fisheries, ecosystem productivity and aquatic biodiversity. Accomplishing these objectives will require merging natural and social science approaches to address coupled social-ecological system dynamics. ?? 2010 The Royal Society.

  5. Ecosystem approach to inland fisheries: research needs and implementation strategies.

    PubMed

    Beard, T Douglas; Arlinghaus, Robert; Cooke, Steven J; McIntyre, Peter B; De Silva, Sena; Bartley, Devin; Cowx, Ian G

    2011-08-23

    Inland fisheries are a vital component in the livelihoods and food security of people throughout the world, as well as contributing huge recreational and economic benefits. These valuable assets are jeopardized by lack of research-based understanding of the impacts of fisheries on inland ecosystems, and similarly the impact of human activities associated with inland waters on fisheries and aquatic biodiversity. To explore this topic, an international workshop was organized in order to examine strategies to incorporate fisheries into ecosystem approaches for management of inland waters. To achieve this goal, a new research agenda is needed that focuses on: quantifying the ecosystem services provided by fresh waters; quantifying the economic, social and nutritional benefits of inland fisheries; improving assessments designed to evaluate fisheries exploitation potential; and examining feedbacks between fisheries, ecosystem productivity and aquatic biodiversity. Accomplishing these objectives will require merging natural and social science approaches to address coupled social-ecological system dynamics.

  6. Condition-dependent migratory behaviour of endangered Atlantic salmon smolts moving through an inland sea

    PubMed Central

    Crossin, Glenn T.; Hatcher, Bruce G.; Denny, Shelley; Whoriskey, Kim; Orr, Michael; Penney, Alicia; Whoriskey, Frederick G.

    2016-01-01

    The Bras d’Or Lake watershed of Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada is a unique inland sea ecosystem, UNESCO Biosphere Reserve and home to a group of regionally distinct Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) populations. Recent population decreases in this region have raised concern about their long-term persistence. We used acoustic telemetry to track the migrations of juvenile salmon (smolts) from the Middle River into the Bras d’Or Lake and, subsequently, into the Atlantic Ocean. Roughly half of the tagged smolts transited the Bras d’Or Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean, using a migration route that took them through the Gulf of St Lawrence’s northern exit at the Strait of Belle Isle (∼650 km from the home river) towards feeding areas in the Labrador Sea and Greenland. However, a significant fraction spent >70 days in the Lakes, suggesting that this population has an alternative resident form, in which smolts limit their migrations within the Bras d’Or. Smolts in good relative condition (as determined from length-to-mass relationships) tended to be residents, whereas fish in poorer condition were ocean migrants. We also found a covarying effect of river temperature that helped to predict residence vs. ocean migration. We discuss these results relative to their bioenergetic implications and provide suggestions for future studies aimed at the conservation of declining salmon populations in Canada. PMID:27293765

  7. Dynamics of Molecular Hydrogen in Hypersaline Microbial Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Bebout, Brad M.; Visscher, Pieter T.; DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Early Earth microbial communities that centered around the anaerobic decomposition of organic molecular hydrogen as a carrier of electrons, regulator of energy metabolism, and facilitator of syntroph'c microbial interactions. The advent of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms added a highly dynamic and potentially dominant term to the hydrogen economy of these communities. We have examined the daily variations of hydrogen concentrations in cyanobacteria-dominated microbial mats from hypersaline ponds in Baja California Sur, Mexico. These mats bring together phototrophic and anaerobic bacteria (along with virtually all other trophic groups) in a spatially ordered and chemically dynamic matrix that provides a good analog for early Earth microbial ecosystems. Hydrogen concentrations in the photic zone of the mat can be three orders of magnitude or more higher than in the photic zone, which are, in turn, an order of magnitude higher than in the unconsolidated sediments underlying the mat community. Within the photic zone, hydrogen concentrations can fluctuate dramatically during the diel (24 hour day-night) cycle, ranging from less than 0.001% during the day to nearly 10% at night. The resultant nighttime flux of hydrogen from the mat to the environment was up to 17% of the daytime oxygen flux. The daily pattern observed is highly dependent on cyanobacterial species composition within the mat, with Lyngbya-dominated systems having a much greater dynamic range than those dominated by Microcoleus; this may relate largely to differing degrees of nitrogen-fixing and fermentative activity in the two mats. The greatest H2 concentrations and fluxes were observed in the absence of oxygen, suggesting an important potential feedback control in the context of the evolution of atmospheric composition. The impact of adding this highly dynamic photosynthetic term to the hydrogen economy of early microbial ecosystems must have been substantial. From an evolutionary standpoint, the H2

  8. Diversity of bacteria and archaea in hypersaline sediment from Death Valley National Park, California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to phylogenetically analyze microorganisms from the domains Bacteria and Archaea in hypersaline sediment from Death Valley National Park. Using domain-specific primers, a region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified using PCR, and the product was subsequently used to cr...

  9. Environmental determinants of cholera outbreaks in inland Africa: a systematic review of main transmission foci and propagation routes.

    PubMed

    Rebaudet, Stanislas; Sudre, Bertrand; Faucher, Benoît; Piarroux, Renaud

    2013-11-01

    Cholera is generally regarded as the prototypical waterborne and environmental disease. In Africa, available studies are scarce, and the relevance of this disease paradigm is questionable. Cholera outbreaks have been repeatedly reported far from the coasts: from 2009 through 2011, three-quarters of all cholera cases in Africa occurred in inland regions. Such outbreaks are either influenced by rainfall and subsequent floods or by drought- and water-induced stress. Their concurrence with global climatic events has also been observed. In lakes and rivers, aquatic reservoirs of Vibrio cholerae have been evocated. However, the role of these reservoirs in cholera epidemiology has not been established. Starting from inland cholera-endemic areas, epidemics burst and spread to various environments, including crowded slums and refugee camps. Human displacements constitute a major determinant of this spread. Further studies are urgently needed to better understand these complex dynamics, improve water and sanitation efforts, and eliminate cholera from Africa.

  10. Satellite-Observed Algae Blooms in China's Lake Taihu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Menghua; Shi, Wei

    2008-05-01

    During the spring of 2007, a massive blue-green algae (Microcystis) bloom broke out in Lake Taihu, one of the largest inland lakes in China. This freshwater lake is located in the Yangtze River delta (Figure 1), one of the world's most urbanized and heavily populated areas. The massive bloom event became an environmental crisis that prompted officials to cut tap water supply to several million residents in nearby Wuxi city in China's Jiangsu province. The outbreak, which the Chinese government identified as a major natural disaster, forced unprepared residents to rush to buy bottled water for their normal usage. This article presents results from an analysis of that event that demonstrate an application of satellite-derived imagery for inland lake water quality monitoring, assessment, and management.

  11. Combined stable isotope, proteomic, metabolomics, and spatial specific analysis to track carbon flow through a hypersaline phototrophic microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J.; Cory, A.; Riha, K. M.; Huang, E. L.; Gritsenko, M. A.; Kim, Y. M.; Metz, T. O.; Lipton, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Tracking labeled substrates through microbial mat systems can help elucidate carbon dynamics, species interactions, and niche partitioning, but the inherent microbial complexity of these systems makes them difficult to probe with single analytical techniques. Here we use a combination of different tools to track three labeled substrates through a benthic phototrophic mat from Hot Lake. Hot Lake is a hypersaline, meromictic lake located in an endorheic basin in north-central Washington which, despite extreme salinity and seasonal water temperatures (> 55 ˚C), hosts dense, phototrophic benthic microbial mats. Cyanobacteria are the dominant CO2-fixing organisms in the system and we seek to understand the spatial and metabolic controls on how the carbon initially fixed by mat cyanobacteria is transferred to associated heterotrophic populations spread throughout the mat strata. We performed ex situ incubations over a complete diel cycle with 13C labeled bicarbonate, acetate, and glucose. Traditional elemental analysis IRMS provided an estimate of bulk label uptake to total biomass and showed that both bicarbonate and acetate were incorporated only during daylight while glucose uptake was nearly constant through the cycle. Spatially resolved isotope analysis using laser ablation IRMS showed distinctive patterns between the different substrates with bicarbonate having highest uptake in the top third of the mat, acetate uptake focused near the mat's center, and glucose showing similar uptake at all mat depths. Proteomic analysis showed a longer lag in substrate conversion to protein than to biomass and a distinct spike in the number of labeled peptides in the bicarbonate incubation near the end of the diel cycle. Proteomic analysis confirmed that photosynthetic organisms showed the highest rates of label conversion to protein but heterotrophic organisms also incorporated label into their peptides. Metabolomic analysis demonstrated the high conversion of organic substrates

  12. Methane and carbon dioxide emissions from inland waters in India - implications for large scale greenhouse gas balances.

    PubMed

    Panneer Selvam, Balathandayuthabani; Natchimuthu, Sivakiruthika; Arunachalam, Lakshmanan; Bastviken, David

    2014-11-01

    Inland waters were recently recognized to be important sources of methane (CH4 ) and carbon dioxide (CO2 ) to the atmosphere, and including inland water emissions in large scale greenhouse gas (GHG) budgets may potentially offset the estimated carbon sink in many areas. However, the lack of GHG flux measurements and well-defined inland water areas for extrapolation, make the magnitude of the potential offset unclear. This study presents coordinated flux measurements of CH4 and CO2 in multiple lakes, ponds, rivers, open wells, reservoirs, springs, and canals in India. All these inland water types, representative of common aquatic ecosystems in India, emitted substantial amounts of CH4 and a major fraction also emitted CO2 . The total CH4 flux (including ebullition and diffusion) from all the 45 systems ranged from 0.01 to 52.1 mmol m(-2)  d(-1) , with a mean of 7.8 ± 12.7 (mean ± 1 SD) mmol m(-2)  d(-1) . The mean surface water CH4 concentration was 3.8 ± 14.5 μm (range 0.03-92.1 μm). The CO2 fluxes ranged from -28.2 to 262.4 mmol m(-2)  d(-1) and the mean flux was 51.9 ± 71.1 mmol m(-2)  d(-1) . The mean partial pressure of CO2 was 2927 ± 3269 μatm (range: 400-11 467 μatm). Conservative extrapolation to whole India, considering the specific area of the different water types studied, yielded average emissions of 2.1 Tg CH4  yr(-1) and 22.0 Tg CO2  yr(-1) from India's inland waters. When expressed as CO2 equivalents, this amounts to 75 Tg CO2 equivalents yr(-1) (53-98 Tg CO2 equivalents yr(-1) ; ± 1 SD), with CH4 contributing 71%. Hence, average inland water GHG emissions, which were not previously considered, correspond to 42% (30-55%) of the estimated land carbon sink of India. Thereby this study illustrates the importance of considering inland water GHG exchange in large scale assessments.

  13. Cold-active halophilic bacteria from the ice-sealed Lake Vida, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Mondino, Lindsay J; Asao, Marie; Madigan, Michael T

    2009-10-01

    Lake Vida is a large, permanently ice-covered lake in the Victoria Valley of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica and is unique among Dry Valley lakes because it is ice-sealed, with an ice-cover of nearly 19 m. Enrichment cultures of melt-water from Lake Vida 15.9 m ice yielded five pure cultures of aerobic, heterotrophic bacteria. Of these, one strain grew at -8 degrees C and the four others at -4 degrees C. All isolates were either halotolerant or halophilic, with two strains capable of growth at 15% NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the Lake Vida isolates to be Gammaproteobacteria, related to species of Psychrobacter and Marinobacter. This is the first report of pure cultures of bacteria from Lake Vida, and the isolates displayed a phenotype consistent with life in a cold hypersaline environment.

  14. Lakes and lake-like waters of the Hawaiian Archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maciolek, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    This summary of Hawaiian lacustrine limnology is based on 12 years of field and literature surveys of archipelagic inland waters. Lakes here are distinguished from other standing waters by limits on surface oceanic area (> 0.1 ha) and depth (> 2 m), and by the absence of flatural surface oceanic connection. A variety of extinct and existing water bodies, sometimes referred to as lakes, are noted. Six lakes are described. Five of them are in crater basins, 3 are freshwater, and 2 are elevated (highest = 3969 m). The scarcity of elevated lakes results from general permeability of the substrata. Among the 6 lakes, surface areas range from 0.22 to 88 ha and maximum depths from 3 to 248 m. Naturally occurring aquatic biota generally is low in species diversity except for phytoplankton; fishes and submersed vascular plants are absent. Two lowland lakes, freshwater Green (Wai a Pele) and saline Kauhak6, are described for the first time. Profundal Kauhak6, 248 m deep, has a surface area of only 0.35 ha, which results in an extraordinary relative depth of 370%. It is permanently stratified, a condition apparently due primarily to the unique morphometry of its basin. 

  15. Rotifers from selected inland saline waters in the Chihuahuan Desert of México

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Elizabeth J; Schröder, Thomas; Wallace, Robert L; Ríos-Arana, Judith V; Rico-Martínez, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Background In spite of considerable efforts over past decades we still know relatively little regarding the biogeography of rotifers of inland waters in México. To help rectify this we undertook an extensive survey of the rotifer fauna of 48 water bodies in the Chihuahuan Desert of México. Results Of the sites surveyed, 21 had salinities ≥ 2000 μS cm-1 and in these we found 57 species of monogonont rotifers and several bdelloids. Species richness in the saline sites varied widely, with a range in species richness of 1 to 27 and a mean (± 1SD) = 8.8 (± 6.2). Collectively all sites possess relatively high percent single- and doubletons, 33.3 and 21.7%, respectively. Simpson's Asymmetric Index indicated that similarity in rotifer species composition varied widely among a set of 10 sites. These were selected because they were sampled more frequently or represent unusual habitats. These SAI values ranged from 0.00 (complete dissimilarity) to 1.00 (complete similarity). The Jaccard Index varied between 0.00 and 0.35. This observation probably reflects similarities and differences in water chemistry among these sites. Inland saline systems differed in their chemical composition by region. Conductivity was related to hardness and alkalinity. In addition, hardness was positively associated with chloride and sulfate. RDA showed that several species were positively associated with chloride concentration. Other factors that were significantly associated with rotifer species included the presence of macrophytes, nitrate content, oxygen concentration, TDS, latitude and whether the habitat was a large lake or reservoir. Conclusion This study illustrates the diversity of the rotiferan fauna of inland saline systems and the uniqueness among waterbodies. Conservation of these systems is needed to preserve these unique sources of biodiversity that include rotifers and the other endemic species found in association with them. PMID:18533042

  16. Proceedings of GLaSS: Global Lakes Sentinel Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Steef; Hommersom, Annelies; Alikas, Krista; Heege, Thomas; Schenk, Karin; Ruescas, Ana; Eleveld, Marieke; Giardino, Claudia; Koponen, Sampsa; Kallio, Kari; Philipson, Petra

    2015-12-01

    Global Lakes Sentinel Services (GLaSS) is developing a prototype Sentinel service infrastructure to ingest and process Sentinel-2 and Sentinel-3 data into validated ecological water quality parameters for lakes, plus training material. GLaSS is an EU-funded R&D project within the Copernicus framework. The project is well on its way to reach its goals. Some results on comparisons on atmospheric correction methods for inland waters are presented here.

  17. Model reactions and natural occurrence of furans from hypersaline environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, T.; Tubbesing, C.; Benzing, K.; Schöler, H. F.

    2014-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds like furan and its derivatives are important for atmospheric properties and reactions. In this work the known abiotic formation of furan from catechol under Fenton-like conditions with Fe3+ sulfate was revised by the use of a bispidine Fe2+ complex as a model compound for iron with well-known characteristics. While total yields were comparable to those with the Fe3+ salt, the bispidine Fe2+ complex is a better catalyst as the turnover numbers of the active iron species were higher. Additionally, the role of iron and pH is discussed in relation to furan formation from model compounds and in natural sediment and water samples collected from the Dead Sea and several salt lakes in Western Australia. Various alkylated furans and even traces of halogenated furans (3-chlorofuran and 3-bromofuran) were found in some Australian samples. 3-chlorofuran was found in three sediments and four water samples, whereas 3-bromofuran was detected in three water samples. Further, the emission of furans is compared to the abundance of several possible precursors such as isoprene and aromatic hydrocarbons as well as to the related thiophenes. It is deduced that the emissions of volatile organic compounds such as furans contribute to the formation of ultra-fine particles in the vicinity of salt lakes and are important for the local climate.

  18. The Conceptual Design Algorithm of Inland LNG Barges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łozowicka, Dorota; Kaup, Magdalena

    2017-03-01

    The article concerns the problem of inland waterways transport of LNG. Its aim is to present the algorithm of conceptual design of inland barges for LNG transport, intended for exploitation on European waterways. The article describes the areas where LNG barges exist, depending on the allowable operating parameters on the waterways. It presents existing architectural and construction solutions of barges for inland LNG transport, as well as the necessary equipment, due to the nature of cargo. Then the article presents the procedure of the conceptual design of LNG barges, including navigation restrictions and functional and economic criteria. The conceptual design algorithm of LGN barges, presented in the article, allows to preliminary design calculations, on the basis of which, are obtained the main dimensions and parameters of unit, depending on the transport task and the class of inland waterways, on which the transport will be realized.

  19. 77 FR 22769 - Amendment to the Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... 1972 (5 U.S.C. Appendix), the Government in the Sunshine Act of 1976 (5 U.S.C. 552b), and 41 CFR 102-3... of the U.S. inland waterways and inland harbors as defined in Public Law 95-502 and amended by Public Law 99-662. According to 33 U.S.C. 2251b, the Board shall annually file their recommendations with...

  20. Methanogenesis at extremely haloalkaline conditions in the soda lakes of Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia).

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Abbas, Ben; Geleijnse, Mitchell; Pimenov, Nikolai V; Sukhacheva, Marina V; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2015-04-01

    Microbial methanogenesis at extreme conditions of saline alkaline soda lakes has, so far, been poorly investigated. Despite the obvious domination of sulfidogenesis as the therminal anaerobic process in the hypersaline soda lakes of Kulunda Steppe (Altai, southwestern Siberia), high concentrations of methane were detected in the anaerobic sediments. Potential activity measurements with different substrates gave results significantly deviating from what is commonly found in hypersaline habitats with neutral pH. In particular, not only a non-competitive methylotrophic pathway was active, but also lithotrophic and, in some cases, even acetate-dependent methanogenesis was found to be present in hypersaline soda lake sediments. All three pathways were functioning exclusively within the alkaline pH range between 8 and 10.5, while the salt concentration was the key factor influencing the activity. Methylotrophic and, to a lesser extent, lithotrophic methanogenesis were active up to soda-saturating conditions (4 M total Na(+)). Acetate-dependent methanogenesis was observed at salinities below 3 M total Na(+). Detection of methanogens in sediments using the mcrA gene as a functional marker demonstrated domination of methylotrophic genera Methanolobus and Methanosalsum and lithotrophic Methanocalculus. In a few cases, acetoclastic Methanosaeta was detected, as well as two deep lineage methanogens. Cultivation results corresponded well to the mcrA-based observations. Enrichments for natronophilic methylotrophic methanogens resulted in isolation of Methanolobus strains at moderate salinity, while at salt concentrations above 2 M Na(+) a novel member of the genus Methanosalsum was dominating. Enrichments with H2 or formate invariably resulted in domination of close relatives of Methanocalculus natronophilus. Enrichments with acetate at low salt concentration yielded two acetoclastic alkaliphilic Methanosaeta cultures, while at salinity above 1 M Na(+) syntrophic associations

  1. Discrimination among spawning concentrations of Lake Superior lake herring based on trace element profiles in sagittae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bronte, Charles R.; Hesselberg, Robert J.; Shoesmith, John A.; Hoff, Michael H.

    1996-01-01

    Little is known about the stock structure of lake herring Coregonus artedi in Lake Superior, and recent increases in harvestable stock sizes has led to expanded exploitation in some areas. Research on marine teleosts has demonstrated that chemical differences in sagittal otoliths can be used for identification of fish stocks. We used plasma emission spectrophotometry to measure the concentrations of 10 trace elements in the sagittal otoliths from lake herring captured at eight spawning sites in Lake Superior and from Little Star Lake, an inland lake outside the Lake Superior basin. Discriminant function analysis indicated that elemental concentrations provided site-specific information but that considerable overlap existed among some locations, especially those in western Lake Superior. Correct classification rates varied from 12.0% to 86.1% and were generally higher for spawning locations from embayments in eastern Lake Superior and for the outgroup population from Little Star Lake. The results presented here demonstrate the potential usefulness of this technique for strictly freshwater species, especially those that live in highly oligotrophic waters such as Lake Superior.

  2. Preliminary evaluation of a lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) bioenergetics model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Pothoven, Steven A.; Schneeberger, Philip J.; O'Connor, Daniel V.; Brandt, Stephen B.

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a preliminary evaluation of a lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) bioenergetics model by applying the model to size-at-age data for lake whitefish from northern Lake Michigan. We then compared estimates of gross growth efficiency (GGE) from our bioenergetis model with previously published estimates of GGE for bloater (C. hoyi) in Lake Michigan and for lake whitefish in Quebec. According to our model, the GGE of Lake Michigan lake whitefish decreased from 0.075 to 0.02 as age increased from 2 to 5 years. In contrast, the GGE of lake whitefish in Quebec inland waters decreased from 0.12 to 0.05 for the same ages. When our swimming-speed submodel was replaced with a submodel that had been used for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Michigan and an observed predator energy density for Lake Michigan lake whitefish was employed, our model predicted that the GGE of Lake Michigan lake whitefish decreased from 0.12 to 0.04 as age increased from 2 to 5 years.

  3. High level of intergenera gene exchange shapes the evolution of haloarchaea in an isolated Antarctic lake

    PubMed Central

    DeMaere, Matthew Z.; Williams, Timothy J.; Allen, Michelle A.; Brown, Mark V.; Gibson, John A. E.; Rich, John; Lauro, Federico M.; Dyall-Smith, Michael; Davenport, Karen W.; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Deep Lake in Antarctica is a globally isolated, hypersaline system that remains liquid at temperatures down to −20 °C. By analyzing metagenome data and genomes of four isolates we assessed genome variation and patterns of gene exchange to learn how the lake community evolved. The lake is completely and uniformly dominated by haloarchaea, comprising a hierarchically structured, low-complexity community that differs greatly to temperate and tropical hypersaline environments. The four Deep Lake isolates represent distinct genera (∼85% 16S rRNA gene similarity and ∼73% genome average nucleotide identity) with genomic characteristics indicative of niche adaptation, and collectively account for ∼72% of the cellular community. Network analysis revealed a remarkable level of intergenera gene exchange, including the sharing of long contiguous regions (up to 35 kb) of high identity (∼100%). Although the genomes of closely related Halobacterium, Haloquadratum, and Haloarcula (>90% average nucleotide identity) shared regions of high identity between species or strains, the four Deep Lake isolates were the only distantly related haloarchaea to share long high-identity regions. Moreover, the Deep Lake high-identity regions did not match to any other hypersaline environment metagenome data. The most abundant species, tADL, appears to play a central role in the exchange of insertion sequences, but not the exchange of high-identity regions. The genomic characteristics of the four haloarchaea are consistent with a lake ecosystem that sustains a high level of intergenera gene exchange while selecting for ecotypes that maintain sympatric speciation. The peculiarities of this polar system restrict which species can grow and provide a tempo and mode for accentuating gene exchange. PMID:24082106

  4. High level of intergenera gene exchange shapes the evolution of haloarchaea in an isolated Antarctic lake.

    PubMed

    DeMaere, Matthew Z; Williams, Timothy J; Allen, Michelle A; Brown, Mark V; Gibson, John A E; Rich, John; Lauro, Federico M; Dyall-Smith, Michael; Davenport, Karen W; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Tringe, Susannah G; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2013-10-15

    Deep Lake in Antarctica is a globally isolated, hypersaline system that remains liquid at temperatures down to -20 °C. By analyzing metagenome data and genomes of four isolates we assessed genome variation and patterns of gene exchange to learn how the lake community evolved. The lake is completely and uniformly dominated by haloarchaea, comprising a hierarchically structured, low-complexity community that differs greatly to temperate and tropical hypersaline environments. The four Deep Lake isolates represent distinct genera (∼85% 16S rRNA gene similarity and ∼73% genome average nucleotide identity) with genomic characteristics indicative of niche adaptation, and collectively account for ∼72% of the cellular community. Network analysis revealed a remarkable level of intergenera gene exchange, including the sharing of long contiguous regions (up to 35 kb) of high identity (∼100%). Although the genomes of closely related Halobacterium, Haloquadratum, and Haloarcula (>90% average nucleotide identity) shared regions of high identity between species or strains, the four Deep Lake isolates were the only distantly related haloarchaea to share long high-identity regions. Moreover, the Deep Lake high-identity regions did not match to any other hypersaline environment metagenome data. The most abundant species, tADL, appears to play a central role in the exchange of insertion sequences, but not the exchange of high-identity regions. The genomic characteristics of the four haloarchaea are consistent with a lake ecosystem that sustains a high level of intergenera gene exchange while selecting for ecotypes that maintain sympatric speciation. The peculiarities of this polar system restrict which species can grow and provide a tempo and mode for accentuating gene exchange.

  5. Diversity of RuBisCO and ATP citrate lyase genes in soda lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Olga L; Tourova, Tatjana P; Muyzer, Gerard; Kolganova, Tatjana V; Sorokin, Dimitry Y

    2011-01-01

    Sediments from six soda lakes of the Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) and from hypersaline alkaline lakes of Wadi Natrun (Egypt) were analyzed for the presence of cbb and aclB genes encoding key enzymes Ci assimilation (RuBisCO in Calvin-Benson and ATP citrate lyase in rTCA cycles, respectively). The cbbL gene (RuBisCO form I) was found in all samples and was most diverse, while the cbbM (RuBisCO form II) and aclB were detected only in few samples and with a much lower diversity. The cbbL libraries from hypersaline lakes were dominated by members of the extremely haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing Ectothiorhodospiraceae, i.e. the chemolithotrophic Thioalkalivibrio and the phototrophic Halorhodospira. In the less saline soda lakes from the Kulunda Steppe, the cbbL gene comprised up to ten phylotypes with a domination of members of a novel phototrophic Chromatiales lineage. The cbbM clone libraries consisted of two major unidentified lineages probably belonging to chemotrophic sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria. One of them, dominating in the haloalkaline lakes from Wadi Natrun, was related to a cbbM phylotype detected previously in a hypersaline lake with a neutral pH, and another, dominating in lakes from the Kulunda Steppe, was only distantly related to the Thiomicrospira cluster. The aclB sequences detected in two samples from the Kulunda Steppe formed a single, deep branch in the Epsilonproteobacteria, distantly related to Arcobacter sulfidicus.

  6. Association of a new type of gliding, filamentous, purple phototrophic bacterium inside bundles of Microcoleus chthonoplastes in hypersaline cyanobacterial mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amelio, E. D.; Cohen, Y.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    An unidentified filamentous purple bacterium, probably belonging to a new genus or even a new family, is found in close association with the filamentous, mat-forming cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes in a hypersaline pond at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico, and in Solar Lake, Sinai, Egypt. This organism is a gliding, segmented trichome, 0.8-0.9 micrometer wide. It contains intracytoplasmic stacked lamellae which are perpendicular and obliquely oriented to the cell wall, similar to those described for the purple sulfur bacteria Ectothiorhodospira. These bacteria are found inside the cyanobacterial bundle, enclosed by the cyanobacterial sheath. Detailed transmission electron microscopical analyses carried out in horizontal sections of the upper 1.5 mm of the cyanobacterial mat show this cyanobacterial-purple bacterial association at depths of 300-1200 micrometers, corresponding to the zone below that of maximal oxygenic photosynthesis. Sharp gradients of oxygen and sulfide are established during the day at this microzone in the two cyanobacterial mats studied. The close association, the distribution pattern of this association and preliminary physiological experiments suggest a co-metabolism of sulfur by the two-membered community. This probable new genus of purple bacteria may also grow photoheterotrophically using organic carbon excreted by the cyanobacterium. Since the chemical gradients in the entire photic zone fluctuate widely in a diurnal cycle, both types of metabolism probably take place. During the morning and afternoon, sulfide migrates up to the photic zone allowing photoautotrophic metabolism with sulfide as the electron donor. During the day the photic zone is highly oxygenated and the purple bacteria may either use oxidized species of sulfur such as elemental sulfur and thiosulfate in the photoautotrophic mode or grow photoheterotrophically using organic carbon excreted by M. chthonoplastes. The new type of filamentous purple sulfur

  7. Phylogeny and ecology of the ubiquitous saprobe Cladosporium sphaerospermum, with descriptions of seven new species from hypersaline environments

    PubMed Central

    Zalar, P.; de Hoog, G.S.; Schroers, H.-J.; Crous, P.W.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Gunde-Cimerman, N.

    2007-01-01

    Saprobic Cladosporium isolates morphologically similar to C. sphaerospermum are phylogenetically analysed on the basis of DNA sequences of the ribosomal RNA gene cluster, including the internal transcribed spacer regions ITS1 and ITS2, the 5.8S rDNA (ITS) and the small subunit (SSU) rDNA as well as β-tubulin and actin gene introns and exons. Most of the C. sphaerospermum-like species show halotolerance as a recurrent feature. Cladosporium sphaerospermum, which is characterised by almost globose conidia, is redefined on the basis of its ex-neotype culture. Cladosporium dominicanum, C. psychrotolerans, C. velox, C. spinulosum and C. halotolerans, all with globoid conidia, are newly described on the basis of phylogenetic analyses and cryptic morphological and physiological characters. Cladosporium halotolerans was isolated from hypersaline water and bathrooms and detected once on dolphin skin. Cladosporium dominicanum and C. velox were isolated from plant material and hypersaline water. Cladosporium psychrotolerans, which grows well at 4 °C but not at 30 °C, and C. spinulosum, having conspicuously ornamented conidia with long digitate projections, are currently only known from hypersaline water. We also newly describe C. salinae from hypersaline water and C. fusiforme from hypersaline water and animal feed. Both species have ovoid to ellipsoid conidia and are therefore reminiscent of C. herbarum. Cladosporium langeronii (= Hormodendrum langeronii) previously described as a pathogen on human skin, is halotolerant but has not yet been recorded from hypersaline environments. PMID:18490999

  8. Isotopic measurements of N2O in a hypersaline pond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, B. D.; Casciotti, K.; Samarkin, V.; Joye, S. B.; Madigan, M.; Schutte, C.

    2012-12-01

    Production of nitrous oxide (N2O) in aquatic environments has often been attributed to biological processes. However, reports of abiotic mechanisms of N2O production have suggested that such processes may be substantial in Antarctic Dry Valley soils. It has been proposed that the reduction of nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2-) coupled to Fe (II) oxidation can produce N2O with a characteristic site preference (SP), where SP is defined as the difference in nitrogen isotope ratio between the center and outside nitrogen atoms in the linear N2O molecule. The current study uses isotopic measurements of N2O, NO2-, and NO3- to examine N2O production mechanisms in Don Juan Pond (DJP), a hypersaline pond in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. [NO3-] and [NO2-] in DJP brine were quite high, ranging from 6,238 to 7,719μM and 23 to 36μM, respectively. N2O samples from pond water (brine) yielded δ15Nbulk of -38±1‰, δ18O of +60±2‰, and SP of +1±7‰. Gas collected from soil had similar N2O isotope ratios, with δ15Nbulk of -45±4‰, δ18O of +56±3‰, and SP of +6±1‰. These field measurements were interpreted using a two end member mixing model, in which the measured N2O was assumed to be a mixture between atmospheric N2O and N2O from a local source. Using the three isotope systems (δ15Nbulk, δ18O, and SP), a series of four equations were constructed with five unknowns: δ15Nbulk, δ18O, and SP of the source, and the fractional contributions of the local source and atmospheric N2O. Solving the equations required an assumption about one of the five unknowns. To do this, we used data from laboratory experiments carried out with sterile brine and DJP soil in order to provide an estimate of the N2O isotope signature of the abiotic source. DJP brine and soil measurements gave similar model results, and thus only results using DJP soil measurements are reported here. Assuming δ18O of the unknown local source is near +82‰(from abiotic laboratory experiments), then

  9. Evaluating integration of inland bathymetry in the U.S. Geological Survey 3D Elevation Program, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller-Corbett, Cynthia

    2016-09-01

    the 3D Elevation Program so that data can be integrated with a minimal level of effort. Geomorphic site conditions are known to affect the success and accuracy of light detection and ranging and other bathymetric surveys, and a baseline that includes geomorphic data is recommended to help in evaluation of limitations imposed by geomorphology for surveys completed in the variable physiographic provinces across the United States. The geographic distribution for existing surveys identifies regions where inland bathymetry data have been collected and, conversely, where little or no survey data seem to be available to provide hydrologic and hydraulic information. This distribution, in conjunction with local to regional data needs to characterize and monitor river and lake resources, provides another important set of criteria to propose and guide acquisition of new bathymetry data for the 3D Elevation Program. An initial evaluation of needs can be based on the importance of water resources that provide primary water supplies for communities, agriculture, energy, and ecological systems; the importance of flood plain analyses; and projected population growth across the United States.

  10. Mapping Hurricane Inland-Storm Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, M.; East, J. W.; Dorsey, M. E.; McGee, B. D.; McCallum, B. E.; Pearman, J. L.; Sallenger, A. H.; Holmes, R. R.; Berembrock, C. E.; Turnipseed, D. P.; Mason, R. R.

    2008-12-01

    Historically, hurricane-induced storm-tides were documented through analysis of structural or vegetative damage and high-water marks. However, these sources rarely provided quantitative information about the timing of the flooding, the sequencing of multiple paths by which the storm-surge waters arrived, or the magnitude of waves and wave run-up comprising floodwaters. In response to these deficiencies, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed and deployed an experimental mobile storm-surge network to provide detailed time-series data for selected hurricane landfalls. The USGS first deployed the network in September 2005 as Hurricane Rita approached the Texas and Louisiana coasts. The network for Rita consisted of 32 water-level and 14 barometric-pressure monitoring sites. Sensors were located at distances ranging from a few hundred feet to approximately 30 miles inland and sampled 4,000 square miles. Deployments have also occurred for Hurricanes Wilma, Gustav, and Ike. For Hurricane Gustav, more than 100 water level sensors were deployed. Analysis of the water-level data enable construction of maps depicting surge topography through time and space, essentially rendering elements of a 3-dimensional view of the storm-surge dome as it moves on- shore, as well as a map of maximum water-level elevations. The USGS also acquired LIDAR topographic data from coasts impacted by hurricanes. These data reveal extreme changes to the beaches and barrier islands that arise from hurricane storm surge and waves. By better understanding where extreme changes occur along our coasts, we will be able to position coastal structures away from hazards.

  11. Mercury distribution, partitioning and speciation in coastal vs. inland High Arctic snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulain, Alexandre J.; Garcia, Edenise; Amyot, Marc; Campbell, Peter G. C.; Ariya, Parisa A.

    2007-07-01

    Atmospheric mercury deposition on snow at springtime has been reported in polar regions, potentially posing a threat to coastal and inland ecosystems receiving meltwaters. However, the post-depositional fate of Hg in snow is not well known, and no data are available on Hg partitioning in polar snow. During snowmelt, we conducted a survey of Hg concentrations, partitioning and speciation in surface snow and at depth, over sea ice and over land along a 100 km transect across Cornwallis Island, NU, Canada. Total Hg concentrations [THg] in surface snow were low (less than 20 pmol L -1) and were significantly higher in marine vs. inland environments. Particulate Hg in surface snow represented up to 90% of total Hg over sea ice and up to 59% over land. At depth, [THg] at the snow/sea ice interface (up to 300 pmol L -1) were two orders of magnitude higher than at the snow/lake ice interface (ca. 2.5 pmol L -1). Integrated snow columns, sampled over sea-ice and over land, showed that particulate Hg was mostly bound to particles ranging from 0.45 to 2.7 μm. Moreover, melting snowpacks over sea ice and over lake ice contribute to increase [THg] at the water/ice interfaces. This study indicates that, at the onset of snowmelt, most of the Hg in snow is in particulate form, particularly over sea ice. Low Hg levels in surface snow suggest that Hg deposited through early spring deposition events is partly lost to the atmosphere from the snowpack before snowmelt. The sea ice/snow interface may constitute a site for Hg accumulation, however. Further understanding of the cycling of mercury at the sea ice/snow and sea ice/seawater interfaces is thus warranted to fully understand how mercury enters the arctic food webs.

  12. Removal performance and microbial communities in a sequencing batch reactor treating hypersaline phenol-laden wastewater.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Wei, Li; Zhang, Huining; Yang, Kai; Wang, Hongyu

    2016-10-01

    Hypersaline phenol-rich wastewater is hard to be treated by traditional biological systems. In this work, a sequencing batch reactor was used to remove phenol from hypersaline wastewater. The removal performance was evaluated in response to the variations of operating parameters and the microbial diversity was investigated by 454 pyrosequencing. The results showed that the bioreactor had high removal efficiency of phenol and was able to keep stable with the increase of initial phenol concentration. DO, pH, and salinity also affected the phenol removal rate. The most abundant bacterial group was phylum Proteobacteria in the two working conditions, and class Gammaproteobacteria as well as Alphaproteobacteria was predominant subgroup. The abundance of bacterial clusters was notably different along with the variation of operation conditions, resulting in changes of phenol degradation rates. The high removal efficiency of phenol suggested that the reactor might be promising in treating phenol-laden industrial wastewater in high-salt condition.

  13. The influence of dry lakebeds, degraded sandy grasslands and abandoned farmland in the arid inlands of northern China on the grain size distribution of East Asian aeolian dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Rong; Yue, Le-Ping; Li, Zhi-Pei

    2008-02-01

    Dry lakes, degraded sandy grasslands, abandoned farmland and mobile dunes which are widely distributed throughout the arid areas of northern China have been investigated in this work. Gain-size distribution of the surface sediments of Manas lake in Junggar basin, Juyan lake in the Alxa plateau, Zhuye lake in Minqin basin and most deserts (such as Mu Us desert, Otindag desert, Horqin desert and Hulun Buir desert) in China have been analyzed. The results show clay with particle sized <10 μm on the surface sediments of dry lakebed and sandy grassland developed from dry lakebed, respectively, account for >60% and ˜50% of the total mass. Since the tiny particles on the surface of abandoned farmland are blown away easily and rapidly, the content of clay particles in Minqin basin is <14%. The grain-size distribution of mobile dunes in northern China mainly consists of particles >63 μm and few particles <10 μm. Consequently, although sand/dust storms originate primarily in the western deserts, the gobi areas of the Alxa plateau, the north and east of Hexi Corridor and in central Mongolia, the widely distributed dry lakebeds, sandy grasslands and abandoned farmland adjacent to the deserts also contribute to aeolian dusts. Hence, the material sources for sand dust storm in East Asia include inland deserts, but also dry lakes, sandy grasslands and abandoned farmland, which are widely distributed throughout the arid inlands of northern China.

  14. Investigating Climate at an Inland Sea During Snowball Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A. J.; Bitz, C. M.; Warren, S. G.; Waddington, E. D.

    2013-12-01

    During the Neoproterozoic, the Earth's oceans may have been completely covered with thick ice, during periods commonly called Snowball Earth events. The Snowball Earth environment would seemingly have prohibited the survival of photosynthetic eukaryotic algae; however, these organisms were alive immediately prior to and immediate subsequent to these periods. Where on a Snowball Earth, or a Snowball-like exoplanet, could photosynthetic eukaryotic algae survive? Recent research, in attempt to reconcile this paradox, has demonstrated that narrow channels connected the ocean, called inland seas, could have provided refugia for photosynthetic eukaryotic algae during Snowball Earth events. Narrow channels could have restricted the flow of ocean-derived ice, called sea glaciers, diminishing sea-glacier penetration into these channels. Provided certain climate conditions and channel geometries, this diminished sea-glacier penetration would have allowed for either open water or thin sea ice, at the far end of these channels. A channel with open water or thin sea ice would provide the conditions needed for survival of photosynthetic eukaryotic algae. Here we test whether the climate needed to prevent sea-glacier penetration, could have existed in the special inland sea environment. Previous climate modeling of Snowball Earth has shown that tropical regions would have likely been warmer than the global average and would have experienced net sublimation at the surface. An inland sea located in the tropics would be surrounded by land that is bare and free from snow, while the inland sea itself would be either ice-covered or open water. With these conditions the inland sea would likely have a high albedo, while the surrounding bare land, would have a lower albedo. This albedo contrast could cause the climate over an inland sea to be warmer than the climate over the ice-covered ocean at the same latitude. We calculate the surface temperature and sublimation rate at an inland sea

  15. Great Salt Lake Microbial Communities: The Foundation of a Terminal Lake Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, B. K.; Acord, M.; Riddle, M. R.; Avery, B.

    2006-12-01

    Great Salt Lake (GSL) is a natural hypersaline ecosystem and a terminal lake of substantial size. The dramatic fluctuation in water levels and salinity creates an ecological backdrop selective for organisms with a high degree of adaptability. At the macro level, the biodiversity of the GSL ecosystem is simple, due to the limitations of an extreme saline environment: Birds eat the two invertebrates of the lake, and the invertebrates eat phytoplankton. However, analysis of the microbial level reveals an enormous diversity of species interacting with one another and the ecosystem as a whole. Our cultivation, biochemical tests, microscopy and DNA sequencing yielded data on dozens of isolates. These data demonstrate novel species, and possibly genera, living in the lake. In addition, we have discovered viruses (bacteriophage) that prey on the microorganisms. Preliminary data on bacteria dwelling in the gut of the brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana, link these prokaryotic organisms to the food chain for the first time. All of these results taken together open the door for the discussion of the significance of the microbial level of terminal lake ecosystem, particularly in light of lake water contamination and bioremediation possibilities.

  16. Microbial Diversity in Water and Sediment of Lake Chaka, an Athalassohaline Lake in Northwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongchen; Dong, Hailiang; Zhang, Gengxin; Yu, Bingsong; Chapman, Leah R.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2006-01-01

    We employed culture-dependent and -independent techniques to study microbial diversity in Lake Chaka, a unique hypersaline lake (32.5% salinity) in northwest China. It is situated at 3,214 m above sea level in a dry climate. The average water depth is 2 to 3 cm. Halophilic isolates were obtained from the lake water, and halotolerant isolates were obtained from the shallow sediment. The isolates exhibited resistance to UV and gamma radiation. Microbial abundance in the sediments ranged from 108 cells/g at the water-sediment interface to 107 cells/g at a sediment depth of 42 cm. A major change in the bacterial community composition was observed across the interface. In the lake water, clone sequences affiliated with the Bacteroidetes were the most abundant, whereas in the sediments, sequences related to low G+C gram-positive bacteria were predominant. A similar change was also present in the archaeal community. While all archaeal clone sequences in the lake water belonged to the Halobacteriales, the majority of the sequences in the sediments were related to those previously obtained from methanogenic soils and sediments. The observed changes in the microbial community structure across the water-sediment interface were correlated with a decrease in salinity from the lake water (32.5%) to the sediments (approximately 4%). Across the interface, the redox state also changed from oxic to anoxic and may also have contributed to the observed shift in the microbial community. PMID:16751487

  17. Anaerobic oxidation of methane by sulfate in hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea aquifer.

    PubMed

    Avrahamov, N; Antler, G; Yechieli, Y; Gavrieli, I; Joye, S B; Saxton, M; Turchyn, A V; Sivan, O

    2014-11-01

    Geochemical and microbial evidence points to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) likely coupled with bacterial sulfate reduction in the hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea (DS) alluvial aquifer. Groundwater was sampled from nine boreholes drilled along the Arugot alluvial fan next to the DS. The groundwater samples were highly saline (up to 6300 mm chlorine), anoxic, and contained methane. A mass balance calculation demonstrates that the very low δ(13) CDIC in this groundwater is due to anaerobic methane oxidation. Sulfate depletion coincident with isotope enrichment of sulfur and oxygen isotopes in the sulfate suggests that sulfate reduction is associated with this AOM. DNA extraction and 16S amplicon sequencing were used to explore the microbial community present and were found to be microbial composition indicative of bacterial sulfate reducers associated with anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) driving AOM. The net sulfate reduction seems to be primarily controlled by the salinity and the available methane and is substantially lower as salinity increases (2.5 mm sulfate removal at 3000 mm chlorine but only 0.5 mm sulfate removal at 6300 mm chlorine). Low overall sulfur isotope fractionation observed ((34) ε = 17 ± 3.5‰) hints at high rates of sulfate reduction, as has been previously suggested for sulfate reduction coupled with methane oxidation. The new results demonstrate the presence of sulfate-driven AOM in terrestrial hypersaline systems and expand our understanding of how microbial life is sustained under the challenging conditions of an extremely hypersaline environment.

  18. Dispersion and transport of hypersaline gravity currents in the presence of internal waves at a pycnocline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, C. A. R.; Pietrasz, V. B.; Ouellette, N. T.; Koseff, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Desalination of seawater offers a source of potable water in arid regions and during drought. However, hypersaline discharge from desalination facilities presents environmental risks, particularly to benthic organisms. The risks posed by salt levels and chemical additives, which can be toxic to local ecosystems, are typically mitigated by ensuring high levels of dilution close to the source. We report on laboratory flume experiments examining how internal waves at the pycnocline of a layered ambient density stratification influence the transport of hypersaline effluent moving as a gravity current down the slope. We found that some of the hypersaline fluid from the gravity current was diverted away from the slope into an intrusion along the pycnocline. A parametric study investigated how varying the energy of the internal wave altered the amount of dense fluid that was diverted into the pycnocline intrusion. The results are compared to an analytical framework that compares the incident energy in the internal wave to potential energy used in diluting the gravity current. These results are significant for desalination effluents because fluid diverted into the intrusion avoids the ecologically sensitive benthic layer and disperses more quickly than if it had continued to propagate along the bed.

  19. The density-driven circulation of the coastal hypersaline system of the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    PubMed

    Salamena, Gerry G; Martins, Flávio; Ridd, Peter V

    2016-04-15

    The coastal hypersaline system of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) in the dry season, was investigated for the first time using a 3D baroclinic model. In the shallow coastal embayments, salinity increases to c.a. 1‰ above typical offshore salinity (~35.4‰). This salinity increase is due to high evaporation rates and negligible freshwater input. The hypersalinity drifts longshore north-westward due to south-easterly trade winds and may eventually pass capes or headlands, e.g. Cape Cleveland, where the water is considerably deeper (c.a. 15m). Here, a pronounced thermohaline circulation is predicted to occur which flushes the hypersalinity offshore at velocities of up to 0.08m/s. Flushing time of the coastal embayments is around 2-3weeks. During the dry season early summer, the thermohaline circulation reduces and therefore, flushing times are predicted to be slight longer due to the reduced onshore-offshore density gradient compared to that in the dry season winter period.

  20. Geochemical modeling of evaporation process in Lake Qarun, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Wahed, Mahmoud S. M.; Mohamed, Essam A.; El-Sayed, Mohamed I.; M'nif, Adel; Sillanpää, Mika

    2014-09-01

    Lake Qarun is an inland closed saline lake. It lies within the Fayoum Depression in the Western Desert of Egypt. Evaporation modeling has been carried out using PHREEQC to simulate the geochemical evolution of surface drainage waters inflow towards lake water. In the case of Lake Qarun, it is the first attempt to carry out such kind of modeling. Performance of this model helped to address the different sources of dissolved major ions to Lake Qarun and to identify the mechanisms control the lake's water chemistry. The model demonstrated that evaporation-crystallization process is the main mechanism controlling the evolution of lake water chemistry where major ions Na+, Mg2+, Cl- and SO42- have been built up in the lake by evaporation while Ca2+ and HCO3- are depleted by calcite precipitation. Moreover, the simulated model reproduced the real data observed in Lake Qarun except in the case of SO42- which is in real more enriched in the lake than the model output. The additional source of SO42- is reported to be from groundwater. The models result agreed well with the modified evolutionary Hardie and Eugster's scheme (1970) in which the final major composition of Lake Qarun water is Na-Mg-SO4-Cl type. In future, the monitoring of Lake Qarun chemistry with detection of any other sources of elements and/or local reactions inside the lake can be detected by performing the simulated evaporation model reported by the present study.

  1. ICESat Observations of Inland Surface Water Stage, Slope, and Extent: a New Method for Hydrologic Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, David J.; Jasinski, Michael F.

    2004-01-01

    River discharge and changes in lake, reservoir and wetland water storage are critical terms in the global surface water balance, yet they are poorly observed globally and the prospects for adequate observations from in-situ networks are poor (Alsdorf et al., 2003). The NASA-sponsored Surface Water Working Group has established a framework for advancing satellite observations of river discharge and water storage changes which focuses on obtaining measurements of water surface height (stage), slope, and extent. Satellite laser altimetry, which can achieve centimeter-level elevation precision for single, small laser footprints, provides a method to obtain these inland water parameters and contribute to global water balance monitoring. Since its launch in January, 2003 the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), a NASA Earth Observing System mission, has achieved over 540 million laser pulse observations of ice sheet, ocean surface, land topography, and inland water elevations and cloud and aerosol height distributions. By recording the laser backscatter from 80 m diameter footprints spaced 175 m along track, ICESat acquires globally-distributed elevation profiles, using a 1064 nm laser altimeter channel, and cloud and aerosol profiles, using a 532 nm atmospheric lidar channel. The ICESat mission has demonstrated the following laser altimeter capabilities relevant to observations of inland water: (1) elevation measurements with a precision of 2 to 3 cm for flat surfaces, suitable for detecting river surface slopes along long river reaches or between multiple crossings of a meandering river channel, (2) from the laser backscatter waveform, detection of water surface elevations beneath vegetation canopies, suitable for measuring water stage in flooded forests, (3) single pulse absolute elevation accuracy of about 50 cm (1 sigma) for 1 degree sloped surfaces, with calibration work in progress indicating that a final accuracy of about 12 cm (1 sigma) will be

  2. Tracing groundwater input into Lake Vanda, Wright Valley, Antarctica using major ions, stable isotopes and noble gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, C. B.; Poreda, R. J.; Snyder, G. T.

    2008-12-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV), Antarctica, is the largest ice-free region on Antarctica. Lake Vanda, located in central Wright Valley, is the deepest lake among the MDV lakes. It has a relatively fresh water layer above 50 m with a hypersaline calcium-chloride brine below (50-72 m). The Onyx River is the only stream input into Lake Vanda. It flows westward from the coastal Lower Wright Glacier and discharges into Lake Vanda. Suggested by the published literature and this study, there has been and may still be groundwater input into Lake Vanda. Stable isotopes, major ions, and noble gas data from this study coupled with previously published data indicate that the bottom waters of Lake Vanda have had significant contributions from a deep groundwater system. The dissolved gas of the bottom waters of Lake Vanda display solubility concentrations rather than the Ar-enriched dissolved gas seen in the Taylor Valley lakes (such as Lake Bonney). The isotopic data indicate that the bottom calcium-chloride-brine of Lake Vanda has undergone very little evaporation. The calcium-chloride chemistry of the groundwater that discharges into Lake Vanda most likely results from the chemical weathering and dissolution of cryogenic evaporites (antarcticite and gypsum) within the glacial sediments of Wright Valley. The high calcium concentrations of the brine have caused gypsum to precipitate on the lake bottom. Our work also supports previous physical and chemical observations suggesting that the upper portion actively circulates and the hypersaline bottom layer does not. The helium and calcium chloride values are concentrated at the bottom, with a very narrow transition layer between it and the above fresh water. If the freshwater layer did not actively circulate, then diffusion over time would have caused the helium and calcium chloride to slowly permeate upwards through the water column.

  3. Blow-down and blow-in of Inland`s No. 7 blast furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, J.; Quisenberry, P.; Carter, W.

    1995-12-01

    After extensive and detailed planning, a mini-reline of the 13.7 meter No. 7 Blast Furnace was executed in November 1993. The furnace lining had 18 million metric tons of production and the bosh, belly and lower stack lining were being maintained through a scheduled grouting practice. The mini-reline was planned for 33 days and the reline work included (a) replacing the bosh, belly and lower stack alumina lining with graphite brick, (b) gunning the middle and upper stack, (c) rebuilding the furnace top, stove burners and tapholes and (d) minor repairs to other auxiliary equipment. During this 33 day reline period the two 8 meter furnaces could only produce 40% of the normal production requirement, therefore the blow-down, quench, salamander tap and blow-in activities were critical to meeting the planned schedule. The planning of these activities was started in the spring of 1993 and included review of Inland`s past blow-down and blow-in performance as well as bench marking the performance of other large blast furnaces in North America, Japan and Europe. The development of the 1993 procedures focused on opportunities to accelerate the blow-down, quench, salamander tap and blow-in as well as having a clean hearth and stack which could also save time during the demolition phase of the reline. Any time that could be saved in these activities directly translated to an early start-up and more plantwide production. This paper will cover the successful planning and implementation of these activities which resulted in a 2 day reduction in the reline schedule, an accelerated production curve and an earlier than planned use of PCI during blow-in.

  4. Lake Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This quarterly publication of the State Historical Society of Iowa features articles and activities for elementary school students. This summer issue focuses on the topic of lake life. The issue includes the following features: (1) "Where the Lakes Are Map"; (2) "Letter from the Lake"; (3) "Lake People"; (4)…

  5. A note on the biogeographical origin of the brine shrimp Artemia urmiana Günther, 1899 from Urmia Lake, Iran.

    PubMed

    Eimanifar, Amin; Asem, Alireza; Djamali, Morteza; Wink, Michael

    2016-03-30

    The brine shrimp Artemia urmiana, an abundant inhabitant of the hypersaline Urmia Lake in northwestern Iran, has recently been described from Lake Koyashskoe, also a shallow hypersaline lake that is located on the Black Sea coast of the Crimean Peninsula (Ukraine). This discovery has questioned the endemicity of A. urmiana in Urmia Lake and has also brought into question the biogeographical origin of this species. In the present study, we combined recent genetic divergence data (mtDNA-COI) with palaeoecological evidence to address the biogeographical origin of A. urmiana. Calibration of the molecular clock of the COI region was set by assigning the age of the micro-crustacean Daphnia pulex minimally at 145 Mya. The divergence age of A. urmiana in Urmia Lake dates back to 383,000 years, whereas Ukrainian Artemia reflects a very young populations that diverged about 196,000 years ago. Palaeoecological evidence suggests that the age of the major habitat of A. urmiana i.e. Urmia Lake goes back to the Tertiary Period while the Ukranian habitats of the species are very young, by virtue of geological features of the Holocene age. We conclude that the biogeographical origin of A. urmiana is outside of Europe and the current state of knowledge strongly suggests that Urmia Lake has been the major source of its expansion into its modern habitats in Europe.

  6. Eutrophic lakes as CO2 sinks - A survey of 19 lakes in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, G.

    2015-12-01

    Inland waters emit a substantial amount of CO2 every year, most recent syntheses estimate (Raymond et al. 2013, IPCC 2013). However, eutrophic water bodies, which constitute the majority of inland waters, are underrepresented in these syntheses and may absorb rather than emit CO2 because of their high productivity (Balmer and Downing 2011, Pacheco et al. 2013). We did a survey of 19 urban and peri-urban lakes in India across a wide range of climates and with varying levels of eutrophication to get a snapshot of lake air-water CO2 exchange. A majority of the lakes (12 out of 19) were undersaturated with CO2 during daytime. Surface water pCO2 varied from 26 to 4600 ppm. Using estimates of gas transfer velocity from two different methods, we found the average daytime flux of CO2 in these lakes to vary from -3.11 mg C m-2d-1 to 36 mg C m-2 d-1. Weighted-averages of pCO2 and flux using lake area were 692 ppm and 2.33 mg C m-2 d-1, respectively. However, these values were dominated by one large coastal lake that was saturated with CO2. The other 18 lakes yielded averages pCO2 and flux of 282 ppm and -0.65 mg C m-2 d-1. Eutrophication is one the biggest contemporary threats to the global freshwater supply, and is particularly severe in developing countries. This study, despite its limited scope, provides strong support to the fact that eutrophic lakes may act as CO2 sinks rather than sources. Follow-up studies on the diurnal and seasonal pCO2 trends and the metabolic characteristics of these lakes will reveal the determinants of their carbon metabolism.

  7. Neonatal birth weight variations between inland and littoral Croatia.

    PubMed

    Bralić, Irena; Rodin, Urelija; Matanić, Dubravka; Jovancevic, Milivoj

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the study was to assess neonatal birth weight (BW) differences between inland and littoral Croatia, to identify BW groups with most pronounced differences, and possible variations in the rate of BW > or = 4000 g between Sibenik area and the rest of littoral (counties with access to the Adriatic Sea) and inland Croatia. The study included data on 99.42% of 200,740 live births recorded in 37 Croatian maternity hospitals during the 2001-2005 period. Distribution of 500-g BW groups was analyzed irrespective of neonatal sex and gestational age. Differences were found between the inland and littoral parts of Croatia according to distribution of the BW groups of < 2500 g (5.4% vs. 4.4%), 2500-3999 g (84% vs. 80.2%) and > or = 4000 g (10.6% vs. 15.4%) (chi2 = 882; p < 0.001).The highest rate of BW > or = 4000 g was recorded in Sibenik-Knin County (5-year mean 18.32%) and was greater throughout the littoral as compared with inland Croatia (5-year mean 14.99% vs. 9.58%). A shift towards higher BWgroups recorded throughout littoral as compared with inland Croatia supports the hypothesis on variation in anthropologic characteristics in the respective populations to be pronounced as early as at birth. Study results confirmed fetal macrosomia not to be exclusively characteristic of Sibenik-Knin County, since the rate of neonatal BW > or =4000 g was significantly higher in the entire littoral as compared with inland Croatia.

  8. Drought-related surface changes in the Upper Inland Niger Delta or Mali

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobberger, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    Examination of rainfall records for the Upper Inland Niger Delta show that rainfall from 1971 through present has been 20% below the long term average. Rainfall since 1982 has been only 60% of normal. Analysis of drought damage and changes in soils and vegetation due to prevailing dry conditions shows that over 75% of the lakes, ponds, and swamps mapped as permanent water bodies in the 1950's and which carried water through the dry season as late as 1976 are now ephemeral. Most lakes visited during January-February 1985 field work were completely dry. Formerly permanent water courses distributary to the Bani and Niger Rivers were also dry. These stream courses are not incised, both the Bani and Niger appear underfit, and flood plain soils within the study area show evidence of recent sapping. Comparison of digital Landsat data from 1976 and 1984 indicate a reduction in vegetation and diminished areas of cultivated land. In the field, these areas had less than 10% vegetation cover, strongly disrupted soils with disaggregation and lowered cohesion, and showed active aeolian transport. Satellite data also show that both the Bani and Niger Rivers have become more turbid, which is consistent with an increase in sediment yield from local devegetated and soil-damaged areas.

  9. Inland diatoms from the McMurdo Dry Valleys and James Ross Island, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esposito, R.M.M.; Spaulding, S.A.; McKnight, Diane M.; Van De Vijver, B.; Kopalova, K.; Lubinski, D.; Hall, B.; Whittaker, T.

    2008-01-01

    Diatom taxa present in the inland streams and lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys and James Ross Island, Antarctica, are presented in this paper. A total of nine taxa are illustrated, with descriptions of four new species (Luticola austroatlantica sp. nov., Luticola dolia sp. nov., Luticola laeta sp. nov., Muelleria supra sp. nov.). In the perennially ice-covered lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, diatoms are confined to benthic mats within the photic zone. In streams, diatoms are attached to benthic surfaces and within the microbial mat matrix. One species, L. austroatlantica, is found on James Ross Island, of the southern Atlantic archipelago, and the McMurdo Dry Valleys. The McMurdo Dry Valley populations are at the lower range of the size spectrum for the species. Streams flow for 6-10 weeks during the austral summer, when temperatures and solar radiation allow glacial ice to melt. The diatom flora of the region is characterized by species assemblages favored under harsh conditions, with naviculoid taxa as the dominant group and several major diatom groups conspicuously absent. ?? 2008 NRC.

  10. Ancient pine forest on inland dunes in the Spanish northern meseta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco-Múgica, Fátima; García-Antón, Mercedes; Maldonado-Ruiz, Javier; Morla-Juaristi, Carlos; Sainz-Ollero, Helios

    2005-01-01

    We present a new stratigraphic (pollen and nonpollen microfossils and charcoal particle) sequence with five AMS dates, covering about the last 9000 yr, of a core collected from the Spanish northern meseta, one of the territories of the Iberian Peninsula for which little paleobotanical information is available. The results support the hypothesis of the permanence of the pine forests, in more or less pure masses or large timber stands, during the Holocene in some Iberian continental zones. The typical substitution in postglacial dynamics of heliophyllous species, such as pines or Cupressaceae, by broadleaf trees did not occur in this inland region. Presumably, factors linked to the substrate, in this case very deep sand dunes covering vast areas, may have contributed to the scarce local competitiveness of the broadleaf trees, which would account for the hegemony of pines in this region. Based on the dynamics of aquatic plants and nonpollen microfossils, an initial phase previous to 7500 14C yr B.P. of high levels in the lake can be identified by high percentages of hydrophytes. A progressive increase in helophytes and the gradual infilling of the lake over the last 5000 yr appear to indicate a phase of aridification similar to those established for the western Mediterranean. Study of charcoal particles, more abundant in the last 2500 yr, has given rise to certain hypotheses regarding the incidence of recurring fires of a local or regional nature.

  11. Inland waters and their role in the carbon cycle of Alaska.

    PubMed

    Stackpoole, Sarah M; Butman, David E; Clow, David W; Verdin, Kristine L; Gaglioti, Benjamin V; Genet, Hélène; Striegl, Robert G

    2017-04-04

    The magnitude of Alaska (AK) inland waters carbon (C) fluxes is likely to change in the future due to amplified climate warming impacts on the hydrology and biogeochemical processes in high latitude regions. Although current estimates of major aquatic C fluxes represent an essential baseline against which future change can be compared, a comprehensive assessment for AK has not yet been completed. To address this gap, we combined available datasets and applied consistent methodologies to estimate river lateral C export to the coast, river and lake carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and methane (CH4 ) emissions, and C burial in lakes for the six major hydrologic regions in the state. Estimated total aquatic C flux for AK was 41 Tg C yr(-1) . Major components of this total flux, in Tg C yr(-1) , were 18 for river lateral export, 17 for river CO2 emissions, and 8 for lake CO2 emissions. Lake C burial offset these fluxes by 2 Tg C yr(-1) . River and lake CH4 emissions were 0.03 and 0.10 Tg C yr(-1) , respectively. The Southeast and South - Central regions had the highest temperature, precipitation, terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP), and C yields (fluxes normalized to land area) were 77 and 42 g C m(-2) yr(-1) , respectively. Lake CO2 emissions represented over half of the total aquatic flux from the Southwest (37 g C m(-2) yr(-1) ). The North Slope, Northwest, and Yukon regions had lesser yields (11, 15, and 17 g C m(2) yr(-1) ), but these estimates may be the most vulnerable to future climate change, because of the heightened sensitivity of arctic and boreal ecosystems to intensified warming. Total aquatic C yield for AK was 27 g C m(-2) yr(-1) , which represented 16% of the estimated terrestrial NPP. Freshwater ecosystems represent a significant conduit for C loss, and a more comprehensive view of land-water-atmosphere interactions is necessary to predict future climate change impacts on the Alaskan ecosystem C balance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights

  12. Metagenomics Reveals a Novel Virophage Population in a Tibetan Mountain Lake.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seungdae; Yoo, Dongwan; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2016-06-25

    Virophages are parasites of giant viruses that infect eukaryotic organisms and may affect the ecology of inland water ecosystems. Despite the potential ecological impact, limited information is available on the distribution, diversity, and hosts of virophages in ecosystems. Metagenomics revealed that virophages were widely distributed in inland waters with various environmental characteristics including salinity and nutrient availability. A novel virophage population was overrepresented in a planktonic microbial community of the Tibetan mountain lake, Lake Qinghai. Our study identified coccolithophores and coccolithovirus-like phycodnaviruses in the same community, which may serve as eukaryotic and viral hosts of the virophage population, respectively.

  13. Metagenomics Reveals a Novel Virophage Population in a Tibetan Mountain Lake

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seungdae; Yoo, Dongwan; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2016-01-01

    Virophages are parasites of giant viruses that infect eukaryotic organisms and may affect the ecology of inland water ecosystems. Despite the potential ecological impact, limited information is available on the distribution, diversity, and hosts of virophages in ecosystems. Metagenomics revealed that virophages were widely distributed in inland waters with various environmental characteristics including salinity and nutrient availability. A novel virophage population was overrepresented in a planktonic microbial community of the Tibetan mountain lake, Lake Qinghai. Our study identified coccolithophores and coccolithovirus-like phycodnaviruses in the same community, which may serve as eukaryotic and viral hosts of the virophage population, respectively. PMID:27151658

  14. Aquatic community response in a groundwater-fed desert lake to Holocene desiccation of the Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggermont, Hilde; Verschuren, Dirk; Fagot, Maureen; Rumes, Bob; Van Bocxlaer, Bert; Kröpelin, Stefan

    2008-12-01

    The finely laminated sediment record of a permanent, hypersaline, desert oasis lake in the Ounianga region of northeastern Chad presents a unique opportunity to document the hydrological evolution of this groundwater-fed aquatic ecosystem during mid- and late-Holocene desiccation of the Sahara. In this study we reconstruct long-term changes in zoobenthos and zooplankton communities of Lake Yoa as their early-Holocene freshwater habitat changed into the hypersaline conditions prevailing today. Chironomid production peaked during the fresh-to-saline transition period, then stabilized at about half that of the earlier freshwater ecosystem. Quantitative salinity inferences based on fossil chironomid assemblages indicate that the fresh-to-saline transition occurred fairly abruptly between ˜4100 and 3400 cal yr BP, but that the ecosystem was buffered against shorter-term climate fluctuations due to continuous inflow of fossil groundwater. The mixture of tropical-African and southern Palaearctic chironomid faunas in the Lake Yoa fossil record required us to address several methodological issues concerning chironomid-based salinity reconstruction, and the applicability of a calibration dataset based on tropical East and West African lakes to this Sahara desert locality. The most coherent reconstruction was obtained with an inference model that applies a weighted best-modern-analogue (WMAT) transfer function to the African calibration dataset expanded with six Sahara lakes.

  15. De novo sequences of Haloquadratum walsbyi from Lake Tyrrell, Australia, reveal a variable genomic landscape.

    PubMed

    Tully, Benjamin J; Emerson, Joanne B; Andrade, Karen; Brocks, Jochen J; Allen, Eric E; Banfield, Jillian F; Heidelberg, Karla B

    2015-01-01

    Hypersaline systems near salt saturation levels represent an extreme environment, in which organisms grow and survive near the limits of life. One of the abundant members of the microbial communities in hypersaline systems is the square archaeon, Haloquadratum walsbyi. Utilizing a short-read metagenome from Lake Tyrrell, a hypersaline ecosystem in Victoria, Australia, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of H. walsbyi to better understand the extent of variation between strains/subspecies. Results revealed that previously isolated strains/subspecies do not fully describe the complete repertoire of the genomic landscape present in H. walsbyi. Rearrangements, insertions, and deletions were observed for the Lake Tyrrell derived Haloquadratum genomes and were supported by environmental de novo sequences, including shifts in the dominant genomic landscape of the two most abundant strains. Analysis pertaining to halomucins indicated that homologs for this large protein are not a feature common for all species of Haloquadratum. Further, we analyzed ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC-type transporters) for evidence of niche partitioning between different strains/subspecies. We were able to identify unique and variable transporter subunits from all five genomes analyzed and the de novo environmental sequences, suggesting that differences in nutrient and carbon source acquisition may play a role in maintaining distinct strains/subspecies.

  16. De Novo Sequences of Haloquadratum walsbyi from Lake Tyrrell, Australia, Reveal a Variable Genomic Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Tully, Benjamin J.; Emerson, Joanne B.; Andrade, Karen; Brocks, Jochen J.; Allen, Eric E.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Heidelberg, Karla B.

    2015-01-01

    Hypersaline systems near salt saturation levels represent an extreme environment, in which organisms grow and survive near the limits of life. One of the abundant members of the microbial communities in hypersaline systems is the square archaeon, Haloquadratum walsbyi. Utilizing a short-read metagenome from Lake Tyrrell, a hypersaline ecosystem in Victoria, Australia, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of H. walsbyi to better understand the extent of variation between strains/subspecies. Results revealed that previously isolated strains/subspecies do not fully describe the complete repertoire of the genomic landscape present in H. walsbyi. Rearrangements, insertions, and deletions were observed for the Lake Tyrrell derived Haloquadratum genomes and were supported by environmental de novo sequences, including shifts in the dominant genomic landscape of the two most abundant strains. Analysis pertaining to halomucins indicated that homologs for this large protein are not a feature common for all species of Haloquadratum. Further, we analyzed ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC-type transporters) for evidence of niche partitioning between different strains/subspecies. We were able to identify unique and variable transporter subunits from all five genomes analyzed and the de novo environmental sequences, suggesting that differences in nutrient and carbon source acquisition may play a role in maintaining distinct strains/subspecies. PMID:25709557

  17. Linking Archaeal Molecular Diversity and Lipid Biomarker Composition in a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda; Orphan, Victoria; Turk, Kendra; Embaye, Tsegereda; Kubo, Mike; Summons, Roger

    2005-01-01

    Lipid biomarkers for discrete microbial groups are a valuable tool for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. Lipid biomarkers can establish organism source and function in contemporary microbial ecosystems (membrane lipids) and by analogy, potential relevance to the fossilized carbon skeletons (geolipids) extracted from ancient sedimentary rock. The Mars Exploration Rovers have provided clear evidence for an early wet Mars and the presence of hypersaline evaporitic basins. Ongoing work on an early Earth analog, the hypersaline benthic mats in Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, may provide clues to what may have evolved and flourished on an early wet Mars, if only for a short period. Cyanobacterial mats are a pertinent early Earth analog for consideration of evolutionary and microbial processes within the aerobic photosynthetic and adjacent anoxic layers. Fluctuations in physio-chemical parameters associated with spatial and temporal scales are expressed through vast microbial metabolic diversity. Our recent work hopes to establish the dynamic of archaeal diversity, particularly as it relates to methane production in this high sulfate environment, through the use of lipid biomarker and phylogenetic analyses. Archaeal 16s rRNA and mcrA gene assemblages, demonstrated distinct spatial separation over the 130 mm core of at least three distinct genera within the order Methanosarcinales, as well as an abundance of uncultured members of the Thermoplasmales and Crenarchaeota. Ether-bound lipid analysis identified abundant 0-alkyl and 0-isopranyl chains throughout the core, and the presence of sn-2 hydroxyarchaeol, a biomarker for methylotrophic methanogens. A unique ether isoprenoid chain, a C30:1 , possibly related to the geolipid squalane, a paleobiomarker associated with hypersaline environments, was most abundant within the oxic-anoxic transition zone.

  18. Microbial characterization of a subzero, hypersaline methane seep in the Canadian High Arctic.

    PubMed

    Niederberger, Thomas D; Perreault, Nancy N; Tille, Stephanie; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Andersen, Dale; Greer, Charles W; Pollard, Wayne; Whyte, Lyle G

    2010-10-01

    We report the first microbiological characterization of a terrestrial methane seep in a cryo-environment in the form of an Arctic hypersaline (∼24% salinity), subzero (-5 °C), perennial spring, arising through thick permafrost in an area with an average annual air temperature of -15 °C. Bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicated a relatively low diversity of phylotypes within the spring sediment (Shannon index values of 1.65 and 1.39, respectively). Bacterial phylotypes were related to microorganisms such as Loktanella, Gillisia, Halomonas and Marinobacter spp. previously recovered from cold, saline habitats. A proportion of the bacterial phylotypes were cultured, including Marinobacter and Halomonas, with all isolates capable of growth at the in situ temperature (-5 °C). Archaeal phylotypes were related to signatures from hypersaline deep-sea methane-seep sediments and were dominated by the anaerobic methane group 1a (ANME-1a) clade of anaerobic methane oxidizing archaea. CARD-FISH analyses indicated that cells within the spring sediment consisted of ∼84.0% bacterial and 3.8% archaeal cells with ANME-1 cells accounting for most of the archaeal cells. The major gas discharging from the spring was methane (∼50%) with the low CH(4)/C(2+) ratio and hydrogen and carbon isotope signatures consistent with a thermogenic origin of the methane. Overall, this hypersaline, subzero environment supports a viable microbial community capable of activity at in situ temperature and where methane may behave as an energy and carbon source for sustaining anaerobic oxidation of methane-based microbial metabolism. This site also provides a model of how a methane seep can form in a cryo-environment as well as a mechanism for the hypothesized Martian methane plumes.

  19. Bacterial Community Response to Petroleum Hydrocarbon Amendments in Freshwater, Marine, and Hypersaline Water-Containing Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Jurelevicius, Diogo; Alvarez, Vanessa Marques; Marques, Joana Montezano; de Sousa Lima, Laryssa Ribeiro Fonseca; Dias, Felipe de Almeida

    2013-01-01

    Hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial communities from freshwater, marine, and hypersaline Brazilian aquatic ecosystems (with water salinities corresponding to 0.2%, 4%, and 5%, respectively) were enriched with different hydrocarbons (heptadecane, naphthalene, or crude oil). Changes within the different microcosms of bacterial communities were analyzed using cultivation approaches and molecular methods (DNA and RNA extraction, followed by genetic fingerprinting and analyses of clone libraries based on the 16S rRNA-coding gene). A redundancy analysis (RDA) of the genetic fingerprint data and a principal component analysis (PCA) of the clone libraries revealed hydrocarbon-enriched bacterial communities specific for each ecosystem studied. However, within the same ecosystem, different bacterial communities were selected according to the petroleum hydrocarbon used. In general, the results demonstrated that Acinetobacter and Cloacibacterium were the dominant genera in freshwater microcosms; the Oceanospirillales order and the Marinobacter, Pseudomonas, and Cycloclasticus genera predominated in marine microcosms; and the Oceanospirillales order and the Marinobacter genus were selected in the different hydrocarbon-containing microcosms in hypersaline water. Determination of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) in all microcosms after 32 days of incubation showed a decrease in the hydrocarbon concentration compared to that for the controls. A total of 50 (41.3%) isolates from the different hydrocarbon-contaminated microcosms were associated with the dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) obtained from the clone libraries, and their growth in the hydrocarbon contaminating the microcosm from which they were isolated as the sole carbon source was observed. These data provide insight into the general response of bacterial communities from freshwater, marine, and hypersaline aquatic ecosystems to petroleum hydrocarbon contamination. PMID:23872573

  20. Bacterial community response to petroleum hydrocarbon amendments in freshwater, marine, and hypersaline water-containing microcosms.

    PubMed

    Jurelevicius, Diogo; Alvarez, Vanessa Marques; Marques, Joana Montezano; de Sousa Lima, Laryssa Ribeiro Fonseca; Dias, Felipe de Almeida; Seldin, Lucy

    2013-10-01

    Hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial communities from freshwater, marine, and hypersaline Brazilian aquatic ecosystems (with water salinities corresponding to 0.2%, 4%, and 5%, respectively) were enriched with different hydrocarbons (heptadecane, naphthalene, or crude oil). Changes within the different microcosms of bacterial communities were analyzed using cultivation approaches and molecular methods (DNA and RNA extraction, followed by genetic fingerprinting and analyses of clone libraries based on the 16S rRNA-coding gene). A redundancy analysis (RDA) of the genetic fingerprint data and a principal component analysis (PCA) of the clone libraries revealed hydrocarbon-enriched bacterial communities specific for each ecosystem studied. However, within the same ecosystem, different bacterial communities were selected according to the petroleum hydrocarbon used. In general, the results demonstrated that Acinetobacter and Cloacibacterium were the dominant genera in freshwater microcosms; the Oceanospirillales order and the Marinobacter, Pseudomonas, and Cycloclasticus genera predominated in marine microcosms; and the Oceanospirillales order and the Marinobacter genus were selected in the different hydrocarbon-containing microcosms in hypersaline water. Determination of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) in all microcosms after 32 days of incubation showed a decrease in the hydrocarbon concentration compared to that for the controls. A total of 50 (41.3%) isolates from the different hydrocarbon-contaminated microcosms were associated with the dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) obtained from the clone libraries, and their growth in the hydrocarbon contaminating the microcosm from which they were isolated as the sole carbon source was observed. These data provide insight into the general response of bacterial communities from freshwater, marine, and hypersaline aquatic ecosystems to petroleum hydrocarbon contamination.

  1. Anaerobic oxidation of methane by sulfate in hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Avrahamov, N; Antler, G; Yechieli, Y; Gavrieli, I; Joye, S B; Saxton, M; Turchyn, A V; Sivan, O

    2014-01-01

    Geochemical and microbial evidence points to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) likely coupled with bacterial sulfate reduction in the hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea (DS) alluvial aquifer. Groundwater was sampled from nine boreholes drilled along the Arugot alluvial fan next to the DS. The groundwater samples were highly saline (up to 6300 mm chlorine), anoxic, and contained methane. A mass balance calculation demonstrates that the very low δ13CDIC in this groundwater is due to anaerobic methane oxidation. Sulfate depletion coincident with isotope enrichment of sulfur and oxygen isotopes in the sulfate suggests that sulfate reduction is associated with this AOM. DNA extraction and 16S amplicon sequencing were used to explore the microbial community present and were found to be microbial composition indicative of bacterial sulfate reducers associated with anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) driving AOM. The net sulfate reduction seems to be primarily controlled by the salinity and the available methane and is substantially lower as salinity increases (2.5 mm sulfate removal at 3000 mm chlorine but only 0.5 mm sulfate removal at 6300 mm chlorine). Low overall sulfur isotope fractionation observed (34ε = 17 ± 3.5‰) hints at high rates of sulfate reduction, as has been previously suggested for sulfate reduction coupled with methane oxidation. The new results demonstrate the presence of sulfate-driven AOM in terrestrial hypersaline systems and expand our understanding of how microbial life is sustained under the challenging conditions of an extremely hypersaline environment. PMID:25039851

  2. 78 FR 4785 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulation: Sacramento River, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 162 RIN 1625-AB95 Inland Waterways Navigation Regulation: Sacramento River... navigation regulations by removing the Decker Island restricted anchorage. V. Regulatory Analyses We... required for this rule. List of Subjects in 33 CFR Part 162 Navigation (water) and Waterways. For...

  3. 78 FR 25677 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 162 Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations; Correction AGENCY: U.S. Coast... Waterways Navigation Regulations published in the Federal Register of April 26, 2013, in FR Doc....

  4. 33 CFR 62.32 - Inland waters obstruction mark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inland waters obstruction mark. 62.32 Section 62.32 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System §...

  5. 33 CFR 62.32 - Inland waters obstruction mark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inland waters obstruction mark. 62.32 Section 62.32 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System §...

  6. 33 CFR 62.32 - Inland waters obstruction mark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inland waters obstruction mark. 62.32 Section 62.32 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System §...

  7. 33 CFR 62.32 - Inland waters obstruction mark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inland waters obstruction mark. 62.32 Section 62.32 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System §...

  8. 33 CFR 62.32 - Inland waters obstruction mark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inland waters obstruction mark. 62.32 Section 62.32 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System §...

  9. Response of biotic communities to salinity changes in a Mediterranean hypersaline stream

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Josefa; Millán, Andrés; Hernández, Juan; Gutiérrez, Cayetano; Abellán, Pedro; Sánchez, David; Ruiz, Mar

    2006-01-01

    Background This study investigates the relationship between salinity and biotic communities (primary producers and macroinvertebrates) in Rambla Salada, a Mediterranean hypersaline stream in SE Spain. Since the 1980's, the mean salinity of the stream has fallen from about 100 g L-1 to 35.5 g L-1, due to intensive irrigated agriculture in the watershed. Furthermore, large dilutions occur occasionally when the water irrigation channel suffers cracks. Results Along the salinity gradient studied (3.5 – 76.4 g L-1) Cladophora glomerata and Ruppia maritima biomass decreased with increasing salinity, while the biomass of epipelic algae increased. Diptera and Coleoptera species dominated the community both in disturbed as in re-established conditions. Most macroinvertebrates species found in Rambla Salada stream are euryhaline species with a broad range of salinity tolerance. Eight of them were recorded in natural hypersaline conditions (~100 g L-1) prior to important change in land use of the watershed: Ephydra flavipes, Stratyomis longicornis, Nebrioporus ceresyi, N. baeticus, Berosus hispanicus, Enochrus falcarius, Ochthebius cuprescens and Sigara selecta. However, other species recorded in the past, such as Ochthebius glaber, O. notabilis and Enochrus politus, were restricted to a hypersaline source or absent from Rambla Salada. The dilution of salinity to 3.5 – 6.8 gL-1 allowed the colonization of species with low salininty tolerance, such as Melanopsis praemorsa, Anax sp., Simulidae, Ceratopogonidae and Tanypodinae. The abundance of Ephydra flavipes and Ochthebius corrugatus showed a positive significant response to salinity, while Anax sp., Simulidae, S. selecta, N. ceresyi, N. baeticus, and B. hispanicus showed significant negative correlations. The number of total macroinvertebrate taxa, Diptera and Coleoptera species, number of families, Margalef's index and Shannon's diversity index decreased with increasing salinity. However, the rest of community

  10. Analysis of methane monooxygenase genes in mono lake suggests that increased methane oxidation activity may correlate with a change in methanotroph community structure.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ju-Ling; Joye, Samantha B; Scholten, Johannes C M; Schäfer, Hendrik; McDonald, Ian R; Murrell, J Colin

    2005-10-01

    Mono Lake is an alkaline hypersaline lake that supports high methane oxidation rates. Retrieved pmoA sequences showed a broad diversity of aerobic methane oxidizers including the type I methanotrophs Methylobacter (the dominant genus), Methylomicrobium, and Methylothermus, and the type II methanotroph Methylocystis. Stratification of Mono Lake resulted in variation of aerobic methane oxidation rates with depth. Methanotroph diversity as determined by analysis of pmoA using new denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis primers suggested that variations in methane oxidation activity may correlate with changes in methanotroph community composition.

  11. Bacterial Communities of Three Saline Meromictic Lakes in Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Baatar, Bayanmunkh; Chiang, Pei-Wen; Rogozin, Denis Yu; Wu, Yu-Ting; Tseng, Ching-Hung; Yang, Cheng-Yu; Chiu, Hsiu-Hui; Oyuntsetseg, Bolormaa; Degermendzhy, Andrey G; Tang, Sen-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Meromictic lakes located in landlocked steppes of central Asia (~2500 km inland) have unique geophysiochemical characteristics compared to other meromictic lakes. To characterize their bacteria and elucidate relationships between those bacteria and surrounding environments, water samples were collected from three saline meromictic lakes (Lakes Shira, Shunet and Oigon) in the border between Siberia and the West Mongolia, near the center of Asia. Based on in-depth tag pyrosequencing, bacterial communities were highly variable and dissimilar among lakes and between oxic and anoxic layers within individual lakes. Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were the most abundant phyla, whereas three genera of purple sulfur bacteria (a novel genus, Thiocapsa and Halochromatium) were predominant bacterial components in the anoxic layer of Lake Shira (~20.6% of relative abundance), Lake Shunet (~27.1%) and Lake Oigon (~9.25%), respectively. However, few known green sulfur bacteria were detected. Notably, 3.94% of all sequencing reads were classified into 19 candidate divisions, which was especially high (23.12%) in the anoxic layer of Lake Shunet. Furthermore, several hydro-parameters (temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, H2S and salinity) were associated (P< 0.05) with variations in dominant bacterial groups. In conclusion, based on highly variable bacterial composition in water layers or lakes, we inferred that the meromictic ecosystem was characterized by high diversity and heterogenous niches.

  12. Bacterial Communities of Three Saline Meromictic Lakes in Central Asia

    PubMed Central

    Baatar, Bayanmunkh; Chiang, Pei-Wen; Rogozin, Denis Yu; Wu, Yu-Ting; Tseng, Ching-Hung; Yang, Cheng-Yu; Chiu, Hsiu-Hui; Oyuntsetseg, Bolormaa; Degermendzhy, Andrey G.; Tang, Sen-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Meromictic lakes located in landlocked steppes of central Asia (~2500 km inland) have unique geophysiochemical characteristics compared to other meromictic lakes. To characterize their bacteria and elucidate relationships between those bacteria and surrounding environments, water samples were collected from three saline meromictic lakes (Lakes Shira, Shunet and Oigon) in the border between Siberia and the West Mongolia, near the center of Asia. Based on in-depth tag pyrosequencing, bacterial communities were highly variable and dissimilar among lakes and between oxic and anoxic layers within individual lakes. Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were the most abundant phyla, whereas three genera of purple sulfur bacteria (a novel genus, Thiocapsa and Halochromatium) were predominant bacterial components in the anoxic layer of Lake Shira (~20.6% of relative abundance), Lake Shunet (~27.1%) and Lake Oigon (~9.25%), respectively. However, few known green sulfur bacteria were detected. Notably, 3.94% of all sequencing reads were classified into 19 candidate divisions, which was especially high (23.12%) in the anoxic layer of Lake Shunet. Furthermore, several hydro-parameters (temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, H2S and salinity) were associated (P< 0.05) with variations in dominant bacterial groups. In conclusion, based on highly variable bacterial composition in water layers or lakes, we inferred that the meromictic ecosystem was characterized by high diversity and heterogenous niches. PMID:26934492

  13. Mesoscale Modeling of the Inland Nocturnal Sea Breeze

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.J.; Buckley, R.L.

    1995-09-12

    The mesoscale sea breeze has important consequences for many densely populated coastal environments, including convection initiation, aviation safety, and air quality. The sea breeze characteristics before and after sunset are markedly different (Sha et al 1993). A gravity current will form during the early afternoon due to the relatively large density difference between the land and sea air. During the afternoon, as the lighter land air is forced upward by the cooler dense sea air, Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) billows often form along the interface, as well as thin regions of turbulent rising air, playing a crucial role in the mixing process (Simpson 1994). After sunset, the frontal zone expands as longwave radiation cools the surface which reduces vertical mixing. With further inland penetration, the sea breeze encounters increasingly stable air near the ground, resulting in the formation of an undular bore or cutoff vortex (Sha et al. 1993). It has been demonstrated that large-scale winds have profound effects on both the strength and inland penetration of sea breezes (Arritt 1993, among others). In general, offshore flow results in a sharper frontal discontinuity and less inland penetration, while onshore flow produces weaker fronts which may penetrate further inland. Most sea breeze studies have focused on its more dramatic daytime properties near the coast whereas inland nocturnal sea breezes have received much less attention. The reason for this neglect is a lack of good observational data in the boundary layer. Sha et al. (1991) note the necessity of high resolution data to capture the finer structures of the sea breeze. A unique opportunity to examine the nocturnal sea breeze became available at the Savannah River Site (SRS, located roughly 150 km from the Atlantic Ocean in southwestern South Carolina) during the Stable Boundary Layer Experiment (STABLE), 12-17 April, 1988. (Abstract Truncated)

  14. 48 CFR 47.303-11 - F.o.b. inland point, country of importation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false F.o.b. inland point... ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-11 F.o.b. inland point, country of importation. (a) Explanation of delivery term. F.o.b. inland point, country...

  15. 48 CFR 47.303-10 - F.o.b. inland carrier, point of exportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false F.o.b. inland carrier... ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-10 F.o.b. inland carrier, point of exportation. (a) Explanation of delivery term. F.o.b. inland carrier, point...

  16. 48 CFR 47.303-11 - F.o.b. inland point, country of importation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false F.o.b. inland point... ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-11 F.o.b. inland point, country of importation. (a) Explanation of delivery term. F.o.b. inland point, country...

  17. 48 CFR 52.247-39 - F.o.b. Inland Point, Country of Importation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false F.o.b. Inland Point... Provisions and Clauses 52.247-39 F.o.b. Inland Point, Country of Importation. As prescribed in 47.303-11(c), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts when the delivery term is f.o.b. inland...

  18. 48 CFR 47.303-10 - F.o.b. inland carrier, point of exportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false F.o.b. inland carrier... ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-10 F.o.b. inland carrier, point of exportation. (a) Explanation of delivery term. F.o.b. inland carrier, point...

  19. 48 CFR 52.247-39 - F.o.b. Inland Point, Country of Importation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false F.o.b. Inland Point... Provisions and Clauses 52.247-39 F.o.b. Inland Point, Country of Importation. As prescribed in 47.303-11(c), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts when the delivery term is f.o.b. inland...

  20. Lake Tahoe

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information on the Lake Tahoe watershed, EPA's protection efforts, water quality issues, effects of climate change, Lake Tahoe Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), EPA-sponsored projects, list of partner agencies.

  1. The Missionary Women in the Inland of Australia and the Australian Inland Mission as Represented in Beth Beckett's Life Memoir

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliyanah, Evi

    2010-01-01

    This article looks at the gender dimension of religious missions administered by the Presbyterian Church in the inland Australia as represented in Beth Beckett's life memoir written in 1947-1955. It is aimed at obtaining general ideas on the involvement of women, as the wives of missionaries. Focusing on the experience of Beth Beckett, it argues…

  2. Lake breezes in the southern Great Lakes region and their influence during BAQS-Met 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sills, D. M. L.; Brook, J. R.; Levy, I.; Makar, P. A.; Zhang, J.; Taylor, P. A.

    2011-08-01

    Meteorological observations from the BAQS-Met field experiment during the summer months of 2007 were integrated and manually analyzed in order to identify and characterize lake breezes in the southern Great Lakes region of North America, and assess their potential impact on air quality. Lake breezes occurred frequently, with one or more lake breezes identified on 90 % of study days. They affected all parts of the study region, including southwestern Ontario and nearby portions of southeast Lower Michigan and northern Ohio, with lake-breeze fronts occasionally penetrating from 100 km to over 200 km inland. Occurrence rates and penetration distances were found to be higher than previously reported in the literature. This comprehensive depiction of observed lake breezes allows an improved understanding of their influence on the transport, dispersion, and production of pollutants in this region. The observational analyses were compared with output from subsequent runs of a high-resolution numerical weather prediction model. The model accurately predicted lake breeze occurrence and type in a variety of synoptic wind regimes, but selected cases showed substantial differences in the detailed timing and location of lake-breeze fronts, and with the initiation of deep moist convection. Knowledge of such strengths and weaknesses aids in the interpretation of results from air quality models driven by this meteorological model.

  3. Limitations to lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) rehabilitation in the Great Lakes imposed by biotic interactions occurring at early life stages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Michael L.; Eck, Gary W.; Evans, David O.; Fabrizio, Mary C.; Hoff, Michael H.; Hudson, Patrick L.; Janssen, John; Jude, David; O'Gorman, Robert; Savino, Jacqueline F.

    1995-01-01

    We examine evidence that biotic factors, particularly predation, may be limiting early survival of wild lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) juveniles in many areas of the Great Lakes. The Great Lakes contain numerous potential predators of lake trout eggs and fry, some of which are recent invaders, and most of which were probably absent when lake trout most recently re-invaded the Great Lakes after the last ice age. Simple quantitative models of predation suggest that plausible assumptions about prey densities, predator feeding rates, and duration of exposure of predator to prey can lead to very high estimates of predation mortality, in some instances approaching 100%. Indirect evidence from inter-Great Lake comparisons and inland lake examples also suggest that biotic factors may impede successful lake trout colonization. Our synthesis of the evidence leads to recommendations for research to better define field feeding rates of lake trout egg and fry predators and comparative studies of densities of potential egg and fry predators on lake trout spawning reefs. Management options should be designed to provide useful information as well as achieve short-term goals. From a management standpoint we recommend that: newly constructed lake trout reefs should be placed well away from concentrations of potential predators; offshore spawning reefs should be stocked; salmonine stocking, nutrient abatement, and commercial harvest of alewives should all be considered as options to enhance survival of young lake trout; hatchery lake trout should not be stocked at sites where wild lake trout are showing signs of recovery; and exotic species expansions or introductions must be curtailed to maintain or improve on our recent successes in lake trout rehabilitation.

  4. Lake Eyre

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... attracts run-off from one of the largest inland drainage systems in the world. The drainage basin is very responsive to rainfall ... suggesting that the combination of angular and spectral information is a more powerful diagnostic of surface conditions than either ...

  5. The Oligochaeta (Annelida, Clitellata) of the St. Lawrence Great Lakes region: An update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, Douglas R.; Hudson, Patrick L.

    2003-01-01

    An updated oligochaete species list for the Great Lakes region is provided. The list was developed through the reexamination of the taxa reported in a previous report in 1980, addition of new taxa or records collected from the region since 1980, and an update of taxonomy commensurate with systematic and nomenclatural changes over the intervening years since the last review. The authors found 74 papers mentioning Great Lakes oligochaete species. The majority of these papers were published in the 1980s. The literature review and additional collections resulted in 15 species being added to the previous list. Nine taxa were removed from the previous list due to misidentification, synonymies, level of identification, or inability to confirm the identity. Based on this review, 101 species of Oligochaeta are now known from the St. Lawrence Great Lakes watershed. Of these, 95 species are known from the St. Lawrence Great Lakes proper, with an additional 6 species recorded from the inland waters of the watershed. The greatest diversity of oligochaete species was found in the inland waters of the region (81) followed by Lake Huron (72), Lake Ontario (65), Lake Erie (64), Lake Superior (63), Lake Michigan (62), St. Marys River (60), Niagara River (49), Saginaw Bay (44), St. Clair River (37), Lake St. Clair (36), St. Lawrence River (27), and the Detroit River (21). Three species are suspected of being introduced, Branchiura sowerbyi, Gianius aquaedulcisand Ripistes parasita, and two are believed to be endemic, Thalassodrilus hallae andTeneridrilus flexus.

  6. On the viscosity of natural hyper-saline solutions and its importance: The Dead Sea brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbrod, Noam; Yechieli, Yoseph; Shandalov, Semion; Lensky, Nadav

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the density, temperature and viscosity of hypersaline solutions, both natural and synthetic, is explored. An empirical equation of the density-viscosity relationship as a function of temperature was developed for the Dead Sea brine and its dilutions. The viscosity levels of the Dead Sea brine (density of 1.24 ṡ 103 kg/m3; viscosity of 3.6 mPa s at 20 °C) and of the more extremely saline natural brine (density of 1.37 ṡ 103 kg/m3) were found to be ∼3 and ∼10 times greater than that of fresh water, respectively. The combined effect of the above changes in viscosity and density on the hydraulic conductivity is reduction by a factor of 3-7. The chemical composition significantly affects the viscosity of brines with similar densities, whereby solutions with a higher Mg/Na ratio have higher viscosity. This explains the extremely high viscosity of the Dead Sea and related Mg-rich brines in comparison with the much lower values of NaCl and KCl brines with similar density. Possible impacts of the results include reduced settling velocity of grains in hypersaline viscous brines and changing hydraulic dynamics at the freshwater-saltwater and the vicinity of sinkholes.

  7. Two Fixed Ratio Dilutions for Soil Salinity Monitoring in Hypersaline Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Juan; Weindorf, David C.; Castañeda, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Highly soluble salts are undesirable in agriculture because they reduce yields or the quality of most cash crops and can leak to surface or sub-surface waters. In some cases salinity can be associated with unique history, rarity, or special habitats protected by environmental laws. Yet in considering the measurement of soil salinity for long-term monitoring purposes, adequate methods are required. Both saturated paste extracts, intended for agriculture, and direct surface and/or porewater salinity measurement, used in inundated wetlands, are unsuited for hypersaline wetlands that often are only occasionally inundated. For these cases, we propose the use of 1:5 soil/water (weight/weight) extracts as the standard for expressing the electrical conductivity (EC) of such soils and for further salt determinations. We also propose checking for ion-pairing with a 1:10 or more diluted extract in hypersaline soils. As an illustration, we apply the two-dilutions approach to a set of 359 soil samples from saline wetlands ranging in ECe from 2.3 dS m-1 to 183.0 dS m-1. This easy procedure will be useful in survey campaigns and in the monitoring of soil salt content. PMID:26001130

  8. PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS AND AUTECOLOGY OF SPORE-FORMING BACTERIA FROM HYPERSALINE ENVIRONMENTS.

    PubMed

    Gladka, G V; Romanovskaya, V A; Tashyreva, H O; Tashyrev, O B

    2015-01-01

    Multi-resistant to extreme factors spore-forming bacteria of Bacillus genus are isolated from hypersaline environments of the Crimea (Ukraine) and the Dead Sea (Israel). Phylogenetic analysis showed distinction of dominating extremophilic culturable species in studied regions. In Crimean environments they are B. mojavensis and B. simplex, in the Dead Sea ecosystem--B. subtilis subsp. spizizenii, B. subtilis subsp. subtilis, B. licheniformis and B. simplex. Isolates are simultaneously halotolerant and resistant to UV radiation. Strains isolated from the Dead Sea and the Crimea environments were resistant to UV: LD90 and LD99.99 made 100-170 J/m2 and 750-1500 J/m2 respectively. Spores showed higher UV-resistance (LD99.99-2500 J/m2) than the vegetative cells. However the number of spores made 0.02-0.007% of the whole cell population, and should not significantly affect the UV LD99.99 value. Isolates of both environments were halotolerant in the range of 0.1-10% NaCl and thermotolerant in the range of 20-50 °C, and didn't grow at 15 °C. Survival strategy of spore-forming bacteria from hypersaline environments under high UV radiation level can be performed by spore formation which minimize cell damage as well as efficient DNA-repair systems that remove damages.

  9. Extremophile microbiomes in acidic and hypersaline river sediments of Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shipeng; Peiffer, Stefan; Lazar, Cassandre Sara; Oldham, Carolyn; Neu, Thomas R; Ciobota, Valerian; Näb, Olga; Lillicrap, Adam; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen; Küsel, Kirsten

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the microbial community compositions in two sediment samples from the acidic (pH ∼3) and hypersaline (>4.5% NaCl) surface waters, which are widespread in Western Australia. In West Dalyup River, large amounts of NaCl, Fe(II) and sulfate are brought by the groundwater into the surface run-off. The presence of K-jarosite and schwertmannite minerals in the river sediments suggested the occurrence of microbial Fe(II) oxidation because chemical oxidation is greatly reduced at low pH. 16S rRNA gene diversity analyses revealed that sequences affiliated with an uncultured archaeal lineage named Aplasma, which has the genomic potential for Fe(II) oxidation, were dominant in both sediment samples. The acidophilic heterotrophs Acidiphilium and Acidocella were identified as the dominant bacterial groups. Acidiphilium strain AusYE3-1 obtained from the river sediment tolerated up to 6% NaCl at pH 3 under oxic conditions and cells of strain AusYE3-1 reduced the effects of high salt content by forming filamentous structure clumping as aggregates. Neither growth nor Fe(III) reduction by strain AusYE3-1 was observed in anoxic salt-containing medium. The detection of Aplasma group as potential Fe(II) oxidizers and the inhibited Fe(III)-reducing capacity of Acidiphilium contributes to our understanding of the microbial ecology of acidic hypersaline environments.

  10. Unveiling microbial activities along the halocline of Thetis, a deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basin

    PubMed Central

    Pachiadaki, Maria G; Yakimov, Michail M; LaCono, Violetta; Leadbetter, Edward; Edgcomb, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs) in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea are considered some of the most hostile environments on Earth. Little is known about the biochemical adaptations of microorganisms living in these habitats. This first metatranscriptome analysis of DHAB samples provides significant insights into shifts in metabolic activities of microorganisms as physicochemical conditions change from deep Mediterranean sea water to brine. The analysis of Thetis DHAB interface indicates that sulfate reduction occurs in both the upper (7.0–16.3% salinity) and lower (21.4–27.6%) halocline, but that expression of dissimilatory sulfate reductase is reduced in the more hypersaline lower halocline. High dark-carbon assimilation rates in the upper interface coincided with high abundance of transcripts for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase affiliated to sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. In the lower interface, increased expression of genes associated with methane metabolism and osmoregulation is noted. In addition, in this layer, nitrogenase transcripts affiliated to uncultivated putative methanotrophic archaea were detected, implying nitrogen fixation in this anoxic habitat, and providing evidence of linked carbon, nitrogen and sulfur cycles. PMID:24950109

  11. Mollusc-Microbe Mutualisms Extend the Potential for Life in Hypersaline Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, Carole S.

    2003-11-01

    Metazoans in extreme environments have evolved mutualisms with microbes that extend the physical and chemical capabilities of both partners. Some of the best examples are bivalve molluscs in evaporite and hypersaline settings. Mollusc tissue is developmentally and evolutionarily amenable to housing vast numbers of symbiotic microbes. Documented benefits to the host are nutritional. Multiple postulated benefits to the microbes are related to optimizing metabolic performance at interfaces, where heterogeneity and steep gradients that cannot be negotiated by microbes can be spanned by larger metazoan hosts. A small cockle, Fragum erugatum, and its photosymbiotic microbes provide a remarkable example of a mutualistic partnership in the hypersaline reaches of Shark Bay, Western Australia. Lucinid bivalves and their endosymbiotic chemolithotrophic bacteria provide examples in which hosts span oxic/anoxic interfaces on behalf of their symbionts at sites of seafloor venting. Multiple lines of evidence underscore the antiquity of mutualisms and suggest that they may have played a significant role in life's first experiments above the prokaryotic grade of complexity. The study of metazoan-microbe mutualisms and their signatures in extreme environments in the geologic record will provide a significant augmentation to microbial models in paleobiology and astrobiology. There are strong potential links between mutualisms and the early history of life on Earth, the persistence of life in extreme environments at times of global crisis and mass extinction, and the possibilities for life elsewhere in the universe.

  12. Evolution of genomic diversity and sex at extreme environments: Fungal life under hypersaline Dead Sea stress

    PubMed Central

    Kis-Papo, Tamar; Kirzhner, Valery; Wasser, Solomon P.; Nevo, Eviatar

    2003-01-01

    We have found that genomic diversity is generally positively correlated with abiotic and biotic stress levels (1–3). However, beyond a high-threshold level of stress, the diversity declines to a few adapted genotypes. The Dead Sea is the harshest planetary hypersaline environment (340 g·liter–1 total dissolved salts, ≈10 times sea water). Hence, the Dead Sea is an excellent natural laboratory for testing the “rise and fall” pattern of genetic diversity with stress proposed in this article. Here, we examined genomic diversity of the ascomycete fungus Aspergillus versicolor from saline, nonsaline, and hypersaline Dead Sea environments. We screened the coding and noncoding genomes of A. versicolor isolates by using >600 AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) markers (equal to loci). Genomic diversity was positively correlated with stress, culminating in the Dead Sea surface but dropped drastically in 50- to 280-m-deep seawater. The genomic diversity pattern paralleled the pattern of sexual reproduction of fungal species across the same southward gradient of increasing stress in Israel. This parallel may suggest that diversity and sex are intertwined intimately according to the rise and fall pattern and adaptively selected by natural selection in fungal genome evolution. Future large-scale verification in micromycetes will define further the trajectories of diversity and sex in the rise and fall pattern. PMID:14645702

  13. The microbial arsenic cycle in Mono Lake, California.

    PubMed

    Oremland, Ronald S; Stolz, John F; Hollibaugh, James T

    2004-04-01

    Significant concentrations of dissolved inorganic arsenic can be found in the waters of a number of lakes located in the western USA and in other water bodies around the world. These lakes are often situated in arid, volcanic terrain. The highest concentrations of arsenic occur in hypersaline, closed basin soda lakes and their remnant brines. Although arsenic is a well-known toxicant to eukaryotes and prokaryotes alike, some prokaryotes have evolved biochemical mechanisms to exploit arsenic oxyanions (i.e., arsenate and arsenite); they can use them either as an electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration (arsenate), or as an electron donor (arsenite) to support chemoautotrophic fixation of CO(2) into cell carbon. Unlike in freshwater or marine ecosystems, these processes may assume quantitative significance with respect to the carbon cycle in arsenic-rich soda lakes. For the past several years our research has focused on the occurrence and biogeochemical manifestations of these processes in Mono Lake, a particularly arsenic-rich environment. Herein we review some of our findings concerning the biogeochemical arsenic cycle in this lake, with the hope that it may broaden the understanding of the influence of microorganisms upon the speciation of arsenic in more common, less "extreme" environments, such as drinking water aquifers.

  14. The microbial arsenic cycle in Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Stolz, John F.; Hollibaugh, James T.

    2004-01-01

    Significant concentrations of dissolved inorganic arsenic can be found in the waters of a number of lakes located in the western USA and in other water bodies around the world. These lakes are often situated in arid, volcanic terrain. The highest concentrations of arsenic occur in hypersaline, closed basin soda lakes and their remnant brines. Although arsenic is a well-known toxicant to eukaryotes and prokaryotes alike, some prokaryotes have evolved biochemical mechanisms to exploit arsenic oxyanions (i.e., arsenate and arsenite); they can use them either as an electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration (arsenate), or as an electron donor (arsenite) to support chemoautotrophic fixation of CO2 into cell carbon. Unlike in freshwater or marine ecosystems, these processes may assume quantitative significance with respect to the carbon cycle in arsenic-rich soda lakes. For the past several years our research has focused on the occurrence and biogeochemical manifestations of these processes in Mono Lake, a particularly arsenic-rich environment. Herein we review some of our findings concerning the biogeochemical arsenic cycle in this lake, with the hope that it may broaden the understanding of the influence of microorganisms upon the speciation of arsenic in more common, less “extreme” environments, such as drinking water aquifers.

  15. Isolation and characterization of halophilic bacteria from Urmia Lake in Iran.

    PubMed

    Vahed, Sepideh Zununi; Forouhandeh, Haleh; Hassanzadeh, Salar; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Hejazi, Mohammad Amin; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid

    2011-01-01

    Urmia Lake is one of the most permanent hypersaline lakes in the world which is threatened by hypersalinity and serious dryness. In spite of its importance no paper has been published regarding bacterial community of this lake. Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate the halophilic bacteria in the aforementioned lake. In so doing, thirty seven strains were isolated on six different culture media. The isolated strains were characterized using phenotypic and genotypic methods. Growth of the strains occurred at 2535 degrees C, pH 6-9 and 7 to 20% (w/v) NaCl indicating that most of the isolates were moderately halophiles. Catalase, oxidase and urease activities were found to be positive for the majority of the isolates. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the isolated bacteria belonged to two major taxa: Gammaproteobacteria (92%, including Salicola [46%], Pseudomonas [13.5%], Marinobacter [ 11%], Idiomarina [11%], and Halomonas [8%]) and Firmicutes (8%, including Bacillus [5%] and Halobacillus [3%]). In addition, a novel bacterium whose 16S rRNA gene sequence showed almost 98% sequence identity with the taxonomically troubled DSM 3050T, Halovibrio denitrificans HGD 3T and Halospina denitrificans HGD 1-3T, each, was isolated. 16S rRNA gene similarity levels along with phenotypic characteristics suggest that some of the isolated strains could be regarded as potential type strain for novel species, on which further studies are recommended.

  16. Grand challenges in the management and conservation of North American inland fishes and fisheries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lynch, Abigail; Cooke, Steven J.; Beard, Douglas; Kao, Yu-Chun; Lorenzen, Kai; Song, Andrew M.; Allen, Micheal S.; Basher, Zeenatul; Bunnell, David; Camp, Edward V.; Cowx, Ian G.; Freedman, Jonathan A.; Nguyen, Vivian M.; Nohner, Joel K.; Rogers, Mark W.; Siders, Zachary A.; Taylor, William W.; Youn, So-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Even with long-standing management and extensive science support, North American inland fish and fisheries still face many conservation and management challenges. We used a grand challenges approach to identify critical roadblocks that if removed would help solve important problems in the management and long-term conservation of North American inland fish and fisheries. We identified seven grand challenges within three themes (valuation, governance, and externalities) and 34 research needs and management actions. The major themes identified are to (1) raise awareness of diverse values associated with inland fish and fisheries, (2) govern inland fish and fisheries to satisfy multiple use and conservation objectives, and (3) ensure productive inland fisheries given nonfishing sector externalities. Addressing these grand challenges will help the broader community understand the diverse values of inland fish and fisheries, promote open forums for engagement of diverse stakeholders in fisheries management, and better integrate the inland fish sector into the greater water and land use policy process.

  17. Estimation Of River And Lake Heights Using CryoSat-2 Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villadsen, Heidi; Anderson, Ole B.; Stenseng, Lars

    2013-12-01

    Using a simple threshold retracker on SAR and LRM data from CryoSat-2 it is seen that the SIRAL radar altimeter shows great potential for height estimation over land and inland waters. Differences between heights from the SRTM DEM and the retracked heights were less than 1 m for Lake Va ̈ttern in Sweden, which is well within the error range of 16 m for SRTM. However, some difficulties where encountered, such as snagging due to bright targets off-nadir, as well as an occasional inability of the altimeter to adjust the window delay to the underlying terrain. It was also found, that classification of waveforms over land and inland waters is challenging. Therefore, using a well resolved river and lake mask and focusing on small test regions is recommended until radar altimetry over land and inland waters is fully understood.

  18. Inland saltwater as a medium for the production of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.E.; Reach, C.D.; O'Connor, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine if waste brine waters originating from inland salt seeps and crude oil production could be used to sustain the growth of marine organisms. In spite of a chemical composition significantly different from seawater controls, a central Missouri brine supported the rapid and dense growth of marine algae, which, in turn, was found to promote the normal growth of the brine shrimp Artemia. Additional experiments with oil-field brines indicated that the ability of waste brines to sustain algae-shrimp growth is site specific. The experimental results indicate that oil-field brines and inland salt waters can serve as media for the production of marine plants and animals.

  19. Assessment of temporal variations of water quality in inland water bodies using atmospheric corrected satellite remotely sensed image data.

    PubMed

    Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G; Clayton, Chris

    2009-12-01

    Although there have been many studies conducted on the use of satellite remote sensing for water quality monitoring and assessment in inland water bodies, relatively few studies have considered the problem of atmospheric intervention of the satellite signal. The problem is especially significant when using time series multi-spectral satellite data to monitor water quality surveillance in inland waters such as reservoirs, lakes, and dams because atmospheric effects constitute the majority of the at-satellite reflectance over water. For the assessment of temporal variations of water quality, the use of multi-date satellite images is required so atmospheric corrected image data must be determined. The aim of this study is to provide a simple way of monitoring and assessing temporal variations of water quality in a set of inland water bodies using an earth observation- based approach. The proposed methodology is based on the development of an image-based algorithm which consists of a selection of sampling area on the image (outlet), application of masking and convolution image processing filter, and application of the darkest pixel atmospheric correction. The proposed method has been applied in two different geographical areas, in UK and Cyprus. Mainly, the method has been applied to a series of eight archived Landsat-5 TM images acquired from March 1985 up to November 1985 of the Lower Thames Valley area in the West London (UK) consisting of large water treatment reservoirs. Finally, the method is further tested to the Kourris Dam in Cyprus. It has been found that atmospheric correction is essential in water quality assessment studies using satellite remotely sensed imagery since it improves significantly the water reflectance enabling effective water quality assessment to be made.

  20. Similarity of osmoregulatory capacity in coastal and inland alligator gar.

    PubMed

    Allen, Peter J; Haukenes, Alf; Lochmann, Steve E

    2017-04-08

    The alligator gar Atractosteus spatula is a primitive fish species, occupying a wide range of temperature and salinity habitats. Long-distance movements are limited, leading to genetic differentiation between inland and coastal populations. Unknown is whether physiological capacity differs between geographically separated populations, particularly for traits important to osmoregulation in saline environments. Alligator gar from inland and coastal populations were reared in a similar environment and exposed to temperature (10, 30 °C) and salinity (0, 20 ppt) extremes to determine whether iono- and osmoregulatory ability differed between populations. There were few differences in osmoregulatory ability between populations, with similar gill, blood and gastrointestinal tract osmoregulatory parameters. Blood plasma osmolality, ion concentrations, intestinal pH and bicarbonate base concentrations, intestinal fluid osmolality, ion concentrations and gill Na(+), K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activity were similar between populations. Notably, gar from both populations did not osmoregulate well at low temperature and high salinity, with elevated plasma osmolality and ion concentrations, low gill NKA, and little evidence of gastrointestinal tract contribution to ionic and base regulation based on a lack of intestinal fluid and low base content. Therefore, the hypothesis that coastal gar would have improved hypo-osmotic regulatory ability as compared to inland alligator gar was not supported, suggesting physiological capacity may be retained in primitive species possibly due to its importance to their persistence through time.

  1. Digital waterway construction based on inland electronic navigation chart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue; Pan, Junfeng; Zhu, Weiwei

    2015-12-01

    With advantages of large capacity, long distance, low energy consumption, low cost, less land occupation and light pollution, inland waterway transportation becomes one of the most important constituents of the comprehensive transportation system and comprehensive water resources utilization in China. As one of "three elements" of navigation, waterway is the important basis for the development of water transportation and plays a key supporting role in shipping economic. The paper discuss how to realize the informatization and digitization of waterway management based on constructing an integrated system of standard inland electronic navigation chart production, waterway maintenance, navigation mark remote sensing and control, ship dynamic management, and water level remote sensing and report, which can also be the foundation of the intelligent waterway construction. Digital waterway construction is an information project and also has a practical meaning for waterway. It can not only meet the growing high assurance and security requirements for waterway, but also play a significant advantage in improving transport efficiency, reducing costs, promoting energy conservation and so on. This study lays a solid foundation on realizing intelligent waterway and building a smooth, efficient, safe, green modern inland waterway system, and must be considered as an unavoidable problem for the coordinated development between "low carbon" transportation and social economic.

  2. Characterization of SAR Mode Altimetry over Inland Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabry, Pierre; Bercher, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Radar altimetry over the inland water domain is a difficult topic that still requires a lot of human expertise as well as manual editing and verifications. This is mainly due to the fact that inland water scenes are highly variable, both in space and time, which leads to a much broader range of radar signatures than in oceanography. The remark is particularly true for LRM altimetry and remains valid in many cases in SAR mode (SARM). In preparation for the operational Sentinel-3 mission and to better benefit from the improved SARM along-track resolution it is required to: 1. better characterize the SARM Individual Echoes, Multi-Look Stacks, 20Hz waveforms as well as the Range Integrated Power (RIP) over the inland water domain, 2. step toward processing schemes that account for the actual content of the illuminated scene. In this work, we introduce an automated technique to assess the water fraction within the Beam-limited Doppler footprint through its intersection area of with a water mask. This framework opens up new ways toward the automated characterization and processing of altimetry data based on regularly updated water masks.

  3. New Characterization of SAR Mode Altimetry Data over Inland Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabry, Pierre; Bercher, Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    Radar altimetry over the inland water domain is a difficult topic that still requires a lot of human expertise as well as manual editing and verifications. This is mainly due to the fact that inland water scenes are highly variable, both in space and time, which leads to a much broader range of radar signatures than in oceanography. The remark is particularly true for LRM altimetry and remains valid in many cases in SAR mode (SARM). In preparation for the operational Sentinel-3 mission and to better benefit from the improved SARM along-track resolution it is required to:1. better characterize the SARM Individual Echoes, Multi-Look Stacks, 20Hz waveforms as well as the Range Integrated Power (RIP) over the inland water domain,2. step toward processing schemes that account for the actual content of the illuminated scene.In this work, we introduce an automated technique to assess the water fraction within the Beam-limited Doppler footprint through its intersection area of with a water mask. This framework opens up new ways toward the automated characterization and processing of altimetry, in the future, thanks to regularly updated water masks.

  4. 33 CFR 162.210 - Lake Tahoe, Calif.; restricted areas along south shore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Tahoe, Calif.; restricted areas along south shore. 162.210 Section 162.210 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION...

  5. Using a Freshwater Lake Model Coupled with WRF for Dynamical Downscaling Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability to represent extremes in temperature and precipitation in regional climates (including those affected by inland lakes) has become an area of focus as regional climate models (RCMs) simulate smaller temporal and spatial scales. When using the Weather Research and Fore...

  6. Unusually high stable carbon isotopic values of methane from low organic carbon Mars analog hypersaline environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, C. A.; Poole, J. A.; Tazaz, A.; Chanton, J.; Bebout, B.

    2010-12-01

    Motivated by the Mars rovers’ findings of past hypersaline environments and the discovery of methane in the atmosphere of Mars, we examined methanogenesis in hypersaline ponds in Baja California Sur and in the Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge in northern California. Methane-rich bubbles were observed to be released from below gypsum/halite crusts in these environments. The stable carbon isotopic composition of these bubbles ranged from about -30 to -40 ‰. Methane with these relatively high isotopic values would typically be considered non-biogenic, however incubations of crust and sediments samples over time resulted in the production of methane. We therefore undertook a series of measurements aimed at understanding the isotopic composition of methane in these environments. The concentrations and isotopic composition of the particulate organic carbon (POC) in these environments were measured. POC content was low (relative to most methane-producing sedimentary environments), generally less than 1%, and always less than 2% of the total mass. The isotopic composition of the POC ranged from -13 to -22 ‰. To determine the substrates used by the methanogens, 13C-labeled trimethylamine (TMA), monomethylamine, methanol, acetate and bicarbonate were added to incubation vials and the methane produced was monitored for 13C content. The main substrates used by the methanogens in these hypersaline environments were the non-competitive substrates, the methylamines and methanol. When unlabeled, but isotopically known, TMA was added to incubation vials in varying concentrations, the isotopic composition of the methane produced also varied. Little, if any, difference in the isotopic composition between the TMA and methane occurred at the lowest TMA concentration (10 µM final concentration). The lowest methane δ13C values (and so greatest fractionation between methane and TMA) occurred when the most TMA was added (1000 µM final concentration). This change in the

  7. Third-Year Results from the Circumarctic Lakes Observation Network (CALON) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, K. M.; Arp, C. D.; Beck, R. A.; Eisner, W. R.; Frey, K. E.; Grosse, G.; Jones, B. M.; Kim, C.; Lenters, J. D.; Liu, H.; Townsend-Small, A.

    2014-12-01

    Since 2012, 60 lakes in northern Alaska have been instrumented under the auspices of CALON, a project designed to document landscape-scale variability in physical and biogeochemical processes of Arctic lakes in permafrost terrain. The network has ten observation nodes along two latitudinal transects extending from the Arctic Ocean inland some 200 km to the Brooks Range foothills. At each node, a meteorological station is deployed, and six representative lakes of differing area and depth are instrumented and sampled at different intensity levels to collect basic field measurements. In April, sensors measuring water temperature and depth are deployed through the ice in each lake, ice and snow thickness recorded, and water samples are collected. Data are downloaded, lakes re-sampled, and bathymetric surveys are conducted in August. In 2014, the snow cover on inland lakes was thinner than in previous years but thicker on lakes located near the coast. Lake ice was generally thinner near the coast, but the difference diminished inland. Winters (Oct-March) have been progressively warmer over the 3-year period, which partially explains the thinner lake ice that formed in 2013-14. Lakes are typically well-mixed and largely isothermal, with minor thermal stratification occurring in deeper lakes during calm, sunny periods. These regional lake and meteorological data sets, used in conjunction with satellite imagery, supports the wind-driven lake circulation model for the origin of thermokarst lakes. Results of biogeochemical analyses of lake waters generally show notably higher concentrations of cations/anions, chromophoric dissolved organic matter, and chlorophyll-a during April as compared with August. Dissolved methane concentrations are also much higher under ice than in open water during summer, although all lakes are a source of atmospheric methane. Interviews with indigenous elders in Anaktuvuk Pass indicate that mountain lakes are drying up. During the 2014 breakup

  8. Meeting report: knowledge and gaps in developing microbial criteria for inland recreational waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorevitch, Samuel; Ashbolt, Nicholas J.; Ferguson, Christobel M.; Fujioka, Roger; McGee, Charles D.; Soller, Jeffrey A.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has committed to issuing in 2012 new or revised criteria designed to protect the health of those who use surface waters for recreation. For this purpose, the U.S. EPA has been conducting epidemiologic studies to establish relationships between microbial measures of water quality and adverse health outcomes among swimmers. New methods for testing water quality that would provide same-day results will likely be elements of the new criteria. Although the epidemiologic studies upon which the criteria will be based were conducted at Great Lakes and marine beaches, the new water quality criteria may be extended to inland waters (IWs). Similarities and important differences between coastal waters (CWs) and IWs that should be considered when developing criteria for IWs were the focus of an expert workshop. Here, we summarize the state of knowledge and research needed to base IWs microbial criteria on sound science. Two key differences between CWs and IWs are the sources of indicator bacteria, which may modify the relationship between indicator microbes and health risk, and the relationship between indicators and pathogens, which also may vary within IWs. Monitoring using rapid molecular methods will require the standardization and simplification of analytical methods, as well as greater clarity about their interpretation. Research needs for the short term and longer term are described.

  9. Molecular Ecology of Hypersaline Microbial Mats: Current Insights and New Directions

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hon Lun; Ahmed-Cox, Aria; Burns, Brendan Paul

    2016-01-01

    Microbial mats are unique geobiological ecosystems that form as a result of complex communities of microorganisms interacting with each other and their physical environment. Both the microorganisms present and the network of metabolic interactions govern ecosystem function therein. These systems are often found in a range of extreme environments, and those found in elevated salinity have been particularly well studied. The purpose of this review is to briefly describe the molecular ecology of select model hypersaline mat systems (Guerrero Negro, Shark Bay, S’Avall, and Kiritimati Atoll), and any potentially modulating effects caused by salinity to community structure. In addition, we discuss several emerging issues in the field (linking function to newly discovered phyla and microbial dark matter), which illustrate the changing paradigm that is seen as technology has rapidly advanced in the study of these extreme and evolutionally significant ecosystems. PMID:27681900

  10. Abiotic nitrous oxide emission from the hypersaline Don Juan Pond in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarkin, Vladimir A.; Madigan, Michael T.; Bowles, Marshall W.; Casciotti, Karen L.; Priscu, John C.; McKay, Christopher P.; Joye, Samantha B.

    2010-05-01

    Nitrous oxide is a potent atmospheric greenhouse gas that contributes to ozone destruction. Biological processes such as nitrification and denitrification are thought to drive nitrous oxide production in soils, which comprise the largest source of nitrous oxide to the atmosphere. Here we present measurements of the concentration and isotopic composition of nitrous oxide in soil pore spaces in samples taken near Don Juan Pond, a metabolically dormant hypersaline pond in Southern Victoria Land, Antarctica in 2006, 2007 and 2008, together with in situ fluxes of nitrous oxide from the soil to the atmosphere. We find fluxes of nitrous oxide that rival those measured in fertilized tropical soils. Laboratory experiments-in which nitrite-rich brine was reacted with a variety of minerals containing Fe(II)-reveal a new mechanism of abiotic water-rock reaction that could support nitrous oxide fluxes at Don Juan Pond. Our findings illustrate a dynamic and unexpected link between the geosphere and atmosphere.

  11. Survival strategies for microorganisms in hypersaline environments and their relevance to life on early Mars.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, C D

    1998-07-01

    There are two groups of microorganisms that live and grow in hypersaline (>10-15% NaCl) environments: the halophilic Archaea and the halotolerant Bacteria and algae. In order to grow and reproduce in such high-salt, low-water activity environments, these organisms have made basic biochemical adaptations in their proteins, osmoregulation mechanisms, nucleic acids, and lipids. The environment of the halophiles and especially how the halophilic Archaea have adapted to that environment are reviewed in this paper. Along with this review is a brief description of how these adaptations could be important in the detection of life on early Mars assuming similar types of salts and a carbon-based life.

  12. SAR Imagery Applied to the Monitoring of Hyper-Saline Deposits: Death Valley Example (CA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasne, Yannick; Paillou, Philippe; Freeman, Anthony; Chapman, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The present study aims at understanding the influence of salinity on the dielectric constant of soils and then on the backscattering coeff cients recorded by airborne/spaceborne SAR systems. Based on dielectric measurements performed over hyper-saline deposits in Death Valley (CA), as well as laboratory electromagnetic characterization of salts and water mixtures, we used the dielectric constants as input parameters of analytical IEM simulations to model both the amplitude and phase behaviors of SAR signal at C, and L-bands. Our analytical simulations allow to reproduce specif c copolar signatures recorded in SAR data, corresponding to the Cottonball Basin saltpan. We also propose the copolar backscattering ratio and phase difference as indicators of moistened and salt-affected soils. More precisely, we show that these copolar indicators should allow to monitor the seasonal variations of the dielectric properties of saline deposits.

  13. High-pH-induced flocculation-flotation of the hypersaline microalga Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Besson, Alexandre; Guiraud, Pascal

    2013-11-01

    Natural autoflocculation was not observed in a Dunaliella salina hypersaline culture and the microalgae did not float without destabilization of the algal suspension. High-pH-induced flocculation by sodium hydroxide addition was chosen to induce flotation. Recovery efficiencies greater than 90% and concentration factors of around 20 were reached. An autoflocculation mechanism, with precipitation of magnesium hydroxide, is proposed to explain a sweeping flotation of D. salina cells. The influence of the flow rate of sodium hydroxide addition was also studied to anticipate the constraints related to the industrialization of this process. The flow rate of sodium hydroxide addition had no effect on the recovery efficiency and reduced the concentration factor only for abrupt injections. Natural increase of culture pH by photosynthetic activity could reduce the amount of base consumed. Non-harvested cells remained viable during pH increase and could be used as inoculum for a new culture.

  14. Polymerization under Hypersaline Conditions: A Robust Route to Phenolic Polymer-Derived Carbon Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Long; Li, Guan-Cheng; Fechler, Nina; Yang, Ning; Ma, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Xin; Antonietti, Markus; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-11-14

    Polymer-derived carbon aerogels can be obtained by direct polymerization of monomers under hypersaline conditions using inorganic salts. This allows for significantly increased mechanical robustness and avoiding special drying processes. This concept was realized by conducting the polymerization of phenol-formaldehyde (PF) in the presence of ZnCl2 salt. Afterwards, the simultaneous carbonization and foaming process conveniently converts the PF monolith into a foam-like carbon aerogel. ZnCl2 plays a key role, serving as dehydration agent, foaming agent, and porogen. The carbon aerogels thus obtained are of very low density (25 mg cm(-3) ), high specific surface area (1340 m(2)  g(-1) ), and have a large micro- and mesopore volume (0.75 cm(3)  g(-1) ). The carbon aerogels show very promising potential in the separation/extraction of organic pollutants and for energy storage.

  15. Volatile selenium flux from the great Salt Lake, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diaz, X.; Johnson, W.P.; Oliver, W.A.; Naftz, D.L.

    2009-01-01

    The removal mechanisms that govern Se concentrations in the Great Salt Lake are unknown despite this terminal lake being an avian habitat of hemispheric importance. However, the volatilization flux of Se from the Great Salt Lake has not been previously measured due to challenges of analysis in this hypersaline environment This paper presents results from recent field studies examining the spatial distribution of dissolved volatile Se (areally and with depth) in the south arm (main body) of the Great Salt Lake. The analyses involved collection of dissolved volatile Se in a cryofocusing trap system via sparging with helium. The cryotrapped volatile Se was digested with nitric acid and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Results show concentrations of dissolved volatile Se that increase with depth in the shallow brine, suggesting that phytoplankton in the open waters and bioherms in shallow sites (<4 m in depth) may be responsible for volatile Se production. Volatile Se flux to the atmosphere was determined using mass transport models corrected to simulate the highly saline environment of the south arm of the Great Salt Lake. The estimated annual flux of volatile Se was 1455 kg/year within a range from 560 to 3780 kg Se/year for the 95% confidence interval and from 970 to 2180 kg Se/year within the 68% confidence interval. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  16. Volatile selenium flux from the Great Salt Lake, Utah.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Ximena; Johnson, William P; Oliver, Wade A; Naftz, David L

    2009-01-01

    The removal mechanisms that govern Se concentrations in the Great Salt Lake are unknown despite this terminal lake being an avian habitat of hemispheric importance. However, the volatilization flux of Se from the Great Salt Lake has not been previously measured due to challenges of analysis in this hypersaline environment This paper presents results from recent field studies examining the spatial distribution of dissolved volatile Se (areally and with depth) in the south arm (main body) of the Great Salt Lake. The analyses involved collection of dissolved volatile Se in a cryofocusing trap system via sparging with helium. The cryotrapped volatile Se was digested with nitric acid and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry(ICP-MS). Results show concentrations of dissolved volatile Se that increase with depth in the shallow brine, suggesting that phytoplankton in the open waters and bioherms in shallow sites (<4 m in depth) may be responsible for volatile Se production. Volatile Se flux to the atmosphere was determined using mass transport models corrected to simulate the highly saline environment of the south arm of the Great Salt Lake. The estimated annual flux of volatile Se was 1455 kg/year within a range from 560 to 3780 kg Se/year for the 95% confidence interval and from 970 to 2180 kg Se/year within the 68% confidence interval.

  17. Quorum-sensing inhibitory compounds from extremophilic microorganisms isolated from a hypersaline cyanobacterial mat.

    PubMed

    Abed, Raeid M M; Dobretsov, Sergey; Al-Fori, Marwan; Gunasekera, Sarath P; Sudesh, Kumar; Paul, Valerie J

    2013-07-01

    In this study, extremely halophilic and moderately thermophilic microorganisms from a hypersaline microbial mat were screened for their ability to produce antibacterial, antidiatom, antialgal, and quorum-sensing (QS) inhibitory compounds. Five bacterial strains belonging to the genera Marinobacter and Halomonas and one archaeal strain belonging to the genus Haloterrigena were isolated from a microbial mat. The strains were able to grow at a maximum salinity of 22-25 % and a maximum temperature of 45-60 °C. Hexanes, dichloromethane, and butanol extracts from the strains inhibited the growth of at least one out of nine human pathogens. Only butanol extracts of supernatants of Halomonas sp. SK-1 inhibited growth of the microalga Dunaliella salina. Most extracts from isolates inhibited QS of the acyl homoserine lactone producer and reporter Chromobacterium violaceum CV017. Purification of QS inhibitory dichloromethane extracts of Marinobacter sp. SK-3 resulted in isolation of four related diketopiperazines (DKPs): cyclo(L-Pro-L-Phe), cyclo(L-Pro-L-Leu), cyclo(L-Pro-L-isoLeu), and cyclo(L-Pro-D-Phe). QS inhibitory properties of these DKPs were tested using C. violaceum CV017 and Escherichia coli-based QS reporters (pSB401 and pSB1075) deficient in AHL production. Cyclo(L-Pro-L-Phe) and cyclo(L-Pro-L-isoLeu) inhibited QS-dependent production of violacein by C. violaceum CV017. Cyclo(L-Pro-L-Phe), cyclo(L-Pro-L-Leu), and cyclo(L-Pro-L-isoLeu) reduced QS-dependent luminescence of the reporter E. coli pSB401 induced by 3-oxo-C6-HSL. Our study demonstrated the ability of halophilic and moderately thermophilic strains from a hypersaline microbial mat to produce biotechnologically relevant compounds that could be used as antifouling agents.

  18. Recent studies in microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    PubMed Central

    Fathepure, Babu Z.

    2014-01-01

    Many hypersaline environments are often contaminated with petroleum compounds. Among these, oil and natural gas production sites all over the world and hundreds of kilometers of coastlines in the more arid regions of Gulf countries are of major concern due to the extent and magnitude of contamination. Because conventional microbiological processes do not function well at elevated salinities, bioremediation of hypersaline environments can only be accomplished using high salt-tolerant microorganisms capable of degrading petroleum compounds. In the last two decades, there have been many reports on the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in moderate to high salinity environments. Numerous microorganisms belonging to the domain Bacteria and Archaea have been isolated and their phylogeny and metabolic capacity to degrade a variety of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in varying salinities have been demonstrated. This article focuses on our growing understanding of bacteria and archaea responsible for the degradation of hydrocarbons under aerobic conditions in moderate to high salinity conditions. Even though organisms belonging to various genera have been shown to degrade hydrocarbons, members of the genera Halomonas Alcanivorax, Marinobacter, Haloferax, Haloarcula, and Halobacterium dominate the published literature. Despite rapid advances in understanding microbial taxa that degrade hydrocarbons under aerobic conditions, not much is known about organisms that carry out similar processes in anaerobic conditions. Also, information on molecular mechanisms and pathways of hydrocarbon degradation in high salinity is scarce and only recently there have been a few reports describing genes, enzymes and breakdown steps for some hydrocarbons. These limited studies have clearly revealed that degradation of oxygenated and non-oxygenated hydrocarbons by halophilic and halotolerant microorganisms occur by pathways similar to those found in non-halophiles. PMID:24795705

  19. Eutrophication of lake waters in China: cost, causes, and control.

    PubMed

    Le, C; Zha, Y; Li, Y; Sun, D; Lu, H; Yin, B

    2010-04-01

    Lake water eutrophication has become one of the most important factors impeding sustainable economic development in China. Knowledge of the current status of lake water eutrophication and determination of its mechanism are prerequisites to devising a sound solution to the problem. Based on reviewing the literature, this paper elaborates on the evolutional process and current state of shallow inland lake water eutrophication in China. The mechanism of lake water eutrophication is explored from nutrient sources. In light of the identified mechanism strategies are proposed to control and tackle lake water eutrophication. This review reveals that water eutrophication in most lakes was initiated in the 1980s when the national economy underwent rapid development. At present, the problem of water eutrophication is still serious, with frequent occurrence of damaging algal blooms, which have disrupted the normal supply of drinking water in shore cities. Each destructive bloom caused a direct economic loss valued at billions of yuan. Nonpoint pollution sources, namely, waste discharge from agricultural fields and nutrients released from floor deposits, are identified as the two major sources of nitrogen and phosphorus. Therefore, all control and rehabilitation measures of lake water eutrophication should target these nutrient sources. Biological measures are recommended to rehabilitate eutrophied lake waters and restore the lake ecosystem in order to bring the problem under control.

  20. Modeling of subglacial hydrological development following rapid supraglacial lake drainage

    PubMed Central

    Dow, C F; Kulessa, B; Rutt, I C; Tsai, V C; Pimentel, S; Doyle, S H; van As, D; Lindbäck, K; Pettersson, R; Jones, G A; Hubbard, A

    2015-01-01

    The rapid drainage of supraglacial lakes injects substantial volumes of water to the bed of the Greenland ice sheet over short timescales. The effect of these water pulses on the development of basal hydrological systems is largely unknown. To address this, we develop a lake drainage model incorporating both (1) a subglacial radial flux element driven by elastic hydraulic jacking and (2) downstream drainage through a linked channelized and distributed system. Here we present the model and examine whether substantial, efficient subglacial channels can form during or following lake drainage events and their effect on the water pressure in the surrounding distributed system. We force the model with field data from a lake drainage site, 70 km from the terminus of Russell Glacier in West Greenland. The model outputs suggest that efficient subglacial channels do not readily form in the vicinity of the lake during rapid drainage and instead water is evacuated primarily by a transient turbulent sheet and the distributed system. Following lake drainage, channels grow but are not large enough to reduce the water pressure in the surrounding distributed system, unless preexisting channels are present throughout the domain. Our results have implications for the analysis of subglacial hydrological systems in regions where rapid lake drainage provides the primary mechanism for surface-to-bed connections. Key Points Model for subglacial hydrological analysis of rapid lake drainage events Limited subglacial channel growth during and following rapid lake drainage Persistence of distributed drainage in inland areas where channel growth is limited PMID:26640746

  1. Eutrophication of Lake Waters in China: Cost, Causes, and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, C.; Zha, Y.; Li, Y.; Sun, D.; Lu, H.; Yin, B.

    2010-04-01

    Lake water eutrophication has become one of the most important factors impeding sustainable economic development in China. Knowledge of the current status of lake water eutrophicatoin and determination of its mechanism are prerequisites to devising a sound solution to the problem. Based on reviewing the literature, this paper elaborates on the evolutional process and current state of shallow inland lake water eutrophication in China. The mechanism of lake water eutrophication is explored from nutrient sources. In light of the identified mechanism strategies are proposed to control and tackle lake water eutrophication. This review reveals that water eutrophication in most lakes was initiated in the 1980s when the national economy underwent rapid development. At present, the problem of water eutrophication is still serious, with frequent occurrence of damaging algal blooms, which have disrupted the normal supply of drinking water in shore cities. Each destructive bloom caused a direct economic loss valued at billions of yuan. Nonpoint pollution sources, namely, waste discharge from agricultural fields and nutrients released from floor deposits, are identified as the two major sources of nitrogen and phosphorus. Therefore, all control and rehabilitation measures of lake water eutrophication should target these nutrient sources. Biological measures are recommended to rehabilitate eutrophied lake waters and restore the lake ecosystem in order to bring the problem under control.

  2. A global database of lake surface temperatures collected by in situ and satellite methods from 1985-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sapna; Gray, Derek K.; Read, Jordan S.; O'Reilly, Catherine M.; Schneider, Philipp; Qudrat, Anam; Gries, Corinna; Stefanoff, Samantha; Hampton, Stephanie E.; Hook, Simon; Lenters, John D.; Livingstone, David M.; McIntyre, Peter B.; Adrian, Rita; Allan, Mathew G.; Anneville, Orlane; Arvola, Lauri; Austin, Jay; Bailey, John; Baron, Jill S.; Brookes, Justin; Chen, Yuwei; Daly, Robert; Dokulil, Martin; Dong, Bo; Ewing, Kye; de Eyto, Elvira; Hamilton, David; Havens, Karl; Haydon, Shane; Hetzenauer, Harald; Heneberry, Jocelyne; Hetherington, Amy L.; Higgins, Scott N.; Hixson, Eric; Izmest'Eva, Lyubov R.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Kangur, Külli; Kasprzak, Peter; Köster, Olivier; Kraemer, Benjamin M.; Kumagai, Michio; Kuusisto, Esko; Leshkevich, George; May, Linda; MacIntyre, Sally; Müller-Navarra, Dörthe; Naumenko, Mikhail; Noges, Peeter; Noges, Tiina; Niederhauser, Pius; North, Ryan P.; Paterson, Andrew M.; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Rigosi, Anna; Rimmer, Alon; Rogora, Michela; Rudstam, Lars; Rusak, James A.; Salmaso, Nico; Samal, Nihar R.; Schindler, Daniel E.; Schladow, Geoffrey; Schmidt, Silke R.; Schultz, Tracey; Silow, Eugene A.; Straile, Dietmar; Teubner, Katrin; Verburg, Piet; Voutilainen, Ari; Watkinson, Andrew; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.; Williamson, Craig E.; Woo, Kara H.

    2015-03-01

    Global environmental change has influenced lake surface temperatures, a key driver of ecosystem structure and function. Recent studies have suggested significant warming of water temperatures in individual lakes across many different regions around the world. However, the spatial and temporal coherence associated with the magnitude of these trends remains unclear. Thus, a global data set of water temperature is required to understand and synthesize global, long-term trends in surface water temperatures of inland bodies of water. We assembled a database of summer lake surface temperatures for 291 lakes collected in situ and/or by satellites for the period 1985-2009. In addition, corresponding climatic drivers (air temperatures, solar radiation, and cloud cover) and geomorphometric characteristics (latitude, longitude, elevation, lake surface area, maximum depth, mean depth, and volume) that influence lake surface temperatures were compiled for each lake. This unique dataset offers an invaluable baseline perspective on global-scale lake thermal conditions as environmental change continues.

  3. A global database of lake surface temperatures collected by in situ and satellite methods from 1985–2009

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sapna; Gray, Derek K; Read, Jordan S; O’Reilly, Catherine M; Schneider, Philipp; Qudrat, Anam; Gries, Corinna; Stefanoff, Samantha; Hampton, Stephanie E; Hook, Simon; Lenters, John D; Livingstone, David M; McIntyre, Peter B; Adrian, Rita; Allan, Mathew G; Anneville, Orlane; Arvola, Lauri; Austin, Jay; Bailey, John; Baron, Jill S; Brookes, Justin; Chen, Yuwei; Daly, Robert; Dokulil, Martin; Dong, Bo; Ewing, Kye; de Eyto, Elvira; Hamilton, David; Havens, Karl; Haydon, Shane; Hetzenauer, Harald; Heneberry, Jocelyne; Hetherington, Amy L; Higgins, Scott N; Hixson, Eric; Izmest’eva, Lyubov R; Jones, Benjamin M; Kangur, Külli; Kasprzak, Peter; Köster, Olivier; Kraemer, Benjamin M; Kumagai, Michio; Kuusisto, Esko; Leshkevich, George; May, Linda; MacIntyre, Sally; Müller-Navarra, Dörthe; Naumenko, Mikhail; Noges, Peeter; Noges, Tiina; Niederhauser, Pius; North, Ryan P; Paterson, Andrew M; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Rigosi, Anna; Rimmer, Alon; Rogora, Michela; Rudstam, Lars; Rusak, James A; Salmaso, Nico; Samal, Nihar R; Schindler, Daniel E; Schladow, Geoffrey; Schmidt, Silke R; Schultz, Tracey; Silow, Eugene A; Straile, Dietmar; Teubner, Katrin; Verburg, Piet; Voutilainen, Ari; Watkinson, Andrew; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A; Williamson, Craig E; Woo, Kara H

    2015-01-01

    Global environmental change has influenced lake surface temperatures, a key driver of ecosystem structure and function. Recent studies have suggested significant warming of water temperatures in individual lakes across many different regions around the world. However, the spatial and temporal coherence associated with the magnitude of these trends remains unclear. Thus, a global data set of water temperature is required to understand and synthesize global, long-term trends in surface water temperatures of inland bodies of water. We assembled a database of summer lake surface temperatures for 291 lakes collected in situ and/or by satellites for the period 1985–2009. In addition, corresponding climatic drivers (air temperatures, solar radiation, and cloud cover) and geomorphometric characteristics (latitude, longitude, elevation, lake surface area, maximum depth, mean depth, and volume) that influence lake surface temperatures were compiled for each lake. This unique dataset offers an invaluable baseline perspective on global-scale lake thermal conditions as environmental change continues. PMID:25977814

  4. A global database of lake surface temperatures collected by in situ and satellite methods from 1985–2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharma, Sapna; Gray, Derek; Read, Jordan S.; O'Reilly, Catherine; Schneider, Philipp; Qudrat, Anam; Gries, Corinna; Stefanoff, Samantha; Hampton, Stephanie; Hook, Simon; Lenters, John; Livingstone, David M.; McIntyre, Peter B.; Adrian, Rita; Allan, Mathew; Anneville, Orlane; Arvola, Lauri; Austin, Jay; Bailey, John E.; Baron, Jill S.; Brookes, Justin D; Chen, Yuwei; Daly, Robert; Ewing, Kye; de Eyto, Elvira; Dokulil, Martin; Hamilton, David B.; Havens, Karl; Haydon, Shane; Hetzenaeur, Harald; Heneberry, Jocelyn; Hetherington, Amy; Higgins, Scott; Hixson, Eric; Izmest'eva, Lyubov; Jones, Benjamin M.; Kangur, Kulli; Kasprzak, Peter; Kraemer, Benjamin; Kumagai, Michio; Kuusisto, Esko; Leshkevich, George; May, Linda; MacIntyre, Sally; Dörthe Müller-Navarra,; Naumenko, Mikhail; Noges, Peeter; Noges, Tiina; Pius Niederhauser,; North, Ryan P.; Andrew Paterson,; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Rigosi, Anna; Rimmer, Alon; Rogora, Michela; Lars Rudstam,; Rusak, James A.; Salmaso, Nico; Samal, Nihar R.; Daniel E. Schindler,; Geoffrey Schladow,; Schmidt, Silke R.; Tracey Schultz,; Silow, Eugene A.; Straile, Dietmar; Teubner, Katrin; Verburg, Piet; Voutilainen, Ari; Watkinson, Andrew; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.; Craig E. Williamson,; Kara H. Woo,

    2015-01-01

    Global environmental change has influenced lake surface temperatures, a key driver of ecosystem structure and function. Recent studies have suggested significant warming of water temperatures in individual lakes across many different regions around the world. However, the spatial and temporal coherence associated with the magnitude of these trends remains unclear. Thus, a global data set of water temperature is required to understand and synthesize global, long-term trends in surface water temperatures of inland bodies of water. We assembled a database of summer lake surface temperatures for 291 lakes collected in situ and/or by satellites for the period 1985–2009. In addition, corresponding climatic drivers (air temperatures, solar radiation, and cloud cover) and geomorphometric characteristics (latitude, longitude, elevation, lake surface area, maximum depth, mean depth, and volume) that influence lake surface temperatures were compiled for each lake. This unique dataset offers an invaluable baseline perspective on global-scale lake thermal conditions as environmental change continues.

  5. A global database of lake surface temperatures collected by in situ and satellite methods from 1985-2009.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sapna; Gray, Derek K; Read, Jordan S; O'Reilly, Catherine M; Schneider, Philipp; Qudrat, Anam; Gries, Corinna; Stefanoff, Samantha; Hampton, Stephanie E; Hook, Simon; Lenters, John D; Livingstone, David M; McIntyre, Peter B; Adrian, Rita; Allan, Mathew G; Anneville, Orlane; Arvola, Lauri; Austin, Jay; Bailey, John; Baron, Jill S; Brookes, Justin; Chen, Yuwei; Daly, Robert; Dokulil, Martin; Dong, Bo; Ewing, Kye; de Eyto, Elvira; Hamilton, David; Havens, Karl; Haydon, Shane; Hetzenauer, Harald; Heneberry, Jocelyne; Hetherington, Amy L; Higgins, Scott N; Hixson, Eric; Izmest'eva, Lyubov R; Jones, Benjamin M; Kangur, Külli; Kasprzak, Peter; Köster, Olivier; Kraemer, Benjamin M; Kumagai, Michio; Kuusisto, Esko; Leshkevich, George; May, Linda; MacIntyre, Sally; Müller-Navarra, Dörthe; Naumenko, Mikhail; Noges, Peeter; Noges, Tiina; Niederhauser, Pius; North, Ryan P; Paterson, Andrew M; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Rigosi, Anna; Rimmer, Alon; Rogora, Michela; Rudstam, Lars; Rusak, James A; Salmaso, Nico; Samal, Nihar R; Schindler, Daniel E; Schladow, Geoffrey; Schmidt, Silke R; Schultz, Tracey; Silow, Eugene A; Straile, Dietmar; Teubner, Katrin; Verburg, Piet; Voutilainen, Ari; Watkinson, Andrew; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A; Williamson, Craig E; Woo, Kara H

    2015-01-01

    Global environmental change has influenced lake surface temperatures, a key driver of ecosystem structure and function. Recent studies have suggested significant warming of water temperatures in individual lakes across many different regions around the world. However, the spatial and temporal coherence associated with the magnitude of these trends remains unclear. Thus, a global data set of water temperature is required to understand and synthesize global, long-term trends in surface water temperatures of inland bodies of water. We assembled a database of summer lake surface temperatures for 291 lakes collected in situ and/or by satellites for the period 1985-2009. In addition, corresponding climatic drivers (air temperatures, solar radiation, and cloud cover) and geomorphometric characteristics (latitude, longitude, elevation, lake surface area, maximum depth, mean depth, and volume) that influence lake surface temperatures were compiled for each lake. This unique dataset offers an invaluable baseline perspective on global-scale lake thermal conditions as environmental change continues.

  6. Discrimination among spawning aggregations of lake herring from Lake Superior using whole-body morphometric characters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoff, Michael H.

    2004-01-01

    The lake herring (Coregonus artedi) was one of the most commercially and ecologically valuable Lake Superior fishes, but declined in the second half of the 20th century as the result of overharvest of putatively discrete stocks. No tools were previously available that described lake herring stock structure and accurately classified lake herring to their spawning stocks. The accuracy of discriminating among spawning aggregations was evaluated using whole-body morphometrics based on a truss network. Lake herring were collected from 11 spawning aggregations in Lake Superior and two inland Wisconsin lakes to evaluate morphometrics as a stock discrimination tool. Discriminant function analysis correctly classified 53% of all fish from all spawning aggregations, and fish from all but one aggregation were classified at greater rates than were possible by chance. Discriminant analysis also correctly classified 66% of fish to nearest neighbor groups, which were groups that accounted for the possibility of mixing among the aggregations. Stepwise discriminant analysis showed that posterior body length and depth measurements were among the best discriminators of spawning aggregations. These findings support other evidence that discrete stocks of lake herring exist in Lake Superior, and fishery managers should consider all but one of the spawning aggregations as discrete stocks. Abundance, annual harvest, total annual mortality rate, and exploitation data should be collected from each stock, and surplus production of each stock should be estimated. Prudent management of stock surplus production and exploitation rates will aid in restoration of stocks and will prevent a repeat of the stock collapses that occurred in the middle of the 20th century, when the species was nearly extirpated from the lake.

  7. Assembly-driven metagenomics of a hypersaline microbial ecosystem (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Eric Allen of Scripps and UC San Diego on "Assembly-driven metagenomics of a hypersaline microbial ecosystem" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  8. Construction of a Causeway Bridge across the Lake Urmia and its Influence on Drying Trend of the Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadimi, M.; Nezammahalleh, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Construction of a causeway bridge on the Lake Urmia accelerated the drying trend of the largest hyper-saline lake of the world. The objective of the research is to investigate the differences of precipitation and river discharge before and after initiation of the construction of the bridge in 2000. The study area was the watershed of the lake. The averages of the precipitation data in the two periods before and after the project have been interpolated by IDW based on GIS Geostatistical Analyst. The two interpolated precipitation layers were used to be plugged into Student T-test equation in GIS in a spatial basis. To do this, the study area was divided to 25 regions based on drainage sub-basins. Less than 30 sample areas were randomly selected as cases from each of the regions to put into the equation. The discharge data were also compared for the two periods. The results indicated that except in some limited areas, the precipitation differences in the two periods are significant. This means that there were little changes in precipitation and river discharge in the area and consequently the drying may be caused mainly by hydrodynamic changes in the lake due to construction of the causeway. However, it can be argued that the changes in the lake's surface area are accompanied by changes in precipitation and river discharge. The t test statistic can be applied samples based on spatial analysis.

  9. Ecological consequences of long-term browning in lakes

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Craig E.; Overholt, Erin P.; Pilla, Rachel M.; Leach, Taylor H.; Brentrup, Jennifer A.; Knoll, Lesley B.; Mette, Elizabeth M.; Moeller, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Increases in terrestrially-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) have led to the browning of inland waters across regions of northeastern North America and Europe. Short-term experimental and comparative studies highlight the important ecological consequences of browning. These range from transparency-induced increases in thermal stratification and oxygen (O2) depletion to changes in pelagic food web structure and alteration of the important role of inland waters in the global carbon cycle. However, multi-decadal studies that document the net ecological consequences of long-term browning are lacking. Here we show that browning over a 27 year period in two lakes of differing transparency resulted in fundamental changes in vertical habitat gradients and food web structure, and that these responses were stronger in the more transparent lake. Surface water temperatures increased by 2–3 °C in both lakes in the absence of any changes in air temperature. Water transparency to ultraviolet (UV) radiation showed a fivefold decrease in the more transparent lake. The primary zooplankton grazers decreased, and in the more transparent lake were largely replaced by a two trophic level zooplankton community. These findings provide new insights into the net effects of the complex and contrasting mechanisms that underlie the ecosystem consequences of browning. PMID:26690504

  10. Remote Sensing as a Tool to Track Algal Blooms in the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradt, S. R.; Wurtsbaugh, W. A.; Naftz, D.; Moore, T.; Haney, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Great Salt Lake is a large hypersaline, terminal water body in northern Utah, USA. The lake has both a significant economic importance to the local community as a source of brine shrimp and mineral resources, as well as, an ecological importance to large numbers of migratory waterfowl. Due to nutrient input from sewage treatment plants, sections of the Great Salt Lake are subjected to highly eutrophic conditions. One of the main tributaries, Farmington Bay, experiences m