Science.gov

Sample records for inland waterway infrastructure

  1. 75 FR 11870 - Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... Transportation System (IMTS) Investment Strategy Team activities, as well as the status of the funding for inland navigation projects and studies and the status of the Inland Waterways Trust Fund. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  2. 77 FR 44222 - Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Inland Waterways Users Board AGENCY: Department of the Army, U.S.... Name of Committee: Inland Waterways Users Board (Board). Date: August 29, 2012. Location: The Sheraton... and the FY 2013 budget, status of the Olmsted Locks and Dam Project, and the Board will consider its...

  3. 78 FR 72070 - Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Inland Waterways Users Board AGENCY: Department of the Army, U.S.... Name of Committee: Inland Waterways Users Board (Board). Date: January 14, 2014. Location: Meeting at...

  4. 77 FR 62435 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 162 RIN 1625-AB84 Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations AGENCY: Coast... Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations (77 FR 27007). We received 1 comment. Specifically, Lake Carriers... 33 CFR 162.138(a)(1)(ii) will lessen navigation restrictions on the public and on private...

  5. 76 FR 11216 - Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... studies and the status of the Inland Waterways Trust Fund, the funding status for Fiscal Year (FY) 2011...) Investment Strategy report recommendations, as well as be updated on the work being performed by the...

  6. 77 FR 27007 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 162 RIN 1625-AB84 Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations AGENCY: Coast... waterways navigation regulations. Specifically, this rule proposes to redefine the geographical points which... navigation restrictions on the public and private industry. If you think that your business, organization,...

  7. 78 FR 23849 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulation: Sacramento River, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 162 RIN 1625-AB95 Inland Waterways Navigation Regulation: Sacramento River... entitled, ``Inland Waterways Navigation Regulation: Sacramento River, CA'' in the Federal Register (78 FR 4785). That rule announced our intent to update the inland waterways navigation regulations by...

  8. 77 FR 26522 - Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    .... Name of Committee: Inland Waterways Users Board (Board). Date: June 6, 2012. Location: The OMNI William Penn Hotel, 530 William Penn Place, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 at 412-281-7100 or 1-800-843-6664 or www.omnihotels.com/FindAHotel/PittsburghWilliamPenn.aspx . Time: Registration will begin at 8:30 a.m. and...

  9. 75 FR 57264 - Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Inland Waterways Users Board AGENCY: Department of the Army, U.S... Casino Hotel Bettendorf, 1777 Isle Parkway, Bettendorf, Iowa 52722 at 1-800-843-4753 or 1-800-724-5825...

  10. 77 FR 28825 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 162 RIN 1625-AB84 Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking; Correction of Preamble. SUMMARY: This document makes...

  11. Tracking and predicting barges on inland waterways

    SciTech Connect

    Randeniya, Duminda I; Hilliard, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    We present a non-linear, probabilistic prediction model developed and implemented to track spatial location and other navigation characteristics of a barge traveling on the inland waterway system. A pre-filter, to check the validity of the measurements, a non-linear speed estimation process, and a Kalman filter to predict the navigation solution of the barge is developed in this work. Due to the complex dynamics involved in the system, a non-linear stochastic model was developed in state space using system dynamics to represent the process and measurement systems while maintaining the fidelity of an actual system. The algorithm was verified using actual measurements obtained from multiple barges on multiple rivers acquired from different sensors. The results show a reliable and robust prediction algorithm for tracking inland waterway barges.

  12. Digital waterway construction based on inland electronic navigation chart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue; Pan, Junfeng; Zhu, Weiwei

    2015-12-01

    With advantages of large capacity, long distance, low energy consumption, low cost, less land occupation and light pollution, inland waterway transportation becomes one of the most important constituents of the comprehensive transportation system and comprehensive water resources utilization in China. As one of "three elements" of navigation, waterway is the important basis for the development of water transportation and plays a key supporting role in shipping economic. The paper discuss how to realize the informatization and digitization of waterway management based on constructing an integrated system of standard inland electronic navigation chart production, waterway maintenance, navigation mark remote sensing and control, ship dynamic management, and water level remote sensing and report, which can also be the foundation of the intelligent waterway construction. Digital waterway construction is an information project and also has a practical meaning for waterway. It can not only meet the growing high assurance and security requirements for waterway, but also play a significant advantage in improving transport efficiency, reducing costs, promoting energy conservation and so on. This study lays a solid foundation on realizing intelligent waterway and building a smooth, efficient, safe, green modern inland waterway system, and must be considered as an unavoidable problem for the coordinated development between "low carbon" transportation and social economic.

  13. 78 FR 4785 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulation: Sacramento River, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 162 RIN 1625-AB95 Inland Waterways Navigation Regulation: Sacramento River... navigation regulations by removing the Decker Island restricted anchorage. V. Regulatory Analyses We... required for this rule. List of Subjects in 33 CFR Part 162 Navigation (water) and Waterways. For...

  14. 78 FR 25677 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 162 Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations; Correction AGENCY: U.S. Coast... Waterways Navigation Regulations published in the Federal Register of April 26, 2013, in FR Doc. 2013-09853...

  15. 77 FR 22769 - Amendment to the Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... 1972 (5 U.S.C. Appendix), the Government in the Sunshine Act of 1976 (5 U.S.C. 552b), and 41 CFR 102-3... of the U.S. inland waterways and inland harbors as defined in Public Law 95-502 and amended by Public Law 99-662. According to 33 U.S.C. 2251b, the Board shall annually file their recommendations with...

  16. ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Randy M; Gross, Ian G; Smith, Cyrus M; Hill, David E

    2011-11-01

    Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor

  17. 77 FR 69447 - Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... investment recommendations, along with updates of the Inland Marine Transportation System (IMTS) Levels of... Road, Casey Building, Alexandria, ] Virginia 22315-3868; Ph: 703-428-6438. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION...

  18. Supporting inland waterway transport on German waterways by operational forecasting services - water-levels, discharges, river ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meißner, Dennis; Klein, Bastian; Ionita, Monica; Hemri, Stephan; Rademacher, Silke

    2017-04-01

    Inland waterway transport (IWT) is an important commercial sector significantly vulnerable to hydrological impacts. River ice and floods limit the availability of the waterway network and may cause considerable damages to waterway infrastructure. Low flows significantly affect IWT's operation efficiency usually several months a year due to the close correlation of (low) water levels / water depths and (high) transport costs. Therefore "navigation-related" hydrological forecasts focussing on the specific requirements of water-bound transport (relevant forecast locations, target parameters, skill characteristics etc.) play a major role in order to mitigate IWT's vulnerability to hydro-meteorological impacts. In light of continuing transport growth within the European Union, hydrological forecasts for the waterways are essential to stimulate the use of the free capacity IWT still offers more consequently. An overview of the current operational and pre-operational forecasting systems for the German waterways predicting water levels, discharges and river ice thickness on various time-scales will be presented. While short-term (deterministic) forecasts have a long tradition in navigation-related forecasting, (probabilistic) forecasting services offering extended lead-times are not yet well-established and are still subject to current research and development activities (e.g. within the EU-projects EUPORIAS and IMPREX). The focus is on improving technical aspects as well as on exploring adequate ways of disseminating and communicating probabilistic forecast information. For the German stretch of the River Rhine, one of the most frequented inland waterways worldwide, the existing deterministic forecast scheme has been extended by ensemble forecasts combined with statistical post-processing modules applying EMOS (Ensemble Model Output Statistics) and ECC (Ensemble Copula Coupling) in order to generate water level predictions up to 10 days and to estimate its predictive

  19. Assessment of vessel-generated waste quantities on the inland waterways of the Republic of Serbia.

    PubMed

    Presburger Ulnikovic, Vladanka; Vukic, Marija; Nikolic, Radosav

    2012-04-30

    To establish the quantity and structure of waste generated during inland vessel exploitation, it is necessary to determine the amount of traffic on the waterways, the number of vessel dockings that generate and deliver waste materials to ports, and the types of inland navigation vessels. Criteria must also be established for the calculation of estimated average waste quantities. This paper presents a methodology for the assessment of waste material quantities that was developed as part of the Technological Development Project TR 21037 of the Republic of Serbia. Required information on the amount of traffic, vessel types and numbers as well as the number of dockings was extracted from questionnaires and interviews with watermen and researchers. A set of criteria was defined in order to determine the number of passengers and crewmembers and to establish and classify quantities of vessel-generated waste (sanitary and fecal wastewater, bilge wastewater, waste oils, and solid waste). These data allowed for the Preliminary analysis of the national waterway traffic and transport infrastructure to be carried out. Results presented in this paper have triggered a number of recommendations for the construction of terminals and other facilities for the reception and management of waste streams, from the vessel where the waste is generated to the final destinations for waste processing and deposition. This is particularly applicable to countries who have not yet tackled the problem of vessel-generated waste. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. TRACC: Algorithm for Predicting and Tracking Barges on Inland Waterways

    SciTech Connect

    Randeniya, Duminda I.B.

    2010-04-23

    Algorithm developed in this work is used to predict the location and estimate the traveling speed of a barge moving in inland waterway network. Measurements obtained from GPS or other systems are corrupted with measurement noise and reported at large, irregular time intervals. Thus, creating uncertainty about the current location of the barge and minimizing the effectiveness of emergency response activities in case of an accident or act of terrorism. Developing a prediction algorithm become a non-trivial problem due to estimation of speed becomes challenging, attributed to the complex interactions between multiple systems associated in the process. This software, uses systems approach in modeling the motion dynamics of the barge and estimates the location and speed of the barge at next, user defined, time interval. In this work, first, to estimate the speed a non-linear, stochastic modeling technique was developed that take local variations and interactions existing in the system. Output speed is then used as an observation in a statistically optimal filtering technique, Kalman filter, formulated in state-space to minimize numerous errors observed in the system. The combined system synergistically fuses the local information available with measurements obtained to predict the location and speed of traveling of the barge accurately.

  1. 75 FR 78688 - Inland Waterways Users Board; Request for Nominations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-16

    ... Gulf Intracoastal Waterway in Louisiana and Texas; (5) the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway east of New...) Coal and Coke; (3) Petroleum, Crude and Products; (4) Minerals, Ores, and Primary Metals and Mineral...

  2. Impact of inland shipping emissions on elemental carbon concentrations near waterways in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keuken, M. P.; Moerman, M.; Jonkers, J.; Hulskotte, J.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.; Hoek, G.; Sokhi, R. S.

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to quantify the impact of black carbon from inland shipping on air quality, expressed as elemental carbon (EC) near inland waterways in The Netherlands. Downwind measurements of particle numbers and EC were used to establish emission factors for EC from inland shipping using inverse modelling. These emission factors were combined with data on energy consumption to derive annual average emissions rates for all Dutch waterways. A line source model was applied to compute the contribution of inland shipping to annual average EC concentrations for around 140,000 people living within 200 m of busy waterways in The Netherlands. The results showed that they are exposed to additional EC concentrations of up to 0.5 μg EC per m3 depending on the shipping volume and distance from the waterway. In view of the envisaged growth in water transport, this underlines the need to reduce combustion emissions from inland shipping. Targeting “gross” polluters may be the most effective approach since 30% of ships cause more than 80% of the total emissions.

  3. Inland waterway ports nodal attraction indices relevant in development strategies on regional level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, O.; Burciu, Ş.; Oprea, C.; Ilie, A.; Rosca, M.

    2016-08-01

    Present paper aims to propose a set of ranking indices and related criteria, concerning mainly spatial analysis, for the inland waterway port, with special view on inland ports of Danube. Commonly, the attraction potential of a certain transport node is assessed by its spatial accessibility indices considering both spatial features of the location provided by the networks that connect into that node and its economic potential defining the level of traffic flows depending on the economic centers of its hinterland. Paper starts with a overview of the critical needs that are required for potential sites to become inland waterway ports and presents nodal functions that coexist at different levels, leading to a port hierarchy from the points of view of: capacity, connection to hinterland, traffic structure and volume. After a brief review of the key inland waterway port ranking criterion, a selection of nodal attraction measures is made. Particular considerations for the Danube inland port case follows proposed methodology concerning indices of performance for network scale and centrality. As expected, the shorter the distance from an inland port to the nearest access point the greater accessibility. Major differences in ranking, dependent on selected criterion, were registered.

  4. Research Study of River Information Services on the US Inland Waterway Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    9 7.1.3 Interface with ACEIT ...supports traffic management on US main inland waterways and which will be the enabler of many of the following RIS initiatives. Third the lessons...higher management. 7.1.3 Interface with ACEIT During the implementation of LOMA it turned out that the procedures to meet the IT security requirements

  5. 75 FR 28757 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Long Island, New York Inland Waterway From East Rockaway Inlet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Long Island, New York Inland Waterway From East Rockaway Inlet to Shinnecock Canal, Hempstead, NY, Maintenance AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...

  6. A model of navigation-induced currents in inland waterways and implications for juvenile fish displacement.

    PubMed

    Wolter, Christian; Arlinghaus, Robert; Sukhodolov, Alexander; Engelhardt, Christof

    2004-11-01

    The likely extension of commercial inland navigation in the future could increase hazards directly impacting on the nurseries of freshwater fish, especially for smaller individuals with limited swimming abilities. One limitation of the evaluation of inland navigation on fish assemblages is the lack of suitable hydraulic models. This article presents a hydraulic model to assess the increase of navigation-induced physical forces due to higher vessel speed, length, and drought in a low-flowing waterway related to maximum swimming performance of fish to (1) foresee hazards of enhancement of inland navigation, (2) derive construction measures to minimize the hydraulic impact on small fish, and (3) improve fish recruitment in waterways. The derived model computed current velocities induced by passing commercial vessels in inland waterways experimentally verified and parameterized in a German lowland waterway. Results were linked with a model of maximum fish swimming performance to elucidate consequences for freshwater fish populations. The absolute magnitude of navigation-induced current limits the availability of littoral habitats for small fish. Typical navigation-induced current velocities of 0.7-1 m/s in the straight reaches of waterways will be maintained by fish longer than 42 mm only. Smaller juveniles unable to withstand those currents could become washed out, injured, or displaced. In contrast, in small local bays, the navigation-induced current declined significantly. According to our model, in a 20-m extended bay, the return current drops below 0.11 m/s, corresponding to the maximum swimming speed of a 9-mm-long fish. Thus, enhancing shoreline development by connecting oxbows, tributaries, and especially by purpose-built bays limits the impact on fish recruitment without restricting navigation resulting in more precautionary and sustainable inland navigation.

  7. Development of a traffic noise prediction model on inland waterway of China using the FHWA.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ben-lin; He, Yu-long; Mu, Fei-hu; Xu, Ning; Wu, Zhen

    2014-06-01

    Based on the local environmental standards, vessels types and traffic conditions, an inland waterway traffic noise prediction model was developed for use in China. This model was modified from the US FHWA model by adding the ground absorption and water surface attenuation correction terms to the governing equations. The parameters that were input into the equations, including traffic flow, vessel speed, distance from the center of the inland waterway to the receiver, position and height of the barriers and buildings, location of the receiver, type of ground, percentage of soft ground cover within the segment, and water surface conditions were re-defined. The model was validated by comparing the measured noise levels obtained at 33 sampling sites from Shugang Channel, Yanhe Channel and Danjinlicaohe Channel in China with the predicted values. The deviation between the predicted and measured noise levels within the range of ±1.5dB(A) was 81.8%. The mean difference between the predicted and measured noise levels was 0.15±1.75dB(A). However, the noise levels predicted developed model are generally higher than the measured levels. Overall, the comparison has proved that the developed method is of a high precision, and that it can be applied to estimate the traffic noise exposure level on inland waterway in China.

  8. The impact of inland ships and recreational boats on measured NOx and ultrafine particle concentrations along the waterways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zee, Saskia C.; Dijkema, Marieke B. A.; van der Laan, Jorrit; Hoek, Gerard

    2012-08-01

    In Amsterdam, many inhabitants reside in proximity to inland waters. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of passing inland ships and recreational boats, including touring boats, on the air quality near houses close to the water. A measurement campaign was performed at five sites in Amsterdam. Two sites were located along the inland waterways used by cargo ships and recreational boats. The other three sites were located along the canals in the historical city centre, used by touring boats and private recreational boats. At each site, measurements were performed at the waterside and at the facade of houses. Nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) and ultrafine particles (particle number (PN) concentration), were measured continuously during one afternoon per site, while time and type of passing ships and road traffic was registered. Linear regression analysis was used to analyze the association between passing ships and concentration, adjusted for passing road traffic. There was substantial variation in the impact of passing ships on concentrations at each measuring site, as well as between sites. On average, cargo ships contributed 5 and 4 μg m-3 to NO and NO2, respectively, and 3000 particles cm-3 to PN concentration near houses during the sampling period. Peak concentrations were occasionally substantially higher. Emissions from touring boats had a small but significant impact on NO concentration near houses but not on NO2, with the exception of one site located near the edge of two canals, where boats use extra power to travel around the bent. At this site, touring boats contributed 5 μg m-3 to the local NO2 concentration. No consistent impact of touring boats on PN concentration was observed. Emissions from private recreational boats were not consistently associated with increased NOx or PN concentration. Road traffic intensity was low at the selected measurement sites. Nevertheless, a significant impact of passing diesel-operated delivery vans on house

  9. Application of advanced diesel technology to inland waterway towboats. variable timing, electronic fuel injection. Final report, September 1985-January 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, D.P.

    1989-03-01

    This report represents the test and evaluation of advanced diesel technology components on the DDC Series 149 Marine engine. The tests were conducted on an inland-waterways towboat and consist of over 20,000 engine hours of operation during the testing. The Detroit Diesel Series 16V-149 engine rated at 900 SHP was tested aboard the M/V ESCATAWPA owned and operated by Warrior and Gulf Navigation Company. Both port and starboard engines were instrumented to measure engine operating parameters, propeller-shaft torque, and fuel consumption. The data were collected by a computer-based data-acquisition system and written to floppy disc for analysis. The tasks included: (1) baseline evaluation of naturally-aspirated (NA) engines; (2) upgrade both engines to turbocharged intercooled and blower bypassed (TIB) configuration and measure performance; (3) upgrade port engine with Detroit Diesel electronic control (DDEC) and measure performance; (4) change port engine to high-torque rise governor setting and measure performance; (5) upgrade starboard engine with DDEC.

  10. Application of advanced diesel technology to inland waterway towboats three-wheel turbocharger system. Final report, Feb 88-Mar 91

    SciTech Connect

    Priebe, R.J.; Rowland, D.P.

    1991-03-01

    The report represents the development, test and evaluation of Three Wheel Turbocharger System on the DDC Series 149 Marine engine. The program included development and performance testing in a test cell and demonstration of the system in actual revenue service aboard an inland waterways towboat. The Detroit Diesel Series 149 Marine engines rated at 700 SHP were tested aboard the M/V ABBIE-C, owned and operated by Compass Marine Services, Inc. Both port and starboard engines were fully instrumented to measure engine operating parameters, propeller shaft torque and fuel consumption. The data was collected by a computer based data acquisition system. The development, testing and demonstration program consisted of six task levels including TWT System design and development, Towboat DDC 12V-149NA (2 engines) baseline testing and DDC 8V-149 engine testing with one engine configured as TIB/DDEC model and the second as TWT/DDEC model. The TWT system in conjunction with DDEC significantly improved air-fuel ratio and transient response of the 8V-149 TWT/DDEC engine which proved to be 15% more fuel efficient than the 12V-149NA engines.

  11. 33 CFR 207.100 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...'s passage through the waterway shall not relieve the owners, agents, and operators of the vessel of full responsibility for its safe passage. (d) Radio equipment. Requirements for radio equipment on...) Damage to waterway property. Damage to the waterway, lands, banks, bridges, jetties, piers, fences...

  12. 33 CFR 207.100 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...'s passage through the waterway shall not relieve the owners, agents, and operators of the vessel of full responsibility for its safe passage. (d) Radio equipment. Requirements for radio equipment on...) Damage to waterway property. Damage to the waterway, lands, banks, bridges, jetties, piers, fences...

  13. 33 CFR 207.100 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...'s passage through the waterway shall not relieve the owners, agents, and operators of the vessel of full responsibility for its safe passage. (d) Radio equipment. Requirements for radio equipment on...) Damage to waterway property. Damage to the waterway, lands, banks, bridges, jetties, piers, fences...

  14. 33 CFR 207.100 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...'s passage through the waterway shall not relieve the owners, agents, and operators of the vessel of full responsibility for its safe passage. (d) Radio equipment. Requirements for radio equipment on...) Damage to waterway property. Damage to the waterway, lands, banks, bridges, jetties, piers, fences...

  15. 33 CFR 207.100 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...'s passage through the waterway shall not relieve the owners, agents, and operators of the vessel of full responsibility for its safe passage. (d) Radio equipment. Requirements for radio equipment on...) Damage to waterway property. Damage to the waterway, lands, banks, bridges, jetties, piers, fences...

  16. 33 CFR 162.40 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware Canal).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... cautioned that large deep draft ocean-going vessels and other large commercial vessels ply the canal, and... with the current shall have the right-of-way over those proceeding against the current. Large vessels... anchor in the ship channel. (e) Water skiing. Water skiing in the waterway is prohibited between...

  17. 33 CFR 162.115 - Keweenaw Waterway, Mich.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Keweenaw Waterway, Mich. 162.115 Section 162.115 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.115 Keweenaw Waterway, Mich....

  18. 33 CFR 162.115 - Keweenaw Waterway, Mich.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Keweenaw Waterway, Mich. 162.115 Section 162.115 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.115 Keweenaw Waterway, Mich....

  19. The 1992 Inland Waterway Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    of nearly 38 million tons in 1988, then declined to 34.7 million tons in 1989 and 31.3 million tons in 1990. Agricultural chemicals, sensitive to...Starches, Gluten , Glue 4161 Wood Chips 3297 Chemical Additives 4170 Wood in the Rough 3298 Wood & Resin Chem. 4189 Lumber 3299 Chem. Products NEC 4190 Forest

  20. The 1988 Inland Waterway Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    Performance Characteristics, Table 2, Parts A and B) and include peak year values of key indicators in the 1980-87 period for individual locks. A...about 8 percent in real terms during the ten year period ending in 1986 ( Table 4.2). During the same period ton-mile traffic increased by 17 percent...H cost table in Appendix A which displays values for nine-year period (1977-1985), and for rivers under each segment. o Inflation factor from 1977

  1. Impacts of small built infrastructure in inland valleys in Burkina Faso and Mali: Rationale for a systems approach that thinks beyond rice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katic, Pamela; Lautze, Jonathan; Namara, Regassa E.

    The potential to increase agricultural production in inland valleys in West Africa has received a good degree of attention in both national development strategies and academic literature, and improving agriculture productivity in inland valleys has been an active area of donor engagement. Despite this attention, documentation of the degree to which benefits are enhanced through construction of built water storage infrastructure in such sites is somewhat scant. This paper examines evidence from eight inland valley sites with recently-built water retention infrastructure (4 in southwest Burkina Faso, 4 in southeast Mali) to determine how economic returns derived from agricultural production have changed through built infrastructure construction. Farmer interviews were undertaken at each site to identify costs and benefits of agricultural production before and after small built infrastructure construction. Overall results indicate that net present value increased substantially after built infrastructure was constructed. The results nonetheless highlight substantial variation in economic impacts across sites. A central variable explaining such variation appears to be the degree to which water retention is exploited for groundwater-based offseason cultivation. These findings will help development planners to better predict the degree and nature of change engendered by water storage projects in inland valley sites, and help to ground-truth grand statements about the development potential of this piece of natural infrastructure.

  2. Climate Change: Federal Efforts Under Way to Assess Water Infrastructure Vulnerabilities and Address Adaptation Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    navigation, flood and coastal storm damage reduction, hydropower , and water supply, among other things. Established in 1902, Reclamation constructed...Adaptation infrastructure, including reservoirs, hydropower facilities, commercial inland waterways, harbors, and levee systems. In June 2011, in response...following: navigation, flood and coastal storm damage reduction, environment, hydropower , regulatory, recreation, emergency management, and water

  3. Keeping our waterways safe by equipping commercial vessels with appropriate sensor suites to enable pervasive surveillance of coastal and inland waterborne commercial traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, Terry; Lavoie, James

    2010-04-01

    The US has over 58,000 miles of ocean shoreline, over 5500 hundred miles of Great Lakes shoreline, and over 3,500,000 miles of river and small lake shoreline. These waterways are critical to the nation's strategic, economic and societal well being. These assets must be protected from potential terrorist attacks. It is a daunting task for an open society to protect such a large and distributed area while still preserving the freedoms for its citizens to enjoy the natural beauty of our waterways. The US has a well developed fleet of merchant tugs and barges that engage in day to day commercial activity around the coasts, rivers and lakes of the country. This paper will discuss the notion of developing a nationwide mobile sensor network by equipping these barges and tugs with sensor suites that would feed data into a common operations' center. The data will be displayed to the first responder community and the vessel operators via data streams from Rite-View (a robust 3D modeling and simulation tool).

  4. Living Waterways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the use of waterways as subjects in works of art. States that teachers can take their students to a river or canal to help them depict waterways. Explains that the four artworks reproduced in the article offer examples for students. Includes artwork by Franklin McMahon, Canaletto, Nancy Lagana, and Vincent van Gogh. (CMK)

  5. 78 FR 24697 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... under 20 meters (65 feet) in length operating in the St. Marys River along Michigan's eastern Upper....117(g). The VMRS requires users, generally including commercial vessels of 20 meters or more, to...(g). These vessels generally include private vessels under 20 meters. As non-VMRS users,...

  6. 78 FR 44934 - Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ... The Brown Hotel, 335 West Broadway, Louisville, Kentucky 40202, at 502-583-1234 or 888-888-5252, or BrownHotel.com . Time: Registration will begin at 8:30 a.m. and the meeting is scheduled to adjourn at...

  7. The Conceptual Design Algorithm of Inland LNG Barges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łozowicka, Dorota; Kaup, Magdalena

    2017-03-01

    The article concerns the problem of inland waterways transport of LNG. Its aim is to present the algorithm of conceptual design of inland barges for LNG transport, intended for exploitation on European waterways. The article describes the areas where LNG barges exist, depending on the allowable operating parameters on the waterways. It presents existing architectural and construction solutions of barges for inland LNG transport, as well as the necessary equipment, due to the nature of cargo. Then the article presents the procedure of the conceptual design of LNG barges, including navigation restrictions and functional and economic criteria. The conceptual design algorithm of LGN barges, presented in the article, allows to preliminary design calculations, on the basis of which, are obtained the main dimensions and parameters of unit, depending on the transport task and the class of inland waterways, on which the transport will be realized.

  8. 26 CFR 48.4042-3 - Certain types of commercial waterway transportation excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Inland Waterways § 48.4042-3 Certain types of commercial waterway transportation excluded. (a) Deep draft...) if: (i) The vessel was designed primarily for use on the high seas; and (ii) The vessel has a draft...). (2) Meaning of “designed primarily for use on the high seas.” Section 4042(c)(1) requires...

  9. 26 CFR 48.4042-3 - Certain types of commercial waterway transportation excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Inland Waterways § 48.4042-3 Certain types of commercial waterway transportation excluded. (a) Deep draft...) if: (i) The vessel was designed primarily for use on the high seas; and (ii) The vessel has a draft...). (2) Meaning of “designed primarily for use on the high seas.” Section 4042(c)(1) requires...

  10. Inland Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Area Cooperative Educational Services, New Haven, CT. Environmental Education Center.

    This material includes student guide sheets, reference materials, and tape script for the audio-tutorial unit on Inland Wetlands. A set of 35mm slides and an audio tape are used with the material. The material is designed for use with Connecticut schools, but it can be adapted to other localities. The materials emphasize characteristics of inland…

  11. Decentralized Fault-Tolerant Control of Inland Navigation Networks: a Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segovia, P.; Rajaoarisoa, L.; Nejjari, F.; Blesa, J.; Puig, V.; Duviella, E.

    2017-01-01

    Inland waterways are large-scale networks used principally for navigation. Even if the transport planning is an important issue, the water resource management is a crucial point. Indeed, navigation is not possible when there is too little or too much water inside the waterways. Hence, the water resource management of waterways has to be particularly efficient in a context of climate change and increase of water demand. This management has to be done by considering different time and space scales and still requires the development of new methodologies and tools in the topics of the Control and Informatics communities. This work addresses the problem of waterways management in terms of modeling, control, diagnosis and fault-tolerant control by focusing in the inland waterways of the north of France. A review of proposed tools and the ongoing research topics are provided in this paper.

  12. National Waterways Study. Waterway Science and Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    high stages that create very flat back- water slopes for an appreciable distance up the tribu - tary, There does not appear to be very much need or...harbor entrances, etc. In each case, there is either a buildup or reduction in water level on one side caused by centrifugal force, flow from tribu ...Design of Navigation Canals, Proceedings, Symposium on Aspecats of Navigability of Constraint Waterways, Including Harbor Entrances, Delft, 1978. Danys

  13. Role of the Inland Waterways System during Mobilization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    Chemicals 3.5 Seashells 1.9 Others 12.8 Source: [Ref.17:p.19] TABLE 5 PRINCIPAL COM MODITIES CARRIED BY WATER 1974 Commodity Percent Petroleum and Products...42.1 Coa’ and Coke 13.1 Iron and Steel 9.8 Sand, Gravel, and Stone 7.3 Grains 5.6 Logs and Lumber 3.0 Chemicals 5.5 Seashells 1.0 Others 12.6 Source...6.3 Sand, Gravel, and Stone 1.7 Grains 8.9 Logs and Lumber 2.5 Chemicals 7.0 Seashells 0.3 Others 14.5 Source: [Ref.19:p.11] TABLE 7 PRINCIPAL DOD

  14. Summary of Commodity Handling Terminals on United States Inland Waterways.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    category is further subdivided into 8 subcategories, each being arranged according to descending tankage: Ammonia (including anhydrous and aqua ammonia...RECEIPT NO. LENGTH AND/OR TANKAGE UNITS (FT) SHIPMENT AMONIA 71 510 R 20,000 TONS AVERAGE: 510 20,000 TONS TOTAL 510 20,000 TONS CHEMICALS...RECEIPT NO. LENGTH AND/OR TANKAGE UNITS (FT) SHIPMENT ALCOHOL 100L 195 R 642,600 GALLONS AVERAGE: 195 642,600 GALLONS TOTAL 195 642,600 GALLONS AMONIA

  15. Coastal, Harbor and Inland Waterway (CHI) Service Boat Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    sling loaded/un- loaded with webbed slings safely with minimal amount of constraints for trans- portability IAW AR 70-44 and MIL-STD-209. 2.15.2.2 In...76.01-2 Incorporation by reference. 76.23-1 Aplication . 76.01-5 Equipment installed but not re- 76.-5 Zoning quired. 76.23-10 Quantity, pipe szes, and dis

  16. 75 FR 5769 - Inland Waterways Users Board; Request for Nominations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ... will begin after July 1, 2010. ADDRESSES: Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Civil Works...., Washington, DC 20314- 1000. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF...

  17. 77 FR 47826 - Inland Waterways Users Board; Request for Nominations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ...-year terms that will begin after February 23, 2013. ADDRESSES: Institute for Water Resources, U.S. Army...: Institute for Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Mr. Mark R. Pointon, (703) 428-6438... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF...

  18. Illicit vessel identification in inland waters using SAR image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fengli; Wu, Bingfang; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Huiping; Tian, Yichen

    2006-10-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar remote sensing has been effectively used in water compliance and enforcement, especially in ship detection, but it is still very difficult to classify or identify vessels in inland water only using existing SAR image. Nevertheless some experience knowledge can help, for example waterway channel is of great significance for water traffic management and illegal activity monitoring. It can be used for judging a vessel complying with traffic rules or not, and also can be used to indicate illicit fishing vessels which are usually far away from navigable waterway channel. For illicit vessel identification speed and efficiency are very important, so it will be significant if we can extract waterway channel directly from SAR images and use it to identify illicit vessels. The paper first introduces the modified two-parameter CFAR algorithm used to detect ship targets in inland waters, and then uses principal curves and neural networks to extract waterway channel. Through comparing the detection results and the extracted waterway channel those vessels not complying with water traffic rules or potential illicit fishing vessels can be easily identified.

  19. Inland capture fishery contributions to global food security and threats to their future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Youn, So-Jung; Taylor, William W.; Lynch, Abigail J.; Cowx, Ian G.; Beard, T. Douglas; Bartley, Devin; Wu, Felicia

    2014-01-01

    Inland fish and fisheries play important roles in ensuring global food security. They provide a crucial source of animal protein and essential micronutrients for local communities, especially in the developing world. Data concerning fisheries production and consumption of freshwater fish are generally inadequately assessed, often leading decision makers to undervalue their importance. Modification of inland waterways for alternative uses of freshwater (particularly dams for hydropower and water diversions for human use) negatively impacts the productivity of inland fisheries for food security at local and regional levels. This paper highlights the importance of inland fisheries to global food security, the challenges they face due to competing demands for freshwater, and possible solutions.

  20. National Waterways Study. Engineering Analysis of Waterways Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    Conl-no ,n .e * vld. I -. cy -d Id.e!iv by block .- lock capacity, channel maintenance, channel conditions for fleet operation , waterway availability...capacity, channel maintenance, channel conditions for fleet operation , and waterway availability. DC) I a" 1473 Eot-1O1 ZIF I4’ 5! NO S OJI LETE /SI 43...OF CONTENTS SECTION TITLE PAGE EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 18 Lock Capacity 18 Channel Maintenance 19 Channel Conditions for Fleet Operation 20 Waterway

  1. Revitalizing urban waterways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-07-01

    Eleven U.S. federal agencies have joined together in a new initiative to protect and revitalize urban waterways and communities. The Urban Waters Federal Partnership, announced on 24 June, is focusing on seven pilot locations to help urban communities reconnect with and revitalize their waterways, according to Lisa Jackson, administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which launched the initiative. “Urban waters have the potential to support healthy environments, growing businesses, and educational and recreational activities. By bringing together the experience and expertise of multiple federal partners, we have a chance to reconnect local residents, young people, and community groups with the environmental resources all around them,” she said.

  2. Evolution of vegetated waterways design

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 1990, the USDA-ARS Hydraulic Engineering Research Unit (HERU) was recognized as a National Historic Landmark by ASABE for its groundbreaking work and development of vegetated waterways design procedures. In 2000, ASABE acknowledged the vegetated waterway design criteria as an Outstanding Achieve...

  3. US tda infrastructure opportunities in South America. Project profile updates, June-December 1995. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This study, conducted by CG/LA Infrastructure, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report provides project profile updates to a study conducted for the TDA Conference on Infrastructure Opportunities held in June, 1995. The updates are organized first by sectors with specific project information including: Energy, Telecommunications, Environment, Industrial, and Transportation. The second section of the report contains an extensive profile of surface transportation projects related to Highways Tunnels and Bridges, Inland Waterways, Ports, Rail and Urban Mass Transit. Each profile provides a technical description, site information, timing, equipment and services demand, nature of demand, and a project assessment. Countries included in the study are: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Columbia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

  4. Inland capture fisheries.

    PubMed

    Welcomme, Robin L; Cowx, Ian G; Coates, David; Béné, Christophe; Funge-Smith, Simon; Halls, Ashley; Lorenzen, Kai

    2010-09-27

    The reported annual yield from inland capture fisheries in 2008 was over 10 million tonnes, although real catches are probably considerably higher than this. Inland fisheries are extremely complex, and in many cases poorly understood. The numerous water bodies and small rivers are inhabited by a wide range of species and several types of fisher community with diversified livelihood strategies for whom inland fisheries are extremely important. Many drivers affect the fisheries, including internal fisheries management practices. There are also many drivers from outside the fishery that influence the state and functioning of the environment as well as the social and economic framework within which the fishery is pursued. The drivers affecting the various types of inland water, rivers, lakes, reservoirs and wetlands may differ, particularly with regard to ecosystem function. Many of these depend on land-use practices and demand for water which conflict with the sustainability of the fishery. Climate change is also exacerbating many of these factors. The future of inland fisheries varies between continents. In Asia and Africa the resources are very intensely exploited and there is probably little room for expansion; it is here that resources are most at risk. Inland fisheries are less heavily exploited in South and Central America, and in the North and South temperate zones inland fisheries are mostly oriented to recreation rather than food production.

  5. Inland capture fisheries

    PubMed Central

    Welcomme, Robin L.; Cowx, Ian G.; Coates, David; Béné, Christophe; Funge-Smith, Simon; Halls, Ashley; Lorenzen, Kai

    2010-01-01

    The reported annual yield from inland capture fisheries in 2008 was over 10 million tonnes, although real catches are probably considerably higher than this. Inland fisheries are extremely complex, and in many cases poorly understood. The numerous water bodies and small rivers are inhabited by a wide range of species and several types of fisher community with diversified livelihood strategies for whom inland fisheries are extremely important. Many drivers affect the fisheries, including internal fisheries management practices. There are also many drivers from outside the fishery that influence the state and functioning of the environment as well as the social and economic framework within which the fishery is pursued. The drivers affecting the various types of inland water, rivers, lakes, reservoirs and wetlands may differ, particularly with regard to ecosystem function. Many of these depend on land-use practices and demand for water which conflict with the sustainability of the fishery. Climate change is also exacerbating many of these factors. The future of inland fisheries varies between continents. In Asia and Africa the resources are very intensely exploited and there is probably little room for expansion; it is here that resources are most at risk. Inland fisheries are less heavily exploited in South and Central America, and in the North and South temperate zones inland fisheries are mostly oriented to recreation rather than food production. PMID:20713391

  6. Projecting the Demand for Ohio River Basin Waterway Traffic Using Correlation and Regression.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    the basin. Each report contains information on past and present waterborne commerce in the basin and projections by commodity group and origin...tools and system information , will be used to evaluate specific waterway improvements to meet short and long-term navigation needs. The output from...these studies will serve as input to Corps’ Inland Navigation Simulation Models to help analyze the performance and opportunities for improvement of the

  7. Waterborne Commerce of the United States, Calendar Year 1980. Part 2. Waterways and Harbors, Gulf Coast, Mississippi River System and Antilles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    IRON AD S’EE- PLATES, SHEETS-------------------------------- 2 ----------1 5962 123,307 1,426 ------1,229 ------. 3317 IRON AND SYEEL PIE ARN OME...1wE V --------------- -- -- ................ 2 ,8 3 2 ------- 1 4 8 9 -7 5 2 2 .9 3 2 3317 IR0N AND STEEL PIE An T .L 2,1.2----------- -1,124 1.000...LF INTRACOASTA WATERWAY TO GULF OF MEXICOS INLAND WATERWAY FiAO VERMILION BAY Tn THE RERMENTAU DIVERS A’D WATERWAY FROM WHITE LAKE TO PECAN ISLAND

  8. Inland notches micromorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Anna; Ben-Binyamin, Atzmon; Shtober-Zisu, Nurit

    2017-04-01

    Inland notches are well known phenomenon in Israel and can be found mostly along the mountainous backbone, developed in hard limestone or dolomite rocks within the Mediterranean climate zone and up to the desert fringe. LiDAR technology presents an opportunity to study the fine scale rock surface within the notch and its texture patterns. De-trending of the LiDAR reconstructed DEM to a local trend, surface roughness, was achieved by fitting a normalized surface to all measured ground points within the roughness neighborhood. Micro-topography plays an important role for modelling geomorphology dynamics, resulting in improved estimates for micro stream lines network and topographic erosion as well as mineral accumulation or deposition. Clearly, dissolution occurs whenever rock and solvent meet; thus water and moisture's crucial role in the decay of carbonate rocks results in texture and roughness variability. Study aims is to generate high resolution normalized DEM models using a terrestrial LiDAR, redefining the texture and roughness within the notch while assessing weathering processes caused by water. Plan curvature is the second derivative of slope taken perpendicular to its direction. It influences convergence and divergence of flow and it emphasizes the ridges and valleys across the surface. Concaved classified areas were tested against all planar curvature areas to distinguish them as unique areas based on their texture co-occurrence measures (GLCM). Overall negative curvature pixels show poor separability, in both TD and JM separation tests, while classes of curvature degree describe a positive trend showing medium and high concavity as unique areas. Study aims to link classified areas as the basic micro infrastructure for water flow, potential runoff flow and further accumulation of minerals. On the other hand, positive values of Plan curvature present the convexity of rock surface to imply diverging flow, thus describing the watershed line within the micro

  9. Inland Water Temperature Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, S. J.; Lenters, J. D.; Schladow, G.; Healey, N.

    2016-12-01

    We are using thermal infrared satellite data in conjunction with in situ measurements to produce water temperatures for all the large inland water bodies in North America and the rest of the world for potential use as climate indicator. Recent studies have revealed significant warming of inland waters throughout the world. The observed rate of warming is - in many cases - greater than that of the ambient air temperature. These rapid, unprecedented changes in inland water temperatures have profound implications for lake hydrodynamics, productivity, and biotic communities. Scientists are just beginning to understand the global extent, regional patterns, physical mechanisms, and ecological consequences of lake warming. As part of our earlier studies we have collected thermal infrared satellite data from those satellite sensors that provide long-term and frequent spaceborne thermal infrared measurements of inland waters including ATSR, AVHRR, and MODIS and used these to examine trends in water surface temperature for approximately 169 of the largest inland water bodies in the world. We are now extending this work to generate temperature time-series of all North American inland water bodies that are sufficiently large to be studied using 1km resolution satellite data for the last 3 decades, approximately 268 lakes. These data are then being related to changes in the surface air temperature and compared with regional trends in water surface temperature derived from CMIP5/IPCC model simulations/projections to better predict future temperature changes. We will discuss the available datasets and processing methodologies together with the patterns they reveal and implications for ecosystem change in inland waters.

  10. A Regional Waterway Management System for Balancing Recreational Boating and Resource Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swett, Robert A.; Listowski, Charles; Fry, Douglas; Boutelle, Stephen; Fann, David

    2009-06-01

    Florida’s coasts have been transformed over the past three decades as population growth and unprecedented demand for individual shore access to bays and estuaries led to the creation of residential canal developments. Thousands of miles of channels and basins were dredged as a by-product of this urbanization process. The navigable waterways that resulted are now being stressed by increasing boat traffic and canal-side activities. Recognizing their common goal to preserve the recreational and ecological value of southwest Florida waterways, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the four-county West Coast Inland Navigation District, and the University of Florida Sea Grant College Program signed a Memorandum of Agreement. The signatories agreed to develop a science-based Regional Waterway Management System (RWMS), which is a new approach to waterway planning and permitting based on carefully mapped channel depths, a census of actual boat populations, and the spatial extent of natural resources. The RWMS provides a comprehensive, regional overview of channel conditions and the geographic distribution and severity of existing impediments to safe navigation and resource protection. RWMS information and analyses result in regional-scale permitting to accommodate water-dependent uses while minimizing environmental impacts and reducing public expenditures. Compared with traditional approaches to waterway management, the science-based RWMS is relatively unbiased, objective, transparent, ecologically sound, and fiscally prudent.

  11. Fuel regulation in inland navigation: reduced soil black carbon and PAH deposition in river valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bläsing, M.; Schwark, L.; Amelung, W.; Lehndorff, E.

    2016-12-01

    Inland navigation (IN) is of increasing importance in the transport sector. Most inland waterways and inland ports are located in/near urban regions; hence many people are exposed to emissions from IN. However, its contribution to environmental quality is not yet known. Accordingly, we aimed at identifying IN emissions in the environment, and investigating consequences of the S-reduction in ship diesel (EU regulation 2009/30/EC) on IN emissions. To do so, topsoil samples were taken from vineyards in valley transects (perpendicular to rivers) at two German inland waterways (Rhine, Moselle) and one ship-free reference valley (Ahr) and analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and black carbon (BC). To elucidate the effect of fuel regulation (effective since 2011), samplings were performed from 2010 to 2013. Additionally, the potential dispersal of IN emissions was simulated by a Lagrangian stochastic model. Before regulating the S-content of ship diesel by the EU directive soil samples indicated a clear impact of IN emissions on BC and PAH deposits, in at least 200 and 350 m distance to the Moselle and Rhine river, respectively. IN emissions accounted for approximately 30% of total soil BC. However, soils along waterways comprised only slightly more BC than soils in the ship-free Ahr Valley, with BC contents comparable to rural to suburban European soils. Contents of PAHs in river valleys compared to remote to urban pollution load. In the course of the fuel regulation, BC and PAH deposits in soil were reduced within three years by 30-60%, respectively. Also the quality of emissions changed to higher shares of low molecular weight PAHs and smaller proportions of soot-BC, indicating less deposition of IN emissions. The impact of the fuel regulation was more obvious at the Rhine Valley than at the Moselle Valley, likely because of higher ship traffic volume at the former. Overall, fuel regulation was effective in reducing IN emissions along inland waterways.

  12. Inland and coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouw, Colleen; Greb, Steven

    2012-09-01

    Workshop for Remote Sensing of Coastal and Inland Waters;Madison, Wisconsin, 20-22 June 2012 Coastal and inland water bodies, which have great value for recreation, food supply, commerce, transportation, and human health, have been experiencing external pressure from direct human activities and climate change. Given their societal and economic value, understanding issues of water quality, water quantity, and the impact of environmental change on the ecological and biogeochemical functioning of these water bodies is of interest to a broad range of communities. Remote sensing offers one of the most spatially and temporally comprehensive tools for observing these waters. While there has been some success with remotely observing these water bodies, many challenges still remain, including algorithm performance, atmospheric correction, the relationships between optical properties and biogeochemical parameters, sufficient spatial and spectral resolution, and a lack of uncertainty estimates over the wide range of environmental conditions encountered across these coastal and inland water bodies.

  13. Inland wetland mineral soils

    Treesearch

    Kimberly P. Wickland; Alex V. Krusche; Randall K. Kolka; Ayaka W. Kishimoto-Mo; Rodney A. Chimner; Stephen Ogle; Nalin. Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides supplementary guidance for estimating and reporting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and removals from managed lands with Inland Wetland Mineral Soils (IWMS) for all land-use categories (see Chapter 1 and decision tree in Chapter 1 in this supplement for what is specifically covered in this chapter in relationship to other chapters in this...

  14. Inland water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The work is reported of the panel concerning the application of space technology to the improved management of the nation's inland resources. The progress since the 1967-68 study is briefly reviewed. The data needed for the management of inlet water ways, and the potential benefits of better management are discussed along with 16 proposed demonstration projects.

  15. Waterway Shielding System and Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-30

    for 14 monitoring waterways and, more specifically, to a system 15 comprising a plurality of underwater communication networks and 16 sensors linked to...and Southern European markets . 4 Only one-half mile wide at the narrowest point, the Turkish 5 straits offer another terrorist opportunity to have a...communications research and development with unmanned undersea 25 vehicles (UUV). As well, a variety of sensors monitor .5 1 environmental conditions in

  16. Complete Lesson 6: Keeping All of Our Waterways Clean

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Looking outside, this lesson explores waterways (streams, rainwater runoff, drainage pollution) with a focus on urban waterways. Students learn about the water cycle and how to keep pollution out of waterways. Mercury in fish is also addressed.

  17. Sediment budgeting of German waterways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promny, M.

    2012-04-01

    Waterways today rarely have a sustainable sediment budget. Supply from upstream and lateral sources is blocked by barrages in many places. The transport capacity is strongly modified by means of planform and cross-section alterations. Many free-flowing river sections are subject to bed degradation, while impoundments tend to aggrade. This has consequences for the usability of navigation facilities, stability of structures (like bridge foundations and dykes) and groundwater levels. Consequently, sediment managements operations are commonplace, being challenging in economic and ecologic terms. A first step towards an improved sediment management is to establish the current sediment budget of a river. There are different methods to gain information about the sediment budget: - measurements of bed-load and suspended load transport - deductions from temporal development of bed-level development - deductions from temporal development of streamwise water-level measurements - deductions from temporal development of water-levels at gauges - bed-load tracer analyses - numerical modelling An overview of the methods used in sediment budgeting of German waterways at the Federal Institute of Hydrology will be given. Ongoing research based on the above mentioned methodology will be presented, with a special focus on the possible influence of climate change on sediment budgets.

  18. The low prevalence of Clostridium botulinum in the lakes, marshes and waterways of the Camargue.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G. R.; Moryson, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    Mud samples collected in June 1975 from the lakes, marshes and waterways of the Camargue were examined for Clostridium botulinum. The Grand Rhône and Petit Rhône were shown to contain types B and E, but of 44 samples taken from well distributed sites on the Ile de la Carmargue, only two (4-5%) were positive and these contained type E alone. The survey indicated a much lower prevalence of Cl. botulinum than any encountered in recent surveys of inland aquatic environments elsewhere. PMID:319166

  19. 33 CFR 162.65 - All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico east and south of... All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary to..., which are tributary to or connected by other waterways with the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake...

  20. Fuel regulation in inland navigation: Reduced soil black carbon deposition in river valleys in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bläsing, M.; Shao, Y.; Lehndorff, E.

    2015-11-01

    Inland navigation is of increasing economic and ecological interest, however its contribution to environmental quality is hardly known. We hypothesized that i) inland navigation emits considerable amounts of soot-Black Carbon (BC) as a product of incomplete combustion of diesel fuel, which is then deposited on soils along river valleys, that ii) improvement of fuel quality by sulfur reduction in 2011 decreased BC inputs to soil, and that iii) this provides a tracer for the spatial impact of inland navigation emissions. The spatial and temporal patterns of soil BC deposits from inland navigation were investigated yearly (2010-2013) working within transects perpendicular to the rivers Rhine, Moselle and Ahr, Germany (the Ahr Valley is free of shipping and served as a reference). In rural areas at inland waterways navigation likely represented the dominant BC emitter. Topsoils (0-10 cm depth) were sampled in vineyards. Their BC content and composition was determined via oxidation of bulk soil organic matter to benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCAs). The highly trafficked Rhine Valley yielded only little more BC (64.7 ± 12 g BC kg-1 soil organic carbon (SOC) compared to 51.7 ± 9 at the Moselle, and 53.6 ± 6 at the reference Ahr Valley). At both inland waterways soil BC increased towards the river, following the simulated dispersal of ship-derived BC using a Lagrangian model. In the course of ship fuel regulation, soil BC deposits at the Rhine and Moselle waterways decreased significantly from 70.2 ± 3.2 to 47.9 ± 1.1 and 57.6 ± 1.3 to 41.7 ± 0.9 g BC kg-1 SOC within 3 years. Even more pronounced was the change in BC composition, i.e., the ratio of pentacarboxylated to mellitic acid increased from 0.75 to 1.3 (Rhine) and 1 to 1.4 (Moselle) during this time span. From this we calculated that ∼30% less BC was deposited by inland navigation likely due to reduced BC emissions after sulfur regulation in ship diesel.

  1. 78 FR 33971 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; City Waterway Also Known as Thea Foss Waterway, Tacoma, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... South 11th Street (``Murray Morgan'') Bridge across the City Waterway also known as the ] Thea Foss...). This NPRM proposed three changes to the operating schedule of the Murray Morgan Bridge, also known as... period. One of the unique features of the Murray Morgan Bridge is its height above the waterway...

  2. [Hygiene problems in inland and sea navigation].

    PubMed

    Goethe, H

    1983-09-01

    Both waste and sewage disposal are ubiquitous problems which have also affected navigation. Shipping is a very important transport carrier on a worldwide basis which together with the fishing industry employs roughly two million people. The problems associated with waste and sewage disposal obviously present a severe hazard to the coastal areas, narrow sea basins and, in particular, to inland and open-sea waterways. These problems are particularly alarming in large sea-ports, docks without outfall etc. The reduction of the crews aboard the ships operated by the industialised countries has helped to quantitatively ease the problem of waste and sewage disposal caused by the crews. However, passenger steamers with high waste and sewage volumes cause considerable nuisance in small harbours and the same holds for the disposal of technical waste products from ships such as dunnage packing material, ropes, plastic material, oil, etc. The quantity of waste water aboard a sea-going vessel including that from the toilets, washrooms, galley, and cleaning is rather considerable and is estimated at 300 litres per person and day under tropical climates. The volume of waste varies greatly and depends mainly on the type of material used aboard as mentioned above. Passenger liners with a very high volume of kitchen refuse and other solid waste give rise to specially insidious problems. In the past, sea-going vessels as well as ships employed in inland navigation used to throw overboard any type of refuse and sewage. However, during the last few decades the port authorities and also governments have introduced local and national regulations ruling that waste may no longer be thrown into harbour basins, but must be collected and disposed of on shore. Most ships have complied with these provisions, but some of them kept the collected refuse aboard and disposed of it on the open sea outside the harbours. International agreements on the prohibition of emptying oil and oil

  3. Critical infrastructure: impacts of natural hazards and consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Elena

    2014-05-01

    Critical infrastructure such as oil and gas pipelines, transmission facilities, heat-, and water supply, lines of communications, roads, railways as well as air and water transport play the key role in social and economic development of every country. Therefore, accidents causing failures and breakdowns of critical infrastructure facilities have the most drastic consequences for the society, economy, and environment. For example, road accidents cause the highest number of fatalities and injuries all over the world, especially in the middle-income countries. The so-called "blackouts" or accidental losses of electric power and power outages entail serious social troubles and heavy economic losses. The pipeline ruptures and oil-tanker crashes accompanied by oil releases cause the most severe environmental and large material damages. Critical infrastructure facilities are most vulnerable to the impacts of natural hazards that trigger many accidents in them especially in the regions most at natural risk. The Russian Federation has more than 2.6 million km of transmission facilities, 940,000 km of roads, 102,000 km of inland waterways, 86,000 km of railways, and more than 70,000 km of trunk pipelines. Many facilities are beyond of their service life and need reconstruction. A very high level of deterioration and "human factor" are the main cause of accidents, ruptures, and crashes. However, natural hazards and disasters also play an essential (sometimes a leading) role in triggering or magnifying accidents in these objects. Thus, natural factors cause more than 70 percent of all "blackouts", about 20 percent of accidents at heat- and water supply systems and water accidents, five percent of pipeline ruptures, and about two to three percent of air crashes, road, and railway accidents. The influence of natural factors is stronger in the North-Western and Central parts of the European Russia, in Krasnodarsky Territory (South of Russia) and in Far East that are more exposed

  4. Study on the propagation and dissipation of inland ship congestion under different control strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanyi; Wu, Hongyu; Wen, Zhe

    2017-05-01

    Inland waterway transportation is an important part of the comprehensive transportation system of sustainable development, and it is also a way of transportation which is restricted by natural conditions greatly. In recent years, the problems of insufficient traffic capacity of The Three Gorges become prominent due to the increasing in the number of ships. And the ship's detention caused by gale, frog, accident and one-way traffic in dry season has occurred, which not only increased the pressure of the navigable waterway but also seriously affected the safety of shipping. Based on the different types of ships, the Arena software was used to simulate the ship traffic flow. The paper analyzed the traffic congestion propagation and dissipation rule of the ship under different navigation control methods, and provided decision reference for the navigation management department to formulate the relevant navigation control strategy.

  5. Recent Inland Water Temperature Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Simon; Healey, Nathan; Lenters, John; O'Reilly, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    We are using thermal infrared satellite data in conjunction with in situ measurements to produce water temperatures for all the large inland water bodies in North America and the rest of the world for potential use as climate indicator. Recent studies have revealed significant warming of inland waters throughout the world. The observed rate of warming is - in many cases - greater than that of the ambient air temperature. These rapid, unprecedented changes in inland water temperatures have profound implications for lake hydrodynamics, productivity, and biotic communities. Scientists are just beginning to understand the global extent, regional patterns, physical mechanisms, and ecological consequences of lake warming. As part of our work we have collected thermal infrared satellite data from those satellite sensors that provide long-term and frequent spaceborne thermal infrared measurements of inland waters including ATSR, AVHRR, and MODIS and used these to examine trends in water surface temperature for approximately 169 of the largest inland water bodies in the world. We are now extending this work to generate temperature time-series of all North American inland water bodies that are sufficiently large to be studied using 1km resolution satellite data for the last 3 decades, approximately 268 lakes. These data are then being related to changes in the surface air temperature and compared with regional trends in water surface temperature derived from CMIP5/IPCC model simulations/projections to better predict future temperature changes. We will discuss the available datasets and processing methodologies together with the patterns they reveal based on recent changes in the global warming, with a particular focus on the inland waters of the southwestern USA.

  6. Inland navigation: PAH inventories in soil and vegetation after EU fuel regulation 2009/30/EC.

    PubMed

    Bläsing, Melanie; Amelung, Wulf; Schwark, Lorenz; Lehndorff, Eva

    2017-01-26

    In January 2011, fuel quality in inland water vessels was changed by EU regulation 2009/30/EC, aiming at improving air quality along waterways. We hypothesized that the implementation of this regulation both lowered the total deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and changed their composition in river valleys. We analyzed parent-, alkylated- and thio-PAHs in soil and vine leaves, at two waterways (Rhine and Moselle, Germany), as well as in one ship-free reference area (Ahr, Germany). Samples were taken annually (2010-2013) in transects perpendicular to the rivers. We did not find any relation of PAH concentration and composition on vine leaves to inland navigation, likely because atmospheric exchange processes distorted ship-specific accumulation patterns. We did find, however, an accumulation of ship-borne PAHs in topsoil near the waterways (1543±788 and 581±252ngg(-1) at Moselle and Rhine, respectively), leading to larger PAH concentrations at the Moselle Valley than at the reference area (535±404ngg(-1)) prior to EU fuel regulation. After fuel regulation, the PAH concentrations decreased in topsoils of the Moselle and Rhine Valley by 35±9 and 62±28%, respectively. These changes were accompanied by increasing proportions of dibenzothiophene (DBT) and low molecular weight PAHs. Both, changes in PAH concentrations and composition were traceable within 200 and 350m distance to the river front of Moselle and Rhine, respectively, and likely favored by erosion of topsoil in vineyards. We conclude that the EU regulation was effective in improving soil and thus also air quality within only three years. The impact was greater and spatially more relevant at the Rhine, which may be attributed to the larger traffic volume of inland navigation.

  7. Quantitative Evaluation of Stereo Visual Odometry for Autonomous Vessel Localisation in Inland Waterway Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kriechbaumer, Thomas; Blackburn, Kim; Breckon, Toby P.; Hamilton, Oliver; Rivas Casado, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Autonomous survey vessels can increase the efficiency and availability of wide-area river environment surveying as a tool for environment protection and conservation. A key challenge is the accurate localisation of the vessel, where bank-side vegetation or urban settlement preclude the conventional use of line-of-sight global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). In this paper, we evaluate unaided visual odometry, via an on-board stereo camera rig attached to the survey vessel, as a novel, low-cost localisation strategy. Feature-based and appearance-based visual odometry algorithms are implemented on a six degrees of freedom platform operating under guided motion, but stochastic variation in yaw, pitch and roll. Evaluation is based on a 663 m-long trajectory (>15,000 image frames) and statistical error analysis against ground truth position from a target tracking tachymeter integrating electronic distance and angular measurements. The position error of the feature-based technique (mean of ±0.067 m) is three times smaller than that of the appearance-based algorithm. From multi-variable statistical regression, we are able to attribute this error to the depth of tracked features from the camera in the scene and variations in platform yaw. Our findings inform effective strategies to enhance stereo visual localisation for the specific application of river monitoring. PMID:26694411

  8. 75 FR 12688 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Long Island, New York Inland Waterway from East Rockaway Inlet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ... closed position for six hours to facilitate bridge maintenance. Vessels that can pass under the draw... p.m. on March 20, 2010. Vessels able to pass under the closed draw may do so at all times....

  9. 78 FR 53664 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Long Island, New York Inland Waterway From East Rockaway Inlet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... York. This deviation is necessary to facilitate the 2013 Dee Snider's Ride to Fight Hunger on Long... 2013 Dee Snider's Ride to Fight Hunger. Under this temporary deviation the Loop Parkway and...

  10. Quantitative Evaluation of Stereo Visual Odometry for Autonomous Vessel Localisation in Inland Waterway Sensing Applications.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Thomas; Blackburn, Kim; Breckon, Toby P; Hamilton, Oliver; Casado, Monica Rivas

    2015-12-17

    Autonomous survey vessels can increase the efficiency and availability of wide-area river environment surveying as a tool for environment protection and conservation. A key challenge is the accurate localisation of the vessel, where bank-side vegetation or urban settlement preclude the conventional use of line-of-sight global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). In this paper, we evaluate unaided visual odometry, via an on-board stereo camera rig attached to the survey vessel, as a novel, low-cost localisation strategy. Feature-based and appearance-based visual odometry algorithms are implemented on a six degrees of freedom platform operating under guided motion, but stochastic variation in yaw, pitch and roll. Evaluation is based on a 663 m-long trajectory (>15,000 image frames) and statistical error analysis against ground truth position from a target tracking tachymeter integrating electronic distance and angular measurements. The position error of the feature-based technique (mean of ±0.067 m) is three times smaller than that of the appearance-based algorithm. From multi-variable statistical regression, we are able to attribute this error to the depth of tracked features from the camera in the scene and variations in platform yaw. Our findings inform effective strategies to enhance stereo visual localisation for the specific application of river monitoring.

  11. 78 FR 6728 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Long Island, New York Inland Waterway From East Rockaway Inlet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... the Wantagh State Parkway Bridge, mile 16.1, across Goose Creek at Jones Beach, New York, and revising... for the Wantagh State Parkway Bridge at mile 16.1, across Goose Creek, at Jones ] Beach, New York, and...), that govern the operation of the Wantagh State Parkway Bridge, mile 16.1, across Goose Creek, at Jones...

  12. 76 FR 48717 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Long Island, New York Inland Waterway From East Rockaway Inlet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... Dimes Motorcycle Run. The deviation allows the two bridges listed above to remain in the closed position... bridge closures to facilitate a public event, the March of Dimes Charity Motorcycle Run. Under this... 25, 2011, to facilitate a public event, the 2011 March of Dimes Motorcycle Run. Vessels that can pass...

  13. 77 FR 22492 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Long Island, New York Inland Waterway from East Rockaway Inlet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ..., receiver bushings, electrical bridge controls, bridge power and lighting, motor control center, navigation lighting, and electrical conduits and wiring. The contractor has arranged for personnel and equipment to be... signal October 1 through May 14. From May 15 through September 30 the draw shall open on signal,...

  14. 77 FR 421 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Long Island, New York Inland Waterway From East Rockaway Inlet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ... passage of vessels from September 26, 2011, through December 21, 2011. The bridge owner, Suffolk County... be completed before the bridge can open both spans for the passage of vessel traffic for the 2012... the passage of vessel traffic because the rehabilitation repairs are not completed. This action will...

  15. A Statistical Survey of Vessel Performance and Configuration Characteristics on Inland Waterways.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    1983 Research Report 83R-1 I4 Copies may be purchased from: National Technical Information Service U.S. Department of Commierce SpigilVrii 25...WAIT .14 4.29 FLEETING SPRING * WEATER .11 13. 33 FOG .26 4.18 LOCKING .78 7.85 REPAIRS .3.5 1.96 ICE -- CREWA CHANGE -- SUPPLIES .15 1.14 CHANNEL

  16. 76 FR 35978 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Long Island, New York Inland Waterway From East Rockaway Inlet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... bridge, Nassau County Department of Public Works, requested a temporary deviation from the regulations to... 4.7, across Reynolds Channel at Nassau, New York. The deviation is necessary to facilitate public safety for a public event. This deviation allows the bridge to remain in the closed position for...

  17. Report of the Inland Waterway Transport (IWT) Mission, 5 February-20 April 1985. Main Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    ESCAP region will . be fruitful . The capabilities within the country are often not optimally used for the reasons indicated in section 3.3.1, on water ...ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK Institute for Water Resources (USACE) AREAA WORK UNIT NUMBERS Delft Hydraulic Laboratory (the Netherlands) Maritiem Research...Instituut Nederland 1. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Water Resources Support Center June 1985 Institute for Water Resources 13

  18. 76 FR 68098 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Long Island, New York Inland Waterway From East Rockaway Inlet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... regulation governing the operation of the Captree State Parkway Bridge at mile 30.7, across the State Boat... INFORMATION: The Captree State Parkway Bridge, across the State Boat Channel at mile 30.7, at Captree...

  19. The use of hydrogen as a fuel for inland waterway units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Gohary, M. Morsy; Welaya, Yousri M. A.; Saad, Amr Abdelwahab

    2014-06-01

    Escalating apprehension about the harmful effects of widespread use of conventional fossil fuels in the marine field and in internal combustion engines in general, has led to a vast amount of efforts and the directing of large capital investment towards research and development of sustainable alternative energy sources. One of the most promising and abundant of these sources is hydrogen. Firstly, the use of current fossil fuels is discussed focusing on the emissions and economic sides to emphasize the need for a new, cleaner and renewable fuel with particular reference to hydrogen as a suitable possible alternative. Hydrogen properties, production and storage methods are then reviewed along with its suitability from the economical point of view. Finally, a cost analysis for the use of hydrogen in internal combustion engines is carried out to illustrate the benefits of its use as a replacement for diesel. The outcome of this cost analysis shows that 98% of the capital expenditure is consumed by the equipment, and 68.3% of the total cost of the equipment is spent on the solar photovoltaic cells. The hydrogen plant is classified as a large investment project because of its high initial cost which is about 1 billion US; but this is justified because hydrogen is produced in a totally green way. When hydrogen is used as a fuel, no harmful emissions are obtained.

  20. Report of the Inland Waterway Transport (IWT) Mission, 5 February-20 April 1985. Appendices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    Pilotage Department, BIWTA Mr. Anib Ahmed Chief, Deck Personnel Training Centre, BIWTA Mr. Anwar Hussain Chief, Ports & Traffic Department, BIWTA...Mauk Muhammad Saeed Chief (T&C), Planning & Khan Development Division Mr. Abdul Ras.id Shaikh Secretary, Irrigation & Power, Government of Sind Mr...Individual Position Titles Mr. Mohsin Shaikh Chief Engineer Development, Government of Sind Mr. Munir Ahmad Bhatti Director, (Planning & Foreign Assistance

  1. 77 FR 55416 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Long Island, New York Inland Waterway From East Rockaway Inlet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... deviation is effective from 11 a.m. through 1 p.m. on September 15, 2012. ADDRESSES: Documents mentioned in... Avenue SE., Washington, DC, 20590, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal... a vertical clearance in the closed position of 21 feet at mean high water and 25 feet at mean low...

  2. 76 FR 13289 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Long Island, New York Inland Waterway From East Rockaway Inlet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... new link arms at the bridge. This deviation allows the bridge to remain in the closed position. DATES... facilitate installation of new link arms. Under this temporary deviation the Meadowbrook State Parkway Bridge...

  3. 76 FR 4819 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Long Island, New York Inland Waterway From East Rockaway Inlet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ...The Commander, First Coast Guard District, has issued a temporary deviation from the regulation governing the operation of the Meadowbrook State Parkway Bridge across the Sloop Channel, mile 12.8, at Hempstead, New York. The deviation is necessary to perform structural repairs. This deviation allows the bridge to remain in the closed...

  4. 77 FR 64036 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Long Island, New York Inland Waterway From East Rockaway Inlet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ...The Commander, First Coast Guard District, has issued a temporary deviation from the regulation governing the operation of the Wantagh State Parkway Bridge across the Sloop Channel, mile 15.4, at Jones Beach, New York. The deviation is necessary to install bascule girders at the bridge. This deviation allows the bridge to remain in the closed...

  5. Bacteriophage in polar inland waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Säwström, Christin; Lisle, John; Anesio, A.M.; Priscu, John C.; Laybourn-Parry, J.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophages are found wherever microbial life is present and play a significant role in aquatic ecosystems. They mediate microbial abundance, production, respiration, diversity, genetic transfer, nutrient cycling and particle size distribution. Most studies of bacteriophage ecology have been undertaken at temperate latitudes. Data on bacteriophages in polar inland waters are scant but the indications are that they play an active and dynamic role in these microbially dominated polar ecosystems. This review summarises what is presently known about polar inland bacteriophages, ranging from subglacial Antarctic lakes to glacial ecosystems in the Arctic. The review examines interactions between bacteriophages and their hosts and the abiotic and biotic variables that influence these interactions in polar inland waters. In addition, we consider the proportion of the bacteria in Arctic and Antarctic lake and glacial waters that are lysogenic and visibly infected with viruses. We assess the relevance of bacteriophages in the microbial loop in the extreme environments of Antarctic and Arctic inland waters with an emphasis on carbon cycling.

  6. Infrastructure sensing

    PubMed Central

    Soga, Kenichi; Schooling, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Design, construction, maintenance and upgrading of civil engineering infrastructure requires fresh thinking to minimize use of materials, energy and labour. This can only be achieved by understanding the performance of the infrastructure, both during its construction and throughout its design life, through innovative monitoring. Advances in sensor systems offer intriguing possibilities to radically alter methods of condition assessment and monitoring of infrastructure. In this paper, it is hypothesized that the future of infrastructure relies on smarter information; the rich information obtained from embedded sensors within infrastructure will act as a catalyst for new design, construction, operation and maintenance processes for integrated infrastructure systems linked directly with user behaviour patterns. Some examples of emerging sensor technologies for infrastructure sensing are given. They include distributed fibre-optics sensors, computer vision, wireless sensor networks, low-power micro-electromechanical systems, energy harvesting and citizens as sensors. PMID:27499845

  7. Infrastructure sensing.

    PubMed

    Soga, Kenichi; Schooling, Jennifer

    2016-08-06

    Design, construction, maintenance and upgrading of civil engineering infrastructure requires fresh thinking to minimize use of materials, energy and labour. This can only be achieved by understanding the performance of the infrastructure, both during its construction and throughout its design life, through innovative monitoring. Advances in sensor systems offer intriguing possibilities to radically alter methods of condition assessment and monitoring of infrastructure. In this paper, it is hypothesized that the future of infrastructure relies on smarter information; the rich information obtained from embedded sensors within infrastructure will act as a catalyst for new design, construction, operation and maintenance processes for integrated infrastructure systems linked directly with user behaviour patterns. Some examples of emerging sensor technologies for infrastructure sensing are given. They include distributed fibre-optics sensors, computer vision, wireless sensor networks, low-power micro-electromechanical systems, energy harvesting and citizens as sensors.

  8. Sewage Contamination under Different Storm and Hydrologic Conditions in Three Urban Waterways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templar, H.; Corsi, S.; McLellan, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Fecal contamination in urban waterways is a major public and environmental health threat. Sanitary sewer and combined sewer overflows are major point sources of fecal pollution. Additionally, stormwater runoff and failing sewer infrastructure contribute fecal contamination and pathogens to urban waterways. Traditionally, fecal indicator bacteria such as E. coli, enterococci, and fecal coliforms are used to gauge fecal contamination in water; however, these general indicators are unable to distinguish fecal sources in the environment. This study used two human-specific fecal indicator bacteria to identify human sewage contamination in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where three rivers form an estuary that discharges to Lake Michigan. Two-hour composite samples were collected at four sites, one in each of the three rivers and one in the estuary, to represent the entire hydrograph before, during, and after a rain event. Samples were collected throughout a variety of conditions, including dry-weather baseline, light and heavy rain events, and combined sewage overflows (CSOs). These samples were analyzed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays to determine human sewage loads in each river during each type of event. Low levels of human indicators were found during dry-weather baseline conditions, and loads increased significantly (one to two orders of magnitude) during rain events. Sampling upstream of the estuary indicated sewage contamination was originating in the heavily urbanized part of the watersheds, likely a result of failing infrastructure. CSO events contributed the highest loads, which were on average ten-fold higher than rainfall events with no CSO. This information will be a useful for directing the efforts of local agencies and municipalities to investigate failing infrastructure, as well as agencies at the state and federal levels to create appropriate goals to address the human health concerns that are posed by sewage contamination in urban

  9. Diversity of inland valleys and opportunities for agricultural development in Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Dossou-Yovo, Elliott Ronald; Baggie, Idriss; Djagba, Justin Fagnombo; Zwart, Sander Jaap

    2017-01-01

    , and better water control through drainage infrastructures along with an integrated nutrient management would promote the sustainable agricultural use of inland valleys.

  10. Diversity of inland valleys and opportunities for agricultural development in Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Baggie, Idriss; Djagba, Justin Fagnombo; Zwart, Sander Jaap

    2017-01-01

    , and better water control through drainage infrastructures along with an integrated nutrient management would promote the sustainable agricultural use of inland valleys. PMID:28662093

  11. Biomass production from inland brines

    SciTech Connect

    Reach, C.D. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing inland saline waters to produce biomass through the application of marine aquaculture was investigated. From available data, the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum and the crustacea Artemia salina were selected as the experimental marine organisms. The proposed diatom served to establish primary productivity and concurrently provide a food source for the herbivorus crustacea. The objective of the first phase research was to investigate the ability of P. tricornutum and A. salina to survive in the inland saline environment. Clarified activated sludge and anaerobic digester effluents were evaluated as nutrient sources for the diatom cultures. Experimental results indicated that diatom and crustacea growth in the inland brine was equivalent to control cultures utilizing seawater. Wastewater effluents were successful as nutrient sources for the diatom cultures. Bioassay experiments conducted with petroleum related brines yielded mixed results respect to the survival and growth of the P. tricornutum and A. salina organisms. A second series of experiments involved cholornaphthalene, chlorophenanthene, and chlorophenanthrene, and chloroanthracene as the experimental hydrocarbons. Results of the diatom studies show chloroanthracene to induce toxic effects at a concentration of 500 ug/L. Artemia studies showed no acutely toxic effects relative to the test hydrocarbons at 50 and 100 ug/L.

  12. 77 FR 69562 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Thea Foss Waterway Previously Known as City Waterway, Tacoma, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ... operating schedule that governs the Murray Morgan Bridge, also known as the South 11th Street Bridge, across... the Murray Morgan Bridge. This temporary deviation will test three separate changes requested by the... of the unique features of the Murray Morgan Bridge is its height above the waterway providing 60...

  13. 33 CFR 117.451 - Gulf Intracoastal Waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Waterway. (a) The draw of the Lapalco Boulevard Bridge, Harvey Canal Route, mile 2.8 at Harvey, shall open... 59.9 west of Harvey Lock, at Houma, shall open on signal; except that, the draw need not open for the... 319 (Louisa) bridge across the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, mile 134.0 west of Harvey Lock, near...

  14. 33 CFR 117.451 - Gulf Intracoastal Waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Waterway. (a) The draw of the Lapalco Boulevard Bridge, Harvey Canal Route, mile 2.8 at Harvey, shall open... 59.9 west of Harvey Lock, at Houma, shall open on signal; except that, the draw need not open for the... 319 (Louisa) bridge across the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, mile 134.0 west of Harvey Lock, near...

  15. 33 CFR 117.451 - Gulf Intracoastal Waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Waterway. (a) The draw of the Lapalco Boulevard Bridge, Harvey Canal Route, mile 2.8 at Harvey, shall open... 59.9 west of Harvey Lock, at Houma, shall open on signal; except that, the draw need not open for the... 319 (Louisa) bridge across the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, mile 134.0 west of Harvey Lock, near...

  16. 33 CFR 62.49 - Intracoastal Waterway identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.49 Intracoastal Waterway identification. (a) In addition to the conventional signals, aids to navigation marking the Intracoastal Waterway exhibit unique yellow symbols to distinguish them from aids marking...

  17. 33 CFR 62.49 - Intracoastal Waterway identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.49 Intracoastal Waterway identification. (a) In addition to the conventional signals, aids to navigation marking the Intracoastal Waterway exhibit unique yellow symbols to distinguish them from aids marking...

  18. 33 CFR 62.49 - Intracoastal Waterway identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.49 Intracoastal Waterway identification. (a) In addition to the conventional signals, aids to navigation marking the Intracoastal Waterway exhibit unique yellow symbols to distinguish them from aids marking...

  19. 33 CFR 62.49 - Intracoastal Waterway identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.49 Intracoastal Waterway identification. (a) In addition to the conventional signals, aids to navigation marking the Intracoastal Waterway exhibit unique yellow symbols to distinguish them from aids marking...

  20. 33 CFR 62.49 - Intracoastal Waterway identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.49 Intracoastal Waterway identification. (a) In addition to the conventional signals, aids to navigation marking the Intracoastal Waterway exhibit unique yellow symbols to distinguish them from aids marking...

  1. 76 FR 66314 - Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard RIN 1625-1148 Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory Committee AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Lower Mississippi River... Federal Officer of the Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory Committee, telephone...

  2. 33 CFR 117.968 - Gulf Intracoastal Waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. 117... BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.968 Gulf Intracoastal Waterway.... to 8 p.m. on weekdays only, excluding federal, state, and local holidays, the drawspan need open...

  3. Green Infrastructure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large paved surfaces keep rain from infiltrating the soil and recharging groundwater supplies. Alternatively, Green infrastructure uses natural processes to reduce and treat stormwater in place by soaking up and storing water. These systems provide many environmental, social, an...

  4. Green Infrastructure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large paved surfaces keep rain from infiltrating the soil and recharging groundwater supplies. Alternatively, Green infrastructure uses natural processes to reduce and treat stormwater in place by soaking up and storing water. These systems provide many environmental, social, an...

  5. Partial reline of Inland`s No. 7 blast furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrance, K.F. II; Johansson, J.; Carter, W.L.

    1995-10-01

    The background for the decision to partially reline No. 7 blast furnace that would achieve the same results as a complete reline is discussed. This approach was designed to reduce actual downtime on the furnace at a critical production period. Areas of work included the hearth, stack, stoves, gas cleaning and furnace top. Highlights of the project execution were: schedules; blowdown; salamander tap; quench; dig out/descale; scaffolding used; and brick installation. The furnace was blown-in 29 days after the blowdown and producing in excess of 9,000 tons/day after 12 days of operation. Inland has adopted a new definition for establishing campaign life based on refractory wear that includes a hearth monitoring system.

  6. Employing the Disadvantaged: Inland Steel's Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Ralph

    1969-01-01

    Among the various approaches used by the Inland Steel Company in training ghetto youth for jobs, greatest promise has been shown by the Work Experience and Training Program initiated in 1965 at the Joseph T. Ryerson and Son plant, an Inland subsidiary located in the Lawndale (West Side) area of Chicago near the scene of the 1966 riots. Results…

  7. Trophic status of inland lakes from LANDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, L. T.; Scarpace, F. L.

    1975-01-01

    A first-cut assessment of the trophic status of inland lakes in Wisconsin was obtained from LANDSAT data. To satisfy the criteria of the project, a large and versatile computer program was developed to gain access to LANDSAT data. This analysis technique has proven to be a cost-effective method of classifying inland lakes in Wisconsin.

  8. Employing the Disadvantaged: Inland Steel's Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Ralph

    1969-01-01

    Among the various approaches used by the Inland Steel Company in training ghetto youth for jobs, greatest promise has been shown by the Work Experience and Training Program initiated in 1965 at the Joseph T. Ryerson and Son plant, an Inland subsidiary located in the Lawndale (West Side) area of Chicago near the scene of the 1966 riots. Results…

  9. User preferences for social conditions on the St. Croix international waterway

    Treesearch

    Jamie Hannon; John J. Daigle; Cynthia Stacey

    2002-01-01

    In cooperation with the St. Croix International Waterway Commission the University of New Brunswick and University of Maine conducted a study of waterway users during the summer of 1999 to determine: 1) characteristics of the waterway visit, including activities, method of travel on the waterway, length of stay, camping conditions encountered; 2) characteristics of...

  10. 76 FR 12981 - Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard RIN 1625-1148 Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety... ports and related waterways of the Lower Mississippi River and related waterways. This meeting will...

  11. National Waterways Study. Review of National Defense Emergency and Safety Issues Affecting the Waterways.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    contingencies. Demands on the waterways system derived from industrial, agricultural and energy production during a future major military contingency are...industrial, agricultural, and energy production base; relieve overloads on other transport modes when possible; transport military items on an as-needed basis...the general industrial, agricultural, and energy production base; transport fuel to military bases; provide a secondary port capability for ocean

  12. Toolkit of Available EPA Green Infrastructure Modeling ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST) is a software application designed tofacilitate integrated water resources management across wet and dry climate regions. It allows waterresources managers and planners to screen a wide range of practices across their watershed or jurisdictionfor cost-effectiveness and environmental and economic sustainability. WMOST allows users to select up to 15stormwater management practices, including traditional grey infrastructure, green infrastructure, and otherlow impact development practices. Stormwater discharges continue to cause impairment of our Nation’s waterbodies. Conventional stormwater infrastructure, or gray infrastructure, is largely designed to move stormwater away from urban areas through pipes and conduit. Runoff from these surfaces can overwhelm sewer systems and end up contaminating local waterways. When stormwater runs off impervious streets, parking lots, sidewalks, and rooftops, it carries pollutants such as motor oil, lawn chemicals, sediments, and pet waste to streams, rivers, and lakes. Runoff flows can also cause erosion and flooding that can damage property, infrastructure, and wildlife habitat. In addition to runoff problems, impervious surfaces also prevent water from penetrating the soil and recharging groundwater supplies. Green infrastructure (e.g., rain gardens, green roofs, porous pavement, cisterns) is becoming an increasingly attractive way to recharge aquifers and reduce the amou

  13. Dynamics of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon in the Waterways of Antropogenically Influenced Closed Semi-Arid Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameel, M. Y.; Bowen, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    Inland aquatic carbon cycling is an important component of global carbon cycle and recent work has shown that anthropogenic activities can significantly alter the flux of terrestrial carbon through these systems to oceans and lakes. The study of dissolved carbon species in rivers provides detailed information about the natural and anthropogenic processing of carbon within a watershed. We measured water chemistry and stable isotope ratios (δ13C, δ18O, δ2H) of three major rivers (Bear, Jordan and Weber) seasonally, within the Great Salt Lake Basin to understand sources and processes governing the carbon cycling within the basin. Our preliminary data suggest strong correlation between the DIC concentration and land use/land cover for all the three waterways, with DIC increasing as the rivers flow through agricultural and urban regions. We also observed significant decrease in the DIC with the addition of fresh water from the tributaries which was most significant during the spring sampling. All the three rivers are super saturated in dissolved CO2 with respected to the atmospheric CO2 concentration, with pCO2 ranging from 1-5 times the atmospheric value and also showing strong seasonal variations. Coupling the pCO2 data with the isotopic value and concentration of DIC suggests that the variations within and among the rivers are manifestation of the different sources of DIC, further altered by in-situ processes such as organic respiration and photosynthesis. Our result suggest that human induced changes in land use and land cover have significantly altered the carbon budget of waterways of the Great Salt Lake Basin and carbon flux to the Great Salt Lake itself. Our future work will further quantify these changes, increasing our understanding of past, present and future changes in carbon cycling in closed semi-arid basins, and its importance in the global carbon cycle.

  14. 76 FR 70345 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ] ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation from regulations. SUMMARY: The...

  15. Pesticide Reduction Campaign: Greener Pesticides for Cleaner Waterways

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP Greener Pesticides for Cleaner Waterways project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  16. 77 FR 75556 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Louisiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... Boulevard bascule span drawbridge across the Harvey Canal Route, Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW), mile 2.8... temporary deviation from the operating schedule for the Bascule Span Bridge across the Harvey Canal...

  17. Tree Guidelines for Inland Empire Communities

    Treesearch

    E.G. McPherson; J.R. Simpson; P.J. Peper; Q. Xiao; D.R. Pittenger; D.R. Hodel

    2001-01-01

    Communities in the Inland Empire region of California contain over 8 million people, or about 25% of the state’s population. The region’s inhabitants derive great benefit from trees because compared to coastal areas, the summers are hotter and air pollution levels are higher. The region’s climate is still mild enough to grow a diverse mix of trees. The Inland Empire’s...

  18. Near-Site Transportation Infrastructure Project

    SciTech Connect

    Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N. )

    1992-02-01

    There are 122 commercial nuclear facilities from which spent nuclear fuel will be accepted by the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS). Since some facilities share common sites and some facilities are on adjacent sites, 76 sites were identified for the Near-Site Transportation Infrastructure (NSTI) project. The objective of the NSTI project was to identify the options available for transportation of spent-fuel casks from each of these commercial nuclear facility sites to the main transportation routes -- interstate highways, commercial rail lines and navigable waterways available for commercial use. The near-site transportation infrastructure from each site was assessed, based on observation of technical features identified during a survey of the routes and facilities plus data collected from referenced information sources. The potential for refurbishment of transportation facilities which are not currently operational was also assessed, as was the potential for establishing new transportation facilities.

  19. 'Neo-Europe' and its ecological consequences: the example of systematic degradation in Australia's inland fisheries.

    PubMed

    Alleway, Heidi K; Gillanders, Bronwyn M; Connell, Sean D

    2016-01-01

    The antiquity of human impact on ecosystems is increasingly understood, though the arrival of settlers to new lands remains a defining period. Colonization of the 'neo-Europes', a reference from the discipline of history, precipitated changes in aquatic ecosystems through modification of waterways and introductions of non-native species. We considered historical fisheries and fish market records from South Australia (1900-1946) against contemporary production statistics (1987-2011). Native inland species historically contributed large quantities to the market but have deteriorated such that fishing is now limited, and conservation regulations exist. This pattern mirrors the demand-driven transition from freshwater to marine fisheries in Europe; hence, we propose that this pattern was predicated on societal expectations and that European settlement and introduction of non-native fishes led to systematic overexploitation and degradation of native inland fisheries species in Australia, representing a further consequence of neo-European colonization to ecology. Accurate interpretation of ecological change can ensure more appropriate management intervention. Concepts, such as neo-Europe, from alternative disciplines can inform the recognition and evaluation of patterns at regional and global scales.

  20. Predictive statistical models linking antecedent meteorological conditions and waterway bacterial contamination in urban waterways.

    PubMed

    Farnham, David J; Lall, Upmanu

    2015-06-01

    Although the relationships between meteorological conditions and waterway bacterial contamination are being better understood, statistical models capable of fully leveraging these links have not been developed for highly urbanized settings. We present a hierarchical Bayesian regression model for predicting transient fecal indicator bacteria contamination episodes in urban waterways. Canals, creeks, and rivers of the New York City harbor system are used to examine the model. The model configuration facilitates the hierarchical structure of the underlying system with weekly observations nested within sampling sites, which in turn were nested inside of the harbor network. Models are compared using cross-validation and a variety of Bayesian and classical model fit statistics. The uncertainty of predicted enterococci concentration values is reflected by sampling from the posterior predictive distribution. Issuing predictions with the uncertainty reasonably reflected allows a water manager or a monitoring agency to issue warnings that better reflect the underlying risk of exposure. A model using only antecedent meteorological conditions is shown to correctly classify safe and unsafe levels of enterococci with good accuracy. The hierarchical Bayesian regression approach is most valuable where transient fecal indicator bacteria contamination is problematic and drainage network data are scarce.

  1. Making green infrastructure healthier infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Lõhmus, Mare; Balbus, John

    2015-01-01

    Increasing urban green and blue structure is often pointed out to be critical for sustainable development and climate change adaptation, which has led to the rapid expansion of greening activities in cities throughout the world. This process is likely to have a direct impact on the citizens’ quality of life and public health. However, alongside numerous benefits, green and blue infrastructure also has the potential to create unexpected, undesirable, side-effects for health. This paper considers several potential harmful public health effects that might result from increased urban biodiversity, urban bodies of water, and urban tree cover projects. It does so with the intent of improving awareness and motivating preventive measures when designing and initiating such projects. Although biodiversity has been found to be associated with physiological benefits for humans in several studies, efforts to increase the biodiversity of urban environments may also promote the introduction and survival of vector or host organisms for infectious pathogens with resulting spread of a variety of diseases. In addition, more green connectivity in urban areas may potentiate the role of rats and ticks in the spread of infectious diseases. Bodies of water and wetlands play a crucial role in the urban climate adaptation and mitigation process. However, they also provide habitats for mosquitoes and toxic algal blooms. Finally, increasing urban green space may also adversely affect citizens allergic to pollen. Increased awareness of the potential hazards of urban green and blue infrastructure should not be a reason to stop or scale back projects. Instead, incorporating public health awareness and interventions into urban planning at the earliest stages can help insure that green and blue infrastructure achieves full potential for health promotion. PMID:26615823

  2. Making green infrastructure healthier infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Lõhmus, Mare; Balbus, John

    2015-01-01

    Increasing urban green and blue structure is often pointed out to be critical for sustainable development and climate change adaptation, which has led to the rapid expansion of greening activities in cities throughout the world. This process is likely to have a direct impact on the citizens' quality of life and public health. However, alongside numerous benefits, green and blue infrastructure also has the potential to create unexpected, undesirable, side-effects for health. This paper considers several potential harmful public health effects that might result from increased urban biodiversity, urban bodies of water, and urban tree cover projects. It does so with the intent of improving awareness and motivating preventive measures when designing and initiating such projects. Although biodiversity has been found to be associated with physiological benefits for humans in several studies, efforts to increase the biodiversity of urban environments may also promote the introduction and survival of vector or host organisms for infectious pathogens with resulting spread of a variety of diseases. In addition, more green connectivity in urban areas may potentiate the role of rats and ticks in the spread of infectious diseases. Bodies of water and wetlands play a crucial role in the urban climate adaptation and mitigation process. However, they also provide habitats for mosquitoes and toxic algal blooms. Finally, increasing urban green space may also adversely affect citizens allergic to pollen. Increased awareness of the potential hazards of urban green and blue infrastructure should not be a reason to stop or scale back projects. Instead, incorporating public health awareness and interventions into urban planning at the earliest stages can help insure that green and blue infrastructure achieves full potential for health promotion.

  3. Global extent and distribution of artificial, residential waterways in estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltham, Nathan J.; Connolly, Rod M.

    2011-08-01

    Artificial residential waterways are now widespread in the world's estuaries. We used the global mapping tool, Google Earth, to determine that there are nearly 4000 linear km of artificial waterways globally, covering an area of 270 km 2. Residential waterways constructed as open, flow-through canal estates are at their greatest extent in North America (77% of global linear extent), where systems are typically longer and narrower, with more openings and dead-ends than systems elsewhere. The remaining canal estates are spread across all other continents except Antarctica: Asia (7%), Europe (7%), Oceania (7%), South America (0.9%), and Africa (0.6%). A relatively recent design change from open canals to artificial estuarine lakes with tidal barriers has occurred on all continents except Africa, most extensively in Australia (14 km 2 area, 57 independent systems). The extremely large expansion in artificial residential waterways aimed at increasing opportunities for waterfront living by humans has also modified and expanded estuarine habitat available to aquatic biota. Research can best underpin planning and management of these types of waterways by focussing on their value as habitat and their provision of other goods and services.

  4. 33 CFR 162.40 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware Canal).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... avoid damage by suction or wave wash to wharves, landings, riprap protection, or other boats, or injury... suction or wave wash does occur. Owners and operators of yachts, motorboats, rowboats and other craft are...

  5. 33 CFR 162.40 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware Canal).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... avoid damage by suction or wave wash to wharves, landings, riprap protection, or other boats, or injury... suction or wave wash does occur. Owners and operators of yachts, motorboats, rowboats and other craft are...

  6. 33 CFR 162.40 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware Canal).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... avoid damage by suction or wave wash to wharves, landings, riprap protection, or other boats, or injury... suction or wave wash does occur. Owners and operators of yachts, motorboats, rowboats and other craft are...

  7. 33 CFR 117.799 - Long Island, New York Inland Waterway from East Rockaway Inlet to Shinnecock Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... at all stages of the tide. The gages shall be so placed on the bridges that they are plainly visible... predicted high tide. Predicted high tide occurs 10 minutes earlier than that predicted for Sandy Hook, as given in the tide table published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (f) The...

  8. 33 CFR 117.799 - Long Island, New York Inland Waterway from East Rockaway Inlet to Shinnecock Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... at all stages of the tide. The gages shall be so placed on the bridges that they are plainly visible... predicted high tide. Predicted high tide occurs 10 minutes earlier than that predicted for Sandy Hook, as given in the tide table published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (f) The...

  9. 33 CFR 117.799 - Long Island, New York Inland Waterway from East Rockaway Inlet to Shinnecock Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... at all stages of the tide. The gages shall be so placed on the bridges that they are plainly visible... predicted high tide. Predicted high tide occurs 10 minutes earlier than that predicted for Sandy Hook, as given in the tide table published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (f) The...

  10. 33 CFR 117.799 - Long Island, New York Inland Waterway from East Rockaway Inlet to Shinnecock Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... at all stages of the tide. The gages shall be so placed on the bridges that they are plainly visible... predicted high tide. Predicted high tide occurs 10 minutes earlier than that predicted for Sandy Hook, as given in the tide table published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (f) The...

  11. 33 CFR 117.799 - Long Island, New York Inland Waterway from East Rockaway Inlet to Shinnecock Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... at all stages of the tide. The gages shall be so placed on the bridges that they are plainly visible... predicted high tide. Predicted high tide occurs 10 minutes earlier than that predicted for Sandy Hook, as given in the tide table published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (f) The...

  12. 33 CFR 162.40 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware Canal).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...., between Reedy Point, Delaware River, and Old Town Point Wharf, Elk River. (b) Speed. No vessel in the..., are required to travel at all times at a safe speed throughout the canal and its approaches so as to...

  13. 78 FR 59339 - Intracoastal Waterway Route “Magenta Line” on NOAA Nautical Charts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Intracoastal Waterway Route ``Magenta Line'' on NOAA Nautical Charts AGENCY: National Ocean Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (NOAA... Intracoastal Waterways, produced by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey and, subsequently, NOAA, have...

  14. 75 FR 20619 - Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory... Mississippi River and related waterways. This meeting will be open to the public. DATES: The Committee will...

  15. 78 FR 5720 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Oak Island, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Oak Island... temporary safety zone established on the waters of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway at Oak Island, North... maintenance on the NC 133 Fixed Bridge crossing the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, mile 311.8, at Oak Island...

  16. 77 FR 44463 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Emerald Isle, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Emerald... establishing a temporary safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway at Emerald Isle, North... maintenance of the NC 58 Fixed Bridge crossing the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, mile 226, at Emerald Isle...

  17. 77 FR 44466 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Oak Island, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Oak Island... temporary safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway at Oak Island, North Carolina. The... the NC 133 Fixed Bridge crossing the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, mile 311.8, at Oak Island, North...

  18. 76 FR 13422 - Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory Committee; Vacancies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory Committee; Vacancies AGENCY: Coast... on the Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory Committee. This Committee advises and makes... ports on the Lower Mississippi River and related waterways. DATES: Applicants should submit a...

  19. Bioaccumulation surveillance in Milford Haven Waterway.

    PubMed

    Langston, W J; O'Hara, S; Pope, N D; Davey, M; Shortridge, E; Imamura, M; Harino, H; Kim, A; Vane, C H

    2012-01-01

    Biomonitoring of contaminants (metals, organotins, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PCBs) was undertaken in Milford Haven Waterway (MHW) and a reference site in the Tywi Estuary (St Ishmael/Ferryside) during 2007-2008. Bioindicator species encompassed various uptake routes-Fucus vesiculosus (dissolved contaminants); Littorina littorea (grazer); Mytilus edulis and Cerastoderma edule (suspension feeders); and Hediste (=Nereis) diversicolor (sediments). Differences in feeding and habitat preference have subtle implications for bioaccumulation trends though, with few exceptions, contaminant burdens in MHW were higher than the Tywi reference site, reflecting inputs. Elevated metal concentrations were observed at some MHW sites, whilst As and Se (molluscs and seaweed) were consistently at the higher end of the UK range. However, for most metals, distributions in MH biota were not exceptional. Several metal-species combinations indicated increases in bioavailability upstream, which may reflect the influence of geogenic/land-based sources-perhaps enhanced by lower salinity. TBT levels in MH mussels were below OSPAR toxicity thresholds and in the Tywi were close to zero. Phenyltins were not accumulated appreciably in M. edulis, whereas some H. diversicolor populations appear subjected to localized (historical) sources. PAHs in H. diversicolor were distributed evenly across most of MHW, although acenaphthene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene and chrysene were highest at one site near the mouth; naphthalenes in H. diversicolor were enriched in the mid-upper Haven (a pattern seen in M. edulis for most PAHs). Whilst PAH (and PCB) concentrations in MH mussels were mostly above reference and OSPAR backgrounds, they are unlikely to exceed ecotoxicological thresholds. Bivalve Condition indices (CI) were highest at the Tywi reference site and at the seaward end of MH, decreasing upstream-giving rise to several significant (negative) relationships between CI and body burdens

  20. Sediment contaminant surveillance in Milford Haven Waterway.

    PubMed

    Little, D I; Bullimore, B; Galperin, Y; Langston, W J

    2016-01-01

    Sediment contaminants were monitored in Milford Haven Waterway (MHW) since 1978 (hydrocarbons) and 1982 (metals), with the aim of providing surveillance of environmental quality in one of the UK's busiest oil and gas ports. This aim is particularly important during and after large-scale investment in liquefied natural gas (LNG) facilities. However, the methods inevitably have changed over the years, compounding the difficulties of coordinating sampling and analytical programmes. After a review by the MHW Environmental Surveillance Group (MHWESG), sediment hydrocarbon chemistry was investigated in detail in 2010. Natural Resources Wales (NRW) contributed their MHW data for 2007 and 2012, collected to assess the condition of the Special Area of Conservation (SAC) designated under the European Union Habitats Directive. Datasets during 2007-2012 have thus been more comparable. The results showed conclusively that a MHW-wide peak in concentrations of sediment polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), metals and other contaminants occurred in late 2007. This was corroborated by independent annual monitoring at one centrally located station with peaks in early 2008 and 2011. The spatial and temporal patterns of recovery from the 2007 peak, shown by MHW-wide surveys in 2010 and 2012, indicate several probable causes of contaminant trends, as follows: atmospheric deposition, catchment runoff, sediment resuspension from dredging, and construction of two LNG terminals and a power station. Adverse biological effects predictable in 2007 using international sediment quality guidelines were independently tested by data from monitoring schemes of more than a decade duration in MHW (starfish, limpets) and in the wider SAC (grey seals). Although not proving cause and effect, many of these potential biological receptors showed a simultaneous negative response to the elevated 2007 contamination following intense dredging activity in 2006. Wetland bird counts were typically at a peak in

  1. Forest ecosystem health in the inland west

    Treesearch

    R. Neil Sampson; Lance R. Clark; Lynnette Z. Morelan

    1995-01-01

    For the past four years, American Forests has focused much of its policy attention on forest health, highlighted by a forest health partnership in southern Idaho. The partnership has been hard at work trying to better understand the forests of the Inland West. Our goal has been to identify what is affecting these forests, why they are responding differently to climate...

  2. USEPA Inland HAB Risk Management - Lake Harsha

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater inland lakes and reservoirs supply approximately 70% of the nation’s drinking water and industrial needs. These are typically open ecological systems and susceptible to Harmful algal blooms (HABs) which are increasing in frequency, intensity, and geographic range. I...

  3. USEPA Inland HAB Risk Management - Lake Harsha

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater inland lakes and reservoirs supply approximately 70% of the nation’s drinking water and industrial needs. These are typically open ecological systems and susceptible to Harmful algal blooms (HABs) which are increasing in frequency, intensity, and geographic range. I...

  4. Global carbon dioxide emissions from inland waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raymond, Peter A.; Hartmann, Jens; Lauerwald, Ronny; Sobek, Sebastian; McDonald, Cory P.; Hoover, Mark; Butman, David; Striegl, Robert G.; Mayorga, Emilio; Humborg, Christoph; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Durr, Hans H.; Meybeck, Michel; Ciais, Philippe; Guth, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) transfer from inland waters to the atmosphere, known as CO2 evasion, is a component of the global carbon cycle. Global estimates of CO2 evasion have been hampered, however, by the lack of a framework for estimating the inland water surface area and gas transfer velocity and by the absence of a global CO2 database. Here we report regional variations in global inland water surface area, dissolved CO2 and gas transfer velocity. We obtain global CO2 evasion rates of 1.8   petagrams of carbon (Pg C) per year from streams and rivers and 0.32  Pg C yr−1 from lakes and reservoirs, where the upper and lower limits are respectively the 5th and 95th confidence interval percentiles. The resulting global evasion rate of 2.1 Pg C yr−1 is higher than previous estimates owing to a larger stream and river evasion rate. Our analysis predicts global hotspots in stream and river evasion, with about 70 per cent of the flux occurring over just 20 per cent of the land surface. The source of inland water CO2 is still not known with certainty and new studies are needed to research the mechanisms controlling CO2 evasion globally.

  5. 75 FR 41987 - Inland Navigation Rules; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AB43 Inland Navigation Rules; Correction ACTION: Final rule... Navigation Rules into the Code of Federal Regulations. That publication contained an error in the...

  6. Global carbon dioxide emissions from inland waters.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Peter A; Hartmann, Jens; Lauerwald, Ronny; Sobek, Sebastian; McDonald, Cory; Hoover, Mark; Butman, David; Striegl, Robert; Mayorga, Emilio; Humborg, Christoph; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Dürr, Hans; Meybeck, Michel; Ciais, Philippe; Guth, Peter

    2013-11-21

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) transfer from inland waters to the atmosphere, known as CO2 evasion, is a component of the global carbon cycle. Global estimates of CO2 evasion have been hampered, however, by the lack of a framework for estimating the inland water surface area and gas transfer velocity and by the absence of a global CO2 database. Here we report regional variations in global inland water surface area, dissolved CO2 and gas transfer velocity. We obtain global CO2 evasion rates of 1.8(+0.25)(-0.25)  petagrams of carbon (Pg C) per year from streams and rivers and 0.32(+0.52)(-0.26)  Pg C yr(-1) from lakes and reservoirs, where the upper and lower limits are respectively the 5th and 95th confidence interval percentiles. The resulting global evasion rate of 2.1 Pg C yr(-1) is higher than previous estimates owing to a larger stream and river evasion rate. Our analysis predicts global hotspots in stream and river evasion, with about 70 per cent of the flux occurring over just 20 per cent of the land surface. The source of inland water CO2 is still not known with certainty and new studies are needed to research the mechanisms controlling CO2 evasion globally.

  7. 33 CFR 117.733 - New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway. 117.733 Section 117.733 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.733 New...

  8. 78 FR 56609 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Illinois Waterway, Beardstown, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... Santa Fe Railroad Bridge across the Illinois Waterway, mile 88.8, at Beardstown, Illinois. The deviation... Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal... Santa Fe Railway Company requested a temporary deviation for the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF...

  9. Ports and Waterways Safety Assessment Workshop Report: Narragansett Bay

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-08

    waterway risk that was conceptually developed by a National Dialog Group on National Needs for Vessel Traffic Services and then translated into computer ... algorithms by Potomac Management Group, Inc. In that model, risk is defined as the product of the probability of a casualty and its consequences

  10. 33 CFR 117.733 - New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway... BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.733 New Jersey... AMTRAK New Jersey Transit Rail Operations (NJTRO) automated railroad swing bridge across Beach Thorofare...

  11. Protecting and managing traditional Allagash Wilderness Waterway recreation activities

    Treesearch

    Thomas J. Cieslinski

    1998-01-01

    The statute creating the Allagash Wilderness Waterway in 1966 specified several outdoor activities traditionally participated in along the watercourse. Additionally, there are other outdoor activities traditional to the watercourse. The identification and provision of opportunities for these activities, consistent with maintaining wilderness character, is central to...

  12. 10. MAP SHOWING 'THE ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTING LINES AND WATERWAYS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. MAP SHOWING 'THE ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTING LINES AND WATERWAYS OF THE TELLURIDE POWER COMPANY OF COLORADO'. THE AMES POWER STATION LIES AT THE FORK OF THE GORGE, LOWER LEFT OF CENTER IN THE PHOTOGRAPH. - Ames Hydroelectric Plant, Ames, San Miguel County, CO

  13. EPA to approve Californias newest list of impaired waterways

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - More than 40,000 miles of California's rivers and streams are currently threatened by pollution, according to a list of impaired waterways submitted by the state to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Monitoring of rivers, lakes and

  14. Bioassays on Illinois waterway dredged material. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.W.; Gibson, A.B.; Dillon, T.M.

    1992-12-01

    Sediment from the Illinois Waterway navigation channel is hydraulically dredged by the US Army Engineer District, Rock Island, and placed in the nearshore environment via pipeline. Water returning to the river can have a high-suspended solids load approaching fluid mud consistency. There is a concern that this return water may exceed the State of Illinois water quality standards for ammonia and have adverse effects on aquatic life. To address these concerns, composite sediment samples and site water collected from selected sites in the Illinois Waterway were evaluated in toxicity tests. Acute (48-hr) toxicity tests were conducted with two species, Pimephales promelas (the fathead minnow) and Daphnia magna (a freshwater cladoceran). A chronic (21-day) toxicity test was also conducted using Daphnia magna. Animals were exposed separately to different concentrations of filtered and unfiltered elutriates prepared from Acute, Cadmium, Daphnia magna, Pimephales promela, Ammonia, Chronic, Elutriate, Sediment, Bioassay, Cladoceran, Fathead minnow. Illinois Waterway edged material. Total ammonia concentrations were measured in all tests and the un-ionized fraction was calculated by adjusting for temperature and pH. Tests were conducted at the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS. In addition, as part of an interlaboratory effort, a 48-hr acute toxicity test with Pimephales pomelas fry was conducted concurrently by the Hygienic Laboratory of the University of Iowa, Des Moines, IA.

  15. Compendium on Waterway Transportation Reliability: Lock Congestion and Lock Queues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    While a microsimulation model for capturing such delays is available (Dai and Schonfeld 89), a significant amount of computer time is required for...development of an approximation to microsimulation that allows for an evaluation of lock delays that incorporate interdependencies. A simulation experiment was... microsimulation model of waterway traffic and lock operations, 3. statistically estimated functions ("metamodels") to approximate the results of the

  16. Trends in Allagash Wilderness Waterway uses in the 1970's

    Treesearch

    Thomas J. Cieslinski

    1980-01-01

    The Allagash Wilderness Waterway is a 92-mile long river and lake corridor through the forests of northern Maine. It begins at Telos Dam at the eastern end of Telos Lake, extends westward to Allagash Stream and Allagash Lake in T8 R14, and northward through Chamberlain Lake, Eagle Lake, and Churchill Lake to the beginning of the river itself at Churchill Dam. The...

  17. ‘Neo-Europe’ and its ecological consequences: the example of systematic degradation in Australia's inland fisheries

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The antiquity of human impact on ecosystems is increasingly understood, though the arrival of settlers to new lands remains a defining period. Colonization of the ‘neo-Europes’, a reference from the discipline of history, precipitated changes in aquatic ecosystems through modification of waterways and introductions of non-native species. We considered historical fisheries and fish market records from South Australia (1900–1946) against contemporary production statistics (1987–2011). Native inland species historically contributed large quantities to the market but have deteriorated such that fishing is now limited, and conservation regulations exist. This pattern mirrors the demand-driven transition from freshwater to marine fisheries in Europe; hence, we propose that this pattern was predicated on societal expectations and that European settlement and introduction of non-native fishes led to systematic overexploitation and degradation of native inland fisheries species in Australia, representing a further consequence of neo-European colonization to ecology. Accurate interpretation of ecological change can ensure more appropriate management intervention. Concepts, such as neo-Europe, from alternative disciplines can inform the recognition and evaluation of patterns at regional and global scales. PMID:26814225

  18. Transitioning to a waterways city: municipal context, capacity and commitment.

    PubMed

    Morison, P J; Brown, R R; Cocklin, C

    2010-01-01

    In Melbourne, Australia, the adoption of Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) and the inclusion of best practice in new urban development has shifted the "drained city" of the 1960s toward an environmentally-oriented "waterways city" for the future. However, the "waterways city" is tenuous owing to the variable commitment of local municipalities to WSUD. This paper reports on the first phase of a social research project, which aims to secure a model of the waterways city by addressing the commitment and capacity deficits of local municipalities. Municipal commitment and capacity across three geographical areas in Melbourne are measured quantitatively using an innovative, comprehensive, and replicable assessment technique. The results show variability in municipal capacity and commitment across the areas, with a pronounced deficit in the rural-regional area. Consequently, intergovernmental attempts to normalise modes of integrated urban water management (such as WSUD) need to include innovative and flexible mechanisms that are responsive to the dynamics of municipal commitment and capacity. These principles have broader application to cities internationally where the management of urban stormwater is the shared responsibility of multiple governments.

  19. Biogeochemical Approaches to Assess PAH Pollution in an Urban Waterway.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xianhao; Forsythe, Jennifer; Peterkin, Earl

    2015-12-01

    Biogeochemical approaches were applied to enhance the study on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pollution in an urban waterway. Chemical characterizations of PAHs in the studied area were identified, geochemical factors were revealed, and related mechanisms were discussed. It was found that, during summer, an early diagenetic process in the sediment could play a major role for the existence of high PAH concentrations, especially high molecular weight PAHs (≥ 4 rings), in the water column and sediment porewater. This effect could vary with tidal cycling, and higher PAH concentration in the water column would be expected during low tide. Other potential pollution sources were also evaluated in the studied creek. Results showed that pyrogenic sources dominated in the creek, generally. Nevertheless, petroleum products from a metal recycling plant could be an important point source to the waterway during wet weather. Comparing with previous studies in other waterways of the same watershed and published literature suggested that the limited toxicity to the ecosystem was only detected in sediments. More information needs to be collected during low tide for a more objective evaluation of PAH toxicity in the creek.

  20. A cellular automaton model for ship traffic flow in waterways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Le; Zheng, Zhongyi; Gang, Longhui

    2017-04-01

    With the development of marine traffic, waterways become congested and more complicated traffic phenomena in ship traffic flow are observed. It is important and necessary to build a ship traffic flow model based on cellular automata (CAs) to study the phenomena and improve marine transportation efficiency and safety. Spatial discretization rules for waterways and update rules for ship movement are two important issues that are very different from vehicle traffic. To solve these issues, a CA model for ship traffic flow, called a spatial-logical mapping (SLM) model, is presented. In this model, the spatial discretization rules are improved by adding a mapping rule. And the dynamic ship domain model is considered in the update rules to describe ships' interaction more exactly. Take the ship traffic flow in the Singapore Strait for example, some simulations were carried out and compared. The simulations show that the SLM model could avoid ship pseudo lane-change efficiently, which is caused by traditional spatial discretization rules. The ship velocity change in the SLM model is consistent with the measured data. At finally, from the fundamental diagram, the relationship between traffic ability and the lengths of ships is explored. The number of ships in the waterway declines when the proportion of large ships increases.

  1. Ocean waves monitor system by inland microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L. C.; Bouchette, F.; Chang, E. T. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Microseisms are continuous ground oscillations which have been wildly introduced for decades. It is well known that the microseismicity in the frequency band from 0.05 to about 1 Hz partly results from ocean waves, which has been first explained by Longuet-Higgins [1950]. The generation mechanism for such a microseismicity is based on nonlinear wave-wave interactions which drive pressure pulses within the seafloor. The resulting ground pressure fluctuations yield ground oscillations at a double frequency (DF) with respect to that of current ocean waves. In order to understand the characteristics of DF microseisms associated with different wave sources, we aim to analyze and interpret the spectra of DF microseisms by using the simple spectrum method [Rabinovich, 1997] at various inland seismometer along the Taiwan coast. This is the first monitoring system of ocean waves observed by inland seismometers in Taiwan. The method is applied to identify wave sources by estimating the spectral ratios of wave induced microseisms associated with local winds and typhoons to background spectra. Microseism amplitudes above 0.2 Hz show a good correlation with wind-driven waves near the coast. Comparison of microseism band between 0.1 and 0.2 Hz with buoys in the deep sea shows a strong correlation of seismic amplitude with storm generated waves, implying that such energy portion originates in remote regions. Results indicate that microseisms observed at inland sites can be a potential tool for the tracking of typhoon displacements and the monitoring of extreme ocean waves in real time. Real- time Microseism-Ocean Waves Monitoring Website (http://mwave.droppages.com/) Reference Rabinovich, A. B. (1997) "Spectral analysis of tsunami waves: Separation of source and topography effects," J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 102, p. 12,663-12,676. Longuet-Higgins, M.S. (1950) "A theory of origin of microseisms," Philos. Trans. R. Soc., A. 243, pp. 1-35.

  2. Inland sea as a unit for environmental history: East Asian inland seas from prehistory to future.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Kati; Uchiyama, Junzo

    2012-04-01

    The boundaries of landscape policies often coincide with political or economic boundaries, thus creating a situation where a unit of landscape protection or management reflects more its present political status than its historico-geographical situation, its historical function and formation. At the same time, it is evident that no unit can exist independently of the context that has given birth to it and that environmental protection in isolated units cannot be very effective. The present paper will discuss inland sea as a landscape unit from prehistory to modern days and its implications for future landscape planning, using EastAsian inland sea (Japan Sea and East China Sea) rim as an example. Historically an area of active communication, EastAsian inland sea rim has become a politically very sharply divided area. The authors will bring examples to demonstrate how cultural communication on the inland sea level has influenced the formation of several landscape features that are now targets for local or national landscape protection programs, and how a unified view could benefit the future of landscape policies in the whole region.

  3. Sustainable Water Infrastructure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Resources for state and local environmental and public health officials, and water, infrastructure and utility professionals to learn about sustainable water infrastructure, sustainable water and energy practices, and their role.

  4. Green Infrastructure Modeling Tools

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Modeling tools support planning and design decisions on a range of scales from setting a green infrastructure target for an entire watershed to designing a green infrastructure practice for a particular site.

  5. Aging Water Infrastructure

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Aging Water Infrastructure (AWI) research program is part of EPA’s larger effort called the Sustainable Water Infrastructure (SI) initiative. The SI initiative brings together drinking water and wastewater utility managers; trade associations; local watershed protection organ...

  6. Aging Water Infrastructure

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Aging Water Infrastructure (AWI) research program is part of EPA’s larger effort called the Sustainable Water Infrastructure (SI) initiative. The SI initiative brings together drinking water and wastewater utility managers; trade associations; local watershed protection organ...

  7. Green Infrastructure Modeling Toolkit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Green Infrastructure Modeling Toolkit is a toolkit of 5 EPA green infrastructure models and tools, along with communication materials, that can be used as a teaching tool and a quick reference resource when making GI implementation decisions.

  8. Climate Action Benefits: Infrastructure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides background on the relationship between infrastructure and climate change and describes what the CIRA Infrastructure analyses cover. It provides links to the subsectors Bridges, Roads, Urban Drainage, and Coastal Property.

  9. Near-Site Transportation Infrastructure Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N.

    1992-02-01

    There are 122 commercial nuclear facilities from which spent nuclear fuel will be accepted by the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS). Since some facilities share common sites and some facilities are on adjacent sites, 76 sites were identified for the Near-Site Transportation Infrastructure (NSTI) project. The objective of the NSTI project was to identify the options available for transportation of spent-fuel casks from each of these commercial nuclear facility sites to the main transportation routes -- interstate highways, commercial rail lines and navigable waterways available for commercial use. The near-site transportation infrastructure from each site was assessed, based on observation of technical features identified during a survey of the routes and facilities plus data collected from referenced information sources. The potential for refurbishment of transportation facilities which are not currently operational was also assessed, as was the potential for establishing new transportation facilities.

  10. Ecosystem approach to inland fisheries: Research needs and implementation strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beard, T.D.; Arlinghaus, R.; Cooke, S.J.; McIntyre, P.B.; De Silva, S.; Bartley, D.; Cowx, I.G.

    2011-01-01

    Inland fisheries are a vital component in the livelihoods and food security of people throughout the world, as well as contributing huge recreational and economic benefits. These valuable assets are jeopardized by lack of research-based understanding of the impacts of fisheries on inland ecosystems, and similarly the impact of human activities associated with inland waters on fisheries and aquatic biodiversity. To explore this topic, an international workshop was organized in order to examine strategies to incorporate fisheries into ecosystem approaches for management of inland waters. To achieve this goal, a new research agenda is needed that focuses on: quantifying the ecosystem services provided by fresh waters; quantifying the economic, social and nutritional benefits of inland fisheries; improving assessments designed to evaluate fisheries exploitation potential; and examining feedbacks between fisheries, ecosystem productivity and aquatic biodiversity. Accomplishing these objectives will require merging natural and social science approaches to address coupled social-ecological system dynamics. ?? 2010 The Royal Society.

  11. Ecosystem approach to inland fisheries: research needs and implementation strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beard, T. Douglas; Arlinghaus, Robert; Cooke, Steven J.; McIntyre, Peter B.; De Silva, Sena; Bartley, Devin M.; Cowx, Ian G.

    2011-01-01

    Inland fisheries are a vital component in the livelihoods and food security of people throughout the world, as well as contributing huge recreational and economic benefits. These valuable assets are jeopardized by lack of research-based understanding of the impacts of fisheries on inland ecosystems, and similarly the impact of human activities associated with inland waters on fisheries and aquatic biodiversity. To explore this topic, an international workshop was organized in order to examine strategies to incorporate fisheries into ecosystem approaches for management of inland waters. To achieve this goal, a new research agenda is needed that focuses on: quantifying the ecosystem services provided by fresh waters; quantifying the economic, social and nutritional benefits of inland fisheries; improving assessments designed to evaluate fisheries exploitation potential; and examining feedbacks between fisheries, ecosystem productivity and aquatic biodiversity. Accomplishing these objectives will require merging natural and social science approaches to address coupled social–ecological system dynamics.

  12. Ecosystem approach to inland fisheries: research needs and implementation strategies.

    PubMed

    Beard, T Douglas; Arlinghaus, Robert; Cooke, Steven J; McIntyre, Peter B; De Silva, Sena; Bartley, Devin; Cowx, Ian G

    2011-08-23

    Inland fisheries are a vital component in the livelihoods and food security of people throughout the world, as well as contributing huge recreational and economic benefits. These valuable assets are jeopardized by lack of research-based understanding of the impacts of fisheries on inland ecosystems, and similarly the impact of human activities associated with inland waters on fisheries and aquatic biodiversity. To explore this topic, an international workshop was organized in order to examine strategies to incorporate fisheries into ecosystem approaches for management of inland waters. To achieve this goal, a new research agenda is needed that focuses on: quantifying the ecosystem services provided by fresh waters; quantifying the economic, social and nutritional benefits of inland fisheries; improving assessments designed to evaluate fisheries exploitation potential; and examining feedbacks between fisheries, ecosystem productivity and aquatic biodiversity. Accomplishing these objectives will require merging natural and social science approaches to address coupled social-ecological system dynamics.

  13. Ecosystem approach to inland fisheries: research needs and implementation strategies

    PubMed Central

    Beard, T. Douglas; Arlinghaus, Robert; Cooke, Steven J.; McIntyre, Peter B.; De Silva, Sena; Bartley, Devin; Cowx, Ian G.

    2011-01-01

    Inland fisheries are a vital component in the livelihoods and food security of people throughout the world, as well as contributing huge recreational and economic benefits. These valuable assets are jeopardized by lack of research-based understanding of the impacts of fisheries on inland ecosystems, and similarly the impact of human activities associated with inland waters on fisheries and aquatic biodiversity. To explore this topic, an international workshop was organized in order to examine strategies to incorporate fisheries into ecosystem approaches for management of inland waters. To achieve this goal, a new research agenda is needed that focuses on: quantifying the ecosystem services provided by fresh waters; quantifying the economic, social and nutritional benefits of inland fisheries; improving assessments designed to evaluate fisheries exploitation potential; and examining feedbacks between fisheries, ecosystem productivity and aquatic biodiversity. Accomplishing these objectives will require merging natural and social science approaches to address coupled social–ecological system dynamics. PMID:21325307

  14. Parallel digital forensics infrastructure.

    SciTech Connect

    Liebrock, Lorie M.; Duggan, David Patrick

    2009-10-01

    This report documents the architecture and implementation of a Parallel Digital Forensics infrastructure. This infrastructure is necessary for supporting the design, implementation, and testing of new classes of parallel digital forensics tools. Digital Forensics has become extremely difficult with data sets of one terabyte and larger. The only way to overcome the processing time of these large sets is to identify and develop new parallel algorithms for performing the analysis. To support algorithm research, a flexible base infrastructure is required. A candidate architecture for this base infrastructure was designed, instantiated, and tested by this project, in collaboration with New Mexico Tech. Previous infrastructures were not designed and built specifically for the development and testing of parallel algorithms. With the size of forensics data sets only expected to increase significantly, this type of infrastructure support is necessary for continued research in parallel digital forensics. This report documents the implementation of the parallel digital forensics (PDF) infrastructure architecture and implementation.

  15. Filtration stability of living brush mattresses at navigable waterways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokopp, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    According to the guidelines of the Federal Waterways Engineering and Research Institute in Germany, waterway construction buildings, which include soil bioengineering structures, must be stable against soil displacements. Therefore, willow brush mattresses were tested for their filtration stability in a specially developed process which is based on the testing of geotextiles and armourstones used for navigable waterway constructions. In March 2016 willow brush mattresses made of white (Salix alba L.) or basket willows (Salix viminalis L.) were planted in 16 sample boxes, each with a cross-section area of 30x30 cm. For the tests on filtration stability, the upper 20 cm of the box were separated and placed upside down into a device in which the sample box could be flowed through from below. When a water column of 50 cm above the sample was reached, the water outlet was opened so the water flowed through the sample in the opposite direction, thus simulating drawdown. By the measurements of the pressure sensors above and below the sample, the coefficient of permeability k of the rooted soil during drawdown could be calculated. After this hydropeaking cycle, the soil material that was rinsed out through the willow branches was collected, weighed after drying until weight constancy, and compared with the dry mass of the retained soil material to calculate the share of the total mass. These filtration stability tests were carried out directly after planting the sample boxes, as well as one, three and six months afterwards, each test series with four reruns per willow species. Over time, the increasing root penetration resulted in a significant reduction in the permeability and in more retained soil material.

  16. Maintenance Dredging of Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, South Carolina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    River Bridge to r’uth Edisto River 3.4 90’ 12.0 26. South Edisto River to Fenwick Cut 7.3 (a) 12.0 27. Fenwick Cut to Combahee River 5.9 (a...Rivcr to S)oul h Edisto River . lire lorrge,,t conI in- Itl bf-t Wl I, Cha)r teston and Bi-aufort is, the, one that (onnect s the Itaijiro ki.’r I Im...South Edisto River . On the reach between Charleston and Beaufort along the South Edisto River , there is a stretch of waterway 5,000 feet long with

  17. Overview of the Inland California Translational Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkas, Linda H.

    2017-05-01

    The mission of the Inland California Translational Consortium (ICTC), an independent research consortium comprising a unique hub of regional institutions (City of Hope [COH], California Institute of Technology [Caltech], Jet Propulsion Laboratory [JPL], University of California Riverside [UCR], and Claremont Colleges Keck Graduate Institute [KGI], is to institute a new paradigm within the academic culture to accelerate translation of innovative biomedical discoveries into clinical applications that positively affect human health and life. The ICTC actively supports clinical translational research as well as the implementation and advancement of novel education and training models for the translation of basic discoveries into workable products and practices that preserve and improve human health while training and educating at all levels of the workforce using innovative forward-thinking approaches.

  18. 77 FR 19937 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Mile 21.6, Illinois Waterway, Hardin, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Mile 21.6, Illinois Waterway, Hardin... Coast Guard has issued a temporary deviation from the operating schedule that governs the Hardin Drawbridge across the Illinois Waterway, mile 21.6, at Hardin, Illinois. The deviation is necessary...

  19. 33 CFR 165.806 - Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas... § 165.806 Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas—regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a regulated... thereto. (b) Unless otherwise authorized by the Captain of the Port, Port Arthur, Texas, tows on a hawser...

  20. 33 CFR 329.7 - Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway. 329.7 Section 329.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF... or interstate nature of waterway. A waterbody may be entirely within a state, yet still be capable of...

  1. 33 CFR 329.7 - Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway. 329.7 Section 329.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF... or interstate nature of waterway. A waterbody may be entirely within a state, yet still be capable of...

  2. 33 CFR 329.7 - Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway. 329.7 Section 329.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF... or interstate nature of waterway. A waterbody may be entirely within a state, yet still be capable of...

  3. 33 CFR 329.7 - Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway. 329.7 Section 329.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF... or interstate nature of waterway. A waterbody may be entirely within a state, yet still be capable of...

  4. 33 CFR 329.7 - Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway. 329.7 Section 329.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF... or interstate nature of waterway. A waterbody may be entirely within a state, yet still be capable of...

  5. 33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.821 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges...

  6. 33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.821 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges...

  7. 33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.821 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges...

  8. 33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.821 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges...

  9. 33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.821 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges...

  10. 78 FR 37969 - Safety Zone; South Park Bridge Construction, Lower Duwamish Waterway, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; South Park Bridge Construction, Lower Duwamish Waterway, Seattle, WA AGENCY: Coast... zone in the lower Duwamish Waterway around the South Park Bridge in Seattle, Washington for the re-construction of the bridge. The safety zone is necessary to ensure the safety of the maritime public and...

  11. 76 FR 37700 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... Waterway in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina during the Myrtle Beach Triathlon. The Myrtle Beach Triathlon...

  12. 33 CFR 165.T05-0741 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC. 165.T05-0741 Section 165.T05-0741 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Guard District § 165.T05-0741 Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC. (a... Carolina Beach, North Carolina (34°03′21″ N, 077°53′58″ W). (b) Regulations. The general safety zone...

  13. 77 FR 64411 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW), Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ...), Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of deviation from drawbridge regulation.... 74 Bridge across the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, NC. The... Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW) mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, NC has a vertical clearance of 20 feet, above...

  14. 78 FR 2650 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ...; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Proposed Rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast... Intracoastal Waterway at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone is necessary to provide for the... Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone...

  15. 33 CFR 165.T05-1082 - Safety Zone; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC. 165.T05-1082 Section 165.T05-1082 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.T05-1082 Safety Zone; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC..., mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina (34°13′07″ N/077°48′46″ W). (b) Regulations. The...

  16. 78 FR 23519 - Safety Zone; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ...; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Proposed Rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast... ] Intracoastal Waterway at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone is necessary to provide for the... Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone...

  17. 77 FR 35903 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Emerald Isle, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Emerald... Emerald Isle, North Carolina. The safety zone would temporarily restrict vessel movement. The safety zone... 58 Fixed Bridge crossing the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, mile 226, at Emerald Isle, North...

  18. 77 FR 57063 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Emerald Isle, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Emerald... proposes to extend a temporary safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway at Emerald..., at Emerald Isle, North Carolina. The safety zone extension would temporarily restrict vessel movement...

  19. 76 FR 38011 - Safety Zone; Hylebos Bridge Restoration, Hylebos Waterway, Tacoma, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... Waterway, Tacoma, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The U.S. Coast Guard... Bridge, Tacoma, WA in both directions along the entire length of the Hylebos Bridge to ensure the safety..., Hylebos Waterway, Tacoma, WA in the Federal Register (76 FR 14829). We received 0 comments on the proposed...

  20. 77 FR 35906 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Oak Island, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Oak Island... Island, North Carolina. The safety zone will temporarily restrict vessel movement. The safety zone is... Bridge crossing the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, mile 311.8, at Oak Island, North Carolina. DATES...

  1. Nature and the river: a natural resources report of the Chicago and Calumet waterways.

    Treesearch

    Barbara J Moore; John D. Rogner; Drew Ullberg

    1998-01-01

    In 1992, the National Park Service initiated a project to galvanize local interest in the conservation and use of the Chicago Waterway System. The purpose of this project was to promote local stewardship of the waterway system through the integration of economic development, recreation, and environmental conservation. As a result, the ChicagoRivers Demonstration...

  2. 77 FR 44463 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Sarasota, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... Waterway; the Tom Adams Bridge, mile 43.5, across the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway; and the Venice Bridge..., the Tom Adams Bridge, and the Venice Avenue Bridge in Sarasota, Florida. These deviations will result... deviation. 3. Tom Adams Bridge, mile 43.5. The vertical clearance of the Tom Adams Bridge, across the Gulf...

  3. 33 CFR 207.187 - Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Tex.; special floodgate, lock and navigation regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Intracoastal Waterway, and navigation of the tributary Colorado River Channel in the vicinity of said locks. (b) Definitions. The term current means the velocity of flow of water in the river. It is expressed in statute... level in the river and that in the waterway when the floodgates or lock gates are closed. The term...

  4. 33 CFR 209.180 - Temporary closure of waterway to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Temporary closure of waterway to navigation. 209.180 Section 209.180 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... navigation. (a) When an application is received for the temporary closure of a waterway for the construction...

  5. 33 CFR 165.806 - Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas-regulated navigation area. 165.806 Section 165.806 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED...

  6. 33 CFR 165.806 - Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas-regulated navigation area. 165.806 Section 165.806 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED...

  7. 33 CFR 165.806 - Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas-regulated navigation area. 165.806 Section 165.806 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED...

  8. 33 CFR 209.180 - Temporary closure of waterway to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Temporary closure of waterway to navigation. 209.180 Section 209.180 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... navigation. (a) When an application is received for the temporary closure of a waterway for the construction...

  9. 33 CFR 209.180 - Temporary closure of waterway to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Temporary closure of waterway to navigation. 209.180 Section 209.180 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... navigation. (a) When an application is received for the temporary closure of a waterway for the construction...

  10. 33 CFR 209.180 - Temporary closure of waterway to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Temporary closure of waterway to navigation. 209.180 Section 209.180 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... navigation. (a) When an application is received for the temporary closure of a waterway for the construction...

  11. 33 CFR 209.180 - Temporary closure of waterway to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Temporary closure of waterway to navigation. 209.180 Section 209.180 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... navigation. (a) When an application is received for the temporary closure of a waterway for the construction...

  12. 33 CFR 165.806 - Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas-regulated navigation area. 165.806 Section 165.806 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED...

  13. 78 FR 2916 - Special Local Regulation; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway, West...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway, West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Intracoastal Waterway, in West Palm Beach, Florida, during the West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship,...

  14. 76 FR 63840 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Duwamish West Waterway, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... of the Spokane Street Swing Bridge across the Duwamish West Waterway, mile 0.3, at Seattle, WA. This... INFORMATION: The Seattle Department of Transportation has requested that the Spokane Street Swing Bridge not... hours for a five day period. The Spokane Street Swing Bridge crosses the Duwamish West Waterway at...

  15. 33 CFR 165.1329 - Regulated Navigation Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA. 165.1329... Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA... Waterways EPA superfund cleanup site. Vessels may otherwise transit or navigate within this area...

  16. 33 CFR 165.1329 - Regulated Navigation Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA. 165.1329... Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA... Waterways EPA superfund cleanup site. Vessels may otherwise transit or navigate within this area...

  17. 33 CFR 165.1329 - Regulated Navigation Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA. 165.1329... Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA... Waterways EPA superfund cleanup site. Vessels may otherwise transit or navigate within this area...

  18. Recently planted vegetation strips reduce Giardia runoff reaching waterways.

    PubMed

    Winkworth, Cynthia L; Matthaei, Christoph D; Townsend, Colin R

    2008-01-01

    Current methods for tracking pathogens across farmland and into surrounding waterways via runoff are limited and typically have been developed using artificially created landscapes. No studies have investigated how Giardia in farm runoff moves across the landscape, despite high prevalence rates in dairy cattle (Bos taurus) worldwide. Here, we report the development of a field-based tracking method specific for Giardia movement in runoff and use this technique to compare the pathogen reduction capability of recently planted vegetation strips with bare soil strips cleared of vegetation. Such scenarios represent typical events in schemes to plant vegetation barriers aimed at reducing waterway contamination. A significant treatment effect was identified, with 26% fewer Giardia detected in runoff collected from the planted strip (P = 0.006). These results highlight the immediate benefit of pathogen removal to be gained from vegetation planting. The successful discrimination of treatment effects by this new technique will enable the assessment of different vegetation types on runoff reduction and the effects of plant development over time.

  19. Hydrogen Distribution Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mintz, Marianne; Molburg, John; Folga, Stephen; Gillette, Jerry

    2003-07-01

    Whether produced from fossil or non-fossil sources, the widespread use of hydrogen will require a new and extensive infrastructure to produce, distribute, store and dispense it as a vehicular fuel or for electric generation. Depending on the source from which hydrogen is produced and the form in which it is delivered, many alternative infrastructures can be envisioned. Tradeoffs in scale economies between process and distribution technologies, and such issues as operating cost, safety, materials, etc. can also favor alternative forms of infrastructure. This paper discusses several infrastructure alternatives and the associated "well-to-pump" or "fuel cycle" cost of delivered hydrogen.

  20. Remote Sensing of Coastal and Inland Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Keukelaere, L.; Sterckx, S.; Adriaensen, S.; Knaeps, E.

    2016-02-01

    The new generation of satellites (e.g. Landsat 8, HyspIRI, Sentinel 2 and Sentinel 3 …) contain sensors that enable monitoring at increased spatial and/or spectral resolution. This opens a wide range of new opportunities, amongst others improved observation of coastal and inland waters. Algorithms for the pre-processing of these images and the derivation of Level 2 products for these waters need to take into account the specific nature of these environments, with adjacency effects of the nearby land and complex interactions of the optially active substances with varying degrees of turbidity. Here a new atmospheric correction algorithm, OPERA, is presented which can deal with these highly complex environments and which is sensor generic. OPERA accounts for the contribution of adjacency effects and provides surface reflectances for both land and water targets. OPERA is extended with a level 2 water algorithm providing TSM and turbidity estimates for a wide variety of water types. The algorithm is based on a multi wavelength switching approach using shorter wavelengths in low turbid waters and long NIR and SWIR wavelengths for highly and extremely turbid waters. Results are shown for Landsat-8, Sentinel-2 and MERIS for a variety of scenes, validated with field aeronet and turbidity data.

  1. Infrastructure Survey 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the Group of Eight (Go8) conducted a survey on the state of its buildings and infrastructure. The survey is the third Go8 Infrastructure survey, with previous surveys being conducted in 2007 and 2009. The current survey updated some of the information collected in the previous surveys. It also collated data related to aspects of the…

  2. Smart Valley Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maule, R. William

    1994-01-01

    Discusses prototype information infrastructure projects in northern California's Silicon Valley. The strategies of the public and private telecommunications carriers vying for backbone services and industries developing end-user infrastructure technologies via office networks, set-top box networks, Internet multimedia, and "smart homes"…

  3. Green Infrastructure 101

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green Infrastructure 101 • What is it? What does it do? What doesn’t it do? • Green Infrastructure as a stormwater and combined sewer control • GI Controls and Best Management Practices that make sense for Yonkers o (Include operations and maintenance requirements for each)

  4. Smart Valley Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maule, R. William

    1994-01-01

    Discusses prototype information infrastructure projects in northern California's Silicon Valley. The strategies of the public and private telecommunications carriers vying for backbone services and industries developing end-user infrastructure technologies via office networks, set-top box networks, Internet multimedia, and "smart homes"…

  5. Mapping of Escherichia coli Sources Connected to Waterways in the Ruamahanga Catchment, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Dymond, John R; Serezat, Dimitri; Ausseil, Anne-Gaelle E; Muirhead, Richard W

    2016-02-16

    Rivers and streams in New Zealand are natural with free access and used by many people for swimming and fishing. However, pastoral farming with free grazing animals is a common land use in New Zealand and faecal microorganisms from them often end up in waterways. These microorganisms can seriously affect human and animal health if ingested. This paper describes spatial modeling using GIS of Escherichia coli sources in a large catchment (350 000 ha), the Ruamahanga. By examining the pathway of water over and through soils, it is possible to determine whether E. coli sources are connected to waterways or not. The map of E. coli sources connected to waterways provides useful context to those setting water quality limits. This approach avoids the complexity of modeling the fate and transport of E. coli in waterways, yet still permits the assessment of catchment-wide mitigation and best management practice. Fencing of waterways would minimize E. coli sources directly defecated to water and would reduce total E. coli sources by approximately 35%. Introduction of dung beetles would minimize sources connected to waterways by overland flow and would reduce total E. coli sources by approximately 35%. Construction of dairy effluent ponds would minimize sources connected to waterways through high bypass flow in soils and would reduce total E. coli sources by approximately 25%.

  6. 46 CFR 11.430 - Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. 11... Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. Any license or MMC endorsement issued for service on the Great Lakes and inland waters is valid on all of the inland waters of the United States as defined in...

  7. 46 CFR 11.430 - Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. 11... Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. Any license or MMC endorsement issued for service on the Great Lakes and inland waters is valid on all of the inland waters of the United States as defined in...

  8. 46 CFR 11.430 - Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. 11... Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. Any license or MMC endorsement issued for service on the Great Lakes and inland waters is valid on all of the inland waters of the United States as defined in...

  9. 46 CFR 11.430 - Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. 11... Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. Any license or MMC endorsement issued for service on the Great Lakes and inland waters is valid on all of the inland waters of the United States as defined in...

  10. Refiners react to changes in the pipeline infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, K.A.

    1997-06-01

    Petroleum pipelines have long been a critical component in the distribution of crude and refined products in the U.S. Pipelines are typically the most cost efficient mode of transportation for reasonably consistent flow rates. For obvious reasons, inland refineries and consumers are much more dependent on petroleum pipelines to provide supplies of crude and refined products than refineries and consumers located on the coasts. Significant changes in U.S. distribution patterns for crude and refined products are reshaping the pipeline infrastructure and presenting challenges and opportunities for domestic refiners. These changes are discussed.

  11. Clostridium botulinum in the lakes and waterways of London.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G. R.; Moryson, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    Mud samples collected during 1974 from a large proportion of the lakes and waterways of London were examined for Clostridium botulinum. Of 69 such sites, 50 (72.5%) contained at least one type of the organism. Of the 50 positive sites, 31, 12, 1 and 10 contained, respectively, types B, C, D and E. Most of the demonstrations of type B required trypsinization of culture filtrates. An examination of 7 lakes in Edinburgh, made for the purpose of comparison, showed that 4 contained type B and one type C. An analysis of the results gave quantitative information on the value of (1) resampling apparently negative lakes, (2) the use of both heated and unheated culture inocula, and (3) trypsinization of culture filtrates. PMID:1104711

  12. [Attributes of forest infrastructure].

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun-kai; Jin, Ying-shan

    2007-06-01

    This paper discussed the origin and evolution of the conception of ecological infrastructure, the understanding of international communities about the functions of forest, the important roles of forest in China' s economic development and ecological security, and the situations and challenges to the ongoing forestry ecological restoration programs. It was suggested that forest should be defined as an essential infrastructure for national economic and social development in a modern society. The critical functions of forest infrastructure played in the transition of forestry ecological development were emphasized. Based on the synthesis of forest ecosystem features, it was considered that the attributes of forest infrastructure are distinctive, due to the fact that it is constructed by living biological material and diversified in ownership. The forestry ecological restoration program should not only follow the basic principles of infrastructural construction, but also take the special characteristics of forests into consideration in studying the managerial system of the programs. Some suggestions for the ongoing programs were put forward: 1) developing a modern concept of ecosystem where man and nature in harmony is the core, 2) formulating long-term stable investments for forestry ecological restoration programs, 3) implementing forestry ecological restoration programs based on infrastructure construction principles, and 4) managing forests according to the principles of infrastructural construction management.

  13. Mapping Hurricane Inland-Storm Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, M.; East, J. W.; Dorsey, M. E.; McGee, B. D.; McCallum, B. E.; Pearman, J. L.; Sallenger, A. H.; Holmes, R. R.; Berembrock, C. E.; Turnipseed, D. P.; Mason, R. R.

    2008-12-01

    Historically, hurricane-induced storm-tides were documented through analysis of structural or vegetative damage and high-water marks. However, these sources rarely provided quantitative information about the timing of the flooding, the sequencing of multiple paths by which the storm-surge waters arrived, or the magnitude of waves and wave run-up comprising floodwaters. In response to these deficiencies, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed and deployed an experimental mobile storm-surge network to provide detailed time-series data for selected hurricane landfalls. The USGS first deployed the network in September 2005 as Hurricane Rita approached the Texas and Louisiana coasts. The network for Rita consisted of 32 water-level and 14 barometric-pressure monitoring sites. Sensors were located at distances ranging from a few hundred feet to approximately 30 miles inland and sampled 4,000 square miles. Deployments have also occurred for Hurricanes Wilma, Gustav, and Ike. For Hurricane Gustav, more than 100 water level sensors were deployed. Analysis of the water-level data enable construction of maps depicting surge topography through time and space, essentially rendering elements of a 3-dimensional view of the storm-surge dome as it moves on- shore, as well as a map of maximum water-level elevations. The USGS also acquired LIDAR topographic data from coasts impacted by hurricanes. These data reveal extreme changes to the beaches and barrier islands that arise from hurricane storm surge and waves. By better understanding where extreme changes occur along our coasts, we will be able to position coastal structures away from hazards.

  14. Investigating Climate at an Inland Sea During Snowball Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A. J.; Bitz, C. M.; Warren, S. G.; Waddington, E. D.

    2013-12-01

    During the Neoproterozoic, the Earth's oceans may have been completely covered with thick ice, during periods commonly called Snowball Earth events. The Snowball Earth environment would seemingly have prohibited the survival of photosynthetic eukaryotic algae; however, these organisms were alive immediately prior to and immediate subsequent to these periods. Where on a Snowball Earth, or a Snowball-like exoplanet, could photosynthetic eukaryotic algae survive? Recent research, in attempt to reconcile this paradox, has demonstrated that narrow channels connected the ocean, called inland seas, could have provided refugia for photosynthetic eukaryotic algae during Snowball Earth events. Narrow channels could have restricted the flow of ocean-derived ice, called sea glaciers, diminishing sea-glacier penetration into these channels. Provided certain climate conditions and channel geometries, this diminished sea-glacier penetration would have allowed for either open water or thin sea ice, at the far end of these channels. A channel with open water or thin sea ice would provide the conditions needed for survival of photosynthetic eukaryotic algae. Here we test whether the climate needed to prevent sea-glacier penetration, could have existed in the special inland sea environment. Previous climate modeling of Snowball Earth has shown that tropical regions would have likely been warmer than the global average and would have experienced net sublimation at the surface. An inland sea located in the tropics would be surrounded by land that is bare and free from snow, while the inland sea itself would be either ice-covered or open water. With these conditions the inland sea would likely have a high albedo, while the surrounding bare land, would have a lower albedo. This albedo contrast could cause the climate over an inland sea to be warmer than the climate over the ice-covered ocean at the same latitude. We calculate the surface temperature and sublimation rate at an inland sea

  15. [Biobanks European infrastructure].

    PubMed

    Kinkorová, Judita; Topolčan, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Biobanks are structured repositories of human tissue samples connected with specific information. They became an integral part of personalized medicine in the new millennium. At the European research area biobanks are isolated not well coordinated and connected to the network. European commission supports European infrastructure BBMRI-ERIC (Biobanks and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure European Research Infrastructure Consortium), consortium of 54 members with more than 225 associated organizations, largely biobanks from over 30 countries. The aim is to support biomedical research using stored samples. Czech Republic is a member of the consortium as a national node BBMRI_CZ, consisting of five partners.

  16. A new algorithm for grid-based hydrologic analysis by incorporating stormwater infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yosoon; Yi, Huiuk; Park, Hyeong-Dong

    2011-08-01

    We developed a new algorithm, the Adaptive Stormwater Infrastructure (ASI) algorithm, to incorporate ancillary data sets related to stormwater infrastructure into the grid-based hydrologic analysis. The algorithm simultaneously considers the effects of the surface stormwater collector network (e.g., diversions, roadside ditches, and canals) and underground stormwater conveyance systems (e.g., waterway tunnels, collector pipes, and culverts). The surface drainage flows controlled by the surface runoff collector network are superimposed onto the flow directions derived from a DEM. After examining the connections between inlets and outfalls in the underground stormwater conveyance system, the flow accumulation and delineation of watersheds are calculated based on recursive computations. Application of the algorithm to the Sangdong tailings dam in Korea revealed superior performance to that of a conventional D8 single-flow algorithm in terms of providing reasonable hydrologic information on watersheds with stormwater infrastructure.

  17. Children's Health Curriculum Lesson 6: Keeping All of Our Waterways Clean

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This lesson helps kids understand the importance of water in our lives and describes the life cycle of freshwater. It also discusses how to keep trash from getting in storm drains and polluting our waterways.

  18. 76 FR 40617 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Near Hackberry, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ....8 west of Harvey Lock, near Hackberry, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. This deviation is necessary to... bridge on the SR 27 (Ellender Ferry) across the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, mile 243.8, west of...

  19. Inland Water Temperature and the recent Global Warming Hiatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, S. J.; Healey, N.; Lenters, J. D.; O'Reilly, C.

    2015-12-01

    We are using thermal infrared satellite data in conjunction with in situ measurements to produce water temperatures for all the large inland water bodies in North America and the rest of the world for potential use as climate indicator. Recent studies have revealed significant warming of inland waters throughout the world. The observed rate of warming is - in many cases - greater than that of the ambient air temperature. These rapid, unprecedented changes in inland water temperatures have profound implications for lake hydrodynamics, productivity, and biotic communities. Scientists are just beginning to understand the global extent, regional patterns, physical mechanisms, and ecological consequences of lake warming. As part of our earlier studies we have collected thermal infrared satellite data from those satellite sensors that provide long-term and frequent spaceborne thermal infrared measurements of inland waters including ATSR, AVHRR, and MODIS and used these to examine trends in water surface temperature for approximately 169 of the largest inland water bodies in the world. We are now extending this work to generate temperature time-series of all North American inland water bodies that are sufficiently large to be studied using 1km resolution satellite data for the last 3 decades, approximately 268 lakes. These data are then being related to changes in the surface air temperature and compared with regional trends in water surface temperature derived from CMIP5/IPCC model simulations/projections to better predict future temperature changes. We will discuss the available datasets and processing methodologies together with the patterns they reveal based on recent changes in the global warming, with a particular focus on the inland waters of the southwestern USA.

  20. Critical Infrastructure Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    2004-10-01

    The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System (CIMS) is a 3D modeling and simulation environment designed to assist users in the analysis of dependencies within individual infrastructure and also interdependencies between multiple infrastructures. Through visual cuing and textual displays, a use can evaluate the effect of system perturbation and identify the emergent patterns that evolve. These patterns include possible outage areas from a loss of power, denial of service or access, and disruption of operations. Method of Solution: CIMS allows the user to model a system, create an overlay of information, and create 3D representative images to illustrate key infrastructure elements. A geo-referenced scene, satellite, aerial images or technical drawings can be incorporated into the scene. Scenarios of events can be scripted, and the user can also interact during run time to alter system characteristics. CIMS operates as a discrete event simulation engine feeding a 3D visualization.

  1. EV Charging Infrastructure Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Karner, Donald; Garetson, Thomas; Francfort, Jim

    2016-08-01

    As highlighted in the U.S. Department of Energy’s EV Everywhere Grand Challenge, vehicle technology is advancing toward an objective to “… produce plug-in electric vehicles that are as affordable and convenient for the average American family as today’s gasoline-powered vehicles …” [1] by developing more efficient drivetrains, greater battery energy storage per dollar, and lighter-weight vehicle components and construction. With this technology advancement and improved vehicle performance, the objective for charging infrastructure is to promote vehicle adoption and maximize the number of electric miles driven. The EV Everywhere Charging Infrastructure Roadmap (hereafter referred to as Roadmap) looks forward and assumes that the technical challenges and vehicle performance improvements set forth in the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge will be met. The Roadmap identifies and prioritizes deployment of charging infrastructure in support of this charging infrastructure objective for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge

  2. Pennsylvania Reaches Infrastructure Milestone

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    With a series of “aye” votes, the Pennsylvania agency that turns EPA funding and state financing into water infrastructure projects crossed a key threshold recently – $8 billion in investment over nearly three decades

  3. Green Infrastructure Modeling Toolkit

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green infrastructure, such as rain gardens, green roofs, porous pavement, cisterns, and constructed wetlands, is becoming an increasingly attractive way to recharge aquifers and reduce the amount of stormwater runoff that flows into wastewater treatment plants or into waterbodies...

  4. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-01

    This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fueling station development.

  5. Green Infrastructure Modeling Toolkit

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green infrastructure, such as rain gardens, green roofs, porous pavement, cisterns, and constructed wetlands, is becoming an increasingly attractive way to recharge aquifers and reduce the amount of stormwater runoff that flows into wastewater treatment plants or into waterbodies...

  6. Clarkesville Green Infrastructure Implementation Strategy

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The report outlines the 2012 technical assistance for Clarkesville, GA to develop a Green Infrastructure Implementation Strategy, which provides the basic building blocks for a green infrastructure plan:

  7. Chemical analysis of sediment cores from the East Waterway (Everett, Washington). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crecelius, E.A.; Bloom, N.S.; Gurtisen, J.M.

    1984-06-01

    Chemical data for two sediment cores from the East Waterway of Everett, Washington, indicate that 20 to 30 cm of contaminated sediments are accumulating per year. The concentrations of several heavy metals (Pb, Hg and Cu), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and petroleum hydrocarbons increase with depth in the sediments suggesting contamination of this waterway has varied by as much as a factor of 10 during the last 5 years. 7 references, 9 figures, 12 tables.

  8. MFC Communications Infrastructure Study

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Cannon; Terry Barney; Gary Cook; George Danklefsen, Jr.; Paul Fairbourn; Susan Gihring; Lisa Stearns

    2012-01-01

    Unprecedented growth of required telecommunications services and telecommunications applications change the way the INL does business today. High speed connectivity compiled with a high demand for telephony and network services requires a robust communications infrastructure.   The current state of the MFC communication infrastructure limits growth opportunities of current and future communication infrastructure services. This limitation is largely due to equipment capacity issues, aging cabling infrastructure (external/internal fiber and copper cable) and inadequate space for telecommunication equipment. While some communication infrastructure improvements have been implemented over time projects, it has been completed without a clear overall plan and technology standard.   This document identifies critical deficiencies with the current state of the communication infrastructure in operation at the MFC facilities and provides an analysis to identify needs and deficiencies to be addressed in order to achieve target architectural standards as defined in STD-170. The intent of STD-170 is to provide a robust, flexible, long-term solution to make communications capabilities align with the INL mission and fit the various programmatic growth and expansion needs.

  9. Building safeguards infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Rebecca S; Mcclelland - Kerr, John

    2009-01-01

    Much has been written in recent years about the nuclear renaissance - the rebirth of nuclear power as a clean and safe source of electricity around the world. Those who question the nuclear renaissance often cite the risk of proliferation, accidents or an attack on a facility as concerns, all of which merit serious consideration. The integration of these three areas - sometimes referred to as 3S, for safety, security and safeguards - is essential to supporting the growth of nuclear power, and the infrastructure that supports them should be strengthened. The focus of this paper will be on the role safeguards plays in the 3S concept and how to support the development of the infrastructure necessary to support safeguards. The objective of this paper has been to provide a working definition of safeguards infrastructure, and to discuss xamples of how building safeguards infrastructure is presented in several models. The guidelines outlined in the milestones document provide a clear path for establishing both the safeguards and the related infrastructures needed to support the development of nuclear power. The model employed by the INSEP program of engaging with partner states on safeguards-related topics that are of current interest to the level of nuclear development in that state provides another way of approaching the concept of building safeguards infrastructure. The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative is yet another approach that underscored five principal areas for growth, and the United States commitment to working with partners to promote this growth both at home and abroad.

  10. Blow-down and blow-in of Inland`s No. 7 blast furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, J.; Quisenberry, P.; Carter, W.

    1995-12-01

    After extensive and detailed planning, a mini-reline of the 13.7 meter No. 7 Blast Furnace was executed in November 1993. The furnace lining had 18 million metric tons of production and the bosh, belly and lower stack lining were being maintained through a scheduled grouting practice. The mini-reline was planned for 33 days and the reline work included (a) replacing the bosh, belly and lower stack alumina lining with graphite brick, (b) gunning the middle and upper stack, (c) rebuilding the furnace top, stove burners and tapholes and (d) minor repairs to other auxiliary equipment. During this 33 day reline period the two 8 meter furnaces could only produce 40% of the normal production requirement, therefore the blow-down, quench, salamander tap and blow-in activities were critical to meeting the planned schedule. The planning of these activities was started in the spring of 1993 and included review of Inland`s past blow-down and blow-in performance as well as bench marking the performance of other large blast furnaces in North America, Japan and Europe. The development of the 1993 procedures focused on opportunities to accelerate the blow-down, quench, salamander tap and blow-in as well as having a clean hearth and stack which could also save time during the demolition phase of the reline. Any time that could be saved in these activities directly translated to an early start-up and more plantwide production. This paper will cover the successful planning and implementation of these activities which resulted in a 2 day reduction in the reline schedule, an accelerated production curve and an earlier than planned use of PCI during blow-in.

  11. Neonatal birth weight variations between inland and littoral Croatia.

    PubMed

    Bralić, Irena; Rodin, Urelija; Matanić, Dubravka; Jovancevic, Milivoj

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the study was to assess neonatal birth weight (BW) differences between inland and littoral Croatia, to identify BW groups with most pronounced differences, and possible variations in the rate of BW > or = 4000 g between Sibenik area and the rest of littoral (counties with access to the Adriatic Sea) and inland Croatia. The study included data on 99.42% of 200,740 live births recorded in 37 Croatian maternity hospitals during the 2001-2005 period. Distribution of 500-g BW groups was analyzed irrespective of neonatal sex and gestational age. Differences were found between the inland and littoral parts of Croatia according to distribution of the BW groups of < 2500 g (5.4% vs. 4.4%), 2500-3999 g (84% vs. 80.2%) and > or = 4000 g (10.6% vs. 15.4%) (chi2 = 882; p < 0.001).The highest rate of BW > or = 4000 g was recorded in Sibenik-Knin County (5-year mean 18.32%) and was greater throughout the littoral as compared with inland Croatia (5-year mean 14.99% vs. 9.58%). A shift towards higher BWgroups recorded throughout littoral as compared with inland Croatia supports the hypothesis on variation in anthropologic characteristics in the respective populations to be pronounced as early as at birth. Study results confirmed fetal macrosomia not to be exclusively characteristic of Sibenik-Knin County, since the rate of neonatal BW > or =4000 g was significantly higher in the entire littoral as compared with inland Croatia.

  12. Waterway-View Imaging with a Small Unmanned Surface System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, S. N.; Peschel, J.

    2015-12-01

    This research investigated the use of a small unmanned surface system (USS) for waterway-view imaging in an intensively managed agricultural landscape. Tile drains commonly dewater landscapes into drainage tributaries so that land uses such as agricultural production can occur. The outlets of tile drain networks, which contribute to the water balance in a river network, are often located on private property and in most instances cannot be readily cataloged. Remote sensing presents one option for identifying tile drain networks but vegetation and other topographic occlusions may obstruct identification. This work presents a case study in the Upper Sangamon River Basin in East-Central Illinois for the use of a small USS utilizing visual sensing with a 360-degree camera as an alternative method of mapping agricultural tile drain outlets for improved hydrologic and hydraulic modeling. The results are expected to serve as groundwork for future design and refinement of small unmanned surface vehicles, as well as improved human interfaces for USS, and a foundation for better understanding human-machine interaction in USS applied to agricultural, riparian, and similar domains.

  13. Review of Contaminant Chemical Properties of Lower Mississippi River Waterways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manheim, F. T.; Horowitz, A. J.; Swarzenski, P. W.; Demas, C. R.; Hooper, R. P.

    2001-12-01

    We have examined large databases including historical data sets pertaining to contaminant chemistry and related parameters for sediments and waters in the Lower Mississippi River area. Investigated waterways range from salty (Gulf of Mexico), brackish (Lakes Pontchartrain and Maurepas), to fresh (Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers). Based on USGS data, trace metal concentrations in suspended matter from the Mississippi River are somewhat(<10%) greater than in the Atchafalaya River, and have been reported to be comparable to concentrations in Gulf sediments deposited near the Mississippi Delta. Sediments in layers of dated cores may thus reflect historical changes in ambient contaminants in the Mississippi River, as reported by B.J. Presley and coworkers (1998) and work currently in progress. Lead concentrations have declined since the 1970's but zinc and chlordane show stable or increasing concentrations, respectively. Lake Pontchartrain sediments come largely from Mississippi River influxes but show lower average contaminant concentrations in spite of being in proximity to New Orleans. Mixing of uncontaminated Pleistocene sediments through shell dredging may help account for this anomaly. Cumulative frequency/log concentration plots of contaminant metal concentrations in sediments from conterminous water bodies areas show distinct fractal character. Fractal plots for larger heterogeneous areas delineate discrete contaminant regimes as well as anomalies attributable to analytical methodology as distinct line segments. Fractal analysis offers an effective tool to characterize contaminant distributions in complex aqueous environments.

  14. Washington, D.C.'s vanishing springs and waterways

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Garnett P.

    1977-01-01

    This paper traces the disappearance or reduction of the many prominent springs and waterways that existed in Washington, D.C. , 200 years ago. The best known springs were the Smith Springs (now under the McMillan Reservoir), the Franklin Park Springs (13th and I Streets, NW.), Gibson 's Spring (15th and E Streets, NE.), Caffrey 's Spring (Ninth and F Streets, NW.), and the City Spring (C Street between Four and One-Half and Sixth Streets, NW.). Tiber Creek, flowing south to the Capitol and thence westward along Consititution Avenue, joined the Potomac River at 17th Street and Constitution Avenue. In the 1800's, the Constitution Avenue reach was made into a canal which was used by scows and steamboats up to about 1850. The canal was changed into a covered sewer in the 1870's, and the only remaining visible surface remnant is the lock-keeper 's little stone house at 17th and Constitution Avenue, NW. Because of sedimentation problems and reclamation projects, Rock Creek, the Potomac River , and the Anacostia River are considerably narrower and shallower today than they were in colonial times. For example, the mouth of Rock Creek at one time was a wide, busy ship harbor , which Georgetown used for an extensive foreign trade, and the Potomac River shore originally extended to 17th and Constitution Avenue, NW. (Woodard-USGS)

  15. Communicating and Visualizing Erosion-associated Risks to Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, Caspar; Simpson, Carolyn; Wainwright, John

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion is a major problem worldwide, affecting agriculture, the natural environment and urban areas through its impact on flood risk, water quality, loss of nutrient-rich upper soil layers, eutrophication of water bodies, sedimentation of waterways and sediment-related damage to roads, buildings and infrastructure such as water, gas and electricity supply networks. This study focuses on risks to infrastructure associated with erosion and the interventions needed to reduce those risks. Deciding on what interventions to make means understanding better which parts of the landscape are most susceptible to erosion and which measures are most effective in reducing it. Effective ways of communicating mitigation strategies to stakeholders such as farmers, land managers and policy-makers are then essential if interventions are to be implemented. Drawing on the Decision-Support Matrix (DSM) approach which combines a set of hydrological principles with Participatory Action Research (PAR), a decision-support tool for Communicating and Visualizing Erosion-Associated Risks to Infrastructure (CAVERTI) was developed. The participatory component was developed with the Wear Rivers Trust, focusing on a case-study area in the North East of England. The CAVERTI tool brings together process understanding gained from modelling with knowledge and experience of a variety of stakeholders to address directly the problem of sediment transport. Development of the tool was a collaborative venture, ensuring that the problems and solutions presented are easily recognised by practitioners and decision-makers. This recognition, and ease of access via a web-based interface, in turn help to ensure that the tools get used. The web-based tool developed helps to assess, manage and improve understanding of risk from a multi-stakeholder perspective and proposes solutions to problems. We argue that visualization and communication tools co-developed by researchers and stakeholders are the best means

  16. ITER Cryoplant Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauve, E.; Monneret, E.; Voigt, T.; Vincent, G.; Forgeas, A.; Simon, M.

    2017-02-01

    The ITER Tokamak requires an average 75 kW of refrigeration power at 4.5 K and 600 kW of refrigeration Power at 80 K to maintain the nominal operation condition of the ITER thermal shields, superconducting magnets and cryopumps. This is produced by the ITER Cryoplant, a complex cluster of refrigeration systems including in particular three identical Liquid Helium Plants and two identical Liquid Nitrogen Plants. Beyond the equipment directly part of the Cryoplant, colossal infrastructures are required. These infrastructures account for a large part of the Cryoplants lay-out, budget and engineering efforts. It is ITER Organization responsibility to ensure that all infrastructures are adequately sized and designed to interface with the Cryoplant. This proceeding presents the overall architecture of the cryoplant. It provides order of magnitude related to the cryoplant building and utilities: electricity, cooling water, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC).

  17. Detection of multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli in the urban waterways of Milwaukee, WI

    PubMed Central

    Kappell, Anthony D.; DeNies, Maxwell S.; Ahuja, Neha H.; Ledeboer, Nathan A.; Newton, Ryan J.; Hristova, Krassimira R.

    2015-01-01

    Urban waterways represent a natural reservoir of antibiotic resistance which may provide a source of transferable genetic elements to human commensal bacteria and pathogens. The objective of this study was to evaluate antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from the urban waterways of Milwaukee, WI compared to those from Milwaukee sewage and a clinical setting in Milwaukee. Antibiotics covering 10 different families were utilized to determine the phenotypic antibiotic resistance for all 259 E. coli isolates. All obtained isolates were determined to be multi-drug resistant. The E. coli isolates were also screened for the presence of the genetic determinants of resistance including ermB (macrolide resistance), tet(M) (tetracycline resistance), and β-lactamases (blaOXA, blaSHV, and blaPSE). E. coli from urban waterways showed a greater incidence of antibiotic resistance to 8 of 17 antibiotics tested compared to human derived sources. These E. coli isolates also demonstrated a greater incidence of resistance to higher numbers of antibiotics compared to the human derived isolates. The urban waterways demonstrated a greater abundance of isolates with co-occurrence of antibiotic resistance than human derived sources. When screened for five different antibiotic resistance genes conferring macrolide, tetracycline, and β-lactam resistance, clinical E. coli isolates were more likely to harbor ermB and blaOXA than isolates from urban waterway. These results indicate that Milwaukee’s urban waterways may select or allow for a greater incidence of multiple antibiotic resistance organisms and likely harbor a different antibiotic resistance gene pool than clinical sources. The implications of this study are significant to understanding the presence of resistance in urban freshwater environments by supporting the idea that sediment from urban waterways serves as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance. PMID:25972844

  18. Detection of multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli in the urban waterways of Milwaukee, WI.

    PubMed

    Kappell, Anthony D; DeNies, Maxwell S; Ahuja, Neha H; Ledeboer, Nathan A; Newton, Ryan J; Hristova, Krassimira R

    2015-01-01

    Urban waterways represent a natural reservoir of antibiotic resistance which may provide a source of transferable genetic elements to human commensal bacteria and pathogens. The objective of this study was to evaluate antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from the urban waterways of Milwaukee, WI compared to those from Milwaukee sewage and a clinical setting in Milwaukee. Antibiotics covering 10 different families were utilized to determine the phenotypic antibiotic resistance for all 259 E. coli isolates. All obtained isolates were determined to be multi-drug resistant. The E. coli isolates were also screened for the presence of the genetic determinants of resistance including ermB (macrolide resistance), tet(M) (tetracycline resistance), and β-lactamases (bla OXA, bla SHV, and bla PSE). E. coli from urban waterways showed a greater incidence of antibiotic resistance to 8 of 17 antibiotics tested compared to human derived sources. These E. coli isolates also demonstrated a greater incidence of resistance to higher numbers of antibiotics compared to the human derived isolates. The urban waterways demonstrated a greater abundance of isolates with co-occurrence of antibiotic resistance than human derived sources. When screened for five different antibiotic resistance genes conferring macrolide, tetracycline, and β-lactam resistance, clinical E. coli isolates were more likely to harbor ermB and bla OXA than isolates from urban waterway. These results indicate that Milwaukee's urban waterways may select or allow for a greater incidence of multiple antibiotic resistance organisms and likely harbor a different antibiotic resistance gene pool than clinical sources. The implications of this study are significant to understanding the presence of resistance in urban freshwater environments by supporting the idea that sediment from urban waterways serves as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance.

  19. Giving Up Terrain: The U.S. Armed Force’s Failure to Control Inland Waterways in the 21st Century

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-04

    countries like China, Korea, Mexico , Venezuela, Peru, Philippines, Russia, and Germany. 5 In the ‗60s, the U.S. military took part in its largest joint...twenty-first century. Both service chiefs, ADM Frank Kelso and Gen Carl Mundy , defined ―power projection from the sea‖ as ―bombs, missiles, shells...494. 33 Ibid., 520. 34 (Kelso and Mundy 1992). 35 Ibid. 10 National Security Strategy‖ is ―projection of power from sea to land.‖ 36 Again

  20. An Infrastructure Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    This article invites teachers to let their students' imaginations soar as they become part of a team that will design a whole new kind of living technological museum, a facility that celebrates the world of infrastructure. In this activity, a new two-story building will be built, occupying a vacant corner parcel of land, approximately 150…

  1. An Infrastructure Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    This article invites teachers to let their students' imaginations soar as they become part of a team that will design a whole new kind of living technological museum, a facility that celebrates the world of infrastructure. In this activity, a new two-story building will be built, occupying a vacant corner parcel of land, approximately 150…

  2. An Infrastructure Roadmap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furgeson, Steven P.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how a master infrastructure plan for electrical and mechanical systems can help determine annual maintenance budgets, form annual capital-improvement budgets, take a snapshot of existing conditions, and lead to better energy management. Discusses important elements in such plans. (EV)

  3. Infrastructure Survey 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    In 2008 the Group of Eight (Go8) released a first report on the state of its buildings and infrastructure, based on a survey undertaken in 2007. A further survey was undertaken in 2009, updating some information about the assessed quality, value and condition of buildings and use of space. It also collated data related to aspects of the estate not…

  4. Assessing the value of the ATL13 inland water level product for the Global Flood Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, G.; Pappenberger, F.; Bates, P. D.; Neal, J. C.; Jasinski, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports on the activities and first results of an our ICESat-2 Early Adopter (EA) project for inland water observations. Our team will assess the value of the ICESat-2 water level product using two flood model use cases, one over the California Bay Delta and one over the Niger Inland Delta. Application of the ALT13 product into routine operations will be ensured via an ALT13 database integrated into the pillar "Global Flood Service and Toolbox" (GFST) of the Global Flood Partnership (GFP). GFP is a cooperation framework between scientific organizations and flood disaster managers worldwide to develop flood observational and modelling infrastructure, leveraging on existing initiatives for better predicting and managing flood disaster impacts and flood risk globally. GFP is hosted as an Expert Working Group by the Global Disaster Alert and Coordination System (GDACS). The objective of this EA project is to make the ICESat-2 water level data available to the international GFP community. The EA team believes that the ALT13 product, after successful demonstration of its value in model calibration/validation and monitoring of large floodplain inundation dynamics, should be made easily accessible to the GFP. The GFST will host data outputs and tools from different flood models and for different applications and regions. All these models can benefit from ALT13 if made available to GFP through GFST. Here, we will introduce both test cases and their model setups and report on first preliminary "capabilities" test runs with the Niger model and ICESat-1 as well as radar altimeter data. Based on our results, we will also reflect on expected capabilities and potential of the ICESat-2 mission for river observations.

  5. Assessing the Climate Change Vulnerability of Physical Infrastructures through a Spatial Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myeong, S.

    2012-12-01

    Natural hazards can destroy or damage physical infrastructures and thus incur socioeconomic losses and threaten the safety of people. Therefore, identifying the vulnerability of a given society's physical infrastructure to climate change and developing appropriate adaptation measures are necessary. A recent trend of climate change vulnerability assessment has shifted its focus from the index-based assessment to the spatial analysis of the vulnerability to climate change in order to see the distribution of vulnerable areas. Although some research has been conducted on the US and Southwestern Asia, no formal research has been conducted on Korea that assessed the vulnerable areas in terms of spatial distribution. The current study attempts to see what types of vulnerability exist in what areas of the country through an analysis of data gathered from different sectors of Korea. Three domains, i.e., sensitivity, exposure, and adaptive capacity, were investigated, with subordinate component data under each domain, to assess the vulnerability of the country. The results showed that the vulnerability degree differs between coastal areas and inland areas. For most subordinate components, coastal areas were more vulnerable than inland areas. Within the inland areas, less urbanized areas were more sensitive to the climate change than more urbanized areas, while large metropolitan areas were exposed more to the climate change due to the density of physical infrastructures. Some southern areas of the country had greater adaptive capacity economically and institutionally; however, Seoul and its vicinity had greater adaptive capacity related to physical infrastructures. The study concludes that since damages from natural disasters such as floods and typhoons are becoming increasingly serious around the world as well as in Korea, it is necessary to develop appropriate measures for physical infrastructure to adapt to the climate change, customized to the specific needs of different

  6. The timber resources of the Inland Empire area, Washington.

    Treesearch

    Hal A. Arbogast

    1974-01-01

    The latest inventory of the timber resources of the Inland Empire area of Washington indicates there are 24 billion board feet of sawtimber on 3.9 million acres of commercial forest land. Public agencies administer about 56 percent of the area and 70 percent of the sawtimber volume, farmer and miscellaneous private ownerships account for 37 percent of the area but only...

  7. 33 CFR 62.32 - Inland waters obstruction mark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inland waters obstruction mark. 62.32 Section 62.32 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System §...

  8. 33 CFR 62.32 - Inland waters obstruction mark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inland waters obstruction mark. 62.32 Section 62.32 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System §...

  9. 33 CFR 62.32 - Inland waters obstruction mark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inland waters obstruction mark. 62.32 Section 62.32 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System §...

  10. 33 CFR 62.32 - Inland waters obstruction mark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inland waters obstruction mark. 62.32 Section 62.32 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System §...

  11. 33 CFR 62.32 - Inland waters obstruction mark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inland waters obstruction mark. 62.32 Section 62.32 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System §...

  12. Restoring fire-prone Inland Pacific landscapes: seven core principles

    Treesearch

    Paul F. Hessburg; Derek J. Churchill; Andrew J. Larson; Ryan D. Haugo; Carol Miller; Thomas A. Spies; Malcolm P. North; Nicholas A. Povak; R. Travis Belote; Peter H. Singleton; William L. Gaines; Robert E. Keane; Gregory H. Aplet; Scott L. Stephens; Penelope Morgan; Peter A. Bisson; Bruce E. Rieman; R. Brion Salter; Gordon H. Reeves

    2015-01-01

    Context More than a century of forest and fire management of Inland Pacific landscapes has transformed their successional and disturbance dynamics. Regional connectivity of many terrestrial and aquatic habitats is fragmented, flows of some ecological and physical processes have been altered in space and time, and the frequency, size and intensity of many disturbances...

  13. Stand establishment and tending in the Inland Northwest

    Treesearch

    Russell T. Graham; Theresa B. Jain; Phil Cannon

    2005-01-01

    The moist, cold, and dry forests of the Inland Northwest occupy approximately 144 million acres. Ponderosa pine, lodgepole pine, western white pine, western larch, and Douglas-fir are usually the preferred commercial species of the area. These early-seral species are relatively resistant to endemic levels of insects and diseases. They tend to grow rapidly and in...

  14. Higher melanoma incidence in coastal versus inland counties in California.

    PubMed

    Korgavkar, Kaveri; Lee, Kachiu C; Weinstock, Martin A

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of melanoma is increasing and there is significant variation by geographical location between and within countries. We sought to determine the incidence of melanoma in coastal versus inland counties in California. Data on melanoma incidence were obtained for 2000-2009 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program of the National Cancer Institute. Incidences for melanoma in situ and invasive melanoma for major racial and ethnic groups for coastal and inland counties were analyzed using multivariable Poisson regression, with adjustment for socioeconomic factors (income, education), ultraviolet index, and latitude. Further analyses were carried out for the non-Hispanic white population through stratification of in-situ versus invasive melanoma, age, thickness, and anatomic distribution. The incidence of melanoma in situ is greater in coastal counties of California than inland counties (incidence rate ratio 1.23, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.47) after adjusting for socioeconomic factors, ultraviolet index, and latitude. In non-Hispanic whites, this difference is significant for in-situ and thin (≤ 1.00 mm) melanomas, but not for melanomas of greater thickness. In melanoma in situ and thin melanomas in non-Hispanic whites, the incidence is greater in coastal versus inland counties. Causes may include differences in exposures, differences in detection, or artifacts such as residual confounding. Our study highlights the need for further research in identifying and addressing these differences.

  15. Planning for prescribed burning in the inland northwest.

    Treesearch

    Robert E. Martin; John D. Dell

    1978-01-01

    Fire has historically played a role in forests and ranges of the inland Northwest. This guide has been prepared to help managers understand the role of fire and the potential uses of fire and to plan for fire use in managing these lands. Sections deal with these topics, and steps in planning a prescribed burn are outlined. A sample burning situation illustrates the...

  16. Investigations of Fusarium diseases within Inland Pacific Northwest forest nurseries

    Treesearch

    Robert L. James; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2007-01-01

    Fusarium spp. cause important diseases that limit production of seedlings in forest nurseries worldwide. Several aspects of these diseases have been investigated for many years within Inland Pacific Northwest nurseries to better understand disease etiology, pathogen inoculum sources, and epidemiology. Investigations have also involved improving...

  17. Wetlands as a large carbon source for inland waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril, Gwenaël; Martinez, Jean-Michel; Artigas, L. Felipe; Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Benedetti, Marc F.; Vidal, Luciana; Meziane, Tarik; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Bernardes, Marcelo C.; Deborde, Jonathan; Lima Souza, Edivaldo; Albéric, Patrick; Landim de Souza, Marcelo F.; Roland, Fabio

    2014-05-01

    Recent estimates suggests that up to 3 PgC y-1 could be emitted as CO2 from global inland waters, offsetting the carbon uptake by terrestrial ecosystems. It is generally assumed that inland waters emit carbon previously fixed upstream by land plant photosynthesis and subsequently transported downstream with runoff. But the observed carbon fluxes from first-order streams do not account for all of the CO2 outgassing at the scale of entire watersheds. Three-quarters of the world's flooded land are temporary wetlands. However, the contribution of these productive ecosystems to the inland water carbon budget has been largely overlooked. Based on observations in rivers and floodplains of the central Amazon, we suggest that wetlands pump large amounts of atmospheric CO2 into river waters. Indeed, the magnitude of CO2 outgassing in Amazonian waters is spatially and temporally related to their connection with the semi-aquatic vegetation that performs aerial photosynthesis (Flooded forests and floating macrophytes). These wetlands export half of their gross primary production to waters as dissolved CO2 and organic carbon, compared to only a few percent of gross primary production in upland ecosystems. Global carbon budgets should explicitly address temporary or vegetated flooded areas, as these ecosystems combine high aerial primary production with a large and fast carbon export capacity, potentially supporting a significant fraction of CO2 evasion from inland waters.

  18. Database for Hydrological Time Series of Inland Waters (DAHITI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwatke, Christian; Dettmering, Denise

    2016-04-01

    Satellite altimetry was designed for ocean applications. However, since some years, satellite altimetry is also used over inland water to estimate water level time series of lakes, rivers and wetlands. The resulting water level time series can help to understand the water cycle of system earth and makes altimetry to a very useful instrument for hydrological applications. In this poster, we introduce the "Database for Hydrological Time Series of Inland Waters" (DAHITI). Currently, the database contains about 350 water level time series of lakes, reservoirs, rivers, and wetlands which are freely available after a short registration process via http://dahiti.dgfi.tum.de. In this poster, we introduce the product of DAHITI and the functionality of the DAHITI web service. Furthermore, selected examples of inland water targets are presented in detail. DAHITI provides time series of water level heights of inland water bodies and their formal errors . These time series are available within the period of 1992-2015 and have varying temporal resolutions depending on the data coverage of the investigated water body. The accuracies of the water level time series depend mainly on the extent of the investigated water body and the quality of the altimeter measurements. Hereby, an external validation with in-situ data reveals RMS differences between 5 cm and 40 cm for lakes and 10 cm and 140 cm for rivers, respectively.

  19. 77 FR 52175 - Changes to the Inland Navigation Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... advancements, such as wing-in-ground craft, and increasing public awareness of the inland navigation rules. The... Convention for Safety of Life at Sea U.S.C. United States Code WIG craft Wing-in-Ground craft III. Basis and... proposes are as follows: 1. The IMO incorporated the term ``Wing-In-Ground (WIG) craft'' into several...

  20. Analysis of native water, bed material, and elutriate samples of major Louisiana waterways, 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demas, Charles R.

    1976-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, conducted a series of elutriate studies in selected reaches of major navigable waterways of Louisiana. As defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, an elutriate is the supernatant resulting from the vigorous 30-minute shaking of one part bottom sediment from the dredging site with four parts water (vol/vol) collected from the dredging site followed by one hour settling time and appropriate centrifugation and a 0.45-micron filtration. The elutriate studies were initiated to evaluate possible environmental effects of proposed dredging activities in selected reaches of Louisiana waterways. The waterways investigated were the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet, Breton Sound, Mississippi River downstream from Baton Rouge, Bayou Long, Intracoastal Waterway (east and west of the Harvey Canal), Three Rivers area, Ouachita River, Barataria Bay, Houma Navigation Canal, Atchafalaya Bay (Ship Channel), Berwick Bay, Intracoastal Waterway (Port Allen to Morgan City), Petite Anse area, and Calcasieu River and Ship Channel. The Geological Survey collected 227 samples of native water and bed (bottom) material from 130 different sites. These samples (as well as elutriates prepared from mixtures of native water and bed material) were analyzed for selected metal, pesticide, nutrient, and organic constituents. An additional 116 bed samples collected at 58 sites were analyzed for selected pesticides; and 4 additional native-water samples from 2 sites were analyzed for selected metal pesticide, nutrient, and organic constituents. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Water-quality sampling plan for evaluating the distribution of bigheaded carps in the Illinois Waterway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duncker, James J.; Terrio, Paul J.

    2017-02-27

    The two nonnative invasive bigheaded carp species (bighead carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis and silver carp H. molitrix) that were accidentally released in the 1970s have spread widely into the rivers and waterways of the Mississippi River Basin. First detected in the lower reaches of the Illinois Waterway (IWW, the combined Illinois River-Des Plaines River-Chicago Area Waterway System) in the 1990s, bighead and silver carps moved quickly upstream, approaching the Chicago Area Waterway System. The potential of substantial negative ecological and economic impact to the Great Lakes from the presence of these species is a concern. However, since 2006, the population front of bigheaded carps has remained in the vicinity of Joliet, Illinois, near river mile 278. This reach of the IWW is characterized by stark changes in habitat, water quality, and food resources as the waterway transitions from a primarily agricultural landscape to a metropolitan and industrial canal system. This report describes a 2015 plan for sampling the IWW to establish water-quality conditions that might be contributing to the apparent stalling of the population front of bigheaded carps in this reach. A detailed description of the study plan, Lagrangian-style sampling approach, selected analytes, sampling methods and protocols are provided. Hydrographs from streamflow-gaging stations show IWW conditions during the 2015 sampling runs.

  2. Sediment contamination and associates laboratory-measured bioaccumulation in New York/New Jersey waterways

    SciTech Connect

    Rosman, L.B.; Barrows, E.S.

    1995-12-31

    Sediments from 10 New York/New Jersey waterways within the Hudson-Raritan Estuary and Long Island Sound were collected to depths representative of dredging activity. Composited core sediments representing each waterway were analyzed for metals, PAHs, PCBs, and pesticides. To assess bioaccumulation, sand worms (Nereis virens) and blunt-nose clams (Macoma nasuta) were exposed for 28 days to sediment composites and to New York Bight sediment. Tissues were analyzed for the same constituents as the sediment samples. The results highlight the range and magnitude of sediment contamination in NY/NJ waterways. Concentrations of some metals in sediments, compared with NY Bight sediment, were at least 10 times higher. Total PAHs reached 30,000 {micro}g/kg (dry weight). The sum of DDT, DDD, and DDE, the dominant pesticides, exceeded 3,000{micro}g/kg (dry weight). Total PCBs approached 3,000 {micro}g/kg (dry weight). Tissues exposed to sediments from several waterways bioaccumulated organic compounds at concentrations 10 times greater than those exposed to New York Bight sediments. Metals were bioaccumulated to a lesser degree. The presence and extent of bioaccumulated contaminants, along with sediment chemistry and benthic toxicity, create a profile characterizing each waterway.

  3. Mesoscale Modeling of the Inland Nocturnal Sea Breeze

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.J.; Buckley, R.L.

    1995-09-12

    The mesoscale sea breeze has important consequences for many densely populated coastal environments, including convection initiation, aviation safety, and air quality. The sea breeze characteristics before and after sunset are markedly different (Sha et al 1993). A gravity current will form during the early afternoon due to the relatively large density difference between the land and sea air. During the afternoon, as the lighter land air is forced upward by the cooler dense sea air, Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) billows often form along the interface, as well as thin regions of turbulent rising air, playing a crucial role in the mixing process (Simpson 1994). After sunset, the frontal zone expands as longwave radiation cools the surface which reduces vertical mixing. With further inland penetration, the sea breeze encounters increasingly stable air near the ground, resulting in the formation of an undular bore or cutoff vortex (Sha et al. 1993). It has been demonstrated that large-scale winds have profound effects on both the strength and inland penetration of sea breezes (Arritt 1993, among others). In general, offshore flow results in a sharper frontal discontinuity and less inland penetration, while onshore flow produces weaker fronts which may penetrate further inland. Most sea breeze studies have focused on its more dramatic daytime properties near the coast whereas inland nocturnal sea breezes have received much less attention. The reason for this neglect is a lack of good observational data in the boundary layer. Sha et al. (1991) note the necessity of high resolution data to capture the finer structures of the sea breeze. A unique opportunity to examine the nocturnal sea breeze became available at the Savannah River Site (SRS, located roughly 150 km from the Atlantic Ocean in southwestern South Carolina) during the Stable Boundary Layer Experiment (STABLE), 12-17 April, 1988. (Abstract Truncated)

  4. 48 CFR 47.303-11 - F.o.b. inland point, country of importation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false F.o.b. inland point... ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-11 F.o.b. inland point, country of importation. (a) Explanation of delivery term. F.o.b. inland point, country...

  5. 48 CFR 47.303-10 - F.o.b. inland carrier, point of exportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false F.o.b. inland carrier... ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-10 F.o.b. inland carrier, point of exportation. (a) Explanation of delivery term. F.o.b. inland carrier, point...

  6. 48 CFR 47.303-11 - F.o.b. inland point, country of importation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false F.o.b. inland point... ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-11 F.o.b. inland point, country of importation. (a) Explanation of delivery term. F.o.b. inland point, country...

  7. 48 CFR 52.247-39 - F.o.b. Inland Point, Country of Importation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false F.o.b. Inland Point... Provisions and Clauses 52.247-39 F.o.b. Inland Point, Country of Importation. As prescribed in 47.303-11(c), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts when the delivery term is f.o.b. inland...

  8. 48 CFR 47.303-10 - F.o.b. inland carrier, point of exportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false F.o.b. inland carrier... ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-10 F.o.b. inland carrier, point of exportation. (a) Explanation of delivery term. F.o.b. inland carrier, point...

  9. 48 CFR 52.247-39 - F.o.b. Inland Point, Country of Importation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false F.o.b. Inland Point... Provisions and Clauses 52.247-39 F.o.b. Inland Point, Country of Importation. As prescribed in 47.303-11(c), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts when the delivery term is f.o.b. inland...

  10. 46 CFR 11.430 - Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. 11... Endorsements § 11.430 Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. (a) Any officer endorsement issued for service on Great Lakes and inland waters self-propelled vessels, excluding towing vessels, is...

  11. The Missionary Women in the Inland of Australia and the Australian Inland Mission as Represented in Beth Beckett's Life Memoir

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliyanah, Evi

    2010-01-01

    This article looks at the gender dimension of religious missions administered by the Presbyterian Church in the inland Australia as represented in Beth Beckett's life memoir written in 1947-1955. It is aimed at obtaining general ideas on the involvement of women, as the wives of missionaries. Focusing on the experience of Beth Beckett, it argues…

  12. The Missionary Women in the Inland of Australia and the Australian Inland Mission as Represented in Beth Beckett's Life Memoir

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliyanah, Evi

    2010-01-01

    This article looks at the gender dimension of religious missions administered by the Presbyterian Church in the inland Australia as represented in Beth Beckett's life memoir written in 1947-1955. It is aimed at obtaining general ideas on the involvement of women, as the wives of missionaries. Focusing on the experience of Beth Beckett, it argues…

  13. 75 FR 30753 - Regulated Navigation Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood... and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways in Commencement Bay, Tacoma, Washington. The RNA would protect the seabed... rulemaking (NPRM) entitled ``Regulated Navigation Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA...

  14. 33 CFR 165.1329 - Regulated Navigation Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA. 165.1329... Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA...

  15. 33 CFR 165.514 - Safety Zone: Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway and connecting waters, vicinity of Marine Corps Base...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Intracoastal Waterway and connecting waters, vicinity of Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. 165... Intracoastal Waterway and connecting waters, vicinity of Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. (a... 39290) at approximate position 34°33′07″ North, 077°20′30″ West. All coordinates reference Datum: NAD...

  16. EPA NRMRL green Infrastructure research

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green Infrastructure is an engineering approach to wet weather flow management that uses infiltration, evapotranspiration, capture and reuse to better mimic the natural drainage processes than traditional gray systems. Green technologies supplement gray infrastructure to red...

  17. Green Infrastructure Checklists and Renderings

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Materials and checklists for Denver, CO to review development project plans for green infrastructure components, best practices for inspecting and maintaining installed green infrastructure. Also includes renderings of streetscape projects.

  18. In Situ Nuclear Characterization Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; J. Rory Kennedy

    2011-11-01

    To be able to evolve microstructure with a prescribed in situ process, an effective measurement infrastructure must exist. This interdisciplinary infrastructure needs to be developed in parallel with in situ sensor technology. This paper discusses the essential elements in an effective infrastructure.

  19. 33 CFR 165.T08-0434 - Safety Zone; Mile Marker 98.5 West of Harvey Lock Gulf Intracoastal Waterway to Mile Marker 108.5...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... West of Harvey Lock Gulf Intracoastal Waterway to Mile Marker 108.5 West of Harvey Lock Gulf... § 165.T08-0434 Safety Zone; Mile Marker 98.5 West of Harvey Lock Gulf Intracoastal Waterway to Mile Marker 108.5 West of Harvey Lock Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. (a) Location. Waters of the Gulf...

  20. Dissolved Mn Speciation and Ligand Characteristics in a Coastal Waterway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, V.; Jensen, L.; Luther, G. W., III

    2014-12-01

    Soluble manganese speciation (Mn(II) and Mn(III); 0.2 μm filtered) was measured along a salinity gradient in the Broadkill River, a coastal waterway bordered by wetlands and salt marshes in Delaware. We modified an established method of porphyrin (T-4(CP)P) addition, by incorporating a heating step and coupling a 100-cm cell to a UV/Vis detector, to achieve a 4.0 nM sample DL. Surface waters were collected from June to August, 2014 and total dissolved Mn (0.23 - 1.92 μM) first increased then decreased along the salinity gradient (31 ppt to freshwater). However, Mn speciation was highly variable; Mn(III) made up 0-49 % of the total dissolved Mn, where the highest Mn(III) values occurred at sites with high salt-marsh runoff. Mn(III) was not recoverable without the addition of a strong reducing agent, indicating that little or no weak ligand was present, and that a strong ligand was responsible for complexing Mn(III). An assessment of potential strong ligand character was made by precipitating humic matter, by acidifying subsamples to pH<1.5, then 100 μM Mn(III)-pyrophosphate was added to acidified supernatant samples and non-acidified samples. In non-acidified samples, the Mn(III)-pyrophosphate peak at 484 nm rapidly disappeared and was replaced by a broad peak at 400 nm and the resulting sample had a yellow color. Upon the addition of 500 μM desferrioxamine-B (DFOB) to the same sample, a peak at 310 nm appeared, indicating the formation of Mn(III)-DFOB. In acidified samples, the Mn(III)-pyrophosphate peak did not change. Humic matter, therefore, may be acting as an Mn(III) binding ligand, outcompeting pyrophosphate for Mn(III), however this natural ligand is outcompeted by a large excess of DFOB. The humic matter and increased Mn likely come from the salt marsh runoff during tidal exchange, and we observed that as salinity increased, the amount of humic binding decreased. These results present the first Mn speciation measurements along a salinity gradient in

  1. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project

    SciTech Connect

    Heydorn, Edward C

    2013-03-12

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a real-world retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation's hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling stations

  2. Grand challenges in the management and conservation of North American inland fishes and fisheries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lynch, Abigail; Cooke, Steven J.; Beard, Douglas; Kao, Yu-Chun; Lorenzen, Kai; Song, Andrew M.; Allen, Micheal S.; Basher, Zeenatul; Bunnell, David B.; Camp, Edward V.; Cowx, Ian G.; Freedman, Jonathan A.; Nguyen, Vivian M.; Nohner, Joel K.; Rogers, Mark W.; Siders, Zachary A.; Taylor, William W.; Youn, So-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Even with long-standing management and extensive science support, North American inland fish and fisheries still face many conservation and management challenges. We used a grand challenges approach to identify critical roadblocks that if removed would help solve important problems in the management and long-term conservation of North American inland fish and fisheries. We identified seven grand challenges within three themes (valuation, governance, and externalities) and 34 research needs and management actions. The major themes identified are to (1) raise awareness of diverse values associated with inland fish and fisheries, (2) govern inland fish and fisheries to satisfy multiple use and conservation objectives, and (3) ensure productive inland fisheries given nonfishing sector externalities. Addressing these grand challenges will help the broader community understand the diverse values of inland fish and fisheries, promote open forums for engagement of diverse stakeholders in fisheries management, and better integrate the inland fish sector into the greater water and land use policy process.

  3. Inland saltwater as a medium for the production of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.E.; Reach, C.D.; O'Connor, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine if waste brine waters originating from inland salt seeps and crude oil production could be used to sustain the growth of marine organisms. In spite of a chemical composition significantly different from seawater controls, a central Missouri brine supported the rapid and dense growth of marine algae, which, in turn, was found to promote the normal growth of the brine shrimp Artemia. Additional experiments with oil-field brines indicated that the ability of waste brines to sustain algae-shrimp growth is site specific. The experimental results indicate that oil-field brines and inland salt waters can serve as media for the production of marine plants and animals.

  4. Inland Waters and the North American Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butman, D. E.; Striegl, R. G.; Stackpoole, S. M.; del Giorgio, P.; Prairie, Y.; Pilcher, D.; Raymond, P. A.; Alcocer, J.; Paz, F.

    2016-12-01

    Inland aquatic ecosystems process, store, and release carbon to the atmosphere and coastal margins. The form of this carbon is a function of terrestrial and aquatic primary and secondary production, the weathering of materials in soils and subsurface environments, the hydrologic controls on the movement of carbon from land to inland waters, and the connectivity between streams, rivers, lakes, reservoirs and groundwater. The 2007 1st State of the Carbon Cycle reported fluxes for the continental United States (CONUS) only. Streams and rivers exported 30-40 Tg C yr-1 to coastal environments, and 17-25 Tg C yr-1 were buried in lake and reservoir sediments. Remarkably, the 2007 report did not quantify gas emissions, which represent over half of the total carbon fluxes through inland water in the US. Current research has shown that 71-149 Tg C yr-1 exits freshwater systems either through atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide or as inorganic and organic carbon fluxes to the coast from the CONUS. These estimates did not include the Laurentian Great Lakes. Variation in the magnitude of these fluxes across regions of the CONUS has been linked to differences in precipitation and terrestrial net ecosystem production. Similar comprehensive assessments have not been done for Canada or Mexico. Here we provide, as part of the 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle report, estimates for the river coastal export and vertical emissions of carbon from inland waters of North America, and report major data gaps, and weaknesses in methodologies. These findings stress that strong international partnerships are needed to improve assessment, monitoring, and modeling of human impacts on the magnitude and timing of aquatic fluxes in the future.

  5. Operational models of infrastructure resilience.

    PubMed

    Alderson, David L; Brown, Gerald G; Carlyle, W Matthew

    2015-04-01

    We propose a definition of infrastructure resilience that is tied to the operation (or function) of an infrastructure as a system of interacting components and that can be objectively evaluated using quantitative models. Specifically, for any particular system, we use quantitative models of system operation to represent the decisions of an infrastructure operator who guides the behavior of the system as a whole, even in the presence of disruptions. Modeling infrastructure operation in this way makes it possible to systematically evaluate the consequences associated with the loss of infrastructure components, and leads to a precise notion of "operational resilience" that facilitates model verification, validation, and reproducible results. Using a simple example of a notional infrastructure, we demonstrate how to use these models for (1) assessing the operational resilience of an infrastructure system, (2) identifying critical vulnerabilities that threaten its continued function, and (3) advising policymakers on investments to improve resilience. © 2014 Society for Risk Analysis.

  6. Similarity of osmoregulatory capacity in coastal and inland alligator gar.

    PubMed

    Allen, Peter J; Haukenes, Alf; Lochmann, Steve E

    2017-07-01

    The alligator gar Atractosteus spatula is a primitive fish species, occupying a wide range of temperature and salinity habitats. Long-distance movements are limited, leading to genetic differentiation between inland and coastal populations. Unknown is whether physiological capacity differs between geographically separated populations, particularly for traits important to osmoregulation in saline environments. Alligator gar from inland and coastal populations were reared in a similar environment and exposed to temperature (10, 30°C) and salinity (0, 20ppt) extremes to determine whether iono- and osmoregulatory ability differed between populations. There were few differences in osmoregulatory ability between populations, with similar gill, blood and gastrointestinal tract osmoregulatory parameters. Blood plasma osmolality, ion concentrations, intestinal pH and bicarbonate base concentrations, intestinal fluid osmolality, ion concentrations and gill Na(+), K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activity were similar between populations. Notably, gar from both populations did not osmoregulate well at low temperature and high salinity, with elevated plasma osmolality and ion concentrations, low gill NKA, and little evidence of gastrointestinal tract contribution to ionic and base regulation based on a lack of intestinal fluid and low base content. Therefore, the hypothesis that coastal gar would have improved osmotic regulatory ability in saline environments as compared to inland alligator gar was not supported, suggesting physiological capacity may be retained in primitive species possibly due to its importance to their persistence through time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The contribution of lakes to global inland fisheries harvest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deines, Andrew M.; Bunnell, David B.; Rogers, Mark W.; Bennion, David; Woelmer, Whitney; Sayers, Michael J.; Grimm, Amanda G.; Shuchman, Robert A.; Raymer, Zachary B.; Brooks, Colin N.; Mychek-Londer, Justin G.; Taylor, William W.; Beard, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Freshwater ecosystems provide numerous services for communities worldwide, including irrigation, hydropower, and municipal water; however, the services provided by inland fisheries – nourishment, employment, and recreational opportunities – are often comparatively undervalued. We provide an independent estimate of global lake harvest to improve biological and socioeconomic assessments of inland fisheries. On the basis of satellite-derived estimates of chlorophyll concentration from 80,012 globally distributed lakes, lake-specific fishing effort based on human population, and output from a Bayesian hierarchical model, we estimated that the global lake fishery harvest in the year 2011 was 8.4 million tons (mt). Our calculations excluded harvests from highly productive rivers, wetlands, and very small lakes; therefore, the true cumulative global fishery harvest from all freshwater sources likely exceeded 11 mt as reported by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). This putative underestimate by the FAO could diminish the perceived importance of inland fisheries and perpetuate decisions that adversely affect these fisheries and millions of people.

  8. Characterization of SAR Mode Altimetry over Inland Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabry, Pierre; Bercher, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Radar altimetry over the inland water domain is a difficult topic that still requires a lot of human expertise as well as manual editing and verifications. This is mainly due to the fact that inland water scenes are highly variable, both in space and time, which leads to a much broader range of radar signatures than in oceanography. The remark is particularly true for LRM altimetry and remains valid in many cases in SAR mode (SARM). In preparation for the operational Sentinel-3 mission and to better benefit from the improved SARM along-track resolution it is required to: 1. better characterize the SARM Individual Echoes, Multi-Look Stacks, 20Hz waveforms as well as the Range Integrated Power (RIP) over the inland water domain, 2. step toward processing schemes that account for the actual content of the illuminated scene. In this work, we introduce an automated technique to assess the water fraction within the Beam-limited Doppler footprint through its intersection area of with a water mask. This framework opens up new ways toward the automated characterization and processing of altimetry data based on regularly updated water masks.

  9. New Characterization of SAR Mode Altimetry Data over Inland Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabry, Pierre; Bercher, Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    Radar altimetry over the inland water domain is a difficult topic that still requires a lot of human expertise as well as manual editing and verifications. This is mainly due to the fact that inland water scenes are highly variable, both in space and time, which leads to a much broader range of radar signatures than in oceanography. The remark is particularly true for LRM altimetry and remains valid in many cases in SAR mode (SARM). In preparation for the operational Sentinel-3 mission and to better benefit from the improved SARM along-track resolution it is required to:1. better characterize the SARM Individual Echoes, Multi-Look Stacks, 20Hz waveforms as well as the Range Integrated Power (RIP) over the inland water domain,2. step toward processing schemes that account for the actual content of the illuminated scene.In this work, we introduce an automated technique to assess the water fraction within the Beam-limited Doppler footprint through its intersection area of with a water mask. This framework opens up new ways toward the automated characterization and processing of altimetry, in the future, thanks to regularly updated water masks.

  10. Atmospheric stability comparisons at shore and inland sites

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.M.; SethuRaman, S.; Nagle, C.

    1980-01-01

    The values needed to predict diffusion and resulting concentrations from sources near coastlines is limited by lack of experimental data at coastal locations. The results obtained in this study are directed to assist in those calculations. Wind measurements made at the coastal site and some comparisons with the measurements made at an inland location, both on Long Island, are presented. Continuous wind speed and direction measurements have been made at the Tiana Beach site since 1975. Hourly averaged wind direction, speed and gustiness types were obtained from these records, and processed by computer techniques. Simultaneous data from the inland location were also obtained. The data were grouped with a digital computer according to gustiness types, wind-speed categories and 10/sup 0/ wind direction increments from 0 to 360 degrees. The initial analysis was to separate the various gustiness types by the number of occurrences per month at each location. These data were used to determine the ratio of each type to the total monthly hours at each place. The ratios at each location were compared to give some understanding of the differences of total gustiness between the coastal and inland site.

  11. Local government techniques for inland wetlands protection. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T.

    1988-01-01

    A fair amount of progress has been made in the area of coastal wetlands protection, but inland wetlands have been given less attention until recently. Except where non-tidal wetlands are large and associated with navigable waters, they have usually been afforded little protection. Since many areas are still in the early stages of inland wetland protection, this report concentrates on examples and techniques for inland circumstances. Most of the strategies discussed, however, could also be applied to coastal wetlands. The report also focuses on the role that local governments can play in the wetland-protection process. The federal and state governments have numerous wetlands-related programs in place, some of which may explicitly involve local governments, and other of which may affect the way the local decision maker chooses to approach the problem. A brief look at all three levels of government may help set the stage for the discussion of the local role, as well as pointing out opportunities for cooperative efforts between the Federal, State, and local levels of government.

  12. Infrastructure for microsystem production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heeren, Henne; Sanchez, Stefan; Elders, Job; Heideman, Rene G.

    1999-03-01

    Manufacturing of micro-systems differs from IC manufacturing because the market requires a diversity of products and lower volumes per product. In addition, a diversity of micro-technologies has been developed, including non-IC compatible processes and potentially IC compatible processes. An infrastructure for the production of micro- system devices is lacking. On one side the technology for MST is available at the universities and small university related companies. On the other side there are several small and medium enterprises and bigger companies wanting to implement MST devices in their products, but unwilling to be dependent on universities. Philips Electronics in the Netherlands and Twente MicroProducts realized this problem and have started a project to fill this gap. At this moment the basic of the infrastructure is available: OnStream BV, Eindhoven, The Netherlands, opened its waferfab and assembly facilities for the production of MST devices. Twente MicroProducts will take care of the design of the products and of the small-scale production. Integration of quality systems for maintenance, yield, statistical process control and production in a Manufacturing Execution System offers direct access for all people involved to all the relevant information. It also ensures quality of the products made. The available capabilities of the infrastructure in the current status are compared to the market needs. In this article, a description of a seamless Micro-System Engineering Foundry is given. A seamless organization is capable of helping the customer from design to production. Several examples are given.

  13. Agile Infrastructure Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Ascenso, J.; Fedorko, I.; Fiorini, B.; Paladin, M.; Pigueiras, L.; Santos, M.

    2014-06-01

    At the present time, data centres are facing a massive rise in virtualisation and cloud computing. The Agile Infrastructure (AI) project is working to deliver new solutions to ease the management of CERN data centres. Part of the solution consists in a new "shared monitoring architecture" which collects and manages monitoring data from all data centre resources. In this article, we present the building blocks of this new monitoring architecture, the different open source technologies selected for each architecture layer, and how we are building a community around this common effort.

  14. The INSC Security Infrastructure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    Le but était de démontrer une infrastructure de réseau qui soutient la sécurité, l’interopérabilité, la maintenance, et la mobilité . La sécurité a...l’interopérabilité, la maintenance, et la mobilité . La sécurité a été fournie à la couche réseau en utilisant le protocole d’IPsec. Aucune sécurité

  15. Vessel traffic safety in busy waterways: A case study of accidents in western shenzhen port.

    PubMed

    Mou, J M; Chen, P F; He, Y X; Yip, Tsz Leung; Li, W H; Tang, J; Zhang, H Z

    2016-08-03

    Throughout the world, busy waterways near large ports witness heavy vessel traffic in recent decades. The waterways are characterized by high risk in terms of loss of life, property, and pollution to environment. To facilitate maritime safety management with satisfactory efficiency and efficacy, the authors propose a framework of safety indexes to evaluate the risk level in busy waterways according to the accident severity, fatality rate and special indicators of maritime transportation. The safety indexes consist of Safety Evaluation Index (SEI) and Safety Warning Index (SWI), and are derived from the proposed risk criteria of Chinese vessel traffic. As a case study, data on vessel traffic accidents reported in the Western Shenzhen Port, South China from 1995 to 2015 are analyzed. The actual risk level of this area during the period is calculated under the framework. The implementation of the safety indexes indicate that the risk criteria and safety indexes are practicable and effective for the vessel traffic management. The methodology based on long-term accident data can significantly support the risk analysis in the macroscopic perspective for busy ports and waterways, such that SWI can act as threshold to trigger actions, while SEI can act as an indicator to measure safety status.

  16. Efficacy of commercial algaecides to manage species of Phytophthora in suburban waterways

    Treesearch

    G. Curtis Colburn; Steven N. Jeffers

    2010-01-01

    Many commercial algaecides contain copper compounds as active ingredients. Phytophthora spp. and other oomycetes are known to be sensitive to copper-based fungicides. Therefore, algaecides registered to manage algae in natural waterways and irrigation waters also might be effective for mitigating or even eradicating Phytophthora ...

  17. 77 FR 24433 - Special Local Regulations; ODBA Draggin on the Waccamaw, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... would be as follows: All ] waters of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway encompassed within an Imaginary... Reform, to minimize litigation, eliminate ambiguity, and reduce burden. Protection of Children We have analyzed this proposed rule under Executive Order 13045, Protection of Children from Environmental...

  18. 78 FR 77590 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Albemarle Sound to Sunset Beach, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Albemarle Sound to Sunset Beach, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AICW), Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of deviation from drawbridge regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard has issued a temporary deviation from the...

  19. 77 FR 45991 - Regulated Navigation Area; Buzzard's Bay, MA; Navigable Waterways Within the First Coast Guard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ...-45992] [FR Doc No: 2012-18832] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Parts 161 and 165...'s Bay, MA; Navigable Waterways Within the First Coast Guard District AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of availability and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard announces the...

  20. 78 FR 72817 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Near Moss Lake, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ... hydraulic unit housing platform. These repairs are essential for the continued safe operation of the bridge... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Near Moss... the docket, call Barbara Hairston, Program Manager, Docket Operations, telephone 202-366-9826...

  1. Dissolved oxygen and pH relationships in northern Australian mangrove waterways

    SciTech Connect

    Boto, K.G.; Bunt, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Consistent, highly significant linear correlations (R2 greater than or equal to 0.8) between pH and dissolved oxygen levels have been found in northern Australian mangrove waterways. These properties seem to be influenced by dissolved organic matter, mainly polyphenolic compounds, present in the creeks and tidal channel waters.

  2. 77 FR 40513 - Safety Zone; Major Motion Picture Filming, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Southport, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... Intracoastal Waterway due to the filming of a movie involving explosions and other dangerous stunts on water... filming of the movie, a delay in enacting this safety zone would be contrary to public interest. Under 5 U... to the area, the effect of the rule will not be significant since this rule will only be...

  3. 78 FR 47191 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Albemarle Sound to Sunset Beach, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Albemarle Sound to Sunset Beach, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AICW), Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice...

  4. 77 FR 5185 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach, Scotts Hill, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of...

  5. Analyses of native water, bottom material, and elutriate samples of southern Louisiana waterways, 1977-78

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dupuy, Alton J.; Couvillion, Nolan P.

    1979-01-01

    From March 1977 to July 1978 the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers conducted a series of elutriate studies to determine water quality in selected reaches of major navigable waterways of southern Louisiana. Sample were collected from the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet areas; Mississippi River, South Pass; Baptiste Collette Bayou; Tiger Pass area; Baou Long; Bayou Barataria and Barataria Bay Waterway area (gulf section); Bayou Segnette Waterway, Lake Pontchartrain near Tangipahoa River mouth; Bayou Grand Caillou; Bayou la Carpe at Homa; Houma Navigation Canal and Terrebonne Bay; Bayou Boeuf, Bayou Chene, and Baou Black, Atchafalaya River Channel, Atchafalaya Bay; Old River Lock tailbay; Red River below mouth of Black River; Freshwaer Canal; Mermentau River and Lake Arthur Mermentau River outlet; and Calcasieu Ship Channel. The studies were initiated at the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to evaluate possible environmental effects of proposed dredging activities in those waterways. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Geological Survey collected 189 samples of native water and 172 samples of bottom (bed) material from 163 different sites. A total of 117 elutriates (Mixtures of native water and bottom material) were prepared. The native water and elutriate samples were analyzed for selected metals, pesticides, nutrients organics, and pysical constituents. Particle-size determinations were made on bottom-material samples. (Kosco-USGS)

  6. 76 FR 5267 - Safety Zone; Beaufort River/Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Beaufort, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... Waterway, South Carolina during construction and expansion of the J.E. McTeer Bridge, also referred to as... of the Beaufort River during construction and expansion of the J.E. McTeer Bridge. Persons and... and Purpose The construction and expansion of the J.E. McTeer Bridge will create safety hazards within...

  7. 75 FR 69371 - Safety Zone; Beaufort River/Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Beaufort, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ... Intracoastal Waterway, South Carolina during the construction and expansion of the J.E. McTeer Bridge, also... navigable waters of the Beaufort River during the construction and expansion of the J.E. McTeer Bridge... Register. Background and Purpose The construction and expansion of the J.E. McTeer Bridge will create...

  8. 77 FR 12994 - Safety Zone for Margate Bridge, Intracoastal Waterway; Margate, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone for Margate Bridge, Intracoastal Waterway... ensure safety while the Margate Bridge undergoes repairs, specifically a high priority fender system... this rule. It is impracticable to publish an NPRM because the Margate Bridge Company gave short notice...

  9. 33 CFR 117.911 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Little River to Savannah River. 117.911 Section 117.911 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.911 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River. (a) General. Public vessels of... Register citations affecting § 117.911, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding...

  10. 33 CFR 117.911 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Little River to Savannah River. 117.911 Section 117.911 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.911 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River. (a) General. Public vessels of... Register citations affecting § 117.911, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding...

  11. 33 CFR 117.911 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Little River to Savannah River. 117.911 Section 117.911 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.911 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River. (a) General. Public vessels of... Register citations affecting § 117.911, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding...

  12. 33 CFR 117.911 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Little River to Savannah River. 117.911 Section 117.911 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.911 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River. (a) General. Public vessels of... Register citations affecting § 117.911, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding...

  13. 78 FR 64178 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Albemarle Sound to Sunset Beach, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Albemarle Sound to Sunset Beach, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AICW), Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... operating schedule that governs the S.R. 74 Bridge across the AICW, at mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, NC...

  14. 77 FR 64904 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway at Carolina Beach..., at Carolina Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone will temporarily restrict vessel movement within...

  15. 76 FR 54703 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The... Beach, South Carolina during the Myrtle Beach Triathlon. The Myrtle Beach Triathlon, which is comprised...

  16. 78 FR 22195 - Safety Zone; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    .... 2064; Department of Homeland Security Delegation No. 0170.1. 0 2. Add Sec. 165.T05-1082 to read as follows: Sec. 165.T05-1082 Safety Zone; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC. (a..., Sec. 165.T05-1082. In addition the following regulations apply: (1) All vessels and persons are...

  17. 77 FR 64906 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Emerald Isle, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Emerald... Emerald Isle, North Carolina. The safety zone is necessary to provide for the safety of mariners on..., mile 226, at Emerald Isle, North Carolina. The safety zone extension will temporarily restrict vessel...

  18. 77 FR 25652 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW), at Wrightsville Beach, NC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... Waterway (AIWW), at Wrightsville Beach, NC; Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear River, at Wilmington, NC...) bridges: The S.R. 74 Bridge, across the AIWW, mile 283.1 at Wrightsville Beach, NC; the Cape Fear Memorial Bridge across the Cape Fear River, mile 26.8; and the Isabel S. Holmes Bridge across the Northeast...

  19. 77 FR 50376 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW); Wrightsville Beach, NC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ... Waterway (AIWW); Wrightsville Beach, NC; Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear River; Wilmington, NC AGENCY... AIWW, mile 283.1 at Wrightsville Beach, NC; the Cape Fear Memorial Bridge across the Cape Fear River, mile 26.8; and the Isabel S. Holmes Bridge across the Northeast Cape Fear River, mile 1.0; both...

  20. 77 FR 14321 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... Waterway in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina during the Myrtle Beach Triathlon. The Myrtle Beach Triathlon... individual submitting the comment (or signing the comment, if submitted on behalf of an association, business, labor union, etc.). You may review a Privacy Act notice regarding our public dockets in the January...

  1. 76 FR 14829 - Safety Zone; 2011 Hylebos Bridge Restoration, Hylebos Waterway, Tacoma, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... Waterway, Tacoma, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The U.S... of the Hylebos Bridge, Tacoma, WA in both directions along the entire length of the Hylebos Bridge to... the entire length of the Hylebos Bridge in Tacoma, WA. (b) Regulations. In accordance with the general...

  2. 77 FR 75602 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Oak Island, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Oak Island... at Oak Island, North Carolina. The safety zone is necessary to provide for the safety of mariners on..., mile 311.8, at Oak Island, North Carolina. The safety zone extension will temporarily restrict vessel...

  3. 78 FR 66266 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW), Chesapeake, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... Bridge across the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, South Branch of the Elizabeth River, mile 7.1, at... have questions on this temporary deviation, call or email Mrs. Kashanda Booker, Bridge Administration... 33 CFR 117.997(e), to facilitate maintenance of the moveable spans on the structure. The...

  4. 78 FR 48608 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW), Chesapeake, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... operation of the I64 Bridge across the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, South Branch of the Elizabeth River... have questions on this temporary deviation, call or email Mrs. Kashanda Booker, Bridge Administration... this bridge, has requested a temporary deviation from the current operating regulation set out in...

  5. EPA Announces National Limits to Reduce Toxic Pollutants Discharged into Waterways by Steam Electric Power Plants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today finalized a rule that will reduce the discharge of toxic pollutants into America's waterways from steam electric power plants by 1.4 billion pounds annually, as well as reduce water w

  6. 78 FR 53665 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway (NJICW), at Atlantic City, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... requested to ensure the safety of the runners and spectators that will be participating in the triathlon, on... the users of the waterway through our Local and Broadcast Notices to Mariners of the closure periods...

  7. 33 CFR 207.187 - Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Tex.; special floodgate, lock and navigation regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Colorado River Locks at Mile 400.8 and Mile 441.5, respectively, west of Harvey Lock, La., on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, and navigation of the tributary Colorado River Channel in the vicinity of said locks. (b... differential is less than 0.7 foot. When the head differential is less than 0.7, the Colorado River locks...

  8. 77 FR 41911 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-17

    ...; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway at Wrightsville Beach... Beach, North Carolina. DATES: This rule is effective from September 1, 2012 until May 1, 2013....

  9. A Multi-Agent System for Tracking the Intent of Surface Contacts in Ports and Waterways

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    identify asymmetric maritime threats in port and waterways. Each surface track is monitored by a compound multi - agent system that comprise of the several...intent models, each containing a nested multi - agent system . The attributes that define intent models of friendly, neutral, unknown and potentially

  10. 33 CFR 127.007 - Letter of intent and waterway suitability assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) An owner or operator intending to build a new facility handling LNG or LHG, or an owner or operator... LNG or LHG, where the construction, expansion, or modification would result in an increase in the size and/or frequency of LNG or LHG marine traffic on the waterway associated with a proposed facility...

  11. Valuing ecosystem services of an impacted waterway in the Southwestern US

    EPA Science Inventory

    While many studies of ecosystem services focus on unaltered areas such as wilderness, management insight is also needed for those more impacted. This case study values ecosystem services of the Santa Cruz River, an effluent-dominated waterway in southern Arizona. Wastewater treat...

  12. 75 FR 51097 - Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... Guard on matters relating to communications, surveillance, traffic management, anchorages, development and operation of the New Orleans Vessel Traffic Service (VTS), and other related topics dealing with..., ATTN: Waterways Management, 1615 Poydras St., New Orleans, LA 70112. This notice, and documents...

  13. 77 FR 47787 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW), Newport River, Morehead...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... Waterway (AIWW), Newport River, Morehead City, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Carolina Coastal Railroad Bridge, at AIWW mile 203.8, across Newport River in Morehead City, NC. This..., across Newport River in Morehead City NC, shall open promptly and fully for the passage of vessels when...

  14. 33 CFR 117.353 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Savannah River to St. Marys River. 117.353 Section 117.353 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....353 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River. (a) General. Public vessels of... Bridge, SR 204, mile 592.9 near Savannah. The draw will open as necessary on the hour from 7 a.m. to 9...

  15. 33 CFR 117.353 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Savannah River to St. Marys River. 117.353 Section 117.353 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....353 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River. (a) General. Public vessels of... Bridge, SR 204, mile 592.9 near Savannah. The draw will open as necessary on the hour from 7 a.m. to 9...

  16. 33 CFR 117.353 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Savannah River to St. Marys River. 117.353 Section 117.353 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....353 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River. (a) General. Public vessels of... Bridge, SR 204, mile 592.9 near Savannah. The draw will open as necessary on the hour from 7 a.m. to 9...

  17. 33 CFR 117.353 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Savannah River to St. Marys River. 117.353 Section 117.353 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....353 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River. (a) General. Public vessels of... Bridge, SR 204, mile 592.9 near Savannah. The draw will open as necessary on the hour from 7 a.m. to 9...

  18. 33 CFR 117.353 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Savannah River to St. Marys River. 117.353 Section 117.353 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....353 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River. (a) General. Public vessels of... Bridge, SR 204, mile 592.9 near Savannah. The draw will open as necessary on the hour from 7 a.m. to 9...

  19. 75 FR 36313 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Arkansas Waterway, Pine Bluff, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ... acknowledgement tone back to the vessel and the remote drawbridge operator then establishes normal verbal radio communications. This protocol is used to isolate and differentiate these radio communications from the railroad... Purpose The Arkansas Waterway is part of the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System. This...

  20. 77 FR 64720 - Safety Zone: Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Oak Island, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... Waterway, mile 311.8, at Oak Island, North Carolina. The contract provides for replacing the fender system... entities: the owners or operators of commercial tug and barge companies, recreational and commercial... on VHF-FM marine band radio channels 13 and 16 one hour in advance of intended transit. (2) All...

  1. 76 FR 78151 - Special Local Regulations; Boca Raton Holiday Boat Parade, Intracoastal Waterway, Boca Raton, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Boca Raton Holiday Boat... Waterway in Boca Raton, Florida during the Boca Raton Holiday Boat Parade on Saturday, December 17, 2011... information about this year's Boca Raton Holiday Boat Parade until November 7, 2011. As a result, the Coast...

  2. Acquisition and Distribution of Nematodes in Irrigation Waterways of the Columbia Basin in Eastern Washington

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, L. R.; Bolander, W. J.

    1970-01-01

    The primary source of plant parasitic nematodes in irrigation waterways in the Columbia Basin Project of eastern Washington is irrigation runoff returned into the irrigation system. This has contributed to the rapid spread of plant parasitic nematodes observed during eight years of study. PMID:19322326

  3. 26 CFR 48.4042-3 - Certain types of commercial waterway transportation excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., whether a ship is “designed primarily for use on the high seas” must be determined from all the facts... following example illustrates the application of paragraph (a)(4)(i) of this section: Example. A ship with a... only a partial load, such that the draft is 12 feet. The ship unloads and departs the waterway...

  4. Coastal residential waterways, science and policy-making: The Australian experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Nick; Stocker, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Thousands of kilometres of coastal residential waterways have been constructed across the globe, mostly in estuaries. These have caused significant environmental impact demonstrating a need for proper management and planning informed by science. Additional potential impacts of climate change, specifically sea-level rise, make coastal residential waterway developments by their nature particularly vulnerable, with restricted options for adaptation. This paper analyses Australian policies on coastal residential waterways over the last 50 years and the extent to which science, including estuarine and climate change science, has been incorporated into policy decisions or policy formulation. This analysis is in the context of theories on the uptake of science in policy-making and against a background of Australian government and inter-governmental reports indicating the vulnerable nature of low-lying coastal development. This paper reveals that coastal residential waterways referred to as canal estates occur in all Australian mainland states but given the lack of any national coastal policy, the onus is on each individual state to formulate its own policies. These policies are on a continuum from explicit, detailed science-based policy guidelines in some states, through implicit scientific impacts informing political decisions in other states, to generic environmental assessment procedures without specific reference to canal estate development. This paper concludes that the extent to which science has been incorporated into policy-making for canal estates is variable across the Australian states and appears to be heavily influenced by politics.

  5. Valuing ecosystem services of an impacted waterway in the Southwestern US

    EPA Science Inventory

    While many studies of ecosystem services focus on unaltered areas such as wilderness, management insight is also needed for those more impacted. This case study values ecosystem services of the Santa Cruz River, an effluent-dominated waterway in southern Arizona. Wastewater treat...

  6. 33 CFR 117.820 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. 117.820 Section 117.820 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... North Carolina § 117.820 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. The draw of the Great Dismal Swamp Canal Bridge, mile 28.0 at South Mills, NC, shall operate as follows:...

  7. 33 CFR 117.820 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. 117.820 Section 117.820 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... North Carolina § 117.820 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. The draw of the Great Dismal Swamp Canal Bridge, mile 28.0 at South Mills, NC, shall operate as follows:...

  8. 77 FR 72737 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Dismal Swamp...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... (Alternate Route), Dismal Swamp Canal, South Mills, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary... deviation from the regulations governing the operation of the Great Dismal Swamp Canal Bridge, at mile 28.0, over the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Dismal Swamp Canal, South Mills, NC....

  9. 33 CFR 117.820 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. 117.820 Section 117.820 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... North Carolina § 117.820 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. The draw of the Great Dismal Swamp Canal Bridge, mile 28.0 at South Mills, NC, shall operate as follows:...

  10. 33 CFR 117.820 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. 117.820 Section 117.820 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... North Carolina § 117.820 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. The draw of the Great Dismal Swamp Canal Bridge, mile 28.0 at South Mills, NC, shall operate as follows:...

  11. 33 CFR 117.820 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. 117.820 Section 117.820 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... North Carolina § 117.820 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. The draw of the Great Dismal Swamp Canal Bridge, mile 28.0 at South Mills, NC, shall operate as follows:...

  12. 75 FR 61094 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Beaufort, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... Waterway at mile 539.0 in Port Royal, South Carolina, vehicle traffic is currently being rerouted from the McTeer Bridge to the Lady's Island Bridge. This rerouting has resulted in increased vehicle traffic congestion on the Lady's Island Bridge. As a result of the increased vehicle traffic congestion,...

  13. 33 CFR 127.007 - Letter of intent and waterway suitability assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) An owner or operator intending to build a new facility handling LNG or LHG, or an owner or operator... LNG or LHG, where the construction, expansion, or modification would result in an increase in the size and/or frequency of LNG or LHG marine traffic on the waterway associated with a proposed facility...

  14. 33 CFR 127.007 - Letter of intent and waterway suitability assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) An owner or operator intending to build a new facility handling LNG or LHG, or an owner or operator... LNG or LHG, where the construction, expansion, or modification would result in an increase in the size and/or frequency of LNG or LHG marine traffic on the waterway associated with a proposed facility...

  15. 33 CFR 127.007 - Letter of intent and waterway suitability assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) An owner or operator intending to build a new facility handling LNG or LHG, or an owner or operator... LNG or LHG, where the construction, expansion, or modification would result in an increase in the size and/or frequency of LNG or LHG marine traffic on the waterway associated with a proposed facility...

  16. 33 CFR 127.007 - Letter of intent and waterway suitability assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) An owner or operator intending to build a new facility handling LNG or LHG, or an owner or operator... LNG or LHG, where the construction, expansion, or modification would result in an increase in the size and/or frequency of LNG or LHG marine traffic on the waterway associated with a proposed facility...

  17. 78 FR 22193 - Special Local Regulations; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway; West...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway; West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary Final Rule... Palm Beach, Florida, during the West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, on Saturday, June 1,...

  18. Applications of UAVs for Remote Sensing of Critical Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegener, Steve; Brass, James; Schoenung, Susan

    2003-01-01

    The surveillance of critical facilities and national infrastructure such as waterways, roadways, pipelines and utilities requires advanced technological tools to provide timely, up to date information on structure status and integrity. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are uniquely suited for these tasks, having large payload and long duration capabilities. UAVs also have the capability to fly dangerous and dull missions, orbiting for 24 hours over a particular area or facility providing around the clock surveillance with no personnel onboard. New UAV platforms and systems are becoming available for commercial use. High altitude platforms are being tested for use in communications, remote sensing, agriculture, forestry and disaster management. New payloads are being built and demonstrated onboard the UAVs in support of these applications. Smaller, lighter, lower power consumption imaging systems are currently being tested over coffee fields to determine yield and over fires to detect fire fronts and hotspots. Communication systems that relay video, meteorological and chemical data via satellite to users on the ground in real-time have also been demonstrated. Interest in this technology for infrastructure characterization and mapping has increased dramatically in the past year. Many of the UAV technological developments required for resource and disaster monitoring are being used for the infrastructure and facility mapping activity. This paper documents the unique contributions from NASA;s Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program to these applications. ERAST is a UAV technology development effort by a consortium of private aeronautical companies and NASA. Details of demonstrations of UAV capabilities currently underway are also presented.

  19. Applications of UAVs for Remote Sensing of Critical Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegener, Steve; Brass, James; Schoenung, Susan

    2003-01-01

    The surveillance of critical facilities and national infrastructure such as waterways, roadways, pipelines and utilities requires advanced technological tools to provide timely, up to date information on structure status and integrity. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are uniquely suited for these tasks, having large payload and long duration capabilities. UAVs also have the capability to fly dangerous and dull missions, orbiting for 24 hours over a particular area or facility providing around the clock surveillance with no personnel onboard. New UAV platforms and systems are becoming available for commercial use. High altitude platforms are being tested for use in communications, remote sensing, agriculture, forestry and disaster management. New payloads are being built and demonstrated onboard the UAVs in support of these applications. Smaller, lighter, lower power consumption imaging systems are currently being tested over coffee fields to determine yield and over fires to detect fire fronts and hotspots. Communication systems that relay video, meteorological and chemical data via satellite to users on the ground in real-time have also been demonstrated. Interest in this technology for infrastructure characterization and mapping has increased dramatically in the past year. Many of the UAV technological developments required for resource and disaster monitoring are being used for the infrastructure and facility mapping activity. This paper documents the unique contributions from NASA;s Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program to these applications. ERAST is a UAV technology development effort by a consortium of private aeronautical companies and NASA. Details of demonstrations of UAV capabilities currently underway are also presented.

  20. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vivek; Tawfik, Magdy S.

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy concept is becoming a reality for the US energy infrastructure where combinations of the various potential energy sources (nuclear, wind, solar, biomass, and so on) are integrated in a hybrid energy system. This paper focuses on challenges facing a hybrid system with a Small Modular Reactor at its core. The core of the paper will discuss efforts required to develop supervisory control center that collects data, supports decision-making, and serves as an information hub for supervisory control center. Such a center will also be a model for integrating future technologies and controls. In addition, advanced operations research, thermal cycle analysis, energy conversion analysis, control engineering, and human factors engineering will be part of the supervisory control center. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure would allow operators to optimize the cost of energy production by providing appropriate means of integrating different energy sources. The data needs to be stored, processed, analyzed, trended, and projected at right time to right operator to integrate different energy sources.

  1. Developing a public information and engagement portal of urban waterways with real-time monitoring and modeling.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, T A; Wicke, D; O'Sullivan, A

    2011-01-01

    Waterways can contribute to the beauty and livelihood of urban areas, but maintaining their hydro-ecosystem health is challenging because they are often recipients of contaminated water from stormwater runoff and other discharges. Public awareness of local waterways' health and community impacts to these waterways is usually poor due to of lack of easily available information. To improve community awareness of water quality in urban waterways in New Zealand, a web portal was developed featuring a real-time waterways monitoring system, a public forum, historical data, interactive maps, contaminant modelling scenarios, mitigation recommendations, and a prototype contamination alert system. The monitoring system featured in the web portal is unique in the use of wireless mesh network technology, direct integration with online modelling, and a clear target of public engagement. The modelling aims to show the origin of contaminants within the local catchment and to help the community prioritize mitigation efforts to improve water quality in local waterways. The contamination alert system aims to keep managers and community members better informed and to provide a more timely response opportunity to avert any unplanned or accidental contamination of the waterways. Preliminary feedback has been positive and is being supported by local and regional authorities. The system was developed in a cost-effective manner providing a community focussed solution for quantifying and mitigating key contaminants in urban catchments and is applicable and transferable to other cities with similar stormwater challenges.

  2. Hydrology of and Current Monitoring Issues for the Chicago Area Waterway System, Northeastern Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duncker, James J.; Johnson, Kevin K.

    2015-10-28

    The Chicago Area Waterway System (CAWS) consists of a combination of natural and manmade channels that form an interconnected navigable waterway of approximately 90-plus miles in the metropolitan Chicago area of northeastern Illinois. The CAWS serves the area as the primary drainage feature, a waterway transportation corridor, and recreational waterbody. The CAWS was constructed by the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRDGC). Completion of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (initial portion of the CAWS) in 1900 breached a low drainage divide and resulted in a diversion of water from the Lake Michigan Basin. A U.S. Supreme Court decree (Consent Decree 388 U.S. 426 [1967] Modified 449 U.S. 48 [1980]) limits the annual diversion from Lake Michigan. While the State of Illinois is responsible for the diversion, the MWRDGC regulates and maintains water level and water quality within the CAWS by using several waterway control structures. The operation and control of water levels in the CAWS results in a very complex hydraulic setting characterized by highly unsteady flows. The complexity leads to unique gaging requirements and monitoring issues. This report provides a general discussion of the complex hydraulic setting within the CAWS and quantifies this information with examples of data collected at a range of flow conditions from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow gaging stations and other locations within the CAWS. Monitoring to address longstanding issues of waterway operation, as well as current (2014) emerging issues such as wastewater disinfection and the threat from aquatic invasive species, is included in the discussion.

  3. The future of infrastructure security :

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Pablo; Turnley, Jessica Glicken; Parrott, Lori K.

    2013-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories hosted a workshop on the future of infrastructure security on February 27-28, 2013, in Albuquerque, NM. The 17 participants came from backgrounds as diverse as federal policy, the insurance industry, infrastructure management, and technology development. The purpose of the workshop was to surface key issues, identify directions forward, and lay groundwork for cross-sectoral and cross-disciplinary collaborations. The workshop addressed issues such as the problem space (what is included in infrastructure problems?), the general types of threats to infrastructure (such as acute or chronic, system-inherent or exogenously imposed) and definitions of secure and resilient infrastructures. The workshop concluded with a consideration of stakeholders and players in the infrastructure world, and identification of specific activities that could be undertaken by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other players.

  4. Michigan E85 Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstrom, Matthew M.

    2012-03-30

    This is the final report for a grant-funded project to financially assist and otherwise provide support to projects that increase E85 infrastructure in Michigan at retail fueling locations. Over the two-year project timeframe, nine E85 and/or flex-fuel pumps were installed around the State of Michigan at locations currently lacking E85 infrastructure. A total of five stations installed the nine pumps, all providing cost share toward the project. By using cost sharing by station partners, the $200,000 provided by the Department of Energy facilitated a total project worth $746,332.85. This project was completed over a two-year timetable (eight quarters). The first quarter of the project focused on project outreach to station owners about the incentive on the installation and/or conversion of E85 compatible fueling equipment including fueling pumps, tanks, and all necessary electrical and plumbing connections. Utilizing Clean Energy Coalition (CEC) extensive knowledge of gasoline/ethanol infrastructure throughout Michigan, CEC strategically placed these pumps in locations to strengthen the broad availability of E85 in Michigan. During the first and second quarters, CEC staff approved projects for funding and secured contracts with station owners; the second through eighth quarters were spent working with fueling station owners to complete projects; the third through eighth quarters included time spent promoting projects; and beginning in the second quarter and running for the duration of the project was spent performing project reporting and evaluation to the US DOE. A total of 9 pumps were installed (four in Elkton, two in Sebewaing, one in East Lansing, one in Howell, and one in Whitmore Lake). At these combined station locations, a total of 192,445 gallons of E85, 10,786 gallons of E50, and 19,159 gallons of E30 were sold in all reporting quarters for 2011. Overall, the project has successfully displaced 162,611 gallons (2,663 barrels) of petroleum, and reduced

  5. Cyber Infrastructure: The Forgotten Vulnerability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-22

    presidential-policy-directive-critical-infrastructure-security-and- resil (accessed January 18, 2014). 114Department of Homeland Security, “NIPP 2013...Partnering Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilence ”, 2103, http://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/NIPP%202013_Partnering%20 for...Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilence ”, 2103, http://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/NIPP%202013_Partnering%20 for%20Critical

  6. Energy Transmission and Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Mathison, Jane

    2012-12-31

    The objective of Energy Transmission and Infrastructure Northern Ohio (OH) was to lay the conceptual and analytical foundation for an energy economy in northern Ohio that will: • improve the efficiency with which energy is used in the residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural, and transportation sectors for Oberlin, Ohio as a district-wide model for Congressional District OH-09; • identify the potential to deploy wind and solar technologies and the most effective configuration for the regional energy system (i.e., the ratio of distributed or centralized power generation); • analyze the potential within the district to utilize farm wastes to produce biofuels; • enhance long-term energy security by identifying ways to deploy local resources and building Ohio-based enterprises; • identify the policy, regulatory, and financial barriers impeding development of a new energy system; and • improve energy infrastructure within Congressional District OH-09. This objective of laying the foundation for a renewable energy system in Ohio was achieved through four primary areas of activity: 1. district-wide energy infrastructure assessments and alternative-energy transmission studies; 2. energy infrastructure improvement projects undertaken by American Municipal Power (AMP) affiliates in the northern Ohio communities of Elmore, Oak Harbor, and Wellington; 3. Oberlin, OH-area energy assessment initiatives; and 4. a district-wide conference held in September 2011 to disseminate year-one findings. The grant supported 17 research studies by leading energy, policy, and financial specialists, including studies on: current energy use in the district and the Oberlin area; regional potential for energy generation from renewable sources such as solar power, wind, and farm-waste; energy and transportation strategies for transitioning the City of Oberlin entirely to renewable resources and considering pedestrians, bicyclists, and public transportation as well as drivers

  7. Hanford Site Infrastructure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The Hanford Site Infrastructure Plan (HIP) has been prepared as an overview of the facilities, utilities, systems, and services that support all activities on the Hanford Site. Its purpose is three-fold: to examine in detail the existing condition of the Hanford Site's aging utility systems, transportation systems, Site services and general-purpose facilities; to evaluate the ability of these systems to meet present and forecasted Site missions; to identify maintenance and upgrade projects necessary to ensure continued safe and cost-effective support to Hanford Site programs well into the twenty-first century. The HIP is intended to be a dynamic document that will be updated accordingly as Site activities, conditions, and requirements change. 35 figs., 25 tabs.

  8. Utilities building NGV infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    Gas utilities across the US are aggressively pursuing the natural gas vehicle market by putting in place the infrastructure needed to ensure the growth of the important market. The first annual P and GJ NGV Marketing Survey has revealed many utilities plant to build and continue building NGV fueling facilities. The NGV industry in the US is confronting a classic chicken-or-egg quandary. Fleet operators and individual drivers are naturally unwilling to commit to a natural gas vehicle fuel until sufficient fueling facilities are in place, yet service station operators are reluctant to add NGV refueling capacity until enough CNG vehicles are on the road to create demand. The future of the NGV market is bright, but continued research and product improvements by suppliers as well as LDCs is needed if the potential is to be fulfilled. Advances in refueling facilities must continue if the market is to develop.

  9. Space Station Freedom commercial infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barquinero, Kevin

    1990-01-01

    Several approaches to initiating the provision of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) commercial infrastructure are discussed, including proposals from the private sector, the commercial development of infrastructure, and the commercial operation of infrastructure. Specific options for SSF commercial infrastructure which are currently being studied by NASA are described. One candidate for commercial service is the supplemental power for SSF beyond the Assembly Complete phase. The methods which a company could use in providing supplemental power are discussed, with special attention given to the use of solar dynamic power elements attached ot the SSF evolution structure. Another option under evaluation is commercial provision of SSF logistics services using ELVs.

  10. Improving Antarctic infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-07-01

    Noting that U.S. activities in Antarctica “are very well managed but suffer from an aging infrastructure, lack of a capital budget, and the effects of operating in an extremely unforgiving environment,” a 23 July report from the U.S. Antarctic Program Blue Ribbon Panel recommends a number of measures to improve the infrastructure, logistics, and other concerns. The panel's recommendations include continued use of the McMurdo, South Pole, and Palmer stations as the primary U.S. science and logistics hubs in Antarctica—because there are no reasonable alternatives, according to the panel—while upgrading or replacing some facilities, restoring the U.S. polar ocean feet, implementing state of-the-art logistics and transportation support, and establishing a long-term facilities capital plan and budget for the U.S. Antarctic Program. “The essence of our findings is that the lack of capital budgeting has placed operations at McMurdo, and to a somewhat lesser extent at Palmer Station, in unnecessary jeopardy—at least in terms of prolonged inefficiency due to deteriorating or otherwise inadequate physical assets,” the panel wrote in the cover letter accompanying the report entitled, More and Better Science in Antarctica Through Increased Logistical Effectiveness. “The Antarctica Blue Ribbon Panel encourages us to take a hard look at how we support Antarctic science and to make the structural changes, however difficult in the current fiscal environment, that will allow us to do more science in the future,” said U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) Director Subra Suresh.

  11. The dependence of educational infrastructure on clinical infrastructure.

    PubMed Central

    Cimino, C.

    1998-01-01

    The Albert Einstein College of Medicine needed to assess the growth of its infrastructure for educational computing as a first step to determining if student needs were being met. Included in computing infrastructure are space, equipment, software, and computing services. The infrastructure was assessed by reviewing purchasing and support logs for a six year period from 1992 to 1998. This included equipment, software, and e-mail accounts provided to students and to faculty for educational purposes. Student space has grown at a constant rate (averaging 14% increase each year respectively). Student equipment on campus has grown by a constant amount each year (average 8.3 computers each year). Student infrastructure off campus and educational support of faculty has not kept pace. It has either declined or remained level over the six year period. The availability of electronic mail clearly demonstrates this with accounts being used by 99% of students, 78% of Basic Science Course Leaders, 38% of Clerkship Directors, 18% of Clerkship Site Directors, and 8% of Clinical Elective Directors. The collection of the initial descriptive infrastructure data has revealed problems that may generalize to other medical schools. The discrepancy between infrastructure available to students and faculty on campus and students and faculty off campus creates a setting where students perceive a paradoxical declining support for computer use as they progress through medical school. While clinical infrastructure may be growing, it is at the expense of educational infrastructure at affiliate hospitals. PMID:9929262

  12. Geophysical investigation of the hydrogeologic setting of Delaware's Inland Bays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Lyndon Audley

    The fundamental goal of this dissertation research project was to use geophysical imaging to provide additional constraints on the hydrostratigraphic framework for ground-water discharge to the Inland Bays of Delaware. This dissertation was part of an EPA-funded Coastal Intensive Sites Network project entitled "CISNet: Nutrient Input as a Stressor and Net Nutrient Flux as an Indicator of Stress Response in Delaware's Inland Bay Ecosystem". The dissertation research was part of the ground-water component of the CISNet project. This component concentrated on the identification of sites of ground-water discharge within the bays and the relationship of this discharge to the underlying geology of the region. Extensive coring by previous investigators in the Inland Bays of Delaware has been conducted in order to understand the Quaternary history of this region. However, prior to this dissertation no attempt had been made to use shallow marine seismics to map the Inland Bays in order to better understand the influence of the subsurface geology on the hydrostratigraphic framework. In this project, an Edgetech chirp sub-bottom profiler was used in Rehoboth and Indian River Bays, the larger two of the three Inland Bays of Delaware, to obtain greater horizontal resolution than that afforded by isolated cores. Processing of the chirp data using Promax(TM) seismic software resulted in sub-decimeter scale resolution of shallow layers below the bay bottom including a high-amplitude, relatively continuous reflection that was interpreted as the Pre-Holocene/Holocene surface. At two sites, the Thorneby-Purnell property along Herring Creek, a tributary of Rehoboth Bay, and the Pete Okie property along Indian River, on-land ground penetrating radar (GPR) data were collected using a Sensors and Software GPR PulseEKKO 100 system with both 50 and 100 MHz antennas. The water table, occurring at depths on the order of 6 m beneath the surface, was imaged along GPR profiles collected at the

  13. On the sustainability of inland fisheries: Finding a future for the forgotten

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooke, Steven J.; Allison, Edward H.; Beard, Douglas; Arlinghaus, Robert; Arthington, Angela; Bartley, Devin; Cowx, Ian G.; Fuentevilla, Carlos; Leonard, Nancy J.; Lorenzen, Kai; Lynch, Abigail; Nguyen, Vivian M.; Youn, So-Jung; Tayor, William W.; Welcomme, Robin

    2016-01-01

    At present, inland fisheries are not often a national or regional governance priority and as a result, inland capture fisheries are undervalued and largely overlooked. As such they are threatened in both developing and developed countries. Indeed, due to lack of reliable data, inland fisheries have never been part of any high profile global fisheries assessment and are notably absent from the Sustainable Development Goals. The general public and policy makers are largely ignorant of the plight of freshwater ecosystems and the fish they support, as well as the ecosystem services generated by inland fisheries. This ignorance is particularly salient given that the current emphasis on the food-water-energy nexus often fails to include the important role that inland fish and fisheries play in food security and supporting livelihoods in low-income food deficit countries. Developing countries in Africa and Asia produce about 11 million tonnes of inland fish annually, 90 % of the global total. The role of inland fisheries goes beyond just kilocalories; fish provide important micronutrients and essentially fatty acids. In some regions, inland recreational fisheries are important, generating much wealth and supporting livelihoods. The following three key recommendations are necessary for action if inland fisheries are to become a part of the food-water-energy discussion: invest in improved valuation and assessment methods, build better methods to effectively govern inland fisheries (requires capacity building and incentives), and develop approaches to managing waters across sectors and scales. Moreover, if inland fisheries are recognized as important to food security, livelihoods, and human well-being, they can be more easily incorporated in regional, national, and global policies and agreements on water issues. Through these approaches, inland fisheries can be better evaluated and be more fully recognized in broader water resource and aquatic ecosystem planning and decision

  14. On the sustainability of inland fisheries: Finding a future for the forgotten.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Steven J; Allison, Edward H; Beard, T Douglas; Arlinghaus, Robert; Arthington, Angela H; Bartley, Devin M; Cowx, Ian G; Fuentevilla, Carlos; Leonard, Nancy J; Lorenzen, Kai; Lynch, Abigail J; Nguyen, Vivian M; Youn, So-Jung; Taylor, William W; Welcomme, Robin L

    2016-11-01

    At present, inland fisheries are not often a national or regional governance priority and as a result, inland capture fisheries are undervalued and largely overlooked. As such they are threatened in both developing and developed countries. Indeed, due to lack of reliable data, inland fisheries have never been part of any high profile global fisheries assessment and are notably absent from the Sustainable Development Goals. The general public and policy makers are largely ignorant of the plight of freshwater ecosystems and the fish they support, as well as the ecosystem services generated by inland fisheries. This ignorance is particularly salient given that the current emphasis on the food-water-energy nexus often fails to include the important role that inland fish and fisheries play in food security and supporting livelihoods in low-income food deficit countries. Developing countries in Africa and Asia produce about 11 million tonnes of inland fish annually, 90 % of the global total. The role of inland fisheries goes beyond just kilocalories; fish provide important micronutrients and essentially fatty acids. In some regions, inland recreational fisheries are important, generating much wealth and supporting livelihoods. The following three key recommendations are necessary for action if inland fisheries are to become a part of the food-water-energy discussion: invest in improved valuation and assessment methods, build better methods to effectively govern inland fisheries (requires capacity building and incentives), and develop approaches to managing waters across sectors and scales. Moreover, if inland fisheries are recognized as important to food security, livelihoods, and human well-being, they can be more easily incorporated in regional, national, and global policies and agreements on water issues. Through these approaches, inland fisheries can be better evaluated and be more fully recognized in broader water resource and aquatic ecosystem planning and decision

  15. Inland out: Midwestern river coal transloaders deal with increased pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2007-06-15

    As greater amounts of US western coal is burned by many eastern and south-eastern power plants located along the Ohio River and its tributaries, Midwestern coal transload facilities are playing an ever growing role in the nation's coal transportation system by moving traffic off clogged rail lines onto barges on inland rivers. The article describes operations by three mid-western ports - American Electric Power's (AEP) Cook Terminal in Metropolis, IL; Kinder-Morgan's Cora Terminal in Cora, IL; and Kinder-Morgan's Grand Rivers Terminal near Paducah, KY. Together these terminals transferred more than 30 m tons onto barges in 2006. 5 figs.

  16. Optimizing irradiance estimates for coastal and inland water imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, David R.; Seidel, Felix C.; Gao, Bo Cai; Gierach, Michelle M.; Green, Robert O.; Kudela, Raphael M.; Mouroulis, Pantazis

    2015-05-01

    Next generation orbital imaging spectrometers, with advanced global remote sensing capabilities, propose to address outstanding ocean science questions related to coastal and inland water environments. These missions require highly accurate characterization of solar irradiance in the critical 380-600 nm spectral range. However, the irradiance in this spectral region is temporally variable and difficult to measure directly, leading to considerable variance between different models. Here we optimize an irradiance estimate using data from the NASA airborne Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer (PRISM), leveraging spectrally smooth in-scene targets. We demonstrate improved retrievals for both PRISM and the Next Generation Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer.

  17. Recovery of fish stocks in the Seto Inland Sea.

    PubMed

    Nagai, T

    2003-01-01

    The total amount of fisheries' yield in the Seto Inland Sea in 1999 was 571,000 MT, consisting of 256,000 MT by fishing and 315,000 MT from aquaculture. About 40,000 people engaged in the fishing and aquaculture industries, earned 129 billion yen (1100 million US$) by fishing and 89 billion yen (770 million $US) by aquaculture. The averaged annual catch for the Seto Inland Sea by fishing was 13 MT/km(2). Division into time periods in terms of eutrophication levels can be made: before 1960 when red sea bream were abundant with ecological divergence (before eutrophication), from 1960 to 1990 when the biomass of anchovy was large (during eutrophication), and after 1990 when the jellyfishes were abundant (excessive eutrophication or high N:P ratio). The fish production will decrease in the sea of jellyfishes. Actually, the amount of catch was 462,000 MT in 1982 which decreased 265,000 MT in 1993, corresponding to 43% in twelve years, then keeping the same level. A big reduction was seen in the catches of the spotlined sardine, anchovy, Spanish mackerel, tiger puffer, short-necked clam, sea cucumber and others. The tiger puffer and Spanish mackerel were abundant as predators in the sea of anchovy. The biomass of anchovy was at its maximum in 1986 and decreased to less than one third in 1996. The stocks of tiger puffer and Spanish mackerel greatly decreased because of the higher fishing pressure compared to the anchovy stock. The fishing power of individual fisheries targeting on the tiger puffer and Spanish mackerel increased substantially when fishing vessel and fishing gear improved, resulting in an excessive fishing effort. A large quantity of small immature fishes is usually caught in the Seto Inland Sea, resulting in growth and/or recruitment overfishing for many species. Hence, it is necessary to promote management of the fisheries so as not to reduce the fish stocks, and to allow the Seto Inland Sea to return from being a sea of jellyfishes to a sea of anchovy

  18. Landsat Thematic Mapper monitoring of turbid inland water quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, Richard G., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This study reports on an investigation of water quality calibration algorithms under turbid inland water conditions using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) multispectral digital data. TM data and water quality observations (total suspended solids and Secchi disk depth) were obtained near-simultaneously and related using linear regression techniques. The relationships between reflectance and water quality for Green Bay and Lake Michigan were compared with results for Yellowstone and Jackson Lakes, Wyoming. Results show similarities in the water quality-reflectance relationships, however, the algorithms derived for Green Bay - Lake Michigan cannot be extrapolated to Yellowstone and Jackson Lake conditions.

  19. Wind Characteristics of Coastal and Inland Surface Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Chelakara; Lazarus, Steven; Jin, Tetsuya

    2015-11-01

    Lidar measurements of the winds in the surface layer (up to 80 m) inland and near the beach are studied to better characterize the velocity profile and the effect of roughness. Mean and root-mean-squared profiles of horizontal and vertical wind components are analyzed. The effects of variable time (18, 60 and 600 seconds) averaging on the above profiles are discussed. The validity of common surface layer wind profile models to estimate skin friction drag is assessed in light of these measurements. Other turbulence statistics such as auto- and cross- correlations in spatial and temporal domains are also presented. The help of FIT DMES field measurement crew is acknowledged.

  20. Landsat Thematic Mapper monitoring of turbid inland water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Lathrop, R.G., JR. )

    1992-04-01

    This study reports on an investigation of water quality calibration algorithms under turbid inland water conditions using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) multispectral digital data. TM data and water quality observations (total suspended solids and Secchi disk depth) were obtained near-simultaneously and related using linear regression techniques. The relationships between reflectance and water quality for Green Bay and Lake Michigan were compared with results for Yellowstone and Jackson Lakes, Wyoming. Results show similarities in the water quality-reflectance relationships, however, the algorithms derived for Green Bay - Lake Michigan cannot be extrapolated to Yellowstone and Jackson Lake conditions. 17 refs.

  1. Cyberwarfare on the Electricity Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Murarka, N.; Ramesh, V.C.

    2000-03-20

    The report analyzes the possibility of cyberwarfare on the electricity infrastructure. The ongoing deregulation of the electricity industry makes the power grid all the more vulnerable to cyber attacks. The report models the power system information system components, models potential threats and protective measures. It therefore offers a framework for infrastructure protection.

  2. Multi-Scale Infrastructure Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) multi-scale infrastructure assessment project supports both water resource adaptation to climate change and the rehabilitation of the nation’s aging water infrastructure by providing tools, scientific data and information to progra...

  3. Cyber and physical infrastructure interdependencies.

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Laurence R.; Kelic, Andjelka; Warren, Drake E.

    2008-09-01

    The goal of the work discussed in this document is to understand the risk to the nation of cyber attacks on critical infrastructures. The large body of research results on cyber attacks against physical infrastructure vulnerabilities has not resulted in clear understanding of the cascading effects a cyber-caused disruption can have on critical national infrastructures and the ability of these affected infrastructures to deliver services. This document discusses current research and methodologies aimed at assessing the translation of a cyber-based effect into a physical disruption of infrastructure and thence into quantification of the economic consequences of the resultant disruption and damage. The document discusses the deficiencies of the existing methods in correlating cyber attacks with physical consequences. The document then outlines a research plan to correct those deficiencies. When completed, the research plan will result in a fully supported methodology to quantify the economic consequences of events that begin with cyber effects, cascade into other physical infrastructure impacts, and result in degradation of the critical infrastructure's ability to deliver services and products. This methodology enables quantification of the risks to national critical infrastructure of cyber threats. The work addresses the electric power sector as an example of how the methodology can be applied.

  4. Multi-Scale Infrastructure Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) multi-scale infrastructure assessment project supports both water resource adaptation to climate change and the rehabilitation of the nation’s aging water infrastructure by providing tools, scientific data and information to progra...

  5. The 1990 direct support infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The airport and cargo terminal were individually analyzed in depth as the principal direct infrastructure components having cross impacts with aircraft carrying cargo. Containerization was also addressed in depth as an infrastructure component since it categorically is linked with and cross impacted by the aircraft, the cargo terminal, the surface transport system, the shipper and consignee, and the actual cargo being moved.

  6. Education, Infrastructure and America's Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley-Braun, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Senator Carol Moseley-Braun, D-Ill., a recognized advocate for federal funding of educational facilities, describes the strategy of placing school infrastructure in the same category as commercial and transportation infrastructure. Three researchers in the facilities field present empirical evidence that facility conditions directly affect…

  7. Distributed Data Integration Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Critchlow, T; Ludaescher, B; Vouk, M; Pu, C

    2003-02-24

    The Internet is becoming the preferred method for disseminating scientific data from a variety of disciplines. This can result in information overload on the part of the scientists, who are unable to query all of the relevant sources, even if they knew where to find them, what they contained, how to interact with them, and how to interpret the results. A related issue is keeping up with current trends in information technology often taxes the end-user's expertise and time. Thus instead of benefiting from this information rich environment, scientists become experts on a small number of sources and technologies, use them almost exclusively, and develop a resistance to innovations that can enhance their productivity. Enabling information based scientific advances, in domains such as functional genomics, requires fully utilizing all available information and the latest technologies. In order to address this problem we are developing a end-user centric, domain-sensitive workflow-based infrastructure, shown in Figure 1, that will allow scientists to design complex scientific workflows that reflect the data manipulation required to perform their research without an undue burden. We are taking a three-tiered approach to designing this infrastructure utilizing (1) abstract workflow definition, construction, and automatic deployment, (2) complex agent-based workflow execution and (3) automatic wrapper generation. In order to construct a workflow, the scientist defines an abstract workflow (AWF) in terminology (semantics and context) that is familiar to him/her. This AWF includes all of the data transformations, selections, and analyses required by the scientist, but does not necessarily specify particular data sources. This abstract workflow is then compiled into an executable workflow (EWF, in our case XPDL) that is then evaluated and executed by the workflow engine. This EWF contains references to specific data source and interfaces capable of performing the desired

  8. ICESat-derived inland water surface spot heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Loughlin, Fiachra E.; Neal, Jeffrey; Yamazaki, Dai; Bates, Paul D.

    2016-04-01

    Accurate measurement of water surface height is key to many fields in hydrology and limnology. Satellite radar and laser altimetry have been shown to be useful means of obtaining such data where no ground gauging stations exist, and the accuracy of different satellite instruments is now reasonably well understood. Past validation studies have shown water surface height data from the ICESat instrument to have the highest vertical accuracy (mean absolute errors of ˜10 cm for ICESat, compared, for example, with ˜28 cm from Envisat), yet no freely available source of processed ICESat data currently exists for inland water bodies. Here we present a database of processed and quality checked ICESat-derived inland water surface heights (IWSH) for water bodies greater than 3 arc sec (˜92 m at the equator) in width. Four automated methods for removing spurious observations or outliers were investigated, along with the impact of using different water masks. We find that the best performing method ensures that observations used are completely surrounded by water in the SRTM Water Body data. Using this method for removing spurious observations, we estimate transect-averaged water surface heights at 587,292 unique locations from 2003 to 2009, with the number of locations proportional to the size of the river.

  9. Characterizing Inland Pacific Northwest American Viticultural Areas with Geospatial Data

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Ian-Huei; Davenport, Joan R.; Rupp, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    American Viticultural Areas are officially recognized appellations for wine grapes (Vitis vinifera L.). They represent not only geographic identification for growers, but also economic significance through price premiums for grapes from desirable appellations and wines sourcing grapes from such appellations. Petitions for establishment and official descriptions of American Viticultural Areas in the inland Pacific Northwest have traditionally relied on general descriptions of physical attributes and data from point measurements, namely weather stations. Examination of spatial datasets in a geographic information system provides a more holistic means of assessing viticultural areas and a spatially continuous representation of an area. Comparison of spatial datasets to official appellation descriptions largely corroborate petitioners' claims, often with greater detail, but also highlight some shortcomings of official appellation descriptions. By focusing on spatial data representing environmental factors most important to wine grape production, viticultural areas can be described more thoroughly and accurately and appellations may be more appropriately delineated. We examined inland Pacific Northwest American Viticultural Areas with a geographic information system approach, illustrating the utility of spatial datasets in characterization and delineation of American Viticultural Areas. PMID:23614001

  10. Monitoring Inland Storm Surge and Flooding from Hurricane Rita

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, Benton D.; Tollett, Roland W.; Mason, Jr., Robert R.

    2006-01-01

    Pressure transducers (sensors) and high-water marks were used to document the inland water levels related to storm surge generated by Hurricane Rita in southwestern Louisiana and southeastern Texas. On September 22-23, 2005, an experimental monitoring network of sensors was deployed at 33 sites over an area of about 4,000 square miles to record the timing, extent, and magnitude of inland hurricane storm surge and coastal flooding. Sensors were programmed to record date and time, temperature, and barometric or water pressure. Water pressure was corrected for changes in barometric pressure and salinity. Elevation surveys using global-positioning systems and differential levels were used to relate all storm-surge water-level data, reference marks, benchmarks, sensor measuring points, and high-water marks to the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88). The resulting data indicated that storm-surge water levels over 14 feet above NAVD 88 occurred at three locations, and rates of water-level rise greater than 5 feet per hour occurred at three locations near the Louisiana coast.

  11. Systemic microsporidiosis in inland bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Jacobson, E R; Green, D E; Undeen, A H; Cranfield, M; Vaughn, K L

    1998-09-01

    One laboratory-hatched and -reared inland bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) (No. 1) and two privately owned inland bearded dragons (Nos. 2 and 3) died, showing nonspecific signs of illness. Light microscopic examination of hematoxylin and eosin-stained tissue sections from lizard No. 1 revealed severe hepatic necrosis with clusters of light basophilic intracytoplasmic microorganisms packing and distending hepatocytes and free in areas of necrosis. Similar microorganisms were within cytoplasmic vacuoles in distended renal epithelial cells, pulmonary epithelial cells, gastric mucosal epithelial cells, enterocytes, and capillary endothelial cells and ventricular ependymal cells in the brain. In lizard Nos. 2 and 3, microorganisms of similar appearance were in macrophages in granulomatous inflammation in the colon, adrenal glands, and ovaries. The microorganism was gram positive and acid fast and had a small polar granule that stained using the periodic acid-Schiff reaction. Electron microscopic examination of deparaffinized liver of lizard No. 1 revealed merogonic and sporogonic stages of a protozoan compatible with members of the phylum Microspora. This report provides the first description of microsporidiosis in bearded dragons and is only the second report of this infection in a lizard.

  12. Clustering chlorine reactivity of haloacetic acid precursors in inland lakes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Teng; Arnold, William A

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) represents the major pool of organic precursors for harmful disinfection byproducts, such as haloacetic acids (HAAs), formed during drinking water chlorination, but much of it remains molecularly uncharacterized. Knowledge of model precursors is thus a prerequisite for understanding the more complex whole water DOM. The utility of HAA formation potential data from model DOM precursors, however, is limited due to the lack of comparability to water samples. In this study, the formation kinetics of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), the two predominant HAA species, were delineated upon chlorination of seventeen model DOM precursors and sixty-eight inland lake water samples collected from the Upper Midwest region of the United States. Of particular interest was the finding that the DCAA and TCAA formation rate constants could be grouped into four statistically distinct clusters reflecting the core structural features of model DOM precursors (i.e., non-β-diketone aliphatics, β-diketone aliphatics, non-β-diketone phenolics, and β-diketone phenolics). A comparative approach built upon hierarchical cluster analysis was developed to gain further insight into the chlorine reactivity patterns of HAA precursors in inland lake waters as defined by the relative proximity to four model precursor clusters. This work highlights the potential for implementing an integrated kinetic-clustering approach to constrain the chlorine reactivity of DOM in source waters.

  13. Modeling Tropical Cyclone induced inland flooding for Houston metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.

    2011-12-01

    Tropical cyclones are an important source of extreme precipitation and they have caused destructive inland floods in Texas. The Houston metropolitan area is a highly populated region with rapid economic development. The Bayou River basin was selected as the study area because it covers most of Houston. This study will employ HEC-HMS (a hydrological model) simulate the flood discharge from tropical storm Alison in 2001. The simulated discharge will be compared with observed discharge values for model adjustment and calibration. An iterative process will be used to calibrate the model. Then the flood discharge of another extreme precipitation event (Hurricane Ike) will be calculated from the fitted HEC model. Modeled discharge from both events will be used as inputs for HEC-RAS (a hydraulic model) to generate regional inundation maps. The purposes of this study are: (1) to understand how an urbanized hydrological system in Texas reacts to extreme precipitation brought by Tropical Cyclones, and (2) to construct a reliable model of inland flooding for future applications. Questions will be answered by this study are: What are the similarities and differences in flooding caused by two recent tropical storms that have affected the Houston metro area? Which factor plays a more important role in determining the TC floods intensity, variations in precipitation or changes in land use? Key words: Tropical Cyclone, Hydrological Model, Floods, Houston

  14. Checklist of the inland fishes of El Salvador.

    PubMed

    McMahan, Caleb D; Matamoros, Wilfredo A; Álvarez Calderón, Francisco S; Henríquez, Wendy Yamileth; Recinos, H Michelle; Chakrabarty, Prosanta; Barraza, Enrique; Herrera, Néstor

    2013-01-23

    The inland fish fauna of El Salvador and its distribution was originally described in 1925 by Samuel Hildebrand. That work has been the main source of information for freshwater fishes of El Salvador up to today. Based on the combination of an intensive literature review, electronic database searches, re-identification of museum specimens, and fieldwork, we hereby provide an updated checklist of the inland fishes of El Salvador. This checklist provides distributional data at the Salvadoran hydrographical and political (by department) levels. The checklist is systematically arranged at the ordinal and familial level and then alphabetically therein. The freshwater fish fauna of El Salvador includes 101 species divided into 64 genera, 29 families, and 14 orders. According to their supposed tolerance to salinity, 73% of these species are peripheral, 23% secondary, and only 4% are primary freshwater fishes. One species is endemic to the country, Amatitlania coatepeque. The low number of primary freshwater fishes and endemics is comparable to the Central American Pacific slope in particular, as well as northern Central America in general.

  15. MOEMS industrial infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heeren, Henne; Paschalidou, Lia

    2004-08-01

    Forecasters and analysts predict the market size for microsystems and microtechnologies to be in the order of 68 billion by the year 2005 (NEXUS Market Study 2002). In essence, the market potential is likely to double in size from its 38 billion status in 2002. According to InStat/MDR the market for MOEMS (Micro Optical Electro Mechanical Systems) in optical communication will be over $1.8 billion in 2006 and WTC states that the market for non telecom MOEMS will be even larger. Underpinning this staggering growth will be an infrastructure of design houses, foundries, package/assembly providers and equipment suppliers to cater for the demand in design, prototyping, and (mass-) production. This infrastructure is needed to provide an efficient route to commercialisation. Foundries, which provide the infrastructure to prototype, fabricate and mass-produce the designs emanating from the design houses and other companies. The reason for the customers to rely on foundries can be diverse: ranging from pure economical reasons (investments, cost-price) to technical (availability of required technology). The desire to have a second source of supply can also be a reason for outsourcing. Foundries aim to achieve economies of scale by combining several customer orders into volume production. Volumes are necessary, not only to achieve the required competitive cost prices, but also to attain the necessary technical competence level. Some products that serve very large markets can reach such high production volumes that they are able to sustain dedicated factories. In such cases, captive supply is possible, although outsourcing is still an option, as can be seen in the magnetic head markets, where captive and non-captive suppliers operate alongside each other. The most striking examples are: inkjet heads (>435 million heads per year) and magnetic heads (>1.5 billion heads per year). Also pressure sensor and accelerometer producers can afford their own facilities to produce the

  16. JINR cloud infrastructure evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, A. V.; Balashov, N. A.; Kutovskiy, N. A.; Semenov, R. N.

    2016-09-01

    To fulfil JINR commitments in different national and international projects related to the use of modern information technologies such as cloud and grid computing as well as to provide a modern tool for JINR users for their scientific research a cloud infrastructure was deployed at Laboratory of Information Technologies of Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. OpenNebula software was chosen as a cloud platform. Initially it was set up in simple configuration with single front-end host and a few cloud nodes. Some custom development was done to tune JINR cloud installation to fit local needs: web form in the cloud web-interface for resources request, a menu item with cloud utilization statistics, user authentication via Kerberos, custom driver for OpenVZ containers. Because of high demand in that cloud service and its resources over-utilization it was re-designed to cover increasing users' needs in capacity, availability and reliability. Recently a new cloud instance has been deployed in high-availability configuration with distributed network file system and additional computing power.

  17. Flexible Computational Science Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Bergen, Ben; Moss, Nicholas; Charest, Marc Robert Joseph

    2016-04-06

    FleCSI is a compile-time configurable framework designed to support multi-physics application development. As such, FleCSI attempts to provide a very general set of infrastructure design patterns that can be specialized and extended to suit the needs of a broad variety of solver and data requirements. Current support includes multi-dimensional mesh topology, mesh geometry, and mesh adjacency information, n-dimensional hashed-tree data structures, graph partitioning interfaces, and dependency closures. FleCSI also introduces a functional programming model with control, execution, and data abstractions that are consistent with both MPI and state-of-the-art task-based runtimes such as Legion and Charm++. The FleCSI abstraction layer provides the developer with insulation from the underlying runtime, while allowing support for multiple runtime systems, including conventional models like asynchronous MPI. The intent is to give developers a concrete set of user-friendly programming tools that can be used now, while allowing flexibility in choosing runtime implementations and optimizations that can be applied to architectures and runtimes that arise in the future. The control and execution models in FleCSI also provide formal nomenclature for describing poorly understood concepts like kernels and tasks.

  18. Recreational boating traffic: a chronic source of anthropogenic noise in the Wilmington, North Carolina Intracoastal Waterway.

    PubMed

    Haviland-Howell, Genevieve; Frankel, Adam S; Powell, Christopher M; Bocconcelli, Alessandro; Herman, Russell L; Sayigh, Laela S

    2007-07-01

    The majority of attention on the impact of anthropogenic noise on marine mammals has focused on low-frequency episodic activities. Persistent sources of mid-frequency noise pollution are less well studied. To address this data gap, the contribution of 25 physical, biological and anthropogenic factors to the ambient noise levels in the Wilmington, North Carolina Intracoastal Waterway were analyzed using a principal components analysis and least squares regression. The total number of recreational vessels passing through the waterway per hour is the factor that had the single greatest influence on environmental noise levels. During times of high boat traffic, anthropogenic noise is continuous rather than episodic, and occurs at frequencies that are biologically relevant to bottlenose dolphins. As a daily part of resident bottlenose dolphins' acoustic environment, recreational boating traffic may represent a chronic source of acoustic harassment.

  19. Amazon dams and waterways: Brazil's Tapajós Basin plans.

    PubMed

    Fearnside, Philip M

    2015-09-01

    Brazil plans to build 43 "large" dams (>30 MW) in the Tapajós Basin, ten of which are priorities for completion by 2022. Impacts include flooding indigenous lands and conservation units. The Tapajós River and two tributaries (the Juruena and Teles Pires Rivers) are also the focus of plans for waterways to transport soybeans from Mato Grosso to ports on the Amazon River. Dams would allow barges to pass rapids and waterfalls. The waterway plans require dams in a continuous chain, including the Chacorão Dam that would flood 18,700 ha of the Munduruku Indigenous Land. Protections in Brazil's constitution and legislation and in international conventions are easily neutralized through application of "security suspensions," as has already occurred during licensing of several dams currently under construction in the Tapajós Basin. Few are aware of "security suspensions," resulting in little impetus to change these laws.

  20. Modelling and Simulation for Safe and Efficient Navigation in Narrow Waterways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ince, A. N.; Topuz, E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper outlines the design of a Vessel Traffic Management and Information System (VTMIS) for the Turkish Straits and taking this as an example shows how modelling and simulation may aid safe and efficient navigation of vessels through waterways which are narrow and winding with changing currents and are therefore difficult to navigate and prone to accidents. Ship Handling and Vessel Traffic Flow simulation models and Hyrographic Prediction model are described and the simulation trials conducted under different traffic and environment conditions are discussed to show the role that these prediction and simulation programmes can play in preventing marine casualities in different waterways, which may result in loss of human lifes and property and contamination of the environment.

  1. Interacting effects of vegetation and hydrogeomorphic complexity on nitrate in agricultural waterways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, A.; Cadenasso, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Intensive cultivation in the California Central Valley has resulted in the loss of ~95% of riparian habitat. In addition, small streams have been replaced by denuded agricultural waterways to convey irrigation drainage high in nitrate (NO3). A variety of strategies are being used to increase riparian vegetation along agricultural waterways, but many of the ecological functions of these novel habitat features are unknown. An extensive study was conducted in summer 2014 to investigate which riparian ecosystem features are associated with variable NO3 levels in waterways draining irrigated cropland. Eighty sites were selected to represent a wide range of riparian vegetation, hydrogeomorphic features, and agricultural contexts. Sites were visited three times to correspond to the early, mid, and late irrigation season. At each visit, water samples were taken 300m apart and analyzed for turbidity, pH, temperature, and NO3. To characterized hydrogeomorphic complexity, the frequency of features associated with transient storage and increased retention time were quantified. Vegetation cover and structure on banks, foreshores, and in channels was also measured. Using a generalized linear model, we tested for the interaction of upstream [NO3-N] with vegetation and hydrogeomorphic variables to predict downstream [NO3-N], the dependent variable. As expected, upstream [NO3-N] strongly predicted downstream [NO3-N] and no features directly predicted downstream [NO3-N]. The frequency of hydrogeomorphic features, however, interacted with upstream [NO3-N] to predict downstream [NO3-N], indicating an effect of hydrogeomorphic complexity on NO3 from up to downstream. Vegetation factors did not interact with upstream [NO3-N], but woody vegetation cover was positively correlated with the frequency of hydrogeomorphic features. These findings support the use of woody riparian vegetation to increase NO3 retention in agricultural waterways, via an indirect association with hydrogeomorphic

  2. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent flow past hydrokinetic turbine arrays in natural waterways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, F.; Kang, S.; Yang, X.

    2012-12-01

    While a considerable amount of work has focused on studying the effects and performance of wind farms, very little is known about the performance of hydrokinetic turbine arrays in open channels such as rivers and oceans. Unlike large wind farms, where the vertical fluxes of momentum and energy from the atmospheric boundary layer comprise the main transport mechanisms, the presence of free surface in hydrokinetic turbine arrays inhibits vertical momentum transport. In addition, the complex bathymetry of natural waterways where turbine arrays are installed impacts the array efficiency and the turbulence-induced loads acting on the turbine blades. To computationally explore these issues we develop a numerical method capable of carrying our large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flows past hydrokinetic turbine arrays mounted in natural waterways. The method employs the LES curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method of Kang et al. (Adv. in Water Resources, 2010) coupled with the actuator disk model for parameterizing the turbines. Simulations are carried out for the same turbine array placed both in a straight open channel and in a natural meandering stream to systematically investigate the effect of waterway bathymetry on array efficiency and power capture ability. Mean flow quantities and turbulence statistics within and downstream of the arrays will be analyzed and the effect of the turbine arrays as means for increasing the effective roughness of the channel bed will be extensively discussed.

  3. Monitoring of metal pollution in waterways across Bangladesh and ecological and public health implications of pollution.

    PubMed

    Kibria, Golam; Hossain, Md Maruf; Mallick, Debbrota; Lau, T C; Wu, Rudolf

    2016-12-01

    Using innovative artificial mussels technology for the first time, this study detected eight heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, U, Zn) on a regular basis in waterways across Bangladesh (Chittagong, Dhaka and Khulna). Three heavy metals, viz. Co, Cr and Hg were always below the instrumental detection levels in all the sites during the study period. Through this study, seven metal pollution "hot spots" have been identified, of which, five "hot spots" (Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb) were located in the Buriganga River, close to the capital Dhaka. Based on this study, the Buriganga River can be classified as the most polluted waterway in Bangladesh compared to waterways monitored in Khulna and Chittagong. Direct effluents discharged from tanneries, textiles are, most likely, reasons for elevated concentrations of heavy metals in the Buriganga River. In other areas (Khulna), agriculture and fish farming effluents may have caused higher Cu, U and Zn in the Bhairab and Rupsa Rivers, whereas untreated industrial discharge and ship breaking activities can be linked to elevated Cd in the coastal sites (Chittagong). Metal pollution may cause significant impacts on water quality (irrigation, drinking), aquatic biodiversity (lethal and sub-lethal effects), food contamination/food security (bioaccumulation of metals in crops and seafood), human health (diseases) and livelihoods of people associated with wetlands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Carbon emissions of infrastructure development.

    PubMed

    Müller, Daniel B; Liu, Gang; Løvik, Amund N; Modaresi, Roja; Pauliuk, Stefan; Steinhoff, Franciska S; Brattebø, Helge

    2013-10-15

    Identifying strategies for reconciling human development and climate change mitigation requires an adequate understanding of how infrastructures contribute to well-being and greenhouse gas emissions. While direct emissions from infrastructure use are well-known, information about indirect emissions from their construction is highly fragmented. Here, we estimated the carbon footprint of the existing global infrastructure stock in 2008, assuming current technologies, to be 122 (-20/+15) Gt CO2. The average per-capita carbon footprint of infrastructures in industrialized countries (53 (± 6) t CO2) was approximately 5 times larger that that of developing countries (10 (± 1) t CO2). A globalization of Western infrastructure stocks using current technologies would cause approximately 350 Gt CO2 from materials production, which corresponds to about 35-60% of the remaining carbon budget available until 2050 if the average temperature increase is to be limited to 2 °C, and could thus compromise the 2 °C target. A promising but poorly explored mitigation option is to build new settlements using less emissions-intensive materials, for example by urban design; however, this strategy is constrained by a lack of bottom-up data on material stocks in infrastructures. Infrastructure development must be considered in post-Kyoto climate change agreements if developing countries are to participate on a fair basis.

  5. Complex Networks and Critical Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setola, Roberto; de Porcellinis, Stefano

    The term “Critical Infrastructures” indicates all those technological infrastructures such as: electric grids, telecommunication networks, railways, healthcare systems, financial circuits, etc. that are more and more relevant for the welfare of our countries. Each one of these infrastructures is a complex, highly non-linear, geographically dispersed cluster of systems, that interact with their human owners, operators, users and with the other infrastructures. Their augmented relevance and the actual political and technological scenarios, which have increased their exposition to accidental failure and deliberate attacks, demand for different and innovative protection strategies (generally indicate as CIP - Critical Infrastructure Protection). To this end it is mandatory to understand the mechanisms that regulate the dynamic of these infrastructures. In this framework, an interesting approach is those provided by the complex networks. In this paper we illustrate some results achieved considering structural and functional properties of the corresponding topological networks both when each infrastructure is assumed as an autonomous system and when we take into account also the dependencies existing among the different infrastructures.

  6. A Science Information Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, C. A.; Hawkins, I.; Malina, R. F.; Dow, K.; Murray, S.

    1994-12-01

    We have created a partnership of science museums, research institutions, teachers, and other centers of informal science education to enable access to the rich resources of remote sensing data available from NASA and other sources and to deliver this information to the general community. We are creating science resource centers in the nation's science museums and planetarium facilities, linking them together through a national Science Information Infrastructure (SII). The SII framework is being founded on Internet connections between the resource centers, which are in turn linked to research institutions. The most up-to-date and exciting science data, related information, and interpretive material will be available from the research institutions. The science museums will present this information in appropriate ways that respond to the needs and interest of the general public and K--12 communities. The science information will be available through the World Wide Web using a Mosaic interface that individuals will use to explore the on-line materials through self-guided learning modules. K--12 teachers will have access to the materials and, in a workshop forum, learn to find and use the information to create lesson plans and curricula for their classrooms. Eventually, as the connectivity of schools and libraries improves, students and teachers will have access to the resource centers from their own locations. The core partnership of the SII includes the Center for EUV Astrophysics (CEA), and Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Exploratorium, Lawrence Hall of Science, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Science Museum of Virginia, New York Hall of Science, Adler Museum of Chicago, University of California Museum of Paleontology, Boston Museum of Science, and the Earth Observing Satellite Company (EOSAT). A demonstration of the application of resource center materials in the K--12 community is being conducted through the Science On-Line project at the Center

  7. The Fermilab data storage infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Jon A Bakken et al.

    2003-02-06

    Fermilab, in collaboration with the DESY laboratory in Hamburg, Germany, has created a petabyte scale data storage infrastructure to meet the requirements of experiments to store and access large data sets. The Fermilab data storage infrastructure consists of the following major storage and data transfer components: Enstore mass storage system, DCache distributed data cache, ftp and Grid ftp for primarily external data transfers. This infrastructure provides a data throughput sufficient for transferring data from experiments' data acquisition systems. It also allows access to data in the Grid framework.

  8. 48 CFR 52.247-38 - F.o.b. Inland Carrier, Point of Exportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false F.o.b. Inland Carrier... Provisions and Clauses 52.247-38 F.o.b. Inland Carrier, Point of Exportation. As prescribed in 47.303-10(c), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts when the delivery term is f.o.b....

  9. 48 CFR 52.247-38 - F.o.b. Inland Carrier, Point of Exportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false F.o.b. Inland Carrier... Provisions and Clauses 52.247-38 F.o.b. Inland Carrier, Point of Exportation. As prescribed in 47.303-10(c), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts when the delivery term is f.o.b....

  10. Chapter 12: Daily Patterns of Marbled Murrelet Activity at Inland Sites

    Treesearch

    Nancy L. Naslund; Brian P. O’Donnell

    1995-01-01

    Patterns in the daily activity of Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) at inland sites has been studied throughout their range from California to Alaska. Murrelets are most active at inland sites around dawn, and to a lesser degree, at dusk. Throughout their range, peak levels of activity (detections) occur in the hour around dawn, but...

  11. 33 CFR 155.245 - Damage stability information for inland oil barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Damage stability information for... VESSELS Vessel Equipment § 155.245 Damage stability information for inland oil barges. (a) Owners or operators of inland oil barges shall ensure that the vessel plans necessary to perform salvage, stability...

  12. The El Asnam 1980 October 10 inland earthquake: a new hypothesis of tsunami generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, J.; Hébert, H.; Ruegg, J.-C.; Briole, P.

    2011-06-01

    The Western Mediterranean Sea is not considered as a high seismic region. Only several earthquakes with magnitude above five occur each year and only a handful have consequences on human beings and infrastructure. The El Asnam (Algeria) earthquake of 1980 October 10 with an estimated magnitude Ms= 7.3 is one of the most destructive earthquakes recorded in northern Africa and more largely in the Western Mediterranean Basin. Although it is located inland, it is known to have been followed by a small tsunami recorded on several tide gauges along the southeastern Spanish Coast. In 1954, a similar earthquake having occurred at the same location induced a turbidity current associated to a submarine landslide, which is widely known to have cut submarine phone cables far from the coast. This event was followed by a small tsunami attributed to the landslide. Thus the origin of the tsunami of 1980 was promptly attributed to the same kind of submarine slide. As no evidence of such mass movement was highlighted, and because the tsunami wave periods does not match with a landslide origin in both cases (1954 and 1980), this study considers two rupture scenarios, that the coseismic deformation itself (of about 10 cm off the Algerian coast near Ténès) is sufficient to produce a low amplitude (several centimetres) tsunami able to reach the Spanish southeastern coast from Alicante to Algeciras (Gibraltar strait to the west). After a discussion concerning the proposed rupture scenarios and their respective parameters, numerical tsunami modelling is performed on a set of bathymetric grids. Then the results of wave propagation and amplification (maximum wave height maps) are discussed, with a special attention to Alicante (Spain) Harbour where the location of two historical tide gauges allows the comparison between synthetic mareograms and historical records showing sufficient signal amplitude. This study is part of the active tsunami hazard assessment in Mediterranean Sea especially

  13. Incorporating Green Infrastructure into TMDLs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The fact sheet provides examples of how some states describe green infrastructure and low impact development activities in their TMDL implementation sections to address stormwater-source impaired waters.

  14. Infrastructure SIP Requirements and Guidance

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Air Act requires states to submit SIPs that implement, maintain, and enforce a new or revised national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) within 3 years of EPA issuing the standard. The Infrastructure SIP is required for all states.

  15. Green Infrastructure for Arid Communities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    how green infrastructure practices and the many associated benefits can be effective not only in wetter climates, but also for those communities in arid and semi-arid regions around the nation that have different precipitation patterns

  16. Inland Steel's No. 7 blast furnace third reline

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrance, K.F. II ); Johansson, J.; Carter, W.L. )

    1994-09-01

    The background information, investigation and benchmarking that led to a decision by Inland Steel to partially reline No. 7 blast furnace is covered. This approach reduced actual downtime on the furnace and extended the current campaign. This alternative allowed for the rebalancing of the physical plant of No. 7 blast furnace. Areas of scope covered are hearth, stack, stoves, gas cleaning and furnace top. Included are highlights of the execution of the project including schedules, blowdown, salamander tap, quench, dig out/descale, scaffolding used and brick installation. A summary of the actual results of the work is presented along with information on production planned, blow-in and the first 20 days of production.

  17. Organic volatile sulfur compounds in inland aquatic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    The speciation, concentration, and fluxes of organic volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in a wide variety of inland aquatic systems wee studied. Dissolved VSCs were sparged from water samples, trapped cryogenically, and quantified by gas chromatograph equipped with a flame photometric detector. Species detected and mean surface water concentrations were: carbonyl sulfide (COS), 0.091-7.6 nM; methanethiol (MSH), undetected-180 nM; dimethyl sulfide (DMS), 0.48-1290 nM; carbon disulfide (CS[sub 2]), undetected-69 nM; dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), undetected-68 nM. The range in surface water concentrations of over five orders of magnitude was influenced principally by lake depth and sulfate concentration ([SO[sub 4][sup 2[minus

  18. Infrastructure dynamics: A selected bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dajani, J. S.; Bencosme, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    The term infrastructure is used to denote the set of life support and public service systems which is necessary for the development of growth of human settlements. Included are some basic references in the field of dynamic simulation, as well as a number of relevant applications in the area of infrastructure planning. The intent is to enable the student or researcher to quickly identify such applications to the extent necessary for initiating further work in the field.

  19. Open Component Portability Infrastructure (OPENCPI)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    OPEN COMPONENT PORTABILITY INFRASTRUCTURE (OPENCPI) MERCURY FEDERAL SYSTEMS, INC. MARCH 2013 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT...NUMBER OC 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER PI 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Mercury Federal Systems, Inc. 1901 South Bell Street, Suite...Component Portability Infrastructure (OPENCPI) ,” AFRL-RI-RS-TR- 2009-257, Mercury Federal Systems, Inc., Arlington, VA, Nov 2009. 2. Kulp, J., “OpenCPI

  20. Joint probability safety assessment for NPP defense infrastructure against extreme external natural hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Guilin, L.; Defu, L.; Huajun, L.; Fengqing, W.; Tao, Z.

    2012-07-01

    With the increasing tendency of natural hazards, the typhoon, hurricane and tropical Cyclone induced surge, wave, precipitation, flood and wind as extreme external loads menacing Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) in coastal and inland provinces of China. For all of planned, designed And constructed NPP the National Nuclear Safety Administration of China and IAEA recommended Probable Maximum Hurricane /Typhoon/(PMH/T), Probable Maximum Storm Surge (PMSS), Probable Maximum Flood (PMF), Design Basis Flood (DBF) as safety regulations for NPP defense infrastructures. This paper discusses the joint probability analysis of simultaneous occurrence typhoon induced extreme external hazards and compare with IAEA 2006-2009 recommended safety regulation design criteria for some NPP defense infrastructures along China coast. (authors)

  1. Water Supply Infrastructure System Surety

    SciTech Connect

    EKMAN,MARK E.; ISBELL,DARYL

    2000-01-06

    The executive branch of the United States government has acknowledged and identified threats to the water supply infrastructure of the United States. These threats include contamination of the water supply, aging infrastructure components, and malicious attack. Government recognition of the importance of providing safe, secure, and reliable water supplies has a historical precedence in the water works of the ancient Romans, who recognized the same basic threats to their water supply infrastructure the United States acknowledges today. System surety is the philosophy of ''designing for threats, planning for failure, and managing for success'' in system design and implementation. System surety is an alternative to traditional compliance-based approaches to safety, security, and reliability. Four types of surety are recognized: reactive surety; proactive surety, preventative surety; and fundamental, inherent surety. The five steps of the system surety approach can be used to establish the type of surety needed for the water infrastructure and the methods used to realize a sure water infrastructure. The benefit to the water industry of using the system surety approach to infrastructure design and assessment is a proactive approach to safety, security, and reliability for water transmission, treatment, distribution, and wastewater collection and treatment.

  2. Strategic plan for infrastructure optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Donley, C.D.

    1998-05-27

    This document represents Fluor Daniel Hanford`s and DynCorp`s Tri-Cities Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 1998--2002, the road map that will guide them into the next century and their sixth year of providing safe and cost effective infrastructure services and support to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Hanford Site. The Plan responds directly to the issues raised in the FDH/DOE Critical Self Assessment specifically: (1) a strategy in place to give DOE the management (systems) and physical infrastructure for the future; (2) dealing with the barriers that exist to making change; and (3) a plan to right-size the infrastructure and services, and reduce the cost of providing services. The Plan incorporates initiatives from several studies conducted in Fiscal Year 1997 to include: the Systems Functional Analysis, 200 Area Water Commercial Practices Plan, $ million Originated Cost Budget Achievement Plan, the 1OO Area Vacate Plan, the Railroad Shutdown Plan, as well as recommendations from the recently completed Review of Hanford Electrical Utility. These and other initiatives identified over the next five years will result in significant improvements in efficiency, allowing a greater portion of the infrastructure budget to be applied to Site cleanup. The Plan outlines a planning and management process that defines infrastructure services and structure by linking site technical base line data and customer requirements to work scope and resources. The Plan also provides a vision of where Site infrastructure is going and specific initiatives to get there.

  3. 46 CFR 11.431 - Tonnage requirements for Great Lakes and inland endorsements for vessels of over 1600 gross tons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tonnage requirements for Great Lakes and inland... Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.431 Tonnage requirements for Great Lakes and inland endorsements for vessels of over 1600 gross tons. (a) All required experience for Great Lakes and inland unlimited...

  4. 46 CFR 11.437 - Requirements for mate of Great Lakes and inland self-propelled vessels of unlimited tonnage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirements for mate of Great Lakes and inland self... Requirements for National Deck Officer Endorsements § 11.437 Requirements for mate of Great Lakes and inland... for an endorsement as mate of Great Lakes and inland self-propelled vessels of unlimited tonnage is...

  5. 46 CFR 90.05-7 - Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... vessels on inland and Great Lakes routes. (a) Vessels inspected and certificated for ocean or unlimited... are concerned on any inland routes, including the Great Lakes. ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ocean or unlimited coastwise vessels on inland and Great...

  6. 46 CFR 11.431 - Tonnage requirements for Great Lakes and inland endorsements for vessels of over 1600 gross tons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tonnage requirements for Great Lakes and inland... Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.431 Tonnage requirements for Great Lakes and inland endorsements for vessels of over 1600 gross tons. (a) All required experience for Great Lakes and inland unlimited...

  7. 46 CFR 11.431 - Tonnage requirements for Great Lakes and inland endorsements for vessels of over 1600 gross tons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tonnage requirements for Great Lakes and inland... Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.431 Tonnage requirements for Great Lakes and inland endorsements for vessels of over 1600 gross tons. (a) All required experience for Great Lakes and inland unlimited...

  8. 46 CFR 11.433 - Requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland self-propelled vessels of unlimited tonnage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland self... Requirements for National Deck Officer Endorsements § 11.433 Requirements for master of Great Lakes and inland... for an endorsement as master of Great Lakes and inland self-propelled vessels of unlimited tonnage is...

  9. Ecologically Enhancing Coastal Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Arthur, Mairi; Naylor, Larissa; Hansom, Jim; Burrows, Mike; Boyd, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Hard engineering structures continue to proliferate in the coastal zone globally in response to increasing pressures associated with rising sea levels, coastal flooding and erosion. These structures are typically plain-cast by design and function as poor ecological surrogates for natural rocky shores which are highly topographically complex and host a range of available microhabitats for intertidal species. Ecological enhancement mitigates some of these negative impacts by integrating components of nature into the construction and design of these structures to improve their sustainability, resilience and multifunctionality. In the largest UK ecological enhancement trial to date, 184 tiles (15x15cm) of up to nine potential designs were deployed on vertical concrete coastal infrastructure in 2016 at three sites across the UK (Saltcoats, Blackness and Isle of Wight). The surface texture and complexity of the tiles were varied to test the effect of settlement surface texture at the mm-cm scale of enhancement on the success of colonisation and biodiversity in the mid-upper intertidal zone in order to answer the following experimental hypotheses: • Tiles with mm-scale geomorphic complexity will have greater barnacle abundances • Tiles with cm-scale geomorphic complexity will have greater species richness than mm-scale tiles. A range of methods were used in creating the tile designs including terrestrial laser scanning of creviced rock surfaces to mimic natural rocky shore complexity as well as artificially generated complexity using computer software. The designs replicated the topographic features of high ecological importance found on natural rocky shores and promoted species recruitment and community composition on artificial surfaces; thus enabling us to evaluate biological responses to geomorphic complexity in a controlled field trial. At two of the sites, the roughest tile designs (cm scale) did not have the highest levels of barnacle recruits which were

  10. Spatial distribution of PAHs and associated laboratory-measured bioaccumulation in New York/New Jersey waterways

    SciTech Connect

    Rosman, L.B.; Barrows, E.S.

    1995-12-31

    Sediment core samples from New York/New Jersey waterways within the Hudson-Raritan Estuary and Long Island Sound were collected to depths representative of dredging activity. Sediment was also collected from a reference site in the New York Bight as a comparison. Composited core sediments representing each waterway were analyzed for PAHs, sediment grain size, and total organic carbon. To assess bioaccumulation, sand worms (Nereis virens) and blunt-nose clams (Macoma nasuta) were exposed for 28 days to sediment composites and to New York Bight sediment. Tissues were analyzed for the same constituents as the sediment samples, as well as for lipid content. The results highlight the range and magnitude of PAH concentrations in sediments of NY/NJ waterways. Concentrations of total PAHs ranged from undetected to 30,000 {micro}g/kg (dry weight). Tissues exposed to sediments from several waterways bioaccumulated organic compounds at concentrations as much as 10 times greater than those exposed to New York Bight sediments. The presence and extent of bioaccumulated compounds, along with benthic toxicity data, create a profile characterizing each waterway.

  11. The influence of hydrology and waterway distance on population structure of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in a large river.

    PubMed

    Olsen, J B; Beacham, T D; Wetklo, M; Seeb, L W; Smith, C T; Flannery, B G; Wenburg, J K

    2010-04-01

    Adult Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha navigate in river systems using olfactory cues that may be influenced by hydrologic factors such as flow and the number, size and spatial distribution of tributaries. Thus, river hydrology may influence both homing success and the level of straying (gene flow), which in turn influences population structure. In this study, two methods of multivariate analysis were used to examine the extent to which four indicators of hydrology and waterway distance explained population structure of O. tshawytscha in the Yukon River. A partial Mantel test showed that the indicators of hydrology were positively associated with broad-scale (Yukon basin) population structure, when controlling for the influence of waterway distance. Multivariate multiple regression showed that waterway distance, supplemented with the number and flow of major drainage basins, explained more variation in broad-scale population structure than any single indicator. At an intermediate spatial scale, indicators of hydrology did not appear to influence population structure after accounting for waterway distance. These results suggest that habitat changes in the Yukon River, which alter hydrology, may influence the basin-wide pattern of population structure in O. tshawytscha. Further research is warranted on the role of hydrology in concert with waterway distance in influencing population structure in Pacific salmon.

  12. To manage inland fisheries is to manage at the social-ecological watershed scale.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vivian M; Lynch, Abigail J; Young, Nathan; Cowx, Ian G; Beard, T Douglas; Taylor, William W; Cooke, Steven J

    2016-10-01

    Approaches to managing inland fisheries vary between systems and regions but are often based on large-scale marine fisheries principles and thus limited and outdated. Rarely do they adopt holistic approaches that consider the complex interplay among humans, fish, and the environment. We argue that there is an urgent need for a shift in inland fisheries management towards holistic and transdisciplinary approaches that embrace the principles of social-ecological systems at the watershed scale. The interconnectedness of inland fisheries with their associated watershed (biotic, abiotic, and humans) make them extremely complex and challenging to manage and protect. For this reason, the watershed is a logical management unit. To assist management at this scale, we propose a framework that integrates disparate concepts and management paradigms to facilitate inland fisheries management and sustainability. We contend that inland fisheries need to be managed as social-ecological watershed system (SEWS). The framework supports watershed-scale and transboundary governance to manage inland fisheries, and transdisciplinary projects and teams to ensure relevant and applicable monitoring and research. We discuss concepts of social-ecological feedback and interactions of multiple stressors and factors within/between the social-ecological systems. Moreover, we emphasize that management, monitoring, and research on inland fisheries at the watershed scale are needed to ensure long-term sustainable and resilient fisheries.

  13. Towards an Infrastructure for MLS Distributed Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Distributed computing owes its success to the development of infrastructure, middleware, and standards (e.g., CORBA) by the computing industry. This...Government must protect national security information against unauthorized information flow. To support MLS distributed computing , a MLS infrastructure...protection of classified information and use both the emerging distributed computing and commercial security infrastructures. The resulting infrastructure

  14. Agent-based modeling of complex infrastructures

    SciTech Connect

    North, M. J.

    2001-06-01

    Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) can be applied to investigate complex infrastructures and infrastructure interdependencies. The CAS model agents within the Spot Market Agent Research Tool (SMART) and Flexible Agent Simulation Toolkit (FAST) allow investigation of the electric power infrastructure, the natural gas infrastructure and their interdependencies.

  15. Critical Infrastructures: Background, Policy, and Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-07

    Government Accountability Office, Critical Infrastructure Protection: Challenges for Selected Agencies and Industry Sectors. Repot to the Committee on...the federal government to develop and implement plans that would protect government -operated infrastructures and called for a dialogue between... government and the private sector to develop a National Infrastructure Assurance Plan that would protect all of the nation’s critical infrastructures by

  16. Infrastructure Commons in Economic Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frischmann, Brett M.

    This chapter briefly summarizes a theory (developed in substantial detail elsewhere)1 that explains why there are strong economic arguments for managing and sustaining infrastructure resources in an openly accessible manner. This theory facilitates a better understanding of two related issues: how society benefits from infrastructure resources and how decisions about how to manage or govern infrastructure resources affect a wide variety of public and private interests. The key insights from this analysis are that infrastructure resources generate value as inputs into a wide range of productive processes and that the outputs from these processes are often public goods and nonmarket goods that generate positive externalities that benefit society as a whole. Managing such resources in an openly accessible manner may be socially desirable from an economic perspective because doing so facilitates these downstream productive activities. For example, managing the Internet infrastructure in an openly accessible manner facilitates active citizen involvement in the production and sharing of many different public and nonmarket goods. Over the last decade, this has led to increased opportunities for a wide range of citizens to engage in entrepreneurship, political discourse, social network formation, and community building, among many other activities. The chapter applies these insights to the network neutrality debate and suggests how the debate might be reframed to better account for the wide range of private and public interests at stake.

  17. Triggered tremor in inland region in Japan (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, K.; Chao, K.

    2013-12-01

    Episodic activity of nonvolcanic ambient tremor accompanied by short-term slow slip event observed in Nankai and Cascadia subduction zones reflects stick slip at the transition zone along the plate interface as one of the subduction process. On the other hand, tremor is sometimes activated temporally by surface wave from teleseismic large event. The triggered tremor has the same properties in frequency content and source location as those of ambient tremor. Therefore the detection of triggered tremor suggests the existence of ambient tremor, which might reflect slow slip event. Ambient tremor activity has been detected not only in the subduction zone but also along the strike slip fault system like as San Andreas Fault. Therefore, even in Japan, there is a possibility to detect tremor associated with the active fault system in inland region. Here we tried to search the triggered tremor during propagation of large amplitude surface wave from M8 class teleseismic large events. All Hi-net stations operated by the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention were used in this analysis. We compared the envelope trace for the bandpass filtered seismogram (2-8 Hz) with the long-period surface wave with the passband between 0.02 and 0.05 Hz. The envelope pattern characterized by a periodic enhancement at an interval of about a few 10 s correlating to the surface wave is recognized as triggered tremor. So far, we newly detected triggered tremor in some inland regions in Japan in addition to subduction tremor. In central Hokkaido, the tremor at a depth of around 10-20 km coincides with active seismicity linked to previously known, deep low-frequency microearthquakes related to volcanic activity. In northernmost Hokkaido, where there are no known active faults, volcanoes, or microearthquake seismicity, the triggered tremor is located near the ground surface. It would be possible that the tremor is related to fluid pressure change within a limestone

  18. Using chloride and other ions to trace sewage and road salt in the Illinois Waterway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, W.R.; Panno, S.V.; Hackley, Keith C.; Hwang, H.-H.; Martinsek, A.T.; Markus, M.

    2010-01-01

    Chloride concentrations in waterways of northern USA are increasing at alarming rates and road salt is commonly assumed to be the cause. However, there are additional sources of Cl- in metropolitan areas, such as treated wastewater (TWW) and water conditioning salts, which may be contributing to Cl- loads entering surface waters. In this study, the potential sources of Cl- and Cl- loads in the Illinois River Basin from the Chicago area to the Illinois River's confluence with the Mississippi River were investigated using halide data in stream samples and published Cl- and river discharge data. The investigation showed that road salt runoff and TWW from the Chicago region dominate Cl- loads in the Illinois Waterway, defined as the navigable sections of the Illinois River and two major tributaries in the Chicago region. Treated wastewater discharges at a relatively constant rate throughout the year and is the primary source of Cl- and other elements such as F- and B. Chloride loads are highest in the winter and early spring as a result of road salt runoff which can increase Cl- concentrations by up to several hundred mg/L. Chloride concentrations decrease downstream in the Illinois Waterway due to dilution, but are always elevated relative to tributaries downriver from Chicago. The TWW component is especially noticeable downstream under low discharge conditions during summer and early autumn when surface drainage is at a minimum and agricultural drain tiles are not flowing. Increases in population, urban and residential areas, and roadways in the Chicago area have caused an increase in the flux of Cl- from both road salt and TWW. Chloride concentrations have been increasing in the Illinois Waterway since around 1960 at a rate of about 1 mg/L/a. The increase is largest in the winter months due to road salt runoff. Shallow groundwater Cl- concentrations are also increasing, potentially producing higher base flow concentrations. Projected increases in population and

  19. The McClellan-Kerr Waterway and Regional Economic Development - Phase II Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    Value Added . Dairy farm products 5.3 28.02 * Poultiy and eggs 2.2 11.63 Meat animals and products 69.3 366.46 Cotton 2.8 14.81 " Food and feed...could the decrease in -qnsportation cost affect the gross regional product , wage payments, and tax rec’ipts? It expands the industrial output which...industries most affected by the water- way? The model estimates that the waterway reduces equilibrium prices of farm, manufacturing, and mining products

  20. Infrastructure for the Geospatial Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Ron; Farley, Jim

    Geospatial data and geoprocessing techniques are now directly linked to business processes in many areas. Commerce, transportation and logistics, planning, defense, emergency response, health care, asset management and many other domains leverage geospatial information and the ability to model these data to achieve increased efficiencies and to develop better, more comprehensive decisions. However, the ability to deliver geospatial data and the capacity to process geospatial information effectively in these domains are dependent on infrastructure technology that facilitates basic operations such as locating data, publishing data, keeping data current and notifying subscribers and others whose applications and decisions are dependent on this information when changes are made. This chapter introduces the notion of infrastructure technology for the Geospatial Web. Specifically, the Geography Markup Language (GML) and registry technology developed using the ebRIM specification delivered from the OASIS consortium are presented as atomic infrastructure components in a working Geospatial Web.

  1. Modelling Inland Flood Events for Hazard Maps in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Nzerem, K.; Sassi, M.; Hilberts, A.; Assteerawatt, A.; Tillmanns, S.; Mathur, P.; Mitas, C.; Rafique, F.

    2015-12-01

    Taiwan experiences significant inland flooding, driven by torrential rainfall from plum rain storms and typhoons during summer and fall. From last 13 to 16 years data, 3,000 buildings were damaged by such floods annually with a loss US$0.41 billion (Water Resources Agency). This long, narrow island nation with mostly hilly/mountainous topography is located at tropical-subtropical zone with annual average typhoon-hit-frequency of 3-4 (Central Weather Bureau) and annual average precipitation of 2502mm (WRA) - 2.5 times of the world's average. Spatial and temporal distributions of countrywide precipitation are uneven, with very high local extreme rainfall intensities. Annual average precipitation is 3000-5000mm in the mountainous regions, 78% of it falls in May-October, and the 1-hour to 3-day maximum rainfall are about 85 to 93% of the world records (WRA). Rivers in Taiwan are short with small upstream areas and high runoff coefficients of watersheds. These rivers have the steepest slopes, the shortest response time with rapid flows, and the largest peak flows as well as specific flood peak discharge (WRA) in the world. RMS has recently developed a countrywide inland flood model for Taiwan, producing hazard return period maps at 1arcsec grid resolution. These can be the basis for evaluating and managing flood risk, its economic impacts, and insured flood losses. The model is initiated with sub-daily historical meteorological forcings and calibrated to daily discharge observations at about 50 river gauges over the period 2003-2013. Simulations of hydrologic processes, via rainfall-runoff and routing models, are subsequently performed based on a 10000 year set of stochastic forcing. The rainfall-runoff model is physically based continuous, semi-distributed model for catchment hydrology. The 1-D wave propagation hydraulic model considers catchment runoff in routing and describes large-scale transport processes along the river. It also accounts for reservoir storage

  2. Dynamic Agroecological Zones for the Inland Pacific Northwest, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggins, D. R.; Rupp, R.; Gessler, P.; Pan, W.; Brown, D. J.; Machado, S.; Walden, V. P.; Eigenbrode, S.; Abatzoglou, J. T.

    2011-12-01

    Agroecological zones (AEZ's) have traditionally been defined by integrating multiple layers of biophysical (e.g. climate, soil, terrain) and occasionally socioeconomic data to create unique zones with specific ranges of land use constraints and potentials. Our approach to defining AEZ's assumes that current agricultural land uses have emerged as a consequence of biophysical and socioeconomic drivers. Therefore, we explore the concept that AEZ's can be derived from classifying the geographic distribution of current agricultural systems (e.g. the wheat-fallow cropping system zone) based on spatially geo-referenced annual cropland use data that is currently available through the National Agricultural Statistical Service (NASS). By defining AEZ's in this way, we expect to: (1) provide baseline information that geographically delineates the boundaries of current AEZ's and subzones and therefore the capacity to evaluate shifts in AEZ boundaries over time; (2) assess the biophysical (e.g. climate, soils, terrain) and socioeconomic factors (e.g. commodity prices) that are most useful for predicting and correctly classifying current AEZ's, subzones or future shifts in AEZ boundaries; (3) identify and develop AEZ-relevant climate mitigation and adaptation strategies; and (4) integrate biophysical and socioeconomic data sources to pursue a transdisciplinary examination of climate-driven AEZ futures. Achieving these goals will aid in realizing major objectives for a USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Agriculture and Food Research Initiative, Cooperative Agricultural Project entitled "Regional Approaches to Climate Change (REACCH) for Pacific Northwest Agriculture". REACCH is a research, education and extension project under the leadership of the University of Idaho with significant collaboration from Washington State University, Oregon State University and the USDA Agricultural Research Service that is working towards increasing the capacity of Inland Pacific

  3. Distribution of similar earthquakes in aftershocks of inland earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Aftershock Observations Of 2007 Noto Hanto, G.

    2010-12-01

    Frictional properties control the slip behavior on a fault surface such as seismic slip and aseismic slip. Asperity, as a seismic slip area, is characterized by a strong coupling in the interseismic period and large coseismic slip. On the other hand, steady slip or afterslip occurs in an aseismic slip area around the asperity. If an afterslip area includes small asperities, a repeating rupture of single asperity can generate similar earthquakes due to the stress accumulation caused by the afterslip. We here investigate a detail distribution of similar earthquakes in the aftershocks of the 2007 Noto Hanto earthquake (Mjma 6.9) and the 2000 Western Tottori earthquake (Mjma 7.3), inland large earthquakes in Japan. We use the data obtained by the group for the aftershock observations of the 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake and by the group for the aftershock observations of the 2000 Western Tottori earthquake. First, we select pairs of aftershocks whose cross correlation coefficients in 10 s time window of band-pass filtered waveforms of 1~4 Hz are greater than 0.95 at more than 5 stations and divide those into groups by a link of the cross correlation coefficients. Second, we reexamine the arrival times of P and S waves and the maximum amplitude for earthquakes of each group and apply the double-difference method (Waldhouser and Ellsworth, 2000) to relocate them. As a result of the analysis, we find 24 groups of similar earthquakes in the aftershocks on the source fault of the 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake and 86 groups of similar earthquakes in the aftershocks on the source fault of the 2000 Western Tottori Earthquake. Most of them are distributed around or outside the asperity of the main shock. Geodetic studies reported that postseismic deformation was detected for the both earthquakes (Sagiya et al., 2002; Hashimoto et al., 2008). The source area of similar earthquakes seems to correspond to the afterslip area. These features suggest that the similar earthquakes observed

  4. Sunlight-induced carbon dioxide emissions from inland waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Birgit; Landelius, Tomas; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.; Machida, Nanako; Tranvik, Lars J.

    2014-07-01

    The emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from inland waters are substantial on a global scale. Yet the fundamental question remains open which proportion of these CO2 emissions is induced by sunlight via photochemical mineralization of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), rather than by microbial respiration during DOC decomposition. Also, it is unknown on larger spatial and temporal scales how photochemical mineralization compares to other C fluxes in the inland water C cycle. We combined field and laboratory data with atmospheric radiative transfer modeling to parameterize a photochemical rate model for each day of the year 2009, for 1086 lakes situated between latitudes from 55°N to 69°N in Sweden. The sunlight-induced production of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) averaged 3.8 ± 0.04 g C m-2 yr-1, which is a flux comparable in size to the organic carbon burial in the lake sediments. Countrywide, 151 ± 1 kt C yr-1 was produced by photochemical mineralization, corresponding to about 12% of total annual mean CO2 emissions from Swedish lakes. With a median depth of 3.2 m, the lakes were generally deep enough that incoming, photochemically active photons were absorbed in the water column. This resulted in a linear positive relationship between DIC photoproduction and the incoming photon flux, which corresponds to the absorbed photons. Therefore, the slope of the regression line represents the wavelength- and depth-integrated apparent quantum yield of DIC photoproduction. We used this relationship to obtain a first estimate of DIC photoproduction in lakes and reservoirs worldwide. Global DIC photoproduction amounted to 13 and 35 Mt C yr-1 under overcast and clear sky, respectively. Consequently, these directly sunlight-induced CO2 emissions contribute up to about one tenth to the global CO2 emissions from lakes and reservoirs, corroborating that microbial respiration contributes a substantially larger share than formerly thought, and generate annual C fluxes similar in

  5. Permafrost Hazards and Linear Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanilovskaya, Julia; Sergeev, Dmitry

    2014-05-01

    The international experience of linear infrastructure planning, construction and exploitation in permafrost zone is being directly tied to the permafrost hazard assessment. That procedure should also consider the factors of climate impact and infrastructure protection. The current global climate change hotspots are currently polar and mountain areas. Temperature rise, precipitation and land ice conditions change, early springs occur more often. The big linear infrastructure objects cross the territories with different permafrost conditions which are sensitive to the changes in air temperature, hydrology, and snow accumulation which are connected to climatic dynamics. One of the most extensive linear structures built on permafrost worldwide are Trans Alaskan Pipeline (USA), Alaska Highway (Canada), Qinghai-Xizang Railway (China) and Eastern Siberia - Pacific Ocean Oil Pipeline (Russia). Those are currently being influenced by the regional climate change and permafrost impact which may act differently from place to place. Thermokarst is deemed to be the most dangerous process for linear engineering structures. Its formation and development depend on the linear structure type: road or pipeline, elevated or buried one. Zonal climate and geocryological conditions are also of the determining importance here. All the projects are of the different age and some of them were implemented under different climatic conditions. The effects of permafrost thawing have been recorded every year since then. The exploration and transportation companies from different countries maintain the linear infrastructure from permafrost degradation in different ways. The highways in Alaska are in a good condition due to governmental expenses on annual reconstructions. The Chara-China Railroad in Russia is under non-standard condition due to intensive permafrost response. Standards for engineering and construction should be reviewed and updated to account for permafrost hazards caused by the

  6. 76 FR 45421 - Safety Zone; Houma Navigation Canal, From Waterway Mile Markers 19.0 to 20.0, Southwest of Bayou...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... Markers 19.0 to 20.0, Southwest of Bayou Plat, Bank to Bank, Terrebonne Parish, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard... the Houma Navigation Canal, from Waterway Mile Markers 19.0 to 20.0, Southwest of Bayou Plat, bank to.../Barriers in the Houma Navigation Canal, from Waterway Mile Markers 19.0 to 20.0, southwest of Bayou Plat...

  7. 33 CFR 165.T11-0523 - Safety Zone; Houma Navigation Canal, From Waterway Mile Markers 19.0 to 20.0, Southwest of Bayou...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Canal, From Waterway Mile Markers 19.0 to 20.0, Southwest of Bayou Plat, Bank to Bank, Terrebonne Parish... Bayou Plat, Bank to Bank, Terrebonne Parish, LA. (a) Location. Houma Navigation Canal, from Waterway Mile Markers 19.0 to 20.0, Southwest of Bayou Plat, bank to bank, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana....

  8. International Needs for Infrastructure Nde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovics, John; Boller, Christian; Cawley, Peter; Spencer, Billie F.; Wang, Ming L.; Washer, Glenn

    2009-03-01

    The Aging of Infrastructure is a world wide problem of increasing importance, with the specifics varying from region to region depending on the age and nature of critical structures. It is clear that the NDE and SHM tools being developed by the QNDE community can play an important role in addressing the Aging Infrastructure problem, and the special evening session is designed to provide perspective to the developers of that technology through an overview of the international needs. A panel of speakers with experience with the unique situations in different regions of the world will first make a series of short presentations. This will be followed by a general discussion period.

  9. Development of a lunar infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of building an infrastructure on the moon is discussed, assuming that earth-to-moon and moon-to-earth transport will be available. The sequence of events which would occur in the process of building an infrastructure is examined. The human needs which must be met on a lunar base are discussed, including minimal life support, quality of life, and growth stages. The technology available to meet these needs is reviewed and further research in fields related to a lunar base, such as the study of the moon's polar regions and the limits of lunar agriculture, is recommended.

  10. Coastal-inland solar radiation difference study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bach, W.D. Jr.; Vukovich, F.M.

    1980-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the characteristics of solar insolation in the coastal zone and to determine the effect of the sea breeze circulation on the global insolation. In order to satisfy these objectives, a six station sampling network was established in the coastal plain of southeastern North Carolina, where previous evidence has indicated that the sea breeze circulation is almost a daily occurrence from late May through October. Three sites (Sloop Point, Onslow Beach, and Cape Fear Technical Institute (CFTI)) were located near the coast (coastal sites) to assess the insolation at the coast. A site (Clinton) was located in an area seldom affected by the sea breeze (about 100 km from the coast). Two additional sites, Wallace and Ellis Airport, located between the coastal sites and the control site, were to be used to assess the transient impact of the sea breeze upon the insolation. Pyranometers were located at each site to measure the global insolation. Direct normal insolation measured by a pyrheliometer and ultraviolet radiation measured by uv radiometers were observed at the Sloop Point and Clinton sites only. Data were collected during the calendar year 1978. The results of the study indicated that the global insolation had greater variability over the network during the summer season (June, July, and August). During the summer, there was a systematicdiurnal variation of the difference in global insolation between the inland and the coastal sites.

  11. Emissions of NO, NO2 and PM from inland shipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtenbach, Ralf; Vaupel, Kai; Kleffmann, Jörg; Klenk, Ulrich; Schmidt, Eberhard; Wiesen, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides NOx (NOx = NO2+ NO) are key species for urban air quality in Europe and are emitted by mobile sources. According to European recommendations, a significant fraction of road freight should be shifted to waterborne transport in the future. In order to better consider this emission change pattern in future emission inventories, in the present study inland water transport emissions of NOx, CO2 and PM were investigated under real world conditions on the river Rhine, Germany, in 2013. An average NO2 / NOx emission ratio of 0.08 ± 0.02 was obtained, which is indicative of ship diesel engines without exhaust gas aftertreatment systems. For all measured motor ship types and operation conditions, overall weighted average emission indices (EIs), as emitted mass of pollutant per kg burnt fuel of EINOx = 54 ± 4 g kg-1 and a lower limit EIPM1 ≥ 2.0 ± 0.3 g kg-1, were obtained. EIs for NOx and PM1 were found to be in the range of 20-161 and ≥ 0.2-8.1 g kg-1 respectively. A comparison with threshold values of national German guidelines shows that the NOx emissions of all investigated motor ship types are above the threshold values, while the obtained lower limit PM1 emissions are just under. To reduce NOx emissions to acceptable values, implementation of exhaust gas aftertreatment systems is recommended.

  12. Inland and coastal flooding: developments in prediction and prevention.

    PubMed

    Hunt, J C R

    2005-06-15

    We review the scientific and engineering understanding of various types of inland and coastal flooding by considering the different causes and dynamic processes involved, especially in extreme events. Clear progress has been made in the accuracy of numerical modelling of meteorological causes of floods, hydraulics of flood water movement and coastal wind-wave-surge. Probabilistic estimates from ensemble predictions and the simultaneous use of several models are recent techniques in meteorological prediction that could be considered for hydraulic and oceanographic modelling. The contribution of remotely sensed data from aircraft and satellites is also considered. The need to compare and combine statistical and computational modelling methodologies for long range forecasts and extreme events is emphasized, because this has become possible with the aid of kilometre scale computations and network grid facilities to simulate and analyse time-series and extreme events. It is noted that despite the adverse effects of climatic trends on flooding, appropriate planning of rapidly growing urban areas could mitigate some of the worst effects. However, resources for flood prevention, including research, have to be considered in relation to those for other natural disasters. Policies have to be relevant to the differing geology, meteorology and cultures of the countries affected.

  13. User's guide: Programs for processing altimeter data over inland seas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Au, A. Y.; Brown, R. D.; Welker, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    The programs described were developed to process GEODYN-formatted satellite altimeter data, and to apply the processed results to predict geoid undulations and gravity anomalies of inland sea areas. These programs are written in standard FORTRAN 77 and are designed to run on the NSESCC IBM 3081(MVS) computer. Because of the experimental nature of these programs they are tailored to the geographical area analyzed. The attached program listings are customized for processing the altimeter data over the Black Sea. Users interested in the Caspian Sea data are expected to modify each program, although the required modifications are generally minor. Program control parameters are defined in the programs via PARAMETER statements and/or DATA statements. Other auxiliary parameters, such as labels, are hard-wired into the programs. Large data files are read in or written out through different input or output units. The program listings of these programs are accompanied by sample IBM job control language (JCL) images. Familiarity with IBM JCL and the TEMPLATE graphic package is assumed.

  14. Organic polar pollutants in surface waters of inland seas.

    PubMed

    Orlikowska, Anna; Fisch, Kathrin; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E

    2015-12-30

    Available data about contamination by polar substances are mostly reported for rivers and near-shore waters and only limited studies exists about their occurrence in marine waters. We present concentrations and distribution of several polar pesticides and UV-filters in surface waters of three inland seas, the Baltic, Black and Mediterranean Sea. Many of the investigated compounds were below detection limits, however, those found in off-shore waters raise a concern about their persistence and possible adverse effect on the ecosystem. Despite a longstanding EU-wide ban we were able to detect atrazine in the Mediterranean and the Baltic Sea. Concentrations in the Black Sea were substantially higher. Runoff from agricultural and urban areas was the main transport route to marine ecosystems for investigated compounds, though irgarol in Mediterranean waters was attributed to intense maritime traffic. 2-Phenylbenzimidazole-5-sulfonic acid was the only UV-filter detected in marine waters, while benzophenone-4 was observed in the estuaries. Occurrence of UV-filters was seasonal.

  15. Anticipated water quality changes in response to climate change and potential consequences for inland fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Yushun; Todd, Andrew S.; Murphy, Margaret H.; Lomnicky, Gregg

    2016-01-01

    Healthy freshwater ecosystems are a critical component of the world's economy, with a critical role in maintaining public health, inland biological diversity, and overall quality of life. Globally, our climate is changing, with air temperature and precipitation regimes deviating significantly from historical patterns. Healthy freshwater ecosystems are a critical component of the world's economy, with a critical role in maintaining public health, inland biological diversity, and overall quality of life. Globally, our climate is changing, with air temperature and precipitation regimes deviating significantly from historical patterns. Changes anticipated with climate change in the future are likely to have a profound effect on inland aquatic ecosystems through diverse pathways, including changes in water quality. In this brief article, we present an initial discussion of several of the water quality responses that can be anticipated to occur within inland water bodies with climate change and how those changes are likely to impact fishes.

  16. Climate change effects on North American inland fish populations and assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lynch, Abigail J.; Myers, Bonnie; Chu, Cindy; Eby, Lisa A.; Falke, Jeffrey A.; Kovach, Ryan P.; Krabbenhoft, Trevor J.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Lyons, John; Paukert, Craig P.; Whitney, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Climate is a critical driver of many fish populations, assemblages, and aquatic communities. However, direct observational studies of climate change impacts on North American inland fishes are rare. In this synthesis, we (1) summarize climate trends that may influence North American inland fish populations and assemblages, (2) compile 31 peer-reviewed studies of documented climate change effects on North American inland fish populations and assemblages, and (3) highlight four case studies representing a variety of observed responses ranging from warmwater systems in the southwestern and southeastern United States to coldwater systems along the Pacific Coast and Canadian Shield. We conclude by identifying key data gaps and research needs to inform adaptive, ecosystem-based approaches to managing North American inland fishes and fisheries in a changing climate.

  17. Fire episodes in the Inland Northwest (1540-1940) based on fire history data

    Treesearch

    Stephen W. Barrett; Stephen F. Arno; James P. Menakis

    1997-01-01

    Presents maps of major fire episodes in the inland northwestern United States between 1540 and 1940 based on a compilation of fire history studies. Estimates annual acreage historically burned in this region and compares that with recent fire years.

  18. Cyanobacteria of the 2016 Lake Okeechobee and Okeechobee Waterway harmful algal bloom

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosen, Barry H.; Davis, Timothy W.; Gobler, Christopher J.; Kramer, Benjamin J.; Loftin, Keith A.

    2017-05-31

    The Lake Okeechobee and the Okeechobee Waterway (Lake Okeechobee, the St. Lucie Canal and River, and the Caloosahatchee River) experienced an extensive harmful algal bloom within Lake Okeechobee, the St. Lucie Canal and River and the Caloosahatchee River in 2016. In addition to the very visible bloom of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa, several other cyanobacteria were present. These other species were less conspicuous; however, they have the potential to produce a variety of cyanotoxins, including anatoxins, cylindrospermopsins, and saxitoxins, in addition to the microcystins commonly associated with Microcystis. Some of these species were found before, during, and 2 weeks after the large Microcystis bloom and could provide a better understanding of bloom dynamics and succession. This report provides photographic documentation and taxonomic assessment of the cyanobacteria present from Lake Okeechobee and the Caloosahatchee River and St. Lucie Canal, with samples collected June 1st from the Caloosahatchee River and Lake Okeechobee and in July from the St. Lucie Canal. The majority of the images were of live organisms, allowing their natural complement of pigmentation to be captured. The report provides a digital image-based taxonomic record of the Lake Okeechobee and the Okeechobee Waterway microscopic flora. It is anticipated that these images will facilitate current and future studies on this system, such as understanding the timing of cyanobacteria blooms and their potential toxin production.

  19. Reclamation of abandoned mined lands along th Upper Illinois Waterway using dredged material

    SciTech Connect

    Van Luik, A; Harrison, W

    1982-01-01

    Sediments were sampled and characterized from 28 actual or proposed maintenance-dredging locations in the Upper Illinois Waterway, that is, the Calumet-Sag Channel, the Des Plaines River downstream of its confluence with the Calumet-Sag Channel, and the Illinois River from the confluence of the Kankakee and Des Plaines rivers to Havana, Illinois. Sufficient data on chemical constituents and physical sediments were obtained to allow the classification of these sediments by currently applicable criteria of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency for the identification of hazardous, persistent, and potentially hazardous wastes. By these criteria, the potential dredged materials studied were not hazardous, persistent, or potentially hazardous; they are a suitable topsoil/ reclamation medium. A study of problem abandoned surface-mined land sites (problem lands are defined as being acidic and/or sparsely vegetated) along the Illinois River showed that three sites were particularly well suited to the needs of the Corps of Engineers (COE) for a dredged material disposal/reclamation site. Thes sites were a pair of municipally owned sites in Morris, Illinois, and a small corporately owned site east of Ottawa, Illinois, and adjacent to the Illinois River. Other sites were also ranked as to suitability for COE involvement in their reclamation. Reclamation disposal was found to be an economically competitive alternative to near-source confined disposal for Upper Illinois Waterway dredged material.

  20. Dry and wet weather microbial characterization of the Chicago area waterway system.

    PubMed

    Rijal, G; Petropoulou, C; Tolson, J K; DeFlaun, M; Gerba, C; Gore, R; Glymph, T; Granato, T; O'Connor, C; Kollias, L; Lanyon, R

    2009-01-01

    The Chicago Area Waterway System (CAWS) is a man-made channel, which serves the Chicago area for the drainage of urban storm water and the conveyance of secondary treated effluent from the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago's (District) North Side, Stickney and Calumet water reclamation plants (WRPs). A microbial characterization of the CAWS upstream and downstream of the WRPs and from the WRP outfall was initiated by collecting dry and wet weather samples and analyzing for indicators and pathogens. During dry weather, indicator bacteria (fecal coliform [FC], E. coli [EC], enterococci [EN]) were the most abundant microbial species detected in the CAWS compared to pathogens (Salmonella spp [SA], enteric viruses [EV], adenovirus [AV], norovirus [NV] and Giardia and Cryptosporidium). Pseudomonas aeruginosa [PA] levels in the outfall samples were either lower or equivalent to the CAWS. The wet weather samples had a higher frequency of detection of indicator bacteria and pathogens compared to dry weather samples. Overall, the concentrations of pathogens in the CAWS, representing the weather conditions experienced in a recreational year, were relatively low. The study concluded that the presence of pathogens in the CAWS downstream of the WRPs were due to secondary loading of the waterway under wet weather conditions from combined sewer overflows (CSOs) and other discharges.