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Sample records for inline phase contrast

  1. MTF evaluation of in-line phase contrast imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoran; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan; Zhang, Limin; Li, Jiao; Zhou, Zhongxing

    2017-02-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) is a novel method that exploits the phase shift for the incident X-ray to form an image. Various XPCI methods have been proposed, among which, in-line phase contrast imaging (IL-PCI) is regarded as one of the most promising clinical methods. The contrast of the interface is enhanced due to the introduction of the boundary fringes in XPCI, thus it is generally used to evaluate the image quality of XPCI. But the contrast is a comprehensive index and it does not reflect the information of image quality in the frequency range. The modulation transfer function (MTF), which is the Fourier transform of the system point spread function, is recognized as the metric to characterize the spatial response of conventional X-ray imaging system. In this work, MTF is introduced into the image quality evaluation of the IL-PCI system. Numerous simulations based on Fresnel - Kirchhoff diffraction theory are performed with varying system settings and the corresponding MTFs were calculated for comparison. The results show that MTF can provide more comprehensive information of image quality comparing to contrast in IL-PCI.

  2. In-line phase contrast micro-CT reconstruction for biomedical specimens.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Tan, Renbo

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase contrast micro computed tomography (micro-CT) can non-destructively provide the internal structure information of soft tissues and low atomic number materials. It has become an invaluable analysis tool for biomedical specimens. Here an in-line phase contrast micro-CT reconstruction technique is reported, which consists of a projection extraction method and the conventional filter back-projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. The projection extraction is implemented by applying the Fourier transform to the forward projections of in-line phase contrast micro-CT. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a biomedical specimen dataset measured at an X-ray tube source micro-CT setup. The numerical and experimental results demonstrate that the presented technique can improve the imaging contrast of biomedical specimens. It will be of interest for a wide range of in-line phase contrast micro-CT applications in medicine and biology.

  3. Geometry-constraint-scan imaging for in-line phase contrast micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Yu, Guangyuan; Fan, Dekai

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) uses the phase shift that x-rays undergo when passing through matter, rather than their attenuation, as the imaging signal and may provide better image quality in soft-tissue and biomedical materials with low atomic number. Here a geometry-constraint-scan imaging technique for in-line phase contrast micro-CT is reported. It consists of two circular-trajectory scans with x-ray detector at different positions, the phase projection extraction method with the Fresnel free-propagation theory and the filter back-projection reconstruction algorithm. This method removes the contact-detector scan and the pure phase object assumption in classical in-line phase contrast Micro-CT. Consequently it relaxes the experimental conditions and improves the image contrast. This work comprises a numerical study of this technique and its experimental verification using a biomedical composite dataset measured at an x-ray tube source Micro-CT setup. The numerical and experimental results demonstrate the validity of the presented method. It will be of interest for a wide range of in-line phase contrast Micro-CT applications in biology and medicine.

  4. CO2-based in-line phase contrast imaging of small intestine in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rongbiao; Li, Wei-Xia; Huang, Wei; Yan, Fuhua; Chai, Wei-Min; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Chen, Ke-Min

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the potential of CO2 single contrast in-line phase contrast imaging (PCI) for pre-clinical small intestine investigation. The absorption and phase contrast images of CO2 gas production were attained and compared. A further increase in image contrast was observed in PCI. Compared with CO2-based absorption contrast imaging (ACI), CO2-based PCI significantly enhanced the detection of mucosal microstructures, such as pits and folds. The CO2-based PCI could provide sufficient image contrast for clearly showing the intestinal mucosa in living mice without using barium. We concluded that CO2-based PCI might be a novel and promising imaging method for future studies of gastrointestinal disorders.

  5. Second order x-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2014-09-01

    X-ray phase imaging is sensitive to structural variation of soft tissue, and offers excellent contrast resolution for characterization of cancerous tissues. Also, the cross-section of x-ray phase shift is a thousand times greater than that of x-ray attenuation in soft tissue over the diagnostic energy range, allowing a much higher signal-to-noise ratio at a substantially lower radiation dose than attenuation-based x-ray imaging. In this paper, we present a second order approximation model with respect to phase shift based on the paraxial Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory, and also discuss in-line dark-field imaging based on the second order model. This proposed model accurately establishes a quantitative correspondence between phases and recorded intensity images, outperforming the linear phase approximation model widely used in the conventional methods of x-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging. This new model can be iteratively solved using the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART). The state of the art compressive sensing ingredients can be incorporated to achieve high quality image reconstruction. Our numerical simulation studies demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach that is more accurate and stable, and more robust against noise than the conventional approach.

  6. Characterization of a high-energy in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis prototype

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Yan, Aimin; Li, Yuhua; Wong, Molly D.; Zheng, Bin; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In this research, a high-energy in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis prototype was developed and characterized through quantitative investigations and phantom studies. Methods: The prototype system consists of an x-ray source, a motorized rotation stage, and a CMOS detector with a pixel pitch of 0.05 mm. The x-ray source was operated at 120 kVp for this study, and the objects were mounted on the rotation stage 76.2 cm (R1) from the source and 114.3 cm (R2) from the detector. The large air gap between the object and detector guarantees sufficient phase-shift effects. The quantitative evaluation of this prototype included modulation transfer function and noise power spectrum measurements conducted under both projection mode and tomosynthesis mode. Phantom studies were performed including three custom designed phantoms with complex structures: a five-layer bubble wrap phantom, a fishbone phantom, and a chicken breast phantom with embedded fibrils and mass structures extracted from an ACR phantom. In-plane images of the phantoms were acquired to investigate their image qualities through observation, intensity profile plots, edge enhancement evaluations, and/or contrast-to-noise ratio calculations. In addition, the robust phase-attenuation duality (PAD)-based phase retrieval method was applied to tomosynthesis for the first time in this research. It was utilized as a preprocessing method to fully exhibit phase contrast on the angular projection before reconstruction. Results: The resolution and noise characteristics of this high-energy in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis prototype were successfully investigated and demonstrated. The phantom studies demonstrated that this imaging prototype can successfully remove the structure overlapping in phantom projections, obtain delineate interfaces, and achieve better contrast-to-noise ratio after applying phase retrieval to the angular projections. Conclusions: This research successfully demonstrated a high-energy in-line

  7. Characterization of a high-energy in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis prototype.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Yan, Aimin; Li, Yuhua; Wong, Molly D; Zheng, Bin; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2015-05-01

    In this research, a high-energy in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis prototype was developed and characterized through quantitative investigations and phantom studies. The prototype system consists of an x-ray source, a motorized rotation stage, and a CMOS detector with a pixel pitch of 0.05 mm. The x-ray source was operated at 120 kVp for this study, and the objects were mounted on the rotation stage 76.2 cm (R1) from the source and 114.3 cm (R2) from the detector. The large air gap between the object and detector guarantees sufficient phase-shift effects. The quantitative evaluation of this prototype included modulation transfer function and noise power spectrum measurements conducted under both projection mode and tomosynthesis mode. Phantom studies were performed including three custom designed phantoms with complex structures: a five-layer bubble wrap phantom, a fishbone phantom, and a chicken breast phantom with embedded fibrils and mass structures extracted from an ACR phantom. In-plane images of the phantoms were acquired to investigate their image qualities through observation, intensity profile plots, edge enhancement evaluations, and/or contrast-to-noise ratio calculations. In addition, the robust phase-attenuation duality (PAD)-based phase retrieval method was applied to tomosynthesis for the first time in this research. It was utilized as a preprocessing method to fully exhibit phase contrast on the angular projection before reconstruction. The resolution and noise characteristics of this high-energy in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis prototype were successfully investigated and demonstrated. The phantom studies demonstrated that this imaging prototype can successfully remove the structure overlapping in phantom projections, obtain delineate interfaces, and achieve better contrast-to-noise ratio after applying phase retrieval to the angular projections. This research successfully demonstrated a high-energy in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis

  8. A fast-converging iterative method for X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Nghia T.; Atwood, Robert C.; Moser, Herbert O.; Lee, Peter D.; Breese, Mark B. H.; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2012-11-01

    X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography holds great promise for the quantitative analysis of soft materials. However, its applications have been limited, so far, by the fact that direct methods based on the transport-of-intensity equation and the contrast transfer function are sensitive to noise and applicable only to limited types of samples. Here, we propose an iterative method based on the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm (R. W. Gerchberg and W. O. Saxton, Optik 35, 237 (1972)), but overcoming its slow convergence by an acceleration technique, named random signed feedback, which shows an excellent performance, both in numerical simulation and tomographic experiment, of discriminating various polymers even when using 53 keV synchrotron X-rays.

  9. A fast-converging iterative method for X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Vo, Nghia T.; Breese, Mark B. H.; Atwood, Robert C.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Moser, Herbert O.; Lee, Peter D.

    2012-11-26

    X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography holds great promise for the quantitative analysis of soft materials. However, its applications have been limited, so far, by the fact that direct methods based on the transport-of-intensity equation and the contrast transfer function are sensitive to noise and applicable only to limited types of samples. Here, we propose an iterative method based on the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm (R. W. Gerchberg and W. O. Saxton, Optik 35, 237 (1972)), but overcoming its slow convergence by an acceleration technique, named random signed feedback, which shows an excellent performance, both in numerical simulation and tomographic experiment, of discriminating various polymers even when using 53 keV synchrotron X-rays.

  10. Geometric correction method for 3d in-line X-ray phase contrast image reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mechanical system with imperfect or misalignment of X-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) components causes projection data misplaced, and thus result in the reconstructed slice images of computed tomography (CT) blurred or with edge artifacts. So the features of biological microstructures to be investigated are destroyed unexpectedly, and the spatial resolution of XPCI image is decreased. It makes data correction an essential pre-processing step for CT reconstruction of XPCI. Methods To remove unexpected blurs and edge artifacts, a mathematics model for in-line XPCI is built by considering primary geometric parameters which include a rotation angle and a shift variant in this paper. Optimal geometric parameters are achieved by finding the solution of a maximization problem. And an iterative approach is employed to solve the maximization problem by using a two-step scheme which includes performing a composite geometric transformation and then following a linear regression process. After applying the geometric transformation with optimal parameters to projection data, standard filtered back-projection algorithm is used to reconstruct CT slice images. Results Numerical experiments were carried out on both synthetic and real in-line XPCI datasets. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method improves CT image quality by removing both blurring and edge artifacts at the same time compared to existing correction methods. Conclusions The method proposed in this paper provides an effective projection data correction scheme and significantly improves the image quality by removing both blurring and edge artifacts at the same time for in-line XPCI. It is easy to implement and can also be extended to other XPCI techniques. PMID:25069768

  11. In-line Phase Contrast Imaging of Soft Tissue in the Mammalian Cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lixin; Rau, C.; Robinson, I.; Richter, C.-P.

    2007-03-01

    Soft tissue has been visualized in a mammalian cochlea with hard X-rays in-line phase contrast imaging at the UNICAT beamline 34 ID-C, APS. The sensation of hearing results from a series of complex events that transform acoustic pressure waves into the perception of sound. During the normal hearing process, sound energy is converted to mechanical energy by the middle ear, which then is converted to motions in the structures of the cochlea. To date, many aspects of the sound induced vibrations are still unclear. Firstly, mechanics of the cochlea are likely to changes by the manipulations, and secondly, cochlear micromechanics are unexplored for the cochlear middle section. Therefore, our objective is to measure the motion patterns of cochlear tissues in a closed cochlea. Thick mammalian cochlear slices have been imaged and were compared with those obtained by light microscopy. Furthermore, intact cochleae have been imaged to identify the soft tissue structures involved in the hearing process.

  12. Performance analysis of the attenuation-partition based iterative phase retrieval algorithm for in-line phase-contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Aimin; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2010-01-01

    The phase retrieval is an important task in x-ray phase contrast imaging. The robustness of phase retrieval is especially important for potential medical imaging applications such as phase contrast mammography. Recently the authors developed an iterative phase retrieval algorithm, the attenuation-partition based algorithm, for the phase retrieval in inline phase-contrast imaging [1]. Applied to experimental images, the algorithm was proven to be fast and robust. However, a quantitative analysis of the performance of this new algorithm is desirable. In this work, we systematically compared the performance of this algorithm with other two widely used phase retrieval algorithms, namely the Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm and the Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE) algorithm. The systematical comparison is conducted by analyzing phase retrieval performances with a digital breast specimen model. We show that the proposed algorithm converges faster than the GS algorithm in the Fresnel diffraction regime, and is more robust against image noise than the TIE algorithm. These results suggest the significance of the proposed algorithm for future medical applications with the x-ray phase contrast imaging technique. PMID:20720992

  13. Using digital inline holographic microscopy and quantitative phase contrast imaging to assess viability of cultured mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missan, Sergey; Hrytsenko, Olga

    2015-03-01

    Digital inline holographic microscopy was used to record holograms of mammalian cells (HEK293, B16, and E0771) in culture. The holograms have been reconstructed using Octopus software (4Deep inwater imaging) and phase shift maps were unwrapped using the FFT-based phase unwrapping algorithm. The unwrapped phase shifts were used to determine the maximum phase shifts in individual cells. Addition of 0.5 mM H2O2 to cell media produced rapid rounding of cultured cells, followed by cell membrane rupture. The cell morphology changes and cell membrane ruptures were detected in real time and were apparent in the unwrapped phase shift images. The results indicate that quantitative phase contrast imaging produced by the digital inline holographic microscope can be used for the label-free real time automated determination of cell viability and confluence in mammalian cell cultures.

  14. Quantitative imaging of the microbubble concentrations by using an in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis prototype: a preliminary phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wong, Molly D.; Li, Yuhua; Yang, Kai; Chen, Wei R.; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of using a high-energy in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis system to quantitatively imaging microbubbles in a tissue simulating phantom under a limited radiation dose. The imaging system used in the investigation was a bench top in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis prototype operated under 120 kVp tube voltage and 0.5 mA tube current. A prime beam filter made of 2.3 mm Cu, 0.8 mm Pb and 1.0 mm Al was employed to obtain as large as possible portion of x-ray photon energy higher than 60 keV. The tissue simulating phantom was built by three acrylic slabs and a wax slab to mimic a 40 mm thick compressed breast. There were two tiny-sized structures with average 1 mm depth engraved on the two different layers. The microbubble suspensions with different concentrations were injected into those tiny structures. The inline phase contrast angular projections acquired were used to reconstruct the in-plane slices of the tiny structures on different layers. The CNRs vs microbubble concentrations were investigated. As the result, the microbubble suspensions were clearly visible, showing higher CNR when compared with the areas with no microbubble. Furthermore, a monotonously increasing relation between CNRs and microbubble concentrations was observed after calculating the area CNR of the phase contrast tomosynthesis slices.

  15. Influence of imaging geometry on noise texture in quantitative in-line X-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A

    2009-08-17

    Quantitative in-line X-ray phase-contrast imaging methods seek to reconstruct separate images that depict an object's projected absorption and refractive properties. An understanding of the statistical properties of the reconstructed images can facilitate the identification of optimal imaging parameters for specific diagnostic tasks. However, the statistical properties of quantitative X-ray phase-contrast imaging remain largely unexplored. In this work, we derive analytic expressions that describe the second-order statistics of the reconstructed absorption and phase images. Concepts from statistical decision theory are applied to demonstrate how the statistical properties of images corresponding to distinct imaging geometries can influence signal detectability.

  16. In-line phase-contrast and grating-based phase-contrast synchrotron imaging study of brain micrometastasis of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sheng; Kou, Binquan; Chi, Yayun; Xi, Yan; Cao, Yixin; Cui, Wenli; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhimin; Guo, Han; Fu, Yanan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Sun, Jianqi; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Yujie; Wu, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Current bio-medical imaging researches aim to detect brain micrometastasis in early stage for its increasing incidence and high mortality rates. Synchrotron phase-contrast imaging techniques, such as in-line phase-contrast (IPC) and grating-based phase-contrast (GPC) imaging, could provide a high spatial and density imaging study of biological specimens' 3D structures. In this study, we demonstrated the detection efficiencies of these two imaging tools on breast cancer micrometastasis in an ex vivo mouse brain. We found that both IPC and GPC can differentiate abnormal brain structures induced by micrometastasis from the surrounding normal tissues. We also found that GPC was more sensitive in detecting the small metastasis as compared to IPC. PMID:25818989

  17. In-line phase-contrast and grating-based phase-contrast synchrotron imaging study of brain micrometastasis of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sheng; Kou, Binquan; Chi, Yayun; Xi, Yan; Cao, Yixin; Cui, Wenli; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhimin; Guo, Han; Fu, Yanan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Sun, Jianqi; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Yujie; Wu, Jiong

    2015-03-01

    Current bio-medical imaging researches aim to detect brain micrometastasis in early stage for its increasing incidence and high mortality rates. Synchrotron phase-contrast imaging techniques, such as in-line phase-contrast (IPC) and grating-based phase-contrast (GPC) imaging, could provide a high spatial and density imaging study of biological specimens' 3D structures. In this study, we demonstrated the detection efficiencies of these two imaging tools on breast cancer micrometastasis in an ex vivo mouse brain. We found that both IPC and GPC can differentiate abnormal brain structures induced by micrometastasis from the surrounding normal tissues. We also found that GPC was more sensitive in detecting the small metastasis as compared to IPC.

  18. Simultaneous amplitude and phase contrast imaging of burning fuel particle and flame with digital inline holography: Model and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yingchun; Brunel, Marc; Li, Renxian; Lan, Lijuan; Ao, Wen; Chen, Jia; Wu, Xuecheng; Gréhan, Gérard

    2017-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) quantitative measurements of reacting multiphase micro-objects are of great interest in fuel particle combustion, which is composed of an inner fuel particle and an outer gas flame. Three models of digital inline holography of this composite fuel particle in the framework of light scattering and diffraction theories have been proposed, and then verified with reported experimental observations. Results show that the dispersed fuel particle and the gas flame distinguish in the reconstructed amplitude and phase contrast images, and reveal that the low extinction efficiency and phase shifting of the highly transparent, weakly scattering gas flame accounts for the difference.

  19. Using Microbubble as Contrast Agent for High-energy X-ray In-line Phase Contrast Imaging: Demonstration and Comparison Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Wong, Molly Donovan; Yang, Kai; Yan, Aimin; Li, Yuhua; Fajardo, Laurie; Zheng, Bin; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2017-08-21

    The ability of microbubbles to benefit the imaging quality of high-energy in-line phase contrast as compared with conventional low-energy contact mode radiography was investigated. The study was conducted by comparing in-line phase contrast imaging with conventional contact-mode projection imaging under the same dose delivered to a phantom. A custom designed phantom was employed to simulate a segment of human blood vessel injected with microbubble suspensions. The microbubbles were suspended in deionized water to obtain different volume concentrations. The area contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) values corresponding to both imaging methods were measured for different microbubble volume concentrations. The phase contrast images were processed by phase-attenuation duality phase retrieval to preserve the imaging quality. Comparison of the resultant CNR values indicates that the microbubble suspension images deliver a higher CNR than the water-only image, with monotonically increasing trends between the CNR values and microbubble concentrations. Compared to low-energy conventional images of the microbubble suspensions, high-energy in-line phase contrast CNRs are lower at high concentrations and are comparable, even better than, at low concentrations. This result suggests that 1) the performance of copolymer-shell microbubble employed in this study as x-ray contrast agent is constrained by the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the system and the attenuation properties of the shell materials, 2) the PAD phase retrieval method has the potential to preserve image quality for areas with low concentration of microbubbles, and 3) the selection of microbubble products as a phase contrast agent may follow criteria of minimizing the impact of absorption attenuation properties of the shells and maximizing the difference factor of electron densities.

  20. In-line phase-contrast stereoscopic X-ray imaging for radiological purposes: An initial experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegbahn, E. A.; Coan, P.; Zhou, S.-A.; Bravin, A.; Brahme, A.

    2011-02-01

    We report results from a pilot study in which the in-line propagation-based phase-contrast imaging technique is combined with the stereoscopic method. Two phantoms were imaged at several sample-detector distances using monochromatic, 30 keV, X-rays. High contrast- and spatial-resolution phase-contrast stereoscopic pairs of X-ray images were constructed using the anaglyph approach and a vivid stereoscopic effect was demonstrated. On the other hand, images of the same phantoms obtained with a shorter sample-to-detector distance, but otherwise the same experimental conditions (i.e. the same X-ray energy and absorbed radiation dose), corresponding to the conventional attenuation-based imaging mode, hardly revealed stereoscopic effects because of the lower image contrast produced. These results have confirmed our hypothesis that stereoscopic X-ray images of samples with objects composed of low-atomic-number elements are considerably improved if phase-contrast imaging is used. It is our belief that the high-resolution phase-contrast stereoscopic method will be a valuable new medical imaging tool for radiologists and that it will be of help to enhance the diagnostic capability in the examination of patients in future clinical practice, even though further efforts will be needed to optimize the system performance.

  1. In-Line Phase-Contrast X-ray Imaging and Tomography for Materials Science.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Sheridan C; Stevenson, Andrew W; Wilkins, Stephen W

    2012-05-24

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography make use of the refraction of X-rays by the sample in image formation. This provides considerable additional information in the image compared to conventional X-ray imaging methods, which rely solely on X-ray absorption by the sample. Phase-contrast imaging highlights edges and internal boundaries of a sample and is thus complementary to absorption contrast, which is more sensitive to the bulk of the sample. Phase-contrast can also be used to image low-density materials, which do not absorb X-rays sufficiently to form a conventional X-ray image. In the context of materials science, X-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography have particular value in the 2D and 3D characterization of low-density materials, the detection of cracks and voids and the analysis of composites and multiphase materials where the different components have similar X-ray attenuation coefficients. Here we review the use of phase-contrast imaging and tomography for a wide variety of materials science characterization problems using both synchrotron and laboratory sources and further demonstrate the particular benefits of phase contrast in the laboratory setting with a series of case studies.

  2. In-Line Phase-Contrast X-ray Imaging and Tomography for Materials Science

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Sheridan C.; Stevenson, Andrew W.; Wilkins, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography make use of the refraction of X-rays by the sample in image formation. This provides considerable additional information in the image compared to conventional X-ray imaging methods, which rely solely on X-ray absorption by the sample. Phase-contrast imaging highlights edges and internal boundaries of a sample and is thus complementary to absorption contrast, which is more sensitive to the bulk of the sample. Phase-contrast can also be used to image low-density materials, which do not absorb X-rays sufficiently to form a conventional X-ray image. In the context of materials science, X-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography have particular value in the 2D and 3D characterization of low-density materials, the detection of cracks and voids and the analysis of composites and multiphase materials where the different components have similar X-ray attenuation coefficients. Here we review the use of phase-contrast imaging and tomography for a wide variety of materials science characterization problems using both synchrotron and laboratory sources and further demonstrate the particular benefits of phase contrast in the laboratory setting with a series of case studies. PMID:28817018

  3. In-line phase-contrast breast tomosynthesis: a phantom feasibility study at a synchrotron radiation facility.

    PubMed

    Bliznakova, K; Russo, P; Kamarianakis, Z; Mettivier, G; Requardt, H; Bravin, A; Buliev, I

    2016-08-21

    The major objective is to adopt, apply and test developed in-house algorithms for volumetric breast reconstructions from projection images, obtained in in-line phase-contrast mode. Four angular sets, each consisting of 17 projection images obtained from four physical phantoms, were acquired at beamline ID17, European Synchroton Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France. The tomosynthesis arc was  ±32°. The physical phantoms differed in complexity of texture and introduced features of interest. Three of the used phantoms were in-house developed, and made of epoxy resin, polymethyl-methacrylate and paraffin wax, while the fourth phantom was the CIRS BR3D. The projection images had a pixel size of 47 µm  ×  47 µm. Tomosynthesis images were reconstructed with standard shift-and-add (SAA) and filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms. It was found that the edge enhancement observed in planar x-ray images is preserved in tomosynthesis images from both phantoms with homogeneous and highly heterogeneous backgrounds. In case of BR3D, it was found that features not visible in the planar case were well outlined in the tomosynthesis slices. In addition, the edge enhancement index calculated for features of interest was found to be much higher in tomosynthesis images reconstructed with FBP than in planar images and tomosynthesis images reconstructed with SAA. The comparison between images reconstructed by the two reconstruction algorithms shows an advantage for the FBP method in terms of better edge enhancement. Phase-contrast breast tomosynthesis realized in in-line mode benefits the detection of suspicious areas in mammography images by adding the edge enhancement effect to the reconstructed slices.

  4. In-line phase-contrast breast tomosynthesis: a phantom feasibility study at a synchrotron radiation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliznakova, K.; Russo, P.; Kamarianakis, Z.; Mettivier, G.; Requardt, H.; Bravin, A.; Buliev, I.

    2016-08-01

    The major objective is to adopt, apply and test developed in-house algorithms for volumetric breast reconstructions from projection images, obtained in in-line phase-contrast mode. Four angular sets, each consisting of 17 projection images obtained from four physical phantoms, were acquired at beamline ID17, European Synchroton Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France. The tomosynthesis arc was  ±32°. The physical phantoms differed in complexity of texture and introduced features of interest. Three of the used phantoms were in-house developed, and made of epoxy resin, polymethyl-methacrylate and paraffin wax, while the fourth phantom was the CIRS BR3D. The projection images had a pixel size of 47 µm  ×  47 µm. Tomosynthesis images were reconstructed with standard shift-and-add (SAA) and filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms. It was found that the edge enhancement observed in planar x-ray images is preserved in tomosynthesis images from both phantoms with homogeneous and highly heterogeneous backgrounds. In case of BR3D, it was found that features not visible in the planar case were well outlined in the tomosynthesis slices. In addition, the edge enhancement index calculated for features of interest was found to be much higher in tomosynthesis images reconstructed with FBP than in planar images and tomosynthesis images reconstructed with SAA. The comparison between images reconstructed by the two reconstruction algorithms shows an advantage for the FBP method in terms of better edge enhancement. Phase-contrast breast tomosynthesis realized in in-line mode benefits the detection of suspicious areas in mammography images by adding the edge enhancement effect to the reconstructed slices.

  5. Visualization of microvasculature by x-ray in-line phase contrast imaging in rat spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jian-Zhong; Wu, Tian-Ding; Zeng, Lei; Liu, Hui-Qiang; He, You; Du, Guo-Hao; Lu, Hong-Bin

    2012-03-01

    Computed tomography combined with angiography has recently been developed to visualize three-dimensional (3D) vascular structure in experi-mental and clinical studies. However, there remain difficulties in using conventional x-ray angiography to detect small vessels with a diameter less than 200 µm. This study attempted to develop a novel method for visualizing the micro-angioarchitecture of rat spinal cord. Herein, synchrotron radiation-based x-ray in-line phase contrast computed tomography (IL-XPCT) was used to obtain 3D micro-vessel structure without angiography. The digital phase contrast images were compared with conventional histological sections. Our results clearly demonstrated that the resolution limit of the spatial blood supply network in the normal rat thoracic cord appeared to be as small as ∼10 µm. The rendered images were consistent with that obtained from histo-morphology sections. In summary, IL-XPCT is a potential tool to investigate the 3D neurovascular morphology of the rat spinal cord without the use of contrast agents, and it could help to evaluate the validity of the pro- or anti-angiogenesis therapeutic strategies on microvasculature repair or regeneration.

  6. Using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging for the investigation of nude mouse hepatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qiang; Li, Dongyue; Zhang, Lu; Luo, Shuqian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the noninvasive imaging of hepatic tumors without contrast agents. Both normal tissues and tumor tissues can be detected, and tumor tissues in different stages can be classified quantitatively. We implanted BEL-7402 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells into the livers of nude mice and then imaged the livers using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging (ILPCI). The projection images' texture feature based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and dual-tree complex wavelet transforms (DTCWT) were extracted to discriminate normal tissues and tumor tissues. Different stages of hepatic tumors were classified using support vector machines (SVM). Images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 6 days after inoculation with cancer cells show diffuse distribution of the tumor tissue, but images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 9, 12, or 15 days after inoculation with cancer cells show necrotic lumps in the tumor tissue. The results of the principal component analysis (PCA) of the texture features based on GLCM of normal regions were positive, but those of tumor regions were negative. The results of PCA of the texture features based on DTCWT of normal regions were greater than those of tumor regions. The values of the texture features in low-frequency coefficient images increased monotonically with the growth of the tumors. Different stages of liver tumors can be classified using SVM, and the accuracy is 83.33%. Noninvasive and micron-scale imaging can be achieved by X-ray ILPCI. We can observe hepatic tumors and small vessels from the phase-contrast images. This new imaging approach for hepatic cancer is effective and has potential use in the early detection and classification of hepatic tumors.

  7. Hybrid quantitative simulation on the in-line phase-contrast x-ray imaging of three dimensional samples under actual clinic imaging parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Hong; Han Shensheng; Ding Jianhui; Jiang Zhaoxia; Peng Weijun

    2009-07-06

    A hybrid model combining Monte Carlo method with diffraction theory of wave optics has been developed and applied to quantitatively simulate the in-line diffractive phase-contrast x-ray imaging of three dimensional tissue samples under actual clinic imaging parameters. The primary microcosmic interactions of medical-energy x-ray within matter including photoabsorption, Compton scattering, and coherent scattering, have been taken into account in the Monte Carlo simulation. A diffraction processing based on Fresnel diffraction theory is carried out to simulate the macroscopic diffraction effect. A comparison with experiment results has also been performed.

  8. In-line phase-contrast imaging of a biological specimen using a compact laser-Compton scattering-based x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeura-Sekiguchi, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yasumoto, M.; Toyokawa, H.; Koike, M.; Yamada, K.; Sakai, F.; Mori, K.; Maruyama, K.; Oka, H.; Kimata, T.

    2008-03-01

    Laser-Compton scattering (LCS) x-ray sources have recently attracted much attention for their potential use at local medical facilities because they can produce ultrashort pulsed, high-brilliance, and quasimonochromatic hard x rays with a small source size. The feasibility of in-line phase-contrast imaging for a "thick" biological specimens of rat lumbar vertebrae using the developed compact LCS-X in AIST was investigated for the promotion of clinical imaging. In the higher-quality images, anatomical details of the spinous processes of the vertebrae are more clearly observable than with conventional absorption radiography. The results demonstrate that phase-contrast radiography can be performed using LCS-X.

  9. Propagator based formalism for optimizing in-line phase contrast imaging in laboratory X-ray setups.

    PubMed

    Balles, Andreas; Zabler, Simon; Ebensperger, Thomas; Fella, Christian; Hanke, Randolf

    2016-09-01

    We derive a propagator based formalism for optimizing phase contrast imaging in laboratory setups as well as in synchrotron setups. We confirm based on five different setups the well known existence of an optimum position for the sample in terms of phase contrast by measuring two types of fibers and evaluating the fringe contrast. Furthermore, we demonstrate for these setups a correlation of our formula and the fringe contrast. Hence, an estimate of this optimum position is given by our formalism which only depends on the source size, the detector blurring, and the total distance between source and detector.

  10. Preliminary comparison of grating-based and in-line phase contrast X-ray imaging with synchrotron radiation for mouse kidney at TOMCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Liu, P.; Irvine, S.; Pinzer, B.; Stampanoni, M.; Xu, L. X.

    2013-06-01

    Phase contrast imaging has been demonstrated to be advantageous in revealing detailed structures inside biological specimens without contrast agents. Grating-based differential phase contrast (DPC) and in-line phase contrast (ILPC) X-ray imaging are the two modalities frequently used at the beamline of TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experimenTs (TOMCAT) at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). In this paper, we preliminarily compared the abilities of two types of phase contrast imaging in distinguishing micro structures in mouse kidneys. The 3D reconstructions showed that the microstructures in kidney, such as micro vessels and renal tubules, were displayed clearly with both imaging modalities. The two techniques may be viewed as complementary. For larger features with very small density variations DPC is the desirable method. In cases where dose and time limits may prohibit the multiple steps required for DPC, and when the focus is on finer features, the ILPC method may be considered as a more viable alternative. Moreover, high resolution ILPC images are comparable with histological results.

  11. Quantitative studies on inner interfaces in conical metal joints using hard x-ray inline phase contrast radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabler, S.; Rack, T.; Rack, A.; Nelson, K.

    2010-10-01

    Quantitative investigation of micrometer and submicrometer gaps between joining metal surfaces is applied to conical plug-socket connections in dental titanium implants. Microgaps of widths well beyond the resolving power of industrial x-ray systems are imaged by synchrotron phase contrast radiography. Furthermore, by using an analytical model for the relatively simple sample geometry and applying it to numerical forward simulations of the optical Fresnel propagation, we show that quantitative measurements of the microgap width down to 0.1 μm are possible. Image data recorded at the BAMline (BESSY-II light source, Germany) are presented, with the resolving power of the imaging system being 4 μm in absorption mode and ˜14 μm in phase contrast mode (z2=0.74 m). Thus, phase contrast radiography, combined with numerical forward simulations, is capable of measuring the widths of gaps that are two orders of magnitude thinner than the conventional detection limit.

  12. Optimization of in-line phase contrast particle image velocimetry using a laboratory x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, I.; Fouras, A.; Paganin, D. M.

    2012-10-01

    Phase contrast particle image velocimetry (PIV) using a laboratory x-ray microfocus source is investigated using a numerical model. Phase contrast images of 75 {mu}m air bubbles, embedded within water exhibiting steady-state vortical flow, are generated under the paraxial approximation using a tungsten x-ray spectrum at 30 kVp. Propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast speckle images at a range of source-object and object-detector distances are generated, and used as input into a simulated PIV measurement. The effects of source-size-induced penumbral blurring, together with the finite dynamic range of the detector, are accounted for in the simulation. The PIV measurement procedure involves using the cross-correlation between temporally sequential speckle images to estimate the transverse displacement field for the fluid. The global error in the PIV reconstruction, for the set of simulations that was performed, suggests that geometric magnification is the key parameter for designing a laboratory-based x-ray phase-contrast PIV system. For the modeled system, x-ray phase-contrast PIV data measurement can be optimized to obtain low error (<0.2 effective pixel of the detector) in the system with magnification lying in the range between 1.5 and 3. For large effective pixel size (>15 {mu}m) of the detector, high geometric magnification (>2.5) is desired, while for large source size system (FWHM > 30 {mu}m), low magnification (<1.5) would be suggested instead. The methods developed in this paper can be applied to optimizing phase-contrast velocimetry using a variety of laboratory x-ray sources.

  13. Combine TV-L1 model with guided image filtering for wide and faint ring artifacts correction of in-line x-ray phase contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ji, Dongjiang; Qu, Gangrong; Hu, Chunhong; Zhao, Yuqing; Chen, Xiaodong

    2017-08-24

    In practice, mis-calibrated detector pixels give rise to wide and faint ring artifacts in the reconstruction image of the In-line phase-contrast computed tomography (IL-PC-CT). Ring artifacts correction is essential in IL-PC-CT. In this study, a novel method of wide and faint ring artifacts correction was presented based on combining TV-L1 model with guided image filtering (GIF) in the reconstruction image domain. The new correction method includes two main steps namely, the GIF step and the TV-L1 step. To validate the performance of this method, simulation data and real experimental synchrotron data are provided. The results demonstrate that TV-L1 model with GIF step can effectively correct the wide and faint ring artifacts for IL-PC-CT.

  14. Quantitative studies on inner interfaces in conical metal joints using hard x-ray inline phase contrast radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zabler, S.; Rack, T.; Nelson, K.; Rack, A.

    2010-10-15

    Quantitative investigation of micrometer and submicrometer gaps between joining metal surfaces is applied to conical plug-socket connections in dental titanium implants. Microgaps of widths well beyond the resolving power of industrial x-ray systems are imaged by synchrotron phase contrast radiography. Furthermore, by using an analytical model for the relatively simple sample geometry and applying it to numerical forward simulations of the optical Fresnel propagation, we show that quantitative measurements of the microgap width down to 0.1 {mu}m are possible. Image data recorded at the BAMline (BESSY-II light source, Germany) are presented, with the resolving power of the imaging system being 4 {mu}m in absorption mode and {approx}14 {mu}m in phase contrast mode (z{sub 2}=0.74 m). Thus, phase contrast radiography, combined with numerical forward simulations, is capable of measuring the widths of gaps that are two orders of magnitude thinner than the conventional detection limit.

  15. In-line phase shift tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hammonds, Jeffrey C.; Price, Ronald R.; Pickens, David R.; Donnelly, Edwin F.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to (1) demonstrate laboratory measurements of phase shift images derived from in-line phase-contrast radiographs using the attenuation-partition based algorithm (APBA) of Yan et al.[Opt. Express 18(15), 16074–16089 (2010)], (2) verify that the APBA reconstructed images obey the linearity principle, and (3) reconstruct tomosynthesis phase shift images from a collection of angularly sampled planar phase shift images.Methods: An unmodified, commercially available cabinet x-ray system (Faxitron LX-60) was used in this experiment. This system contains a tungsten anode x-ray tube with a nominal focal spot size of 10 μm. The digital detector uses CsI/CMOS with a pixel size of 50 × 50 μm. The phantoms used consisted of one acrylic plate, two polystyrene plates, and a habanero pepper. Tomosynthesis images were reconstructed from 51 images acquired over a ±25° arc. All phase shift images were reconstructed using the APBA.Results: Image contrast derived from the planar phase shift image of an acrylic plate of uniform thickness exceeded the contrast of the traditional attenuation image by an approximate factor of two. Comparison of the planar phase shift images from a single, uniform thickness polystyrene plate with two polystyrene plates demonstrated an approximate linearity of the estimated phase shift with plate thickness (−1600 rad vs −2970 rad). Tomographic phase shift images of the habanero pepper exhibited acceptable spatial resolution and contrast comparable to the corresponding attenuation image.Conclusions: This work demonstrated the feasibility of laboratory-based phase shift tomosynthesis and suggests that phase shift imaging could potentially provide a new imaging biomarker. Further investigation will be needed to determine if phase shift contrast will be able to provide new tissue contrast information or improved clinical performance.

  16. SU-E-I-91: Quantitative Assessment of Early Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Cavernous Hemangioma of Live Using In-Line Phase-Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the potential utility of in-line phase-contrast imaging (ILPCI) technique with synchrotron radiation in detecting early hepatocellular carcinoma and cavernous hemangioma of live using in vitro model system. Methods: Without contrast agents, three typical early hepatocellular carcinoma specimens and three typical cavernous hemangioma of live specimens were imaged using ILPCI. To quantitatively discriminate early hepatocellular carcinoma tissues and cavernous hemangioma tissues, the projection images texture feature based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) were extracted. The texture parameters of energy, inertia, entropy, correlation, sum average, sum entropy, difference average, difference entropy and inverse difference moment, were obtained respectively. Results: In the ILPCI planar images of early hepatocellular carcinoma specimens, vessel trees were clearly visualized on the micrometer scale. Obvious distortion deformation was presented, and the vessel mostly appeared as a ‘dry stick’. Liver textures appeared not regularly. In the ILPCI planar images of cavernous hemangioma of live specimens, typical vessels had not been found compared with the early hepatocellular carcinoma planar images. The planar images of cavernous hemangioma of live specimens clearly displayed the dilated hepatic sinusoids with the diameter of less than 100 microns, but all of them were overlapped with each other. The texture parameters of energy, inertia, entropy, correlation, sum average, sum entropy, and difference average, showed a statistically significant between the two types specimens image (P<0.01), except the texture parameters of difference entropy and inverse difference moment(P>0.01). Conclusion: The results indicate that there are obvious changes in morphological levels including vessel structures and liver textures. The study proves that this imaging technique has a potential value in evaluating early hepatocellular carcinoma and cavernous

  17. Some simple rules for contrast, signal-to-noise and resolution in in-line x-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Gureyev, Timur E; Nesterets, Yakov I; Stevenson, Andrew W; Miller, Peter R; Pogany, Andrew; Wilkins, Stephen W

    2008-03-03

    Simple analytical expressions are derived for the spatial resolution, contrast and signal-to-noise in X-ray projection images of a generic phase edge. The obtained expressions take into account the maximum phase shift generated by the sample and the sharpness of the edge, as well as such parameters of the imaging set-up as the wavelength spectrum and the size of the incoherent source, the source-to-object and object-to-detector distances and the detector resolution. Different asymptotic behavior of the expressions in the cases of large and small Fresnel numbers is demonstrated. The analytical expressions are compared with the results of numerical simulations using Kirchhoff diffraction theory, as well as with experimental X-ray measurements.

  18. SU-E-I-90: Characterizing Small Animal Lung Properties Using Speckle Observed with An In-Line X-Ray Phase Contrast Benchtop System

    SciTech Connect

    Garson, A; Gunsten, S; Guan, H; Brody, S; Anastasio, M; Vasireddi, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We demonstrate a novel X-ray phase-contrast (XPC) method for lung imaging representing a paradigm shift in the way small animal functional imaging is performed. In our method, information regarding airway microstructure that is encoded within speckle texture of a single XPC radiograph is decoded to produce 2D parametric images that will spatially resolve changes in lung properties such as microstructure sizes and air volumes. Such information cannot be derived from conventional lung radiography or any other 2D imaging modality. By computing these images at different points within a breathing cycle, dynamic functional imaging will be readily achieved without the need for tomography. Methods: XPC mouse lung radiographs acquired in situ with an in-line X-ray phase contrast benchtop system. The lung air volume is varied and controlled with a small animal ventilator. XPC radiographs will be acquired for various lung air volume levels representing different phases of the respiratory cycle. Similar data will be acquired of microsphere-based lung phantoms containing hollow glass spheres with known distributions of diameters. Image texture analysis is applied to the data to investigate relationships between texture characteristics and airspace/microsphere physical properties. Results: Correlations between Fourier-based texture descriptors (FBTDs) and regional lung air volume indicate that the texture features in 2D radiographs reveal information on 3D properties of the lungs. For example, we find for a 350 × 350 πm2 lung ROI a linear relationship between injected air volume and FBTD value with slope and intercept of 8.9×10{sup 5} and 7.5, respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrate specific image texture measures related to lung speckle features are correlated with physical characteristics of refracting elements (i.e. lung air spaces). Furthermore, we present results indicating the feasibility of implementing the technique with a simple imaging system design, short

  19. Quantitative evaluation of a single-distance phase-retrieval method applied on in-line phase-contrast images of a mouse lung

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Sara; Larsson, Emanuel; Alves, Frauke; Dal Monego, Simeone; Biffi, Stefania; Garrovo, Chiara; Lorenzon, Andrea; Tromba, Giuliana; Dullin, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PBI) has already proven its potential in a great variety of soft-tissue-related applications including lung imaging. However, the strong edge enhancement, caused by the phase effects, often hampers image segmentation and therefore the quantitative analysis of data sets. Here, the benefits of applying single-distance phase retrieval prior to the three-dimensional reconstruction (PhR) are discussed and quantified compared with three-dimensional reconstructions of conventional PBI data sets in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and preservation of image features. The PhR data sets show more than a tenfold higher CNR and only minor blurring of the edges when compared with PBI in a predominately absorption-based set-up. Accordingly, phase retrieval increases the sensitivity and provides more functionality in computed tomography imaging. PMID:24971975

  20. Quantitative evaluation of a single-distance phase-retrieval method applied on in-line phase-contrast images of a mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Sara; Larsson, Emanuel; Alves, Frauke; Dal Monego, Simeone; Biffi, Stefania; Garrovo, Chiara; Lorenzon, Andrea; Tromba, Giuliana; Dullin, Christian

    2014-07-01

    Propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PBI) has already proven its potential in a great variety of soft-tissue-related applications including lung imaging. However, the strong edge enhancement, caused by the phase effects, often hampers image segmentation and therefore the quantitative analysis of data sets. Here, the benefits of applying single-distance phase retrieval prior to the three-dimensional reconstruction (PhR) are discussed and quantified compared with three-dimensional reconstructions of conventional PBI data sets in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and preservation of image features. The PhR data sets show more than a tenfold higher CNR and only minor blurring of the edges when compared with PBI in a predominately absorption-based set-up. Accordingly, phase retrieval increases the sensitivity and provides more functionality in computed tomography imaging.

  1. Functionalized synchrotron in-line phase-contrast computed tomography: a novel approach for simultaneous quantification of structural alterations and localization of barium-labelled alveolar macrophages within mouse lung samples

    PubMed Central

    Dullin, Christian; dal Monego, Simeone; Larsson, Emanuel; Mohammadi, Sara; Krenkel, Martin; Garrovo, Chiara; Biffi, Stefania; Lorenzon, Andrea; Markus, Andrea; Napp, Joanna; Salditt, Tim; Accardo, Agostino; Alves, Frauke; Tromba, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized computed tomography (CT) in combination with labelled cells is virtually non-existent due to the limited sensitivity of X-ray-absorption-based imaging, but would be highly desirable to realise cell tracking studies in entire organisms. In this study we applied in-line free propagation X-ray phase-contrast CT (XPCT) in an allergic asthma mouse model to assess structural changes as well as the biodistribution of barium-labelled macrophages in lung tissue. Alveolar macrophages that were barium-sulfate-loaded and fluorescent-labelled were instilled intratracheally into asthmatic and control mice. Mice were sacrificed after 24 h, lungs were kept in situ, inflated with air and scanned utilizing XPCT at the SYRMEP beamline (Elettra Synchrotron Light Source, Italy). Single-distance phase retrieval was used to generate data sets with ten times greater contrast-to-noise ratio than absorption-based CT (in our setup), thus allowing to depict and quantify structural hallmarks of asthmatic lungs such as reduced air volume, obstruction of airways and increased soft-tissue content. Furthermore, we found a higher concentration as well as a specific accumulation of the barium-labelled macrophages in asthmatic lung tissue. It is believe that XPCT will be beneficial in preclinical asthma research for both the assessment of therapeutic response as well as the analysis of the role of the recruitment of macrophages to inflammatory sites. PMID:25537601

  2. Functionalized synchrotron in-line phase-contrast computed tomography: a novel approach for simultaneous quantification of structural alterations and localization of barium-labelled alveolar macrophages within mouse lung samples.

    PubMed

    Dullin, Christian; dal Monego, Simeone; Larsson, Emanuel; Mohammadi, Sara; Krenkel, Martin; Garrovo, Chiara; Biffi, Stefania; Lorenzon, Andrea; Markus, Andrea; Napp, Joanna; Salditt, Tim; Accardo, Agostino; Alves, Frauke; Tromba, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized computed tomography (CT) in combination with labelled cells is virtually non-existent due to the limited sensitivity of X-ray-absorption-based imaging, but would be highly desirable to realise cell tracking studies in entire organisms. In this study we applied in-line free propagation X-ray phase-contrast CT (XPCT) in an allergic asthma mouse model to assess structural changes as well as the biodistribution of barium-labelled macrophages in lung tissue. Alveolar macrophages that were barium-sulfate-loaded and fluorescent-labelled were instilled intratracheally into asthmatic and control mice. Mice were sacrificed after 24 h, lungs were kept in situ, inflated with air and scanned utilizing XPCT at the SYRMEP beamline (Elettra Synchrotron Light Source, Italy). Single-distance phase retrieval was used to generate data sets with ten times greater contrast-to-noise ratio than absorption-based CT (in our setup), thus allowing to depict and quantify structural hallmarks of asthmatic lungs such as reduced air volume, obstruction of airways and increased soft-tissue content. Furthermore, we found a higher concentration as well as a specific accumulation of the barium-labelled macrophages in asthmatic lung tissue. It is believe that XPCT will be beneficial in preclinical asthma research for both the assessment of therapeutic response as well as the analysis of the role of the recruitment of macrophages to inflammatory sites.

  3. X-ray phase-contrast methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lider, V. V. Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2013-11-15

    This review is devoted to a comparative description of the methods for forming X-ray phase-contrast images of weakly absorbing (phase) objects. These include the crystal interferometer method, the Talbot interferometer method, diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging, and the in-line method. The potential of their practical application in various fields of science and technology is discussed. The publications on the development and optimization of X-ray phase-contrast methods and the experimental study of phase objects are analyzed.

  4. Near-field ptychography: phase retrieval for inline holography using a structured illumination.

    PubMed

    Stockmar, Marco; Cloetens, Peter; Zanette, Irene; Enders, Bjoern; Dierolf, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Thibault, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inline holography is a common phase-contrast imaging method which uses free-space propagation to encode the phase signal into measured intensities. However, quantitative retrieval of the sample's image remains challenging, imposing constraints on the nature of the sample or on the propagation distance. Here, we present a way of simultaneously retrieving the sample's complex-valued transmission function and the incident illumination function from near-field diffraction patterns. The procedure relies on the measurement diversity created by lateral translations of the sample with respect to a structured illumination. The reconstruction approach, in essence identical to that employed in ptychography, is applied to hard X-ray synchrotron measurements and to simulations. Compared to other inline holography techniques, we expect near-field ptychography to reduce reconstruction artefacts by factoring out wavefront imperfections and relaxing constraints on the sample's scattering properties, thus ultimately improving the robustness of propagation-based X-ray phase tomography.

  5. Phase contrast imaging of cochlear soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintani Smith, Stephanie; Hwang, Margaret; Rau, Christoph; Fishman, Andrew J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2011-03-01

    A noninvasive technique to image soft tissue could expedite diagnosis and disease management in the auditory system. We propose inline phase contrast imaging with hard X-rays as a novel method that overcomes the limitations of conventional absorption radiography for imaging soft tissue. In this study, phase contrast imaging of mouse cochleae was performed at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source. The phase contrast tomographic reconstructions show soft tissue structures of the cochlea, including the inner pillar cells, the inner spiral sulcus, the tectorial membrane, the basilar membrane, and the Reissner's membrane. The results suggest that phase contrast X-ray imaging and tomographic techniques hold promise to noninvasively image cochlear structures at an unprecedented cellular level.

  6. Differential-interference-contrast digital in-line holography microscopy based on a single-optical-element.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuchao; Xie, Changqing

    2015-11-01

    Both digital in-line holography (DIH) and zone plate-based microscopy have received considerable interest as powerful imaging tools. However, the former suffers from a twin-image noise problem. The latter suffers from low efficiency and difficulty in fabrication. Here, we present an effective and efficient phase-contrast imaging approach, named differential-interference-contrast digital in-line holography (DIC-DIH), by using a single optical element to split the incident light into a plane wave and a converging spherical wave and generate a two-dimensional (2D) DIC effect simultaneously. Specifically, to improve image contrast, we present a new single optical element, termed 2D DIC compound photon sieves, by combining two overlaid binary gratings and a compound photon sieve through two logical XOR operations. The proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate that the proposed technique can eliminate the twin-image noise problem and improve image contrast with high efficiency. Additionally, we present an example of the phase-contrast imaging nonuniform thick photoresist development process.

  7. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-09-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  8. Phase-contrast radiography.

    PubMed

    Gao, D; Pogany, A; Stevenson, A W; Wilkins, S W

    1998-01-01

    For the past 100 years, the paradigm for radiography has been premised on absorption as the sole means of contrast formation and on ray optics as the basis for image interpretation. A new conceptual approach to radiography has been developed that includes phase (ie, refractive) contrast and requires wave optics for proper treatment. This new approach greatly increases the amount of information that can be obtained with radiographic techniques and is particularly well suited to the imaging of soft tissue and of very small features in biologic samples. A key feature of the present technique of phase-contrast radiography is the use of a microfocus x-ray source about an order of magnitude (< or = 20 microm) smaller than that used in conventional radiography. Phase-contrast radiography offers a number of improvements over conventional radiography in a clinical setting, especially in soft-tissue imaging. These improvements include increased contrast resulting in improved visualization of anatomic detail, reduced absorbed dose to the patient, inherent image magnification and high spatial resolution, use of harder x rays, and relative ease of implementation. More technologically advanced detectors are currently being developed and commercialized, which will help fully realize the considerable potential of phase-contrast imaging.

  9. Inline SAW RFID tag using time position and phase encoding.

    PubMed

    Härmä, Sanna; Arthur, Wesley G; Hartmann, Clinton S; Maev, Roman G; Plessky, Victor P

    2008-08-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags are encoded according to partial reflections of an interrogation signal by short metal reflectors. The standard encryption method involves time position encoding that uses time delays of response signals. However, the data capacity of a SAW RFID tag can be significantly enhanced by extracting additional phase information from the tag responses. In this work, we have designed, using FEM-BEM simulations, and fabricated, on 128 degrees -LiNbO3, inline 2.44-GHz SAW RFID tag samples that combine time position and phase encoding. Each reflective echo has 4 possible time positions and a phase of 0 degrees , -90 degrees , -180 degrees , or -270 degrees. This corresponds to 16 different states, i.e., 4 bits of data, per code reflector. In addition to the enhanced data capacity, our samples also exhibit a low loss level of -38 dB for code reflections.

  10. Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik

    2008-11-13

    All standard (medical) x-ray imaging technologies, rely primarily on the amplitude properties of the incident radiation, and do not depend on its phase. This is unchanged since the discovery by Roentgen that the intensity of an x-ray beam, as measured by the exposure on a film, was related to the relative transmission properties of an object. However, recently various imaging techniques have emerged which depend on the phase of the x-rays as well as the amplitude. Phase becomes important when the beam is coherent and the imaging system is sensitive to interference phenomena. Significant new advances have been made in coherent optic theory and techniques, which now promise phase information in medical imaging. The development of perfect crystal optics and the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation facilities have contributed to a significant increase in the application of phase based imaging in materials and life sciences. Unique source characteristics such as high intensity, monochromaticity, coherence and high collimating provide an ideal source for advanced imaging. Phase contrast imaging has been applied in both projection and computed tomography modes, and recent applications have been made in the field of medical imaging. Due to the underlying principle of X-ray detection conventional image receptors register only intensities of wave fields and not their phases. During the last decade basically five different methods were developed that translate the phase information into intensity variations. These methods are based on measuring the phase shift {phi} directly (using interference phenomena), the gradient {nabla}{sub {phi}}, or the Laplacian {nabla}{sup 2}{phi}. All three methods can be applied to polychromatic X-ray sources keeping in mind that the native source is synchrotron radiation, featuring monochromatic and reasonable coherent X-ray beams. Due to the vast difference in the coefficients that are driven absorption and phase effects (factor 1

  11. Experimentally enhanced model-based deconvolution of propagation-based phase-contrast data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichotka, M.; Palma, K.; Hasn, S.; Jakubek, J.; Vavrik, D.

    2016-12-01

    In recent years phase-contrast has become a much investigated modality in radiographic imaging. The radiographic setups employed in phase-contrast imaging are typically rather costly and complex, e.g. high performance Talbot-Laue interferometers operated at synchrotron light sources. In-line phase-contrast imaging states the most pedestrian approach towards phase-contrast enhancement. Utilizing small angle deflection within the imaged sample and the entailed interference of the deflected and un-deflected beam during spatial propagation, in-line phase-contrast imaging only requires a well collimated X-ray source with a high contrast & high resolution detector. Employing high magnification the above conditions are intrinsically fulfilled in cone-beam micro-tomography. As opposed of 2D imaging, where contrast enhancement is generally considered beneficial, in tomographic modalities the in-line phase-contrast effect can be quite a nuisance since it renders the inverse problem posed by tomographic reconstruction inconsistent, thus causing reconstruction artifacts. We present an experimentally enhanced model-based approach to disentangle absorption and in-line phase-contrast. The approach employs comparison of transmission data to a system model computed iteratively on-line. By comparison of the forward model to absorption data acquired in continuous rotation strong local deviations of the data residual are successively identified as likely candidates for in-line phase-contrast. By inducing minimal vibrations (few mrad) to the sample around the peaks of such deviations the transmission signal can be decomposed into a constant absorptive fraction and an oscillating signal caused by phase-contrast which again allows to generate separate maps for absorption and phase-contrast. The contributions of phase-contrast and the corresponding artifacts are subsequently removed from the tomographic dataset. In principle, if a 3D handling of the sample is available, this method also

  12. Phase contrast MR angiography techniques.

    PubMed

    Dumoulin, C L

    1995-08-01

    Phase contrast MR methods encode information from macroscopic motion into the phase of the MR signal. Phase contrast methods can be applied with small and large fields-of-view, can give quantitative measures of velocity, and provide excellent suppression of signals from stationary tissue. Unlike time-of-flight methods, phase contrast methods directly measure flow and thus are not hindered by the artifactual appearance of tissue having short T1. Phase contrast angiograms can be two-dimensional (thin slice or projectile), three-dimensional, and/or time resolved and have applications throughout the body.

  13. Recent progress of phase-contrast imaging at Tsinghua Thomson-scattering X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Zhijun; Yan, Lixin; Du, Yingchao; Zhang, Zhen; Huang, Wenhui; Chen, Huaibi; Tang, Chuanxiang

    2017-07-01

    Due to its small spot size, a Thomson-scattering X-ray source can produce high spatial coherent X-ray pulse, which is the prerequisite for phase-contrast imaging. In this paper, we will introduce the recent progress of phase-contrast imaging at Tsinghua Thomson-scattering X-ray source (TTX). Since the generation of first hard X-ray pulse at TTX in 2012, we have demonstrated the capacity of in-line phase contrast imaging using a refill of gel ink pen. And then, a Monte Carlo simulation tool for in-line phase-contrast imaging based on Thomson-scattering X-ray source has been developed. Taking advantage of this code, we calculate the typical requirement of photon numbers for in-line phase-contrast imaging based on this type of X-ray source. After the upgrade of infrared laser system and control program, the total photon yield of TTX has been increased to ∼2 × 107 photons/pulse at X-ray central energy of 25 keV and 50 keV with RMS jitter less than 6% and 4% respectively. A new run of experiments about in-line phase-contrast imaging and phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) have been carried out at TTX.

  14. X-ray Phase Contrast analysis - Digital wavefront development

    SciTech Connect

    Idir, Mourad; Potier, Jonathan; Fricker, Sebastien; Snigirev, Anatoly; Snigireva, Irina; Modi, M. H.

    2010-06-23

    Optical schemes that enable imaging of the phase shift produced by an object have become popular in the x-ray region, where phase can be the dominant contrast mechanism. The propagation-based technique consists of recording the interference pattern produced by choosing one or several sample-to-detector distances. Pioneering studies, carried out making use of synchrotron radiation, demonstrated that this technique results in a dramatic increase of image contrast and detail visibility, allowing the detection of structures invisible with conventional techniques. An experimental and theoretical study of in-line hard x-ray phase-contrast imaging had been performed. The theoretical description of the technique is based on Fresnel diffraction. As an illustration of the potential of this quantitative imaging technique, high-resolution x-ray phase contrast images of simple objects will be presented.

  15. Superresolved common-path phase-shifting digital inline holographic microscopy using a spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Micó, Vicente; Zalevsky, Zeev; Garcia, Javier

    2012-12-01

    Common-path phase-shifting lensless holographic microscopy has been recently proposed as a novel approach capable of high numerical aperture imaging in a lensless digital inline holographic microscopy layout [Opt. Lett.35, 3919 (2010)]. Here we present proof-of-concept validation for improving the resolution limit imposed by diffraction in such a setup. This is accomplished by shifting the phase lens displayed at the spatial light modulator, which moves the illumination point source to different off-axis positions. For each off-axis position, a set of inline phase-shifted holograms are recorded by the digital sensor and stored at the computer's memory for later digital postprocessing. As a consequence, each recording allows the recovery of different spatial frequency content of the object's diffracted wavefront meaning a superresolved image of the input object. Experimental results are reported validating the proposed method.

  16. Dual-channel in-line digital holographic double random phase encryption.

    PubMed

    Das, Bhargab; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S; Rao, D V G L N

    2012-10-01

    We present a robust encryption method for the encoding of 2D/3D objects using digital holography and virtual optics. Using our recently developed dual-plane in-line digital holography technique, two in-line digital holograms are recorded at two different planes and are encrypted using two different double random phase encryption configurations, independently. The process of using two mutually exclusive encryption channels makes the system more robust against attacks since both the channels should be decrypted accurately in order to get a recognizable reconstruction. Results show that the reconstructed object is unrecognizable even when the portion of the correct phase keys used during decryption is close to 75%. The system is verified against blind decryptions by evaluating the SNR and MSE. Validation of the proposed method and sensitivities of the associated parameters are quantitatively analyzed and illustrated.

  17. Dual-channel in-line digital holographic double random phase encryption

    PubMed Central

    Das, Bhargab; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S; Rao, D V G L N

    2012-01-01

    We present a robust encryption method for the encoding of 2D/3D objects using digital holography and virtual optics. Using our recently developed dual-plane in-line digital holography technique, two in-line digital holograms are recorded at two different planes and are encrypted using two different double random phase encryption configurations, independently. The process of using two mutually exclusive encryption channels makes the system more robust against attacks since both the channels should be decrypted accurately in order to get a recognizable reconstruction. Results show that the reconstructed object is unrecognizable even when the portion of the correct phase keys used during decryption is close to 75%. The system is verified against blind decryptions by evaluating the SNR and MSE. Validation of the proposed method and sensitivities of the associated parameters are quantitatively analyzed and illustrated. PMID:23471012

  18. Phase shifting technique for extended inline holographic microscopy with a pinhole array.

    PubMed

    Graulig, Christian; Kanka, Mario; Riesenberg, Rainer

    2012-09-24

    Digital inline holographic microscopy using a pinhole for sample illumination allows lensless imaging. To overcome restrictions of the sample size and density in the setup additional reference waves are generated by extending the single pinhole to a regular 2D pinhole array illumination. A technique is presented that uses phase shifting between the pinhole waves. Multiple foci with stable phase differences and a phase error (rms) of 0.027 rad generate pinhole waves which illuminate an undiluted, dense blood smear sample. Amplitude and phase images of the blood sample were successfully reconstructed.

  19. Quantitative characterization of edge enhancement in phase contrast x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Monnin, P; Bulling, S; Hoszowska, J; Valley, J F; Meuli, R; Verdun, F R

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to model the edge enhancement effect in in-line holography phase contrast imaging. A simple analytical approach was used to quantify refraction and interference contrasts in terms of beam energy and imaging geometry. The model was applied to predict the peak intensity and frequency of the edge enhancement for images of cylindrical fibers. The calculations were compared with measurements, and the relationship between the spatial resolution of the detector and the amplitude of the phase contrast signal was investigated. Calculations using the analytical model were in good agreement with experimental results for nylon, aluminum and copper wires of 50 to 240 microm diameter, and with numerical simulations based on Fresnel-Kirchhoff theory. A relationship between the defocusing distance and the pixel size of the image detector was established. This analytical model is a useful tool for optimizing imaging parameters in phase contrast in-line holography, including defocusing distance, detector resolution and beam energy.

  20. Phase contrast imaging with coherent high energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Snigireva, I.

    1997-02-01

    X-ray imaging concern high energy domain (>6 keV) like a contact radiography, projection microscopy and tomography is used for many years to discern the features of the internal structure non destructively in material science, medicine and biology. In so doing the main contrast formation is absorption that makes some limitations for imaging of the light density materials and what is more the resolution of these techniques is not better than 10-100 {mu}m. It was turned out that there is now way in which to overcome 1{mu}m or even sub-{mu}m resolution limit except phase contrast imaging. It is well known in optics that the phase contrast is realised when interference between reference wave front and transmitted through the sample take place. Examples of this imaging are: phase contrast microscopy suggested by Zernike and Gabor (in-line) holography. Both of this techniques: phase contrast x-ray microscopy and holography are successfully progressing now in soft x-ray region. For imaging in the hard X-rays to enhance the contrast and to be able to resolve phase variations across the beam the high degree of the time and more importantly spatial coherence is needed. Because of this it was reasonable that the perfect crystal optics was involved like Bonse-Hart interferometry, double-crystal and even triple-crystal set-up using Laue and Bragg geometry with asymmetrically cut crystals.

  1. Material contrast based inline metrology: process verification and control using back scattered electron imaging on CD-SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, Carsten; Fischer, Daniel; Schulz, Bernd; Vaid, Alok; Adan, Ofer; Levi, Shimon; Ge, Adam; Zhou, Jessica; Bar-Zvi, Maayan; Enge, Ronny; Groh, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    The Critical Dimension Scanning Electron Microscope (CDSEM) is the traditional workhorse solution for inline process control. Measurements are extracted from top-down images based on secondary electron collection while scanning the specimen. Secondary electrons holding majority of detection yield. These images provide more on the structural information of the specimen surface and less in terms of material contrast. In some cases there is too much structural information in the image which can irritate the measurement, in other cases small but important differences between various material compounds cannot be detected as images are limited by contrast information and resolution of primary scanning beam. Furthermore, accuracy in secondary electron based metrology is limited by charging. To gather the exact required information for certain material compound as needed, a technique, known from material analytic SEḾs has been introduced for inline CDSEM analysis and process control: Low Loss Back Scattered Electron Imaging (LL-BSE). The key at LL-BSE imaging is the collection of only the back scattered electrons (BSE) from outermost specimen surface which undergo the least amount possible of energy loss in the process of image generation following impact of the material by a primary beam. In LL-BSE very good and measurable material distinction and sensitivity, even for very low density material compounds can be achieved. This paper presents new methods for faster process development cycle, at reduced cost, based on LL-BSE mass data mining instead of sending wafers for destructive material analysis.

  2. In-line retro-reflective polarizing contrast scope for translucent objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun

    2012-11-01

    We propose a very-low-cost fixed interferential polarizing phase contrast scope suitable for the study of translucent objects. Our key design approach is relied on the arrangement of a circular polarizer sheet, a mirror, and a digital camera in a retro-reflective optical structure. The linear polarizer embedded in the circular polarizer sheet acts as both a polarization beam splitter and a polarization beam combiner. Meanwhile the quarter waveplate inside the circular polarizer sheet functions as a fixed phase plate but without narrowing the field of view of the digital camera. The retroreflective configuration amplifies the phase difference between the two orthogonal polarized optical beams twice, thus automatically creating an initial dark background. Experimental demonstration using an off-the-shelf digital microscope with built-in white light emitting diodes and a specified 400x maximum magnification, a circular polarizer sheet, and a mirror shows that onion cells and Steinernema Thailandense nematodes can be clearly observed with striking color, high contrast, and three-dimensional appearance.

  3. Contrast and resolution in direct Fresnel diffraction phase-contrast imaging with partially coherent x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Han Shensheng; Yu Hong; Cheng Jing; Gao Chen; Luo Zhenlin

    2004-10-01

    A general treatment of x-ray image formation by direct Fresnel diffraction with partially coherent hard x rays is presented. Contrast and resolution are the criteria used to specify the visibility of an image, which depend primarily on the spatial coherence of the illumination and the distance from object to the image, with chromatic coherence of lesser importance. The dependence of the quality of phase-contrast images on the parameters of in-line imaging configuration is described quantitatively. The influence of spatial coherence of hard x-ray source on the imaging quality is also discussed based on the partially coherent direct Fresnel diffraction phase-contrast imaging theory. Experimental results are also presented for phase-contrast x-ray images with partially coherent hard x rays.

  4. Motion compensation and noise tolerance in phase-shifting digital in-line holography.

    PubMed

    Stenner, Michael D; Neifeld, Mark A

    2006-05-15

    We present a technique for phase-shifting digital in-line holography which compensates for lateral object motion. By collecting two frames of interference between object and reference fields with identical reference phase, one can estimate the lateral motion that occurred between frames using the cross-correlation. We also describe a very general linear framework for phase-shifting holographic reconstruction which minimizes additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) for an arbitrary set of reference field amplitudes and phases. We analyze the technique's sensitivity to noise (AWGN, quantization, and shot), errors in the reference fields, errors in motion estimation, resolution, and depth of field. We also present experimental motion-compensated images achieving the expected resolution.

  5. In-line phase retarder and polarimeter for conversion of linear to circular polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J.B.; Smith, N.V.; Denlinger, J.D.

    1997-04-01

    An in-line polarimeter including phase retarder and linear polarizer was designed and commissioned on undulator beamline 7.0 for the purpose of converting linear to circular polarization for experiments downstream. In commissioning studies, Mo/Si multilayers at 95 eV were used both as the upstream, freestanding phase retarder and the downstream linear polarized. The polarization properties of the phase retarder were characterized by direct polarimetry and by collecting MCD spectra in photoemission from Gd and other magnetic surfaces. The resonant birefringence of transmission multilayers results from differing distributions of s- and p-component wave fields in the multilayer when operating near a structural (Bragg) interference condition. The resulting phase retardation is especially strong when the interference is at or near the Brewster angle, which is roughly 45{degrees} in the EUV and soft x-ray ranges.

  6. Refraction-Contrast Articular Cartilage Image: Comparison of Depiction Abilities between In-Line Holographic Method and a Laue Type Analyzer Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimao, Daisuke; Mori, Koichi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Hyodo, Kazuyuki

    2005-01-01

    Two kinds of refraction-contrast image, one obtained using the in-line holographic method and the other obtained using an analyzer crystal in the Laue geometry, from a specimen of a human articular cartilage were investigated using synchrotron X-rays at 30 keV. The former image was superior in spatial resolution and the latter image was superior in contrast regarding the delineation of the articular cartilage, which is invisible by the absorption contrast.

  7. Terahertz in-line digital holography of dragonfly hindwing: amplitude and phase reconstruction at enhanced resolution by extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Rong, Lu; Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Wang, Dayong; Zhou, Xun; Huang, Haochong; Li, Zeyu; Wang, Yunxin

    2014-07-14

    We report here on terahertz (THz) digital holography on a biological specimen. A continuous-wave (CW) THz in-line holographic setup was built based on a 2.52 THz CO(2) pumped THz laser and a pyroelectric array detector. We introduced novel statistical method of obtaining true intensity values for the pyroelectric array detector's pixels. Absorption and phase-shifting images of a dragonfly's hindwing were reconstructed simultaneously from single in-line hologram. Furthermore, we applied phase retrieval routines to eliminate twin image and enhanced the resolution of the reconstructions by hologram extrapolation beyond the detector area. The finest observed features are 35 μm width cross veins.

  8. Morphological analysis of GeTe in inline phase change switches

    SciTech Connect

    King, Matthew R.; El-Hinnawy, Nabil; Salmon, Mike; Gu, Jitty; Wagner, Brian P.; Jones, Evan B.; Howell, Robert S.; Nichols, Doyle T.; Young, Robert M.; Borodulin, Pavel

    2015-09-07

    Crystallization and amorphization phenomena in indirectly heated phase change material-based devices were investigated. Scanning transmission electron microscopy was utilized to explore GeTe phase transition processes in the context of the unique inline phase change switch (IPCS) architecture. A monolithically integrated thin film heating element successfully converted GeTe to ON and OFF states. Device cycling prompted the formation of an active area which sustains the majority of structural changes during pulsing. A transition region on both sides of the active area consisting of polycrystalline GeTe and small nuclei (<15 nm) in an amorphous matrix was also observed. The switching mechanism, determined by variations in pulsing parameters, was shown to be predominantly growth-driven. A preliminary model for crystallization and amorphization in IPCS devices is presented.

  9. Morphological analysis of GeTe in inline phase change switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Matthew R.; El-Hinnawy, Nabil; Salmon, Mike; Gu, Jitty; Wagner, Brian P.; Jones, Evan B.; Borodulin, Pavel; Howell, Robert S.; Nichols, Doyle T.; Young, Robert M.

    2015-09-01

    Crystallization and amorphization phenomena in indirectly heated phase change material-based devices were investigated. Scanning transmission electron microscopy was utilized to explore GeTe phase transition processes in the context of the unique inline phase change switch (IPCS) architecture. A monolithically integrated thin film heating element successfully converted GeTe to ON and OFF states. Device cycling prompted the formation of an active area which sustains the majority of structural changes during pulsing. A transition region on both sides of the active area consisting of polycrystalline GeTe and small nuclei (<15 nm) in an amorphous matrix was also observed. The switching mechanism, determined by variations in pulsing parameters, was shown to be predominantly growth-driven. A preliminary model for crystallization and amorphization in IPCS devices is presented.

  10. A general theoretical formalism for X-ray phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2003-01-01

    The in-line phase-contrast imaging has great potential for clinical imaging applications. This work presents a general theoretical formalism for the in-line phase-contrast imaging. The theoretical formalism developed in this work is derived by taking a new strategy to calculate the Fourier transform of image intensity directly. Different from the transport of intensity equation (TIE) formalism for phase-contrast imaging in literature [6], this general formalism covers both the near field regime and the holography regime of phase-contrast imaging. The image intensity formulas have been derived in both the image space and frequency space. Especially our results show that the Fresnel diffraction image intensity is a sum of convolutions of the cosine- and sine-Fresnel filters with the object attenuation A20(x) and attenuated phase A20(x)φ(x), respectively. The Pogany-Gao-Wilkins (PGW) formalism is recovered as a special case of our general formalism. In addition, in the low-resolution approximation, the general formula is reduced a spherical wave-generalization of the TIE-based formula for phase-contrast imaging. This spherical wave-generalization will be useful for phase-contrast imaging with a micro-focus x-ray tube. The transition of the formalism from 1-D to 2-D cases has been provided as well.

  11. Registration of phase-contrast images in propagation-based X-ray phase tomography.

    PubMed

    Weber, L; Hänsch, A; Wolfram, U; Pacureanu, A; Cloetens, P; Peyrin, F; Rit, S; Langer, M

    2017-08-16

    X-ray phase tomography aims at reconstructing the 3D electron density distribution of an object. It offers enhanced sensitivity compared to attenuation-based X-ray absorption tomography. In propagation-based methods, phase contrast is achieved by letting the beam propagate after interaction with the object. The phase shift is then retrieved at each projection angle, and subsequently used in tomographic reconstruction to obtain the refractive index decrement distribution, which is proportional to the electron density. Accurate phase retrieval is achieved by combining images at different propagation distances. For reconstructions of good quality, the phase-contrast images recorded at different distances need to be accurately aligned. In this work, we characterise the artefacts related to misalignment of the phase-contrast images, and investigate the use of different registration algorithms for aligning in-line phase-contrast images. The characterisation of artefacts is done by a simulation study and comparison with experimental data. Loss in resolution due to vibrations is found to be comparable to attenuation-based computed tomography. Further, it is shown that registration of phase-contrast images is nontrivial due to the difference in contrast between the different images, and the often periodical artefacts present in the phase-contrast images if multilayer X-ray optics are used. To address this, we compared two registration algorithms for aligning phase-contrast images acquired by magnified X-ray nanotomography: one based on cross-correlation and one based on mutual information. We found that the mutual information-based registration algorithm was more robust than a correlation-based method. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  12. Digital in-line holography on amplitude and phase objects prepared with electron beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Schwenke, J; Lorek, E; Rakowski, R; He, X; Kvennefors, A; Mikkelsen, A; Rudawski, P; Heyl, C M; Maximov, I; Pettersson, S-G; Persson, A; L'Huillier, A

    2012-08-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of amplitude and phase samples consisting of well defined Au or Al features formed on ultrathin silicon nitride membranes. The samples were manufactured using electron beam lithography, metallization and a lift-off technique, which allow precise lateral control and thickness of the metal features. The fabricated specimens were evaluated by conventional microscopy, atomic force microscopy and with the digital in-line holography set-up at the Lund Laser Centre. The latter uses high-order harmonic generation as a light source, and is capable of recovering both the shape and phase shifting properties of the samples. We report on the details of the sample production and on the imaging tests with the holography set-up. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  13. Quantitative phase microscopy using dual-plane in-line digital holography.

    PubMed

    Das, Bhargab; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S; Rao, D V G L N

    2012-03-20

    We present detailed theoretical evaluation and thorough experimental investigation of quantitative phase imaging using our previously demonstrated dual-plane in-line digital holographic microscopy technique [Opt. Lett. 35, 3426 (2010)]. This evaluation is based on the recording of two interferograms at slightly different planes and numerically reconstructing the object information. The zero-order diffracted wave is eliminated by using the method of subtraction of average intensity of the entire hologram, and the twin-image diffracted wave is removed by Fourier domain processing of the two recorded holograms. Experiments are performed using controlled amplitude and phase objects and human muscle cells to demonstrate the potential of this technique. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  14. Information-based analysis of X-ray in-line phase tomography with application to the detection of iron oxide nanoparticles in the brain.

    PubMed

    Rositi, Hugo; Frindel, Carole; Langer, Max; Wiart, Marlène; Olivier, Cécile; Peyrin, Françoise; Rousseau, David

    2013-11-04

    The study analyzes noise in X-ray in-line phase tomography in a biomedical context. The impact of noise on detection of iron oxide nanoparticles in mouse brain is assessed. The part of the noise due to the imaging system and the part due to biology are quantitatively expressed in a Neyman Pearson detection strategy with two models of noise. This represents a practical extension of previous work on noise in phase-contrast X-ray imaging which focused on the theoretical expression of the signal-to-noise ratio in mono-dimensional phantoms, taking account of the statistical noise of the imaging system only. We also report the impact of the phase retrieval step on detection performance. Taken together, this constitutes a general methodology of practical interest for quantitative extraction of information from X-ray in-line phase tomography, and is also relevant to assessment of contrast agents with a blob-like signature in high resolution imaging.

  15. X-ray phase-contrast imaging: transmission functions separable in Cartesian coordinates.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guohua; Hamilton, Theron J; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J

    2007-04-01

    In-line, x-ray phase-contrast imaging is responsive to both phase changes and absorption as the x radiation traverses a body. Expressions are derived for phase-contrast imaging of objects having transmission functions separable in Cartesian coordinates. Starting from the Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral formula for image formation, an expression is found for the phase-contrast image produced by an x-ray source with nonvanishing dimensions. This expression is evaluated in limiting cases where the source-to-object distance is large, where the source acts as a point source, and where the weak phase approximation is valid. The integral expression for the image is evaluated for objects with simple geometrical shapes, showing the influence of the source dimensions on the visibility of phase-contrast features. The expressions derived here are evaluated for cases where the magnification is substantially greater than one as would be employed in biological imaging. Experiments are reported using the in-line phase-contrast imaging method with a microfocus x-ray source and a CCD camera.

  16. Helical X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography without phase stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, M.; Willner, M.; Potdevin, G.; Fehringer, A.; Noël, P. B.; Pfeiffer, F.; Herzen, J.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) using grating interferometry provides enhanced soft-tissue contrast. The possibility to use standard polychromatic laboratory sources enables an implementation into a clinical setting. Thus, PCCT has gained significant attention in recent years. However, phase-contrast CT scans still require significantly increased measurement times in comparison to conventional attenuation-based CT imaging. This is mainly due to a time-consuming stepping of a grating, which is necessary for an accurate retrieval of the phase information. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel scan technique, which directly allows the determination of the phase signal without a phase-stepping procedure. The presented work is based on moiré fringe scanning, which allows fast data acquisition in radiographic applications such as mammography or in-line product analysis. Here, we demonstrate its extension to tomography enabling a continuous helical sample rotation as routinely performed in clinical CT systems. Compared to standard phase-stepping techniques, the proposed helical fringe-scanning procedure enables faster measurements, an extended field of view and relaxes the stability requirements of the system, since the gratings remain stationary. Finally, our approach exceeds previously introduced methods by not relying on spatial interpolation to acquire the phase-contrast signal.

  17. Dissolved oxygen determination by electrocatalysed chemiluminescence with in-line solid phase media.

    PubMed

    Atwater, J E; DeHart, J; Wheeler, R R

    1998-01-01

    Dissolved elemental oxygen is determined in a flowing aqueous stream using glucose oxidase to catalyse the reaction between D-glucose and O2 to produce hydrogen peroxide. The levels of the resulting H2O2 are detected and quantified by luminol chemiluminescence using in-line solid phase media for pH adjustment of the reagent stream and for controlled release of the luminophore. The reaction is initiated by electrochemical catalysis. By the use of excess D-glucose in the reagent flow stream, the intensity of chemiluminescence is rendered proportional only to fluctuations in the dissolved O2 concentration. The methodology provides a means for the detection of aqueous O2 in the range 0-10 mg/L.

  18. High Resolution X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Contrast and resolution in imaging with microfocus x - ray source. Rev. Sci. Instr. 68, 2774 (1997). 8. Krol, A. et al. Laser-based microfocused x - ray ...water jet of carbon suspension and imaged using a microfocus x - ray source coupled in-line with a synchronously gated intensified optically coupled...

  19. High speed phase retrieval of in-line holograms by the assistance of corresponding off-axis holograms.

    PubMed

    Orzó, László

    2015-06-29

    Retrieving correct phase information from an in-line hologram is difficult as the object wave field and the diffractions of the zero order and the conjugate object term overlap. The existing iterative numerical phase retrieval methods are slow, especially in the case of high Fresnel number systems. Conversely, the reconstruction of the object wave field from an off-axis hologram is simple, but due to the applied spatial frequency filtering the achievable resolution is confined. Here, a new, high-speed algorithm is introduced that efficiently incorporates the data of an auxiliary off-axis hologram in the phase retrieval of the corresponding in-line hologram. The efficiency of the introduced combined phase retrieval method is demonstrated by simulated and measured holograms.

  20. Phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Hiroki; Tamai, Takayuki; Iijima, Hirofumi; Hosokawa, Fumio; Kondo, Yukihito

    2015-06-01

    This report introduces the first results obtained using phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (P-STEM). A carbon-film phase plate (PP) with a small center hole is placed in the condenser aperture plane so that a phase shift is introduced in the incident electron waves except those passing through the center hole. A cosine-type phase-contrast transfer function emerges when the phase-shifted scattered waves interfere with the non-phase-shifted unscattered waves, which passed through the center hole before incidence onto the specimen. The phase contrast resulting in P-STEM is optically identical to that in phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy that is used to provide high contrast for weak phase objects. Therefore, the use of PPs can enhance the phase contrast of the STEM images of specimens in principle. The phase shift resulting from the PP, whose thickness corresponds to a phase shift of π, has been confirmed using interference fringes displayed in the Ronchigram of a silicon single crystal specimen. The interference fringes were found to abruptly shift at the edge of the PP hole by π. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Comparative analysis of autofocus functions in digital in-line phase-shifting holography.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Elsa S R; Fiadeiro, Paulo T; Pereira, Manuela; Pinheiro, António

    2016-09-20

    Numerical reconstruction of digital holograms relies on a precise knowledge of the original object position. However, there are a number of relevant applications where this parameter is not known in advance and an efficient autofocusing method is required. This paper addresses the problem of finding optimal focusing methods for use in reconstruction of digital holograms of macroscopic amplitude and phase objects, using digital in-line phase-shifting holography in transmission mode. Fifteen autofocus measures, including spatial-, spectral-, and sparsity-based methods, were evaluated for both synthetic and experimental holograms. The Fresnel transform and the angular spectrum reconstruction methods were compared. Evaluation criteria included unimodality, accuracy, resolution, and computational cost. Autofocusing under angular spectrum propagation tends to perform better with respect to accuracy and unimodality criteria. Phase objects are, generally, more difficult to focus than amplitude objects. The normalized variance, the standard correlation, and the Tenenbaum gradient are the most reliable spatial-based metrics, combining computational efficiency with good accuracy and resolution. A good trade-off between focus performance and computational cost was found for the Fresnelet sparsity method.

  2. Optimization of phase contrast imaging using hard x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zabler, S.; Cloetens, P.; Guigay, J.-P.; Baruchel, J.; Schlenker, M.

    2005-07-15

    X ray radiography and tomography are important tools in medicine as well as in life science and materials science. Not long ago an approach called in-line holography based on simple propagation became possible using partially coherent synchrotron beams like the ones available at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). Theoretical and experimental work by Cloetens et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett 75, 2912 (1999)] have shown that quantitative retrieval of the optical phase, from a set of radiographs taken at different sample-to-detector distances, is feasible. Mathematically speaking we are dealing with a direct method based on linearization in order to solve an inverse nonlinear problem. The phase retrieval can be combined with classical tomography in order to obtain a three-dimensional representation of the object's electron density (holotomography). In order to optimize the image contrast for the numerical phase retrieval process, we have carried out calculations resulting in an optimized choice of value and number of the sample-to-detector distances as well as of the photon energy. These results were then confirmed by experiments on the ESRF long beamline ID19.

  3. In-line phase-sensitive amplification of QPSK signal using multiple quasi-phase matched LiNbO₃ waveguide.

    PubMed

    Asobe, Masaki; Umeki, Takeshi; Takenouchi, Hirokazu; Miyamoto, Yutaka

    2014-11-03

    Phase-sensitive amplifiers (PSA) using periodically poled (PPLN) LiNbO₃ waveguides are promising as low-noise optical amplifiers. However, it is difficult to realize in-line operation for multi-level phase modulated signals using a PPLN based PSA with the conventional configuration. In this paper, we report a PPLN based in-line PSA that can regenerate quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) signals. Multi-stage frequency mixing in a multiple quasi-phase matched LiNbO₃waveguide allows carrier phase recovery from a QPSK signal. Non-degenerate parametric amplification enables the phase-sensitive amplification of a QPSK signal. Amplitude and phase regeneration is examined utilizing gain saturation and phase squeezing capability.

  4. X-ray elastography: Modification of x-ray phase contrast images using ultrasonic radiation pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Theron J.; Bailat, Claude; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J.; Gehring, Stephan; Laperle, Christopher M.; Wands, Jack

    2009-05-15

    The high resolution characteristic of in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging can be used in conjunction with directed ultrasound to detect small displacements in soft tissue generated by differential acoustic radiation pressure. The imaging method is based on subtraction of two x-ray images, the first image taken with, and the second taken without the presence of ultrasound. The subtraction enhances phase contrast features and, to a large extent, removes absorption contrast so that differential movement of tissues with different acoustic impedances or relative ultrasonic absorption is highlighted in the image. Interfacial features of objects with differing densities are delineated in the image as a result of both the displacement introduced by the ultrasound and the inherent sensitivity of x-ray phase contrast imaging to density variations. Experiments with ex vivo murine tumors and human tumor phantoms point out a diagnostic capability of the method for identifying tumors.

  5. Clinical implementation of x-ray phase-contrast imaging: theoretical foundations and design considerations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2003-08-01

    Theoretical foundation and design considerations of a clinical feasible x-ray phase contrast imaging technique were presented in this paper. Different from the analysis of imaging phase object with weak absorption in literature, we proposed a new formalism for in-line phase-contrast imaging to analyze the effects of four clinically important factors on the phase contrast. These are the body parts attenuation, the spatial coherence of spherical waves from a finite-size focal spot, and polychromatic x-ray and radiation doses to patients for clinical applications. The theory presented in this paper can be applied widely in diagnostic x-ray imaging procedures. As an example, computer simulations were conducted and optimal design parameters were derived for clinical mammography. The results of phantom experiments were also presented which validated the theoretical analysis and computer simulations.

  6. Compressed sensing for phase contrast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Gaass, Thomas; Potdevin, Guillaume; Noeel, Peter B.; Tapfer, Arne; Willner, Marian; Herzen, Julia; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Haase, Axel

    2012-07-31

    Modern x-ray techniques opened the possibility to retrieve phase information. Phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) has the potential to significantly improve soft tissue contrast. Radiation dose, however, continues to be an issue when moving from bench to bedside. Dose reduction in this work is achieved by sparsely acquiring PCCT data. To compensate for appearing aliasing artifacts we introduce a compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction framework. We present the feasibility of CS on PCCT with numerical as well as measured phantom data. The results proof that CS compensates for under-sampling artifacts and maintains the superior soft tissue contrast and detail visibility in the reconstructed images.

  7. 3D profile reconstruction of biological sample by in-line image-plane phase-shifting digital microscopic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaoxu; Chen, Jianpei; Liu, Shengde; Ma, Zhijian; Zhang, Zhun; Zhong, Liyun

    2012-10-01

    To improve the measuring accuracy is an important research content for digital microscopic holography (DMH) development and application. In this study, we have upgraded application of DMH through the in-line image-plane phase-shifting technique and the image correlation algorithm to reconstruct the 3D profile of a biological sample. Importantly, since this novel DMH system can obtain the phase-shifting hologram with a high ratio of signal to noise conveniently, the reconstructed algorithm of DMH and the compensation operation of the phase aberration are simplified significantly. Moreover, by using the image correlation algorithm, the digital phase mask with high precision also can be obtained easily; thus both the measuring accuracy of DMH and the quality of the reconstructed image are improved significantly. More importantly, this kind of in-line image-plane phase-shifting digital microscopic holography provides a powerful imaging tool to simultaneously reconstruct the amplitude and the phase of the measured object with submicron scale resolution.

  8. Low Dose High Energy X-ray In-Line Phase Sensitive Imaging Prototype: Investigation of Optimal Geometric Conditions and Design Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Ghani, Muhammad. U.; Yan, Aimin; Wong, Molly. D.; Li, Yuhua; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the optimization of a high energy in-line phase sensitive x-ray imaging prototype under different geometric and operating conditions for mammography application. A phase retrieval algorithm based on phase attenuation duality (PAD) was applied to the phase contrast images acquired by the prototype. Imaging performance was investigated at four magnification values of 1.67, 2, 2.5 and 3 using an acrylic edge, an American College of Radiology (ACR) mammography phantom and contrast detail (CD) phantom with tube potentials of 100, 120 and 140 kVp. The ACR and CD images were acquired at the same mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.29 mGy with a computed radiography (CR) detector of 43.75 µm pixel pitch at a fixed source to image distance (SID) of 170 cm. The x-ray tube focal spot size was kept constant as 7 µm while a 2.5 mm thick aluminum (Al) filter was used for beam hardening. The performance of phase contrast and phase retrieved images were compared with computer simulations based on the relative phase contrast factor (RPF) at high x-ray energies. The imaging results showed that the x-ray tube operated at 100 kVp under the magnification of 2.5 exhibits superior imaging performance which is in accordance to the computer simulations. As compared to the phase contrast images, the phase retrieved images of the ACR and CD phantoms demonstrated improved imaging contrast and target discrimination. We compared the CD phantom images acquired in conventional contact mode with and without the anti-scatter grid using the same prototype at 1.295 mGy and 2.59 mGy using 40 kVp, a 25 µm rhodium (Rh) filter. At the same radiation dose, the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for both the large and small discs, while compared to the double dose image acquired in conventional mode, the observer study also indicated that the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for the large discs. This

  9. Low dose high energy x-ray in-line phase sensitive imaging prototype: Investigation of optimal geometric conditions and design parameters.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Muhammad U; Yan, Aimin; Wong, Molly D; Li, Yuhua; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the optimization of a high energy in-line phase sensitive x-ray imaging prototype under different geometric and operating conditions for mammography application. A phase retrieval algorithm based on phase attenuation duality (PAD) was applied to the phase contrast images acquired by the prototype. Imaging performance was investigated at four magnification values of 1.67, 2, 2.5 and 3 using an acrylic edge, an American College of Radiology (ACR) mammography phantom and contrast detail (CD) phantom with tube potentials of 100, 120 and 140 kVp. The ACR and CD images were acquired at the same mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.29 mGy with a computed radiography (CR) detector of 43.75 μm pixel pitch at a fixed source to image distance (SID) of 170 cm. The x-ray tube focal spot size was kept constant as 7 μm while a 2.5 mm thick aluminum (Al) filter was used for beam hardening. The performance of phase contrast and phase retrieved images were compared with computer simulations based on the relative phase contrast factor (RPF) at high x-ray energies. The imaging results showed that the x-ray tube operated at 100 kVp under the magnification of 2.5 exhibits superior imaging performance which is in accordance to the computer simulations. As compared to the phase contrast images, the phase retrieved images of the ACR and CD phantoms demonstrated improved imaging contrast and target discrimination. We compared the CD phantom images acquired in conventional contact mode with and without the anti-scatter grid using the same prototype at 1.295 mGy and 2.59 mGy using 40 kVp, a 25 μm rhodium (Rh) filter. At the same radiation dose, the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for both the large and small discs, while compared to the double dose image acquired in conventional mode, the observer study also indicated that the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for the large discs. This

  10. Vowel identification by amplitude and phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Molis, Michelle R; Diedesch, Anna; Gallun, Frederick; Leek, Marjorie R

    2013-02-01

    Vowel identification is largely dependent on listeners' access to the frequency of two or three peaks in the amplitude spectrum. Earlier work has demonstrated that, whereas normal-hearing listeners can identify harmonic complexes with vowel-like spectral shapes even with very little amplitude contrast between "formant" components and remaining harmonic components, listeners with hearing loss require greater amplitude differences. This is likely the result of the poor frequency resolution that often accompanies hearing loss. Here, we describe an additional acoustic dimension for emphasizing formant versus non-formant harmonics that may supplement amplitude contrast information. The purpose of this study was to determine whether listeners were able to identify "vowel-like" sounds using temporal (component phase) contrast, which may be less affected by cochlear loss than spectral cues, and whether overall identification improves when congruent temporal and spectral information are provided together. Five normal-hearing and five hearing-impaired listeners identified three vowels over many presentations. Harmonics representing formant peaks were varied in amplitude, phase, or a combination of both. In addition to requiring less amplitude contrast, normal-hearing listeners could accurately identify the sounds with less phase contrast than required by people with hearing loss. However, both normal-hearing and hearing-impaired groups demonstrated the ability to identify vowel-like sounds based solely on component phase shifts, with no amplitude contrast information, and they also showed improved performance when congruent phase and amplitude cues were combined. For nearly all listeners, the combination of spectral and temporal information improved identification in comparison to either dimension alone.

  11. X-ray phase-contrast imaging with an Inverse Compton Scattering source

    SciTech Connect

    Endrizzi, M.; Carpinelli, M.; Oliva, P.; Golosio, B.; Delogu, P.; Stefanini, A.; Gureyev, T. E.; Bottigli, U.

    2010-07-23

    Single-shot in-line phase-contrast imaging with the Inverse Compton Scattering X-ray source available at ATF (Accelerator Test Facility) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is experimentally demonstrated. Phase-contrast images of polymer wires are obtained with a single X-ray pulse whose time length is about 1 picosecond. The edge-enhancement effect is clearly visible in the images and simulations show a quantitative agreement with experimental data. A phase-retrieval step in the image processing leads to a accurate estimation of the projected thickness of our samples. Finally, a single-shot image of a wasp is presented as an example of a biological sample.

  12. Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    ScienceCinema

    Erin Miller

    2016-07-12

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

  13. Reconstruction methods for phase-contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Raven, C.

    1997-02-01

    Phase contrast imaging with coherent x-rays can be distinguished in outline imaging and holography, depending on the wavelength {lambda}, the object size d and the object-to-detector distance r. When r << d{sup 2}{lambda}, phase contrast occurs only in regions where the refractive index fastly changes, i.e. at interfaces and edges in the sample. With increasing object-to-detector distance we come in the area of holographic imaging. The image contrast outside the shadow region of the object is due to interference of the direct, undiffracted beam and a beam diffracted by the object, or, in terms of holography, the interference of a reference wave with the object wave. Both, outline imaging and holography, offer the possibility to obtain three dimensional information of the sample in conjunction with a tomographic technique. But the data treatment and the kind of information one can obtain from the reconstruction is different.

  14. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-15

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  15. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  16. Phase contrast in high resolution electron microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rose, H.H.

    1975-09-23

    This patent relates to a device for developing a phase contrast signal for a scanning transmission electron microscope. The lens system of the microscope is operated in a condition of defocus so that predictable alternate concentric regions of high and low electron density exist in the cone of illumination. Two phase detectors are placed beneath the object inside the cone of illumination, with the first detector having the form of a zone plate, each of its rings covering alternate regions of either higher or lower electron density. The second detector is so configured that it covers the regions of electron density not covered by the first detector. Each detector measures the number of electrons incident thereon and the signal developed by the first detector is subtracted from the signal developed by the record detector to provide a phase contrast signal. (auth)

  17. Quantitative phase-contrast confocal microscope

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changgeng; Marchesini, Stefano; Kim, Myung K.

    2014-01-01

    We present a quantitative phase-contrast confocal microscope (QPCCM) by combining a line-scanning confocal system with digital holography (DH). This combination can merge the merits of these two different imaging modalities. High-contrast intensity images with low coherent noise, and the optical sectioning capability are made available due to the confocality. Phase profiles of the samples become accessible thanks to DH. QPCCM is able to quantitatively measure the phase variations of optical sections of the opaque samples and has the potential to take high-quality intensity and phase images of non-opaque samples such as many biological samples. Because each line scan is recorded by a hologram that may contain the optical aberrations of the system, it opens avenues for a variety of numerical aberration compensation methods and development of full digital adaptive optics confocal system to emulate current hardware-based adaptive optics system for biomedical imaging, especially ophthalmic imaging. Preliminary experiments with a microscope objective of NA 0.65 and 40 × on opaque samples are presented to demonstrate this idea. The measured lateral and axial resolutions of the intensity images from the current system are ~0.64μm and ~2.70μm respectively. The noise level of the phase profile by QPCCM is ~2.4nm which is better than the result by DH. PMID:25089404

  18. Quantitative phase-contrast confocal microscope.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changgeng; Marchesini, Stefano; Kim, Myung K

    2014-07-28

    We present a quantitative phase-contrast confocal microscope (QPCCM) by combining a line-scanning confocal system with digital holography (DH). This combination can merge the merits of these two different imaging modalities. High-contrast intensity images with low coherent noise, and the optical sectioning capability are made available due to the confocality. Phase profiles of the samples become accessible thanks to DH. QPCCM is able to quantitatively measure the phase variations of optical sections of the opaque samples and has the potential to take high-quality intensity and phase images of non-opaque samples such as many biological samples. Because each line scan is recorded by a hologram that may contain the optical aberrations of the system, it opens avenues for a variety of numerical aberration compensation methods and development of full digital adaptive optics confocal system to emulate current hardware-based adaptive optics system for biomedical imaging, especially ophthalmic imaging. Preliminary experiments with a microscope objective of NA 0.65 and 40 × on opaque samples are presented to demonstrate this idea. The measured lateral and axial resolutions of the intensity images from the current system are ~0.64μm and ~2.70μm respectively. The noise level of the phase profile by QPCCM is ~2.4nm which is better than the result by DH.

  19. 3D differential phase contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michael; Tian, Lei; Waller, Laura

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate three-dimensional (3D) optical phase and amplitude reconstruction based on coded source illumination using a programmable LED array. Multiple stacks of images along the optical axis are computed from recorded intensities captured by multiple images under off-axis illumination. Based on the first Born approximation, a linear differential phase contrast (DPC) model is built between 3D complex index of refraction and the intensity stacks. Therefore, 3D volume reconstruction can be achieved via a fast inversion method, without the intermediate 2D phase retrieval step. Our system employs spatially partially coherent illumination, so the transverse resolution achieves twice the NA of coherent systems, while axial resolution is also improved 2× as compared to holographic imaging.

  20. 3D differential phase contrast microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Michael; Tian, Lei; Waller, Laura

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate 3D phase and absorption recovery from partially coherent intensity images captured with a programmable LED array source. Images are captured through-focus with four different illumination patterns. Using first Born and weak object approximations (WOA), a linear 3D differential phase contrast (DPC) model is derived. The partially coherent transfer functions relate the sample’s complex refractive index distribution to intensity measurements at varying defocus. Volumetric reconstruction is achieved by a global FFT-based method, without an intermediate 2D phase retrieval step. Because the illumination is spatially partially coherent, the transverse resolution of the reconstructed field achieves twice the NA of coherent systems and improved axial resolution. PMID:27867705

  1. Phase Contrast Wavefront Sensing for Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Wallace, J. K.; Bloemhof, E. E.

    2004-01-01

    Most ground-based adaptive optics systems use one of a small number of wavefront sensor technologies, notably (for relatively high-order systems) the Shack-Hartmann sensor, which provides local measurements of the phase slope (first-derivative) at a number of regularly-spaced points across the telescope pupil. The curvature sensor, with response proportional to the second derivative of the phase, is also sometimes used, but has undesirable noise propagation properties during wavefront reconstruction as the number of actuators becomes large. It is interesting to consider the use for astronomical adaptive optics of the "phase contrast" technique, originally developed for microscopy by Zemike to allow convenient viewing of phase objects. In this technique, the wavefront sensor provides a direct measurement of the local value of phase in each sub-aperture of the pupil. This approach has some obvious disadvantages compared to Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing, but has some less obvious but substantial advantages as well. Here we evaluate the relative merits in a practical ground-based adaptive optics system.

  2. Hybridization approach to in-line and off-axis (electron) holography for superior resolution and phase sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ozsoy-Keskinbora, C.; Boothroyd, C. B.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; van Aken, P. A.; Koch, C. T.

    2014-01-01

    Holography - originally developed for correcting spherical aberration in transmission electron microscopes - is now used in a wide range of disciplines that involve the propagation of waves, including light optics, electron microscopy, acoustics and seismology. In electron microscopy, the two primary modes of holography are Gabor's original in-line setup and an off-axis approach that was developed subsequently. These two techniques are highly complementary, offering superior phase sensitivity at high and low spatial resolution, respectively. All previous investigations have focused on improving each method individually. Here, we show how the two approaches can be combined in a synergetic fashion to provide phase information with excellent sensitivity across all spatial frequencies, low noise and an efficient use of electron dose. The principle is also expected to be widely to applications of holography in light optics, X-ray optics, acoustics, ultra-sound, terahertz imaging, etc. PMID:25387480

  3. Hybridization approach to in-line and off-axis (electron) holography for superior resolution and phase sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozsoy-Keskinbora, C.; Boothroyd, C. B.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; van Aken, P. A.; Koch, C. T.

    2014-11-01

    Holography - originally developed for correcting spherical aberration in transmission electron microscopes - is now used in a wide range of disciplines that involve the propagation of waves, including light optics, electron microscopy, acoustics and seismology. In electron microscopy, the two primary modes of holography are Gabor's original in-line setup and an off-axis approach that was developed subsequently. These two techniques are highly complementary, offering superior phase sensitivity at high and low spatial resolution, respectively. All previous investigations have focused on improving each method individually. Here, we show how the two approaches can be combined in a synergetic fashion to provide phase information with excellent sensitivity across all spatial frequencies, low noise and an efficient use of electron dose. The principle is also expected to be widely to applications of holography in light optics, X-ray optics, acoustics, ultra-sound, terahertz imaging, etc.

  4. Halo-free Phase Contrast Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tan H.; Kandel, Mikhail; Shakir, Haadi M.; Best-Popescu, Catherine; Arikkath, Jyothi; Do, Minh N.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    We present a new approach for retrieving halo-free phase contrast microscopy (hfPC) images by upgrading the conventional PC microscope with an external interferometric module, which generates sufficient data for reversing the halo artifact. Acquiring four independent intensity images, our approach first measures haloed phase maps of the sample. We solve for the halo-free sample transmission function by using a physical model of the image formation under partial spatial coherence. Using this halo-free sample transmission, we can numerically generate artifact-free PC images. Furthermore, this transmission can be further used to obtain quantitative information about the sample, e.g., the thickness with known refractive indices, dry mass of live cells during their cycles. We tested our hfPC method on various control samples, e.g., beads, pillars and validated its potential for biological investigation by imaging live HeLa cells, red blood cells, and neurons. PMID:28338086

  5. Halo-free Phase Contrast Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tan H; Kandel, Mikhail; Shakir, Haadi M; Best-Popescu, Catherine; Arikkath, Jyothi; Do, Minh N; Popescu, Gabriel

    2017-03-24

    We present a new approach for retrieving halo-free phase contrast microscopy (hfPC) images by upgrading the conventional PC microscope with an external interferometric module, which generates sufficient data for reversing the halo artifact. Acquiring four independent intensity images, our approach first measures haloed phase maps of the sample. We solve for the halo-free sample transmission function by using a physical model of the image formation under partial spatial coherence. Using this halo-free sample transmission, we can numerically generate artifact-free PC images. Furthermore, this transmission can be further used to obtain quantitative information about the sample, e.g., the thickness with known refractive indices, dry mass of live cells during their cycles. We tested our hfPC method on various control samples, e.g., beads, pillars and validated its potential for biological investigation by imaging live HeLa cells, red blood cells, and neurons.

  6. Halo-free Phase Contrast Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tan H.; Kandel, Mikhail; Shakir, Haadi M.; Best-Popescu, Catherine; Arikkath, Jyothi; Do, Minh N.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2017-03-01

    We present a new approach for retrieving halo-free phase contrast microscopy (hfPC) images by upgrading the conventional PC microscope with an external interferometric module, which generates sufficient data for reversing the halo artifact. Acquiring four independent intensity images, our approach first measures haloed phase maps of the sample. We solve for the halo-free sample transmission function by using a physical model of the image formation under partial spatial coherence. Using this halo-free sample transmission, we can numerically generate artifact-free PC images. Furthermore, this transmission can be further used to obtain quantitative information about the sample, e.g., the thickness with known refractive indices, dry mass of live cells during their cycles. We tested our hfPC method on various control samples, e.g., beads, pillars and validated its potential for biological investigation by imaging live HeLa cells, red blood cells, and neurons.

  7. Laboratory-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique for material and medical science applications.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Yogesh S; Yadav, P S; Roy, Tushar; Sarkar, P S; Shukla, M; Sinha, Amar

    2008-08-01

    In-line X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique is an emerging method for the study of materials such as carbon fibers, carbon composite materials, polymers, etc. Similarly this technique is also well suited for the imaging of soft materials such as tissues, distinguishing between tumor and normal tissue. These represent the class of materials for which X-ray attenuation cross-section is very small. Thus this method promises a far better contrast for low X-ray absorbing substances than the conventional radiography method. We have set up an experimental facility using a combination of X-ray CCD detector and a microfocus X-ray source. This facility is dedicated to micro-imaging experiments such as microtomography and high-resolution phase-contrast experiments. In this paper, the results of X-ray phase-contrast imaging experiments are described.

  8. Phase-contrast computed tomography for quantification of structural changes in lungs of asthma mouse models of different severity.

    PubMed

    Dullin, Christian; Larsson, Emanuel; Tromba, Giuliana; Markus, Andrea M; Alves, Frauke

    2015-07-01

    Lung imaging in mouse disease models is crucial for the assessment of the severity of airway disease but remains challenging due to the small size and the high porosity of the organ. Synchrotron inline free-propagation phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) with its intrinsic high soft-tissue contrast provides the necessary sensitivity and spatial resolution to analyse the mouse lung structure in great detail. Here, this technique has been applied in combination with single-distance phase retrieval to quantify alterations of the lung structure in experimental asthma mouse models of different severity. In order to mimic an in vivo situation as close as possible, the lungs were inflated with air at a constant physiological pressure. Entire mice were embedded in agarose gel and imaged using inline free-propagation phase-contrast CT at the SYRMEP beamline (Synchrotron Light Source, `Elettra', Trieste, Italy). The quantification of the obtained phase-contrast CT data sets revealed an increasing lung soft-tissue content in mice correlating with the degree of the severity of experimental allergic airways disease. In this way, it was possible to successfully discriminate between healthy controls and mice with either mild or severe allergic airway disease. It is believed that this approach may have the potential to evaluate the efficacy of novel therapeutic strategies that target airway remodelling processes in asthma.

  9. Phase-contrast computed tomography for quantification of structural changes in lungs of asthma mouse models of different severity

    PubMed Central

    Dullin, Christian; Larsson, Emanuel; Tromba, Giuliana; Markus, Andrea M.; Alves, Frauke

    2015-01-01

    Lung imaging in mouse disease models is crucial for the assessment of the severity of airway disease but remains challenging due to the small size and the high porosity of the organ. Synchrotron inline free-propagation phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) with its intrinsic high soft-tissue contrast provides the necessary sensitivity and spatial resolution to analyse the mouse lung structure in great detail. Here, this technique has been applied in combination with single-distance phase retrieval to quantify alterations of the lung structure in experimental asthma mouse models of different severity. In order to mimic an in vivo situation as close as possible, the lungs were inflated with air at a constant physiological pressure. Entire mice were embedded in agarose gel and imaged using inline free-propagation phase-contrast CT at the SYRMEP beamline (Synchrotron Light Source, ‘Elettra’, Trieste, Italy). The quantification of the obtained phase-contrast CT data sets revealed an increasing lung soft-tissue content in mice correlating with the degree of the severity of experimental allergic airways disease. In this way, it was possible to successfully discriminate between healthy controls and mice with either mild or severe allergic airway disease. It is believed that this approach may have the potential to evaluate the efficacy of novel therapeutic strategies that target airway remodelling processes in asthma. PMID:26134818

  10. Theory of x-ray holography including phase and amplitude contrast and finite transfer functions

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    We present the theory in broadly the same way as for visible holography, specializing to the Gabor, in-line case with plane-wave illumination, but allowing phase and amplitude contrast and a fairly general transfer function. Much of this theory is treated by a number of earlier authors but none with the particular choice of issues that we wish to address. These are those mentioned plus numerical reconstruction from a digitized hologram and of course application to the soft x-ray spectral range. For simplicity and clarity, we consider first an amplitude and phase object consisting of a single, on-axis pixel and an ideal, perfect transfer function. (12 refs., 4 figs.)

  11. Holo-GPC: Holographic Generalized Phase Contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bañas, Andrew; Glückstad, Jesper

    2017-06-01

    Light shaping methods based on spatial phase-only modulation can be classified depending on whether they distribute multiple beams or shape the individual beams. Diffractive optics or holography can be classified as the former, as it spatially distributes a plurality of focal spots over a working volume. On the other hand, Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) forms beams with well-defined lateral shapes and could be classified as the latter. To certain extents, GPC and holography can also perform both beam distribution and beam shaping. But despite the overlap in beam distribution and beam shaping, it is clear that one approach outperforms the other in one of these aspects. In this work, we introduce a hybrid of holography and GPC, coined Holo-GPC, which can efficiently control both the individual shape and the collective distribution of the resulting light beams. Hereby, Holo-GPC obtains the simplicity of GPC in forming well-defined speckle-free shapes that can be distributed over an extended 3D volume through holographic means. The combined strengths of the two photon-efficient phase-only light shaping modalities open new possibilities for contemporary laser sculpting applications.

  12. Soft-tissue and phase-contrast imaging at the Swiss Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Philipp; Mohan, Nishant; Stampanoni, Marco; Muller, Ralph

    2004-05-01

    Recent results show that bone vasculature is a major contributor to local tissue porosity, and therefore can be directly linked to the mechanical properties of bone tissue. With the advent of third generation synchrotron radiation (SR) sources, micro-computed tomography (μCT) with resolutions in the order of 1 μm and better has become feasible. This technique has been employed frequently to analyze trabecular architecture and local bone tissue properties, i.e. the hard or mineralized bone tissue. Nevertheless, less is known about the soft tissues in bone, mainly due to inadequate imaging capabilities. Here, we discuss three different methods and applications to visualize soft tissues. The first approach is referred to as negative imaging. In this case the material around the soft tissue provides the absorption contrast necessary for X-ray based tomography. Bone vasculature from two different mouse strains was investigated and compared qualitatively. Differences were observed in terms of local vessel number and vessel orientation. The second technique represents corrosion casting, which is principally adapted for imaging of vascular systems. The technique of corrosion casting has already been applied successfully at the Swiss Light Source. Using the technology we were able to show that pathological features reminiscent of Alzheimer"s disease could be distinguished in the brain vasculature of APP transgenic mice. The third technique discussed here is phase contrast imaging exploiting the high degree of coherence of third generation synchrotron light sources, which provide the necessary physical conditions for phase contrast. The in-line approach followed here for phase contrast retrieval is a modification of the Gerchberg-Saxton-Fienup type. Several measurements and theoretical thoughts concerning phase contrast imaging are presented, including mathematical phase retrieval. Although up-to-now only phase images have been computed, the approach is now ready to

  13. A software platform for phase contrast x-ray breast imaging research.

    PubMed

    Bliznakova, K; Russo, P; Mettivier, G; Requardt, H; Popov, P; Bravin, A; Buliev, I

    2015-06-01

    To present and validate a computer-based simulation platform dedicated for phase contrast x-ray breast imaging research. The software platform, developed at the Technical University of Varna on the basis of a previously validated x-ray imaging software simulator, comprises modules for object creation and for x-ray image formation. These modules were updated to take into account the refractive index for phase contrast imaging as well as implementation of the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory of the propagating x-ray waves. Projection images are generated in an in-line acquisition geometry. To test and validate the platform, several phantoms differing in their complexity were constructed and imaged at 25 keV and 60 keV at the beamline ID17 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The software platform was used to design computational phantoms that mimic those used in the experimental study and to generate x-ray images in absorption and phase contrast modes. The visual and quantitative results of the validation process showed an overall good correlation between simulated and experimental images and show the potential of this platform for research in phase contrast x-ray imaging of the breast. The application of the platform is demonstrated in a feasibility study for phase contrast images of complex inhomogeneous and anthropomorphic breast phantoms, compared to x-ray images generated in absorption mode. The improved visibility of mammographic structures suggests further investigation and optimisation of phase contrast x-ray breast imaging, especially when abnormalities are present. The software platform can be exploited also for educational purposes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. X-ray phase-contrast CO2 angiography for sub-10 μm vessel imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundström, U.; Larsson, D. H.; Burvall, A.; Scott, L.; Westermark, U. K.; Wilhelm, M.; Arsenian Henriksson, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2012-11-01

    X-ray in-line phase contrast has recently been combined with CO2 angiography for high-resolution small-animal vascular imaging at low radiation dose. In this paper we further investigate the potential and limitations of this method and demonstrate observation of vessels down to 8 μm in diameter, considerably smaller than the 60 μm previously reported. Our in-line phase-contrast imaging system is based on a liquid-metal-jet-anode x-ray source and utilizes free-space propagation to convert phase shifts, caused by refractive index variations, into intensity differences. Enhanced refractive index variations are obtained through injection of CO2 gas into the vascular system to replace the blood. We show rat-kidney images with blood vessels down to 27 μm in diameter and mouse-ear images with vessels down to 8 μm. The minimum size of observable blood vessels is found to be limited by the penetration of gas into the vascular system and the signal-to-noise ratio, i.e. the allowed dose. The diameters of vessels being gas-filled depend on the gas pressure and follow a simple model based on surface tension. A theoretical signal-to-noise comparison shows that this method requires 1000 times less radiation dose than conventional iodine-based absorption contrast for observing sub-50 μm vessels.

  15. Monitoring stem cells in phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, K. P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Collins, D. J.; Richardson, J. B.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms behind the proliferation of Mesenchymal Stem cells (MSCs) can offer a greater insight into the behaviour of these cells throughout their life cycles. Traditional methods of determining the rate of MSC differentiation rely on population based studies over an extended time period. However, such methods can be inadequate as they are unable to track cells as they interact; for example, in autologous cell therapies for osteoarthritis, the development of biological assays that could predict in vivo functional activity and biological action are particularly challenging. Here further research is required to determine non-histochemical biomarkers which provide correlations between cell survival and predictive functional outcome. This paper proposes using a (previously developed) advanced texture-based analysis algorithm to facilitate in vitro cells tracking using time-lapsed microscopy. The technique was adopted to monitor stem cells in the context of unlabelled, phase contrast imaging, with the goal of examining the cell to cell interactions in both monoculture and co-culture systems. The results obtained are analysed using established exploratory procedures developed for time series data and compared with the typical fluorescent-based approach of cell labelling. A review of the progress and the lessons learned are also presented.

  16. Pitch-to-diameter effect on two-phase flow across an in-line tube bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Dowlati, R.; Kawaji, M. ); Chan, M.M.C. )

    1990-05-01

    This paper reports on void fraction and friction pressure drop measurements that were made for an adiabatic, vertical two-phase flow of air-water across two horizontal, in-line, 5 {times} 20 rod bundles, one with a pitch-to-diameter ratio, P/D, of 1.3, the other 1.75. For both bundles the average void fraction showed a strong mass velocity effect and values were significantly less than those predicted by a homogeneous flow model. All void fraction data were found to be well correlated, with no P/D effect, using the dimensionless gas velocity, j*{sub g}. The two-phase friction multiplier data exhibited a strong effect of P/D and mass velocity, however, the data for both bundles could be well correlated with the Martinelli parameter for G {gt} 200 kg/m{sup 2}s. The correlations developed for void fraction and two-phase friction multiplier were successfully tested in predicting the total pressure drop in boiling freon experiments.

  17. The application of phase contrast X-ray techniques for imaging Li-ion battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastwood, D. S.; Bradley, R. S.; Tariq, F.; Cooper, S. J.; Taiwo, O. O.; Gelb, J.; Merkle, A.; Brett, D. J. L.; Brandon, N. P.; Withers, P. J.; Lee, P. D.; Shearing, P. R.

    2014-04-01

    In order to accelerate the commercialization of fuel cells and batteries across a range of applications, an understanding of the mechanisms by which they age and degrade at the microstructural level is required. Here, the most widely commercialized Li-ion batteries based on porous graphite based electrodes which de/intercalate Li+ ions during charge/discharge are studied by two phase contrast enhanced X-ray imaging modes, namely in-line phase contrast and Zernike phase contrast at the micro (synchrotron) and nano (laboratory X-ray microscope) level, respectively. The rate of charge cycling is directly dependent on the nature of the electrode microstructure, which are typically complex multi-scale 3D geometries with significant microstructural heterogeneities. We have been able to characterise the porosity and the tortuosity by micro-CT as well as the morphology of 5 individual graphite particles by nano-tomography finding that while their volume varied significantly their sphericity was surprisingly similar. The volume specific surface areas of the individual grains measured by nano-CT are significantly larger than the total volume specific surface area of the electrode from the micro-CT imaging, which can be attributed to the greater particle surface area visible at higher resolution.

  18. In-line micro-matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction for simultaneous separation and extraction of Sudan dyes in different spices.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Maryam; Sabzalian, Sedigheh; Barfi, Behruz; Arghavani-Beydokhti, Somayeh; Asghari, Alireza

    2015-12-18

    A novel, simple, fast, and miniaturized method, termed in-line micro-matrix solid-phase dispersion (in-line MMSPD), coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed for the simultaneous extraction and determination of Sudan dyes (i.e. Sudan I-IV, Sudan orange G, Sudan black B, and Sudan red G) with the aid of an experimental design strategy. In this method, a matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) column including a suitable mixture of polar sorbents was inserted in the mobile phase pathway, and while the interfering compounds were retained, the analytes were eluted and entered into the analytical column. In this way, the extraction, elution, and separation of the analytes were performed sequentially. Under the optimal experimental conditions (including the amount of sample, 0.0426g; amount of dispersant phase, 0.0216g of florisil, 0.0227g of silica, 0.0141g of alumina; and blending time, 112s), the limits of detection (LODs), limits of quantification, linear dynamic ranges, and recoveries were obtained to be 0.3-15.3μgkg(-1), 1-50μgkg(-1), 50-28,000μgkg(-1), and 94.5-99.1%, respectively. The results obtained showed that determination of the selected Sudan dyes in food samples using an enough sensitive and a simple analytically validated method like in-line MMSPD may offer a suitable screening method, which could be useful for food analysis and adulteration.

  19. The effect of interocular phase difference on perceived contrast.

    PubMed

    Baker, Daniel H; Wallis, Stuart A; Georgeson, Mark A; Meese, Tim S

    2012-01-01

    Binocular vision is traditionally treated as two processes: the fusion of similar images, and the interocular suppression of dissimilar images (e.g. binocular rivalry). Recent work has demonstrated that interocular suppression is phase-insensitive, whereas binocular summation occurs only when stimuli are in phase. But how do these processes affect our perception of binocular contrast? We measured perceived contrast using a matching paradigm for a wide range of interocular phase offsets (0-180°) and matching contrasts (2-32%). Our results revealed a complex interaction between contrast and interocular phase. At low contrasts, perceived contrast reduced monotonically with increasing phase offset, by up to a factor of 1.6. At higher contrasts the pattern was non-monotonic: perceived contrast was veridical for in-phase and antiphase conditions, and monocular presentation, but increased a little at intermediate phase angles. These findings challenge a recent model in which contrast perception is phase-invariant. The results were predicted by a binocular contrast gain control model. The model involves monocular gain controls with interocular suppression from positive and negative phase channels, followed by summation across eyes and then across space. Importantly, this model--applied to conditions with vertical disparity--has only a single (zero) disparity channel and embodies both fusion and suppression processes within a single framework.

  20. Resistive phase transition of the superconducting Si(111)-([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.])-In surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchihashi, Takashi; Mishra, Puneet; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2013-04-01

    Recently, superconductivity was found on semiconductor surface reconstructions induced by metal adatoms, promising a new field of research where superconductors can be studied from the atomic level. Here we measure the electron transport properties of the Si(111)-([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.])-In surface near the resistive phase transition and analyze the data in terms of theories of two-dimensional (2D) superconductors. In the normal state, the sheet resistances (2D resistivities) R □ of the samples decrease significantly between 20 and 5 K, suggesting the importance of the electron-electron scattering in electron transport phenomena. The decrease in R □ is progressively accelerated just above the transition temperature ( T c ) due to the direct (Aslamazov-Larkin term) and the indirect (Maki-Thompson term) superconducting fluctuation effects. A minute but finite resistance tail is found below T c down to the lowest temperature of 1.8 K, which may be ascribed to a dissipation due to free vortex flow. The present study lays the ground for a future research aiming to find new superconductors in this class of materials.

  1. Characterization of an x-ray phase contrast imaging system based on the miniature synchrotron MIRRORCLE-6X

    SciTech Connect

    Heekeren, Joop van; Kostenko, Alexander; Hanashima, Takayasu; Yamada, Hironari; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Offerman, S. Erik; Vliet, Lucas J. van

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The implementation of in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) for soft-tissue patient imaging is hampered by the lack of a bright and spatially coherent x-ray source that fits into the hospital environment. This article provides a quantitative characterization of the phase-contrast enhancement of a PCI system based on the miniature synchrotron technology MIRRORCLE-6X. Methods: The phase-contrast effect was measured using an edge response of a plexiglass plate as a function of the incident angle of radiation. We have developed a comprehensive x-ray propagation model based on the system's components, properties, and geometry in order to interpret the measurement data. Monte-Carlo simulations are used to estimate the system's spectral properties and resolution. Results: The measured ratio of the detected phase-contrast to the absorption contrast is currently in the range 100% to 200%. Experiments show that with the current implementation of the MIRRORCLE-6X, a target smaller than 30-40 {mu}m does not lead to a larger phase-contrast. The reason for this is that the fraction of x-rays produced by the material (carbon filament and glue) that is used for mounting the target in the electron beam is more than 25% of the total amount of x-rays produced. This increases the apparent source size. The measured phase-contrast is at maximum two times larger than the absorption contrast with the current set-up. Conclusions: Calculations based on our model of the present imaging system predict that the phase-contrast can be up to an order of magnitude larger than the absorption contrast in case the materials used for mounting the target in the electron beam do not (or hardly) produce x-rays. The methods described in this paper provide vital feedback for guiding future modifications to the design of the x-ray target of MIRRORCLE-type system and configuration of the in-line PCI systems in general.

  2. Variable multimodal light microscopy with interference contrast and phase contrast; dark or bright field.

    PubMed

    Piper, T; Piper, J

    2014-07-01

    Using the optical methods described, specimens can be observed with modified multimodal light microscopes based on interference contrast combined with phase contrast, dark- or bright-field illumination. Thus, the particular visual information associated with interference and phase contrast, dark- and bright-field illumination is joined in real-time composite images appearing in enhanced clarity and purified from typical artefacts, which are apparent in standard phase contrast and dark-field illumination. In particular, haloing and shade-off are absent or significantly reduced as well as marginal blooming and scattering. The background brightness and thus the range of contrast can be continuously modulated and variable transitions can be achieved between interference contrast and complementary illumination techniques. The methods reported should be of general interest for all disciplines using phase and interference contrast microscopy, especially in biology and medicine, and also in material sciences when implemented in vertical illuminators. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  3. A phase-shifting in-line digital holography of pre-magnification on imaging research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qiaowen; Wang, Dayong; Rong, Lu; Wang, Yunxin; Zhao, Jie; Panezai, Spozmai

    2013-12-01

    A phase shifting digital holography with pre-magnification is designed. In order to fully utilize the bandwidth of the camera, a four-step phase-shifting digital holography is adopted to retrieve the complex distribution of the object. To further enhance the resolution of the reconstructed image without phase aberration, two microscope objectives (MOs) are placed in front of the object and the reference mirror. The MO in the reference arm provides parallel beam at the PZT plane thus improve the precision of the phase shifting. A 1951 USAF negative resolution target is used as the sample. Experiment result demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed method.

  4. Spatial frequency, phase, and the contrast of natural images.

    PubMed

    Bex, Peter J; Makous, Walter

    2002-06-01

    We examined contrast sensitivity and suprathreshold apparent contrast with natural images. The spatial-frequency components within single octaves of the images were removed (notch filtered), their phases were randomized, or the polarity of the images was inverted. Of Michelson contrast, root-mean-square (RMS) contrast, and band-limited contrast, RMS contrast was the best index of detectability. Negative images had lower apparent contrast than their positives. Contrast detection thresholds showed spatial-frequency-dependent elevation following both notch filtering and phase randomization. The peak of the spatial-frequency tuning function was approximately 0.5-2 cycles per degree (c/deg). Suprathreshold contrast matching functions also showed spatial-frequency-dependent contrast loss for both notch-filtered and phase-randomized images. The peak of the spatial-frequency tuning function was approximately 1-3 c/deg. There was no detectable difference between the effects of phase randomization and notch filtering on contrast sensitivity. We argue that these observations are consistent with changes in the activity within spatial-frequency channels caused by the higher-order phase structure of natural images that is responsible for the presence of edges and specularities.

  5. Spatial frequency, phase, and the contrast of natural images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bex, Peter J.; Makous, Walter

    2002-06-01

    We examined contrast sensitivity and suprathreshold apparent contrast with natural images. The spatial-frequency components within single octaves of the images were removed (notch filtered), their phases were randomized, or the polarity of the images was inverted. Of Michelson contrast, root-mean-square (RMS) contrast, and band-limited contrast, RMS contrast was the best index of detectability. Negative images had lower apparent contrast than their positives. Contrast detection thresholds showed spatial-frequency-dependent elevation following both notch filtering and phase randomization. The peak of the spatial-frequency tuning function was approximately 0.5-2 cycles per degree (c/deg). Suprathreshold contrast matching functions also showed spatial-frequency-dependent contrast loss for both notch-filtered and phase-randomized images. The peak of the spatial-frequency tuning function was approximately 1-3 c/deg. There was no detectable difference between the effects of phase randomization and notch filtering on contrast sensitivity. We argue that these observations are consistent with changes in the activity within spatial-frequency channels caused by the higher-order phase structure of natural images that is responsible for the presence of edges and specularities.

  6. Photon-counting spectral phase-contrast mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, E.; Roessl, E.; Koehler, T.; van Stevendaal, U.; Schulze-Wenck, I.; Wieberneit, N.; Stampanoni, M.; Wang, Z.; Kubik-Huch, R. A.; Hauser, N.; Lundqvist, M.; Danielsson, M.; Åslund, M.

    2012-03-01

    Phase-contrast imaging is an emerging technology that may increase the signal-difference-to-noise ratio in medical imaging. One of the most promising phase-contrast techniques is Talbot interferometry, which, combined with energy-sensitive photon-counting detectors, enables spectral differential phase-contrast mammography. We have evaluated a realistic system based on this technique by cascaded-systems analysis and with a task-dependent ideal-observer detectability index as a figure-of-merit. Beam-propagation simulations were used for validation and illustration of the analytical framework. Differential phase contrast improved detectability compared to absorption contrast, in particular for fine tumor structures. This result was supported by images of human mastectomy samples that were acquired with a conventional detector. The optimal incident energy was higher in differential phase contrast than in absorption contrast when disregarding the setup design energy. Further, optimal weighting of the transmitted spectrum was found to have a weaker energy dependence than for absorption contrast. Taking the design energy into account yielded a superimposed maximum on both detectability as a function of incident energy, and on optimal weighting. Spectral material decomposition was not facilitated by phase contrast, but phase information may be used instead of spectral information.

  7. Simulation of phase contrast MRI of turbulent flow.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Sven; Dyverfeldt, Petter; Gårdhagen, Roland; Karlsson, Matts; Ebbers, Tino

    2010-10-01

    Phase contrast MRI is a powerful tool for the assessment of blood flow. However, especially in the highly complex and turbulent flow that accompanies many cardiovascular diseases, phase contrast MRI may suffer from artifacts. Simulation of phase contrast MRI of turbulent flow could increase our understanding of phase contrast MRI artifacts in turbulent flows and facilitate the development of phase contrast MRI methods for the assessment of turbulent blood flow. We present a method for the simulation of phase contrast MRI measurements of turbulent flow. The method uses an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach, in which spin particle trajectories are computed from time-resolved large eddy simulations. The Bloch equations are solved for each spin for a frame of reference moving along the spins trajectory. The method was validated by comparison with phase contrast MRI measurements of velocity and intravoxel velocity standard deviation (IVSD) on a flow phantom consisting of a straight rigid pipe with a stenosis. Turbulence related artifacts, such as signal drop and ghosting, could be recognized in the measurements as well as in the simulations. The velocity and the IVSD obtained from the magnitude of the phase contrast MRI simulations agreed well with the measurements.

  8. Acoustically modulated x-ray phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Theron J; Bailat, Claude J; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J

    2004-11-07

    We report the use of ultrasonic radiation pressure with phase contrast x-ray imaging to give an image proportional to the space derivative of a conventional phase contrast image in the direction of propagation of an ultrasonic beam. Intense ultrasound is used to exert forces on objects within a body giving displacements of the order of tens to hundreds of microns. Subtraction of images made with and without the ultrasound field gives an image that removes low spatial frequency features and highlights high frequency features. The method acts as an acoustic 'contrast agent' for phase contrast x-ray imaging, which in soft tissue acts to highlight small density changes.

  9. Lensless phase contrast microscopy based on multiwavelength Fresnel diffraction.

    PubMed

    Noom, Daniel W E; Eikema, Kjeld S E; Witte, Stefan

    2014-01-15

    We demonstrate a compact, wide-field, quantitative phase contrast microscope that does not require lenses for image formation. High-resolution images are retrieved from Fresnel diffraction patterns recorded at multiple wavelengths, combined with a robust iterative phase retrieval algorithm. Quantitative phase contrast images of living cultured neurons are obtained with a transverse resolution of <2 μm. Our system is well suited for high-resolution live cell imaging and provides a compact, cost-effective alternative to full-sized phase-contrast microscopes.

  10. Complex dark-field contrast in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Tang, Xiangyang

    2015-03-01

    Without assuming that the sub-pixel microstructures of an object to be imaged distribute in space randomly, we investigate the influence of the object's microstructures on grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging. Our theoretical analysis and 3D computer simulation study based on the paraxial Fresnel-Kirchhoff theory show that the existing dark-field contrast can be generalized into a complex dark-field contrast in a way such that its imaginary part quantifies the effect of the object's sub-pixel microstructures on the phase of intensity oscillations. A method based on the phase-attenuation duality that holds for soft tissues to be imaged at high x-ray energies is proposed to retrieve the imaginary part of the complex dark-field contrast for imaging. In comparison to the existing dark-field contrast, the imaginary part of complex dark-field contrast exhibits significantly stronger selectivity on the shape of the object's sub-pixel microstructures. Thus the x-ray imaging corresponding to the imaginary part of complex dark-field contrast can provide additional and complementary information to that corresponding to the attenuation contrast, phase contrast and the existing dark-field contrast.

  11. Axial Phase-Darkfield-Contrast (APDC), a new technique for variable optical contrasting in light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Piper, T; Piper, J

    2012-09-01

    Axial phase-darkfield-contrast (APDC) has been developed as an illumination technique in light microscopy which promises significant improvements and a higher variability in imaging of several transparent 'problem specimens'. With this method, a phase contrast image is optically superimposed on an axial darkfield image so that a partial image based on the principal zeroth order maximum (phase contrast) interferes with an image, which is based on the secondary maxima (axial darkfield). The background brightness and character of the resulting image can be continuously modulated from a phase contrast-dominated to a darkfield-dominated character. In order to achieve this illumination mode, normal objectives for phase contrast have to be fitted with an additional central light stopper needed for axial (central) darkfield illumination. In corresponding condenser light masks, a small perforation has to be added in the centre of the phase contrast providing light annulus. These light modulating elements are properly aligned when the central perforation is congruent with the objective's light stop and the light annulus is conjugate with the phase ring. The breadth of the condenser light annulus and thus the intensity of the phase contrast partial image can be regulated with the aperture diaphragm. Additional contrast effects can be achieved when both illuminating light components are filtered at different colours. In this technique, the axial resolution (depth of field) is significantly enhanced and the specimen's three-dimensional appearance is accentuated with improved clarity as well as fine details at the given resolution limit. Typical artefacts associated with phase contrast and darkfield illumination are reduced in our methods.

  12. Synchrotron-radiation phase-contrast imaging of human stomach and gastric cancer: in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lei; Li, Gang; Sun, Ying-Shi; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiao-Peng

    2012-05-01

    The electron density resolution of synchrotron-radiation phase-contrast imaging (SR-PCI) is 1000 times higher than that of conventional X-ray absorption imaging in light elements, through which high-resolution X-ray imaging of biological soft tissue can be achieved. For biological soft tissue, SR-PCI can give better imaging contrast than conventional X-ray absorption imaging. In this study, human resected stomach and gastric cancer were investigated using in-line holography and diffraction enhanced imaging at beamline 4W1A of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. It was possible to depict gastric pits, measuring 50-70 µm, gastric grooves and tiny blood vessels in the submucosa layer by SR-PCI. The fine structure of a cancerous ulcer was displayed clearly on imaging the mucosa. The delamination of the gastric wall and infiltration of cancer in the submucosa layer were also demonstrated on cross-sectional imaging. In conclusion, SR-PCI can demonstrate the subtle structures of stomach and gastric cancer that cannot be detected by conventional X-ray absorption imaging, which prompt the X-ray diagnosis of gastric disease to the level of the gastric pit, and has the potential to provide new methods for the imageology of gastric cancer.

  13. Magnetic field induced differential neutron phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Strobl, M.; Treimer, W.; Walter, P.; Keil, S.; Manke, I.

    2007-12-17

    Besides the attenuation of a neutron beam penetrating an object, induced phase changes have been utilized to provide contrast in neutron and x-ray imaging. In analogy to differential phase contrast imaging of bulk samples, the refraction of neutrons by magnetic fields yields image contrast. Here, it will be reported how double crystal setups can provide quantitative tomographic images of magnetic fields. The use of magnetic air prisms adequate to split the neutron spin states enables a distinction of field induced phase shifts and these introduced by interaction with matter.

  14. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Mark Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-15

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  15. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner.

    PubMed

    Müller, Mark; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-01

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  16. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Mark; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-01

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  17. Phase contrast image guidance for synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Larkin, Kieran G.

    2016-08-01

    Recent image guidance developments for preclinical synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy represent a necessary step for future clinical translation of the technique. Image quality can be further improved using x-ray phase contrast, which is readily available at synchrotron facilities. We here describe a methodology for phase contrast image guidance at the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Differential phase contrast is measured alongside conventional attenuation and used to improve the image quality. Post-processing based on the inverse Riesz transform is employed on the measured data to obtain noticeably sharper images. The procedure is extremely well suited for applications such as image guidance which require both visual assessment and sample alignment based on semi automatic image registration. Moreover, our approach can be combined with all other differential phase contrast imaging techniques, in all cases where a quantitative evaluation of the refractive index is not required.

  18. Feasibility of ultrasound phase contrast for heating localization.

    PubMed

    Farny, Caleb H; Clement, Greg T

    2008-03-01

    Ultrasound-based methods for temperature monitoring could greatly assist focused ultrasound visualization and treatment planning based on sound speed-induced change in phase as a function of temperature. A method is presented that uses reflex transmission integration, planar projection, and tomographic reconstruction techniques to visualize phase contrast by measuring the sound field before and after heat deposition. Results from experiments and numerical simulations employing a through-transmission setup are presented to demonstrate feasibility of using phase contrast methods for identifying temperature change. A 1.088-MHz focused transducer was used to interrogate a medium with a phase contrast feature, following measurement of the baseline reference field with a hydrophone. A thermal plume in water and a tissue phantom with multiple water columns was used in separate experiments to produce a phase contrast. The reference and phase contrast field scans were numerically backprojected and the phase difference correctly identified the position and orientation of the features. The peak temperature reconstructed from the phase shift was within 0.2 degrees C of the measured temperature in the plume. Simulated results were in good agreement with experimental results. Finally, employment of reflex transmission imaging techniques for adopting a pulse-echo arrangement was simulated, and its future experimental application is discussed.

  19. Improved Zernike-type phase contrast for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koeck, P J B

    2015-07-01

    Zernike phase contrast has been recognized as a means of recording high-resolution images with high contrast using a transmission electron microscope. This imaging mode can be used to image typical phase objects such as unstained biological molecules or cryosections of biological tissue. According to the original proposal discussed in Danev and Nagayama (2001) and references therein, the Zernike phase plate applies a phase shift of π/2 to all scattered electron beams outside a given scattering angle and an image is recorded at Gaussian focus or slight underfocus (below Scherzer defocus). Alternatively, a phase shift of -π/2 is applied to the central beam using the Boersch phase plate. The resulting image will have an almost perfect contrast transfer function (close to 1) from a given lowest spatial frequency up to a maximum resolution determined by the wave length, the amount of defocus and the spherical aberration of the microscope. In this paper, I present theory and simulations showing that this maximum spatial frequency can be increased considerably without loss of contrast by using a Zernike or Boersch phase plate that leads to a phase shift between scattered and unscattered electrons of only π /4, and recording images at Scherzer defocus. The maximum resolution can be improved even more by imaging at extended Scherzer defocus, though at the cost of contrast loss at lower spatial frequencies. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  20. Improving visibility of X-ray phase-contrast imaging with Wiener filtering.

    PubMed

    Gong, Shaorun; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Zhongxing

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the degrading effects of the physical parameters on the in-line X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCi), a simulation tool based on the Fresnel/Kirchhoff diffraction integral was firstly developed with comprehensively considering effects of the source-to-sample (S-S) and sample-to-detector (S-D) distances, the practical characteristics of a polychromatic and finite size source, the point spread function (PSF) of the fluorescent screen and the spatial resolution of the detector on the theoretical phase-contrast pattern. By a comparison between the simulative profile and the experimental one under the commonly-used parameters, an acceptable consistency has been demonstrated in despite of the deviation between the theoretically-predicted contrast (0.188) and the original experimental one (0.12). From the simulations, it is apparently observed that the fine interference pattern has been severely degraded by the finite spatial resolution, and will inevitably be further deteriorated by the system noise in practice. Since the image quality of the X-ray phase-contrast imaging is strongly dependent on the physical parameters of the system, a model-based deblurring procedure to upgrade the image visibility is preferably desired. As a simple restoration way, a Wiener filter was then introduced to offer an optimal tradeoff between the contrast preservation and the noise suppression. Finally, to minimize the deviation resulting from the finite spatial resolution, one-dimensional interpolation was performed by positioning the set square at a tiny angle to the vertical direction. The result after the Wiener-filtering-based deblurring has shown a considerably improved profile visibility: the processed experimental contrast (0.156) increased by 30% as compared to the original one (0.12) in company with the increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by 0.9dB. With the trend of the post-filtered experimental contrast to the theoretical one, it could be motivated that

  1. Differential phase contrast OCT in transparant and scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sticker, Markus; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Leitgeb, Rainer; Fercher, Adolf F.

    2001-05-01

    Many biological objects have a poor contrast in microscopy when they are imaged on the basis of the intensity of transmitted and reflected light. For pure phase objects the differential phase contrast technique increases the contrast of the images. We combined the differential phase contrast technique with optical coherence tomography. Our setup is based on a Michelson interferometer with a polarization sensitive detection unit. We scan the sample with two orthogonally polarized beams, which are separated by a distance of 17.5 micrometers . The full interferometric signal of each object beam is recorded by a separate detector. We calculate the phase functions of the interferometric signal through analytic continuation by use of the Hilbert transformation. Subtracting the two phase functions we get the phase difference between the object beams. Now we can derive the path length difference of the object beams at a certain depth in the object where the light was backscattered. The method is independent of variations in the backscattering coefficient, which was a problem in an earlier version of our setup. To investigate the performance of the technique we measured pure phase objects in the nm range. Differential phase measurements through scattering test samples quantified the influence of scattering on the phase measurement. First images of cell structures are presented.

  2. Anatomical background noise power spectrum in differential phase contrast and dark field contrast mammograms.

    PubMed

    Garrett, John; Ge, Yongshuai; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-12-01

    In x-ray absorption mammography, it has been found that the anatomical background noise can be characterized by a power law dependence on the spatial frequency, NPSa(f) ≈ αf(-β). In this letter, the authors present the first experimental results of the corresponding exponents, β, for differential phase contrast (βDPC) and dark field contrast (βDF) mammography. A grating-based x-ray multicontrast imaging acquisition benchtop system was used to simultaneously acquire mammograms with three different contrast mechanisms from 15 cadaver breasts under the same x-ray data acquisition conditions. The cadaver breasts were imaged in the coronal plane. The authors' experimental implementation of the well documented method [Burgess, Jacobson, and Judy, Med. Phys. 28, 419-437 (2001)] to extract the exponent β was first validated using anonymized clinical mammograms. Experiments were then used to determine β for the three types of mammograms for each cadaver breast acquired with our multicontrast imaging system: absorption contrast mammogram (βAbs.), differential phase contrast mammogram (βDPC), and dark-field contrast mammogram (βDF). The measured β values, acquired in the coronal plane with the benchtop multicontrast imaging system are βAbs. = 3.61 ± 0.49, βDPC = 2.54 ± 0.75, and βDF = 1.44 ± 0.49 for absorption, differential phase, and dark field mammogram, respectively. The β values for differential phase contrast and dark field mammography are significantly lower than the measured value of β for the corresponding absorption contrast mammograms. The greatly reduced β value of the anatomical background noise in differential phase contrast and dark field mammograms may suggest potentially improved diagnostic performance for certain types of breast cancer imaging tasks.

  3. Mesh-based phase contrast Fourier transform imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Sajjad; Bashir, Sajid; MacDonald, C. A.; Petruccelli, Jonathan C.

    2017-04-01

    Traditional x-ray radiography is limited by low attenuation contrast in materials of low electron density. Phase contrast imaging offers the potential to improve the contrast between such materials, but due to the requirements on the spatial coherence of the x-ray beam, practical implementation of such systems with tabletop (i.e. non-synchrotron) sources has been limited. One phase imaging technique employs multiple fine-pitched gratings. However, the strict manufacturing tolerances and precise alignment requirements have limited the widespread adoption of grating-based techniques. In this work, we have investigated a recently developed technique that utilizes a single grid of much coarser pitch. Our system consisted of a low power 100 μm spot Mo source, a CCD with 22 μm pixel pitch, and either a focused mammography linear grid or a stainless steel woven mesh. Phase is extracted from a single image by windowing and comparing data localized about harmonics of the mesh in the Fourier domain. The effects on the diffraction phase contrast and scattering amplitude images of varying grid types and periods, and of varying the width of the window function used to separate the harmonics were investigated. Using the wire mesh, derivatives of the phase along two orthogonal directions were obtained and combined to form improved phase contrast images.

  4. Grid-Based Fourier Transform Phase Contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Sajjad

    Low contrast in x-ray attenuation imaging between different materials of low electron density is a limitation of traditional x-ray radiography. Phase contrast imaging offers the potential to improve the contrast between such materials, but due to the requirements on the spatial coherence of the x-ray beam, practical implementation of such systems with tabletop (i.e. non-synchrotron) sources has been limited. One recently developed phase imaging technique employs multiple fine-pitched gratings. However, the strict manufacturing tolerances and precise alignment requirements have limited the widespread adoption of grating-based techniques. In this work, we have investigated a technique recently demonstrated by Bennett et al. that utilizes a single grid of much coarser pitch. Our system consisted of a low power 100 microm spot Mo source, a CCD with 22 microm pixel pitch, and either a focused mammography linear grid or a stainless steel woven mesh. Phase is extracted from a single image by windowing and comparing data localized about harmonics of the grid in the Fourier domain. A Matlab code was written to perform the image processing. For the first time, the effects on the diffraction phase contrast and scattering amplitude images of varying grid types and periods, and of varying the window function type used to separate the harmonics, and the window widths, were investigated. Using the wire mesh, derivatives of the phase along two orthogonal directions were obtained and new methods investigated to form improved phase contrast images.

  5. Development of neutron tomography and phase contrast imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kashyap, Y. S.; Agrawal, Ashish; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar

    2013-02-05

    This paper presents design and development of a state of art neutron imaging technique at CIRUS reactor with special reference for techniques adopted for tomography and phase contrast imaging applications. Different components of the beamline such as collimator, shielding, sample manipulator, digital imaging system were designed keeping in mind the requirements of data acquisition time and resolution. The collimator was designed in such a way that conventional and phase contrast imaging can be done using same collimator housing. We have done characterization of fuel pins, study of hydride blisters in pressure tubes hydrogen based cells, two phase flow visualization, and online study of locomotive parts etc. using neutron tomography and radiography technique. We have also done some studies using neutron phase contrast imaging technique on this beamline.

  6. Development of neutron tomography and phase contrast imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, Y. S.; Agrawal, Ashish; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents design and development of a state of art neutron imaging technique at CIRUS reactor with special reference for techniques adopted for tomography and phase contrast imaging applications. Different components of the beamline such as collimator, shielding, sample manipulator, digital imaging system were designed keeping in mind the requirements of data acquisition time and resolution. The collimator was designed in such a way that conventional and phase contrast imaging can be done using same collimator housing. We have done characterization of fuel pins, study of hydride blisters in pressure tubes hydrogen based cells, two phase flow visualization, and online study of locomotive parts etc. using neutron tomography and radiography technique. We have also done some studies using neutron phase contrast imaging technique on this beamline.

  7. Phase contrast without phase plates and phase rings--optical solutions for improved imaging of phase structures.

    PubMed

    Piper, Timm; Piper, Jörg

    2013-10-01

    Using the optical methods described, phase specimens can be observed with a modified light microscope in enhanced clarity, purified from typical artifacts which are apparent in standard phase contrast illumination. In particular, haloing and shade-off are absent, lateral and vertical resolution are maximized and the image quality remains constant even in problematic preparations which cannot be well examined in normal phase contrast, such as specimens beyond a critical thickness or covered by obliquely situated cover slips. The background brightness and thus the range of contrast can be continuously modulated and specimens can be illuminated in concentric-peripheral, axial or paraxial light. Additional contrast effects can be achieved by spectral color separation. Normal glass or mirror lenses can be used; they do not need to be fitted with a phase plate or a phase ring. The methods described should be of general interest for all disciplines using phase microscopy.

  8. High Resolution X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging With Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    microfocus x - ray source. Rev. Sci. Instr. 68, 2774 (1997). 8. Krol, A. et al. Laser-based microfocused x - ray source for mammography: Feasibility study...W81XWH-04-1-0481 TITLE: High Resolution X - ray Phase Contrast Imaging With Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement PRINCIPAL...REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 Jun 2005 – 31 May 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER High Resolution X - ray

  9. High Resolution X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    murine liver. 15. SUBJECT TERMS X-ray, ultrasound, phase contrast, imaging, elastography 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...of the veins in a mouse liver that was excised from an euthanized mouse, fixed in paraformaldehyde and subsequently dried. The vascular tree is...clearly visible in the x-ray image. Contrast agent injections into the portal vein of another mouse liver verified that the veins are imaged and not

  10. Contrast agent influences MRI phase-contrast flow measurements in small vessels.

    PubMed

    Lagerstrand, Kerstin M; Vikhoff-Baaz, Barbro; Starck, Göran; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2010-07-01

    Contrast-enhanced MR angiography is often combined with phase contrast (PC) flow measurement to answer a particular clinical question. The contrast agent that is administered during contrast-enhanced MR angiography may still be present in the blood during the consecutive PC flow measurement. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of contrast agent on PC flow measurements in small vessels. For that purpose, both in vivo measurements and computer simulations were performed. The dependence of the PC flow quantification on the signal amplitude difference between blood and stationary background tissue for various vessel sizes was characterized. Results show that the partial-volume effect strongly affects the accuracy of the PC flow quantification when the imaged vessel is small compared to the spatial resolution. A higher blood-to-background-contrast level during imaging significantly increases the partial-volume effect and thereby reduces the accuracy of the flow quantification. On the other hand, a higher blood-to-background-contrast level facilitated the segmentation of the vessel for flow rate determination. PC flow measurements should therefore be performed after contrast agent administration in large vessels, but before contrast agent administration in small vessels.

  11. Projection phase contrast microscopy with a hard x-ray nanofocused beam: Defocus and contrast transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Salditt, T.; Giewekemeyer, K.; Fuhse, C.; Krueger, S. P.; Tucoulou, R.; Cloetens, P.

    2009-05-01

    We report a projection phase contrast microscopy experiment using hard x-ray pink beam undulator radiation focused by an adaptive mirror system to 100-200 nm spot size. This source is used to illuminate a lithographic test pattern with a well-controlled range of spatial frequencies. The oscillatory nature of the contrast transfer function with source-to-sample distance in this holographic imaging scheme is quantified and the validity of the weak phase object approximation is confirmed for the experimental conditions.

  12. Contrast transfer function in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianheng; Du, Yang; Lin, Danying; Liu, Xin; Niu, Hanben

    2014-05-01

    x-Ray grating interferometry is a method for x-ray wave front sensing and phase-contrast imaging that has been developed over past few years. Contrast and resolution are the criteria used to specify the quality of an image. In characterizing the performance of this interferometer, the contrast transfer function is considered in this paper. The oscillatory nature of the contrast transfer function (CTF) is derived and quantified for this interferometer. The illumination source and digital detector are both considered as significant factors controlling image quality, and it can be noted that contrast and resolution in turn depends primarily on the projected intensity profile of the array source and the pixel size of the detector. Furthermore, a test pattern phantom with a well-controlled range of spatial frequencies was designed and imaging of this phantom was simulated by a computer. Contrast transfer function behavior observed in the simulated image is consistent with our theoretical CTF. This might be beneficial for the evaluation and optimization of a grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging system.

  13. Simultaneous amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast surface plasmon resonance imaging by use of digital holography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiping; Zhong, Jingang

    2012-01-01

    The surface plasmon resonance imaging technique provides a tool that allows high-throughput analysis and real-time kinetic measurement. A simultaneous amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast surface plasmon resonance imaging method is presented. The amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast images are simultaneously obtained by use of digital holography. The detection sensitivity of amplitude-contrast imaging and phase-contrast imaging can compensate for each other. Thus, the detectable sample components may cover a wider range of refractive index values for the simultaneous amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast imaging method than for the phase-contrast imaging method or amplitude-contrast imaging method. A detailed description of the theory and an experiment of monitoring the evaporation process of a drop of NaCl injection in real time are presented. In addition, the amplitude-contrast image has less coherent noise by digital holography. PMID:23243569

  14. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM

    PubMed Central

    Damircheli, Mehrnoosh; Payam, Amir F

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM). Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes. PMID:26114079

  15. Applications of phase-contrast velocimetry sequences in cardiovascular imaging.

    PubMed

    Caroff, J; Bière, L; Trebuchet, G; Nedelcu, C; Sibileau, E; Beregi, J-P; Aubé, C; Furber, A; Willoteaux, S

    2012-03-01

    To describe and illustrate the main applications of phase-contrast flow quantification in cardiovascular imaging. Phase-contrast velocimetry sequences provide an accurate, reliable, reproducible and non-invasive study of blood flow, information which is sometimes not available from other investigation methods. The haemodynamic information obtained from these complement MRI angiography images. They appear to have a range of clinical applications, firstly improving pathophysiological understanding but also contributing to the treatment and follow-up strategy after surgical or endovascular treatment. Copyright © 2012 Éditions Françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Cone beam geometry for small objects in phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, P.; Louis, A. K.

    2013-09-01

    Phase contrast tomography has developed rapidly within the last ten years. The new method enables the reconstruction of the refraction index in addition to the attenuation coefficient and can therefore be very well applied to samples which are only weakly absorbing. First studies in phase contract tomography were done using synchrotron devices which are modeled by the so-called parallel geometry. Samples studied so far are special foams and fiber materials, see Cloetens et al (1999 App. Phys. Lett. 75 2912-4), which give almost no contrast due to absorption but provide excellent images in phase contrast. Recently tubes were successfully applied to a variety of applications. These laboratory devices no longer fulfil the requirement of a parallel geometry but need to be treated as a fan/cone beam geometry. In this paper we derive a mathematical model for cone beam geometry in phase contrast tomography in two and three dimensions for objects small compared to the two distances of object to detector and x-ray source to object. All approximations needed are analyzed and an efficient reconstruction method providing both phase and absorption in a single step is derived, based on the method by Louis and Maaß (1990 Inverse Problems 6 427-39). The reconstruction method is successfully tested using numerical examples with simulated phantom data.

  17. Quantitative analysis of contrast to noise ratio using a phase contrast x-ray imaging prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Kang, Minhua; Chen, Wei R.; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) of the x-ray images taken with the phase contrast imaging mode and compare them with the CNR of the images taken under the conventional mode. For each mode, three images were taken under three exposure conditions of 100 kVp (2.8mAs), 120 kVp (1.9mAs) and 140kVp (1.42mAs). A 1.61cm thick contrast detail phantom was used as an imaging object. For phase contrast, the source to image detector distance (SID) was 182.88 cm and the source to object (SOD) distance was 73.15 cm. The SOD was the same as SID in the conventional imaging mode. A computed radiography (CR) plate was used as a detector and the output CR images were converted to linear form in relation with the incident x-ray exposure. To calculate CNR, an image processing software was used to determine the mean pixel value and the standard deviation of the pixels in the region of interest (ROI) and in the nearby background around ROI. At any given exposure condition investigated in this study, the CNR values for the phase contrast images were better as compared to the corresponding conventional mode images. The superior image quality in terms of CNR is contributed by the phase-shifts resulted contrast, as well as the reduced scatters due to the air gap between the object and the detector.

  18. Evaluation of microbubble contrast agents for dynamic imaging with x-ray phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Millard, T P; Endrizzi, M; Everdell, N; Rigon, L; Arfelli, F; Menk, R H; Stride, E; Olivo, A

    2015-07-29

    X-rays are commonly used as a means to image the inside of objects opaque to visible light, as their short wavelength allows penetration through matter and the formation of high spatial resolution images. This physical effect has found particular importance in medicine where x-ray based imaging is routinely used as a diagnostic tool. Increasingly, however, imaging modalities that provide functional as well as morphological information are required. In this study the potential to use x-ray phase based imaging as a functional modality through the use of microbubbles that can be targeted to specific biological processes is explored. We show that the concentration of a microbubble suspension can be monitored quantitatively whilst in flow using x-ray phase contrast imaging. This could provide the basis for a dynamic imaging technique that combines the tissue penetration, spatial resolution, and high contrast of x-ray phase based imaging with the functional information offered by targeted imaging modalities.

  19. Differential phase contrast in scanning x-ray microscopy with half-wavelength phase shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yoshio Takeuchi, Akihisa

    2016-01-28

    A method for differential-phase-contrast imaging in scanning x-ray microscopy is proposed. The microfocus beam is produced with an x-ray focusing optics, and a half of the optical aperture is masked with a λ/2 phase shifter. This generates a pair of focused beam at the focal plane, with π phase difference. Combining with a diaphragm in front of the transmission beam detector, differential phase contrast (contrast proportional to the phase-difference between two foci) can be obtained. Preliminary results with a Fresnel zone plate focusing optics at 12.4 keV x-ray energy are shown.

  20. AUTOMATED ANALYSIS OF AQUEOUS SAMPLES CONTAINING PESTICIDES, ACIDIC/BASIC/NEUTRAL SEMIVOLATILES AND VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION COUPLED IN-LINE TO LARGE VOLUME INJECTION GC/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data is presented on the development of a new automated system combining solid phase extraction (SPE) with GC/MS spectrometry for the single-run analysis of water samples containing a broad range of organic compounds. The system uses commercially available automated in-line 10-m...

  1. AUTOMATED ANALYSIS OF AQUEOUS SAMPLES CONTAINING PESTICIDES, ACIDIC/BASIC/NEUTRAL SEMIVOLATILES AND VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION COUPLED IN-LINE TO LARGE VOLUME INJECTION GC/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data is presented on the development of a new automated system combining solid phase extraction (SPE) with GC/MS spectrometry for the single-run analysis of water samples containing a broad range of organic compounds. The system uses commercially available automated in-line 10-m...

  2. X-ray phase contrast imaging and noise evaluation using a single phase grating interferometer.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, J; Mercère, P; Idir, M; Silva, P Da; Vincent, G; Primot, Jérôme

    2013-07-15

    In this paper we present some quantitative measurements of X-ray phase contrast images and noise evaluation obtained with a recent grating based X-ray phase contrast interferometer. This device is built using a single phase grating and a large broadband X-ray source. It was calibrated using a reference sample and finally used to perform measurements of a biological fossil: a mosquito trapped in amber. As phase images, noise was evaluated from the measured interferograms.

  3. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOEpatents

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  4. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOEpatents

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2017-01-31

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  5. Grating Based, Phase Contrast Radiography with Bremsstrahlung Source

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher Goldin and Shaun Hampton

    2009-09-11

    Phase-contrast radiography (PCR) generates an image from gradients in the phase of the probing X-radiation induced by the radiographic object, and can therefore make visible features difficult or impossible to see with conventional, absorption-contrast (ACR) radiography. For any particular object, variations in either the real or imaginary parts of the index of refraction could be greater. Most practical difficulties of PCR arise from the very small deviation from unity (~10-5-10-6, depending of material and energy) of the real part of the index of refraction. In principal, straightforward shadowgraphy would provide a phase-contrast image, but in practice this is usually overwhelmed by the zero-order (bright field) signal. Eliminating this sets the phase-contrast signal against a dark field (as in Schlieren photography with visible light). One way to do this with X-rays is with a grating that produces a Talbot interference pattern. Minute variations in optical path lengths through the radiographic object can significantly shift the Talbot fringes, and these shifts constitute a dark-field signal separate from the zero-order wave. This technique has recently been investigated up to ~20keV [1-3]; this work addresses what sets the practical upper limit, and where that limit is. These appear to be grating fabrication, and ~60keV, respectively.

  6. Phase contrast image segmentation using a Laue analyser crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Paganin, David M.; Uesugi, Kentaro; Allison, Beth J.; Lewis, Robert A.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Pavlov, Konstantin M.

    2011-02-01

    Dual-energy x-ray imaging is a powerful tool enabling two-component samples to be separated into their constituent objects from two-dimensional images. Phase contrast x-ray imaging can render the boundaries between media of differing refractive indices visible, despite them having similar attenuation properties; this is important for imaging biological soft tissues. We have used a Laue analyser crystal and a monochromatic x-ray source to combine the benefits of both techniques. The Laue analyser creates two distinct phase contrast images that can be simultaneously acquired on a high-resolution detector. These images can be combined to separate the effects of x-ray phase, absorption and scattering and, using the known complex refractive indices of the sample, to quantitatively segment its component materials. We have successfully validated this phase contrast image segmentation (PCIS) using a two-component phantom, containing an iodinated contrast agent, and have also separated the lungs and ribcage in images of a mouse thorax. Simultaneous image acquisition has enabled us to perform functional segmentation of the mouse thorax throughout the respiratory cycle during mechanical ventilation.

  7. Newly designed, simple relief phase contrast for microscopy of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Zižka, Z

    2010-11-01

    A new method providing a relief phase contrast for investigation of microorganisms by optical microscopy used a neutral filter Zeiss NG 10/1 that could be controllably slid at a certain azimuthal angle below the aperture condenser diaphragm of the microscope phase contrast. Two ways of application are described depending on the type of the microscope: (1) in a special holder, and (2) fixed on a rubber ring. The device enabled us to obtain excellent results in the area of both optical microscopy and microphotography. With the microorganisms visualized, a better resolution, higher contrast and a significant 3D effect were obtained; outer morphology and organelles (chloroplasts, nuclei, granules, oil reserve vacuoles, etc.) could also be investigated.

  8. Effect of coherence loss in differential phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Weixing; Ning, Ruola; Liu, Jiangkun

    2014-03-01

    Coherence property of x-rays is critical in the grating-based differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging because it is the physical foundation that makes any form of phase contrast imaging possible. Loss of coherence is an important experimental issue, which results in increased image noise and reduced object contrast in DPC images and DPC cone beam CT (DPC-CBCT) reconstructions. In this study, experimental results are investigated to characterize the visibility loss (a measurement of coherence loss) in several different applications, including different-sized phantom imaging, specimen imaging and small animal imaging. Key measurements include coherence loss (relative intensity changes in the area of interest in phase-stepping images), contrast and noise level in retrieved DPC images, and contrast and noise level in reconstructed DPC-CBCT images. The influence of size and composition of imaged object (uniform object, bones, skin hairs, tissues, and etc) will be quantified. The same investigation is also applied for moiré pattern-based DPC-CBCT imaging with the same exposure dose. A theoretical model is established to relate coherence loss, noise level in phase stepping images (or moiré images), and the contrast and noise in the retrieved DPC images. Experiment results show that uniform objects lead to a small coherence loss even when the attenuation is higher, while objects with large amount of small structures result in huge coherence loss even when the attenuation is small. The theoretical model predicts the noise level in retrieved DPC images, and it also suggests a minimum dose required for DPC imaging to compensate for coherence loss.

  9. Nonlinear dynamic phase contrast microscopy for microfluidic and microbiological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denz, C.; Holtmann, F.; Woerdemann, M.; Oevermann, M.

    2008-08-01

    In live sciences, the observation and analysis of moving living cells, molecular motors or motion of micro- and nano-objects is a current field of research. At the same time, microfluidic innovations are needed for biological and medical applications on a micro- and nano-scale. Conventional microscopy techniques are reaching considerable limits with respect to these issues. A promising approach for this challenge is nonlinear dynamic phase contrast microscopy. It is an alternative full field approach that allows to detect motion as well as phase changes of living unstained micro-objects in real-time, thereby being marker free, without contact and non destructive, i.e. fully biocompatible. The generality of this system allows it to be combined with several other microscope techniques such as conventional bright field or fluorescence microscopy. In this article we will present the dynamic phase contrast technique and its applications in analysis of micro organismic dynamics, micro flow velocimetry and micro-mixing analysis.

  10. Dynamic Studies of Lung Fluid Clearance with Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Williams, Ivan; Irvine, Sarah C.; Morgan, Michael J.; Paganin, David M.; Lewis, Rob A.; Pavlov, Konstantin; Hooper, Stuart B.; Wallace, Megan J.; Siu, Karen K. W.; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2007-01-19

    Clearance of liquid from the airways at birth is a poorly understood process, partly due to the difficulties of observing and measuring the distribution of air within the lung. Imaging dynamic processes within the lung in vivo with high contrast and spatial resolution is therefore a major challenge. However, phase contrast X-ray imaging is able to exploit inhaled air as a contrast agent, rendering the lungs of small animals visible due to the large changes in the refractive index at air/tissue interfaces. In concert with the high spatial resolution afforded by X-ray imaging systems (<100 {mu}m), propagation-based phase contrast imaging is ideal for studying lung development. To this end we have utilized intense, monochromatic synchrotron radiation, together with a fast readout CCD camera, to study fluid clearance from the lungs of rabbit pups at birth. Local rates of fluid clearance have been measured from the dynamic sequences using a single image phase retrieval algorithm.

  11. Cumulative phase delay imaging for contrast-enhanced ultrasound tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Standard dynamic-contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) imaging detects and estimates ultrasound-contrast-agent (UCA) concentration based on the amplitude of the nonlinear (harmonic) components generated during ultrasound (US) propagation through UCAs. However, harmonic components generation is not specific to UCAs, as it also occurs for US propagating through tissue. Moreover, nonlinear artifacts affect standard DCE-US imaging, causing contrast to tissue ratio reduction, and resulting in possible misclassification of tissue and misinterpretation of UCA concentration. Furthermore, no contrast-specific modality exists for DCE-US tomography; in particular speed-of-sound changes due to UCAs are well within those caused by different tissue types. Recently, a new marker for UCAs has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental component is in fact observable for US propagating through UCAs, and is absent in tissue. In this paper, tomographic US images based on CPD are for the first time presented and compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Results show the applicability of this marker for contrast specific US imaging, with cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI) showing superior capabilities in detecting and localizing UCA, as compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Cavities (filled with UCA) which were down to 1 mm in diameter were clearly detectable. Moreover, CPDI is free of the above mentioned nonlinear artifacts. These results open important possibilities to DCE-US tomography, with potential applications to breast imaging for cancer localization.

  12. Clinical application of low-dose phase contrast breast CT: methods for the optimization of the reconstruction workflow.

    PubMed

    Pacilè, S; Brun, F; Dullin, C; Nesterest, Y I; Dreossi, D; Mohammadi, S; Tonutti, M; Stacul, F; Lockie, D; Zanconati, F; Accardo, A; Tromba, G; Gureyev, T E

    2015-08-01

    Results are presented of a feasibility study of three-dimensional X-ray tomographic mammography utilising in-line phase contrast. Experiments were performed at SYRMEP beamline of Elettra synchrotron. A specially designed plastic phantom and a mastectomy sample containing a malignant lesion were used to study the reconstructed image quality as a function of different image processing operations. Detailed evaluation and optimization of image reconstruction workflows have been carried out using combinations of several advanced computed tomography algorithms with different pre-processing and post-processing steps. Special attention was paid to the effect of phase retrieval on the diagnostic value of the reconstructed images. A number of objective image quality indices have been applied for quantitative evaluation of the results, and these were compared with subjective assessments of the same images by three experienced radiologists and one pathologist. The outcomes of this study provide practical guidelines for the optimization of image processing workflows in synchrotron-based phase-contrast mammo-tomography.

  13. Clinical application of low-dose phase contrast breast CT: methods for the optimization of the reconstruction workflow

    PubMed Central

    Pacilè, S.; Brun, F.; Dullin, C.; Nesterest, Y. I.; Dreossi, D.; Mohammadi, S.; Tonutti, M.; Stacul, F.; Lockie, D.; Zanconati, F.; Accardo, A.; Tromba, G.; Gureyev, T. E.

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented of a feasibility study of three-dimensional X-ray tomographic mammography utilising in-line phase contrast. Experiments were performed at SYRMEP beamline of Elettra synchrotron. A specially designed plastic phantom and a mastectomy sample containing a malignant lesion were used to study the reconstructed image quality as a function of different image processing operations. Detailed evaluation and optimization of image reconstruction workflows have been carried out using combinations of several advanced computed tomography algorithms with different pre-processing and post-processing steps. Special attention was paid to the effect of phase retrieval on the diagnostic value of the reconstructed images. A number of objective image quality indices have been applied for quantitative evaluation of the results, and these were compared with subjective assessments of the same images by three experienced radiologists and one pathologist. The outcomes of this study provide practical guidelines for the optimization of image processing workflows in synchrotron-based phase-contrast mammo-tomography. PMID:26309770

  14. Phase contrast hard x-ray microscopy with submicron resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Lagomarsino, S.; Cedola, A.; Cloetens, P.; Di Fonzo, S.; Jark, W.; Soullie, G.; Riekel, C.

    1997-11-01

    In this letter we present a hard x-ray phase contrast microscope based on the divergent and coherent beam exiting an x-ray waveguide. It uses lensless geometrical projection to magnify spatial variations in optical path length more than 700 times. Images of a nylon fiber and a gold test pattern were obtained with a resolution of 0.14 {mu}m in one direction. Exposure times as short as 0.1 s gave already visible contrast, opening the way to high resolution, real time studies. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. High Resolution X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    microfocus x - ray source. Rev. Sci. Instr. 68, 2774 (1997). 8. Krol, A. et al. Laser-based microfocused x - ray ...high spatial coherence, such as synchrotrons 46, microfocus x - ray tubes 7, or laser plasma x - ray sources 8,9are employed is the phase contrast component...imaging apparatus to determine the deflection of the bead as a function of acoustic pressure. The x - rays , generated by a microfocus x - ray tube

  16. Analyser-based phase contrast image reconstruction using geometrical optics.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, M J; Pavlov, K M; Siu, K K W; Menk, R H; Tromba, G; Lewis, R A

    2007-07-21

    Analyser-based phase contrast imaging can provide radiographs of exceptional contrast at high resolution (<100 microm), whilst quantitative phase and attenuation information can be extracted using just two images when the approximations of geometrical optics are satisfied. Analytical phase retrieval can be performed by fitting the analyser rocking curve with a symmetric Pearson type VII function. The Pearson VII function provided at least a 10% better fit to experimentally measured rocking curves than linear or Gaussian functions. A test phantom, a hollow nylon cylinder, was imaged at 20 keV using a Si(1 1 1) analyser at the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility. Our phase retrieval method yielded a more accurate object reconstruction than methods based on a linear fit to the rocking curve. Where reconstructions failed to map expected values, calculations of the Takagi number permitted distinction between the violation of the geometrical optics conditions and the failure of curve fitting procedures. The need for synchronized object/detector translation stages was removed by using a large, divergent beam and imaging the object in segments. Our image acquisition and reconstruction procedure enables quantitative phase retrieval for systems with a divergent source and accounts for imperfections in the analyser.

  17. Phase-Change Contrast Agents for Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sheeran, Paul S.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) for ultrasound-based applications have resulted in novel ways of approaching diagnostic and therapeutic techniques beyond what is possible with microbubble contrast agents and liquid emulsions. When subjected to sufficient pressures delivered by an ultrasound transducer, stabilized droplets undergo a phase-transition to the gaseous state and a volumetric expansion occurs. This phenomenon, termed acoustic droplet vaporization, has been proposed as a means to address a number of in vivo applications at the microscale and nanoscale. In this review, the history of PCCAs, physical mechanisms involved, and proposed applications are discussed with a summary of studies demonstrated in vivo. Factors that influence the design of PCCAs are discussed, as well as the need for future studies to characterize potential bioeffects for administration in humans and optimization of ultrasound parameters. PMID:22352770

  18. Single-shot quantitative phase microscopy with color-multiplexed differential phase contrast (cDPC)

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We present a new technique for quantitative phase and amplitude microscopy from a single color image with coded illumination. Our system consists of a commercial brightfield microscope with one hardware modification—an inexpensive 3D printed condenser insert. The method, color-multiplexed Differential Phase Contrast (cDPC), is a single-shot variant of Differential Phase Contrast (DPC), which recovers the phase of a sample from images with asymmetric illumination. We employ partially coherent illumination to achieve resolution corresponding to 2× the objective NA. Quantitative phase can then be used to synthesize DIC and phase contrast images or extract shape and density. We demonstrate amplitude and phase recovery at camera-limited frame rates (50 fps) for various in vitro cell samples and c. elegans in a micro-fluidic channel. PMID:28152023

  19. Single-shot quantitative phase microscopy with color-multiplexed differential phase contrast (cDPC).

    PubMed

    Phillips, Zachary F; Chen, Michael; Waller, Laura

    2017-01-01

    We present a new technique for quantitative phase and amplitude microscopy from a single color image with coded illumination. Our system consists of a commercial brightfield microscope with one hardware modification-an inexpensive 3D printed condenser insert. The method, color-multiplexed Differential Phase Contrast (cDPC), is a single-shot variant of Differential Phase Contrast (DPC), which recovers the phase of a sample from images with asymmetric illumination. We employ partially coherent illumination to achieve resolution corresponding to 2× the objective NA. Quantitative phase can then be used to synthesize DIC and phase contrast images or extract shape and density. We demonstrate amplitude and phase recovery at camera-limited frame rates (50 fps) for various in vitro cell samples and c. elegans in a micro-fluidic channel.

  20. Spline based iterative phase retrieval algorithm for X-ray differential phase contrast radiography.

    PubMed

    Nilchian, Masih; Wang, Zhentian; Thuering, Thomas; Unser, Michael; Stampanoni, Marco

    2015-04-20

    Differential phase contrast imaging using grating interferometer is a promising alternative to conventional X-ray radiographic methods. It provides the absorption, differential phase and scattering information of the underlying sample simultaneously. Phase retrieval from the differential phase signal is an essential problem for quantitative analysis in medical imaging. In this paper, we formalize the phase retrieval as a regularized inverse problem, and propose a novel discretization scheme for the derivative operator based on B-spline calculus. The inverse problem is then solved by a constrained regularized weighted-norm algorithm (CRWN) which adopts the properties of B-spline and ensures a fast implementation. The method is evaluated with a tomographic dataset and differential phase contrast mammography data. We demonstrate that the proposed method is able to produce phase image with enhanced and higher soft tissue contrast compared to conventional absorption-based approach, which can potentially provide useful information to mammographic investigations.

  1. Halo-free phase contrast microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tan H.; Kandel, Mikhail E.; Shakir, Haadi M.; Best, Catherine; Do, Minh N.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2017-02-01

    The phase contrast (PC) method is one of the most impactful developments in the four-century long history of microscopy. It allows for intrinsic, nondestructive contrast of transparent specimens, such as live cells. However, PC is plagued by the halo artifact, a result of insufficient spatial coherence in the illumination field, which limits its applicability. We present a new approach for retrieving halo-free phase contrast microscopy (hfPC) images by upgrading the conventional PC microscope with an external interferometric module, which generates sufficient data for reversing the halo artifact. Measuring four independent intensity images, our approach first measures haloed phase maps of the sample. We solve for the halo-free sample transmission function by using a physical model of the image formation under partial spatial coherence. Using this halo-free sample transmission, we can numerically generate artifact-free PC images. Furthermore, this transmission can be further used to obtain quantitative information about the sample, e.g., the thickness with known refractive indices, dry mass of live cells during their cycles. We tested our hfPC method on various control samples, e.g., beads, pillars and validated its potential for biological investigation by imaging live HeLa cells, red blood cells, and neurons.

  2. Clinical study in phase- contrast mammography: image-quality analysis.

    PubMed

    Longo, Renata; Tonutti, Maura; Rigon, Luigi; Arfelli, Fulvia; Dreossi, Diego; Quai, Elisa; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Castelli, Edoardo; Tromba, Giuliana; Cova, Maria A

    2014-03-06

    The first clinical study of phase-contrast mammography (PCM) with synchrotron radiation was carried out at the Synchrotron Radiation for Medical Physics beamline of the Elettra synchrotron radiation facility in Trieste (Italy) in 2006-2009. The study involved 71 patients with unresolved breast abnormalities after conventional digital mammography and ultrasonography exams carried out at the Radiology Department of Trieste University Hospital. These cases were referred for mammography at the synchrotron radiation facility, with images acquired using a propagation-based phase-contrast imaging technique. To investigate the contribution of phase-contrast effects to the image quality, two experienced radiologists specialized in mammography assessed the visibility of breast abnormalities and of breast glandular structures. The images acquired at the hospital and at the synchrotron radiation facility were compared and graded according to a relative seven-grade visual scoring system. The statistical analysis highlighted that PCM with synchrotron radiation depicts normal structures and abnormal findings with higher image quality with respect to conventional digital mammography.

  3. Zernike phase contrast in scanning microscopy with X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Holzner, Christian; Feser, Michael; Vogt, Stefan; Hornberger, Benjamin; Baines, Stephen B.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Scanning X-ray microscopy focuses radiation to a small spot and probes the sample by raster scanning. It allows information to be obtained from secondary signals such as X-ray fluorescence, which yields an elemental mapping of the sample not available in full-field imaging. The analysis and interpretation from these secondary signals can be considerably enhanced if these data are coupled with structural information from transmission imaging. However, absorption often is negligible and phase contrast has not been easily available. Originally introduced with visible light, Zernike phase contrast1 is a well-established technique in full-field X-ray microscopes for visualization of weakly absorbing samples2–7. On the basis of reciprocity, we demonstrate the implementation of Zernike phase contrast in scanning X-ray microscopy, revealing structural detail simultaneously with hard-X-ray trace-element measurements. The method is straightforward to implement without significant influence on the resolution of the fluorescence images and delivers complementary information. We show images of biological specimens that clearly demonstrate the advantage of correlating morphology with elemental information. PMID:21544232

  4. Optimal Phase Masks for High Contrast Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruane, Garreth J.

    2016-05-01

    Phase-only optical elements can provide a number of important functions for high-contrast imaging. This thesis presents analytical and numerical optical design methods for accomplishing specific tasks, the most significant of which is the precise suppression of light from a distant point source. Instruments designed for this purpose are known as coronagraphs. Here, advanced coronagraph designs are presented that offer improved theoretical performance in comparison to the current state-of-the-art. Applications of these systems include the direct imaging and characterization of exoplanets and circumstellar disks with high sensitivity. Several new coronagraph designs are introduced and, in some cases, experimental support is provided. In addition, two novel high-contrast imaging applications are discussed: the measurement of sub-resolution information using coronagraphic optics and the protection of sensors from laser damage. The former is based on experimental measurements of the sensitivity of a coronagraph to source displacement. The latter discussion presents the current state of ongoing theoretical work. Beyond the mentioned applications, the main outcome of this thesis is a generalized theory for the design of optical systems with one of more phase masks that provide precise control of radiation over a large dynamic range, which is relevant in various high-contrast imaging scenarios. The optimal phase masks depend on the necessary tasks, the maximum number of optics, and application specific performance measures. The challenges and future prospects of this work are discussed in detail.

  5. Zernike phase contrast in scanning microscopy with X-rays.

    PubMed

    Holzner, Christian; Feser, Michael; Vogt, Stefan; Hornberger, Benjamin; Baines, Stephen B; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-11-01

    Scanning X-ray microscopy focuses radiation to a small spot and probes the sample by raster scanning. It allows information to be obtained from secondary signals such as X-ray fluorescence, which yields an elemental mapping of the sample not available in full-field imaging. The analysis and interpretation from these secondary signals can be considerably enhanced if these data are coupled with structural information from transmission imaging. However, absorption often is negligible and phase contrast has not been easily available. Originally introduced with visible light, Zernike phase contrast(1) is a well-established technique in full-field X-ray microscopes for visualization of weakly absorbing samples(2-7). On the basis of reciprocity, we demonstrate the implementation of Zernike phase contrast in scanning X-ray microscopy, revealing structural detail simultaneously with hard-X-ray trace-element measurements. The method is straightforward to implement without significant influence on the resolution of the fluorescence images and delivers complementary information. We show images of biological specimens that clearly demonstrate the advantage of correlating morphology with elemental information.

  6. Multi-pore carbon phase plate for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sannomiya, Takumi; Junesch, Juliane; Hosokawa, Fumio; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Arai, Yoshihiro; Kayama, Yoko

    2014-11-01

    A new fabrication method of carbon based phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy is presented. This method utilizes colloidal masks to produce pores as well as disks on thin carbon membranes for phase modulation. Since no serial process is involved, carbon phase plate membranes containing hundreds of pores can be mass-produced on a large scale, which allows "disposal" of contaminated or degraded phase modulating objects after use. Due to the spherical shape of the mask colloid particles, the produced pores are perfectly circular. The pore size and distribution can be easily tuned by the mask colloid size and deposition condition. By using the stencil method, disk type phase plates can also be fabricated on a pore type phase plate. Both pore and disk type phase plates were tested by measuring amorphous samples and confirmed to convert the sinus phase contrast transfer function to the cosine shape.

  7. Covalent triazine framework-1 as adsorbent for inline solid phase extraction-high performance liquid chromatographic analysis of trace nitroimidazoles in porcine liver and environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Cheng; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Hu, Bin

    2017-02-03

    In this study, covalent triazine framework-1 (CTF-1) was adopted as solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbents, and a method of SPE inline coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) detection was developed for trace analysis of three nitroimidazolaes (including metronidazole, ronidazole and dimetridazole) in porcine liver and environmental water samples. CTF-1 has rich π-electron and N containing triazine, thus can form π-π interaction and intermolecular hydrogen bond with three target polar nitroimidazoles, resulting in high extraction efficiency (87%-98%). Besides, CTF-1 has large specific area, which benefits rapid mass transfer and low column pressure, leading to fast adsorption/desorption dynamics. Several parameters affecting inline SPE including pH, sample flow rate, sample volume, desorption reagents, elution flow rate, elution volume, and ionic strength were investigated. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the limits of detection (S/N=3) were found to be in the range of 0.11-0.13μg/L. The enrichment factors (EFs) ranged from 52 to 59 fold (theoretical EF was 60-fold). The relative standard deviations were in the range of 4.3-9.4% (n=7, c=1μg/L), and the linear range was 0.5-500μg/L for three target analytes. The sample throughput is 7/h. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of nitroimidazoles in porcine liver and environmental water samples with good recoveries for the spiked samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Multi-illumination Gabor holography recorded in a single camera snap-shot for high-resolution phase retrieval in digital in-line holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, Martin; Picazo-Bueno, Jose A.; Garcia, Javier; Micó, Vicente

    2015-05-01

    In this contribution we introduce MISHELF microscopy, a new concept and design of a lensless holographic microscope based on wavelength multiplexing, single hologram acquisition and digital image processing. The technique which name comes from Multi-Illumination Single-Holographic-Exposure Lensless Fresnel microscopy, is based on the simultaneous illumination and recording of three diffraction patterns in the Fresnel domain. In combination with a novel and fast iterative phase retrieval algorithm, MISHELF microscopy is capable of high-resolution (micron range) phase-retrieved (twin image elimination) biological imaging of dynamic events (video rate recording speed) since it avoids the time multiplexing needed for the in-line hologram sequence recording when using conventional phase-shifting or phase retrieval algorithms. MISHELF microscopy is validated using two different experimental layouts: one using RGB illumination and detection schemes and another using IRRB as illumination while keeping the RGB color camera as detection device. Preliminary experimental results are provided for both experimental layouts using a synthetic object (USAF resolution test target).

  9. Design, development and characterization of an x-band 5 bit DMTL phase shifter using an inline MEMS bridge and MAM capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sukomal; Koul, Shiban K.

    2014-09-01

    A radio frequency micro-electro-mechanical system (RF-MEMS) 5 bit phase shifter based on a distributed MEMS transmission line concept with excellent phase accuracy and good repeatability is presented in this paper. The phase shifter is built with three fixed-fixed beams; one is switchable with electrostatic actuation and the other two are fixed for a metal-air-metal (MAM) capacitor. The design is based on a coplanar waveguide (CPW) configuration using alumina substrate. Gold-based surface micromachining is used to develop the individual primary phase bits (11.25°/22.5°/45°/90°/180°), which are fundamental building blocks of the complete 5 bit phase shifter. All of the primary phase bits are cascaded together to build the complete phase shifter. Detailed design methodology and performance analysis of the unit cell phase shifter has been carried out with structural and parametric optimization using an in-line bridge and MAM capacitors. The mechanical, electrical, transient, intermodulation distortion (IMD), temperature distribution, power handling and loss performances of the MEMS bridge have been experimentally obtained and validated using simulations up to reasonable extent. A single unit cell is able to provide 31 dB return loss, maximum insertion loss of 0.085 dB and a differential phase shift of 5.95° (at 10 GHz) over the band of interest. Furthermore, all primary phase bits are individually tested to ensure overall optimum phase shifter performance. The complete 5 bit phase shifter demonstrates an average insertion loss of 4.72 dB with return loss of better than 12 dB within 8-12 GHz using periodic placement of 62 unit cells and a maximum phase error of ±3.2° has been obtained at 10 GHz. Finally, the x-band 5 bit phase shifter is compared with the present state-of-the-art. The performance of the 5 bit phase shifter when mounted inside a test jig has been experimentally investigated and the results are presented. The total area of

  10. Various clinical application of phase contrast X-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Chilhwan; Park, Sangyong; Ha, Seunghan; Park, Gyuman; Lee, Gunwoo; Lee, Onseok; Je, Jungho

    2008-02-01

    In biomedical application study using phase contrast X-ray, both sample thickness or density and absorption difference are very important factors in aspects of contrast enhancement. We present experimental evidence that synchrotron hard X-ray are suitable for radiological imaging of biological samples down to the cellular level. We investigated the potential of refractive index radiology using un-monochromatized synchrotron hard X-rays for the imaging of cell and tissue in various diseases. Material had been adopted various medical field, such as apoE knockout mouse in cardiologic field, specimen from renal and prostatic carcinoma patient in urology, basal cell epithelioma in dermatology, brain tissue from autosy sample of pakinson's disease, artificially induced artilrtis tissue from rabbits and extracted tooth from patients of crack tooth syndrome. Formalin and paraffin fixed tissue blocks were cut in 3 mm thickness for the X-ray radiographic imaging. From adjacent areas, 4 μm thickness sections were also prepared for hematoxylin-eosin staining. Radiographic images of dissected tissues were obtained using the hard X-rays from the 7B2 beamline of the Pohang Light Source (PLS). The technique used for the study was the phase contrast images were compared with the optical microscopic images of corresponding histological slides. Radiographic images of various diseased tissues showed clear histological details of organelles in normal tissues. Most of cancerous lesions were well differentiated from adjacent normal tissues and detailed histological features of each tumor were clearly identified. Also normal microstructures were identifiable by the phase contrast imaging. Tissue in cancer or other disease showed clearly different findings from those of surrounding normal tissue. For the first time we successfully demonstrated that synchrotron hard X-rays can be used for radiological imaging of relatively thick tissue samples with great histological details.

  11. Toward clinical X-ray phase-contrast CT: demonstration of enhanced soft-tissue contrast in human specimen.

    PubMed

    Donath, Tilman; Pfeiffer, Franz; Bunk, Oliver; Grünzweig, Christian; Hempel, Eckhard; Popescu, Stefan; Vock, Peter; David, Christian

    2010-07-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) using phase contrast can provide images with greatly enhanced soft-tissue contrast in comparison to conventional attenuation-based CT. We report on the first scan of a human specimen recorded with a phase-contrast CT system based on an x-ray grating interferometer and a conventional x-ray tube source. Feasibility and potential applications of preclinical and clinical phase-contrast CT are discussed. A hand of an infant was scanned ex vivo at 40 kVp tube voltage. The simultaneously recorded attenuation and phase-contrast CT images were quantitatively compared with each other, by introducing a specific Hounsfield unit for phase-contrast imaging. We observe significantly enhanced soft-tissue contrast in the phase images, when compared with the attenuation data. Particularly, tendons and ligaments appear with strongly increased contrast-to-noise ratio. Our results demonstrate the huge potential of phase-contrast CT for clinical investigations of human specimens and, potentially, of humans. Because the applied technique works efficiently with conventional x-ray tubes and detectors, it is suitable for the realization of preclinical and clinical phase-contrast CT systems.

  12. Non-linear regularized phase retrieval for unidirectional X-ray differential phase contrast radiography.

    PubMed

    Thüring, Thomas; Modregger, Peter; Pinzer, Bernd R; Wang, Zhentian; Stampanoni, Marco

    2011-12-05

    Phase retrieval from unidirectional radiographic differential phase contrast images requires integration of noisy data. A method is presented, which aims to suppress stripe artifacts arising from direct image integration. It is purely algorithmic and therefore, compared to alternative approaches, neither additional alignment nor an increased scan time is required. We report on the theory of this method and present results using numerical as well as experimental data. The method shows significant improvements on the phase retrieval accuracy and enhances contrast in the phase image. Due to its general applicability, the proposed method provides a valuable tool for various 2D imaging applications using differential data.

  13. In-line cold column trapping of organic phase in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction: enrichment and determination of curcumin in human serum.

    PubMed

    Safdarian, Mehdi; Hashemi, Payman; Naderlou, Malihe

    2012-06-29

    A new temperature controlled cold column trapping (CCT) system was developed for in-line sequestration of organic phase in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) method. In the developed CCT-DLLME method, the dispersed organic extraction phase is solidified and trapped in the CCT, packed with glass particles. Subsequently, the sequestered phase is washed out in an elevated temperature by using an appropriate solvent. The column temperature is controlled by a pair of thermal electric cooler (TEC) plates. The new device is simple and portable and can eliminate the need for centrifugation in the DLLME method for solvents with an appropriate melting point. Some important parameters such as types of extraction and disperser solvents and their volumes, minimum and maximum column temperatures and extraction time were optimized for the extraction of curcumin, as a model compound. Using 1-dodecanol as the organic solvent and acetone as the disperser, recoveries exceeding 90% and a relative standard deviation of 2.87% were obtained for 5 replicated analyses of curcumin by an HPLC method. The detection limit of curcumin (3σ) extracted by the CCT-DLLME system was 28 μg L⁻¹. The method was successfully applied to the determination of curcumin in some human serum samples.

  14. X-ray phase contrast for CO2 microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundström, U.; Larsson, D. H.; Burvall, A.; Takman, P. A. C.; Scott, L.; Brismar, H.; Hertz, H. M.

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrate a laboratory method for imaging small blood vessels using x-ray propagation-based phase-contrast imaging and carbon dioxide (CO2) gas as a contrast agent. The limited radiation dose in combination with CO2 being clinically acceptable makes the method promising for small-diameter vascular visualization. We investigate the possibilities and limitations of the method for small-animal angiography and compare it with conventional absorption-based x-ray angiography. Photon noise in absorption-contrast imaging prevents visualization of blood vessels narrower than 50 µm at the highest radiation doses compatible with living animals, whereas our simulations and experiments indicate the possibility of visualizing 20 µm vessels at radiation doses as low as 100 mGy. Experimental computed tomography of excised rat kidney shows blood vessels of diameters down to 60 µm with improved image quality compared to absorption-based methods. With our present prototype x-ray source, the acquisition time for a tomographic dataset is approximately 1 h, which is long compared to the 1-20 min common for absorption-contrast micro-CT systems. Further development of the liquid-metal-jet microfocus x-ray sources used here and high-resolution x-ray detectors shows promise to reduce exposure times and make this high-resolution method practical for imaging of living animals.

  15. Optical phase encryption by phase contrast using electrically addressed spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishchal, Naveen Kumar; Joseph, Joby; Singh, Kehar

    2003-03-01

    We report the use of an electrically addressed liquid crystal spatial light modulator (EALCSLM) operating in the phase mode as a phase-contrast filter (PCF). As an application, an optical phase encryption system has been implemented. We encrypt and decrypt a two-dimensional phase image obtained from an amplitude image. Encrypted image is holographically recorded in a Barium titanate crystal and is then decrypted by generating through phase conjugation, a conjugate of the encrypted image. The decrypted phase image is converted into an amplitude image using an EASLM as a PCF. The idea has been supported by the experimental results.

  16. Motionless phase stepping in X-ray phase contrast imaging with a compact source

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Houxun; Chen, Lei; Bennett, Eric E.; Adamo, Nick M.; Gomella, Andrew A.; DeLuca, Alexa M.; Patel, Ajay; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Wen, Han

    2013-01-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging offers a way to visualize the internal structures of an object without the need to deposit significant radiation, and thereby alleviate the main concern in X-ray diagnostic imaging procedures today. Grating-based differential phase contrast imaging techniques are compatible with compact X-ray sources, which is a key requirement for the majority of clinical X-ray modalities. However, these methods are substantially limited by the need for mechanical phase stepping. We describe an electromagnetic phase-stepping method that eliminates mechanical motion, thus removing the constraints in speed, accuracy, and flexibility. The method is broadly applicable to both projection and tomography imaging modes. The transition from mechanical to electromagnetic scanning should greatly facilitate the translation of X-ray phase contrast techniques into mainstream applications. PMID:24218599

  17. Development of a synthetic phase contrast imaging diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Rost, J. C.; Lin, L.; Porkolab, M.

    2010-06-15

    A ''synthetic diagnostic'' has been developed to calculate the expected experimental response of phase contrast imaging (PCI), a scattering diagnostic used to measure density fluctuations in laboratory plasmas, to a tokamak discharge modeled with the GYRO nonlinear gyrokinetic code [J. Candy and R. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. The synthetic PCI includes the spatial response of the experimental diagnostic, primarily implemented as a line integral of plasma density along the beam path, and the minimum and maximum wavenumber response resulting from the detection scheme. The synthetic PCI can be used for comparisons between GYRO and experiment as well as studies of the PCI response.

  18. Scanning Electron and Phase-Contrast Microscopy of Bacterial Spores

    PubMed Central

    Bulla, L. A.; Julian, G. St.; Rhodes, R. A.; Hesseltine, C. W.

    1969-01-01

    The three-dimensional immages of free and intrasporangial spores produced by scanning electron microscopy show surface structures not visible by phase-contrast microscopy. Although fine surface detail is not elucidated by scanning electron microscopy, this technique does afford a definitive picture of the general shape of spores. Spores of Bacillus popilliae, B. lentimorbus, B. thuringiensis, B. alvei, B. cereus, and Sarcina ureae have varying patterns of surface ridge formation, whereas spores of B. larvae, B. subtilis, and B. licheniformis have relatively smooth surfaces. Images PMID:4907010

  19. Hard X-ray Phase-Contrast Tomographic Nanoimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampanoni, M.; Marone, F.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Gorelick, S.; David, C.; Trtik, P.; Jefimovs, K.; Mokso, R.

    2011-09-01

    Synchrotron-based full-field tomographic microscopy established itself as a tool for noninvasive investigations. Many beamlines worldwide routinely achieve micrometer spatial resolution while the isotropic 100-nm barrier is reached and trespassed only by few instruments, mainly in the soft x-ray regime. We present an x-ray, full-field microscope with tomographic capabilities operating at 10 keV and with a 3D isotropic resolution of 144 nm recently installed at the TOMCAT beamline of the Swiss Light Source. Custom optical components, including a beam-shaping condenser and phase-shifting dot arrays, were used to obtain an ideal, aperture-matched sample illumination and very sensitive phase-contrast imaging. The instrument has been successfully used for the nondestructive, volumetric investigation of single, unstained cells.

  20. Phase Contrast Imaging on the HL-2A Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yi; Gong, Shaobo; Xu, Min; Jiang, Wei; Zhong, Wulv; Shi, Zhongbin; Wang, Huajie; Wu, Yifan; Yuan, Boda; Lan, Tao; Ye, Minyou; Duan, Xuru; HL-2A Team

    2016-10-01

    In this article we present the design of a phase contrast imaging (PCI) system on the HL-2A tokamak. This diagnostic is developed to infer line integrated plasma density fluctuations by measuring the phase shift of an expanded CO2 laser beam passing through magnetically confined high temperature plasmas. This system is designed to diagnose plasma density fluctuations with the maximum wavenumber of 66 cm-1. The designed wavenumber resolution is 2.09cm-1, and the time resolution is higher than 0.2 μs. The broad kρs ranging from 0.34 to 13.37 makes it suitable for turbulence measurement. An upgraded PCI system is also discussed, which is designed for the HL-2M tokamak. Supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Energy Research Project (Grant No. 2015GB120002), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11375053, 11105144, 10905057, 11535013).

  1. Demonstration of synchrotron x-ray phase contrast imaging computed tomography of infiltrative transitional cell carcinoma of the prostatic urethra in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, James E.; Wesolowski, Michal J.; Wolkowski, Bailey; Chibbar, Rajni; Snead, Elisabeth C. R.; Singh, Jaswant; Pettitt, Murray; Malhi, Pritpal S.; Barboza, Trinita; Adams, Gregg

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Prostatic urethral transitional cell carcinoma with prostatic invasion in a dog was imaged with abdominal radiography and abdominal ultrasonography antemortem. Synchrotron in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging computed tomography (XPCI-CT) was performed on the prostate ex vivo at the Canadian Light Source Synchrotron and compared to histology. XPCI-CT imaging provides greater soft tissue contrast than conventional absorption-based x-ray imaging modalities, permitting visualization of regions of inflammatory cell infiltration, differentiation of invasive versus noninvasive tumor regions, and areas of necrosis and mineralization. This represents the first report of XPCI-CT images of an invasive prostatic urothelial neoplasm in a dog. PMID:27014719

  2. Determination of perfluorooctanoate and perfluorooctanesulfonate in water matrices by inline matrix elimination liquid chromatography with reversed phase separation and suppressed conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, N Harihara; Manigandan, P; Wille, Andrea; Radhakrishnan, Ganga

    2011-09-01

    This work describes a new method for the determination of perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in water matrices by suppressed conductivity detection. Separation was achieved by isocratic elution on a reversed-phase column thermostated at 45°C using an aqueous mobile phase containing boric acid and acetonitrile. The PFOA and PFOS content in the water matrix were quantified by a pre-concentration technique. For the concentration range of 1 to 15 ng/mL and 2 to 30 ng/mL, the linear calibration curve for PFOA and PFOS yielded coefficients of determination (R(2)) of 0.9995 and 0.9985, respectively. The relative standard deviations were smaller than 1.5% for PFOA and PFOS. The retention-time precision of four consecutive 12 h injections was smaller than 0.641% and 0.818%, respectively. The presence of common divalent cations, such as calcium, magnesium, and iron in water matrices impairs PFOS recovery. This drawback was overcome by applying inline matrix elimination method. The optimized method was successfully applied for drinking water, ground water, and seawater samples.

  3. Wall Shear Stress Measurement Using Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Angiography in Arteriovenous Polytetrafluoroethylene Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Sanjay; Fu, Alex A.; Misra, Khamal D.; Glockner, James F.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present article was to determine the changes in luminal vessel area, blood flow, and wall shear stress in both the inflow artery and the venous stenosis of arteriovenous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts. Methods and materials Polytetrafluoroethylene grafts were placed from the carotid artery to the ipsilateral jugular vein in 8 castrated juvenile male pigs. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) with cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed 2 weeks after graft placement. Results The mean wall shear stress at the venous stenosis was 4 times higher than the control vein, while the inflow artery was only 2-fold higher. By day 14, venous stenosis had formed, which was characterized by narrowed area and elevated blood flow. Conclusion By day 14, there is venous stenosis formation in porcine arteriovenous PTFE grafts with increased shear stress with decreased area when compared to control vein. PMID:19625275

  4. Wall shear stress measurement using phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging with phase contrast magnetic resonance angiography in arteriovenous polytetrafluoroethylene grafts.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sanjay; Fu, Alex A; Misra, Khamal D; Glockner, James F; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present article was to determine the changes in luminal vessel area, blood flow, and wall shear stress in both the inflow artery and the venous stenosis of arteriovenous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts. Polytetrafluoroethylene grafts were placed from the carotid artery to the ipsilateral jugular vein in 8 castrated juvenile male pigs. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) with cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed 2 weeks after graft placement. The mean wall shear stress at the venous stenosis was 4 times higher than the control vein, while the inflow artery was only 2-fold higher. By day 14, venous stenosis had formed, which was characterized by narrowed area and elevated blood flow. By day 14, there is venous stenosis formation in porcine arteriovenous PTFE grafts with increased shear stress with decreased area when compared to control vein.

  5. A phase contrast interferometer on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Coda, S.; Porkolab, M.; Carlstrom, T.N.

    1992-04-01

    A novel imaging diagnostic has recently become operational on the DIII-D tokamak for the study of density fluctuations at the outer edge of the plasma. The phase contrast imaging approach overcomes the limitations of conventional scattering techniques in the spectral range of interest for transport-related phenomena, by allowing detection of long wavelength modes (up to 7.6 cm) with excellent spatial resolution (5 mm) in the radial direction. Additional motivation for the diagnostic is provided by wave-plasma interactions during heating and current drive experiments in the Ion Cyclotron range of frequencies. Density perturbations of 4 {times} 10{sup 7} cm{sup {minus}3} with a 1 MHz bandwidth can be resolved. The diagnostic employs a 7.6 cm diameter CO{sub 2} laser beam launched vertically across the plasma edge. An image of the plasma is then created on a 16-element detector array: the detector signals are directly proportional to the density fluctuations integrated along each chord. Wavelengths and correlation lengths can be inferred from the spatial mapping. The phase contrast method and its application to DIII-D are described and tests and first plasma data are presented.

  6. A phase contrast interferometer on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Coda, S.; Porkolab, M. ); Carlstrom, T.N. )

    1992-04-01

    A novel imaging diagnostic has recently become operational on the DIII-D tokamak for the study of density fluctuations at the outer edge of the plasma. The phase contrast imaging approach overcomes the limitations of conventional scattering techniques in the spectral range of interest for transport-related phenomena, by allowing detection of long wavelength modes (up to 7.6 cm) with excellent spatial resolution (5 mm) in the radial direction. Additional motivation for the diagnostic is provided by wave-plasma interactions during heating and current drive experiments in the Ion Cyclotron range of frequencies. Density perturbations of 4 {times} 10{sup 7} cm{sup {minus}3} with a 1 MHz bandwidth can be resolved. The diagnostic employs a 7.6 cm diameter CO{sub 2} laser beam launched vertically across the plasma edge. An image of the plasma is then created on a 16-element detector array: the detector signals are directly proportional to the density fluctuations integrated along each chord. Wavelengths and correlation lengths can be inferred from the spatial mapping. The phase contrast method and its application to DIII-D are described and tests and first plasma data are presented.

  7. [Measurement of cerebral blood flow using phase-contrast MRI].

    PubMed

    Obata, T; Shishido, F; Koga, M; Ikehira, H; Kimura, F; Yoshida, K

    1997-07-01

    The development of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging(P-C MRI) provides a noninvasive method for measurement of volumetric blood flow(VFR). The VFR of the left and right internal carotid arteries and basilar artery were measured using P-C MRI, and total cerebral blood flow(tCBF) was calculated by summing up the VFR values in three vessels. We investigated the changes in these blood flows as influenced from age, head size, height, weight, body surface area and handedness. Moreover, regional CBF(rCBF) was measured by combining with the single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) of 123I. The blood flows were 142 +/- 58 mL/ min(mean +/- SD) in the basilar artery, 229 +/- 86 mL/min in the left, 223 +/- 58 mL/min in the right internal carotid artery, and tCBF was 617 +/- 128 mL/min(Ref. Magn Resn Imaging 14:P. 1143, 1996). Significant increases were observed in head-size-related change of VFR in the basilar artery and height-related change of tCBF. The value of rCBF was easily acquired in combination with SPECT. Phase-contrast MRI is useful for a noninvasive and rapid analysis of cerebral VFR and has potential for clinical use.

  8. Phase Contrast X-ray Imaging of Shuttle Insulating Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Zhengwei

    2005-01-01

    X-ray radiation has been widely used for imaging applications since Rontgen first discovered X-rays over a century ago. Its large penetration depth makes it ideal for the nondestructive visualization of internal structure of materials or objects unobtainable otherwise. Currently widely used nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tools-X-ray radiography and tomography are absorption-based, and work well in highly absorbing materials where density or composition variations due to internal structure or defects are high enough to be spatially distinguished in terms of absorption contrast. However, in many cases where materials such as insulating foam are light-weight, the conventional absorption-based X-ray methods for NDE become less effective. Indeed, the low-density shuttle insulating foam used for flight mission poses a great challenge to the standard NDE tools in that the absorption contrast arising from internal defects of such a low- density material is either weak or indistinguishable. In this presentation, the latest progress in phase contrast X-ray imaging of internal defects of insulating foam will be presented and discussed, demonstrating new opportunities to solve challenging issues involved in advanced materials development and processing for space exploration.

  9. Absorption and phase retrieval in phase contrast imaging with non linear Tikhonov regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sixou, B.; Davidoiu, V.; Langer, M.; Peyrin, F.

    2012-09-01

    The X-ray phase contrast imaging technique relies on the measurement of the Fresnel diffraction intensity patterns associated to a phase shift induced by the object. The simultaneous recovery of the phase and of the absorption is an ill-posed non linear inverse problem. In this work, we investigate the resolution of this problem with non linear Tikhonov regularization and with the Iterative Gauss Newton method. The algorithm is evalutated using simulated noisy data.

  10. Arterial-phase three-dimensional gadolinium magnetic resonance angiography of the renal arteries. Strategies for timing and contrast media injection: original investigation.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, S O; Knopp, M V; Prince, M R; Londy, F; Knopp, M A

    1998-09-01

    The authors review different imaging and contrast-media infusion strategies for arterial-phase three-dimensional (3D) gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (Gd-MRA). The influence of physicochemical factors on the infusion of contrast media, including viscosity, flow rate, inline pressure, and cannula size, is assessed. The combination of manual or automated contrast-media administration with timing-dependent or -independent 3D Gd-MRA techniques is reviewed regarding the aspects of effectiveness, robustness, image quality, and costs. For effective bolus delivery with high flow rates, the type and temperature of the contrast media, the size of the cannula, and an immediate saline flush must be considered. Timing-dependent techniques based on a test bolus and using automated contrast-media infusion as well as timing independent techniques such as MR SmartPrep or multiphase 3D Gd-MRA by using a manual injection with a SmartSet tubing set, are all effective procedures for arterial phase 3D Gd-MRA. Manual contrast-media injection with a tubing set can be used for timing-independent MRA techniques. The multiphase 3D Gd-MRA approach seems to be favorable for different MR systems, robustness, and speed.

  11. A theoretical study on phase-contrast mammography with Thomson-scattering x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    De Caro, Liberato; Giannini, Cinzia; Bellotti, Roberto; Tangaro, Sabina

    2009-10-01

    The x-ray transmitted beam from any material/tissue depends on the complex refractive index (n= 1-delta+ibeta), where delta is responsible for the phase shift and beta is for the beam attenuation. Although for human tissues, the delta cross section is about 1000 times greater than the beta ones in the x-ray energy range from 10 to 150 keV, the gain in breast tumor visualization of phase-contrast mammography (PCM) with respect to absorption contact imaging (AI) is limited by the maximum dose that can be delivered to the patient. Moreover, in-line PC imaging (PCI) is the simplest experimental mode among all available x-ray PCI techniques since no optics are needed. The latter is a fundamental requirement in order to transfer the results of laboratory research into hospitals. Alternative to synchrotron radiation sources, the implementation of relativistic Thomson-scattering (TS) x-ray sources is particularly suitable for hospital use because of their high peak brightness within a relatively compact and affordable system. In this work, the possibility to realize PCM using a TS source in a hospital environment is studied, accounting for the effect of a finite deliverable dose on the PC visibility enhancement with respect to AI. The contrast-to-noise ratio of tumor-tissue lesions in PCM has been studied on the bases of a recent theoretical model, describing image contrast formation by means of both wave-optical theory and the mutual coherence formalism. The latter is used to describe the evolution, during wave propagation, of the coherence of the wave field emitted by a TS source. The contrast-to-noise ratio for both PCI and AI has been analyzed in terms of tumor size, beam energy, detector, and source distances, studying optimal conditions for performing PCM. Regarding other relevant factors which could influence "tumor" visibility, the authors have assumed simplified conditions such as a spherical shape description of the tumor inclusion, a constant surrounding

  12. Consistency of flow quantifications in tridirectional phase-contrast MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unterhinninghofen, R.; Ley, S.; Dillmann, R.

    2009-02-01

    Tridirectionally encoded phase-contrast MRI is a technique to non-invasively acquire time-resolved velocity vector fields of blood flow. These may not only be used to analyze pathological flow patterns, but also to quantify flow at arbitrary positions within the acquired volume. In this paper we examine the validity of this approach by analyzing the consistency of related quantifications instead of comparing it with an external reference measurement. Datasets of the thoracic aorta were acquired from 6 pigs, 1 healthy volunteer and 3 patients with artificial aortic valves. Using in-house software an elliptical flow quantification plane was placed manually at 6 positions along the descending aorta where it was rotated to 5 different angles. For each configuration flow was computed based on the original data and data that had been corrected for phase offsets. Results reveal that quantifications are more dependent on changes in position than on changes in angle. Phase offset correction considerably reduces this dependency. Overall consistency is good with a maximum variation coefficient of 9.9% and a mean variation coefficient of 7.2%.

  13. First application of liquid-metal-jet sources for small-animal imaging: High-resolution CT and phase-contrast tumor demarcation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, Daniel H.; Lundstroem, Ulf; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Small-animal studies require images with high spatial resolution and high contrast due to the small scale of the structures. X-ray imaging systems for small animals are often limited by the microfocus source. Here, the authors investigate the applicability of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for such high-resolution small-animal imaging, both in tomography based on absorption and in soft-tissue tumor imaging based on in-line phase contrast. Methods: The experimental arrangement consists of a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source, the small-animal object on a rotating stage, and an imaging detector. The source-to-object and object-to-detector distances are adjusted for the preferred contrast mechanism. Two different liquid-metal-jet sources are used, one circulating a Ga/In/Sn alloy and the other an In/Ga alloy for higher penetration through thick tissue. Both sources are operated at 40-50 W electron-beam power with {approx}7 {mu}m x-ray spots, providing high spatial resolution in absorption imaging and high spatial coherence for the phase-contrast imaging. Results: High-resolution absorption imaging is demonstrated on mice with CT, showing 50 {mu}m bone details in the reconstructed slices. High-resolution phase-contrast soft-tissue imaging shows clear demarcation of mm-sized tumors at much lower dose than is required in absorption. Conclusions: This is the first application of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for whole-body small-animal x-ray imaging. In absorption, the method allows high-resolution tomographic skeletal imaging with potential for significantly shorter exposure times due to the power scalability of liquid-metal-jet sources. In phase contrast, the authors use a simple in-line arrangement to show distinct tumor demarcation of few-mm-sized tumors. This is, to their knowledge, the first small-animal tumor visualization with a laboratory phase-contrast system.

  14. First application of liquid-metal-jet sources for small-animal imaging: high-resolution CT and phase-contrast tumor demarcation.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Daniel H; Lundström, Ulf; Westermark, Ulrica K; Arsenian Henriksson, Marie; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M

    2013-02-01

    Small-animal studies require images with high spatial resolution and high contrast due to the small scale of the structures. X-ray imaging systems for small animals are often limited by the microfocus source. Here, the authors investigate the applicability of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for such high-resolution small-animal imaging, both in tomography based on absorption and in soft-tissue tumor imaging based on in-line phase contrast. The experimental arrangement consists of a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source, the small-animal object on a rotating stage, and an imaging detector. The source-to-object and object-to-detector distances are adjusted for the preferred contrast mechanism. Two different liquid-metal-jet sources are used, one circulating a Ga∕In∕Sn alloy and the other an In∕Ga alloy for higher penetration through thick tissue. Both sources are operated at 40-50 W electron-beam power with ∼7 μm x-ray spots, providing high spatial resolution in absorption imaging and high spatial coherence for the phase-contrast imaging. High-resolution absorption imaging is demonstrated on mice with CT, showing 50 μm bone details in the reconstructed slices. High-resolution phase-contrast soft-tissue imaging shows clear demarcation of mm-sized tumors at much lower dose than is required in absorption. This is the first application of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for whole-body small-animal x-ray imaging. In absorption, the method allows high-resolution tomographic skeletal imaging with potential for significantly shorter exposure times due to the power scalability of liquid-metal-jet sources. In phase contrast, the authors use a simple in-line arrangement to show distinct tumor demarcation of few-mm-sized tumors. This is, to their knowledge, the first small-animal tumor visualization with a laboratory phase-contrast system.

  15. Robustness of phase retrieval methods in x-ray phase contrast imaging: A comparison

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Aimin; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The robustness of the phase retrieval methods is of critical importance for limiting and reducing radiation doses involved in x-ray phase contrast imaging. This work is to compare the robustness of two phase retrieval methods by analyzing the phase maps retrieved from the experimental images of a phantom. Methods: Two phase retrieval methods were compared. One method is based on the transport of intensity equation (TIE) for phase contrast projections, and the TIE-based method is the most commonly used method for phase retrieval in the literature. The other is the recently developed attenuation-partition based (AP-based) phase retrieval method. The authors applied these two methods to experimental projection images of an air-bubble wrap phantom for retrieving the phase map of the bubble wrap. The retrieved phase maps obtained by using the two methods are compared. Results: In the wrap’s phase map retrieved by using the TIE-based method, no bubble is recognizable, hence, this method failed completely for phase retrieval from these bubble wrap images. Even with the help of the Tikhonov regularization, the bubbles are still hardly visible and buried in the cluttered background in the retrieved phase map. The retrieved phase values with this method are grossly erroneous. In contrast, in the wrap’s phase map retrieved by using the AP-based method, the bubbles are clearly recovered. The retrieved phase values with the AP-based method are reasonably close to the estimate based on the thickness-based measurement. The authors traced these stark performance differences of the two methods to their different techniques employed to deal with the singularity problem involved in the phase retrievals. Conclusions: This comparison shows that the conventional TIE-based phase retrieval method, regardless if Tikhonov regularization is used or not, is unstable against the noise in the wrap’s projection images, while the AP-based phase retrieval method is shown in these

  16. Robustness of phase retrieval methods in x-ray phase contrast imaging: A comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Aimin; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The robustness of the phase retrieval methods is of critical importance for limiting and reducing radiation doses involved in x-ray phase contrast imaging. This work is to compare the robustness of two phase retrieval methods by analyzing the phase maps retrieved from the experimental images of a phantom. Methods: Two phase retrieval methods were compared. One method is based on the transport of intensity equation (TIE) for phase contrast projections, and the TIE-based method is the most commonly used method for phase retrieval in the literature. The other is the recently developed attenuation-partition based (AP-based) phase retrieval method. The authors applied these two methods to experimental projection images of an air-bubble wrap phantom for retrieving the phase map of the bubble wrap. The retrieved phase maps obtained by using the two methods are compared. Results: In the wrap's phase map retrieved by using the TIE-based method, no bubble is recognizable, hence, this method failed completely for phase retrieval from these bubble wrap images. Even with the help of the Tikhonov regularization, the bubbles are still hardly visible and buried in the cluttered background in the retrieved phase map. The retrieved phase values with this method are grossly erroneous. In contrast, in the wrap's phase map retrieved by using the AP-based method, the bubbles are clearly recovered. The retrieved phase values with the AP-based method are reasonably close to the estimate based on the thickness-based measurement. The authors traced these stark performance differences of the two methods to their different techniques employed to deal with the singularity problem involved in the phase retrievals. Conclusions: This comparison shows that the conventional TIE-based phase retrieval method, regardless if Tikhonov regularization is used or not, is unstable against the noise in the wrap's projection images, while the AP-based phase retrieval method is shown in these

  17. Phase-contrast X-ray microtomography of mouse fetus

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto

    2012-01-01

    Summary A phase-contrast X-ray microtomography system using the Talbot imaging has been built at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. This system has much higher density resolution than absorption-based X-ray microtomography. The tomographic sections of formalin-fixed mouse fetuses obtained with this method clearly depict various organs without any staining at a pixel resolution of up to 5 µm. Since this technique allows us to obtain three-dimensional structural information without sectioning, it will be particularly useful to examine anomalies that take place during development. It can be also used to quantitatively measure volume and mass of organs during development. PMID:23213417

  18. Computed tomography using broadband Bessel THz beams and phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Bitman, Assaf; Goldring, Sharone; Moshe, Inon; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-04-01

    We present new results demonstrating the capability of performing computed tomography (CT) using broadband Bessel terahertz (THz) beams. Nondiffractive beams such as these exhibit propagation-invariant lines of focus with an extended depth-of-field compared to conventional Gaussian beams. Using this property, we demonstrate a considerable improvement in the 3D reconstruction image of a synthetic sample through the backprojection algorithm. Only when THz Bessel beams are used, a full reconstruction of the object structure is made. Moreover, we use phase-contrast mechanism which improves the spatial resolution and reconstructed images. Our results highlight the potential in using nondiffractive Bessel beams to significantly improve 3D-image reconstruction of THz CT.

  19. Small-animal microangiography using phase-contrast X-ray imaging and gas as contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundström, Ulf; Larsson, Daniel H.; Westermark, Ulrica K.; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M.

    2014-03-01

    We use propagation-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging with gas as contrast agent to visualize the microvasculature in small animals like mice and rats. The radiation dose required for absorption X-ray imaging is proportional to the minus fourth power of the structure size to be detected. This makes small vessels impossible to image at reasonable radiation doses using the absorption of conventional iodinated contrast agents. Propagation-based phase contrast gives enhanced contrast for high spatial frequencies by moving the detector away from the sample to let phase variations in the transmitted X-rays develop into intensity variations at the detector. Blood vessels are normally difficult to observe in phase contrast even with iodinated contrast agents as the density difference between blood and most tissues is relatively small. By injecting gas into the blood stream this density difference can be greatly enhanced giving strong phase contrast. One possible gas to use is carbon dioxide, which is a clinically accepted X-ray contrast agent. The gas is injected into the blood stream of patients to temporarily displace the blood in a region and thereby reduce the X-ray absorption in the blood vessels. We have shown that this method can be used to image blood vessels down to 8 μm in diameter in mouse ears. The low dose requirements of this method indicate a potential for live small-animal imaging and longitudinal studies of angiogenesis.

  20. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    SciTech Connect

    Demi, Libertario Sloun, Ruud J. G. van; Mischi, Massimo; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2015-10-28

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO{sup ®} UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  1. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO® UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  2. Propagation-based phase-contrast enhancement of nanostructure images using a debris-free femtosecond-laser-driven cluster-based plasma soft x-ray source and an LiF crystal detector.

    PubMed

    Pikuz, Tatiana A; Faenov, Anatoly Ya; Gasilov, Sergei V; Skobelev, Igor Yu; Fukuda, Yuji; Kando, Masaki; Kotaki, Hideyuki; Homma, Takayuki; Kawase, Keigo; Hayashi, Yukio; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Daido, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yoshiaki; Bulanov, Sergei V

    2009-11-10

    We demonstrate in-line phase-contrast imaging of nanothickness foils by using a relatively large, polychromatic, debris-free femtosecond-laser-driven cluster-based plasma soft x-ray source, and a high-resolution, large dynamic range LiF crystal detector. The spatial coherence length of radiation in our setup reached a value of 5 microm on the sample plane, which is enough to observe phase-contrast enhancement in the images registered by the detector placed only a few hundred micrometers behind the object. We have developed a tabletop soft x-ray emission source, which emits radiation within a 4pi sr solid angle, and which allows one to obtain contact and propagation-based phase-contrast imaging of nanostructures with 700 nm spatial resolutions. This advance could be of utility for metrology applications.

  3. Advanced contrast modalities for X-ray radiology: Phase-contrast and dark-field imaging using a grating interferometer.

    PubMed

    Bech, Martin; Jensen, Torben H; Bunk, Oliver; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Weitkamp, Timm; Le Duc, Geraldine; Bravin, Alberto; Cloetens, Peter; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2010-01-01

    Here we review our recent progress in the field of X-ray dark-field and phase-contrast imaging using a grating interferometer. We describe the basic imaging principles of grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field radiography and present some exemplary results obtained for simple test objects and biological specimens. Furthermore, we discuss how phase-contrast and dark-field radiography can be combined with the concept of computed tomography, and yield highly detailed three-dimensional insights into biomedical sample. Exemplary results obtained with standard X-ray tube sources and highly brilliant synchrotron sources are presented.

  4. Twin-image reduction method for in-line digital holography using periphery and random reference phase-shifting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Teppei; Matsudo, Yusuke; Kakue, Takashi; Arai, Daisuke; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2015-09-01

    Digital holography has the twin image problem that unwanted lights (conjugate and direct lights) overlap in the object light in the reconstruction process. As a method for extracting only the object light, phase-shifting digital holography is widely used; however, this method is not applicable for the observation of moving objects, because this method requires the recording of plural holograms. In this study, we propose a twin-image reduction method by combining the "periphery" method with the "random phase-shifting" method. The proposed method succeeded in improving the reconstruction quality, compared to other one-shot recording methods ("parallel phase-shifting digital holography" and "random phase-shifting").

  5. On-sky multiwavelength phasing of segmented telescopes with the Zernike phase contrast sensor.

    PubMed

    Vigan, Arthur; Dohlen, Kjetil; Mazzanti, Silvio

    2011-06-10

    Future extremely large telescopes will adopt segmented primary mirrors with several hundreds of segments. Cophasing of the segments together is essential to reach high wavefront quality. The phasing sensor must be able to maintain very high phasing accuracy during the observations, while being able to phase segments dephased by several micrometers. The Zernike phase contrast sensor has been demonstrated on-sky at the Very Large Telescope. We present the multiwavelength scheme that has been implemented to extend the capture range from ±λ/2 on the wavefront to many micrometers, demonstrating that it is successful at phasing mirrors with piston errors up to ±4.0  μm on the wavefront. We discuss the results at different levels and conclude with a phasing strategy for a future extremely large telescope.

  6. Quantitative volumetric breast density estimation using phase contrast mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhentian; Hauser, Nik; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; D'Isidoro, Fabio; Stampanoni, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Phase contrast mammography using a grating interferometer is an emerging technology for breast imaging. It provides complementary information to the conventional absorption-based methods. Additional diagnostic values could be further obtained by retrieving quantitative information from the three physical signals (absorption, differential phase and small-angle scattering) yielded simultaneously. We report a non-parametric quantitative volumetric breast density estimation method by exploiting the ratio (dubbed the R value) of the absorption signal to the small-angle scattering signal. The R value is used to determine breast composition and the volumetric breast density (VBD) of the whole breast is obtained analytically by deducing the relationship between the R value and the pixel-wise breast density. The proposed method is tested by a phantom study and a group of 27 mastectomy samples. In the clinical evaluation, the estimated VBD values from both cranio-caudal (CC) and anterior-posterior (AP) views are compared with the ACR scores given by radiologists to the pre-surgical mammograms. The results show that the estimated VBD results using the proposed method are consistent with the pre-surgical ACR scores, indicating the effectiveness of this method in breast density estimation. A positive correlation is found between the estimated VBD and the diagnostic ACR score for both the CC view (p=0.033 ) and AP view (p=0.001 ). A linear regression between the results of the CC view and AP view showed a correlation coefficient γ = 0.77, which indicates the robustness of the proposed method and the quantitative character of the additional information obtained with our approach.

  7. Unstained viable cell recognition in phase-contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoczylas, M.; Rakowski, W.; Cherubini, R.; Gerardi, S.

    2011-09-01

    Individual cell recognition is a relevant task to be accomplished when single-ion microbeam irradiations are performed. At INFN-LNL facility cell visualization system is based on a phase-contrast optical microscope, without the use of any cell dye. Unstained cells are seeded in the special designed Petri dish, between two mylar foils, and at present the cell recognition is achieved manually by an expert operator. Nevertheless, this procedure is time consuming and sometimes it could be not practical if the amount of living cells to be irradiated is large. To reduce the time needed to recognize unstained cells on the Petri dish, it has been designed and implemented an automated, parallel algorithm. Overlapping ROIs sliding in steps over the captured grayscale image are firstly pre-classified and potential cell markers for the segmentation are obtained. Segmented objects are additionally classified to categorize cell bodies from other structures considered as sample dirt or background. As a result, cell coordinates are passed to the dedicated CELLView program that controls all the LNL single-ion microbeam irradiation protocol, including the positioning of individual cells in front of the ion beam. Unstained cell recognition system was successfully tested in experimental conditions with two different mylar surfaces. The recognition time and accuracy was acceptable, however, improvements in speed would be useful.

  8. Responsive Image Inline Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Ian

    2016-10-20

    RIIF is a contributed module for the Drupal php web application framework (drupal.org). It is written as a helper or sub-module of other code which is part of version 8 "core Drupal" and is intended to extend its functionality. It allows Drupal to resize images uploaded through the user-facing text editor within the Drupal GUI (a.k.a. "inline images") for various browser widths. This resizing is already done foe other images through the parent "Responsive Image" core module. This code extends that functionality to inline images.

  9. High sensitivity phase retrieval method in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhao; Gao, Kun; Chen, Jian; Wang, Dajiang; Wang, Shenghao; Chen, Heng; Bao, Yuan; Shao, Qigang; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging is considered as one of the most promising techniques for future medical imaging. Many different methods have been developed to retrieve phase signal, among which the phase stepping (PS) method is widely used. However, further practical implementations are hindered, due to its complex scanning mode and high radiation dose. In contrast, the reverse projection (RP) method is a novel fast and low dose extraction approach. In this contribution, the authors present a quantitative analysis of the noise properties of the refraction signals retrieved by the two methods and compare their sensitivities. Methods: Using the error propagation formula, the authors analyze theoretically the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the refraction images retrieved by the two methods. Then, the sensitivities of the two extraction methods are compared under an identical exposure dose. Numerical experiments are performed to validate the theoretical results and provide some quantitative insight. Results: The SNRs of the two methods are both dependent on the system parameters, but in different ways. Comparison between their sensitivities reveals that for the refraction signal, the RP method possesses a higher sensitivity, especially in the case of high visibility and/or at the edge of the object. Conclusions: Compared with the PS method, the RP method has a superior sensitivity and provides refraction images with a higher SNR. Therefore, one can obtain highly sensitive refraction images in grating-based phase contrast imaging. This is very important for future preclinical and clinical implementations.

  10. Development of ultrafast laser-based x-ray in-vivo phase-contrast micro-CT beamline for biomedical applications at Advanced Laser Light Source (ALLS).

    PubMed

    Kincaid, Russell; Krol, Andrzej; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Serbanescu, Cristina; Servol, Marina; Vogelsang, Levon; Wilkins, Steve; Stevenson, Andrew; Nesterets, Yakov; Lipson, Edward; Ye, Hongwei; Pogany, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    We are developing and exploring the imaging performance of, an in vivo, in-line holography, x-ray phase-contrast, micro-CT system with an ultrafast laser-based x-ray (ULX) source. By testing and refining our system, and by performing computer simulations, we plan to improve system performance in terms of contrast resolution and multi-energy imaging to a level beyond what can be obtained using a conventional microfocal x-ray tube. Initial CT projection sets at single energy (Mo K(alpha) and K(beta) lines) were acquired in the Fresnel regime and reconstructed for phantoms and a euthanized mouse. We also performed computer simulations of phase-contrast micro-CT scans for low-contrast, soft-tissue, tumor imaging. We determined that, in order to perform a phase-contrast, complete micro-CT scan using ULX, the following conditions must be met: (i) the x-ray source needs to be stable during the scan; (ii) the laser focal spot size needs to be less than 10 mum for source-to-object distance greater than 30 cm; (iii) the laser light intensity on the target needs to be in the range of 5 x 10(17) to 5 x 10(19) W/cm(2); (iv) the ablation protection system needs to allow uninterrupted scans; (v) the laser light focusing on the target needs to remain accurate during the entire scan; (vi) a fresh surface of the target must be exposed to consecutive laser shots during the entire scan; (vii) the effective detector element size must be less than 12 mum. Based on the results obtained in this research project, we anticipate that the new 10 Hz, 200 TW laser with 50 W average power that is being commissioned at ALLS will allow us practical implementation of in vivo x-ray phase-contrast micro-CT.

  11. Phase-contrast and magnification radiography at diagnostic X-ray energies using a pseudo-microfocus X-ray source

    PubMed Central

    Robson, K J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the use of conventional diagnostic X-ray tubes for applications in which specialist microfocus sources are normally required. Methods: A conventional diagnostic X-ray tube was used in conjunction with a range of apertures to investigate improvements in spatial resolution using a line-pairs test object. Phase-contrast effects were investigated by varying source-to-object and object-to-receptor distances using a 2-French catheter as a clinically realistic test object. Results: For magnification radiography using a computed radiography receptor and conventional X-ray tube with a 1-mm nominal focus size, the limiting spatial resolution was improved from 3.55 line-pairs per millimetre, for a conventional contact image, to 5.6 line-pairs per millimetre, for a ×2 magnified view with a 250-µm aperture. For inline phase-contrast radiography, phase contrast enhancement of a 2-French catheter was demonstrated, and the expected trends with variations in source-to-object and object-to-receptor distances were found. Images of a neonatal phantom demonstrated a subtle improvement in visibility of a superimposed 1-French catheter simulating a percutaneously inserted central catheter for no increase in patient radiation dose. Conclusion: Spatial resolution improvement and visible phase contrast can be produced in clinically relevant objects using a pseudo-microfocus geometry at X-ray energies in the normal diagnostic range, using conventional diagnostic X-ray tubes and image receptors. The disadvantages of the proposal are the large distances required to produce phase contrast and limitations imposed by the resulting tube loading. Advances in knowledge: It is possible to use conventional diagnostic X-ray equipment in applications that normally require microfocus X-ray sources. This presents some possibilities for clinical applications. PMID:24779409

  12. On-sky performance of the Zernike phase contrast sensor for the phasing of segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Surdej, Isabelle; Yaitskova, Natalia; Gonte, Frederic

    2010-07-20

    The Zernike phase contrast method is a novel technique to phase the primary mirrors of segmented telescopes. It has been tested on-sky on a unit telescope of the Very Large Telescope with a segmented mirror conjugated to the primary mirror to emulate a segmented telescope. The theoretical background of this sensor and the algorithm used to retrieve the piston, tip, and tilt information are described. The performance of the sensor as a function of parameters such as star magnitude, seeing, and integration time is discussed. The phasing accuracy has always been below 15 nm root mean square wavefront error under normal conditions of operation and the limiting star magnitude achieved on-sky with this sensor is 15.7 in the red, which would be sufficient to phase segmented telescopes in closed-loop during observations.

  13. MR phase-contrast imaging in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Ursula; Reiter, Gert; Fuchsjäger, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a life-threatening, multifactorial pathophysiological haemodynamic condition, diagnosed when the mean pulmonary arterial pressure equals or exceeds 25 mmHg at rest during right heart catheterization. Cardiac MRI, in general, and MR phase-contrast (PC) imaging, in particular, have emerged as potential techniques for the standardized assessment of cardiovascular function, morphology and haemodynamics in PH. Allowing the quantification and characterization of macroscopic cardiovascular blood flow, MR PC imaging offers non-invasive evaluation of haemodynamic alterations associated with PH. Techniques used to study the PH include both the routine two-dimensional (2D) approach measuring predominant velocities through an acquisition plane and the rapidly evolving four-dimensional (4D) PC imaging, which enables the assessment of the complete time-resolved, three-directional blood-flow velocity field in a volume. Numerous parameters such as pulmonary arterial mean velocity, vessel distensibility, flow acceleration time and volume and tricuspid regurgitation peak velocity, as well as the duration and onset of vortical blood flow in the main pulmonary artery, have been explored to either diagnose PH or find non-invasive correlates to right heart catheter parameters. Furthermore, PC imaging-based analysis of pulmonary arterial pulse-wave velocities, wall shear stress and kinetic energy losses grants novel insights into cardiopulmonary remodelling in PH. This review aimed to outline the current applications of 2D and 4D PC imaging in PH and show why this technique has the potential to contribute significantly to early diagnosis and characterization of PH.

  14. Vibration-resistant phase retrieval method with contrast compensation for phase-shifting interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qian; He, Huabin; Yuan, Daocheng; He, Jianguo; Ji, Fang

    2017-04-01

    Vibration hinders the application of phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) to on-machine test and large-aperture mirror measurement. The investigation of PSI fringe disturbed by vibration indicates that, besides tilt-shifting error, inter- and intra-frame contrast variation is significant. The contrast variation is another dominant error source in phase retrieval of PSI. An inter- and intra-frame contrast compensation method is proposed here to retrieve wavefront phase from interferograms subjected to vibration. The method constructs algebraic equations with interferogram data and solves equations using iterative procedures. Experiments validate its effectiveness and manifest its capability to suppress vibration-induced error over a large frequency region. To enhance the calculation efficiency, a spatial subsampling strategy is proposed. Practical testing shows that subsampling reduces calculation time exponentially and preserves retrieval accuracy and spatial resolution. The proposed method, of which the unique ability is compensating the tilt-shifting error and fringe blur caused by vibration, predicates an effective and low-cost solution for PSI applied in vibration.

  15. Volta potential phase plate for in-focus phase contrast transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Danev, Radostin; Buijsse, Bart; Khoshouei, Maryam; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    We describe a phase plate for transmission electron microscopy taking advantage of a hitherto-unknown phenomenon, namely a beam-induced Volta potential on the surface of a continuous thin film. The Volta potential is negative, indicating that it is not caused by beam-induced electrostatic charging. The film must be heated to ∼200 °C to prevent contamination and enable the Volta potential effect. The phase shift is created “on the fly” by the central diffraction beam eliminating the need for precise phase plate alignment. Images acquired with the Volta phase plate (VPP) show higher contrast and unlike Zernike phase plate images no fringing artifacts. Following installation into the microscope, the VPP has an initial settling time of about a week after which the phase shift behavior becomes stable. The VPP has a long service life and has been used for more than 6 mo without noticeable degradation in performance. The mechanism underlying the VPP is the same as the one responsible for the degradation over time of the performance of thin-film Zernike phase plates, but in the VPP it is used in a constructive way. The exact physics and/or chemistry behind the process causing the Volta potential are not fully understood, but experimental evidence suggests that radiation-induced surface modification combined with a chemical equilibrium between the surface and residual gases in the vacuum play an important role. PMID:25331897

  16. Determination of 74 new psychoactive substances in serum using automated in-line solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Sabrina; Kieliba, Tobias; Beike, Justus; Thevis, Mario; Mercer-Chalmers-Bender, Katja

    2017-10-01

    A detailed description is given of the development and validation of a fully automated in-line solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS/MS) method capable of detecting 90 central-stimulating new psychoactive substances (NPS) and 5 conventional amphetamine-type stimulants (amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxy-amphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethyl-amphetamine (MDEA), methamphetamine) in serum. The aim was to apply the validated method to forensic samples. The preparation of 150μL of serum was performed by an Instrument Top Sample Preparation (ITSP)-SPE with mixed mode cation exchanger cartridges. The extracts were directly injected into an LC-MS/MS system, using a biphenyl column and gradient elution with 2mM ammonium formate/0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile/0.1% formic acid as mobile phases. The chromatographic run time amounts to 9.3min (including re-equilibration). The total cycle time is 11min, due to the interlacing between sample preparation and analysis. The method was fully validated using 69 NPS and five conventional amphetamine-type stimulants, according to the guidelines of the Society of Toxicological and Forensic Chemistry (GTFCh). The guidelines were fully achieved for 62 analytes (with a limit of detection (LOD) between 0.2 and 4μg/L), whilst full validation was not feasible for the remaining 12 analytes. For the fully validated analytes, the method achieved linearity in the 5μg/L (lower limit of quantification, LLOQ) to 250μg/L range (coefficients of determination>0.99). Recoveries for 69 of these compounds were greater than 50%, with relative standard deviations≤15%. The validated method was then tested for its capability in detecting a further 21 NPS, thus totalling 95 tested substances. An LOD between 0.4 and 1.6μg/L was obtained for these 21 additional qualitatively-measured substances. The method was subsequently successfully applied to 28 specimens from

  17. Estimation of visibility of phase contrast with extraction voltages for field emission gun electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xing

    2017-02-01

    Estimation was made for visibility of phase contrast with varying extraction voltages. The resulting decay rates of visibility show that images with low image contrast from cryo EM will be seriously impacted with high extraction voltages.

  18. Single-shot x-ray phase contrast imaging with an algorithmic approach using spectral detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Mini; Park, Chan-Soo; Fredette, Nathaniel R.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging has been investigated during the last two decades for potential benefits in soft tissue imaging. Long imaging time, high radiation dose and general measurement complexity involving motion of x-ray optical components have prevented the clinical translation of these methods. In all existing popular phase contrast imaging methods, multiple measurements per projection angle involving motion of optical components are required to achieve quantitatively accurate estimation of absorption, phase and differential phase. Recently we proposed an algorithmic approach to use spectral detection data in a phase contrast imaging setup to obtain absorption, phase and differential phase in a single-step. Our generic approach has been shown via simulations in all three types of phase contrast imaging: propagation, coded aperture and grating interferometry. While other groups have used spectral detector in phase contrast imaging setups, our proposed method is unique in outlining an approach to use this spectral data to simplify phase contrast imaging. In this abstract we show the first experimental proof of our single-shot phase retrieval using a Medipix3 photon counting detector in an edge illumination aperture (also referred to as coded aperture) phase contrast set up as well as for a free space propagation setup. Our preliminary results validate our new transport equation for edge illumination PCI and our spectral phase retrieval algorithm for both PCI methods being investigated. Comparison with simulations also point to excellent performance of Medipix3 built-in charge sharing correction mechanism.

  19. CRITIR: model-based reconstruction for x-ray phase contrast tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xianghui; Mohan, Aditya; Bouman, Charles A.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging provides greater contrast compared to conventional absorption contrast imaging. It has higher sensitivity in discriminating mass density difference in a sample. Therefore phase contrast imaging has broad applications in dynamic tomography in which signal-to-noise ratio is usually traded off to the desired temporal resolution. Single-distance propagation phase contrast tomography is the most popular approach at many synchrotron facilities. The simple and flexible setup facilitates complicated in situ experiments. There are few phase retrieval algorithms available for phase-contrast image data processing. All the algorithms rely on certain models. In this talk we present a phase retrieval algorithm for phase-contrast tomography that is suitable for large propagation distance under phase-attenuation duality assumption. The validity of the algorithm is proved with both simulated and experimental data. The reconstruction results with the new algorithm show improved accuracy compared to other model based algorithms. The framework of this algorithm may be extended to the scenario in which phase-attenuation assumption is not satisfied, therefore a general model-free phase retrieval approach for single-distance phase contrast tomography.

  20. Application of autofocusing methods in continuous-wave terahertz in-line digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haochong; Wang, Dayong; Rong, Lu; Zhou, Xun; Li, Zeyu; Wang, Yunxin

    2015-07-01

    Terahertz digital holography is a combination of terahertz imaging and digital holography. During reconstruction, the key point is to find accurately the propagation distance from which the distribution of focused samples can be reconstructed. In this paper, we use a continuous-wave terahertz in-line digital holographic imaging system to record holograms. Moreover, the autofocusing algorithms through which the reconstructed distance can be calculated are applied to the reconstruction. The in-line schematic is beneficial to the terahertz wave imaging, which, however, inevitably produces the object's twin image. In the refocusing process, both the reconstructed image with low signal-to-noise ratio and contrast and the twin image induce the formation of false peaks corresponding to improper distances on the autofocusing curves. To restrain the disturbance factors and improve the accuracy of the judgment, a phase retrieval method is implemented in the reconstruction. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the autofocusing method with phase retrieval in terahertz in-line digital holographic imaging system. The proposed method provides an automated and efficient evaluation which helps to obtain the optimized propagation distance.

  1. Gas-sampling accuracy unaffected by in-line separator

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, V.C.

    1997-01-13

    How sampling accuracy is affected by the use of an in-line separator during the sampling of unprocessed natural gas has been studied at Chevron`s Sand Hills gas plant, in Crane, Texas. In experiments on three pipelines, the in-line separator caused no statistically significant condensation of unprocessed gas. Entrained NGL in the pipeline was observed, however, and gas liquid collected in the separator. The in-line separator is used to remove any liquid entrainment in the sample gas stream to protect the gas chromatograph system. There is a concern, however, that thermodynamic conditions in the in-line separator cause the heavy, gaseous-phase hydrocarbon components to condense. The paper discusses measurement accuracy, test locations, sampling and analysis systems, sampling methods, and operation.

  2. Noise properties of grating-based x-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Thomas; Juergen Engel, Klaus; Roessl, Ewald

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate the properties of tomographic grating-based phase contrast imaging with respect to its noise power spectrum and the energy dependence of the achievable contrast to noise ratio. Methods: Tomographic simulations of an object with 11 cm diameter constituted of materials of biological interest were conducted at different energies ranging from 25 to 85 keV by using a wave propagation approach. Using a Monte Carlo simulation of the x-ray attenuation within the object, it is verified that the simulated measurement deposits the same dose within the object at each energy. Results: The noise in reconstructed phase contrast computed tomography images shows a maximum at low spatial frequencies. The contrast to noise ratio reaches a maximum around 45 keV for the simulated object. The general dependence of the contrast to noise on the energy appears to be independent of the material. Compared with reconstructed absorption contrast images, the reconstructed phase contrast images show sometimes better, sometimes worse, and sometimes similar contrast to noise, depending on the material and the energy. Conclusions: Phase contrast images provide additional information to the conventional absorption contrast images and might thus be useful for medical applications. However, the observed noise power spectrum in reconstructed phase contrast images implies that the usual trade-off between noise and resolution is less efficient for phase contrast imaging compared with absorption contrast imaging. Therefore, high-resolution imaging is a strength of phase contrast imaging, but low-resolution imaging is not. This might hamper the clinical application of the method, in cases where a low spatial resolution is sufficient for diagnosis.

  3. Phase contrast digital mammography using molybdenum x-ray: clinical implications in detectability improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Matthew T.; Lo, Shih-Chung B.; Honda, Chika; Makariou, Erini; Sisney, Gale; Pien, Edward; Ohara, Hiromu; Ishisaka, Akira; Shimada, Fumio

    2003-06-01

    We have applied phase imaging on digital mammography to investigate adequate contrast of printed images for digital phase contrast mammography using a practical molybdenum X-ray tube. Phase contrast mammography procedures were performed with defined air gap (e.g., 0.6 m) configuration using customized mammography equipment and a computed radiography (CR) system. Magnified (x2) phase contrast images acquired with 0.0875mm per pixel were mapped onto the laser imager resolution at 0.04375mm per pixel for printing life-size object on wet processing silver halide recording film. For contact mammography of screen-film system, we used MinR2000 system as a baseline method. ACR 156 phantom printed images with contrasts of 2.8, 3.7, 4.9, 5.7 and 6.7 were evaluated by five radiologists. The ACR scores for the life-size image based on the 2 times magnified phase contrast image acquired by the computed radiography were higher than the scores of MinR2000 image, when the contrast of printed images for both methods was 3.7. The ACR scores were lower in the low contrast images (i.e., 2.8) than its higher contrast counterparts (i.e., >= 3.7) for all techniques used. The detectability improvement should be due to higher spatial resolution and lower noise in the phase contrast images.

  4. Results from the first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast and a rotating gantry

    SciTech Connect

    Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Velroyen, Astrid; Yaroshenko, Andre; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Mohr, Juergen; Walter, Marco; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-31

    After successful demonstrations of soft-tissue phase-contrast imaging with grating interferometers at synchrotron radiation sources and at laboratory based x-ray tubes, a first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast imaging modality has been constructed. The rotating gantry is equipped with a three-grating interferometer, a 50 watt tungsten anode source and a Hamamatsu flat panel detector. The total length of the interferometer is 45 cm, and the bed of the scanner is optimized for mice, with a scanning diameter of 35 mm. From one single scan both phase-contrast and standard attenuation based tomography can be attained, providing an overall gain in image contrast.

  5. Results from the first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast and a rotating gantry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Velroyen, Astrid; Yaroshenko, Andre; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu, Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Mohr, Jürgen; Walter, Marco; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-01

    After successful demonstrations of soft-tissue phase-contrast imaging with grating interferometers at synchrotron radiation sources and at laboratory based x-ray tubes, a first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast imaging modality has been constructed. The rotating gantry is equipped with a three-grating interferometer, a 50 watt tungsten anode source and a Hamamatsu flat panel detector. The total length of the interferometer is 45 cm, and the bed of the scanner is optimized for mice, with a scanning diameter of 35 mm. From one single scan both phase-contrast and standard attenuation based tomography can be attained, providing an overall gain in image contrast.

  6. Motionless electromagnetic phase stepping versus mechanical phase stepping in x-ray phase-contrast imaging with a compact source.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Katherine J; Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A; Bennett, Eric E; Foster, Barbara A; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-04-21

    X-ray phase contrast imaging based on grating interferometers detects the refractive index distribution of an object without relying on radiation attenuation, thereby having the potential for reduced radiation absorption. These techniques belong to the broader category of optical wavefront measurement, which requires stepping the phase of the interference pattern to obtain a pixel-wise map of the phase distortion of the wavefront. While phase stepping traditionally involves mechanical scanning of a grating or mirror, we developed electromagnetic phase stepping (EPS) for imaging with compact sources to obviate the need for mechanical movement. In EPS a solenoid coil is placed outside the x-ray tube to shift its focal spot with a magnetic field, causing a relative movement between the projection of the sample and the interference pattern in the image. Here we present two embodiments of this method. We verified experimentally that electromagnetic and mechanical phase stepping give the same results and attain the same signal-to-noise ratios under the same radiation dose. We found that the relative changes of interference fringe visibility were within 3.0% when the x-ray focal spot was shifted by up to 1.0 mm in either direction. We conclude that when using x-ray tube sources, EPS is an effective means of phase stepping without the need for mechanical movement.

  7. Visualization of neurons in the brain with phase-contrast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onodera, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Masato; Takashima, Kenta; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional structural analysis of brain is essential to understand neuronal function and brain pathology. The phase-contrast X-ray imaging technique uses an X-ray interferometer and is an extremely sensitive method to visualize structures with low X-ray absorbance. Since the phase shifts caused by light elements can be detected as interference patterns in spite of nearly zero absorption coefficients, the signal/noise ratio for the phase-contrast images of the brain is expected to be hundreds times higher than that obtained with the conventional X-ray absorption contrast method. With phase-contrast imaging technique, we could visualize brain microstructures and specific types of neurons, such as the pyramidal cells in the hippocampus. Phase-contrast CT is a promising technique for nondestructive visualization of brain and spinal cord.

  8. Phase contrast portal imaging for image-guided microbeam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, Keiji; Kondoh, Takeshi

    2014-03-01

    High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy is a unique treatment technique used to destroy tumors without severely affecting circumjacent healthy tissue. We applied a phase contrast technique to portal imaging in preclinical microbeam radiation therapy experiments. Phase contrast portal imaging is expected to enable us to obtain higherresolution X-ray images at therapeutic X-ray energies compared to conventional portal imaging. Frontal view images of a mouse head sample were acquired in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. The phase contrast images depicted edge-enhanced fine structures of the parietal bones surrounding the cerebrum. The phase contrast technique is expected to be effective in bony-landmark-based verification for image-guided radiation therapy.

  9. Phase Contrast X-ray Imaging Signatures for Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Erin A.; White, Timothy A.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Seifert, Allen; Flynn, Michael J.

    2011-06-13

    Gratings-based phase contrast imaging is a promising new radiographic technique providing three distinct contrast mechanisms, absorption, phase, and scatter, using a conventional x-ray tube source. We investigate the signatures available in these three contrast mechanisms with particular attention towards potential homeland security applications. We find that the scatter mode in particular is sensitive to textured materials, enabling lowered detection limits than absorption for materials such as powders. We investigate the length scales to which our imaging system is sensitive.

  10. Spectral x-ray phase contrast imaging for single-shot retrieval of absorption, phase, and differential-phase imagery.

    PubMed

    Das, Mini; Liang, Zhihua

    2014-11-01

    In this Letter, we propose the first single-shot, noninterferometric x-ray imaging method for simultaneous retrieval of absorption, phase, and differential-phase imagery with quantitative accuracy. Our method utilizes a photon-counting spectral x-ray detector in conjunction with a simplified transport-of-intensity equation for coded-aperture phase-contrast imaging to efficiently solve the retrieval problem. This method can utilize an incoherent and polychromatic (clinical or laboratory) x-ray tube and can enable retrieval for a wide range and composition of material properties. The proposed method has been validated via computer simulations and is expected to significantly benefit applications that are sensitive to complexity of measurement, radiation dose and imaging time.

  11. Evaluation of edge effect due to phase contrast imaging for mammography.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Satoru; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Tohyama, Keiko; Morishita, Junji; Yamada, Katsuhiko; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2005-08-01

    It is well-known that the edge effect produced by phase contrast imaging results in the edge enhancement of x-ray images and thereby sharpens those images. It has recently been reported that phase contrast imaging using practical x-ray tubes with small focal spots has improved image sharpness as observed in the phase contrast imaging with x-ray from synchrotron radiation or micro-focus x-ray tubes. In this study, we conducted the phase contrast imaging of a plastic fiber and plant seeds using a customized mammography equipment with a 0.1 mm focal spot, and the improvement of image sharpness was evaluated in terms of spatial frequency response of the images. We observed that the image contrast of the plastic fiber was increased by edge enhancement, and, as predicted elsewhere, spectral analysis revealed that as the spatial frequencies of the x-ray images increased, so did the sharpness gained through phase contrast imaging. Thus, phase contrast imaging using a practical molybdenum anode tube with a 0.1 mm-focal spot would benefit mammography, in which the morphological detectability of small species such as microcalcifications is of great concern. And detectability of tumor-surrounded glandular tissues in dense breast would be also improved by the phase contrast imaging.

  12. Artifact characterization and reduction in scanning X-ray Zernike phase contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Holzner, Christian; Mohacsi, Istvan; Karvinen, Petri; Diaz, Ana; Pigino, Gaia; David, Christian

    2015-05-18

    Zernike phase contrast microscopy is a well-established method for imaging specimens with low absorption contrast. It has been successfully implemented in full-field microscopy using visible light and X-rays. In microscopy Cowley's reciprocity principle connects scanning and full-field imaging. Even though the reciprocity in Zernike phase contrast has been discussed by several authors over the past thirty years, only recently it was experimentally verified using scanning X-ray microscopy. In this paper, we investigate the image and contrast formation in scanning Zernike phase contrast microscopy with a particular and detailed focus on the origin of imaging artifacts that are typically associated with Zernike phase contrast. We demonstrate experimentally with X-rays the effect of the phase mask design on the contrast and halo artifacts and present an optimized design of the phase mask with respect to photon efficiency and artifact reduction. Similarly, due to the principle of reciprocity the observations and conclusions of this work have direct applicability to Zernike phase contrast in full-field microscopy as well.

  13. Phase-contrast tomography with low-intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rehacek, J.; Hradil, Z.; Zawisky, M.; Dubus, F.; Bonse, U.

    2005-02-01

    In newly developed neutron phase tomography, wave properties of neutrons are exploited for the nondestructive testing of the internal structure of matter. We show how limitations due to small available intensities of present neutron sources can be overcome by using an advanced maximum-likelihood reconstruction algorithm. Unlike the standard filtered back-projection, the developed procedure gives reasonable results also when used on very noisy data or data consisting of only a few measured projections. This is demonstrated by means of simulations and also experimentally. The proposed method leads to considerably shorter measuring times and/or increased precision.

  14. Enhanced phase contrast transfer using ptychography combined with a pre-specimen phase plate in a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Ercius, Peter; Nellist, Peter D; Ophus, Colin

    2016-12-01

    The ability to image light elements in both crystalline and noncrystalline materials at near atomic resolution with an enhanced contrast is highly advantageous to understand the structure and properties of a wide range of beam sensitive materials including biological specimens and molecular hetero-structures. This requires the imaging system to have an efficient phase contrast transfer at both low and high spatial frequencies. In this work we introduce a new phase contrast imaging method in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) using a pre-specimen phase plate in the probe forming aperture, combined with a fast pixelated detector to record diffraction patterns at every probe position, and phase reconstruction using ptychography. The phase plate significantly enhances the contrast transfer of low spatial frequency information, and ptychography maximizes the extraction of the phase information at all spatial frequencies. In addition, the STEM probe with the presence of the phase plate retains its atomic resolution, allowing simultaneous incoherent Z-contrast imaging to be obtained along with the ptychographic phase image. An experimental image of Au nanoparticles on a carbon support shows high contrast for both materials. Multislice image simulations of a DNA molecule shows the capability of imaging soft matter at low dose conditions, which implies potential applications of low dose imaging of a wide range of beam sensitive materials. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. X-ray phase contrast imaging at MAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ghazaly, M.; Backe, H.; Lauth, W.; Kube, G.; Kunz, P.; Sharafutdinov, A.; Weber, T.

    2006-05-01

    Experiments have been performed to explore the potential of the low emittance 855MeV electron beam of the Mainz Microtron MAMI for imaging with coherent X-rays. Transition radiation from a micro-focused electron beam traversing a foil stack served as X-ray source with good transverse coherence. Refraction contrast radiographs of low absorbing materials, in particular polymer strings with diameters between 30 and 450μm, were taken with a polychromatic transition radiation X-ray source with a spectral distribution in the energy range between 8 and about 40keV. The electron beam spot size had standard deviation σh = (8.6±0.1)μm in the horizontal and σv = (7.5±0.1)μm in the vertical direction. X-ray films were used as detectors. The source-to-detector distance amounted to 11.4m. The objects were placed in a distance of up to 6m from the X-ray film. Holograms of strings were taken with a beam spot size σv = (0.50±0.05)μm in vertical direction, and a monochromatic X-ray beam of 6keV energy. A good longitudinal coherence has been obtained by the (111) reflection of a flat silicon single crystal in Bragg geometry. It has been demonstrated that a direct exposure CCD chip with a pixel size of 13×13μm^2 provides a highly efficient on-line detector. Contrast images can easily be generated with a complete elimination of all parasitic background. The on-line capability allows a minimization of the beam spot size by observing the smallest visible interference fringe spacings or the number of visible fringes. It has been demonstrated that X-ray films are also very useful detectors. The main advantage in comparison with the direct exposure CCD chip is the resolution. For the Structurix D3 (Agfa) X-ray film the standard deviation of the resolution was measured to be σf = (1.2±0.4)μm, which is about a factor of 6 better than for the direct exposure CCD chip. With the small effective X-ray spot size in vertical direction of σv = (1.2±0.3)μm and a geometrical

  16. Analyzer-based phase contrast imaging and phase retrieval using a rotating anode x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, D. J.; Paganin, D. M.; Pavlov, K. M.; Kraeusslich, J.; Wehrhan, O.; Uschmann, I.; Foerster, E.

    2007-12-17

    We have performed an analyzer crystal based phase contrast imaging (ABI) experiment using a rotating anode x-ray source. The use of such an incoherent source demonstrates the potential of ABI as a quantitative characterization tool for the laboratory environment. A phase contrast image of a plastic phantom was recorded on high resolution x-ray film and the projected thickness was retrieved from a single image. The projected thickness recovered from the phase contrast image was shown to quantitatively agree with a reference optical microscope measurement.

  17. Microbubble-based synchrotron radiation phase contrast imaging: basic study and angiography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rongbiao; Xi, Yan; Chai, Wei-Min; Wang, Yongting; Guan, Yongjing; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Xie, Honglan; Chen, Ke-Min

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of microbubbles as phase contrast imaging (PCI) agents for angiography applications. The hypothesis was that the introduction of microbubbles into tissue produces a significant change in the refractive index and highlights the lumen of the vessel in PCI. The absorption and phase contrast images of commercially available microbubbles were obtained and compared in vitro. A further increase in contrast was observed in PCI. Microbubbles highlighted the lumen of the renal microvessels, acting as a positive contrast medium in ex vivo imaging. In addition, home-made microbubbles with larger diameters were introduced for image contrast enhancement in living tumor-bearing mice, demonstrating the feasibility of microbubble-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging for tumor vasculature in vivo.

  18. On measuring cell confluence in phase contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, K. P.; Richardson, J. B.; Lam, K. P.

    2014-03-01

    A principal focus highlighting recent advances in cell based therapies concerns the development of effective treatments for osteoarthritis. Earlier clinicaltrials have shown that 80% of patients receiving mesenchymal stem cell(MSC) based treatment have improved their quality of life by alleviating pain whilst extending the life of their natural joints. The current challenge facing researchers is to identify the biological differences between the treatments that have worked and those which have shown little improvement. One possible candidate for the difference in treatment prognosis is an examination of the proliferation of the ( type) cells as they grow. To further understanding of the proliferation and differentiation of MSC, non-invasive live cell imaging techniques have been developed which capture important cell events and dynamics in cell divisions over an extended period of time. An automated image analysis procedure capable of tracking cell confluence over time has also been implemented, providing an objective and realistic estimation of cell growth within continuous live cell cultures. The proposed algorithm accounts for the halo artefacts that occur in phase microscopy. In addition to a favourable run-time performance, the method was also validated using continuous live MSC cultures, with consistent and meaningful results.

  19. 'Edge illumination' in X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, Peter R. T.; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Diemoz, Paul C.; Szafraniec, Magdalena B.; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Millard, Thomas P.; Zapata, Cesar E.; Speller, Robert D.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2012-07-31

    In the late '90s, the concept of 'edge illumination' was developed at ELETTRA in Italy as an alternative method to increase the phase sensitivity of an imaging system. The main idea was to be able to reproduce the fine angular selection of 'analyzer' crystals without actually using a crystal, as this would allow employing the method with divergent and polychromatic (i.e. conventional) x-ray sources. It was observed that this could be achieved by illuminating only the edges of the detector pixels, and that the method's sensitivity could be progressively increased by illuminating smaller pixel fractions closer to its physical edge. A few years later the idea was adapted for use with a conventional source by means of two sets of x-ray masks ('coded aperture' masks), which enabled obtaining the same effect for each row (or column) of pixels of an area detector illuminated by a cone beam. This article reviews the method and presents recent examples of application.

  20. Sensitivity enhancement for the analysis of naproxen in tap water by solid-phase extraction coupled in-line to capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Macià, Alba; Borrull, Francesc; Calull, Marta; Benavente, Fernando; Hernández, Elena; Sanz-Nebot, Victòria; Barbosa, José; Aguilar, Carme

    2008-03-01

    SPE coupled in-line to CE, as the strategy to enhance the concentration sensitivity in CE, has been used to enrich naproxen in tap water samples. In this study, a microcartridge containing an octadecyl silica (C18) sorbent was placed near the inlet within the separation capillary column. The optimum conditions were obtained when naproxen in an acidic aqueous solution (pH 3.5) was loaded into the capillary at 930 mbar for 30 min, and 20 mM ammonium acetate in methanol/water (70:30 v/v) was used as both an elution solution and a separation BGE. Under these conditions, the sensitivity was enhanced 1820-fold with respect to normal hydrodynamic injection, and the LOD achieved was 0.2 microg/L. To show the capability of the in-line SPE-CE method, tap water samples were analysed after a pretreatment consisting in an off-line C18-SPE procedure. The recovery of this procedure was higher than 80%. Under these conditions, naproxen could be detected at a concentration of 10 ng/L; so the potential of the procedure for the sensitive analysis of this type of drugs in water samples was demonstrated. Afterwards, these results were compared with those previously obtained for naproxen in water samples using different sample stacking techniques.

  1. Matched filtering Generalized Phase Contrast using binary phase for dynamic spot- and line patterns in biophotonics and structured lighting.

    PubMed

    Bañas, Andrew; Aabo, Thomas; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2013-01-28

    This work discusses the use of matched filtering Generalized Phase Contrast (mGPC) as an efficient and cost-effective beam shaper for applications such as in biophotonics, optical micromanipulation, microscopy and two-photon polymerization. The theoretical foundation of mGPC is described as a combination of Generalized Phase Contrast and phase-only correlation. Such an analysis makes it convenient to optimize an mGPC system for different setup conditions. Results showing binary-only phase generation of dynamic spot arrays and line patterns are presented.

  2. Grating-based X-ray phase contrast for biomedical imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia; Willner, Marian; Chabior, Michael; Auweter, Sigrid; Reiser, Maximilian; Bamberg, Fabian

    2013-09-01

    In this review article we describe the development of grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging, with particular emphasis on potential biomedical applications of the technology. We review the basics of image formation in grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field radiography and present some exemplary multimodal radiography results obtained with laboratory X-ray sources. Furthermore, we discuss the theoretical concepts to extend grating-based multimodal radiography to quantitative transmission, phase-contrast, and dark-field scattering computed tomography.

  3. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willner, M.; Herzen, J.; Grandl, S.; Auweter, S.; Mayr, D.; Hipp, A.; Chabior, M.; Sarapata, A.; Achterhold, K.; Zanette, I.; Weitkamp, T.; Sztrókay, A.; Hellerhoff, K.; Reiser, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method’s prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography.

  4. Tomographic Hard X-ray Phase Contrast Micro- and Nano-imaging at TOMCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampanoni, M.; Marone, F.; Modregger, P.; Pinzer, B.; Thüring, T.; Vila-Comamala, J.; David, C.; Mokso, R.

    2010-07-01

    This article illustrates the phase contrast instrumentation installed at the Tomographic Microscopy and Coherent Radiology beamline (TOMCAT) of the Swiss Light Source. Our experimental framework has been designed to extract phase information at spatial resolutions covering three orders of magnitude. For moderate (5-10 microns) resolutions we implemented a two-gratings interferometer, operated at energies between 14 and 40 keV. For high resolution (1-5 microns) we obtain phase information thanks to a modified transport of intensity approach. For very high-resolutions (0.1-0.5 microns) we developed a broadband hard X-ray full-field microscope operated in Zernike-phase contrast.

  5. Dynamic measures of regional lung air volume using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, M. J.; Lewis, R. A.; Morgan, M. J.; Wallace, M. J.; Siew, M. L.; Siu, K. K. W.; Habib, A.; Fouras, A.; Yagi, N.; Uesugi, K.; Hooper, S. B.

    2008-11-01

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging can provide detailed images of lung morphology with sufficient spatial resolution to observe the terminal airways (alveoli). We demonstrate that quantitative functional and anatomical imaging of lung ventilation can be achieved in vivo using two-dimensional phase contrast x-ray images with high contrast and spatial resolution (<100 µm) in near real time. Changes in lung air volume as small as 25 µL were calculated from the images of term and preterm rabbit pup lungs (n = 28) using a single-image phase retrieval algorithm. Comparisons with plethysmography and computed tomography showed that the technique provided an accurate and robust method of measuring total lung air volumes. Furthermore, regional ventilation was measured by partitioning the phase contrast images, which revealed differences in aeration for different ventilation strategies.

  6. A phantom study to characterize the imaging quality of a phase-contrast tomosynthesis prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Ghani, Muhammad U.; Miao, Hui; Li, Yuhua; Chen, Wei R.; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2013-02-01

    This research is aimed at studying the advantages of an x-ray phase-contrast tomosynthesis prototype by using phantoms. A prototype system is assembled with a micro-focus x-ray source, a rotating stage and a computed radiography detector mounted on an optical rail. A custom designed bubble wrap phantom is used in experiments. Angular projection images are acquired from -20° to +20° with 2° interval. The in-plane slices are reconstructed. The feature area on the phantom is observed. The prototype system provides an intrinsic way to investigate the potential and imaging quality of a phase-contrast tomosynthesis imaging method. As the result, phase-contrast tomosynthesis imaging method is demonstrated for its advantages in avoiding structure noise and overlapping issues by comparing the results acquired by computed radiography and phase-contrast radiography.

  7. Quantitative characterization of inertial confinement fusion capsules using phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B.J.; Koch, J.A.; Barty, A.; Martz, H.E. Jr.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2005-03-15

    Current designs for inertial confinement fusion capsules for the National Ignition Facility consist of a solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layer inside of a copper doped beryllium, Be(Cu), shell. Phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging is shown to render the D-T layer visible inside the Be(Cu) shell. Phase contrast imaging is experimentally demonstrated for several surrogate capsules and validates computational models. Polyimide and low density divinyl benzene foam shells were imaged at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron. The surrogates demonstrate that phase contrast enhanced imaging provides a method to characterize surfaces when absorption imaging cannot be used. Our computational models demonstrate that a rough surface can be accurately characterized using phase contrast enhanced x-ray images.

  8. Quantitative Characterization of Inertial Confinement Fusion Capsules Using Phase Contrast Enhanced X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B J; Koch, J A; Barty, A; Martz, H E; Lee, W; Fezzaa, K

    2004-05-07

    Current designs for inertial confinement fusion capsules for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) consist of a solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layer inside of a copper doped beryllium capsule. Phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging is shown to render the D-T layer visible inside the Be(Cu) capsule. Phase contrast imaging is experimentally demonstrated for several surrogate capsules and validates computational models. Polyimide and low density divinyl benzene foam capsules were imaged at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron. The surrogates demonstrate that phase contrast enhanced imaging provides a method to characterize surfaces when absorption imaging cannot be used. Our computational models demonstrate that a rough surface can be accurately reproduced in phase contrast enhanced x-ray images.

  9. Design and development of a CPW-based 5-bit switched-line phase shifter using inline metal contact MEMS series switches for 17.25 GHz transmit/receive module application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sukomal; Koul, Shiban K.

    2014-01-01

    A radio frequency micro-electro-mechanical system (RF-MEMS) phase shifter based on switchable delay line concept with maximum desirable phase shift and good reliability is presented in this paper. The phase shifter is based on the switchable reference and delay line configurations with inline metal contact series switches that employs MEMS systems based on electrostatic actuation and implemented using coplanar waveguide (CPW) configuration. Electromechanical behaviour of the MEMS switch has been extensively investigated using commercially available simulation tools and validated using system level simulation. A detailed design and performance analysis of the phase shifter has been carried out as a function of various structural parameters with reference to the gold-based surface micromachining process on alumina substrate. The mechanical, electrical, transient, intermodulation distortion (IMD) and loss performance of an MEMS switch have been experimentally investigated. The individual primary phase-bits (11.25°/22.5°/45°/90°/180°) that are fundamental building blocks of a complete 5-bit phase shifter have been designed, fabricated and experimentally characterized. Furthermore, two different 5-bit switched-line phase shifters, that lead to 25% size reduction and result in marked improvement in the reliability of the complete 5-bit phase shifter with 30 V actuation voltage, have been developed. The performance comparison between two different CPW-based switched-line phase shifters have been extensively investigated and validated. The complete 5-bit phase shifter demonstrates an average insertion loss of 5.4 dB with a return loss of better than 14 dB at 17.25 GHz. The maximum phase error of 1.3° has been obtained at 17.25 GHz from these 5-bit phase shifters.

  10. Image segmentation of nanoscale Zernike phase contrast X-ray computed tomography images

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Arjun S.; Mandal, Pratiti; Zhang, Yongjie; Litster, Shawn

    2015-05-14

    Zernike phase contrast is a useful technique for nanoscale X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of materials with a low X-ray absorption coefficient. It enhances the image contrast by phase shifting X-ray waves to create changes in amplitude. However, it creates artifacts that hinder the use of traditional image segmentation techniques. We propose an image restoration method that models the X-ray phase contrast optics and the three-dimensional image reconstruction method. We generate artifact-free images through an optimization problem that inverts this model. Though similar approaches have been used for Zernike phase contrast in visible light microscopy, this optimization employs an effective edge detection method tailored to handle Zernike phase contrast artifacts. We characterize this optics-based restoration method by removing the artifacts in and thresholding multiple Zernike phase contrast X-ray CT images to produce segmented results that are consistent with the physical specimens. We quantitatively evaluate and compare our method to other segmentation techniques to demonstrate its high accuracy.

  11. Application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging in endoscopic aqueductoplasty.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoqiang; Zheng, Jiaping; Xiao, Qing; Liu, Yunsheng

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endoscopic aqueductoplasty (EA) for patients with obstructive hydrocephalus. The clinical diagnosis of hydrocephalus caused by aqueduct obstruction in 23 patients was confirmed by phase-contrast cine MRI examination. The patients were treated with EA and MRI was repeated during the follow-up. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow velocity in the aqueduct was measured to determine whether the aqueduct was obstructed. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations indicated that there was no CSF flow in the aqueduct for all patients prior to surgery. Aqueductoplasty was successfully performed in all patients. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations performed a week after surgery demonstrated an average CSF flow velocity of 4.74±1.77 cm/sec. During the follow-up, intracranial hypertension recurred in two patients in whom CSF flow was not observed in the aqueduct by the phase-contrast cine MRI scan. Aqueduct re-occlusion was revealed by an endoscopic exploration. By measuring the CSF flow velocity, phase-contrast cine MRI accurately identifies aqueduct obstruction. Cine MRI is a nontraumatic, simple and reliable method for determining whether the aqueduct is successfully opened following aqueductoplasty.

  12. Understanding the Phase Contrast Optics to Restore Artifact-free Microscopy Images for Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhaozheng; Kanade, Takeo; Chen, Mei

    2012-01-01

    Phase contrast, a noninvasive microscopy imaging technique, is widely used to capture time-lapse images to monitor the behavior of transparent cells without staining or altering them. Due to the optical principle, phase contrast microscopy images contain artifacts such as the halo and shade-off that hinder image segmentation, a critical step in automated microscopy image analysis. Rather than treating phase contrast microscopy images as general natural images and applying generic image processing techniques on them, we propose to study the optical properties of the phase contrast microscope to model its image formation process. The phase contrast imaging system can be approximated by a linear imaging model. Based on this model and input image properties, we formulate a regularized quadratic cost function to restore artifact-free phase contrast images that directly correspond to the specimen's optical path length. With artifacts removed, high quality segmentation can be achieved by simply thresholding the restored images. The imaging model and restoration method are quantitatively evaluated on microscopy image sequences with thousands of cells captured over several days. We also demonstrate that accurate restoration lays the foundation for high performance in cell detection and tracking. PMID:22386070

  13. Visualizing Typical Features of Breast Fibroadenomas Using Phase-Contrast CT: An Ex-Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Grandl, Susanne; Willner, Marian; Herzen, Julia; Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Mayr, Doris; Auweter, Sigrid D.; Hipp, Alexander; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Marschner, Mathias; Chabior, Michael; Reiser, Maximilian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Bamberg, Fabian; Hellerhoff, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Background Fibroadenoma is the most common benign solid breast lesion type and a very common cause for histologic assessment. To justify a conservative therapy, a highly specific discrimination between fibroadenomas and other breast lesions is crucial. Phase-contrast imaging offers improved soft-tissue contrast and differentiability of fine structures combined with the potential of 3-dimensional imaging. In this study we assessed the potential of grating-based phase-contrast CT imaging for visualizing diagnostically relevant features of fibroadenomas. Materials and Methods Grating-based phase-contrast CT was performed on six ex-vivo formalin-fixed breast specimens containing a fibroadenoma and three samples containing benign changes that resemble fibroadenomas using Talbot Lau interferometry and a polychromatic X-ray source. Phase-contrast and simultaneously acquired absorption-based 3D-datasets were manually matched with corresponding histological slices. The visibility of diagnostically valuable features was assessed in comparison with histology as the gold-standard. Results In all cases, matching of grating-based phase-contrast CT images and histology was successfully completed. Grating-based phase-contrast CT showed greatly improved differentiation of fine structures and provided accurate depiction of strands of fibrous tissue within the fibroadenomas as well as of the diagnostically valuable dilated, branched ductuli of the fibroadenomas. A clear demarcation of tumor boundaries in all cases was provided by phase- but not absorption-contrast CT. Conclusions Pending successful translation of the technology to a clinical setting and considerable reduction of the required dose, the data presented here suggest that grating-based phase-contrast CT may be used as a supplementary non-invasive diagnostic tool in breast diagnostics. Phase-contrast CT may thus contribute to the reduction of false positive findings and reduce the recall and core biopsy rate in population

  14. Redefining the lower statistical limit in x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, M.; Birnbacher, L.; Willner, M.; Chabior, M.; Fehringer, A.; Herzen, J.; Noël, P. B.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2015-03-01

    Phase-contrast x-ray computed tomography (PCCT) is currently investigated and developed as a potentially very interesting extension of conventional CT, because it promises to provide high soft-tissue contrast for weakly absorbing samples. For data acquisition several images at different grating positions are combined to obtain a phase-contrast projection. For short exposure times, which are necessary for lower radiation dose, the photon counts in a single stepping position are very low. In this case, the currently used phase-retrieval does not provide reliable results for some pixels. This uncertainty results in statistical phase wrapping, which leads to a higher standard deviation in the phase-contrast projections than theoretically expected. For even lower statistics, the phase retrieval breaks down completely and the phase information is lost. New measurement procedures rely on a linear approximation of the sinusoidal phase stepping curve around the zero crossings. In this case only two images are acquired to obtain the phase-contrast projection. The approximation is only valid for small phase values. However, typically nearly all pixels are within this regime due to the differential nature of the signal. We examine the statistical properties of a linear approximation method and illustrate by simulation and experiment that the lower statistical limit can be redefined using this method. That means that the phase signal can be retrieved even with very low photon counts and statistical phase wrapping can be avoided. This is an important step towards enhanced image quality in PCCT with very low photon counts.

  15. Evaluation of a new reconstruction algorithm for x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Maria; Hauke, Christian; Horn, Florian; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Schuster, Max; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-04-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging might open up entirely new opportunities in medical imaging. However, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, vibrations or distortions of the system lead to inaccuracies within the phase-stepping procedure. Given insufficient stability of the phase-step positions, up to now, artifacts in phase-contrast images occur, which lower the image quality. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging in clinical routine as for example tiny structures of the human anatomy cannot be observed. In this contribution we evaluate an algorithm proposed by Vargas et.al.1 and applied to X-ray imaging by Pelzer et.al. that enables us to reconstruct a differential phase-contrast image without the knowledge of the specific phase-step positions. This method was tested in comparison to the standard reconstruction by Fourier analysis. The quality of phase-contrast images remains stable, even if the phase-step positions are completely unknown and not uniformly distributed. To also achieve attenuation and dark-field images the proposed algorithm has been combined with a further algorithm of Vargas et al.3 Using this algorithm, the phase-step positions can be reconstructed. With the help of the proper phase-step positions it is possible to get information about the phase, the amplitude and the offset of the measured data. We evaluated this algorithm concerning the measurement of thick objects which show a high absorbency.

  16. X-ray phase-contrast tomosynthesis for improved breast tissue discrimination.

    PubMed

    Schleede, Simone; Bech, Martin; Grandl, Susanne; Sztrókay, Aniko; Herzen, Julia; Mayr, Doris; Stockmar, Marco; Potdevin, Guillaume; Zanette, Irene; Rack, Alexander; Weitkamp, Timm; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-03-01

    Attenuation-based tomosynthesis has proven to successfully resolve the glandular tissue overlap present in mammography. However, the ability of tomosynthesis to differentiate tumorous and glandular tissue remains limited, due to the small differences in X-ray attenuation in breast tissue. One possibility to overcome this limitation and to further increase the diagnostic value of tomosynthesis exams, is the application of recently developed grating-based phase-contrast methods, which provide complementary information on the phase shift and the local scattering power of the sample. In this study, we report on first phase-contrast breast tomosynthesis results of a mastectomy sample slice with an invasive ductal carcinoma. A slice of a mastectomy sample with histologically proven invasive ductal cancer was imaged at the synchrotron radiation source ESRF (Grenoble, France). We used a two-grating interferometer setup at the ninth fractional Talbot distance and with an X-ray energy of 23 keV. In grating interferometry absorption, differential phase, and scattering images are recorded simultaneously. The tomosynthesis scan comprises 61 projections. Multimodal tomosynthesis results were reconstructed using a standard filtered back-projection approach. Our findings are supported by a comparison of tomographic views to histopathology. Phase-contrast tomosynthesis combines the advantage of improved soft-tissue discrimination in phase-contrast imaging with the ability of tomosynthesis to provide a third dimension so that improved feature visibility is not hampered by superposition artifacts. Our results indicate superior diagnostic value due to the depth resolution supplied in tomosynthesis imaging; a region of necrotic tissue that is obscured in a projection image can clearly be depicted in one single tomosynthesis slice. Compared to absorption tomosynthesis alone, soft tissue contrast is significantly enhanced in phase-contrast tomosynthesis views, where fibrous structures

  17. Combining phase and magnitude information for contrast agent quantification in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using statistical modeling.

    PubMed

    Brynolfsson, Patrik; Yu, Jun; Wirestam, Ronnie; Karlsson, Mikael; Garpebring, Anders

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate, using simulations, a method for improved contrast agent (CA) quantification in DCE-MRI. We developed a maximum likelihood estimator that combines the phase signal in the DCE-MRI image series with an additional CA estimate, e.g. the estimate obtained from magnitude data. A number of simulations were performed to investigate the ability of the estimator to reduce bias and noise in CA estimates. Noise levels ranging from that of a body coil to that of a dedicated head coil were investigated at both 1.5T and 3T. Using the proposed method, the root mean squared error in the bolus peak was reduced from 2.24 to 0.11 mM in the vessels and 0.16 to 0.08 mM in the tumor rim for a noise level equivalent of a 12-channel head coil at 3T. No improvements were seen for tissues with small CA uptake, such as white matter. Phase information reduces errors in the estimated CA concentrations. A larger phase response from higher field strengths or higher CA concentrations yielded better results. Issues such as background phase drift need to be addressed before this method can be applied in vivo. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Subnanoradian X-ray phase-contrast imaging using a far-field interferometer of nanometric phase gratings.

    PubMed

    Wen, Han; Gomella, Andrew A; Patel, Ajay; Lynch, Susanna K; Morgan, Nicole Y; Anderson, Stasia A; Bennett, Eric E; Xiao, Xianghui; Liu, Chian; Wolfe, Douglas E

    2013-01-01

    Hard X-ray phase-contrast imaging characterizes the electron density distribution in an object without the need for radiation absorption. The power of phase contrast to resolve subtle changes, such as those in soft tissue structures, lies in its ability to detect minute refractive bending of X-rays. Here we report a far-field, two-arm interferometer based on the new nanometric phase gratings, which can detect X-ray refraction with subnanoradian sensitivity, and at the same time overcomes the fundamental limitation of ultra-narrow bandwidths (Δλ/λ~10⁻⁴) of the current, most sensitive methods based on crystal interferometers. On a 1.5% bandwidth synchrotron source, we demonstrate clear visualization of blood vessels in unstained mouse organs in simple projection views, with over an order-of-magnitude higher phase contrast than current near-field grating interferometers.

  19. Subnanoradian X-ray phase-contrast imaging using a far-field interferometer of nanometric phase gratings

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Han; Gomella, Andrew A.; Patel, Ajay; Lynch, Susanna K.; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Anderson, Stasia A.; Bennett, Eric E.; Xiao, Xianghui; Liu, Chian; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2013-01-01

    Hard X-ray phase-contrast imaging characterizes the electron density distribution in an object without the need for radiation absorption. The power of phase contrast to resolve subtle changes, such as those in soft tissue structures, lies in its ability to detect minute refractive bending of X-rays. Here we report a far-field, two-arm interferometer based on the new nanometric phase gratings, which can detect X-ray refraction with subnanoradian sensitivity, and at the same time overcomes the fundamental limitation of ultra-narrow bandwidths (Δλ/λ~10−4) of the current, most sensitive methods based on crystal interferometers. On a 1.5% bandwidth synchrotron source, we demonstrate clear visualization of blood vessels in unstained mouse organs in simple projection views, with over an order-of-magnitude higher phase contrast than current near-field grating interferometers. PMID:24189696

  20. Flexible Retrospective Phase Stepping in X-Ray Scatter Correction and Phase Contrast Imaging Using Structured Illumination

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Han; Miao, Houxun; Bennett, Eric E.; Adamo, Nick M.; Chen, Lei

    2013-01-01

    The development of phase contrast methods for diagnostic x-ray imaging is inspired by the potential of seeing the internal structures of the human body without the need to deposit any harmful radiation. An efficient class of x-ray phase contrast imaging and scatter correction methods share the idea of using structured illumination in the form of a periodic fringe pattern created with gratings or grids. They measure the scatter and distortion of the x-ray wavefront through the attenuation and deformation of the fringe pattern via a phase stepping process. Phase stepping describes image acquisition at regular phase intervals by shifting a grating in uniform steps. However, in practical conditions the actual phase intervals can vary from step to step and also spatially. Particularly with the advent of electromagnetic phase stepping without physical movement of a grating, the phase intervals are dependent upon the focal plane of interest. We describe a demodulation algorithm for phase stepping at arbitrary and position-dependent (APD) phase intervals without assuming a priori knowledge of the phase steps. The algorithm retrospectively determines the spatial distribution of the phase intervals by a Fourier transform method. With this ability, grating-based x-ray imaging becomes more adaptable and robust for broader applications. PMID:24205177

  1. Flexible retrospective phase stepping in x-ray scatter correction and phase contrast imaging using structured illumination.

    PubMed

    Wen, Han; Miao, Houxun; Bennett, Eric E; Adamo, Nick M; Chen, Lei

    2013-01-01

    The development of phase contrast methods for diagnostic x-ray imaging is inspired by the potential of seeing the internal structures of the human body without the need to deposit any harmful radiation. An efficient class of x-ray phase contrast imaging and scatter correction methods share the idea of using structured illumination in the form of a periodic fringe pattern created with gratings or grids. They measure the scatter and distortion of the x-ray wavefront through the attenuation and deformation of the fringe pattern via a phase stepping process. Phase stepping describes image acquisition at regular phase intervals by shifting a grating in uniform steps. However, in practical conditions the actual phase intervals can vary from step to step and also spatially. Particularly with the advent of electromagnetic phase stepping without physical movement of a grating, the phase intervals are dependent upon the focal plane of interest. We describe a demodulation algorithm for phase stepping at arbitrary and position-dependent (APD) phase intervals without assuming a priori knowledge of the phase steps. The algorithm retrospectively determines the spatial distribution of the phase intervals by a Fourier transform method. With this ability, grating-based x-ray imaging becomes more adaptable and robust for broader applications.

  2. Diffraction enhance x-ray imaging for quantitative phase contrast studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, A. K.; Singh, B.; Kashyap, Y. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2016-05-01

    Conventional X-ray imaging based on absorption contrast permits limited visibility of feature having small density and thickness variations. For imaging of weakly absorbing material or materials possessing similar densities, a novel phase contrast imaging techniques called diffraction enhanced imaging has been designed and developed at imaging beamline Indus-2 RRCAT Indore. The technique provides improved visibility of the interfaces and show high contrast in the image forsmall density or thickness gradients in the bulk. This paper presents basic principle, instrumentation and analysis methods for this technique. Initial results of quantitative phase retrieval carried out on various samples have also been presented.

  3. Diffraction enhance x-ray imaging for quantitative phase contrast studies

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, A. K.; Singh, B. Kashyap, Y. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2016-05-23

    Conventional X-ray imaging based on absorption contrast permits limited visibility of feature having small density and thickness variations. For imaging of weakly absorbing material or materials possessing similar densities, a novel phase contrast imaging techniques called diffraction enhanced imaging has been designed and developed at imaging beamline Indus-2 RRCAT Indore. The technique provides improved visibility of the interfaces and show high contrast in the image forsmall density or thickness gradients in the bulk. This paper presents basic principle, instrumentation and analysis methods for this technique. Initial results of quantitative phase retrieval carried out on various samples have also been presented.

  4. Report of improved performance in Talbot–Lau phase-contrast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Thomas Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Anton, Gisela

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Many expectations have been raised since the use of conventional x-ray tubes on grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging. Despite a reported increase in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in many publications, there is doubt on whether phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) is advantageous in clinical CT scanners in vivo. The aim of this paper is to contribute to this discussion by analyzing the performance of a phase-contrast CT laboratory setup. Methods: A phase-contrast CT performance analysis was done. Projection images of a phantom were recorded, and image slices were reconstructed using standard filtered back projection methods. The resulting image slices were analyzed by determining the CNRs in the attenuation and phase image. These results were compared to analytically calculated expectations according to the already published phase-contrast CT performance analysis by Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)]. There, a severe mistake was found leading to wrong predictions of the performance of phase-contrast CT. The error was corrected and with the new formulae, the experimentally obtained results matched the analytical calculations. Results: The squared ratios of the phase-contrast CNR and the attenuation CNR obtained in the authors’ experiment are five- to ten-fold higher than predicted by Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)]. The effective lateral spatial coherence length deduced outnumbers the already optimistic assumption of Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)] by a factor of 3. Conclusions: The authors’ results indicate that the assumptions made in former performance analyses are pessimistic. The break-even point, when phase-contrast CT outperforms attenuation CT, is within reach even with realistic, nonperfect gratings. Further improvements to state-of-the-art clinical CT scanners, like increasing the spatial resolution, could change the balance in favor of phase-contrast computed tomography

  5. X-ray computed tomography of wood-adhesive bondlines: Attenuation and phase-contrast effects

    DOE PAGES

    Paris, Jesse L.; Kamke, Frederick A.; Xiao, Xianghui

    2015-07-29

    Microscale X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is discussed as a technique for identifying 3D adhesive distribution in wood-adhesive bondlines. Visualization and material segmentation of the adhesives from the surrounding cellular structures require sufficient gray-scale contrast in the reconstructed XCT data. Commercial wood-adhesive polymers have similar chemical characteristics and density to wood cell wall polymers and therefore do not provide good XCT attenuation contrast in their native form. Here, three different adhesive types, namely phenol formaldehyde, polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate, and a hybrid polyvinyl acetate, are tagged with iodine such that they yield sufficient X-ray attenuation contrast. However, phase-contrast effects at material edgesmore » complicate image quality and segmentation in XCT data reconstructed with conventional filtered backprojection absorption contrast algorithms. A quantitative phase retrieval algorithm, which isolates and removes the phase-contrast effect, was demonstrated. The paper discusses and illustrates the balance between material X-ray attenuation and phase-contrast effects in all quantitative XCT analyses of wood-adhesive bondlines.« less

  6. X-ray computed tomography of wood-adhesive bondlines: Attenuation and phase-contrast effects

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, Jesse L.; Kamke, Frederick A.; Xiao, Xianghui

    2015-07-29

    Microscale X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is discussed as a technique for identifying 3D adhesive distribution in wood-adhesive bondlines. Visualization and material segmentation of the adhesives from the surrounding cellular structures require sufficient gray-scale contrast in the reconstructed XCT data. Commercial wood-adhesive polymers have similar chemical characteristics and density to wood cell wall polymers and therefore do not provide good XCT attenuation contrast in their native form. Here, three different adhesive types, namely phenol formaldehyde, polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate, and a hybrid polyvinyl acetate, are tagged with iodine such that they yield sufficient X-ray attenuation contrast. However, phase-contrast effects at material edges complicate image quality and segmentation in XCT data reconstructed with conventional filtered backprojection absorption contrast algorithms. A quantitative phase retrieval algorithm, which isolates and removes the phase-contrast effect, was demonstrated. The paper discusses and illustrates the balance between material X-ray attenuation and phase-contrast effects in all quantitative XCT analyses of wood-adhesive bondlines.

  7. Intact Imaging of Human Heart Structure Using X-ray Phase-Contrast Tomography.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yukihiro; Shinohara, Gen; Hoshino, Masato; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Morita, Kiyozo; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Masashi; Yagi, Naoto; Okita, Yutaka; Tsukube, Takuro

    2017-02-01

    Structural examination of human heart specimens at the microscopic level is a prerequisite for understanding congenital heart diseases. It is desirable not to destroy or alter the properties of such specimens because of their scarcity. However, many of the currently available imaging techniques either destroy the specimen through sectioning or alter the chemical and mechanical properties of the specimen through staining and contrast agent injection. As a result, subsequent studies may not be possible. X-ray phase-contrast tomography is an imaging modality for biological soft tissues that does not destroy or alter the properties of the specimen. The feasibility of X-ray phase-contrast tomography for the structural examination of heart specimens was tested using infantile and fetal heart specimens without congenital diseases. X-ray phase-contrast tomography was carried out at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility using the Talbot grating interferometer at the bending magnet beamline BL20B2 to visualize the structure of five non-pretreated whole heart specimens obtained by autopsy. High-resolution, three-dimensional images were obtained for all specimens. The images clearly showed the myocardial structure, coronary vessels, and conduction bundle. X-ray phase-contrast tomography allows high-resolution, three-dimensional imaging of human heart specimens. Intact imaging using X-ray phase-contrast tomography can contribute to further structural investigation of heart specimens with congenital heart diseases.

  8. Single grating phase contrast imaging for x-ray microscopy and microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruyndonckx, P.; Sasov, A.; Pauwels, B.

    2014-09-01

    The grating based approach to phase contrast imaging is rather inefficient in the use of the available x-ray flux due to the presence of two absorption gratings and it requires longer scan times compared to conventional CT because multiple images are needed at each projection angle. To avoid these drawbacks, a proof-of-principle experiment was developed to obtain absorption, phase contrast (DPC) and dark field images (DCI) in a single exposure using only a non-absorbing phase grating, a micro-focus source in cone-beam geometry and a highresolution x-ray detector.

  9. Shared velocity encoding: a method to improve the temporal resolution of phase-contrast velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hung-Yu; Bender, Jacob A; Ding, Yu; Chung, Yiu-Cho; Hinton, Alice M; Pennell, Michael L; Whitehead, Kevin K; Raman, Subha V; Simonetti, Orlando P

    2012-09-01

    Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) is used routinely to measure fluid and tissue velocity with a variety of clinical applications. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging methods require acquisition of additional data to enable phase difference reconstruction, making real-time imaging problematic. Shared Velocity Encoding (SVE), a method devised to improve the effective temporal resolution of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging, was implemented in a real-time pulse sequence with segmented echo planar readout. The effect of SVE on peak velocity measurement was investigated in computer simulation, and peak velocities and total flow were measured in a flow phantom and in volunteers and compared with a conventional ECG-triggered, segmented k-space phase-contrast sequence as a reference standard. Computer simulation showed a 36% reduction in peak velocity error from 8.8 to 5.6% with SVE. A similar reduction of 40% in peak velocity error was shown in a pulsatile flow phantom. In the phantom and volunteers, volume flow did not differ significantly when measured with or without SVE. Peak velocity measurements made in the volunteers using SVE showed a higher concordance correlation (0.96) with the reference standard than non-SVE (0.87). The improvement in effective temporal resolution with SVE reconstruction has a positive impact on the precision and accuracy of real-time phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging peak velocity measurements.

  10. Cardiovascular flow measurement with phase-contrast MR imaging: basic facts and implementation.

    PubMed

    Lotz, Joachim; Meier, Christian; Leppert, Andreas; Galanski, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a well-known but undervalued method of obtaining quantitative information on blood flow. Applications of this technique in cardiovascular MR imaging are expanding. According to the sequences available, phase-contrast measurement can be performed in a breath hold or during normal respiration. Prospective as well as retrospective gating techniques can be used. Common errors in phase-contrast imaging include mismatched encoding velocity, deviation of the imaging plane, inadequate temporal resolution, inadequate spatial resolution, accelerated flow and spatial misregistration, and phase offset errors. Flow measurements are most precise if the imaging plane is perpendicular to the vessel of interest and flow encoding is set to through-plane flow. The sequence should be repeated at least once, with a high encoding velocity used initially. If peak velocity has to be estimated, flow measurement is repeated with an adapted encoding velocity. The overall error of a phase-contrast flow measurement comprises errors during prescription as well as errors that occur during image analysis of the flow data. With phase-contrast imaging, the overall error in flow measurement can be reduced to less than 10%, an acceptable level of error for routine clinical use. Copyright RSNA, 2002

  11. Recent advances in synchrotron-based hard x-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Nelson, J.; Holzner, C.; Andrews, J. C.; Pianetta, P.

    2013-12-01

    Ever since the first demonstration of phase contrast imaging (PCI) in the 1930s by Frits Zernike, people have realized the significant advantage of phase contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging in terms of sensitivity to ‘transparent’ features within specimens. Thus, x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) holds great potential in studies of soft biological tissues, typically containing low Z elements such as C, H, O and N. Particularly when synchrotron hard x-rays are employed, the favourable brightness, energy tunability, monochromatic characteristics and penetration depth have dramatically enhanced the quality and variety of XPCI methods, which permit detection of the phase shift associated with 3D geometry of relatively large samples in a non-destructive manner. In this paper, we review recent advances in several synchrotron-based hard x-ray XPCI methods. Challenges and key factors in methodological development are discussed, and biological and medical applications are presented.

  12. Optical Fourier techniques for medical image processing and phase contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Rao, D.V.G.L.N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the basics of optical Fourier techniques (OFT) and applications for medical image processing as well as phase contrast imaging of live biological specimens. Enhancement of microcalcifications in a mammogram for early diagnosis of breast cancer is the main focus. Various spatial filtering techniques such as conventional 4f filtering using a spatial mask, photoinduced polarization rotation in photosensitive materials, Fourier holography, and nonlinear transmission characteristics of optical materials are discussed for processing mammograms. We also reviewed how the intensity dependent refractive index can be exploited as a phase filter for phase contrast imaging with a coherent source. This novel approach represents a significant advance in phase contrast microscopy. PMID:18458764

  13. Model-based reconstruction for real-time phase-contrast flow MRI: Improved spatiotemporal accuracy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhengguo; Roeloffs, Volkert; Voit, Dirk; Joseph, Arun A; Untenberger, Markus; Merboldt, K Dietmar; Frahm, Jens

    2017-03-01

    To develop a model-based reconstruction technique for real-time phase-contrast flow MRI with improved spatiotemporal accuracy in comparison to methods using phase differences of two separately reconstructed images with differential flow encodings. The proposed method jointly computes a common image, a phase-contrast map, and a set of coil sensitivities from every pair of flow-compensated and flow-encoded datasets obtained by highly undersampled radial FLASH. Real-time acquisitions with five and seven radial spokes per image resulted in 25.6 and 35.7 ms measuring time per phase-contrast map, respectively. The signal model for phase-contrast flow MRI requires the solution of a nonlinear inverse problem, which is accomplished by an iteratively regularized Gauss-Newton method. Aspects of regularization and scaling are discussed. The model-based reconstruction was validated for a numerical and experimental flow phantom and applied to real-time phase-contrast MRI of the human aorta for 10 healthy subjects and 2 patients. Under all conditions, and compared with a previously developed real-time flow MRI method, the proposed method yields quantitatively accurate phase-contrast maps (i.e., flow velocities) with improved spatial acuity, reduced phase noise and reduced streaking artifacts. This novel model-based reconstruction technique may become a new tool for clinical flow MRI in real time. Magn Reson Med 77:1082-1093, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. Phase contrast X-ray microtomography of the Rhodnius prolixus head: Comparison of direct reconstruction and phase retrieval approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, A. P.; Braz, D.; Nogueira, L. P.; Colaço, M. V.; Soares, J.; Cardoso, S. C.; Garcia, E. S.; Azambuja, P.; Gonzalez, M. S.; Mohammadi, S.; Tromba, G.; Barroso, R. C.

    2014-02-01

    We have used phase-contrast X-ray microtomography (PPC-μCT) to study the head of the blood-feeding bug, Rhodnius prolixus, which is one of the most important insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, ethiologic agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. Images reconstructed from phase-retrieved projections processed by ANKA phase are compared to those obtained through direct tomographic reconstruction of the flat-field-corrected transmission radiographs. It should be noted that the relative locations of the important morphological internal structures are observable with a precision that is difficult to obtain without the phase retrieval approach.

  15. Refracting Roentgen's rays: Propagation-based x-ray phase contrast for biomedical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gureyev, T. E.; Mayo, S. C.; Nesterets, Ya.; Pogany, A.; Stevenson, A. W.; Wilkins, S. W.; Myers, D. E.; Paganin, D. M.

    2009-05-15

    Absorption-contrast x-ray imaging serves to visualize the variation in x-ray attenuation within the volume of a given sample, whereas phase contrast allows one to visualize variations in x-ray refractive index. The former imaging mechanism has been well known and widely utilized since the time of Roentgen's Nobel prize winning work, whereas the latter mechanism--sought for, but not found, by Roentgen himself--has laid the foundation for a revolution in x-ray imaging which is the central topic of this review. We consider the physical imaging mechanisms underlying both absorption contrast and phase contrast, together with the associated inverse problem of how one may obtain quantitative two- or three-dimensional information regarding a sample, given one or more phase-contrast images of the same. Practical questions are considered, regarding optimized phase-contrast imaging geometries as a function of detector resolution, source size, x-ray spectrum, and dose. Experimental examples pertaining to biomedical applications are given, and prospects for the future outlined.

  16. Beam hardening effects in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chabior, Michael; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Bunk, Oliver; Schuster, Manfred; Schroer, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors investigate how beam hardening affects the image formation in x-ray phase-contrast imaging and consecutively develop a correction algorithm based on the results of the analysis. Methods: The authors' approach utilizes a recently developed x-ray imaging technique using a grating interferometer capable of visualizing the differential phase shift of a wave front traversing an object. An analytical description of beam hardening is given, highlighting differences between attenuation and phase-contrast imaging. The authors present exemplary beam hardening artifacts for a number of well-defined samples in measurements at a compact laboratory setup using a polychromatic source. Results: Despite the differences in image formation, the authors show that beam hardening leads to a similar reduction of image quality in phase-contrast imaging as in conventional attenuation-contrast imaging. Additionally, the authors demonstrate that for homogeneous objects, beam hardening artifacts can be corrected by a linearization technique, applicable to all kinds of phase-contrast methods using polychromatic sources. Conclusions: The evaluated correction algorithm is shown to yield good results for a number of simple test objects and can thus be advocated in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

  17. Phase Quantization Study of Spatial Light Modulator for Extreme High-contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Jiangpei; Ren, Deqing

    2016-11-01

    Direct imaging of exoplanets by reflected starlight is extremely challenging due to the large luminosity ratio to the primary star. Wave-front control is a critical technique to attenuate the speckle noise in order to achieve an extremely high contrast. We present a phase quantization study of a spatial light modulator (SLM) for wave-front control to meet the contrast requirement of detection of a terrestrial planet in the habitable zone of a solar-type star. We perform the numerical simulation by employing the SLM with different phase accuracy and actuator numbers, which are related to the achievable contrast. We use an optimization algorithm to solve the quantization problems that is matched to the controllable phase step of the SLM. Two optical configurations are discussed with the SLM located before and after the coronagraph focal plane mask. The simulation result has constrained the specification for SLM phase accuracy in the above two optical configurations, which gives us a phase accuracy of 0.4/1000 and 1/1000 waves to achieve a contrast of 10-10. Finally, we have demonstrated that an SLM with more actuators can deliver a competitive contrast performance on the order of 10-10 in comparison to that by using a deformable mirror.

  18. Beam hardening effects in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Chabior, Michael; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Bunk, Oliver; Schuster, Manfred; Schroer, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-03-01

    In this work, the authors investigate how beam hardening affects the image formation in x-ray phase-contrast imaging and consecutively develop a correction algorithm based on the results of the analysis. The authors' approach utilizes a recently developed x-ray imaging technique using a grating interferometer capable of visualizing the differential phase shift of a wave front traversing an object. An analytical description of beam hardening is given, highlighting differences between attenuation and phase-contrast imaging. The authors present exemplary beam hardening artifacts for a number of well-defined samples in measurements at a compact laboratory setup using a polychromatic source. Despite the differences in image formation, the authors show that beam hardening leads to a similar reduction of image quality in phase-contrast imaging as in conventional attenuation-contrast imaging. Additionally, the authors demonstrate that for homogeneous objects, beam hardening artifacts can be corrected by a linearization technique, applicable to all kinds of phase-contrast methods using polychromatic sources. The evaluated correction algorithm is shown to yield good results for a number of simple test objects and can thus be advocated in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

  19. Breast tumor segmentation in high resolution x-ray phase contrast analyzer based computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, E.; Grandl, S.; Sztrókay-Gaul, A.; Gasilov, S.; Barbone, G.; Mittone, A.; Coan, P.; Bravin, A.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Phase contrast computed tomography has emerged as an imaging method, which is able to outperform present day clinical mammography in breast tumor visualization while maintaining an equivalent average dose. To this day, no segmentation technique takes into account the specificity of the phase contrast signal. In this study, the authors propose a new mathematical framework for human-guided breast tumor segmentation. This method has been applied to high-resolution images of excised human organs, each of several gigabytes. Methods: The authors present a segmentation procedure based on the viscous watershed transform and demonstrate the efficacy of this method on analyzer based phase contrast images. The segmentation of tumors inside two full human breasts is then shown as an example of this procedure’s possible applications. Results: A correct and precise identification of the tumor boundaries was obtained and confirmed by manual contouring performed independently by four experienced radiologists. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that applying the watershed viscous transform allows them to perform the segmentation of tumors in high-resolution x-ray analyzer based phase contrast breast computed tomography images. Combining the additional information provided by the segmentation procedure with the already high definition of morphological details and tissue boundaries offered by phase contrast imaging techniques, will represent a valuable multistep procedure to be used in future medical diagnostic applications.

  20. In vitro motility of cells from human epidermoid carcinomas. A study by phase-contrast and reflection-contrast cinematography.

    PubMed

    Haemmerli, G; Sträuli, P

    1981-05-15

    The motile behavior of six cell lines derived from human squamous carcinomas (two from the larynx, four from the tongue) was studied by cinematography under phase- and reflection-contrast illumination. The recorded cell activities consist in spreading, stationary and translocation motility, and aggregate formation. Within this common pattern, quantitative modifications ("sub-pattern") are stable properties of the individual cells lines. Such modifications are particularly evident with regard to the dynamic texture of the aggregates which ranges from loose, netlike structures to compact islands with smooth borders. Accordingly, the intensity of cell traffic within and around the aggregates varies considerably. It is discussed to what extent the in vitro motility of the carcinoma cell populations reflects their behavior in the organism and thus the significance of cell movements for invasion.

  1. Development of a prototype gantry system for preclinical x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pauwels, Bart; Liu Xuan; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Kenntner, Johannes; Mohr, Juergen; Walter, Marco; Schulz, Joachim; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To explore the potential of grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging for clinical applications, a first compact gantry system was developed. It is designed such that it can be implemented into an in-vivo small-animal phase-contrast computed tomography (PC-CT) scanner. The purpose of the present study is to assess the accuracy and quantitativeness of the described gantry in both absorption and phase-contrast. Methods: A phantom, containing six chemically well-defined liquids, was constructed. A tomography scan with cone-beam reconstruction of this phantom was performed yielding the spatial distribution of the linear attenuation coefficient {mu} and decrement {delta} of the complex refractive index. Theoretical values of {mu} and {delta} were calculated for each liquid from tabulated data and compared with the experimentally measured values. Additionally, a color-fused image representation is proposed to display the complementary absorption and phase-contrast information in a single image. Results: Experimental and calculated data of the phantom agree well confirming the quantitativeness and accuracy of the reconstructed spatial distributions of {mu} and {delta}. The proposed color-fused image representation, which combines the complementary absorption and phase information, considerably helps in distinguishing the individual substances. Conclusions: The concept of grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) can be implemented into a compact, cone-beam geometry gantry setup. The authors believe that this work represents an important milestone in translating phase-contrast x-ray imaging from previous proof-of-principle experiments to first preclinical biomedical imaging applications on small-animal models.

  2. Development of a prototype gantry system for preclinical x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pauwels, Bart; Liu, Xuan; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Kenntner, Johannes; Mohr, Jurgen; Walter, Marco; Schulz, Joachim; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-11-01

    To explore the potential of grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging for clinical applications, a first compact gantry system was developed. It is designed such that it can be implemented into an in-vivo small-animal phase-contrast computed tomography (PC-CT) scanner. The purpose of the present study is to assess the accuracy and quantitativeness of the described gantry in both absorption and phase-contrast. A phantom, containing six chemically well-defined liquids, was constructed. A tomography scan with cone-beam reconstruction of this phantom was performed yielding the spatial distribution of the linear attenuation coefficient μ and decrement δ of the complex refractive index. Theoretical values of μ and δ were calculated for each liquid from tabulated data and compared with the experimentally measured values. Additionally, a color-fused image representation is proposed to display the complementary absorption and phase-contrast information in a single image. Experimental and calculated data of the phantom agree well confirming the quantitativeness and accuracy of the reconstructed spatial distributions of μ and δ. The proposed color-fused image representation, which combines the complementary absorption and phase information, considerably helps in distinguishing the individual substances. The concept of grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) can be implemented into a compact, cone-beam geometry gantry setup. The authors believe that this work represents an important milestone in translating phase-contrast x-ray imaging from previous proof-of-principle experiments to first preclinical biomedical imaging applications on small-animal models.

  3. Coherent noise reduction in digital holographic phase contrast microscopy by slightly shifting object.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Xiao, Wen; Liu, Shuo; Wang, FanJing; Rong, Lu; Li, Rui

    2011-02-28

    A method to reduce coherent noise in digital holographic phase contrast microscopy is proposed. By slightly shifting the specimen, a series of digital holograms with different coherent noise patterns is recorded. Each hologram is reconstructed individually, while the different phase tilts of the reconstructed complex amplitudes due to the specimen shifts are corrected in the hologram plane by using numerical parametric lens method. Afterward, the lateral displacements of the phase maps from different holograms are compensated in the image plane by using digital image registration method. Thus, all phase images have same distribution, but uncorrelated coherent noise patterns. By a proper averaging procedure, the coherent noise of phase contrast image is reduced significantly. The experimental results are given to confirm the proposed method.

  4. Binocular combination of phase and contrast explained by a gain-control and gain-enhancement model

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jian; Klein, Stanley A.; Levi, Dennis M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated suprathreshold binocular combination, measuring both the perceived phase and perceived contrast of a cyclopean sine wave. We used a paradigm adapted from Ding and Sperling (2006, 2007) to measure the perceived phase by indicating the apparent location (phase) of the dark trough in the horizontal cyclopean sine wave relative to a black horizontal reference line, and we used the same stimuli to measure perceived contrast by matching the binocular combined contrast to a standard contrast presented to one eye. We found that under normal viewing conditions (high contrast and long stimulus duration), perceived contrast is constant, independent of the interocular contrast ratio and the interocular phase difference, while the perceived phase shifts smoothly from one eye to the other eye depending on the contrast ratios. However, at low contrasts and short stimulus durations, binocular combination is more linear and contrast summation is phase-dependent. To account for phase-dependent contrast summation, we incorporated a fusion remapping mechanism into our model, using disparity energy to shift the monocular phases towards the cyclopean phase in order to align the two eyes' images through motor/sensory fusion. The Ding-Sperling model with motor/sensory fusion mechanism gives a reasonable account of the phase dependence of binocular contrast combination and can account for either the perceived phase or the perceived contrast of a cyclopean sine wave separately; however it requires different model parameters for the two. However, when fit to both phase and contrast data simultaneously, the Ding-Sperling model fails. Incorporating interocular gain enhancement into the model results in a significant improvement in fitting both phase and contrast data simultaneously, successfully accounting for both linear summation at low contrast energy and strong nonlinearity at high contrast energy. PMID:23397038

  5. Binocular combination of phase and contrast explained by a gain-control and gain-enhancement model.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jian; Klein, Stanley A; Levi, Dennis M

    2013-02-08

    We investigated suprathreshold binocular combination, measuring both the perceived phase and perceived contrast of a cyclopean sine wave. We used a paradigm adapted from Ding and Sperling (2006, 2007) to measure the perceived phase by indicating the apparent location (phase) of the dark trough in the horizontal cyclopean sine wave relative to a black horizontal reference line, and we used the same stimuli to measure perceived contrast by matching the binocular combined contrast to a standard contrast presented to one eye. We found that under normal viewing conditions (high contrast and long stimulus duration), perceived contrast is constant, independent of the interocular contrast ratio and the interocular phase difference, while the perceived phase shifts smoothly from one eye to the other eye depending on the contrast ratios. However, at low contrasts and short stimulus durations, binocular combination is more linear and contrast summation is phase-dependent. To account for phase-dependent contrast summation, we incorporated a fusion remapping mechanism into our model, using disparity energy to shift the monocular phases towards the cyclopean phase in order to align the two eyes' images through motor/sensory fusion. The Ding-Sperling model with motor/sensory fusion mechanism gives a reasonable account of the phase dependence of binocular contrast combination and can account for either the perceived phase or the perceived contrast of a cyclopean sine wave separately; however it requires different model parameters for the two. However, when fit to both phase and contrast data simultaneously, the Ding-Sperling model fails. Incorporating interocular gain enhancement into the model results in a significant improvement in fitting both phase and contrast data simultaneously, successfully accounting for both linear summation at low contrast energy and strong nonlinearity at high contrast energy.

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of grating-based neutron phase contrast imaging at CPHS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ran; Chen, Zhiqiang; Huang, Zhifeng; Xiao, Yongshun; Wang, Xuewu; Wie, Jie; Loong, C.-K.

    2011-09-01

    Since the launching of the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) project of Tsinghua University in 2009, works have begun on the design and engineering of an imaging/radiography instrument for the neutron source provided by CPHS. The instrument will perform basic tasks such as transmission imaging and computerized tomography. Additionally, we include in the design the utilization of coded-aperture and grating-based phase contrast methodology, as well as the options of prompt gamma-ray analysis and neutron-energy selective imaging. Previously, we had implemented the hardware and data-analysis software for grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging. Here, we investigate Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations of neutron refraction phenomena and then model the grating-based neutron phase contrast imaging system according to the classic-optics-based method. The simulated experimental results of the retrieving phase shift gradient information by five-step phase-stepping approach indicate the feasibility of grating-based neutron phase contrast imaging as an option for the cold neutron imaging instrument at the CPHS.

  7. Terahertz in-line digital holography of human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Lu; Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Chen, Chunhai; Wang, Dayong; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Xun; Li, Zeyu; Huang, Haochong; Wang, Yunxin; Zhou, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz waves provide a better contrast in imaging soft biomedical tissues than X-rays, and unlike X-rays, they cause no ionisation damage, making them a good option for biomedical imaging. Terahertz absorption imaging has conventionally been used for cancer diagnosis. However, the absorption properties of a cancerous sample are influenced by two opposing factors: an increase in absorption due to a higher degree of hydration and a decrease in absorption due to structural changes. It is therefore difficult to diagnose cancer from an absorption image. Phase imaging can thus be critical for diagnostics. We demonstrate imaging of the absorption and phase-shift distributions of 3.2 mm × 2.3 mm × 30-μm-thick human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue by continuous-wave terahertz digital in-line holography. The acquisition time of a few seconds for a single in-line hologram is much shorter than that of other terahertz diagnostic techniques, and future detectors will allow acquisition of meaningful holograms without sample dehydration. The resolution of the reconstructions was enhanced by sub-pixel shifting and extrapolation. Another advantage of this technique is its relaxed minimal sample size limitation. The fibrosis indicated in the phase distribution demonstrates the potential of terahertz holographic imaging to obtain a more objective, early diagnosis of cancer. PMID:25676705

  8. Terahertz in-line digital holography of human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue.

    PubMed

    Rong, Lu; Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Chen, Chunhai; Wang, Dayong; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Xun; Li, Zeyu; Huang, Haochong; Wang, Yunxin; Zhou, Zhou

    2015-02-13

    Terahertz waves provide a better contrast in imaging soft biomedical tissues than X-rays, and unlike X-rays, they cause no ionisation damage, making them a good option for biomedical imaging. Terahertz absorption imaging has conventionally been used for cancer diagnosis. However, the absorption properties of a cancerous sample are influenced by two opposing factors: an increase in absorption due to a higher degree of hydration and a decrease in absorption due to structural changes. It is therefore difficult to diagnose cancer from an absorption image. Phase imaging can thus be critical for diagnostics. We demonstrate imaging of the absorption and phase-shift distributions of 3.2 mm × 2.3 mm × 30-μm-thick human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue by continuous-wave terahertz digital in-line holography. The acquisition time of a few seconds for a single in-line hologram is much shorter than that of other terahertz diagnostic techniques, and future detectors will allow acquisition of meaningful holograms without sample dehydration. The resolution of the reconstructions was enhanced by sub-pixel shifting and extrapolation. Another advantage of this technique is its relaxed minimal sample size limitation. The fibrosis indicated in the phase distribution demonstrates the potential of terahertz holographic imaging to obtain a more objective, early diagnosis of cancer.

  9. Terahertz in-line digital holography of human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Lu; Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Chen, Chunhai; Wang, Dayong; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Xun; Li, Zeyu; Huang, Haochong; Wang, Yunxin; Zhou, Zhou

    2015-02-01

    Terahertz waves provide a better contrast in imaging soft biomedical tissues than X-rays, and unlike X-rays, they cause no ionisation damage, making them a good option for biomedical imaging. Terahertz absorption imaging has conventionally been used for cancer diagnosis. However, the absorption properties of a cancerous sample are influenced by two opposing factors: an increase in absorption due to a higher degree of hydration and a decrease in absorption due to structural changes. It is therefore difficult to diagnose cancer from an absorption image. Phase imaging can thus be critical for diagnostics. We demonstrate imaging of the absorption and phase-shift distributions of 3.2 mm × 2.3 mm × 30-μm-thick human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue by continuous-wave terahertz digital in-line holography. The acquisition time of a few seconds for a single in-line hologram is much shorter than that of other terahertz diagnostic techniques, and future detectors will allow acquisition of meaningful holograms without sample dehydration. The resolution of the reconstructions was enhanced by sub-pixel shifting and extrapolation. Another advantage of this technique is its relaxed minimal sample size limitation. The fibrosis indicated in the phase distribution demonstrates the potential of terahertz holographic imaging to obtain a more objective, early diagnosis of cancer.

  10. Inclusion of coherence in Monte Carlo models for simulation of x-ray phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Cipiccia, Silvia; Vittoria, Fabio A; Weikum, Maria; Olivo, Alessandro; Jaroszynski, Dino A

    2014-09-22

    Interest in phase contrast imaging methods based on electromagnetic wave coherence has increased significantly recently, particularly at X-ray energies. This is giving rise to a demand for effective simulation methods. Coherent imaging approaches are usually based on wave optics, which require significant computational resources, particularly for producing 2D images. Monte Carlo (MC) methods, used to track individual particles/photons for particle physics, are not considered appropriate for describing coherence effects. Previous preliminary work has evaluated the possibility of incorporating coherence in Monte Carlo codes. However, in this paper, we present the implementation of refraction in a model that is based on time of flight calculations and the Huygens-Fresnel principle, which allow reproducing the formation of phase contrast images in partially and fully coherent experimental conditions. The model is implemented in the FLUKA Monte Carlo code and X-ray phase contrast imaging simulations are compared with experiments and wave optics calculations.

  11. Interferometric hard x-ray phase contrast imaging at 204 nm grating period

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Han; Gomella, Andrew A.; Miao, Houxun; Lynch, Susanna K.; Wolfe, Douglas E.; Xiao Xianghui; Liu Chian; Morgan, Nicole

    2013-01-15

    We report on hard x-ray phase contrast imaging experiments using a grating interferometer of approximately 1/10th the grating period achieved in previous studies. We designed the gratings as a staircase array of multilayer stacks which are fabricated in a single thin film deposition process. We performed the experiments at 19 keV x-ray energy and 0.8 {mu}m pixel resolution. The small grating period resulted in clear separation of different diffraction orders and multiple images on the detector. A slitted beam was used to remove overlap of the images from the different diffraction orders. The phase contrast images showed detailed features as small as 10 {mu}m, and demonstrated the feasibility of high resolution x-ray phase contrast imaging with nanometer scale gratings.

  12. Analytical reconstructions of intensity modulated x-ray phase-contrast imaging of human scale phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Włodarczyk, Bartłomiej; Pietrzak, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents analytical approach to modeling of a full planar and volumetric acquisition system with image reconstructions originated from partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging at a human scale using graphics processor units. The model is based on x-ray tracing and wave optics methods to develop a numerical framework for predicting the performance of a preclinical phase-contrast imaging system of a human-scaled phantom. In this study, experimental images of simple numerical phantoms and high resolution anthropomorphic phantoms of head and thorax based on non-uniform rational b-spline shapes (NURBS) prove the correctness of the model. Presented results can be used to simulate the performance of partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging system on various preclinical applications. PMID:26600991

  13. Interferometric hard x-ray phase contrast imaging at 204 nm grating period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Han; Wolfe, Douglas E.; Gomella, Andrew A.; Miao, Houxun; Xiao, Xianghui; Liu, Chian; Lynch, Susanna K.; Morgan, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    We report on hard x-ray phase contrast imaging experiments using a grating interferometer of approximately 1/10th the grating period achieved in previous studies. We designed the gratings as a staircase array of multilayer stacks which are fabricated in a single thin film deposition process. We performed the experiments at 19 keV x-ray energy and 0.8 μm pixel resolution. The small grating period resulted in clear separation of different diffraction orders and multiple images on the detector. A slitted beam was used to remove overlap of the images from the different diffraction orders. The phase contrast images showed detailed features as small as 10 μm, and demonstrated the feasibility of high resolution x-ray phase contrast imaging with nanometer scale gratings.

  14. X-Ray Phase-Contrast Imaging with Three 2D Gratings

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ming; Wyatt, Christopher Lee; Wang, Ge

    2008-01-01

    X-ray imaging is of paramount importance for clinical and preclinical imaging but it is fundamentally restricted by the attenuation-based contrast mechanism, which has remained essentially the same since Roentgen's discovery a century ago. Recently, based on the Talbot effect, groundbreaking work was reported using 1D gratings for X-ray phase-contrast imaging with a hospital-grade X-ray tube instead of a synchrotron or microfocused source. In this paper, we report an extension using 2D gratings that reduces the imaging time and increases the accuracy and robustness of phase retrieval compared to current grating-based phase-contrast techniques. Feasibility is demonstrated via numerical simulation. PMID:18401460

  15. Interferometric hard x-ray phase contrast imaging at 204 nm grating period.

    PubMed

    Wen, Han; Wolfe, Douglas E; Gomella, Andrew A; Miao, Houxun; Xiao, Xianghui; Liu, Chian; Lynch, Susanna K; Morgan, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    We report on hard x-ray phase contrast imaging experiments using a grating interferometer of approximately 1/10th the grating period achieved in previous studies. We designed the gratings as a staircase array of multilayer stacks which are fabricated in a single thin film deposition process. We performed the experiments at 19 keV x-ray energy and 0.8 μm pixel resolution. The small grating period resulted in clear separation of different diffraction orders and multiple images on the detector. A slitted beam was used to remove overlap of the images from the different diffraction orders. The phase contrast images showed detailed features as small as 10 μm, and demonstrated the feasibility of high resolution x-ray phase contrast imaging with nanometer scale gratings.

  16. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.

  17. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals. PMID:26923483

  18. Color-coded LED microscopy for multi-contrast and quantitative phase-gradient imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Donghak; Ryu, Suho; Kim, Uihan; Jung, Daeseong; Joo, Chulmin

    2015-01-01

    We present a multi-contrast microscope based on color-coded illumination and computation. A programmable three-color light-emitting diode (LED) array illuminates a specimen, in which each color corresponds to a different illumination angle. A single color image sensor records light transmitted through the specimen, and images at each color channel are then separated and utilized to obtain bright-field, dark-field, and differential phase contrast (DPC) images simultaneously. Quantitative phase imaging is also achieved based on DPC images acquired with two different LED illumination patterns. The multi-contrast and quantitative phase imaging capabilities of our method are demonstrated by presenting images of various transparent biological samples. PMID:26713205

  19. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-29

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.

  20. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-29

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Ultimately, simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.

  1. Myelinated mouse nerves studied by X-ray phase contrast zoom tomography.

    PubMed

    Bartels, M; Krenkel, M; Cloetens, P; Möbius, W; Salditt, T

    2015-12-01

    We have used X-ray phase contrast tomography to resolve the structure of uncut, entire myelinated optic, saphenous and sciatic mouse nerves. Intrinsic electron density contrast suffices to identify axonal structures. Specific myelin labeling by an osmium tetroxide stain enables distinction between axon and surrounding myelin sheath. Utilization of spherical wave illumination enables zooming capabilities which enable imaging of entire sciatic internodes as well as identification of sub-structures such as nodes of Ranvier and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures.

  2. High speed optical phased array using high contrast grating all-pass filters.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weijian; Sun, Tianbo; Rao, Yi; Megens, Mischa; Chan, Trevor; Yoo, Byung-Wook; Horsley, David A; Wu, Ming C; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2014-08-25

    We report a high speed 8x8 optical phased array using tunable 1550 nm all-pass filters with ultrathin high contrast gratings (HCGs) as the microelectromechanical-actuated top reflectors. The all-pass filter design enables a highly efficient phase tuning (1.7 π) with a small actuation voltage (10 V) and actuation displacement of the HCG (50 nm). The microelectromechanical HCG structure facilitates a high phase tuning speed >0.5 MHz. Beam steering is experimentally demonstrated with the optical phased array.

  3. Phase contrast imaging simulation and measurements using polychromatic sources with small source-object distances

    SciTech Connect

    Golosio, Bruno; Carpinelli, Massimo; Masala, Giovanni Luca; Oliva, Piernicola; Stumbo, Simone; Delogu, Pasquale; Zanette, Irene; Stefanini, Arnaldo

    2008-11-01

    Phase contrast imaging is a technique widely used in synchrotron facilities for nondestructive analysis. Such technique can also be implemented through microfocus x-ray tube systems. Recently, a relatively new type of compact, quasimonochromatic x-ray sources based on Compton backscattering has been proposed for phase contrast imaging applications. In order to plan a phase contrast imaging system setup, to evaluate the system performance and to choose the experimental parameters that optimize the image quality, it is important to have reliable software for phase contrast imaging simulation. Several software tools have been developed and tested against experimental measurements at synchrotron facilities devoted to phase contrast imaging. However, many approximations that are valid in such conditions (e.g., large source-object distance, small transverse size of the object, plane wave approximation, monochromatic beam, and Gaussian-shaped source focal spot) are not generally suitable for x-ray tubes and other compact systems. In this work we describe a general method for the simulation of phase contrast imaging using polychromatic sources based on a spherical wave description of the beam and on a double-Gaussian model of the source focal spot, we discuss the validity of some possible approximations, and we test the simulations against experimental measurements using a microfocus x-ray tube on three types of polymers (nylon, poly-ethylene-terephthalate, and poly-methyl-methacrylate) at varying source-object distance. It will be shown that, as long as all experimental conditions are described accurately in the simulations, the described method yields results that are in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  4. Phase-contrast Hounsfield units of fixated and non-fixated soft-tissue samples

    SciTech Connect

    Willner, Marian; Fior, Gabriel; Marschner, Mathias; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Schock, Jonathan; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Noël, Peter B.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia; Rozhkova, Elena A.

    2015-08-31

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of imaging results. Thus far, the experimental values of few tissue types have been reported; these values have been determined from fixated tissue samples. This study presents phase-contrast Hounsfield units for various types of non-fixated human soft tissues. A large variety of tissue specimens ranging from adipose, muscle and connective tissues to liver, kidney and pancreas tissues were imaged by a grating interferometer with a rotating-anode X-ray tube and a photon-counting detector. In addition, we investigated the effects of formalin fixation on the quantitative phase-contrast imaging results.

  5. Phase-contrast Hounsfield units of fixated and non-fixated soft-tissue samples

    DOE PAGES

    Willner, Marian; Fior, Gabriel; Marschner, Mathias; ...

    2015-08-31

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of imaging results. Thus far, the experimental values of few tissue types have been reported; these values have been determined from fixated tissue samples. This study presents phase-contrast Hounsfield units for various types of non-fixated human soft tissues. A large variety of tissuemore » specimens ranging from adipose, muscle and connective tissues to liver, kidney and pancreas tissues were imaged by a grating interferometer with a rotating-anode X-ray tube and a photon-counting detector. In addition, we investigated the effects of formalin fixation on the quantitative phase-contrast imaging results.« less

  6. Simulation of single grid-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging (g-PCXI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H. W.; Lee, H. W.; Cho, H. S.; Je, U. K.; Park, C. K.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, G. A.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, D. Y.; Park, Y. O.; Woo, T. H.; Lee, S. H.; Chung, W. H.; Kim, J. W.; Kim, J. G.

    2017-04-01

    Single grid-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging (g-PCXI) technique, which was recently proposed by Wen et al. to retrieve absorption, scattering, and phase-gradient images from the raw image of the examined object, seems a practical method for phase-contrast imaging with great simplicity and minimal requirements on the setup alignment. In this work, we developed a useful simulation platform for g-PCXI and performed a simulation to demonstrate its viability. We also established a table-top setup for g-PCXI which consists of a focused-linear grid (200-lines/in strip density), an x-ray tube (100-μm focal spot size), and a flat-panel detector (48-μm pixel size) and performed a preliminary experiment with some samples to show the performance of the simulation platform. We successfully obtained phase-contrast x-ray images of much enhanced contrast from both the simulation and experiment and the simulated contract seemed similar to the experimental contrast, which shows the performance of the developed simulation platform. We expect that the simulation platform will be useful for designing an optimal g-PCXI system.

  7. Phase-Contrast Hounsfield Units of Fixated and Non-Fixated Soft-Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Willner, Marian; Fior, Gabriel; Marschner, Mathias; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Schock, Jonathan; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander A; Noël, Peter B; Rummeny, Ernst J; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of imaging results. Thus far, the experimental values of few tissue types have been reported; these values have been determined from fixated tissue samples. This study presents phase-contrast Hounsfield units for various types of non-fixated human soft tissues. A large variety of tissue specimens ranging from adipose, muscle and connective tissues to liver, kidney and pancreas tissues were imaged by a grating interferometer with a rotating-anode X-ray tube and a photon-counting detector. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of formalin fixation on the quantitative phase-contrast imaging results.

  8. Phase-Contrast Hounsfield Units of Fixated and Non-Fixated Soft-Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Willner, Marian; Fior, Gabriel; Marschner, Mathias; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Schock, Jonathan; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Noël, Peter B.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of imaging results. Thus far, the experimental values of few tissue types have been reported; these values have been determined from fixated tissue samples. This study presents phase-contrast Hounsfield units for various types of non-fixated human soft tissues. A large variety of tissue specimens ranging from adipose, muscle and connective tissues to liver, kidney and pancreas tissues were imaged by a grating interferometer with a rotating-anode X-ray tube and a photon-counting detector. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of formalin fixation on the quantitative phase-contrast imaging results. PMID:26322638

  9. A Broad-Band Phase-Contrast Wave-Front Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, Eric; Wallace, J. Kent

    2005-01-01

    A broadband phase-contrast wave-front sensor has been proposed as a real-time wave-front sensor in an adaptive-optics system. The proposed sensor would offer an alternative to the Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensors now used in high-order adaptive-optics systems of some astronomical telescopes. Broadband sensing gives higher sensitivity than does narrow-band sensing, and it appears that for a given bandwidth, the sensitivity of the proposed phase-contrast sensor could exceed that of a Shack-Hartmann sensor. Relative to a Shack-Hartmann sensor, the proposed sensor may be optically and mechanically simpler. As described below, an important element of the principle of operation of a phase-contrast wave-front sensor is the imposition of a 90deg phase shift between diffracted and undiffracted parts of the same light beam. In the proposed sensor, this phase shift would be obtained by utilizing the intrinsic 90 phase shift between the transmitted and reflected beams in an ideal (thin, symmetric) beam splitter. This phase shift can be characterized as achromatic or broadband because it is 90deg at every wavelength over a broad wavelength range.

  10. Investigation of suitable biopsy markers for grating-based phase contrast mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arboleda, C.; Wang, Z.; Forte, S.; Kubik-Huch, R. A.; Stampanoni, M.

    2017-01-01

    Phase-contrast mammography is a rising technology where, in addition to X-ray absorption, images show phase and dark-field contrast. Although the use of biopsy markers constitutes a fundamental task in breast examinations, there has not been any investigation concerning appropriate clips for this technology. We studied the suitability of three markers (Tumark, Somatex Medical Technologies; Hydromark, Mammotome; and Mammostar, Mammotome) for this modality on a laboratory source setup using a chicken breast phantom. The first two clips appeared to be innocuous, whereas Mammostar showed the potential that the non-metallic portion only could be used as a marker for this technique.

  11. Phase contrast x-ray microscopy study of rabbit primo vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.-S.; Oh, S.-W.; Lim, J.-H.; Han, S.-W.

    2010-11-01

    The microstructural properties of the primo-vascular systems of rabbits were examined by phase contrast x-ray microscopy. The primo-vascular systems with an average diameter of 32 μm were extracted from the surfaces of the rabbit internal organs. Phase contrast x-ray imaging showed that the primo-vascular systems were tubules with random holes on their lateral surfaces. The size of the holes on the vascular surface was 2-5 μm. The holes might act as size selective channels for microcells coming in and out and assist in the unidirectional flow of the primo-vascular systems.

  12. Phase-contrast enhanced mammography: A new diagnostic tool for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhentian; Thuering, Thomas; David, Christian; Roessl, Ewald; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Singer, Gad; Hohl, Michael K.; Hauser, Nik; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-07-01

    Phase contrast and scattering-based X-ray imaging can potentially revolutionize the radiological approach to breast imaging by providing additional and complementary information to conventional, absorption-based methods. We investigated native, non-fixed whole breast samples using a grating interferometer with an X-ray tube-based configuration. Our approach simultaneously recorded absorption, differential phase contrast and small-angle scattering signals. The results show that this novel technique - combined with a dedicated image fusion algorithm - has the potential to deliver enhanced breast imaging with complementary information for an improved diagnostic process.

  13. Phase-contrast enhanced mammography: A new diagnostic tool for breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhentian; Thuering, Thomas; David, Christian; Roessl, Ewald; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Singer, Gad; Hohl, Michael K.; Hauser, Nik; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-07-31

    Phase contrast and scattering-based X-ray imaging can potentially revolutionize the radiological approach to breast imaging by providing additional and complementary information to conventional, absorption-based methods. We investigated native, non-fixed whole breast samples using a grating interferometer with an X-ray tube-based configuration. Our approach simultaneously recorded absorption, differential phase contrast and small-angle scattering signals. The results show that this novel technique - combined with a dedicated image fusion algorithm - has the potential to deliver enhanced breast imaging with complementary information for an improved diagnostic process.

  14. Dual-modality endomicroscopy with co-registered fluorescence and phase contrast

    PubMed Central

    Ba, C.; Palmiere, M.; Ritt, J.; Mertz, J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a dual-modality laser scanning endomicroscope that provides simultaneous fluorescence contrast based on confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) and phase-gradient contrast based on scanning oblique back-scattering microscopy (sOBM). The probe consists of a 2.6mm-diameter micro-objective attached to a 30,000-core flexible fiber bundle. The dual contrasts are inherently co-registered, providing complementary information on labeled and un-labeled sample structure. Proof of principle demonstrations are presented with ex-vivo mouse colon tissue. PMID:27699107

  15. Optimization of propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography for breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, P.; Pacile, S.; Nesterets, Y. I.; Mayo, S. C.; Dullin, C.; Dreossi, D.; Arfelli, F.; Thompson, D.; Lockie, D.; McCormack, M.; Taba, S. T.; Brun, F.; Pinamonti, M.; Nickson, C.; Hall, C.; Dimmock, M.; Zanconati, F.; Cholewa, M.; Quiney, H.; Brennan, P. C.; Tromba, G.; Gureyev, T. E.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise the experimental protocol and data analysis for in-vivo breast cancer x-ray imaging. Results are presented of the experiment at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra Synchrotron using the propagation-based phase-contrast mammographic tomography method, which incorporates not only absorption, but also x-ray phase information. In this study the images of breast tissue samples, of a size corresponding to a full human breast, with radiologically acceptable x-ray doses were obtained, and the degree of improvement of the image quality (from the diagnostic point of view) achievable using propagation-based phase-contrast image acquisition protocols with proper incorporation of x-ray phase retrieval into the reconstruction pipeline was investigated. Parameters such as the x-ray energy, sample-to-detector distance and data processing methods were tested, evaluated and optimized with respect to the estimated diagnostic value using a mastectomy sample with a malignant lesion. The results of quantitative evaluation of images were obtained by means of radiological assessment carried out by 13 experienced specialists. A comparative analysis was performed between the x-ray and the histological images of the specimen. The results of the analysis indicate that, within the investigated range of parameters, both the objective image quality characteristics and the subjective radiological scores of propagation-based phase-contrast images of breast tissues monotonically increase with the strength of phase contrast which in turn is directly proportional to the product of the radiation wavelength and the sample-to-detector distance. The outcomes of this study serve to define the practical imaging conditions and the CT reconstruction procedures appropriate for low-dose phase-contrast mammographic imaging of live patients at specially designed synchrotron beamlines.

  16. Optimization of propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography for breast cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Baran, P; Pacile, S; Nesterets, Y I; Mayo, S C; Dullin, C; Dreossi, D; Arfelli, F; Thompson, D; Lockie, D; McCormack, M; Taba, S T; Brun, F; Pinamonti, M; Nickson, C; Hall, C; Dimmock, M; Zanconati, F; Cholewa, M; Quiney, H; Brennan, P C; Tromba, G; Gureyev, T E

    2017-03-21

    The aim of this study was to optimise the experimental protocol and data analysis for in-vivo breast cancer x-ray imaging. Results are presented of the experiment at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra Synchrotron using the propagation-based phase-contrast mammographic tomography method, which incorporates not only absorption, but also x-ray phase information. In this study the images of breast tissue samples, of a size corresponding to a full human breast, with radiologically acceptable x-ray doses were obtained, and the degree of improvement of the image quality (from the diagnostic point of view) achievable using propagation-based phase-contrast image acquisition protocols with proper incorporation of x-ray phase retrieval into the reconstruction pipeline was investigated. Parameters such as the x-ray energy, sample-to-detector distance and data processing methods were tested, evaluated and optimized with respect to the estimated diagnostic value using a mastectomy sample with a malignant lesion. The results of quantitative evaluation of images were obtained by means of radiological assessment carried out by 13 experienced specialists. A comparative analysis was performed between the x-ray and the histological images of the specimen. The results of the analysis indicate that, within the investigated range of parameters, both the objective image quality characteristics and the subjective radiological scores of propagation-based phase-contrast images of breast tissues monotonically increase with the strength of phase contrast which in turn is directly proportional to the product of the radiation wavelength and the sample-to-detector distance. The outcomes of this study serve to define the practical imaging conditions and the CT reconstruction procedures appropriate for low-dose phase-contrast mammographic imaging of live patients at specially designed synchrotron beamlines.

  17. X-ray phase contrast tomography by tracking near field speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Herzen, Julia; Atwood, Robert; Laundy, David; Hipp, Alexander; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-03-01

    X-ray imaging techniques that capture variations in the x-ray phase can yield higher contrast images with lower x-ray dose than is possible with conventional absorption radiography. However, the extraction of phase information is often more difficult than the extraction of absorption information and requires a more sophisticated experimental arrangement. We here report a method for three-dimensional (3D) X-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) which gives quantitative volumetric information on the real part of the refractive index. The method is based on the recently developed X-ray speckle tracking technique in which the displacement of near field speckle is tracked using a digital image correlation algorithm. In addition to differential phase contrast projection images, the method allows the dark-field images to be simultaneously extracted. After reconstruction, compared to conventional absorption CT images, the 3D phase CT images show greatly enhanced contrast. This new imaging method has advantages compared to other X-ray imaging methods in simplicity of experimental arrangement, speed of measurement and relative insensitivity to beam movements. These features make the technique an attractive candidate for material imaging such as in-vivo imaging of biological systems containing soft tissue.

  18. X-ray phase contrast tomography by tracking near field speckle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Herzen, Julia; Atwood, Robert; Laundy, David; Hipp, Alexander; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-01-01

    X-ray imaging techniques that capture variations in the x-ray phase can yield higher contrast images with lower x-ray dose than is possible with conventional absorption radiography. However, the extraction of phase information is often more difficult than the extraction of absorption information and requires a more sophisticated experimental arrangement. We here report a method for three-dimensional (3D) X-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) which gives quantitative volumetric information on the real part of the refractive index. The method is based on the recently developed X-ray speckle tracking technique in which the displacement of near field speckle is tracked using a digital image correlation algorithm. In addition to differential phase contrast projection images, the method allows the dark-field images to be simultaneously extracted. After reconstruction, compared to conventional absorption CT images, the 3D phase CT images show greatly enhanced contrast. This new imaging method has advantages compared to other X-ray imaging methods in simplicity of experimental arrangement, speed of measurement and relative insensitivity to beam movements. These features make the technique an attractive candidate for material imaging such as in-vivo imaging of biological systems containing soft tissue. PMID:25735237

  19. Extreme ultraviolet digital in-line holography using a tabletop source.

    PubMed

    Zürch, Michael; Spielmann, Christian

    2015-07-01

    Digital in-line holography (DIH) offers fast, lensless, and aberration-free imaging with diffraction-limited resolution and inherently combines phase- and amplitude-contrast imaging, as well as three-dimensional imaging. Extending this technique to shorter wavelengths allows increasing the achievable spatial and phase-contrast resolution, as well as accessing material parameters not accessible in the optical domain. In this paper, we report on DIH experiments conducted with a coherent tabletop ultrafast high harmonic source operated at 38 nm wavelength. Applying a twin-image-free reconstruction scheme optimized for highly absorbing samples, we were able to demonstrate the phase-contrast imaging of silicon nitride sheets of 15 nm thickness and the use of the strong absorption of extreme ultraviolet in matter for amplitude-contrast imaging of thin films with spatial resolution below 1 μm. High-resolution morphology determination in combination with phase-contrast imaging is of special importance in thin-film characterization and applications arising thereof.

  20. X-ray Phase-Contrast Imaging and Metrology through Unified Modulated Pattern Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdora, Marie-Christine; Thibault, Pierre; Zhou, Tunhe; Koch, Frieder J.; Romell, Jenny; Sala, Simone; Last, Arndt; Rau, Christoph; Zanette, Irene

    2017-05-01

    We present a method for x-ray phase-contrast imaging and metrology applications based on the sample-induced modulation and subsequent computational demodulation of a random or periodic reference interference pattern. The proposed unified modulated pattern analysis (UMPA) technique is a versatile approach and allows tuning of signal sensitivity, spatial resolution, and scan time. We characterize the method and demonstrate its potential for high-sensitivity, quantitative phase imaging, and metrology to overcome the limitations of existing methods.

  1. Experimental demonstration of passive coherent combining of fiber lasers by phase contrast filtering.

    PubMed

    Jeux, François; Desfarges-Berthelemot, Agnès; Kermène, Vincent; Barthelemy, Alain

    2012-12-17

    We report experiments on a new laser architecture involving phase contrast filtering to coherently combine an array of fiber lasers. We demonstrate that the new technique yields a more stable phase-locking than standard methods using only amplitude filtering. A spectral analysis of the output beams shows that the new scheme generates more resonant frequencies common to the coupled lasers. This property can enhance the combining efficiency when the number of lasers to be coupled is large.

  2. Theoretical analysis of x-ray CT phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Sheng; Liu, Song; Zhang, Xuelong

    2008-12-01

    Recently phase contrast imaging has attracted much attention. An obvious advantage of using X-rays for imaging the internal structure of relatively thick samples lies in its high degree of penetration of solid objects. However, often leads to poor image contrast for soft tissue. Phase contrast imaging can be very useful in such situation, as the phase of the transmitted beam may often be more sensitive indicator of density of sample than convention contrast. On the other hand, Computed Tomography is the best technology in the aspect of X-rays detection. Using the technology, the detected object can be imaged to three-dimensional image, so as to observe the inner structure of object, and be convenient to the disease examination. If the phase contrast imaging can be used to the technology of Computed Tomography, the high resolution image can be gained. The technology will become the development orientation of medical image. The aim of this article was to apply the theory of X-rays phase contrast imaging to the traditional X-CT technique. For this purpose, the formula deduced from the imaging theory with parallel monochromatic X-rays illuminating the object based on the Fresnel-Kircohhof theory had been completed and a formula similar to that of the traditional X-CT reconstruction had been gained, which was Radon transform formula. At last, X-rays reconstruction simulation had been carried out according to the formula, and proved that the method could be used in clinical medical imaging. The method discussed in this paper had a very bright prospect for application.

  3. Phase Contrast MRI is an Early Marker of Micrometastatic Breast Cancer Development in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Budde, Matthew D; Gold, Eric; Jordan, E. Kay; Smith-Brown, Melissa; Frank, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    The early growth of micrometastatic breast cancer in the brain often occurs through vessel co-option and is independent of angiogenesis. Remodeling of the existing vasculature is an important step in the evolution of co-opting micrometastases into angiogenesis-dependent solid tumor masses. The purpose of this study was to determine if phase contrast MRI, an intrinsic source of contrast exquisitely sensitive to the magnetic susceptibility properties of deoxygenated hemoglobin, could detect vascular changes occurring independent of angiogenesis in a rat model of breast cancer metastases to the brain. Twelve nude rats were administered with 106 MDA-MB-231BRL “brain seeking” breast cancer cells through intracardiac injection. Serial, multiparametric MRI of the brain was performed weekly until metastatic disease was detected. The results demonstrate that images of the signal phase were more sensitive to metastatic brain lesions (area under receiver operating characteristic curve, AUC = 0.97) compared to T2* gradient echo magnitude images, (AUC = 0.73). The difference between the two techniques was likely the result of the confounding effects of edema on the magnitude signal. A region of interest analysis revealed that vascular abnormalities detected with phase contrast MRI preceded tumor permeability as measured with contrast-enhanced MRI by 1 to 2 weeks. Tumor size was correlated with permeability (R2 = 0.23, p < 0.01), but phase contrast was independent of tumor size (R2 = 0.03). Histopathological analysis demonstrated that capillary endothelial cells coopted by tumor cells were significantly enlarged, but less dense, compared to the normal brain vasculature. Whereas co-opted vessels were VEGF-negative, vessels within larger tumor masses were VEGF-positive. In conclusion, phase contrast MRI is believed to be sensitive to vascular remodeling in co-opting brain tumor metastases independent of sprouting angiogenesis and may therefore aid in pre-clinical studies of

  4. Differential phase contrast with a segmented detector in a scanning X-ray microprobe

    PubMed Central

    Hornberger, B.; de Jonge, M. D.; Feser, M.; Holl, P.; Holzner, C.; Jacobsen, C.; Legnini, D.; Paterson, D.; Rehak, P.; Strüder, L.; Vogt, S.

    2008-01-01

    Scanning X-ray microprobes are unique tools for the nanoscale investigation of specimens from the life, environmental, materials and other fields of sciences. Typically they utilize absorption and fluorescence as contrast mechanisms. Phase contrast is a complementary technique that can provide strong contrast with reduced radiation dose for weakly absorbing structures in the multi-keV range. In this paper the development of a segmented charge-integrating silicon detector which provides simultaneous absorption and differential phase contrast is reported. The detector can be used together with a fluorescence detector for the simultaneous acquisition of transmission and fluorescence data. It can be used over a wide range of photon energies, photon rates and exposure times at third-generation synchrotron radiation sources, and is currently operating at two beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source. Images obtained at around 2 keV and 10 keV demonstrate the superiority of phase contrast over absorption for specimens composed of light elements. PMID:18552427

  5. Phase-contrast x-ray imaging of the breast: recent developments towards clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coan, P.; Bravin, A.; Tromba, G.

    2013-12-01

    Breast imaging is one of the most demanding and delicate radiological applications. Mammography is the primary diagnosis tool in breast cancer detection and national screening programmes. Recognition of breast cancer depends on the detection of subtle architectural distortion, masses showing near normal breast tissue density, skin thickening and microcalcifications. The small differences in attenuation of x-rays between normal and malignant tissue result in low contrast and make cancer detection difficult in conventional x-ray absorption mammography. Because of these challenging aspects, breast imaging has been the first and most explored diagnostic field in phase-contrast imaging research. This novel imaging method has been extensively used and has demonstrated a unique capability in producing high-contrast and sensitive images at quasi-histological resolution. The most recent and significant technical developments are introduced and results obtained by the application of various phase-contrast imaging techniques for breast imaging are reported. The first phase-contrast mammography clinical trials project is also presented and the short- and long-term future perspectives of the method are discussed.

  6. High-Resolution Phase-Contrast Imaging of Submicron Particles in Unstained Lung Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Schittny, J. C.; Barre, S. F.; Haberthuer, D.; Mokso, R.; Tsuda, A.; Stampanoni, M.

    2011-09-09

    To access the risks and chances of deposition of submicron particles in the gas-exchange area of the lung, a precise three-dimensional (3D)-localization of the sites of deposition is essential--especially because local peaks of deposition are expected in the acinar tree and in individual alveoli. In this study we developed the workflow for such an investigation. We administered 200-nm gold particles to young adult rats by intratracheal instillation. After fixation and paraffin embedding, their lungs were imaged unstained using synchrotron radiation x-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) at the beamline TOMCAT (Swiss Light Source, Villigen, Switzerland) at sample detector distances of 2.5 mm (absorption contrast) and of 52.5 mm (phase contrast). A segmentation based on a global threshold of grey levels was successfully done on absorption-contrast images for the gold and on the phase-contrast images for the tissue. The smallest spots containing gold possessed a size of 1-2 voxels of 370-nm side length. We conclude that a combination of phase and absorption contrast SRXTM imaging is necessary to obtain the correct segmentation of both tissue and gold particles. This method will be used for the 3D localization of deposited particles in the gas-exchange area of the lung.

  7. Table-top phase-contrast imaging employing photon-counting detectors towards mammographic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, K. D.; Pichotka, M.; Hasn, S.; Granja, C.

    2017-02-01

    In mammography the difficult task to detect microcalcifications (≈ 100 μm) and low contrast structures in the breast has been a topic of interest from its beginnings. The possibility to improve the image quality requires the effort to employ novel X-ray imaging techniques, such as phase-contrast, and high resolution detectors. Phase-contrast techniques are promising tools for medical diagnosis because they provide additional and complementary information to traditional absorption-based X-ray imaging methods. In this work a Hamamatsu microfocus X-ray source with tungsten anode and a photon counting detector (Timepix operated in Medipix mode) was used. A significant improvement in the detection of phase-effects using Medipix detector was observed in comparison to an standard flat-panel detector. An optimization of geometrical parameters reveals the dependency on the X-ray propagation path and the small angle deviation. The quantification of these effects was achieved taking into account the image noise, contrast, spatial resolution of the phase-enhancement, absorbed dose, and energy dependence.

  8. High-Resolution and Quantitative X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography for Mouse Brain Research.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yan; Lin, Xiaojie; Yuan, Falei; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Zhao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Imaging techniques for visualizing cerebral vasculature and distinguishing functional areas are essential and critical to the study of various brain diseases. In this paper, with the X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique, we proposed an experiment scheme for the ex vivo mouse brain study, achieving both high spatial resolution and improved soft-tissue contrast. This scheme includes two steps: sample preparation and volume reconstruction. In the first step, we use heparinized saline to displace the blood inside cerebral vessels and then replace it with air making air-filled mouse brain. After sample preparation, X-ray phase-contrast tomography is performed to collect the data for volume reconstruction. Here, we adopt a phase-retrieval combined filtered backprojection method to reconstruct its three-dimensional structure and redesigned the reconstruction kernel. To evaluate its performance, we carried out experiments at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The results show that the air-tissue structured cerebral vasculatures are highly visible with propagation-based phase-contrast imaging and can be clearly resolved in reconstructed cross-images. Besides, functional areas, such as the corpus callosum, corpus striatum, and nuclei, are also clearly resolved. The proposed method is comparable with hematoxylin and eosin staining method but represents the studied mouse brain in three dimensions, offering a potential powerful tool for the research of brain disorders.

  9. Hard X-Ray Phase-Contrast Imaging for Medical Applications - Physicist's Dream or Radiologist's Mainstream?

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S. W.; Gureyev, T. E.; Mayo, S. C.; Nesterets, Ya. I.; Pogany, A.; Stevenson, A. W.; Paganin, D. M.

    2007-03-30

    We briefly review currently practiced methods of X-ray phase contrast imaging and consider some of their relative features, especially in regard to applicability to clinical medical studies. Various related technological issues and promising future areas of development are also briefly discussed.

  10. Requirements for dynamical differential phase contrast x-ray imaging with a laboratory source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macindoe, David; Kitchen, Marcus J.; Irvine, Sarah C.; Fouras, Andreas; Morgan, Kaye S.

    2016-12-01

    X-ray phase contrast enables weakly-attenuating structures to be imaged, with bright synchrotron sources adding the ability to capture time sequences and analyse sample dynamics. Here, we describe the translation of dynamical differential phase contrast imaging from the synchrotron to a compact x-ray source, in order to achieve this kind of time sequence imaging in the laboratory. We formulate broadly-applicable set-up guidelines for the single-grid, single-exposure imaging technique using a divergent source, exploring the experimental factors that restrict set-up size, imaging sensitivity and sample size. Experimental images are presented using the single-grid phase contrast technique with a steel attenuation grid and a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source, enabling exposure times as short as 0.5 s for dynamic imaging. Differential phase contrast images were retrieved from phantoms, incorporating noise filtering to improve the low-count images encountered when imaging dynamics using short exposures.

  11. Energy weighting in grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelzer, Georg; Weber, Thomas; Anton, Gisela; Ballabriga Sune, Rafael; Bayer, Florian; Campbell, Michael; Haas, Wilhelm; Horn, Florian; Llopart Cudie, Xavi; Michel, Norbert; Mollenbauer, Uwe; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Ritter, Ina; Wölfel, Stefan; Wong, Winnie S.; Zang, Andrea; Michel, Thilo

    2014-03-01

    With energy-resolving photon-counting detectors in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging it is possible to reduce the dose needed and optimize the imaging chain towards better performance. The advantage of photon- counting detector's linear energy response and absence of electronic noise in attenuation based imaging is known. The access to the energy information of the photons counted provides even further potential for optimization by applying energy weighting factors. We have evaluated energy weighting for grating-based phase-contrast imaging. Measurements with the hybrid photon-counting detector Dosepix were performed. The concept of energy binning implemented in the pixel electronics allows individual storing of the energy information of the incoming photons in 16 energy bins for each pixel. With this technique the full spectral information can be obtained pixel wise from one single acquisition. On the differential phase-contrast data taken, we applied different types of energy weighting factors. The results presented in this contribution demonstrate the advantages of energy-resolved photon-counting in differential phase-contrast imaging. Using a x-ray spectrum centred significantly above the interferometers design energy leads to poor image quality. But with the proposed method and detector the quality was enhanced by 2.8 times in signal-to-noise ratio squared. As this is proportional to dose, energy- resolved photon-counting might be valuable especially for medical applications.

  12. Kupffer-phase findings of hepatic hemangiomas in contrast-enhanced ultrasound with sonazoid.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Katsutoshi; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Saito, Kazuhiro; Yoshiara, Hiroki; Imai, Yasuharu

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess quantitatively the Kupffer-phase enhancement patterns of hepatic hemangiomas in contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) with Sonazoid. A total of 46 patients with 46 hepatic hemangiomas (17.1 ± 6.2 mm in diameter, 34 typical type and 12 high-flow type) underwent CEUS in the Kupffer phase. The lesion-to-liver contrast ratio in the Kupffer phase was quantitatively assessed for both types of hemangioma. Most of the hepatic hemangiomas, whether or not they were the high-flow type, were iso- to hypo-echoic relative to the surrounding liver parenchyma. The contrast ratio was -5.33 ± 6.70 dB for the high-flow hemangiomas and -4.54 ± 6.28 dB for the typical hemangiomas. There was no significant difference in contrast ratio between the two types of lesions (p = 0.73). All of the hemangiomas, whether of typical or high-flow type, are iso- to hypo-echoic relative to the surrounding liver parenchyma on Kupffer-phase imaging.

  13. Benchmarking the x-ray phase contrast imaging for ICF DT ice characterization using roughened surrogates

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B; Moody, J; Koch, J; Mapoles, E; Montesanti, R; Youngblood, K; Letts, S; Nikroo, A; Sater, J; Atherton, J

    2008-06-26

    We use x-ray phase contrast imaging to characterize the inner surface roughness of DT ice layers in capsules planned for future ignition experiments. It is therefore important to quantify how well the x-ray data correlates with the actual ice roughness. We benchmarked the accuracy of our system using surrogates with fabricated roughness characterized with high precision standard techniques. Cylindrical artifacts with azimuthally uniform sinusoidal perturbations with 100 um period and 1 um amplitude demonstrated 0.02 um accuracy limited by the resolution of the imager and the source size of our phase contrast system. Spherical surrogates with random roughness close to that required for the DT ice for a successful ignition experiment were used to correlate the actual surface roughness to that obtained from the x-ray measurements. When comparing average power spectra of individual measurements, the accuracy mode number limits of the x-ray phase contrast system benchmarked against surface characterization performed by Atomic Force Microscopy are 60 and 90 for surrogates smoother and rougher than the required roughness for the ice. These agreement mode number limits are >100 when comparing matching individual measurements. We will discuss the implications for interpreting DT ice roughness data derived from phase-contrast x-ray imaging.

  14. Phase contrast microscopy analysis of breast tissue: differences in benign vs. malignant epithelium and stroma.

    PubMed

    Wells, Wendy A; Wang, Xin; Daghlian, Charles P; Paulsen, Keith D; Pogue, Brian W

    2009-08-01

    To assess how optical scatter properties in breast tissue, as measured by phase contrast microscopy and interpreted pathophysiologically, might be exploited as a diagnostic tool to differentiate cancer from benign tissue. We evaluated frozen human breast tissue sections of adipose tissue, normal breast parenchyma, benign fibroadenoma tumors and noninvasive and invasive malignant cancers by phase contrast microscopy through quantification of grayscale values, using multiple regions of interest (ROI). Student's t tests were performed on phase contrast measures across diagnostic categories testing data from individual cases; all ROI data were used as separate measures. Stroma demonstrated significantly higher scatter intensity than did epithelium, with lower scattering in tumor-associated stroma as compared with normal or benign-associated stroma. Measures were comparable for invasive and noninvasive malignant tumors but were higher than those found in benign tumors and were lowest in adipose tissue. Significant differences were found in scatter coefficient properties of epithelium and stroma across diagnostic categories of breast tissue, particularly between benign and malignant-associated stroma. Improved understanding of how scatter properties correlate with morphologic criteria used in routine pathologic diagnoses could have a significant clinical impact as developing optical technology allows macroscopic in situ phase contrast imaging.

  15. Extracting optical scattering properties on the basis of phase contrast images for diagnosing stomach cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui; Zhang, Hui; Lin, Xiaona; Chen, Wei R.

    2013-04-01

    We combine morphological granulometry with Mie theory in order to analyze phase contrast images of biomedical tissue for cancer diagnosis. This method correlates microscopic phase distributions of the tissue image and macroscopic optical scattering properties of the tissue. Our results show that the particle size density distribution can be used to quantitatively identify morphological changes of cancerous stomach tissues. Our method can distinguish normal tissue from cancerous tissues, using the significant differences in scattering coefficient, reduced scattering coefficient and phase function. Therefore, this method can provide not only quantitative information for the diagnosis of cancer, but also accurate optical scattering parameters for photothermal therapy for cancer.

  16. Contrasting Mechanical Anisotropies of the Superfluid {sup 3}He Phases in Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D. I.; Fisher, S. N.; Guenault, A. M.; Haley, R. P.; O'Sullivan, S.; Pickett, G. R.; Roberts, J.; Tsepelin, V.; Mulders, N.

    2007-02-16

    There has been much recent interest in how impurity scattering may affect the phases of the p-wave superfluid {sup 3}He. Impurities may be added to the otherwise absolutely pure superfluid by immersing it in aerogel. Some predictions suggest that impurity scattering may destroy orientational order and force all of the superfluid phases to have an isotropic superfluid density. In contrast to this, we present experimental data showing that the response of the A-like phase to superfluid flow is highly anisotropic, revealing a texture that is easily modified by flow.

  17. Quantitative Carré differential interference contrast microscopy to assess phase and amplitude.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Donald D; Fischer, David G; Dayton, Amanda; Prahl, Scott A

    2011-06-01

    We present a method of using an unmodified differential interference contrast microscope to acquire quantitative information on scatter and absorption of thin tissue samples. A simple calibration process is discussed that uses a standard optical wedge. Subsequently, we present a phase-stepping procedure for acquiring phase gradient information exclusive of absorption effects. The procedure results in two-dimensional maps of the local angular (polar and azimuthal) ray deviation. We demonstrate the calibration process, discuss details of the phase-stepping algorithm, and present representative results for a porcine skin sample.

  18. Simple broadband implementation of a phase contrast wavefront sensor for adaptive optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Wallace, J. K.

    2004-01-01

    The most critical element of an adaptive optics system is its wavefront sensor, which must measure the closed-loop difference between the corrected wavefront and an ideal template at high speed, in real time, over a dense sampling of the pupil. Most high-order systems have used Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors, but a novel approach based on Zernike's phase contrast principle appears promising. In this paper we discuss a simple way to achromatize such a phase contrast wavefront sensor, using the pi/2 phase difference between reflected and transmitted rays in a thin, symmetric beam splitter. We further model the response at a range of wavelengths to show that the required transverse dimension of the focal-plane phase-shifting spot, nominally lambda/D, may not be very sensitive to wavelength, and so in practice additional optics to introduce wavelength-dependent transverse magnification achromatizing this spot diameter may not be required. A very simple broadband implementation of the phase contrast wavefront sensor results.

  19. Lyot-plane phase masks for improved high-contrast imaging with a vortex coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruane, G. J.; Huby, E.; Absil, O.; Mawet, D.; Delacroix, C.; Carlomagno, B.; Swartzlander, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The vortex coronagraph is an optical instrument that precisely removes on-axis starlight allowing for high contrast imaging at small angular separation from the star, a crucial capability for direct detection and characterization of exoplanets and circumstellar disks. Telescopes with aperture obstructions, such as secondary mirrors and spider support structures, require advanced coronagraph designs to provide adequate starlight suppression. Aims: We introduce a phase-only Lyot-plane optic to the vortex coronagraph, which offers improved contrast performance on telescopes with complicated apertures. Potential solutions for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) are described. Methods: Adding a Lyot-plane phase mask relocates residual starlight away from a region of the image plane, thereby reducing stellar noise and improving sensitivity to off-axis companions. The phase mask is calculated using an iterative phase retrieval algorithm. Results: Numerically, we achieve a contrast on the order of 10-6 for a companion with angular displacement as small as 4λ/D with an E-ELT type aperture. Even in the presence of aberrations, improved performance is expected compared to either a conventional vortex coronagraph or an optimized pupil plane phase element alone.

  20. Simple broadband implementation of a phase contrast wavefront sensor for adaptive optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Wallace, J. K.

    2004-01-01

    The most critical element of an adaptive optics system is its wavefront sensor, which must measure the closed-loop difference between the corrected wavefront and an ideal template at high speed, in real time, over a dense sampling of the pupil. Most high-order systems have used Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors, but a novel approach based on Zernike's phase contrast principle appears promising. In this paper we discuss a simple way to achromatize such a phase contrast wavefront sensor, using the pi/2 phase difference between reflected and transmitted rays in a thin, symmetric beam splitter. We further model the response at a range of wavelengths to show that the required transverse dimension of the focal-plane phase-shifting spot, nominally lambda/D, may not be very sensitive to wavelength, and so in practice additional optics to introduce wavelength-dependent transverse magnification achromatizing this spot diameter may not be required. A very simple broadband implementation of the phase contrast wavefront sensor results.

  1. Misleading changes of the signal intensity on opposed-phase MRI after injection of contrast medium

    SciTech Connect

    Heywang-Koebrunner, S.H.; Hoefer, H.; Spielmann, R.P.

    1996-03-01

    The effect of opposed-phase imaging on the interpretation of MR contrast studies is highlighted. A model calculation is performed. It demonstrates the change of signal intensity of an average tumor before and after application of Gd-DTPA on an in-phase and an opposed-phase image, depending on the percentage of fat within the voxels. The effect is then demonstrated, using a small cotton stick soaked with water or a solution of contrast agent representing a tumor before and after i.v. application of Gd-DTPA. If an average enhancing tumor, which is surrounded by fat, occupies less than 50-60% of the slice thickness, it becomes undetectable on opposed-phase images. The reason is that due to signal cancellation on the the opposed image, no signal change or even signal decrease results, while signal increase is visible on the in-phase image. In those areas of the body where significant partial volume of a tumor with fat may occur (such as for breast tumors growing along ducts, which are surrounded by fat), severe errors can result. Therefore we explicitly warn from using opposed-image sequences for MR contrast studies. 14 ref.s, 4 figs.

  2. Quantitative measurement of ultrasound pressure field by optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Seiji; Yasuda, Jun; Hanayama, Hiroki; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    A fast and accurate measurement of an ultrasound field with various exposure sequences is necessary to ensure the efficacy and safety of various ultrasound applications in medicine. The most common method used to measure an ultrasound pressure field, that is, hydrophone scanning, requires a long scanning time and potentially disturbs the field. This may limit the efficiency of developing applications of ultrasound. In this study, an optical phase contrast method enabling fast and noninterfering measurements is proposed. In this method, the modulated phase of light caused by the focused ultrasound pressure field is measured. Then, a computed tomography (CT) algorithm used to quantitatively reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) pressure field is applied. For a high-intensity focused ultrasound field, a new approach that combines the optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography was attempted. First, the optical measurement of focused ultrasound was rapidly performed over the field near a transducer. Second, the nonlinear propagation of the measured ultrasound was simulated. The result of the new approach agreed well with that of the measurement using a hydrophone and was improved from that of the phase contrast method alone with phase unwrapping.

  3. Improved algorithm for processing grating-based phase contrast interferometry image sets

    SciTech Connect

    Marathe, Shashidhara Assoufid, Lahsen Xiao, Xianghui; Ham, Kyungmin; Johnson, Warren W.; Butler, Leslie G.

    2014-01-15

    Grating-based X-ray and neutron interferometry tomography using phase-stepping methods generates large data sets. An improved algorithm is presented for solving for the parameters to calculate transmissions, differential phase contrast, and dark-field images. The method takes advantage of the vectorization inherent in high-level languages such as Mathematica and MATLAB and can solve a 16 × 1k × 1k data set in less than a second. In addition, the algorithm can function with partial data sets. This is demonstrated with processing of a 16-step grating data set with partial use of the original data chosen without any restriction. Also, we have calculated the reduced chi-square for the fit and notice the effect of grating support structural elements upon the differential phase contrast image and have explored expanded basis set representations to mitigate the impact.

  4. A continuous sampling scheme for edge illumination x-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, C. K.; Coan, P.; Bravin, A.; Olivo, A.; Diemoz, P. C.

    2015-08-01

    We discuss an alternative acquisition scheme for edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast imaging based on a continuous scan of the object and compare its performance to that of a previously used scheme, which involved scanning the object in discrete steps rather than continuously. By simulating signals for both continuous and discrete methods under realistic experimental conditions, the effect of the spatial sampling rate is analysed with respect to metrics such as image contrast and accuracy of the retrieved phase shift. Experimental results confirm the theoretical predictions. Despite being limited to a specific example, the results indicate that continuous schemes present advantageous features compared to discrete ones. Not only can they be used to speed up the acquisition but they also prove superior in terms of accurate phase retrieval. The theory and experimental results provided in this study will guide the design of future EI experiments through the implementation of optimized acquisition schemes and sampling rates.

  5. Improved algorithm for processing grating-based phase contrast interferometry image sets.

    PubMed

    Marathe, Shashidhara; Assoufid, Lahsen; Xiao, Xianghui; Ham, Kyungmin; Johnson, Warren W; Butler, Leslie G

    2014-01-01

    Grating-based X-ray and neutron interferometry tomography using phase-stepping methods generates large data sets. An improved algorithm is presented for solving for the parameters to calculate transmissions, differential phase contrast, and dark-field images. The method takes advantage of the vectorization inherent in high-level languages such as Mathematica and MATLAB and can solve a 16 × 1k × 1k data set in less than a second. In addition, the algorithm can function with partial data sets. This is demonstrated with processing of a 16-step grating data set with partial use of the original data chosen without any restriction. Also, we have calculated the reduced chi-square for the fit and notice the effect of grating support structural elements upon the differential phase contrast image and have explored expanded basis set representations to mitigate the impact.

  6. Zernike Phase Contrast Electron Cryo-Tomography Applied to Marine Cyanobacteria Infected with Cyanophages

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wei; Fu, Caroline; Khant, Htet A.; Ludtke, Steven J.; Schmid, Michael F.; Chiu, Wah

    2015-01-01

    Advances in electron cryo-tomography have provided a new opportunity to visualize the internal 3D structures of a bacterium. An electron microscope equipped with Zernike phase contrast optics produces images with dramatically increased contrast compared to images obtained by conventional electron microscopy. Here we describe a protocol to apply Zernike phase plate technology for acquiring electron tomographic tilt series of cyanophage-infected cyanobacterial cells embedded in ice, without staining or chemical fixation. We detail the procedures for aligning and assessing phase plates for data collection, and methods to obtain 3D structures of cyanophage assembly intermediates in the host, by subtomogram alignment, classification and averaging. Acquiring three to four tomographic tilt series takes approximately 12 h on a JEM2200FS electron microscope. We expect this time requirement to decrease substantially as the technique matures. Time required for annotation and subtomogram averaging varies widely depending on the project goals and data volume. PMID:25321408

  7. X-ray optics for phase differential contrast: Design, optimization, simulation, fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, V.; Chukalina, M.; Firsov, A.; Ishikawa, T.; Kikuta, S.; Kohmura, Y.; Svintsov, A.; Zaitsev, S.

    2000-05-01

    With increasing of X-ray energy an interesting situation appears when due to different dependence of refraction and absorption on X-ray energy a sample becomes transparent but still produces refraction. So such samples become unvisible for usual absorption methods but could be analyzed with variouse phase contrast methodes. The situation becomes more actual for higher X-ray energy especially for range 20-100 keV. F. Polack and D. Joyeux described an extension of an interferential differential phase contrast to scanning X-ray microscopy. The principle is to illuminate two points of an object with coherent radiation and detect the fringe shift induced by small phase differences. Fresnel mirrors have been suggested to split a X-ray beam in two coherent ones. In this paper it is proposed instead to use bifocal (multi-focal) lenses. Design and fabrication process of the lenses are described.

  8. Digital Inline Holographic Microscopy (DIHM) of Weakly-scattering Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Camila B.; Zhang, Rongjing; Wilson, Laurence G.

    2014-01-01

    Weakly-scattering objects, such as small colloidal particles and most biological cells, are frequently encountered in microscopy. Indeed, a range of techniques have been developed to better visualize these phase objects; phase contrast and DIC are among the most popular methods for enhancing contrast. However, recording position and shape in the out-of-imaging-plane direction remains challenging. This report introduces a simple experimental method to accurately determine the location and geometry of objects in three dimensions, using digital inline holographic microscopy (DIHM). Broadly speaking, the accessible sample volume is defined by the camera sensor size in the lateral direction, and the illumination coherence in the axial direction. Typical sample volumes range from 200 µm x 200 µm x 200 µm using LED illumination, to 5 mm x 5 mm x 5 mm or larger using laser illumination. This illumination light is configured so that plane waves are incident on the sample. Objects in the sample volume then scatter light, which interferes with the unscattered light to form interference patterns perpendicular to the illumination direction. This image (the hologram) contains the depth information required for three-dimensional reconstruction, and can be captured on a standard imaging device such as a CMOS or CCD camera. The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld back propagation method is employed to numerically refocus microscope images, and a simple imaging heuristic based on the Gouy phase anomaly is used to identify scattering objects within the reconstructed volume. This simple but robust method results in an unambiguous, model-free measurement of the location and shape of objects in microscopic samples. PMID:24561665

  9. Digital inline holographic microscopy (DIHM) of weakly-scattering subjects.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Camila B; Zhang, Rongjing; Wilson, Laurence G

    2014-02-08

    Weakly-scattering objects, such as small colloidal particles and most biological cells, are frequently encountered in microscopy. Indeed, a range of techniques have been developed to better visualize these phase objects; phase contrast and DIC are among the most popular methods for enhancing contrast. However, recording position and shape in the out-of-imaging-plane direction remains challenging. This report introduces a simple experimental method to accurately determine the location and geometry of objects in three dimensions, using digital inline holographic microscopy (DIHM). Broadly speaking, the accessible sample volume is defined by the camera sensor size in the lateral direction, and the illumination coherence in the axial direction. Typical sample volumes range from 200 µm x 200 µm x 200 µm using LED illumination, to 5 mm x 5 mm x 5 mm or larger using laser illumination. This illumination light is configured so that plane waves are incident on the sample. Objects in the sample volume then scatter light, which interferes with the unscattered light to form interference patterns perpendicular to the illumination direction. This image (the hologram) contains the depth information required for three-dimensional reconstruction, and can be captured on a standard imaging device such as a CMOS or CCD camera. The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld back propagation method is employed to numerically refocus microscope images, and a simple imaging heuristic based on the Gouy phase anomaly is used to identify scattering objects within the reconstructed volume. This simple but robust method results in an unambiguous, model-free measurement of the location and shape of objects in microscopic samples.

  10. Diagnostics of 3D Scaffolds by the Method of X-Ray Phase Contrast Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al'tapova, V. R.; Khlusov, I. A.; Karpov, D. A.; Chen, F.; Baumbach, T.; Pichugin, V. F.

    2014-02-01

    Polymers are one of the most interesting classes of materials for bioengineering due to their high biocompatibility and the possibility of regulating their strength and degradation. In bioengineering, the design of a polymer scaffold determines the functional possibilities of the scaffold and its possible medical applications. Traditionally, the design of polymer scaffolds is analyzed with the help of two-dimensional visualization methods, such as optical and electron microscopy, and computer tomography. However, the x-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum is only insignificantly absorbed by polymers and soft tissue, which means that it does not support computer tomography with sufficient contrast. The present work investigates visualization with the help of an interferometer based on the Talbot effect for three-dimensional visualization of a polymer scaffold in absorption, phase, and dark-field contrasts. A comparison of images obtained by x-ray visualization with histological sections of the scaffold is made. Phase contrast has made it possible to visualize the polymer structure and growth of soft tissues in the volume of the scaffold. In the future, it will be possible to use phase contrast for three-dimensional visualization of polymer scaffolds and soft tissues in vivo as well as in vitro.

  11. Phase contrast imaging using a micro focus x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-09-01

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging, a new technique to increase the imaging contrast for the tissues with close attenuation coefficients, has been studied since mid 1990s. This technique reveals the possibility to show the clear details of the soft tissues and tumors in small scale resolution. A compact and low cost phase contrast imaging system using a conventional x-ray source is described in this paper. Using the conventional x-ray source is of great importance, because it provides the possibility to use the method in hospitals and clinical offices. Simple materials and components are used in the setup to keep the cost in a reasonable and affordable range.Tungsten Kα1 line with the photon energy 59.3 keV was used for imaging. Some of the system design details are discussed. The method that was used to stabilize the system is introduced. A chicken thigh bone tissue sample was used for imaging followed by the image quality, image acquisition time and the potential clinical application discussion. High energy x-ray beam can be used in phase contrast imaging. Therefore the radiation dose to the patients can be greatly decreased compared to the traditional x-ray radiography.

  12. High-energy x-ray grating-based phase-contrast radiography of human anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Florian; Hauke, Christian; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Schuster, Max; Seifert, Maria; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-03-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast Talbot-Lau interferometry is a promising imaging technology that has the potential to raise soft tissue contrast in comparison to conventional attenuation-based imaging. Additionally, it is sensitive to attenuation, refraction and scattering of the radiation and thus provides complementary and otherwise inaccessible information due to the dark-field image, which shows the sub-pixel size granularity of the measured object. Until recent progress the method has been mainly limited to photon energies below 40 keV. Scaling the method to photon energies that are sufficient to pass large and spacious objects represents a challenging task. This is caused by increasing demands regarding the fabrication process of the gratings and the broad spectra that come along with the use of polychromatic X-ray sources operated at high acceleration voltages. We designed a setup that is capable to reach high visibilities in the range from 50 to 120 kV. Therefore, spacious and dense parts of the human body with high attenuation can be measured, such as a human knee. The authors will show investigations on the resulting attenuation, differential phase-contrast and dark-field images. The images experimentally show that X-ray grating-based phase-contrast radiography is feasible with highly absorbing parts of the human body containing massive bones.

  13. Segmentation and Tracking of Lymphocytes Based on Modified Active Contour Models in Phase Contrast Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiwen

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes an improved active contour model for segmenting and tracking accurate boundaries of the single lymphocyte in phase-contrast microscopic images. Active contour models have been widely used in object segmentation and tracking. However, current external-force-inspired methods are weak at handling low-contrast edges and suffer from initialization sensitivity. In order to segment low-contrast boundaries, we combine the region information of the object, extracted by morphology gray-scale reconstruction, and the edge information, extracted by the Laplacian of Gaussian filter, to obtain an improved feature map to compute the external force field for the evolution of active contours. To alleviate initial location sensitivity, we set the initial contour close to the real boundaries by performing morphological image processing. The proposed method was tested on live lymphocyte images acquired through the phase-contrast microscope from the blood samples of mice, and comparative experimental results showed the advantages of the proposed method in terms of the accuracy and the speed. Tracking experiments showed that the proposed method can accurately segment and track lymphocyte boundaries in microscopic images over time even in the presence of low-contrast edges, which will provide a good prerequisite for the quantitative analysis of lymphocyte morphology and motility. PMID:26089973

  14. Noise in x-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Thomas; Bartl, Peter; Bayer, Florian; Durst, Juergen; Haas, Wilhelm; Michel, Thilo; Ritter, Andre; Anton, Gisela

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging is a fast developing new modality not only for medical imaging, but as well for other fields such as material sciences. While these many possible applications arise, the knowledge of the noise behavior is essential. Methods: In this work, the authors used a least squares fitting algorithm to calculate the noise behavior of the three quantities absorption, differential phase, and dark-field image. Further, the calculated error formula of the differential phase image was verified by measurements. Therefore, a Talbot interferometer was setup, using a microfocus x-ray tube as source and a Timepix detector for photon counting. Additionally, simulations regarding this topic were performed. Results: It turned out that the variance of the reconstructed phase is only dependent of the total number of photons used to generate the phase image and the visibility of the experimental setup. These results could be evaluated in measurements as well as in simulations. Furthermore, the correlation between absorption and dark-field image was calculated. Conclusions: These results provide the understanding of the noise characteristics of grating-based phase-contrast imaging and will help to improve image quality.

  15. Phase contrast tomography of the mouse cochlea at microfocus x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Matthias; Hernandez, Victor H.; Krenkel, Martin; Moser, Tobias; Salditt, Tim

    2013-08-01

    We present phase contrast x-ray tomography of functional soft tissue within the bony cochlear capsule of mice, carried out at laboratory microfocus sources with well-matched source, detector, geometry, and reconstruction algorithms at spatial resolutions down to 2 μm. Contrast, data quality and resolution enable the visualization of thin membranes and nerve fibers as well as automated segmentation of surrounding bone. By complementing synchrotron radiation imaging techniques, a broad range of biomedical applications becomes possible as demonstrated for optogenetic cochlear implant research.

  16. Phase contrast tomography of the mouse cochlea at microfocus x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bartels, Matthias; Krenkel, Martin; Hernandez, Victor H.; Moser, Tobias; Salditt, Tim

    2013-08-19

    We present phase contrast x-ray tomography of functional soft tissue within the bony cochlear capsule of mice, carried out at laboratory microfocus sources with well-matched source, detector, geometry, and reconstruction algorithms at spatial resolutions down to 2 μm. Contrast, data quality and resolution enable the visualization of thin membranes and nerve fibers as well as automated segmentation of surrounding bone. By complementing synchrotron radiation imaging techniques, a broad range of biomedical applications becomes possible as demonstrated for optogenetic cochlear implant research.

  17. Laboratory Demonstration of Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) Coronagraph with Better than 10(exp -9) Contrast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Brian; Guyon, Olivier; Kuhnert, Andreas; Niessner, Albert; Martinache, Frantz; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    2013-01-01

    We present coronagraphic images from the Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph on NASA's High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Lab, showing contrasts of 5x10(exp -1) averaged from 2-4 lambda/D, in monochromatic light at 808 nm. In parallel with the coronagraph and its deformable mirror and coronagraphic wavefront control, we also demonstrate a low-order wavefront control system, giving 100 x rms suppression of introduced tip/tilt disturbances down to residual levels of 10(exp -3) lambda/D. Current limitations, as well as broadband (10% fractional bandpass) preliminary results are discussed.

  18. Grating-based phase contrast tomosynthesis imaging: proof-of-concept experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Ge, Yongshuai; Garrett, John; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    This paper concerns the feasibility of x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) tomosynthesis imaging using a grating-based DPC benchtop experimental system, which is equipped with a commercial digital flat-panel detector and a medical-grade rotating-anode x-ray tube. An extensive system characterization was performed to quantify its imaging performance. The major components of the benchtop system include a diagnostic x-ray tube with a 1.0 mm nominal focal spot size, a flat-panel detector with 96 μm pixel pitch, a sample stage that rotates within a limited angular span of ± 30°, and a Talbot-Lau interferometer with three x-ray gratings. A total of 21 projection views acquired with 3° increments were used to reconstruct three sets of tomosynthetic image volumes, including the conventional absorption contrast tomosynthesis image volume (AC-tomo) reconstructed using the filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm with the ramp kernel, the phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (PC-tomo) reconstructed using FBP with a Hilbert kernel, and the differential phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (DPC-tomo) reconstructed using the shift-and-add algorithm. Three inhouse physical phantoms containing tissue-surrogate materials were used to characterize the signal linearity, the signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the three-dimensional noise power spectrum (3D NPS), and the through-plane artifact spread function (ASF). While DPC-tomo highlights edges and interfaces in the image object, PC-tomo removes the differential nature of the DPC projection data and its pixel values are linearly related to the decrement of the real part of the x-ray refractive index. The SDNR values of polyoxymethylene in water and polystyrene in oil are 1.5 and 1.0, respectively, in AC-tomo, and the values were improved to 3.0 and 2.0, respectively, in PC-tomo. PC-tomo and AC-tomo demonstrate equivalent ASF, but their noise characteristics quantified by the 3D NPS were found to be different

  19. Grating-based phase contrast tomosynthesis imaging: Proof-of-concept experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Ge, Yongshuai; Garrett, John; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This paper concerns the feasibility of x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) tomosynthesis imaging using a grating-based DPC benchtop experimental system, which is equipped with a commercial digital flat-panel detector and a medical-grade rotating-anode x-ray tube. An extensive system characterization was performed to quantify its imaging performance. Methods: The major components of the benchtop system include a diagnostic x-ray tube with a 1.0 mm nominal focal spot size, a flat-panel detector with 96 μm pixel pitch, a sample stage that rotates within a limited angular span of ±30°, and a Talbot-Lau interferometer with three x-ray gratings. A total of 21 projection views acquired with 3° increments were used to reconstruct three sets of tomosynthetic image volumes, including the conventional absorption contrast tomosynthesis image volume (AC-tomo) reconstructed using the filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm with the ramp kernel, the phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (PC-tomo) reconstructed using FBP with a Hilbert kernel, and the differential phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (DPC-tomo) reconstructed using the shift-and-add algorithm. Three inhouse physical phantoms containing tissue-surrogate materials were used to characterize the signal linearity, the signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the three-dimensional noise power spectrum (3D NPS), and the through-plane artifact spread function (ASF). Results: While DPC-tomo highlights edges and interfaces in the image object, PC-tomo removes the differential nature of the DPC projection data and its pixel values are linearly related to the decrement of the real part of the x-ray refractive index. The SDNR values of polyoxymethylene in water and polystyrene in oil are 1.5 and 1.0, respectively, in AC-tomo, and the values were improved to 3.0 and 2.0, respectively, in PC-tomo. PC-tomo and AC-tomo demonstrate equivalent ASF, but their noise characteristics quantified by the 3D NPS

  20. Grating-based phase contrast tomosynthesis imaging: Proof-of-concept experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ke; Ge, Yongshuai; Garrett, John; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: This paper concerns the feasibility of x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) tomosynthesis imaging using a grating-based DPC benchtop experimental system, which is equipped with a commercial digital flat-panel detector and a medical-grade rotating-anode x-ray tube. An extensive system characterization was performed to quantify its imaging performance. Methods: The major components of the benchtop system include a diagnostic x-ray tube with a 1.0 mm nominal focal spot size, a flat-panel detector with 96 μm pixel pitch, a sample stage that rotates within a limited angular span of ±30°, and a Talbot-Lau interferometer with three x-ray gratings. A total of 21 projection views acquired with 3° increments were used to reconstruct three sets of tomosynthetic image volumes, including the conventional absorption contrast tomosynthesis image volume (AC-tomo) reconstructed using the filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm with the ramp kernel, the phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (PC-tomo) reconstructed using FBP with a Hilbert kernel, and the differential phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (DPC-tomo) reconstructed using the shift-and-add algorithm. Three inhouse physical phantoms containing tissue-surrogate materials were used to characterize the signal linearity, the signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the three-dimensional noise power spectrum (3D NPS), and the through-plane artifact spread function (ASF). Results: While DPC-tomo highlights edges and interfaces in the image object, PC-tomo removes the differential nature of the DPC projection data and its pixel values are linearly related to the decrement of the real part of the x-ray refractive index. The SDNR values of polyoxymethylene in water and polystyrene in oil are 1.5 and 1.0, respectively, in AC-tomo, and the values were improved to 3.0 and 2.0, respectively, in PC-tomo. PC-tomo and AC-tomo demonstrate equivalent ASF, but their noise characteristics quantified by the 3D NPS

  1. Rapid pediatric cardiac assessment of flow and ventricular volume with compressed sensing parallel imaging volumetric cine phase-contrast MRI.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Albert; Lustig, Michael; Alley, Marcus T; Murphy, Mark; Chan, Frandics P; Herfkens, Robert J; Vasanawala, Shreyas S

    2012-03-01

    The quantification of cardiac flow and ventricular volumes is an essential goal of many congenital heart MRI examinations, often requiring acquisition of multiple 2D phase-contrast and bright-blood cine steady-state free precession (SSFP) planes. Scan acquisition, however, is lengthy and highly reliant on an imager who is well-versed in structural heart disease. Although it can also be lengthy, 3D time-resolved (4D) phase-contrast MRI yields global flow patterns and is simpler to perform. We therefore sought to accelerate 4D phase contrast and to determine whether equivalent flow and volume measurements could be extracted. Four-dimensional phase contrast was modified for higher acceleration with compressed sensing. Custom software was developed to process 4D phase-contrast images. We studied 29 patients referred for congenital cardiac MRI who underwent a routine clinical protocol, including cine short-axis stack SSFP and 2D phase contrast, followed by contrast-enhanced 4D phase contrast. To compare quantitative measurements, Bland-Altman analysis, paired Student t tests, and F tests were used. Ventricular end-diastolic, end-systolic, and stroke volumes obtained from 4D phase contrast and SSFP were well correlated (ρ = 0.91-0.95; r(2) = 0.83-0.90), with no statistically significant difference. Ejection fractions were well correlated in a subpopulation that underwent higher-resolution compressed-sensing 4D phase contrast (ρ = 0.88; r(2) = 0.77). Four-dimensional phase contrast and 2D phase contrast flow rates were also well correlated (ρ = 0.90; r(2) = 0.82). Excluding ventricles with valvular insufficiency, cardiac outputs derived from outlet valve flow and stroke volumes were more consistent by 4D phase contrast than by 2D phase contrast and SSFP. Combined parallel imaging and compressed sensing can be applied to 4D phase contrast. With custom software, flow and ventricular volumes may be extracted with comparable accuracy to SSFP and 2D phase contrast

  2. Laboratory-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography enables 3D virtual histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töpperwien, Mareike; Krenkel, Martin; Quade, Felix; Salditt, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Due to the large penetration depth and small wavelength hard x-rays offer a unique potential for 3D biomedical and biological imaging, combining capabilities of high resolution and large sample volume. However, in classical absorption-based computed tomography, soft tissue only shows a weak contrast, limiting the actual resolution. With the advent of phase-contrast methods, the much stronger phase shift induced by the sample can now be exploited. For high resolution, free space propagation behind the sample is particularly well suited to make the phase shift visible. Contrast formation is based on the self-interference of the transmitted beam, resulting in object-induced intensity modulations in the detector plane. As this method requires a sufficiently high degree of spatial coherence, it was since long perceived as a synchrotron-based imaging technique. In this contribution we show that by combination of high brightness liquid-metal jet microfocus sources and suitable sample preparation techniques, as well as optimized geometry, detection and phase retrieval, excellent three-dimensional image quality can be obtained, revealing the anatomy of a cobweb spider in high detail. This opens up new opportunities for 3D virtual histology of small organisms. Importantly, the image quality is finally augmented to a level accessible to automatic 3D segmentation.

  3. Reverse projection retrieval in edge illumination x-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Charlotte K.; Endrizzi, Marco; Diemoz, Paul C.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) can provide three-dimensional distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index (n=1-δ +\\text{i}β ) of the sample. Phase retrieval, i.e. the separation of attenuation and refraction data from projections that contain a combination of both, is a key step in the image reconstruction process. In EI-based x-ray phase contrast CT, this is conventionally performed on the basis of two projections acquired in opposite illumination configurations (i.e. with different positions of the pre-sample mask) at each CT angle. Displacing the pre-sample mask at each projection makes the scan susceptible to motor-induced misalignment and prevents a continuous sample rotation. We present an alternative method for the retrieval of attenuation and refraction data that does not require repositioning the pre-sample mask. The method is based on the reverse projection relation published by Zhu et al (2010 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107 13576-81) for grating interferometry-based x-ray phase contrast CT. We use this relation to derive a simplified acquisition strategy that allows acquiring data with a continuous sample rotation, which can reduce scan time when combined with a fast read-out detector. Besides discussing the theory and the necessary alignment of the experimental setup, we present tomograms obtained with reverse projection retrieval and demonstrate their agreement with those obtained with the conventional EI retrieval.

  4. RESTORATION OF WEAK PHASE-CONTRAST IMAGES RECORDED WITH A HIGH DEGREE OF DEFOCUS: THE “TWIN IMAGE” PROBLEM ASSOCIATED WITH CTF CORRECTION

    PubMed Central

    Downing, Kenneth H.; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Relatively large values of objective-lens defocus must normally be used to produce detectable levels of image contrast for unstained biological specimens, which are generally weak phase objects. As a result, a subsequent restoration operation must be used to correct for oscillations in the contrast transfer function (CTF) at higher resolution. Currently used methods of CTF-correction assume the ideal case in which Friedel mates in the scattered wave have contributed pairs of Fourier components that overlap with one another in the image plane. This “ideal” situation may be only poorly satisfied, or not satisfied at all, as the particle size gets smaller, the defocus value gets larger, and the resolution gets higher. We have therefore investigated whether currently used methods of CTF correction are also effective in restoring the single-sideband image information that becomes displaced (delocalized) by half (or more) the diameter of a particle of finite size. Computer simulations are used to show that restoration either by “phase flipping” or by multiplying by the CTF recovers only about half of the delocalized information. The other half of the delocalized information goes into a doubly defocused “twin” image of the type produced during optical reconstruction of an in-line hologram. Restoration with a Wiener filter is effective in recovering the delocalized information only when the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) is orders of magnitude higher than that which exists in low-dose images of biological specimens, in which case the Wiener filter approaches division by the CTF (i.e. the formal inverse). For realistic values of the S/N, however, the “twin image” problem seen with a Wiener filter is very similar to that seen when either phase flipping or multiplying by the CTF are used for restoration. The results of these simulations suggest that CTF correction is a poor alternative to using a Zernike-type phase plate when imaging biological specimens, in

  5. RESTORATION OF WEAK PHASE-CONTRAST IMAGES RECORDED WITH A HIGH DEGREE OF DEFOCUS: THE"TWIN IMAGE" PROBLEM ASSOCIATED WITH CTF CORRECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, Kenneth H.; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2008-03-28

    Relatively large values of objective-lens defocus must normally be used to produce detectable levels of image contrast for unstained biological specimens, which are generally weak phase objects. As a result, a subsequent restoration operation must be used to correct for oscillations in the contrast transfer function (CTF) at higher resolution. Currently used methods of CTF-correction assume the ideal case in which Friedel mates in the scattered wave have contributed pairs of Fourier components that overlap with one another in the image plane. This"ideal" situation may be only poorly satisfied, or not satisfied at all, as the particle size gets smaller, the defocus value gets larger, and the resolution gets higher. We have therefore investigated whether currently used methods of CTF correction are also effective in restoring the single-sideband image information that becomes displaced (delocalized) by half (or more) the diameter of a particle of finite size. Computer simulations are used to show that restoration either by"phase flipping" or by multiplying by the CTF recovers only about half of the delocalized information. The other half of the delocalized information goes into a doubly defocused"twin" image of the type produced during optical reconstruction of an in-line hologram. Restoration with a Wiener filter is effective in recovering the delocalized information only when the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) is orders of magnitude higher than that which exists in low-dose images of biological specimens, in which case the Wiener filter approaches division by the CTF (i.e. the formal inverse). For realistic values of the S/N, however, the"twin image" problem seenwith a Wiener filter is very similar to that seen when either phase flipping or multiplying by the CTF are used for restoration. The results of these simulations suggest that CTF correction is a poor alternative to using a Zernike-type phase plate when imaging biological specimens, in which case the images can

  6. A study of quantification of aortic compliance in mice using radial acquisition phase contrast MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuandong

    Spatiotemporal changes in blood flow velocity measured using Phase contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be used to quantify Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) and Wall Shear Stress (WSS), well known indices of vessel compliance. A study was conducted to measure the PWV in the aortic arch in young healthy children using conventional phase contrast MRI and a post processing algorithm that automatically track the peak velocity in phase contrast images. It is shown that the PWV calculated using peak velocity-time data has less variability compared to that using mean velocity and flow. Conventional MR data acquisition techniques lack both the spatial and temporal resolution needed to accurately calculate PWV and WSS in in vivo studies using transgenic animal models of arterial diseases. Radial k-space acquisition can improve both spatial and temporal resolution. A major part of this thesis was devoted to developing technology for Radial Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance (RPCMR) cine imaging on a 7 Tesla Animal scanner. A pulse sequence with asymmetric radial k-space acquisition was designed and implemented. Software developed to reconstruct the RPCMR images include gridding, density compensation and centering of k-Space that corrects the image ghosting introduced by hardware response time. Image processing software was developed to automatically segment the vessel lumen and correct for phase offset due to eddy currents. Finally, in vivo and ex vivo aortic compliance measurements were conducted in a well-established mouse model for atherosclerosis: Apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE-KO). Using RPCMR technique, a significantly higher PWV value as well as a higher average WSS was detected among 9 months old ApoE-KO mice compare to in wild type mice. A follow up ex-vivo test of tissue elasticity confirmed the impaired distensibility of aortic arteries among ApoE-KO mice.

  7. Anisotropic total variation minimization approach in in-line phase-contrast tomography and its application to correction of ring artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Dong-Jiang; Qu, Gang-Rong; Hu, Chun-Hong; Liu, Bao-Dong; Jian, Jian-Bo; Guo, Xiao-Kun

    2017-06-01

    Not Available Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61671004, 61271012, 81371549, 81671683, and 11501415), the Natural Science Foundation of Tianjin City, China (Grant No. 16JCYBJC28600), the WBE Liver Fibrosis Foundation of China (Grant No. CFHPC20131033), the Instrument Developing Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. YZ201410), the Foundation of Tianjin University of Technology and Education (Grant Nos. KJ11-22 and J10011060321), SRF for ROCS, SEM, and the IHEP-CAS Scientific Research Foundation (Grant No. 2013IHEPYJRC801).

  8. Comparison of laboratory grating-based and speckle-tracking x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romell, J.; Zhou, T.; Zdora, M.; Sala, S.; Koch, F. J.; Hertz, H. M.; Burvall, A.

    2017-06-01

    Phase-contrast imaging with x-rays is a developing field for imaging weakly absorbing materials. In this work, two phase-contrast imaging methods, grating- and speckle-based imaging, that measure the derivative of the phase shift, have been implemented with a laboratory source and compared experimentally. It was found that for the same dose conditions, the speckle-tracking differential phase-contrast images have considerably higher contrast-to-noise ratio than the grating-based images, but at the cost of lower resolution. Grating-based imaging performs better in terms of resolution, but would require longer exposure times, mainly due to absorption in the grating interferometer.

  9. Inverse geometry for grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Donath, Tilman; Bunk, Oliver; David, Christian; Chabior, Michael; Schuster, Manfred; Baumann, Joachim; Pfeiffer, Franz; Reznikova, Elena; Mohr, Juergen; Hempel, Eckhard; Popescu, Stefan; Hoheisel, Martin

    2009-09-01

    Phase-contrast imaging using conventional polychromatic x-ray sources and grating interferometers has been developed and demonstrated for x-ray energies up to 60 keV. Here, we conduct an analysis of possible grating configurations for this technique and present further geometrical arrangements not considered so far. An inverse interferometer geometry is investigated that offers significant advantages for grating fabrication and for the application of the method in computed tomography (CT) scanners. We derive and measure the interferometer's angular sensitivity for both the inverse and the conventional configuration as a function of the sample position. Thereby, we show that both arrangements are equally sensitive and that the highest sensitivity is obtained, when the investigated object is close to the interferometer's phase grating. We also discuss the question whether the sample should be placed in front of or behind the phase grating. For CT applications, we propose an inverse geometry with the sample position behind the phase grating.

  10. Visualizing resonances in the complex plane with vibrational phase contrast coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Jurna, Martin; Garbacik, Erik T; Korterik, Jeroen P; Herek, Jennifer L; Otto, Cees; Offerhaus, Herman L

    2010-09-15

    In coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), the emitted signal carries both amplitude and phase information of the molecules in the focal volume. Most CARS experiments ignore the phase component, but its detection allows for two advantages over intensity-only CARS. First, the pure resonant response can be determined, and the nonresonant background rejected, by extracting the imaginary component of the complex response, enhancing the sensitivity of CARS measurements. Second, selectivity is increased via determination of the phase and amplitude, allowing separation of individual molecular components of a sample even when their vibrational bands overlap. Here, using vibrational phase contrast CARS (VPC-CARS), we demonstrate enhanced sensitivity in quantitative measurements of ethanol/methanol mixtures and increased selectivity in a heterogeneous mixture of plastics and water. This powerful technique opens a wide range of possibilities for studies of complicated systems where overlapping resonances limit standard methodologies.

  11. Improving image quality in laboratory x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, F.; Marschner, M.; Birnbacher, L.; Viermetz, M.; Noël, P.; Herzen, J.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2017-03-01

    Grating-based X-ray phase-contrast (gbPC) is known to provide significant benefits for biomedical imaging. To investigate these benefits, a high-sensitivity gbPC micro-CT setup for small (≍ 5 cm) biological samples has been constructed. Unfortunately, high differential-phase sensitivity leads to an increased magnitude of data processing artifacts, limiting the quality of tomographic reconstructions. Most importantly, processing of phase-stepping data with incorrect stepping positions can introduce artifacts resembling Moiré fringes to the projections. Additionally, the focal spot size of the X-ray source limits resolution of tomograms. Here we present a set of algorithms to minimize artifacts, increase resolution and improve visual impression of projections and tomograms from the examined setup. We assessed two algorithms for artifact reduction: Firstly, a correction algorithm exploiting correlations of the artifacts and differential-phase data was developed and tested. Artifacts were reliably removed without compromising image data. Secondly, we implemented a new algorithm for flatfield selection, which was shown to exclude flat-fields with strong artifacts. Both procedures successfully improved image quality of projections and tomograms. Deconvolution of all projections of a CT scan can minimize blurring introduced by the finite size of the X-ray source focal spot. Application of the Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm to gbPC-CT projections resulted in an improved resolution of phase-contrast tomograms. Additionally, we found that nearest-neighbor interpolation of projections can improve the visual impression of very small features in phase-contrast tomograms. In conclusion, we achieved an increase in image resolution and quality for the investigated setup, which may lead to an improved detection of very small sample features, thereby maximizing the setup's utility.

  12. Boosting phase contrast with a grating Bonse–Hart interferometer of 200 nanometre grating period

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Han; Gomella, Andrew A.; Patel, Ajay; Wolfe, Douglas E.; Lynch, Susanna K.; Xiao, Xianghui; Morgan, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    We report on a grating Bonse–Hart interferometer for phase-contrast imaging with hard X-rays. The method overcomes limitations in the level of sensitivity that can be achieved with the well-known Talbot grating interferometer, and without the stringent spectral filtering at any given incident angle imposed by the classic Bonse–Hart interferometer. The device operates in the far-field regime, where an incident beam is split by a diffraction grating into two widely separated beams, which are redirected by a second diffraction grating to merge at a third grating, where they coherently interfere. The wide separation of the interfering beams results in large phase contrast, and in some cases absolute phase images are obtained. Imaging experiments were performed using diffraction gratings of 200 nm period, at 22.5 keV and 1.5% spectral bandwidth on a bending-magnetic beamline. Novel design and fabrication process were used to achieve the small grating period. Using a slitted incident beam, we acquired absolute and differential phase images of lightly absorbing samples. An advantage of this method is that it uses only phase modulating gratings, which are easier to fabricate than absorption gratings of the same periods. PMID:24470412

  13. Boosting phase contrast with a grating Bonse-Hart interferometer of 200 nanometre grating period.

    PubMed

    Wen, Han; Gomella, Andrew A; Patel, Ajay; Wolfe, Douglas E; Lynch, Susanna K; Xiao, Xianghui; Morgan, Nicole

    2014-03-06

    We report on a grating Bonse-Hart interferometer for phase-contrast imaging with hard X-rays. The method overcomes limitations in the level of sensitivity that can be achieved with the well-known Talbot grating interferometer, and without the stringent spectral filtering at any given incident angle imposed by the classic Bonse-Hart interferometer. The device operates in the far-field regime, where an incident beam is split by a diffraction grating into two widely separated beams, which are redirected by a second diffraction grating to merge at a third grating, where they coherently interfere. The wide separation of the interfering beams results in large phase contrast, and in some cases absolute phase images are obtained. Imaging experiments were performed using diffraction gratings of 200 nm period, at 22.5 keV and 1.5% spectral bandwidth on a bending-magnetic beamline. Novel design and fabrication process were used to achieve the small grating period. Using a slitted incident beam, we acquired absolute and differential phase images of lightly absorbing samples. An advantage of this method is that it uses only phase modulating gratings, which are easier to fabricate than absorption gratings of the same periods.

  14. Microscopy imaging and quantitative phase contrast mapping in turbid microfluidic channels by digital holography.

    PubMed

    Paturzo, Melania; Finizio, Andrea; Memmolo, Pasquale; Puglisi, Roberto; Balduzzi, Donatella; Galli, Andrea; Ferraro, Pietro

    2012-09-07

    We show that sharp imaging and quantitative phase-contrast microcopy is possible in microfluidics in flowing turbid media by digital holography. In fact, in flowing liquids with suspended colloidal particles, clear vision is hindered and cannot be recovered by any other microscopic imaging technique. On the contrary, using digital holography, clear imaging is possible thanks to the Doppler frequency shift experienced by the photons scattered by the flowing colloidal particles, which do not contribute to the interference process, i.e. the recorded hologram. The method is illustrated and imaging results are demonstrated for pure phase objects, i.e. biological cells in microfluidic channels.

  15. The phase-contrast imaging instrument at the matter in extreme conditions endstation at LCLS

    DOE PAGES

    Nagler, Bob; Schropp, Andreas; Galtier, Eric C.; ...

    2016-10-07

    Here, we describe the phase-contrast imaging instrument at the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) endstation of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The instrument can image phenomena with a spatial resolution of a few hundreds of nanometers and at the same time reveal the atomic structure through X-ray diffraction, with a temporal resolution better than 100 fs. It was specifically designed for studies relevant to high-energy-density science and can monitor, e.g., shock fronts, phase transitions, or void collapses. This versatile instrument was commissioned last year and is now available to the MEC user community.

  16. The phase-contrast imaging instrument at the matter in extreme conditions endstation at LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Nagler, Bob; Schropp, Andreas; Galtier, Eric C.; Arnold, Brice; Brown, Shaughnessy B.; Fry, Alan; Gleason, Arianna; Granados, Eduardo; Hashim, Akel; Hastings, Jerome B.; Samberg, Dirk; Seiboth, Frank; Tavella, Franz; Xing, Zhou; Lee, Hae Ja; Schroer, Christian G.

    2016-10-07

    Here, we describe the phase-contrast imaging instrument at the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) endstation of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The instrument can image phenomena with a spatial resolution of a few hundreds of nanometers and at the same time reveal the atomic structure through X-ray diffraction, with a temporal resolution better than 100 fs. It was specifically designed for studies relevant to high-energy-density science and can monitor, e.g., shock fronts, phase transitions, or void collapses. This versatile instrument was commissioned last year and is now available to the MEC user community.

  17. Imaging organic and mineral phases in a biomineral using novel contrast techniques.

    PubMed

    Stockdale, E J; Shaw, J A; Macey, D J; Clode, P L

    2009-01-01

    Chitons are marine molluscs that mineralize their teeth by the process of matrix-mediated biomineralization. The teeth develop in a continuous manner forming hard minerals, including magnetite, making analysis of the matrix within these mineralized regions difficult. This article describes the use of charge contrast imaging techniques, rarely applied to biological samples, to simultaneously image the organic and mineral phases within the teeth of these animals. Resulting evidence demonstrates the power of this technique in delivering architectural information concerning both the matrix and mineral phases, without the need for removal of the hard mineralized material.

  18. Improved image reconstruction of low-resolution multichannel phase contrast angiography

    PubMed Central

    P. Krishnan, Akshara; Joy, Ajin; Paul, Joseph Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. In low-resolution phase contrast magnetic resonance angiography, the maximum intensity projected channel images will be blurred with consequent loss of vascular details. The channel images are enhanced using a stabilized deblurring filter, applied to each channel prior to combining the individual channel images. The stabilized deblurring is obtained by the addition of a nonlocal regularization term to the reverse heat equation, referred to as nonlocally stabilized reverse diffusion filter. Unlike reverse diffusion filter, which is highly unstable and blows up noise, nonlocal stabilization enhances intensity projected parallel images uniformly. Application to multichannel vessel enhancement is illustrated using both volunteer data and simulated multichannel angiograms. Robustness of the filter applied to volunteer datasets is shown using statistically validated improvement in flow quantification. Improved performance in terms of preserving vascular structures and phased array reconstruction in both simulated and real data is demonstrated using structureness measure and contrast ratio. PMID:26835501

  19. Propagation-based phase-contrast tomography for high-resolution lung imaging with laboratory sources

    SciTech Connect

    Krenkel, Martin Töpperwien, Mareike; Salditt, Tim; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke

    2016-03-15

    We have performed high-resolution phase-contrast tomography on whole mice with a laboratory setup. Enabled by a high-brilliance liquid-metal-jet source, we show the feasibility of propagation-based phase contrast in local tomography even in the presence of strongly absorbing surrounding tissue as it is the case in small animal imaging of the lung. We demonstrate the technique by reconstructions of the mouse lung for two different fields of view, covering the whole organ, and a zoom to the local finer structure of terminal airways and alveoli. With a resolution of a few micrometers and the wide availability of the technique, studies of larger biological samples at the cellular level become possible.

  20. Sub-diffraction phase-contrast imaging of transparent nano-objects by plasmonic lens structure.

    PubMed

    Yao, Na; Wang, Changtao; Tao, Xing; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Luo, Xiangang

    2013-04-05

    We propose a specially designed plasmonic lens structure to succeed in realizing sub-diffraction phase-contrast imaging of transparent nano-objects. The nano-objects are embedded inside the insulator layer of the metal-insulator-metal (MIM) plasmonic structure and have a small refractive index difference with respect to the transparent insulator layer. The excited surface plasmons in the MIM structure help to greatly enhance scattered light from the nano-objects and effectively suppress the transmitted illumination light. A spatial resolution of about 64 nm and a minimum distinguishable refractive index difference down to 0.05 are numerically demonstrated. For sub-diffraction phase-contrast imaging of irregular three-dimensional (3D) nanowires and nanocylinders, the optimized MIM structure shows much better performance in comparison with that of a superlens.

  1. Phase contrast MRI is an early marker of micrometastatic breast cancer development in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Budde, Matthew D; Gold, Eric; Jordan, E Kay; Smith-Brown, Melissa; Frank, Joseph A

    2012-05-01

    The early growth of micrometastatic breast cancer in the brain often occurs through vessel co-option and is independent of angiogenesis. Remodeling of the existing vasculature is an important step in the evolution of co-opting micrometastases into angiogenesis-dependent solid tumor masses. The purpose of this study was to determine whether phase contrast MRI, an intrinsic source of contrast exquisitely sensitive to the magnetic susceptibility properties of deoxygenated hemoglobin, could detect vascular changes occurring independent of angiogenesis in a rat model of breast cancer metastases to the brain. Twelve nude rats were administered 10(6) MDA-MB-231BRL 'brain-seeking' breast cancer cells through intracardiac injection. Serial, multiparametric MRI of the brain was performed weekly until metastatic disease was detected. The results demonstrated that images of the signal phase (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.97) were more sensitive than T(2)* gradient echo magnitude images (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.73) to metastatic brain lesions. The difference between the two techniques was probably the result of the confounding effects of edema on the magnitude of the signal. A region of interest analysis revealed that vascular abnormalities detected with phase contrast MRI preceded tumor permeability measured with contrast-enhanced MRI by 1-2  weeks. Tumor size was correlated with permeability (R(2)= 0.23, p < 0.01), but phase contrast was independent of tumor size (R(2)= 0.03). Histopathologic analysis demonstrated that capillary endothelial cells co-opted by tumor cells were significantly enlarged, but less dense, relative to the normal brain vasculature. Although co-opted vessels were vascular endothelial growth factor-negative, vessels within larger tumor masses were vascular endothelial growth factor-positive. In conclusion, phase contrast MRI is believed to be sensitive to vascular remodeling in co

  2. Effects of microchannel confinement on acoustic vaporisation of ultrasound phase change contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shengtao; Zhang, Ge; Leow, Chee Hau; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2017-08-07

    The sub-micron phase change contrast agent (PCCA) composed of a perfluorocarbon liquid core can be activated into gaseous state and form stable echogenic microbubbles for contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging. It has shown great promise in imaging microvasculature, tumour microenvironment, and cancer cells. Although PCCAs have been extensively studied for different diagnostic and therapeutic applications, the effect of biologically geometrical confinement on the acoustic vaporisation of PCCAs is still not clear. We have investigated the difference in PCCA-produced ultrasound contrast enhancement after acoustic activation with and without a microvessel confinement on a microchannel phantom. The experimental results indicated more than one-order of magnitude less acoustic vaporisation in a microchannel than that in a free environment taking into account the attenuation effect of the vessel on the microbubble scattering. This may provide an improved understanding in the applications of PCCAs in vivo.

  3. Effects of microchannel confinement on acoustic vaporisation of ultrasound phase change contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shengtao; Zhang, Ge; Hau Leow, Chee; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2017-09-01

    The sub-micron phase change contrast agent (PCCA) composed of a perfluorocarbon liquid core can be activated into gaseous state and form stable echogenic microbubbles for contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging. It has shown great promise in imaging microvasculature, tumour microenvironment, and cancer cells. Although PCCAs have been extensively studied for different diagnostic and therapeutic applications, the effect of biologically geometrical confinement on the acoustic vaporisation of PCCAs is still not clear. We have investigated the difference in PCCA-produced ultrasound contrast enhancement after acoustic activation with and without a microvessel confinement on a microchannel phantom. The experimental results indicated more than one-order of magnitude less acoustic vaporisation in a microchannel than that in a free environment taking into account the attenuation effect of the vessel on the microbubble scattering. This may provide an improved understanding in the applications of PCCAs in vivo.

  4. Phase contrast and DIC instrumentation and applications in cell, developmental, and marine biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, Heinz

    1994-05-01

    Nomarski's differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is discussed in comparison to Zernike's phase contrast (PhC) microscopy. The possibilities and limits of both are demonstrated by various applications. The high contrast and the use of the full numerical aperture of the DIC optics makes it possible to obtain a series of 'optical sections' through rather thick living specimens (e.g. head of water flea, salivary gland of Drosophila, Xenopus nucleolus, sea urchen egg, mouse embryo). PhC and DIC optics are today available for high resolution light microscopy until N.A. 1.4 Oil as well as for long working distance (LWD) optics, mainly combined with inverted biological microscopes.

  5. Subtraction MR Venography Acquired from Time-Resolved Contrast-Enhanced MR Angiography: Comparison with Phase-Contrast MR Venography and Single-Phase Contrast-Enhanced MR Venography.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jinhee; Kim, Bum-Soo; Sung, Jinkyeong; Kim, Bom-Yi; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the image characteristics of subtraction magnetic resonance venography (SMRV) from time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography (TRMRA) compared with phase-contrast MR venography (PCMRV) and single-phase contrast-enhanced MR venography (CEMRV). Twenty-one patients who underwent brain MR venography (MRV) using standard protocols (PCMRV, CEMRV, and TRMRA) were included. SMRV was made by subtracting the arterial phase data from the venous phase data in TRMRA. Co-registration and subtraction of the two volume data was done using commercially available software. Image quality and the degree of arterial contamination of the three MRVs were compared. In the three MRVs, 19 pre-defined venous structures (14 dural sinuses and 5 cerebral veins) were evaluated. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the three MRVs were also compared. Single-phase contrast-enhanced MR venography showed better image quality (median score 4 in both reviewers) than did the other two MRVs (p < 0.001), whereas SMRV (median score 3 in both reviewers) and PCMRV (median score 3 in both reviewers) had similar image quality (p ≥ 0.951). SMRV (median score 0 in both reviewers) suppressed arterial signal better than did the other MRVs (median score 1 in CEMRV, median score 2 in PCMRV, both reviewers) (p < 0.001). The dural sinus score of SMRV (median and interquartile range [IQR] 48, 43-50 for reviewer 1, 47, 43-49 for reviewer 2) was significantly higher than for PCMRV (median and IQR 31, 25-34 for reviewer 1, 30, 23-32 for reviewer 2) (p < 0.01) and did not differ from that of CEMRV (median and IQR 50, 47-52 for reviewer 1, 49, 45-51 for reviewer 2) (p = 0.146 in reviewer 1 and 0.123 in reviewer 2). The SNR and CNR of SMRV (median and IQR 104.5, 83.1-121.2 and 104.1, 74.9-120.5, respectively) were between those of CEMRV (median and IQR 150.3, 111-182.6 and 148.4, 108-178.2) and PCMRV (median and IQR 59.4, 49.2-74.9 and 53.6, 43.8-69.2). Subtraction magnetic

  6. Subtraction MR Venography Acquired from Time-Resolved Contrast-Enhanced MR Angiography: Comparison with Phase-Contrast MR Venography and Single-Phase Contrast-Enhanced MR Venography

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jinhee; Sung, Jinkyeong; Kim, Bom-Yi; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the image characteristics of subtraction magnetic resonance venography (SMRV) from time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography (TRMRA) compared with phase-contrast MR venography (PCMRV) and single-phase contrast-enhanced MR venography (CEMRV). Materials and Methods Twenty-one patients who underwent brain MR venography (MRV) using standard protocols (PCMRV, CEMRV, and TRMRA) were included. SMRV was made by subtracting the arterial phase data from the venous phase data in TRMRA. Co-registration and subtraction of the two volume data was done using commercially available software. Image quality and the degree of arterial contamination of the three MRVs were compared. In the three MRVs, 19 pre-defined venous structures (14 dural sinuses and 5 cerebral veins) were evaluated. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the three MRVs were also compared. Results Single-phase contrast-enhanced MR venography showed better image quality (median score 4 in both reviewers) than did the other two MRVs (p < 0.001), whereas SMRV (median score 3 in both reviewers) and PCMRV (median score 3 in both reviewers) had similar image quality (p ≥ 0.951). SMRV (median score 0 in both reviewers) suppressed arterial signal better than did the other MRVs (median score 1 in CEMRV, median score 2 in PCMRV, both reviewers) (p < 0.001). The dural sinus score of SMRV (median and interquartile range [IQR] 48, 43-50 for reviewer 1, 47, 43-49 for reviewer 2) was significantly higher than for PCMRV (median and IQR 31, 25-34 for reviewer 1, 30, 23-32 for reviewer 2) (p < 0.01) and did not differ from that of CEMRV (median and IQR 50, 47-52 for reviewer 1, 49, 45-51 for reviewer 2) (p = 0.146 in reviewer 1 and 0.123 in reviewer 2). The SNR and CNR of SMRV (median and IQR 104.5, 83.1-121.2 and 104.1, 74.9-120.5, respectively) were between those of CEMRV (median and IQR 150.3, 111-182.6 and 148.4, 108-178.2) and PCMRV (median and IQR 59.4, 49.2-74.9 and

  7. Regularized iterative integration combined with non-linear diffusion filtering for phase-contrast x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Burger, Karin; Koehler, Thomas; Chabior, Michael; Allner, Sebastian; Marschner, Mathias; Fehringer, Andreas; Willner, Marian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Noël, Peter

    2014-12-29

    Phase-contrast x-ray computed tomography has a high potential to become clinically implemented because of its complementarity to conventional absorption-contrast.In this study, we investigate noise-reducing but resolution-preserving analytical reconstruction methods to improve differential phase-contrast imaging. We apply the non-linear Perona-Malik filter on phase-contrast data prior or post filtered backprojected reconstruction. Secondly, the Hilbert kernel is replaced by regularized iterative integration followed by ramp filtered backprojection as used for absorption-contrast imaging. Combining the Perona-Malik filter with this integration algorithm allows to successfully reveal relevant sample features, quantitatively confirmed by significantly increased structural similarity indices and contrast-to-noise ratios. With this concept, phase-contrast imaging can be performed at considerably lower dose.

  8. Quantitative imaging of murine osteoarthritic cartilage by phase-contrast micro-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Merry Z C; Dawson, Brian; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Gannon, Francis; Heggeness, Michael; Lee, Brendan H L

    2013-02-01

    The mouse is an optimal model organism in which gene-environment interactions can be used to study the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). The gold standard for arthritis research in mice is based on histopathology and immunohistochemistry, which are labor-intensive, prone to sampling bias and technical variability, and limited in throughput. The aim of this study was to develop a new technique that assesses mouse cartilage by integrating quantitative volumetric imaging techniques. A novel mouse model of OA was generated by cruciate ligament transection (CLT) and evaluated by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Knee joint specimens were then imaged using a new technique that combines high-resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and phase-contrast optics followed by quantitative analyses. A comparative analysis was also performed in a previously established mouse model of OA generated by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM). Phase-contrast micro-CT achieved cellular resolution of chondrocytes and quantitative assessment of parameters such as articular cartilage volume and surface area. In mouse models of OA generated by either CLT or DMM, we showed that phase-contrast micro-CT distinguished control and OA cartilage by providing quantitative measures with high reproducibility and minimal variability. Features of OA at the cellular or tissue level could also be observed in images generated by phase-contrast micro-CT. We established an imaging technology that comprehensively assessed and quantified the 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional changes of articular cartilage. Application of this technology will facilitate the rapid and high-throughput assessment of genetic and therapeutic models of OA in mice. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  9. TV-regularized phase reconstruction in differential-interference-contrast (DIC) microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebegoldi, Simone; Bautista, Lola; Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Prato, Marco; Zanni, Luca; Plata, Arturo

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we address the problem of reconstructing the phase from color images acquired with differential-interference-contrast (DIC) microscopy. In particular, we reformulate the problem as the minimization of a least-squares fidelity function regularized with a total variation term, and we address the solution by exploiting a recently proposed inexact forward-backward approach. The effectiveness of this method is assessed on a realistic synthetic test.

  10. Optimization of MR phase-contrast-based flow velocimetry and shear stress measurements.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeho; Seo, Ji-Hyea; Bang, Seong-Sik; Choi, Hyeon-Woo; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Jongmin

    2010-02-01

    This study was designed to measure the pixel-by-pixel flow velocity and shear stress from phase-contrast MR images. An optimized method was suggested and the use of the method was confirmed. A self-developed, straight steady flow model system was scanned by MRI with a velocity-encoded phase-contrast sequence. In-house developed software was used for the pixel-by-pixel flow velocity and shear stress measurements and the measurements were compared with physically measured mean velocity and shear stress. A comparison between the use of the in-house velocimetry software and a commercial velocimetry system was also performed. Curved steady flow models were scanned by phase-contrast MRI. Subsequently, velocity and shear stress were measured to confirm the shifted peak flow velocity and shear stress toward the outer side of the lumen. Peak velocity and shear stress were calculated for both the inner and outer half of the lumen and were statistically compared. The mean velocity measured with the use of in-house software had a significant correlation with the physical measurements of mean velocity; in addition, the measurement was more precise compared to the commercial system (R(2) = 0.85 vs. 0.75, respectively). The calculated mean shear stress had a significant correlation with the physical measurements of mean shear stress (R(2) = 0.95). The curved flow model showed a significantly shifted peak velocity and shear stress zones toward the outside of the flow (P < 0.0001). The technique to measure pixel-by-pixel velocity and shear stress of steady flow from velocity-encoded phase-contrast MRI was optimized. This technique had a good correlation with physical measurements and was superior to a commercially available system.

  11. Surface-roughness measurement by digital processing of Nomarski phase-contrast images.

    PubMed

    Jabr, S N

    1985-11-01

    Surface roughnesses down to 0.1 nm rms were measured on low-reflectance polished glass and silica substrates by quantitative analysis of Nomarski differential phase-contrast images with a fast digital image processor. A measure of roughness was obtained from the standard deviation of intensities in the Nomarski image observed by a vidicon tube with linear response and digitized in real time.

  12. Investigating biofilm structure using x-ray microtomography and gratings-based phase contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Erin A.; Xiao, Xianghui; Miller, Micah; Keller, Paul; White, Timothy A.; Marshall, Matthew

    2012-10-01

    Direct examination of natural and engineered environments has revealed that the majority of microorganisms in these systems live in structured communities termed biofilms. To gain a better understanding for how biofilms function and interact with their local environment, fundamental capabilities for enhanced visualization, compositional analysis, and functional characterization of biofilms are needed. For pore-scale and community-scale analysis (100's of nm to 10's of microns), a variety of surface tools are available. However, understanding biofilm structure in complex three-dimensional (3-D) environments is considerably more difficult. X-ray microtomography can reveal a biofilm's internal structure, but obtaining sufficient contrast to image low atomic number (Z) biological material against a higher-Z substrate makes detecting biofilms difficult. Here we present results imaging Shewanella oneidensis biofilms on a Hollow-fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactor (HfMBR), using the x-ray microtomography system at sector 2-BM of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), at energies ranging from 12.9-15.4 keV and pixel sizes of 0.7 and 1.3 μm/pixel. We examine the use of osmium (Os) as a contrast agent to enhance biofilm visibility and demonstrate that staining improves imaging of hydrated biofilms. We also present results using a Talbot interferometer to provide phase and scatter contrast information in addition to absorption. Talbot interferometry allows imaging of unstained hydrated biofilms with phase contrast, while absorption contrast primarily highlights edges and scatter contrast provides little information. However, the gratings used here limit the spatial resolution to no finer than 2 μm, which hinders the ability to detect small features. Future studies at higher resolution or higher Talbot order for greater sensitivity to density variations may improve imaging.

  13. Improved diagnostic differentiation of renal cystic lesions with phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, Peter B.; Willner, Marian; Fingerle, Alexander; Herzen, Julia; Münzel, Daniela; Hahn, Dieter; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-03-01

    The diagnostic quality of phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) is one the unexplored areas in medical imaging; at the same time, it seems to offer the opportunity as a fast and highly sensitive diagnostic tool. Conventional computed tomography (CT) has had an enormous impact on medicine, while it is limited in soft-tissue contrast. One example that portrays this challenge is the differentiation between benign and malignant renal cysts. In this work we report on a feasibility study to determine the usefulness of PCCT in differentiation of renal cysts. A renal phantom was imaged with a grating-based PCCT system consisting of a standard rotating anode x-ray tube (40 kV, 70 mA) and a Pilatus II photoncounting detector (pixel size: 172 μm). The phantom is composed of a renal equivalent soft-tissue and cystic lesions grouped in non-enhancing cyst and hemorrhage series and an iodine enhancing series. The acquired projection images (absorption and phase-contrast) are reconstructed with a standard filtered backprojection algorithm. For evaluation both reconstructions are compared in respect to contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and subjective image quality. We found that with PCCT a significantly improved differentiation between hemorrhage renal cysts from contrast enhancing malignant cysts is possible. If comparing PCCT and CT with respect to CNR and SNR, PCCT shows significant improvements. In conclusion, PCCT has the potential to improve the diagnostics and characterization of renal cysts without using any contrast agents. These results in combination with a non-synchrotron setup indicate a future paradigm shift in diagnostic computed tomography.

  14. Investigating biofilm structure using x-ray microtomography and gratings-based phase contrast

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Erin A.; Xiao, Xianghui; Miller, Micah D.; Keller, Paul E.; White, Timothy A.; Marshall, Matthew J.

    2012-10-17

    Direct examination of natural and engineered environments has revealed that the majority of microorganisms in these systems live in structured communities termed biofilms. To gain a better understanding for how biofilms function and interact with their local environment, fundamental capabilities for enhanced visualization, compositional analysis, and functional characterization of biofilms are needed. For pore-scale and community-scale analysis (100’s of nm to 10’s of microns), a variety of surface tools are available. However, understanding biofilm structure in complex three-dimensional (3-D) environments is considerably more difficult. X-ray microtomography can reveal a biofilm’s internal structure, but the obtaining sufficient contrast to image low-Z biological material against a higher-Z substrate makes detecting biofilms difficult. Here we present results imaging Shewanella oneidensis biofilms on a Hollow-fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactor (HfMBR), using the x-ray microtomography system at sector 2-BM of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), at energies ranging from 13-15.4 keV and pixel sizes of 0.7 and 1.3 μm/pixel. We examine the use of osmium (Os) as a contrast agent to enhance biofilm visibility and demonstrate that staining improves imaging of hydrated biofilms. We also present results using a Talbot interferometer to provide phase and scatter contrast information in addition to absorption. Talbot interferometry allows imaging of unstained hydrated biofilms with phase contrast, while absorption contrast primarily highlights edges and scatter contrast provides little information. However, the gratings used here limit the spatial resolution to no finer than 2 μm, which hinders the ability to detect small features. Future studies at higher resolution or higher Talbot order for greater sensitivity to density variations may improve imaging.

  15. Phase-contrast imaging in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krumeich, F; Müller, E; Wepf, R A

    2013-06-01

    Although the presence of phase-contrast information in bright field images recorded with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) has been known for a long time, its systematic exploitation for the structural characterization of materials began only with the availability of aberration-corrected microscopes that allow sufficiently large illumination angles. Today, phase-contrast STEM (PC-STEM) imaging represents an increasingly important alternative to the well-established HRTEM method. In both methods, the image contrast is coherently generated and thus depends not only on illumination and collection angles but on defocus and specimen thickness as well. By PC-STEM, a projection of the crystal potential is obtained in thin areas, with the scattering sites being represented either with dark or bright contrast at two different defocus values which are both close to Gaussian defocus. This imaging behavior can be further investigated by image simulations performed with standard HRTEM simulation software based on the principle of reciprocity. As examples for the application of this method, PC-STEM results obtained on metal nanoparticles and dodecagonal quasicrystals dd-(Ta,V)₁.₆Te are discussed.

  16. Whole-cell phase contrast imaging at the nanoscale using Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Michael W. M.; van Riessen, Grant A.; Abbey, Brian; Putkunz, Corey T.; Junker, Mark D.; Balaur, Eugeniu; Vine, David J.; McNulty, Ian; Chen, Bo; Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Frankland, Sarah; Nugent, Keith A.; Tilley, Leann; Peele, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray tomography can provide structural information of whole cells in close to their native state. Radiation-induced damage, however, imposes a practical limit to image resolution, and as such, a choice between damage, image contrast, and image resolution must be made. New coherent diffractive imaging techniques, such Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging (FCDI), allows quantitative phase information with exceptional dose efficiency, high contrast, and nano-scale resolution. Here we present three-dimensional quantitative images of a whole eukaryotic cell by FCDI at a spatial resolution below 70 nm with sufficient phase contrast to distinguish major cellular components. From our data, we estimate that the minimum dose required for a similar resolution is close to that predicted by the Rose criterion, considerably below accepted estimates of the maximum dose a frozen-hydrated cell can tolerate. Based on the dose efficiency, contrast, and resolution achieved, we expect this technique will find immediate applications in tomographic cellular characterisation. PMID:23887204

  17. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    DOE PAGES

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; ...

    2016-02-29

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, makingmore » it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Ultimately, simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.« less

  18. Comparison of fiber counting by TV screen and eyepieces of phase contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mao, I-Fang; Yeh, Hui-Roung; Chen, Mei-Lien

    2002-01-01

    This study designed a modified light path of a phase-contrast microscope to evaluate the feasibility of fiber counting on a television screen (TVS). A comparison also was made of the fiber counts, fiber density, and precision derived from repeatedly counting fibers through eyepieces (EPs) and on a TVS connected to a phase contrast microscope. Thirty asbestos fiber samples were counted 10 times repeatedly. Ten samples were counted by viewing the same field through an EP and on a TVS alternately, whereas the other 20 samples were counted separately by using an EP and a TVS. The A rules of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) 7400 method was quoted. No statistically significant difference of fiber density (p = 0.39) or fiber counts (p > 0.05) was observed between the TVS and EP methods, though TVS gave a slightly lower value than EP did. The bias of the two methods was 7.7 +/- 8.0% on an average. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for both methods were the same, 0.40, which resembled the theoretical RSD, 0.44, of NIOSH 7400. Meanwhile, the theoretical and experimental RSDs were not significantly different for either method (p > 0.05). The modified light path of a phase contrast microscope provided a compatible view with less eye strain on a TVS than a conventional EP. Moreover, operator biases and variability might be greatly reduced by training several counters simultaneously on the TVS.

  19. Model-based pancreas segmentation in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT images.

    PubMed

    Hammon, Matthias; Cavallaro, Alexander; Erdt, Marius; Dankerl, Peter; Kirschner, Matthias; Drechsler, Klaus; Wesarg, Stefan; Uder, Michael; Janka, Rolf

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to automatically detect and segment the pancreas in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images. The institutional review board of the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg approved this study and waived the need for informed consent. Discriminative learning is used to build a pancreas tissue classifier incorporating spatial relationships between the pancreas and surrounding organs and vessels. Furthermore, discrete cosine and wavelet transforms are used to build texture features to describe local tissue appearance. Classification is used to guide a constrained statistical shape model to fit the data. The algorithm to detect and segment the pancreas was evaluated on 40 consecutive CT data that were acquired in the portal venous contrast agent phase. Manual segmentation of the pancreas was carried out by experienced radiologists and served as reference standard. Threefold cross validation was performed. The algorithm-based detection and segmentation yielded an average surface distance of 1.7 mm and an average overlap of 61.2 % compared with the reference standard. The overall runtime of the system was 20.4 min. The presented novel approach enables automatic pancreas segmentation in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT images which are included in almost every clinical routine abdominal CT examination. Reliable pancreatic segmentation is crucial for computer-aided detection systems and an organ-specific decision support.

  20. [Phase contrast microscopy demonstration of glomerular erythrocytes in urine: practicable in ambulatory practice?].

    PubMed

    Conzelmann, M; Conen, D; Besch, W; Dubach, U C; Thiel, G

    1988-04-16

    The use of phase-contrast microscopy in microhematuria, as proposed in 1979 by Birch and Fairley, renders morphological changes in red cells easily detectable and makes it possible to distinguish glomerular from non-glomerular bleeding. The aim of this study was to evaluate the practicability of this method as a routine laboratory test in ambulatory care. 60 patients with asymptomatic microhematuria (greater than or equal to 2 erythrocytes per high power field) were followed up over a one-year period. All patients were investigated by intravenous pyelography, ultrasound of urinary tract and three cytological examinations of the urine. The description of urine samples was done with phase-contrast microscopy by a first investigator at the beginning of the study and by a second after 12.8 months, blinded to clinical results and previous examinations. In 21 patients a definitive diagnosis was possible. In 18 patients the morphologic descriptions of the two investigators correlated with the clinical results. Only in two patients with established diagnosis there were differences between the urine description of the two investigators, and in one patient the interpretations of both investigators were wrong. These incorrect descriptions concerned patients with low-grade microhematuria. Thus, phase-contrast microscopy is a practicable method for the practitioner's use as a routine laboratory investigation. In low-grade microhematuria the method seems to be of minor value.

  1. Automatic detection of endothelial cells in 3D angiogenic sprouts from experimental phase contrast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, MengMeng; Ong, Lee-Ling Sharon; Dauwels, Justin; Asada, H. Harry

    2015-03-01

    Cell migration studies in 3D environments become more popular, as cell behaviors in 3D are more similar to the behaviors of cells in a living organism (in vivo). We focus on the 3D angiogenic sprouting in microfluidic devices, where Endothelial Cells (ECs) burrow into the gel matrix and form solid lumen vessels. Phase contrast microscopy is used for long-term observation of the unlabeled ECs in the 3D microfluidic devices. Two template matching based approaches are proposed to automatically detect the unlabeled ECs in the angiogenic sprouts from the acquired experimental phase contrast images. Cell and non-cell templates are obtained from these phase contrast images as the training data. The first approach applies Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR) to find the discriminative features and their corresponding weight to distinguish cells and non-cells, whereas the second approach relies on Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to reduce the template feature dimension and Support Vector Machine (SVM) to find their corresponding weight. Through a sliding window manner, the cells in the test images are detected. We then validate the detection accuracy by comparing the results with the same images acquired with a confocal microscope after cells are fixed and their nuclei are stained. More accurate numerical results are obtained for approach I (PLSR) compared to approach II (PCA & SVM) for cell detection. Automatic cell detection will aid in the understanding of cell migration in 3D environment and in turn result in a better understanding of angiogenesis.

  2. Optical phased array using single crystalline silicon high-contrast-gratings for beamsteering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Byung-Wook; Chan, Trevor; Megens, Mischa; Sun, Tianbo; Yang, Weijian; Rao, Yi; Horsley, David A.; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.; Wu, Ming C.

    2013-03-01

    We present a single crystalline silicon optical phased array using high-contrast-gratings (HCG) for fast two dimensional beamforming and beamsteering at 0.5 MHz. Since there are various applications for beamforming and beamsteering such as 3D imaging, optical communications, and light detection and ranging (LIDAR), it is great interest to develop ultrafast optical phased arrays. However, the beamsteering speed of optical phased arrays using liquid crystal and electro-wetting are typically limited to tens of milliseconds. Optical phased arrays using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technologies can operate in the submegahertz range, but generally require metal coatings. The metal coating unfortunately cause bending of mirrors due to thermally induced stress. The novel MEMS-based optical phased array presented here consists of electrostatically driven 8 × 8 HCG pixels fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. The HCG mirror is designed to have 99.9% reflectivity at 1550 nm wavelength without any reflective coating. The size of the HCG mirror is 20 × 20 μm2 and the mass is only 140 pg, much lighter than traditional MEMS mirrors. Our 8 × 8 optical phased array has a total field of view of +/-10° × 10° and a beam width of 2°. The maximum phase shift regarding the actuation gap defined by a 2 μm buried oxide layer of a SOI wafer is 1.7π at 20 V.

  3. Phase contrast: the frontier of x-ray and electron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwu, Y.; Margaritondo, G.

    2013-12-01

    Phase contrast has been a fundamental component of microscopy since the early 1940s. In broad terms, it refers to the formation of images using not the combination of wave intensities but their amplitudes with the corresponding phase factors. The impact on visible microscopy of biological specimens has been major. This contrast mechanism is now playing an increasingly important role in other kinds of microscopy, notably those based on electrons or x-rays. It notably solves the background problem of weak absorption contrast. New breakthroughs and new techniques are continuously produced, unfortunately unknown to most of the scientists that could exploit them. The present special cluster issue of reviews was inspired by this situation. The case of x-rays is very interesting. Phase contrast requires a high degree of longitudinal and lateral coherence. But conventional x-ray sources are not coherent. The progress of synchrotron sources yielded high coherence as a key byproduct—and started a rapid expansion of phase contrast radiology. No review—or cluster of reviews—can possibly cover all the facets of the recent progress. Without trying to be absolutely comprehensive, the present special cluster issue touches a variety of issues, giving a very broad picture. Liu et al review in general terms the different phase-based hard-x-ray techniques, with an interesting variety of examples. Then, Suortti et al and Wang et al present more specialized overviews of crystal and grating based x-ray imaging techniques, very powerful in the analysis of biological specimens. Mokso et al discuss the many facets of tomography using phase effects, expanding the picture of tomographic reconstruction of the three previous reviews. Wu et al treat the rapid progress in hard-x-ray focusing and its impact on radiology and tomography for materials science and biomedical research. The next two reviews deal with special and very interesting classes of applications. Specifically, Lee et al

  4. Optimal transmit phasing on tissue background suppression in contrast harmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Shen, Che-Chou; Hsieh, Yi-Chun

    2008-11-01

    Ultrasonic harmonic imaging provides superior image quality than linear imaging and has become an important diagnostic tool in many clinical applications. Nevertheless, the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in harmonic imaging is generally limited by tissue background signal comprising both the leakage harmonic signal and the tissue harmonic signal. Harmonic leakage generally occurs when a wideband transmit pulse is used for better axial resolution. In addition, generation of tissue harmonic signal during acoustic propagation also decreases the CTR. In this paper, suppression of tissue background signal in harmonic imaging is studied by selecting an optimal phase of the transmit signal to achieve destructive cancellation between the tissue harmonic signal and the leakage harmonic signal. With the optimal suppression phase, our results indicate that the tissue signal can be significantly reduced at second harmonic band, whereas the harmonic amplitude from contrast agents shows negligible change with the selection of transmit phase. Consequently, about 5-dB CTR improvement can be achieved from effective reduction of tissue background amplitude in optimal transmit phasing.

  5. Hard x-ray phase contrast imaging using single absorption grating and hybrid semiconductor pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Krejci, Frantisek; Jakubek, Jan; Kroupa, Martin

    2010-11-01

    A method for x-ray phase contrast imaging is introduced in which only one absorption grating and a microfocus x-ray source in a tabletop setup are used. The method is based on precise subpixel position determination of the x-ray pattern projected by the grating directly from the pattern image. For retrieval of the phase gradient and absorption image (both images obtained from one exposure), it is necessary to measure only one projection of the investigated object. Thus, our method is greatly simplified compared with the phase-stepping method and our method can significantly reduce the time-consuming scanning and possibly the unnecessary dose. Furthermore, the technique works with a fully polychromatic spectrum and gives ample variability in object magnification. Consequently, the approach can open the way to further widespread application of phase contrast imaging, e.g., into clinical practice. The experimental results on a simple testing object as well as on complex biological samples are presented.

  6. A tilted grating interferometer for full vector field differential x-ray phase contrast tomography.

    PubMed

    Rutishauser, Simon; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Marone, Federica; Modregger, Peter; Stampanoni, Marco

    2011-12-05

    We report on a setup for differential x-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography, that measures the full 2D phase-gradient information. The setup uses a simple one-dimensional x-ray grating interferometer, in which the grating structures of the interferometer are oriented at a tilt angle with respect to the sample rotation axis. In such a configuration, the differential phase images from opposing tomography projections can be combined to yield both components of the gradient vector. We show how the refractive index distribution as well as its x, y, and z gradient components can be reconstructed directly from the recorded projection data. The method can equally well be applied at conventional x-ray tube sources, to analyzer based x-ray imaging or neutron imaging. It is demonstrated with measurements of an x-ray phantom and a rat brain using synchrotron radiation.

  7. Edge-illumination x-ray phase contrast imaging with Pt-based metallic glass masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghamanesh, Somayeh; Aghamiri, Seyed Mahmoud-Reza; Olivo, Alessandro; Sadeghilarijani, Maryam; Kato, Hidemi; Kamali-Asl, Alireza; Yashiro, Wataru

    2017-06-01

    Edge-illumination x-ray phase contrast imaging (EI XPCI) is a non-interferometric phase-sensitive method where two absorption masks are employed. These masks are fabricated through a photolithography process followed by electroplating which is challenging in terms of yield as well as time- and cost-effectiveness. We report on the first implementation of EI XPCI with Pt-based metallic glass masks fabricated by an imprinting method. The new tested alloy exhibits good characteristics including high workability beside high x-ray attenuation. The fabrication process is easy and cheap, and can produce large-size masks for high x-ray energies within minutes. Imaging experiments show a good quality phase image, which confirms the potential of these masks to make the EI XPCI technique widely available and affordable.

  8. Observation of a Soft Tissue by a Zernike Phase Contrast Hard X-ray Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Sadao; Namikawa, Tadahiro; Hoshino, Masato; Watanabe, Norio

    2007-01-19

    A Zernike-type phase contrast hard X-ray microscope was constructed at the Photon Factory BL3C2 (KEK). A white beam from a bending magnet was monochromatized by a silicon double crystal monochromator. Monochromatic parallel X-ray beam illuminated a sample, and transmitted and diffracted X-ray beams were imaged by a Fresnel zone plate (FZP) which had the outer zone width of 100 nm. A phase plate made of a thin aluminum foil with a pinhole was set at the back focal plane of the FZP. The phase plate modulated the diffraction beam from the FZP, whereas a direct beam passed through the pinhole. The resolution of the microscope was measured by observing a tantalum test pattern at an X-ray energy of 9 keV. A 100nm line-and-space pattern could be resolved. X-ray montage pictures of growing eggs of artemia (plankton) were obtained.

  9. Observation of a Soft Tissue by a Zernike Phase Contrast Hard X-ray Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Sadao; Namikawa, Tadahiro; Hoshino, Masato; Watanabe, Norio

    2007-01-01

    A Zernike-type phase contrast hard X-ray microscope was constructed at the Photon Factory BL3C2 (KEK). A white beam from a bending magnet was monochromatized by a silicon double crystal monochromator. Monochromatic parallel X-ray beam illuminated a sample, and transmitted and diffracted X-ray beams were imaged by a Fresnel zone plate (FZP) which had the outer zone width of 100 nm. A phase plate made of a thin aluminum foil with a pinhole was set at the back focal plane of the FZP. The phase plate modulated the diffraction beam from the FZP, whereas a direct beam passed through the pinhole. The resolution of the microscope was measured by observing a tantalum test pattern at an X-ray energy of 9 keV. A 100nm line-and-space pattern could be resolved. X-ray montage pictures of growing eggs of artemia (plankton) were obtained.

  10. Increased robustness and speed in low-dose phase-contrast tomography with laboratory sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamir, Anna; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Diemoz, Paul C.; Endrizzi, Marco; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Urbani, Luca; De Coppi, Paolo; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    In this article we discuss three different developments in Edge Illumination (EI) X-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi), all ultimately aimed at optimising EI computed tomography (CT) for use in different environments, and for different applications. For the purpose of reducing scan times, two approaches are presented; the "reverse projection" acquisition scheme which allows a continuous rotation of the sample, and the "single image" retrieval algorithm, which requires only one frame for retrieval of the projected phase map. These are expected to lead to a substantial reduction of EI CT scan times, a prospect which is likely to promote the translation of EI into several applications, including clinical. The last development presented is the "modified local" phase retrieval. This retrieval algorithm is specifically designed to accurately retrieve sample properties (absorption, refraction, scattering) in cases where high-resolution scans are required in non-ideal environments. Experimental results, using both synchrotron radiation and laboratory sources, are shown for the various approaches.

  11. Noise analysis of grating-based x-ray differential phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Revol, Vincent; Kottler, Christian; Kaufmann, Rolf; Urban, Claus; Straumann, Ulrich

    2010-07-15

    The sensitivity of x-ray radiographic images, meaning the minimal detectable change in the thickness or in the index of refraction of a sample, is directly related to the uncertainty of the measurement method. In the following work, we report on the recent development of quantitative descriptions for the stochastic error of grating-based differential phase contrast imaging (DPCi). Our model includes the noise transfer characteristics of the x-ray detector and the jitter of the phase steps. We find that the noise in DPCi depends strongly on the phase stepping visibility and the sample properties. The results are supported by experimental evidence acquired with our new instrument with a field of view of 50x70 mm{sup 2}. Our conclusions provide general guidelines to optimize grating interferometers for specific applications and problems.

  12. Integral refractive index determination of living suspension cells by multifocus digital holographic phase contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Björn; Kosmeier, Sebastian; Langehanenberg, Patrik; von Bally, Gert; Bredebusch, Ilona; Domschke, Wolfram; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    A method for the determination of the integral refractive index of living cells in suspension by digital holographic microscopy is described. Digital holographic phase contrast images of spherical cells in suspension are recorded, and the radius as well as the integral refractive index are determined by fitting the relation between cell thickness and phase distribution to the measured phase data. The algorithm only requires information about the refractive index of the suspension medium and the image scale of the microscope system. The specific digital holographic microscopy advantage of subsequent focus correction allows a simultaneous investigation of cells in different focus planes. Results obtained from human pancreas and liver tumor cells show that the integral cellular refractive index decreases with increasing cell radius.

  13. Measurement of nonlinear characteristics of silver-halide holographic materials by phase-contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banyasz, Istvan

    2003-05-01

    Lin-curves of plane-wave phase holograms recorded in Agfa-Gevaert 8E75HD emulsions were measured for the combinations of AAC developer and the R9 bleaching agent. Then each holographic grating was studied by phase-contrast microscopy, using both medium-power (40 X) and high-power immersion (100 X) objectives. Thus, besides of the Lin-curves, the modulation of the refractive index as a function of the bias exposure and the visibility of the recording interference pattern can also been determined. This latter characteristics is used in coupled wave theory to calculate the diffraction efficiency of holographic gratings, thus the measured diffraction efficiencies can be compared to those predicted by the theory. Moreover, this direct study of the phase profile of the gratings can be used for optimising processing.

  14. Phase-contrast microscopy at high x-ray energy with a laboratory setup.

    PubMed

    Endrizzi, Marco; Vittoria, Fabio A; Diemoz, Paul C; Lorenzo, Rodolfo; Speller, Robert D; Wagner, Ulrich H; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian K; Olivo, Alessandro

    2014-06-01

    We report on the design and realization of an x-ray imaging system for quantitative phase-contrast microscopy at high x-ray energy with laboratory-scale instrumentation. Phase and amplitude were separated quantitatively at x-ray energies up to 80 keV with micrometric spatial resolution. The accuracy of the results was tested against numerical simulations, and the spatial resolution was experimentally quantified by measuring a Siemens star phase object. This simple setup should find broad application in those areas of x-ray imaging where high energy and spatial resolution are simultaneously required and in those difficult cases where the sample contains materials with similar x-ray absorption.

  15. Contrast harmonic detection with chirp excitation in 3f0 transmit phasing.

    PubMed

    Shen, Che-Chou; Wang, Hong-Wei; Chiu, Yi-Yuan

    2008-10-01

    The method of third harmonic (3f0 transmit phasing is capable of providing effective tissue background suppression for contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) improvement in harmonic imaging. With the additional 3f0 transmit signal to generate both the frequency-sum and the frequency-difference components of harmonic signal, the tissue suppression is achieved when the two components are opposite in phase and mutually cancel out. One major problem in 3f0 transmit phasing is the limited signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) due to the constraint on transmit amplitude. Chirp excitation can be applied in contrast harmonic imaging to enhance the SNR with minimal destruction of the microbubbles. In this paper, the effect of chirp waveform in combination with the 3f0 transmit phasing was studied using both in-vitro experiments and simulations. Our results indicate that, though the chirp transmit pulse can increase the SNR of harmonic imaging in 3f0 transmit phasing (3 dB, p < 0.001), it suffers from degraded tissue harmonic suppression and thus provides less CTR improvement as compared to a conventional pulse. The spectral mismatch between the frequency-sum and the frequency-difference components of tissue harmonic signal is particularly evident in the off-center region of second harmonic band, leading to significant residue tissue background. Consequently, with the chirp waveform, the improvement of CTR decreases from 9.5 dB to 5.9 dB (p < 0.0006) and thus a tradeoff exists between the SNR improvement and the CTR improvement in 3f0 transmit phasing.

  16. High-resolution STEM imaging with a quadrant detector--conditions for differential phase contrast microscopy in the weak phase object approximation.

    PubMed

    Majert, S; Kohl, H

    2015-01-01

    Differential phase contrast is a contrast mechanism that can be utilized in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to determine the distribution of magnetic or electric fields. In practice, several different detector geometries can be used to obtain differential phase contrast. As recent high resolution differential phase contrast experiments with the STEM are focused on ring quadrant detectors, we evaluate the contrast transfer characteristics of different quadrant detector geometries, namely two ring quadrant detectors with different inner detector angles and a conventional quadrant detector, by calculating the corresponding phase gradient transfer functions. For an ideal microscope and a weak phase object, this can be done analytically. The calculated phase gradient transfer functions indicate that the barely illuminated ring quadrant detector setup used for imaging magnetic fields in the specimen reduces the resolution limit to about 2.5Å for an aberration corrected STEM. Our results show that the resolution can be drastically improved by using a conventional quadrant detector instead.

  17. 4D x-ray phase contrast tomography for repeatable motion of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto

    2016-09-01

    X-ray phase contrast tomography based on a grating interferometer was applied to fast and dynamic measurements of biological samples. To achieve this, the scanning procedure in the tomographic scan was improved. A triangle-shaped voltage signal from a waveform generator to a Piezo stage was used for the fast phase stepping in the grating interferometer. In addition, an optical fiber coupled x-ray scientific CMOS camera was used to achieve fast and highly efficient image acquisitions. These optimizations made it possible to perform an x-ray phase contrast tomographic measurement within an 8 min scan with density resolution of 2.4 mg/cm3. A maximum volume size of 13 × 13 × 6 mm3 was obtained with a single tomographic measurement with a voxel size of 6.5 μm. The scanning procedure using the triangle wave was applied to four-dimensional measurements in which highly sensitive three-dimensional x-ray imaging and a time-resolved dynamic measurement of biological samples were combined. A fresh tendon in the tail of a rat was measured under a uniaxial stretching and releasing condition. To maintain the freshness of the sample during four-dimensional phase contrast tomography, the temperature of the bathing liquid of the sample was kept below 10° using a simple cooling system. The time-resolved deformation of the tendon and each fascicle was measured with a temporal resolution of 5.7 Hz. Evaluations of cross-sectional area size, length of the axis, and mass density in the fascicle during a stretching process provided a basis for quantitative analysis of the deformation of tendon fascicle.

  18. Context-sensitive trace inlining for Java.

    PubMed

    Häubl, Christian; Wimmer, Christian; Mössenböck, Hanspeter

    2013-12-01

    Method inlining is one of the most important optimizations in method-based just-in-time (JIT) compilers. It widens the compilation scope and therefore allows optimizing multiple methods as a whole, which increases the performance. However, if method inlining is used too frequently, the compilation time increases and too much machine code is generated. This has negative effects on the performance. Trace-based JIT compilers only compile frequently executed paths, so-called traces, instead of whole methods. This may result in faster compilation, less generated machine code, and better optimized machine code. In the previous work, we implemented a trace recording infrastructure and a trace-based compiler for [Formula: see text], by modifying the Java HotSpot VM. Based on this work, we evaluate the effect of trace inlining on the performance and the amount of generated machine code. Trace inlining has several major advantages when compared to method inlining. First, trace inlining is more selective than method inlining, because only frequently executed paths are inlined. Second, the recorded traces may capture information about virtual calls, which simplify inlining. A third advantage is that trace information is context sensitive so that different method parts can be inlined depending on the specific call site. These advantages allow more aggressive inlining while the amount of generated machine code is still reasonable. We evaluate several inlining heuristics on the benchmark suites DaCapo 9.12 Bach, SPECjbb2005, and SPECjvm2008 and show that our trace-based compiler achieves an up to 51% higher peak performance than the method-based Java HotSpot client compiler. Furthermore, we show that the large compilation scope of our trace-based compiler has a positive effect on other compiler optimizations such as constant folding or null check elimination.

  19. Glancing angle Talbot-Lau grating interferometers for phase contrast imaging at high x-ray energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.

    2012-08-01

    A Talbot-Lau interferometer is demonstrated using micro-periodic gratings inclined at a glancing angle along the light propagation direction. Due to the increase in the effective thickness of the absorption gratings, the device enables differential phase contrast imaging at high x-ray energy, with improved fringe visibility (contrast). For instance, at 28° glancing angle, we obtain up to ˜35% overall interferometer contrast with a spectrum having ˜43 keV mean energy, suitable for medical applications. In addition, glancing angle interferometers could provide high contrast at energies above 100 keV, enabling industrial and security applications of phase contrast imaging.

  20. Analyzer-based x-ray phase-contrast microscopy combining channel-cut and asymmetrically cut crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hoennicke, M. G.; Cusatis, C.

    2007-11-15

    An analyzer-based x-ray phase-contrast microscopy (ABM) setup combining a standard analyzer-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging (ABI) setup [nondispersive 4-crystal setup (Bonse-Hart setup)] and diffraction by asymmetrically cut crystals is presented here. An attenuation-contrast microscopy setup with conventional x-ray source and asymmetrically cut crystals is first analyzed. Edge-enhanced effects attributed to phase jumps or refraction/total external reflection on the fiber borders were detected. However, the long exposure times and the possibility to achieve high contrast microscopies by using extremely low attenuation-contrast samples motivated us to assemble the ABM setup using a synchrotron source. This setup was found to be useful for low contrast attenuation samples due to the low exposure time, high contrast, and spatial resolution found. Moreover, thanks to the combination with the nondispersive ABI setup, the diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging algorithm could be applied.

  1. Phase Error Correction in Time-Averaged 3D Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Cerebral Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, M. Ethan; Forkert, Nils D.; Pike, G. Bruce; Frayne, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Volume flow rate (VFR) measurements based on phase contrast (PC)-magnetic resonance (MR) imaging datasets have spatially varying bias due to eddy current induced phase errors. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of phase errors in time averaged PC-MR imaging of the cerebral vasculature and explore the effects of three common correction schemes (local bias correction (LBC), local polynomial correction (LPC), and whole brain polynomial correction (WBPC)). Methods Measurements of the eddy current induced phase error from a static phantom were first obtained. In thirty healthy human subjects, the methods were then assessed in background tissue to determine if local phase offsets could be removed. Finally, the techniques were used to correct VFR measurements in cerebral vessels and compared statistically. Results In the phantom, phase error was measured to be <2.1 ml/s per pixel and the bias was reduced with the correction schemes. In background tissue, the bias was significantly reduced, by 65.6% (LBC), 58.4% (LPC) and 47.7% (WBPC) (p < 0.001 across all schemes). Correction did not lead to significantly different VFR measurements in the vessels (p = 0.997). In the vessel measurements, the three correction schemes led to flow measurement differences of -0.04 ± 0.05 ml/s, 0.09 ± 0.16 ml/s, and -0.02 ± 0.06 ml/s. Although there was an improvement in background measurements with correction, there was no statistical difference between the three correction schemes (p = 0.242 in background and p = 0.738 in vessels). Conclusions While eddy current induced phase errors can vary between hardware and sequence configurations, our results showed that the impact is small in a typical brain PC-MR protocol and does not have a significant effect on VFR measurements in cerebral vessels. PMID:26910600

  2. Ultrafast x-ray phase-contrast imaging of the initial coalescence phase of two water droplets.

    SciTech Connect

    Fezzaa, K.; Wang, Y.; X-Ray Science Division

    2008-03-14

    We report an ultrafast x-ray phase-contrast imaging study of the early merging dynamics of two water drops in air. Owing to the edge-enhancement capability, the high penetrability, and the unprecedented temporal and spatial resolutions offered by this new x-ray technique, the coalescence singularity of two water drops was revisited. A finite initial contact radius was identified and the evolvement of the trapped toroidal air bubble was studied for the first time. Despite the existence of this finite initial contact radius, the subsequent meniscus radius followed power laws which agree with theoretical predictions for the inviscid regime.

  3. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  4. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers.

    PubMed

    Sarapata, A; Stayman, J W; Finkenthal, M; Siewerdsen, J H; Pfeiffer, F; Stutman, D

    2014-02-01

    The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼ 45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as replacing, but as complimentary to

  5. Microdissection of Human Esophagogastric Junction Wall with Phase-contrast X-ray CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfa; Zhou, Guangzhao; Tian, Dongping; Lin, Runhua; Peng, Guanyun; Su, Min

    2015-09-08

    Phase-contrast x-ray imaging using an x-ray interferometer has great potential to reveal the structures inside soft tissues, because the sensitivity of this method to hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen is about 1000 times higher than that of the absorption-contrast x-ray method. In this study, we used phase-contrast X-ray CT to investigate human resected esophagogastric junction. This technology revealed the three-layer structure of the esophagogastric junction wall-mucous, submucosa and muscular layers. The mucous and muscular layers were clearly separated by a loose submucosa layer with a honeycomb appearance. The shape of the mucous and muscular layers was intact. The boundary between the mucous and submucosa layers was distinct, as was the border of the muscular and submucosa layers. The surface of the esophagogastric junction was displayed clearly through 3D reconstruction. The technology might be helpful in the diagnosis of esophagogastric junction lesion, especially for the early adenocarcinoma.

  6. X-ray phase-contrast tomography for high-spatial-resolution zebrafish muscle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vågberg, William; Larsson, Daniel H.; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Hertz, Hans M.

    2015-11-01

    Imaging of muscular structure with cellular or subcellular detail in whole-body animal models is of key importance for understanding muscular disease and assessing interventions. Classical histological methods for high-resolution imaging methods require excision, fixation and staining. Here we show that the three-dimensional muscular structure of unstained whole zebrafish can be imaged with sub-5 μm detail with X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Our method relies on a laboratory propagation-based phase-contrast system tailored for detection of low-contrast 4-6 μm subcellular myofibrils. The method is demonstrated on 20 days post fertilization zebrafish larvae and comparative histology confirms that we resolve individual myofibrils in the whole-body animal. X-ray imaging of healthy zebrafish show the expected structured muscle pattern while specimen with a dystrophin deficiency (sapje) displays an unstructured pattern, typical of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The method opens up for whole-body imaging with sub-cellular detail also of other types of soft tissue and in different animal models.

  7. Pain & resistance in patients with adhesive capsulitis during contrast material injection phase of MR arthrography.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Mehmet Halit; Kantarci, Fatih; Adaletli, Ibrahim; Ulus, Sila; Gulsen, Fatih; Ozer, Harun; Aktas, Ilknur; Akgun, Kenan; Kanberoglu, Kaya

    2007-04-01

    Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a condition of unknown aetiology that results in the development of restricted active and passive glenohumeral motion. It has been reported that magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is useful in diagnosing adhesive capsulitis. We carried out this study to assess how pain and/or resistance during contrast material injection affects the diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis on magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography. The study included MR arthrography examinations of 21 patients with a diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis. The control group consisted of 20 patients who presented clinically with rotator cuff tear. The pain (visual analog scale, VAS), resistance to injection and the amount of contrast material that could be injected during injection phase of MR arthrography was assessed and compared between groups. The patients in adhesive capsulitis group (mean VAS score 66.5+/-25.5) experienced more pain when compared with the control group (mean VAS score 34.9+/-27.7, P<0.001). A statistically significant difference (P<0.001) in terms of the amount of the injected fluid (4.3+/-2.6 ml for adhesive capsulitis group, and 10.9+/-4.1 ml for control group) was seen into the joint cavity. Resistance to injection was significantly more (P<0.001) in patients with adhesive capsulitis when compared to control group. Experience of pain during injection, a decreased amount of contrast material injected and resistance to injection in patients during injection phase of MR arthrography may suggest adhesive capsulitis.

  8. Phase-contrast zoom tomography reveals precise locations of macrophages in mouse lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenkel, Martin; Markus, Andrea; Bartels, Matthias; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Salditt, Tim

    2015-05-01

    We have performed x-ray phase-contrast tomography on mouse lung tissue. Using a divergent x-ray beam generated by nanoscale focusing, we used zoom tomography to produce three-dimensional reconstructions with selectable magnification, resolution, and field of view. Thus, macroscopic tissue samples extending over several mm can be studied in sub-cellular-level structural detail. The zoom capability and, in particular, the high dose efficiency are enabled by the near-perfect exit wavefront of an optimized x-ray waveguide channel. In combination with suitable phase-retrieval algorithms, challenging radiation-sensitive and low-contrast samples can be reconstructed with minimal artefacts. The dose efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the reconstruction of living macrophages both with and without phagocytized contrast agents. We also used zoom tomography to visualize barium-labelled macrophages in the context of morphological structures in asthmatic and healthy mouse lung tissue one day after intratracheal application. The three-dimensional reconstructions showed that the macrophages predominantly localized to the alveoli, but they were also found in bronchial walls, indicating that these cells might be able to migrate from the lumen of the bronchi through the epithelium.

  9. Phase-contrast imaging using a scanning-double-grating configuration.

    PubMed

    Nesterets, Ya I; Wilkins, S W

    2008-04-14

    A new double-grating-based phase-contrast imaging technique is described. This technique differs from the conventional double-grating imaging method by the image acquisition strategy. The novelty of the proposed method is in lateral scanning of both gratings simultaneously while an image is collected. The collected image is not contaminated by a Moiré pattern and can be recorded even by using a high-spatial-resolution integrating detector (e.g. X-ray film), thus facilitating improved resolution and/or contrast in the image. A detailed theoretical analysis of image formation in the scanning-double-grating method is carried out within the rigorous wave-optical formalism. The transfer function for the scanning-double-grating imaging system is derived. An approximate geometrical-optics solution for the image intensity distribution is derived from the exact wave-optical formula using the stationary-phase approach. Based on the present formalism, the effects of finite source size on the preferred operating conditions and of polychromaticity on the image contrast and resolution are investigated.

  10. Effects of signal diffusion on x-ray phase contrast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatyev, K.; Munro, P. R. T.; Speller, R. D.; Olivo, A.

    2011-07-01

    We discuss the problem of signal diffusion among neighbouring pixels in x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) specifically for coded-aperture (CA) XPCi, but many of the discussed observations are directly transferable to other XPCi modalities. CA XPCi exploits the principle of pixel edge illumination by means of two CA masks. The first mask, placed in contact with the detector, creates insensitive regions between adjacent pixels; the second one, placed immediately before the sample, creates individual beams impinging on the boundaries between sensitive and insensitive regions on the detector, as created by the detector mask. In this way, edge illumination is achieved for all pixels of an area detector illuminated by a divergent and polychromatic beam generated by a conventional source. As the detector mask redefines the resolution properties of the detector, sample dithering can be used to effectively increase the system spatial resolution, without having to apply any post-processing procedure (e.g., deconvolution). This however creates artifacts in the form of secondary fringes (which have nothing to do with phase-related secondary fringes) if there is signal diffusion between adjacent pixels. In non-dithered images, signal diffusion between adjacent pixels causes a reduction in image contrast. This effect is investigated both theoretically and experimentally, and its direct implications on image quality are discussed. The interplay with the sample positioning with respect to the detector pixel matrix, which also has an effect on the obtained image contrast, is also discussed.

  11. Quantitative X-ray phase-contrast microtomography from a compact laser-driven betatron source.

    PubMed

    Wenz, J; Schleede, S; Khrennikov, K; Bech, M; Thibault, P; Heigoldt, M; Pfeiffer, F; Karsch, S

    2015-07-20

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to a brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present a phase-contrast microtomogram of a biological sample using betatron X-rays. Comprehensive source characterization enables the reconstruction of absolute electron densities. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential for filling the large performance gap between synchrotron- and current X-ray tube-based sources.

  12. Effects of signal diffusion on x-ray phase contrast images.

    PubMed

    Ignatyev, K; Munro, P R T; Speller, R D; Olivo, A

    2011-07-01

    We discuss the problem of signal diffusion among neighbouring pixels in x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) specifically for coded-aperture (CA) XPCi, but many of the discussed observations are directly transferable to other XPCi modalities. CA XPCi exploits the principle of pixel edge illumination by means of two CA masks. The first mask, placed in contact with the detector, creates insensitive regions between adjacent pixels; the second one, placed immediately before the sample, creates individual beams impinging on the boundaries between sensitive and insensitive regions on the detector, as created by the detector mask. In this way, edge illumination is achieved for all pixels of an area detector illuminated by a divergent and polychromatic beam generated by a conventional source. As the detector mask redefines the resolution properties of the detector, sample dithering can be used to effectively increase the system spatial resolution, without having to apply any post-processing procedure (e.g., deconvolution). This however creates artifacts in the form of secondary fringes (which have nothing to do with phase-related secondary fringes) if there is signal diffusion between adjacent pixels. In non-dithered images, signal diffusion between adjacent pixels causes a reduction in image contrast. This effect is investigated both theoretically and experimentally, and its direct implications on image quality are discussed. The interplay with the sample positioning with respect to the detector pixel matrix, which also has an effect on the obtained image contrast, is also discussed.

  13. Quantitative X-ray phase-contrast microtomography from a compact laser-driven betatron source

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, J.; Schleede, S.; Khrennikov, K.; Bech, M.; Thibault, P.; Heigoldt, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Karsch, S.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to a brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present a phase-contrast microtomogram of a biological sample using betatron X-rays. Comprehensive source characterization enables the reconstruction of absolute electron densities. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential for filling the large performance gap between synchrotron- and current X-ray tube-based sources. PMID:26189811

  14. A novel framework for cellular tracking and mitosis detection in dense phase contrast microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Thirusittampalam, Ketheesan; Hossain, M Julius; Ghita, Ovidiu; Whelan, Paul F

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to detail the development of a novel tracking framework that is able to extract the cell motility indicators and to determine the cellular division (mitosis) events in large time-lapse phase-contrast image sequences. To address the challenges induced by nonstructured (random) motion, cellular agglomeration, and cellular mitosis, the process of automatic (unsupervised) cell tracking is carried out in a sequential manner, where the interframe cell association is achieved by assessing the variation in the local cellular structures in consecutive frames of the image sequence. In our study, a strong emphasis has been placed on the robust use of the topological information in the cellular tracking process and in the development of targeted pattern recognition techniques that were designed to redress the problems caused by segmentation errors, and to precisely identify mitosis using a backward (reversed) tracking strategy. The proposed algorithm has been evaluated on dense phase-contrast cellular data and the experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm is able to accurately track epithelial and endothelial cells in time-lapse image sequences that are characterized by low contrast and high level of noise. Our algorithm achieved 86.10% overall tracking accuracy and 90.12% mitosis detection accuracy.

  15. Quantitative hard x-ray phase contrast imaging of micropipes in SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, V. G.; Argunova, T. S.; Je, J. H.

    2013-12-15

    Peculiarities of quantitative hard x-ray phase contrast imaging of micropipes in SiC are discussed. The micropipe is assumed as a hollow cylinder with an elliptical cross section. The major and minor diameters can be restored using the least square fitting procedure by comparing the experimental data, i.e. the profile across the micropipe axis, with those calculated based on phase contrast theory. It is shown that one projection image gives an information which does not allow a complete determination of the elliptical cross section, if an orientation of micropipe is not known. Another problem is a weak accuracy in estimating the diameters, partly because of using pink synchrotron radiation, which is necessary because a monochromatic beam intensity is not sufficient to reveal the weak contrast from a very small object. The general problems of accuracy in estimating the two diameters using the least square procedure are discussed. Two experimental examples are considered to demonstrate small as well as modest accuracies in estimating the diameters.

  16. Phase-contrast zoom tomography reveals precise locations of macrophages in mouse lungs

    PubMed Central

    Krenkel, Martin; Markus, Andrea; Bartels, Matthias; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Salditt, Tim

    2015-01-01

    We have performed x-ray phase-contrast tomography on mouse lung tissue. Using a divergent x-ray beam generated by nanoscale focusing, we used zoom tomography to produce three-dimensional reconstructions with selectable magnification, resolution, and field of view. Thus, macroscopic tissue samples extending over several mm can be studied in sub-cellular-level structural detail. The zoom capability and, in particular, the high dose efficiency are enabled by the near-perfect exit wavefront of an optimized x-ray waveguide channel. In combination with suitable phase-retrieval algorithms, challenging radiation-sensitive and low-contrast samples can be reconstructed with minimal artefacts. The dose efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the reconstruction of living macrophages both with and without phagocytized contrast agents. We also used zoom tomography to visualize barium-labelled macrophages in the context of morphological structures in asthmatic and healthy mouse lung tissue one day after intratracheal application. The three-dimensional reconstructions showed that the macrophages predominantly localized to the alveoli, but they were also found in bronchial walls, indicating that these cells might be able to migrate from the lumen of the bronchi through the epithelium. PMID:25966338

  17. Phase-contrast zoom tomography reveals precise locations of macrophages in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Krenkel, Martin; Markus, Andrea; Bartels, Matthias; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Salditt, Tim

    2015-05-12

    We have performed x-ray phase-contrast tomography on mouse lung tissue. Using a divergent x-ray beam generated by nanoscale focusing, we used zoom tomography to produce three-dimensional reconstructions with selectable magnification, resolution, and field of view. Thus, macroscopic tissue samples extending over several mm can be studied in sub-cellular-level structural detail. The zoom capability and, in particular, the high dose efficiency are enabled by the near-perfect exit wavefront of an optimized x-ray waveguide channel. In combination with suitable phase-retrieval algorithms, challenging radiation-sensitive and low-contrast samples can be reconstructed with minimal artefacts. The dose efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the reconstruction of living macrophages both with and without phagocytized contrast agents. We also used zoom tomography to visualize barium-labelled macrophages in the context of morphological structures in asthmatic and healthy mouse lung tissue one day after intratracheal application. The three-dimensional reconstructions showed that the macrophages predominantly localized to the alveoli, but they were also found in bronchial walls, indicating that these cells might be able to migrate from the lumen of the bronchi through the epithelium.

  18. Preliminary research on dual-energy X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hua-Jie; Wang, Sheng-Hao; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhi-Li; Zhang, Can; Yang, Meng; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Pei-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) has been widely applied to measure the bone mineral density (BMD) and soft-tissue composition of the human body. However, the use of DEXA is greatly limited for low-Z materials such as soft tissues due to their weak absorption, while X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) shows significantly improved contrast in comparison with the conventional standard absorption-based X-ray imaging for soft tissues. In this paper, we propose a novel X-ray phase-contrast method to measure the area density of low-Z materials, including a single-energy method and a dual-energy method. The single-energy method is for the area density calculation of one low-Z material, while the dual-energy method aims to calculate the area densities of two low-Z materials simultaneously. Comparing the experimental and simulation results with the theoretical ones, the new method proves to have the potential to replace DEXA in area density measurement. The new method sets the prerequisites for a future precise and low-dose area density calculation method for low-Z materials. Supported by Major State Basic Research Development Program (2012CB825800), Science Fund for Creative Research Groups (11321503) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11179004, 10979055, 11205189, 11205157)

  19. In-line thermoelectric module

    DOEpatents

    Pento, Robert; Marks, James E.; Staffanson, Clifford D.

    2000-01-01

    A thermoelectric module with a plurality of electricity generating units each having a first end and a second end, the units being arranged first end to second end along an in-line axis. Each unit includes first and second elements each made of a thermoelectric material, an electrically conductive hot member arranged to heat one side of the first element, and an electrically conductive cold member arranged to cool another side of the first element and to cool one side of the second element. The hot member, the first element, the cold member and the second element are supported in a fixture, are electrically connected respectively to provide an electricity generating unit, and are arranged respectively in positions along the in-line axis. The individual components of each generating unit and the respective generating units are clamped in their in-line positions by a loading bolt at one end of the fixture and a stop wall at the other end of the fixture. The hot members may have a T-shape and the cold members an hourglass shape to facilitate heat transfer. The direction of heat transfer through the hot members may be perpendicular to the direction of heat transfer through the cold members, and both of these heat transfer directions may be perpendicular to the direction of current flow through the module.

  20. Penalized maximum likelihood reconstruction for x-ray differential phase-contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brendel, Bernhard; Teuffenbach, Maximilian von; Noël, Peter B.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Koehler, Thomas

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to propose a cost function with regularization to iteratively reconstruct attenuation, phase, and scatter images simultaneously from differential phase contrast (DPC) acquisitions, without the need of phase retrieval, and examine its properties. Furthermore this reconstruction method is applied to an acquisition pattern that is suitable for a DPC tomographic system with continuously rotating gantry (sliding window acquisition), overcoming the severe smearing in noniterative reconstruction. Methods: We derive a penalized maximum likelihood reconstruction algorithm to directly reconstruct attenuation, phase, and scatter image from the measured detector values of a DPC acquisition. The proposed penalty comprises, for each of the three images, an independent smoothing prior. Image quality of the proposed reconstruction is compared to images generated with FBP and iterative reconstruction after phase retrieval. Furthermore, the influence between the priors is analyzed. Finally, the proposed reconstruction algorithm is applied to experimental sliding window data acquired at a synchrotron and results are compared to reconstructions based on phase retrieval. Results: The results show that the proposed algorithm significantly increases image quality in comparison to reconstructions based on phase retrieval. No significant mutual influence between the proposed independent priors could be observed. Further it could be illustrated that the iterative reconstruction of a sliding window acquisition results in images with substantially reduced smearing artifacts. Conclusions: Although the proposed cost function is inherently nonconvex, it can be used to reconstruct images with less aliasing artifacts and less streak artifacts than reconstruction methods based on phase retrieval. Furthermore, the proposed method can be used to reconstruct images of sliding window acquisitions with negligible smearing artifacts.

  1. Phase-contrast imaging using ultrafast x-rays in laser-shocked materials

    SciTech Connect

    Workman, Jonathan B; Cobble, James A; Flippo, Kirk; Gautier, Donald C; Montgomery, David S; Offermann, Dustin T

    2010-01-01

    High-energy x-rays, > 10-keV, can be efficiently produced from ultrafast laser target interactions with many applications to dense target materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High-Energy Density Physics (HEDP). These same x-rays can also be applied to measurements of low-density materials inside high-density hohlraum environments. In the experiments presented, high-energy x-ray images of laser-shocked polystyrene are produced through phase contrast imaging. The plastic targets are nominally transparent to traditional x-ray absorption but show detailed features in regions of high density gradients due to refractive effects often called phase contrast imaging. The 200-TW Trident laser is used both to produce the x-ray source and to shock the polystyrene target. X-rays at 17-keV produced from 2-ps, 100-J laser interactions with a 12-micron molybdenum wire are used to produce a small source size, required for optimizing refractive effects. Shocks are driven in the 1-mm thick polystyrene target using 2-ns, 250-J, 532-nm laser drive with phase plates. X-ray images of shocks compare well to 1-D hydro calculations, HELIOS-CR.

  2. A novel high temporal resolution phase contrast MRI technique for measuring mitral valve flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorhees, Abram; Bohmann, Katja; McGorty, Kelly Anne; Wei, Timothy; Chen, Qun

    2005-11-01

    Mitral valve flow imaging is inherently difficult due to valve plane motion and high blood flow velocities, which can range from 200 cm/s to 700 cm/s under regurgitant conditions. As such, insufficient temporal resolution has hampered imaging of mitral valve flows using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A novel phase contrast MRI technique, phase contrast using phase train imaging (PCPTI), has been developed to address the high temporal resolution needs for imaging mitral valve flows. The PCPTI sequence provides the highest temporal resolution to-date (6 ms) for measuring in-plane and through-plane flow patterns, with each velocity component acquired in a separate breathhold. Tested on healthy human volunteers, comparison to a conventional retrogated PC-FLASH cine sequence showed reasonable agreement. Results from a more rigorous validation using digital particle image velocimetry technique will be presented. The technique will be demonstrated in vitro using a physiological flow phantom and a St. Jude Medical Masters Series prosthetic valve.

  3. Reconstruction of divergence-free velocity fields from cine 3D phase-contrast flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Busch, Julia; Giese, Daniel; Wissmann, Lukas; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional phase-contrast velocity vector field mapping shows great potential for clinical applications; however measurement inaccuracies may limit the utility and robustness of the technique. While parts of the error in the measured velocity fields can be minimized by background phase estimation in static tissue and magnetic field monitoring, considerable inaccuracies remain. The present work introduces divergence-reduction processing of 3D phase-contrast flow data based on a synergistic combination of normalized convolution and divergence-free radial basis functions. It is demonstrated that this approach effectively addresses erroneous flow for image reconstructions from both fully sampled and undersampled data. Using computer simulations and in vivo data acquired in the aorta of healthy subjects and a stenotic valve patient it is shown that divergence arising from measurement imperfections can be reduced by up to 87% resulting in improved vector field representations. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that integration of the divergence-free condition into postprocessing of vector fields presents an efficient approach to addressing flow field inaccuracies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Quantitative X-ray phase contrast waveguide imaging of bacterial endospores1

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, R. N.; Hoppert, M.; Krenkel, M.; Bartels, M.; Salditt, T.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative waveguide-based X-ray phase contrast imaging has been carried out on the level of single, unstained, unsliced and freeze-dried bacterial cells of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus subtilis using hard X-rays of 7.9 keV photon energy. The cells have been prepared in the metabolically dormant state of an endospore. The quantitative phase maps obtained by iterative phase retrieval using a modified hybrid input–output algorithm allow for mass and mass density determinations on the level of single individual endospores but include also large field of view investigations. Additionally, a direct reconstruction based on the contrast transfer function is investigated, and the two approaches are compared. Depending on the field of view and method, a resolution down to 65 nm was achieved at a maximum applied dose of below 5 × 105 Gy. Masses in the range of about ∼110–190 (20) fg for isolated endospores have been obtained. PMID:25844079

  5. Tumors in murine brains studied by grating-based phase contrast microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Georg; Dominietto, Marco; Kovacs, Zsofia; Schmitz, Rüdiger; Hieber, Simone E.; Thalmann, Peter; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    Angiogenesis, i.e. the formation of vessels, is one of the key processes during tumor development. The newly formed vessels transport oxygen and nutrients from the healthy tissue to the tumor and gives tumor cells the possibility to replicate. The principle of anti-angiogenic therapy is to block angiogenic process in order to stop tumor growth. The aim of the present study is the investigation of murine glioma vascular architecture at early (7 days), intermediate (10 and 15 days) and late (23 days) stage of growth by means of grating-based phase contrast microtomography. We demonstrate that this technique yields premium contrast between healthy and cancerous parts of murine brain tissues.

  6. Bacteria-clay interactions investigated by light scattering and phase contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimova, Alexandra; Block, Karin; Rudolph, Elizabeth; Katz, A.; Steiner, J. C.; Gottlieb, P.; Alfano, R. R.

    2006-02-01

    Light scattering experiments and phase contrast microscopy are used to evaluate the aggregate-forming characteristics of simple clay-bacteria mixtures. Colloidal suspensions of negatively charged Pseudomonas syringae (Ps) and Mg 2+-, Li + - or Ca 2+ -exchanged smectite (and non-exchanged smectite) are flocculated in neutral (pH 7) aqueous media. Aggregate formation is monitored using changes in optical transmission. Clustering is observed in all the clay-bacteria preparations. The Li +-substituted clay aggregates average 50-300 microns in diameter, in contrast to the Ca 2+- substituted clay that produces aggregates of 10-50 microns in diameter. Light scattering measurements indicate that aggregates begin forming 3 hours after mixing and that the (larger sized) aggregates exhibit less scattering than a mixture with an equivalent concentration of unattached Ps and clay particles.

  7. Differential phase contrast x-ray microimaging with scanning-imaging x-ray microscope optics.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yoshio; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2012-08-01

    A novel x-ray microimaging system that consists of a scanning microscope optics with a one-dimensional focusing (line-focusing) device and an imaging microscope optics with a one-dimensional objective is developed. These two optical systems are set normal to each other regarding the optical axis. A two-dimensional image is obtained with one-dimensional translation scan of the line probe. During scans, positional data in the normal to the scanning direction are obtained simultaneously with the imaging microscope optics. Differential phase contrast (DPC) image and absorption contrast (AC) image can be arbitrarily obtained by image processing after data acquisition. Preliminary experiment has been carried out by using a couple of one-dimensional Fresnel zone plate as the linear-focusing device and the one-dimensional objective. Two-dimensional DPC and AC images of test sample have been successfully obtained with 8 keV x-rays.

  8. Virtual unrolling and deciphering of Herculaneum papyri by X-ray phase-contrast tomography.

    PubMed

    Bukreeva, I; Mittone, A; Bravin, A; Festa, G; Alessandrelli, M; Coan, P; Formoso, V; Agostino, R G; Giocondo, M; Ciuchi, F; Fratini, M; Massimi, L; Lamarra, A; Andreani, C; Bartolino, R; Gigli, G; Ranocchia, G; Cedola, A

    2016-06-06

    A collection of more than 1800 carbonized papyri, discovered in the Roman 'Villa dei Papiri' at Herculaneum is the unique classical library survived from antiquity. These papyri were charred during 79 A.D. Vesuvius eruption, a circumstance which providentially preserved them until now. This magnificent collection contains an impressive amount of treatises by Greek philosophers and, especially, Philodemus of Gadara, an Epicurean thinker of 1st century BC. We read many portions of text hidden inside carbonized Herculaneum papyri using enhanced X-ray phase-contrast tomography non-destructive technique and a new set of numerical algorithms for 'virtual-unrolling'. Our success lies in revealing the largest portion of Greek text ever detected so far inside unopened scrolls, with unprecedented spatial resolution and contrast, all without damaging these precious historical manuscripts. Parts of text have been decoded and the 'voice' of the Epicurean philosopher Philodemus is brought back again after 2000 years from Herculaneum papyri.

  9. On the feasibility of exomoon detection via exoplanet phase curve spectral contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgan, D. H.

    2017-09-01

    An exoplanet-exomoon system presents a superposition of phase curves to observers - the dominant component varies according to the planetary period, and the lesser component varies according to both the planetary and the lunar periods. If the spectra of the two bodies differ significantly, then it is likely that there are wavelength regimes where the contrast between the moon and planet is significantly larger. In principle, this effect could be used to isolate periodic oscillations in the combined phase curve. Being able to detect the exomoon component would allow a characterization of the exomoon radius, and potentially some crude atmospheric data. We run a parameter survey of combined exoplanet-exomoon phase curves, which shows that for most sets of planet-moon parameters, the lunar component of the phase curve is undetectable to current state-of-the-art transit observations. Even with future transit survey missions, measuring the exomoon signal will most likely require photometric precision of 10 parts per million or better. The only exception to this is if the moon is strongly tidally heated or in some way self-luminous. In this case, measurements of the phase curve at wavelengths greater than a few μm can be dominated by the lunar contribution. Instruments like the James Webb Space Telescope and its successors are needed to make this method feasible.

  10. In-line interferometric femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dobner, Sven; Groß, Petra; Fallnich, Carsten

    2013-06-28

    We present in-line interferometric femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (II-FSRS), a new method to measure the spectral Raman intensity and phase over a broad spectral range, potentially in a single shot. An analytic model is developed, that excellently reproduces the measured spectra. Additionally, the performance of II-FSRS is directly compared in experiments to two established techniques, namely femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering and femtosecond Raman induced Kerr-effect spectroscopy.

  11. Ecdysis period of Rhodnius prolixus head investigated using phase contrast synchrotron microtomography.

    PubMed

    Sena, G; Nogueira, L P; Braz, D; Almeida, A P; Gonzalez, M S; Azambuja, P; Colaço, M V; Barroso, R C

    2016-06-01

    Microtomography using synchrotron sources is a useful tool in biological imaging research since the phase coherence of synchrotron beams can be exploited to obtain images with high contrast resolution. This work is part of a series of works using phase contrast synchrotron microtomography in the study of Rhodnius prolixus head, the insect vector of Chagas' disease, responsible for about 12,000 deaths per year. The control of insect vector is the most efficient method to prevent this disease and studies have shown that the use of triflumuron, a chitin synthesis inhibitor, disrupted chitin synthesis during larval development and it's an alternative method against insect pests. The aim of this work was to investigate the biological effects of treatments with triflumuron in the ecdysis period (the moulting of the R. prolixus cuticle) using the new imaging beamline IMX at LNLS (Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory). Nymphs of R. prolixus were taken from the Laboratory of Biochemistry and Physiology of Insects, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Brazil. Doses of 0.05mg of triflumuron were applied directly to the abdomen on half of the insects immediately after feeding. The insects were sacrificed 25days after feeding (intermoulting period) and fixed with glutaraldehyde. The results obtained using phase contrast synchrotron microtomography in R. prolixus showed amazing images of the effects of triflumuron on insects in the ecdysis period, and the formation of the new cuticle on those which were not treated with triflumuron. Both formation and malformation of this insect's cuticle have never been seen before with this technique. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Blood flow computation in phase-contrast MRI by minimal paths in anisotropic media.

    PubMed

    Schwenke, Michael; Hennemuth, Anja; Fischer, Bernd; Friman, Ola

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, anisotropic Fast Marching is employed to compute blood flow trajectories as minimal paths in 3D phase-contrast MRI images. Uncertainty in the estimated blood flow vectors is incorporated in a tensor which is used as metric for the anisotropic Fast Marching. A flow connectivity distribution is computed simultaneously to the Fast Marching. Based on the connectivity distribution the most likely flow trajectories can be identified. Results are presented for several PC MRI data sets and the capability of the method to indicate uncertainty of the flow trajectories is shown.

  13. Hard x-ray phase contrast imaging of black lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Beerlink, A.; Mell, M.; Tolkiehn, M.; Salditt, T.

    2009-11-16

    We report hard x-ray phase contrast imaging of black lipid membranes, freely suspended over a micromachined aperture in an aqueous solution. Biomolecular and organic substances can thus be probed in hydrated environments by parallel beam propagation imaging, using coherent multi-kilo-electronvolt x-ray radiation. The width of the thinning film can be resolved from analysis of the intensity fringes in the Fresnel diffraction regime down to about 200 nm. The thinning process, in which solvent is expelled from the space in between two opposing monolayers, is monitored, and the domain walls between coexisting domains of swollen and thinned membrane patches are characterized.

  14. Phase-contrast tomography at the nanoscale using hard x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampanoni, Marco; Mokso, Rajmund; Marone, Federica; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Gorelick, Sergey; Trtik, Pavel; Jefimovs, Konstantin; David, Christian

    2010-04-01

    Synchrotron-based full-field tomographic microscopy established itself as a tool for noninvasive investigations. Many beamlines worldwide routinely achieve micrometer spatial resolution while the isotropic 100-nm barrier is reached and trespassed only by few instruments, mainly in the soft x-ray regime. We present an x-ray, full-field microscope with tomographic capabilities operating at 10 keV and with an isotropic resolution of 144 nm. Custom-designed optical components allow for ideal, aperture-matched sample illumination and very sensitive phase contrast imaging. We show here that the instrument has been successfully used for the nondestructive, volumetric investigation of single cells.

  15. Optimization Of Phase-Contrast Enhanced X-Ray Imaging Of D-T Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B

    2005-06-17

    Phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging has been demonstrated for characterization of D-T layers inside of beryllium shells. These first demonstrations used both scintillator and direct-detection imaging. This memo details tradeoffs between the two methods in order to optimize the imaging. The guiding principle for optimization is to minimize the exposure time while maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio at the D-T solid-vapor interface. Direct-detection and scintillator performance are comparable when imaging the full capsule. However, a scintillator allows for higher-resolution images necessary for studying local defects in the D-T layer.

  16. Source effects in analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging with conventional sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hoennicke, M. G.; Manica, J.; Mazzaro, I.; Cusatis, C.; Huang, X.-R.

    2012-11-15

    Several recent papers have shown the implementation of analyzer based X-ray phase contrast imaging (ABI) with conventional X-ray sources. The high flux is always a requirement to make the technique useful for bio-medical applications. Here, we present and discuss three important parameters, which need to be taken into account, when searching for the high flux ABI: anisotropic magnification, double image, and source size spread due to intrinsic dispersive diffraction by asymmetrically cut crystals. These parameters, if not well optimized, may cause important features in the acquired images which can mislead the interpretation. A few ways to minimize these effects are implemented and discussed, including some experimental results.

  17. Source effects in analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging with conventional sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hönnicke, M. G.; Manica, J.; Mazzaro, I.; Cusatis, C.; Huang, X.-R.

    2012-11-01

    Several recent papers have shown the implementation of analyzer based X-ray phase contrast imaging (ABI) with conventional X-ray sources. The high flux is always a requirement to make the technique useful for bio-medical applications. Here, we present and discuss three important parameters, which need to be taken into account, when searching for the high flux ABI: anisotropic magnification, double image, and source size spread due to intrinsic dispersive diffraction by asymmetrically cut crystals. These parameters, if not well optimized, may cause important features in the acquired images which can mislead the interpretation. A few ways to minimize these effects are implemented and discussed, including some experimental results.

  18. Design of tangential viewing phase contrast imaging for turbulence measurements in JT-60SA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Coda, S.; Yoshida, M.; Sasao, H.; Kawano, Y.; Imazawa, R.; Kubo, H.; Kamada, Y.

    2016-11-01

    A tangential viewing phase contrast imaging system is being designed for the JT-60SA tokamak to investigate microturbulence. In order to obtain localized information on the turbulence, a spatial-filtering technique is applied, based on magnetic shearing. The tangential viewing geometry enhances the radial localization. The probing laser beam is injected tangentially and traverses the entire plasma region including both low and high field sides. The spatial resolution for an Internal Transport Barrier discharge is estimated at 30%-70% of the minor radius at k = 5 cm-1, which is the typical expected wave number of ion scale turbulence such as ion temperature gradient/trapped electron mode.

  19. Observation of Crack Propagation in Glass Using X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Parab, Niranjan D.; Black, John T.; Claus, Benjamin; Hudspeth, Matthew; Sun, Jianzhuo; Fezzaa, Kamel; Chen, Weinong W.

    2014-12-01

    High-speed X-ray phase contrast imaging synchronized with a Kolsky bar apparatus was utilized to investigate the cracking behavior of a borosilicate glass, a soda lime glass, and a glass ceramic in front of a cylindrical projectile with an impact velocity of 5ms(-1). For each material, three different surface conditions were prepared for the impacted edge of the specimen. Angular cracking was observed in front of the projectile for borosilicate glass. For soda lime glass, straight cracking was observed. For glass ceramic, curved cracking was observed in front of the projectile. Cracking behavior was observed to be independent of the surface condition on the impacted edge.

  20. Characterization of LiBC by phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krumeich, Frank; Wörle, Michael; Reibisch, Philipp; Nesper, Reinhard

    2014-08-01

    LiBC was used as a model compound for probing the applicability of phase-contrast (PC) imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to visualize lithium distributions. In the LiBC structure, boron and carbon are arranged to hetero graphite layers between which lithium is incorporated. The crystal structure is reflected in the PC-STEM images recorded perpendicular to the layers. The experimental images and their defocus dependence match with multi-slice simulations calculated utilizing the reciprocity principle. The observation that a part of the Li positions is not occupied is likely an effect of the intense electron beam triggering Li displacement.

  1. IRRADIATION ULTRA-VIOLETTE DES ORGANITES CELLULAIRES AVEC OBSERVATION CONTINUE EN CONTRASTE DE PHASE

    PubMed Central

    Bessis, Marcel; Nomarski, Georges

    1960-01-01

    The apparatus described is designed to permit the observation of the smallest cellular components with the phase contrast microscope (which requires an objective of a high numerical aperture) while a part of the cell is irradiated by a very small spot of ultraviolet radiation. Theoretical considerations show a good distribution of the energy for a diameter of the irradiation spot as small as 0.2 microns. Indications are given about the limitations of the brightness caused by diffraction at the spot diaphragm and the energy absorption by volume-unit of the irradiated object. The practical applications of the apparatus are discussed. PMID:19866576

  2. Wavefront sensing based on phase contrast theory and coherent optical processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huang; Qi, Bian; Chenlu, Zhou; Tenghao, Li; Mali, Gong

    2016-07-01

    A novel wavefront sensing method based on phase contrast theory and coherent optical processing is proposed. The wavefront gradient field in the object plane is modulated into intensity distribution in a gang of patterns, making high-density detection available. By applying the method, we have also designed a wavefront sensor. It consists of a classical coherent optical processing system, a CCD detector array, two pieces of orthogonal composite sinusoidal gratings, and a mechanical structure that can perform real-time linear positioning. The simulation results prove and demonstrate the validity of the method and the sensor in high-precision measurement of the wavefront gradient field.

  3. Programmable aperture microscopy: A computational method for multi-modal phase contrast and light field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Feng, Shijie; Zhang, Minliang; Chen, Qian

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a simple and cost-effective programmable aperture microscope to realize multi-modal computational imaging by integrating a programmable liquid crystal display (LCD) into a conventional wide-field microscope. The LCD selectively modulates the light distribution at the rear aperture of the microscope objective, allowing numerous imaging modalities, such as bright field, dark field, differential phase contrast, quantitative phase imaging, multi-perspective imaging, and full resolution light field imaging to be achieved and switched rapidly in the same setup, without requiring specialized hardwares and any moving parts. We experimentally demonstrate the success of our method by imaging unstained cheek cells, profiling microlens array, and changing perspective views of thick biological specimens. The post-exposure refocusing of a butterfly mouthpart and RFP-labeled dicot stem cross-section is also presented to demonstrate the full resolution light field imaging capability of our system for both translucent and fluorescent specimens.

  4. Scattering properties of normal and cancerous tissues from human stomach based on phase-contrast microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui

    2012-12-01

    In order to study scattering properties of normal and cancerous tissues from human stomach, we collect images for human gastric specimens by using phase-contrast microscope. The images were processed by the way of mathematics morphology. The equivalent particle size distribution of tissues can be obtained. Combining with Mie scattering theory, the scattering properties of tissues can be calculated. Assume scattering of light in biological tissue can be seen as separate scattering events by different particles, total scattering properties can be equivalent to as scattering sum of particles with different diameters. The results suggest that scattering coefficient of the cancerous tissue is significantly higher than that of normal tissue. The scattering phase function is different especially in the backscattering area. Those are significant clinical benefits to diagnosis cancerous tissue

  5. Toward clinical differential phase contrast mammography: preliminary evaluations and image processing schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampanoni, M.; Wang, Z.; Thüring, T.; David, C.; Rössl, E.; van Stevendaal, U.; Köhler, T.; Trippel, M.; Singer, G.; Kubik-Huch, R. A.; Hohl, M. K.; Hauser, N.

    2013-05-01

    Phase contrast and scattering-based X-ray imaging are very promising tools for medical diagnostics because they are able to provide additional and complementary information to traditional absorption-based methods. In this work, we discuss the investigation of three native breast samples with a grating interferometer equipped with a conventional X-ray tube, the full study being published in ref. [1]. We briefly introduce a method to fuse absorption, differential phase and scattering signals into a unique image with improved diagnostic contents. Our approach yields complementary and inaccessible information on the electron density distribution and the small-angle scattering power of the sample which could potentially answer clinically relevant, yet unresolved questions such as the capability to unequivocally discern between (pre-) malignant changes and post-operative scars or to distinguish cancer-invaded regions within healthy tissue.

  6. Renal Arteries: Isotropic, High-Spatial-Resolution, Unenhanced MR Angiography with Three-dimensional Radial Phase Contrast1

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Darren P.; Johnson, Kevin M.; Landgraf, Benjamin R.; Bley, Thorsten A.; Reeder, Scott B.; Schiebler, Mark L.; Grist, Thomas M.; Wieben, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively compare a new three-dimensional (3D) radial phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) angiographic method with contrast material–enhanced MR angiography for anatomic assessment of the renal arteries. Materials and Methods: An institutional review board approved this prospective HIPAA-compliant study. Informed consent was obtained. Twenty-seven subjects (mean age, 52.6 years ± 20.5 [standard deviation]) were imaged with respiratory-gated phase-contrast vastly undersampled isotropic projection reconstruction (VIPR) prior to contrast-enhanced MR angiographic acquisition with a 3.0-T clinical system. The imaging duration for phase-contrast VIPR was 10 minutes and provided magnitude and complex difference (“angiographic”) images with 3D volumetric (320 mm) coverage and isotropic high spatial resolution (1.25 mm3). Quantitative analysis consisted of comparing vessel diameters between the two techniques. Qualitative assessment included evaluation of the phase-contrast VIPR and contrast-enhanced MR angiographic techniques for artifacts, noise, and image quality. Bland-Altman analysis was used for comparison of quantitative measurements, and the Wilcoxon signed rank test was used for comparison of qualitative scores. Results: Phase-contrast VIPR images were successfully acquired in all subjects. The vessel diameters measured with phase-contrast VIPR were slightly greater than those measured with contrast-enhanced MR angiography (mean bias = 0.09 mm). Differences in mean artifact, quality scores for the proximal renal arteries, and overall image quality scores between phase-contrast VIPR and contrast-enhanced MR angiographic techniques were not statistically significant (P = .31 and .29, .27 and .39, and .43 and .69 for readers 1 and 2, respectively). The quality scores for the segmental renal arteries were higher for phase-contrast VIPR than for contrast-enhanced MR angiography (P < .05). Although the noise scores were higher with phase-contrast

  7. The second-order differential phase contrast and its retrieval for imaging with x-ray Talbot interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yi; Tang Xiangyang

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: The x-ray differential phase contrast imaging implemented with the Talbot interferometry has recently been reported to be capable of providing tomographic images corresponding to attenuation-contrast, phase-contrast, and dark-field contrast, simultaneously, from a single set of projection data. The authors believe that, along with small-angle x-ray scattering, the second-order phase derivative {Phi}{sup Double-Prime }{sub s}(x) plays a role in the generation of dark-field contrast. In this paper, the authors derive the analytic formulae to characterize the contribution made by the second-order phase derivative to the dark-field contrast (namely, second-order differential phase contrast) and validate them via computer simulation study. By proposing a practical retrieval method, the authors investigate the potential of second-order differential phase contrast imaging for extensive applications. Methods: The theoretical derivation starts at assuming that the refractive index decrement of an object can be decomposed into {delta}={delta}{sub s}+{delta}{sub f}, where {delta}{sub f} corresponds to the object's fine structures and manifests itself in the dark-field contrast via small-angle scattering. Based on the paraxial Fresnel-Kirchhoff theory, the analytic formulae to characterize the contribution made by {delta}{sub s}, which corresponds to the object's smooth structures, to the dark-field contrast are derived. Through computer simulation with specially designed numerical phantoms, an x-ray differential phase contrast imaging system implemented with the Talbot interferometry is utilized to evaluate and validate the derived formulae. The same imaging system is also utilized to evaluate and verify the capability of the proposed method to retrieve the second-order differential phase contrast for imaging, as well as its robustness over the dimension of detector cell and the number of steps in grating shifting. Results: Both analytic formulae and computer

  8. Zernike-type phase contrast X-ray microscopy at 4 keV photon energy with 60 nm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhäusler, Ulrich; Schneider, Gerd

    2004-05-01

    X-ray microscopy in the multi-keV photon energy range offers unique possibilities to study thick dense samples with high spatial resolution. When employing a high numerical aperture (N.A.) condenser zone plate sample illumination in combination with a high resolution micro zone plate objective lens, a spatial resolution of currently 60 nm is achieved. Since the absorption becomes smaller with increasing photon energy, phase contrast imaging overcomes the limitation for imaging weakly absorbing structures in amplitude contrast mode. We report here on X-ray microscopy of advanced microelectronic devices imaged in Zernike phase contrast mode. While the amplitude contrast between copper and silicon dioxide in these samples is only 7 %, negative as well as positive phase contrast were demonstrated with a contrast of 40 % and 45 %, respectively.

  9. Interior tomography from differential phase contrast data via Hilbert transform based on spline functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qingsong; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2016-10-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging is an important mode due to its sensitivity to subtle features of soft biological tissues. Grating-based differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging is one of the most promising phase imaging techniques because it works with a normal x-ray tube of a large focal spot at a high flux rate. However, a main obstacle before this paradigm shift is the fabrication of large-area gratings of a small period and a high aspect ratio. Imaging large objects with a size-limited grating results in data truncation which is a new type of the interior problem. While the interior problem was solved for conventional x-ray CT through analytic extension, compressed sensing and iterative reconstruction, the difficulty for interior reconstruction from DPC data lies in that the implementation of the system matrix requires the differential operation on the detector array, which is often inaccurate and unstable in the case of noisy data. Here, we propose an iterative method based on spline functions. The differential data are first back-projected to the image space. Then, a system matrix is calculated whose components are the Hilbert transforms of the spline bases. The system matrix takes the whole image as an input and outputs the back-projected interior data. Prior information normally assumed for compressed sensing is enforced to iteratively solve this inverse problem. Our results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can successfully reconstruct an interior region of interest (ROI) from the differential phase data through the ROI.

  10. Low density contrast agents for x-ray phase contrast imaging: the use of ambient air for x-ray angiography of excised murine liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Laperle, Christopher M; Hamilton, Theron J; Wintermeyer, Philip; Walker, Evan J; Shi, Daxin; Anastasio, Mark A; Derdak, Zoltan; Wands, Jack R; Diebold, Gerald; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2008-12-07

    We report a new preparative method for providing contrast through reduction in electron density that is uniquely suited for propagation-based differential x-ray phase contrast imaging. The method, which results in an air or fluid filled vasculature, makes possible visualization of the smallest microvessels, roughly down to 15 microm, in an excised murine liver, while preserving the tissue for subsequent histological workup. We show the utility of spatial frequency filtering for increasing the visibility of minute features characteristic of phase contrast imaging, and the capability of tomographic reconstruction to reveal microvessel structure and three-dimensional visualization of the sample. The effect of water evaporation from livers during x-ray imaging on the visibility of blood vessels is delineated. The deformed vascular tree in a cancerous murine liver is imaged.

  11. Accelerating phase contrast MR angiography by simplified skipped phase encoding and edge deghosting with array coil enhancement.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zheng; Xiang, Qing-San; Shen, Hao; Ji, Jim; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the feasibility of accelerating phase contrast magnetic resonance angiography (PC-MRA) by the fast imaging method of simplified skipped phase encoding and edge deghosting with array coil enhancement (S-SPEED-ACE). The parallel imaging method of skipped phase encoding and edge deghosting with array coil enhancement (SPEED-ACE) is simplified for imaging sparse objects like phase contrast MRA. This approach is termed S-SPEED-ACE in which k-space is sparsely sampled with skipped phase encoding at every Nth step using multiple receiver coils simultaneously. The sampled data are then Fourier transformed into a set of ghosted images, each with N-fold aliasing ghosts. Given signal sparseness of MRA, the ghosted images are modeled with a single-layer structure, in which the most dominant ghost within the potentially overlapped ghosts at each pixel is selected to represent the signal of that pixel. The single-layer model is analogous to that used in maximum-intensity-projection (MIP) that selects only the brightest signal even when there are overlapped vessels. With an algorithm based on a least-square-error solution, a deghosted image is obtained, along with a residual map for quality control. In this way, S-SPEED-ACE partially samples k-space using multiple receiver coils in parallel, and yields a deghosted image with an acceleration factor of N. Without full central k-space sampling and differential filtering, S-SPEED-ACE achieves further scan time reduction with a more straightforward reconstruction. In this work, S-SPEED-ACE is demonstrated to accelerate a computer simulated PC-MRA and a real human 3D PC-MRA, which was acquired using a clinical 1.5 T scanner on a healthy volunteer. Images are reconstructed by S-SPEED-ACE to achieve an undersampling factor of up to 8.3 with four receiver coils. The reconstructed images generally have comparable quality as that of the reference images reconstructed from full k-space data. Maximum

  12. Early Tumor Development Captured Through Nondestructive, High Resolution Differential Phase Contrast X-ray Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Beheshti, A.; Pinzer, B. R.; McDonald, J. T.; Stampanoni, M.; Hlatky, L.

    2014-01-01

    Although a considerable amount is known about molecular dysregulations in later stages of tumor progression, much less is known about the regulated processes supporting initial tumor growth. Insight into such processes can provide a fuller understanding of carcinogenesis, with implications for cancer treatment and risk assessment. Work from our laboratory suggests that organized substructure emerges during tumor formation. The goal here was to examine the feasibility of using state-of-the-art differential phase contrast X-ray imaging to investigate density differentials that evolve during early tumor development. To this end the beamline for TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experimenTs (TOMCAT) at the Swiss Light Source was used to examine the time-dependent assembly of substructure in developing tumors. Differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging based on grating interferometry as implement