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Sample records for inline phase contrast

  1. CO2-based in-line phase contrast imaging of small intestine in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rongbiao; Li, Wei-Xia; Huang, Wei; Yan, Fuhua; Chai, Wei-Min; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Chen, Ke-Min

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the potential of CO2 single contrast in-line phase contrast imaging (PCI) for pre-clinical small intestine investigation. The absorption and phase contrast images of CO2 gas production were attained and compared. A further increase in image contrast was observed in PCI. Compared with CO2-based absorption contrast imaging (ACI), CO2-based PCI significantly enhanced the detection of mucosal microstructures, such as pits and folds. The CO2-based PCI could provide sufficient image contrast for clearly showing the intestinal mucosa in living mice without using barium. We concluded that CO2-based PCI might be a novel and promising imaging method for future studies of gastrointestinal disorders.

  2. An iterative method for robust in-line phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Aidan J.; van Riessen, Grant A.; Balaur, Eugeniu; Dolbnya, Igor P.; Tran, Giang N.; Peele, Andrew G.

    2016-04-01

    We present an iterative near-field in-line phase contrast method that allows quantitative determination of the thickness of an object given the refractive index of the sample material. The iterative method allows for quantitative phase contrast imaging in regimes where the contrast transfer function (CTF) and transport of intensity equation (TIE) cannot be applied. Further, the nature of the iterative scheme offers more flexibility and potentially allows more high-resolution image reconstructions when compared to TIE method and less artefacts when compared to the CTF method. While, not addressed here, extension of our approach in future work to broadband illumination will also be straightforward as the wavelength dependence of the refractive index of an object can be readily incorporated into the iterative approach.

  3. A fast-converging iterative method for X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Vo, Nghia T.; Breese, Mark B. H.; Atwood, Robert C.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Moser, Herbert O.; Lee, Peter D.

    2012-11-26

    X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography holds great promise for the quantitative analysis of soft materials. However, its applications have been limited, so far, by the fact that direct methods based on the transport-of-intensity equation and the contrast transfer function are sensitive to noise and applicable only to limited types of samples. Here, we propose an iterative method based on the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm (R. W. Gerchberg and W. O. Saxton, Optik 35, 237 (1972)), but overcoming its slow convergence by an acceleration technique, named random signed feedback, which shows an excellent performance, both in numerical simulation and tomographic experiment, of discriminating various polymers even when using 53 keV synchrotron X-rays.

  4. Combined mixed approach algorithm for in-line phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    De Caro, Liberato; Scattarella, Francesco; Giannini, Cinzia; Tangaro, Sabina; Rigon, Luigi; Longo, Renata; Bellotti, Roberto

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: In the past decade, phase-contrast imaging (PCI) has been applied to study different kinds of tissues and human body parts, with an increased improvement of the image quality with respect to simple absorption radiography. A technique closely related to PCI is phase-retrieval imaging (PRI). Indeed, PCI is an imaging modality thought to enhance the total contrast of the images through the phase shift introduced by the object (human body part); PRI is a mathematical technique to extract the quantitative phase-shift map from PCI. A new phase-retrieval algorithm for the in-line phase-contrast x-ray imaging is here proposed. Methods: The proposed algorithm is based on a mixed transfer-function and transport-of-intensity approach (MA) and it requires, at most, an initial approximate estimate of the average phase shift introduced by the object as prior knowledge. The accuracy in the initial estimate determines the convergence speed of the algorithm. The proposed algorithm retrieves both the object phase and its complex conjugate in a combined MA (CMA). Results: Although slightly less computationally effective with respect to other mixed-approach algorithms, as two phases have to be retrieved, the results obtained by the CMA on simulated data have shown that the obtained reconstructed phase maps are characterized by particularly low normalized mean square errors. The authors have also tested the CMA on noisy experimental phase-contrast data obtained by a suitable weakly absorbing sample consisting of a grid of submillimetric nylon fibers as well as on a strongly absorbing object made of a 0.03 mm thick lead x-ray resolution star pattern. The CMA has shown a good efficiency in recovering phase information, also in presence of noisy data, characterized by peak-to-peak signal-to-noise ratios down to a few dBs, showing the possibility to enhance with phase radiography the signal-to-noise ratio for features in the submillimetric scale with respect to the attenuation

  5. Using digital inline holographic microscopy and quantitative phase contrast imaging to assess viability of cultured mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missan, Sergey; Hrytsenko, Olga

    2015-03-01

    Digital inline holographic microscopy was used to record holograms of mammalian cells (HEK293, B16, and E0771) in culture. The holograms have been reconstructed using Octopus software (4Deep inwater imaging) and phase shift maps were unwrapped using the FFT-based phase unwrapping algorithm. The unwrapped phase shifts were used to determine the maximum phase shifts in individual cells. Addition of 0.5 mM H2O2 to cell media produced rapid rounding of cultured cells, followed by cell membrane rupture. The cell morphology changes and cell membrane ruptures were detected in real time and were apparent in the unwrapped phase shift images. The results indicate that quantitative phase contrast imaging produced by the digital inline holographic microscope can be used for the label-free real time automated determination of cell viability and confluence in mammalian cell cultures.

  6. Quantitative imaging of the microbubble concentrations by using an in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis prototype: a preliminary phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wong, Molly D.; Li, Yuhua; Yang, Kai; Chen, Wei R.; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of using a high-energy in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis system to quantitatively imaging microbubbles in a tissue simulating phantom under a limited radiation dose. The imaging system used in the investigation was a bench top in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis prototype operated under 120 kVp tube voltage and 0.5 mA tube current. A prime beam filter made of 2.3 mm Cu, 0.8 mm Pb and 1.0 mm Al was employed to obtain as large as possible portion of x-ray photon energy higher than 60 keV. The tissue simulating phantom was built by three acrylic slabs and a wax slab to mimic a 40 mm thick compressed breast. There were two tiny-sized structures with average 1 mm depth engraved on the two different layers. The microbubble suspensions with different concentrations were injected into those tiny structures. The inline phase contrast angular projections acquired were used to reconstruct the in-plane slices of the tiny structures on different layers. The CNRs vs microbubble concentrations were investigated. As the result, the microbubble suspensions were clearly visible, showing higher CNR when compared with the areas with no microbubble. Furthermore, a monotonously increasing relation between CNRs and microbubble concentrations was observed after calculating the area CNR of the phase contrast tomosynthesis slices.

  7. Quantitative evaluation of single-shot inline phase contrast imaging using an inverse compton x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Oliva, P.; Carpinelli, M.; Golosio, B.; Delogu, P.; Endrizzi, M.; Park, J.; Pogorelsky, I.; Yakimenko, V.; Williams, O.; Rosenzweig, J.

    2010-09-27

    Inverse compton scattering (ICS) x-ray sources are of current interest in biomedical imaging. We present an experimental demonstration of inline phase contrast imaging using a single picosecond pulse of the ICS source located at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility. The phase contrast effect is clearly observed. Its qualities are shown to be in agreement with the predictions of theoretical models through comparison of experimental and simulated images of a set of plastic wires of differing composition and size. Finally, we display an application of the technique to a biological sample, confirming the possibility of time-resolved imaging on the picosecond scale.

  8. In-line phase-contrast and grating-based phase-contrast synchrotron imaging study of brain micrometastasis of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sheng; Kou, Binquan; Chi, Yayun; Xi, Yan; Cao, Yixin; Cui, Wenli; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhimin; Guo, Han; Fu, Yanan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Sun, Jianqi; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Yujie; Wu, Jiong

    2015-03-01

    Current bio-medical imaging researches aim to detect brain micrometastasis in early stage for its increasing incidence and high mortality rates. Synchrotron phase-contrast imaging techniques, such as in-line phase-contrast (IPC) and grating-based phase-contrast (GPC) imaging, could provide a high spatial and density imaging study of biological specimens' 3D structures. In this study, we demonstrated the detection efficiencies of these two imaging tools on breast cancer micrometastasis in an ex vivo mouse brain. We found that both IPC and GPC can differentiate abnormal brain structures induced by micrometastasis from the surrounding normal tissues. We also found that GPC was more sensitive in detecting the small metastasis as compared to IPC.

  9. Femtosecond digital in-line holography with the fractional Fourier transform: application to phase-contrast metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunel, M.; Shen, H.; Coetmellec, S.; Lebrun, D.; Ait Ameur, K.

    2012-03-01

    The possibility to analyze transparent phase objects using femtosecond digital in-line holography is demonstrated. We show that the diffraction patterns produced by the diffraction of 20-fs pulses by pure phase objects can be advantageously processed by using the fractional Fourier transform. The optimal fractional orders lead to the longitudinal location of the phase object while the analysis of the reconstructed patterns leads to its diameter and to the value of the phase shift. Simulations and experimental results are in good concordance. This work shows new important applications of these reconstruction techniques in the domain of digital phase-contrast metrology. We further show that the use of femtosecond pulses results in a significant reduction of coherent noise.

  10. In-line phase-contrast breast tomosynthesis: a phantom feasibility study at a synchrotron radiation facility.

    PubMed

    Bliznakova, K; Russo, P; Kamarianakis, Z; Mettivier, G; Requardt, H; Bravin, A; Buliev, I

    2016-08-21

    The major objective is to adopt, apply and test developed in-house algorithms for volumetric breast reconstructions from projection images, obtained in in-line phase-contrast mode. Four angular sets, each consisting of 17 projection images obtained from four physical phantoms, were acquired at beamline ID17, European Synchroton Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France. The tomosynthesis arc was  ±32°. The physical phantoms differed in complexity of texture and introduced features of interest. Three of the used phantoms were in-house developed, and made of epoxy resin, polymethyl-methacrylate and paraffin wax, while the fourth phantom was the CIRS BR3D. The projection images had a pixel size of 47 µm  ×  47 µm. Tomosynthesis images were reconstructed with standard shift-and-add (SAA) and filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms. It was found that the edge enhancement observed in planar x-ray images is preserved in tomosynthesis images from both phantoms with homogeneous and highly heterogeneous backgrounds. In case of BR3D, it was found that features not visible in the planar case were well outlined in the tomosynthesis slices. In addition, the edge enhancement index calculated for features of interest was found to be much higher in tomosynthesis images reconstructed with FBP than in planar images and tomosynthesis images reconstructed with SAA. The comparison between images reconstructed by the two reconstruction algorithms shows an advantage for the FBP method in terms of better edge enhancement. Phase-contrast breast tomosynthesis realized in in-line mode benefits the detection of suspicious areas in mammography images by adding the edge enhancement effect to the reconstructed slices. PMID:27486086

  11. In-line phase-contrast breast tomosynthesis: a phantom feasibility study at a synchrotron radiation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliznakova, K.; Russo, P.; Kamarianakis, Z.; Mettivier, G.; Requardt, H.; Bravin, A.; Buliev, I.

    2016-08-01

    The major objective is to adopt, apply and test developed in-house algorithms for volumetric breast reconstructions from projection images, obtained in in-line phase-contrast mode. Four angular sets, each consisting of 17 projection images obtained from four physical phantoms, were acquired at beamline ID17, European Synchroton Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France. The tomosynthesis arc was  ±32°. The physical phantoms differed in complexity of texture and introduced features of interest. Three of the used phantoms were in-house developed, and made of epoxy resin, polymethyl-methacrylate and paraffin wax, while the fourth phantom was the CIRS BR3D. The projection images had a pixel size of 47 µm  ×  47 µm. Tomosynthesis images were reconstructed with standard shift-and-add (SAA) and filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms. It was found that the edge enhancement observed in planar x-ray images is preserved in tomosynthesis images from both phantoms with homogeneous and highly heterogeneous backgrounds. In case of BR3D, it was found that features not visible in the planar case were well outlined in the tomosynthesis slices. In addition, the edge enhancement index calculated for features of interest was found to be much higher in tomosynthesis images reconstructed with FBP than in planar images and tomosynthesis images reconstructed with SAA. The comparison between images reconstructed by the two reconstruction algorithms shows an advantage for the FBP method in terms of better edge enhancement. Phase-contrast breast tomosynthesis realized in in-line mode benefits the detection of suspicious areas in mammography images by adding the edge enhancement effect to the reconstructed slices.

  12. In-line x-ray phase-contrast tomography and diffraction-contrast tomography study of the ferrite-cementite microstructure in steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostenko, Alexander; Sharma, Hemant; Dere, E. Gözde; King, Andrew; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Van Oel, Wim; Offerman, S. Erik; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Vliet, Lucas J. van

    2012-05-01

    This work presents the development of a non-destructive imaging technique for the investigation of the microstructure of cementite grains embedded in a ferrite matrix of medium-carbon steel. The measurements were carried out at the material science beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) ID11. It was shown that in-line X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) can be used for the detection of cementite grains of several microns in size. X-ray PCT of the cementite structure can be achieved by either a `single distance' or a `multiple distance' acquisition protocol. The latter permits quantitative phase retrieval. A second imaging technique, X-ray diffraction-contrast tomography (DCT), was employed to obtain information about the shapes and crystallographic orientations of the distinct ferrite grains surrounding the cementite structures. The initial results demonstrate the feasibility of determining the geometry of the cementite grains after the austenite-ferrite phase-transformation in a non-destructive manner. The results obtained with PCT and DCT are verified with ex-situ optical microscopy studies of the same specimen.

  13. Using synchrotron radiation inline phase-contrast imaging computed tomography to visualize three-dimensional printed hybrid constructs for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Olubamiji, Adeola D; Izadifar, Zohreh; Zhu, Ning; Chang, Tuanjie; Chen, Xiongbiao; Eames, B Frank

    2016-05-01

    Synchrotron radiation inline phase-contrast imaging combined with computed tomography (SR-inline-PCI-CT) offers great potential for non-invasive characterization and three-dimensional visualization of fine features in weakly absorbing materials and tissues. For cartilage tissue engineering, the biomaterials and any associated cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) that is secreted over time are difficult to image using conventional absorption-based imaging techniques. For example, three-dimensional printed polycaprolactone (PCL)/alginate/cell hybrid constructs have low, but different, refractive indices and thicknesses. This paper presents a study on the optimization and utilization of inline-PCI-CT for visualizing the components of three-dimensional printed PCL/alginate/cell hybrid constructs for cartilage tissue engineering. First, histological analysis using Alcian blue staining and immunofluorescent staining assessed the secretion of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAGs) and collagen type II (Col2) in the cell-laden hybrid constructs over time. Second, optimization of inline PCI-CT was performed by investigating three sample-to-detector distances (SDD): 0.25, 1 and 3 m. Then, the optimal SDD was utilized to visualize structural changes in the constructs over a 42-day culture period. The results showed that there was progressive secretion of cartilage-specific ECM by ATDC5 cells in the hybrid constructs over time. An SDD of 3 m provided edge-enhancement fringes that enabled simultaneous visualization of all components of hybrid constructs in aqueous solution. Structural changes that might reflect formation of ECM also were evident in SR-inline-PCI-CT images. Summarily, SR-inline-PCI-CT images captured at the optimized SDD enables visualization of the different components in hybrid cartilage constructs over a 42-day culture period. PMID:27140161

  14. In-line phase-contrast imaging of a biological specimen using a compact laser-Compton scattering-based x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeura-Sekiguchi, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yasumoto, M.; Toyokawa, H.; Koike, M.; Yamada, K.; Sakai, F.; Mori, K.; Maruyama, K.; Oka, H.; Kimata, T.

    2008-03-31

    Laser-Compton scattering (LCS) x-ray sources have recently attracted much attention for their potential use at local medical facilities because they can produce ultrashort pulsed, high-brilliance, and quasimonochromatic hard x rays with a small source size. The feasibility of in-line phase-contrast imaging for a 'thick' biological specimens of rat lumbar vertebrae using the developed compact LCS-X in AIST was investigated for the promotion of clinical imaging. In the higher-quality images, anatomical details of the spinous processes of the vertebrae are more clearly observable than with conventional absorption radiography. The results demonstrate that phase-contrast radiography can be performed using LCS-X.

  15. Quantitative studies on inner interfaces in conical metal joints using hard x-ray inline phase contrast radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zabler, S.; Rack, T.; Nelson, K.; Rack, A.

    2010-10-15

    Quantitative investigation of micrometer and submicrometer gaps between joining metal surfaces is applied to conical plug-socket connections in dental titanium implants. Microgaps of widths well beyond the resolving power of industrial x-ray systems are imaged by synchrotron phase contrast radiography. Furthermore, by using an analytical model for the relatively simple sample geometry and applying it to numerical forward simulations of the optical Fresnel propagation, we show that quantitative measurements of the microgap width down to 0.1 {mu}m are possible. Image data recorded at the BAMline (BESSY-II light source, Germany) are presented, with the resolving power of the imaging system being 4 {mu}m in absorption mode and {approx}14 {mu}m in phase contrast mode (z{sub 2}=0.74 m). Thus, phase contrast radiography, combined with numerical forward simulations, is capable of measuring the widths of gaps that are two orders of magnitude thinner than the conventional detection limit.

  16. In-line phase shift tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hammonds, Jeffrey C.; Price, Ronald R.; Pickens, David R.; Donnelly, Edwin F.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to (1) demonstrate laboratory measurements of phase shift images derived from in-line phase-contrast radiographs using the attenuation-partition based algorithm (APBA) of Yan et al.[Opt. Express 18(15), 16074–16089 (2010)], (2) verify that the APBA reconstructed images obey the linearity principle, and (3) reconstruct tomosynthesis phase shift images from a collection of angularly sampled planar phase shift images.Methods: An unmodified, commercially available cabinet x-ray system (Faxitron LX-60) was used in this experiment. This system contains a tungsten anode x-ray tube with a nominal focal spot size of 10 μm. The digital detector uses CsI/CMOS with a pixel size of 50 × 50 μm. The phantoms used consisted of one acrylic plate, two polystyrene plates, and a habanero pepper. Tomosynthesis images were reconstructed from 51 images acquired over a ±25° arc. All phase shift images were reconstructed using the APBA.Results: Image contrast derived from the planar phase shift image of an acrylic plate of uniform thickness exceeded the contrast of the traditional attenuation image by an approximate factor of two. Comparison of the planar phase shift images from a single, uniform thickness polystyrene plate with two polystyrene plates demonstrated an approximate linearity of the estimated phase shift with plate thickness (−1600 rad vs −2970 rad). Tomographic phase shift images of the habanero pepper exhibited acceptable spatial resolution and contrast comparable to the corresponding attenuation image.Conclusions: This work demonstrated the feasibility of laboratory-based phase shift tomosynthesis and suggests that phase shift imaging could potentially provide a new imaging biomarker. Further investigation will be needed to determine if phase shift contrast will be able to provide new tissue contrast information or improved clinical performance.

  17. Initial experimentation with in-line holography x-ray phase-contrast imaging with an ultrafast laser-based x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Kincaid, Russell; Servol, Marina; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Nesterets, Yakov; Gureyev, Tim; Stevenson, Andrew; Wilkins, Steve; Ye, Hongwei; Lipson, Edward; Toth, Remy; Pogany, Andrew; Coman, Ioana

    2007-03-01

    We have investigated experimentally and theoretically the imaging performance of our newly constructed in-line holography x-ray phase-contrast imaging system with an ultrafast laser-based x-ray source. Projection images of nylon fibers with diameters in the 10-330 μm range were obtained using an ultrafast (100 Hz, 28 fs, 40 mJ) laser-based x-ray source with Mo and Ta targets and Be filter, and Gaussian spatial-intensity distribution (FWHMS = 5 μm). A cooled CCD camera (24 μm pitch) with a Gd IIOS II screen coupled via 1:1 optical taper was used (FWHMD = 50 μm). We have investigated nylon-fiber image quality vs. imaging setup geometry and x-ray spectra. The following parameters were evaluated: contrast, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), resolution, and sampling. In addition, we performed theoretical simulation of image formation for the same objects but within a wide range of geometrical parameters. The rigorous wave-optical formalism was used for modeling of the free-space propagation of x-rays from the object plane to the detector, and the "projection approximation" was used. We found reasonable agreement between predictions of our analytical model and the experiments. We conclude that: a) Optimum magnification maximizing contrast and SNR is almost independent of the source-to-detector (R) distance and depends strongly on the diameter of the fiber. b) The corresponding maximum values of the contrast and SNR are almost linear with respect to R; the optimum magnification decreases with fiber diameter. c) The minimum diameter of fiber defines the minimum source-to-object distance R I if R is fixed and the object is moved.

  18. SU-E-I-91: Quantitative Assessment of Early Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Cavernous Hemangioma of Live Using In-Line Phase-Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the potential utility of in-line phase-contrast imaging (ILPCI) technique with synchrotron radiation in detecting early hepatocellular carcinoma and cavernous hemangioma of live using in vitro model system. Methods: Without contrast agents, three typical early hepatocellular carcinoma specimens and three typical cavernous hemangioma of live specimens were imaged using ILPCI. To quantitatively discriminate early hepatocellular carcinoma tissues and cavernous hemangioma tissues, the projection images texture feature based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) were extracted. The texture parameters of energy, inertia, entropy, correlation, sum average, sum entropy, difference average, difference entropy and inverse difference moment, were obtained respectively. Results: In the ILPCI planar images of early hepatocellular carcinoma specimens, vessel trees were clearly visualized on the micrometer scale. Obvious distortion deformation was presented, and the vessel mostly appeared as a ‘dry stick’. Liver textures appeared not regularly. In the ILPCI planar images of cavernous hemangioma of live specimens, typical vessels had not been found compared with the early hepatocellular carcinoma planar images. The planar images of cavernous hemangioma of live specimens clearly displayed the dilated hepatic sinusoids with the diameter of less than 100 microns, but all of them were overlapped with each other. The texture parameters of energy, inertia, entropy, correlation, sum average, sum entropy, and difference average, showed a statistically significant between the two types specimens image (P<0.01), except the texture parameters of difference entropy and inverse difference moment(P>0.01). Conclusion: The results indicate that there are obvious changes in morphological levels including vessel structures and liver textures. The study proves that this imaging technique has a potential value in evaluating early hepatocellular carcinoma and cavernous

  19. SU-E-I-90: Characterizing Small Animal Lung Properties Using Speckle Observed with An In-Line X-Ray Phase Contrast Benchtop System

    SciTech Connect

    Garson, A; Gunsten, S; Guan, H; Brody, S; Anastasio, M; Vasireddi, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We demonstrate a novel X-ray phase-contrast (XPC) method for lung imaging representing a paradigm shift in the way small animal functional imaging is performed. In our method, information regarding airway microstructure that is encoded within speckle texture of a single XPC radiograph is decoded to produce 2D parametric images that will spatially resolve changes in lung properties such as microstructure sizes and air volumes. Such information cannot be derived from conventional lung radiography or any other 2D imaging modality. By computing these images at different points within a breathing cycle, dynamic functional imaging will be readily achieved without the need for tomography. Methods: XPC mouse lung radiographs acquired in situ with an in-line X-ray phase contrast benchtop system. The lung air volume is varied and controlled with a small animal ventilator. XPC radiographs will be acquired for various lung air volume levels representing different phases of the respiratory cycle. Similar data will be acquired of microsphere-based lung phantoms containing hollow glass spheres with known distributions of diameters. Image texture analysis is applied to the data to investigate relationships between texture characteristics and airspace/microsphere physical properties. Results: Correlations between Fourier-based texture descriptors (FBTDs) and regional lung air volume indicate that the texture features in 2D radiographs reveal information on 3D properties of the lungs. For example, we find for a 350 × 350 πm2 lung ROI a linear relationship between injected air volume and FBTD value with slope and intercept of 8.9×10{sup 5} and 7.5, respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrate specific image texture measures related to lung speckle features are correlated with physical characteristics of refracting elements (i.e. lung air spaces). Furthermore, we present results indicating the feasibility of implementing the technique with a simple imaging system design, short

  20. Quantitative evaluation of a single-distance phase-retrieval method applied on in-line phase-contrast images of a mouse lung

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Sara; Larsson, Emanuel; Alves, Frauke; Dal Monego, Simeone; Biffi, Stefania; Garrovo, Chiara; Lorenzon, Andrea; Tromba, Giuliana; Dullin, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PBI) has already proven its potential in a great variety of soft-tissue-related applications including lung imaging. However, the strong edge enhancement, caused by the phase effects, often hampers image segmentation and therefore the quantitative analysis of data sets. Here, the benefits of applying single-distance phase retrieval prior to the three-dimensional reconstruction (PhR) are discussed and quantified compared with three-dimensional reconstructions of conventional PBI data sets in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and preservation of image features. The PhR data sets show more than a tenfold higher CNR and only minor blurring of the edges when compared with PBI in a predominately absorption-based set-up. Accordingly, phase retrieval increases the sensitivity and provides more functionality in computed tomography imaging. PMID:24971975

  1. Characterization of the in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging beam line developed at ALLS and based on laser driven betatron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmaux, S.; Otani, K.; Saraf, A.; MacLean, S.; Wesolowski, M. J.; Babyn, P. S.; Hallin, E.; Krol, A.; Kieffer, J. C.

    2015-05-01

    The 200TW ALLS laser system (30 fs, 5J) is used to accelerate electrons through laser wakefield and generate betatron emission in the 10keV range. Single shot phase contrast images of a series of nylon fibers with diameter ranging from 10μm to 400μm have been obtained in different geometries and are interpreted with a comprehensive model of x-ray propagation integrating the properties and geometries of the imaging beam line. A simple figure of merit, which can give indication on the interface sharpness of a phase object, is used to assess the quality of the imaging beam line.

  2. In-line phase sensitive amplifier based on PPLN waveguides.

    PubMed

    Umeki, Takeshi; Asobe, Masaki; Takenouchi, Hirokazu

    2013-05-20

    We demonstrate a χ(2)-based in-line PSA with a carrier-recovery and phase-locking system for a phase shift keying (PSK) signal. By doubling the signal phase using a wavelength conversion technique, the carrier was recovered from a PSK signal. The carrier phase was synchronized to a local oscillator using optical injection locking. Phase sensitive amplification with a wide phase sensitive dynamic range of 20 dB was achieved using degenerate parametric amplification in a periodically poled LiNbO(3) (PPLN) waveguide. The phase regeneration effect was examined for a degraded signal by means of constellation analyses and bit-error rate measurements. The in-line PSA also operated successfully as a repeater amplifier in a 160 km fiber link without a power penalty. Finally, we demonstrate the regeneration of non-linear impairments induced by fiber non-linearity.

  3. X-ray phase-contrast methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lider, V. V. Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2013-11-15

    This review is devoted to a comparative description of the methods for forming X-ray phase-contrast images of weakly absorbing (phase) objects. These include the crystal interferometer method, the Talbot interferometer method, diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging, and the in-line method. The potential of their practical application in various fields of science and technology is discussed. The publications on the development and optimization of X-ray phase-contrast methods and the experimental study of phase objects are analyzed.

  4. Phase contrast imaging of cochlear soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintani Smith, Stephanie; Hwang, Margaret; Rau, Christoph; Fishman, Andrew J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2011-03-01

    A noninvasive technique to image soft tissue could expedite diagnosis and disease management in the auditory system. We propose inline phase contrast imaging with hard X-rays as a novel method that overcomes the limitations of conventional absorption radiography for imaging soft tissue. In this study, phase contrast imaging of mouse cochleae was performed at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source. The phase contrast tomographic reconstructions show soft tissue structures of the cochlea, including the inner pillar cells, the inner spiral sulcus, the tectorial membrane, the basilar membrane, and the Reissner's membrane. The results suggest that phase contrast X-ray imaging and tomographic techniques hold promise to noninvasively image cochlear structures at an unprecedented cellular level.

  5. Differential-interference-contrast digital in-line holography microscopy based on a single-optical-element.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuchao; Xie, Changqing

    2015-11-01

    Both digital in-line holography (DIH) and zone plate-based microscopy have received considerable interest as powerful imaging tools. However, the former suffers from a twin-image noise problem. The latter suffers from low efficiency and difficulty in fabrication. Here, we present an effective and efficient phase-contrast imaging approach, named differential-interference-contrast digital in-line holography (DIC-DIH), by using a single optical element to split the incident light into a plane wave and a converging spherical wave and generate a two-dimensional (2D) DIC effect simultaneously. Specifically, to improve image contrast, we present a new single optical element, termed 2D DIC compound photon sieves, by combining two overlaid binary gratings and a compound photon sieve through two logical XOR operations. The proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate that the proposed technique can eliminate the twin-image noise problem and improve image contrast with high efficiency. Additionally, we present an example of the phase-contrast imaging nonuniform thick photoresist development process.

  6. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-09-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  7. Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik

    2008-11-13

    All standard (medical) x-ray imaging technologies, rely primarily on the amplitude properties of the incident radiation, and do not depend on its phase. This is unchanged since the discovery by Roentgen that the intensity of an x-ray beam, as measured by the exposure on a film, was related to the relative transmission properties of an object. However, recently various imaging techniques have emerged which depend on the phase of the x-rays as well as the amplitude. Phase becomes important when the beam is coherent and the imaging system is sensitive to interference phenomena. Significant new advances have been made in coherent optic theory and techniques, which now promise phase information in medical imaging. The development of perfect crystal optics and the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation facilities have contributed to a significant increase in the application of phase based imaging in materials and life sciences. Unique source characteristics such as high intensity, monochromaticity, coherence and high collimating provide an ideal source for advanced imaging. Phase contrast imaging has been applied in both projection and computed tomography modes, and recent applications have been made in the field of medical imaging. Due to the underlying principle of X-ray detection conventional image receptors register only intensities of wave fields and not their phases. During the last decade basically five different methods were developed that translate the phase information into intensity variations. These methods are based on measuring the phase shift {phi} directly (using interference phenomena), the gradient {nabla}{sub {phi}}, or the Laplacian {nabla}{sup 2}{phi}. All three methods can be applied to polychromatic X-ray sources keeping in mind that the native source is synchrotron radiation, featuring monochromatic and reasonable coherent X-ray beams. Due to the vast difference in the coefficients that are driven absorption and phase effects (factor 1

  8. Extreme Ultraviolet Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Denbeaux, Gregory; Garg, Rashi; Aquila, Andy; Barty, Anton; Goldberg, Kenneth; Gullikson, Eric; Liu, Yanwei; Wood, Obert

    2005-11-01

    The conclusions of this report are: (1) zone plate microscopy provides high resolution imaging of EUV masks; (2) using phase plates in the back focal plane of the objective lens can provide contrast mechanisms for measurement of the phase shift from defects on the mask; (3) the first high resolution EUV Zernike phase contrast images have been acquired; and (4) future work will include phase contrast mode in reflection from an EUV mask to directly measure the reflectivity and phase shift from defects.

  9. Dual-channel in-line digital holographic double random phase encryption

    PubMed Central

    Das, Bhargab; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S; Rao, D V G L N

    2012-01-01

    We present a robust encryption method for the encoding of 2D/3D objects using digital holography and virtual optics. Using our recently developed dual-plane in-line digital holography technique, two in-line digital holograms are recorded at two different planes and are encrypted using two different double random phase encryption configurations, independently. The process of using two mutually exclusive encryption channels makes the system more robust against attacks since both the channels should be decrypted accurately in order to get a recognizable reconstruction. Results show that the reconstructed object is unrecognizable even when the portion of the correct phase keys used during decryption is close to 75%. The system is verified against blind decryptions by evaluating the SNR and MSE. Validation of the proposed method and sensitivities of the associated parameters are quantitatively analyzed and illustrated. PMID:23471012

  10. Dual-channel in-line digital holographic double random phase encryption.

    PubMed

    Das, Bhargab; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S; Rao, D V G L N

    2012-10-01

    We present a robust encryption method for the encoding of 2D/3D objects using digital holography and virtual optics. Using our recently developed dual-plane in-line digital holography technique, two in-line digital holograms are recorded at two different planes and are encrypted using two different double random phase encryption configurations, independently. The process of using two mutually exclusive encryption channels makes the system more robust against attacks since both the channels should be decrypted accurately in order to get a recognizable reconstruction. Results show that the reconstructed object is unrecognizable even when the portion of the correct phase keys used during decryption is close to 75%. The system is verified against blind decryptions by evaluating the SNR and MSE. Validation of the proposed method and sensitivities of the associated parameters are quantitatively analyzed and illustrated.

  11. Phase contrast imaging with coherent high energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Snigireva, I.

    1997-02-01

    X-ray imaging concern high energy domain (>6 keV) like a contact radiography, projection microscopy and tomography is used for many years to discern the features of the internal structure non destructively in material science, medicine and biology. In so doing the main contrast formation is absorption that makes some limitations for imaging of the light density materials and what is more the resolution of these techniques is not better than 10-100 {mu}m. It was turned out that there is now way in which to overcome 1{mu}m or even sub-{mu}m resolution limit except phase contrast imaging. It is well known in optics that the phase contrast is realised when interference between reference wave front and transmitted through the sample take place. Examples of this imaging are: phase contrast microscopy suggested by Zernike and Gabor (in-line) holography. Both of this techniques: phase contrast x-ray microscopy and holography are successfully progressing now in soft x-ray region. For imaging in the hard X-rays to enhance the contrast and to be able to resolve phase variations across the beam the high degree of the time and more importantly spatial coherence is needed. Because of this it was reasonable that the perfect crystal optics was involved like Bonse-Hart interferometry, double-crystal and even triple-crystal set-up using Laue and Bragg geometry with asymmetrically cut crystals.

  12. In-line retro-reflective polarizing contrast scope for translucent objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun

    2012-11-01

    We propose a very-low-cost fixed interferential polarizing phase contrast scope suitable for the study of translucent objects. Our key design approach is relied on the arrangement of a circular polarizer sheet, a mirror, and a digital camera in a retro-reflective optical structure. The linear polarizer embedded in the circular polarizer sheet acts as both a polarization beam splitter and a polarization beam combiner. Meanwhile the quarter waveplate inside the circular polarizer sheet functions as a fixed phase plate but without narrowing the field of view of the digital camera. The retroreflective configuration amplifies the phase difference between the two orthogonal polarized optical beams twice, thus automatically creating an initial dark background. Experimental demonstration using an off-the-shelf digital microscope with built-in white light emitting diodes and a specified 400x maximum magnification, a circular polarizer sheet, and a mirror shows that onion cells and Steinernema Thailandense nematodes can be clearly observed with striking color, high contrast, and three-dimensional appearance.

  13. Quantitative phase and refractive index measurements with point-source digital in-line holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jericho, M H; Kreuzer, H J; Kanka, M; Riesenberg, R

    2012-04-01

    Point-source digital in-line holographic microscopy with numerical reconstruction is ideally suited for quantitative phase measurements to determine optical path lengths and to extract changes in refractive index within accuracy close to 0.001 on the submicrometer length scale. This is demonstrated with simulated holograms and with detailed measurements on a number of different micrometer-sized samples such as suspended drops, optical fibers, as well as organisms of biological interest such as E. coli bacteria, HeLa cells, and fibroblast cells.

  14. Contrast transfer functions for Zernike phase contrast in full-field transmission hard X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Cheng, Yin; Heine, Ruth; Baumbach, Tilo

    2016-03-21

    Full-field transmission hard X-ray microscopy (TXM) has been widely applied to study morphology and structures with high spatial precision and to dynamic processes. Zernike phase contrast (ZPC) in hard X-ray TXM is often utilized to get an in-line phase contrast enhancement for weak-absorbing materials with little contrast differences. Here, following forward image formation, we derive and simplify the contrast transfer functions (CTFs) of the Zernike phase imaging system in TXM based on a linear space-shift-invariant imaging mode under certain approximations. The CTFs in ZPC in their simplified forms show a high similarity to the one in free-space propagation X-ray imaging systems. PMID:27136800

  15. In-line phase retarder and polarimeter for conversion of linear to circular polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J.B.; Smith, N.V.; Denlinger, J.D.

    1997-04-01

    An in-line polarimeter including phase retarder and linear polarizer was designed and commissioned on undulator beamline 7.0 for the purpose of converting linear to circular polarization for experiments downstream. In commissioning studies, Mo/Si multilayers at 95 eV were used both as the upstream, freestanding phase retarder and the downstream linear polarized. The polarization properties of the phase retarder were characterized by direct polarimetry and by collecting MCD spectra in photoemission from Gd and other magnetic surfaces. The resonant birefringence of transmission multilayers results from differing distributions of s- and p-component wave fields in the multilayer when operating near a structural (Bragg) interference condition. The resulting phase retardation is especially strong when the interference is at or near the Brewster angle, which is roughly 45{degrees} in the EUV and soft x-ray ranges.

  16. Surface metrology by phase contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Lionel R.

    1990-08-01

    Increasing use of electrooptical imaging and detection systems in thermography high density information storage laser instrumentation and X-ray optics has led to a pressing need for machinecompatible sensors for the measurement of surface texture. This paper reviews recent advances in the use of deterministic and parametric noncontact methods for texture measurement and justifies the need for objective simple and yet precise means for displaying the microfinish of a machined surface. The design of a simple two channel phase contrast microscope is described which can be calibrated by test pieces and used as a means for optimising the process parameters involved in the generation of high quality surfaces. Typical results obtained with this technique including dynamic range and ultimate sensitivity are discussed. 1 . NEED FOR SURFACE METROLOGY Surface quality has a direct influence on product acceptability in many different industries including those concerned with optoelectronics and engineering. The influence may be cosmetic as with paint finish on a motor car body or functional for example when excessive wear rates may occur in a bearing surface with inadequate oil retention. Since perfection can never be achieved and overspecification can be costly it is clearly necessary to be able to define thresholds of acceptance in relation to different situations. Such thresholds do of course require agreed methods of measurement with traceability to national standards. The current trends in surface metrology are towards higher

  17. Morphological analysis of GeTe in inline phase change switches

    SciTech Connect

    King, Matthew R.; El-Hinnawy, Nabil; Salmon, Mike; Gu, Jitty; Wagner, Brian P.; Jones, Evan B.; Howell, Robert S.; Nichols, Doyle T.; Young, Robert M.; Borodulin, Pavel

    2015-09-07

    Crystallization and amorphization phenomena in indirectly heated phase change material-based devices were investigated. Scanning transmission electron microscopy was utilized to explore GeTe phase transition processes in the context of the unique inline phase change switch (IPCS) architecture. A monolithically integrated thin film heating element successfully converted GeTe to ON and OFF states. Device cycling prompted the formation of an active area which sustains the majority of structural changes during pulsing. A transition region on both sides of the active area consisting of polycrystalline GeTe and small nuclei (<15 nm) in an amorphous matrix was also observed. The switching mechanism, determined by variations in pulsing parameters, was shown to be predominantly growth-driven. A preliminary model for crystallization and amorphization in IPCS devices is presented.

  18. Helical X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography without phase stepping

    PubMed Central

    Marschner, M.; Willner, M.; Potdevin, G.; Fehringer, A.; Noël, P. B.; Pfeiffer, F.; Herzen, J.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) using grating interferometry provides enhanced soft-tissue contrast. The possibility to use standard polychromatic laboratory sources enables an implementation into a clinical setting. Thus, PCCT has gained significant attention in recent years. However, phase-contrast CT scans still require significantly increased measurement times in comparison to conventional attenuation-based CT imaging. This is mainly due to a time-consuming stepping of a grating, which is necessary for an accurate retrieval of the phase information. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel scan technique, which directly allows the determination of the phase signal without a phase-stepping procedure. The presented work is based on moiré fringe scanning, which allows fast data acquisition in radiographic applications such as mammography or in-line product analysis. Here, we demonstrate its extension to tomography enabling a continuous helical sample rotation as routinely performed in clinical CT systems. Compared to standard phase-stepping techniques, the proposed helical fringe-scanning procedure enables faster measurements, an extended field of view and relaxes the stability requirements of the system, since the gratings remain stationary. Finally, our approach exceeds previously introduced methods by not relying on spatial interpolation to acquire the phase-contrast signal. PMID:27052368

  19. Helical X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography without phase stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, M.; Willner, M.; Potdevin, G.; Fehringer, A.; Noël, P. B.; Pfeiffer, F.; Herzen, J.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) using grating interferometry provides enhanced soft-tissue contrast. The possibility to use standard polychromatic laboratory sources enables an implementation into a clinical setting. Thus, PCCT has gained significant attention in recent years. However, phase-contrast CT scans still require significantly increased measurement times in comparison to conventional attenuation-based CT imaging. This is mainly due to a time-consuming stepping of a grating, which is necessary for an accurate retrieval of the phase information. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel scan technique, which directly allows the determination of the phase signal without a phase-stepping procedure. The presented work is based on moiré fringe scanning, which allows fast data acquisition in radiographic applications such as mammography or in-line product analysis. Here, we demonstrate its extension to tomography enabling a continuous helical sample rotation as routinely performed in clinical CT systems. Compared to standard phase-stepping techniques, the proposed helical fringe-scanning procedure enables faster measurements, an extended field of view and relaxes the stability requirements of the system, since the gratings remain stationary. Finally, our approach exceeds previously introduced methods by not relying on spatial interpolation to acquire the phase-contrast signal.

  20. Phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Hiroki; Tamai, Takayuki; Iijima, Hirofumi; Hosokawa, Fumio; Kondo, Yukihito

    2015-06-01

    This report introduces the first results obtained using phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (P-STEM). A carbon-film phase plate (PP) with a small center hole is placed in the condenser aperture plane so that a phase shift is introduced in the incident electron waves except those passing through the center hole. A cosine-type phase-contrast transfer function emerges when the phase-shifted scattered waves interfere with the non-phase-shifted unscattered waves, which passed through the center hole before incidence onto the specimen. The phase contrast resulting in P-STEM is optically identical to that in phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy that is used to provide high contrast for weak phase objects. Therefore, the use of PPs can enhance the phase contrast of the STEM images of specimens in principle. The phase shift resulting from the PP, whose thickness corresponds to a phase shift of π, has been confirmed using interference fringes displayed in the Ronchigram of a silicon single crystal specimen. The interference fringes were found to abruptly shift at the edge of the PP hole by π.

  1. Optimization of in-line fritless solid-phase extraction for capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tak, Yvonne H; Toraño, Javier Sastre; Somsen, Govert W; de Jong, Gerhardus J

    2012-12-01

    In this study, in-line frit-free solid-phase extraction (SPE) has been studied for the preconcentration of analytes prior to analysis by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS). The mixed-mode sorbent Oasis HLB was selected for the trapping of compounds of different polarity. Using 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpirrolidine (EDDP), dihydrocodeine and codeine as test compounds, SPE parameters such as the pH of the sample and composition of the washing and elution solvent were optimized. Trapping of the analytes was optimal at pH 8.0 or higher. For efficient elution of the SPE micro column, 85% of methanol in water with 2% (v/v) acetic acid was used, which also prevented current break down in subsequent CE analysis. CE resolution of the test compounds was highest for background electrolytes (BGEs) with a pH above 8. For optimal analysis, samples were 1:1 diluted with carbonate buffer (1M, pH 8.0) prior to analysis, BGE was 60mM ammonium acetate buffer (pH 10.0), and the injected sample volume was 60 μl (i.e., 30 capillary volumes). Good recoveries were found: 101% for EDDP, 88% for codeine and 90% for dihydrocodeine. Intraday RSDs for migration time and peak areas were below 0.56% and 15%, respectively. Peak widths at half height obtained with SPE-CE-MS were 12s for EDDP, 3.7s for dihydrocodeine and 7.4s for codeine, and were comparable to those for CE-MS. LODs were 0.22 pg/ml for EDDP, 2.1 pg/ml for dihydrocodeine and 24 pg/ml for codeine. It is concluded that the applied fritless in-line preconcentration construct proved to be highly useful for improving the sensitivity of CE while maintaining separation.

  2. Comparative analysis of autofocus functions in digital in-line phase-shifting holography.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Elsa S R; Fiadeiro, Paulo T; Pereira, Manuela; Pinheiro, António

    2016-09-20

    Numerical reconstruction of digital holograms relies on a precise knowledge of the original object position. However, there are a number of relevant applications where this parameter is not known in advance and an efficient autofocusing method is required. This paper addresses the problem of finding optimal focusing methods for use in reconstruction of digital holograms of macroscopic amplitude and phase objects, using digital in-line phase-shifting holography in transmission mode. Fifteen autofocus measures, including spatial-, spectral-, and sparsity-based methods, were evaluated for both synthetic and experimental holograms. The Fresnel transform and the angular spectrum reconstruction methods were compared. Evaluation criteria included unimodality, accuracy, resolution, and computational cost. Autofocusing under angular spectrum propagation tends to perform better with respect to accuracy and unimodality criteria. Phase objects are, generally, more difficult to focus than amplitude objects. The normalized variance, the standard correlation, and the Tenenbaum gradient are the most reliable spatial-based metrics, combining computational efficiency with good accuracy and resolution. A good trade-off between focus performance and computational cost was found for the Fresnelet sparsity method. PMID:27661596

  3. Comparative analysis of autofocus functions in digital in-line phase-shifting holography.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Elsa S R; Fiadeiro, Paulo T; Pereira, Manuela; Pinheiro, António

    2016-09-20

    Numerical reconstruction of digital holograms relies on a precise knowledge of the original object position. However, there are a number of relevant applications where this parameter is not known in advance and an efficient autofocusing method is required. This paper addresses the problem of finding optimal focusing methods for use in reconstruction of digital holograms of macroscopic amplitude and phase objects, using digital in-line phase-shifting holography in transmission mode. Fifteen autofocus measures, including spatial-, spectral-, and sparsity-based methods, were evaluated for both synthetic and experimental holograms. The Fresnel transform and the angular spectrum reconstruction methods were compared. Evaluation criteria included unimodality, accuracy, resolution, and computational cost. Autofocusing under angular spectrum propagation tends to perform better with respect to accuracy and unimodality criteria. Phase objects are, generally, more difficult to focus than amplitude objects. The normalized variance, the standard correlation, and the Tenenbaum gradient are the most reliable spatial-based metrics, combining computational efficiency with good accuracy and resolution. A good trade-off between focus performance and computational cost was found for the Fresnelet sparsity method.

  4. In-line phase-sensitive amplification of QPSK signal using multiple quasi-phase matched LiNbO₃ waveguide.

    PubMed

    Asobe, Masaki; Umeki, Takeshi; Takenouchi, Hirokazu; Miyamoto, Yutaka

    2014-11-01

    Phase-sensitive amplifiers (PSA) using periodically poled (PPLN) LiNbO₃ waveguides are promising as low-noise optical amplifiers. However, it is difficult to realize in-line operation for multi-level phase modulated signals using a PPLN based PSA with the conventional configuration. In this paper, we report a PPLN based in-line PSA that can regenerate quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) signals. Multi-stage frequency mixing in a multiple quasi-phase matched LiNbO₃waveguide allows carrier phase recovery from a QPSK signal. Non-degenerate parametric amplification enables the phase-sensitive amplification of a QPSK signal. Amplitude and phase regeneration is examined utilizing gain saturation and phase squeezing capability.

  5. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Krishna S; Nielsen, Jon-Fredrik; Bernstein, Matt A; Markl, Michael; D Gatehouse, Peter; M Botnar, Rene; Saloner, David; Lorenz, Christine; Wen, Han; S Hu, Bob; Epstein, Frederick H; N Oshinski, John; Raman, Subha V

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) phase contrast imaging has undergone a wide range of changes with the development and availability of improved calibration procedures, visualization tools, and analysis methods. This article provides a comprehensive review of the current state-of-the-art in CMR phase contrast imaging methodology, clinical applications including summaries of past clinical performance, and emerging research and clinical applications that utilize today's latest technology. PMID:26254979

  6. Compressed sensing for phase contrast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Gaass, Thomas; Potdevin, Guillaume; Noeel, Peter B.; Tapfer, Arne; Willner, Marian; Herzen, Julia; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Haase, Axel

    2012-07-31

    Modern x-ray techniques opened the possibility to retrieve phase information. Phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) has the potential to significantly improve soft tissue contrast. Radiation dose, however, continues to be an issue when moving from bench to bedside. Dose reduction in this work is achieved by sparsely acquiring PCCT data. To compensate for appearing aliasing artifacts we introduce a compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction framework. We present the feasibility of CS on PCCT with numerical as well as measured phantom data. The results proof that CS compensates for under-sampling artifacts and maintains the superior soft tissue contrast and detail visibility in the reconstructed images.

  7. Phase contrast radiography: Image modeling and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Mancuso, Adrian P.; Peele, Andrew G.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2004-12-01

    We consider image formation for the phase-contrast radiography technique where the radiation source is extended and spatially incoherent. A model is developed for this imaging process which allows us to define an objective filtering criterion that can be applied to the recovery of quantitative phase images from data obtained at different propagation distances. We test our image model with experimental x-ray data. We then apply our filter to experimental neutron phase radiography data and demonstrate improved image quality.

  8. Toward Clinically Compatible Phase-Contrast Mammography

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Kai; Willer, Konstantin; Gromann, Lukas; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Braig, Eva; Grandl, Susanne; Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Herzen, Julia; Mayr, Doris; Hellerhoff, Karin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Phase-contrast mammography using laboratory X-ray sources is a promising approach to overcome the relatively low sensitivity and specificity of clinical, absorption-based screening. Current research is mostly centered on identifying potential diagnostic benefits arising from phase-contrast and dark-field mammography and benchmarking the latter with conventional state-of-the-art imaging methods. So far, little effort has been made to adjust this novel imaging technique to clinical needs. In this article, we address the key points for a successful implementation to a clinical routine in the near future and present the very first dose-compatible and rapid scan-time phase-contrast mammograms of both a freshly dissected, cancer-bearing mastectomy specimen and a mammographic accreditation phantom. PMID:26110618

  9. Toward Clinically Compatible Phase-Contrast Mammography.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Kai; Willer, Konstantin; Gromann, Lukas; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Braig, Eva; Grandl, Susanne; Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Herzen, Julia; Mayr, Doris; Hellerhoff, Karin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Phase-contrast mammography using laboratory X-ray sources is a promising approach to overcome the relatively low sensitivity and specificity of clinical, absorption-based screening. Current research is mostly centered on identifying potential diagnostic benefits arising from phase-contrast and dark-field mammography and benchmarking the latter with conventional state-of-the-art imaging methods. So far, little effort has been made to adjust this novel imaging technique to clinical needs. In this article, we address the key points for a successful implementation to a clinical routine in the near future and present the very first dose-compatible and rapid scan-time phase-contrast mammograms of both a freshly dissected, cancer-bearing mastectomy specimen and a mammographic accreditation phantom.

  10. Reduction of phase artifacts in differential phase contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Jerjen, Iwan; Revol, Vincent; Schuetz, Philipp; Kottler, Christian; Kaufmann, Rolf; Luethi, Thomas; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Urban, Claus; Sennhauser, Urs

    2011-07-01

    X-ray differential phase contrast computed tomography (DPC CT) with a Talbot-Lau interferometer setup allows visualizing the three-dimensional distribution of the refractive index by measuring the shifts of an interference pattern due to phase variations of the X-ray beam. Unfortunately, severe reconstruction artifacts appear in the presence of differential phase wrapping and clipping. In this paper, we propose to use the attenuation contrast, which is obtained from the same measurement, for correcting the DPC signal. Using the example of a DPC CT measurement with pronounced phase artifacts, we will discuss the efficiency of our phase artifact correction method. PMID:21747516

  11. Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    ScienceCinema

    Erin Miller

    2016-07-12

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

  12. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-15

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  13. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  14. Reconstruction methods for phase-contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Raven, C.

    1997-02-01

    Phase contrast imaging with coherent x-rays can be distinguished in outline imaging and holography, depending on the wavelength {lambda}, the object size d and the object-to-detector distance r. When r << d{sup 2}{lambda}, phase contrast occurs only in regions where the refractive index fastly changes, i.e. at interfaces and edges in the sample. With increasing object-to-detector distance we come in the area of holographic imaging. The image contrast outside the shadow region of the object is due to interference of the direct, undiffracted beam and a beam diffracted by the object, or, in terms of holography, the interference of a reference wave with the object wave. Both, outline imaging and holography, offer the possibility to obtain three dimensional information of the sample in conjunction with a tomographic technique. But the data treatment and the kind of information one can obtain from the reconstruction is different.

  15. Low Dose High Energy X-ray In-Line Phase Sensitive Imaging Prototype: Investigation of Optimal Geometric Conditions and Design Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Ghani, Muhammad. U.; Yan, Aimin; Wong, Molly. D.; Li, Yuhua; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the optimization of a high energy in-line phase sensitive x-ray imaging prototype under different geometric and operating conditions for mammography application. A phase retrieval algorithm based on phase attenuation duality (PAD) was applied to the phase contrast images acquired by the prototype. Imaging performance was investigated at four magnification values of 1.67, 2, 2.5 and 3 using an acrylic edge, an American College of Radiology (ACR) mammography phantom and contrast detail (CD) phantom with tube potentials of 100, 120 and 140 kVp. The ACR and CD images were acquired at the same mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.29 mGy with a computed radiography (CR) detector of 43.75 µm pixel pitch at a fixed source to image distance (SID) of 170 cm. The x-ray tube focal spot size was kept constant as 7 µm while a 2.5 mm thick aluminum (Al) filter was used for beam hardening. The performance of phase contrast and phase retrieved images were compared with computer simulations based on the relative phase contrast factor (RPF) at high x-ray energies. The imaging results showed that the x-ray tube operated at 100 kVp under the magnification of 2.5 exhibits superior imaging performance which is in accordance to the computer simulations. As compared to the phase contrast images, the phase retrieved images of the ACR and CD phantoms demonstrated improved imaging contrast and target discrimination. We compared the CD phantom images acquired in conventional contact mode with and without the anti-scatter grid using the same prototype at 1.295 mGy and 2.59 mGy using 40 kVp, a 25 µm rhodium (Rh) filter. At the same radiation dose, the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for both the large and small discs, while compared to the double dose image acquired in conventional mode, the observer study also indicated that the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for the large discs. This

  16. Low dose high energy x-ray in-line phase sensitive imaging prototype: Investigation of optimal geometric conditions and design parameters.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Muhammad U; Yan, Aimin; Wong, Molly D; Li, Yuhua; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the optimization of a high energy in-line phase sensitive x-ray imaging prototype under different geometric and operating conditions for mammography application. A phase retrieval algorithm based on phase attenuation duality (PAD) was applied to the phase contrast images acquired by the prototype. Imaging performance was investigated at four magnification values of 1.67, 2, 2.5 and 3 using an acrylic edge, an American College of Radiology (ACR) mammography phantom and contrast detail (CD) phantom with tube potentials of 100, 120 and 140 kVp. The ACR and CD images were acquired at the same mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.29 mGy with a computed radiography (CR) detector of 43.75 μm pixel pitch at a fixed source to image distance (SID) of 170 cm. The x-ray tube focal spot size was kept constant as 7 μm while a 2.5 mm thick aluminum (Al) filter was used for beam hardening. The performance of phase contrast and phase retrieved images were compared with computer simulations based on the relative phase contrast factor (RPF) at high x-ray energies. The imaging results showed that the x-ray tube operated at 100 kVp under the magnification of 2.5 exhibits superior imaging performance which is in accordance to the computer simulations. As compared to the phase contrast images, the phase retrieved images of the ACR and CD phantoms demonstrated improved imaging contrast and target discrimination. We compared the CD phantom images acquired in conventional contact mode with and without the anti-scatter grid using the same prototype at 1.295 mGy and 2.59 mGy using 40 kVp, a 25 μm rhodium (Rh) filter. At the same radiation dose, the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for both the large and small discs, while compared to the double dose image acquired in conventional mode, the observer study also indicated that the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for the large discs. This

  17. Reconstructions of phase contrast, phased array multicoil data.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, M A; Grgic, M; Brosnan, T J; Pelc, N J

    1994-09-01

    We present a reconstruction method for phased array multicoil data that is compatible with phase contrast MR angiography. The proposed algorithm can produce either complex difference or phase difference angiograms. Directional flow and quantitative information are preserved with the phase difference reconstruction. The proposed method is computationally efficient and avoids intercoil cancellation errors near the velocity aliasing boundary. Feasibility of the method is demonstrated on human scans.

  18. Phase contrast in high resolution electron microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rose, H.H.

    1975-09-23

    This patent relates to a device for developing a phase contrast signal for a scanning transmission electron microscope. The lens system of the microscope is operated in a condition of defocus so that predictable alternate concentric regions of high and low electron density exist in the cone of illumination. Two phase detectors are placed beneath the object inside the cone of illumination, with the first detector having the form of a zone plate, each of its rings covering alternate regions of either higher or lower electron density. The second detector is so configured that it covers the regions of electron density not covered by the first detector. Each detector measures the number of electrons incident thereon and the signal developed by the first detector is subtracted from the signal developed by the record detector to provide a phase contrast signal. (auth)

  19. 3D differential phase contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michael; Tian, Lei; Waller, Laura

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate three-dimensional (3D) optical phase and amplitude reconstruction based on coded source illumination using a programmable LED array. Multiple stacks of images along the optical axis are computed from recorded intensities captured by multiple images under off-axis illumination. Based on the first Born approximation, a linear differential phase contrast (DPC) model is built between 3D complex index of refraction and the intensity stacks. Therefore, 3D volume reconstruction can be achieved via a fast inversion method, without the intermediate 2D phase retrieval step. Our system employs spatially partially coherent illumination, so the transverse resolution achieves twice the NA of coherent systems, while axial resolution is also improved 2× as compared to holographic imaging.

  20. Hybridization approach to in-line and off-axis (electron) holography for superior resolution and phase sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy-Keskinbora, C; Boothroyd, C B; Dunin-Borkowski, R E; van Aken, P A; Koch, C T

    2014-01-01

    Holography--originally developed for correcting spherical aberration in transmission electron microscopes--is now used in a wide range of disciplines that involve the propagation of waves, including light optics, electron microscopy, acoustics and seismology. In electron microscopy, the two primary modes of holography are Gabor's original in-line setup and an off-axis approach that was developed subsequently. These two techniques are highly complementary, offering superior phase sensitivity at high and low spatial resolution, respectively. All previous investigations have focused on improving each method individually. Here, we show how the two approaches can be combined in a synergetic fashion to provide phase information with excellent sensitivity across all spatial frequencies, low noise and an efficient use of electron dose. The principle is also expected to be widely to applications of holography in light optics, X-ray optics, acoustics, ultra-sound, terahertz imaging, etc. PMID:25387480

  1. A comparison of iterative algorithms and a mixed approach for in-line x-ray phase retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanbo; Zhang, Da; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that iterative in-line x-ray phase retrieval algorithms may have higher precision than direct retrieval algorithms. This communication compares three iterative phase retrieval algorithms in terms of accuracy and efficiency using computer simulations. We found the Fourier transformation based algorithm (FT) is of the fastest convergence, while the Poisson-solver based algorithm (PS) has higher precision. The traditional Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm (GS) is very slow and sometimes does not converge in our tests. Then a mixed FT-PS algorithm is presented to achieve both high efficiency and high accuracy. The mixed algorithm is tested using simulated images with different noise level and experimentally obtained images of a piece of chicken breast muscle. PMID:20161234

  2. A comparison of iterative algorithms and a mixed approach for in-line x-ray phase retrieval.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanbo; Zhang, Da; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2009-08-15

    Previous studies have shown that iterative in-line x-ray phase retrieval algorithms may have higher precision than direct retrieval algorithms. This communication compares three iterative phase retrieval algorithms in terms of accuracy and efficiency using computer simulations. We found the Fourier transformation based algorithm (FT) is of the fastest convergence, while the Poisson-solver based algorithm (PS) has higher precision. The traditional Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm (GS) is very slow and sometimes does not converge in our tests. Then a mixed FT-PS algorithm is presented to achieve both high efficiency and high accuracy. The mixed algorithm is tested using simulated images with different noise level and experimentally obtained images of a piece of chicken breast muscle.

  3. Characterization of pyrocarbon coated materials using laboratory based x-ray phase contrast imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Y S; Roy, Tushar; Sarkar, P S; Yadav, P S; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar; Dasgupta, K; Sathiyamoorthy, D

    2007-08-01

    In-line x-ray phase contrast is an emerging x-ray imaging technique that promises to improve the contrast in x-ray imaging process. This technique is most suited for x-ray imaging of soft materials, low atomic number elements such as carbon composite fibers, very thin coatings, etc. We have used this new emerging technique for visualization and characterization of the pyrocarbon coated materials using a combination of microfocus x-ray source and x-ray charge coupled device detector. These studies are important for characterization of coating and optimization of various process parameters during deposition. These experiments will help us to exploit the potential of this technique for studies in other areas of material science such as characterization of carbon fibered structures and detection of cracks and flaws in materials. The characterization of the imaging system and optimization of some process parameters for carbon deposition are also described in detail. PMID:17764325

  4. Quantitative x-ray phase-contrast imaging of air-assisted water sprays with high Weber numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. J.; Im, Kyoung-Su; Fezzaa, K.; Lee, W. K.; Wang, Jin; Micheli, P.; Laub, C.

    2006-10-01

    X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging along with a single-image phase retrieval reconstruction was used to visualize the near-nozzle breakup of optically dense water jets atomized by a high-speed, annular air flow. The influence of the atomizing air on water mass distribution was investigated to reveal the complex air/liquid interactions at various breakup stages. Unlike low-Weber-number jets, the breakup of high-Weber-number jets can occur in the liquid core, which causes sudden decreases in liquid volume fraction.

  5. Soft-tissue and phase-contrast imaging at the Swiss Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Philipp; Mohan, Nishant; Stampanoni, Marco; Muller, Ralph

    2004-05-01

    Recent results show that bone vasculature is a major contributor to local tissue porosity, and therefore can be directly linked to the mechanical properties of bone tissue. With the advent of third generation synchrotron radiation (SR) sources, micro-computed tomography (μCT) with resolutions in the order of 1 μm and better has become feasible. This technique has been employed frequently to analyze trabecular architecture and local bone tissue properties, i.e. the hard or mineralized bone tissue. Nevertheless, less is known about the soft tissues in bone, mainly due to inadequate imaging capabilities. Here, we discuss three different methods and applications to visualize soft tissues. The first approach is referred to as negative imaging. In this case the material around the soft tissue provides the absorption contrast necessary for X-ray based tomography. Bone vasculature from two different mouse strains was investigated and compared qualitatively. Differences were observed in terms of local vessel number and vessel orientation. The second technique represents corrosion casting, which is principally adapted for imaging of vascular systems. The technique of corrosion casting has already been applied successfully at the Swiss Light Source. Using the technology we were able to show that pathological features reminiscent of Alzheimer"s disease could be distinguished in the brain vasculature of APP transgenic mice. The third technique discussed here is phase contrast imaging exploiting the high degree of coherence of third generation synchrotron light sources, which provide the necessary physical conditions for phase contrast. The in-line approach followed here for phase contrast retrieval is a modification of the Gerchberg-Saxton-Fienup type. Several measurements and theoretical thoughts concerning phase contrast imaging are presented, including mathematical phase retrieval. Although up-to-now only phase images have been computed, the approach is now ready to

  6. In-line hologram segmentation for volumetric samples.

    PubMed

    Orzó, László; Göröcs, Zoltán; Fehér, András; Tőkés, Szabolcs

    2013-01-01

    We propose a fast, noniterative method to segment an in-line hologram of a volumetric sample into in-line subholograms according to its constituent objects. In contrast to the phase retrieval or twin image elimination algorithms, we do not aim or require to reconstruct the complex wave field of all the objects, which would be a more complex task, but only provide a good estimate about the contribution of the particular objects to the original hologram quickly. The introduced hologram segmentation algorithm exploits the special inner structure of the in-line holograms and applies only the estimated supports and reconstruction distances of the corresponding objects as parameters. The performance of the proposed method is demonstrated and analyzed experimentally both on synthetic and measured holograms. We discussed how the proposed algorithm can be efficiently applied for object reconstruction and phase retrieval tasks.

  7. Monitoring stem cells in phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, K. P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Collins, D. J.; Richardson, J. B.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms behind the proliferation of Mesenchymal Stem cells (MSCs) can offer a greater insight into the behaviour of these cells throughout their life cycles. Traditional methods of determining the rate of MSC differentiation rely on population based studies over an extended time period. However, such methods can be inadequate as they are unable to track cells as they interact; for example, in autologous cell therapies for osteoarthritis, the development of biological assays that could predict in vivo functional activity and biological action are particularly challenging. Here further research is required to determine non-histochemical biomarkers which provide correlations between cell survival and predictive functional outcome. This paper proposes using a (previously developed) advanced texture-based analysis algorithm to facilitate in vitro cells tracking using time-lapsed microscopy. The technique was adopted to monitor stem cells in the context of unlabelled, phase contrast imaging, with the goal of examining the cell to cell interactions in both monoculture and co-culture systems. The results obtained are analysed using established exploratory procedures developed for time series data and compared with the typical fluorescent-based approach of cell labelling. A review of the progress and the lessons learned are also presented.

  8. Phase-contrast x-ray imaging and tomography of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olendrowitz, C.; Bartels, M.; Krenkel, M.; Beerlink, A.; Mokso, R.; Sprung, M.; Salditt, T.

    2012-08-01

    We have analyzed the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans with the help of phase-contrast x-ray tomography. This work combines techniques from x-ray imaging studies of single biological cells by in-line holography with three-dimensional reconstruction and furthermore extends these studies to the multicellular level. To preserve the sub-cellular ultrastructure of the nematodes, we used the near-native sample preparation of high-pressure freezing as commonly used in the field of electron microscopy. For the presented samples, a standard, non-magnifying parallel-beam setting, as well as a magnifying, divergent-beam setting using nanofocusing optics is evaluated based on their tomographic reconstruction potential. In this paper, we address difficulties in sample preparation and issues of image processing. By experimental refinement and through optimized reconstruction procedures, we were able to perform x-ray imaging studies on a living specimen.

  9. Research on object-plane constraints and hologram expansion in phase retrieval algorithms for continuous-wave terahertz inline digital holography reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiaqi; Li, Qi; Cui, Shanshan

    2014-10-20

    In terahertz inline digital holography, zero-order diffraction light and conjugate images can cause the reconstructed image to be blurred. In this paper, three phase retrieval algorithms are applied to conduct reconstruction based on the same near-field diffraction propagation conditions and image-plane constraints. The impact of different object-plane constraints on CW terahertz inline digital holographic reconstruction is studied. The results show that in the phase retrieval algorithm it is not suitable to impose restriction on the phase when the object is not isolated in the transmission-type CW terahertz inline digital holography. In addition, the effects of zero-padding expansion, boundary replication expansion, and apodization operation on reconstructed images are studied. The results indicate that the conjugate image can be eliminated, and a better reconstructed image can be obtained by adopting an appropriate phase retrieval algorithm after the normalized hologram extending to the minimum area, which meets the applicable range of the angular spectrum reconstruction algorithm by means of boundary replication.

  10. In-line micro-matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction for simultaneous separation and extraction of Sudan dyes in different spices.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Maryam; Sabzalian, Sedigheh; Barfi, Behruz; Arghavani-Beydokhti, Somayeh; Asghari, Alireza

    2015-12-18

    A novel, simple, fast, and miniaturized method, termed in-line micro-matrix solid-phase dispersion (in-line MMSPD), coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed for the simultaneous extraction and determination of Sudan dyes (i.e. Sudan I-IV, Sudan orange G, Sudan black B, and Sudan red G) with the aid of an experimental design strategy. In this method, a matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) column including a suitable mixture of polar sorbents was inserted in the mobile phase pathway, and while the interfering compounds were retained, the analytes were eluted and entered into the analytical column. In this way, the extraction, elution, and separation of the analytes were performed sequentially. Under the optimal experimental conditions (including the amount of sample, 0.0426g; amount of dispersant phase, 0.0216g of florisil, 0.0227g of silica, 0.0141g of alumina; and blending time, 112s), the limits of detection (LODs), limits of quantification, linear dynamic ranges, and recoveries were obtained to be 0.3-15.3μgkg(-1), 1-50μgkg(-1), 50-28,000μgkg(-1), and 94.5-99.1%, respectively. The results obtained showed that determination of the selected Sudan dyes in food samples using an enough sensitive and a simple analytically validated method like in-line MMSPD may offer a suitable screening method, which could be useful for food analysis and adulteration. PMID:26614171

  11. In-line micro-matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction for simultaneous separation and extraction of Sudan dyes in different spices.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Maryam; Sabzalian, Sedigheh; Barfi, Behruz; Arghavani-Beydokhti, Somayeh; Asghari, Alireza

    2015-12-18

    A novel, simple, fast, and miniaturized method, termed in-line micro-matrix solid-phase dispersion (in-line MMSPD), coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed for the simultaneous extraction and determination of Sudan dyes (i.e. Sudan I-IV, Sudan orange G, Sudan black B, and Sudan red G) with the aid of an experimental design strategy. In this method, a matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) column including a suitable mixture of polar sorbents was inserted in the mobile phase pathway, and while the interfering compounds were retained, the analytes were eluted and entered into the analytical column. In this way, the extraction, elution, and separation of the analytes were performed sequentially. Under the optimal experimental conditions (including the amount of sample, 0.0426g; amount of dispersant phase, 0.0216g of florisil, 0.0227g of silica, 0.0141g of alumina; and blending time, 112s), the limits of detection (LODs), limits of quantification, linear dynamic ranges, and recoveries were obtained to be 0.3-15.3μgkg(-1), 1-50μgkg(-1), 50-28,000μgkg(-1), and 94.5-99.1%, respectively. The results obtained showed that determination of the selected Sudan dyes in food samples using an enough sensitive and a simple analytically validated method like in-line MMSPD may offer a suitable screening method, which could be useful for food analysis and adulteration.

  12. Characterization of an x-ray phase contrast imaging system based on the miniature synchrotron MIRRORCLE-6X

    SciTech Connect

    Heekeren, Joop van; Kostenko, Alexander; Hanashima, Takayasu; Yamada, Hironari; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Offerman, S. Erik; Vliet, Lucas J. van

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The implementation of in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) for soft-tissue patient imaging is hampered by the lack of a bright and spatially coherent x-ray source that fits into the hospital environment. This article provides a quantitative characterization of the phase-contrast enhancement of a PCI system based on the miniature synchrotron technology MIRRORCLE-6X. Methods: The phase-contrast effect was measured using an edge response of a plexiglass plate as a function of the incident angle of radiation. We have developed a comprehensive x-ray propagation model based on the system's components, properties, and geometry in order to interpret the measurement data. Monte-Carlo simulations are used to estimate the system's spectral properties and resolution. Results: The measured ratio of the detected phase-contrast to the absorption contrast is currently in the range 100% to 200%. Experiments show that with the current implementation of the MIRRORCLE-6X, a target smaller than 30-40 {mu}m does not lead to a larger phase-contrast. The reason for this is that the fraction of x-rays produced by the material (carbon filament and glue) that is used for mounting the target in the electron beam is more than 25% of the total amount of x-rays produced. This increases the apparent source size. The measured phase-contrast is at maximum two times larger than the absorption contrast with the current set-up. Conclusions: Calculations based on our model of the present imaging system predict that the phase-contrast can be up to an order of magnitude larger than the absorption contrast in case the materials used for mounting the target in the electron beam do not (or hardly) produce x-rays. The methods described in this paper provide vital feedback for guiding future modifications to the design of the x-ray target of MIRRORCLE-type system and configuration of the in-line PCI systems in general.

  13. Photon-counting spectral phase-contrast mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, E.; Roessl, E.; Koehler, T.; van Stevendaal, U.; Schulze-Wenck, I.; Wieberneit, N.; Stampanoni, M.; Wang, Z.; Kubik-Huch, R. A.; Hauser, N.; Lundqvist, M.; Danielsson, M.; Åslund, M.

    2012-03-01

    Phase-contrast imaging is an emerging technology that may increase the signal-difference-to-noise ratio in medical imaging. One of the most promising phase-contrast techniques is Talbot interferometry, which, combined with energy-sensitive photon-counting detectors, enables spectral differential phase-contrast mammography. We have evaluated a realistic system based on this technique by cascaded-systems analysis and with a task-dependent ideal-observer detectability index as a figure-of-merit. Beam-propagation simulations were used for validation and illustration of the analytical framework. Differential phase contrast improved detectability compared to absorption contrast, in particular for fine tumor structures. This result was supported by images of human mastectomy samples that were acquired with a conventional detector. The optimal incident energy was higher in differential phase contrast than in absorption contrast when disregarding the setup design energy. Further, optimal weighting of the transmitted spectrum was found to have a weaker energy dependence than for absorption contrast. Taking the design energy into account yielded a superimposed maximum on both detectability as a function of incident energy, and on optimal weighting. Spectral material decomposition was not facilitated by phase contrast, but phase information may be used instead of spectral information.

  14. Complex dark-field contrast in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Tang, Xiangyang

    2015-03-01

    Without assuming that the sub-pixel microstructures of an object to be imaged distribute in space randomly, we investigate the influence of the object's microstructures on grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging. Our theoretical analysis and 3D computer simulation study based on the paraxial Fresnel-Kirchhoff theory show that the existing dark-field contrast can be generalized into a complex dark-field contrast in a way such that its imaginary part quantifies the effect of the object's sub-pixel microstructures on the phase of intensity oscillations. A method based on the phase-attenuation duality that holds for soft tissues to be imaged at high x-ray energies is proposed to retrieve the imaginary part of the complex dark-field contrast for imaging. In comparison to the existing dark-field contrast, the imaginary part of complex dark-field contrast exhibits significantly stronger selectivity on the shape of the object's sub-pixel microstructures. Thus the x-ray imaging corresponding to the imaginary part of complex dark-field contrast can provide additional and complementary information to that corresponding to the attenuation contrast, phase contrast and the existing dark-field contrast.

  15. Adaptive optimisation of a generalised phase contrast beam shaping system

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, F.; Choi, F.S.; Glückstad, J.; Booth, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    The generalised phase contrast (GPC) method provides versatile and efficient light shaping for a range of applications. We have implemented a generalised phase contrast system that used two passes on a single spatial light modulator (SLM). Both the pupil phase distribution and the phase contrast filter were generated by the SLM. This provided extra flexibility and control over the parameters of the system including the phase step magnitude, shape, radius and position of the filter. A feedback method for the on-line optimisation of these properties was also developed. Using feedback from images of the generated light field, it was possible to dynamically adjust the phase filter parameters to provide optimum contrast. PMID:26089573

  16. Magnetic field induced differential neutron phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Strobl, M.; Treimer, W.; Walter, P.; Keil, S.; Manke, I.

    2007-12-17

    Besides the attenuation of a neutron beam penetrating an object, induced phase changes have been utilized to provide contrast in neutron and x-ray imaging. In analogy to differential phase contrast imaging of bulk samples, the refraction of neutrons by magnetic fields yields image contrast. Here, it will be reported how double crystal setups can provide quantitative tomographic images of magnetic fields. The use of magnetic air prisms adequate to split the neutron spin states enables a distinction of field induced phase shifts and these introduced by interaction with matter.

  17. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Mark Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-15

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  18. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Mark; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-01

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  19. Phase contrast image guidance for synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Larkin, Kieran G.

    2016-08-01

    Recent image guidance developments for preclinical synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy represent a necessary step for future clinical translation of the technique. Image quality can be further improved using x-ray phase contrast, which is readily available at synchrotron facilities. We here describe a methodology for phase contrast image guidance at the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Differential phase contrast is measured alongside conventional attenuation and used to improve the image quality. Post-processing based on the inverse Riesz transform is employed on the measured data to obtain noticeably sharper images. The procedure is extremely well suited for applications such as image guidance which require both visual assessment and sample alignment based on semi automatic image registration. Moreover, our approach can be combined with all other differential phase contrast imaging techniques, in all cases where a quantitative evaluation of the refractive index is not required.

  20. Phase contrast radiography. II. Imaging of complex objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Nugent, Keith A.; Peele, Andrew G.; Thornton, John

    2005-11-01

    An image model for phase contrast in projection radiography of complex objects is presented and tested experimentally. The model includes the wavelength distribution of the radiation. The model is used to optimize the contrast of a radiograph of a piece of aluminium containing a fine crack.

  1. Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography Visualizes Microvasculature Changes in Mice Brains after Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yuanyuan; Xie, Bohua; Lin, Xiaojie

    2016-01-01

    Imaging brain microvasculature is important in plasticity studies of cerebrovascular diseases. Applying contrast agents, traditional μCT and μMRI methods gain imaging contrast for vasculature. The aim of this study is to develop a synchrotron radiation X-ray inline phase-contrast tomography (SRXPCT) method for imaging the intact mouse brain (micro)vasculature in high resolution (~3.7 μm) without contrast agent. A specific preparation protocol was proposed to enhance the phase contrast of brain vasculature by using density difference over gas-tissue interface. The CT imaging system was developed and optimized to obtain 3D brain vasculature of adult male C57BL/6 mice. The SRXPCT method was further applied to investigate the microvasculature changes in mouse brains (n = 14) after 14-day reperfusion from transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). 3D reconstructions of brain microvasculature demonstrated that the branching radius ratio (post- to preinjury) of small vessels (radius < 7.4 μm) in the injury group was significantly smaller than that in the sham group (p < 0.05). This result revealed the active angiogenesis in the recovery brain after stroke. As a high-resolution and contrast-agent-free method, the SRXPCT method demonstrates higher potential in investigations of functional plasticity in cerebrovascular diseases. PMID:27563468

  2. Grid-Based Fourier Transform Phase Contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Sajjad

    Low contrast in x-ray attenuation imaging between different materials of low electron density is a limitation of traditional x-ray radiography. Phase contrast imaging offers the potential to improve the contrast between such materials, but due to the requirements on the spatial coherence of the x-ray beam, practical implementation of such systems with tabletop (i.e. non-synchrotron) sources has been limited. One recently developed phase imaging technique employs multiple fine-pitched gratings. However, the strict manufacturing tolerances and precise alignment requirements have limited the widespread adoption of grating-based techniques. In this work, we have investigated a technique recently demonstrated by Bennett et al. that utilizes a single grid of much coarser pitch. Our system consisted of a low power 100 microm spot Mo source, a CCD with 22 microm pixel pitch, and either a focused mammography linear grid or a stainless steel woven mesh. Phase is extracted from a single image by windowing and comparing data localized about harmonics of the grid in the Fourier domain. A Matlab code was written to perform the image processing. For the first time, the effects on the diffraction phase contrast and scattering amplitude images of varying grid types and periods, and of varying the window function type used to separate the harmonics, and the window widths, were investigated. Using the wire mesh, derivatives of the phase along two orthogonal directions were obtained and new methods investigated to form improved phase contrast images.

  3. Resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging by microsphere digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunxin; Guo, Sha; Wang, Dayong; Lin, Qiaowen; Rong, Lu; Zhao, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Microsphere has shown the superiority of super-resolution imaging in the traditional 2D intensity microscope. Here a microsphere digital holography approach is presented to realize the resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging. The system is designed by combining the microsphere with the image-plane digital holography. A microsphere very close to the object can increase the resolution by transforming the object wave from the higher frequency to the lower one. The resolution enhancement amplitude and phase images can be retrieved from a single hologram. The experiments are carried on the 1D and 2D gratings, and the results demonstrate that the observed resolution has been improved, meanwhile, the phase-contrast image is obtained. The proposed method can improve the transverse resolution in all directions based on a single exposure. Furthermore, this system has extended the application of the microsphere from the conventional 2D microscopic imaging to 3D phase-contrast microscopic imaging.

  4. Development of neutron tomography and phase contrast imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kashyap, Y. S.; Agrawal, Ashish; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar

    2013-02-05

    This paper presents design and development of a state of art neutron imaging technique at CIRUS reactor with special reference for techniques adopted for tomography and phase contrast imaging applications. Different components of the beamline such as collimator, shielding, sample manipulator, digital imaging system were designed keeping in mind the requirements of data acquisition time and resolution. The collimator was designed in such a way that conventional and phase contrast imaging can be done using same collimator housing. We have done characterization of fuel pins, study of hydride blisters in pressure tubes hydrogen based cells, two phase flow visualization, and online study of locomotive parts etc. using neutron tomography and radiography technique. We have also done some studies using neutron phase contrast imaging technique on this beamline.

  5. Contrast enhancement of propagation based X-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Adam; Xu, Ling; Petruccelli, Jon C.; Gupta, Rajiv; Barbastathis, George

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate a quantitative X-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) technique derived from propagation dependent phase change. We assume that the absorption and phase components are correlated and solve the Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE). The experimental setup is simple compared to other XPCI techniques; the only requirements are a micro-focus X-ray source with sufficient temporal coherence and an X-ray detector of sufficient spatial resolution. This method was demonstrated in three scenarios, the first of which entails identification of an index-matched sphere. A rubber and nylon sphere were immersed in water and imaged. While the rubber sphere could be plainly seen on a radiograph, the nylon sphere was only visible in the phase reconstruction. Next, the technique was applied to differentiating liquid samples. In this scenario, three liquid samples (acetone, water, and hydrogen peroxide) were analyzed using both conventional computed tomography (CT) and phase contrast CT. While conventional CT was capable of differentiating between acetone and the other two liquids, it failed to distinguish between water and hydrogen peroxide; only phase CT was capable of differentiating all three samples. Finally, the technique was applied to CT imaging of a human artery specimen with extensive atherosclerotic plaque. This scenario demonstrated the increased sensitivity to soft tissue compared to conventional CT; it also uncovered some drawbacks of the method, which will be the target of future work. In all cases, the signal-to-noise ratio of phase contrast was greatly enhanced relative to conventional attenuation-based imaging.

  6. Projection phase contrast microscopy with a hard x-ray nanofocused beam: Defocus and contrast transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Salditt, T.; Giewekemeyer, K.; Fuhse, C.; Krueger, S. P.; Tucoulou, R.; Cloetens, P.

    2009-05-01

    We report a projection phase contrast microscopy experiment using hard x-ray pink beam undulator radiation focused by an adaptive mirror system to 100-200 nm spot size. This source is used to illuminate a lithographic test pattern with a well-controlled range of spatial frequencies. The oscillatory nature of the contrast transfer function with source-to-sample distance in this holographic imaging scheme is quantified and the validity of the weak phase object approximation is confirmed for the experimental conditions.

  7. Contrast transfer function in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianheng; Du, Yang; Lin, Danying; Liu, Xin; Niu, Hanben

    2014-05-01

    x-Ray grating interferometry is a method for x-ray wave front sensing and phase-contrast imaging that has been developed over past few years. Contrast and resolution are the criteria used to specify the quality of an image. In characterizing the performance of this interferometer, the contrast transfer function is considered in this paper. The oscillatory nature of the contrast transfer function (CTF) is derived and quantified for this interferometer. The illumination source and digital detector are both considered as significant factors controlling image quality, and it can be noted that contrast and resolution in turn depends primarily on the projected intensity profile of the array source and the pixel size of the detector. Furthermore, a test pattern phantom with a well-controlled range of spatial frequencies was designed and imaging of this phantom was simulated by a computer. Contrast transfer function behavior observed in the simulated image is consistent with our theoretical CTF. This might be beneficial for the evaluation and optimization of a grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging system.

  8. Simultaneous amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast surface plasmon resonance imaging by use of digital holography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiping; Zhong, Jingang

    2012-01-01

    The surface plasmon resonance imaging technique provides a tool that allows high-throughput analysis and real-time kinetic measurement. A simultaneous amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast surface plasmon resonance imaging method is presented. The amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast images are simultaneously obtained by use of digital holography. The detection sensitivity of amplitude-contrast imaging and phase-contrast imaging can compensate for each other. Thus, the detectable sample components may cover a wider range of refractive index values for the simultaneous amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast imaging method than for the phase-contrast imaging method or amplitude-contrast imaging method. A detailed description of the theory and an experiment of monitoring the evaporation process of a drop of NaCl injection in real time are presented. In addition, the amplitude-contrast image has less coherent noise by digital holography. PMID:23243569

  9. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM.

    PubMed

    Damircheli, Mehrnoosh; Payam, Amir F; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM). Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes.

  10. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM

    PubMed Central

    Damircheli, Mehrnoosh; Payam, Amir F

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM). Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes. PMID:26114079

  11. Dose efficiency consideration for volume-of-interest breast imaging using x-ray differential phase-contrast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Weixing; Ning, Ruola

    2009-02-01

    The newly developed differential phase-contrast (DPC) imaging technique has attracted increasing interest among researchers. In a DPC system, the self-imaging effect and the phase-stepping method are implemented through three gratings to manifest phase contrast, and differentiated phase images can be obtained. An important advantage of this technique is that hospital-grade x-ray tubes can be used, allowing much higher x-ray output power and faster image processing than with micro-focus in-line phase-contrast imaging. A DPC-CT system can acquire images from different view angles along a circular orbit, and tomographic images can be reconstructed. However, the principle of DPC imaging requires multiple exposures to compute any differentiated phase image at each view angle, which raises concerns about radiation exposure via x-ray dose. Computer simulations are carried out to study the dose efficiency for DPC-CT for volume-of-interest breast imaging. A conceptual CBCT/DPC-CT hybrid imaging system and a numerical breast phantom are designed for this study. A FBP-type reconstruction algorithm is optimized for the VOI reconstruction. Factors including the x-ray flux and detector pixel size are considered and their effects on reconstruction image quality in terms of noise level and contrast-to-noise ratio are investigated. The results indicate that with a pixel size of 20 microns and a dose level of 5.7mGy, which is equivalent to the patient dose of a two-view mammography screening or a dedicated CBCT breast imaging scan, much better tissue contrast and spatial resolution can be achieved using the DPC-CT technique. It is very promising for possible application at pathology-level in vivo study for human breasts.

  12. Interactive cell segmentation based on phase contrast optics.

    PubMed

    Su, Hang; Su, Zhou; Zheng, Shibao; Yang, Hua; Wei, Sha

    2014-01-01

    Cell segmentation in phase contrast microscopy images lays a crucial foundation for numerous subsequent computer-aided cell image analysis, but it encounters many unsolved challenges due to image qualities and artifacts caused by phase contrast optics. Addressing the unsolved challenges, the authors propose an interactive cell segmentation scheme over phase retardation features. After partitioning the images into phase homogeneous atoms, human annotations are propagated to unlabeled atoms over an affinity graph that is learned based on discrimination analysis. Then, an active query strategy is proposed for which the most informative unlabeled atom is selected for annotation, which is also propagated to the other unlabeled atoms. Cell segmentation converges to quality results after several rounds of interactions involving both the user's intentions and characteristics of image features. Experimental results demonstrate that cells with different optical properties are well segmented via the proposed approach.

  13. Phase contrast microscopy with full numerical aperture illumination.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Christian; Jesacher, Alexander; Bernet, Stefan; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2008-11-24

    A modification of the phase contrast method in microscopy is presented, which reduces inherent artifacts and improves the spatial resolution. In standard Zernike phase contrast microscopy the illumination is achieved through an annular ring aperture, and the phase filtering operation is performed by a corresponding phase ring in the back focal plane of the objective. The Zernike method increases the spatial resolution as compared to plane wave illumination, but it also produces artifacts, such as the halo- and the shade-off effect. Our modification consists in replacing the illumination ring by a set of point apertures which are randomly distributed over the whole aperture of the condenser, and in replacing the Zernike phase ring by a matched set of point-like phase shifters in the back focal plane of the objective. Experimentally this is done by illuminating the sample with light diffracted from a phase hologram displayed at a spatial light modulator (SLM). The subsequent filtering operation is then done with a second matched phase hologram displayed at another SLM in a Fourier plane of the imaging pathway. This method significantly reduces the halo- and shade-off artifacts whilst providing the full spatial resolution of the microscope. PMID:19030068

  14. Investigation of in-line solid-phase extraction capillary electrophoresis for the analysis of drugs of abuse and their metabolites in water samples.

    PubMed

    Botello, Igor; Borrull, Francesc; Aguilar, Carme; Calull, Marta

    2012-02-01

    In this study, in-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) was used as an enrichment technique in combination with CE for the preconcentration and separation of 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), cocaine (COC), codeine (COD) and 6-acetylmorphine (6AM). The separation buffer (BGE) used was 80 mM disodium phosphate anhydrous and 6 mM of HCl (final BGE pH of 3). The SPE extractor consists of a small segment of capillary filled with Oasis HLB sorbent and inserted into the inlet section of the electrophoretic capillary. Different parameters affecting preconcentration were evaluated, such as sample pH, the volume of the elution plug and sample injection time. The detection limits (LODs) reached for standard samples by in-line SPE-CE-UV ranged between 50 and 200 ng/L, with sensitivity enhancement factors ranging from 2300 to 5300. Reproducibility values (expressed in terms of relative standard deviation) were below 7.6% for standard samples. This is a simple and an effective method for the determination of the studied drugs of abuse and their metabolites. The applicability of the developed method was demonstrated in tap and river water samples which were directly analyzed without any off-line pretreatment. Analytical parameters were evaluated and LODs were between 70 and 270 ng/L with relative recoveries between 85 and 97%.

  15. Differential phase contrast in scanning x-ray microscopy with half-wavelength phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Takeuchi, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    A method for differential-phase-contrast imaging in scanning x-ray microscopy is proposed. The microfocus beam is produced with an x-ray focusing optics, and a half of the optical aperture is masked with a λ/2 phase shifter. This generates a pair of focused beam at the focal plane, with π phase difference. Combining with a diaphragm in front of the transmission beam detector, differential phase contrast (contrast proportional to the phase-difference between two foci) can be obtained. Preliminary results with a Fresnel zone plate focusing optics at 12.4 keV x-ray energy are shown.

  16. Grating Based, Phase Contrast Radiography with Bremsstrahlung Source

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher Goldin and Shaun Hampton

    2009-09-11

    Phase-contrast radiography (PCR) generates an image from gradients in the phase of the probing X-radiation induced by the radiographic object, and can therefore make visible features difficult or impossible to see with conventional, absorption-contrast (ACR) radiography. For any particular object, variations in either the real or imaginary parts of the index of refraction could be greater. Most practical difficulties of PCR arise from the very small deviation from unity (~10-5-10-6, depending of material and energy) of the real part of the index of refraction. In principal, straightforward shadowgraphy would provide a phase-contrast image, but in practice this is usually overwhelmed by the zero-order (bright field) signal. Eliminating this sets the phase-contrast signal against a dark field (as in Schlieren photography with visible light). One way to do this with X-rays is with a grating that produces a Talbot interference pattern. Minute variations in optical path lengths through the radiographic object can significantly shift the Talbot fringes, and these shifts constitute a dark-field signal separate from the zero-order wave. This technique has recently been investigated up to ~20keV [1-3]; this work addresses what sets the practical upper limit, and where that limit is. These appear to be grating fabrication, and ~60keV, respectively.

  17. Phase contrast image segmentation using a Laue analyser crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Paganin, David M.; Uesugi, Kentaro; Allison, Beth J.; Lewis, Robert A.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Pavlov, Konstantin M.

    2011-02-01

    Dual-energy x-ray imaging is a powerful tool enabling two-component samples to be separated into their constituent objects from two-dimensional images. Phase contrast x-ray imaging can render the boundaries between media of differing refractive indices visible, despite them having similar attenuation properties; this is important for imaging biological soft tissues. We have used a Laue analyser crystal and a monochromatic x-ray source to combine the benefits of both techniques. The Laue analyser creates two distinct phase contrast images that can be simultaneously acquired on a high-resolution detector. These images can be combined to separate the effects of x-ray phase, absorption and scattering and, using the known complex refractive indices of the sample, to quantitatively segment its component materials. We have successfully validated this phase contrast image segmentation (PCIS) using a two-component phantom, containing an iodinated contrast agent, and have also separated the lungs and ribcage in images of a mouse thorax. Simultaneous image acquisition has enabled us to perform functional segmentation of the mouse thorax throughout the respiratory cycle during mechanical ventilation.

  18. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    SciTech Connect

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  19. Effect of coherence loss in differential phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Weixing; Ning, Ruola; Liu, Jiangkun

    2014-03-01

    Coherence property of x-rays is critical in the grating-based differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging because it is the physical foundation that makes any form of phase contrast imaging possible. Loss of coherence is an important experimental issue, which results in increased image noise and reduced object contrast in DPC images and DPC cone beam CT (DPC-CBCT) reconstructions. In this study, experimental results are investigated to characterize the visibility loss (a measurement of coherence loss) in several different applications, including different-sized phantom imaging, specimen imaging and small animal imaging. Key measurements include coherence loss (relative intensity changes in the area of interest in phase-stepping images), contrast and noise level in retrieved DPC images, and contrast and noise level in reconstructed DPC-CBCT images. The influence of size and composition of imaged object (uniform object, bones, skin hairs, tissues, and etc) will be quantified. The same investigation is also applied for moiré pattern-based DPC-CBCT imaging with the same exposure dose. A theoretical model is established to relate coherence loss, noise level in phase stepping images (or moiré images), and the contrast and noise in the retrieved DPC images. Experiment results show that uniform objects lead to a small coherence loss even when the attenuation is higher, while objects with large amount of small structures result in huge coherence loss even when the attenuation is small. The theoretical model predicts the noise level in retrieved DPC images, and it also suggests a minimum dose required for DPC imaging to compensate for coherence loss.

  20. Phase contrast and operation regimes in multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Sergio

    2014-04-07

    In amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy the attractive and the repulsive force regimes induce phase shifts above and below 90°, respectively. In the more recent multifrequency approach, however, multiple operation regimes have been reported and the theory should be revisited. Here, a theory of phase contrast in multifrequency atomic force microscopy is developed and discussed in terms of energy transfer between modes, energy dissipation and the kinetic energy and energy transfer associated with externally driven harmonics. The single frequency virial that controls the phase shift might undergo transitions in sign while the average force (modal virial) remains positive (negative)

  1. Nonlinear dynamic phase contrast microscopy for microfluidic and microbiological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denz, C.; Holtmann, F.; Woerdemann, M.; Oevermann, M.

    2008-08-01

    In live sciences, the observation and analysis of moving living cells, molecular motors or motion of micro- and nano-objects is a current field of research. At the same time, microfluidic innovations are needed for biological and medical applications on a micro- and nano-scale. Conventional microscopy techniques are reaching considerable limits with respect to these issues. A promising approach for this challenge is nonlinear dynamic phase contrast microscopy. It is an alternative full field approach that allows to detect motion as well as phase changes of living unstained micro-objects in real-time, thereby being marker free, without contact and non destructive, i.e. fully biocompatible. The generality of this system allows it to be combined with several other microscope techniques such as conventional bright field or fluorescence microscopy. In this article we will present the dynamic phase contrast technique and its applications in analysis of micro organismic dynamics, micro flow velocimetry and micro-mixing analysis.

  2. Dynamic Studies of Lung Fluid Clearance with Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Williams, Ivan; Irvine, Sarah C.; Morgan, Michael J.; Paganin, David M.; Lewis, Rob A.; Pavlov, Konstantin; Hooper, Stuart B.; Wallace, Megan J.; Siu, Karen K. W.; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2007-01-19

    Clearance of liquid from the airways at birth is a poorly understood process, partly due to the difficulties of observing and measuring the distribution of air within the lung. Imaging dynamic processes within the lung in vivo with high contrast and spatial resolution is therefore a major challenge. However, phase contrast X-ray imaging is able to exploit inhaled air as a contrast agent, rendering the lungs of small animals visible due to the large changes in the refractive index at air/tissue interfaces. In concert with the high spatial resolution afforded by X-ray imaging systems (<100 {mu}m), propagation-based phase contrast imaging is ideal for studying lung development. To this end we have utilized intense, monochromatic synchrotron radiation, together with a fast readout CCD camera, to study fluid clearance from the lungs of rabbit pups at birth. Local rates of fluid clearance have been measured from the dynamic sequences using a single image phase retrieval algorithm.

  3. Phase contrast neutron imaging at the PULSTAR reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Kaushal K.; Hawari, Ayman I.

    2011-10-01

    Non-interferometric phase contrast effects have been shown to enhance material edges in neutron images. The achieved contrast enhancement in the image depends upon the neutron coherent scattering lengths of the materials present in the object and the degree of spatial coherence of the neutron beam. Spatial coherence of the beam is achieved using design-based spatial filters, a large L/ d ratio (˜10,000) and low average neutron energy. Physically, a large L/ d ratio is realized by a pinhole neutron source thereby significantly reducing the neutron beam intensity at the image plane. Thus, performance of such imaging exercises at low/medium intensity neutron sources is associated with additional design considerations that are not needed at high intensity neutron sources, where it has been demonstrated. In the present work, phase contrast neutron imaging was conducted using a suitably designed collimator at the 1-MWth PULSTAR reactor located at North Carolina State University (NCSU). Results of the imaging exercises that depict phase contrast edge enhancement are being presented along with the collimator design. Digital image plate detectors were used to capture images with a range of exposure times between 45 and 120 min.

  4. Cumulative phase delay imaging for contrast-enhanced ultrasound tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Standard dynamic-contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) imaging detects and estimates ultrasound-contrast-agent (UCA) concentration based on the amplitude of the nonlinear (harmonic) components generated during ultrasound (US) propagation through UCAs. However, harmonic components generation is not specific to UCAs, as it also occurs for US propagating through tissue. Moreover, nonlinear artifacts affect standard DCE-US imaging, causing contrast to tissue ratio reduction, and resulting in possible misclassification of tissue and misinterpretation of UCA concentration. Furthermore, no contrast-specific modality exists for DCE-US tomography; in particular speed-of-sound changes due to UCAs are well within those caused by different tissue types. Recently, a new marker for UCAs has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental component is in fact observable for US propagating through UCAs, and is absent in tissue. In this paper, tomographic US images based on CPD are for the first time presented and compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Results show the applicability of this marker for contrast specific US imaging, with cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI) showing superior capabilities in detecting and localizing UCA, as compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Cavities (filled with UCA) which were down to 1 mm in diameter were clearly detectable. Moreover, CPDI is free of the above mentioned nonlinear artifacts. These results open important possibilities to DCE-US tomography, with potential applications to breast imaging for cancer localization.

  5. AUTOMATED ANALYSIS OF AQUEOUS SAMPLES CONTAINING PESTICIDES, ACIDIC/BASIC/NEUTRAL SEMIVOLATILES AND VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION COUPLED IN-LINE TO LARGE VOLUME INJECTION GC/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data is presented on the development of a new automated system combining solid phase extraction (SPE) with GC/MS spectrometry for the single-run analysis of water samples containing a broad range of organic compounds. The system uses commercially available automated in-line 10-m...

  6. Noise properties of in-line x-ray imaging and tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2008-08-01

    Quantitative in-line phase-contrast imaging methods seek to reconstruct separate images that depict an object's absorption and real-valued refractive index distributions. An understanding of the statistical properties of images in planar and tomographic implementations of X-ray phase-contrast imaging is required for optimizing system and algorithm designs using task-based measures of image quality. In this work, the statistical properties of phase-contrast imaging are investigated by use of analytical and computer-simulation methods.

  7. Comparison of phase-difference and complex-difference processing in phase-contrast MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, M A; Ikezaki, Y

    1991-01-01

    The two main phase-contrast reconstruction methods are phase difference and complex difference. The signal-to-noise ratio properties and relative advantages of the two techniques are discussed. It is argued that each processing method has applications in which it is superior, and guidelines are provided to determine those applications. It is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that only the complex-difference method is well suited for processing phase-contrast slabs with use of a projection dephaser gradient.

  8. Clinical application of low-dose phase contrast breast CT: methods for the optimization of the reconstruction workflow.

    PubMed

    Pacilè, S; Brun, F; Dullin, C; Nesterest, Y I; Dreossi, D; Mohammadi, S; Tonutti, M; Stacul, F; Lockie, D; Zanconati, F; Accardo, A; Tromba, G; Gureyev, T E

    2015-08-01

    Results are presented of a feasibility study of three-dimensional X-ray tomographic mammography utilising in-line phase contrast. Experiments were performed at SYRMEP beamline of Elettra synchrotron. A specially designed plastic phantom and a mastectomy sample containing a malignant lesion were used to study the reconstructed image quality as a function of different image processing operations. Detailed evaluation and optimization of image reconstruction workflows have been carried out using combinations of several advanced computed tomography algorithms with different pre-processing and post-processing steps. Special attention was paid to the effect of phase retrieval on the diagnostic value of the reconstructed images. A number of objective image quality indices have been applied for quantitative evaluation of the results, and these were compared with subjective assessments of the same images by three experienced radiologists and one pathologist. The outcomes of this study provide practical guidelines for the optimization of image processing workflows in synchrotron-based phase-contrast mammo-tomography.

  9. Clinical application of low-dose phase contrast breast CT: methods for the optimization of the reconstruction workflow.

    PubMed

    Pacilè, S; Brun, F; Dullin, C; Nesterest, Y I; Dreossi, D; Mohammadi, S; Tonutti, M; Stacul, F; Lockie, D; Zanconati, F; Accardo, A; Tromba, G; Gureyev, T E

    2015-08-01

    Results are presented of a feasibility study of three-dimensional X-ray tomographic mammography utilising in-line phase contrast. Experiments were performed at SYRMEP beamline of Elettra synchrotron. A specially designed plastic phantom and a mastectomy sample containing a malignant lesion were used to study the reconstructed image quality as a function of different image processing operations. Detailed evaluation and optimization of image reconstruction workflows have been carried out using combinations of several advanced computed tomography algorithms with different pre-processing and post-processing steps. Special attention was paid to the effect of phase retrieval on the diagnostic value of the reconstructed images. A number of objective image quality indices have been applied for quantitative evaluation of the results, and these were compared with subjective assessments of the same images by three experienced radiologists and one pathologist. The outcomes of this study provide practical guidelines for the optimization of image processing workflows in synchrotron-based phase-contrast mammo-tomography. PMID:26309770

  10. Clinical application of low-dose phase contrast breast CT: methods for the optimization of the reconstruction workflow

    PubMed Central

    Pacilè, S.; Brun, F.; Dullin, C.; Nesterest, Y. I.; Dreossi, D.; Mohammadi, S.; Tonutti, M.; Stacul, F.; Lockie, D.; Zanconati, F.; Accardo, A.; Tromba, G.; Gureyev, T. E.

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented of a feasibility study of three-dimensional X-ray tomographic mammography utilising in-line phase contrast. Experiments were performed at SYRMEP beamline of Elettra synchrotron. A specially designed plastic phantom and a mastectomy sample containing a malignant lesion were used to study the reconstructed image quality as a function of different image processing operations. Detailed evaluation and optimization of image reconstruction workflows have been carried out using combinations of several advanced computed tomography algorithms with different pre-processing and post-processing steps. Special attention was paid to the effect of phase retrieval on the diagnostic value of the reconstructed images. A number of objective image quality indices have been applied for quantitative evaluation of the results, and these were compared with subjective assessments of the same images by three experienced radiologists and one pathologist. The outcomes of this study provide practical guidelines for the optimization of image processing workflows in synchrotron-based phase-contrast mammo-tomography. PMID:26309770

  11. Phase-Change Contrast Agents for Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sheeran, Paul S.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) for ultrasound-based applications have resulted in novel ways of approaching diagnostic and therapeutic techniques beyond what is possible with microbubble contrast agents and liquid emulsions. When subjected to sufficient pressures delivered by an ultrasound transducer, stabilized droplets undergo a phase-transition to the gaseous state and a volumetric expansion occurs. This phenomenon, termed acoustic droplet vaporization, has been proposed as a means to address a number of in vivo applications at the microscale and nanoscale. In this review, the history of PCCAs, physical mechanisms involved, and proposed applications are discussed with a summary of studies demonstrated in vivo. Factors that influence the design of PCCAs are discussed, as well as the need for future studies to characterize potential bioeffects for administration in humans and optimization of ultrasound parameters. PMID:22352770

  12. Elemental x-ray imaging using Zernike phase contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qi-Gang; Chen, Jian; Wali, Faiz; Bao, Yuan; Wang, Zhi-Li; Zhu, Pei-Ping; Tian, Yang-Chao; Gao, Kun

    2016-10-01

    We develop an element-specific x-ray microscopy method by using Zernike phase contrast imaging near absorption edges, where a real part of refractive index changes abruptly. In this method two phase contrast images are subtracted to obtain the target element: one is at the absorption edge of the target element and the other is near the absorption edge. The x-ray exposure required by this method is expected to be significantly lower than that of conventional absorption-based x-ray elemental imaging methods. Numerical calculations confirm the advantages of this highly efficient imaging method. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB825801) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11505188, and 11305173).

  13. Phase-Contrast Velocimetry with Simultaneous Fat/Water Separation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kevin M.; Wieben, Oliver; Samsonov, Alexey A.

    2011-01-01

    Phase-contrast MRI can provide high-resolution angiographic velocity images, especially in conjunction with non-Cartesian k-space sampling. However, acquisitions can be sensitive to errors from artifacts from main magnetic field inhomogeneities and chemical shift from fat. Particularly in body imaging, fat content can cause degraded image quality, create errors in the velocity measurements, and prevent the use of self-calibrated amplitude of static field heterogeneity corrections. To reduce the influence of fat and facilitate self-calibrated amplitude of static field heterogeneity corrections, a combination of chemical shift imaging with phase-contrast velocimetry with nonlinear least-squares estimation of velocity, fat, and water signals is proposed. A chemical shift and first-moment symmetric dual-echo sequence is proposed to minimize the scan time penalty, and initial investigations are performed in phantoms and volunteers that show reduced influence from fat in velocity images. PMID:20512860

  14. Spline based iterative phase retrieval algorithm for X-ray differential phase contrast radiography.

    PubMed

    Nilchian, Masih; Wang, Zhentian; Thuering, Thomas; Unser, Michael; Stampanoni, Marco

    2015-04-20

    Differential phase contrast imaging using grating interferometer is a promising alternative to conventional X-ray radiographic methods. It provides the absorption, differential phase and scattering information of the underlying sample simultaneously. Phase retrieval from the differential phase signal is an essential problem for quantitative analysis in medical imaging. In this paper, we formalize the phase retrieval as a regularized inverse problem, and propose a novel discretization scheme for the derivative operator based on B-spline calculus. The inverse problem is then solved by a constrained regularized weighted-norm algorithm (CRWN) which adopts the properties of B-spline and ensures a fast implementation. The method is evaluated with a tomographic dataset and differential phase contrast mammography data. We demonstrate that the proposed method is able to produce phase image with enhanced and higher soft tissue contrast compared to conventional absorption-based approach, which can potentially provide useful information to mammographic investigations.

  15. Image fusion algorithm for differential phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roessl, Ewald; Koehler, Thomas; van Stevendaal, Udo; Martens, Gerhard; Hauser, Nik; Wang, Zhentian; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-03-01

    Differential phase-contrast imaging in the x-ray domain provides three physically complementary signals:1, 2 the attenuation, the differential phase-contrast, related to the refractive index, and the dark-field signal, strongly influenced by the total amount of radiation scattered into very small angles. In medical applications, it is of the utmost importance to present to the radiologist all clinically relevant information in as compact a way as possible. Hence, the need arises for a method to combine two or more of the above mentioned signals into one image containing all information relevant for diagnosis. We present an image composition algorithm that fuses the attenuation image and the differential phase contrast image into a composite, final image based on the assumption that the real and imaginary part of the complex refractive index of the sample can be related by a constant scaling factor. The merging is performed in such a way that the composite image is characterized by minimal noise-power at each frequency component.

  16. Multi-pore carbon phase plate for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sannomiya, Takumi; Junesch, Juliane; Hosokawa, Fumio; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Arai, Yoshihiro; Kayama, Yoko

    2014-11-01

    A new fabrication method of carbon based phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy is presented. This method utilizes colloidal masks to produce pores as well as disks on thin carbon membranes for phase modulation. Since no serial process is involved, carbon phase plate membranes containing hundreds of pores can be mass-produced on a large scale, which allows "disposal" of contaminated or degraded phase modulating objects after use. Due to the spherical shape of the mask colloid particles, the produced pores are perfectly circular. The pore size and distribution can be easily tuned by the mask colloid size and deposition condition. By using the stencil method, disk type phase plates can also be fabricated on a pore type phase plate. Both pore and disk type phase plates were tested by measuring amorphous samples and confirmed to convert the sinus phase contrast transfer function to the cosine shape. PMID:25129640

  17. Spiral phase plate contrast in optical and electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juchtmans, Roeland; Clark, Laura; Lubk, Axel; Verbeeck, Jo

    2016-08-01

    The use of phase plates in the back focal plane of a microscope is a well-established technique in optical microscopy to increase the contrast of weakly interacting samples and is gaining interest in electron microscopy as well. In this paper we study the spiral phase plate (SPP), also called helical, vortex, or two-dimensional Hilbert phase plate, which adds an angularly dependent phase of the form ei ℓ ϕk to the exit wave in Fourier space. In the limit of large collection angles, we analytically calculate that the average of a pair of ℓ =±1 SPP filtered images is directly proportional to the gradient squared of the exit wave, explaining the edge contrast previously seen in optical SPP work. We discuss the difference between a clockwise-anticlockwise pair of SPP filtered images and derive conditions under which the modulus of the wave's gradient can be seen directly from one SPP filtered image. This work provides the theoretical background to interpret images obtained with a SPP, thereby opening new perspectives for new experiments to study, for example, magnetic materials in an electron microscope.

  18. Various clinical application of phase contrast X-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Chilhwan; Park, Sangyong; Ha, Seunghan; Park, Gyuman; Lee, Gunwoo; Lee, Onseok; Je, Jungho

    2008-02-01

    In biomedical application study using phase contrast X-ray, both sample thickness or density and absorption difference are very important factors in aspects of contrast enhancement. We present experimental evidence that synchrotron hard X-ray are suitable for radiological imaging of biological samples down to the cellular level. We investigated the potential of refractive index radiology using un-monochromatized synchrotron hard X-rays for the imaging of cell and tissue in various diseases. Material had been adopted various medical field, such as apoE knockout mouse in cardiologic field, specimen from renal and prostatic carcinoma patient in urology, basal cell epithelioma in dermatology, brain tissue from autosy sample of pakinson's disease, artificially induced artilrtis tissue from rabbits and extracted tooth from patients of crack tooth syndrome. Formalin and paraffin fixed tissue blocks were cut in 3 mm thickness for the X-ray radiographic imaging. From adjacent areas, 4 μm thickness sections were also prepared for hematoxylin-eosin staining. Radiographic images of dissected tissues were obtained using the hard X-rays from the 7B2 beamline of the Pohang Light Source (PLS). The technique used for the study was the phase contrast images were compared with the optical microscopic images of corresponding histological slides. Radiographic images of various diseased tissues showed clear histological details of organelles in normal tissues. Most of cancerous lesions were well differentiated from adjacent normal tissues and detailed histological features of each tumor were clearly identified. Also normal microstructures were identifiable by the phase contrast imaging. Tissue in cancer or other disease showed clearly different findings from those of surrounding normal tissue. For the first time we successfully demonstrated that synchrotron hard X-rays can be used for radiological imaging of relatively thick tissue samples with great histological details.

  19. Renal stones on portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT: does intravenous contrast interfere with detection?

    PubMed Central

    Dym, R. Joshua; Duncan, Dameon R.; Spektor, Michael; Cohen, Hillel W.; Scheinfeld, Meir H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the sensitivity of portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT for the detection of renal stones. Methods This retrospective study included 97 CT examinations of the abdomen without and with intravenous contrast, including 85 (87.6%) examinations with at least one renal stone on the “gold standard” noncontrast images, as scored by a single radiologist. Three other radiologists each independently reviewed only the contrast-enhanced images from all 97 examinations and recorded all renal stones. Reviewer sensitivity for stones was categorized by stone diameter. Reviewer sensitivity and specificity for stone disease were also calculated on a per-kidney basis. Results The 97 cases included a total of 238 stones ≥1 mm, with a mean (±SD) of 1.2 ± 1.9 stones per kidney and a stone diameter of 3.5 ± 3.0 mm. Pooling data for the three reviewers, sensitivity for all stones was 81%; sensitivity for stones ≥2, ≥3, ≥4, and ≥5 mm was 88%, 95%, 99%, and 98%, respectively. Sensitivity for stone disease on a per-kidney basis was 94% when considering all stones; when considering only stones ≥2, ≥3, and ≥4 mm, sensitivity was 96%, 99%, and 100%, respectively. Specificity for stone disease on a per-kidney basis was 98% overall, 99% when considering only stones ≥2 mm, and 100% when considering only stones ≥3 mm. Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced CT is highly sensitive for the detection of renal stones ≥3 mm in diameter and less sensitive for smaller stones. In cases where the clinical diagnosis is uncertain and performance of a CT examination is being contemplated, intravenous contrast utilization would allow assessment for stone disease while also optimizing evaluation for other conditions. PMID:24504541

  20. Design, development and characterization of an x-band 5 bit DMTL phase shifter using an inline MEMS bridge and MAM capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sukomal; Koul, Shiban K.

    2014-09-01

    A radio frequency micro-electro-mechanical system (RF-MEMS) 5 bit phase shifter based on a distributed MEMS transmission line concept with excellent phase accuracy and good repeatability is presented in this paper. The phase shifter is built with three fixed-fixed beams; one is switchable with electrostatic actuation and the other two are fixed for a metal-air-metal (MAM) capacitor. The design is based on a coplanar waveguide (CPW) configuration using alumina substrate. Gold-based surface micromachining is used to develop the individual primary phase bits (11.25°/22.5°/45°/90°/180°), which are fundamental building blocks of the complete 5 bit phase shifter. All of the primary phase bits are cascaded together to build the complete phase shifter. Detailed design methodology and performance analysis of the unit cell phase shifter has been carried out with structural and parametric optimization using an in-line bridge and MAM capacitors. The mechanical, electrical, transient, intermodulation distortion (IMD), temperature distribution, power handling and loss performances of the MEMS bridge have been experimentally obtained and validated using simulations up to reasonable extent. A single unit cell is able to provide 31 dB return loss, maximum insertion loss of 0.085 dB and a differential phase shift of 5.95° (at 10 GHz) over the band of interest. Furthermore, all primary phase bits are individually tested to ensure overall optimum phase shifter performance. The complete 5 bit phase shifter demonstrates an average insertion loss of 4.72 dB with return loss of better than 12 dB within 8-12 GHz using periodic placement of 62 unit cells and a maximum phase error of ±3.2° has been obtained at 10 GHz. Finally, the x-band 5 bit phase shifter is compared with the present state-of-the-art. The performance of the 5 bit phase shifter when mounted inside a test jig has been experimentally investigated and the results are presented. The total area of

  1. Motionless phase stepping in X-ray phase contrast imaging with a compact source

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Houxun; Chen, Lei; Bennett, Eric E.; Adamo, Nick M.; Gomella, Andrew A.; DeLuca, Alexa M.; Patel, Ajay; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Wen, Han

    2013-01-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging offers a way to visualize the internal structures of an object without the need to deposit significant radiation, and thereby alleviate the main concern in X-ray diagnostic imaging procedures today. Grating-based differential phase contrast imaging techniques are compatible with compact X-ray sources, which is a key requirement for the majority of clinical X-ray modalities. However, these methods are substantially limited by the need for mechanical phase stepping. We describe an electromagnetic phase-stepping method that eliminates mechanical motion, thus removing the constraints in speed, accuracy, and flexibility. The method is broadly applicable to both projection and tomography imaging modes. The transition from mechanical to electromagnetic scanning should greatly facilitate the translation of X-ray phase contrast techniques into mainstream applications. PMID:24218599

  2. Dual-wavelength in-line phase-shifting interferometry based on two dc-term-suppressed intensities with a special phase shift for quantitative phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Yawei; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jin, Weifeng

    2016-06-01

    To efficiently promote the phase retrieval in quantitative phase imaging, a new approach of quantitative phase extraction is proposed based on two intensities with dual wavelength after filtering the corresponding dc terms for each wavelength, in which a special phase shift is used. In this approach, only the combination of the phase-shifting technique and subtraction procedures is needed, and no additional algorithms are required. The thickness of the phase object can be achieved from the phase image, which is related to the synthetic beat wavelength. The feasibility of this method is verified by the simulated experiments of the optically transparent objects. PMID:27244381

  3. Development of a synthetic phase contrast imaging diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Rost, J. C.; Lin, L.; Porkolab, M.

    2010-06-15

    A ''synthetic diagnostic'' has been developed to calculate the expected experimental response of phase contrast imaging (PCI), a scattering diagnostic used to measure density fluctuations in laboratory plasmas, to a tokamak discharge modeled with the GYRO nonlinear gyrokinetic code [J. Candy and R. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. The synthetic PCI includes the spatial response of the experimental diagnostic, primarily implemented as a line integral of plasma density along the beam path, and the minimum and maximum wavenumber response resulting from the detection scheme. The synthetic PCI can be used for comparisons between GYRO and experiment as well as studies of the PCI response.

  4. Hard X-ray Phase-Contrast Tomographic Nanoimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Stampanoni, M.; Marone, F.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Gorelick, S.; David, C.; Mokso, R.; Trtik, P.; Jefimovs, K.

    2011-09-09

    Synchrotron-based full-field tomographic microscopy established itself as a tool for noninvasive investigations. Many beamlines worldwide routinely achieve micrometer spatial resolution while the isotropic 100-nm barrier is reached and trespassed only by few instruments, mainly in the soft x-ray regime. We present an x-ray, full-field microscope with tomographic capabilities operating at 10 keV and with a 3D isotropic resolution of 144 nm recently installed at the TOMCAT beamline of the Swiss Light Source. Custom optical components, including a beam-shaping condenser and phase-shifting dot arrays, were used to obtain an ideal, aperture-matched sample illumination and very sensitive phase-contrast imaging. The instrument has been successfully used for the nondestructive, volumetric investigation of single, unstained cells.

  5. A phase contrast interferometer on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Coda, S.; Porkolab, M. ); Carlstrom, T.N. )

    1992-04-01

    A novel imaging diagnostic has recently become operational on the DIII-D tokamak for the study of density fluctuations at the outer edge of the plasma. The phase contrast imaging approach overcomes the limitations of conventional scattering techniques in the spectral range of interest for transport-related phenomena, by allowing detection of long wavelength modes (up to 7.6 cm) with excellent spatial resolution (5 mm) in the radial direction. Additional motivation for the diagnostic is provided by wave-plasma interactions during heating and current drive experiments in the Ion Cyclotron range of frequencies. Density perturbations of 4 {times} 10{sup 7} cm{sup {minus}3} with a 1 MHz bandwidth can be resolved. The diagnostic employs a 7.6 cm diameter CO{sub 2} laser beam launched vertically across the plasma edge. An image of the plasma is then created on a 16-element detector array: the detector signals are directly proportional to the density fluctuations integrated along each chord. Wavelengths and correlation lengths can be inferred from the spatial mapping. The phase contrast method and its application to DIII-D are described and tests and first plasma data are presented.

  6. Determination of perfluorooctanoate and perfluorooctanesulfonate in water matrices by inline matrix elimination liquid chromatography with reversed phase separation and suppressed conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, N Harihara; Manigandan, P; Wille, Andrea; Radhakrishnan, Ganga

    2011-09-01

    This work describes a new method for the determination of perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in water matrices by suppressed conductivity detection. Separation was achieved by isocratic elution on a reversed-phase column thermostated at 45°C using an aqueous mobile phase containing boric acid and acetonitrile. The PFOA and PFOS content in the water matrix were quantified by a pre-concentration technique. For the concentration range of 1 to 15 ng/mL and 2 to 30 ng/mL, the linear calibration curve for PFOA and PFOS yielded coefficients of determination (R(2)) of 0.9995 and 0.9985, respectively. The relative standard deviations were smaller than 1.5% for PFOA and PFOS. The retention-time precision of four consecutive 12 h injections was smaller than 0.641% and 0.818%, respectively. The presence of common divalent cations, such as calcium, magnesium, and iron in water matrices impairs PFOS recovery. This drawback was overcome by applying inline matrix elimination method. The optimized method was successfully applied for drinking water, ground water, and seawater samples.

  7. A theoretical study on phase-contrast mammography with Thomson-scattering x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    De Caro, Liberato; Giannini, Cinzia; Bellotti, Roberto; Tangaro, Sabina

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: The x-ray transmitted beam from any material/tissue depends on the complex refractive index (n=1-{delta}+i{beta}), where {delta} is responsible for the phase shift and {beta} is for the beam attenuation. Although for human tissues, the {delta} cross section is about 1000 times greater than the {beta} ones in the x-ray energy range from 10 to 150 keV, the gain in breast tumor visualization of phase-contrast mammography (PCM) with respect to absorption contact imaging (AI) is limited by the maximum dose that can be delivered to the patient. Moreover, in-line PC imaging (PCI) is the simplest experimental mode among all available x-ray PCI techniques since no optics are needed. The latter is a fundamental requirement in order to transfer the results of laboratory research into hospitals. Alternative to synchrotron radiation sources, the implementation of relativistic Thomson-scattering (TS) x-ray sources is particularly suitable for hospital use because of their high peak brightness within a relatively compact and affordable system. In this work, the possibility to realize PCM using a TS source in a hospital environment is studied, accounting for the effect of a finite deliverable dose on the PC visibility enhancement with respect to AI. Methods: The contrast-to-noise ratio of tumor-tissue lesions in PCM has been studied on the bases of a recent theoretical model, describing image contrast formation by means of both wave-optical theory and the mutual coherence formalism. The latter is used to describe the evolution, during wave propagation, of the coherence of the wave field emitted by a TS source. The contrast-to-noise ratio for both PCI and AI has been analyzed in terms of tumor size, beam energy, detector, and source distances, studying optimal conditions for performing PCM. Regarding other relevant factors which could influence ''tumor'' visibility, the authors have assumed simplified conditions such as a spherical shape description of the tumor inclusion

  8. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    SciTech Connect

    Demi, Libertario Sloun, Ruud J. G. van; Mischi, Massimo; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2015-10-28

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO{sup ®} UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  9. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO® UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  10. First application of liquid-metal-jet sources for small-animal imaging: High-resolution CT and phase-contrast tumor demarcation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, Daniel H.; Lundstroem, Ulf; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Small-animal studies require images with high spatial resolution and high contrast due to the small scale of the structures. X-ray imaging systems for small animals are often limited by the microfocus source. Here, the authors investigate the applicability of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for such high-resolution small-animal imaging, both in tomography based on absorption and in soft-tissue tumor imaging based on in-line phase contrast. Methods: The experimental arrangement consists of a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source, the small-animal object on a rotating stage, and an imaging detector. The source-to-object and object-to-detector distances are adjusted for the preferred contrast mechanism. Two different liquid-metal-jet sources are used, one circulating a Ga/In/Sn alloy and the other an In/Ga alloy for higher penetration through thick tissue. Both sources are operated at 40-50 W electron-beam power with {approx}7 {mu}m x-ray spots, providing high spatial resolution in absorption imaging and high spatial coherence for the phase-contrast imaging. Results: High-resolution absorption imaging is demonstrated on mice with CT, showing 50 {mu}m bone details in the reconstructed slices. High-resolution phase-contrast soft-tissue imaging shows clear demarcation of mm-sized tumors at much lower dose than is required in absorption. Conclusions: This is the first application of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for whole-body small-animal x-ray imaging. In absorption, the method allows high-resolution tomographic skeletal imaging with potential for significantly shorter exposure times due to the power scalability of liquid-metal-jet sources. In phase contrast, the authors use a simple in-line arrangement to show distinct tumor demarcation of few-mm-sized tumors. This is, to their knowledge, the first small-animal tumor visualization with a laboratory phase-contrast system.

  11. Quantification of endogenous brassinosteroids in sub-gram plant tissues by in-line matrix solid-phase dispersion-tandem solid phase extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Duan, Chunfeng; Wu, Dapeng; Guan, Yafeng

    2014-09-12

    A matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD)-tandem mixed mode anion exchange (MAX)-mixed mode cation exchange (MCX) solid phase extraction-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method was developed for quantification of six endogenous brassinosteroids (BRs) (24-epibrassinolide, 24-epicastasterone, 6-deoxo-24-epicastasterone, dolichosterone, teasterone and typhasterol) in rice plant tissues. Non-polar interferences were removed effectively by C8 dispersant used in MSPD, while the following tandem MAX-MCX process facilitated the elimination of polar and ionizable compounds. The weak reversed-phase retention feature of MAX-MCX leaded to good compatibility of the elution solvents in the in-line coupled MSPD-MAX-MCX system. This system was optimized for extraction and purification of BRs in plant samples. The effects of the type of solid phase, the elution solvent, the extraction temperature and the clean-up material were studied. Before HPLC separation, BRs purified were derivatized by m-aminophenylboronic acid to enhance the sensitivity of MS/MS to BRs. Compared with traditional liquid-liquid extraction and solid phase extraction (LLE-SPE), the proposed MSPD-MAX-MCX method showed higher extraction efficiency, lower matrix effect, and advantages of easy manipulation and time-saving. The in-line MSPD-MAX-MCX coupled with HPLC-MS/MS method provided a linear response over two orders of magnitude of BRs concentration with correlation coefficients above 0.9982, limits of detection between 0.008 and 0.04ngmL(-1), relative standard deviations (RSDs) below 29.4%, and recoveries above 77.8%. The proposed method has been successfully applied to analysis of endogenous BRs in rice plant at booting stage and maturity stage.

  12. Concomitant gradient terms in phase contrast MR: analysis and correction.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, M A; Zhou, X J; Polzin, J A; King, K F; Ganin, A; Pelc, N J; Glover, G H

    1998-02-01

    Whenever a linear gradient is activated, concomitant magnetic fields with non-linear spatial dependence result. This is a consequence of Maxwell's equations, i.e., within the imaging volume the magnetic field must have zero divergence, and has negligible curl. The concomitant, or Maxwell field has been described in the MRI literature for over 10 years. In this paper, we theoretically and experimentally show the existence of two additional lowest-order terms in the concomitant field, which we call cross-terms. The concomitant gradient cross-terms only arise when the longitudinal gradient Gz is simultaneously active with a transverse gradient (Gx or Gy). The effect of all of the concomitant gradient terms on phase contrast imaging is examined in detail. Several methods for reducing or eliminating phase errors arising from the concomitant magnetic field are described. The feasibility of a joint pulse sequence-reconstruction method, which requires no increase in minimum TE, is demonstrated. Since the lowest-order terms of the concomitant field are proportional to G2/B0, the importance of concomitant gradient terms is expected to increase given the current interest in systems with stronger gradients and/or weaker main magnetic fields.

  13. On-sky multiwavelength phasing of segmented telescopes with the Zernike phase contrast sensor.

    PubMed

    Vigan, Arthur; Dohlen, Kjetil; Mazzanti, Silvio

    2011-06-10

    Future extremely large telescopes will adopt segmented primary mirrors with several hundreds of segments. Cophasing of the segments together is essential to reach high wavefront quality. The phasing sensor must be able to maintain very high phasing accuracy during the observations, while being able to phase segments dephased by several micrometers. The Zernike phase contrast sensor has been demonstrated on-sky at the Very Large Telescope. We present the multiwavelength scheme that has been implemented to extend the capture range from ±λ/2 on the wavefront to many micrometers, demonstrating that it is successful at phasing mirrors with piston errors up to ±4.0  μm on the wavefront. We discuss the results at different levels and conclude with a phasing strategy for a future extremely large telescope.

  14. X-ray differential phase-contrast tomographic reconstruction with a phase line integral retrieval filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jian; Hu, Xinhua; Li, Chen

    2015-04-01

    We report an alternative reconstruction technique for x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT). This approach is based on a new phase line integral projection retrieval filter, which is rooted in the derivative property of the Fourier transform and counteracts the differential nature of the DPC-CT projections. It first retrieves the phase line integral from the DPC-CT projections. Then the standard filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithms popular in x-ray absorption-contrast CT are directly applied to the retrieved phase line integrals to reconstruct the DPC-CT images. Compared with the conventional DPC-CT reconstruction algorithms, the proposed method removes the Hilbert imaginary filter and allows for the direct use of absorption-contrast FBP algorithms. Consequently, FBP-oriented image processing techniques and reconstruction acceleration softwares that have already been successfully used in absorption-contrast CT can be directly adopted to improve the DPC-CT image quality and speed up the reconstruction.

  15. Quantitative volumetric breast density estimation using phase contrast mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhentian; Hauser, Nik; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; D'Isidoro, Fabio; Stampanoni, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Phase contrast mammography using a grating interferometer is an emerging technology for breast imaging. It provides complementary information to the conventional absorption-based methods. Additional diagnostic values could be further obtained by retrieving quantitative information from the three physical signals (absorption, differential phase and small-angle scattering) yielded simultaneously. We report a non-parametric quantitative volumetric breast density estimation method by exploiting the ratio (dubbed the R value) of the absorption signal to the small-angle scattering signal. The R value is used to determine breast composition and the volumetric breast density (VBD) of the whole breast is obtained analytically by deducing the relationship between the R value and the pixel-wise breast density. The proposed method is tested by a phantom study and a group of 27 mastectomy samples. In the clinical evaluation, the estimated VBD values from both cranio-caudal (CC) and anterior-posterior (AP) views are compared with the ACR scores given by radiologists to the pre-surgical mammograms. The results show that the estimated VBD results using the proposed method are consistent with the pre-surgical ACR scores, indicating the effectiveness of this method in breast density estimation. A positive correlation is found between the estimated VBD and the diagnostic ACR score for both the CC view (p=0.033 ) and AP view (p=0.001 ). A linear regression between the results of the CC view and AP view showed a correlation coefficient γ = 0.77, which indicates the robustness of the proposed method and the quantitative character of the additional information obtained with our approach.

  16. Quantitative volumetric breast density estimation using phase contrast mammography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhentian; Hauser, Nik; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A; D'Isidoro, Fabio; Stampanoni, Marco

    2015-05-21

    Phase contrast mammography using a grating interferometer is an emerging technology for breast imaging. It provides complementary information to the conventional absorption-based methods. Additional diagnostic values could be further obtained by retrieving quantitative information from the three physical signals (absorption, differential phase and small-angle scattering) yielded simultaneously. We report a non-parametric quantitative volumetric breast density estimation method by exploiting the ratio (dubbed the R value) of the absorption signal to the small-angle scattering signal. The R value is used to determine breast composition and the volumetric breast density (VBD) of the whole breast is obtained analytically by deducing the relationship between the R value and the pixel-wise breast density. The proposed method is tested by a phantom study and a group of 27 mastectomy samples. In the clinical evaluation, the estimated VBD values from both cranio-caudal (CC) and anterior-posterior (AP) views are compared with the ACR scores given by radiologists to the pre-surgical mammograms. The results show that the estimated VBD results using the proposed method are consistent with the pre-surgical ACR scores, indicating the effectiveness of this method in breast density estimation. A positive correlation is found between the estimated VBD and the diagnostic ACR score for both the CC view (p = 0.033) and AP view (p = 0.001). A linear regression between the results of the CC view and AP view showed a correlation coefficient γ = 0.77, which indicates the robustness of the proposed method and the quantitative character of the additional information obtained with our approach.

  17. Morphological Evolution of Electrochemically Plated/Stripped Lithium Microstructures Investigated by Synchrotron X-ray Phase Contrast Tomography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fu; Zielke, Lukas; Markötter, Henning; Hilger, André; Zhou, Dong; Moroni, Riko; Zengerle, Roland; Thiele, Simon; Banhart, John; Manke, Ingo

    2016-08-23

    Due to its low redox potential and high theoretical specific capacity, Li metal has drawn worldwide research attention because of its potential use in next-generation battery technologies such as Li-S and Li-O2. Unfortunately, uncontrollable growth of Li microstructures (LmSs, e.g., dendrites, fibers) during electrochemical Li stripping/plating has prevented their practical commercialization. Despite various strategies proposed to mitigate LmS nucleation and/or block its growth, a fundamental understanding of the underlying evolution mechanisms remains elusive. Herein, synchrotron in-line phase contrast X-ray tomography was employed to investigate the morphological evolution of electrochemically deposited/dissolved LmSs nondestructively. We present a 3D characterization of electrochemically stripped Li electrodes with regard to electrochemically plated LmSs. We clarify fundamentally the origin of the porous lithium interface growing into Li electrodes. Moreover, cleavage of the separator caused by growing LmS was experimentally observed and visualized in 3D. Our systematic investigation provides fundamental insights into LmS evolution and enables us to understand the evolution mechanisms in Li electrodes more profoundly. PMID:27463258

  18. High sensitivity phase retrieval method in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhao; Gao, Kun; Chen, Jian; Wang, Dajiang; Wang, Shenghao; Chen, Heng; Bao, Yuan; Shao, Qigang; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging is considered as one of the most promising techniques for future medical imaging. Many different methods have been developed to retrieve phase signal, among which the phase stepping (PS) method is widely used. However, further practical implementations are hindered, due to its complex scanning mode and high radiation dose. In contrast, the reverse projection (RP) method is a novel fast and low dose extraction approach. In this contribution, the authors present a quantitative analysis of the noise properties of the refraction signals retrieved by the two methods and compare their sensitivities. Methods: Using the error propagation formula, the authors analyze theoretically the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the refraction images retrieved by the two methods. Then, the sensitivities of the two extraction methods are compared under an identical exposure dose. Numerical experiments are performed to validate the theoretical results and provide some quantitative insight. Results: The SNRs of the two methods are both dependent on the system parameters, but in different ways. Comparison between their sensitivities reveals that for the refraction signal, the RP method possesses a higher sensitivity, especially in the case of high visibility and/or at the edge of the object. Conclusions: Compared with the PS method, the RP method has a superior sensitivity and provides refraction images with a higher SNR. Therefore, one can obtain highly sensitive refraction images in grating-based phase contrast imaging. This is very important for future preclinical and clinical implementations.

  19. On-sky performance of the Zernike phase contrast sensor for the phasing of segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Surdej, Isabelle; Yaitskova, Natalia; Gonte, Frederic

    2010-07-20

    The Zernike phase contrast method is a novel technique to phase the primary mirrors of segmented telescopes. It has been tested on-sky on a unit telescope of the Very Large Telescope with a segmented mirror conjugated to the primary mirror to emulate a segmented telescope. The theoretical background of this sensor and the algorithm used to retrieve the piston, tip, and tilt information are described. The performance of the sensor as a function of parameters such as star magnitude, seeing, and integration time is discussed. The phasing accuracy has always been below 15 nm root mean square wavefront error under normal conditions of operation and the limiting star magnitude achieved on-sky with this sensor is 15.7 in the red, which would be sufficient to phase segmented telescopes in closed-loop during observations. PMID:20648188

  20. On-sky performance of the Zernike phase contrast sensor for the phasing of segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Surdej, Isabelle; Yaitskova, Natalia; Gonte, Frederic

    2010-07-20

    The Zernike phase contrast method is a novel technique to phase the primary mirrors of segmented telescopes. It has been tested on-sky on a unit telescope of the Very Large Telescope with a segmented mirror conjugated to the primary mirror to emulate a segmented telescope. The theoretical background of this sensor and the algorithm used to retrieve the piston, tip, and tilt information are described. The performance of the sensor as a function of parameters such as star magnitude, seeing, and integration time is discussed. The phasing accuracy has always been below 15 nm root mean square wavefront error under normal conditions of operation and the limiting star magnitude achieved on-sky with this sensor is 15.7 in the red, which would be sufficient to phase segmented telescopes in closed-loop during observations.

  1. Volta potential phase plate for in-focus phase contrast transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Danev, Radostin; Buijsse, Bart; Khoshouei, Maryam; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2014-11-01

    We describe a phase plate for transmission electron microscopy taking advantage of a hitherto-unknown phenomenon, namely a beam-induced Volta potential on the surface of a continuous thin film. The Volta potential is negative, indicating that it is not caused by beam-induced electrostatic charging. The film must be heated to ∼ 200 °C to prevent contamination and enable the Volta potential effect. The phase shift is created "on the fly" by the central diffraction beam eliminating the need for precise phase plate alignment. Images acquired with the Volta phase plate (VPP) show higher contrast and unlike Zernike phase plate images no fringing artifacts. Following installation into the microscope, the VPP has an initial settling time of about a week after which the phase shift behavior becomes stable. The VPP has a long service life and has been used for more than 6 mo without noticeable degradation in performance. The mechanism underlying the VPP is the same as the one responsible for the degradation over time of the performance of thin-film Zernike phase plates, but in the VPP it is used in a constructive way. The exact physics and/or chemistry behind the process causing the Volta potential are not fully understood, but experimental evidence suggests that radiation-induced surface modification combined with a chemical equilibrium between the surface and residual gases in the vacuum play an important role. PMID:25331897

  2. Volta potential phase plate for in-focus phase contrast transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Danev, Radostin; Buijsse, Bart; Khoshouei, Maryam; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    We describe a phase plate for transmission electron microscopy taking advantage of a hitherto-unknown phenomenon, namely a beam-induced Volta potential on the surface of a continuous thin film. The Volta potential is negative, indicating that it is not caused by beam-induced electrostatic charging. The film must be heated to ∼200 °C to prevent contamination and enable the Volta potential effect. The phase shift is created “on the fly” by the central diffraction beam eliminating the need for precise phase plate alignment. Images acquired with the Volta phase plate (VPP) show higher contrast and unlike Zernike phase plate images no fringing artifacts. Following installation into the microscope, the VPP has an initial settling time of about a week after which the phase shift behavior becomes stable. The VPP has a long service life and has been used for more than 6 mo without noticeable degradation in performance. The mechanism underlying the VPP is the same as the one responsible for the degradation over time of the performance of thin-film Zernike phase plates, but in the VPP it is used in a constructive way. The exact physics and/or chemistry behind the process causing the Volta potential are not fully understood, but experimental evidence suggests that radiation-induced surface modification combined with a chemical equilibrium between the surface and residual gases in the vacuum play an important role. PMID:25331897

  3. Partially coherent contrast-transfer-function approximation.

    PubMed

    Nesterets, Yakov I; Gureyev, Timur E

    2016-04-01

    The contrast-transfer-function (CTF) approximation, widely used in various phase-contrast imaging techniques, is revisited. CTF validity conditions are extended to a wide class of strongly absorbing and refracting objects, as well as to nonuniform partially coherent incident illumination. Partially coherent free-space propagators, describing amplitude and phase in-line contrast, are introduced and their properties are investigated. The present results are relevant to the design of imaging experiments with partially coherent sources, as well as to the analysis and interpretation of the corresponding images. PMID:27140752

  4. Single-shot x-ray phase contrast imaging with an algorithmic approach using spectral detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Mini; Park, Chan-Soo; Fredette, Nathaniel R.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging has been investigated during the last two decades for potential benefits in soft tissue imaging. Long imaging time, high radiation dose and general measurement complexity involving motion of x-ray optical components have prevented the clinical translation of these methods. In all existing popular phase contrast imaging methods, multiple measurements per projection angle involving motion of optical components are required to achieve quantitatively accurate estimation of absorption, phase and differential phase. Recently we proposed an algorithmic approach to use spectral detection data in a phase contrast imaging setup to obtain absorption, phase and differential phase in a single-step. Our generic approach has been shown via simulations in all three types of phase contrast imaging: propagation, coded aperture and grating interferometry. While other groups have used spectral detector in phase contrast imaging setups, our proposed method is unique in outlining an approach to use this spectral data to simplify phase contrast imaging. In this abstract we show the first experimental proof of our single-shot phase retrieval using a Medipix3 photon counting detector in an edge illumination aperture (also referred to as coded aperture) phase contrast set up as well as for a free space propagation setup. Our preliminary results validate our new transport equation for edge illumination PCI and our spectral phase retrieval algorithm for both PCI methods being investigated. Comparison with simulations also point to excellent performance of Medipix3 built-in charge sharing correction mechanism.

  5. Noise properties of grating-based x-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Thomas; Juergen Engel, Klaus; Roessl, Ewald

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate the properties of tomographic grating-based phase contrast imaging with respect to its noise power spectrum and the energy dependence of the achievable contrast to noise ratio. Methods: Tomographic simulations of an object with 11 cm diameter constituted of materials of biological interest were conducted at different energies ranging from 25 to 85 keV by using a wave propagation approach. Using a Monte Carlo simulation of the x-ray attenuation within the object, it is verified that the simulated measurement deposits the same dose within the object at each energy. Results: The noise in reconstructed phase contrast computed tomography images shows a maximum at low spatial frequencies. The contrast to noise ratio reaches a maximum around 45 keV for the simulated object. The general dependence of the contrast to noise on the energy appears to be independent of the material. Compared with reconstructed absorption contrast images, the reconstructed phase contrast images show sometimes better, sometimes worse, and sometimes similar contrast to noise, depending on the material and the energy. Conclusions: Phase contrast images provide additional information to the conventional absorption contrast images and might thus be useful for medical applications. However, the observed noise power spectrum in reconstructed phase contrast images implies that the usual trade-off between noise and resolution is less efficient for phase contrast imaging compared with absorption contrast imaging. Therefore, high-resolution imaging is a strength of phase contrast imaging, but low-resolution imaging is not. This might hamper the clinical application of the method, in cases where a low spatial resolution is sufficient for diagnosis.

  6. The lamina splendens of articular cartilage is an artefact of phase contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Aspden, R M; Hukins, D W

    1979-11-30

    The so-called lamina splendens of articular cartilage is shown to be a characteristic of phase contrast microscopy; this technique provides no evidence for an anatomically distinct surface layer. Fresnel diffraction occurs at edges separating regions of different refractive indices. These diffraction effects, when viewed under phase contrast, lead to the appearance of a bright line along the edge. PMID:42065

  7. Results from the first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast and a rotating gantry

    SciTech Connect

    Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Velroyen, Astrid; Yaroshenko, Andre; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Mohr, Juergen; Walter, Marco; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-31

    After successful demonstrations of soft-tissue phase-contrast imaging with grating interferometers at synchrotron radiation sources and at laboratory based x-ray tubes, a first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast imaging modality has been constructed. The rotating gantry is equipped with a three-grating interferometer, a 50 watt tungsten anode source and a Hamamatsu flat panel detector. The total length of the interferometer is 45 cm, and the bed of the scanner is optimized for mice, with a scanning diameter of 35 mm. From one single scan both phase-contrast and standard attenuation based tomography can be attained, providing an overall gain in image contrast.

  8. Motionless electromagnetic phase stepping versus mechanical phase stepping in x-ray phase-contrast imaging with a compact source.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Katherine J; Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A; Bennett, Eric E; Foster, Barbara A; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-04-21

    X-ray phase contrast imaging based on grating interferometers detects the refractive index distribution of an object without relying on radiation attenuation, thereby having the potential for reduced radiation absorption. These techniques belong to the broader category of optical wavefront measurement, which requires stepping the phase of the interference pattern to obtain a pixel-wise map of the phase distortion of the wavefront. While phase stepping traditionally involves mechanical scanning of a grating or mirror, we developed electromagnetic phase stepping (EPS) for imaging with compact sources to obviate the need for mechanical movement. In EPS a solenoid coil is placed outside the x-ray tube to shift its focal spot with a magnetic field, causing a relative movement between the projection of the sample and the interference pattern in the image. Here we present two embodiments of this method. We verified experimentally that electromagnetic and mechanical phase stepping give the same results and attain the same signal-to-noise ratios under the same radiation dose. We found that the relative changes of interference fringe visibility were within 3.0% when the x-ray focal spot was shifted by up to 1.0 mm in either direction. We conclude that when using x-ray tube sources, EPS is an effective means of phase stepping without the need for mechanical movement.

  9. Phase contrast portal imaging for image-guided microbeam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, Keiji; Kondoh, Takeshi

    2014-03-01

    High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy is a unique treatment technique used to destroy tumors without severely affecting circumjacent healthy tissue. We applied a phase contrast technique to portal imaging in preclinical microbeam radiation therapy experiments. Phase contrast portal imaging is expected to enable us to obtain higherresolution X-ray images at therapeutic X-ray energies compared to conventional portal imaging. Frontal view images of a mouse head sample were acquired in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. The phase contrast images depicted edge-enhanced fine structures of the parietal bones surrounding the cerebrum. The phase contrast technique is expected to be effective in bony-landmark-based verification for image-guided radiation therapy.

  10. Visualization of neurons in the brain with phase-contrast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onodera, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Masato; Takashima, Kenta; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional structural analysis of brain is essential to understand neuronal function and brain pathology. The phase-contrast X-ray imaging technique uses an X-ray interferometer and is an extremely sensitive method to visualize structures with low X-ray absorbance. Since the phase shifts caused by light elements can be detected as interference patterns in spite of nearly zero absorption coefficients, the signal/noise ratio for the phase-contrast images of the brain is expected to be hundreds times higher than that obtained with the conventional X-ray absorption contrast method. With phase-contrast imaging technique, we could visualize brain microstructures and specific types of neurons, such as the pyramidal cells in the hippocampus. Phase-contrast CT is a promising technique for nondestructive visualization of brain and spinal cord.

  11. Phase contrast in Simultaneous Topography and Recognition imaging.

    PubMed

    Fuss, M C; Sahagún, E; Köber, M; Briones, F; Luna, M; Sáenz, J J

    2009-08-01

    The operation of a force microscope in Simultaneous Topography and Recognition (TREC) imaging mode is analyzed by means of numerical simulations. Both topography and recognition signals are analyzed by using a worm-like chain force as the specific interaction between the functionalized tip probe and the sample. The special feedback mechanism in this mode is shown to couple the phase signal to the presence of molecular recognition interactions even in absence of dissipation.

  12. Optical Fourier techniques for medical image processing and phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Yelleswarapu, Chandra S; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Rao, D V G L N

    2008-04-01

    This paper briefly reviews the basics of optical Fourier techniques (OFT) and applications for medical image processing as well as phase contrast imaging of live biological specimens. Enhancement of microcalcifications in a mammogram for early diagnosis of breast cancer is the main focus. Various spatial filtering techniques such as conventional 4f filtering using a spatial mask, photoinduced polarization rotation in photosensitive materials, Fourier holography, and nonlinear transmission characteristics of optical materials are discussed for processing mammograms. We also reviewed how the intensity dependent refractive index can be exploited as a phase filter for phase contrast imaging with a coherent source. This novel approach represents a significant advance in phase contrast microscopy.

  13. Artifact characterization and reduction in scanning X-ray Zernike phase contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Holzner, Christian; Mohacsi, Istvan; Karvinen, Petri; Diaz, Ana; Pigino, Gaia; David, Christian

    2015-05-18

    Zernike phase contrast microscopy is a well-established method for imaging specimens with low absorption contrast. It has been successfully implemented in full-field microscopy using visible light and X-rays. In microscopy Cowley's reciprocity principle connects scanning and full-field imaging. Even though the reciprocity in Zernike phase contrast has been discussed by several authors over the past thirty years, only recently it was experimentally verified using scanning X-ray microscopy. In this paper, we investigate the image and contrast formation in scanning Zernike phase contrast microscopy with a particular and detailed focus on the origin of imaging artifacts that are typically associated with Zernike phase contrast. We demonstrate experimentally with X-rays the effect of the phase mask design on the contrast and halo artifacts and present an optimized design of the phase mask with respect to photon efficiency and artifact reduction. Similarly, due to the principle of reciprocity the observations and conclusions of this work have direct applicability to Zernike phase contrast in full-field microscopy as well. PMID:26074579

  14. Phase-contrast tomography with low-intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rehacek, J.; Hradil, Z.; Zawisky, M.; Dubus, F.; Bonse, U.

    2005-02-01

    In newly developed neutron phase tomography, wave properties of neutrons are exploited for the nondestructive testing of the internal structure of matter. We show how limitations due to small available intensities of present neutron sources can be overcome by using an advanced maximum-likelihood reconstruction algorithm. Unlike the standard filtered back-projection, the developed procedure gives reasonable results also when used on very noisy data or data consisting of only a few measured projections. This is demonstrated by means of simulations and also experimentally. The proposed method leads to considerably shorter measuring times and/or increased precision.

  15. Spatial phase sensitivity of complex cells in primary visual cortex depends on stimulus contrast.

    PubMed

    Meffin, H; Hietanen, M A; Cloherty, S L; Ibbotson, M R

    2015-12-01

    Neurons in primary visual cortex are classified as simple, which are phase sensitive, or complex, which are significantly less phase sensitive. Previously, we have used drifting gratings to show that the phase sensitivity of complex cells increases at low contrast and after contrast adaptation while that of simple cells remains the same at all contrasts (Cloherty SL, Ibbotson MR. J Neurophysiol 113: 434-444, 2015; Crowder NA, van Kleef J, Dreher B, Ibbotson MR. J Neurophysiol 98: 1155-1166, 2007; van Kleef JP, Cloherty SL, Ibbotson MR. J Physiol 588: 3457-3470, 2010). However, drifting gratings confound the influence of spatial and temporal summation, so here we have stimulated complex cells with gratings that are spatially stationary but continuously reverse the polarity of the contrast over time (contrast-reversing gratings). By varying the spatial phase and contrast of the gratings we aimed to establish whether the contrast-dependent phase sensitivity of complex cells results from changes in spatial or temporal processing or both. We found that most of the increase in phase sensitivity at low contrasts could be attributed to changes in the spatial phase sensitivities of complex cells. However, at low contrasts the complex cells did not develop the spatiotemporal response characteristics of simple cells, in which paired response peaks occur 180° out of phase in time and space. Complex cells that increased their spatial phase sensitivity at low contrasts were significantly overrepresented in the supragranular layers of cortex. We conclude that complex cells in supragranular layers of cat cortex have dynamic spatial summation properties and that the mechanisms underlying complex cell receptive fields differ between cortical layers.

  16. Phase-contrast x-ray imaging with a liquid-metal-jet-anode microfocus source

    SciTech Connect

    Tuohimaa, T.; Otendal, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2007-08-13

    Phase-contrast methods increase contrast, detail, and selectivity in x-ray imaging. Present compact x-ray sources do not provide the necessary spatial coherence with sufficient power to allow the laboratory-scale high-resolution phase-contrast imaging with adequate exposure times. In this letter, the authors demonstrate phase-contrast imaging with few-micron detail employing a compact {approx}6.5 {mu}m spot liquid-metal-jet-anode high-brightness microfocus source. The 40 W source is operated at more than ten times higher electron-beam power density than present microfocus sources and is shown to provide sufficient spatial coherence as well as scalability to high power, thereby enabling the application of phase-contrast x-ray imaging with short exposure times in clinics and laboratories.

  17. Differential phase-contrast dark-field electron holography for strain mapping.

    PubMed

    Denneulin, Thibaud; Houdellier, Florent; Hÿtch, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Strain mapping is an active area of research in transmission electron microscopy. Here we introduce a dark-field electron holographic technique that shares several aspects in common with both off-axis and in-line holography. Two incident and convergent plane waves are produced in front of the specimen thanks to an electrostatic biprism in the condenser system of a transmission electron microscope. The interference of electron beams diffracted by the illuminated crystal is then recorded in a defocused plane. The differential phase recovered from the hologram is directly proportional to the strain in the sample. The strain can be quantified if the separation of the images due to the defocus is precisely determined. The present technique has the advantage that the derivative of the phase is measured directly which allows us to avoid numerical differentiation. The distribution of the noise in the reconstructed strain maps is isotropic and more homogeneous. This technique was used to investigate different samples: a Si/SiGe superlattice, transistors with SiGe source/drain and epitaxial PZT thin films. PMID:26476802

  18. High-contrast pattern reconstructions using a phase-seeded point CGH method.

    PubMed

    McWilliam, Richard; Williams, Gavin L; Cowling, Joshua J; Seed, Nicholas L; Purvis, Alan

    2016-03-01

    A major challenge encountered in digital holography applications is the need to synthesize computer-generated holograms (CGHs) that are realizable as phase-only elements while also delivering high quality reconstruction. This trade-off is particularly acute in high-precision applications such as photolithography where contrast typically must exceed 0.6. A seeded-phase point method is proposed to address this challenge, whereby patterns composed of fine lines that intersect and form closed shapes are reconstructed with high contrast while maintaining a phase-only CGH. The method achieves superior contrast to that obtained by uniform or random seeded-phase methods while maintaining computational efficiency for large area exposures. It is also shown that binary phase modulation achieves similar contrast performance with benefits for the fabrication of simpler diffractive optical elements. PMID:26974633

  19. On measuring cell confluence in phase contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, K. P.; Richardson, J. B.; Lam, K. P.

    2014-03-01

    A principal focus highlighting recent advances in cell based therapies concerns the development of effective treatments for osteoarthritis. Earlier clinicaltrials have shown that 80% of patients receiving mesenchymal stem cell(MSC) based treatment have improved their quality of life by alleviating pain whilst extending the life of their natural joints. The current challenge facing researchers is to identify the biological differences between the treatments that have worked and those which have shown little improvement. One possible candidate for the difference in treatment prognosis is an examination of the proliferation of the ( type) cells as they grow. To further understanding of the proliferation and differentiation of MSC, non-invasive live cell imaging techniques have been developed which capture important cell events and dynamics in cell divisions over an extended period of time. An automated image analysis procedure capable of tracking cell confluence over time has also been implemented, providing an objective and realistic estimation of cell growth within continuous live cell cultures. The proposed algorithm accounts for the halo artefacts that occur in phase microscopy. In addition to a favourable run-time performance, the method was also validated using continuous live MSC cultures, with consistent and meaningful results.

  20. Quantitative phase contrast imaging using a Nomarski microscope with variable shear distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falldorf, Claas; Agour, Mostafa; Kötter, Jonas; Bergmann, Ralf B.

    2016-03-01

    We present a Nomarski microscope with variable shear distance that allows for determining the full complex modulation function including the quantitative phase contrast that a specimen imposes on incident light, rather than only its differential phase contrast. The system preserves all beneficial properties of the Nomarski setup with respect to coherence and stability. Hence, we can measure the quantitative phase contrast under Köhler illumination with full condenser aperture and without vibration isolation. We will explain the system, give an analysis of the coherence requirements and provide an example from the field of MEMS inspection.

  1. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willner, M.; Herzen, J.; Grandl, S.; Auweter, S.; Mayr, D.; Hipp, A.; Chabior, M.; Sarapata, A.; Achterhold, K.; Zanette, I.; Weitkamp, T.; Sztrókay, A.; Hellerhoff, K.; Reiser, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method’s prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography.

  2. PHASE CONTRAST OBSERVATIONS OF THE ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM IN LIVING TISSUE CULTURES

    PubMed Central

    Rose, George G.; Pomerat, C. M.

    1960-01-01

    Cells from three human sources (two malignant and one fetal) were observed through phase contrast microscopy to contain unusual cytoplasmic images. These were photographed and are discussed as representing the endoplasmic reticulum in the living cell. PMID:13743266

  3. Quantitative Characterization of Inertial Confinement Fusion Capsules Using Phase Contrast Enhanced X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B J; Koch, J A; Barty, A; Martz, H E; Lee, W; Fezzaa, K

    2004-05-07

    Current designs for inertial confinement fusion capsules for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) consist of a solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layer inside of a copper doped beryllium capsule. Phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging is shown to render the D-T layer visible inside the Be(Cu) capsule. Phase contrast imaging is experimentally demonstrated for several surrogate capsules and validates computational models. Polyimide and low density divinyl benzene foam capsules were imaged at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron. The surrogates demonstrate that phase contrast enhanced imaging provides a method to characterize surfaces when absorption imaging cannot be used. Our computational models demonstrate that a rough surface can be accurately reproduced in phase contrast enhanced x-ray images.

  4. Dynamic measures of regional lung air volume using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, M. J.; Lewis, R. A.; Morgan, M. J.; Wallace, M. J.; Siew, M. L.; Siu, K. K. W.; Habib, A.; Fouras, A.; Yagi, N.; Uesugi, K.; Hooper, S. B.

    2008-11-01

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging can provide detailed images of lung morphology with sufficient spatial resolution to observe the terminal airways (alveoli). We demonstrate that quantitative functional and anatomical imaging of lung ventilation can be achieved in vivo using two-dimensional phase contrast x-ray images with high contrast and spatial resolution (<100 µm) in near real time. Changes in lung air volume as small as 25 µL were calculated from the images of term and preterm rabbit pup lungs (n = 28) using a single-image phase retrieval algorithm. Comparisons with plethysmography and computed tomography showed that the technique provided an accurate and robust method of measuring total lung air volumes. Furthermore, regional ventilation was measured by partitioning the phase contrast images, which revealed differences in aeration for different ventilation strategies.

  5. Simplified approach for quantitative digital holographic phase contrast imaging of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Björn; Vollmer, Angelika; Rommel, Christina E.; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Bally, Gert Von

    2011-02-01

    Many interferometry-based quantitative phase contrast imaging techniques require a separately generated coherent reference wave. This results in a low phase stability and the demand for a precise adjustment of the intensity ratio between object and reference wave. To overcome these problems, the performance of a Michelson interferometer approach for digital holographic microscopy was analyzed that avoids a separately generated reference wave by superposition of different image areas. It is shown that this simplified arrangement yields improved phase stability. Furthermore, results from time-lapse investigations on living pancreas tumor cells demonstrate the capability of the method for reliable quantitative phase contrast imaging.

  6. Understanding the Phase Contrast Optics to Restore Artifact-free Microscopy Images for Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhaozheng; Kanade, Takeo; Chen, Mei

    2012-01-01

    Phase contrast, a noninvasive microscopy imaging technique, is widely used to capture time-lapse images to monitor the behavior of transparent cells without staining or altering them. Due to the optical principle, phase contrast microscopy images contain artifacts such as the halo and shade-off that hinder image segmentation, a critical step in automated microscopy image analysis. Rather than treating phase contrast microscopy images as general natural images and applying generic image processing techniques on them, we propose to study the optical properties of the phase contrast microscope to model its image formation process. The phase contrast imaging system can be approximated by a linear imaging model. Based on this model and input image properties, we formulate a regularized quadratic cost function to restore artifact-free phase contrast images that directly correspond to the specimen's optical path length. With artifacts removed, high quality segmentation can be achieved by simply thresholding the restored images. The imaging model and restoration method are quantitatively evaluated on microscopy image sequences with thousands of cells captured over several days. We also demonstrate that accurate restoration lays the foundation for high performance in cell detection and tracking. PMID:22386070

  7. Image fusion in x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, W.; Polyanskaya, M.; Bayer, F.; Gödel, K.; Hofmann, H.; Rieger, J.; Ritter, A.; Weber, T.; Wucherer, L.; Durst, J.; Michel, T.; Anton, G.; Hornegger, J.

    2012-02-01

    Phase-contrast imaging is a novel modality in the field of medical X-ray imaging. The pioneer method is the grating-based interferometry which has no special requirements to the X-ray source and object size. Furthermore, it provides three different types of information of an investigated object simultaneously - absorption, differential phase-contrast and dark-field images. Differential phase-contrast and dark-field images represent a completely new information which has not yet been investigated and studied in context of medical imaging. In order to introduce phase-contrast imaging as a new modality into medical environment the resulting information about the object has to be correctly interpreted. The three output images reflect different properties of the same object the main challenge is to combine and visualize these data in such a way that it diminish the information explosion and reduce the complexity of its interpretation. This paper presents an intuitive image fusion approach which allows to operate with grating-based phase-contrast images. It combines information of the three different images and provides a single image. The approach is implemented in a fusion framework which is aimed to support physicians in study and analysis. The framework provides the user with an intuitive graphical user interface allowing to control the fusion process. The example given in this work shows the functionality of the proposed method and the great potential of phase-contrast imaging in medical practice.

  8. Application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging in endoscopic aqueductoplasty.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoqiang; Zheng, Jiaping; Xiao, Qing; Liu, Yunsheng

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endoscopic aqueductoplasty (EA) for patients with obstructive hydrocephalus. The clinical diagnosis of hydrocephalus caused by aqueduct obstruction in 23 patients was confirmed by phase-contrast cine MRI examination. The patients were treated with EA and MRI was repeated during the follow-up. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow velocity in the aqueduct was measured to determine whether the aqueduct was obstructed. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations indicated that there was no CSF flow in the aqueduct for all patients prior to surgery. Aqueductoplasty was successfully performed in all patients. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations performed a week after surgery demonstrated an average CSF flow velocity of 4.74±1.77 cm/sec. During the follow-up, intracranial hypertension recurred in two patients in whom CSF flow was not observed in the aqueduct by the phase-contrast cine MRI scan. Aqueduct re-occlusion was revealed by an endoscopic exploration. By measuring the CSF flow velocity, phase-contrast cine MRI accurately identifies aqueduct obstruction. Cine MRI is a nontraumatic, simple and reliable method for determining whether the aqueduct is successfully opened following aqueductoplasty.

  9. Understanding the phase contrast optics to restore artifact-free microscopy images for segmentation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhaozheng; Kanade, Takeo; Chen, Mei

    2012-07-01

    Phase contrast, a noninvasive microscopy imaging technique, is widely used to capture time-lapse images to monitor the behavior of transparent cells without staining or altering them. Due to the optical principle, phase contrast microscopy images contain artifacts such as the halo and shade-off that hinder image segmentation, a critical step in automated microscopy image analysis. Rather than treating phase contrast microscopy images as general natural images and applying generic image processing techniques on them, we propose to study the optical properties of the phase contrast microscope to model its image formation process. The phase contrast imaging system can be approximated by a linear imaging model. Based on this model and input image properties, we formulate a regularized quadratic cost function to restore artifact-free phase contrast images that directly correspond to the specimen's optical path length. With artifacts removed, high quality segmentation can be achieved by simply thresholding the restored images. The imaging model and restoration method are quantitatively evaluated on microscopy image sequences with thousands of cells captured over several days. We also demonstrate that accurate restoration lays the foundation for high performance in cell detection and tracking. PMID:22386070

  10. Phase Contrast Imaging with Coded Apertures Using Laboratory-Based X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatyev, K.; Munro, P. R. T.; Speller, R. D.; Olivo, A.

    2011-09-09

    X-ray phase contrast imaging is a powerful technique that allows detection of changes in the phase of x-ray wavefronts as they pass through a sample. As a result, details not visible in conventional x-ray absorption imaging can be detected. Until recently the majority of applications of phase contrast imaging were at synchrotron facilities due to the availability of their high flux and coherence; however, a number of techniques have appeared recently that allow phase contrast imaging to be performed using laboratory sources. Here we describe a phase contrast imaging technique, developed at University College London, that uses two coded apertures. The x-ray beam is shaped by the pre-sample aperture, and small deviations in the x-ray propagation direction are detected with the help of the detector aperture. In contrast with other methods, it has a much more relaxed requirement for the source size (it works with source sizes up to 100 {mu}m). A working prototype coded-aperture system has been built. An x-ray detector with directly deposited columnar CsI has been used to minimize signal spill-over into neighboring pixels. Phase contrast images obtained with the system have demonstrated its effectiveness for imaging low-absorption materials.

  11. Image segmentation of nanoscale Zernike phase contrast X-ray computed tomography images

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Arjun S.; Mandal, Pratiti; Zhang, Yongjie; Litster, Shawn

    2015-05-14

    Zernike phase contrast is a useful technique for nanoscale X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of materials with a low X-ray absorption coefficient. It enhances the image contrast by phase shifting X-ray waves to create changes in amplitude. However, it creates artifacts that hinder the use of traditional image segmentation techniques. We propose an image restoration method that models the X-ray phase contrast optics and the three-dimensional image reconstruction method. We generate artifact-free images through an optimization problem that inverts this model. Though similar approaches have been used for Zernike phase contrast in visible light microscopy, this optimization employs an effective edge detection method tailored to handle Zernike phase contrast artifacts. We characterize this optics-based restoration method by removing the artifacts in and thresholding multiple Zernike phase contrast X-ray CT images to produce segmented results that are consistent with the physical specimens. We quantitatively evaluate and compare our method to other segmentation techniques to demonstrate its high accuracy.

  12. Enhancing Tabletop X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Nano-Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A; Harmon, Katherine J; Bennett, Eric E; Chedid, Nicholas; Znati, Sami; Panna, Alireza; Foster, Barbara A; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising approach for improving soft-tissue contrast and lowering radiation dose in biomedical applications. While current tabletop imaging systems adapt to common x-ray tubes and large-area detectors by employing absorptive elements such as absorption gratings or monolithic crystals to filter the beam, we developed nanometric phase gratings which enable tabletop x-ray far-field interferometry with only phase-shifting elements, leading to a substantial enhancement in the performance of phase contrast imaging. In a general sense the method transfers the demands on the spatial coherence of the x-ray source and the detector resolution to the feature size of x-ray phase masks. We demonstrate its capabilities in hard x-ray imaging experiments at a fraction of clinical dose levels and present comparisons with the existing Talbot-Lau interferometer and with conventional digital radiography.

  13. 4D STEM: High efficiency phase contrast imaging using a fast pixelated detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Jones, L.; Ryll, H.; Simson, M.; Soltau, H.; Kondo, Y.; Sagawa, R.; Banba, H.; MacLaren, I.; Nellist, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    Phase contrast imaging is widely used for imaging beam sensitive and weak phase objects in electron microscopy. In this work we demonstrate the achievement of high efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using the pnCCD, a fast direct electron pixelated detector, which records the diffraction patterns at every probe position with a speed of 1000 to 4000 frames per second, forming a 4D STEM dataset simultaneously with the incoherent Z-contrast imaging. Ptychographic phase reconstruction has been applied and the obtained complex transmission function reveals the phase of the specimen. The results using GaN and Ti, Nd- doped BiFeO3 show that this imaging mode is especially powerful for imaging light elements in the presence of much heavier elements.

  14. Enhancing Tabletop X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Nano-Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A.; Harmon, Katherine J.; Bennett, Eric E.; Chedid, Nicholas; Znati, Sami; Panna, Alireza; Foster, Barbara A.; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising approach for improving soft-tissue contrast and lowering radiation dose in biomedical applications. While current tabletop imaging systems adapt to common x-ray tubes and large-area detectors by employing absorptive elements such as absorption gratings or monolithic crystals to filter the beam, we developed nanometric phase gratings which enable tabletop x-ray far-field interferometry with only phase-shifting elements, leading to a substantial enhancement in the performance of phase contrast imaging. In a general sense the method transfers the demands on the spatial coherence of the x-ray source and the detector resolution to the feature size of x-ray phase masks. We demonstrate its capabilities in hard x-ray imaging experiments at a fraction of clinical dose levels and present comparisons with the existing Talbot-Lau interferometer and with conventional digital radiography. PMID:26315891

  15. Evaluation of a new reconstruction algorithm for x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Maria; Hauke, Christian; Horn, Florian; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Schuster, Max; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-04-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging might open up entirely new opportunities in medical imaging. However, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, vibrations or distortions of the system lead to inaccuracies within the phase-stepping procedure. Given insufficient stability of the phase-step positions, up to now, artifacts in phase-contrast images occur, which lower the image quality. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging in clinical routine as for example tiny structures of the human anatomy cannot be observed. In this contribution we evaluate an algorithm proposed by Vargas et.al.1 and applied to X-ray imaging by Pelzer et.al. that enables us to reconstruct a differential phase-contrast image without the knowledge of the specific phase-step positions. This method was tested in comparison to the standard reconstruction by Fourier analysis. The quality of phase-contrast images remains stable, even if the phase-step positions are completely unknown and not uniformly distributed. To also achieve attenuation and dark-field images the proposed algorithm has been combined with a further algorithm of Vargas et al.3 Using this algorithm, the phase-step positions can be reconstructed. With the help of the proper phase-step positions it is possible to get information about the phase, the amplitude and the offset of the measured data. We evaluated this algorithm concerning the measurement of thick objects which show a high absorbency.

  16. Subnanoradian X-ray phase-contrast imaging using a far-field interferometer of nanometric phase gratings

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Han; Gomella, Andrew A.; Patel, Ajay; Lynch, Susanna K.; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Anderson, Stasia A.; Bennett, Eric E.; Xiao, Xianghui; Liu, Chian; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2013-01-01

    Hard X-ray phase-contrast imaging characterizes the electron density distribution in an object without the need for radiation absorption. The power of phase contrast to resolve subtle changes, such as those in soft tissue structures, lies in its ability to detect minute refractive bending of X-rays. Here we report a far-field, two-arm interferometer based on the new nanometric phase gratings, which can detect X-ray refraction with subnanoradian sensitivity, and at the same time overcomes the fundamental limitation of ultra-narrow bandwidths (Δλ/λ~10−4) of the current, most sensitive methods based on crystal interferometers. On a 1.5% bandwidth synchrotron source, we demonstrate clear visualization of blood vessels in unstained mouse organs in simple projection views, with over an order-of-magnitude higher phase contrast than current near-field grating interferometers. PMID:24189696

  17. Design and development of a CPW-based 5-bit switched-line phase shifter using inline metal contact MEMS series switches for 17.25 GHz transmit/receive module application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sukomal; Koul, Shiban K.

    2014-01-01

    A radio frequency micro-electro-mechanical system (RF-MEMS) phase shifter based on switchable delay line concept with maximum desirable phase shift and good reliability is presented in this paper. The phase shifter is based on the switchable reference and delay line configurations with inline metal contact series switches that employs MEMS systems based on electrostatic actuation and implemented using coplanar waveguide (CPW) configuration. Electromechanical behaviour of the MEMS switch has been extensively investigated using commercially available simulation tools and validated using system level simulation. A detailed design and performance analysis of the phase shifter has been carried out as a function of various structural parameters with reference to the gold-based surface micromachining process on alumina substrate. The mechanical, electrical, transient, intermodulation distortion (IMD) and loss performance of an MEMS switch have been experimentally investigated. The individual primary phase-bits (11.25°/22.5°/45°/90°/180°) that are fundamental building blocks of a complete 5-bit phase shifter have been designed, fabricated and experimentally characterized. Furthermore, two different 5-bit switched-line phase shifters, that lead to 25% size reduction and result in marked improvement in the reliability of the complete 5-bit phase shifter with 30 V actuation voltage, have been developed. The performance comparison between two different CPW-based switched-line phase shifters have been extensively investigated and validated. The complete 5-bit phase shifter demonstrates an average insertion loss of 5.4 dB with a return loss of better than 14 dB at 17.25 GHz. The maximum phase error of 1.3° has been obtained at 17.25 GHz from these 5-bit phase shifters.

  18. Report of improved performance in Talbot–Lau phase-contrast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Thomas Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Anton, Gisela

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Many expectations have been raised since the use of conventional x-ray tubes on grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging. Despite a reported increase in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in many publications, there is doubt on whether phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) is advantageous in clinical CT scanners in vivo. The aim of this paper is to contribute to this discussion by analyzing the performance of a phase-contrast CT laboratory setup. Methods: A phase-contrast CT performance analysis was done. Projection images of a phantom were recorded, and image slices were reconstructed using standard filtered back projection methods. The resulting image slices were analyzed by determining the CNRs in the attenuation and phase image. These results were compared to analytically calculated expectations according to the already published phase-contrast CT performance analysis by Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)]. There, a severe mistake was found leading to wrong predictions of the performance of phase-contrast CT. The error was corrected and with the new formulae, the experimentally obtained results matched the analytical calculations. Results: The squared ratios of the phase-contrast CNR and the attenuation CNR obtained in the authors’ experiment are five- to ten-fold higher than predicted by Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)]. The effective lateral spatial coherence length deduced outnumbers the already optimistic assumption of Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)] by a factor of 3. Conclusions: The authors’ results indicate that the assumptions made in former performance analyses are pessimistic. The break-even point, when phase-contrast CT outperforms attenuation CT, is within reach even with realistic, nonperfect gratings. Further improvements to state-of-the-art clinical CT scanners, like increasing the spatial resolution, could change the balance in favor of phase-contrast computed tomography

  19. X-ray computed tomography of wood-adhesive bondlines: Attenuation and phase-contrast effects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Paris, Jesse L.; Kamke, Frederick A.; Xiao, Xianghui

    2015-07-29

    Microscale X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is discussed as a technique for identifying 3D adhesive distribution in wood-adhesive bondlines. Visualization and material segmentation of the adhesives from the surrounding cellular structures require sufficient gray-scale contrast in the reconstructed XCT data. Commercial wood-adhesive polymers have similar chemical characteristics and density to wood cell wall polymers and therefore do not provide good XCT attenuation contrast in their native form. Here, three different adhesive types, namely phenol formaldehyde, polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate, and a hybrid polyvinyl acetate, are tagged with iodine such that they yield sufficient X-ray attenuation contrast. However, phase-contrast effects at material edgesmore » complicate image quality and segmentation in XCT data reconstructed with conventional filtered backprojection absorption contrast algorithms. A quantitative phase retrieval algorithm, which isolates and removes the phase-contrast effect, was demonstrated. The paper discusses and illustrates the balance between material X-ray attenuation and phase-contrast effects in all quantitative XCT analyses of wood-adhesive bondlines.« less

  20. X-ray computed tomography of wood-adhesive bondlines: Attenuation and phase-contrast effects

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, Jesse L.; Kamke, Frederick A.; Xiao, Xianghui

    2015-07-29

    Microscale X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is discussed as a technique for identifying 3D adhesive distribution in wood-adhesive bondlines. Visualization and material segmentation of the adhesives from the surrounding cellular structures require sufficient gray-scale contrast in the reconstructed XCT data. Commercial wood-adhesive polymers have similar chemical characteristics and density to wood cell wall polymers and therefore do not provide good XCT attenuation contrast in their native form. Here, three different adhesive types, namely phenol formaldehyde, polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate, and a hybrid polyvinyl acetate, are tagged with iodine such that they yield sufficient X-ray attenuation contrast. However, phase-contrast effects at material edges complicate image quality and segmentation in XCT data reconstructed with conventional filtered backprojection absorption contrast algorithms. A quantitative phase retrieval algorithm, which isolates and removes the phase-contrast effect, was demonstrated. The paper discusses and illustrates the balance between material X-ray attenuation and phase-contrast effects in all quantitative XCT analyses of wood-adhesive bondlines.

  1. Cardiovascular flow measurement with phase-contrast MR imaging: basic facts and implementation.

    PubMed

    Lotz, Joachim; Meier, Christian; Leppert, Andreas; Galanski, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a well-known but undervalued method of obtaining quantitative information on blood flow. Applications of this technique in cardiovascular MR imaging are expanding. According to the sequences available, phase-contrast measurement can be performed in a breath hold or during normal respiration. Prospective as well as retrospective gating techniques can be used. Common errors in phase-contrast imaging include mismatched encoding velocity, deviation of the imaging plane, inadequate temporal resolution, inadequate spatial resolution, accelerated flow and spatial misregistration, and phase offset errors. Flow measurements are most precise if the imaging plane is perpendicular to the vessel of interest and flow encoding is set to through-plane flow. The sequence should be repeated at least once, with a high encoding velocity used initially. If peak velocity has to be estimated, flow measurement is repeated with an adapted encoding velocity. The overall error of a phase-contrast flow measurement comprises errors during prescription as well as errors that occur during image analysis of the flow data. With phase-contrast imaging, the overall error in flow measurement can be reduced to less than 10%, an acceptable level of error for routine clinical use. PMID:12006694

  2. First principles study of the optical contrast in phase change materials.

    PubMed

    Caravati, S; Bernasconi, M; Parrinello, M

    2010-08-11

    We study from first principles the optical properties of the phase change materials Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) (GST), GeTe and Sb(2)Te(3) in the crystalline phase and in realistic models of the amorphous phase generated by quenching from the melt in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The calculations reproduce the strong optical contrast between the crystalline and amorphous phases measured experimentally and exploited in optical data storage. It is demonstrated that the optical contrast is due to a change in the optical matrix elements across the phase change in all the compounds. It is concluded that the reduction of the optical matrix elements in the amorphous phases is due to angular disorder in p-bonding which dominates the amorphous network in agreement with previous proposals (Huang and Robertson 2010 Phys. Rev. B 81 081204) based on calculations on crystalline models.

  3. Optical Fourier techniques for medical image processing and phase contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Rao, D.V.G.L.N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the basics of optical Fourier techniques (OFT) and applications for medical image processing as well as phase contrast imaging of live biological specimens. Enhancement of microcalcifications in a mammogram for early diagnosis of breast cancer is the main focus. Various spatial filtering techniques such as conventional 4f filtering using a spatial mask, photoinduced polarization rotation in photosensitive materials, Fourier holography, and nonlinear transmission characteristics of optical materials are discussed for processing mammograms. We also reviewed how the intensity dependent refractive index can be exploited as a phase filter for phase contrast imaging with a coherent source. This novel approach represents a significant advance in phase contrast microscopy. PMID:18458764

  4. Correlation between off-axis illumination and apodized phase-contrast: two complementary microscopic phase-imaging modes.

    PubMed

    Pelc, Radek; Hostounský, Zdenek; Otaki, Tatsuro

    2008-01-01

    Microscopic images of biological phase specimens of various optical thickness, acquired under off-axis illumination and apodized/conventional phase-contrast are compared. The luminance profiles in appropriately filtered apodized phase-contrast images compare well with those in the original off-axis illumination images. The two unfiltered image types also yield similar results in terms of quasi-three-dimensional surface (pseudo-relief) rendering, and thus are comparable in terms of the information contents (optical thickness map). However, the overall visual impression is very different as the visual cues to depth structure are present in the off-axis illumination images only. The comparison demonstrated in the present paper was made possible owing to apodization, which substantially reduces the "halo"/shade-off artifacts in the phase-contrast images. The results imply the possibility of combining the off-axis illumination and apodized phase-contrast imaging to examine specimens of medium optical thickness, in which the phase visualization capability of the two imaging modes substantially overlaps (e.g., larger cells or cell clusters). PMID:19021445

  5. Refracting Roentgen's rays: Propagation-based x-ray phase contrast for biomedical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gureyev, T. E.; Mayo, S. C.; Nesterets, Ya.; Pogany, A.; Stevenson, A. W.; Wilkins, S. W.; Myers, D. E.; Paganin, D. M.

    2009-05-15

    Absorption-contrast x-ray imaging serves to visualize the variation in x-ray attenuation within the volume of a given sample, whereas phase contrast allows one to visualize variations in x-ray refractive index. The former imaging mechanism has been well known and widely utilized since the time of Roentgen's Nobel prize winning work, whereas the latter mechanism--sought for, but not found, by Roentgen himself--has laid the foundation for a revolution in x-ray imaging which is the central topic of this review. We consider the physical imaging mechanisms underlying both absorption contrast and phase contrast, together with the associated inverse problem of how one may obtain quantitative two- or three-dimensional information regarding a sample, given one or more phase-contrast images of the same. Practical questions are considered, regarding optimized phase-contrast imaging geometries as a function of detector resolution, source size, x-ray spectrum, and dose. Experimental examples pertaining to biomedical applications are given, and prospects for the future outlined.

  6. Phase-contrast imaging of weakly absorbing materials using hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. J.; Gao, D.; Gureyev, T. E.; Stevenson, A. W.; Wilkins, S. W.

    1995-02-01

    IMAGING with hard X-rays is an important diagnostic tool in medicine, biology and materials science. Contact radiography and tomography using hard X-rays provide information on internal structures that cannot be obtained using other non-destructive methods. The image contrast results from variations in the X-ray absorption arising from density differences and variations in composition and thickness of the object. But although X-rays penetrate deeply into carbon-based compounds, such as soft biological tissue, polymers and carbon-fibre composites, there is little absorption and therefore poor image contrast. Here we describe a method for enhancing the contrast in hard X-ray images of weakly absorbing materials by resolving phase variations across the X-ray beam1-4. The phase gradients are detected using diffraction from perfect silicon crystals. The diffraction properties of the crystal determine the ultimate spatial resolution in the image; we can readily obtain a resolution of a fraction of a millimetre. Our method shows dramatic contrast enhancement for weakly absorbing biological and inorganic materials, compared with conventional radiography using the same X-ray energy. We present both bright-field and dark-field phase-contrast images, and show evidence of contrast reversal. The method should have the clinical advantage of good contrast for low absorbed X-ray dose.

  7. Phase contrast X-ray microtomography of the Rhodnius prolixus head: Comparison of direct reconstruction and phase retrieval approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, A. P.; Braz, D.; Nogueira, L. P.; Colaço, M. V.; Soares, J.; Cardoso, S. C.; Garcia, E. S.; Azambuja, P.; Gonzalez, M. S.; Mohammadi, S.; Tromba, G.; Barroso, R. C.

    2014-02-01

    We have used phase-contrast X-ray microtomography (PPC-μCT) to study the head of the blood-feeding bug, Rhodnius prolixus, which is one of the most important insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, ethiologic agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. Images reconstructed from phase-retrieved projections processed by ANKA phase are compared to those obtained through direct tomographic reconstruction of the flat-field-corrected transmission radiographs. It should be noted that the relative locations of the important morphological internal structures are observable with a precision that is difficult to obtain without the phase retrieval approach.

  8. Beam hardening effects in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chabior, Michael; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Bunk, Oliver; Schuster, Manfred; Schroer, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors investigate how beam hardening affects the image formation in x-ray phase-contrast imaging and consecutively develop a correction algorithm based on the results of the analysis. Methods: The authors' approach utilizes a recently developed x-ray imaging technique using a grating interferometer capable of visualizing the differential phase shift of a wave front traversing an object. An analytical description of beam hardening is given, highlighting differences between attenuation and phase-contrast imaging. The authors present exemplary beam hardening artifacts for a number of well-defined samples in measurements at a compact laboratory setup using a polychromatic source. Results: Despite the differences in image formation, the authors show that beam hardening leads to a similar reduction of image quality in phase-contrast imaging as in conventional attenuation-contrast imaging. Additionally, the authors demonstrate that for homogeneous objects, beam hardening artifacts can be corrected by a linearization technique, applicable to all kinds of phase-contrast methods using polychromatic sources. Conclusions: The evaluated correction algorithm is shown to yield good results for a number of simple test objects and can thus be advocated in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

  9. Breast tumor segmentation in high resolution x-ray phase contrast analyzer based computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, E.; Grandl, S.; Sztrókay-Gaul, A.; Gasilov, S.; Barbone, G.; Mittone, A.; Coan, P.; Bravin, A.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Phase contrast computed tomography has emerged as an imaging method, which is able to outperform present day clinical mammography in breast tumor visualization while maintaining an equivalent average dose. To this day, no segmentation technique takes into account the specificity of the phase contrast signal. In this study, the authors propose a new mathematical framework for human-guided breast tumor segmentation. This method has been applied to high-resolution images of excised human organs, each of several gigabytes. Methods: The authors present a segmentation procedure based on the viscous watershed transform and demonstrate the efficacy of this method on analyzer based phase contrast images. The segmentation of tumors inside two full human breasts is then shown as an example of this procedure’s possible applications. Results: A correct and precise identification of the tumor boundaries was obtained and confirmed by manual contouring performed independently by four experienced radiologists. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that applying the watershed viscous transform allows them to perform the segmentation of tumors in high-resolution x-ray analyzer based phase contrast breast computed tomography images. Combining the additional information provided by the segmentation procedure with the already high definition of morphological details and tissue boundaries offered by phase contrast imaging techniques, will represent a valuable multistep procedure to be used in future medical diagnostic applications.

  10. Imaging of Metastatic Lymph Nodes by X-ray Phase-Contrast Micro-Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Torben Haugaard; Bech, Martin; Binderup, Tina; Böttiger, Arvid; David, Christian; Weitkamp, Timm; Zanette, Irene; Reznikova, Elena; Mohr, Jürgen; Rank, Fritz; Feidenhans’l, Robert; Kjær, Andreas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Invasive cancer causes a change in density in the affected tissue, which can be visualized by x-ray phase-contrast tomography. However, the diagnostic value of this method has so far not been investigated in detail. Therefore, the purpose of this study was, in a blinded manner, to investigate whether malignancy could be revealed by non-invasive x-ray phase-contrast tomography in lymph nodes from breast cancer patients. Seventeen formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lymph nodes from 10 female patients (age range 37–83 years) diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinomas were analyzed by X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Ten lymph nodes had metastatic deposits and 7 were benign. The phase-contrast images were analyzed according to standards for conventional CT images looking for characteristics usually only visible by pathological examinations. Histopathology was used as reference. The result of this study was that the diagnostic sensitivity of the image analysis for detecting malignancy was 100% and the specificity was 87%. The positive predictive value was 91% for detecting malignancy and the negative predictive value was 100%. We conclude that x-ray phase-contrast imaging can accurately detect density variations to obtain information regarding lymph node involvement previously inaccessible with standard absorption x-ray imaging. PMID:23349784

  11. Development of a prototype gantry system for preclinical x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pauwels, Bart; Liu Xuan; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Kenntner, Johannes; Mohr, Juergen; Walter, Marco; Schulz, Joachim; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To explore the potential of grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging for clinical applications, a first compact gantry system was developed. It is designed such that it can be implemented into an in-vivo small-animal phase-contrast computed tomography (PC-CT) scanner. The purpose of the present study is to assess the accuracy and quantitativeness of the described gantry in both absorption and phase-contrast. Methods: A phantom, containing six chemically well-defined liquids, was constructed. A tomography scan with cone-beam reconstruction of this phantom was performed yielding the spatial distribution of the linear attenuation coefficient {mu} and decrement {delta} of the complex refractive index. Theoretical values of {mu} and {delta} were calculated for each liquid from tabulated data and compared with the experimentally measured values. Additionally, a color-fused image representation is proposed to display the complementary absorption and phase-contrast information in a single image. Results: Experimental and calculated data of the phantom agree well confirming the quantitativeness and accuracy of the reconstructed spatial distributions of {mu} and {delta}. The proposed color-fused image representation, which combines the complementary absorption and phase information, considerably helps in distinguishing the individual substances. Conclusions: The concept of grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) can be implemented into a compact, cone-beam geometry gantry setup. The authors believe that this work represents an important milestone in translating phase-contrast x-ray imaging from previous proof-of-principle experiments to first preclinical biomedical imaging applications on small-animal models.

  12. Single-shot X-ray phase-contrast imaging using two-dimensional gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Genta; Itoh, Hidenosuke; Nagai, Kentaro; Nakamura, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Kimiaki; Kondoh, Takeshi; Handa, Soichiro; Ouchi, Chidane; Teshima, Takayuki; Setomoto, Yutaka; Den, Toru

    2012-07-31

    We developed a two-dimensional gratings-based X-ray interferometer that requires only a single exposure for clinical radiography. The interferometer consisted of a checkerboard phase grating for {pi} phase modulation and a latticed amplitude grating. Using a synchrotron radiation source, the phase grating modulates the X-rays and generates a self-image, transformed to a moire fringe by the amplitude grating. To allow use of a conventional X-ray tube, the latticed source grating was installed downstream from the X-ray tube. Differential phase-contrast and scattering images in two orthogonal directions were obtained by Fourier analysis of the single moire fringe image and an absorption image. Results show that characteristic features of soft tissue in two orthogonal directions were clearly shown in the differential phase-contrast images.

  13. Diagnosis of gallbladder diseases by contrast-enhanced phase-inversion harmonic ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tatsuo; Kitano, Masayuki; Kudo, Masatoshi; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Kawasaki, Toshihiko; Yasuda, Chikao; Maekawa, Kiyoshi

    2007-03-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography(US) for detecting and differentiating gallbladder lesions. Contrast-enhanced coded phase-inversion harmonic US was performed on 90 patients with gallbladder abnormalities. After administering Levovist, we observed the gallbladders in real time. Contrast-enhanced coded phase-inversion harmonic ultrasonography was compared with B-mode US and contrast-enhanced computer tomography (CT) with regard to the sensitivity and specificity in depicting the elevated gallbladder lesions. Furthermore, we assessed how the vascular patterns of the elevated gallbladder lesions depicted by contrast-enhanced US correlated with the diagnosis. Contrast-enhanced US efficiently discriminated true lesions from biliary sludge, unlike B-mode US. Consequently, contrast-enhanced US was more specific (100%) than B-mode US (81%), although their sensitivities were similar (98% and 96%, respectively). Contrast-enhanced US was also more sensitive that contrast-enhanced CT (98% versus 79%), although the two methods were equally sensitive (100% versus 95%). We classified the vascular patterns of the abnormalities depicted by contrast-enhanced US in the 90 cases into types 1 to 4, which represent branch-like, heterogeneous, homogeneous, and avascular patterns, respectively. All type 1 and 2 lesions were over 10 mm in size while most (88%) type 3 lesions were 10 mm or less in size. While the majority of carcinomas (86%) were type 1 or 2, three benign lesions also showed these patterns. Thus, the vascular pattern may simply reflect the size of the lesion and therefore its usefulness in diagnosing gallbladder lesions may be limited. Nevertheless, contrast-enhanced US is clearly superior to the other techniques in discriminating biliary sludge from other lesions.

  14. Whole-cell phase contrast imaging at the nanoscale using Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Michael W. M.; van Riessen, Grant A.; Abbey, Brian; Putkunz, Corey T.; Junker, Mark D.; Balaur, Eugeniu; Vine, David J.; McNulty, Ian; Chen, Bo; Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Frankland, Sarah; Nugent, Keith A.; Tilley, Leann; Peele, Andrew G.

    2013-07-01

    X-ray tomography can provide structural information of whole cells in close to their native state. Radiation-induced damage, however, imposes a practical limit to image resolution, and as such, a choice between damage, image contrast, and image resolution must be made. New coherent diffractive imaging techniques, such Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging (FCDI), allows quantitative phase information with exceptional dose efficiency, high contrast, and nano-scale resolution. Here we present three-dimensional quantitative images of a whole eukaryotic cell by FCDI at a spatial resolution below 70 nm with sufficient phase contrast to distinguish major cellular components. From our data, we estimate that the minimum dose required for a similar resolution is close to that predicted by the Rose criterion, considerably below accepted estimates of the maximum dose a frozen-hydrated cell can tolerate. Based on the dose efficiency, contrast, and resolution achieved, we expect this technique will find immediate applications in tomographic cellular characterisation.

  15. Analytical reconstructions of intensity modulated x-ray phase-contrast imaging of human scale phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Włodarczyk, Bartłomiej; Pietrzak, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents analytical approach to modeling of a full planar and volumetric acquisition system with image reconstructions originated from partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging at a human scale using graphics processor units. The model is based on x-ray tracing and wave optics methods to develop a numerical framework for predicting the performance of a preclinical phase-contrast imaging system of a human-scaled phantom. In this study, experimental images of simple numerical phantoms and high resolution anthropomorphic phantoms of head and thorax based on non-uniform rational b-spline shapes (NURBS) prove the correctness of the model. Presented results can be used to simulate the performance of partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging system on various preclinical applications. PMID:26600991

  16. Color-coded LED microscopy for multi-contrast and quantitative phase-gradient imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Donghak; Ryu, Suho; Kim, Uihan; Jung, Daeseong; Joo, Chulmin

    2015-12-01

    We present a multi-contrast microscope based on color-coded illumination and computation. A programmable three-color light-emitting diode (LED) array illuminates a specimen, in which each color corresponds to a different illumination angle. A single color image sensor records light transmitted through the specimen, and images at each color channel are then separated and utilized to obtain bright-field, dark-field, and differential phase contrast (DPC) images simultaneously. Quantitative phase imaging is also achieved based on DPC images acquired with two different LED illumination patterns. The multi-contrast and quantitative phase imaging capabilities of our method are demonstrated by presenting images of various transparent biological samples. PMID:26713205

  17. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.

  18. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H; Ercius, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals. PMID:26923483

  19. Interferometric hard x-ray phase contrast imaging at 204 nm grating period

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Han; Gomella, Andrew A.; Miao, Houxun; Lynch, Susanna K.; Wolfe, Douglas E.; Xiao Xianghui; Liu Chian; Morgan, Nicole

    2013-01-15

    We report on hard x-ray phase contrast imaging experiments using a grating interferometer of approximately 1/10th the grating period achieved in previous studies. We designed the gratings as a staircase array of multilayer stacks which are fabricated in a single thin film deposition process. We performed the experiments at 19 keV x-ray energy and 0.8 {mu}m pixel resolution. The small grating period resulted in clear separation of different diffraction orders and multiple images on the detector. A slitted beam was used to remove overlap of the images from the different diffraction orders. The phase contrast images showed detailed features as small as 10 {mu}m, and demonstrated the feasibility of high resolution x-ray phase contrast imaging with nanometer scale gratings.

  20. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals. PMID:26923483

  1. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-29

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.

  2. Myelinated mouse nerves studied by X-ray phase contrast zoom tomography.

    PubMed

    Bartels, M; Krenkel, M; Cloetens, P; Möbius, W; Salditt, T

    2015-12-01

    We have used X-ray phase contrast tomography to resolve the structure of uncut, entire myelinated optic, saphenous and sciatic mouse nerves. Intrinsic electron density contrast suffices to identify axonal structures. Specific myelin labeling by an osmium tetroxide stain enables distinction between axon and surrounding myelin sheath. Utilization of spherical wave illumination enables zooming capabilities which enable imaging of entire sciatic internodes as well as identification of sub-structures such as nodes of Ranvier and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures. PMID:26546551

  3. Myelinated mouse nerves studied by X-ray phase contrast zoom tomography.

    PubMed

    Bartels, M; Krenkel, M; Cloetens, P; Möbius, W; Salditt, T

    2015-12-01

    We have used X-ray phase contrast tomography to resolve the structure of uncut, entire myelinated optic, saphenous and sciatic mouse nerves. Intrinsic electron density contrast suffices to identify axonal structures. Specific myelin labeling by an osmium tetroxide stain enables distinction between axon and surrounding myelin sheath. Utilization of spherical wave illumination enables zooming capabilities which enable imaging of entire sciatic internodes as well as identification of sub-structures such as nodes of Ranvier and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures.

  4. Phase contrast imaging simulation and measurements using polychromatic sources with small source-object distances

    SciTech Connect

    Golosio, Bruno; Carpinelli, Massimo; Masala, Giovanni Luca; Oliva, Piernicola; Stumbo, Simone; Delogu, Pasquale; Zanette, Irene; Stefanini, Arnaldo

    2008-11-01

    Phase contrast imaging is a technique widely used in synchrotron facilities for nondestructive analysis. Such technique can also be implemented through microfocus x-ray tube systems. Recently, a relatively new type of compact, quasimonochromatic x-ray sources based on Compton backscattering has been proposed for phase contrast imaging applications. In order to plan a phase contrast imaging system setup, to evaluate the system performance and to choose the experimental parameters that optimize the image quality, it is important to have reliable software for phase contrast imaging simulation. Several software tools have been developed and tested against experimental measurements at synchrotron facilities devoted to phase contrast imaging. However, many approximations that are valid in such conditions (e.g., large source-object distance, small transverse size of the object, plane wave approximation, monochromatic beam, and Gaussian-shaped source focal spot) are not generally suitable for x-ray tubes and other compact systems. In this work we describe a general method for the simulation of phase contrast imaging using polychromatic sources based on a spherical wave description of the beam and on a double-Gaussian model of the source focal spot, we discuss the validity of some possible approximations, and we test the simulations against experimental measurements using a microfocus x-ray tube on three types of polymers (nylon, poly-ethylene-terephthalate, and poly-methyl-methacrylate) at varying source-object distance. It will be shown that, as long as all experimental conditions are described accurately in the simulations, the described method yields results that are in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  5. Cryo X-ray microscopy with high spatial resolution in amplitude and phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Schneider, G

    1998-11-01

    The resolution of transmission X-ray microscopes (TXMs) using zone plate optics is presently about 30 nm. Theory and experiments presented here show that this resolution can be obtained in radiation sensitive hydrated biological material by using shock frozen samples. For this purpose the interaction of X-rays with matter and the image formation with zone plates is described. For the first time the influence of the limited apertures of the condenser and the zone plate objective are in included in calculations of the image contrast, the photon density and radiation dose required for the object illumination. Model considerations show that lowest radiation dose and high image contrast are obtained in optimized phase contrast which exploits absorption as well as phase shift. The damaging effect of the absorbed X-rays is quantitatively evaluated by radiation-induced kinetics showing that cryogenic samples are structurally stable. To verify these theoretical models the TXM was modified to allow imaging of frozen-hydrated samples at atmospheric pressure. Details inside cells and algae as small as 35 nm are visible at 2.4 nm wavelength in amplitude contrast mode. At this resolution the cryogenic samples show no structural changes. As predicted, optimized phase contrast shows structures inside the frozen-hydrated objects with high contrast. Stereo-pair images of algae reveal the 3D organization of the organelles. Element analysis and micro-tomography of whole cryogenic cells are possible. PMID:9836467

  6. High speed optical phased array using high contrast grating all-pass filters.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weijian; Sun, Tianbo; Rao, Yi; Megens, Mischa; Chan, Trevor; Yoo, Byung-Wook; Horsley, David A; Wu, Ming C; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2014-08-25

    We report a high speed 8x8 optical phased array using tunable 1550 nm all-pass filters with ultrathin high contrast gratings (HCGs) as the microelectromechanical-actuated top reflectors. The all-pass filter design enables a highly efficient phase tuning (1.7 π) with a small actuation voltage (10 V) and actuation displacement of the HCG (50 nm). The microelectromechanical HCG structure facilitates a high phase tuning speed >0.5 MHz. Beam steering is experimentally demonstrated with the optical phased array.

  7. Phase-contrast Hounsfield units of fixated and non-fixated soft-tissue samples

    SciTech Connect

    Willner, Marian; Fior, Gabriel; Marschner, Mathias; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Schock, Jonathan; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Noël, Peter B.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia; Rozhkova, Elena A.

    2015-08-31

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of imaging results. Thus far, the experimental values of few tissue types have been reported; these values have been determined from fixated tissue samples. This study presents phase-contrast Hounsfield units for various types of non-fixated human soft tissues. A large variety of tissue specimens ranging from adipose, muscle and connective tissues to liver, kidney and pancreas tissues were imaged by a grating interferometer with a rotating-anode X-ray tube and a photon-counting detector. In addition, we investigated the effects of formalin fixation on the quantitative phase-contrast imaging results.

  8. Phase-contrast Hounsfield units of fixated and non-fixated soft-tissue samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Willner, Marian; Fior, Gabriel; Marschner, Mathias; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Schock, Jonathan; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Noël, Peter B.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz; et al

    2015-08-31

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of imaging results. Thus far, the experimental values of few tissue types have been reported; these values have been determined from fixated tissue samples. This study presents phase-contrast Hounsfield units for various types of non-fixated human soft tissues. A large variety of tissuemore » specimens ranging from adipose, muscle and connective tissues to liver, kidney and pancreas tissues were imaged by a grating interferometer with a rotating-anode X-ray tube and a photon-counting detector. In addition, we investigated the effects of formalin fixation on the quantitative phase-contrast imaging results.« less

  9. Dual-modality endomicroscopy with co-registered fluorescence and phase contrast

    PubMed Central

    Ba, C.; Palmiere, M.; Ritt, J.; Mertz, J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a dual-modality laser scanning endomicroscope that provides simultaneous fluorescence contrast based on confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) and phase-gradient contrast based on scanning oblique back-scattering microscopy (sOBM). The probe consists of a 2.6mm-diameter micro-objective attached to a 30,000-core flexible fiber bundle. The dual contrasts are inherently co-registered, providing complementary information on labeled and un-labeled sample structure. Proof of principle demonstrations are presented with ex-vivo mouse colon tissue.

  10. Dual-modality endomicroscopy with co-registered fluorescence and phase contrast

    PubMed Central

    Ba, C.; Palmiere, M.; Ritt, J.; Mertz, J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a dual-modality laser scanning endomicroscope that provides simultaneous fluorescence contrast based on confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) and phase-gradient contrast based on scanning oblique back-scattering microscopy (sOBM). The probe consists of a 2.6mm-diameter micro-objective attached to a 30,000-core flexible fiber bundle. The dual contrasts are inherently co-registered, providing complementary information on labeled and un-labeled sample structure. Proof of principle demonstrations are presented with ex-vivo mouse colon tissue. PMID:27699107

  11. A Broad-Band Phase-Contrast Wave-Front Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, Eric; Wallace, J. Kent

    2005-01-01

    A broadband phase-contrast wave-front sensor has been proposed as a real-time wave-front sensor in an adaptive-optics system. The proposed sensor would offer an alternative to the Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensors now used in high-order adaptive-optics systems of some astronomical telescopes. Broadband sensing gives higher sensitivity than does narrow-band sensing, and it appears that for a given bandwidth, the sensitivity of the proposed phase-contrast sensor could exceed that of a Shack-Hartmann sensor. Relative to a Shack-Hartmann sensor, the proposed sensor may be optically and mechanically simpler. As described below, an important element of the principle of operation of a phase-contrast wave-front sensor is the imposition of a 90deg phase shift between diffracted and undiffracted parts of the same light beam. In the proposed sensor, this phase shift would be obtained by utilizing the intrinsic 90 phase shift between the transmitted and reflected beams in an ideal (thin, symmetric) beam splitter. This phase shift can be characterized as achromatic or broadband because it is 90deg at every wavelength over a broad wavelength range.

  12. Automatic segmentation of the liver from multi- and single-phase contrast-enhanced CT images.

    PubMed

    Ruskó, László; Bekes, György; Fidrich, Márta

    2009-12-01

    Segmentation of contrast-enhanced abdominal CT images is required by many clinical applications of computer aided diagnosis and therapy planning. The research on automated methods involves different organs among which the liver is the most emphasized. In the current clinical practice more images (at different phases) are acquired from the region of interest in case of a contrast-enhanced abdominal CT examination. The majority of the existing methods, however, use only the portal-venous image to segment the liver. This paper presents a method that automatically segments the liver by combining more phases of the contrast-enhanced CT examination. The method uses region-growing facilitated by pre- and post-processing functions, which incorporate anatomical and multi-phase information to eliminate over- and under-segmentation. Another method, which uses only the portal-venous phase to segment the liver automatically, is also presented. Both methods were evaluated using different datasets, which showed that the result of multi-phase method can be used without or after minor correction in nearly 94% of the cases, and the single-phase method can provide result comparable with non-expert manual segmentation in 90% of the cases. The comparison of the two methods demonstrates that automatic segmentation is more reliable when the information of more phases is combined.

  13. Phase-contrast enhanced mammography: A new diagnostic tool for breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhentian; Thuering, Thomas; David, Christian; Roessl, Ewald; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Singer, Gad; Hohl, Michael K.; Hauser, Nik; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-07-31

    Phase contrast and scattering-based X-ray imaging can potentially revolutionize the radiological approach to breast imaging by providing additional and complementary information to conventional, absorption-based methods. We investigated native, non-fixed whole breast samples using a grating interferometer with an X-ray tube-based configuration. Our approach simultaneously recorded absorption, differential phase contrast and small-angle scattering signals. The results show that this novel technique - combined with a dedicated image fusion algorithm - has the potential to deliver enhanced breast imaging with complementary information for an improved diagnostic process.

  14. Phase-contrast enhanced mammography: A new diagnostic tool for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhentian; Thuering, Thomas; David, Christian; Roessl, Ewald; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Singer, Gad; Hohl, Michael K.; Hauser, Nik; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-07-01

    Phase contrast and scattering-based X-ray imaging can potentially revolutionize the radiological approach to breast imaging by providing additional and complementary information to conventional, absorption-based methods. We investigated native, non-fixed whole breast samples using a grating interferometer with an X-ray tube-based configuration. Our approach simultaneously recorded absorption, differential phase contrast and small-angle scattering signals. The results show that this novel technique - combined with a dedicated image fusion algorithm - has the potential to deliver enhanced breast imaging with complementary information for an improved diagnostic process.

  15. On the relationship between intensity diffraction tomography and phase-contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasio, Mark A.; Shi, Daxin

    2004-10-01

    Diffraction tomography (DT) is a well-known method for reconstructing the complex-valued refractive index distribution of weakly scattering objects. A reconstruction theory of intensity DT (I-DT) has been proposed [Gbur and Wolf, JOSA A, 2002] that can accomplish such a reconstruction from knowledge of only the wavefield intensities on two different transverse planes at each tomographic view angle. In this work, we elucidate the relationship between I-DT and phase-contrast tomography and demonstrate that I-DT reconstruction theory contains some of the existing reconstruction algorithms for phase-contrast tomography as special cases.

  16. The dynamic response of high pressure phase of Si using phase contrast imaging and X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. J.; Galtier, E.; Xing, Z.; Gleason, A.; Granados, E.; Tavella, F.; Schropp, A.; Seiboth, F.; Schroer, C.; Higginbotham, A.; Brown, S.; Arnold, B.; Curiel, R.; Peterswright, D.; Fry, A.; Nagler, B.

    2015-11-01

    Static compression studies have revealed that crystalline silicon undergoes phase transitions from a cubic diamond structure to a variety of phases including body-centered tetragonal phase, an orthorhombic phase, and a hexagonal primitive phase. However, the dynamic response of silicon at high pressure is not well understood. Phase contrast imaging has proven to be a powerful tool for probing density changes caused by the shock propagation into a material. With respect to the elastic and plastic compression, we image shock waves in Si with high spatial resolution using the LCLS X-ray free electron laser and Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument. In this study, the long pulse optical laser with pseudoflat top shape creates high pressures up to 60 GPa. We also measure the crystal structure by observing the X-ray diffraction orthogonal to the shock propagation direction over a range of pressure. In this talk, we will present the capability of simultaneously performing phase contrast imaging and in situ X-ray diffraction during shock loading and will discuss the dynamic response of Si in high pressure phases

  17. Theoretical considerations for X-ray phase contrast mammography by Thomson source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedola, A.; Bukreeva, I.; Lagomarsino, S.; Petrillo, V.; Maroli, C.

    2009-09-01

    The advent, in the near future, of compact X-ray sources like Thomson Back-Scattering (TBS) will allow the clinical application of advanced X-ray imaging techniques, such as phase contrast, with higher sensitivity and lower impact in terms of dose delivery. In this work, we theoretically investigated the possibility of using such sources for phase contrast imaging of micro-calcifications included in a breast tissue. In our study we analyzed the phase and amplitude distribution of the TBS source and we showed that this source can be used for phase contrast imaging since the source coherence at the sample position is sufficiently high for achieving good contrast and micrometer spatial resolution. Indeed the spatial coherence of a TBS source is closer to that of a synchrotron radiation source, and much better than that of a laboratory source. Moreover, we showed the advantages of phase imaging with respect to standard absorption imaging, in the specific case of micro-calcifications detection.

  18. X-ray phase contrast tomography by tracking near field speckle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Herzen, Julia; Atwood, Robert; Laundy, David; Hipp, Alexander; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-01-01

    X-ray imaging techniques that capture variations in the x-ray phase can yield higher contrast images with lower x-ray dose than is possible with conventional absorption radiography. However, the extraction of phase information is often more difficult than the extraction of absorption information and requires a more sophisticated experimental arrangement. We here report a method for three-dimensional (3D) X-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) which gives quantitative volumetric information on the real part of the refractive index. The method is based on the recently developed X-ray speckle tracking technique in which the displacement of near field speckle is tracked using a digital image correlation algorithm. In addition to differential phase contrast projection images, the method allows the dark-field images to be simultaneously extracted. After reconstruction, compared to conventional absorption CT images, the 3D phase CT images show greatly enhanced contrast. This new imaging method has advantages compared to other X-ray imaging methods in simplicity of experimental arrangement, speed of measurement and relative insensitivity to beam movements. These features make the technique an attractive candidate for material imaging such as in-vivo imaging of biological systems containing soft tissue.

  19. X-ray phase contrast tomography by tracking near field speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Herzen, Julia; Atwood, Robert; Laundy, David; Hipp, Alexander; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-03-01

    X-ray imaging techniques that capture variations in the x-ray phase can yield higher contrast images with lower x-ray dose than is possible with conventional absorption radiography. However, the extraction of phase information is often more difficult than the extraction of absorption information and requires a more sophisticated experimental arrangement. We here report a method for three-dimensional (3D) X-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) which gives quantitative volumetric information on the real part of the refractive index. The method is based on the recently developed X-ray speckle tracking technique in which the displacement of near field speckle is tracked using a digital image correlation algorithm. In addition to differential phase contrast projection images, the method allows the dark-field images to be simultaneously extracted. After reconstruction, compared to conventional absorption CT images, the 3D phase CT images show greatly enhanced contrast. This new imaging method has advantages compared to other X-ray imaging methods in simplicity of experimental arrangement, speed of measurement and relative insensitivity to beam movements. These features make the technique an attractive candidate for material imaging such as in-vivo imaging of biological systems containing soft tissue.

  20. Theoretical analysis of x-ray CT phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Sheng; Liu, Song; Zhang, Xuelong

    2008-12-01

    Recently phase contrast imaging has attracted much attention. An obvious advantage of using X-rays for imaging the internal structure of relatively thick samples lies in its high degree of penetration of solid objects. However, often leads to poor image contrast for soft tissue. Phase contrast imaging can be very useful in such situation, as the phase of the transmitted beam may often be more sensitive indicator of density of sample than convention contrast. On the other hand, Computed Tomography is the best technology in the aspect of X-rays detection. Using the technology, the detected object can be imaged to three-dimensional image, so as to observe the inner structure of object, and be convenient to the disease examination. If the phase contrast imaging can be used to the technology of Computed Tomography, the high resolution image can be gained. The technology will become the development orientation of medical image. The aim of this article was to apply the theory of X-rays phase contrast imaging to the traditional X-CT technique. For this purpose, the formula deduced from the imaging theory with parallel monochromatic X-rays illuminating the object based on the Fresnel-Kircohhof theory had been completed and a formula similar to that of the traditional X-CT reconstruction had been gained, which was Radon transform formula. At last, X-rays reconstruction simulation had been carried out according to the formula, and proved that the method could be used in clinical medical imaging. The method discussed in this paper had a very bright prospect for application.

  1. Quality of the reconstruction in x-ray phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arhatari, B. D.; Peele, A. G.; Nugent, K. A.; De Carlo, F.

    2006-06-01

    We develop an analytical model for three dimensional phase contrast tomography for a pure phase object. The model incorporates an extended source, which is suitable for a laboratory based microfocus x-ray source. From the modeled intensities for the tomographic data set we obtain a model reconstruction and define a reconstruction quality factor that allows us to optimize the tomographic reconstruction for given feature sizes in an object.

  2. Experimental demonstration of passive coherent combining of fiber lasers by phase contrast filtering.

    PubMed

    Jeux, François; Desfarges-Berthelemot, Agnès; Kermène, Vincent; Barthelemy, Alain

    2012-12-17

    We report experiments on a new laser architecture involving phase contrast filtering to coherently combine an array of fiber lasers. We demonstrate that the new technique yields a more stable phase-locking than standard methods using only amplitude filtering. A spectral analysis of the output beams shows that the new scheme generates more resonant frequencies common to the coupled lasers. This property can enhance the combining efficiency when the number of lasers to be coupled is large.

  3. Terahertz in-line digital holography of human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Lu; Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Chen, Chunhai; Wang, Dayong; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Xun; Li, Zeyu; Huang, Haochong; Wang, Yunxin; Zhou, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz waves provide a better contrast in imaging soft biomedical tissues than X-rays, and unlike X-rays, they cause no ionisation damage, making them a good option for biomedical imaging. Terahertz absorption imaging has conventionally been used for cancer diagnosis. However, the absorption properties of a cancerous sample are influenced by two opposing factors: an increase in absorption due to a higher degree of hydration and a decrease in absorption due to structural changes. It is therefore difficult to diagnose cancer from an absorption image. Phase imaging can thus be critical for diagnostics. We demonstrate imaging of the absorption and phase-shift distributions of 3.2 mm × 2.3 mm × 30-μm-thick human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue by continuous-wave terahertz digital in-line holography. The acquisition time of a few seconds for a single in-line hologram is much shorter than that of other terahertz diagnostic techniques, and future detectors will allow acquisition of meaningful holograms without sample dehydration. The resolution of the reconstructions was enhanced by sub-pixel shifting and extrapolation. Another advantage of this technique is its relaxed minimal sample size limitation. The fibrosis indicated in the phase distribution demonstrates the potential of terahertz holographic imaging to obtain a more objective, early diagnosis of cancer. PMID:25676705

  4. Monitoring cells in engineered tissues with optical coherence phase microscopy: Optical phase fluctuations as endogenous sources of contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnaninchi, P. O.; Holmes, Christina; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2013-02-01

    There is a need in tissue engineering to monitor cell growth and health within 3D constructs non-invasively and in a label-free manner. We have previously shown that optical coherence phase microscopy was sensitive enough to monitor intracellular motion. Here we demonstrate that intracellular motility can be used as an endogeneous contrast agent to image cells in various 3D engineered tissue architectures. Phase and intensity-based reconstruction algorithms are compared. In this study, we used an optical coherence phase microscope set up in a common path configuration, developed around a Callisto OCT engine (Thorlbas) centred at 930nm and an inverted microscope with a custom scanning head. Intensity data were used to perform in-depth microstructural imaging. In addition, phase fluctuations were measured by collecting several successive B scans at the same location, and the first time derivative of the phase, i.e. time fluctuations, was analysed over the acquisition time interval to map the motility. Alternative intensity-based Doppler variance algorithms were also investigated. Two distinct scaffold systems seeded with adult stem cells; algimatrix (Invitrogen) and custom microfabricated poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) fibrous scaffolds, as well as cell pellets were imaged. We showed that optical phase fluctuations resulting from intracellular motility can be used as an endogenous source of contrast for optical coherence phase microscopy enabling the distinction of viable cells from the surrounding scaffold.

  5. Phase-contrast x-ray imaging of the breast: recent developments towards clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coan, P.; Bravin, A.; Tromba, G.

    2013-12-01

    Breast imaging is one of the most demanding and delicate radiological applications. Mammography is the primary diagnosis tool in breast cancer detection and national screening programmes. Recognition of breast cancer depends on the detection of subtle architectural distortion, masses showing near normal breast tissue density, skin thickening and microcalcifications. The small differences in attenuation of x-rays between normal and malignant tissue result in low contrast and make cancer detection difficult in conventional x-ray absorption mammography. Because of these challenging aspects, breast imaging has been the first and most explored diagnostic field in phase-contrast imaging research. This novel imaging method has been extensively used and has demonstrated a unique capability in producing high-contrast and sensitive images at quasi-histological resolution. The most recent and significant technical developments are introduced and results obtained by the application of various phase-contrast imaging techniques for breast imaging are reported. The first phase-contrast mammography clinical trials project is also presented and the short- and long-term future perspectives of the method are discussed.

  6. High-Resolution Phase-Contrast Imaging of Submicron Particles in Unstained Lung Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Schittny, J. C.; Barre, S. F.; Haberthuer, D.; Mokso, R.; Tsuda, A.; Stampanoni, M.

    2011-09-09

    To access the risks and chances of deposition of submicron particles in the gas-exchange area of the lung, a precise three-dimensional (3D)-localization of the sites of deposition is essential--especially because local peaks of deposition are expected in the acinar tree and in individual alveoli. In this study we developed the workflow for such an investigation. We administered 200-nm gold particles to young adult rats by intratracheal instillation. After fixation and paraffin embedding, their lungs were imaged unstained using synchrotron radiation x-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) at the beamline TOMCAT (Swiss Light Source, Villigen, Switzerland) at sample detector distances of 2.5 mm (absorption contrast) and of 52.5 mm (phase contrast). A segmentation based on a global threshold of grey levels was successfully done on absorption-contrast images for the gold and on the phase-contrast images for the tissue. The smallest spots containing gold possessed a size of 1-2 voxels of 370-nm side length. We conclude that a combination of phase and absorption contrast SRXTM imaging is necessary to obtain the correct segmentation of both tissue and gold particles. This method will be used for the 3D localization of deposited particles in the gas-exchange area of the lung.

  7. Differential phase contrast with a segmented detector in a scanning X-ray microprobe

    PubMed Central

    Hornberger, B.; de Jonge, M. D.; Feser, M.; Holl, P.; Holzner, C.; Jacobsen, C.; Legnini, D.; Paterson, D.; Rehak, P.; Strüder, L.; Vogt, S.

    2008-01-01

    Scanning X-ray microprobes are unique tools for the nanoscale investigation of specimens from the life, environmental, materials and other fields of sciences. Typically they utilize absorption and fluorescence as contrast mechanisms. Phase contrast is a complementary technique that can provide strong contrast with reduced radiation dose for weakly absorbing structures in the multi-keV range. In this paper the development of a segmented charge-integrating silicon detector which provides simultaneous absorption and differential phase contrast is reported. The detector can be used together with a fluorescence detector for the simultaneous acquisition of transmission and fluorescence data. It can be used over a wide range of photon energies, photon rates and exposure times at third-generation synchrotron radiation sources, and is currently operating at two beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source. Images obtained at around 2 keV and 10 keV demonstrate the superiority of phase contrast over absorption for specimens composed of light elements. PMID:18552427

  8. High-Resolution Phase-Contrast Imaging of Submicron Particles in Unstained Lung Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schittny, J. C.; Barré, S. F.; Mokso, R.; Haberthür, D.; Semmler-Behnke, M.; Kreyling, W. G.; Tsuda, A.; Stampanoni, M.

    2011-09-01

    To access the risks and chances of deposition of submicron particles in the gas-exchange area of the lung, a precise three-dimensional (3D)-localization of the sites of deposition is essential—especially because local peaks of deposition are expected in the acinar tree and in individual alveoli. In this study we developed the workflow for such an investigation. We administered 200-nm gold particles to young adult rats by intratracheal instillation. After fixation and paraffin embedding, their lungs were imaged unstained using synchrotron radiation x-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) at the beamline TOMCAT (Swiss Light Source, Villigen, Switzerland) at sample detector distances of 2.5 mm (absorption contrast) and of 52.5 mm (phase contrast). A segmentation based on a global threshold of grey levels was successfully done on absorption-contrast images for the gold and on the phase-contrast images for the tissue. The smallest spots containing gold possessed a size of 1-2 voxels of 370-nm side length. We conclude that a combination of phase and absorption contrast SRXTM imaging is necessary to obtain the correct segmentation of both tissue and gold particles. This method will be used for the 3D localization of deposited particles in the gas-exchange area of the lung.

  9. Kupffer-phase findings of hepatic hemangiomas in contrast-enhanced ultrasound with sonazoid.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Katsutoshi; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Saito, Kazuhiro; Yoshiara, Hiroki; Imai, Yasuharu

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess quantitatively the Kupffer-phase enhancement patterns of hepatic hemangiomas in contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) with Sonazoid. A total of 46 patients with 46 hepatic hemangiomas (17.1 ± 6.2 mm in diameter, 34 typical type and 12 high-flow type) underwent CEUS in the Kupffer phase. The lesion-to-liver contrast ratio in the Kupffer phase was quantitatively assessed for both types of hemangioma. Most of the hepatic hemangiomas, whether or not they were the high-flow type, were iso- to hypo-echoic relative to the surrounding liver parenchyma. The contrast ratio was -5.33 ± 6.70 dB for the high-flow hemangiomas and -4.54 ± 6.28 dB for the typical hemangiomas. There was no significant difference in contrast ratio between the two types of lesions (p = 0.73). All of the hemangiomas, whether of typical or high-flow type, are iso- to hypo-echoic relative to the surrounding liver parenchyma on Kupffer-phase imaging.

  10. Benchmarking the x-ray phase contrast imaging for ICF DT ice characterization using roughened surrogates

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B; Moody, J; Koch, J; Mapoles, E; Montesanti, R; Youngblood, K; Letts, S; Nikroo, A; Sater, J; Atherton, J

    2008-06-26

    We use x-ray phase contrast imaging to characterize the inner surface roughness of DT ice layers in capsules planned for future ignition experiments. It is therefore important to quantify how well the x-ray data correlates with the actual ice roughness. We benchmarked the accuracy of our system using surrogates with fabricated roughness characterized with high precision standard techniques. Cylindrical artifacts with azimuthally uniform sinusoidal perturbations with 100 um period and 1 um amplitude demonstrated 0.02 um accuracy limited by the resolution of the imager and the source size of our phase contrast system. Spherical surrogates with random roughness close to that required for the DT ice for a successful ignition experiment were used to correlate the actual surface roughness to that obtained from the x-ray measurements. When comparing average power spectra of individual measurements, the accuracy mode number limits of the x-ray phase contrast system benchmarked against surface characterization performed by Atomic Force Microscopy are 60 and 90 for surrogates smoother and rougher than the required roughness for the ice. These agreement mode number limits are >100 when comparing matching individual measurements. We will discuss the implications for interpreting DT ice roughness data derived from phase-contrast x-ray imaging.

  11. Modelling of a novel x-ray phase contrast imaging technique based on coded apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivo, A.; Speller, R.

    2007-11-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging is probably the most relevant among emerging x-ray imaging techniques, and it has the proven potential of revolutionizing the field of diagnostic radiology. Impressive images of a wide range of samples have been obtained, mostly at synchrotron radiation facilities. The necessity of relying on synchrotron radiation has prevented to a large extent a widespread diffusion of phase contrast imaging, thus precluding its transfer to clinical practice. A new technique, based on the use of coded apertures, was recently developed at UCL. This technique was demonstrated to provide intense phase contrast signals with conventional x-ray sources and detectors. Unlike other attempts at making phase contrast imaging feasible with conventional sources, the coded-aperture approach does not impose substantial limitations and/or filtering of the radiation beam, and it therefore allows, for the first time, exposures compatible with clinical practice. The technique has been thoroughly modelled, and this paper describes the technique in detail by going through the different steps of the modelling. All the main factors influencing image quality are discussed, alongside the viability of realizing a prototype suitable for clinical use. The model has been experimentally validated and a section of the paper shows the comparison between simulated and experimental results.

  12. Hard X-Ray Phase-Contrast Imaging for Medical Applications - Physicist's Dream or Radiologist's Mainstream?

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S. W.; Gureyev, T. E.; Mayo, S. C.; Nesterets, Ya. I.; Pogany, A.; Stevenson, A. W.; Paganin, D. M.

    2007-03-30

    We briefly review currently practiced methods of X-ray phase contrast imaging and consider some of their relative features, especially in regard to applicability to clinical medical studies. Various related technological issues and promising future areas of development are also briefly discussed.

  13. Quantitative Carré differential interference contrast microscopy to assess phase and amplitude.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Donald D; Fischer, David G; Dayton, Amanda; Prahl, Scott A

    2011-06-01

    We present a method of using an unmodified differential interference contrast microscope to acquire quantitative information on scatter and absorption of thin tissue samples. A simple calibration process is discussed that uses a standard optical wedge. Subsequently, we present a phase-stepping procedure for acquiring phase gradient information exclusive of absorption effects. The procedure results in two-dimensional maps of the local angular (polar and azimuthal) ray deviation. We demonstrate the calibration process, discuss details of the phase-stepping algorithm, and present representative results for a porcine skin sample.

  14. X-ray phase contrast tomography with a bending magnet source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peele, A. G.; De Carlo, F.; McMahon, P. J.; Dhal, B. B.; Nugent, K. A.

    2005-08-01

    X-ray radiography and x-ray tomography are important tools for noninvasive characterization of materials. Historically, the contrast mechanism used with these techniques has been absorption. However, for any given sample there are x-ray energies for which absorption contrast is poor. Alternatively, when good contrast can be obtained, radiation damage from an excessive dose may become an issue. Consequently, phase-contrast methods have in recent years been implemented at both synchrotron and laboratory facilities. A range of radiographic and tomographic demonstrations have now been made, typically utilizing the coherent flux from an insertion device at a synchrotron or a microfocus laboratory source. In this paper we demonstrate that useful results may be obtained using a bending magnet source at a synchrotron. In particular we show that the same beamline can be used to make and characterize a sample made by x-ray lithographic methods.

  15. Lyot-plane phase masks for improved high-contrast imaging with a vortex coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruane, G. J.; Huby, E.; Absil, O.; Mawet, D.; Delacroix, C.; Carlomagno, B.; Swartzlander, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The vortex coronagraph is an optical instrument that precisely removes on-axis starlight allowing for high contrast imaging at small angular separation from the star, a crucial capability for direct detection and characterization of exoplanets and circumstellar disks. Telescopes with aperture obstructions, such as secondary mirrors and spider support structures, require advanced coronagraph designs to provide adequate starlight suppression. Aims: We introduce a phase-only Lyot-plane optic to the vortex coronagraph, which offers improved contrast performance on telescopes with complicated apertures. Potential solutions for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) are described. Methods: Adding a Lyot-plane phase mask relocates residual starlight away from a region of the image plane, thereby reducing stellar noise and improving sensitivity to off-axis companions. The phase mask is calculated using an iterative phase retrieval algorithm. Results: Numerically, we achieve a contrast on the order of 10-6 for a companion with angular displacement as small as 4λ/D with an E-ELT type aperture. Even in the presence of aberrations, improved performance is expected compared to either a conventional vortex coronagraph or an optimized pupil plane phase element alone.

  16. Quantitative measurement of ultrasound pressure field by optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Seiji; Yasuda, Jun; Hanayama, Hiroki; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    A fast and accurate measurement of an ultrasound field with various exposure sequences is necessary to ensure the efficacy and safety of various ultrasound applications in medicine. The most common method used to measure an ultrasound pressure field, that is, hydrophone scanning, requires a long scanning time and potentially disturbs the field. This may limit the efficiency of developing applications of ultrasound. In this study, an optical phase contrast method enabling fast and noninterfering measurements is proposed. In this method, the modulated phase of light caused by the focused ultrasound pressure field is measured. Then, a computed tomography (CT) algorithm used to quantitatively reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) pressure field is applied. For a high-intensity focused ultrasound field, a new approach that combines the optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography was attempted. First, the optical measurement of focused ultrasound was rapidly performed over the field near a transducer. Second, the nonlinear propagation of the measured ultrasound was simulated. The result of the new approach agreed well with that of the measurement using a hydrophone and was improved from that of the phase contrast method alone with phase unwrapping.

  17. Regularized Newton methods for x-ray phase contrast and general imaging problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maretzke, Simon; Bartels, Matthias; Krenkel, Martin; Salditt, Tim; Hohage, Thorsten

    2016-03-01

    Like many other advanced imaging methods, x-ray phase contrast imaging and tomography require mathematical inversion of the observed data to obtain real-space information. While an accurate forward model describing the generally nonlinear image formation from a given object to the observations is often available, explicit inversion formulas are typically not known. Moreover, the measured data might be insufficient for stable image reconstruction, in which case it has to be complemented by suitable a priori information. In this work, regularized Newton methods are presented as a general framework for the solution of such ill-posed nonlinear imaging problems. For a proof of principle, the approach is applied to x-ray phase contrast imaging in the near-field propagation regime. Simultaneous recovery of the phase- and amplitude from a single near-field diffraction pattern without homogeneity constraints is demonstrated for the first time. The presented methods further permit all-at-once phase contrast tomography, i.e. simultaneous phase retrieval and tomographic inversion. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by three-dimensional imaging of a colloidal crystal at 95 nm isotropic resolution.

  18. Improved algorithm for processing grating-based phase contrast interferometry image sets

    SciTech Connect

    Marathe, Shashidhara Assoufid, Lahsen Xiao, Xianghui; Ham, Kyungmin; Johnson, Warren W.; Butler, Leslie G.

    2014-01-15

    Grating-based X-ray and neutron interferometry tomography using phase-stepping methods generates large data sets. An improved algorithm is presented for solving for the parameters to calculate transmissions, differential phase contrast, and dark-field images. The method takes advantage of the vectorization inherent in high-level languages such as Mathematica and MATLAB and can solve a 16 × 1k × 1k data set in less than a second. In addition, the algorithm can function with partial data sets. This is demonstrated with processing of a 16-step grating data set with partial use of the original data chosen without any restriction. Also, we have calculated the reduced chi-square for the fit and notice the effect of grating support structural elements upon the differential phase contrast image and have explored expanded basis set representations to mitigate the impact.

  19. Phase contrast enhancement of x-ray mammography: a design study.

    PubMed

    Kotre, C J; Birch, I P

    1999-11-01

    This paper explores the application to mammography of phase contrast produced by variations in x-ray refractive index. As a spatially coherent x-ray beam propagates through an x-ray transparent medium, the phase of the incident wavefront becomes modified in a manner related to the electron density of the medium. The resulting phase gradient across the wavefront is equivalent to a small change in direction of the propagation of the wave. For a general object, the change in propagation direction will vary from point to point depending on the structures within the object. The net effect can be recorded in a radiographic image using an appropriate geometry to produce the visual appearance of edge enhancement at interfaces between materials with differing x-ray refractive indices. Normally these materials will also have differences in attenuation coefficient, so the overall effect is to increase the visibility of interfaces between materials. It is proposed that mammographic images can be subtly enhanced by the use of phase contrast information to overcome some of the known limitations of the imaging process whilst leaving the gross radiological appearance of the images substantially unchanged. The design trade-offs required to utilize phase contrast information were investigated using a conventional mammographic x-ray generator and film-screen system. The Leeds TORMAM mammographic image quality test object was then used to demonstrate a considerable improvement in image quality for the phase contrast enhanced images over those produced in the conventional geometry with no increase in radiation dose to the patient. The results are discussed in terms of their possible practical application.

  20. Quantitative tracking of tumor cells in phase-contrast microscopy exploiting halo artifact pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Song, Soo-Min; Lee, Hana; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2012-03-01

    Tumor cell morphology is closely related to its invasiveness characteristics and migratory behaviors. An invasive tumor cell has a highly irregular shape, whereas a spherical cell is non-metastatic. Thus, quantitative analysis of cell features is crucial to determine tumor malignancy or to test the efficacy of anticancer treatment. We use phase-contrast microscopy to analyze single cell morphology and to monitor its change because it enables observation of long-term activity of living cells without photobleaching and phototoxicity, which is common in other fluorescence-labeled microscopy. Despite this advantage, there are image-level drawbacks to phase-contrast microscopy, such as local light effect and contrast interference ring, among others. Thus, we first applied a local filter to compensate for non-uniform illumination. Then, we used intensity distribution information to detect the cell boundary. In phase-contrast microscopy images, the cell normally appears as a dark region surrounded by a bright halo. As the halo artifact around the cell body is minimal and has an asymmetric diffusion pattern, we calculated the cross-sectional plane that intersected the center of each cell and was orthogonal to the first principal axis. Then, we extracted the dark cell region by level set. However, a dense population of cultured cells still rendered single-cell analysis difficult. Finally, we measured roundness and size to classify tumor cells into malignant and benign groups. We validated segmentation accuracy by comparing our findings with manually obtained results.

  1. Hard X-ray phase-contrast imaging with a microfocus source

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, A. W.; Gao, D.; Pogany, A.; Wilkins, S. W.; Gureyev, T. E.

    1999-12-02

    Since Roentgen's discovery of X rays in 1895 the vast majority of radiographs have been collected and interpreted on the basis of absorption contrast and geometrical (ray) optics. In recent years the possibility of utilizing phase-contrast effects has received considerable attention, much of this activity stemming from the possibility of producing X-ray beams of suitably high coherence at synchrotron sources (1). A description of a phase-contrast imaging (PCI) technique which utilizes a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source to achieve the required spatial coherence, and does not rely on there being a high degree of chromatic coherence, will be described (2). The method employs a relatively large object-to-image distance to allow wave interference (Fresnel diffraction) to occur and manifest itself as contrast formation in the intensity distribution recorded at the image plane. PCI is particularly relevant to the nondestructive characterization of materials and this will be demonstrated by way of some examples. A theoretical description of image structure in terms of the Kirchhoff formulation will be used to elucidate some of the important features of the technique. These include the ability to provide improved information from weakly-absorbing features of an object; edge enhancement; inherent magnification; improved signal-to-noise. Another aspect of PCI which will be discussed is phase-(and absorption-) retrieval (3), whereby images can be used to obtain quantitative physical information about the sample structure.

  2. High-energy x-ray grating-based phase-contrast radiography of human anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Florian; Hauke, Christian; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Schuster, Max; Seifert, Maria; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-03-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast Talbot-Lau interferometry is a promising imaging technology that has the potential to raise soft tissue contrast in comparison to conventional attenuation-based imaging. Additionally, it is sensitive to attenuation, refraction and scattering of the radiation and thus provides complementary and otherwise inaccessible information due to the dark-field image, which shows the sub-pixel size granularity of the measured object. Until recent progress the method has been mainly limited to photon energies below 40 keV. Scaling the method to photon energies that are sufficient to pass large and spacious objects represents a challenging task. This is caused by increasing demands regarding the fabrication process of the gratings and the broad spectra that come along with the use of polychromatic X-ray sources operated at high acceleration voltages. We designed a setup that is capable to reach high visibilities in the range from 50 to 120 kV. Therefore, spacious and dense parts of the human body with high attenuation can be measured, such as a human knee. The authors will show investigations on the resulting attenuation, differential phase-contrast and dark-field images. The images experimentally show that X-ray grating-based phase-contrast radiography is feasible with highly absorbing parts of the human body containing massive bones.

  3. Noise in x-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Thomas; Bartl, Peter; Bayer, Florian; Durst, Juergen; Haas, Wilhelm; Michel, Thilo; Ritter, Andre; Anton, Gisela

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging is a fast developing new modality not only for medical imaging, but as well for other fields such as material sciences. While these many possible applications arise, the knowledge of the noise behavior is essential. Methods: In this work, the authors used a least squares fitting algorithm to calculate the noise behavior of the three quantities absorption, differential phase, and dark-field image. Further, the calculated error formula of the differential phase image was verified by measurements. Therefore, a Talbot interferometer was setup, using a microfocus x-ray tube as source and a Timepix detector for photon counting. Additionally, simulations regarding this topic were performed. Results: It turned out that the variance of the reconstructed phase is only dependent of the total number of photons used to generate the phase image and the visibility of the experimental setup. These results could be evaluated in measurements as well as in simulations. Furthermore, the correlation between absorption and dark-field image was calculated. Conclusions: These results provide the understanding of the noise characteristics of grating-based phase-contrast imaging and will help to improve image quality.

  4. Cell segmentation in phase contrast microscopy images via semi-supervised classification over optics-related features.

    PubMed

    Su, Hang; Yin, Zhaozheng; Huh, Seungil; Kanade, Takeo

    2013-10-01

    Phase-contrast microscopy is one of the most common and convenient imaging modalities to observe long-term multi-cellular processes, which generates images by the interference of lights passing through transparent specimens and background medium with different retarded phases. Despite many years of study, computer-aided phase contrast microscopy analysis on cell behavior is challenged by image qualities and artifacts caused by phase contrast optics. Addressing the unsolved challenges, the authors propose (1) a phase contrast microscopy image restoration method that produces phase retardation features, which are intrinsic features of phase contrast microscopy, and (2) a semi-supervised learning based algorithm for cell segmentation, which is a fundamental task for various cell behavior analysis. Specifically, the image formation process of phase contrast microscopy images is first computationally modeled with a dictionary of diffraction patterns; as a result, each pixel of a phase contrast microscopy image is represented by a linear combination of the bases, which we call phase retardation features. Images are then partitioned into phase-homogeneous atoms by clustering neighboring pixels with similar phase retardation features. Consequently, cell segmentation is performed via a semi-supervised classification technique over the phase-homogeneous atoms. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed approach produces quality segmentation of individual cells and outperforms previous approaches.

  5. Phase contrast tomography of the mouse cochlea at microfocus x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Matthias; Hernandez, Victor H.; Krenkel, Martin; Moser, Tobias; Salditt, Tim

    2013-08-01

    We present phase contrast x-ray tomography of functional soft tissue within the bony cochlear capsule of mice, carried out at laboratory microfocus sources with well-matched source, detector, geometry, and reconstruction algorithms at spatial resolutions down to 2 μm. Contrast, data quality and resolution enable the visualization of thin membranes and nerve fibers as well as automated segmentation of surrounding bone. By complementing synchrotron radiation imaging techniques, a broad range of biomedical applications becomes possible as demonstrated for optogenetic cochlear implant research.

  6. Phase contrast tomography of the mouse cochlea at microfocus x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bartels, Matthias; Krenkel, Martin; Hernandez, Victor H.; Moser, Tobias; Salditt, Tim

    2013-08-19

    We present phase contrast x-ray tomography of functional soft tissue within the bony cochlear capsule of mice, carried out at laboratory microfocus sources with well-matched source, detector, geometry, and reconstruction algorithms at spatial resolutions down to 2 μm. Contrast, data quality and resolution enable the visualization of thin membranes and nerve fibers as well as automated segmentation of surrounding bone. By complementing synchrotron radiation imaging techniques, a broad range of biomedical applications becomes possible as demonstrated for optogenetic cochlear implant research.

  7. Laboratory Demonstration of Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) Coronagraph with Better than 10(exp -9) Contrast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Brian; Guyon, Olivier; Kuhnert, Andreas; Niessner, Albert; Martinache, Frantz; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    2013-01-01

    We present coronagraphic images from the Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph on NASA's High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Lab, showing contrasts of 5x10(exp -1) averaged from 2-4 lambda/D, in monochromatic light at 808 nm. In parallel with the coronagraph and its deformable mirror and coronagraphic wavefront control, we also demonstrate a low-order wavefront control system, giving 100 x rms suppression of introduced tip/tilt disturbances down to residual levels of 10(exp -3) lambda/D. Current limitations, as well as broadband (10% fractional bandpass) preliminary results are discussed.

  8. Grating-based phase contrast tomosynthesis imaging: Proof-of-concept experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ke; Ge, Yongshuai; Garrett, John; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: This paper concerns the feasibility of x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) tomosynthesis imaging using a grating-based DPC benchtop experimental system, which is equipped with a commercial digital flat-panel detector and a medical-grade rotating-anode x-ray tube. An extensive system characterization was performed to quantify its imaging performance. Methods: The major components of the benchtop system include a diagnostic x-ray tube with a 1.0 mm nominal focal spot size, a flat-panel detector with 96 μm pixel pitch, a sample stage that rotates within a limited angular span of ±30°, and a Talbot-Lau interferometer with three x-ray gratings. A total of 21 projection views acquired with 3° increments were used to reconstruct three sets of tomosynthetic image volumes, including the conventional absorption contrast tomosynthesis image volume (AC-tomo) reconstructed using the filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm with the ramp kernel, the phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (PC-tomo) reconstructed using FBP with a Hilbert kernel, and the differential phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (DPC-tomo) reconstructed using the shift-and-add algorithm. Three inhouse physical phantoms containing tissue-surrogate materials were used to characterize the signal linearity, the signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the three-dimensional noise power spectrum (3D NPS), and the through-plane artifact spread function (ASF). Results: While DPC-tomo highlights edges and interfaces in the image object, PC-tomo removes the differential nature of the DPC projection data and its pixel values are linearly related to the decrement of the real part of the x-ray refractive index. The SDNR values of polyoxymethylene in water and polystyrene in oil are 1.5 and 1.0, respectively, in AC-tomo, and the values were improved to 3.0 and 2.0, respectively, in PC-tomo. PC-tomo and AC-tomo demonstrate equivalent ASF, but their noise characteristics quantified by the 3D NPS

  9. Quantitative X-ray projection microscopy: phase-contrast and multi-spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Mayo, S C; Miller, P R; Wilkins, S W; Davis, T J; Gao, D; Gureyev, T E; Paganin, D; Parry, D J; Pogany, A; Stevenson, A W

    2002-08-01

    We outline a new approach to X-ray projection microscopy in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), which exploits phase contrast to boost the quality and information content of images. These developments have been made possible by the combination of a high-brightness field-emission gun (FEG)-based SEM, direct detection CCD technology and new phase retrieval algorithms. Using this approach we have been able to obtain spatial resolution of < 0.2 micro m and have demonstrated novel features such as: (i) phase-contrast enhanced visibility of high spatial frequency image features (e.g. edges and boundaries) over a wide energy range; (ii) energy-resolved imaging to simultaneously produce multiple quasi-monochromatic images using broad-band polychromatic illumination; (iii) easy implementation of microtomography; (iv) rapid and robust phase/amplitude-retrieval algorithms to enable new real-time and quantitative modes of microscopic imaging. These algorithms can also be applied successfully to recover object-plane information from intermediate-field images, unlocking the potentially greater contrast and resolution of the intermediate-field regime. Widespread applications are envisaged for fields such as materials science, biological and biomedical research and microelectronics device inspection. Some illustrative examples are presented. The quantitative methods described here are also very relevant to projection microscopy using other sources of radiation, such as visible light and electrons.

  10. Reverse projection retrieval in edge illumination x-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Charlotte K.; Endrizzi, Marco; Diemoz, Paul C.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) can provide three-dimensional distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index (n=1-δ +\\text{i}β ) of the sample. Phase retrieval, i.e. the separation of attenuation and refraction data from projections that contain a combination of both, is a key step in the image reconstruction process. In EI-based x-ray phase contrast CT, this is conventionally performed on the basis of two projections acquired in opposite illumination configurations (i.e. with different positions of the pre-sample mask) at each CT angle. Displacing the pre-sample mask at each projection makes the scan susceptible to motor-induced misalignment and prevents a continuous sample rotation. We present an alternative method for the retrieval of attenuation and refraction data that does not require repositioning the pre-sample mask. The method is based on the reverse projection relation published by Zhu et al (2010 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107 13576–81) for grating interferometry-based x-ray phase contrast CT. We use this relation to derive a simplified acquisition strategy that allows acquiring data with a continuous sample rotation, which can reduce scan time when combined with a fast read-out detector. Besides discussing the theory and the necessary alignment of the experimental setup, we present tomograms obtained with reverse projection retrieval and demonstrate their agreement with those obtained with the conventional EI retrieval.

  11. Reverse projection retrieval in edge illumination x-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Charlotte K.; Endrizzi, Marco; Diemoz, Paul C.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) can provide three-dimensional distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index (n=1-δ +\\text{i}β ) of the sample. Phase retrieval, i.e. the separation of attenuation and refraction data from projections that contain a combination of both, is a key step in the image reconstruction process. In EI-based x-ray phase contrast CT, this is conventionally performed on the basis of two projections acquired in opposite illumination configurations (i.e. with different positions of the pre-sample mask) at each CT angle. Displacing the pre-sample mask at each projection makes the scan susceptible to motor-induced misalignment and prevents a continuous sample rotation. We present an alternative method for the retrieval of attenuation and refraction data that does not require repositioning the pre-sample mask. The method is based on the reverse projection relation published by Zhu et al (2010 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107 13576-81) for grating interferometry-based x-ray phase contrast CT. We use this relation to derive a simplified acquisition strategy that allows acquiring data with a continuous sample rotation, which can reduce scan time when combined with a fast read-out detector. Besides discussing the theory and the necessary alignment of the experimental setup, we present tomograms obtained with reverse projection retrieval and demonstrate their agreement with those obtained with the conventional EI retrieval.

  12. A study of quantification of aortic compliance in mice using radial acquisition phase contrast MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuandong

    Spatiotemporal changes in blood flow velocity measured using Phase contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be used to quantify Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) and Wall Shear Stress (WSS), well known indices of vessel compliance. A study was conducted to measure the PWV in the aortic arch in young healthy children using conventional phase contrast MRI and a post processing algorithm that automatically track the peak velocity in phase contrast images. It is shown that the PWV calculated using peak velocity-time data has less variability compared to that using mean velocity and flow. Conventional MR data acquisition techniques lack both the spatial and temporal resolution needed to accurately calculate PWV and WSS in in vivo studies using transgenic animal models of arterial diseases. Radial k-space acquisition can improve both spatial and temporal resolution. A major part of this thesis was devoted to developing technology for Radial Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance (RPCMR) cine imaging on a 7 Tesla Animal scanner. A pulse sequence with asymmetric radial k-space acquisition was designed and implemented. Software developed to reconstruct the RPCMR images include gridding, density compensation and centering of k-Space that corrects the image ghosting introduced by hardware response time. Image processing software was developed to automatically segment the vessel lumen and correct for phase offset due to eddy currents. Finally, in vivo and ex vivo aortic compliance measurements were conducted in a well-established mouse model for atherosclerosis: Apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE-KO). Using RPCMR technique, a significantly higher PWV value as well as a higher average WSS was detected among 9 months old ApoE-KO mice compare to in wild type mice. A follow up ex-vivo test of tissue elasticity confirmed the impaired distensibility of aortic arteries among ApoE-KO mice.

  13. Three-dimensional phase retrieval in propagation-based phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhlandt, A.; Krenkel, M.; Bartels, M.; Salditt, T.

    2014-03-01

    We present a solution to the phase problem in near-field x-ray (propagation) imaging. The three-dimensional complex-valued index of refraction is reconstructed from a set of projections recorded in the near-field (Fresnel) setting at a single detector distance. The solution is found by an iterative algorithm based only on the measured data and the three-dimensional tomographic (Helgason-Ludwig) consistency constraint without the need for further a priori knowledge or other restrictive assumptions.

  14. Digital inline holographic microscopy (DIHM) of weakly-scattering subjects.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Camila B; Zhang, Rongjing; Wilson, Laurence G

    2014-01-01

    Weakly-scattering objects, such as small colloidal particles and most biological cells, are frequently encountered in microscopy. Indeed, a range of techniques have been developed to better visualize these phase objects; phase contrast and DIC are among the most popular methods for enhancing contrast. However, recording position and shape in the out-of-imaging-plane direction remains challenging. This report introduces a simple experimental method to accurately determine the location and geometry of objects in three dimensions, using digital inline holographic microscopy (DIHM). Broadly speaking, the accessible sample volume is defined by the camera sensor size in the lateral direction, and the illumination coherence in the axial direction. Typical sample volumes range from 200 µm x 200 µm x 200 µm using LED illumination, to 5 mm x 5 mm x 5 mm or larger using laser illumination. This illumination light is configured so that plane waves are incident on the sample. Objects in the sample volume then scatter light, which interferes with the unscattered light to form interference patterns perpendicular to the illumination direction. This image (the hologram) contains the depth information required for three-dimensional reconstruction, and can be captured on a standard imaging device such as a CMOS or CCD camera. The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld back propagation method is employed to numerically refocus microscope images, and a simple imaging heuristic based on the Gouy phase anomaly is used to identify scattering objects within the reconstructed volume. This simple but robust method results in an unambiguous, model-free measurement of the location and shape of objects in microscopic samples. PMID:24561665

  15. Digital Inline Holographic Microscopy (DIHM) of Weakly-scattering Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Camila B.; Zhang, Rongjing; Wilson, Laurence G.

    2014-01-01

    Weakly-scattering objects, such as small colloidal particles and most biological cells, are frequently encountered in microscopy. Indeed, a range of techniques have been developed to better visualize these phase objects; phase contrast and DIC are among the most popular methods for enhancing contrast. However, recording position and shape in the out-of-imaging-plane direction remains challenging. This report introduces a simple experimental method to accurately determine the location and geometry of objects in three dimensions, using digital inline holographic microscopy (DIHM). Broadly speaking, the accessible sample volume is defined by the camera sensor size in the lateral direction, and the illumination coherence in the axial direction. Typical sample volumes range from 200 µm x 200 µm x 200 µm using LED illumination, to 5 mm x 5 mm x 5 mm or larger using laser illumination. This illumination light is configured so that plane waves are incident on the sample. Objects in the sample volume then scatter light, which interferes with the unscattered light to form interference patterns perpendicular to the illumination direction. This image (the hologram) contains the depth information required for three-dimensional reconstruction, and can be captured on a standard imaging device such as a CMOS or CCD camera. The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld back propagation method is employed to numerically refocus microscope images, and a simple imaging heuristic based on the Gouy phase anomaly is used to identify scattering objects within the reconstructed volume. This simple but robust method results in an unambiguous, model-free measurement of the location and shape of objects in microscopic samples. PMID:24561665

  16. Visualizing resonances in the complex plane with vibrational phase contrast coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Jurna, Martin; Garbacik, Erik T; Korterik, Jeroen P; Herek, Jennifer L; Otto, Cees; Offerhaus, Herman L

    2010-09-15

    In coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), the emitted signal carries both amplitude and phase information of the molecules in the focal volume. Most CARS experiments ignore the phase component, but its detection allows for two advantages over intensity-only CARS. First, the pure resonant response can be determined, and the nonresonant background rejected, by extracting the imaginary component of the complex response, enhancing the sensitivity of CARS measurements. Second, selectivity is increased via determination of the phase and amplitude, allowing separation of individual molecular components of a sample even when their vibrational bands overlap. Here, using vibrational phase contrast CARS (VPC-CARS), we demonstrate enhanced sensitivity in quantitative measurements of ethanol/methanol mixtures and increased selectivity in a heterogeneous mixture of plastics and water. This powerful technique opens a wide range of possibilities for studies of complicated systems where overlapping resonances limit standard methodologies. PMID:20731373

  17. Propulsive performance of unsteady tandem hydrofoils in an in-line configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschitsch, Birgitt M.; Dewey, Peter A.; Smits, Alexander J.

    2014-05-01

    Experiments are reported on the behavior of two hydrofoils arranged in an in-line configuration as they undergo prescribed pitching motions over a wide range of phase lags and spacings between the foils. It is found that the thrust production and propulsive efficiency of the upstream foil differed from that of an isolated one only for relatively closely spaced foils, and the effects attenuated rapidly with increasing spacing. In contrast, the performance of the downstream foil depends strongly on the streamwise spacing and phase differential between the foils for all cases considered, and the thrust and propulsive efficiency could be as high as 1.5 times or as low as 0.5 times those of an isolated foil. Particle image velocimetry reveals how the wake interactions lead to these variations in propulsive performance, where a coherent mode corresponds to enhanced performance, and a branched mode corresponds to diminished performance.

  18. Phase contrast and DIC instrumentation and applications in cell, developmental, and marine biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, Heinz

    1994-05-01

    Nomarski's differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is discussed in comparison to Zernike's phase contrast (PhC) microscopy. The possibilities and limits of both are demonstrated by various applications. The high contrast and the use of the full numerical aperture of the DIC optics makes it possible to obtain a series of 'optical sections' through rather thick living specimens (e.g. head of water flea, salivary gland of Drosophila, Xenopus nucleolus, sea urchen egg, mouse embryo). PhC and DIC optics are today available for high resolution light microscopy until N.A. 1.4 Oil as well as for long working distance (LWD) optics, mainly combined with inverted biological microscopes.

  19. RESTORATION OF WEAK PHASE-CONTRAST IMAGES RECORDED WITH A HIGH DEGREE OF DEFOCUS: THE"TWIN IMAGE" PROBLEM ASSOCIATED WITH CTF CORRECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, Kenneth H.; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2008-03-28

    Relatively large values of objective-lens defocus must normally be used to produce detectable levels of image contrast for unstained biological specimens, which are generally weak phase objects. As a result, a subsequent restoration operation must be used to correct for oscillations in the contrast transfer function (CTF) at higher resolution. Currently used methods of CTF-correction assume the ideal case in which Friedel mates in the scattered wave have contributed pairs of Fourier components that overlap with one another in the image plane. This"ideal" situation may be only poorly satisfied, or not satisfied at all, as the particle size gets smaller, the defocus value gets larger, and the resolution gets higher. We have therefore investigated whether currently used methods of CTF correction are also effective in restoring the single-sideband image information that becomes displaced (delocalized) by half (or more) the diameter of a particle of finite size. Computer simulations are used to show that restoration either by"phase flipping" or by multiplying by the CTF recovers only about half of the delocalized information. The other half of the delocalized information goes into a doubly defocused"twin" image of the type produced during optical reconstruction of an in-line hologram. Restoration with a Wiener filter is effective in recovering the delocalized information only when the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) is orders of magnitude higher than that which exists in low-dose images of biological specimens, in which case the Wiener filter approaches division by the CTF (i.e. the formal inverse). For realistic values of the S/N, however, the"twin image" problem seenwith a Wiener filter is very similar to that seen when either phase flipping or multiplying by the CTF are used for restoration. The results of these simulations suggest that CTF correction is a poor alternative to using a Zernike-type phase plate when imaging biological specimens, in which case the images can

  20. A multi-stage random forest classifier for phase contrast cell segmentation.

    PubMed

    Essa, Ehab; Xie, Xianghua; Errington, Rachel J; White, Nick

    2015-01-01

    We present a machine learning based approach to automatically detect and segment cells in phase contrast images. The proposed method consists of a multi-stage classification scheme based on random forest (RF) classifier. Both low level and mid level image features are used to determine meaningful cell regions. Pixel-wise RF classification is first carried out to categorize pixels into 4 classes (dark cell, bright cell, halo artifact, and background) and generate a probability map for cell regions. K-means clustering is then applied on the probability map to group similar pixels into candidate cell regions. Finally, cell validation is performed by another RF to verify the candidate cell regions. The proposed method has been tested on U2-OS human osteosarcoma phase contrast images. The experimental results show better performance of the proposed method with precision 92.96% and recall 96.63% compared to a state-of-the-art segmentation technique. PMID:26737137

  1. A multi-stage random forest classifier for phase contrast cell segmentation.

    PubMed

    Essa, Ehab; Xie, Xianghua; Errington, Rachel J; White, Nick

    2015-01-01

    We present a machine learning based approach to automatically detect and segment cells in phase contrast images. The proposed method consists of a multi-stage classification scheme based on random forest (RF) classifier. Both low level and mid level image features are used to determine meaningful cell regions. Pixel-wise RF classification is first carried out to categorize pixels into 4 classes (dark cell, bright cell, halo artifact, and background) and generate a probability map for cell regions. K-means clustering is then applied on the probability map to group similar pixels into candidate cell regions. Finally, cell validation is performed by another RF to verify the candidate cell regions. The proposed method has been tested on U2-OS human osteosarcoma phase contrast images. The experimental results show better performance of the proposed method with precision 92.96% and recall 96.63% compared to a state-of-the-art segmentation technique.

  2. High spatial and temporal resolution phase contrast imaging of shock wave using the LCLS beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae Ja; Galtier, E.; Nagler, B.; Schropp, A.; Hastings, J. B.; Lee, R. W.; Collins, G. W.; Ping, Y.; Schroer, C. G.

    2012-10-01

    A new technique using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the x-ray free electron laser source, was developed at Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) endstation to provide high spatial and temporal resolution phase contrast imaging of shock waves in matter. The LCLS has high peak brightness enabling a high beam current of a few mJ/pulse to be focused into a small spot to achieve high imaging resolution < 1 μm. 150 ps, 140 mJ, 800 nm short pulse laser beam was focused to produce shock waves in a material. We collected the first high resolution phase contrast movies of shock propagation inside materials. These results provide the first in-situ imaging of the shock front width, deformation length and time scale behind the shock of materials with free electron laser.

  3. Propagation-based phase-contrast tomography for high-resolution lung imaging with laboratory sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenkel, Martin; Töpperwien, Mareike; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Salditt, Tim

    2016-03-01

    We have performed high-resolution phase-contrast tomography on whole mice with a laboratory setup. Enabled by a high-brilliance liquid-metal-jet source, we show the feasibility of propagation-based phase contrast in local tomography even in the presence of strongly absorbing surrounding tissue as it is the case in small animal imaging of the lung. We demonstrate the technique by reconstructions of the mouse lung for two different fields of view, covering the whole organ, and a zoom to the local finer structure of terminal airways and alveoli. With a resolution of a few micrometers and the wide availability of the technique, studies of larger biological samples at the cellular level become possible.

  4. Sensitivity of edge illumination X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Diemoz, P. C.; Endrizzi, M.; Bravin, A.; Robinson, I. K.; Olivo, A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we developed a theoretical model that can predict the signal-to-noise ratio for edge-like features in phase-contrast images. This model was then applied for the estimation of the sensitivity of three different X-ray phase-contrast techniques: propagation-based imaging, analyser-based imaging and grating interferometry. We show here how the same formalism can be used also in the case of the edge illumination (EI) technique, providing results that are consistent with those of a recently developed method for the estimation of noise in the retrieved refraction image. The new model is then applied to calculate, in the case of a given synchrotron radiation set-up, the optimum positions of the pre-sample aperture and detector edge to maximize the sensitivity. Finally, an example of the extremely high angular resolution achievable with the EI technique is presented. PMID:24470420

  5. Quantification of reconstruction quality in x-ray phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Nugent, Keith A.; Peele, Andrew G.

    2006-08-01

    We have developed a quality function that quantifies how well features are reconstructed in 3D phase contrast tomographic reconstructions for pure phase samples. We consider image formation using the free space propagation method for each projected data-set. A partially coherent radiation field originating from an extended source is also incorporated. This means the model is suitable for a laboratory based micro focus x-ray source. The quality function is useful for optimizing the tomographic reconstruction for given feature sizes in an object. We then use the quality function to develop filters for improving the reconstruction quality for high spatial frequency objects.

  6. Imaging organic and mineral phases in a biomineral using novel contrast techniques.

    PubMed

    Stockdale, E J; Shaw, J A; Macey, D J; Clode, P L

    2009-01-01

    Chitons are marine molluscs that mineralize their teeth by the process of matrix-mediated biomineralization. The teeth develop in a continuous manner forming hard minerals, including magnetite, making analysis of the matrix within these mineralized regions difficult. This article describes the use of charge contrast imaging techniques, rarely applied to biological samples, to simultaneously image the organic and mineral phases within the teeth of these animals. Resulting evidence demonstrates the power of this technique in delivering architectural information concerning both the matrix and mineral phases, without the need for removal of the hard mineralized material.

  7. The phase-contrast imaging instrument at the matter in extreme conditions endstation at LCLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, Bob; Schropp, Andreas; Galtier, Eric C.; Arnold, Brice; Brown, Shaughnessy B.; Fry, Alan; Gleason, Arianna; Granados, Eduardo; Hashim, Akel; Hastings, Jerome B.; Samberg, Dirk; Seiboth, Frank; Tavella, Franz; Xing, Zhou; Lee, Hae Ja; Schroer, Christian G.

    2016-10-01

    We describe the phase-contrast imaging instrument at the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) endstation of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The instrument can image phenomena with a spatial resolution of a few hundreds of nanometers and at the same time reveal the atomic structure through X-ray diffraction, with a temporal resolution better than 100 fs. It was specifically designed for studies relevant to high-energy-density science and can monitor, e.g., shock fronts, phase transitions, or void collapses. This versatile instrument was commissioned last year and is now available to the MEC user community.

  8. Imaging organic and mineral phases in a biomineral using novel contrast techniques.

    PubMed

    Stockdale, E J; Shaw, J A; Macey, D J; Clode, P L

    2009-01-01

    Chitons are marine molluscs that mineralize their teeth by the process of matrix-mediated biomineralization. The teeth develop in a continuous manner forming hard minerals, including magnetite, making analysis of the matrix within these mineralized regions difficult. This article describes the use of charge contrast imaging techniques, rarely applied to biological samples, to simultaneously image the organic and mineral phases within the teeth of these animals. Resulting evidence demonstrates the power of this technique in delivering architectural information concerning both the matrix and mineral phases, without the need for removal of the hard mineralized material. PMID:19177503

  9. First small-animal in-vivo phase-contrast micro-CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauwels, B.; Bruyndonckx, P.; Liu, X.; Tapfer, A.; Velroyen, A.; Yaroshenko, A.; Bech, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Sasov, A.

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a compact grating-based in-vivo phase-contrast micro-CT system with a rotating gantry. The 50 W microfocus x-ray source operates with 20 to 50 kV peak energy. The length of the rotating interferometer is around 47 cm. Pixel size in the object is 30 micron; the field of view is approx. 35 mm in diameter, suited to image a mouse. The interferometer consists of three gratings: an absorption grating close to the x-ray source, a phase grating to introduce a π/2 phase shift and an absorption analyzer grating positioned at the first fractional Talbot distance. Numerous drives and actuators are used to provide angular and linear grating alignment, phase stepping and object/gantry precision positioning. Phantom studies were conducted to investigate performance, accuracy and stability of the scanner. In particular, the influences of gantry rotation and of temperature fluctuations on the interferometric image acquisition were characterized. Also dose measurements were performed. The first imaging results obtained with the system show the complementary nature of phase-contrast micro-CT images with respect to absorption-based micro-CT. Future improvements, necessary to optimize the scanner for in-vivo small-animal CT scanning on a regular and easy-to-use basis, are also discussed.

  10. Regularized iterative integration combined with non-linear diffusion filtering for phase-contrast x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Burger, Karin; Koehler, Thomas; Chabior, Michael; Allner, Sebastian; Marschner, Mathias; Fehringer, Andreas; Willner, Marian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Noël, Peter

    2014-12-29

    Phase-contrast x-ray computed tomography has a high potential to become clinically implemented because of its complementarity to conventional absorption-contrast.In this study, we investigate noise-reducing but resolution-preserving analytical reconstruction methods to improve differential phase-contrast imaging. We apply the non-linear Perona-Malik filter on phase-contrast data prior or post filtered backprojected reconstruction. Secondly, the Hilbert kernel is replaced by regularized iterative integration followed by ramp filtered backprojection as used for absorption-contrast imaging. Combining the Perona-Malik filter with this integration algorithm allows to successfully reveal relevant sample features, quantitatively confirmed by significantly increased structural similarity indices and contrast-to-noise ratios. With this concept, phase-contrast imaging can be performed at considerably lower dose.

  11. Investigating biofilm structure using x-ray microtomography and gratings-based phase contrast

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Erin A.; Xiao, Xianghui; Miller, Micah D.; Keller, Paul E.; White, Timothy A.; Marshall, Matthew J.

    2012-10-17

    Direct examination of natural and engineered environments has revealed that the majority of microorganisms in these systems live in structured communities termed biofilms. To gain a better understanding for how biofilms function and interact with their local environment, fundamental capabilities for enhanced visualization, compositional analysis, and functional characterization of biofilms are needed. For pore-scale and community-scale analysis (100’s of nm to 10’s of microns), a variety of surface tools are available. However, understanding biofilm structure in complex three-dimensional (3-D) environments is considerably more difficult. X-ray microtomography can reveal a biofilm’s internal structure, but the obtaining sufficient contrast to image low-Z biological material against a higher-Z substrate makes detecting biofilms difficult. Here we present results imaging Shewanella oneidensis biofilms on a Hollow-fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactor (HfMBR), using the x-ray microtomography system at sector 2-BM of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), at energies ranging from 13-15.4 keV and pixel sizes of 0.7 and 1.3 μm/pixel. We examine the use of osmium (Os) as a contrast agent to enhance biofilm visibility and demonstrate that staining improves imaging of hydrated biofilms. We also present results using a Talbot interferometer to provide phase and scatter contrast information in addition to absorption. Talbot interferometry allows imaging of unstained hydrated biofilms with phase contrast, while absorption contrast primarily highlights edges and scatter contrast provides little information. However, the gratings used here limit the spatial resolution to no finer than 2 μm, which hinders the ability to detect small features. Future studies at higher resolution or higher Talbot order for greater sensitivity to density variations may improve imaging.

  12. Improved diagnostic differentiation of renal cystic lesions with phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, Peter B.; Willner, Marian; Fingerle, Alexander; Herzen, Julia; Münzel, Daniela; Hahn, Dieter; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-03-01

    The diagnostic quality of phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) is one the unexplored areas in medical imaging; at the same time, it seems to offer the opportunity as a fast and highly sensitive diagnostic tool. Conventional computed tomography (CT) has had an enormous impact on medicine, while it is limited in soft-tissue contrast. One example that portrays this challenge is the differentiation between benign and malignant renal cysts. In this work we report on a feasibility study to determine the usefulness of PCCT in differentiation of renal cysts. A renal phantom was imaged with a grating-based PCCT system consisting of a standard rotating anode x-ray tube (40 kV, 70 mA) and a Pilatus II photoncounting detector (pixel size: 172 μm). The phantom is composed of a renal equivalent soft-tissue and cystic lesions grouped in non-enhancing cyst and hemorrhage series and an iodine enhancing series. The acquired projection images (absorption and phase-contrast) are reconstructed with a standard filtered backprojection algorithm. For evaluation both reconstructions are compared in respect to contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and subjective image quality. We found that with PCCT a significantly improved differentiation between hemorrhage renal cysts from contrast enhancing malignant cysts is possible. If comparing PCCT and CT with respect to CNR and SNR, PCCT shows significant improvements. In conclusion, PCCT has the potential to improve the diagnostics and characterization of renal cysts without using any contrast agents. These results in combination with a non-synchrotron setup indicate a future paradigm shift in diagnostic computed tomography.

  13. Comparison of subtracted venography and phase contrast in cerebral regions by utilizing 3DT1TFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Yeong-Cheol; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Jang, Hyon-Chol; Lee, Chang-Hee; Kim, Jung-Su; Lee, Hae-Kag

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we evaluated the 3D venography images and the phase contrast images that were subtracted by using the images that had been obtained before and after utilizing the contrast medium with a 3D, segmented, T1-weighted gradient echo sequence (3DT1TFE) when performing a cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination with contrast medium. The study was carried out in 10 patients who under went a brain examination with a contrast medium by using the 3.0T MR System and 8-channel sensitivity encoding (SENSE) head coil. The 3DT1TFE images after the contrast medium had been used was subtracted from the 3DT1TFE images before the utilization. The subtracted images were re-formed to venography images by using maximum intensity projection (MIP) techniques; then, the re-formed images and 3D phase contrast (PC) venography were evaluated qualitative analysis. The qualitative analysis was done to confirm the reliability of the ratings of the observers via the ICC (intraclass correlation coefficient) and then to evaluate of the statistical significance via an independent T-test. The ICC test showed that 3D PC venography images and subtracted venography images had reliabilities of 0.677 and 0.734 on average, respectively, indicating good reliability of the ratings by the observers. Because the proximal superior sagittal sinus (SSS), the middle SSS, the confluence SSS, the vein of labbe, the internal cerebral vein, and the Vein of Galen represented p > 0.05 a the independent T-test, no statistically significant difference was observed between the two images. However, a significant difference was observed between the images regarding the straight sinus (p < 0.05). As such, the venography images subtracted from the straight sinus would be better, because the average of the straight sinus was higher in subtracted venography.

  14. Ultrastructure of Candida albicans pleomorphic forms: phase-contrast microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Monika; Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Siennicka, Katarzyna; Kurzatkowski, Wiesław

    2012-01-01

    A modified method of glutaraldeyde-osmium tetroxide fixation was adjusted to characterize the ultrastructure of Candida albicans pleomorphic forms, using phase-contrast microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The discovered morphological criteria defining the individual morphotypes are discussed in terms of mycological and histopathological diagnostics of candidiasis. The relations are discussed between fungal pleomorphism, virulence and susceptibility of different morphotypes to fungicides.

  15. Halo suppression in full-field x-ray Zernike phase contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Mokso, Rajmund; Stampanoni, Marco; David, Christian

    2014-03-15

    Visible light Zernike phase contrast (ZPC) microscopy is a well established method for imaging weakly absorbing samples. The method is also used with hard x-ray photon energies for structural evaluation of material science and biological applications. However, the method suffers from artifacts that are inherent for the Zernike image formation. In this Letter, we investigate their origin and experimentally show how to suppress them in x-ray full-field ZPC microscopy based on diffractive x-ray optics.

  16. Dynamic DIC by digital holography microscopy for enhancing phase-contrast visualization.

    PubMed

    Miccio, Lisa; Finizio, Andrea; Puglisi, Roberto; Balduzzi, Donatella; Galli, Andrea; Ferraro, Pietro

    2011-01-13

    Differential image contrast (DIC), through the numerical managing and manipulation of complex wavefronts obtained by digital holography (DH), is investigated. We name the approach Dynamical Differential Holographic Image Contrast (DDHIC). DDHIC dispenses from special optics and/or complex setup configurations with moveable components, as usually occurs in classical DIC, that is not well-suited for investigating objects experiencing dynamic evolution during the measurement. In fact, the technique presented here, is useful for floating samples since it allows, from a single recording, to set a posteriori the best conditions for DIC imaging in conjunction with the numerical focusing feature of DH. By DDHIC, the movies can be easily built-up to offering dynamic representation of phase-contrast along all directions, thus improving the visualization. Furthermore, the dynamic representation is useful for making the proper choice of other key parameters of DIC such as the amount of shear and the bias, with the aim to optimize the visualized phase-contrast imaging as favorite representation for bio-scientists. Investigation is performed on various biological samples.

  17. Whole-cell phase contrast imaging at the nanoscale using Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Michael W. M.; van Riessen, Grant A.; Abbey, Brian; Putkunz, Corey T.; Junker, Mark D.; Balaur, Eugeniu; Vine, David J.; McNulty, Ian; Chen, Bo; Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Frankland, Sarah; Nugent, Keith A.; Tilley, Leann; Peele, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray tomography can provide structural information of whole cells in close to their native state. Radiation-induced damage, however, imposes a practical limit to image resolution, and as such, a choice between damage, image contrast, and image resolution must be made. New coherent diffractive imaging techniques, such Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging (FCDI), allows quantitative phase information with exceptional dose efficiency, high contrast, and nano-scale resolution. Here we present three-dimensional quantitative images of a whole eukaryotic cell by FCDI at a spatial resolution below 70 nm with sufficient phase contrast to distinguish major cellular components. From our data, we estimate that the minimum dose required for a similar resolution is close to that predicted by the Rose criterion, considerably below accepted estimates of the maximum dose a frozen-hydrated cell can tolerate. Based on the dose efficiency, contrast, and resolution achieved, we expect this technique will find immediate applications in tomographic cellular characterisation. PMID:23887204

  18. Phase-contrast imaging in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krumeich, F; Müller, E; Wepf, R A

    2013-06-01

    Although the presence of phase-contrast information in bright field images recorded with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) has been known for a long time, its systematic exploitation for the structural characterization of materials began only with the availability of aberration-corrected microscopes that allow sufficiently large illumination angles. Today, phase-contrast STEM (PC-STEM) imaging represents an increasingly important alternative to the well-established HRTEM method. In both methods, the image contrast is coherently generated and thus depends not only on illumination and collection angles but on defocus and specimen thickness as well. By PC-STEM, a projection of the crystal potential is obtained in thin areas, with the scattering sites being represented either with dark or bright contrast at two different defocus values which are both close to Gaussian defocus. This imaging behavior can be further investigated by image simulations performed with standard HRTEM simulation software based on the principle of reciprocity. As examples for the application of this method, PC-STEM results obtained on metal nanoparticles and dodecagonal quasicrystals dd-(Ta,V)₁.₆Te are discussed.

  19. Blood flow in major cerebral arteries measured by phase-contrast cine MR

    SciTech Connect

    Enzmann, D.R.; Ross, M.R.; Marks, M.P.; Pelc, N.J. )

    1994-01-01

    To measure mean blood flow in individual cerebral arteries (carotid, basilar, anterior cerebral, middle cerebral, and posterior cerebral) using a cine phase contrast MR pulse sequence. Ten healthy volunteers (22 to 38 years of age) were studied. The cine phase-contrast section was positioned perpendicular to the vessel of interest using oblique scanning planes. This pulse sequence used a velocity encoding range of 60 to 250 cm/sec. From the velocity and area measurements on the cine images, mean blood flow was calculated in millimeters per minute and milliliters per cardiac cycle. In the same subjects, transcranial Doppler measurements of blood velocity in these same vessels were also obtained. There was no difference in blood flow in the paired cerebral arteries. Carotid arteries had mean blood flow in the range of 4.8 [+-] 0.4 ml/cycle, the basilar artery 2.4 [+-] 0.2 ml/cycle, the middle cerebral artery 1.8 [+-] 0.2 ml/cycle, the distal anterior cerebral artery 0.6 [+-] 0.1 ml/cycle, and the posterior cerebral artery 0.8 [+-] 0.1 ml/cycle. Overall, there was poor correlation between MR-measured and transcranial Doppler-measured peak velocity. Although careful attention to technical detail is required, mean blood flow measurements in individual cerebral vessels is feasible using a cine phase-contrast MR pulse sequence. 22 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. A reconstruction method for cone-beam differential x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Velroyen, Astrid; Tan, Renbo; Zhang, Junwei; Chen, Liyuan; Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-09-10

    Most existing differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) approaches are based on three kinds of scanning geometries, described by parallel-beam, fan-beam and cone-beam. Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution, cone-beam DPC-CT has attracted significant interest. In this paper, we report a reconstruction method based on a back-projection filtration (BPF) algorithm for cone-beam DPC-CT. Due to the differential nature of phase contrast projections, the algorithm restrains from differentiation of the projection data prior to back-projection, unlike BPF algorithms commonly used for absorption-based CT data. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a micro-focus x-ray tube source. Moreover, the numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can deal with several classes of truncated cone-beam datasets. We believe that this feature is of particular interest for future medical cone-beam phase-contrast CT imaging applications.

  1. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-29

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, makingmore » it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Ultimately, simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.« less

  2. Synchrotron-based phase-contrast images of zebrafish and its anatomical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao Donepudi, Venkateswara; Melumai, Bhaskaraiah; Thallapaka, Balasaidulu; Sandeep, Konam; Cesareo, Roberto; Brunetti, Antonio; Zhong, Zhong; Akatsuka, Takao; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Takeda, Tohoru; Gigante, Giovanni E.

    2014-08-01

    Images of vertebrates (zebrafish and zebrafish eye) have been obtained by using an X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique, namely, synchrotron-based diffraction-enhanced imaging (SY-DEI) (or analyzer based imaging) and synchrotron-based diffraction imaging in tomography mode (SY-DEI-CT). Due to the limitations of the conventional radiographic imaging in visualizing the internal complex feature of the sample, we utilized the upgraded SY-DEI and SY-DEI-CT systems to acquire the images at 20, 30 and 40 keV, to observe the enhanced contrast. SY-DEI and SY-DEI-CT techniques exploits the refraction properties, and have great potential in studies of soft biological tissues, in particular for low (Z) elements, such as, C, H, O and N, which constitutes the soft tissue. Recently, these techniques are characterized by its extraordinary image quality, with improved contrast, by imaging invertebrates. We have chosen the vertebrate sample of zebrafish (Danio rerio), a model organism widely used in developmental biology and oncology. For biological imaging, these techniques are most sensitive to enhance the contrast. For the present study, images of the sample, in planar and tomography modes offer more clarity on the contrast enhancement of anatomical features of the eye, especially the nerve bundle, swim bladder, grills and some internal organs in gut with more visibility.

  3. Phase contrast: the frontier of x-ray and electron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwu, Y.; Margaritondo, G.

    2013-12-01

    Phase contrast has been a fundamental component of microscopy since the early 1940s. In broad terms, it refers to the formation of images using not the combination of wave intensities but their amplitudes with the corresponding phase factors. The impact on visible microscopy of biological specimens has been major. This contrast mechanism is now playing an increasingly important role in other kinds of microscopy, notably those based on electrons or x-rays. It notably solves the background problem of weak absorption contrast. New breakthroughs and new techniques are continuously produced, unfortunately unknown to most of the scientists that could exploit them. The present special cluster issue of reviews was inspired by this situation. The case of x-rays is very interesting. Phase contrast requires a high degree of longitudinal and lateral coherence. But conventional x-ray sources are not coherent. The progress of synchrotron sources yielded high coherence as a key byproduct—and started a rapid expansion of phase contrast radiology. No review—or cluster of reviews—can possibly cover all the facets of the recent progress. Without trying to be absolutely comprehensive, the present special cluster issue touches a variety of issues, giving a very broad picture. Liu et al review in general terms the different phase-based hard-x-ray techniques, with an interesting variety of examples. Then, Suortti et al and Wang et al present more specialized overviews of crystal and grating based x-ray imaging techniques, very powerful in the analysis of biological specimens. Mokso et al discuss the many facets of tomography using phase effects, expanding the picture of tomographic reconstruction of the three previous reviews. Wu et al treat the rapid progress in hard-x-ray focusing and its impact on radiology and tomography for materials science and biomedical research. The next two reviews deal with special and very interesting classes of applications. Specifically, Lee et al

  4. Observation of a Soft Tissue by a Zernike Phase Contrast Hard X-ray Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Sadao; Namikawa, Tadahiro; Hoshino, Masato; Watanabe, Norio

    2007-01-19

    A Zernike-type phase contrast hard X-ray microscope was constructed at the Photon Factory BL3C2 (KEK). A white beam from a bending magnet was monochromatized by a silicon double crystal monochromator. Monochromatic parallel X-ray beam illuminated a sample, and transmitted and diffracted X-ray beams were imaged by a Fresnel zone plate (FZP) which had the outer zone width of 100 nm. A phase plate made of a thin aluminum foil with a pinhole was set at the back focal plane of the FZP. The phase plate modulated the diffraction beam from the FZP, whereas a direct beam passed through the pinhole. The resolution of the microscope was measured by observing a tantalum test pattern at an X-ray energy of 9 keV. A 100nm line-and-space pattern could be resolved. X-ray montage pictures of growing eggs of artemia (plankton) were obtained.

  5. Noise analysis of grating-based x-ray differential phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Revol, Vincent; Kottler, Christian; Kaufmann, Rolf; Urban, Claus; Straumann, Ulrich

    2010-07-15

    The sensitivity of x-ray radiographic images, meaning the minimal detectable change in the thickness or in the index of refraction of a sample, is directly related to the uncertainty of the measurement method. In the following work, we report on the recent development of quantitative descriptions for the stochastic error of grating-based differential phase contrast imaging (DPCi). Our model includes the noise transfer characteristics of the x-ray detector and the jitter of the phase steps. We find that the noise in DPCi depends strongly on the phase stepping visibility and the sample properties. The results are supported by experimental evidence acquired with our new instrument with a field of view of 50x70 mm{sup 2}. Our conclusions provide general guidelines to optimize grating interferometers for specific applications and problems.

  6. Observation of a Soft Tissue by a Zernike Phase Contrast Hard X-ray Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Sadao; Namikawa, Tadahiro; Hoshino, Masato; Watanabe, Norio

    2007-01-01

    A Zernike-type phase contrast hard X-ray microscope was constructed at the Photon Factory BL3C2 (KEK). A white beam from a bending magnet was monochromatized by a silicon double crystal monochromator. Monochromatic parallel X-ray beam illuminated a sample, and transmitted and diffracted X-ray beams were imaged by a Fresnel zone plate (FZP) which had the outer zone width of 100 nm. A phase plate made of a thin aluminum foil with a pinhole was set at the back focal plane of the FZP. The phase plate modulated the diffraction beam from the FZP, whereas a direct beam passed through the pinhole. The resolution of the microscope was measured by observing a tantalum test pattern at an X-ray energy of 9 keV. A 100nm line-and-space pattern could be resolved. X-ray montage pictures of growing eggs of artemia (plankton) were obtained.

  7. Optimization of X-ray phase contrast imaging system toward high-sensitivity measurements of biological organs

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto

    2012-07-31

    X-ray phase contrast imaging and tomography using a Talbot grating interferometer is currently available for user experiments at BL20B2 in SPring-8. The measurement condition for X-ray phase contrast tomography has been optimized to achieve high-sensitivity measurements of biological soft tissues and organs. Some biological samples were measured to demonstrate the high-sensitivity imaging.

  8. 4D x-ray phase contrast tomography for repeatable motion of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto

    2016-09-01

    X-ray phase contrast tomography based on a grating interferometer was applied to fast and dynamic measurements of biological samples. To achieve this, the scanning procedure in the tomographic scan was improved. A triangle-shaped voltage signal from a waveform generator to a Piezo stage was used for the fast phase stepping in the grating interferometer. In addition, an optical fiber coupled x-ray scientific CMOS camera was used to achieve fast and highly efficient image acquisitions. These optimizations made it possible to perform an x-ray phase contrast tomographic measurement within an 8 min scan with density resolution of 2.4 mg/cm3. A maximum volume size of 13 × 13 × 6 mm3 was obtained with a single tomographic measurement with a voxel size of 6.5 μm. The scanning procedure using the triangle wave was applied to four-dimensional measurements in which highly sensitive three-dimensional x-ray imaging and a time-resolved dynamic measurement of biological samples were combined. A fresh tendon in the tail of a rat was measured under a uniaxial stretching and releasing condition. To maintain the freshness of the sample during four-dimensional phase contrast tomography, the temperature of the bathing liquid of the sample was kept below 10° using a simple cooling system. The time-resolved deformation of the tendon and each fascicle was measured with a temporal resolution of 5.7 Hz. Evaluations of cross-sectional area size, length of the axis, and mass density in the fascicle during a stretching process provided a basis for quantitative analysis of the deformation of tendon fascicle.

  9. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  10. X-ray phase-contrast tomography for high-spatial-resolution zebrafish muscle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vågberg, William; Larsson, Daniel H.; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Hertz, Hans M.

    2015-11-01

    Imaging of muscular structure with cellular or subcellular detail in whole-body animal models is of key importance for understanding muscular disease and assessing interventions. Classical histological methods for high-resolution imaging methods require excision, fixation and staining. Here we show that the three-dimensional muscular structure of unstained whole zebrafish can be imaged with sub-5 μm detail with X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Our method relies on a laboratory propagation-based phase-contrast system tailored for detection of low-contrast 4-6 μm subcellular myofibrils. The method is demonstrated on 20 days post fertilization zebrafish larvae and comparative histology confirms that we resolve individual myofibrils in the whole-body animal. X-ray imaging of healthy zebrafish show the expected structured muscle pattern while specimen with a dystrophin deficiency (sapje) displays an unstructured pattern, typical of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The method opens up for whole-body imaging with sub-cellular detail also of other types of soft tissue and in different animal models.

  11. X-ray phase-contrast tomography for high-spatial-resolution zebrafish muscle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Vågberg, William; Larsson, Daniel H.; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Hertz, Hans M.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of muscular structure with cellular or subcellular detail in whole-body animal models is of key importance for understanding muscular disease and assessing interventions. Classical histological methods for high-resolution imaging methods require excision, fixation and staining. Here we show that the three-dimensional muscular structure of unstained whole zebrafish can be imaged with sub-5 μm detail with X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Our method relies on a laboratory propagation-based phase-contrast system tailored for detection of low-contrast 4–6 μm subcellular myofibrils. The method is demonstrated on 20 days post fertilization zebrafish larvae and comparative histology confirms that we resolve individual myofibrils in the whole-body animal. X-ray imaging of healthy zebrafish show the expected structured muscle pattern while specimen with a dystrophin deficiency (sapje) displays an unstructured pattern, typical of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The method opens up for whole-body imaging with sub-cellular detail also of other types of soft tissue and in different animal models. PMID:26564785

  12. Preliminary research on dual-energy X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hua-Jie; Wang, Sheng-Hao; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhi-Li; Zhang, Can; Yang, Meng; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Pei-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) has been widely applied to measure the bone mineral density (BMD) and soft-tissue composition of the human body. However, the use of DEXA is greatly limited for low-Z materials such as soft tissues due to their weak absorption, while X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) shows significantly improved contrast in comparison with the conventional standard absorption-based X-ray imaging for soft tissues. In this paper, we propose a novel X-ray phase-contrast method to measure the area density of low-Z materials, including a single-energy method and a dual-energy method. The single-energy method is for the area density calculation of one low-Z material, while the dual-energy method aims to calculate the area densities of two low-Z materials simultaneously. Comparing the experimental and simulation results with the theoretical ones, the new method proves to have the potential to replace DEXA in area density measurement. The new method sets the prerequisites for a future precise and low-dose area density calculation method for low-Z materials. Supported by Major State Basic Research Development Program (2012CB825800), Science Fund for Creative Research Groups (11321503) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11179004, 10979055, 11205189, 11205157)

  13. X-ray phase-contrast tomography for high-spatial-resolution zebrafish muscle imaging.

    PubMed

    Vågberg, William; Larsson, Daniel H; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Hertz, Hans M

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of muscular structure with cellular or subcellular detail in whole-body animal models is of key importance for understanding muscular disease and assessing interventions. Classical histological methods for high-resolution imaging methods require excision, fixation and staining. Here we show that the three-dimensional muscular structure of unstained whole zebrafish can be imaged with sub-5 μm detail with X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Our method relies on a laboratory propagation-based phase-contrast system tailored for detection of low-contrast 4-6 μm subcellular myofibrils. The method is demonstrated on 20 days post fertilization zebrafish larvae and comparative histology confirms that we resolve individual myofibrils in the whole-body animal. X-ray imaging of healthy zebrafish show the expected structured muscle pattern while specimen with a dystrophin deficiency (sapje) displays an unstructured pattern, typical of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The method opens up for whole-body imaging with sub-cellular detail also of other types of soft tissue and in different animal models. PMID:26564785

  14. Quantitative hard x-ray phase contrast imaging of micropipes in SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, V. G.; Argunova, T. S.; Je, J. H.

    2013-12-15

    Peculiarities of quantitative hard x-ray phase contrast imaging of micropipes in SiC are discussed. The micropipe is assumed as a hollow cylinder with an elliptical cross section. The major and minor diameters can be restored using the least square fitting procedure by comparing the experimental data, i.e. the profile across the micropipe axis, with those calculated based on phase contrast theory. It is shown that one projection image gives an information which does not allow a complete determination of the elliptical cross section, if an orientation of micropipe is not known. Another problem is a weak accuracy in estimating the diameters, partly because of using pink synchrotron radiation, which is necessary because a monochromatic beam intensity is not sufficient to reveal the weak contrast from a very small object. The general problems of accuracy in estimating the two diameters using the least square procedure are discussed. Two experimental examples are considered to demonstrate small as well as modest accuracies in estimating the diameters.

  15. Quantitative X-ray phase-contrast microtomography from a compact laser-driven betatron source

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, J.; Schleede, S.; Khrennikov, K.; Bech, M.; Thibault, P.; Heigoldt, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Karsch, S.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to a brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present a phase-contrast microtomogram of a biological sample using betatron X-rays. Comprehensive source characterization enables the reconstruction of absolute electron densities. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential for filling the large performance gap between synchrotron- and current X-ray tube-based sources. PMID:26189811

  16. Phase-contrast zoom tomography reveals precise locations of macrophages in mouse lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenkel, Martin; Markus, Andrea; Bartels, Matthias; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Salditt, Tim

    2015-05-01

    We have performed x-ray phase-contrast tomography on mouse lung tissue. Using a divergent x-ray beam generated by nanoscale focusing, we used zoom tomography to produce three-dimensional reconstructions with selectable magnification, resolution, and field of view. Thus, macroscopic tissue samples extending over several mm can be studied in sub-cellular-level structural detail. The zoom capability and, in particular, the high dose efficiency are enabled by the near-perfect exit wavefront of an optimized x-ray waveguide channel. In combination with suitable phase-retrieval algorithms, challenging radiation-sensitive and low-contrast samples can be reconstructed with minimal artefacts. The dose efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the reconstruction of living macrophages both with and without phagocytized contrast agents. We also used zoom tomography to visualize barium-labelled macrophages in the context of morphological structures in asthmatic and healthy mouse lung tissue one day after intratracheal application. The three-dimensional reconstructions showed that the macrophages predominantly localized to the alveoli, but they were also found in bronchial walls, indicating that these cells might be able to migrate from the lumen of the bronchi through the epithelium.

  17. Phase-contrast zoom tomography reveals precise locations of macrophages in mouse lungs

    PubMed Central

    Krenkel, Martin; Markus, Andrea; Bartels, Matthias; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Salditt, Tim

    2015-01-01

    We have performed x-ray phase-contrast tomography on mouse lung tissue. Using a divergent x-ray beam generated by nanoscale focusing, we used zoom tomography to produce three-dimensional reconstructions with selectable magnification, resolution, and field of view. Thus, macroscopic tissue samples extending over several mm can be studied in sub-cellular-level structural detail. The zoom capability and, in particular, the high dose efficiency are enabled by the near-perfect exit wavefront of an optimized x-ray waveguide channel. In combination with suitable phase-retrieval algorithms, challenging radiation-sensitive and low-contrast samples can be reconstructed with minimal artefacts. The dose efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the reconstruction of living macrophages both with and without phagocytized contrast agents. We also used zoom tomography to visualize barium-labelled macrophages in the context of morphological structures in asthmatic and healthy mouse lung tissue one day after intratracheal application. The three-dimensional reconstructions showed that the macrophages predominantly localized to the alveoli, but they were also found in bronchial walls, indicating that these cells might be able to migrate from the lumen of the bronchi through the epithelium. PMID:25966338

  18. Large-field high-contrast hard x-ray Zernike phase-contrast nano-imaging beamline at Pohang Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jun; Park, So Yeong; Huang, Jung Yun; Han, Sung Mi; Kim, Hong-Tae

    2013-01-01

    We developed an off-axis-illuminated zone-plate-based hard x-ray Zernike phase-contrast microscope beamline at Pohang Light Source. Owing to condenser optics-free and off-axis illumination, a large field of view was achieved. The pinhole-type Zernike phase plate affords high-contrast images of a cell with minimal artifacts such as the shade-off and halo effects. The setup, including the optics and the alignment, is simple and easy, and allows faster and easier imaging of large bio-samples.

  19. Large-field high-contrast hard x-ray Zernike phase-contrast nano-imaging beamline at Pohang Light Source.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jun; Park, So Yeong; Huang, Jung Yun; Han, Sung Mi; Kim, Hong-Tae

    2013-01-01

    We developed an off-axis-illuminated zone-plate-based hard x-ray Zernike phase-contrast microscope beamline at Pohang Light Source. Owing to condenser optics-free and off-axis illumination, a large field of view was achieved. The pinhole-type Zernike phase plate affords high-contrast images of a cell with minimal artifacts such as the shade-off and halo effects. The setup, including the optics and the alignment, is simple and easy, and allows faster and easier imaging of large bio-samples. PMID:23387659

  20. Concomitant use of polarization and positive phase contrast microscopy for the study of microbial cells.

    PubMed

    Žižka, Zdeněk; Gabriel, Jiří

    2015-11-01

    Polarization and positive phase contrast microscope were concomitantly used in the study of the internal structure of microbial cells. Positive phase contrast allowed us to view even the fine cell structure with a refractive index approaching that of the surrounding environment, e.g., the cytoplasm, and transferred the invisible phase image to a visible amplitude image. With polarization microscopy, crossed polarizing filters together with compensators and a rotary stage showed the birefringence of different cell structures. Material containing algae was collected in ponds in Sýkořice and Zbečno villages (Křivoklát region). The objects were studied in laboratory microscopes LOMO MIN-8 Sankt Petersburg and Polmi A Carl Zeiss Jena fitted with special optics for positive phase contrast, polarizers, analyzers, compensators, rotary stages, and digital SLR camera Nikon D 70 for image capture. Anisotropic granules were found in the cells of flagellates of the order Euglenales, in green algae of the orders Chlorococcales and Chlorellales, and in desmid algae of the order Desmidiales. The cell walls of filamentous algae of the orders Zygnematales and Ulotrichales were found to exhibit significant birefringence; in addition, relatively small amounts of small granules were found in the cytoplasm. A typical shape-related birefringence of the cylindrical walls and the septa between the cells differed in intensity, which was especially apparent when using a Zeiss compensator RI-c during its successive double setting. In conclusion, the anisotropic granules found in the investigated algae mostly showed strong birefringence and varied in number, size, and location of the cells. Representatives of the order Chlorococcales contained the highest number of granules per cell, and the size of these granules was almost double than that of the other monitored microorganisms. Very strong birefringence was exhibited by cell walls of filamentous algae; it differed in the intensity

  1. Quantitative X-ray phase contrast waveguide imaging of bacterial endospores1

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, R. N.; Hoppert, M.; Krenkel, M.; Bartels, M.; Salditt, T.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative waveguide-based X-ray phase contrast imaging has been carried out on the level of single, unstained, unsliced and freeze-dried bacterial cells of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus subtilis using hard X-rays of 7.9 keV photon energy. The cells have been prepared in the metabolically dormant state of an endospore. The quantitative phase maps obtained by iterative phase retrieval using a modified hybrid input–output algorithm allow for mass and mass density determinations on the level of single individual endospores but include also large field of view investigations. Additionally, a direct reconstruction based on the contrast transfer function is investigated, and the two approaches are compared. Depending on the field of view and method, a resolution down to 65 nm was achieved at a maximum applied dose of below 5 × 105 Gy. Masses in the range of about ∼110–190 (20) fg for isolated endospores have been obtained. PMID:25844079

  2. A novel high temporal resolution phase contrast MRI technique for measuring mitral valve flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorhees, Abram; Bohmann, Katja; McGorty, Kelly Anne; Wei, Timothy; Chen, Qun

    2005-11-01

    Mitral valve flow imaging is inherently difficult due to valve plane motion and high blood flow velocities, which can range from 200 cm/s to 700 cm/s under regurgitant conditions. As such, insufficient temporal resolution has hampered imaging of mitral valve flows using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A novel phase contrast MRI technique, phase contrast using phase train imaging (PCPTI), has been developed to address the high temporal resolution needs for imaging mitral valve flows. The PCPTI sequence provides the highest temporal resolution to-date (6 ms) for measuring in-plane and through-plane flow patterns, with each velocity component acquired in a separate breathhold. Tested on healthy human volunteers, comparison to a conventional retrogated PC-FLASH cine sequence showed reasonable agreement. Results from a more rigorous validation using digital particle image velocimetry technique will be presented. The technique will be demonstrated in vitro using a physiological flow phantom and a St. Jude Medical Masters Series prosthetic valve.

  3. Automatic neuron segmentation and neural network analysis method for phase contrast microscopy images

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jincheng; Özkucur, Nurdan; Ren, Michael; Kaplan, David L.; Levin, Michael; Miller, Eric L.

    2015-01-01

    Phase Contrast Microscopy (PCM) is an important tool for the long term study of living cells. Unlike fluorescence methods which suffer from photobleaching of fluorophore or dye molecules, PCM image contrast is generated by the natural variations in optical index of refraction. Unfortunately, the same physical principles which allow for these studies give rise to complex artifacts in the raw PCM imagery. Of particular interest in this paper are neuron images where these image imperfections manifest in very different ways for the two structures of specific interest: cell bodies (somas) and dendrites. To address these challenges, we introduce a novel parametric image model using the level set framework and an associated variational approach which simultaneously restores and segments this class of images. Using this technique as the basis for an automated image analysis pipeline, results for both the synthetic and real images validate and demonstrate the advantages of our approach. PMID:26601004

  4. Virtual unrolling and deciphering of Herculaneum papyri by X-ray phase-contrast tomography.

    PubMed

    Bukreeva, I; Mittone, A; Bravin, A; Festa, G; Alessandrelli, M; Coan, P; Formoso, V; Agostino, R G; Giocondo, M; Ciuchi, F; Fratini, M; Massimi, L; Lamarra, A; Andreani, C; Bartolino, R; Gigli, G; Ranocchia, G; Cedola, A

    2016-06-06

    A collection of more than 1800 carbonized papyri, discovered in the Roman 'Villa dei Papiri' at Herculaneum is the unique classical library survived from antiquity. These papyri were charred during 79 A.D. Vesuvius eruption, a circumstance which providentially preserved them until now. This magnificent collection contains an impressive amount of treatises by Greek philosophers and, especially, Philodemus of Gadara, an Epicurean thinker of 1st century BC. We read many portions of text hidden inside carbonized Herculaneum papyri using enhanced X-ray phase-contrast tomography non-destructive technique and a new set of numerical algorithms for 'virtual-unrolling'. Our success lies in revealing the largest portion of Greek text ever detected so far inside unopened scrolls, with unprecedented spatial resolution and contrast, all without damaging these precious historical manuscripts. Parts of text have been decoded and the 'voice' of the Epicurean philosopher Philodemus is brought back again after 2000 years from Herculaneum papyri.

  5. Artery and vein separation using susceptibility-dependent phase in contrast-enhanced MRA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Yu, Y; Li, D; Bae, K T; Brown, J J; Lin, W; Haacke, E M

    2000-11-01

    In magnetic resonance angiography, contrast agents are frequently used to help highlight arteries over background tissue. Unfortunately, enhancing veins hamper the visualization of arteries when data are collected over a long period of time after the arterial phase of the contrast agent. To overcome this problem, we have developed a novel imaging and postprocessing method that is capable of eliminating veins by utilizing the susceptibility difference between veins and surrounding tissue. This method was applied in the peripheral vasculature where the vessels are predominantly parallel to the main field and where the blood oxygen level-dependent effect is most pronounced. Results are presented for both long (15.8 msec) and short echo times (7.8 msec) and for sequential and centrally reordered acquisition schemes. The short echo scan approach appears to be the most promising, making it possible to obtain good suppression of the venous signal even when the timing is not perfect or when repeat scans are necessary.

  6. Bacteria-clay interactions investigated by light scattering and phase contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimova, Alexandra; Block, Karin; Rudolph, Elizabeth; Katz, A.; Steiner, J. C.; Gottlieb, P.; Alfano, R. R.

    2006-02-01

    Light scattering experiments and phase contrast microscopy are used to evaluate the aggregate-forming characteristics of simple clay-bacteria mixtures. Colloidal suspensions of negatively charged Pseudomonas syringae (Ps) and Mg 2+-, Li + - or Ca 2+ -exchanged smectite (and non-exchanged smectite) are flocculated in neutral (pH 7) aqueous media. Aggregate formation is monitored using changes in optical transmission. Clustering is observed in all the clay-bacteria preparations. The Li +-substituted clay aggregates average 50-300 microns in diameter, in contrast to the Ca 2+- substituted clay that produces aggregates of 10-50 microns in diameter. Light scattering measurements indicate that aggregates begin forming 3 hours after mixing and that the (larger sized) aggregates exhibit less scattering than a mixture with an equivalent concentration of unattached Ps and clay particles.

  7. Tumors in murine brains studied by grating-based phase contrast microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Georg; Dominietto, Marco; Kovacs, Zsofia; Schmitz, Rüdiger; Hieber, Simone E.; Thalmann, Peter; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    Angiogenesis, i.e. the formation of vessels, is one of the key processes during tumor development. The newly formed vessels transport oxygen and nutrients from the healthy tissue to the tumor and gives tumor cells the possibility to replicate. The principle of anti-angiogenic therapy is to block angiogenic process in order to stop tumor growth. The aim of the present study is the investigation of murine glioma vascular architecture at early (7 days), intermediate (10 and 15 days) and late (23 days) stage of growth by means of grating-based phase contrast microtomography. We demonstrate that this technique yields premium contrast between healthy and cancerous parts of murine brain tissues.

  8. Virtual unrolling and deciphering of Herculaneum papyri by X-ray phase-contrast tomography.

    PubMed

    Bukreeva, I; Mittone, A; Bravin, A; Festa, G; Alessandrelli, M; Coan, P; Formoso, V; Agostino, R G; Giocondo, M; Ciuchi, F; Fratini, M; Massimi, L; Lamarra, A; Andreani, C; Bartolino, R; Gigli, G; Ranocchia, G; Cedola, A

    2016-01-01

    A collection of more than 1800 carbonized papyri, discovered in the Roman 'Villa dei Papiri' at Herculaneum is the unique classical library survived from antiquity. These papyri were charred during 79 A.D. Vesuvius eruption, a circumstance which providentially preserved them until now. This magnificent collection contains an impressive amount of treatises by Greek philosophers and, especially, Philodemus of Gadara, an Epicurean thinker of 1st century BC. We read many portions of text hidden inside carbonized Herculaneum papyri using enhanced X-ray phase-contrast tomography non-destructive technique and a new set of numerical algorithms for 'virtual-unrolling'. Our success lies in revealing the largest portion of Greek text ever detected so far inside unopened scrolls, with unprecedented spatial resolution and contrast, all without damaging these precious historical manuscripts. Parts of text have been decoded and the 'voice' of the Epicurean philosopher Philodemus is brought back again after 2000 years from Herculaneum papyri. PMID:27265417

  9. On detector linearity and precision of beam shift detection for quantitative differential phase contrast applications.

    PubMed

    Zweck, Josef; Schwarzhuber, Felix; Wild, Johannes; Galioit, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    Differential phase contrast is a STEM imaging mode where minute sideways deflections of the electron probe are monitored, usually by using a position sensitive device (Chapman, 1984 [1]; Lohr et al., 2012 [2]) or, alternatively in some cases, a fast camera (Müller et al., 2012 [3,4]; Yang et al., 2015 [5]; Pennycook et al., 2015 [6]) as a pixelated detector. While traditionally differential phase contrast electron microscopy was mainly focused on investigations of micro-magnetic domain structures and their specific features, such as domain wall widths, etc. (Chapman, 1984 [1]; Chapman et al., 1978, 1981, 1985 [7-9]; Sannomiya et al., 2004 [10]), its usage has recently been extended to mesoscopic (Lohr et al., 2012, 2016 [2,12]; Bauer et al., 2014 [11]; Shibata et al., 2015 [13]) and nano-scale electric fields (Shibata et al., 2012 [14]; Mueller et al., 2014 [15]). In this paper, the various interactions which can cause a beam deflection are reviewed and expanded by two so far undiscussed mechanisms which may be important for biological applications. As differential phase contrast microscopy strongly depends on the ability to detect minute beam deflections we first treat the linearity problem for an annular four quadrant detector and then determine the factors which limit the minimum measurable deflection angle, such as S/N ratio, current density, dwell time and detector geometry. Knowing these factors enables the experimenter to optimize the set-up for optimum performance of the microscope and to get a clear figure for the achievable field resolution error margins.

  10. Ecdysis period of Rhodnius prolixus head investigated using phase contrast synchrotron microtomography.

    PubMed

    Sena, G; Nogueira, L P; Braz, D; Almeida, A P; Gonzalez, M S; Azambuja, P; Colaço, M V; Barroso, R C

    2016-06-01

    Microtomography using synchrotron sources is a useful tool in biological imaging research since the phase coherence of synchrotron beams can be exploited to obtain images with high contrast resolution. This work is part of a series of works using phase contrast synchrotron microtomography in the study of Rhodnius prolixus head, the insect vector of Chagas' disease, responsible for about 12,000 deaths per year. The control of insect vector is the most efficient method to prevent this disease and studies have shown that the use of triflumuron, a chitin synthesis inhibitor, disrupted chitin synthesis during larval development and it's an alternative method against insect pests. The aim of this work was to investigate the biological effects of treatments with triflumuron in the ecdysis period (the moulting of the R. prolixus cuticle) using the new imaging beamline IMX at LNLS (Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory). Nymphs of R. prolixus were taken from the Laboratory of Biochemistry and Physiology of Insects, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Brazil. Doses of 0.05mg of triflumuron were applied directly to the abdomen on half of the insects immediately after feeding. The insects were sacrificed 25days after feeding (intermoulting period) and fixed with glutaraldehyde. The results obtained using phase contrast synchrotron microtomography in R. prolixus showed amazing images of the effects of triflumuron on insects in the ecdysis period, and the formation of the new cuticle on those which were not treated with triflumuron. Both formation and malformation of this insect's cuticle have never been seen before with this technique. PMID:27184550

  11. In-line thermoelectric module

    DOEpatents

    Pento, Robert; Marks, James E.; Staffanson, Clifford D.

    2000-01-01

    A thermoelectric module with a plurality of electricity generating units each having a first end and a second end, the units being arranged first end to second end along an in-line axis. Each unit includes first and second elements each made of a thermoelectric material, an electrically conductive hot member arranged to heat one side of the first element, and an electrically conductive cold member arranged to cool another side of the first element and to cool one side of the second element. The hot member, the first element, the cold member and the second element are supported in a fixture, are electrically connected respectively to provide an electricity generating unit, and are arranged respectively in positions along the in-line axis. The individual components of each generating unit and the respective generating units are clamped in their in-line positions by a loading bolt at one end of the fixture and a stop wall at the other end of the fixture. The hot members may have a T-shape and the cold members an hourglass shape to facilitate heat transfer. The direction of heat transfer through the hot members may be perpendicular to the direction of heat transfer through the cold members, and both of these heat transfer directions may be perpendicular to the direction of current flow through the module.

  12. Fast gridding projectors for analytical and iterative tomographic reconstruction of differential phase contrast data.

    PubMed

    Arcadu, Filippo; Stampanoni, Marco; Marone, Federica

    2016-06-27

    This paper introduces new gridding projectors designed to efficiently perform analytical and iterative tomographic reconstruction, when the forward model is represented by the derivative of the Radon transform. This inverse problem is tightly connected with an emerging X-ray tube- and synchrotron-based imaging technique: differential phase contrast based on a grating interferometer. This study shows, that the proposed projectors, compared to space-based implementations of the same operators, yield high quality analytical and iterative reconstructions, while improving the computational efficiency by few orders of magnitude. PMID:27410628

  13. Halo suppression in full-field x-ray Zernike phase contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Mokso, Rajmund; Stampanoni, Marco; David, Christian

    2014-03-15

    Visible light Zernike phase contrast (ZPC) microscopy is a well established method for imaging weakly absorbing samples. The method is also used with hard x-ray photon energies for structural evaluation of material science and biological applications. However, the method suffers from artifacts that are inherent for the Zernike image formation. In this Letter, we investigate their origin and experimentally show how to suppress them in x-ray full-field ZPC microscopy based on diffractive x-ray optics. PMID:24690848

  14. Design of tangential viewing phase contrast imaging for turbulence measurements in JT-60SA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Coda, S.; Yoshida, M.; Sasao, H.; Kawano, Y.; Imazawa, R.; Kubo, H.; Kamada, Y.

    2016-11-01

    A tangential viewing phase contrast imaging system is being designed for the JT-60SA tokamak to investigate microturbulence. In order to obtain localized information on the turbulence, a spatial-filtering technique is applied, based on magnetic shearing. The tangential viewing geometry enhances the radial localization. The probing laser beam is injected tangentially and traverses the entire plasma region including both low and high field sides. The spatial resolution for an Internal Transport Barrier discharge is estimated at 30%-70% of the minor radius at k = 5 cm-1, which is the typical expected wave number of ion scale turbulence such as ion temperature gradient/trapped electron mode.

  15. Wavefront sensing based on phase contrast theory and coherent optical processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huang; Qi, Bian; Chenlu, Zhou; Tenghao, Li; Mali, Gong

    2016-07-01

    A novel wavefront sensing method based on phase contrast theory and coherent optical processing is proposed. The wavefront gradient field in the object plane is modulated into intensity distribution in a gang of patterns, making high-density detection available. By applying the method, we have also designed a wavefront sensor. It consists of a classical coherent optical processing system, a CCD detector array, two pieces of orthogonal composite sinusoidal gratings, and a mechanical structure that can perform real-time linear positioning. The simulation results prove and demonstrate the validity of the method and the sensor in high-precision measurement of the wavefront gradient field.

  16. Application of x-ray phase contrast imaging to microscopic identification of Chinese medicines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xun; Xiao, Ti-Qiao; Liu, Li-Xiang; Du, Guo-Hao; Chen, Min; Luo, Yu-Yu; Xu, Hong-Jie

    2005-09-01

    In the last decade, x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) has received considerable attention as a novel imaging technique, which has proved to be suitable for weakly absorbing materials such as biomedical samples and polymers. In this paper, the microstructures of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs), which are used as judging criteria in the identification of TCMs, were investigated by XPCI based on a nano-focus x-ray tube. The results demonstrated that XPCI is a promising new method for the identification of TCMs, with advantages such as nondestructivity, no special sample preparation and suitability for thick samples.

  17. Characterization of LiBC by phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krumeich, Frank; Wörle, Michael; Reibisch, Philipp; Nesper, Reinhard

    2014-08-01

    LiBC was used as a model compound for probing the applicability of phase-contrast (PC) imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to visualize lithium distributions. In the LiBC structure, boron and carbon are arranged to hetero graphite layers between which lithium is incorporated. The crystal structure is reflected in the PC-STEM images recorded perpendicular to the layers. The experimental images and their defocus dependence match with multi-slice simulations calculated utilizing the reciprocity principle. The observation that a part of the Li positions is not occupied is likely an effect of the intense electron beam triggering Li displacement.

  18. Programmable aperture microscopy: A computational method for multi-modal phase contrast and light field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Feng, Shijie; Zhang, Minliang; Chen, Qian

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a simple and cost-effective programmable aperture microscope to realize multi-modal computational imaging by integrating a programmable liquid crystal display (LCD) into a conventional wide-field microscope. The LCD selectively modulates the light distribution at the rear aperture of the microscope objective, allowing numerous imaging modalities, such as bright field, dark field, differential phase contrast, quantitative phase imaging, multi-perspective imaging, and full resolution light field imaging to be achieved and switched rapidly in the same setup, without requiring specialized hardwares and any moving parts. We experimentally demonstrate the success of our method by imaging unstained cheek cells, profiling microlens array, and changing perspective views of thick biological specimens. The post-exposure refocusing of a butterfly mouthpart and RFP-labeled dicot stem cross-section is also presented to demonstrate the full resolution light field imaging capability of our system for both translucent and fluorescent specimens.

  19. Toward clinical differential phase contrast mammography: preliminary evaluations and image processing schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampanoni, M.; Wang, Z.; Thüring, T.; David, C.; Rössl, E.; van Stevendaal, U.; Köhler, T.; Trippel, M.; Singer, G.; Kubik-Huch, R. A.; Hohl, M. K.; Hauser, N.

    2013-05-01

    Phase contrast and scattering-based X-ray imaging are very promising tools for medical diagnostics because they are able to provide additional and complementary information to traditional absorption-based methods. In this work, we discuss the investigation of three native breast samples with a grating interferometer equipped with a conventional X-ray tube, the full study being published in ref. [1]. We briefly introduce a method to fuse absorption, differential phase and scattering signals into a unique image with improved diagnostic contents. Our approach yields complementary and inaccessible information on the electron density distribution and the small-angle scattering power of the sample which could potentially answer clinically relevant, yet unresolved questions such as the capability to unequivocally discern between (pre-) malignant changes and post-operative scars or to distinguish cancer-invaded regions within healthy tissue.

  20. Comparison of propagation-based phase-contrast tomography approaches for the evaluation of dentin microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyhle, Hans; Weitkamp, Timm; Lang, Sabrina; Schulz, Georg; Rack, Alexander; Zanette, Irene; Müller, Bert

    2012-10-01

    The complex hierarchical structure of human tooth hard tissues, enamel and dentin, guarantees function for decades. On the micrometer level the dentin morphology is dominated by the tubules, micrometer-narrow channels extending from the dentin-enamel junction to the pulp chamber. Their structure has been extensively studied, mainly with two-dimensional approaches. Dentin tubules are formed during tooth growth and their orientation is linked to the morphology of the nanometer-sized components, which is of interest for example for the development of bio-inspired dental fillings. Therefore, a method has to be identified that can access the three-dimensional organization of the tubules, e.g. density and orientation. Tomographic setups with pixel sizes in the sub-micrometer range allow for the three-dimensional visualization of tooth dentin tubules both in phase and absorption contrast modes. We compare high-resolution tomographic scans reconstructed with propagation based phase retrieval algorithms as well as reconstructions without phase retrieval concerning spatial and density resolution as well as rendering of the dentin microstructure to determine the approach best suited for dentin tubule imaging. Reasonable results were obtained with a single-distance phase retrieval algorithm and a propagation distance of about 75% of the critical distance of d2/λ, where d is the size of the smallest objects identifiable in the specimen and λ is the X-ray wavelength.

  1. DESIGN OF A MICROFABRICATED, TWO-ELECTRODE PHASE-CONTRAST ELEMENTSUITABLE FOR ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Cambie, Rossana; Downing, Kenneth H.; Typke, Dieter; Glaeser,Robert M.; Jin, Jian

    2006-09-20

    A miniature electrostatic element has been designed to selectively apply a ninety-degree phase shift to the unscattered beam in the back focal plane of the objective lens, in order to realize Zernike-type, in-focus phase contrast in an electron microscope. The design involves a cylindrically shaped, biased-voltage electrode, which is surrounded by a concentric grounded electrode. Electrostatic calculations have been used to determine that the fringing fields in the region of the scattered electron beams will cause a negligible phase shift as long as the ratio of electrode length to the transverse feature-size is greater than 5:1. Unlike the planar, three-electrode einzel lens originally proposed by Boersch for the same purpose, this new design does not require insulating layers to separate the biased and grounded electrodes, and it can thus be produced by a very simple microfabrication process. Scanning electron microscope images confirm that mechanically robust devices with feature sizes of {approx}1 {micro}m can be easily fabricated. Preliminary experimental images demonstrate that these devices do apply a 90-degree phase shift between the scattered and unscattered electrons, as expected.

  2. Ex vivo differential phase contrast and magnetic resonance imaging for characterization of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Meletta, Romana; Borel, Nicole; Stolzmann, Paul; Astolfo, Alberto; Klohs, Jan; Stampanoni, Marco; Rudin, Markus; Schibli, Roger; Krämer, Stefanie D; Herde, Adrienne Müller

    2015-10-01

    Non-invasive detection of specific atherosclerotic plaque components related to vulnerability is of high clinical relevance to prevent cerebrovascular events. The feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for characterization of plaque components was already demonstrated. We aimed to evaluate the potential of ex vivo differential phase contrast X-ray tomography (DPC) to accurately characterize human carotid plaque components in comparison to high field multicontrast MRI and histopathology. Two human plaque segments, obtained from carotid endarterectomy, classified according to criteria of the American Heart Association as stable and unstable plaque, were examined by ex vivo DPC tomography and multicontrast MRI (T1-, T2-, and proton density-weighted imaging, magnetization transfer contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging). To identify specific plaque components, the plaques were subsequently sectioned and stained for fibrous and cellular components, smooth muscle cells, hemosiderin, and fibrin. Histological data were then matched with DPC and MR images to define signal criteria for atherosclerotic plaque components. Characteristic structures, such as the lipid and necrotic core covered by a fibrous cap, calcification and hemosiderin deposits were delineated by histology and found with excellent sensitivity, resolution and accuracy in both imaging modalities. DPC tomography was superior to MRI regarding resolution and soft tissue contrast. Ex vivo DPC tomography allowed accurate identification of structures and components of atherosclerotic plaques at different lesion stages, in good correlation with histopathological findings.

  3. Pixelated detectors and improved efficiency for magnetic imaging in STEM differential phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Krajnak, Matus; McGrouther, Damien; Maneuski, Dzmitry; Shea, Val O'; McVitie, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    The application of differential phase contrast imaging to the study of polycrystalline magnetic thin films and nanostructures has been hampered by the strong diffraction contrast resulting from the granular structure of the materials. In this paper we demonstrate how a pixelated detector has been used to detect the bright field disk in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and subsequent processing of the acquired data allows efficient enhancement of the magnetic contrast in the resulting images. Initial results from a charged coupled device (CCD) camera demonstrate the highly efficient nature of this improvement over previous methods. Further hardware development with the use of a direct radiation detector, the Medipix3, also shows the possibilities where the reduction in collection time is more than an order of magnitude compared to the CCD. We show that this allows subpixel measurement of the beam deflection due to the magnetic induction. While the detection and processing is data intensive we have demonstrated highly efficient DPC imaging whereby pixel by pixel interpretation of the induction variation is realised with great potential for nanomagnetic imaging. PMID:27085170

  4. X-ray phase contrast with injected gas for tumor microangiography.

    PubMed

    Lundström, U; Westermark, U K; Larsson, D H; Burvall, A; Arsenian Henriksson, M; Hertz, H M

    2014-06-01

    We show that the microvasculature of mouse tumors can be visualized using propagation-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging with gas as the contrast agent. The large density difference over the gas-tissue interface provides high contrast, allowing the imaging of small-diameter blood vessels with relatively short exposure times and low dose using a compact liquid-metal-jet x-ray source. The method investigated is applied to tumors (E1A/Ras-transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts) grown in mouse ears, demonstrating sub-15-µm-diameter imaging of their blood vessels. The exposure time for a 2D projection image is a few seconds and a full tomographic 3D map takes some minutes. The method relies on the strength of the vasculature to withstand the gas pressure. Given that tumor vessels are known to be more fragile than normal vessels, we investigate the tolerance of the vasculature of 12 tumors to gas injection and find that a majority withstand 200 mbar pressures, enough to fill 12-µm-diameter vessels with gas. A comparison of the elasticity of tumorous and non-tumorous vessels supports the assumption of tumor vessels being more fragile. Finally, we conclude that the method has the potential to be extended to the imaging of 15 µm vessels in thick tissue, including mouse imaging, making it of interest for, e.g., angiogenesis research. PMID:24801363

  5. Statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm for X-ray phase-contrast CT

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Dieter; Thibault, Pierre; Fehringer, Andreas; Bech, Martin; Koehler, Thomas; Pfeiffer, Franz; Noël, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) is a promising imaging tool on the horizon for pre-clinical and clinical applications. Until now PCCT has been plagued by strong artifacts when dense materials like bones are present. In this paper, we present a new statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm which overcomes this limitation. It makes use of the fact that an X-ray interferometer provides a conventional absorption as well as a dark-field signal in addition to the phase-contrast signal. The method is based on a statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm utilizing maximum-a-posteriori principles and integrating the statistical properties of the raw data as well as information of dense objects gained from the absorption signal. Reconstruction of a pre-clinical mouse scan illustrates that artifacts caused by bones are significantly reduced and image quality is improved when employing our approach. Especially small structures, which are usually lost because of streaks, are recovered in our results. In comparison with the current state-of-the-art algorithms our approach provides significantly improved image quality with respect to quantitative and qualitative results. In summary, we expect that our new statistical iterative reconstruction method to increase the general usability of PCCT imaging for medical diagnosis apart from applications focused solely on soft tissue visualization. PMID:26067714

  6. Systolically gated 3D phase contrast MRA of mesenteric arteries in suspected mesenteric ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wasser, M.N.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Roos, A. de

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the value of MRA for detecting stenoses in the celiac (CA) and superior mesenteric (SMA) arteries in patients suspected of having chronic mesenteric ischemia, using an optimized systolically gated 3D phase contrast technique. In an initial study in 24 patients who underwent conventional angiography of the abdominal vessels for different clinical indications, a 3D phase contrast MRA technique (3D-PCA) was evaluated and optimized to image the CAs and SMAs. Subsequently, a prospective study was performed to assess the value of systolically gated 3D-PCA in evaluation of the mesenteric arteries in 10 patients with signs and symptoms of chronic mesenteric ischemia. Intraarterial digital subtraction angiography and surgical findings were used as the reference standard. In the initial study, systolic gating appeared to be essential in imaging the SMA on 3D-PCA. In 10 patients suspected of mesenteric ischemia, systolically gated 3D-PCA identified significant proximal disease in the two mesenteric vessels in 4 patients. These patients underwent successful reconstruction of their stenotic vessels. Cardiac-gated MRA may become a useful tool in selection of patients suspected of having mesenteric ischemia who may benefit from surgery. 16 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Automated Detection of Low-Contrast Solar Features Using the Phase-Congruency Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Song; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Feng; Deng, Hui; Yang, Yunfei; Ji, Kaifan

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new feature-detection technique based on phase-congruency (PC) measurements to automatically recognize or enhance faint features in solar observations, such as off-limb coronal loops and umbral dots. Compared with other feature-detection methods that are based on gradient illuminance and imaging filtering, PC-based measurements are particular efficient for recognizing faint features, which generally have a low-intensity contrast to their surroundings. In the present article, we carry out a PC-based measurement of the local weighted mean phase angle (LWMPA) at each point in an image to indicate or highlight low-contrast features. We first used artificial images to check the detection accuracy and sensitivity to the noise of this approach. Subsequently, we applied this approach to an EUV observation obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly to highlight off-limb coronal loops, and a photospheric observation obtained by the Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope to recognize faint dots within the cores of sunspots and pores. The results illustrate that this PC-based measurement of the LWMPA is a robust detection method for faint structures in solar observations.

  8. Wavelet-based noise-model driven denoising algorithm for differential phase contrast mammography.

    PubMed

    Arboleda, Carolina; Wang, Zhentian; Stampanoni, Marco

    2013-05-01

    Traditional mammography can be positively complemented by phase contrast and scattering x-ray imaging, because they can detect subtle differences in the electron density of a material and measure the local small-angle scattering power generated by the microscopic density fluctuations in the specimen, respectively. The grating-based x-ray interferometry technique can produce absorption, differential phase contrast (DPC) and scattering signals of the sample, in parallel, and works well with conventional X-ray sources; thus, it constitutes a promising method for more reliable breast cancer screening and diagnosis. Recently, our team proved that this novel technology can provide images superior to conventional mammography. This new technology was used to image whole native breast samples directly after mastectomy. The images acquired show high potential, but the noise level associated to the DPC and scattering signals is significant, so it is necessary to remove it in order to improve image quality and visualization. The noise models of the three signals have been investigated and the noise variance can be computed. In this work, a wavelet-based denoising algorithm using these noise models is proposed. It was evaluated with both simulated and experimental mammography data. The outcomes demonstrated that our method offers a good denoising quality, while simultaneously preserving the edges and important structural features. Therefore, it can help improve diagnosis and implement further post-processing techniques such as fusion of the three signals acquired.

  9. Cell morphology classification in phase contrast microscopy image reducing halo artifact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Song, Soo-Min; Lee, Hana; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2012-03-01

    Since the morphology of tumor cells is a good indicator of their invasiveness, we used time-lapse phase-contrast microscopy to examine the morphology of tumor cells. This technique enables long-term observation of the activity of live cells without photobleaching and phototoxicity which is common in other fluorescence-labeled microscopy. However, it does have certain drawbacks in terms of imaging. Therefore, we first corrected for non-uniform illumination artifacts and then we use intensity distribution information to detect cell boundary. In phase contrast microscopy image, cell is normally appeared as dark region surrounded by bright halo ring. Due to halo artifact is minimal around the cell body and has non-symmetric diffusion pattern, we calculate cross sectional plane which intersects center of each cell and orthogonal to first principal axis. Then, we extract dark cell region by analyzing intensity profile curve considering local bright peak as halo area. Finally, we examined cell morphology to classify tumor cells as malignant and benign.

  10. Development of optics for x-ray phase-contrast imaging of high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Moldovan, N.

    2010-10-15

    Phase-contrast or refraction-enhanced x-ray radiography can be useful for the diagnostic of low-Z high energy density plasmas, such as imploding inertial confinement fusion (ICF) pellets, due to its sensitivity to density gradients. To separate and quantify the absorption and refraction contributions to x-ray images, methods based on microperiodic optics, such as shearing interferometry, can be used. To enable applying such methods with the energetic x rays needed for ICF radiography, we investigate a new type of optics consisting of grazing incidence microperiodic mirrors. Using such mirrors, efficient phase-contrast imaging systems could be built for energies up to {approx}100 keV. In addition, a simple lithographic method is proposed for the production of the microperiodic x-ray mirrors based on the difference in the total reflection between a low-Z substrate and a high-Z film. Prototype mirrors fabricated with this method show promising characteristics in laboratory tests.

  11. Absorption and Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging in Paleontology Using Laboratory and Synchrotron Sources.

    PubMed

    Bidola, Pidassa; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Pfeiffer, Franz; Pacheco, Mírian L A F; Soriano, Carmen; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia

    2015-10-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT) is commonly used for imaging of samples in biomedical or materials science research. Owing to the ability to visualize a sample in a nondestructive way, X-ray μCT is perfectly suited to inspect fossilized specimens, which are mostly unique or rare. In certain regions of the world where important sedimentation events occurred in the Precambrian geological time, several fossilized animals are studied to understand questions related to their origin, environment, and life evolution. This article demonstrates the advantages of applying absorption and phase-contrast CT on the enigmatic fossil Corumbella werneri, one of the oldest known animals capable of building hard parts, originally discovered in Corumbá (Brazil). Different tomographic setups were tested to visualize the fossilized inner structures: a commercial laboratory-based μCT device, two synchrotron-based imaging setups using conventional absorption and propagation-based phase contrast, and a commercial X-ray microscope with a lens-coupled detector system, dedicated for radiography and tomography. Based on our results we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different imaging setups for paleontological studies.

  12. Teachable, high-content analytics for live-cell, phase contrast movies.

    PubMed

    Alworth, Samuel V; Watanabe, Hirotada; Lee, James S J

    2010-09-01

    CL-Quant is a new solution platform for broad, high-content, live-cell image analysis. Powered by novel machine learning technologies and teach-by-example interfaces, CL-Quant provides a platform for the rapid development and application of scalable, high-performance, and fully automated analytics for a broad range of live-cell microscopy imaging applications, including label-free phase contrast imaging. The authors used CL-Quant to teach off-the-shelf universal analytics, called standard recipes, for cell proliferation, wound healing, cell counting, and cell motility assays using phase contrast movies collected on the BioStation CT and BioStation IM platforms. Similar to application modules, standard recipes are intended to work robustly across a wide range of imaging conditions without requiring customization by the end user. The authors validated the performance of the standard recipes by comparing their performance with truth created manually, or by custom analytics optimized for each individual movie (and therefore yielding the best possible result for the image), and validated by independent review. The validation data show that the standard recipes' performance is comparable with the validated truth with low variation. The data validate that the CL-Quant standard recipes can provide robust results without customization for live-cell assays in broad cell types and laboratory settings. PMID:20639505

  13. Absorption and Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging in Paleontology Using Laboratory and Synchrotron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bidola, Pidassa; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Pfeiffer, Franz; Pacheco, Mirian L.A.F.; Soriano, Carmen; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia

    2015-10-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) is commonly used for imaging of samples in biomedical or materials science research. Owing to the ability to visualize a sample in a nondestructive way, X-ray CT is perfectly suited to inspect fossilized specimens, which are mostly unique or rare. In certain regions of the world where important sedimentation events occurred in the Precambrian geological time, several fossilized animals are studied to understand questions related to their origin, environment, and life evolution. This article demonstrates the advantages of applying absorption and phase-contrast CT on the enigmatic fossil Corumbella werneri, one of the oldest known animals capable of building hard parts, originally discovered in Corumba (Brazil). Different tomographic setups were tested to visualize the fossilized inner structures: a commercial laboratory-based CT device, two synchrotron-based imaging setups using conventional absorption and propagation-based phase contrast, and a commercial X-ray microscope with a lens-coupled detector system, dedicated for radiography and tomography. Based on our results we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different imaging setups for paleontological studies.

  14. Proposed Imaging of the Ultrafast Electronic Motion in Samples using X-Ray Phase Contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Gopal; Slowik, Jan Malte; Santra, Robin

    2013-03-01

    Tracing the motion of electrons has enormous relevance to understanding ubiquitous phenomena in ultrafast science, such as the dynamical evolution of the electron density during complex chemical and biological processes. Scattering of ultrashort x-ray pulses from an electronic wave packet would appear to be the most obvious approach to image the electronic motion in real time and real space with the notion that such scattering patterns, in the far-field regime, encode the instantaneous electron density of the wave packet. However, recent results by Dixit et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 109, 11 636 (2012)] have put this notion into question and have shown that the scattering in the far-field regime probes spatiotemporal density-density correlations. Here, we propose a possible way to image the instantaneous electron density of the wave packet via ultrafast x-ray phase contrast imaging. Moreover, we show that inelastic scattering processes, which plague ultrafast scattering in the far-field regime, do not contribute in ultrafast x-ray phase contrast imaging as a consequence of an interference effect. We illustrate our general findings by means of a wave packet that lies in the time and energy range of the dynamics of valence electrons in complex molecular and biological systems. This present work offers a potential to image not only instantaneous snapshots of nonstationary electron dynamics, but also the Laplacian of these snapshots which provide information about the complex bonding and topology of the charge distributions in the systems.

  15. Teachable, high-content analytics for live-cell, phase contrast movies.

    PubMed

    Alworth, Samuel V; Watanabe, Hirotada; Lee, James S J

    2010-09-01

    CL-Quant is a new solution platform for broad, high-content, live-cell image analysis. Powered by novel machine learning technologies and teach-by-example interfaces, CL-Quant provides a platform for the rapid development and application of scalable, high-performance, and fully automated analytics for a broad range of live-cell microscopy imaging applications, including label-free phase contrast imaging. The authors used CL-Quant to teach off-the-shelf universal analytics, called standard recipes, for cell proliferation, wound healing, cell counting, and cell motility assays using phase contrast movies collected on the BioStation CT and BioStation IM platforms. Similar to application modules, standard recipes are intended to work robustly across a wide range of imaging conditions without requiring customization by the end user. The authors validated the performance of the standard recipes by comparing their performance with truth created manually, or by custom analytics optimized for each individual movie (and therefore yielding the best possible result for the image), and validated by independent review. The validation data show that the standard recipes' performance is comparable with the validated truth with low variation. The data validate that the CL-Quant standard recipes can provide robust results without customization for live-cell assays in broad cell types and laboratory settings.

  16. First evidence of phase-contrast imaging with laboratory sources and active pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivo, A.; Arvanitis, C. D.; Bohndiek, S. E.; Clark, A. T.; Prydderch, M.; Turchetta, R.; Speller, R. D.

    2007-11-01

    The aim of the present work is to achieve a first step towards combining the advantages of an innovative X-ray imaging technique—phase-contrast imaging (XPCi)—with those of a new class of sensors, i.e. CMOS-based active pixel sensors (APSs). The advantages of XPCi are well known and include increased image quality and detection of details invisible to conventional techniques, with potential application fields encompassing the medical, biological, industrial and security areas. Vanilla, one of the APSs developed by the MI-3 collaboration (see http://mi3.shef.ac.uk), was thoroughly characterised and an appropriate scintillator was selected to provide X-ray sensitivity. During this process, a set of phase-contrast images of different biological samples was acquired by means of the well-established free-space propagation XPCi technique. The obtained results are very encouraging and are in optimum agreement with the predictions of a simulation recently developed by some of the authors thus further supporting its reliability. This paper presents these preliminary results in detail and discusses in brief both the background to this work and its future developments.

  17. Absorption and Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging in Paleontology Using Laboratory and Synchrotron Sources.

    PubMed

    Bidola, Pidassa; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Pfeiffer, Franz; Pacheco, Mírian L A F; Soriano, Carmen; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia

    2015-10-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT) is commonly used for imaging of samples in biomedical or materials science research. Owing to the ability to visualize a sample in a nondestructive way, X-ray μCT is perfectly suited to inspect fossilized specimens, which are mostly unique or rare. In certain regions of the world where important sedimentation events occurred in the Precambrian geological time, several fossilized animals are studied to understand questions related to their origin, environment, and life evolution. This article demonstrates the advantages of applying absorption and phase-contrast CT on the enigmatic fossil Corumbella werneri, one of the oldest known animals capable of building hard parts, originally discovered in Corumbá (Brazil). Different tomographic setups were tested to visualize the fossilized inner structures: a commercial laboratory-based μCT device, two synchrotron-based imaging setups using conventional absorption and propagation-based phase contrast, and a commercial X-ray microscope with a lens-coupled detector system, dedicated for radiography and tomography. Based on our results we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different imaging setups for paleontological studies. PMID:26306692

  18. Observation of dendritic cell morphology under light, phase-contrast or confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yuen-Fen; Leong, Chooi-Fun; Cheong, Soon-Keng

    2010-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells of the immune system. They can be generated in vitro from peripheral blood monocytes supplemented with GM-CSF, IL-4 and TNF alpha. During induction, DCs will increase in size and acquire multiple cytoplasmic projections when compared to their precursor cells such as monocytes or haematopoietic stem cells which are usually round or spherical. Morphology of DCs can be visualized by conventional light microscopy after staining or phase-contrast inverted microscopy or confocal laser scanning microscopy. In this report, we described the morphological appearances of DCs captured using the above-mentioned techniques. We found that confocal laser scanning microscopy yielded DCs images with greater details but the operating cost for such a technique is high. On the other hand, the images obtained through light microscopy after appropriate staining or phase contrast microscopy were acceptable for identification purpose. Besides, these equipments are readily available in most laboratories and the cost of operation is affordable. Nevertheless, morphological identification is just one of the methods to characterise DCs. Other methods such as phenotypic expression markers and mixed leukocyte reactions are additional tools used in the characterisation of DCs. PMID:21329180

  19. Statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm for X-ray phase-contrast CT.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Dieter; Thibault, Pierre; Fehringer, Andreas; Bech, Martin; Koehler, Thomas; Pfeiffer, Franz; Noël, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    Grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) is a promising imaging tool on the horizon for pre-clinical and clinical applications. Until now PCCT has been plagued by strong artifacts when dense materials like bones are present. In this paper, we present a new statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm which overcomes this limitation. It makes use of the fact that an X-ray interferometer provides a conventional absorption as well as a dark-field signal in addition to the phase-contrast signal. The method is based on a statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm utilizing maximum-a-posteriori principles and integrating the statistical properties of the raw data as well as information of dense objects gained from the absorption signal. Reconstruction of a pre-clinical mouse scan illustrates that artifacts caused by bones are significantly reduced and image quality is improved when employing our approach. Especially small structures, which are usually lost because of streaks, are recovered in our results. In comparison with the current state-of-the-art algorithms our approach provides significantly improved image quality with respect to quantitative and qualitative results. In summary, we expect that our new statistical iterative reconstruction method to increase the general usability of PCCT imaging for medical diagnosis apart from applications focused solely on soft tissue visualization.

  20. Early Tumor Development Captured Through Nondestructive, High Resolution Differential Phase Contrast X-ray Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Beheshti, A.; Pinzer, B. R.; McDonald, J. T.; Stampanoni, M.; Hlatky, L.

    2014-01-01

    Although a considerable amount is known about molecular dysregulations in later stages of tumor progression, much less is known about the regulated processes supporting initial tumor growth. Insight into such processes can provide a fuller understanding of carcinogenesis, with implications for cancer treatment and risk assessment. Work from our laboratory suggests that organized substructure emerges during tumor formation. The goal here was to examine the feasibility of using state-of-the-art differential phase contrast X-ray imaging to investigate density differentials that evolve during early tumor development. To this end the beamline for TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experimenTs (TOMCAT) at the Swiss Light Source was used to examine the time-dependent assembly of substructure in developing tumors. Differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging based on grating interferometry as implemented with TOMCAT, offers sensitivity to density differentials within soft tissues and a unique combination of high resolution coupled with a large field of view that permits the accommodation of larger tissue sizes (1 cm in diameter), difficult with other imaging modalities. PMID:24125488

  1. Hard X-ray phase-contrast tomography of non-homogeneous specimens: grating interferometry versus propagation-based imaging.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Yaniz, Maite; Zanette, Irene; Sarapata, Adrian; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Marschner, Mathias; Chabior, Michael; Olbinado, Margie; Pfeiffer, Franz; Rack, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is an effective approach to drastically increase the contrast and sensitivity of microtomographic techniques. Numerous approaches to depict the real part of the complex-valued refractive index of a specimen are nowadays available. A comparative study using experimental data from grating-based interferometry and propagation-based phase contrast combined with single-distance phase retrieval applied to a non-homogeneous sample is presented (acquired at beamline ID19-ESRF). It is shown that grating-based interferometry can handle density gradients in a superior manner. The study underlines the complementarity of the two techniques for practical applications. PMID:27577776

  2. Temporal expectation enhances contrast sensitivity by phase entrainment of low-frequency oscillations in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    CRAVO, André M.; ROHENKOHL, Gustavo; WYART, Valentin; NOBRE, Anna C.

    2013-01-01

    Although it is increasingly accepted that temporal expectation can modulate early perceptual processing, the underlying neural computations remain unknown. In the present study, we combined a psychophysical paradigm with electrophysiological recordings to investigate the putative contribution of low-frequency oscillatory activity in mediating the modulation of visual perception by temporal expectation. Human participants judged the orientation of brief targets (visual Gabor patterns tilted clockwise or counter-clockwise) embedded within temporally regular or irregular streams of noise-patches used as temporal cues. Psychophysical results indicated that temporal expectation enhanced the contrast sensitivity of visual targets. A diffusion model indicated that rhythmic temporal expectation modulated the signal-to-noise gain of visual processing. The concurrent electrophysiological data revealed that the phase of delta oscillations overlying human visual cortex (1 to 4 Hz) was predictive of the quality of target processing only in regular streams of events. Moreover, in the regular condition, the optimum phase of these perception-predictive oscillations occurred in anticipation of the expected events. Together, these results show a strong correspondence between psychophysical and neurophysiological data, suggesting that the phase entrainment of low-frequency oscillations to external sensory cues can serve as an important and flexible mechanism for enhancing sensory processing. PMID:23447609

  3. Low-dose phase contrast tomography with conventional x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, C. K. Endrizzi, M.; Diemoz, P. C.; Olivo, A.; Munro, P. R. T.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) method has been recently further developed to perform tomographic and, thus, volumetric imaging. In this paper, the first tomographic EI XPCi images acquired with a conventional x-ray source at dose levels below that used for preclinical small animal imaging are presented. Methods: Two test objects, a biological sample and a custom-built phantom, were imaged with a laboratory-based EI XPCi setup in tomography mode. Tomographic maps that show the phase shift and attenuating properties of the object were reconstructed, and analyzed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and quantitative accuracy. Dose measurements using thermoluminescence devices were performed. Results: The obtained images demonstrate that phase based imaging methods can provide superior results compared to attenuation based modalities for weakly attenuating samples also in 3D. Moreover, and, most importantly, they demonstrate the feasibility of low-dose imaging. In addition, the experimental results can be considered quantitative within the constraints imposed by polychromaticity. Conclusions: The results, together with the method's dose efficiency and compatibility with conventional x-ray sources, indicate that tomographic EI XPCi can become an important tool for the routine imaging of biomedical samples.

  4. Optimization of propagation-based phase-contrast imaging at a laboratory setup.

    PubMed

    Bidola, Pidassa M; Zanette, Irene; Achterhold, Klaus; Holzner, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-11-16

    Single distance X-ray propagation-based phase-contrast imaging is considered as a simple method compared to those requiring additional precise instruments and sophisticated algorithms to retrieve phase images. It requires, however, a modicum of conditions within the setup which include partial coherence and small pixel size at the sample position. While these conditions are usually satisfied at synchrotron light sources, they are not always satisfied within laboratory setups. In fact, these setups are limited by the size of the polychromatic source that directly influences the partial coherence of the beam, the propagation distance and the photon flux. A prior knowledge of the sample refractive index, namely the ratio of delta (δ) and beta (β) values, are also essential for the phase retrieval but this method is powerful in the presence of noise compared to absorption-based imaging. An investigation of the feasibility and the efficient applicability of this method in a commercially available X-ray microscope is conducted in this work. PMID:26698481

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Vortical Blood Flow in the Thoracic Aorta Using 4D Phase Contrast MRI

    PubMed Central

    von Spiczak, Jochen; Crelier, Gerard; Giese, Daniel; Kozerke, Sebastian; Maintz, David; Bunck, Alexander Christian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Phase contrast MRI allows for the examination of complex hemodynamics in the heart and adjacent great vessels. Vortex flow patterns seem to play an important role in certain vascular pathologies. We propose two- and three-dimensional metrics for the objective quantification of aortic vortex blood flow in 4D phase contrast MRI. Materials and Methods For two-dimensional vorticity assessment, a standardized set of 6 regions-of-interest (ROIs) was defined throughout the course of the aorta. For each ROI, a heatmap of time-resolved vorticity values ω→=∇v→ was computed. Evolution of minimum, maximum, and average values as well as opposing rotational flow components were analyzed. For three-dimensional analysis, vortex core detection was implemented combining the predictor-corrector method with λ2 correction. Strength, elongation, and radial expansion of the detected vortex core were recorded over time. All methods were applied to 4D flow MRI datasets of 9 healthy subjects, 2 patients with mildly dilated aorta, and 1 patient with aortic aneurysm. Results Vorticity quantification in the 6 standardized ROIs enabled the description of physiological vortex flow in the healthy aorta. Helical flow developed early in the ascending aorta (absolute vorticity = 166.4±86.4 s-1 at 12% of cardiac cycle) followed by maximum values in mid-systole in the aortic arch (240.1±45.2 s-1 at 16%). Strength, elongation, and radial expansion of 3D vortex cores escalated in early systole, reaching a peak in mid systole (strength = 241.2±30.7 s-1 at 17%, elongation = 65.1±34.6 mm at 18%, expansion = 80.1±48.8 mm2 at 20%), before all three parameters similarly decreased to overall low values in diastole. Flow patterns were considerably altered in patient data: Vortex flow developed late in mid/end-systole close to the aortic bulb and no physiological helix was found in the aortic arch. Conclusions We have introduced objective measures for quantification of vortical flow in

  6. Measurements and simulations analysing the noise behaviour of grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, T.; Bartl, P.; Durst, J.; Haas, W.; Michel, T.; Ritter, A.; Anton, G.

    2011-08-01

    In the last decades, phase-contrast imaging using a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer is possible even with a low-brilliance X-ray source. With the potential of increasing the soft-tissue contrast, this method is on its way into medical imaging. For this purpose, the knowledge of the underlying physics of this technique is necessary.With this paper, we would like to contribute to the understanding of grating-based phase-contrast imaging by presenting results on measurements and simulations regarding the noise behaviour of the differential phases.These measurements were done using a microfocus X-ray tube with a hybrid, photon-counting, semiconductor Medipix2 detector. The additional simulations were performed by our in-house developed phase-contrast simulation tool “SPHINX”, combining both wave and particle contributions of the simulated photons.The results obtained by both of these methods show the same behaviour. Increasing the number of photons leads to a linear decrease of the standard deviation of the phase. The number of used phase steps has no influence on the standard deviation, if the total number of photons is held constant.Furthermore, the probability density function (pdf) of the reconstructed differential phases was analysed. It turned out that the so-called von Mises distribution is the physically correct pdf, which was also confirmed by measurements.This information advances the understanding of grating-based phase-contrast imaging and can be used to improve image quality.

  7. Single-image phase retrieval using an edge illumination X-ray phase-contrast imaging setup

    PubMed Central

    Diemoz, Paul C.; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Endrizzi, Marco; Coan, Paola; Brun, Emmanuel; Wagner, Ulrich H.; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian K.; Bravin, Alberto; Olivo, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed which enables the retrieval of the thickness or of the projected electron density of a sample from a single input image acquired with an edge illumination phase-contrast imaging setup. The method assumes the case of a quasi-homogeneous sample, i.e. a sample with a constant ratio between the real and imaginary parts of its complex refractive index. Compared with current methods based on combining two edge illumination images acquired in different configurations of the setup, this new approach presents advantages in terms of simplicity of acquisition procedure and shorter data collection time, which are very important especially for applications such as computed tomography and dynamical imaging. Furthermore, the fact that phase information is directly extracted, instead of its derivative, can enable a simpler image interpretation and be beneficial for subsequent processing such as segmentation. The method is first theoretically derived and its conditions of applicability defined. Quantitative accuracy in the case of homogeneous objects as well as enhanced image quality for the imaging of complex biological samples are demonstrated through experiments at two synchrotron radiation facilities. The large range of applicability, the robustness against noise and the need for only one input image suggest a high potential for investigations in various research subjects. PMID:26134813

  8. Revealing letters in rolled Herculaneum papyri by X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocella, Vito; Brun, Emmanuel; Ferrero, Claudio; Delattre, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of papyrus rolls, buried by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD and belonging to the only library passed on from Antiquity, were discovered 260 years ago at Herculaneum. These carbonized papyri are extremely fragile and are inevitably damaged or destroyed in the process of trying to open them to read their contents. In recent years, new imaging techniques have been developed to read the texts without unwrapping the rolls. Until now, specialists have been unable to view the carbon-based ink of these papyri, even when they could penetrate the different layers of their spiral structure. Here for the first time, we show that X-ray phase-contrast tomography can reveal various letters hidden inside the precious papyri without unrolling them. This attempt opens up new opportunities to read many Herculaneum papyri, which are still rolled up, thus enhancing our knowledge of ancient Greek literature and philosophy.

  9. Real-time measurement of alveolar size and population using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Andrew F.T.; Buckley, Genevieve A.; Paganin, David M.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Wallace, Megan J.; Kitchen, Marcus J.

    2014-01-01

    Herein a propagation-based phase contrast x-ray imaging technique for measuring particle size and number is presented. This is achieved with an algorithm that utilizes the Fourier space signature of the speckle pattern associated with the images of particles. We validate this algorithm using soda-lime glass particles, demonstrating its effectiveness on random and non-randomly packed particles. This technique is then applied to characterise lung alveoli, which are difficult to measure dynamically in vivo with current imaging modalities due to inadequate temporal resolution and/or depth of penetration and field-of-view. We obtain an important result in that our algorithm is able to measure changes in alveolar size on the micron scale during ventilation and shows the presence of alveolar recruitment/de-recruitment in newborn rabbit kittens. This technique will be useful for ventilation management and lung diagnostic procedures. PMID:25426328

  10. Feedback control of an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate using phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szigeti, S. S.; Hush, M. R.; Carvalho, A. R. R.; Hope, J. J.

    2010-10-01

    The linewidth of an atom laser is limited by density fluctuations in the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) from which the atom laser beam is outcoupled. In this paper we show that a stable spatial mode for an interacting BEC can be generated using a realistic control scheme that includes the effects of the measurement backaction. This model extends the feedback theory, based on a phase-contrast imaging setup, presented by Szigeti, Hush, Carvalho, and Hope [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.80.013614 80, 013614 (2009)]. In particular, it is applicable to a BEC with large interatomic interactions and solves the problem of inadequacy of the mean-field (coherent state) approximation by utilizing a fixed number state approximation. Our numerical analysis shows the control to be more effective for a condensate with a large nonlinearity.

  11. Revealing letters in rolled Herculaneum papyri by X-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Mocella, Vito; Brun, Emmanuel; Ferrero, Claudio; Delattre, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of papyrus rolls, buried by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD and belonging to the only library passed on from Antiquity, were discovered 260 years ago at Herculaneum. These carbonized papyri are extremely fragile and are inevitably damaged or destroyed in the process of trying to open them to read their contents. In recent years, new imaging techniques have been developed to read the texts without unwrapping the rolls. Until now, specialists have been unable to view the carbon-based ink of these papyri, even when they could penetrate the different layers of their spiral structure. Here for the first time, we show that X-ray phase-contrast tomography can reveal various letters hidden inside the precious papyri without unrolling them. This attempt opens up new opportunities to read many Herculaneum papyri, which are still rolled up, thus enhancing our knowledge of ancient Greek literature and philosophy.

  12. Phase Contrast X-Ray Synchrotron Microtomography for Virtual Dissection of the Head of Rhodnius prolixus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sena, G.; Almeida, A. P.; Braz, D.; Nogueira, L. P.; Colaço, M. V.; Soares, J.; Cardoso, S. C.; Garcia, E. S.; Azambuja, P.; Gonzalez, M. S.; Mohammadi, S.; Tromba, G.; Barroso, R. C.

    2014-04-01

    Phase Contrast X-Ray Synchroton Microtomography is a non-destructive technique that allows the microanatomical investigations of Rhodnius prolixus, one of the most important insect vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi. In this work complete series of virtual thin sections through the heads of selected Rhodnius prolixus were obtained. The sections of the head were important to compare the difference in use the spatial resolution of 2 μm or 4.5 μm and to see anatomical details that couldn't be seen with other technique. Three different groups of Rhodnius prolixus were used. One group was fed with defibrinated rabbit blood and after 10 days was sacrificed, other group was sacrificed 4 days after feeding and the last group remained unfed. The results show some differences for each kind of groups and for the different resolutions.

  13. An algebraic iterative reconstruction technique for differential X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Schleede, Simone; Tan, Renbo; Chen, Liyuan; Bech, Martin; Achterhold, Klaus; Gifford, Martin; Loewen, Rod; Ruth, Ronald; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2013-09-01

    Iterative reconstruction has a wide spectrum of proven advantages in the field of conventional X-ray absorption-based computed tomography (CT). In this paper, we report on an algebraic iterative reconstruction technique for grating-based differential phase-contrast CT (DPC-CT). Due to the differential nature of DPC-CT projections, a differential operator and a smoothing operator are added to the iterative reconstruction, compared to the one commonly used for absorption-based CT data. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured at a two-grating interferometer setup. Since the algorithm is easy to implement and allows for the extension to various regularization possibilities, we expect a significant impact of the method for improving future medical and industrial DPC-CT applications.

  14. Asymmetric masks for laboratory-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging with edge illumination

    PubMed Central

    Endrizzi, Marco; Astolfo, Alberto; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Millard, Thomas P.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We report on an asymmetric mask concept that enables X-ray phase-contrast imaging without requiring any movement in the system during data acquisition. The method is compatible with laboratory equipment, namely a commercial detector and a rotating anode tube. The only motion required is that of the object under investigation which is scanned through the imaging system. Two proof-of-principle optical elements were designed, fabricated and experimentally tested. Quantitative measurements on samples of known shape and composition were compared to theory with good agreement. The method is capable of measuring the attenuation, refraction and (ultra-small-angle) X-ray scattering, does not have coherence requirements and naturally adapts to all those situations in which the X-ray image is obtained by scanning a sample through the imaging system. PMID:27145924

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging by using phase-contrast MR technique.

    PubMed

    Battal, B; Kocaoglu, M; Bulakbasi, N; Husmen, G; Tuba Sanal, H; Tayfun, C

    2011-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces include ventricles and cerebral and spinal subarachnoid spaces. CSF motion is a combined effect of CSF production rate and superimposed cardiac pulsations. Knowledge of CSF dynamics has benefited considerably from the development of phase-contrast (PC) MRI. There are several disorders such as communicating and non-communicating hydrocephalus, Chiari malformation, syringomyelic cyst and arachnoid cyst that can change the CSF dynamics. The aims of this pictorial review are to outline the PC MRI technique, CSF physiology and cerebrospinal space anatomy, to describe a group of congenital and acquired disorders that can alter the CSF dynamics, and to assess the use of PC MRI in the assessment of various central nervous system abnormalities. PMID:21586507

  16. Asymmetric masks for laboratory-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging with edge illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endrizzi, Marco; Astolfo, Alberto; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Millard, Thomas P.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    We report on an asymmetric mask concept that enables X-ray phase-contrast imaging without requiring any movement in the system during data acquisition. The method is compatible with laboratory equipment, namely a commercial detector and a rotating anode tube. The only motion required is that of the object under investigation which is scanned through the imaging system. Two proof-of-principle optical elements were designed, fabricated and experimentally tested. Quantitative measurements on samples of known shape and composition were compared to theory with good agreement. The method is capable of measuring the attenuation, refraction and (ultra-small-angle) X-ray scattering, does not have coherence requirements and naturally adapts to all those situations in which the X-ray image is obtained by scanning a sample through the imaging system.

  17. Real-time contrast-enhanced holographic imaging using phase coherent photorefractive quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Dongol, A; Thompson, J; Schmitzer, H; Tierney, D; Wagner, H P

    2015-05-18

    We demonstrate wide-field real-time and depth-resolved contrast enhanced holographic imaging (CEHI) using the all-optical phase coherent photorefractive effect in ZnSe quantum wells. Moving objects are imaged at large depth-of-field by the local enhancement of a static reference hologram. The high refresh rate of the holographic films enables direct-to-video monitoring of floating glass beads and of living Paramecium and Euglena cells moving in water. Depth resolution is achieved by tilting the incident laser beam with respect to the normal of the cuvette. This creates double images of the objects, which are analyzed geometrically and with Fresnel diffraction theory. A two-color CEHI set-up further enables the visualization of a concealed 95 µm thick wire behind a thin layer of chicken skin. PMID:26074534

  18. High-resolution phase contrast imaging of brittle failure during impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Kyle; Jensen, Brian; Shengnian, Luo; Hooks, Daniel; Yeager, John; Kwiatkowski, Kris; Shimada, Tsutomu; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2012-02-01

    Heterogeneous processes involved in brittle failure necessitate in situ, spatially resolved observation. An impact capability has recently been developed in which synchrotron phase contrast imaging (PCI), at the 32-ID beamline of the Advanced Photon Source, can be used to resolve crack interfaces during dynamic deformation. The imaging is both fast and high-resolution as images with approximately 3 micrometer resolution are obtained from single x-ray pulses (<100 ps duration). Experiments have been performed to investigate questions regarding velocimetry interpretation, the effect of stress states, and whether cracking can occur under uniaxial compression. Uniaxial compression and tension in planar impact configurations and cylindrical impact penetration has been used to vary stress states and observe failure. PCI and velocimetry results from these experiments will be presented for a range of brittle materials spanning glasses and ceramics.

  19. Low magnification differential phase contrast imaging of electric fields in crystals with fine electron probes.

    PubMed

    Taplin, D J; Shibata, N; Weyland, M; Findlay, S D

    2016-10-01

    To correlate atomistic structure with longer range electric field distribution within materials, it is necessary to use atomically fine electron probes and specimens in on-axis orientation. However, electric field mapping via low magnification differential phase contrast imaging under these conditions raises challenges: electron scattering tends to reduce the beam deflection due to the electric field strength from what simple models predict, and other effects, most notably crystal mistilt, can lead to asymmetric intensity redistribution in the diffraction pattern which is difficult to distinguish from that produced by long range electric fields. Using electron scattering simulations, we explore the effects of such factors on the reliable interpretation and measurement of electric field distributions. In addition to these limitations of principle, some limitations of practice when seeking to perform such measurements using segmented detector systems are also discussed.

  20. Non-invasive classification of microcalcifications with phase-contrast X-ray mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhentian; Hauser, Nik; Singer, Gad; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Schneider, Christof W.; Stampanoni, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Microcalcifications can be indicative in the diagnosis of early breast cancer. Here we report a non-invasive diagnostic method that may potentially distinguish between different types of microcalcifications using X-ray phase-contrast imaging. Our approach exploits the complementary nature of the absorption and small-angle scattering signals of microcalcifications, obtained simultaneously with an X-ray grating interferometer on a conventional X-ray tube. We demonstrate that the new approach has 100% sensitivity and specificity when applied to phantom data, and we provide evidence of the solidity of the technique by showing its discrimination power when applied to fixed biopsies, to non-fixed tissue specimens and to fresh, whole-breast samples. The proposed method might be further developed to improve early breast cancer diagnosis and has the potential to increase the diagnostic accuracy and reduce the number of uncomfortable breast biopsies, or, in case of widespread microcalcifications, to select the biopsy site before intervention.

  1. Note: Gratings on low absorbing substrates for x-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, F. J.; Schröter, T. J.; Kunka, D.; Meyer, P.; Meiser, J.; Faisal, A.; Khalil, M. I.; Birnbacher, L.; Viermetz, M.; Walter, M.; Schulz, J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Mohr, J.

    2015-12-01

    Grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging is on the verge of being applied in clinical settings. To achieve this goal, compact setups with high sensitivity and dose efficiency are necessary. Both can be increased by eliminating unwanted absorption in the beam path, which is mainly due to the grating substrates. Fabrication of gratings via deep X-ray lithography can address this issue by replacing the commonly used silicon substrate with materials with lower X-ray absorption that fulfill certain boundary conditions. Gratings were produced on both graphite and polymer substrates without compromising on structure quality. These gratings were tested in a three-grating setup with a source operated at 40 kVp and lead to an increase in the detector photon count rate of almost a factor of 4 compared to a set of gratings on silicon substrates. As the visibility was hardly affected, this corresponds to a significant increase in sensitivity and therefore dose efficiency.

  2. Revealing letters in rolled Herculaneum papyri by X-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Mocella, Vito; Brun, Emmanuel; Ferrero, Claudio; Delattre, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of papyrus rolls, buried by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD and belonging to the only library passed on from Antiquity, were discovered 260 years ago at Herculaneum. These carbonized papyri are extremely fragile and are inevitably damaged or destroyed in the process of trying to open them to read their contents. In recent years, new imaging techniques have been developed to read the texts without unwrapping the rolls. Until now, specialists have been unable to view the carbon-based ink of these papyri, even when they could penetrate the different layers of their spiral structure. Here for the first time, we show that X-ray phase-contrast tomography can reveal various letters hidden inside the precious papyri without unrolling them. This attempt opens up new opportunities to read many Herculaneum papyri, which are still rolled up, thus enhancing our knowledge of ancient Greek literature and philosophy. PMID:25603114

  3. Real-time contrast-enhanced holographic imaging using phase coherent photorefractive quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Dongol, A; Thompson, J; Schmitzer, H; Tierney, D; Wagner, H P

    2015-05-18

    We demonstrate wide-field real-time and depth-resolved contrast enhanced holographic imaging (CEHI) using the all-optical phase coherent photorefractive effect in ZnSe quantum wells. Moving objects are imaged at large depth-of-field by the local enhancement of a static reference hologram. The high refresh rate of the holographic films enables direct-to-video monitoring of floating glass beads and of living Paramecium and Euglena cells moving in water. Depth resolution is achieved by tilting the incident laser beam with respect to the normal of the cuvette. This creates double images of the objects, which are analyzed geometrically and with Fresnel diffraction theory. A two-color CEHI set-up further enables the visualization of a concealed 95 µm thick wire behind a thin layer of chicken skin.

  4. Theory of single-shot phase contrast imaging in spinor Bose-Einstein condensates.

    PubMed

    Ilo-Okeke, Ebubechukwu O; Byrnes, Tim

    2014-06-13

    We introduce a theoretical framework for single-shot phase contrast imaging (PCI) measurements of spinor Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). Our model allows for the simple calculation of the quantum backaction resulting from the measurement, and the amount of information that is read out. We find that there is an optimum time Gτ ∼ 1/N for the light-matter interaction (G is the ac Stark shift frequency, N is the number of particles in the BEC), where the maximum amount of information can be read out from the BEC. A universal information-disturbance tradeoff law ε(F)ε(G) ∝ 1/N(2) is found where ε(F) is the amount of backaction and ε(G) is the estimation error. The PCI measurement can also be found to be a direct probe of the quantum fluctuations of the BEC, via the noise of the PCI signal.

  5. Phase contrast x-ray velocimetry of small animal lungs: optimising imaging rates

    PubMed Central

    Murrie, R. P.; Paganin, D. M.; Fouras, A.; Morgan, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases affect a vast portion of the world’s population. One of the key difficulties in accurately diagnosing and treating chronic lung disease is our inability to measure dynamic motion of the lungs in vivo. Phase contrast x-ray imaging (PCXI) allows us to image the lungs in high resolution by exploiting the difference in refractive indices between tissue and air. Combining PCXI with x-ray velocimetry (XV) allows us to track the local motion of the lungs, improving our ability to locate small regions of disease under natural ventilation conditions. Via simulation, we investigate the optimal imaging speed and sequence to capture lung motion in vivo in small animals using XV on both synchrotron and laboratory x-ray sources, balancing the noise inherent in a short exposure with motion blur that results from a long exposure. PMID:26819819

  6. Note: Gratings on low absorbing substrates for x-ray phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, F. J. Schröter, T. J.; Kunka, D.; Meyer, P.; Meiser, J.; Faisal, A.; Khalil, M. I.; Mohr, J.; Birnbacher, L.; Viermetz, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Walter, M.; Schulz, J.

    2015-12-15

    Grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging is on the verge of being applied in clinical settings. To achieve this goal, compact setups with high sensitivity and dose efficiency are necessary. Both can be increased by eliminating unwanted absorption in the beam path, which is mainly due to the grating substrates. Fabrication of gratings via deep X-ray lithography can address this issue by replacing the commonly used silicon substrate with materials with lower X-ray absorption that fulfill certain boundary conditions. Gratings were produced on both graphite and polymer substrates without compromising on structure quality. These gratings were tested in a three-grating setup with a source operated at 40 kVp and lead to an increase in the detector photon count rate of almost a factor of 4 compared to a set of gratings on silicon substrates. As the visibility was hardly affected, this corresponds to a significant increase in sensitivity and therefore dose efficiency.

  7. Primary ciliary dyskinesia assessment by means of optical flow analysis of phase-contrast microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Parrilla, Eduardo; Armengot, Miguel; Mata, Manuel; Sánchez-Vílchez, José Manuel; Cortijo, Julio; Hueso, José L; Riera, Jaime; Moratal, David

    2014-04-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia implies cilia with defective or total absence of motility, which may result in sinusitis, chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis and male infertility. Diagnosis can be difficult and is based on an abnormal ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and beat pattern. In this paper, we present a method to determine CBF of isolated cells through the analysis of phase-contrast microscopy images, estimating cilia motion by means of an optical flow algorithm. After having analyzed 28 image sequences (14 with a normal beat pattern and 14 with a dyskinetic pattern), the normal group presented a CBF of 5.2 ± 1.6 Hz, while the dyskinetic patients presented a 1.9 ± 0.9 Hz CBF. The cutoff value to classify a dyskinetic specimen was set to 3.45 Hz (sensitivity 0.86, specificity 0.93). The presented methodology has provided excellent results to objectively diagnose PCD. PMID:24438822

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging by using phase-contrast MR technique

    PubMed Central

    Battal, B; Kocaoglu, M; Bulakbasi, N; Husmen, G; Tuba Sanal, H; Tayfun, C

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces include ventricles and cerebral and spinal subarachnoid spaces. CSF motion is a combined effect of CSF production rate and superimposed cardiac pulsations. Knowledge of CSF dynamics has benefited considerably from the development of phase-contrast (PC) MRI. There are several disorders such as communicating and non-communicating hydrocephalus, Chiari malformation, syringomyelic cyst and arachnoid cyst that can change the CSF dynamics. The aims of this pictorial review are to outline the PC MRI technique, CSF physiology and cerebrospinal space anatomy, to describe a group of congenital and acquired disorders that can alter the CSF dynamics, and to assess the use of PC MRI in the assessment of various central nervous system abnormalities. PMID:21586507

  9. Phase-contrast imaging with a novel X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yumiko; Kuwada, Takao; Sakai, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Yasushi; Nakao, Keisuke; Nogami, Kyoko; Imagaki, Manabu; Tanaka, Toshinari; Hayakawa, Ken; Sato, Isamu

    2010-04-06

    A novel X-ray source based on Parametric X-ray radiation (PXR) has been employed for phase-contrast imaging at the Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application (LEBRA), Nihon University, Japan. The PXR X-rays were generated by the 100 MeV electron beam passing through a Si single crystal. The X-rays in the 16approx34 keV range were chosen for imaging of biological samples. The quasi-monochromatic, tunable, and coherent X-ray source is appropriate for this application. In addition, the large X-ray beam irradiation field of approximately 100 mm in diameter, which was achieved without special optics, suggests that the PXR is applicable to imaging for medical diagnostics.

  10. Interpretation of Line-Integrated Signals from 2-D Phase Contrast Imaging on LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Clive; Tanaka, Kenji; Vyacheslavov, Leonid; Sanin, Andrei; Kawahata, Kazuo; Okajima, S.

    Two dimensional (2D) phase contrast imaging (PCI) is an excellent method to measure core and edge turbulence with good spatial resolution (Δρ ˜ 0.1). General analytical consideration is given to the signal interpretation of the line-integrated signals, with specific application to images from 2D PCI. It is shown that the Fourier components of fluctuations having any non-zero component propagating along the line of sight are not detected. The ramifications of this constraint are discussed, including consideration of the angle between the sight line and flux surface normal. In the experimental geometry, at the point where the flux surfaces are tangent to the sight line, it is shown that it may be possible to detect large poloidally extended (though with small radial wavelength) structures, such as GAMS. The spatial localization technique of this diagnostic is illustrated with experimental data.

  11. Phase-Contrast Optical Coherence Tomography: A New Technique for Non-Invasive Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Daniel M.; Fingler, Jeff; Kim, Dae Yu; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Morse, Lawrence S.; Park, Susanna S.; Fraser, Scott E.; Werner, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Phase-contrast optical coherence tomography (PC-OCT) provides volumetric imaging of the retinal vasculature without the need for intravenous injection of a fluorophore. Here, we compare images from PC-OCT and fluorescein angiography (FA) for normal individuals and patients with age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Design This is an evaluation of a diagnostic technology. Participants 4 patients underwent comparative retinovascular imaging using FA and PC-OCT. Imaging was performed on 1 normal individual, 1 patient with dry age-related macular degeneration, 1 patient with exudative age-related macular degeneration and 1 patient with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Methods FA imaging was performed using a Topcon (TRC-50IX) camera having resolution of 1280 (H) x 1024 (V) pixels. PC-OCT images were generated by software data processing of the entire cross-sectional image from consecutively acquired B-scans. Bulk axial motion was calculated and corrected for each transverse location, reducing the phase noise introduced from eye motion. Phase contrast was calculated through the variance of the motion-corrected phase changes acquired within multiple B-scans at the same position. Repeating these calculations over the entire volumetric scan produced a three-dimensional PC-OCT representation of the vasculature. Main Outcome Measures Feasibility of rendering retinal and choroidal microvasculature using PC-OCT was compared qualitatively to FA, the current gold standard for retinovascular imaging. Results PC-OCT rendered a two-dimensional depth color-coded vasculature map of the retinal and choroidal vasculature non-invasively. The choriocapillaris was imaged with better resolution of microvascular detail using PC-OCT. Areas of geographic atrophy and choroidal neovascularization imaged by FA were depicted by PC-OCT. Regions of capillary non-perfusion from diabetic retinopathy were shown by both imaging techniques; there was not complete

  12. Talbot phase-contrast x-ray imaging for the small joints of the hand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutman, Dan; Beck, Thomas J.; Carrino, John A.; Bingham, Clifton O.

    2011-09-01

    A high-resolution radiographic method for soft tissues in the small joints of the hand would aid in the study and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), which often attacks these joints. Of particular interest would be imaging with <100 µm resolution the joint cartilage, whose integrity is a main indicator of disease. Differential phase-contrast (DPC) or refraction-based x-ray imaging with Talbot grating interferometers could provide such a method, since it enhances soft tissue contrast and can be implemented with conventional x-ray tubes. A numerical joint phantom was first developed to assess the angular sensitivity and spectrum needed for a hand DPC system. The model predicts that, due to quite similar refraction indexes for joint soft tissues, the refraction effects are very small, requiring high angular resolution. To compare our model to experiment we built a high-resolution bench-top interferometer using 10 µm period gratings, a W anode tube and a CCD-based detector. Imaging experiments on animal cartilage and on a human finger support the model predictions. For instance, the estimated difference between the index of refraction of cartilage and water is of only several percent at ~25 keV mean energy, comparable to that between the linear attenuation coefficients. The potential advantage of DPC imaging thus comes mainly from the edge enhancement at the soft tissue interfaces. Experiments using a cadaveric human finger are also qualitatively consistent with the joint model, showing that refraction contrast is dominated by tendon embedded in muscle, with the cartilage layer difficult to observe in our conditions. Nevertheless, the model predicts that a DPC radiographic system for the small hand joints of the hand could be feasible using a low energy quasi-monochromatic source, such as a K-edge filtered Rh or Mo tube, in conjunction with a ~2 m long 'symmetric' interferometer operated in a high Talbot order.

  13. Analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging system using a micro focus x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wei; Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-08-15

    Here we describe a new in-laboratory analyzer based phase contrast-imaging (ABI) instrument using a conventional X-ray tube source (CXS) aimed at bio-medical imaging applications. Phase contrast-imaging allows visualization of soft tissue details usually obscured in conventional X-ray imaging. The ABI system design and major features are described in detail. The key advantage of the presented system, over the few existing CXS ABI systems, is that it does not require high precision components, i.e., CXS, X-ray detector, and electro-mechanical components. To overcome a main problem introduced by these components, identified as temperature stability, the system components are kept at a constant temperature inside of three enclosures, thus minimizing the electrical and mechanical thermal drifts. This is achieved by using thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling/heating modules that are easy to control precisely. For CXS we utilized a microfocus X-ray source with tungsten (W) anode material. In addition the proposed system eliminates tungsten's multiple spectral lines by selecting monochromator crystal size appropriately therefore eliminating need for the costly mismatched, two-crystal monochromator. The system imaging was fine-tuned for tungsten Kα{sub 1} line with the energy of 59.3 keV since it has been shown to be of great clinical significance by a number of researchers at synchrotron facilities. In this way a laboratory system that can be used for evaluating and quantifying tissue properties, initially explored at synchrotron facilities, would be of great interest to a larger research community. To demonstrate the imaging capability of our instrument we use a chicken thigh tissue sample.

  14. In vivo imaging of rat cortical bone porosity by synchrotron phase contrast micro computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, I. V.; Belev, G.; Zhu, N.; Chapman, L. D.; Cooper, D. M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical bone is a dynamic tissue which undergoes adaptive and pathological changes throughout life. Direct longitudinal tracking of this remodeling process holds great promise for improving our understanding of bone development, maintenance and senescence. The application of in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has enabled longitudinal tracking of trabecular bone microarchitecture with commercially available scanners generally operating in the 10-20 µm voxel range with absorbed doses reported between 0.5 and 1 Gy. Imaging of cortical bone microarchitecture (porosity) requires higher resolution and thus in vivo imaging of these structures has not been achieved due to excessive radiation dose. In this study we tested the hypothesis that synchrotron propagation phase contrast micro-CT can enable in vivo imaging of cortical porosity in rats at doses comparable to those currently employed for trabecular bone imaging. Synchrotron imaging experiments were conducted at the Canadian Light Source using the bending magnet beamline of the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility. Protocol optimization (propagation distance, projection number) was conducted ex vivo on rat (Sprague-Dawley) forelimbs with dose determined by ion chamber and lithium fluoride crystal thermoluminescent dosimeters. Comparative ex vivo imaging was performed using laboratory in vivo scanning systems, identifying a range of doses between 1.2-3.6 Gy for common protocols. A final in vivo synchrotron protocol involving a 2.5 Gy dose was implemented with live rats. The resulting images demonstrated improved delineation of cortical porosity through the improved edge enhancement effect of phase contrast, opening the door to novel experimental studies involving the longitudinal tracking of remodeling.

  15. In vivo imaging of rat cortical bone porosity by synchrotron phase contrast micro computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Pratt, I V; Belev, G; Zhu, N; Chapman, L D; Cooper, D M L

    2015-01-01

    Cortical bone is a dynamic tissue which undergoes adaptive and pathological changes throughout life. Direct longitudinal tracking of this remodeling process holds great promise for improving our understanding of bone development, maintenance and senescence. The application of in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has enabled longitudinal tracking of trabecular bone microarchitecture with commercially available scanners generally operating in the 10-20 µm voxel range with absorbed doses reported between 0.5 and 1 Gy. Imaging of cortical bone microarchitecture (porosity) requires higher resolution and thus in vivo imaging of these structures has not been achieved due to excessive radiation dose. In this study we tested the hypothesis that synchrotron propagation phase contrast micro-CT can enable in vivo imaging of cortical porosity in rats at doses comparable to those currently employed for trabecular bone imaging. Synchrotron imaging experiments were conducted at the Canadian Light Source using the bending magnet beamline of the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility. Protocol optimization (propagation distance, projection number) was conducted ex vivo on rat (Sprague-Dawley) forelimbs with dose determined by ion chamber and lithium fluoride crystal thermoluminescent dosimeters. Comparative ex vivo imaging was performed using laboratory in vivo scanning systems, identifying a range of doses between 1.2-3.6 Gy for common protocols. A final in vivo synchrotron protocol involving a 2.5 Gy dose was implemented with live rats. The resulting images demonstrated improved delineation of cortical porosity through the improved edge enhancement effect of phase contrast, opening the door to novel experimental studies involving the longitudinal tracking of remodeling. PMID:25489926

  16. X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging of Calcified Tissue and Biomaterial Structure in Bioreactor Engineered Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Alyssa A.; Larson, Jeffery C.; Garson, III, Alfred B.; Guan, Huifeng; Zhong, Zhong; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc; Fisher, John P.; Anastasio, Mark A.; Brey, Eric M.

    2014-11-04

    Tissues engineered in bioreactor systems have been used clinically to replace damaged tissues and organs. In addition, these systems are under continued development for many tissue engineering applications. The ability to quantitatively assess material structure and tissue formation is critical for evaluating bioreactor efficacy and for preimplantation assessment of tissue quality. These techniques allow for the nondestructive and longitudinal monitoring of large engineered tissues within the bioreactor systems and will be essential for the translation of these strategies to viable clinical therapies. X-ray Phase Contrast (XPC) imaging techniques have shown tremendous promise for a number of biomedical applications owing to their ability to provide image contrast based on multiple X-ray properties, including absorption, refraction, and scatter. In this research, mesenchymal stem cell-seeded alginate hydrogels were prepared and cultured under osteogenic conditions in a perfusion bioreactor. The constructs were imaged at various time points using XPC microcomputed tomography (µCT). Imaging was performed with systems using both synchrotron- and tube-based X-ray sources. XPC µCT allowed for simultaneous three-dimensional (3D) quantification of hydrogel size and mineralization, as well as spatial information on hydrogel structure and mineralization. Samples were processed for histological evaluation and XPC showed similar features to histology and quantitative analysis consistent with the histomorphometry. Furthermore, these results provide evidence of the significant potential of techniques based on XPC for noninvasive 3D imaging engineered tissues grown in bioreactors.

  17. Phase change events of volatile liquid perfluorocarbon contrast agents produce unique acoustic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheeran, Paul S.; Matsunaga, Terry O.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) provide a dynamic platform to approach problems in medical ultrasound (US). Upon US-mediated activation, the liquid core vaporizes and expands to produce a gas bubble ideal for US imaging and therapy. In this study, we demonstrate through high-speed video microscopy and US interrogation that PCCAs composed of highly volatile perfluorocarbons (PFCs) exhibit unique acoustic behavior that can be detected and differentiated from standard microbubble contrast agents. Experimental results show that when activated with short pulses PCCAs will over-expand and undergo unforced radial oscillation while settling to a final bubble diameter. The size-dependent oscillation phenomenon generates a unique acoustic signal that can be passively detected in both time and frequency domain using confocal piston transducers with an ‘activate high’ (8 MHz, 2 cycles), ‘listen low’ (1 MHz) scheme. Results show that the magnitude of the acoustic ‘signature’ increases as PFC boiling point decreases. By using a band-limited spectral processing technique, the droplet signals can be isolated from controls and used to build experimental relationships between concentration and vaporization pressure. The techniques shown here may be useful for physical studies as well as development of droplet-specific imaging techniques.

  18. Single-slice reconstruction method for helical cone-beam differential phase-contrast CT.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Chen, Liyuan

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PC-CT) can provide the internal structure information of biomedical specimens with high-quality cross-section images and has become an invaluable analysis tool. Here a simple and fast reconstruction algorithm is reported for helical cone-beam differential PC-CT (DPC-CT), which is called the DPC-CB-SSRB algorithm. It combines the existing CB-SSRB method of helical cone-beam absorption-contrast CT with the differential nature of DPC imaging. The reconstruction can be performed using 2D fan-beam filtered back projection algorithm with the Hilbert imaginary filter. The quality of the results for large helical pitches is surprisingly good. In particular, with this algorithm comparable quality is obtained using helical cone-beam DPC-CT data with a normalized pitch of 10 to that obtained using the traditional inter-row interpolation reconstruction with a normalized pitch of 2. This method will push the future medical helical cone-beam DPC-CT imaging applications.

  19. Interior tomography in x-ray differential phase contrast CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Lauzier, Pascal Thériault; Qi, Zhihua; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2012-05-01

    Differential phase contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) is an x-ray imaging method that uses the wave properties of imaging photons as the contrast mechanism. It has been demonstrated that DPC images can be obtained using a conventional x-ray tube and a Talbot-Lau-type interferometer. Due to the limited size of the gratings, current data acquisition systems only offer a limited field of view, and thus are prone to data truncation. As a result, the reconstructed DPC-CT image may suffer from image artifacts and increased inaccuracy in the reconstructed image values. In this paper, we demonstrate that a small region of interest (ROI) within a large object can be accurately and stably reconstructed using fully truncated projection datasets provided that a priori information on electron density is known for a small region inside the ROI. The method reconstructs an image iteratively to satisfy a group of physical conditions by using a projection onto convex set (POCS) approach. In this work, this POCS algorithm is validated using both numerical simulations and physical phantom experimental data. In both cases, the root mean square error is reduced by an order of magnitude with respect to the truncated analytic reconstructions. Truncation artifacts observed in the latter reconstructions are eliminated using the POCS algorithm.

  20. Cantilever energy effects on bimodal AFM: phase and amplitude contrast of multicomponent samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Ishita; Yablon, Dalia G.

    2013-11-01

    Bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a recently developed technique of dynamic AFM where a higher eigenmode of the cantilever is simultaneously excited along with the fundamental eigenmode. The effects of different operating parameters while imaging an impact copolymer blend of polypropylene (PP) and ethylene-propylene (E-P) rubber in bimodal mode are explored through experiments and numerical simulations. The higher mode amplitude and phase contrasts between the two components of the sample reverse at different points as the free amplitude of the higher eigenmode is increased. Three different regimes are identified experimentally depending on the relative contrast between the PP and the E-P rubber. It is observed that the kinetic energy and free air drive input energy of the two cantilever eigenmodes play a role in determining the regimes of operation. Numerical simulations conducted with appropriate tip-sample interaction forces support the experimental results. An understanding of these regimes and the associated cantilever dynamics will guide a rational approach towards selecting appropriate operating parameters.

  1. X-ray phase contrast imaging of calcified tissue and biomaterial structure in bioreactor engineered tissues.

    PubMed

    Appel, Alyssa A; Larson, Jeffery C; Garson, Alfred B; Guan, Huifeng; Zhong, Zhong; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc B; Fisher, John P; Anastasio, Mark A; Brey, Eric M

    2015-03-01

    Tissues engineered in bioreactor systems have been used clinically to replace damaged tissues and organs. In addition, these systems are under continued development for many tissue engineering applications. The ability to quantitatively assess material structure and tissue formation is critical for evaluating bioreactor efficacy and for preimplantation assessment of tissue quality. Techniques that allow for the nondestructive and longitudinal monitoring of large engineered tissues within the bioreactor systems will be essential for the translation of these strategies to viable clinical therapies. X-ray Phase Contrast (XPC) imaging techniques have shown tremendous promise for a number of biomedical applications owing to their ability to provide image contrast based on multiple X-ray properties, including absorption, refraction, and scatter. In this research, mesenchymal stem cell-seeded alginate hydrogels were prepared and cultured under osteogenic conditions in a perfusion bioreactor. The constructs were imaged at various time points using XPC microcomputed tomography (µCT). Imaging was performed with systems using both synchrotron- and tube-based X-ray sources. XPC µCT allowed for simultaneous three-dimensional (3D) quantification of hydrogel size and mineralization, as well as spatial information on hydrogel structure and mineralization. Samples were processed for histological evaluation and XPC showed similar features to histology and quantitative analysis consistent with the histomorphometry. These results provide evidence of the significant potential of techniques based on XPC for noninvasive 3D imaging engineered tissues grown in bioreactors.

  2. Interior tomography in x-ray differential phase contrast CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thériault Lauzier, Pascal; Qi, Zhihua; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2012-05-01

    Differential phase contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) is an x-ray imaging method that uses the wave properties of imaging photons as the contrast mechanism. It has been demonstrated that DPC images can be obtained using a conventional x-ray tube and a Talbot-Lau-type interferometer. Due to the limited size of the gratings, current data acquisition systems only offer a limited field of view, and thus are prone to data truncation. As a result, the reconstructed DPC-CT image may suffer from image artifacts and increased inaccuracy in the reconstructed image values. In this paper, we demonstrate that a small region of interest (ROI) within a large object can be accurately and stably reconstructed using fully truncated projection datasets provided that a priori information on electron density is known for a small region inside the ROI. The method reconstructs an image iteratively to satisfy a group of physical conditions by using a projection onto convex set (POCS) approach. In this work, this POCS algorithm is validated using both numerical simulations and physical phantom experimental data. In both cases, the root mean square error is reduced by an order of magnitude with respect to the truncated analytic reconstructions. Truncation artifacts observed in the latter reconstructions are eliminated using the POCS algorithm.

  3. Feasibility of using energy-resolving detectors in differential phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, Pavlo

    2016-03-01

    In a common clinical setting, conventional absorption-based imaging provides relatively good contrast between bonelike and soft-tissue materials. The reliability of material differentiation, however, is hampered when materials with similar absorption properties are scanned. This problem can be addressed by utilizing a spectral imaging technique whereby multiple X-ray measurements are taken at different beam conditions. In this work, we discuss the possibility of using a spectral imaging approach in a grating-based, differential-phase contrast-imaging (DPCI) modality. Two approaches, dual exposure with a conventional flat-panel detector (FPD) and a single exposure with a photon-counting energy-resolving detector (PCD), were reviewed. The feasibility of a single-exposure DPCI and a two-bin PCD setup was assessed quantitatively by a least-squares minimization algorithm applied to an X-ray diffraction pattern. It was shown that a two-peak-shaped X-ray spectrum can allow PCDs to be placed unambiguously at single Talbot distances making it possible to simultaneously detect photons in each energy bin with comparable efficiencies. The results of this work can help build a bridge between two rapidly developing imaging modalities, X-ray spectral imaging and X-ray DPCI.

  4. Virtual unrolling and deciphering of Herculaneum papyri by X-ray phase-contrast tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bukreeva, I.; Mittone, A.; Bravin, A.; Festa, G.; Alessandrelli, M.; Coan, P.; Formoso, V.; Agostino, R. G.; Giocondo, M.; Ciuchi, F.; Fratini, M.; Massimi, L.; Lamarra, A.; Andreani, C.; Bartolino, R.; Gigli, G.; Ranocchia, G.; Cedola, A.

    2016-01-01

    A collection of more than 1800 carbonized papyri, discovered in the Roman ‘Villa dei Papiri’ at Herculaneum is the unique classical library survived from antiquity. These papyri were charred during 79 A.D. Vesuvius eruption, a circumstance which providentially preserved them until now. This magnificent collection contains an impressive amount of treatises by Greek philosophers and, especially, Philodemus of Gadara, an Epicurean thinker of 1st century BC. We read many portions of text hidden inside carbonized Herculaneum papyri using enhanced X-ray phase-contrast tomography non-destructive technique and a new set of numerical algorithms for ‘virtual-unrolling’. Our success lies in revealing the largest portion of Greek text ever detected so far inside unopened scrolls, with unprecedented spatial resolution and contrast, all without damaging these precious historical manuscripts. Parts of text have been decoded and the ‘voice’ of the Epicurean philosopher Philodemus is brought back again after 2000 years from Herculaneum papyri. PMID:27265417

  5. High-throughput, high-resolution X-ray phase contrast tomographic microscopy for visualisation of soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, S. A.; Marone, F.; Hintermüller, C.; Bensadoun, J.-C.; Aebischer, P.; Stampanoni, M.

    2009-09-01

    The use of conventional absorption based X-ray microtomography can become limited for samples showing only very weak absorption contrast. However, a wide range of samples studied in biology and materials science can produce significant phase shifts of the X-ray beam, and thus the use of the phase signal can provide substantially increased contrast and therefore new and otherwise inaccessible information. The application of two approaches for high-throughput, high-resolution X-ray phase contrast tomography, both available on the TOMCAT beamline of the SLS, is illustrated. Differential Phase Contrast (DPC) imaging uses a grating interferometer and a phase-stepping technique. It has been integrated into the beamline environment on TOMCAT in terms of the fast acquisition and reconstruction of data and the availability to scan samples within an aqueous environment. The second phase contrast approach is a modified transfer of intensity approach that can yield the 3D distribution of the phase (refractive index) of a weakly absorbing object from a single tomographic dataset. These methods are being used for the evaluation of cell integrity in 3D, with the specific aim of following and analyzing progressive cell degeneration to increase knowledge of the mechanistic events of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease.

  6. In-Line Thermoelectric Module

    SciTech Connect

    Pento, Robert; Marks, James E.; Staffanson, Clifford D.

    1998-07-28

    A thermoelectric module with a plurality of electricity generating units each having a first end and a second end, the units being arranged first end to second end along an-in-line axis. Each unit includes first and second elements each made of a thermoelectric material, an electrically conductive hot member arranged to heat one side of the first element, and an electrically conductive cold member arranged to cool another side of the first element and to cool one side of the second element. The hot member, the first element, the cold member and the second element are supported in a fixture, are electrically connected respectively to provide an electricity generating unit, and are arranged respectively in positions along the in-line axis. The individual components of each generating unit and the respective generating units are clamped in their in-line positions by a loading bolt at one end of the fixture and a stop wall at the other end of the fixture. The hot members may have a T-shape and the cold members an hourglass shape to facilitate heat transfer. The direction of heat transfer through the hot members may be perpendicular to the direction of heat transfer through the cold members, and both of these heat transfer directions maybe perpendicular to the direction-of current flow through the module.

  7. A feasibility study for compressed sensing combined phase contrast MR angiography reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Hong, Cheol-Pyo; Lee, Man-Woo; Han, Bong-Soo

    2012-02-01

    Phase contrast magnetic resonance angiography (PC MRA) is a technique for flow velocity measurement and vessels visualization, simultaneously. The PC MRA takes long scan time because each flow encoding gradients which are composed bipolar gradient type need to reconstruct the angiography image. Moreover, it takes more image acquisition time when we use the PC MRA at the low-tesla MRI system. In this study, we studied and evaluation of feasibility for CS MRI reconstruction combined PC MRA which data acquired by low-tesla MRI system. We used non-linear reconstruction algorithm which named Bregman iteration for CS image reconstruction and validate the usefulness of CS combined PC MRA reconstruction technique. The results of CS reconstructed PC MRA images provide similar level of image quality between fully sampled reconstruction data and sparse sampled reconstruction using CS technique. Although our results used half of sampling ratio and do not used specification hardware device or performance which are improving the temporal resolution of MR image acquisition such as parallel imaging reconstruction using phased array coil or non-cartesian trajectory, we think that CS combined PC MRA technique will be helpful to increase the temporal resolution and at low-tesla MRI system.

  8. Life Cycle Leadership Theory vs. Theory on the Phases of Small Group Discussion: Comparisons, Contrasts, and Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Charles Thomas, Jr.

    The work of Paul Hersey and Kenneth Blanchard on life-cycle leadership was compared and contrasted to three studies on group phase theories. The studies on group phases were conducted by Robert Bales and Fred Strodtbeck in 1951, Thomas Scheidel and Laura Crowell in 1964, and B. Aubrey Fisher in 1970. The two theoretical approaches were found to…

  9. Value of Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion MRI in the Acute Phase of Transient Global Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Alex; Al-Zghloul, Mansour; Kerl, Hans U.; Böhme, Johannes; Mürle, Bettina; Groden, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a transitory, short-lasting neurological disorder characterized by a sudden onset of antero- and retrograde amnesia. Perfusion abnormalities in TGA have been evaluated mainly by use of positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In the present study we explore the value of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted MRI (PWI) in TGA in the acute phase. Methods From a MRI report database we identified TGA patients who underwent MRI including PWI in the acute phase and compared these to control subjects. Quantitative perfusion maps (cerebral blood flow (CBF) and volume (CBV)) were generated and analyzed by use of Signal Processing In NMR-Software (SPIN). CBF and CBV values in subcortical brain regions were assessed by use of VOI created in FIRST, a model-based segmentation tool in the Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB) Software Library (FSL). Results Five TGA patients were included (2 men, 3 women). On PWI, no relevant perfusion alterations were found by visual inspection in TGA patients. Group comparisons for possible differences between TGA patients and control subjects showed significant lower rCBF values bilaterally in the hippocampus, in the left thalamus and globus pallidus as well as bilaterally in the putamen and the left caudate nucleus. Correspondingly, significant lower rCBV values were observed bilaterally in the hippocampus and the putamen as well as in the left caudate nucleus. Group comparisons for possible side differences in rCBF and rCBV values in TGA patients revealed a significant lower rCBV value in the left caudate nucleus. Conclusions Mere visual inspection of PWI is not sufficient for the assessment of perfusion changes in TGA in the acute phase. Group comparisons with healthy control subjects might be useful to detect subtle perfusion changes on PWI in TGA patients. However, this should be confirmed in

  10. Accelerated phase-contrast cine MRI using k-t SPARSE-SENSE.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daniel; Dyvorne, Hadrien A; Otazo, Ricardo; Feng, Li; Sodickson, Daniel K; Lee, Vivian S

    2012-04-01

    Phase-contrast (PC) cine MRI is a promising method for assessment of pathologic hemodynamics, including cardiovascular and hepatoportal vascular dynamics, but its low data acquisition efficiency limits the achievable spatial and temporal resolutions within clinically acceptable breath-hold durations. We propose to accelerate PC cine MRI using an approach which combines compressed sensing and parallel imaging (k-t SPARSE-SENSE). We validated the proposed 6-fold accelerated PC cine MRI against 3-fold accelerated PC cine MRI with parallel imaging (generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions). With the programmable flow pump, we simulated a time varying waveform emulating hepatic blood flow. Normalized root mean square error between two sets of velocity measurements was 2.59%. In multiple blood vessels of 12 control subjects, two sets of mean velocity measurements were in good agreement (mean difference = -0.29 cm/s; lower and upper 95% limits of agreement = -5.26 and 4.67 cm/s, respectively). The mean phase noise, defined as the standard deviation of the phase in a homogeneous stationary region, was significantly lower for k-t SPARSE-SENSE than for generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (0.05 ± 0.01 vs. 0.19 ± 0.06 radians, respectively; P < 0.01). The proposed 6-fold accelerated PC cine MRI pulse sequence with k-t SPARSE-SENSE is a promising investigational method for rapid velocity measurement with relatively high spatial (1.7 mm × 1.7 mm) and temporal (∼35 ms) resolutions.

  11. Error analysis of cine phase contrast MRI velocity measurements used for strain calculation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Elisabeth R; Morrow, Duane A; Felmlee, Joel P; Odegard, Gregory M; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2015-01-01

    Cine Phase Contrast (CPC) MRI offers unique insight into localized skeletal muscle behavior by providing the ability to quantify muscle strain distribution during cyclic motion. Muscle strain is obtained by temporally integrating and spatially differentiating CPC-encoded velocity. The aim of this study was to quantify CPC measurement accuracy and precision and to describe error propagation into displacement and strain. Using an MRI-compatible jig to move a B-gel phantom within a 1.5 T MRI bore, CPC-encoded velocities were collected. The three orthogonal encoding gradients (through plane, frequency, and phase) were evaluated independently in post-processing. Two systematic error types were corrected: eddy current-induced bias and calibration-type error. Measurement accuracy and precision were quantified before and after removal of systematic error. Through plane- and frequency-encoded data accuracy were within 0.4 mm/s after removal of systematic error - a 70% improvement over the raw data. Corrected phase-encoded data accuracy was within 1.3 mm/s. Measured random error was between 1 to 1.4 mm/s, which followed the theoretical prediction. Propagation of random measurement error into displacement and strain was found to depend on the number of tracked time segments, time segment duration, mesh size, and dimensional order. To verify this, theoretical predictions were compared to experimentally calculated displacement and strain error. For the parameters tested, experimental and theoretical results aligned well. Random strain error approximately halved with a two-fold mesh size increase, as predicted. Displacement and strain accuracy were within 2.6 mm and 3.3%, respectively. These results can be used to predict the accuracy and precision of displacement and strain in user-specific applications.

  12. Error Analysis of Cine Phase Contrast MRI Velocity Measurements used for Strain Calculation

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Elisabeth R.; Morrow, Duane A.; Felmlee, Joel P.; Odegard, Gregory M.; Kaufman, Kenton R.

    2014-01-01

    Cine Phase Contrast (CPC) MRI offers unique insight into localized skeletal muscle behavior by providing the ability to quantify muscle strain distribution during cyclic motion. Muscle strain is obtained by temporally integrating and spatially differentiating CPC-encoded velocity. The aim of this study was to quantify measurement accuracy and precision and to describe error propagation into displacement and strain. Using an MRI-compatible jig to move a B-gel phantom within a 1.5T MRI bore, CPC-encoded velocities were collected. The three orthogonal encoding gradients (through plane, frequency, and phase) were evaluated independently in post-processing. Two systematic error types were corrected: eddy current-induced bias and calibration-type error. Measurement accuracy and precision were quantified before and after removal of systematic error. Through plane- and frequency-encoded data accuracy were within 0.4mm/s after removal of systematic error – a 70% improvement over the raw data. Corrected phase-encoded data accuracy was within 1.3mm/s. Measured random error was between 1 to 1.4mm/s, which followed the theoretical prediction. Propagation of random measurement error into displacement and strain was found to depend on the number of tracked time segments, time segment duration, mesh size, and dimensional order. To verify this, theoretical predictions were compared to experimentally calculated displacement and strain error. For the parameters tested, experimental and theoretical results aligned well. Random strain error approximately halved with a two-fold mesh size increase, as predicted. Displacement and strain accuracy were within 2.6mm and 3.3%, respectively. These results can be used to predict the accuracy and precision of displacement and strain in user-specific applications. PMID:25433567

  13. Accelerated three-dimensional cine phase contrast imaging using randomly undersampled echo planar imaging with compressed sensing reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Nezafat, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to implement and evaluate an accelerated three-dimensional (3D) cine phase contrast MRI sequence by combining a randomly sampled 3D k-space acquisition sequence with an echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. An accelerated 3D cine phase contrast MRI sequence was implemented by combining EPI readout with randomly undersampled 3D k-space data suitable for compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction. The undersampled data were then reconstructed using low-dimensional structural self-learning and thresholding (LOST). 3D phase contrast MRI was acquired in 11 healthy adults using an overall acceleration of 7 (EPI factor of 3 and CS rate of 3). For comparison, a single two-dimensional (2D) cine phase contrast scan was also performed with sensitivity encoding (SENSE) rate 2 and approximately at the level of the pulmonary artery bifurcation. The stroke volume and mean velocity in both the ascending and descending aorta were measured and compared between two sequences using Bland-Altman plots. An average scan time of 3 min and 30 s, corresponding to an acceleration rate of 7, was achieved for 3D cine phase contrast scan with one direction flow encoding, voxel size of 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) , foot-head coverage of 6 cm and temporal resolution of 30 ms. The mean velocity and stroke volume in both the ascending and descending aorta were statistically equivalent between the proposed 3D sequence and the standard 2D cine phase contrast sequence. The combination of EPI with a randomly undersampled 3D k-space sampling sequence using LOST reconstruction allows a seven-fold reduction in scan time of 3D cine phase contrast MRI without compromising blood flow quantification.

  14. Synchrotron- and laboratory-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging for imaging mouse articular cartilage in the absence of radiopaque contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Marenzana, Massimo; Hagen, Charlotte K; Borges, Patricia Das Neves; Endrizzi, Marco; Szafraniec, Magdalena B; Vincent, Tonia L; Rigon, Luigi; Arfelli, Fulvia; Menk, Ralf-Hendrik; Olivo, Alessandro

    2014-03-01

    The mouse model of osteoarthritis (OA) has been recognized as the most promising research tool for the identification of new OA therapeutic targets. However, this model is currently limited by poor throughput, dependent on the extremely time-consuming histopathology assessment of the articular cartilage (AC). We have recently shown that AC in the rat tibia can be imaged both in air and in saline solution using a laboratory system based on coded-aperture X-ray phase-contrast imaging (CAXPCi). Here, we explore ways to extend the methodology for imaging the much thinner AC of the mouse, by means of gold-standard synchrotron-based phase-contrast methods. Specifically, we have used analyser-based phase-contrast micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) for its high sensitivity to faint phase changes, coupled with a high-resolution (4.5 μm pixel) detector. Healthy, diseased (four weeks post induction of OA) and artificially damaged mouse AC was imaged at the Elettra synchrotron in Trieste, Italy, using the above method. For validation, we used conventional micro-CT combined with radiopaque soft-tissue staining and standard histomorphometry. We show that mouse cartilage can be visualized correctly by means of the synchrotron method. This suggests that: (i) further developments of the laboratory-based CAXPCi system, especially in terms of pushing the resolution limits, might have the potential to resolve mouse AC ex vivo and (ii) additional improvements may lead to a new generation of CAXPCi micro-CT scanners which could be used for in vivo longitudinal pre-clinical imaging of soft tissue at resolutions impossible to achieve by current MRI technology.

  15. Immunological evaluation of the new stable ultrasound contrast agent LK565: a phase one clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Funke, B; Maerz, HK; Okorokow, S; Polata, S; Lehmann, I; Sack, U; Wild, P; Geisler, T; Zotz, RJ

    2004-01-01

    Background Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) allow the enhancement of vascular definition, thereby providing more diagnostic information. LK565 is a new second-generation UCA based on synthetic polymers of aspartic acid which is eliminated from the blood stream via phagocytosis. LK565 forms very stable air-filled microspheres and is capable of repeated passage through the pulmonary capillary bed after peripheral intravenous injection. This characteristic allows examination of the cardiac function or extracardiac vessel abnormalities up to 15 minutes. Methods A phase one clinical study was conducted on 15 healthy volunteers to identify the development of an undesirable immune response. Phagocytosis capacity, TNF-α secretion, and MHC class II upregulation of monocytes was monitored, as well as microsphere specific antibody development (IgM, IgG). Furthermore, the kinetics of the activation surface markers CD69, CD25, CD71, and CD11b on leukocytes were analyzed. Results Due to LK565-metabolism the administration of the UCA led to saturation of phagocytes which was reversible after 24 hrs. Compared to positive controls neither significant TNF-α elevation, neither MHC class II and activation surface markers upregulation, nor specific antibody development was detectable. Conclusion The administration of LK565 provides a comfortable duration of signal enhancement, esp. in echocardiography, without causing a major activation cascade or triggering an adaptive immune response. To minimize the risk of undesirable adverse events such as anaphylactoid reactions, immunological studies should be included in clinical trials for new UCAs. The use of LK565 as another new ultrasound contrast agent should be encouraged as a safe means to provide additional diagnostic information. PMID:15357870

  16. Anatomical background noise power spectrum in differential phase contrast breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, John; Ge, Yongshuai; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-03-01

    In x-ray breast imaging, the anatomical noise background of the breast has a significant impact on the detection of lesions and other features of interest. This anatomical noise is typically characterized by a parameter, β, which describes a power law dependence of anatomical noise on spatial frequency (the shape of the anatomical noise power spectrum). Large values of β have been shown to reduce human detection performance, and in conventional mammography typical values of β are around 3.2. Recently, x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) and the associated dark field imaging methods have received considerable attention as possible supplements to absorption imaging for breast cancer diagnosis. However, the impact of these additional contrast mechanisms on lesion detection is not yet well understood. In order to better understand the utility of these new methods, we measured the β indices for absorption, DPC, and dark field images in 15 cadaver breast specimens using a benchtop DPC imaging system. We found that the measured β value for absorption was consistent with the literature for mammographic acquisitions (β = 3.61±0.49), but that both DPC and dark field images had much lower values of β (β = 2.54±0.75 for DPC and β = 1.44±0.49 for dark field). In addition, visual inspection showed greatly reduced anatomical background in both DPC and dark field images. These promising results suggest that DPC and dark field imaging may help provide improved lesion detection in breast imaging, particularly for those patients with dense breasts, in whom anatomical noise is a major limiting factor in identifying malignancies.

  17. Contrast-enhanced multiple-phase imaging features in hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Yu, Ri-Sheng; Qiu, Ling-Ling; Jiang, Ding-Yao; Tan, Yan-Bin; Fu, Yan-Biao

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate and review the contrast-enhanced multiple-phase computed tomography (CEMP CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with pathologically confirmed hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HEHE). METHODS: Findings from imaging examinations in 8 patients (5 women and 3 men) with pathologically confirmed HEHE were retrospectively reviewed (CT images obtained from 7 patients and MR images obtained from 6 patients). The age of presentation varied from 27 years to 60 years (average age 39.8 years). RESULTS: There were two types of HEHE: multifocal type (n = 7) and diffuse type (n = 1). In the multifocal-type cases, there were 74 lesions on CT and 28 lesions on MRI with 7 lesions found with diffusion weighted imaging; 18 (24.3%) of 74 lesions on plain CT and 26 (92.9%) of 28 lesions on pre-contrast MRI showed the target sign. On CEMP CT, 28 (37.8%) of 74 lesions appeared with the target sign and a progressive-enhancement rim and 9 (12.2%) of 74 lesions displayed progressive enhancement, maintaining a state of persistent enhancement. On CEMP MRI, 27 (96.4%) of 28 lesions appeared with the target sign with a progressive-enhancement rim and 28 (100%) of 28 lesions displayed progressive-enhancement, maintaining a state of persistent enhancement. In the diffuse-type cases, an enlarged liver was observed with a large nodule appearing with persistent enhancement on CEMP CT and MRI. CONCLUSION: The most important imaging features of HEHE are the target sign and/or progressive enhancement with persistent enhancement on CEMP CT and MRI. MRI is advantageous over CT in displaying these imaging features. PMID:21941423

  18. High speed X-ray phase contrast imaging of energetic composites under dynamic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parab, Niranjan D.; Roberts, Zane A.; Harr, Michael H.; Mares, Jesus O.; Casey, Alex D.; Gunduz, I. Emre; Hudspeth, Matthew; Claus, Benjamin; Sun, Tao; Fezzaa, Kamel; Son, Steven F.; Chen, Weinong W.

    2016-09-01

    Fracture of crystals and frictional heating are associated with the formation of "hot spots" (localized heating) in energetic composites such as polymer bonded explosives (PBXs). Traditional high speed optical imaging methods cannot be used to study the dynamic sub-surface deformation and the fracture behavior of such materials due to their opaque nature. In this study, high speed synchrotron X-ray experiments are conducted to visualize the in situ deformation and the fracture mechanisms in PBXs composed of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) crystals and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene binder doped with iron (III) oxide. A modified Kolsky bar apparatus was used to apply controlled dynamic compression on the PBX specimens, and a high speed synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) setup was used to record the in situ deformation and failure in the specimens. The experiments show that synchrotron X-ray PCI provides a sufficient contrast between the HMX crystals and the doped binder, even at ultrafast recording rates. Under dynamic compression, most of the cracking in the crystals was observed to be due to the tensile stress generated by the diametral compression applied from the contacts between the crystals. Tensile stress driven cracking was also observed for some of the crystals due to the transverse deformation of the binder and superior bonding between the crystal and the binder. The obtained results are vital to develop improved understanding and to validate the macroscopic and mesoscopic numerical models for energetic composites so that eventually hot spot formation can be predicted.

  19. Ideal-observer detectability in photon-counting differential phase-contrast imaging using a linear-systems approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fredenberg, Erik; Danielsson, Mats; Stayman, J. Webster; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Aslund, Magnus

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To provide a cascaded-systems framework based on the noise-power spectrum (NPS), modulation transfer function (MTF), and noise-equivalent number of quanta (NEQ) for quantitative evaluation of differential phase-contrast imaging (Talbot interferometry) in relation to conventional absorption contrast under equal-dose, equal-geometry, and, to some extent, equal-photon-economy constraints. The focus is a geometry for photon-counting mammography. Methods: Phase-contrast imaging is a promising technology that may emerge as an alternative or adjunct to conventional absorption contrast. In particular, phase contrast may increase the signal-difference-to-noise ratio compared to absorption contrast because the difference in phase shift between soft-tissue structures is often substantially larger than the absorption difference. We have developed a comprehensive cascaded-systems framework to investigate Talbot interferometry, which is a technique for differential phase-contrast imaging. Analytical expressions for the MTF and NPS were derived to calculate the NEQ and a task-specific ideal-observer detectability index under assumptions of linearity and shift invariance. Talbot interferometry was compared to absorption contrast at equal dose, and using either a plane wave or a spherical wave in a conceivable mammography geometry. The impact of source size and spectrum bandwidth was included in the framework, and the trade-off with photon economy was investigated in some detail. Wave-propagation simulations were used to verify the analytical expressions and to generate example images. Results: Talbot interferometry inherently detects the differential of the phase, which led to a maximum in NEQ at high spatial frequencies, whereas the absorption-contrast NEQ decreased monotonically with frequency. Further, phase contrast detects differences in density rather than atomic number, and the optimal imaging energy was found to be a factor of 1.7 higher than for absorption

  20. Correlation between human observer performance and model observer performance in differential phase contrast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ke; Garrett, John; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: With the recently expanding interest and developments in x-ray differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT), the evaluation of its task-specific detection performance and comparison with the corresponding absorption CT under a given radiation dose constraint become increasingly important. Mathematical model observers are often used to quantify the performance of imaging systems, but their correlations with actual human observers need to be confirmed for each new imaging method. This work is an investigation of the effects of stochastic DPC-CT noise on the correlation of detection performance between model and human observers with signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection tasks.Methods: The detectabilities of different objects (five disks with different diameters and two breast lesion masses) embedded in an experimental DPC-CT noise background were assessed using both model and human observers. The detectability of the disk and lesion signals was then measured using five types of model observers including the prewhitening ideal observer, the nonprewhitening (NPW) observer, the nonprewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (NPWEi), the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (PWEi), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). The same objects were also evaluated by four human observers using the two-alternative forced choice method. The results from the model observer experiment were quantitatively compared to the human observer results to assess the correlation between the two techniques.Results: The contrast-to-detail (CD) curve generated by the human observers for the disk-detection experiments shows that the required contrast to detect a disk is inversely proportional to the square root of the disk size. Based on the CD curves, the ideal and NPW observers tend to systematically overestimate the performance of the human observers. The NPWEi and PWEi observers did not predict human performance well either, as the slopes of their CD

  1. Analytical evaluation of the signal and noise propagation in x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raupach, Rainer; Flohr, Thomas G.

    2011-04-01

    We analyze the signal and noise propagation of differential phase-contrast computed tomography (PCT) compared with conventional attenuation-based computed tomography (CT) from a theoretical point of view. This work focuses on grating-based differential phase-contrast imaging. A mathematical framework is derived that is able to analytically predict the relative performance of both imaging techniques in the sense of the relative contrast-to-noise ratio for the contrast of any two materials. Two fundamentally different properties of PCT compared with CT are identified. First, the noise power spectra show qualitatively different characteristics implying a resolution-dependent performance ratio. The break-even point is derived analytically as a function of system parameters such as geometry and visibility. A superior performance of PCT compared with CT can only be achieved at a sufficiently high spatial resolution. Second, due to periodicity of phase information which is non-ambiguous only in a bounded interval statistical phase wrapping can occur. This effect causes a collapse of information propagation for low signals which limits the applicability of phase-contrast imaging at low dose.

  2. Noise texture and signal detectability in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) is a rapidly emerging imaging modality for reconstructing estimates of an object's three-dimensional x-ray refractive index distribution. Unlike conventional x-ray computed tomography methods, the statistical properties of the reconstructed images in PCT remain unexplored. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively investigate noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. Methods: The authors derived explicit expressions for the autocovariance of the reconstructed absorption and refractive index images to characterize noise texture and understand how the noise properties are influenced by the imaging geometry. Concepts from statistical detection theory were employed to understand how the imaging geometry-dependent statistical properties affect the signal detection performance in a signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly task. Results: The analytical formulas for the phase and absorption autocovariance functions were implemented numerically and compared to the corresponding empirical values, and excellent agreement was found. They observed that the reconstructed refractive images are highly spatially correlated, while the absorption images are not. The numerical results confirm that the strength of the covariance is scaled by the detector spacing. Signal detection studies were conducted, employing a numerical observer. The detection performance was found to monotonically increase as the detector-plane spacing was increased. Conclusions: The authors have conducted the first quantitative investigation of noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. The reconstructed refractive images were found to be highly spatially correlated, while absorption images were not. This is due to the presence of a Fourier space singularity in the reconstruction formula for the refraction images. The statistical analysis may facilitate the use of task-based image quality measures to further develop and optimize this emerging

  3. Increasing the darkfield contrast-to-noise ratio using a deconvolution-based information retrieval algorithm in X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas; Pelzer, Georg; Bayer, Florian; Horn, Florian; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Zang, Andrea; Durst, Jürgen; Anton, Gisela; Michel, Thilo

    2013-07-29

    A novel information retrieval algorithm for X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging based on the deconvolution of the object and the reference phase stepping curve (PSC) as proposed by Modregger et al. was investigated in this paper. We applied the method for the first time on data obtained with a polychromatic spectrum and compared the results to those, received by applying the commonly used method, based on a Fourier analysis. We confirmed the expectation, that both methods deliver the same results for the absorption and the differential phase image. For the darkfield image, a mean contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) increase by a factor of 1.17 using the new method was found. Furthermore, the dose saving potential was estimated for the deconvolution method experimentally. It is found, that for the conventional method a dose which is higher by a factor of 1.66 is needed to obtain a similar CNR value compared to the novel method. A further analysis of the data revealed, that the improvement in CNR and dose efficiency is due to the superior background noise properties of the deconvolution method, but at the cost of comparability between measurements at different applied dose values, as the mean value becomes dependent on the photon statistics used.

  4. Increasing the darkfield contrast-to-noise ratio using a deconvolution-based information retrieval algorithm in X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas; Pelzer, Georg; Bayer, Florian; Horn, Florian; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Zang, Andrea; Durst, Jürgen; Anton, Gisela; Michel, Thilo

    2013-07-29

    A novel information retrieval algorithm for X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging based on the deconvolution of the object and the reference phase stepping curve (PSC) as proposed by Modregger et al. was investigated in this paper. We applied the method for the first time on data obtained with a polychromatic spectrum and compared the results to those, received by applying the commonly used method, based on a Fourier analysis. We confirmed the expectation, that both methods deliver the same results for the absorption and the differential phase image. For the darkfield image, a mean contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) increase by a factor of 1.17 using the new method was found. Furthermore, the dose saving potential was estimated for the deconvolution method experimentally. It is found, that for the conventional method a dose which is higher by a factor of 1.66 is needed to obtain a similar CNR value compared to the novel method. A further analysis of the data revealed, that the improvement in CNR and dose efficiency is due to the superior background noise properties of the deconvolution method, but at the cost of comparability between measurements at different applied dose values, as the mean value becomes dependent on the photon statistics used. PMID:23938672

  5. Concept of contrast transfer function for edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging and its comparison with the free-space propagation technique.

    PubMed

    Diemoz, Paul C; Vittoria, Fabio A; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-05-16

    Previous studies on edge illumination (EI) X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCi) have investigated the nature and amplitude of the signal provided by this technique. However, the response of the imaging system to different object spatial frequencies was never explicitly considered and studied. This is required in order to predict the performance of a given EI setup for different classes of objects. To this scope, in the present work we derive analytical expressions for the contrast transfer function of an EI imaging system, using the approximation of near-field regime, and study its dependence upon the main experimental parameters. We then exploit these results to compare the frequency response of an EI system with respect of that of a free-space propagation XPCi one. The results achieved in this work can be useful for predicting the signals obtainable for different types of objects and also as a basis for new retrieval methods. PMID:27409946

  6. Concept of contrast transfer function for edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging and its comparison with the free-space propagation technique.

    PubMed

    Diemoz, Paul C; Vittoria, Fabio A; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-05-16

    Previous studies on edge illumination (EI) X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCi) have investigated the nature and amplitude of the signal provided by this technique. However, the response of the imaging system to different object spatial frequencies was never explicitly considered and studied. This is required in order to predict the performance of a given EI setup for different classes of objects. To this scope, in the present work we derive analytical expressions for the contrast transfer function of an EI imaging system, using the approximation of near-field regime, and study its dependence upon the main experimental parameters. We then exploit these results to compare the frequency response of an EI system with respect of that of a free-space propagation XPCi one. The results achieved in this work can be useful for predicting the signals obtainable for different types of objects and also as a basis for new retrieval methods.

  7. Phase-gradient contrast in thick tissue with a scanning microscope

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, J.; Gasecka, A.; Daradich, A.; Davison, I.; Coté, D.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the principle of reciprocity is valid for light traveling even through scattering or absorptive media. This principle has been used to establish an equivalence between conventional widefield microscopes and scanning microscopes. We make use of this principle to introduce a scanning version of oblique back-illumination microscopy, or sOBM. This technique provides sub-surface phase-gradient and amplitude images from unlabeled tissue, in an epi-detection geometry. That is, it may be applied to arbitrarily thick tissue. sOBM may be implemented as a simple, cost-effective add-on with any scanning microscope, requiring only the availability of an extra input channel in the microscope electronics. We demonstrate here its implementation in combination with two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy and with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, applied to brain or spinal cord tissue imaging. In both cases, sOBM provides information on tissue morphology complementary to TPEF or CARS contrast. This information is obtained simultaneously and is automatically co-registered. Finally, we show that sOBM can be operated at video rate. PMID:24575336

  8. Edge fluctuation measurements by phase contrast imaging on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coda, S.; Porkolab, M.

    1994-05-01

    A novel CO2 laser phase contrast imaging diagnostic has been developed for the DIII-D tokamak, where it is being employed to investigate density fluctuations at the outer edge of the plasma. This system generates 16-point, 1-D images of a 7.6 cm wide region in the radial direction, and is characterized by long wavelength (7.6 cm) and high frequency (100 MHz) capability, as well as excellent sensitivity (bar-n is approximately greater than 10(exp 9) cm(sup -3)). The effects of vertical line integration have been studied in detail, both analytically and numerically with actual flux surface geometries generated by the EFITD magnetic equilibrium code. It is shown that in the present configuration the measurement is mostly sensitive to radial wave vectors. Experimental results on fluctuation suppression at the L- to H-mode transition and on the L-mode wave number spectrum are discussed briefly. Finally, future plans for extending the measurement to the core of the plasma and for investigating externally launched fast waves are presented.

  9. ICRF Mode Conversion Studies with Phase Contrast Imaging and Comparisons with Full-Wave Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujii, N.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Porkolab, M.; Jaeger, E. F.; Harvey, R. W.

    2011-12-23

    Waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat toka-mak plasmas. In a multi-ion-species plasma, the FW converts to ion cyclotron waves (ICW) and ion Bernstein waves (IBW) around the ion-ion hybrid resonance (mode conversion). The mode converted wave is of interest as an actuator to optimise plasma performance through flow drive and current drive. Numerical simulations are essential to describe these processes accurately, and it is important that these simulation codes be validated. On Alcator C-Mod, direct measurements of the mode converted waves have been performed using Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI), which measures the line-integrated electron density fluctuations. The results were compared to full-wave simulations AORSA and TORIC. AORSA is coupled to a Fokker-Planck code CQL3D for self-consistent simulation of the wave electric field and the minority distribution function. The simulation results are compared to PCI measurements using synthetic diagnostic. The experiments were performed in D-H and D-{sup 3}He plasmas over a wide range of ion species concentrations. The simulations agreed well with the measurements in the strong absorption regime. However, the measured fluctuation intensity was smaller by 1-2 orders of magnitudes in the weakly abosorbing regime, and a realistic description of the plasma edge including dissipation and antenna geometry may be required in these cases.

  10. Design of a tangential phase contrast imaging diagnostic for the TCV tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Marinoni, A.; Coda, S.; Chavan, R.; Pochon, G.

    2006-10-15

    A core density fluctuation imaging diagnostic is being developed for the TCV tokamak, employing a 7 cm wide CO{sub 2} laser beam transmitted through the plasma in a near-toroidal direction. The proposed system employs the phase contrast method and can resolve wavelengths ranging from 7 down to 0.1 cm, with a minimum measurable line-averaged density of 3x10{sup 15} m{sup 3}/ MHz{sup 1/}2. The broad range of microinstabilities that can be at play in the strongly electron-cyclotron-resonance heated TCV plasmas, from ion to electron spatial scale lengths, widely known as ion-temperature-gradient, trapped-electron-mode, and electron-temperature-gradient modes, would thus be accessible. The use of an imaging technique overcomes the difficulties faced by traditional scattering diagnostics in investigating highly inhomogeneous regions, such as internal transport barriers. Wavelengths and correlation properties can be recovered from the spatial mapping. The tangential configuration, combined with appropriate spatial filtering techniques, provides an excellent spatial resolution, of the order of 1% of the minor radius. In view of the extreme plasma shaping and positioning flexibility of the TCV tokamak, the beam positioning will also be flexible, with translatable mirrors enabling measurements close to the magnetic axis in some configurations.

  11. Correction of data truncation artifacts in differential phase contrast (DPC) tomosynthesis imaging.

    PubMed

    Garrett, John; Ge, Yongshuai; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-10-01

    The use of grating based Talbot-Lau interferometry permits the acquisition of differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging with a conventional medical x-ray source and detector. However, due to the limited area of the gratings, limited area of the detector, or both, data truncation image artifacts are often observed in tomographic DPC acquisitions and reconstructions, such as tomosynthesis (limited-angle tomography). When data are truncated in the conventional x-ray absorption tomosynthesis imaging, a variety of methods have been developed to mitigate the truncation artifacts. However, the same strategies used to mitigate absorption truncation artifacts do not yield satisfactory reconstruction results in DPC tomosynthesis reconstruction. In this work,several new methods have been proposed to mitigate data truncation artifacts in a DPC tomosynthesis system. The proposed methods have been validated using experimental data of a mammography accreditation phantom, a bovine udder, as well as several human cadaver breast specimens using a bench-top DPC imaging system at our facility.

  12. Phase-contrast helium-3 MRI of aerosol deposition in human airways.

    PubMed

    Sarracanie, Mathieu; Grebenkov, Denis; Sandeau, Julien; Coulibaly, Soulé; Martin, Andrew R; Hill, Kyle; Pérez Sánchez, José Manuel; Fodil, Redouane; Martin, Lionel; Durand, Emmanuel; Caillibotte, Georges; Isabey, Daniel; Darrasse, Luc; Bittoun, Jacques; Maître, Xavier

    2015-02-01

    One of the key challenges in the study of health-related aerosols is predicting and monitoring sites of particle deposition in the respiratory tract. The potential health risks of ambient exposure to environmental or workplace aerosols and the beneficial effects of medical aerosols are strongly influenced by the site of aerosol deposition along the respiratory tract. Nuclear medicine is the only current modality that combines quantification and regional localization of aerosol deposition, and this technique remains limited by its spatial and temporal resolutions and by patient exposure to radiation. Recent work in MRI has shed light on techniques to quantify micro-sized magnetic particles in living bodies by the measurement of associated static magnetic field variations. With regard to lung MRI, hyperpolarized helium-3 may be used as a tracer gas to compensate for the lack of MR signal in the airways, so as to allow assessment of pulmonary function and morphology. The extrathoracic region of the human respiratory system plays a critical role in determining aerosol deposition patterns, as it acts as a filter upstream from the lungs. In the present work, aerosol deposition in a mouth-throat phantom was measured using helium-3 MRI and compared with single-photon emission computed tomography. By providing high sensitivity with high spatial and temporal resolutions, phase-contrast helium-3 MRI offers new insights for the study of particle transport and deposition.

  13. Volumetric characterization of human patellar cartilage matrix on phase contrast x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Anas Z.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Checefsky, Walter A.; Coan, Paola; Diemoz, Paul C.; Hobbs, Susan K.; Huber, Markus B.; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-03-01

    Phase contrast X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has recently emerged as a novel imaging technique that allows visualization of cartilage soft tissue, subsequent examination of chondrocyte patterns, and their correlation to osteoarthritis. Previous studies have shown that 2D texture features are effective at distinguishing between healthy and osteoarthritic regions of interest annotated in the radial zone of cartilage matrix on PCI-CT images. In this study, we further extend the texture analysis to 3D and investigate the ability of volumetric texture features at characterizing chondrocyte patterns in the cartilage matrix for purposes of classification. Here, we extracted volumetric texture features derived from Minkowski Functionals and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) from 496 volumes of interest (VOI) annotated on PCI-CT images of human patellar cartilage specimens. The extracted features were then used in a machine-learning task involving support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic. Classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). The best classification performance was observed with GLCM features correlation (AUC = 0.83 +/- 0.06) and homogeneity (AUC = 0.82 +/- 0.07), which significantly outperformed all Minkowski Functionals (p < 0.05). These results suggest that such quantitative analysis of chondrocyte patterns in human patellar cartilage matrix involving GLCM-derived statistical features can distinguish between healthy and osteoarthritic tissue with high accuracy.

  14. Phase-contrast versus off-axis illumination: is a more complex microscope always more powerful?

    PubMed

    Hostounský, Zdenek; Pelc, Radek

    2007-06-01

    In this article, a practical demonstration suitable for any biology college classroom is presented. With the examples of a complex biological specimen (slug's radula) and a simple reference specimen (electron microscopical grid imprint in gelatin), both of which can be easily prepared, the capabilities of two imaging modes commonly used in optical microscopy are demonstrated. The results obtained under phase contrast (a rather sophisticated method, 1953 Nobel Prize to Zernike) and off-axis illumination (a very simple method) are compared. The off-axis illumination setup is capable of delivering noticeably better microscopic images of these two particular specimens, yet it can be easily assembled in a laboratory classroom. The outcome of such a demonstration is expected to be the realization on the part of the students that one needs to carefully choose the apparatus to address a given biological problem, with the "bottom line" being that a more complex one may not necessarily yield better results. An attempt to explain this "paradox" is presented, in the particular case presented here, partly from the physiology of vision perspective (the shape-from-shading problem). The overall aim of the present article is to induce in students critical thinking about the capabilities of a laboratory equipment in general and about data interpretation. PMID:17562916

  15. Towards nanometer period gratings for hard x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Han; Wolfe, Doug E.; Liu Chian; Xiao Xianghui; Lynch, Susanna K.; Gomella, Andrew A.; Bennett, Eric E.; Morgan, Nicole Y.

    2012-07-31

    Transmission grating-based x-ray interferometers have been developed into wide-field imaging devices that are sensitive to x-ray refraction and diffraction in the sample. While current grating designs rely on UV and x-ray lithography processes to produce periodic vertical structures, it becomes prohibitively difficult to make the grating periods below 1 - 2 microns due to the high aspect ratios of the structures. Since the phase-contrast sensitivity is inversely related to the grating period, we describe a new grating design for sub-micron to nanometer grating periods. In this design, multiple bi-layers of two alternating materials are deposited on a stair like substrate, and mostly on the floor surfaces of the steps only. The incident x-ray beam is parallel to the planes of the layers (side illumination). Thus, the multilayer structure on each step serves as a micro grating whose grating period is the thickness of a bi-layer. The array of micro gratings over the whole length of the stair can act as a single continuous grating, when certain continuity conditions between neighboring steps are met. Since the layer thickness can be as small as tens of nanometers, as has been demonstrated in multilayer x-ray zone plates, this design allows nanometer grating periods over large grating areas. Here we describe a prototype intensity grating of 440 nm period. We show x-ray projection images of the grating which were obtained by contact lithography.

  16. The direct determination of magnetic domain wall profiles by differential phase contrast electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chapman, J N; Batson, P E; Waddell, E M; Ferrier, R P

    1978-01-01

    A new technique for the quantitative investigation of magnetic structures in ferromagnetic thin films is proposed. Unlike previous techniques the detected signal is simply related to the magnetic induction in the film, and as such the direct determination of domain wall profiles is possible. The technique utilizes a differential phase contrast mode of scanning transmission electron microscopy in which the normal bright field detector is replaced by a split-detector lying symmetrically about the optic axis of the system. The difference signal from the two halves of the detector provides the required magnetic information. Analysis of the image formation mechanism shows that, using a commercially available scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with a field emission gun, wall profiles should be obtainable directly from most structures of interest in Lorentz microscopy. Furthermore, signal-to-noise considerations indicate that these results can be obtained in acceptably short recording times. Finally, experimental results using both polycrystalline and single crystal specimens are presented, which confirm the theoretical predictions. PMID:358526

  17. Schlieren, Phase-Contrast, and Spectroscopy Diagnostics for the LBNL HIF Plasma Channel Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, D. M.; Niemann, C.; Fessenden, T. J.; Leemans, W.; Vandersloot, K.; Dahlbacka, G.; Yu, S. S.; Sharp, W. M.; Tauschwitz, A.

    1999-11-01

    The LBNL Plasma Channel experiment has demonstrated stable 42-cm Z-pinch discharge plasma channels with peak currents in excess of 50 kA for a 7 torr nitrogen, 30 kV discharge. These channels offer the possibility of transporting heavy-ion beams for inertial fusion. We postulate that the stability of these channels resides in the existance of a neutral-gas density depresion created by a pre-pulse discharge before the main capacitor bank discharge is created. Here, we present the results and experimental diagnostics setup used for the study of the pre-pulse and main bank channels. Observation of both the plasma and neutral gas dynamics is achieved. Schlieren, Zernike's phase-contrast, and spectroscopic techniques are used. Preliminary Schlieren results show a gas shockwave moving radially at a rate of ≈ 10^6 mm/sec as a result of the fast and localized deposited energy during the evolution of the pre-pulse channel. This data will be used to validate simulation codes (BUCKY and CYCLOPS).

  18. Non-invasive classification of microcalcifications with phase-contrast X-ray mammography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhentian; Hauser, Nik; Singer, Gad; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A; Schneider, Christof W; Stampanoni, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Microcalcifications can be indicative in the diagnosis of early breast cancer. Here we report a non-invasive diagnostic method that may potentially distinguish between different types of microcalcifications using X-ray phase-contrast imaging. Our approach exploits the complementary nature of the absorption and small-angle scattering signals of microcalcifications, obtained simultaneously with an X-ray grating interferometer on a conventional X-ray tube. We demonstrate that the new approach has 100% sensitivity and specificity when applied to phantom data, and we provide evidence of the solidity of the technique by showing its discrimination power when applied to fixed biopsies, to non-fixed tissue specimens and to fresh, whole-breast samples. The proposed method might be further developed to improve early breast cancer diagnosis and has the potential to increase the diagnostic accuracy and reduce the number of uncomfortable breast biopsies, or, in case of widespread microcalcifications, to select the biopsy site before intervention. PMID:24827387

  19. X-ray micro-beam techniques and phase contrast tomography applied to biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, Michela; Campi, Gaetano; Bukreeva, Inna; Pelliccia, Daniele; Burghammer, Manfred; Tromba, Giuliana; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena; Cedola, Alessia

    2015-12-01

    A deeper comprehension of the biomineralization (BM) process is at the basis of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine developments. Several in-vivo and in-vitro studies were dedicated to this purpose via the application of 2D and 3D diagnostic techniques. Here, we develop a new methodology, based on different complementary experimental techniques (X-ray phase contrast tomography, micro-X-ray diffraction and micro-X-ray fluorescence scanning technique) coupled to new analytical tools. A qualitative and quantitative structural investigation, from the atomic to the micrometric length scale, is obtained for engineered bone tissues. The high spatial resolution achieved by X-ray scanning techniques allows us to monitor the bone formation at the first-formed mineral deposit at the organic-mineral interface within a porous scaffold. This work aims at providing a full comprehension of the morphology and functionality of the biomineralization process, which is of key importance for developing new drugs for preventing and healing bone diseases and for the development of bio-inspired materials.

  20. Hemodynamic evaluation with TURBO BRISK--a rapid phase contrast angiography technique.

    PubMed

    Anayiotos, A S; Kortright, E; Doyle, M; Walsh, E G; Fuisz, A R; Pohost, G M

    2000-01-01

    Hemodynamic imaging by phase contrast angiography was significantly accelerated by selective interpolation and segmentation in k-space using TURBO BRISK. The method was tested in vitro on three independent flowfields, representative of human blood rheology: a straight tube simulating the descending aorta, a curved tube simulating the aortic arch and a two-chamber orifice flow model simulating valvular regurgitation. The results were compared to data obtained by Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and showed good agreement. For the straight tube, the flow velocity obtained by five TURBO BRISK methods with increasing segmentation factors and corresponding time savings showed good agreement with LDV. For the curved tube, the velocity showed good general agreement with some differences in the decelerating part of the cycle, and in the low-velocity secondary flow structures. The orifice flow evaluation, the most time consuming case, was performed by the control volume method. It showed good agreement with actual flows through the orifice. Data acquisitions for TURBO-4 BRISK could be performed in 20s for each velocity component. The method shows promise for breath-hold acquisitions in clinical applications, including calculation of blood flow volumes through diseased arteries, measurement of blood backflow volumes through dysfunctional heart valves to time valve replacement operations, and evaluation of arterial wall shear stress, an important factor in the genesis of atherosclerosis.

  1. High-throughput 3D tracking of bacteria on a standard phase contrast microscope

    PubMed Central

    Taute, K.M.; Gude, S.; Tans, S.J.; Shimizu, T.S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria employ diverse motility patterns in traversing complex three-dimensional (3D) natural habitats. 2D microscopy misses crucial features of 3D behaviour, but the applicability of existing 3D tracking techniques is constrained by their performance or ease of use. Here we present a simple, broadly applicable, high-throughput 3D bacterial tracking method for use in standard phase contrast microscopy. Bacteria are localized at micron-scale resolution over a range of 350 × 300 × 200 μm by maximizing image cross-correlations between their observed diffraction patterns and a reference library. We demonstrate the applicability of our technique to a range of bacterial species and exploit its high throughput to expose hidden contributions of bacterial individuality to population-level variability in motile behaviour. The simplicity of this powerful new tool for bacterial motility research renders 3D tracking accessible to a wider community and paves the way for investigations of bacterial motility in complex 3D environments. PMID:26522289

  2. Muscle Velocity and Inertial Force from Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wentland, Andrew L.; McWalter, Emily J.; Pal, Saikat; Delp, Scott L.; Gold, Garry E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate velocity waveforms in muscle and to create a tool and algorithm for computing and analyzing muscle inertial forces derived from 2D phase contrast (PC) MRI. Materials and Methods PC MRI was performed in the forearm of four healthy volunteers during 1 Hz cycles of wrist flexion-extension as well as in the lower leg of six healthy volunteers during 1 Hz cycles of plantarflexion-dorsiflexion. Inertial forces (F) were derived via the equation F = ma. The mass, m, was derived by multiplying voxel volume by voxel-by-voxel estimates of density via fat-water separation techniques. Acceleration, a, was obtained via the derivative of the PC MRI velocity waveform. Results Mean velocities in the flexors of the forearm and lower leg were 1.94 ± 0.97 cm/s and 5.57 ± 2.72 cm/s, respectively, as averaged across all subjects; the inertial forces in the flexors of the forearm and lower leg were 1.9 × 10-3 ± 1.3 × 10-3 N and 1.1 × 10-2 ± 6.1 × 10-3 N, respectively, as averaged across all subjects. Conclusion PC MRI provided a promising means of computing muscle velocities and inertial forces—providing the first method for quantifying inertial forces. PMID:25425185

  3. Rule-based fuzzy vector median filters for 3D phase contrast MRI segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundareswaran, Kartik S.; Frakes, David H.; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2008-02-01

    Recent technological advances have contributed to the advent of phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PCMRI) as standard practice in clinical environments. In particular, decreased scan times have made using the modality more feasible. PCMRI is now a common tool for flow quantification, and for more complex vector field analyses that target the early detection of problematic flow conditions. Segmentation is one component of this type of application that can impact the accuracy of the final product dramatically. Vascular segmentation, in general, is a long-standing problem that has received significant attention. Segmentation in the context of PCMRI data, however, has been explored less and can benefit from object-based image processing techniques that incorporate fluids specific information. Here we present a fuzzy rule-based adaptive vector median filtering (FAVMF) algorithm that in combination with active contour modeling facilitates high-quality PCMRI segmentation while mitigating the effects of noise. The FAVMF technique was tested on 111 synthetically generated PC MRI slices and on 15 patients with congenital heart disease. The results were compared to other multi-dimensional filters namely the adaptive vector median filter, the adaptive vector directional filter, and the scalar low pass filter commonly used in PC MRI applications. FAVMF significantly outperformed the standard filtering methods (p < 0.0001). Two conclusions can be drawn from these results: a) Filtering should be performed after vessel segmentation of PC MRI; b) Vector based filtering methods should be used instead of scalar techniques.

  4. Quantitative Three-Dimensional Imaging of Lipid, Protein, and Water Contents via X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Willner, Marian; Viermetz, Manuel; Marschner, Mathias; Scherer, Kai; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander; Noël, Peter; Rummeny, Ernst; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography is an emerging imaging technology with powerful capabilities for three-dimensional (3D) visualization of weakly absorbing objects such as biological soft tissues. This technique is an extension of existing X-ray applications because conventional attenuation-contrast images are simultaneously acquired. The complementary information provided by both the contrast modalities suggests that enhanced material characterization is possible when performing combined data analysis. In this study, we describe how protein, lipid, and water concentrations in each 3D voxel can be quantified by vector decomposition. Experimental results of dairy products, porcine fat and rind, and different human soft tissue types are presented. The results demonstrate the potential of phase-contrast imaging as a new analysis tool. The 3D representations of protein, lipid, and water contents open up new opportunities in the fields of biology, medicine, and food science. PMID:27003308

  5. Tangential phase contrast imaging diagnostic for density fluctuation measurement on CDX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Ernest P.

    Understanding the nature and effects of turbulence is one of the central efforts in fusion science. Spatially resolved measurement of turbulent fluctuations in the core of hot fusion plasmas would permit the detailed investigation of the relationship between turbulence characteristics and variations in global confinement and local gradients. The tangential CO2 laser phase contrast imaging system was developed on the Current Drive Experiment Upgrade (CDX-U), to allow such measurements to be made. Theoretical work demonstrates that the effect of the plasma on the tangential imaging beam is approximately that of a shift-invariant point-spread function. The result indicates that the recovery of core-localized density fluctuation images using a spatial filter is possible in principle. The imaging process is studied through extensive computer simulations. Results show that a simple step-function phase mirror design provides adequate qualitative image recovery, even in the presence of non-ideal effects in the plasma model, such as a finite k∥ variation along the field lines and significant field line pitch. The instrumental components of the system are characterized and calibrated and the absolute system sensitivity is calculated. Sound waves are used as test phase objects to calibrate the diagnostic. The tests locate the image plane, verify the system magnification, and demonstrate spatial filtering capabilities. Plasma measurements show adequate signal to noise and k spectrum measurement capability. Localization of the measurement is suggested by measurements of sawtooth modes. Full experimental demonstration of image recovery, however, will require further work. Preliminary analyses of the MHD activity and turbulence are done. Analysis of the sawtooth mode measurements indicate a long wavelength structure (kr/leq0.78cm-1) localized to the core, and a density fluctuation amplitude of (3.7/pm0.7)cm-1, yielding /Delta n/n≈(17/pm3)/%. A measurement of the fluctuation k

  6. X-ray phase contrast imaging of the breast: Analysis of tissue simulating materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Phase contrast imaging, particularly of the breast, is being actively investigated. The purpose of this work is to investigate the x-ray phase contrast properties of breast tissues and commonly used breast tissue substitutes or phantom materials with an aim of determining the phantom materials best representative of breast tissues. Methods: Elemental compositions of breast tissues including adipose, fibroglandular, and skin were used to determine the refractive index, n= 1 -{delta}+i {beta}. The real part of the refractive index, specifically the refractive index decrement ({delta}), over the energy range of 5-50 keV were determined using XOP software (version 2.3, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, France). Calcium oxalate and calcium hydroxyapatite were considered to represent the material compositions of microcalcifications in vivo. Nineteen tissue substitutes were considered as possible candidates to represent adipose tissue, fibroglandular tissue and skin, and four phantom materials were considered as possible candidates to represent microcalcifications. For each material, either the molecular formula, if available, or the elemental composition based on weight fraction, was used to determine {delta}. At each x-ray photon energy, the absolute percent difference in {delta} between the breast tissue and the substitute material was determined, from which three candidates were selected. From these candidate tissue substitutes, the material that minimized the absolute percent difference in linear attenuation coefficient {mu}, and hence {beta}, was considered to be best representative of that breast tissue. Results: Over the energy range of 5-50 keV, while the {delta} of CB3 and fibroglandular tissue-equivalent material were within 1% of that of fibroglandular tissue, the {mu} of fibroglandular tissue-equivalent material better approximated the fibroglandular tissue. While the {delta} of BR10 and adipose tissue-equivalent material were within 1% of

  7. Non-destructive characterisation of polymers and Al-alloys by polychromatic cone-beam phase contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, Johann; Plank, Bernhard; Requena, Guillermo

    2012-02-15

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT) has become a very important tool for the non-destructive characterisation of materials. Continuous improvements in the quality and performance of X-ray tubes and detectors have led to cone-beam XCT systems that can now achieve spatial resolutions down to 1 {mu}m and even below. Since not only the amplitude but also the phase of an X-ray beam is altered while passing through an object, phase contrast effects can occur even for polychromatic sources when the spatial coherence due to a small focal spot size is high enough. This can lead to significant improvements over conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography. Phase contrast can increase by edge enhancement the visibility of small structures and of features which are only slightly different in attenuation. We report on the possibilities of polychromatic cone-beam phase contrast tomography for non-destructive characterisation of materials. A carbon fibre-reinforced polymer and the Al-alloys AlMg5Si7 and AlSi18 were investigated with high resolution cone-beam X-ray computed tomography with a polychromatic tube source. Under certain conditions strong phase contrast resulting in an upward and downward overshooting of the grey values across edges was observed. The phase effects are much stronger for the polymer than for the Al-alloys. The influence on the phase contrast of the parameters, including source-detector distance, focal spot size and tube acceleration voltage is presented. Maximum phase contrast was observed for a maximum distance between the source and the detector, for a low voltage and a minimum focal spot size at the X-ray source. The detectability of the different phases is improved by the edge enhancement and the resulting improvement of sharpness. Thus, a better segmentation of the carbon fibres in the fibre-reinforced polymer and of the Mg{sub 2}Si-phase in the AlMg5Si7-alloy is achieved. Primary and eutectic Si cannot be detected by attenuation-based X

  8. In vivo x-ray phase contrast analyzer-based imaging for longitudinal osteoarthritis studies in guinea pigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coan, Paola; Wagner, Andreas; Bravin, Alberto; Diemoz, Paul C.; Keyriläinen, Jani; Mollenhauer, Juergen

    2010-12-01

    Over the last two decades phase contrast x-ray imaging techniques have been extensively studied for applications in the biomedical field. Published results demonstrate the high capability of these imaging modalities of improving the image contrast of biological samples with respect to standard absorption-based radiography and routinely used clinical imaging techniques. A clear depiction of the anatomic structures and a more accurate disease diagnosis may be provided by using radiation doses comparable to or lower than those used in current clinical methods. In the literature many works show images of phantoms and excised biological samples proving the high sensitivity of the phase contrast imaging methods for in vitro investigations. In this scenario, the applications of the so-called analyzer-based x-ray imaging (ABI) phase contrast technique are particularly noteworthy. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo x-ray ABI phase contrast imaging for biomedical applications and in particular with respect to joint anatomic depiction and osteoarthritis detection. ABI in planar and tomographic modes was performed in vivo on articular joints of guinea pigs in order to investigate the animals with respect to osteoarthritis by using highly monochromatic x-rays of 52 keV and a low noise detector with a pixel size of 47 × 47 µm2. Images give strong evidence of the ability of ABI in depicting both anatomic structures in complex systems as living organisms and all known signs of osteoarthritis with high contrast, high spatial resolution and with an acceptable radiation dose. This paper presents the first proof of principle study of in vivo application of ABI. The technical challenges encountered when imaging an animal in vivo are discussed. This experimental study is an important step toward the study of clinical applications of phase contrast x-ray imaging techniques.

  9. Milestones and basic principles of grating-based x-ray and neutron phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-31

    This is a review of the most important milestones in the last ten years of development in the field of grating-based x-ray and neutron imaging. It provides a description of the basic imaging principles of grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field radiography and present some exemplary multimodal radiography results obtained with x-rays and neutrons. Furthermore, it reviews the theory of grating-based quantitative transmission, phase-contrast, and dark-field scattering computed tomography.

  10. Single-shot x-ray differential phase contrast and diffraction imaging using two-dimensional transmission gratings

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Harold H.; Bennett, Eric E.; Kopace, Rael; Stein, Ashley F.; Pai, Vinay

    2011-01-01

    We describe an x-ray differential phase contrast imaging method based on two-dimensional transmission gratings that are directly resolved by an x-ray camera. X-ray refraction and diffraction in the sample lead to variations of the positions and amplitudes of the grating fringes on the camera. These effects can be quantified through spatial harmonic analysis. The use of 2D gratings allows differential phase contrast in several directions to be obtained from a single image. When compared to previous grating-based interferometry methods, this approach obviates the need for multiple exposures and separate measurements for different directions, and thereby accelerates imaging speed. PMID:20548343

  11. A grating-based single-shot x-ray phase contrast and diffraction method for in vivo imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Eric E.; Kopace, Rael; Stein, Ashley F.; Wen Han

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a single-shot version of the grating-based phase contrast x-ray imaging method and demonstrate its capability of in vivo animal imaging. Here, the authors describe the principle and experimental results. They show the source of artifacts in the phase contrast signal and optimal designs that minimize them. They also discuss its current limitations and ways to overcome them. Methods: A single lead grid was inserted midway between an x-ray tube and an x-ray camera in the planar radiography setting. The grid acted as a transmission grating and cast periodic dark fringes on the camera. The camera had sufficient spatial resolution to resolve the fringes. Refraction and diffraction in the imaged object manifested as position shifts and amplitude attenuation of the fringes, respectively. In order to quantify these changes precisely without imposing a fixed geometric relationship between the camera pixel array and the fringes, a spatial harmonic method in the Fourier domain was developed. The level of the differential phase (refraction) contrast as a function of hardware specifications and device geometry was derived and used to guide the optimal placement of the grid and object. Both ex vivo and in vivo images of rodent extremities were collected to demonstrate the capability of the method. The exposure time using a 50 W tube was 28 s. Results: Differential phase contrast images of glass beads acquired at various grid and object positions confirmed theoretical predictions of how phase contrast and extraneous artifacts vary with the device geometry. In anesthetized rats, a single exposure yielded artifact-free images of absorption, differential phase contrast, and diffraction. Differential phase contrast was strongest at bone-soft tissue interfaces, while diffraction was strongest in bone. Conclusions: The spatial harmonic method allowed us to obtain absorption, differential phase contrast, and diffraction images, all from a

  12. Application of Fourier-wavelet regularized deconvolution for improving image quality of free space propagation x-ray phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhongxing; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan; Zhang, Lixin

    2012-11-21

    New x-ray phase contrast imaging techniques without using synchrotron radiation confront a common problem from the negative effects of finite source size and limited spatial resolution. These negative effects swamp the fine phase contrast fringes and make them almost undetectable. In order to alleviate this problem, deconvolution procedures should be applied to the blurred x-ray phase contrast images. In this study, three different deconvolution techniques, including Wiener filtering, Tikhonov regularization and Fourier-wavelet regularized deconvolution (ForWaRD), were applied to the simulated and experimental free space propagation x-ray phase contrast images of simple geometric phantoms. These algorithms were evaluated in terms of phase contrast improvement and signal-to-noise ratio. The results demonstrate that the ForWaRD algorithm is most appropriate for phase contrast image restoration among above-mentioned methods; it can effectively restore the lost information of phase contrast fringes while reduce the amplified noise during Fourier regularization.

  13. Study of OSEM with different subsets in grating-based X-ray differential phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Hong, Youli; Zhu, Peiping; Yuan, Qingxi; Huang, Wanxia; Wang, Zhili; Chu, Shengqi; McDonald, Samuel A; Marone, Federica; Stampanoni, Marco; Wu, Ziyu

    2011-08-01

    Impressive developments in X-ray imaging are associated with X-ray phase contrast computed tomography based on grating interferometry, a technique that provides increased contrast compared with conventional absorption-based imaging. A new "single-step" method capable of separating phase information from other contributions has been recently proposed. This approach not only simplifies data-acquisition procedures, but, compared with the existing phase step approach, significantly reduces the dose delivered to a sample. However, the image reconstruction procedure is more demanding than for traditional methods and new algorithms have to be developed to take advantage of the "single-step" method. In the work discussed in this paper, a fast iterative image reconstruction method named OSEM (ordered subsets expectation maximization) was applied to experimental data to evaluate its performance and range of applicability. The OSEM algorithm with different subsets was also characterized by comparison of reconstruction image quality and convergence speed. Computer simulations and experimental results confirm the reliability of this new algorithm for phase-contrast computed tomography applications. Compared with the traditional filtered back projection algorithm, in particular in the presence of a noisy acquisition, it furnishes better images at a higher spatial resolution and with lower noise. We emphasize that the method is highly compatible with future X-ray phase contrast imaging clinical applications.

  14. Age, training, and previous experience predict race performance in long-distance inline skaters, not anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2012-02-01

    The association of characteristics of anthropometry, training, and previous experience with race time in 84 recreational, long-distance, inline skaters at the longest inline marathon in Europe (111 km), the Inline One-eleven in Switzerland, was investigated to identify predictor variables for performance. Age, duration per training unit, and personal best time were the only three variables related to race time in a multiple regression, while none of the 16 anthropometric variables were related. Anthropometric characteristics seem to be of no importance for a fast race time in a long-distance inline skating race in contrast to training volume and previous experience, when controlled with covariates. Improving performance in a long-distance inline skating race might be related to a high training volume and previous race experience. Also, doing such a race requires a parallel psychological effort, mental stamina, focus, and persistence. This may be reflected in the preparation and training for the event. Future studies should investigate what motivates these athletes to train and compete.

  15. Low-dose, phase-contrast mammography with high signal-to-noise ratio

    PubMed Central

    Gromann, Lukas B.; Bequé, Dirk; Scherer, Kai; Willer, Konstantin; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Herzen, Julia; Grandl, Susanne; Hellerhoff, Karin; Sperl, Jonathan I.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Cozzini, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Differential phase-contrast X-ray imaging using a Talbot-Lau interferometer has recently shown promising results for applications in medical imaging. However, reducing the applied radiation dose remains a major challenge. In this study, we consider the realization of a Talbot-Lau interferometer in a high Talbot order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio for low-dose applications. The quantitative performance of π and π/2 systems at high Talbot orders is analyzed through simulations, and the design energy and X-ray spectrum are optimized for mammography. It is found that operation even at very high Talbot orders is feasible and beneficial for image quality. As long as the X-ray spectrum is matched to the visibility spectrum, the SNR continuously increases with the Talbot order for π-systems. We find that the optimal X-ray spectra and design energies are almost independent of the Talbot order and that the overall imaging performance is robust against small variations in these parameters. Discontinuous spectra, such as that from molybdenum, are less robust because the characteristic lines may coincide with minima in the visibility spectra; however, they may offer slightly better performance. We verify this hypothesis by realizing a prototype system with a mean fringe visibility of above 40% at the seventh Talbot order. With this prototype, a proof-of-principle measurement of a freshly dissected breast at reasonable compression to 4 cm is conducted with a mean glandular dose of only 3 mGy but with a high SNR. PMID:26977347

  16. On filtration for high-energy phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Christian; Mohamed, Ashraf; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    Phase-sensitive x-ray imaging promises unprecedented soft-tissue contrast and resolution. However, several practical challenges have to be overcome when using the setup in a clinical environment. The system design that is currently closest to clinical use is the grating-based Talbot-Lau interferometer (GBI).1-3 The requirements for patient imaging are low patient dose, fast imaging time, and high image quality. For GBI, these requirements can be met most successfully with a narrow energy width, high- ux spectrum. Additionally, to penetrate a human-sized object, the design energy of the system has to be well above 40 keV. To our knowledge, little research has been done so far to investigate optimal GBI filtration at such high x-ray energies. In this paper, we study different filtration strategies and their impact on high-energy GBI. Specifically, we compare copper filtration at low peak voltage with equal-absorption, equal-imaging time K-edge filtration of spectra with higher peak voltage under clinically realistic boundary conditions. We specifically focus on a design energy of 59 keV and investigate combinations of tube current, peak voltage, and filtration that lead to equal patient absorption. Theoretical considerations suggest that the K edge of tantalum might provide a transmission pocket at around 59 keV, yielding a well-shaped spectrum. Although one can observe a slight visibility benefit when using tungsten or tantalum filtration, experimental results indicate that visibility benefits most from a low x-ray tube peak voltage.

  17. Level set segmentation of the heart from 4D phase contrast MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainmuller, Dagmar; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Ley, Sebastian; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2008-03-01

    Blood flow properties in the heart can be examined non invasively by means of Phase Contrast MRI (PC MRI), an imaging technique that provides not only morphology images but also velocity information. We present a novel feature combination for level set segmentation of the heart's cavities in multidirectional 4D PC MRI data. The challenge in performing the segmentation task successfully in this context is first of all the bad image quality, as compared to classical MRI. As generally in heart segmentation, the intra and inter subject variability of the heart has to be coped with as well. The central idea of our approach is to integrate a set of essentially differing sources of information into the segmentation process to make it capable of handling qualitatively bad and highly varying data. To the best of our knowledge our system is the first to concurrently incorporate a flow measure as well as a priori shape knowledge into a level set framework in addition to the commonly used edge and curvature information. The flow measure is derived from PC MRI velocity data. As shape knowledge we use a 3D shape of the respective cavity. We validated our system design by a series of qualitative performance tests. The combined use of shape knowledge and a flow measure increases segmentation quality compared to results obtained by using only one of those features. A first clinical study was performed on two 4D datasets, from which we segmented the left ventricle and atrium. The segmentation results were examined by an expert and judged suitable for use in clinical practice.

  18. Impact of Cardiac Arrhythmia on Velocity Quantification by ECG gated Phase Contrast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Markl, Michael; Fluckiger, Jacob; Lee, Daniel C.; Ng, Jason; Goldberger, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To systematically investigate the impact of beat-to-beat variations on ECG gated multi-beat flow imaging with phase contrast (PC) MRI based on real time in-vivo TEE data in patients with known arrhythmia. Methods Real-time 2D Doppler transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) was performed in five patients with atrial fibrillation (4 male, age=64±8.7 years). TEE data provided real-time left atrial (LA) and left ventricular (LV) flow velocities in consecutive cardiac cycles with different RR-interval durations. PC-MRI acquisitions were simulated from the TEE velocity measures by constructing time-resolved k-space data for segmented sampling schemes typically used for ECG gated 2D PC MRI. Each simulation was repeated 100 times to minimize effects from data that may be weighted to a particular beat in the center of k-space. The resulting LA and LV velocities were compared to the average TEE velocities and data from individual cardiac cycles. Results Despite beat-to-beat variations velocities in TEE data, ECG gated flow imaging with MRI could reproduce persistent average LA and LV mean velocities within 7.0–7.4% compared to TEE. Conclusions PC-MRI velocity measurements in patients with varying R-R interval durations are not significantly different from time-averaged real-time velocity data for a typical segmented k-space data acquisition schemes. Though beat-to-beat variations in atrial velocities that were observed with TEE cannot be detected with ECG gated multi-beat PC MRI, it can reliably assess average flow patterns across multiple beats PMID:25978593

  19. Direct Comparison of Gyrokinetic Turbulence Simulations with Phase Contrast Imaging Fluctuation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Darin; Long, A.; Basse, N.; Lin, L.; Porkolab, M.; Dorland, W.

    2006-04-01

    We have developed a synthetic diagnostic^1 for the GS2 gyrokinetic code for direct comparisons with phase contrast imaging (PCI) measurements of density fluctuations in Alcator C-Mod. The gyrokinetic simulation is carried out in a local, field line following flux-tube, while PCI measures density fluctuations along 32 chords passing vertically through the plasma cross-section.^2 Transforming from Clebsch to cartesian coordinates, and integrating appropriately over portions of the flux tube viewed by the diagnostic, yields a density fluctuation spectrum versus wavenumber kR in the major radius direction. To achieve vertical localization, we examine an ITB case in which the spectrum is dominated by a strong trapped electron mode, localized near the half-radius. The wavelength spectrum from the simulations, using the synthetic diagnostic, closely reproduces the PCI spectrum. Contributions from kψ, where B=∇αx∇ψ, downshift the GS2 kα spectrum to improve upon our previous raw comparison with the PCI kR spectrum.^3 ^1A. Long, D. R. Ernst et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50(8) p. 153, GP1.48, also p. 235, LP1.37 http://www.psfc.mit.edu/research/alcator/pubs/APS/APS2005/ernst.pdf. ^2N. P. Basse et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 052512 (2005). ^3D. R. Ernst et al., 2004 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, IAEA-CN116/TH/4-1 http://www-naweb.iaea.org/napc/physics/fec/fec2004/datasets/TH4-1.html, see also Phys. Plasmas 11 (2004) 2637.

  20. In Vitro Validation of an Artefact Suppression Algorithm in X-Ray Phase-Contrast Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hirano, Shin-ichi; Gupta, Rajiv; Ando, Masami

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast tomography can significantly increase the contrast-resolution of conventional attenuation-contrast imaging, especially for soft-tissue structures that have very similar attenuation. Just as in attenuation-based tomography, phase contrast tomography requires a linear dependence of aggregate beam direction on the incremental direction alteration caused by individual voxels along the path of the X-ray beam. Dense objects such as calcifications in biological specimens violate this condition. There are extensive beam deflection artefacts in the vicinity of such structures because they result in large distortion of wave front due to the large difference of refractive index; for such large changes in beam direction, the transmittance of the silicon analyzer crystal saturates and is no longer linearly dependent on the angle of refraction. This paper describes a method by which these effects can be overcome and excellent soft-tissue contrast of phase tomography can be preserved in the vicinity of such artefact-producing structures. PMID:26295713

  1. In Vitro Validation of an Artefact Suppression Algorithm in X-Ray Phase-Contrast Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hirano, Shin-Ichi; Gupta, Rajiv; Ando, Masami

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast tomography can significantly increase the contrast-resolution of conventional attenuation-contrast imaging, especially for soft-tissue structures that have very similar attenuation. Just as in attenuation-based tomography, phase contrast tomography requires a linear dependence of aggregate beam direction on the incremental direction alteration caused by individual voxels along the path of the X-ray beam. Dense objects such as calcifications in biological specimens violate this condition. There are extensive beam deflection artefacts in the vicinity of such structures because they result in large distortion of wave front due to the large difference of refractive index; for such large changes in beam direction, the transmittance of the silicon analyzer crystal saturates and is no longer linearly dependent on the angle of refraction. This paper describes a method by which these effects can be overcome and excellent soft-tissue contrast of phase tomography can be preserved in the vicinity of such artefact-producing structures. PMID:26295713

  2. Quantification of signal detection performance degradation induced by phase-retrieval in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    In propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast (PB XPC) imaging, the measured image contains a mixture of absorption- and phase-contrast. To obtain separate images of the projected absorption and phase (i.e., refractive) properties of a sample, phase retrieval methods can be employed. It has been suggested that phase-retrieval can always improve image quality in PB XPC imaging. However, when objective (task-based) measures of image quality are employed, this is not necessarily true and phase retrieval can be detrimental. In this work, signal detection theory is utilized to quantify the performance of a Hotelling observer (HO) for detecting a known signal in a known background. Two cases are considered. In the first case, the HO acts directly on the measured intensity data. In the second case, the HO acts on either the retrieved phase or absorption image. We demonstrate that the performance of the HO is superior when acting on the measured intensity data. The loss of task-specific information induced by phase-retrieval is quantified by computing the efficiency of the HO as the ratio of the test statistic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the two cases. The effect of the system geometry on this efficiency is systematically investigated. Our findings confirm that phase-retrieval can impair signal detection performance in XPC imaging.

  3. Estimation of age based on tooth cementum annulations: A comparative study using light, polarized, and phase contrast microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Prabhpreet; Astekar, Madhusudan; Singh, Jappreet; Arora, Karandeep Singh; Bhalla, Gagandeep

    2015-01-01

    Context: The identification of living or deceased persons using unique traits and characteristics of the teeth and jaws is a cornerstone of forensic science. Teeth have been used to estimate age both in the young and old, as well as in the living and dead. Gradual structural changes in teeth throughout life are the basis for age estimation. Tooth cementum annulation (TCA) is a microscopic method for the determination of an individual's age based on the analysis of incremental lines of cementum. Aim: To compare ages estimated using incremental lines of cementum as visualized by bright field microscopy, polarized microscopy, and phase contrast microscopy with the actual age of subject and to determine accuracy and feasibility of the method used. Materials and Methods: Cementum annulations of 60 permanent teeth were analyzed after longitudinal ground sections were made in the mesiodistal plane. The incremental lines were counted manually using a light, polarized and phase contrast microscopy. Ages were estimated and then compared with the actual age of individual. Statistical Analysis: Analysis of variance (ANOVA), Student's t-test, the Pearson product-moment corre (PPMCC) and regression analysis were performed. Results: PPMCC value r = 0.347, 0.542 and 0.989 were obtained using light, polarized and phase contrast microscopy methods respectively. Conclusion: It was concluded that incremental lines of cementum were most clearly visible under a phase contrast microscope, followed by a polarized microscope, and then a light microscope when used for age estimation. PMID:26816462

  4. Experimental Realisation of High-sensitivity Laboratory X-ray Grating-based Phase-contrast Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Velroyen, Astrid; Marschner, Mathias; Hipp, Alexander; Meiser, Jan; Koch, Frieder; Schröter, Tobias; Kunka, Danays; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to perform high-sensitivity X-ray phase-contrast imaging with laboratory grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (gbPC-CT) setups is of great interest for a broad range of high-resolution biomedical applications. However, achieving high sensitivity with laboratory gbPC-CT setups still poses a challenge because several factors such as the reduced flux, the polychromaticity of the spectrum, and the limited coherence of the X-ray source reduce the performance of laboratory gbPC-CT in comparison to gbPC-CT at synchrotron facilities. In this work, we present our laboratory X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometry setup operating at 40 kVp and describe how we achieve the high sensitivity yet unrivalled by any other laboratory X-ray phase-contrast technique. We provide the angular sensitivity expressed via the minimum resolvable refraction angle both in theory and experiment, and compare our data with other differential phase-contrast setups. Furthermore, we show that the good stability of our high-sensitivity setup allows for tomographic scans, by which even the electron density can be retrieved quantitatively as has been demonstrated in several preclinical studies. PMID:27040492

  5. Realistic wave-optics simulation of X-ray phase-contrast imaging at a human scale

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Yongjin; Segars, W. Paul; Pan, Adam; Ando, Masami; Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Gupta, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) can dramatically improve soft tissue contrast in X-ray medical imaging. Despite worldwide efforts to develop novel XPCI systems, a numerical framework to rigorously predict the performance of a clinical XPCI system at a human scale is not yet available. We have developed such a tool by combining a numerical anthropomorphic phantom defined with non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS) and a wave optics-based simulator that can accurately capture the phase-contrast signal from a human-scaled numerical phantom. Using a synchrotron-based, high-performance XPCI system, we provide qualitative comparison between simulated and experimental images. Our tool can be used to simulate the performance of XPCI on various disease entities and compare proposed XPCI systems in an unbiased manner. PMID:26169570

  6. Propagation based differential phase contrast imaging and tomography of murine tissue with a laser plasma x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Laperle, Christopher M.; Wintermeyer, Philip; Wands, Jack R.; Shi, Daxin; Anastasio, Mark A.; Li Xiaodi; Ahr, Brian; Diebold, Gerald J.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2007-10-22

    An ultrafast, laser-driven x-ray source with a liquid mercury target has been used for phase contrast imaging of an excised murine liver and for computed tomography of an electronic component. The x-ray spectrum emitted at 5 kHz repetition rate is found to be similar to that of a 2.5 W, 30 kV microfocus x-ray tube with a tungsten anode. The images of the excised liver show the venous network with approximately 20 {mu}m spatial resolution. Phase contrast features in the tomographic images of the electronic component, transferred to the orthogonal cross sections upon reconstruction, show the internal components of the device with high contrast. Adequate signal-to-noise ratios in the images were achieved with exposure times between 1 and 3 min.

  7. Lensless multispectral digital in-line holographic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryle, James P.; McDonnell, Susan; Sheridan, John T.

    2011-12-01

    An compact multispectral digital in-line holographic microscope (DIHM) is developed that emulates Gabor's original holographic principle. Using sources of varying spatial coherence (laser, LED), holographic images of objects, including optical fiber, latex microspheres, and cancer cells, are successfully captured and numerically processed. Quantitative measurement of cell locations and percentage confluence are estimated, and pseudocolor images are also presented. Phase profiles of weakly scattering cells are obtained from the DIHM and are compared to those produced by a commercially available off-axis digital holographic microscope.

  8. Optimisation of image reconstruction for phase-contrast x-ray Talbot-Lau imaging with regard to mechanical robustness.

    PubMed

    Seifert, M; Kaeppler, S; Hauke, C; Horn, F; Pelzer, G; Rieger, J; Michel, T; Riess, C; Anton, G

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging opens new opportunities, inter alia, in medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Because, information about the attenuation properties and about the refractive properties of an object are gained simultaneously. Talbot-Lau imaging requires the knowledge of a reference or free-field image. The long-term stability of a Talbot-Lau interferometer is related to the time span of the validity of a measured reference image. It would be desirable to keep the validity of the reference image for a day or longer to improve feasibility of Talbot-Lau imaging. However, for example thermal and other long-term external influences result in drifting effects of the phase images. Therefore, phases are shifting over time and the reference image is not valid for long-term measurements. Thus, artifacts occur in differential phase-contrast images. We developed an algorithm to determine the differential phase-contrast image with the help of just one calibration image, which is valid for a long time-period. With the help of this algorithm, called phase-plane-fit method, it is possible to save measurement-time, as it is not necessary to take a reference image for each measurement. Additionally, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, short-term effects like vibrations or distortions of the system lead to imperfections within the phase-stepping procedure. Consequently, artifacts occur in all three image modalities (differential phase-contrast image, attenuation image and dark-field image) of Talbot-Lau imaging. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging for example in clinical routine or non-destructive testing. In this publication an algorithm of Vargas et al is applied and complemented to correct inaccurate phase-step positions with the help of a principal component analysis (PCA

  9. Optimisation of image reconstruction for phase-contrast x-ray Talbot-Lau imaging with regard to mechanical robustness.

    PubMed

    Seifert, M; Kaeppler, S; Hauke, C; Horn, F; Pelzer, G; Rieger, J; Michel, T; Riess, C; Anton, G

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging opens new opportunities, inter alia, in medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Because, information about the attenuation properties and about the refractive properties of an object are gained simultaneously. Talbot-Lau imaging requires the knowledge of a reference or free-field image. The long-term stability of a Talbot-Lau interferometer is related to the time span of the validity of a measured reference image. It would be desirable to keep the validity of the reference image for a day or longer to improve feasibility of Talbot-Lau imaging. However, for example thermal and other long-term external influences result in drifting effects of the phase images. Therefore, phases are shifting over time and the reference image is not valid for long-term measurements. Thus, artifacts occur in differential phase-contrast images. We developed an algorithm to determine the differential phase-contrast image with the help of just one calibration image, which is valid for a long time-period. With the help of this algorithm, called phase-plane-fit method, it is possible to save measurement-time, as it is not necessary to take a reference image for each measurement. Additionally, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, short-term effects like vibrations or distortions of the system lead to imperfections within the phase-stepping procedure. Consequently, artifacts occur in all three image modalities (differential phase-contrast image, attenuation image and dark-field image) of Talbot-Lau imaging. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging for example in clinical routine or non-destructive testing. In this publication an algorithm of Vargas et al is applied and complemented to correct inaccurate phase-step positions with the help of a principal component analysis (PCA

  10. Optimisation of image reconstruction for phase-contrast x-ray Talbot–Lau imaging with regard to mechanical robustness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, M.; Kaeppler, S.; Hauke, C.; Horn, F.; Pelzer, G.; Rieger, J.; Michel, T.; Riess, C.; Anton, G.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging opens new opportunities, inter alia, in medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Because, information about the attenuation properties and about the refractive properties of an object are gained simultaneously. Talbot–Lau imaging requires the knowledge of a reference or free-field image. The long-term stability of a Talbot–Lau interferometer is related to the time span of the validity of a measured reference image. It would be desirable to keep the validity of the reference image for a day or longer to improve feasibility of Talbot–Lau imaging. However, for example thermal and other long-term external influences result in drifting effects of the phase images. Therefore, phases are shifting over time and the reference image is not valid for long-term measurements. Thus, artifacts occur in differential phase-contrast images. We developed an algorithm to determine the differential phase-contrast image with the help of just one calibration image, which is valid for a long time-period. With the help of this algorithm, called phase-plane-fit method, it is possible to save measurement-time, as it is not necessary to take a reference image for each measurement. Additionally, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, short-term effects like vibrations or distortions of the system lead to imperfections within the phase-stepping procedure. Consequently, artifacts occur in all three image modalities (differential phase-contrast image, attenuation image and dark-field image) of Talbot–Lau imaging. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging for example in clinical routine or non-destructive testing. In this publication an algorithm of Vargas et al is applied and complemented to correct inaccurate phase-step positions with the help of a principal component analysis

  11. Optimisation of image reconstruction for phase-contrast x-ray Talbot-Lau imaging with regard to mechanical robustness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, M.; Kaeppler, S.; Hauke, C.; Horn, F.; Pelzer, G.; Rieger, J.; Michel, T.; Riess, C.; Anton, G.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging opens new opportunities, inter alia, in medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Because, information about the attenuation properties and about the refractive properties of an object are gained simultaneously. Talbot-Lau imaging requires the knowledge of a reference or free-field image. The long-term stability of a Talbot-Lau interferometer is related to the time span of the validity of a measured reference image. It would be desirable to keep the validity of the reference image for a day or longer to improve feasibility of Talbot-Lau imaging. However, for example thermal and other long-term external influences result in drifting effects of the phase images. Therefore, phases are shifting over time and the reference image is not valid for long-term measurements. Thus, artifacts occur in differential phase-contrast images. We developed an algorithm to determine the differential phase-contrast image with the help of just one calibration image, which is valid for a long time-period. With the help of this algorithm, called phase-plane-fit method, it is possible to save measurement-time, as it is not necessary to take a reference image for each measurement. Additionally, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, short-term effects like vibrations or distortions of the system lead to imperfections within the phase-stepping procedure. Consequently, artifacts occur in all three image modalities (differential phase-contrast image, attenuation image and dark-field image) of Talbot-Lau imaging. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging for example in clinical routine or non-destructive testing. In this publication an algorithm of Vargas et al is applied and complemented to correct inaccurate phase-step positions with the help of a principal component analysis (PCA

  12. Investigation of Moiré pattern-based phase retrieval approach for differential phase-contrast cone beam CT imaging using a hospital-grade tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Weixing; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Yang; Liu, Jiangkun; Conover, David

    2012-03-01

    The phase stepping algorithm is commonly used for phase retrieval in grating-based differential phase-contrast (DPC) imaging, which requires multiple intensity images to compute one DPC image. It is not efficient for data acquisition, especially in the case of dynamic imaging using either DPC imaging or DPC-based come beam CT (DPC-CBCT) imaging. A Fourier transform-based approach has been developed for fringe pattern analysis in optics, and it was recently implemented into a synchrotron-based DPC tomography system. In this research, this approach is further developed for a bench-top DPC-CBCT imaging system with a hospital-grade x-ray tube. The key idea is to separate carrier fringes and object information in Fourier domain of the interferogram and to reconstruct the differentiated phase information using the object information. Only one interferogram is required for phase retrieval at a cost of spatial resolution. The fringes of moiré patterns are used as the carrier fringes, and a phantom is scanned to evaluate the approach. Various interferograms with different carrier fringe frequencies are investigated and the reconstruction image quality is evaluated in terms of contrast, noise and sharpness. The results indicated that the DPC images can be effectively retrieved using the Fourier transform-based approach and the reconstructed phase coefficient showed better contrast compared to that of attenuation-based contrast. The spatial resolution is acceptable in the phantom studies although it is not as good as the results of phase-stepping approach. The Fourier transform-based phase retrieval approach is able to greatly simplify data acquisition, to improve the temporal resolution and to make it possible for dynamic DPC-CBCT imaging. It is promising for perfusion imaging where spatial resolution is not a concern.

  13. Ptychography – a label free, high-contrast imaging technique for live cells using quantitative phase information

    PubMed Central

    Marrison, Joanne; Räty, Lotta; Marriott, Poppy; O'Toole, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Cell imaging often relies on synthetic or genetic fluorescent labels, to provide contrast which can be far from ideal for imaging cells in their in vivo state. We report on the biological application of a, label-free, high contrast microscopy technique known as ptychography, in which the image producing step is transferred from the microscope lens to a high-speed phase retrieval algorithm. We demonstrate that this technology is appropriate for label-free imaging of adherent cells and is particularly suitable for reporting cellular changes such as mitosis, apoptosis and cell differentiation. The high contrast, artefact-free, focus-free information rich images allow dividing cells to be distinguished from non-dividing cells by a greater than two-fold increase in cell contrast, and we demonstrate this technique is suitable for downstream automated cell segmentation and analysis. PMID:23917865

  14. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging reveals net retrograde aqueductal flow in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Ringstad, Geir; Emblem, Kyrre Eeg; Eide, Per Kristian

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to assess the net aqueductal stroke volume (ASV) and CSF aqueductal flow rate derived from phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) in patients with probable idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) before and after ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery, and to compare observations with intracranial pressure (ICP) scores. METHODS PC-MRI at the level of the sylvian aqueduct was undertaken in patients undergoing assessment for probable iNPH. Aqueductal flow in the craniocaudal direction was defined as positive, or antegrade flow, and net ASV was calculated by subtracting retrograde from antegrade aqueductal flow. Aqueductal flow rate per minute was calculated by multiplying net ASV by heart rate. During the same hospital admission, clinical examination was performed using NPH score and overnight continuous ICP monitoring. Twelve patients were followed prospectively 12 months after shunt placement with clinical assessment and a second PC-MRI. The study also included 2 healthy controls. RESULTS Among 21 patients examined for iNPH, 17 (81%) received a shunt (shunt group), and 4 were treated conservatively (conservative group). Among the patients with shunts, a clinical improvement was observed in 16 (94%) of the 17. Net ASV was negative in 16 (76%) of 21 patients before shunt placement and in 5 (42%) of 12 patients after shunt placement, and increased from a median of -5 μl (range -175 to 27 μl) to a median of 1 μl (range -61 to 30 μl; p = 0.04). Among the 12 patients with PC-MRI after shunt placement, 11 were shunt responders, and in 9 of these 11 either a reduced magnitude of retrograde aqueductal flow, or a complete reversal from retrograde to antegrade flow, occurred. Net ASV was significantly lower in the shunt group than in the conservative group (p = 0.01). The aqueductal flow rate increased from -0.56 ml/min (range -12.78 to 0.58 ml/min) to 0.06 ml/min (range -4.51 to 1.93 ml/min; p = 0.04) after shunt placement. CONCLUSIONS In

  15. Zernike phase contrast cryo-electron microscopy reveals 100 kDa component in a protein complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yi-Min; Wang, Chun-Hsiung; Chang, Jen-wei; Chen, Yi-yun; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Chang, Wei-Hau

    2013-12-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has become a powerful technique for obtaining near atomic structures for large protein assemblies or large virus particles, but the application to protein particles smaller than 200-300 kDa has been hampered by the feeble phase contrast obtained for such small samples and the limited number of electrons tolerated by them without incurring excessive radiation damage. By implementing a thin-film quarter-wave phase plate to a cryo-EM, Nagayama, one of the present authors, has recently restored the long-lost very low spatial frequencies, generating in-focus phase contrast superior to that of conventional defocusing phase contrast, and successfully applied the so-called Zernike phase-plate cryo-EM to target various biological samples in native state. Nevertheless, the sought-after goal of using enhanced phase contrast to reveal a native protein as small as 100 kDa waits to be realized. Here, we report a study in which 200 kV Zernike phase-plate cryo-EM with a plate cut-on periodicity of 36 nm was applied to visualize 100 kDa components of various protein complexes, including the small domains on the surface of an icosahedral particle of ˜38 nm derived from the dragon grouper nervous necrosis virus (DGNNV) and the labile sub-complex dissociated from yeast RNA polymerase III of 17 nm. In the former case, we observed a phase contrast reversal phenomenon at the centre of the icosahedral particle and traced its root cause to the near matching of the cut-on size and the particle size. In summary, our work has demonstrated that Zernike phase-plate implementation can indeed expand the size range of proteins that can be successfully investigated by cryo-EM, opening the door for countless proteins. Finally, we briefly discuss the possibility of using a transfer lens system to enlarge the cut-on periodicity without further miniaturizing the plate pinhole.

  16. Bilateral filtering using the full noise covariance matrix applied to x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allner, S.; Koehler, T.; Fehringer, A.; Birnbacher, L.; Willner, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Noël, P. B.

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an image-based de-noising algorithm that exploits complementary information and noise statistics from multi-modal images, as they emerge in x-ray tomography techniques, for instance grating-based phase-contrast CT and spectral CT. Among the noise reduction methods, image-based de-noising is one popular approach and the so-called bilateral filter is a well known algorithm for edge-preserving filtering. We developed a generalization of the bilateral filter for the case where the imaging system provides two or more perfectly aligned images. The proposed generalization is statistically motivated and takes the full second order noise statistics of these images into account. In particular, it includes a noise correlation between the images and spatial noise correlation within the same image. The novel generalized three-dimensional bilateral filter is applied to the attenuation and phase images created with filtered backprojection reconstructions from grating-based phase-contrast tomography. In comparison to established bilateral filters, we obtain improved noise reduction and at the same time a better preservation of edges in the images on the examples of a simulated soft-tissue phantom, a human cerebellum and a human artery sample. The applied full noise covariance is determined via cross-correlation of the image noise. The filter results yield an improved feature recovery based on enhanced noise suppression and edge preservation as shown here on the example of attenuation and phase images captured with grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography. This is supported by quantitative image analysis. Without being bound to phase-contrast imaging, this generalized filter is applicable to any kind of noise-afflicted image data with or without noise correlation. Therefore, it can be utilized in various imaging applications and fields.

  17. Single shot x-ray phase contrast imaging using a direct conversion microstrip detector with single photon sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagias, M.; Cartier, S.; Wang, Z.; Bergamaschi, A.; Dinapoli, R.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.; Stampanoni, M.

    2016-06-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging enables the measurement of the electron density of a sample with high sensitivity compared to the conventional absorption contrast. This is advantageous for the study of dose-sensitive samples, in particular, for biological and medical investigations. Recent developments relaxed the requirement for the beam coherence, such that conventional X-ray sources can be used for phase contrast imaging and thus clinical applications become possible. One of the prominent phase contrast imaging methods, Talbot-Lau grating interferometry, is limited by the manufacturing, alignment, and photon absorption of the analyzer grating, which is placed in the beam path in front of the detector. We propose an alternative improved method based on direct conversion charge integrating detectors, which enables a grating interferometer to be operated without an analyzer grating. Algorithms are introduced, which resolve interference fringes with a periodicity of 4.7 μm recorded with a 25 μm pitch Si microstrip detector (GOTTHARD). The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated by an experiment at the TOMCAT beamline of the Swiss Light Source on a polyethylene sample.

  18. A preliminary investigation of the potential of phase contrast x-ray imaging in the field of homeland security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivo, A.; Chana, D.; Speller, R.

    2008-11-01

    A novel technique based on coded apertures which makes x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) feasible with conventional sources has been recently developed at University College London. This technique is expected to enable for the first time real-world applications of XPCi in fields as diverse as medical, biological and scientific imaging, industrial inspections and security scans. This paper focuses on XPCi applications in homeland security. A simulation of coded-aperture XPCi, which was experimentally validated in a previous work, has been used to produce images of potential threat objects, and to quantitatively assess detail visibility improvements in terms of contrast and signal-to-noise ratio over conventional techniques based on absorption. Free-space propagation phase contrast images taken with synchrotron radiation (SR) are also presented. Although not directly related to the coded-aperture technique used in the simulation, these can be considered indicative of the image quality that would be made available through coded-aperture XPCi with conventional sources: previous studies have demonstrated that this technique provides image enhancements compatible with those obtained with free-space propagation phase contrast with SR. Substantial enhancements in image quality and improvement in detail detectability in cluttered environments are demonstrated in this way. The results presented in this study and the software used to generate them will provide the basis for the design and realization of a dedicated imaging prototype.

  19. High-order myopic coronagraphic phase diversity (COFFEE) for wave-front control in high-contrast imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Paul, B; Mugnier, L M; Sauvage, J-F; Dohlen, K; Ferrari, M

    2013-12-30

    The estimation and compensation of quasi-static aberrations is mandatory to reach the ultimate performance of high-contrast imaging systems. COFFEE is a focal plane wave-front sensing method that consists in the extension of phase diversity to high-contrast imaging systems. Based on a Bayesian approach, it estimates the quasi-static aberrations from two focal plane images recorded from the scientific camera itself. In this paper, we present COFFEE's extension which allows an estimation of low and high order aberrations with nanometric precision for any coronagraphic device. The performance is evaluated by realistic simulations, performed in the SPHERE instrument framework. We develop a myopic estimation that allows us to take into account an imperfect knowledge on the used diversity phase. Lastly, we evaluate COFFEE's performance in a compensation process, to optimize the contrast on the detector, and show it allows one to reach the 10(-6) contrast required by SPHERE at a few resolution elements from the star. Notably, we present a non-linear energy minimization method which can be used to reach very high contrast levels (better than 10(7) in a SPHERE-like context).

  20. 7 CFR 993.106 - In-line inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false In-line inspection. 993.106 Section 993.106 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing... CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and Regulations Definitions § 993.106 In-line inspection. In-line...

  1. 7 CFR 993.504 - In-line inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false In-line inspection. 993.504 Section 993.504 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing... CALIFORNIA Pack Specification as to Size Definitions § 993.504 In-line inspection. In-line inspection...

  2. 7 CFR 993.106 - In-line inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false In-line inspection. 993.106 Section 993.106 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing... CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and Regulations Definitions § 993.106 In-line inspection. In-line...

  3. 7 CFR 993.504 - In-line inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false In-line inspection. 993.504 Section 993.504 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing... CALIFORNIA Pack Specification as to Size Definitions § 993.504 In-line inspection. In-line inspection...

  4. In-vivo dark-field and phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, M.; Tapfer, A.; Velroyen, A.; Yaroshenko, A.; Pauwels, B.; Hostens, J.; Bruyndonckx, P.; Sasov, A.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2013-11-01

    Novel radiography approaches based on the wave nature of x-rays when propagating through matter have a great potential for improved future x-ray diagnostics in the clinics. Here, we present a significant milestone in this imaging method: in-vivo multi-contrast x-ray imaging of a mouse using a compact scanner. Of particular interest is the enhanced contrast in regions related to the respiratory system, indicating a possible application in diagnosis of lung diseases (e.g. emphysema).

  5. Towards tender X-rays with Zernike phase-contrast imaging of biological samples at 50 nm resolution.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Warmer, Martin; Goeries, Dennis; Herker, Eva; Reimer, Rudolph; David, Christian; Meents, Alke

    2014-07-01

    X-ray microscopy is a commonly used method especially in material science application, where the large penetration depth of X-rays is necessary for three-dimensional structural studies of thick specimens with high-Z elements. In this paper it is shown that full-field X-ray microscopy at 6.2 keV can be utilized for imaging of biological specimens with high resolution. A full-field Zernike phase-contrast microscope based on diffractive optics is used to study lipid droplet formation in hepatoma cells. It is shown that the contrast of the images is comparable with that of electron microscopy, and even better contrast at tender X-ray energies between 2.5 keV and 4 keV is expected.

  6. Efficient decoding of 2D structured illumination with linear phase stepping in X-ray phase contrast and dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Katherine J; Bennett, Eric E; Gomella, Andrew A; Wen, Han

    2014-01-01

    The ability to map the phase distribution and lateral coherence of an x-ray wavefront offers the potential for imaging the human body through phase contrast, without the need to deposit significant radiation energy. The classic means to achieve this goal is structured illumination, in which a periodic intensity modulation is introduced into the image, and changes in the phase distribution of the wavefront are detected as distortions of the modulation pattern. Two-dimensional periodic patterns are needed to fully characterize a transverse wavefront. Traditionally, the information in a 2D pattern is retrieved at high resolution by acquiring multiple images while shifting the pattern over a 2D matrix of positions. Here we describe a method to decode 2D periodic patterns with single-axis phase stepping, without either a loss of information or increasing the number of sampling steps. The method is created to reduce the instrumentation complexity of high-resolution 2D wavefront sensing in general. It is demonstrated with motionless electromagnetic phase stepping and a flexible processing algorithm in x-ray dark-field and phase contrast imaging.

  7. Vessel-contrast enhancement in label-free optical coherence angiography based on phase and amplitude speckle variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, Lev A.; Demidov, Valentin; Moiseev, Alexander A.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Matveyev, Alexandr L.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Karabut, Maria M.; Gubarkova, Ekaterina V.; Finagina, Elena S.; Sirotkina, Marina A.; Maslennikova, Anna V.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Vitkin, Alex; Zaitsev, Vladimir Y.

    2016-04-01

    Recently proposed in vivo label-free optical coherence angiography techniques based on phase and amplitude speckle variability often require additional signal pre- and post processing operations to enhance vessel-contrast. We observe here 1) contrast enhancement by optimizing the signal normalization/weighing before processing; 2) algorithm based on Kasai estimator for phase compensation between processed A-scans to reduce masking role of motion artifacts; and 3) image projection through the imaging depth for en face plotting. We demonstrate the efficiency of proposed additional algorithms as for the microcirculation imaging of hamsters cheek in vivo as for the preliminary microcirculation imaging of patients after radiotherapy. This technical framework complete in details our recent publications on M-Mode like OCT algorithms and its implementation.

  8. Aerosol-induced lung injuries observed by synchrotron radiation X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Weisheng; Zhang, Guilin; Liu, Ping; Sun, Jianqi; Hwu, Yeukuang; Je, Jung Ho; Tan, Mingguang; Li, Yan

    2007-09-01

    Adverse health effects are associated with the inhalation of a variety of atmospheric particles. To study the lung injuries caused by aerosol PM2.5, synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique was used. Nude mice were inoculated with PM2.5 samples collected from suburban area (JD), industrial area (BS) and traffic tunnel (DPQ) of Shanghai. From X-ray phase-contrast images of lung tissues, apart from blood vessels and structures of alveoli, even hemorrhage spots of several microns caused by the inflammation were clearly observed. The studies showed that the PM2.5 samples collected from the traffic tunnel (DPQ) produced higher level of lung injury, followed by the aerosol samples collected from industrial area (BS) and suburban area (JD). Our studies also helped us to understand the process of lung injuries caused by aerosol particles.

  9. MINIMIZING ELECTROSTATIC CHARGING OF AN APERTURE USED TO PRODUCE IN-FOCUS PHASE CONTRAST IN THE TEM

    PubMed Central

    Glaeser, Robert M.; Sassolini, Simone; Cambie, Rossana; Jin, Jian; Cabrini, Stefano; Schmid, Andreas; Danev, Radostin; Buijsse, Bart; Csencsits, Roseann; Downing, Kenneth H.; Larson, David M.; Typke, Dieter; Han, BG.

    2013-01-01

    Microfabricated devices designed to provide phase contrast in the transmission electron microscope must be free of phase distortions caused by unexpected electrostatic effects. We find that such phase distortions occur even when a device is heated to 300 °C during use in order to avoid the formation of polymerized, carbonaceous contamination. Remaining factors that could cause unwanted phase distortions include patchy variations in the work function of a clean metal surface, radiation-induced formation of a localized oxide layer, and creation of a contact potential between an irradiated area and the surround due to radiation-induced structural changes. We show that coating a microfabricated device with evaporated carbon apparently eliminates the problem of patchy variation in the work function. Furthermore, we show that a carbon-coated titanium device is superior to a carbon-coated gold device, with respect to radiation-induced electrostatic effects. A carbon-coated, hybrid double-sideband/single-sideband aperture is used to record in-focus, cryo-EM images of monolayer crystals of streptavidin. Images showing no systematic phase error due to charging are achievable under conditions of low-dose data collection. The contrast in such in-focus images is sufficient that one can readily see individual streptavidin tetramer molecules. Nevertheless, these carbon-coated devices perform well for only a limited length of time, and the cause of failure is not yet understood. PMID:23872037

  10. An efficient reconstruction algorithm for differential phase-contrast tomographic images from a limited number of views

    SciTech Connect

    Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Gupta, Rajiv; Ando, Masami

    2015-12-21

    The main focus of this paper is reconstruction of tomographic phase-contrast image from a set of projections. We propose an efficient reconstruction algorithm for differential phase-contrast computed tomography that can considerably reduce the number of projections required for reconstruction. The key result underlying this research is a projection theorem that states that the second derivative of the projection set is linearly related to the Laplacian of the tomographic image. The proposed algorithm first reconstructs the Laplacian image of the phase-shift distribution from the second-derivative of the projections using total variation regularization. The second step is to obtain the phase-shift distribution by solving a Poisson equation whose source is the Laplacian image previously reconstructed under the Dirichlet condition. We demonstrate the efficacy of this algorithm using both synthetically generated simulation data and projection data acquired experimentally at a synchrotron. The experimental phase data were acquired from a human coronary artery specimen using dark-field-imaging optics pioneered by our group. Our results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can reduce the number of projections to approximately 33% as compared with the conventional filtered backprojection method, without any detrimental effect on the image quality.

  11. In-line chemical sensor deployment in a tritium plant

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.S.; Hope, D.T.; Torres, R.D.; Peters, B.; Tovo, L.L.

    2015-03-15

    The Savannah River Tritium Plant (TP) relies on well understood but aging sensor technology for process gas analysis. The use of alternative sensing and detection technologies for in-line and real-time analysis would aid process control and optimization. The TP upgrading follows a 2-phase projects. In the first phase, TP sensing requirements were determined by a team of process experts. Meanwhile, Savannah River National Laboratory sensor experts identified candidate technologies and related them to the TP processing requirements. The resulting road-map links the candidate technologies to actual plant needs. In the second phase an instrument demonstration station was established within a TP glove box in order to provide accurate assessments of how a candidate sensor technology would perform in a contaminated process environment.

  12. Asymmetric rotational axis reconstruction of grating-based x-ray phase contrast tomography of the human cerebellum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Georg; Weitkamp, Timm; Zanette, Irene; Pfeiffer, Franz; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; David, Christian; Müller, Bert

    2012-10-01

    The brain has an outstanding functional importance in the human organism. Therefore, there is a strong need for three-dimensional brain imaging modalities. Magnetic resonance imaging provides deep insights but its spatial resolution is insufficient to study the structure on the cellular level. X-ray absorption microtomography yields the necessary spatial resolution, but shows only marginal contrast between the different types of brain tissue. Alternatively, differential X-ray phase contrast obtained with grating interferometry, which is known for much better differentiations between soft tissues can be used for the visualization of the human brain. As important structures of the human brain such as the human thalamus have dimensions of several centimeters, a large field of view is required. In the present communication, we report an evaluation of grating-based X-ray phase contrast microtomography in the off-axis modus which allows to expand the field of view up to a factor of two but may reduce the image quality. We demonstrate that tomograms with comparable contrast-to-noise values, about 10%, and 50% inferior spatial resolution can be generated with off-axis measurements. As one can reduce the effective pixel size up to a factor of two, the choice of an asymmetrical rotation axis can give rise to an improvement of the spatial resolution by 20%.

  13. Synergistic enhancements of ultrasound image contrast with a combination of phase aberration correction and dual apodization with cross-correlation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Junseob; Yen, Jesse T

    2012-09-01

    Dual apodization with cross-correlation (DAX) is a novel adaptive beamforming technique which utilizes two distinct apodization functions in suppressing side lobes and clutter. Previous studies have shown that the performance of DAX in minimizing the effects of phase aberration diminishes with increasing aberrator strength. To achieve greater improvement in image contrast, we propose, in this paper, to combine DAX with a phase aberration correction algorithm based on nearest-neighbor cross-correlation (NNCC). Our simulation and experimental results presented in this work showed that the proposed method allows for synergistic enhancements of image contrast and achieves greater improvement in image quality than using DAX alone or phase aberration correction alone in the presence of weak and strong aberrators. Compared with standard delay-and-sum (DAS) beamforming, using the proposed method on simulated data with weak and strong aberrations increased the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) values from 4.10 to 10.96 and from 1.69 to 9.80, respectively. Experimental results were obtained using pork tissues of 4 and 10 mm thickness and a tissue-mimicking phantom. The CNR values increased from 3.74 to 9.72 for the 4-mm pork aberrator and from 1.27 to 8.17 for the 10-mm pork aberrator. PMID:23007784

  14. Contrast enhancement in widefield CARS microscopy by tailored phase matching using a spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Jesacher, Alexander; Roider, Clemens; Khan, Saranjam; Thalhammer, Gregor; Bernet, Stefan; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2011-06-15

    We introduce a widefield CARS microscope implementation that uses a spatial light modulator to obtain extremely precise control over the pump/probe-beam incidence geometry, which provides the possibility to enhance the image contrast at specific target resonances by fine-tuning the incidence angles. We show how this technique can be used to optimize the image contrast between objects of different size and to practically eliminate the undesired signal from the solvent that embeds small target specimens. Changing the numerical aperture of the illumination from 1.27 to 1.24 improved the ratio of the signals of 500 nm polystyrene beads and the agarose solvent by about 20 dB. PMID:21685981

  15. Bending magnet source: A radiation source for X-ray phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhal, B. B.; Peele, A. G.; McMahon, P. J.; De Carlo, F.; Nugent, K. A.

    2006-11-01

    The rapid development of electronic data processing and phase retrieval technique for image reconstruction leads to new opportunities in X-ray phase tomography. A range of radiographic and tomographic demonstrations have now been made, typically utilizing the coherent flux from an insertion device at a synchrotron or a micro-focus laboratory source. In this paper we demonstrate that useful results may be obtained using a bending magnet source at a synchrotron. In particular we show that the same beamline can be used to make and characterize a sample made by X-ray lithographic methods.

  16. Quantitative imaging using high-energy X-ray phase-contrast CT with a 70 kVp polychromatic X-ray spectrum.

    PubMed

    Sarapata, Adrian; Willner, Marian; Walter, Marco; Duttenhofer, Thomas; Kaiser, Konradin; Meyer, Pascal; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander; Noël, Peter B; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2015-01-12

    Imaging of large and dense objects with grating-based X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography requires high X-ray photon energy and large fields of view. It has become increasingly possible due to the improvements in the grating manufacturing processes. Using a high-energy X-ray phase-contrast CT setup with a large (10 cm in diameter) analyzer grating and operated at an acceleration tube voltage of 70 kVp, we investigate the complementarity of both attenuation and phase contrast modalities with materials of various atomic numbers (Z). We confirm experimentally that for low-Z materials, phase contrast yields no additional information content over attenuation images, yet it provides increased contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). The complementarity of both signals can be seen again with increasing Z of the materials and a more comprehensive material characterization is thus possible. Imaging of a part of a human cervical spine with intervertebral discs surrounded by bones and various soft tissue types showcases the benefit of high-energy X-ray phase-contrast system. Phase-contrast reconstruction reveals the internal structure of the discs and makes the boundary between the disc annulus and nucleus pulposus visible. Despite the fact that it still remains challenging to develop a high-energy grating interferometer with a broad polychromatic source with satisfactory optical performance, improved image quality for phase contrast as compared to attenuation contrast can be obtained and new exciting applications foreseen. PMID:25835698

  17. Correction of contrast in projection systems by means of phase-controlled prism coatings and band-shifted twist compensators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbluth, Alan E.; Lu, Minhua; Yang, Kei H.; Ho, Kenneth; Singh, Rama N.; Nakasogi, Teruhiro

    2000-04-01

    Projectors that use LCOS lightvalves face special contrast requirements. Most configurations for reflective light valves employ tilted beam-dividing coatings that see both bright and dark polarization states. The optics must then be designed to eliminate polarization mixing at these coatings, which ordinarily arises when the S and P planes for different rays are non-parallel. We show how phase- controlled coatings can exploit the double-pass symmetry of the Plumbicon tri-prism geometry to correct this effect, reducing cross-polarized reflectivity to approximately 1E-3 when the light valve is mirror-like in black-state. Though contrast in different rays varies as a function of both ray skew component and coating angle of incidence, we show that for NA contrast is essentially equivalent to tracing a single ray. Light valves that use a normally-black TN mode exhibit a non-mirror-like phase dispersion in their black-state, complicating contrast control in the optics. Scatter depolarization at the edges of pixel electrodes is enhanced in these light valves, because the inherent twist causes the backplane polarization to be rotated out of alignment with pixel edges. We show that all of these contrast degradation mechanisms can be addressed by incorporating into the light valve a compensating layer having opposite birefringence to the black-state TN active layer. Moreover, when the compensating layer and driven layer are blue-shifted to a shorter LC thickness than would ordinarily be appropriate for the wavelength band of interest, a highly achromatic response is obtained at all gray levels.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of analyzer gratings with high aspect ratios for phase contrast imaging using a Talbot interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kenntner, Johannes; Altapova, Venera; Grund, Thomas; Pantenburg, Franz Josef; Meiser, Jan; Baumbach, Tilo; Mohr, Juergen

    2012-05-17

    In recent years, X-ray imaging based on the differential phase contrast gained more and more attention to be used in X-ray imaging. Among other techniques like crystal-based diffraction and propagation methods, the grating based Talbot interferometry offers an approach measuring phase modulations of X-rays while passing low absorbing objects. The Talbot interferometer yields for highly efficient X-ray imaging signals for hard X-rays with energies above 10 keV. One factor with high impact on the imaging performance of such grating interferometers is the gratings quality. We introduce a fabrication process allowing both, the fabrication of phase modulating and analyzer gratings with high aspect ratios, up to 100. Structural deviations from the optimal geometry of the gratings are investigated and their influence on the obtained image quality is discussed.

  19. High-contrast grating hollow-core waveguide splitter applied to optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Che; Xue, Ping; Zhang, Hanxing; Chen, Te; Peng, Chao; Hu, Weiwei

    2014-11-01

    A novel hollow-core (HW) Y-branch waveguide splitter based on high-contrast grating (HCG) is presented. We calculated and designed the HCG-HW splitter using Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA). Finite-different timedomain (FDTD) simulation shows that the splitter has a broad bandwidth and the branching loss is as low as 0.23 dB. Fabrication is accomplished with standard Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) process. The experimental measurement results indicate its good performance on beam splitting near the central wavelength λ = 1550 nm with a total insertion loss of 7.0 dB.

  20. Experimental imaging research on continuous-wave terahertz in-line digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haochong; Wang, Dayong; Rong, Lu; Wang, Yunxin

    2014-09-01

    The terahertz (THz) imaging is an advanced technique on the basis of the unique characteristics of terahertz radiation. Due to its noncontact, non-invasive and high-resolution capabilities, it has already shown great application prospects in biomedical observation, sample measurement, and quality control. The continuous-wave terahertz in-line digital holography is a combination of terahertz technology and in-line digital holography of which the source is a continuous-wave terahertz laser. Over the past decade, many researchers used different terahertz sources and detectors to undertake experiments. In this paper, the pre-process of the hologram is accomplished after the holograms' recording process because of the negative pixels in the pyroelectric detector and the air vibration caused by the chopper inside the camera. To improve the quality of images, the phase retrieval algorithm is applied to eliminate the twin images. In the experiment, the pin which terahertz wave can't penetrate and the TPX slice carved letters "THz" are chosen for the samples. The amplitude and phase images of samples are obtained and the twin image and noise in the reconstructed images are suppressed. The results validate the feasibility of the terahertz in-line digital holographic imaging technique. This work also shows the terahertz in-line digital holography technique's prospects in materials science and biological samples' detection.

  1. A Universal Moiré Effect and Application in X-Ray Phase-Contrast Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Houxun; Panna, Alireza; Gomella, Andrew A.; Bennett, Eric E.; Znati, Sami; Chen, Lei; Wen, Han

    2016-01-01

    A moiré pattern is created by superimposing two black-and-white or gray-scale patterns of regular geometry, such as two sets of evenly spaced lines. We observed an analogous effect between two transparent phase masks in a light beam which occurs at a distance. This phase moiré effect and the classic moiré effect are shown to be the two ends of a continuous spectrum. The phase moiré effect allows the detection of sub-resolution intensity or phase patterns with a transparent screen. When applied to x-ray imaging, it enables a polychromatic far-field interferometer (PFI) without absorption gratings. X-ray interferometry can non-invasively detect refractive index variations inside an object1–10. Current bench-top interferometers operate in the near field with limitations in sensitivity and x-ray dose efficiency2, 5, 7–10. The universal moiré effect helps overcome these limitations and obviates the need to make hard x-ray absorption gratings of sub-micron periods. PMID:27746823

  2. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part 1: experimental demonstration at atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Pennycook, Timothy J; Lupini, Andrew R; Yang, Hao; Murfitt, Matthew F; Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate a method to achieve high efficiency phase contrast imaging in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a pixelated detector. The pixelated detector is used to record the Ronchigram as a function of probe position which is then analyzed with ptychography. Ptychography has previously been used to provide super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the optics, alongside numerically correcting for spherical aberration. Here we rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations, but use the pixelated detector data set to utilize the largest possible volume of Fourier space to create high efficiency phase contrast images. The use of ptychography to diagnose the effects of chromatic aberration is also demonstrated. Finally, the four dimensional dataset is used to compare different bright field detector configurations from the same scan for a sample of bilayer graphene. Our method of high efficiency ptychography produces the clearest images, while annular bright field produces almost no contrast for an in-focus aberration-corrected probe.

  3. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part 1: Experimental demonstration at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, Timothy J.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Yang, Hao; Murfitt, Matthew F.; Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D.

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate a method to achieve high efficiency phase contrast imaging in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a pixelated detector. The pixelated detector is used to record the Ronchigram as a function of probe position which is then analyzed with ptychography. Ptychography has previously been used to provide super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the optics, alongside numerically correcting for spherical aberration. Here we rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations, but use the pixelated detector data set to utilize the largest possible volume of Fourier space to create high efficiency phase contrast images. The use of ptychography to diagnose the effects of chromatic aberration is also demonstrated. In conclusion, the four dimensional dataset is used to compare different bright field detector configurations from the same scan for a sample of bilayer graphene. Our method of high efficiency ptychography produces the clearest images, while annular bright field produces almost no contrast for an in-focus aberration-corrected probe.

  4. An ICP-MS procedure to determine Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in oceanic waters using in-line flow-injection with solid-phase extraction for preconcentration.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Jeanette E; Watson, Roslyn J; Butler, Edward C V

    2013-10-15

    An automated procedure including both in-line preconcentration and multi-element determination by an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) has been developed for the determination of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in open-ocean samples. The method relies on flow injection of the sample through a minicolumn of chelating (iminodiacetate) sorbent to preconcentrate the trace metals, while simultaneously eliminating the major cations and anions of seawater. The effectiveness of this step is tested and reliability in results are secured with a rigorous process of quality assurance comprising 36 calibration and reference samples in a run for analysis of 24 oceanic seawaters in a 6-h program. The in-line configuration and procedures presented minimise analyst operations and exposure to contamination. Seawater samples are used for calibration providing a true matrix match. The continuous automated pH measurement registers that chelation occurs within a selected narrow pH range and monitors the consistency of the entire analytical sequence. The eluent (0.8M HNO3) is sufficiently strong to elute the six metals in 39 s at a flow rate of 2.0 mL/min, while being compatible for prolonged use with the mass spectrometer. Throughput is one sample of 7 mL every 6 min. Detection limits were Co 3.2 pM, Ni 23 pM, Cu 46 pM, Zn 71 pM, Cd 2.7 pM and Pb 1.5 pM with coefficients of variation ranging from 3.4% to 8.6% (n=14) and linearity of calibration established beyond the observed concentration range of each trace metal in ocean waters. Recoveries were Co 96.7%, Ni 102%, Cu 102%, Zn 98.1%, Cd 92.2% and Pb 97.6%. The method has been used to analyse ~800 samples from three voyages in the Southern Ocean and Tasman Sea. It has the potential to be extended to other trace elements in ocean waters. PMID:24054694

  5. An ICP-MS procedure to determine Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in oceanic waters using in-line flow-injection with solid-phase extraction for preconcentration.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Jeanette E; Watson, Roslyn J; Butler, Edward C V

    2013-10-15

    An automated procedure including both in-line preconcentration and multi-element determination by an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) has been developed for the determination of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in open-ocean samples. The method relies on flow injection of the sample through a minicolumn of chelating (iminodiacetate) sorbent to preconcentrate the trace metals, while simultaneously eliminating the major cations and anions of seawater. The effectiveness of this step is tested and reliability in results are secured with a rigorous process of quality assurance comprising 36 calibration and reference samples in a run for analysis of 24 oceanic seawaters in a 6-h program. The in-line configuration and procedures presented minimise analyst operations and exposure to contamination. Seawater samples are used for calibration providing a true matrix match. The continuous automated pH measurement registers that chelation occurs within a selected narrow pH range and monitors the consistency of the entire analytical sequence. The eluent (0.8M HNO3) is sufficiently strong to elute the six metals in 39 s at a flow rate of 2.0 mL/min, while being compatible for prolonged use with the mass spectrometer. Throughput is one sample of 7 mL every 6 min. Detection limits were Co 3.2 pM, Ni 23 pM, Cu 46 pM, Zn 71 pM, Cd 2.7 pM and Pb 1.5 pM with coefficients of variation ranging from 3.4% to 8.6% (n=14) and linearity of calibration established beyond the observed concentration range of each trace metal in ocean waters. Recoveries were Co 96.7%, Ni 102%, Cu 102%, Zn 98.1%, Cd 92.2% and Pb 97.6%. The method has been used to analyse ~800 samples from three voyages in the Southern Ocean and Tasman Sea. It has the potential to be extended to other trace elements in ocean waters.

  6. Analysis of a deconvolution-based information retrieval algorithm in X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Florian; Bayer, Florian; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Weber, Thomas; Zang, Andrea; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2014-03-01

    Grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising imaging modality to increase soft tissue contrast in comparison to conventional attenuation-based radiography. Complementary and otherwise inaccessible information is provided by the dark-field image, which shows the sub-pixel size granularity of the measured object. This could especially turn out to be useful in mammography, where tumourous tissue is connected with the presence of supertiny microcalcifications. In addition to the well-established image reconstruction process, an analysis method was introduced by Modregger, 1 which is based on deconvolution of the underlying scattering distribution within a single pixel revealing information about the sample. Subsequently, the different contrast modalities can be calculated with the scattering distribution. The method already proved to deliver additional information in the higher moments of the scattering distribution and possibly reaches better image quality with respect to an increased contrast-to-noise ratio. Several measurements were carried out using melamine foams as phantoms. We analysed the dependency of the deconvolution-based method with respect to the dark-field image on different parameters such as dose, number of iterations of the iterative deconvolution-algorithm and dark-field signal. A disagreement was found in the reconstructed dark-field values between the FFT method and the iterative method. Usage of the resulting characteristics might be helpful in future applications.

  7. Generalized in-line digital holographic technique based on intensity measurements at two different planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Situ, Guohai; Ryle, James P.; Gopinathan, Unnikrishnan; Sheridan, John T.

    2008-02-01

    In-line digital holography based on two-intensity measurements [Zhang et al. Opt. Lett. 29, 1787 (2004)], is modified by introducing a π shifting in the reference phase. Such an improvement avoids the assumption that the object beam must be much weaker than the reference beam in strength and results in a simplified experimental implementation. Computer simulations and optical experiments are carried out to validate the method, which we refer to as position-phase-shifting digital holography.

  8. Calibration and test of the tangential phase contrast imaging diagnostic on CDX-U (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, E.; Nazikian, R.; Stutman, D.; Choe, W.; Kaita, R.

    1997-01-01

    The novel CO{sub 2} laser based tangential imaging diagnostic has been completely calibrated and the system has been tested on CDX-U plasmas. It has been shown that localized, two-dimensional images of the plasma electron density fluctuations in the tokamak core can be obtained from a tangential imaging beam.1 A variation of the Zernike phase mirror is used. Test measurements made on soundwaves verify that the system will image phase variations placed at the object plane. An absolute sensitivity of {approx}1{times}10{sup 7} cm{sup {minus}3}/{radical}(Hz) has been determined. A series of plasma measurements made on CDX-U are described. Results show that the plasma fluctuations are 2{endash}3 orders of magnitude above the noise floor of the diagnostic. It is also verified that a high-pass cutoff wave number (from {approx}1{endash}8 cm{sup {minus}1}) for the fluctuations can be selected by translating the phase mirror. The density fluctuation {ital k} spectrum is measured and found to peak at {approx}1{endash}3 cm{sup {minus}1}.{copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Calibration and Test of the Tangential Phase Contrast Imaging Diagnostic on CDX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, E.; Nazikian, R.; Stutman, D.; Breslau, J.; Wright, J.; Choe, W.; Cdx-U Group

    1996-11-01

    The novel CO2 laser based tangential imaging diagnostic has been completely calibrated and the system has been tested on CDX-U plasmas. It can be shown that localized, two-dimensional images of the plasma electron density fluctuations in the tokamak core can be obtained from a tangential imaging beam. A variation of the Zernike phase mirror is used. Test measurements made on sound waves verify that the system will image phase variations placed at the object plane. An absolute sensitivity of ≈ 1 × 10^7 cm-3/√Hz has been determined. A series of plasma measurements made on CDX-U are described. Results show that the plasma fluctuations are 2-3 orders of magnitude above the noise floor of the diagnostic. It is also verified that a high-pass cut-off wavenumber (from ≈ 1-8 cm-1) for the fluctuations can be selected by translating the phase mirror. The density fluctuation k-spectrum is measured and found to peak at ≈ 1-3 cm-1. Preliminary correlation with other fluctuation diagnostics, including observation of sawteeth in the plasma core, indicate that localization of imaging to the core of the CDX-U plasma is occurring.

  10. Calibration and test of the tangential phase contrast imaging diagnostic on CDX-U (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, E.; Nazikian, R.; Stutman, D.; Choe, W.; Kaita, R.

    1997-01-01

    The novel CO2 laser based tangential imaging diagnostic has been completely calibrated and the system has been tested on CDX-U plasmas. It has been shown that localized, two-dimensional images of the plasma electron density fluctuations in the tokamak core can be obtained from a tangential imaging beam.1 A variation of the Zernike phase mirror is used. Test measurements made on soundwaves verify that the system will image phase variations placed at the object plane. An absolute sensitivity of ≈1×107 cm-3/√Hz has been determined. A series of plasma measurements made on CDX-U are described. Results show that the plasma fluctuations are 2-3 orders of magnitude above the noise floor of the diagnostic. It is also verified that a high-pass cutoff wave number (from ≈1-8 cm-1) for the fluctuations can be selected by translating the phase mirror. The density fluctuation k spectrum is measured and found to peak at ≈1-3 cm-1.

  11. Calibration and test of the tangential phase contrast imaging diagnostic on CDX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, E.; Nazikian, R.; Stutman, D.; Choe, W.; Kaita, R.

    1997-02-01

    A novel CO{sub 2} laser-based tangential imaging diagnostic was completely calibrated and the system was tested on CDX-U plasmas. It was shown that localized, two-dimensional images of the plasma electron density fluctuations in the tokamak core can be obtained from a tangential imaging beam [E. Lo, J. Wright, and R. Nazikian, Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 66}, 1180 (1995)]. A variation of the Zernike phase mirror is used. Test measurements made on sound waves verify that the system will image phase variations placed at the object plane. An absolute sensitivity of {approx}1{times}10{sup 7} cm{sup {minus}3}/{radical}(Hz) was determined. A series of plasma measurements made on CDX-U is described. Results show that the plasma fluctuations are two to three orders of magnitude above the noise floor of the diagnostic. It is also verified that a high-pass cut-off wave number (from {approx}1 to 8 cm{sup {minus}1}) for the fluctuations can be selected by translating the phase mirror. The density fluctuation {ital k} spectrum is measured and found to peak at {approx}1{endash}3 cm{sup {minus}1}. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Calibration and test of the tangential phase contrast imaging diagnostic on CDX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, E.; Nazikian, R.; Stutman, D.; Choe, W.; Kaita, R.

    1997-02-01

    A novel CO2 laser-based tangential imaging diagnostic was completely calibrated and the system was tested on CDX-U plasmas. It was shown that localized, two-dimensional images of the plasma electron density fluctuations in the tokamak core can be obtained from a tangential imaging beam [E. Lo, J. Wright, and R. Nazikian, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 66, 1180 (1995)]. A variation of the Zernike phase mirror is used. Test measurements made on sound waves verify that the system will image phase variations placed at the object plane. An absolute sensitivity of ≈1×107 cm-3/√Hz was determined. A series of plasma measurements made on CDX-U is described. Results show that the plasma fluctuations are two to three orders of magnitude above the noise floor of the diagnostic. It is also verified that a high-pass cut-off wave number (from ≈1 to 8 cm-1) for the fluctuations can be selected by translating the phase mirror. The density fluctuation k spectrum is measured and found to peak at ≈1-3 cm-1.

  13. High-contrast, reversible thermal conductivity regulation utilizing the phase transition of polyethylene nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Teng; Luo, Tengfei

    2013-09-24

    Reversible thermal conductivity regulation at the nanoscale is of great interest to a wide range of applications such as thermal management, phononics, sensors, and energy devices. Through a series of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate a thermal conductivity regulation utilizing the phase transition of polyethylene nanofibers, enabling a thermal conductivity tuning factor of as high as 12, exceeding all previously reported values. The thermal conductivity change roots from the segmental rotations along the polymer chains, which introduce along-chain morphology disorder that significantly interrupts phonon transport along the molecular chains. This phase transition, which can be regulated by temperature, strain, or their combinations, is found to be fully reversible in the polyethylene nanofibers and can happen at a narrow temperature window. The phase change temperature can be further tuned by engineering the diameters of the nanofibers, making such a thermal conductivity regulation scheme adaptable to different application needs. The findings can stimulate significant research interest in nanoscale heat transfer control.

  14. A universal moiré effect and application in X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Houxun; Panna, Alireza; Gomella, Andrew A.; Bennett, Eric E.; Znati, Sami; Chen, Lei; Wen, Han

    2016-09-01

    A moiré pattern results from superimposing two black-and-white or greyscale patterns of regular geometry, such as two sets of evenly spaced lines. Here, we report the observation of an analogous effect with two transparent phase masks put in a light beam. The phase moiré effect and the classic moiré effect are shown to be the two ends of a continuous spectrum. The former allows the detection of sub-resolution intensity or phase patterns with a transparent screen. When applied to X-ray imaging, it enables the realization of a polychromatic far-field interferometer (PFI) without the need for absorption gratings. X-ray interferometry can non-invasively detect refractive index variations inside an object. Current bench-top interferometers operate in the near field with limitations in sensitivity and X-ray dose efficiency. The universal moiré effect helps overcome these limitations and obviates the need for using hard X-ray absorption gratings with sub-micrometre periods.

  15. Investigation of the phase morphology of bacterial PHA inclusion bodies by contrast variation SANS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, R. A.; Holden, P. J.; Garvey, C. J.; Wilde, K. L.; Hammerton, K. M.; Foster, L. J.

    2006-11-01

    Under growth-limiting conditions, many bacteria are able to metabolise excess organic acids into polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) and store these polymers as intracellular inclusions until the return of favourable conditions. Various models have been proposed for the macromolecular organisation of the boundary layer surrounding the polymer, and contrast-variation small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study its organisation. Inclusions formed by Pseudomonas oleovorans under hydrogenating conditions showed lowest scattering intensity at ca. 20% D 2O. The inclusions consist of protein and membrane lipids in the boundary layer and polyhydroxyoctanoate (lipid) in the inclusion body. At 20% D 2O the contributions of lipids were contrast matched with the solvent, indicating that lipids contributed the bulk of the scattering intensity observed at other D 2O/H 2O ratios. These results are inconsistent with a model of the boundary layer which proposed outer and inner layers of crystalline protein lattice sandwiching a membrane lipid membrane layer [E.S. Stuart, R.W. Lenz, R.C. Fuller, Can J Microbiol 41(Suppl 1) (1995) 84-93], and is more consistent with a model consisting of a lipid monolayer containing embedded proteins [U. Pieper-furst, M.H. Madkour, F. Mayer, A. Steinbuchel, J. Bacteriol. 176 (1994) 4328-4337.] By altering the H/D content of the precursors, we were able to collect SANS data from preparations of both deuterated and H/D copolymer inclusions, where initial PHA produced was hydrogenated followed by deuteration. Deuterated inclusions showed minimum intensity above 90% D 2O/H 2O whereas the sequentially produced copolymer (assumed to be in a core/shell arrangement) displayed minimum scattering some 20% lower, which is consistent with the increased hydrogenation of the boundary layer expected from its synthesis during supply of hydrogenated followed by deuterated precursors.

  16. Increasing the field of view in grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging using stitched gratings.

    PubMed

    Meiser, J; Willner, M; Schröter, T; Hofmann, A; Rieger, J; Koch, F; Birnbacher, L; Schüttler, M; Kunka, D; Meyer, P; Faisal, A; Amberger, M; Duttenhofer, T; Weber, T; Hipp, A; Ehn, S; Walter, M; Herzen, J; Schulz, J; Pfeiffer, F; Mohr, J

    2016-03-17

    Grating based X-ray differential phase contrast imaging (DPCI) allows for high contrast imaging of materials with similar absorption characteristics. In the last years' publications, small animals or parts of the human body like breast, hand, joints or blood vessels have been studied. Larger objects could not be investigated due to the restricted field of view limited by the available grating area. In this paper, we report on a new stitching method to increase the grating area significantly: individual gratings are merged on a carrier substrate. Whereas the grating fabrication process is based on the LIGA technology (X-ray lithography and electroplating) different cutting and joining methods have been evaluated. First imaging results using a 2×2 stitched analyzer grating in a Talbot-Lau interferometer have been generated using a conventional polychromatic X-ray source. The image quality and analysis confirm the high potential of the stitching method to increase the field of view considerably. PMID:27257876

  17. Applications of a non-interferometric x-ray phase contrast imaging method with both synchrotron and conventional sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endrizzi, M.; Diemoz, P. C.; Munro, P. R. T.; Hagen, C. K.; Szafraniec, M. B.; Millard, T. P.; Zapata, C. E.; Speller, R. D.; Olivo, A.

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a totally incoherent, non-interferometric x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) method. This is based on the edge illumination (EI) concept developed at the ELETTRA synchrotron in Italy in the late `90s. The method was subsequently adapted to the divergent beam generated by a conventional source, by replicating it for every detector line through suitable masks. The method was modelled both with the simplified ray-tracing and with the more rigorous wave-optics approach, and in both cases excellent agreement with the experimental results was found. The wave-optics model enabled assessing the methods' coherence requirements, showing that they are at least an order of magnitude more relaxed than in other methods, without this having negative consequences on the phase sensitivity. Our masks have large pitches (up to 50 times larger than in grating interferometry, for example), which allows for manufacturing through standard lithography, scalability, cost-effectiveness and easiness to align. When applied to a polychromatic and divergent beam generated by a conventional source, the method enables the detection of strong phase effects also with uncollimated, unapertured sources with focal spots of up to 100 μm, compatible with the state-of-the-art in mammography. When used at synchrotrons, it enables a contrast increase of orders of magnitude over other methods. Robust phase retrieval was proven for both coherent and incoherent sources, and additional advantages are compatibility with high x-ray energies and easy implementation of phase sensitivity in two directions simultaneously. This paper briefly summarizes these achievements and reviews some of the key results.

  18. Synthesis of core-shell molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres by precipitation polymerization for the inline molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction of thiabendazole from citrus fruits and orange juice samples.

    PubMed

    Barahona, Francisco; Turiel, Esther; Cormack, Peter A G; Martín-Esteban, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres with narrow particle size distributions and core-shell morphology by a two-step precipitation polymerization procedure is described. Polydivinylbenzene (poly DVB-80) core particles were used as seed particles in the production of molecularly imprinted polymer shells by copolymerization of divinylbenzene-80 with methacrylic acid in the presence of thiabendazole (TBZ) and an appropriate porogen. Thereafter, polymer particles were packed into refillable stainless steel HPLC columns used in the development of an inline molecularly imprinted SPE method for the determination of TBZ in citrus fruits and orange juice samples. Under optimized chromatographic conditions, recoveries of TBZ within the range 81.1-106.4%, depending upon the sample, were obtained, with RSDs lower than 10%. This novel method permits the unequivocal determination of TBZ in the samples under study, according to the maximum residue levels allowed within Europe, in less than 20 min and without any need for a clean-up step in the analytical protocol.

  19. Flow Quantification from 2D Phase Contrast MRI in Renal Arteries Using Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zöllner, Frank G.; Monnsen, Jan Ankar; Lundervold, Arvid; Rørvik, Jarle

    We present an approach based on clustering to segment renal arteries from 2D PC Cine MR images to measure blood velocity and flow. Such information are important in grading renal artery stenosis and support the decision on surgical interventions like percutan transluminal angioplasty. Results show that the renal arteries could be extracted automatically and the corresponding velocity profiles could be calculated. Furthermore, the clustering could detect possible phase wrap effects automatically as well as differences in the blood flow patterns within the vessel.

  20. Developing a platform for high-resolution phase contrast imaging of high pressure shock waves in matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schropp, Andreas; Patommel, Jens; Seiboth, Frank; Arnold, Brice; Galtier, Eric C.; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Hastings, Jerome B.; Schroer, Christian G.

    2012-10-01

    Current and upcoming X-ray sources, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC, USA), the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free Electron Laser (SACLA, Japan), or the X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL, Germany) will provide X-ray beams with outstanding properties.1, 2 Short and intense X-ray pulses of about 50 fs time duration and even shorter will push X-ray science to new frontiers such as, e. g., in high-resolution X-ray imaging, high-energy-density physics or in dynamical studies based on pump-probe techniques. Fast processes in matter often require high-resolution imaging capabilities either by magnified imaging in direct space or diffractive imaging in reciprocal space. In both cases highest resolutions require focusing the X-ray beam.3, 4 In order to further develop high-resolution imaging at free-electron laser sources we are planning a platform to carry out high-resolution phase contrast imaging experiments based on Beryllium compound refractive X-ray lenses (Be-CRLs) at the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) endstation of the LCLS. The instrument provides all necessary equipment to induce high pressure shock waves by optical lasers. The propagation of a shock wave is then monitored with an X-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) pulse by magnified phase contrast imaging. With the CRL optics, X-ray beam sizes in the sub-100nm range are expected, leading to a similar spatial resolution in the direct coherent projection image. The experiment combines different state-of-the art scientific techniques that are currently available at the LCLS. In this proceedings paper we describe the technical developments carried out at the LCLS in order to implement magnified X-ray phase contrast imaging at the MEC endstation.