Science.gov

Sample records for innovative characterization techniques

  1. Characterization of Electronic Materials HgZnSe and HgZnTe Using Innovative and Conventional Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanton, George; Kesmodel, Roy; Burden, Judy; Su, Ching-Hua; Cobb, Sharon D.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    HgZnSe and HgZnTe are electronic materials of interest for potential IR detector and focal plane array applications due to their improved strength and compositional stability over HgCdTe, but they are difficult to grow on Earth and to fully characterize. Conventional contact methods of characterization, such as Hall and van der Paw, although adequate for many situations are typically labor intensive and not entirely suitable where only very small samples are available. To adequately characterize and compare properties of electronic materials grown in low earth orbit with those grown on Earth, innovative techniques are needed that complement existing methods. This paper describes the implementation and test results of a unique non-contact method of characterizing uniformity, mobility, and carrier concentration together with results from conventional methods applied to HgZnSe and HgZnTe. The innovative method has advantages over conventional contact methods since it circumvents problems of possible contamination from alloying electrical contacts to a sample and also has the capability to map a sample. Non- destructive mapping, the determination of the carrier concentration and mobility at each place on a sample, provides a means to quantitatively compare, at high spatial resolution, effects of microgravity on electronic properties and uniformity of electronic materials grown in low-Earth orbit with Earth grown materials. The mapping technique described here uses a 1mm diameter polarized beam of radiation to probe the sample. Activation of a magnetic field, in which the sample is placed, causes the plane of polarization of the probe beam to rotate. This Faraday rotation is a function of the free carrier concentration and the band parameters of the material. Maps of carrier concentration, mobility, and transmission generated from measurements of the Faraday rotation angles over the temperature range from 300K to 77K will be presented. New information on band parameters

  2. Innovative hyperspectral imaging (HSI) based techniques applied to end-of-life concrete drill core characterization for optimal dismantling and materials recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Picone, Nicoletta; Serranti, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    The reduction of EOL concrete disposal in landfills, together with a lower exploitation of primary raw materials, generates a strong interest to develop, set-up and apply innovative technologies to maximize Construction and Demolition Waste (C&DW) conversion into useful secondary raw materials. Such a goal can be reached starting from a punctual in-situ efficient characterization of the objects to dismantle in order to develop demolition actions aimed to set up innovative mechanical-physical processes to recover the different materials and products to recycle. In this paper an innovative recycling-oriented characterization strategy based on HyperSpectral Imaging (HSI) is described in order to identify aggregates and mortar in drill core samples from end-of-life concrete. To reach this goal, concrete drill cores from a demolition site were systematically investigated by HSI in the short wave infrared field (1000-2500 nm). Results obtained by the adoption of the HSI approach showed as this technology can be successfully applied to analyze quality and characteristics of C&DW before dismantling and as final product to reutilise after demolition-milling-classification actions. The proposed technique and the related recognition logics, through the spectral signature detection of finite physical domains (i.e. concrete slice and/or particle) of different nature and composition, allows; i) to develop characterization procedures able to quantitatively assess end-of-life concrete compositional/textural characteristics and ii) to set up innovative sorting strategies to qualify the different materials constituting drill core samples.

  3. Innovative Techniques Simplify Vibration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In the early years of development, Marshall Space Flight Center engineers encountered challenges related to components in the space shuttle main engine. To assess the problems, they evaluated the effects of vibration and oscillation. To enhance the method of vibration signal analysis, Marshall awarded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts to AI Signal Research, Inc. (ASRI), in Huntsville, Alabama. ASRI developed a software package called PC-SIGNAL that NASA now employs on a daily basis, and in 2009, the PKP-Module won Marshall s Software of the Year award. The technology is also used in many industries: aircraft and helicopter, rocket engine manufacturing, transportation, and nuclear power."

  4. Innovative Techniques for Evaluating Behavioral Nutrition Interventions.

    PubMed

    Scherr, Rachel E; Laugero, Kevin D; Graham, Dan J; Cunningham, Brian T; Jahns, Lisa; Lora, Karina R; Reicks, Marla; Mobley, Amy R

    2017-01-01

    Assessing outcomes and the impact from behavioral nutrition interventions has remained challenging because of the lack of methods available beyond traditional nutrition assessment tools and techniques. With the current high global obesity and related chronic disease rates, novel methods to evaluate the impact of behavioral nutrition-based interventions are much needed. The objective of this narrative review is to describe and review the current status of knowledge as it relates to 4 different innovative methods or tools to assess behavioral nutrition interventions. Methods reviewed include 1) the assessment of stress and stress responsiveness to enhance the evaluation of nutrition interventions, 2) eye-tracking technology in nutritional interventions, 3) smartphone biosensors to assess nutrition and health-related outcomes, and 4) skin carotenoid measurements to assess fruit and vegetable intake. Specifically, the novel use of functional magnetic resonance imaging, by characterizing the brain's responsiveness to an intervention, can help researchers develop programs with greater efficacy. Similarly, if eye-tracking technology can enable researchers to get a better sense as to how participants view materials, the materials may be better tailored to create an optimal impact. The latter 2 techniques reviewed, smartphone biosensors and methods to detect skin carotenoids, can provide the research community with portable, effective, nonbiased ways to assess dietary intake and quality and more in the field. The information gained from using these types of methodologies can improve the efficacy and assessment of behavior-based nutrition interventions.

  5. Innovative application of classic and newer techniques for the characterization of haemocytes in the New Zealand black-footed abalone (Haliotis iris).

    PubMed

    Grandiosa, Roffi; Mérien, Fabrice; Pillay, Krish; Alfaro, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Haemocytes play an important role in innate immune responses within invertebrate organisms. However, identification and quantification of different types of haemocytes can be extremely challenging, and has led to numerous inconsistencies and misinterpretations within the literature. As a step to rectify this issue, we present a comprehensive and detailed approach to characterize haemocytes using a combination of classical (cytochemical and phagocytosis assays with optical microscopy) and novel (flow cytometry with Sysmex XN-1000 and Muse(®) Cell analyser) techniques. The Sysmex XN-1000 is an innovative fluorescent flow cytometric analyser that can effectively detect, identify and count haemocytes, while the Muse(®) Cell analyser provides accurate and rapid haemocyte cell counts and viability. To illustrate this approach, we present the first report on morphological and functional features of New Zealand black-footed abalone (Haliotis iris) haemocyte cells. Two types of haemocytes were identified in this study, including type I (monocyte-like) and type II (lymphocyte-like) cells. Granular cells, which have been reported in other molluscan species, were not detected in H. iris. Cell types were categorized based on shape, size, internal structures and function. The lymphocyte-like haemocytes were the most abundant hemocytes in the haemolymph samples, and they had large nuclei and basic cytoplasms. Monocyte-like cells generally were larger cells compared to lymphocyte-like cells, and had low nucleus-cytoplasm ratios. Monocyte-like cells showed higher phagocytic activity when encountering Zymosan A particles compared to lymphocyte-like cells. The present study provides a comprehensive and accurate new approach to identify and quantify haemocyte cells for future comparative studies on the immune system of abalone and other molluscan species.

  6. 40 CFR 35.935-20 - Innovative processes and techniques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Innovative processes and techniques. 35... § 35.935-20 Innovative processes and techniques. If the grantee receives 85-percent grant assistance for innovative processes and techniques, the following conditions apply during the 5-year...

  7. 40 CFR 35.935-20 - Innovative processes and techniques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Innovative processes and techniques. 35... § 35.935-20 Innovative processes and techniques. If the grantee receives 85-percent grant assistance for innovative processes and techniques, the following conditions apply during the 5-year...

  8. Using Innovative Information Systems Techniques To Teach Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chimi, Carl J.; Gordon, Gene M.

    This paper discusses a number of innovative techniques that were used to teach courses in Information Systems to undergraduate and graduate students. While none of these techniques is individually innovative, the combination of techniques provides a true "hands-on" environment for students; because of the way that the components of the…

  9. Innovative Tools Advance Revolutionary Weld Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    The iconic, orange external tank of the space shuttle launch system not only contains the fuel used by the shuttle s main engines during liftoff but also comprises the shuttle s backbone, supporting the space shuttle orbiter and solid rocket boosters. Given the tank s structural importance and the extreme forces (7.8 million pounds of thrust load) and temperatures it encounters during launch, the welds used to construct the tank must be highly reliable. Variable polarity plasma arc welding, developed for manufacturing the external tank and later employed for building the International Space Station, was until 1994 the best process for joining the aluminum alloys used during construction. That year, Marshall Space Flight Center engineers began experimenting with a relatively new welding technique called friction stir welding (FSW), developed in 1991 by The Welding Institute, of Cambridge, England. FSW differs from traditional fusion welding in that it is a solid-state welding technique, using frictional heat and motion to join structural components without actually melting any of the material. The weld is created by a shouldered pin tool that is plunged into the seam of the materials to be joined. The tool traverses the line while rotating at high speeds, generating friction that heats and softens but does not melt the metal. (The heat produced approaches about 80 percent of the metal s melting temperature.) The pin tool s rotation crushes and stirs the plasticized metal, extruding it along the seam as the tool moves forward. The material cools and consolidates, resulting in a weld with superior mechanical properties as compared to those weld properties of fusion welds. The innovative FSW technology promises a number of attractive benefits. Because the welded materials are not melted, many of the undesirables associated with fusion welding porosity, cracking, shrinkage, and distortion of the weld are minimized or avoided. The process is more energy efficient, safe

  10. Innovative foraging behaviour in birds: what characterizes an innovator?

    PubMed

    Overington, Sarah E; Cauchard, Laure; Côté, Kimberly-Ann; Lefebvre, Louis

    2011-07-01

    Innovative foraging behaviour has been observed in many species, but little is known about how novel behaviour emerges or why individuals differ in their propensity to innovate. Here, we investigate these questions by presenting 36 wild-caught adult male Carib grackles (Quiscalus lugubris) with a novel problem-solving task. Twenty birds solved the task ("innovators") while 16 did not ("non-innovators"). We compared innovators to non-innovators and explored variation in latency to innovate to determine the characteristics of an innovative bird. Innovativeness was not predicted by any morphological trait, but innovators had higher exploration scores and lower object neophobia scores than non-innovators. Within the innovators, latency to innovate was positively correlated with learning speed. Video analysis also revealed a marked difference in the way individuals interacted with the novel apparatus: when innovators contacted the correct part of the apparatus, they continued to do so until they solved the problem. Non-innovators often contacted the correct part of the apparatus, but did not persist in doing so. The importance of obstacle movement cues was confirmed by an experiment where they were manipulated.

  11. Single Cell Electrical Characterization Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mansor, Muhammad Asraf; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    Electrical properties of living cells have been proven to play significant roles in understanding of various biological activities including disease progression both at the cellular and molecular levels. Since two decades ago, many researchers have developed tools to analyze the cell’s electrical states especially in single cell analysis (SCA). In depth analysis and more fully described activities of cell differentiation and cancer can only be accomplished with single cell analysis. This growing interest was supported by the emergence of various microfluidic techniques to fulfill high precisions screening, reduced equipment cost and low analysis time for characterization of the single cell’s electrical properties, as compared to classical bulky technique. This paper presents a historical review of single cell electrical properties analysis development from classical techniques to recent advances in microfluidic techniques. Technical details of the different microfluidic techniques are highlighted, and the advantages and limitations of various microfluidic devices are discussed. PMID:26053399

  12. [Aquapheresis, an innovative technique in cardiology].

    PubMed

    Armand, Patricia; Boutarin, David; Gerbaaï, Raphaëlle

    2015-03-01

    Used in France for the last two years, aquapheresis is a technique to remove excess water from patients with heart failure resistant to diuretics. The therapy is delivered during the patient's hospitalisation in a cardiology intensive care unit to ensure optimal monitoring and the prevention of potential complications. A team from Grenoble shares its experience.

  13. Innovative techniques for evaluating behavioral nutrition interventions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessing outcomes and impact from behavioral nutrition interventions in the community has remained challenging for a variety of reasons. One main reason is the lack of methods available beyond traditional nutrition assessment tools and techniques. With current global obesity and related chronic dis...

  14. Characterization Techniques for Amorphous Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 2 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from B-Be-Fe to Co-W-Zr' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter '2 Characterization Techniques for Amorphous Alloys' with the content:

  15. Surface Characterization Techniques: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2002-01-01

    To understand the benefits that surface modifications provide, and ultimately to devise better ones, it is necessary to study the physical, mechanical, and chemical changes they cause. This chapter surveys classical and leading-edge developments in surface structure and property characterization methodologies. The primary emphases are on the use of these techniques as they relate to surface modifications, thin films and coatings, and tribological engineering surfaces and on the implications rather than the instrumentation.

  16. Innovative production technique for PEFC electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bevers, D.; Guelzow, E.; Helmbold, A.; Mueller, B.

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cells are high efficient and low polluting energy conversation devices. Using hydrogen as a fuel gas they are applicable to solve environmental problems e.g. CO{sub 2} impact on the climate. Thus international research efforts have been increased in recent years. Low temperature fuel cells e.g. the PEFC are specially applicable for future transportation and stationary energy supply systems. Application and economics success of his technology is obstructed by the high investment costs with respect to conventional energy conversion devices. The intent of our activities is the improvement of electrodes and membrane-electrode-assemblies as used in PEFC. Commercial and technical aspects of electrode manufacturing have been considered in early stages of the development of the production procedure. Two different techniques are developed at DLR. The first is a rolling procedure as used for production for batteries and alkaline fuel cells which has been modified and adapted to the specific demand of PEFC electrodes. The second technique is a new printing process to produce ultra thin layers of catalyst directly on the electrolyte. In this paper we will show the first results of the first electrode technique which have been tested in fuel cells and a short description of the second very new method.

  17. Innovative Balloon Buoyancy Techniques for Atmospheric Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J.

    2000-01-01

    Until quite recently, the only practical means to control balloon buoyancy, and thus altitude, required consuming large amounts of fuel or the limited venting of helium balloons and/or dropping of ballast. With recent discoveries at JPL, novel long-life, balloon buoyancy techniques have been discovered that for the first time allow balloons to float in the primarily hydrogen atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune (using ambient fill-gas), and by using renewable energy sources, allow multiple controlled landings on Venus (using atmospheric temperature differences), Mars (solar heat), Titan (RTG heat), and Earth (planet radiant heat).

  18. Comparison of Traditional and Innovative Techniques to Solve Technical Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of traditional and innovative techniques to solve technical challenges in food storage technology. The planning for a mission to Mars is underway, and the food storage technology improvements requires that improvements be made. This new technology is required, because current food storage technology is inadequate,refrigerators or freezers are not available for food preservation, and that a shelf life of 5 years is expected. A 10 year effort to improve food packaging technology has not enhanced significantly food packaging capabilities. Two innovation techniques were attempted InnoCentive and Yet2.com and have provided good results, and are still under due diligence for solver verification.

  19. Innovative safety valve selection techniques and data.

    PubMed

    Miller, Curt; Bredemyer, Lindsey

    2007-04-11

    The new valve data resources and modeling tools that are available today are instrumental in verifying that that safety levels are being met in both current installations and project designs. If the new ISA 84 functional safety practices are followed closely, good industry validated data used, and a user's maintenance integrity program strictly enforced, plants should feel confident that their design has been quantitatively reinforced. After 2 years of exhaustive reliability studies, there are now techniques and data available to support this safety system component deficiency. Everyone who has gone through the process of safety integrity level (SIL) verification (i.e. reliability math) will appreciate the progress made in this area. The benefits of these advancements are improved safety with lower lifecycle costs such as lower capital investment and/or longer testing intervals. This discussion will start with a review of the different valve, actuator, and solenoid/positioner combinations that can be used and their associated application restraints. Failure rate reliability studies (i.e. FMEDA) and data associated with the final combinations will then discussed. Finally, the impact of the selections on each safety system's SIL verification will be reviewed.

  20. Innovation in surgical technology and techniques: Challenges and ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Geiger, James D; Hirschl, Ronald B

    2015-06-01

    The pace of medical innovation continues to increase. The deployment of new technologies in surgery creates many ethical challenges including how to determine safety of the technology, what is the timing and process for deployment of a new technology, how are patients informed before undergoing a new technology or technique, how are the outcomes of a new technology evaluated and how are the responsibilities of individual patients and society at large balanced. Ethical considerations relevant to the implementation of ECMO and robotic surgery are explored to further discussion of how we can optimize the delicate balance between innovation and regulation.

  1. Electrical characterization of a Mapham inverter using pulse testing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, E. D.; Myers, I. T.; Hammoud, A. N.

    1990-01-01

    The use of a multiple pulse testing technique to determine the electrical characteristics of large megawatt-level power systems for aerospace missions is proposed. An innovative test method based on the multiple pulse technique is demonstrated on a 2-kW Mapham inverter. The concept of this technique shows that characterization of large power systems under electrical equilibrium at rated power can be accomplished without large costly power supplies. The heat generation that occurs in systems when tested in a continuous mode is eliminated. The results indicate that there is a good agreement between this testing technique and that of steady state testing.

  2. Ecosystem discovery: Measuring clean energy innovation ecosystems through knowledge discovery and mapping techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Jessica; Chinthavali, Supriya; Stahl, Chelsey Dunivan; ...

    2016-10-01

    The term ‘innovation ecosystem’ is often utilized, but rarely quantified. Oak Ridge National Lab conducted a ground-breaking application of natural language processing, link analysis and other computational techniques to transform text and numerical data into metrics on clean energy innovation activity and geography for the U.S. Department of Energy. The project demonstrates that a machine-assisted methodology gives the user a replicable method to rapidly identify, quantify and characterize clean energy innovation ecosystems. EPSA advanced a novel definition for clean energy innovation ecosystem as the overlap of five Ecosystem Components: 1) nascent clean energy indicators, 2) investors, 3) enabling environment, 4)more » networking assets and 5) large companies. The tool was created with the flexibility to allow the user to choose the weights of each of the five ecosystem components and the subcomponents. This flexibility allows the user to visualize different subsets of data as well as the composite IE rank. In an independent parallel effort, a DOE analyst in EPSA developed a short list of 22 top US clean energy innovation ecosystems; the Ecosystem Discovery tool was able to identify over 90% of the analyst-reported ecosystems. Full validation and calibration remain outstanding tasks. The tool and the underlying datasets have the potential to address a number of important policy questions. The initial broad list of U.S. clean energy innovation ecosystems, with geographic area, technology focus, and list and types of involved organizations can help describe regional technology activities and capabilities. The implementation of knowledge discovery techniques also revealed both the potential and limitations of an automatic machine extraction methodology to gather ecosystem component data. The project demonstrates that a machine-assisted methodology gives the user a replicable method to rapidly identify, quantify, and characterize clean energy innovation

  3. Ecosystem discovery: Measuring clean energy innovation ecosystems through knowledge discovery and mapping techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jessica; Chinthavali, Supriya; Stahl, Chelsey Dunivan; Stahl, Christopher; Lee, Sangkeun; Shankar, Mallikarjun

    2016-10-01

    The term ‘innovation ecosystem’ is often utilized, but rarely quantified. Oak Ridge National Lab conducted a ground-breaking application of natural language processing, link analysis and other computational techniques to transform text and numerical data into metrics on clean energy innovation activity and geography for the U.S. Department of Energy. The project demonstrates that a machine-assisted methodology gives the user a replicable method to rapidly identify, quantify and characterize clean energy innovation ecosystems. EPSA advanced a novel definition for clean energy innovation ecosystem as the overlap of five Ecosystem Components: 1) nascent clean energy indicators, 2) investors, 3) enabling environment, 4) networking assets and 5) large companies. The tool was created with the flexibility to allow the user to choose the weights of each of the five ecosystem components and the subcomponents. This flexibility allows the user to visualize different subsets of data as well as the composite IE rank. In an independent parallel effort, a DOE analyst in EPSA developed a short list of 22 top US clean energy innovation ecosystems; the Ecosystem Discovery tool was able to identify over 90% of the analyst-reported ecosystems. Full validation and calibration remain outstanding tasks. The tool and the underlying datasets have the potential to address a number of important policy questions. The initial broad list of U.S. clean energy innovation ecosystems, with geographic area, technology focus, and list and types of involved organizations can help describe regional technology activities and capabilities. The implementation of knowledge discovery techniques also revealed both the potential and limitations of an automatic machine extraction methodology to gather ecosystem component data. The project demonstrates that a machine-assisted methodology gives the user a replicable method to rapidly identify, quantify, and characterize clean energy innovation ecosystems.

  4. Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, G.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of this research is to develop an advanced, innovative technique for the description of reservoir heterogeneity. This proposed method consists of using tracers in single-well backflow tests. The general idea is to make use of fluid drift in the reservoir either due to naturally occurring pressure gradients in the reservoir, or by deliberately imposed pressure gradients using adjacent injection and production wells in the same reservoir. The analytical tool that will be used to design and interpret these tests is a compositional reservoir simulator with special features added and tested specifically for this purpose. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Ambient air contamination: Characterization and detection techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nulton, C. P.; Silvus, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques to characterize and detect sources of ambient air contamination are described. Chemical techniques to identify indoor contaminants are outlined, they include gas chromatography, or colorimetric detection. Organics generated from indoor materials at ambient conditions and upon combustion are characterized. Piezoelectric quartz crystals are used as precision frequency determining elements in electronic oscillators.

  6. An innovative technique to probe the middle and upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assink, Jelle; Smets, Pieter; Le Pichon, Alexis; Evers, Läslo

    2016-04-01

    The middle atmosphere has gained more and more importance for the purpose of weather and climate prediction, since increasing evidence has indicated that the troposphere and stratosphere are more closely coupled than assumed before. Significant effort has been made towards a more comprehensive representation of the atmosphere to better capture the stratospheric variability as well as the stratospheric-tropospheric interactions, for example during Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW) events. Despite these advances, it remains difficult to measure in the upper layers of the atmosphere. Over recent years, new developments in the field of low-frequency inaudible sound (infrasound) have lead to an innovative method for evaluating numerical weather prediction models. In this presentation, the general technique is described and a case study is presented in which stratospheric forecasts of the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) of the 2013 major SSW are evaluated.

  7. AN INNOVATIVE TECHNIQUE FOR THIN FILM INTERFACE TOUGHNESS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.J.

    2004-11-01

    scale and MA956 substrate is 3.7 N-m/m{sup 2}, and the estimated equivalent Mode I fracture toughness is 1.1 MPa {radical}m. This innovative technique is expected to greatly assist the development of coating materials with improved protective capabilities and provide a reliable method for use in assessing material performance.

  8. Using Innovative Techniques for Manufacturing Rocket Engine Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Erin M.; Reynolds, David C.; Eddleman, David E.; Hardin, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Many of the manufacturing techniques that are currently used for rocket engine component production are traditional methods that have been proven through years of experience and historical precedence. As we enter into a new space age where new launch vehicles are being designed and propulsion systems are being improved upon, it is sometimes necessary to adopt new and innovative techniques for manufacturing hardware. With a heavy emphasis on cost reduction and improvements in manufacturing time, manufacturing techniques such as Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) are being adopted and evaluated for their use on J-2X, with hopes of employing this technology on a wide variety of future projects. DMLS has the potential to significantly reduce the processing time and cost of engine hardware, while achieving desirable material properties by using a layered powder metal manufacturing process in order to produce complex part geometries. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently hot-fire tested a J-2X gas generator discharge duct that was manufactured using DMLS. The duct was inspected and proof tested prior to the hot-fire test. Using the Workhorse Gas Generator (WHGG) test setup at MSFC?s East Test Area test stand 116, the duct was subject to extreme J-2X gas generator environments and endured a total of 538 seconds of hot-fire time. The duct survived the testing and was inspected after the test. DMLS manufacturing has proven to be a viable option for manufacturing rocket engine hardware, and further development and use of this manufacturing method is recommended.

  9. Electrical characterization of a Mapham inverter using pulse testing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, E. D.; Myers, I. T.; Hammond, A. N.

    1990-01-01

    Electric power requirements for aerospace missions have reached megawatt power levels. Within the next few decades, it is anticipated that a manned lunar base, interplanetary travel, and surface exploration of the Martian surface will become reality. Several research and development projects aimed at demonstrating megawatt power level converters for space applications are currently underway at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Innovative testing techniques will be required to evaluate the components and converters, when developed, at their rated power in the absence of costly power sources, loads, and cooling systems. Facilities capable of testing these components and systems at full power are available, but their use may be cost prohibitive. The use of a multiple pulse testing technique is proposed to determine the electrical characteristics of large megawatt level power systems. Characterization of a Mapham inverter is made using the proposed technique and conclusions are drawn concerning its suitability as an experimental tool to evaluate megawatt level power systems.

  10. Electrocaloric refrigeration: an innovative, emerging, eco-friendly refrigeration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprea, C.; Greco, A.; Maiorino, A.; Masselli, C.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, the refrigeration is responsible of about 15% of the overall energy consumption all over the world. Actually most of the refrigerant fluids working in vapor compression plants (VCPs) are environmentally harmful, since they presents high GWP (Global Warming Potential), which leads to a substantial warming of both earth surface and atmosphere. Electrocaloric refrigeration (ER) is an innovative, emerging refrigeration technique based on solid state refrigerant that shows a great potential. It fits in the context of environment-friendly refrigeration systems, whom are spreading increasingly to replace VCPs. ER is founded on electrocaloric effect that is a physical phenomenon found in materials with dielectric properties, electrocaloric materials. The thermodynamical cycle that best is addressed to the electrocaloric refrigeration is Active Electrocaloric Regeneration cycle (AER) that consists of two adiabatic and two isofield stages. The core of an electrocaloric refrigerator is the regenerator whom operates both as refrigerant and regenerator in an AER cycle. In this paper, we compare the energetic performance of a commercial R134a refrigeration plant to that of an electrocaloric refrigerator working with an AER cycle. The comparison is performed in term of TEWI index (Total Equivalent Warming Impact) that includes both direct and indirect contributions to global warming.

  11. Composite Characterization Using Ultrasonic Wavefield Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara A. C.; Juarez, Peter D.; Seebo, Jeffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    The large-scale use of composite components in aerospace applications is expected to continue due to the benefits of composite materials, such as reduced weight, increased strength, and tailorability. NASA's Advanced Composites Project (ACP) has the goals of reducing the timeline for certification of composite materials and enabling the expanded use of advanced composite materials. A key technical challenge area for accomplishing these goals is the need for nondestructive evaluation and materials characterization techniques that are optimized for rapid inspection and detailed defect/damage characterization in composite materials. This presentation will discuss ongoing research investigating the use of ultrasonic wavefield techniques for the characterization of defects such as fiber waviness and delamination damage. Ongoing work includes the development of realistic ultrasonic simulation tools for use in predicting the inspectability of composites and optimizing inspection methodologies. Recent studies on detecting/characterizing delamination damage and fiber waviness via wavefield methods will be described.

  12. SITE PROGRAM CURRENT AND FUTURE INNOVATIVE TECHNIQUES FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Research and Development (ORD) conducts research related to the demonstration and evaluation of innovative cleanup technologies. One of the mechanisms for the evaluation of innovative field-scale technologies for hazardous ...

  13. 76 FR 45334 - Innovative Techniques for Delivering ITS Learning; Request for Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... they be implemented? Examples could be e-learning techniques, interactive games, or simulations. The... text messages for quick responses during an e-learning. 7. Are you aware of any learning materials... Research and Innovative Technology Administration Innovative Techniques for Delivering ITS...

  14. Optical Measurement Technique for Space Column Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, Danny A.; Watson, Judith J.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Phelps, James E.

    2004-01-01

    A simple optical technique for the structural characterization of lightweight space columns is presented. The technique is useful for determining the coefficient of thermal expansion during cool down as well as the induced strain during tension and compression testing. The technique is based upon object-to-image plane scaling and does not require any photogrammetric calibrations or computations. Examples of the measurement of the coefficient of thermal expansion are presented for several lightweight space columns. Examples of strain measured during tension and compression testing are presented along with comparisons to results obtained with Linear Variable Differential Transformer (LVDT) position transducers.

  15. Enhanced Landfill Mining case study: Innovative separation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuyvers, Lars; Moerenhout, Tim; Helsen, Stefan; Van de Wiele, Katrien; Behets, Tom; Umans, Luk; Wille, Eddy

    2014-05-01

    In 2011, a corporate vision on Enhanced Landfill Mining (ELFM)1 was approved by the OVAM Board of directors, which resulted in an operational programme over the period 2011-2015. OVAM (Public Waste Agency of Flanders) is the competent authority in charge of waste, Sustainable Materials Management (SMM) and contaminated soil management in Flanders. The introduction of the ELFM concept needs to be related with the concept of SMM and the broader shift to a circular economy. Within the concept of ELFM, landfills are no longer considered to be a final and static situation, but a dynamic part of the materials cycle. The main goal of this research programme is to develop a comprehensive policy on resource management to deal with the issue of former landfills. In order to investigate the opportunities of ELFM, the OVAM is applying a three step approach including mapping, surveying and mining of these former landfills. As a result of the mapping part over 2,000 landfill sites, that will need to be dealt with, were revealed. The valorisation potential of ELFM could be assigned to different goals, according to the R³P-concept : Recycling of Materials, Recovery of Energy, Reclamation of Land and Protection of drinking water supply. . On behalf of the OVAM, ECOREM was assigned to follow-up a pilot case executed on a former landfill, located in Zuienkerke, Flanders. Within this case study some technical tests were carried out on the excavated waste material to investigate the possibilities for a waste to resource conversion. The performance of both on site and off site techniques were evaluated. These testings also contribute to the mapping part of OVAM's research programme on ELFM and reveal more information on the composition of former landfills dating from different era's. In order to recover as many materials as possible, five contractors were assigned to perform separation tests on the bulk material from the Zuienkerke landfill. All used techniques were described

  16. New characterization techniques for LSST sensors

    DOE PAGES

    Nomerotski, A.

    2015-06-18

    Fully depleted, thick CCDs with extended infra-red response have become the sensor of choice for modern sky surveys. The charge transport effects in the silicon and associated astrometric distortions could make mapping between the sky coordinates and sensor coordinates non-trivial, and limit the ultimate precision achievable with these sensors. Two new characterization techniques for the CCDs, which both could probe these issues, are discussed: x-ray flat fielding and imaging of pinhole arrays.

  17. UTILITY EXPERIENCE WITH INNOVATIVE WATER MAIN REHAB TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    All utilities are motivated to renew their aging infrastructure in the most efficient manner with respect to cost and minimal disruption to the community. American Water was given an opportunity to participate in an EPA funded project to demonstrate innovative water (and wastewa...

  18. Innovative green technique for preparing of flame retardant cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to its environmentally benign character, microwave-assisted or supercritical carbon dioxide high pressure reactors are considered in green chemistry as a substitute for organic solvents in chemical reactions. In this paper, an innovative approach for preparation of flame retardant cotton fabric ...

  19. The NLP Swish Pattern: An Innovative Visualizing Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Betsy J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes swish pattern, one of many innovative therapeutic interventions that developers of neurolinguistic programing (NLP) have contributed to counseling profession. Presents brief overview of NLP followed by an explanation of the basic theory and expected outcomes of the swish. Presents description of the intervention process and case studies…

  20. INNOVATIONS IN EQUIPMENT AND TECHNIQUES FOR THE BIOLOGY TEACHING LABORATORY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BARTHELEMY, RICHARD E.; AND OTHERS

    LABORATORY TECHNIQUES AND EQUIPMENT APPROPRIATE FOR TEACHING BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE CURRICULUM STUDY BIOLOGY ARE EMPHASIZED. MAJOR CATEGORIES INCLUDE (1) LABORATORY FACILITIES, (2) EQUIPMENT AND TECHNIQUES FOR CULTURE OF MICRO-ORGANISMS, (3) LABORATORY ANIMALS AND THEIR HOUSING, (4) TECHNIQUES FOR STUDYING PLANT GROWTH, (5) TECHNIQUES FOR STUDYING…

  1. New Techniques in Characterization of Ferroelectric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehirlioglu, Alp

    2008-01-01

    Two new techniques have been developed to characterize Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) based ferroelectric single crystals: (i) electro-thermal imaging, and (ii) single crystal x-ray diffraction in the transmission mode. (i) Electro-thermal imaging is a remote sensing technique that can detect the polarization direction and poling state of a whole crystal slice. This imaging technique utilizes an IR camera to determine the field induced temperature change and does not require any special or destructive sample preparation. In the resulting images it is possible to distinguish regions of 180 deg domains. This powerful technique can be used remotely during poling to determine the poling state of the crystal to avoid over-poling that can result in inferior properties and/or cracking of the crystals. Electro-thermal imaging produced the first direct observations of polarization rotation. Under bipolar field, the domains near the corners were the first to switch direction. As the field increased above the coercive field, domains at the center part of the crystals switched direction. (ii) X-ray diffraction in the transmission mode has long been used in structure determination of organic crystals and proteins; however, it is not used much to characterize inorganic systems. 0.7Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.3PbTiO3 single crystals were examined by this XRD technique for the first time, and a never-before-seen super-lattice was revealed with a doubling of the unit cell in all three directions, giving a cell volume eight times that of a traditional perovskite unit cell. The significance of the super-lattice peaks increased with poling, indicating a structural contribution to ordering. Lack of such observations by electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope examinations suggests the presence of a bulk effect.

  2. Techniques for physicochemical characterization of nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ping-Chang; Lin, Stephen; Wang, Paul C.; Sridhar, Rajagopalan

    2014-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have opened up a new era of diagnosis, prevention and treatment of diseases and traumatic injuries. Nanomaterials, including those with potential for clinical applications, possess novel physicochemical properties that have an impact on their physiological interactions, from the molecular level to the systemic level. There is a lack of standardized methodologies or regulatory protocols for detection or characterization of nanomaterials. This review summarizes the techniques that are commonly used to study the size, shape, surface properties, composition, purity and stability of nanomaterials, along with their advantages and disadvantages. At present there are no FDA guidelines that have been developed specifically for nanomaterial based formulations for diagnostic or therapeutic use. There is an urgent need for standardized protocols and procedures for the characterization of nanoparticles, especially those that are intended for use as theranostics. PMID:24252561

  3. Innovation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA frames innovation as critical to the protection of human health and the environment through initiatives such as sustainable practices, innovative research, prize competitions, innovation awards, partnerships, and community activities.

  4. Waste minimization in analytical chemistry through innovative sample preparation techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L. L.

    1998-05-28

    Because toxic solvents and other hazardous materials are commonly used in analytical methods, characterization procedures result in significant and costly amount of waste. We are developing alternative analytical methods in the radiological and organic areas to reduce the volume or form of the hazardous waste produced during sample analysis. For the radiological area, we have examined high-pressure, closed-vessel microwave digestion as a way to minimize waste from sample preparation operations. Heated solutions of strong mineral acids can be avoided for sample digestion by using the microwave approach. Because reactivity increases with pressure, we examined the use of less hazardous solvents to leach selected contaminants from soil for subsequent analysis. We demonstrated the feasibility of this approach by extracting plutonium from a NET reference material using citric and tartaric acids with microwave digestion. Analytical results were comparable to traditional digestion methods, while hazardous waste was reduced by a factor often. We also evaluated the suitability of other natural acids, determined the extraction performance on a wider variety of soil types, and examined the extraction efficiency of other contaminants. For the organic area, we examined ways to minimize the wastes associated with the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in environmental samples. Conventional methods for analyzing semivolatile organic compounds are labor intensive and require copious amounts of hazardous solvents. For soil and sediment samples, we have a method to analyze PCBs that is based on microscale extraction using benign solvents (e.g., water or hexane). The extraction is performed at elevated temperatures in stainless steel cells containing the sample and solvent. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to quantitate the analytes in the isolated extract. More recently, we developed a method utilizing solid-phase microextraction (SPME) for natural

  5. Characterization of nutraceuticals and functional foods by innovative HPLC methods.

    PubMed

    Corradini, Claudio; Galanti, Roberta; Nicoletti, Isabella

    2002-04-01

    In recent years there is a growing interest in food and food ingredient which may provide health benefits. Food as well as food ingredients containing health-preserving components, are not considered conventional food, but can be defined as functional food. To characterise such foods, as well as nutraceuticals specific, high sensitive and reproducible analytical methodologies are needed. In light of this importance we set out to develop innovative HPLC methods employing reversed phase narrow bore column and high-performance anion-exchange chromatographic methods coupled with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD), which are specific for carbohydrate analysis. The developed methods were applied for the separation and quantification of citrus flavonoids and to characterize fructooligosaccharide (FOS) and fructans added to functional foods and nutraceuticals.

  6. Photographic techniques for characterizing streambed particle sizes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, M.S.; Moran, E.H.; Ourso, R.T.

    2003-01-01

    We developed photographic techniques to characterize coarse (>2-mm) and fine (???2-mm) streambed particle sizes in 12 streams in Anchorage, Alaska. Results were compared with current sampling techniques to assess which provided greater sampling efficiency and accuracy. The streams sampled were wade-able and contained gravel - cobble streambeds. Gradients ranged from about 5% at the upstream sites to about 0.25% at the downstream sites. Mean particle sizes and size-frequency distributions resulting from digitized photographs differed significantly from those resulting from Wolman pebble counts for five sites in the analysis. Wolman counts were biased toward selecting larger particles. Photographic analysis also yielded a greater number of measured particles (mean = 989) than did the Wolman counts (mean = 328). Stream embeddedness ratings assigned from field and photographic observations were significantly different at 5 of the 12 sites, although both types of ratings showed a positive relationship with digitized surface fines. Visual estimates of embeddedness and digitized surface fines may both be useful indicators of benthic conditions, but digitizing surface fines produces quantitative rather than qualitative data. Benefits of the photographic techniques include reduced field time, minimal streambed disturbance, convenience of postfield processing, easy sample archiving, and improved accuracy and replication potential.

  7. Innovative Techniques for Teaching about Landslides and Triggered Landslide Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, F. E.; Malamud, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    When we think of a landslide (mass wasting), both the public and scientists often envisage an individual movement of earth material down a slope. Yet, landslides often occur not as individuals, but as parts of a triggered landslide event. This is where a trigger (e.g., an earthquake or heavy rainfall) results in up to tens of thousands of landslides in a region in the minutes to days after the trigger. In this paper, we will present ideas for innovative demonstrations, teaching practicals and projects, ranging from low-cost low-tech to more advanced digital methods, to communicate the ideas of landslides and triggered landslide events to the public and students. This paper is aimed at those in secondary school/university education and the public sector looking for examples to interest and inform their respective audiences about landslides, triggered landslide events, and the importance and implications of considering landslides not just as individuals, but as populations.

  8. Denture bar-coding: An innovative technique in forensic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Venkateshwaran, Rajendran; Vidhya, J; Anuradha, R; Mary, Gold Pealin; Pradeep, R; Senthileagappan, A R

    2015-08-01

    Denture markers play an important role in forensic odontology and also in identifying a person. A number of methods are there for identifying dentures from a less expensive technique to a more expensive technique. Out of different denture markers, the bar-coding system is a way of collecting data from the mobile. Even a huge amount of data can be stored in that. It can be easily incorporated during acrylization of the denture and thus could be helpful in identification. This article reviews the strengths of bar-coding and how easily it can be used in the routine procedure.

  9. Denture bar-coding: An innovative technique in forensic dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Venkateshwaran, Rajendran; Vidhya, J.; Anuradha, R.; Mary, Gold Pealin; Pradeep, R.; Senthileagappan, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Denture markers play an important role in forensic odontology and also in identifying a person. A number of methods are there for identifying dentures from a less expensive technique to a more expensive technique. Out of different denture markers, the bar-coding system is a way of collecting data from the mobile. Even a huge amount of data can be stored in that. It can be easily incorporated during acrylization of the denture and thus could be helpful in identification. This article reviews the strengths of bar-coding and how easily it can be used in the routine procedure. PMID:26538876

  10. Innovative techniques to analyze time series of geomagnetic activity indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Potirakis, Stelios M.; Eftaxias, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic storms are undoubtedly among the most important phenomena in space physics and also a central subject of space weather. The non-extensive Tsallis entropy has been recently introduced, as an effective complexity measure for the analysis of the geomagnetic activity Dst index. The Tsallis entropy sensitively shows the complexity dissimilarity among different "physiological" (normal) and "pathological" states (intense magnetic storms). More precisely, the Tsallis entropy implies the emergence of two distinct patterns: (i) a pattern associated with the intense magnetic storms, which is characterized by a higher degree of organization, and (ii) a pattern associated with normal periods, which is characterized by a lower degree of organization. Other entropy measures such as Block Entropy, T-Complexity, Approximate Entropy, Sample Entropy and Fuzzy Entropy verify the above mentioned result. Importantly, the wavelet spectral analysis in terms of Hurst exponent, H, also shows the existence of two different patterns: (i) a pattern associated with the intense magnetic storms, which is characterized by a fractional Brownian persistent behavior (ii) a pattern associated with normal periods, which is characterized by a fractional Brownian anti-persistent behavior. Finally, we observe universality in the magnetic storm and earthquake dynamics, on a basis of a modified form of the Gutenberg-Richter law for the Tsallis statistics. This finding suggests a common approach to the interpretation of both phenomena in terms of the same driving physical mechanism. Signatures of discrete scale invariance in Dst time series further supports the aforementioned proposal.

  11. Comparison of Traditional and Innovative Techniques to Solve Technical Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Although NASA has an adequate food system for current missions, research is required to accommodate new requirements for future NASA exploration missions. The Inadequate Food System risk reflects the need to develop requirements and technologies that will enable NASA to provide the crew with a safe, nutritious and acceptable food system while effectively balancing appropriate resources such as mass, volume, and crew time in exploratory missions. As we go deeper into space or spend more time on the International Space Station (ISS), there will be requirements for packaged food to be stored for 3 5 years. New food packaging technologies are needed that have adequate oxygen and water barrier properties to maintain the foods' quality over this extended shelf life. NASA has been unsuccessful in identify packaging materials that meet the necessary requirements when using several traditional routes including literature reviews, workshops, and internal shelf life studies on foods packaged in various packaging materials. Small Business Innovative Research grants were used for accelerating food packaging materials research with limited success. In order to accelerate the process, a theoretical challenge was submitted to InnoCentive resulting in a partial award. A similar food packaging challenge was submitted to Yet2.com and several potential commercial packaging material suppliers were identified that, at least partially, met the requirements. Comparisons and results of these challenges will be discussed.

  12. Imprisoned Resources--Innovative Techniques in Educating Prison Inmates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Larry F.; Jenkins, William O.

    The effectiveness of employing educationally advanced inmates as one-to-one basic education tutors for inmate students was evaluated. In conjunction with this evaluation, an experimental study of the most efficient material presentation and testing techniques using this manpower resource was conducted. Three different modes of presenting…

  13. Filtrates and Residues: Gel Filtration--An Innovative Separation Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenfeld, Fred; Gardner, James

    1985-01-01

    Gel filtration is a form of liquid chromatography that separates molecules primarily on the basis of their size. Advantages of using this technique, theoretical aspects, and experiments (including procedures used) are discussed. Several questions for students to answer (with answers) are also provided. (JN)

  14. Innovative Perceptual Motor Activities: Programing Techniques That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorrell, Howard M.

    1978-01-01

    A circuit approach and station techniques are used to depict perceptual motor games for handicapped and nonhandicapped children. Twenty activities are described in terms of objectives, materials, and procedures, and their focus on visual tracking, visual discrimination and copying of forms, spatial body perception, fine motor coordination, tactile…

  15. X-ray techniques for innovation in industry

    PubMed Central

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, Krystyna; Cutler, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The smart specialization declared in the European program Horizon 2020, and the increasing cooperation between research and development found in companies and researchers at universities and research institutions have created a new paradigm where many calls for proposals require participation and funding from public and private entities. This has created a unique opportunity for large-scale facilities, such as synchrotron research laboratories, to participate in and support applied research programs. Scientific staff at synchrotron facilities have developed many advanced tools that make optimal use of the characteristics of the light generated by the storage ring. These tools have been exceptionally valuable for materials characterization including X-ray absorption spectroscopy, diffraction, tomography and scattering, and have been key in solving many research and development issues. Progress in optics and detectors, as well as a large effort put into the improvement of data analysis codes, have resulted in the development of reliable and reproducible procedures for materials characterization. Research with photons has contributed to the development of a wide variety of products such as plastics, cosmetics, chemicals, building materials, packaging materials and pharma. In this review, a few examples are highlighted of successful cooperation leading to solutions of a variety of industrial technological problems which have been exploited by industry including lessons learned from the Science Link project, supported by the European Commission, as a new approach to increase the number of commercial users at large-scale research infrastructures. PMID:25485139

  16. Innovative Seismological Techniques for Investigating the Interior Structure of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. J.; Cutts, J. A.; Mimoun, D.

    2014-12-01

    The formation, evolution and structure of Venus remain a mystery more than fifty years after the first visit by a robotic spacecraft. Radar images have revealed a surface that is much younger than those of the Moon, Mercury and Mars as well as a variety of enigmatic volcanic and tectonic features quite unlike those generated by plate tectonics on Earth. To understand how Venus works as a planet it is necessary to probe the interior of Venus. To accomplish this seismology must play a key role. Conventional seismology employs sensors in contact with the planetary surface but for Venus theses sensors must tolerate the Venus environment (460oC and 90 bars) for up to a year. The dense atmosphere of Venus, which efficiently couples seismic energy into the atmosphere as infrasonic waves, enables an alternative: detection of infrasonic waves in the upper atmosphere using either high altitude balloons or orbiting spacecraft. In June 2014, the Keck Institute for Space Studies (KISS) at the California Institute of Technology sponsored a one week workshop with 30 specialists in the key techniques and technologies that can bring these technique to readiness. In this paper, we describe the key synergies with earth science drawing on methods from terrestrial seismology and oceanography and identify key technical issues that need to be solved as well as important precursor measurements that should be made.

  17. Innovative, Inexpensive Etching Technique Developed for Polymer Electro- Optical Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.

    1999-01-01

    Electro-optic, polymer-based integrated optic devices for high-speed communication and computing applications offer potentially significant advantages over conventional inorganic electro-optic crystals. One key area of integrated optical technology--primary processing and fabrication--may particularly benefit from the use of polymer materials. However, as efforts concentrate on the miniaturization of electro-integrated circuit pattern geometries, the ability to etch fine features and smoothly sloped sidewalls is essential to make polymers useful for electro-integrated circuit applications. There are many existing processes available to etch polymer materials, but they all yield nearly vertical sidewalls. Vertical sidewalls are too difficult to reliably cover with a metal layer, and incomplete metalization degrades microwave performance, particularly at high frequency. However, obtaining a very sloped sidewall greatly improves the deposition of metal on the sidewall, leading to low-loss characteristics, which are essential to integrating these devices in highspeed electro-optic modulators. The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed in-house an inexpensive etching technique that uses a photolithography method followed by a simple, wet chemical etching process to etch through polymer layers. In addition to being simpler and inexpensive, this process can be used to fabricate smoothly sloped sidewalls by using a commercial none rodible mask: Spin-On-Glass. A commercial transparent material, Spin-On-Glass, uses processes and equipment similar to that for photoresist techniques.

  18. Hubble Servicing Challenges Drive Innovation of Shuttle Rendezvous Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.; Walker, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing, performed by Space Shuttle crews, has contributed to what is arguably one of the most successful astronomy missions ever flown. Both nominal and contingency proximity operations techniques were developed to enable successful servicing, while lowering the risk of damage to HST systems, and improve crew safety. Influencing the development of these techniques were the challenges presented by plume impingement and HST performance anomalies. The design of both the HST and the Space Shuttle was completed before the potential of HST contamination and structural damage by shuttle RCS jet plume impingement was fully understood. Relative navigation during proximity operations has been challenging, as HST was not equipped with relative navigation aids. Since HST reached orbit in 1990, proximity operations design for servicing missions has evolved as insight into plume contamination and dynamic pressure has improved and new relative navigation tools have become available. Servicing missions have provided NASA with opportunities to gain insight into servicing mission design and development of nominal and contingency procedures. The HST servicing experiences and lessons learned are applicable to other programs that perform on-orbit servicing and rendezvous, both human and robotic.

  19. Innovative techniques for sampling stream-inhabiting salamanders

    SciTech Connect

    T.M. Luhring; C.A. Young

    2006-01-01

    Although salamanders are excellent indicators of environmental health, the ability to catch them efficiently without substantially disrupting their habitat is not always practical or even possible with current techniques. Ripping open logs and raking leaf packs onto shore (Bruce 1972) are examples of such practices that are disruptive but widely used by herpetologists who have no other means of efficient collection. Drift fences with pitfall traps are effective in catching animals moving within or between habitats but are time consuming and require an initial financial investment and constant upkeep to maintain functionality and prevent animal fatalities (Gibbons and Semlitsch 1981). One current alternative to drift fences is the use of coverboards (Grant et al. 1992), which require less maintenance and sampling effort than drift fences. However, coverboards do not integrate captures over a long time period and often result in a lower number of captures per trap (Grant et al. 1992).

  20. Innovative Visualization Techniques applied to a Flood Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcão, António; Ho, Quan; Lopes, Pedro; Malamud, Bruce D.; Ribeiro, Rita; Jern, Mikael

    2013-04-01

    The large and ever-increasing amounts of multi-dimensional, time-varying and geospatial digital information from multiple sources represent a major challenge for today's analysts. We present a set of visualization techniques that can be used for the interactive analysis of geo-referenced and time sampled data sets, providing an integrated mechanism and that aids the user to collaboratively explore, present and communicate visually complex and dynamic data. Here we present these concepts in the context of a 4 hour flood scenario from Lisbon in 2010, with data that includes measures of water column (flood height) every 10 minutes at a 4.5 m x 4.5 m resolution, topography, building damage, building information, and online base maps. Techniques we use include web-based linked views, multiple charts, map layers and storytelling. We explain two of these in more detail that are not currently in common use for visualization of data: storytelling and web-based linked views. Visual storytelling is a method for providing a guided but interactive process of visualizing data, allowing more engaging data exploration through interactive web-enabled visualizations. Within storytelling, a snapshot mechanism helps the author of a story to highlight data views of particular interest and subsequently share or guide others within the data analysis process. This allows a particular person to select relevant attributes for a snapshot, such as highlighted regions for comparisons, time step, class values for colour legend, etc. and provide a snapshot of the current application state, which can then be provided as a hyperlink and recreated by someone else. Since data can be embedded within this snapshot, it is possible to interactively visualize and manipulate it. The second technique, web-based linked views, includes multiple windows which interactively respond to the user selections, so that when selecting an object and changing it one window, it will automatically update in all the other

  1. The innovative application of surface geophysical techniques for remedial investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, W.R.; Smith, S.; Gilmore, P.; Cox, S.

    1993-03-01

    When researchers are investigating potential subsurface contamination at hazardous waste landfills, the surface geophysical techniques they may use are often limited. Many geophysical surveys are concerned with areas next to and not directly within the landfill units. The highly variable properties of the materials within the landfill may result in geophysical data that are either difficult or impossible to interpret. Therefore, contamination at these sites may not be detected until substantial lateral migration away from the unit has occurred. In addition, because of the poor resolution of some techniques, the landfill as a whole must be considered as a source, where discrete disposal areas within landfill units may be the actual point sources of contaminants. In theory, if specific sources within the landfill are identified and isolated, then reduced time, effort, and expenditures will be required for remediation activities. In the summer of 1989, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) investigated a small potentially hazardous waste landfill to determine if contaminant hot spots could be identified within the landfill and to determine if significant vertical and lateral migration of contaminants was occurring away from these locations. Based on the present hydrogeologic conditions, researchers anticipated that subsurface flow would be primarily vertical, with the zone of saturation at a depth greater than 150 meters. This necessitated that the survey be performed, for the most part, directly on the capped portion of the landfill. Focused geophysical surveys conducted off the landfill would not have provided useful information concerning conditions directly beneath the landfill. This paper discusses the planning, application, and analysis of four combined sensing methods: two methods of electromagnetic induction [low induction (Em) and time domain (TEM)], ground penetrating radar (GPR), and soil gas.

  2. Stabilizing the Carbon Marker During Surveying: An Innovative Technique.

    PubMed

    Pande, Neelam Abhay; Kulkarni, Sayali; Radke, Usha; Rathi, Akhil

    2014-12-01

    Dental surveyor has been defined as an instrument used to determine the relative parallelism of two or more surfaces of the teeth or other parts of the cast of a dental arch. Therefore the primary purpose of surveying is to identify the modifications of oral structures that are necessary to fabricate a removable partial denture that will have a successful prognosis. It is the modification of tooth surfaces to accommodate placement of the component parts of the partial denture in their designated ideal position on abutment teeth that facilitates this prognosis. Routinely, during marking the survey line, the carbon marker breaks many a times, as it is somehow brittle in structure, even after holding it in the metal sheath. This unnecessarily lengthens the working time of the operator as well as laboratory personnel. In the above mentioned new technique, the plastic refill sheath holds the carbon marker easily and securely. This serves the marking on the cast without breakage of carbon marker, thus saves the operator's time. The plastic refill sheath is easily available and economical.

  3. Innovative technology summary report: mobile automated characterization system

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    The Mobile Automated Characterization System (MACS) has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Robotics Technology Development Program as an automated floor surface contamination characterization system. MACS was designed for use by Health Physics (HP) personnel in the performance of floor surveys of known or suspected contaminated areas, to be used during any floor characterization task which has significant open areas requiring radiological surveys. MACS was designed to automate the collection, storage and analysis of large, open floor areas, relieving the HP personnel of this portion of the floor characterization task. MACS does not require a dedicated full time operator and can be setup by the normal HP staff to survey the open areas while other techniques are used on the more constrained areas. The HP personnel performing the other characterization activities can monitor the MACS progress and address any problems encountered by MACS during survey operations. MACS is designed for unattended operation and has safety and operational monitoring functions which will safely shut the system down if any difficulties are encountered. During survey operations, MACS generates a map of surveyed areas with color-coding indicating radiation levels. This map is displayed on the control console monitor during operation and can be printed for survey result documentation. MACS produces data files containing data for all sensors used during a survey, providing a complete record of samples taken and contamination levels found for all areas traversed during a survey. This data can be processed to produce tabular output of the survey results.

  4. Characterizing odors from cattle feedlots with different odor techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Odors from cattle feedlots negatively affect local communities. The purpose of this study was to characterize odors and odorants using different odor sampling techniques. Odors were characterized with field olfactometers (Nasal Ranger®), sensory techniques (GC-O) and analytical techniques (sorbent t...

  5. An Innovative Technique for Pancreatic Head Resection: The "Uncinate First" Approach.

    PubMed

    Hackert, Thilo; Büchler, Marcus W

    2011-12-01

    The resection in partial pancreatico-duodenectomy as the standard treatment for malignancies of the pancreatic head is commonly performed starting from the hepatoduodenal ligament after division of the bile duct, stomach, or proximal duodenum and pancreatic body. The "Uncinate First" approach is a technical modification with a retrograde dissection of the pancreatic head as a novel surgical procedure. Caudo-cranial resection of the pancreatic head is characterized by starting with the uncinate process after division and mobilization of the first jejunal loop. Transection of the upper gastrointestinal structures (bile duct, stomach or duodenum and pancreas) is performed at the end of the resection. The retrograde Uncinate First technique offers a comfortable and innovative approach for partial pancreatico-duodenectomy. The superior mesenteric artery as well as the portal and superior mesenteric vein can be very accurately dissected and controlled during the resection phase associated with potentially less blood loss and a more radical resection along the medial margin, which is often the site of R1 resections. Future studies are required to evaluate this procedure regarding operative parameters and postoperative outcome compared with the standard resection.

  6. Innovative directional and position specific sampling technique (POLO). Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-06-01

    The UTD Inc. Position Location (POLO) device is used for identifying the position of characterization sensors in the subsurface. POLO fits within a cone penetrometer rod to quickly and cost-effectively identify sample location, rod tip location, and track the rod path. UTD demonstrated the POLO device at a private site in Virginia and at the DOE Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Results show POLO as accurate as any alternative approach at less than 0.50% error, and at a fraction of the cost. POLO can be used in close proximity to tanks, pipelines, and buildings with greatly reduced risk of puncture and resulting spills--a major improvement over current approaches. POLO only adds about 4% to cost of penetrometer use.

  7. Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers. Final report, October 1992--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Delshad, M.; Ferreira, L.; Gupta, A.; Maroongroge, V.

    1994-11-01

    This is the final report of a three year research project on the use of tracers for reservoir characterization. The objective of this research was to develop advanced, innovative techniques for the description of reservoir characteristics using both single-well backflow and interwell tracer tests. (1) The authors implemented and validated tracer modeling features in a compositional simulator (UTCOMP). (2) They developed and applied a new single well tracer test for estimating reservoir heterogeneity. (3) They developed and applied a new single well tracer test for estimating reservoir wettability in-situ. (4) They developed a new, simple and efficient method to analyze two well tracer tests based upon type curve matching and illustrated its use with actual field tracer data. (5) They developed a new method for deriving an integrated reservoir description based upon combinatorial optimization schemes. (6) They developed a new, interwell tracer test for reservoir heterogeneity called vertical tracer profiling (VTP) and demonstrated its advantages over conventional interwell tracer testing. (7) They developed a simple and easy analytical method to estimate swept pore volume from interwell tracer data and showed both the theoretical basis for this method and its practical utility. (8) They made numerous enhancements to our compositional reservoir simulator such as including the full permeability tensor, adding faster solvers, improving its speed and robustness and making it easier to use (better I/0) for tracer simulation problems. (9) They applied the enhanced version of UTCOMP to the analysis of interwell tracer data using perfluorocarbons at Elks Hill Naval Petroleum Reserve. All of these accomplishments taken together have significantly improved the state of reservoir tracer technology and have demonstrated that it is a far more powerful and useful tool for quantitative reservoir characterization than previously realized or practiced by the industry.

  8. Photogrammetric detection technique for rotor blades structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enei, C.; Bernardini, G.; Serafini, J.; Mattioni, L.; Ficuciello, C.; Vezzari, V.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes an innovative use of photogrammetric detection techniques to experimentally estimate structural/inertial properties of helicopter rotor blades. The identification algorithms for the evaluation of mass and flexural stiffness distributions are an extension of the ones proposed by Larsen, whereas the procedure for torsional properties determination (stiffness and shear center position) is based on the Euler-Prandtl beam theory. These algorithms rely on measurements performed through photogrammetric detection, which requires the collection of digital photos allowing the identification of 3D coordinates of labeled points (markers) on the structure through the correlation of 2D pictures. The displacements are evaluated by comparing the positions of markers in loaded and reference configuration. Being the applied loads known, the structural characteristics can be directly obtained from the measured displacements. The accuracy of the proposed identification algorithms has been firstly verified by comparison with numerical and experimental data, and then applied to the structural characterization of two main rotor blades, designed for ultra-light helicopter applications.

  9. Innovators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NEA Today, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes various innovations that have been developed to enhance education. These innovations include: helping educators help at-risk students succeed; promoting high school journalism; ensuring quality online learning experiences; developing a student performing group that uses theater to address social issues; and having students design their…

  10. Innovative Two-Part Impression Technique for an Extensive Maxillary Defect.

    PubMed

    Soofi, Zahid Iqbal; Yazdanie, Nazia; Kazmi, Syed Murtaza Raza

    2015-10-01

    Patients reporting with large maxillary defects pose great difficulty in prosthodontic practice. After thorough history and clinical examination, prosthetic rehabilitation of these patients usually starts with an impression. In such cases conventional single step impression technique solely may not give the desired results. If the defect is of large size then impression making becomes difficult and complicated procedure. Therefore, conventional impression technique can be modified according to the needs and requirements. This report describes a modified and innovative technique of making impression in two parts, which can be withdrawn from mouth in two segments and easily reoriented outside the mouth.

  11. Better innovate than compromise: a novel hepatic outflow reconstruction technique in pediatric living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cherian, P Thomas; Mishra, Ashish K; Bangaari, Ashish; Kota, Venugopal; Sathyanarayanan, Mohan; Raya, Ravichandra; Rela, Mohamed

    2015-05-01

    Pediatric LDLT using donors with unfavorable vascular anatomy is challenging in terms of donor safety, and complexity of reconstruction in the recipient. We describe an innovative technique of hepatic venous outflow reconstruction involving the recipient RHV, in the presence of a rudimentary RHV in the donor. The postoperative course of the donor and recipient was uneventful with satisfactory venous outflow in both. This technique avoided the use of prosthetic material, an important consideration given the recipient age and requirement for growth. This shows that donors previously considered unsuitable for donation can be utilized safely as long as principles of vascular anastomosis are adhered to. Moreover, it highlights that innovation is sometimes necessary to avoid compromise in donor safety.

  12. Characterizing Hyperspectral Imagery (AVIRIS) Using Fractal Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Hong-Lie; Lam, Nina Siu-Ngan; Quattrochi, Dale

    1997-01-01

    With the rapid increase in hyperspectral data acquired by various experimental hyperspectral imaging sensors, it is necessary to develop efficient and innovative tools to handle and analyze these data. The objective of this study is to seek effective spatial analytical tools for summarizing the spatial patterns of hyperspectral imaging data. In this paper, we (1) examine how fractal dimension D changes across spectral bands of hyperspectral imaging data and (2) determine the relationships between fractal dimension and image content. It has been documented that fractal dimension changes across spectral bands for the Landsat-TM data and its value [(D)] is largely a function of the complexity of the landscape under study. The newly available hyperspectral imaging data such as that from the Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) which has 224 bands, covers a wider spectral range with a much finer spectral resolution. Our preliminary result shows that fractal dimension values of AVIRIS scenes from the Santa Monica Mountains in California vary between 2.25 and 2.99. However, high fractal dimension values (D > 2.8) are found only from spectral bands with high noise level and bands with good image quality have a fairly stable dimension value (D = 2.5 - 2.6). This suggests that D can also be used as a summary statistics to represent the image quality or content of spectral bands.

  13. An innovative technique for customizing the stock acrylic resin ocular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Mowade, Tushar K; Dange, S P

    2011-01-01

    The loss of an eye is a traumatic and common event. The psychological effects of losing an eye are frequently more difficult to deal with than its functional loss. This article describes the management of a child patient with anopthalmic socket, by an innovative technique of customizing the stock acrylic resin ocular prosthesis to get improved esthetics, accurate location of iris-pupil complex and exact fit in the defect.

  14. Innovative analytical tools to characterize prebiotic carbohydrates of functional food interest.

    PubMed

    Corradini, Claudio; Lantano, Claudia; Cavazza, Antonella

    2013-05-01

    Functional foods are one of the most interesting areas of research and innovation in the food industry. A functional food or functional ingredient is considered to be any food or food component that provides health benefits beyond basic nutrition. Recently, consumers have shown interest in natural bioactive compounds as functional ingredients in the diet owing to their various beneficial effects for health. Water-soluble fibers and nondigestible oligosaccharides and polysaccharides can be defined as functional food ingredients. Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) and inulin are resistant to direct metabolism by the host and reach the caecocolon, where they are used by selected groups of beneficial bacteria. Furthermore, they are able to improve physical and structural properties of food, such as hydration, oil-holding capacity, viscosity, texture, sensory characteristics, and shelf-life. This article reviews major innovative analytical developments to screen and identify FOS, inulins, and the most employed nonstarch carbohydrates added or naturally present in functional food formulations. High-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed electrochemical detection (HPAEC-PED) is one of the most employed analytical techniques for the characterization of those molecules. Mass spectrometry is also of great help, in particularly matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), which is able to provide extensive information regarding the molecular weight and length profiles of oligosaccharides and polysaccharides. Moreover, MALDI-TOF-MS in combination with HPAEC-PED has been shown to be of great value for the complementary information it can provide. Some other techniques, such as NMR spectroscopy, are also discussed, with relevant examples of recent applications. A number of articles have appeared in the literature in recent years regarding the analysis of inulin, FOS, and other carbohydrates of interest in the field and

  15. Wafer Stepper Characterization And Process Control Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, S. C.; Friedberg, C. B.

    1982-09-01

    A process control vehicle is described which allows the characterization and comparison of wafer steppers with respect to distortion, resolution, uniformity, and misregistration. A block of test structures consisting of optical resolution patterns, verniers, and electrical line width and misalignment resistors is arrayed on an 11 x 11 grid which fills the entire available field of a 10X reticle. Fach block also contains a pair of targets for the THE laser-interferometric auto-alignment system. The ability of the auto-aligner to acquire such targets to within 500 is exploited as a metrology tool whereby the measured coordinates at each site are compared to the ideal (theoretical) coordinates to generate a vector distortion map across the field. Subsequent reduction of misregistration data is accomplished via application of the six parameter model developed by Perloff and co-workers. It is shown that these diagnostic tools permit the rapid characterization of distortion anisotropy for a given stepper and can be used to optimize and monitor level-to-level regis-tration. Further applications are suggested.

  16. Female stress urinary incontinence: standard techniques revisited and critical evaluation of innovative techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Cornelia; de Riese, Werner T. W.

    2003-06-01

    Objectives: The treatment of female urinary incontinence (UI) is a growing health care concern in our aging society. Publications of recent innovations and modifications are creating expectations. This brief review provides some insight and structure regarding indications and expected outcomes for the different approaches. Materials: Data extraction is part of a Medline data base search, which was performed for "female stress incontinence" from 1960 until 2000. Additional literature search was performed to cover 2001 and 2002. Outcome data were extracted. Results: (1) INJECTION OF BULKING AGENTS (collagen, synthetic agents): The indication for mucosal coaptation was more clearly defined and in the majority of articles limited to ISD. (2) OPEN COLPOSUSPENSION (Burch, MMK): Best long-term results of all operative procedures, to date considered the gold standard. (3) LAPAROSCOPIC COLPOSUSPENSION (different modifications): Long-term success rates appear dependent on operator skills. There are few long-term data. (4) NEEDLE SUSPENSION: (Stamey, Pareyra and modifications): Initial results were equal to Burch with less morbidity, but long-term success rates are worse. (5) SLING PROCEDURES (autologous, synthetic, allogenic graft materials, different modes of support and anchoring, free tapes): The suburethral sling has traditionally been considered a procedure for those in whom suspension had failed and for those with severe ISD. The most current trend shows its use as a primary procedure for SUI. Long-term data beyond 5 years are insufficient. (6) EXTERNAL OCCLUSIVE DEVICES (vaginal sponges and pessaries, urethral insert): Both vaginal and urethral insert devices can be effective in selected patients. (7) IMPLANTABLE ARTEFICIAL URETHRAL SPHINCTERS: Modifications and improvements of the devices resulted in improved clinical results regarding durability and efficacy. CONCLUSION: (1) The Burch colposuspension is still considered the gold standard in the treatment of female

  17. Innovative techniques for improving overlay accuracy by using DCM (device correlated metrology) targets as reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzai, Wei-Jhe; Hsu, Simon C. C.; Chen, Howard; Chen, Charlie; Pai, Yuan Chi; Yu, Chun-Chi; Lin, Chia Ching; Itzkovich, Tal; Yap, Lipkong; Amit, Eran; Tien, David; Huang, Eros; Kuo, Kelly T. L.; Amir, Nuriel

    2014-04-01

    Overlay metrology performance as Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU), design rule compatibility, device correlation and measurement accuracy are been challenged at 2x nm node and below. Process impact on overlay metrology becoming critical, and techniques to improve measurement accuracy becomes increasingly important. In this paper, we present an innovative methodology for improving overlay accuracy. A propriety quality metric, Qmerit, is used to identify overlay metrology measurement settings with least process impacts and reliable accuracies. Using the quality metric, an innovative calibration method, ASC (Archer Self Calibration) is then used to remove the inaccuracies. Accuracy validation can be achieved by correlation to reference overlay data from another independent metrology source such as CDSEM data collected on DCM (Device Correlated Metrology) hybrid target or electrical testing. Additionally, reference metrology can also be used to verify which measurement conditions are the most accurate. In this paper we bring an example of such use case.

  18. Synthesis Technique and Characterizations of Silver Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajawat, Shweta; Qureshi, M. S.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we report synthesis of nanostructures of silver nanoparticles using X-ray films. Exposed X-ray films, which consist of silver nanoparticles, are cut into small pieces of size 1 cm × 1 cm. These pieces were heated in distilled water at temperature 70°C. These nanoparticles, separated from heated films, are simultaneously collected through electrolytic deposition using copper and carbon rods. The carbon rod is wrapped over by Low density polyethylene (LDPE) sheet for easy extraction. This process was carried in two different environments (1) in broad daylight and (2) on a cloudy day. Characterization of the two samples was done using X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. XRD of the particles gave peaks well in accordance with JCPDS file 04-. This result confirms formation of highly pure silver nanoparticles. TEM revealed that the interaction of silver nanoparticles with sunlight gave chain like structures whereas in the absence of interaction with sunlight, cloudy day, nanoflowers were formed. Nanostructures were more prominent for bigger particles.

  19. Loop mediated isothermal amplification: An innovative gene amplification technique for animal diseases.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Pravas Ranjan; Sethy, Kamadev; Mohapatra, Swagat; Panda, Debasis

    2016-05-01

    India being a developing country mainly depends on livestock sector for its economy. However, nowadays, there is emergence and reemergence of more transboundary animal diseases. The existing diagnostic techniques are not so quick and with less specificity. To reduce the economy loss, there should be a development of rapid, reliable, robust diagnostic technique, which can work with high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Loop mediated isothermal amplification assay is a rapid gene amplification technique that amplifies nucleic acid under an isothermal condition with a set of designed primers spanning eight distinct sequences of the target. This assay can be used as an emerging powerful, innovative gene amplification diagnostic tool against various pathogens of livestock diseases. This review is to highlight the basic concept and methodology of this assay in livestock disease.

  20. Loop mediated isothermal amplification: An innovative gene amplification technique for animal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Pravas Ranjan; Sethy, Kamadev; Mohapatra, Swagat; Panda, Debasis

    2016-01-01

    India being a developing country mainly depends on livestock sector for its economy. However, nowadays, there is emergence and reemergence of more transboundary animal diseases. The existing diagnostic techniques are not so quick and with less specificity. To reduce the economy loss, there should be a development of rapid, reliable, robust diagnostic technique, which can work with high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Loop mediated isothermal amplification assay is a rapid gene amplification technique that amplifies nucleic acid under an isothermal condition with a set of designed primers spanning eight distinct sequences of the target. This assay can be used as an emerging powerful, innovative gene amplification diagnostic tool against various pathogens of livestock diseases. This review is to highlight the basic concept and methodology of this assay in livestock disease. PMID:27284221

  1. Remote Underwater Characterization System - Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, W D

    1999-04-01

    Characterization and inspection of water-cooled and moderated nuclear reactors and fuel storage pools requires equipment capable of operating underwater. Similarly, the deactivation and decommissioning of older nuclear facilities often requires the facility owner to accurately characterize underwater structures and equipment which may have been sitting idle for years. The Remote Underwater Characterization System (RUCS) is a small, remotely operated submersible vehicle intended to serve multiple purposes in underwater nuclear operations. It is based on the commercially-available "Scallop" vehicle 1 , but has been modified by the Department of Energy's Robotics Technology Development Program to add auto-depth control, and vehicle orientation and depth monitoring at the operator control panel. The RUCS is designed to provide visual and gamma radiation characterization, even in confined or limited access areas. It was demonstrated in August 1998 at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as part of the INEEL Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project. During the demonstration it was compared in a "head-to-head" fashion with the baseline characterization technology. This paper summarizes the results of the demonstration and lessons learned; comparing and contrasting both technologies in the areas of cost, visual characterization, radiological characterization, and overall operations.

  2. Innovative sputtering techniques for CIS and CdTe submodule fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, J.M.; Misra, M.S.; Lanning, B. . Astronautics Group)

    1993-03-01

    This report describes work done during Phase 1 of the subject subcontract. The subcontract was designed to study innovative deposition techniques, such as the rotating cylindrical magnetron sputtering system and electrodeposition for large-area, low-cost copper indium diselenide (CIS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) devices. A key issue for photovoltaics (PV) in terrestrial and future space applications is producibility, particularly for applications using a large quantity of PV. Among the concerns for fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film PV, such as CIS and CdTe, are production volume, cost, and minimization of waste. Both rotating cylindrical magnetron (C-Mag[trademark]) sputtering and electrodeposition have tremendous potential for the fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film PV due to scaleability, efficient utilization of source materials, and inherently higher deposition rates. In the case of sputtering, the unique geometry of the C-Mae facilitates innovative cosputtering and reactive sputtering that could lead to greater throughput reduced health and safety risks, and, ultimately, lower fabrication cost. Electrodeposited films appear to be adherent and comparable with low-cost fabrication techniques. Phase I involved the initial film and device fabrication using the two techniques mentioned herein. Devices were tested by both internal facilities, as well as NREL and ISET.

  3. Innovative technique for gastric retraction during laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy: the marionette

    PubMed Central

    Surjan, Rodrigo C.; Basseres, Tiago; Makdissi, Fabio F.; Machado, Marcel A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomies became more common in the past few years as a safe and effective treatment option for benign and low-grade malignant tumors of the body and tail of the pancreas. Adequate exposure and wide operative field are crucial to perform this procedure, and this is achieved by retraction of the stomach with an angled liver retractor or a grasper through a subxiphoid trocar, that is usually used only to this purpose. We developed an innovative technique to retract the stomach during laparoscopic distal pancreatectomies that provides excellent operative field and frees the subxiphoid trocar to be used in other tasks during the surgery. PMID:26690568

  4. An Innovative Application for SMOS: Characterization of Seasonal Soil Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautiainen, Kimmo; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Schwank, Mike; Pulliainen, Jouni; Mätzler, Christian; Kontu, Anna; Wiesmann, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Soil freezing and thawing, including the winter-time evolution of soil frost, are important characteristics influencing hydrological and climate processes at the regions of seasonal frost and permafrost, which include major land areas of North America and northern Eurasia. Changes in the seasonal behaviour of soil frost have a major effect on the surface energy balance, as well as on the intensity of CO2 and CH4 fluxes. The monitoring of seasonal frost and the permafrost active layer is currently based mostly on sparse in-situ observations. Some research using satellite observations for global and continuous coverage has been conducted in the past using active and passive microwave data. The European Space Agency's (ESA) SMOS satellite (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) is the first passive instrument using a low microwave frequency band (1.403 - 1.424 GHz) for Earth remote sensing. The output signal of the SMOS payload instrument MIRAS (Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis) is highly sensitive to changes in soil permittivity (i.e. soil liquid water content), with relatively low influence of surface vegetation. Due to the instrument's low operating frequency, information on the soil processes can be achieved from deeper layers than from previously available satellite instruments. SMOS sensitivity to changes in soil permittivity and the deeper soil layer monitoring capabilities ensure new possibilities for soil freeze/thaw cycle monitoring. Within the frame of SMOS programme, ESA has initialized several innovation projects to extend the applicability of SMOS data. One such project is SMOS+ Innovation Permafrost, coordinated by the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) with GAMMA Remote Sensing as a Swiss partner. The main objectives of the project are (1) to develop methods and algorithms for detection and monitoring of soil freezing/thawing processes using L-band passive microwave data and (2) to demonstrate the developed methods with soil frost

  5. The Bladon Lysimeter: An Innovative Environmental Characterization Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy-Dilek, C.A.

    2000-12-15

    Chemical analysis of groundwater samples is the baseline method of characterizing and monitoring groundwater contamination in the vadose (unsaturated) zone at most waste sites. Contamination moving from the surface to the water table passes through an unsaturated zone that can range in thickness from a few inches to hundreds of feet at a give site. Lysimeters are samplers that are designed to apply suction to the subsurface and are typically used to collect groundwater in the unsaturated zone.

  6. Statistical techniques for the characterization of partially observed epidemics.

    SciTech Connect

    Safta, Cosmin; Ray, Jaideep; Crary, David; Cheng, Karen

    2010-11-01

    Techniques appear promising to construct and integrate automated detect-and-characterize technique for epidemics - Working off biosurveillance data, and provides information on the particular/ongoing outbreak. Potential use - in crisis management and planning, resource allocation - Parameter estimation capability ideal for providing the input parameters into an agent-based model, Index Cases, Time of Infection, infection rate. Non-communicable diseases are easier than communicable ones - Small anthrax can be characterized well with 7-10 days of data, post-detection; plague takes longer, Large attacks are very easy.

  7. Innovative Ultrasonic Techniques for Inspection and Monitoring of Large Concrete Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggenhauser, H.; Niederleithinger, E.

    2013-07-01

    Ultrasonic echo and transmission techniques are used in civil engineering on a regular basis. New sensors and data processing techniques have lead to many new applications in the structural investigation as well as quality control. But concrete structures in the nuclear sector have special features and parameters, which pose problems for the methods and instrumentation currently available, e.g. extreme thickness, dense reinforcement, steel liners or special materials. Several innovative ultrasonic techniques have been developed to deal with these issues at least partly in lab experiments and pilot studies. Modern imaging techniques as multi-offset SAFT have been used e. g. to map delaminations. Thick concrete walls have successfully been inspected, partly through a steel liner. Embedded ultrasonic sensors have been designed which will be used in monitoring networks of large concrete structures above and below ground. In addition, sensitive mathematical methods as coda wave interferometry have been successfully evaluated to detect subtle changes in material properties. Examples of measurements and data evaluation are presented.

  8. Application of Material Characterization Techniques to Electrical Forensic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, T.D.

    2003-03-11

    The application of forensic science techniques to electrical equipment failure investigation has not been widely documented in the engineering world. This paper is intended to share an example of using material characterization techniques to support an initial cause determination of an electrical component failure event. The resulting conclusion supported the initial cause determination and ruled out the possibility of design deficiencies. Thus, the qualification testing of the equipment was allowed to continue to successful completion.

  9. Possibilities and Realities in Leveraging Innovative Technologies and Techniques to Meet Aggressive Remediation Timelines and Performance Goals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-30

    Innovative  Technologies & Techniques to Meet Aggressive  Remediation Timelines & Performance Goals Greg Gervais USEPA Office of  Superfund  Remediation...S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation,1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW...MR. GREGORY GERVAIS, P.E. USEPA Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW 5203P Washington, DC 20460

  10. Signal processing applied to photothermal techniques for materials characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rooney, James A.

    1989-01-01

    There is a need to make noncontact measurements of material characteristics in the microgravity environment. Photothermal and photoacoustics techniques offer one approach for attaining this capability since lasers can be used to generate the required thermal or acoustic signals. The perturbations in the materials that can be used for characterization can be detected by optical reflectance, infrared detection or laser detection of photoacoustics. However, some of these laser techniques have disadvantages of either high energy pulsed excitation or low signal-to-noise ratio. Alternative signal processing techniques that have been developed can be applied to photothermal or photoacoustic instrumentation. One fully coherent spread spectrum signal processing technique is called time delay spectrometry (TDS). With TDS the system is excited using a combined frequency-time domain by employing a linear frequency sweep excitation function. The processed received signal can provide either frequency, phase or improved time resolution. This signal processing technique was shown to outperform other time selective techniques with respect to noise rejection and was recently applied to photothermal instrumentation. The technique yields the mathematical equivalent of pulses yet the input irradiances are orders of magnitude less than pulses with the concomitant reduction in perturbation of the sample and can increase the capability of photothermal methods for materials characterization.

  11. Physical and chemical characterization techniques for metallic powders

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Stutzman, P. E.; Ferraris, C. F.; Watson, S. S.; Peltz, M. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Systematic studies have been carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. An extensive array of characterization techniques were applied to these two powders. The physical techniques included laser-diffraction particle-size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to chemistry included X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive analytical X-ray analysis. The background of these techniques will be summarized and some typical findings comparing different samples of virgin additive manufacturing powders, taken from the same lot, will be given. The techniques were used to confirm that different samples of powder from the same lot were essentially identical, within the uncertainty of the measurements.

  12. Processing and characterization of innovative scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, D; Chiellini, F; Ciardelli, G; Gazzarri, M; Gentile, P; Sola, A; Cannillo, V

    2012-06-01

    A new protocol, based on a modified replication method, is proposed to obtain bioactive glass scaffolds. The main feature of these samples, named "shell scaffolds", is their external surface that, like a compact and porous shell, provides both high permeability to fluids and mechanical support. In this work, two different scaffolds were prepared using the following slurry components: 59 % water, 29 % 45S5 Bioglass(®) and 12 % polyvinylic binder and 51 % water, 34 % 45S5 Bioglass(®), 10 % polyvinylic binder and 5 % polyethylene. All the proposed samples were characterized by a widespread microporosity and an interconnected macroporosity, with a total porosity of 80 % vol. After immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF), the scaffolds showed strong ability to develop hydroxyapatite, enhanced by the high specific surface of the porous systems. Moreover preliminary biological evaluations suggested a promising role of the shell scaffolds for applications in bone tissue regeneration. As regards the mechanical behaviour, the shell scaffolds could be easily handled without damages, due to their resistant external surface. More specifically, they possessed suitable mechanical properties for bone regeneration, as proved by compression tests performed before and after immersion in SBF.

  13. Analytical technique characterizes all trace contaminants in water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. N.; Lysyj, I.; Nelson, K. H.

    1967-01-01

    Properly programmed combination of advanced chemical and physical analytical techniques characterize critically all trace contaminants in both the potable and waste water from the Apollo Command Module. This methodology can also be applied to the investigation of the source of water pollution.

  14. An innovative technique to restore velopharyngeal incompetency for a patient with cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Manawar; Dhanasekar, B; Aparna, I N; Naim, Hina

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of cleft lip and palate patients often demand well-coordinated work of medical and dental specialists. In spite of surgical and orthodontic therapy, prosthetic rehabilitation is always necessary because of partial anadontia, maxillary hypoplasia and velopharyngeal dysfuction. The aim of the prosthetic treatment is to improve aesthetics, function and speech of the patients; however, factors like underdeveloped and collapsed maxillary arch, retrognathic maxilla and reduced alveolar ridge height make the treatment challenging. This clinical report describes an interdisciplinary approach for the management of cleft lip and palate patient associated with mutilated dentition. The prosthetic phase began along with orthodontic treatment to achieve sufficient space distribution, which was restored with fixed dental prosthesis to stabilise the achieved status of occlusion. Palatal lift prosthesis was fabricated to restore the velopharyngeal incompetency with an innovative technique using ‘standard orthodontic expansion screw’ to eliminate hypernasality, decrease intelligibility of speech and to aid in deglutition. PMID:23821635

  15. An innovative technique to restore velopharyngeal incompetency for a patient with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Manawar; Dhanasekar, B; Aparna, I N; Naim, Hina

    2013-07-02

    Treatment of cleft lip and palate patients often demand well-coordinated work of medical and dental specialists. In spite of surgical and orthodontic therapy, prosthetic rehabilitation is always necessary because of partial anadontia, maxillary hypoplasia and velopharyngeal dysfuction. The aim of the prosthetic treatment is to improve aesthetics, function and speech of the patients; however, factors like underdeveloped and collapsed maxillary arch, retrognathic maxilla and reduced alveolar ridge height make the treatment challenging. This clinical report describes an interdisciplinary approach for the management of cleft lip and palate patient associated with mutilated dentition. The prosthetic phase began along with orthodontic treatment to achieve sufficient space distribution, which was restored with fixed dental prosthesis to stabilise the achieved status of occlusion. Palatal lift prosthesis was fabricated to restore the velopharyngeal incompetency with an innovative technique using 'standard orthodontic expansion screw' to eliminate hypernasality, decrease intelligibility of speech and to aid in deglutition.

  16. Characterization of microstructure with low frequency electromagnetic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, Matthew R.; Sathish, Shamachary; Pilchak, Adam L.; Blodgett, Mark P.; Cherry, Aaron J.

    2014-02-18

    A new computational method for characterizing the relationship between surface crystallography and electrical conductivity in anisotropic materials with low frequency electromagnetic techniques is presented. The method is discussed from the standpoint of characterizing the orientation of a single grain, as well as characterizing statistical information about grain ensembles in the microstructure. Large-area electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data was obtained and used in conjunction with a synthetic aperture approach to simulate the eddy current response of beta annealed Ti-6Al-4V. Experimental eddy current results are compared to the computed eddy current approximations based on electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data, demonstrating good agreement. The detectability of notches in the presence of noise from microstructure is analyzed with the described simulation method and advantages and limitations of this method are discussed relative to other NDE techniques for such analysis.

  17. A new technique for the characterization of chaff elements.

    PubMed

    Scholfield, David; Myat, Maung; Dauby, Jason; Fesler, Jonathon; Bright, Jonathan

    2011-07-01

    A new technique for the experimental characterization of electromagnetic chaff based on Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar is presented. This technique allows for the characterization of as few as one filament of chaff in a controlled anechoic environment allowing for stability and repeatability of experimental results. This approach allows for a deeper understanding of the fundamental phenomena of electromagnetic scattering from chaff through an incremental analysis approach. Chaff analysis can now begin with a single element and progress through the build-up of particles into pseudo-cloud structures. This controlled incremental approach is supported by an identical incremental modeling and validation process. Additionally, this technique has the potential to produce considerable savings in financial and schedule cost and provides a stable and repeatable experiment to aid model valuation.

  18. Characterization techniques for gas diffusion layers for proton exchange membrane fuel cells - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvay, A.; Yli-Rantala, E.; Liu, C.-H.; Peng, X.-H.; Koski, P.; Cindrella, L.; Kauranen, P.; Wilde, P. M.; Kannan, A. M.

    2012-09-01

    The gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is one of the functional components that provide a support structure for gas and water transport. The GDL plays a crucial role when the oxidant is air, especially when the fuel cell operates in the higher current density region. There has been an exponential growth in research and development because the PEMFC has the potential to become the future energy source for automotive applications. In order to serve in this capacity, the GDL requires due innovative analysis and characterization toward performance and durability. It is possible to achieve the optimum fuel cell performance only by understanding the characteristics of GDLs such as structure, pore size, porosity, gas permeability, wettability, thermal and electrical conductivities, surface morphology and water management. This review attempts to bring together the characterization techniques for the essential properties of the GDLs as handy tools for R&D institutions. Topics are categorized based on the ex-situ and in-situ characterization techniques of GDLs along with related modeling and simulation. Recently reported techniques used for accelerated durability evaluation of the GDLs are also consolidated within the ex-situ and in-situ methods.

  19. Innovative techniques for estimating illegal activities in a human-wildlife-management conflict.

    PubMed

    Cross, Paul; St John, Freya A V; Khan, Saira; Petroczi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Effective management of biological resources is contingent upon stakeholder compliance with rules. With respect to disease management, partial compliance can undermine attempts to control diseases within human and wildlife populations. Estimating non-compliance is notoriously problematic as rule-breakers may be disinclined to admit to transgressions. However, reliable estimates of rule-breaking are critical to policy design. The European badger (Meles meles) is considered an important vector in the transmission and maintenance of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in cattle herds. Land managers in high bTB prevalence areas of the UK can cull badgers under license. However, badgers are also known to be killed illegally. The extent of illegal badger killing is currently unknown. Herein we report on the application of three innovative techniques (Randomized Response Technique (RRT); projective questioning (PQ); brief implicit association test (BIAT)) for investigating illegal badger killing by livestock farmers across Wales. RRT estimated that 10.4% of farmers killed badgers in the 12 months preceding the study. Projective questioning responses and implicit associations relate to farmers' badger killing behavior reported via RRT. Studies evaluating the efficacy of mammal vector culling and vaccination programs should incorporate estimates of non-compliance. Mitigating the conflict concerning badgers as a vector of bTB requires cross-disciplinary scientific research, departure from deep-rooted positions, and the political will to implement evidence-based management.

  20. Colorimetry Technique for Scalable Characterization of Suspended Graphene.

    PubMed

    Cartamil-Bueno, Santiago J; Steeneken, Peter G; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia; van der Zant, Herre S J; Houri, Samer

    2016-11-09

    Previous statistical studies on the mechanical properties of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) suspended graphene membranes have been performed by means of measuring individual devices or with techniques that affect the material. Here, we present a colorimetry technique as a parallel, noninvasive, and affordable way of characterizing suspended graphene devices. We exploit Newton's rings interference patterns to study the deformation of a double-layer graphene drum 13.2 μm in diameter when a pressure step is applied. By studying the time evolution of the deformation, we find that filling the drum cavity with air is 2-5 times slower than when it is purged.

  1. Preparation and characterization of mesh membranes using electrospinning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Giuseppina; Peters, Gerrit W. M.; Solberg, Ramon H. M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper is focused on the formulation and characterization of membranes that can act as biomedical devices with a mesh sample structure to reduce local inflammation and improve the tissue regeneration. These systems were realized homogenously dispersing lamellar Hydrotalcite loaded with Diclofenac Sodium (HTLc-DIK) in a polymeric matrix of Poly-caprolactone (PCL). Membranes were obtained through the electrospinning technique that has shown many advantages with respect to other techniques. Experiments carried out on the manufactured samples highlight the no- toxicity of the samples and very good interactions between cells and device.

  2. Physicochemical characterization techniques for solid lipid nanoparticles: principles and limitations.

    PubMed

    Kathe, Niranjan; Henriksen, Brian; Chauhan, Harsh

    2014-12-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are gaining importance due to numerous advantages they offer as a drug delivery system. SLN incorporate poorly soluble drugs, proteins, biologicals, etc. SLN are prepared by techniques like high-pressure homogenization, sonication and employs a wide range of lipids and surfactants. Physicochemical characterization techniques include particle size analysis, zeta potential and determination of crystallinity/polymorphism. Furthermore, drug loading and drug entrapment efficiency are common parameters used to test the efficiency of SLN. Most importantly, the functionality assay of SLN is essential to predict the activity and performance in vivo. The review presented discusses the importance of SLN in drug delivery with emphasis on principles and limitations associated with their physicochemical characterization.

  3. Vadose Zone Characterization Techniques Developed by EMSP Research

    SciTech Connect

    Guillen, Donna P.

    2003-02-24

    This paper discusses research contributions made by Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research in the area of geophysical characterization of the subsurface. The goal of these EMSP research projects is to develop combined high-resolution measurement and interpretation packages that provide accurate, timely information needed to characterize the vadose zone. Various types of geophysical imaging techniques can be used to characterize the shallow subsurface. Since individual geophysical characterization tools all have specific limitations, many different techniques are being explored to provide more widespread applicability over a range of hydrogeologic settings. A combination of laboratory, field, theoretical, and computational studies are necessary to develop our understanding of how contaminants move through the vadose zone. This entails field tests with field-hardened systems, packaging and calibration of instrumentation, data processing and analysis algorithms, forward and inverse modeling, and so forth. DOE sites are seeking to team with EMSP researchers to leverage the basic science research investment and apply these advances to address subsurface contamination issues that plague many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites.

  4. Imaging techniques applied to characterize bitumen and bituminous emulsions.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Valverde, M A; Ramón-Torregrosa, P; Páez-Dueñas, A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M A; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R

    2008-01-15

    The purpose of this article is to present some important advances in the imaging techniques currently used in the characterization of bitumen and bituminous emulsions. Bitumen exhibits some properties, such as a black colour and a reflecting surface at rest, which permit the use of optical techniques to study the macroscopic behaviour of asphalt mixes in the cold mix technology based on emulsion use. Imaging techniques allow monitoring in situ the bitumen thermal sensitivity as well as the complex phenomenon of emulsion breaking. Evaporation-driven breaking was evaluated from the shape of evaporating emulsion drops deposited onto non-porous and hydrophobic substrates. To describe the breaking kinetics, top-view images of a drying emulsion drop placed on an aggregate sheet were acquired and processed properly. We can conclude that computer-aided image analysis in road pavement engineering can elucidate the mechanism of breaking and curing of bituminous emulsion.

  5. Characterization of burns using hyperspectral imaging technique - a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Calin, Mihaela Antonina; Parasca, Sorin Viorel; Savastru, Roxana; Manea, Dragos

    2015-02-01

    Surgical burn treatment depends on accurate estimation of burn depth. Many methods have been used to asses burns, but none has gained wide acceptance. Hyperspectral imaging technique has recently entered the medical research field with encouraging results. In this paper we present a preliminary study (case presentation) that aims to point out the value of this optical method in burn wound characterization and to set up future lines of investigation. A hyperspectral image of a leg and foot with partial thickness burns was obtained in the fifth postburn day. The image was analyzed using linear spectral unmixing model as a tool for mapping the investigated areas. The article gives details on the mathematical bases of the interpretation model and correlations with clinical examination pointing out the advantages of hyperspectral imaging technique. While the results were encouraging, further more extended and better founded studies are being prepared before recognizing hyperspectral imaging technique as an applicable method of burn wound assessment.

  6. Reverse engineering and rapid prototyping techniques to innovate prosthesis socket design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Giorgio; Bertetti, Massimiliano; Bonacini, Daniele; Magrassi, Grazia

    2006-02-01

    The paper presents an innovative approach totally based on digital data to optimize lower limb socket prosthesis design. This approach is based on a stump's detailed geometric model and provides a substitute to plaster cast obtained through the traditional manual methodology with a physical model, realized with Rapid Prototyping technologies; this physical model will be used for the socket lamination. The paper discusses a methodology to reconstruct a 3D geometric model of the stump able to describe with high accuracy and detail the complete structure subdivided into bones, soft tissues, muscular masses and dermis. Some different technologies are used for stump acquisition: non contact laser technique for external geometry, CT and MRI imaging technologies for the internal structure, the first one dedicated to bones geometrical model, the last for soft tissues and muscles. We discuss problems related to 3D geometric reconstruction: the patient and stump positioning for the different acquisitions, markers' definition on the stump to identify landmarks, alignment's strategies for the different digital models, in order to define a protocol procedure with a requested accuracy for socket's realization. Some case-studies illustrate the methodology and the results obtained.

  7. Land Cover Classification overEurope Using SAR Imaging Innovative Methodologies and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntouanoglou, K.; Mouratidis, A.

    2016-08-01

    There is an increasingly growing interest in observing the Earth's surface from space. This can be done in several ways, such as using visible and radar imaging - the latter significantly less popular amongst members of the international scientific community. The purpose of this study is the exploitation of the advantages of radar satellite data, namely independence from cloud cover and solar illumination, for land cover classification. The properties of the recorded radar data heavily depend on the type of land cover, season and weather conditions. Therefore, it is possible to utilize the variability of these factors, in order to develop various methodologies and innovative techniques that can be used for classifying land surfaces. Although the study focuses on four main land cover types in Europe (urban, mountainous, agricultural-low vegetation and forested areas), the same principles can be extended worldwide, concluding to useful results for designing future satellite missions or as a guideline for researchers interested in an in- depth studying of a specific land cover type.

  8. Scientific Tools and Techniques: An Innovative Introduction to Planetary Science / Astronomy for 9th Grade Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, Edward F.

    2014-11-01

    Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta, GA (USA) offers instruction in planetary science and astronomy to gifted 9th grade students within a program called "Scientific Tools and Techniques" (STT). Although STT provides a semester long overview of all sciences, the planetary science / astronomy section is innovative since students have access to instruction in the Center's Zeiss planetarium and observatory, which includes a 0.9 m cassegrain telescope. The curriculum includes charting the positions of planets in planetarium the sky; telescopic observations of the Moon and planets; hands-on access to meteorites and tektites; and an introduction to planetary spectroscopy utilizing LPI furnished ALTA reflectance spectrometers. In addition, students have the opportunity to watch several full dome planetary themed planetarium presentations, including "Back to the Moon for Good" and "Ring World: Cassini at Saturn." An overview of NASA's planetary exploration efforts is also considered, with special emphasis on the new Orion / Space Launch System for human exploration of the solar system. A primary goal of our STT program is to not only engage but encourage students to pursue careers in the field of science, with the hope of inspiring future scientists / leaders in the field of planetary science.

  9. Wafer hot spot identification through advanced photomask characterization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yohan; Green, Michael; McMurran, Jeff; Ham, Young; Lin, Howard; Lan, Andy; Yang, Richer; Lung, Mike

    2016-10-01

    As device manufacturers progress through advanced technology nodes, limitations in standard 1-dimensional (1D) mask Critical Dimension (CD) metrics are becoming apparent. Historically, 1D metrics such as Mean to Target (MTT) and CD Uniformity (CDU) have been adequate for end users to evaluate and predict the mask impact on the wafer process. However, the wafer lithographer's process margin is shrinking at advanced nodes to a point that the classical mask CD metrics are no longer adequate to gauge the mask contribution to wafer process error. For example, wafer CDU error at advanced nodes is impacted by mask factors such as 3-dimensional (3D) effects and mask pattern fidelity on subresolution assist features (SRAFs) used in Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) models of ever-increasing complexity. These items are not quantifiable with the 1D metrology techniques of today. Likewise, the mask maker needs advanced characterization methods in order to optimize the mask process to meet the wafer lithographer's needs. These advanced characterization metrics are what is needed to harmonize mask and wafer processes for enhanced wafer hot spot analysis. In this paper, we study advanced mask pattern characterization techniques and their correlation with modeled wafer performance.

  10. Application of physical and chemical characterization techniques to metallic powders

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Watson, S. S.; Stutzman, P. E.; Ferraris, C. F.; Peltz, M. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Systematic studies have been carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. The characterization of these powders is important in NIST efforts to develop appropriate measurements and standards for additive materials and to document the property of powders used in a NIST-led additive manufacturing material round robin. An extensive array of characterization techniques was applied to these two powders, in both virgin and recycled states. The physical techniques included laser diffraction particle size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to chemistry, including X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive analytical X-ray analysis using the X-rays generated during scanning electron microscopy, were also employed. Results of these analyses will be used to shed light on the question: how does virgin powder change after being exposed to and recycled from one or more additive manufacturing build cycles? In addition, these findings can give insight into the actual additive manufacturing process.

  11. Innovation, Innovation, Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuller, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Innovation, Universities and Skills. The new title of the department offers much food for thought. The title is indeed an intriguing and important one. Bringing the idea of innovation right to the fore is, to use an overworked term, challenging. Pinning down what innovation means is not at all easy. There are three different lines of argument. The…

  12. Characterization Techniques for Aggregated Nanomaterials in Biological and Environmental Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Seongho

    Nanoparticles, which are defined as objects with characteristic lengths in the 10--9 -- 10--7 m (nanoscale) size range, are used with increasing frequency in a wide of applications, leading to increases in nanomaterial interactions with biological and environmental systems. There is therefore considerable interest in studying the influence nanomaterials can have when inside the human body or dispersed in the ambient environment. However, nanoparticles persist as homo aggregates or heterogeneous mixtures with organic matters, such as proteins, in biological and environmental systems. A large and growing body of research confirm that nanomaterial morphology as well as the degree of aggregation between nanomaterials influences nanomaterial interactions with their surroundings. Specifically, the structures/morphologies of nanoparticles determine their overall surface areas and corresponding surface reactivity (e.g. their catalytic activity). Nanoparticle transport properties (e.g. diffusion coefficient and extent of cellular uptake) are also determined by both their structures and surface properties. Unfortunately, techniques to characterize nanomaterial size and shape quantitatively, when nanomaterials have complex geometries or persist as aggregates, are lacking. Hydrodynamic sizes of nanoparticles and their aggregates can be inferred by dynamic light scattering (DLS) or nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). However, since these techniques are relied on the scattering light intensity properties, sizes of polydisperse sub 30 nm particles cannot be effectively measured in those techniques. For structure inference of aggregated nanomaterials, microscopy images have been used for qualitative visual analysis, but the quantitative morphology analysis technique is yet to be developed. Five studies in this dissertation are hence aimed to develop new techniques to provide improved morphology characterization of aggregated nanomaterials in various biological and environmental

  13. Structured Problem-Solving Techniques to Stimulate Innovation in New Product Development in UK SMEs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, D. M.; McKinna, A.; Thake, G.

    2003-01-01

    "Innovation" is an often used, yet much misunderstood term. Often innovation is left to chance or, at best, approached by relatively unstructured hard work and hard thinking. This paper describes a research programme known as the "Futures Project", which provides a "virtual" body of expertise that small and…

  14. Closing the gap: accelerating the translational process in nanomedicine by proposing standardized characterization techniques.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, Ali A; Weaver, James L; Salvador-Morales, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    On the cusp of widespread permeation of nanomedicine, academia, industry, and government have invested substantial financial resources in developing new ways to better treat diseases. Materials have unique physical and chemical properties at the nanoscale compared with their bulk or small-molecule analogs. These unique properties have been greatly advantageous in providing innovative solutions for medical treatments at the bench level. However, nanomedicine research has not yet fully permeated the clinical setting because of several limitations. Among these limitations are the lack of universal standards for characterizing nanomaterials and the limited knowledge that we possess regarding the interactions between nanomaterials and biological entities such as proteins. In this review, we report on recent developments in the characterization of nanomaterials as well as the newest information about the interactions between nanomaterials and proteins in the human body. We propose a standard set of techniques for universal characterization of nanomaterials. We also address relevant regulatory issues involved in the translational process for the development of drug molecules and drug delivery systems. Adherence and refinement of a universal standard in nanomaterial characterization as well as the acquisition of a deeper understanding of nanomaterials and proteins will likely accelerate the use of nanomedicine in common practice to a great extent.

  15. Closing the gap: accelerating the translational process in nanomedicine by proposing standardized characterization techniques

    PubMed Central

    Khorasani, Ali A; Weaver, James L; Salvador-Morales, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    On the cusp of widespread permeation of nanomedicine, academia, industry, and government have invested substantial financial resources in developing new ways to better treat diseases. Materials have unique physical and chemical properties at the nanoscale compared with their bulk or small-molecule analogs. These unique properties have been greatly advantageous in providing innovative solutions for medical treatments at the bench level. However, nanomedicine research has not yet fully permeated the clinical setting because of several limitations. Among these limitations are the lack of universal standards for characterizing nanomaterials and the limited knowledge that we possess regarding the interactions between nanomaterials and biological entities such as proteins. In this review, we report on recent developments in the characterization of nanomaterials as well as the newest information about the interactions between nanomaterials and proteins in the human body. We propose a standard set of techniques for universal characterization of nanomaterials. We also address relevant regulatory issues involved in the translational process for the development of drug molecules and drug delivery systems. Adherence and refinement of a universal standard in nanomaterial characterization as well as the acquisition of a deeper understanding of nanomaterials and proteins will likely accelerate the use of nanomedicine in common practice to a great extent. PMID:25525356

  16. An Innovative Method for Dynamic Characterization of Fan FilterUnit Operation.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tengfang

    2006-12-21

    Fan filter units (FFU) are widely used to deliver re-circulated air while providing filtration control of particle concentration in controlled environments such as cleanrooms, minienvironments, and operating rooms in hospitals. The objective of this paper is to document an innovative method for characterizing operation and control of an individual fan filter unit within its operable conditions. Built upon the draft laboratory method previously published [1] , this paper presents an updated method including a testing procedure to characterize dynamic operation of fan filter units, i.e., steady-state operation conditions determined by varied control schemes, airflow rates, and pressure differential across the units. The parameters for dynamic characterization include total electric power demand, total pressure efficiency, airflow rate, pressure differential across fan filter units, and airflow uniformity.

  17. Characterization of Tibetan Medicine Zuota by Multiple Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mei; Wang, Jing-Xia; Xu, Yun-Zhang; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Zhi-Feng; Lu, Lu-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Zuota is regarded as the king of Tibetan medicine. However, due to the confidentiality of this precious medicine, the scientific characterization of Zuota is very scarce, which limits the pharmacology and biosafety studies of Zuota. Herein, we collected four different Zuota samples from Tibet, Qinghai, Gansu, and Sichuan and characterized them by multiple techniques. Our results showed that Zuota was mainly an inorganic mixture of HgS, sulfur, and graphite. Morphologically, Zuota samples were composed of nanoparticles, which further aggregated into microsized particles. Chemically, the majorities of Zuota were S and Hg (in the forms of HgS and pure sulfur). All samples contained pure sulfur with orthorhombic crystalline. Zuota from Qinghai province had different HgS crystalline, namely, hexagonal crystalline. The others were all face-centered cubic crystalline. Carbon in Zuota NPs was in the form of graphite. The implication to future studies of Zuota was discussed. PMID:24093005

  18. Characterizing TPS Microstructure: A Review of Some techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew; Stackpole, Mairead; Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcie, Jose

    2011-01-01

    I. When seeking to understand ablator microstructure and morphology there are several useful techniques A. SEM 1) Visual characteriza3on at various length scales. 2) Chemical mapping by backscatter or x-ray highlights areas of interest. 3) Combined with other techniques (density, weight change, chemical analysis) SEM is a powerful tool to aid in explaining thermo/structural data. B. ASAP. 1) Chemical characteriza3on at various length scales. 2) Chemical mapping of pore structure by gas adsorption. 3) Provides a map of pore size vs. pore volume. 4) Provided surface area of exposed TPS. II. Both methods help characterize and understand how ablators react with other chemical species and provides insight into how they oxidize.

  19. Characterization of PTFE Using Advanced Thermal Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumm, J.; Lindemann, A.; Meyer, M.; Strasser, C.

    2010-10-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is a synthetic fluoropolymer used in numerous industrial applications. It is often referred to by its trademark name, Teflon. Thermal characterization of a PTFE material was carried out using various thermal analysis and thermophysical properties test techniques. The transformation energetics and specific heat were measured employing differential scanning calorimetry. The thermal expansion and the density changes were determined employing pushrod dilatometry. The viscoelastic properties (storage and loss modulus) were analyzed using dynamic mechanical analysis. The thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash technique. Combining thermal diffusivity data with specific heat and density allows calculation of the thermal conductivity of the polymer. Measurements were carried out from - 125 °C up to 150 °C. Additionally, measurements of the mechanical properties were carried out down to - 170 °C. The specific heat tests were conducted into the fully molten regions up to 370 °C.

  20. Residual stress characterization with an ultrasonic/magnetic technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    A potentially useful new technique for residual stress characterization in ferromagnetic material is described. The unique feature of this technique is the measurement of small changes in ultrasonic wave velocity by the application of external dc magnetic field in the material under various stress conditions. It was found, in steel, that the fractional change in the natural velocity Delta W/W of waves propagating along the external field direction is affected by the uniaxial stress applied in the same axis. External compression lowers the slope of the Delta W/W curve in the low field region, while external tension generally does the opposite. For most cases, the slope in this region falls below zero under external compression. The result of measurements in specimens with residual stress shows exactly the same tendency.

  1. Hyperspectral-imaging-based techniques applied to wheat kernels characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serranti, Silvia; Cesare, Daniela; Bonifazi, Giuseppe

    2012-05-01

    Single kernels of durum wheat have been analyzed by hyperspectral imaging (HSI). Such an approach is based on the utilization of an integrated hardware and software architecture able to digitally capture and handle spectra as an image sequence, as they results along a pre-defined alignment on a surface sample properly energized. The study was addressed to investigate the possibility to apply HSI techniques for classification of different types of wheat kernels: vitreous, yellow berry and fusarium-damaged. Reflectance spectra of selected wheat kernels of the three typologies have been acquired by a laboratory device equipped with an HSI system working in near infrared field (1000-1700 nm). The hypercubes were analyzed applying principal component analysis (PCA) to reduce the high dimensionality of data and for selecting some effective wavelengths. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was applied for classification of the three wheat typologies. The study demonstrated that good classification results were obtained not only considering the entire investigated wavelength range, but also selecting only four optimal wavelengths (1104, 1384, 1454 and 1650 nm) out of 121. The developed procedures based on HSI can be utilized for quality control purposes or for the definition of innovative sorting logics of wheat.

  2. Interactions Between Antigens and Nanoemulsion Adjuvants: Separation and Characterization Techniques.

    PubMed

    Chan, Michelle Y; Fedor, Dawn M; Phan, Tony; V, Lucien Barnes; Kramer, Ryan M

    2017-01-01

    Determining the association of vaccine components in a formulation is of interest for designing and optimizing well characterized vaccines. Three methods are described to assess interactions between protein antigens and oil-in-water nanoemulsion adjuvants. The methods include (1) ultracentrifugation to measure free versus adjuvant-associated protein, (2) size exclusion chromatography (SEC) to qualitatively assess existing interactions, and (3) Native PAGE as a means to visualize the formulation run in its native state on a polyacrylamide gel. As with many techniques, the methods alone are not definitive, but data from multiple orthogonal assays can provide a more complete picture of protein-adjuvant interactions.

  3. Characterization of Cavities Using the GPR, LIDAR and GNSS Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conejo-Martín, Miguel Angel; Herrero-Tejedor, Tomás Ramón; Lapazaran, Javier; Perez-Martin, Enrique; Otero, Jaime; Prieto, Juan F.; Velasco, Jesús

    2015-11-01

    The study of the many types of natural and manmade cavities in different parts of the world is important to the fields of geology, geophysics, engineering, architectures, agriculture, heritages and landscape. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is a noninvasive geodetection and geolocation technique suitable for accurately determining buried structures. This technique requires knowing the propagation velocity of electromagnetic waves (EM velocity) in the medium. We propose a method for calibrating the EM velocity using the integration of laser imaging detection and ranging (LIDAR) and GPR techniques using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) as support for geolocation. Once the EM velocity is known and the GPR profiles have been properly processed and migrated, they will also show the hidden cavities and the old hidden structures from the cellar. In this article, we present a complete study of the joint use of the GPR, LIDAR and GNSS techniques in the characterization of cavities. We apply this methodology to study underground cavities in a group of wine cellars located in Atauta (Soria, Spain). The results serve to identify construction elements that form the cavity and group of cavities or cellars. The described methodology could be applied to other shallow underground structures with surface connection, where LIDAR and GPR profiles could be joined, as, for example, in archaeological cavities, sewerage systems, drainpipes, etc.

  4. Innovative combination of spectroscopic techniques to reveal nanoparticle fate in a crop plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larue, Camille; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Stein, Ricardo J.; Fayard, Barbara; Pouyet, Emeline; Villanova, Julie; Magnin, Valérie; Pradas del Real, Ana-Elena; Trcera, Nicolas; Legros, Samuel; Sorieul, Stéphanie; Sarret, Géraldine

    2016-05-01

    Nanotechnology is the new industrial revolution of our century. Its development leads to an increasing use of nanoparticles and thus to their dissemination. Their fate in the environment is of great concern and especially their possible transfer in trophic chains might be an issue for food safety. However, so far our knowledge on this topic has been restricted by the lack of appropriate techniques to characterize their behavior in complex matrices. Here, we present in detail the use of cutting-edge beam-based techniques for nanoparticle in situ localization, quantification and speciation in a crop plant species (Lactuca sativa). Lettuce seedlings have been exposed to TiO2 and Ag nanoparticles and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry, micro-particle induced X-ray emission coupled to Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy on nuclear microprobe, micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The benefits and drawbacks of each technique are discussed, and the types of information that can be drawn, for example on the translocation to edible parts, change of speciation within the plant, detoxification mechanisms, or impact on the plant ionome, are highlighted. Such type of coupled approach would be an asset for nanoparticle risk assessment.

  5. Low tip damage AFM technique development for nano structures characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Biao; Wang, Charles C.; Huang, Po-Fu; Uritsky, Yuri

    2010-06-01

    Ambient dynamic mode (tapping mode or intermittent-contact mode) AFM imaging has been used extensively for the characterization of the topography of nano structures. However, the results are beset with artifacts, because hard tapping of the AFM tip on sample surface usually causes premature tip damage. Through careful study of the cantilever amplitude and phase signals as functions of tip-to-sample distance, principle of non-contact AFM operation was discovered to enable high resolution and low tip damage AFM image acquisition [1, 2]. However, current study discovers that the conventional way of acquiring amplitude and phase versus distance curves gives erroneous non-contact operating range, because the tip gets damaged during the data acquisition process. A new technique is developed to reliably map the operating parameters of an intact tip that ensures the AFM be operated with the correct non-contact settings. Two examples are given to illustrate the successful applications of this new technique. The first example involves the size characterization of polystyrene latex (PSL) nano particles used for light scattering tool calibration. The second example is the development of robust recipes for the measurement of the depth of phase-shift mask trenches.

  6. Advanced techniques for characterization of ion beam modified materials

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Yanwen; Debelle, Aurélien; Boulle, Alexandre; ...

    2014-10-30

    Understanding the mechanisms of damage formation in materials irradiated with energetic ions is essential for the field of ion-beam materials modification and engineering. Utilizing incident ions, electrons, photons, and positrons, various analysis techniques, including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), electron RBS, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and positron annihilation spectroscopy, are routinely used or gaining increasing attention in characterizing ion beam modified materials. The distinctive information, recent developments, and some perspectives in these techniques are reviewed in this paper. Applications of these techniques are discussed to demonstrate their unique ability for studying ion-solid interactions and the corresponding radiationmore » effects in modified depths ranging from a few nm to a few tens of μm, and to provide information on electronic and atomic structure of the materials, defect configuration and concentration, as well as phase stability, amorphization and recrystallization processes. Finally, such knowledge contributes to our fundamental understanding over a wide range of extreme conditions essential for enhancing material performance and also for design and synthesis of new materials to address a broad variety of future energy applications.« less

  7. Advanced techniques for characterization of ion beam modified materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Debelle, Aurélien; Boulle, Alexandre; Kluth, Patrick; Tuomisto, Filip

    2014-10-30

    Understanding the mechanisms of damage formation in materials irradiated with energetic ions is essential for the field of ion-beam materials modification and engineering. Utilizing incident ions, electrons, photons, and positrons, various analysis techniques, including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), electron RBS, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and positron annihilation spectroscopy, are routinely used or gaining increasing attention in characterizing ion beam modified materials. The distinctive information, recent developments, and some perspectives in these techniques are reviewed in this paper. Applications of these techniques are discussed to demonstrate their unique ability for studying ion-solid interactions and the corresponding radiation effects in modified depths ranging from a few nm to a few tens of μm, and to provide information on electronic and atomic structure of the materials, defect configuration and concentration, as well as phase stability, amorphization and recrystallization processes. Finally, such knowledge contributes to our fundamental understanding over a wide range of extreme conditions essential for enhancing material performance and also for design and synthesis of new materials to address a broad variety of future energy applications.

  8. Characterization of ultrafast devices using novel optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Md Ershad

    Optical techniques have been extensively used to examine the high frequency performance of a number of devices including High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs), Heterojunction Bipolar Phototransistors (HPTs) and Low Temperature GaAs (LT-GaAs) Photoconductive Switches. To characterize devices, frequency and time domain techniques, namely optical heterodyning and electro-optic sampling, having measurement bandwidths in excess of 200 GHz, were employed. Optical mixing in three-terminal devices has been extended for the first time to submillimeter wave frequencies. Using a new generation of 50-nm gate pseudomorphic InP-based HEMTs, optically mixed signals were detected to 552 GHz with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 5 dB. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest frequency optical mixing obtained in three- terminal devices to date. A novel harmonic three-wave detection scheme was used for the detection of the optically generated signals. The technique involved downconversion of the signal in the device by the second harmonic of a gate-injected millimeter wave local oscillator. Measurements were also conducted up to 212 GHz using direct optical mixing and up to 382 GHz using a fundamental three-wave detection scheme. New interesting features in the bias dependence of the optically mixed signals have been reported. An exciting novel development from this work is the successful integration of near-field optics with optical heterodyning. The technique, called near-field optical heterodyning (NFOH), allows for extremely localized injection of high-frequency stimulus to any arbitrary point of an ultrafast device or circuit. Scanning the point of injection across the sample provides details of the high frequency operation of the device with high spatial resolution. For the implementation of the technique, fiber-optic probes with 100 nm apertures were fabricated. A feedback controlled positioning system was built for accurate placement and scanning of the

  9. Laser Shockwave Technique For Characterization Of Nuclear Fuel Plate Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Barry H. Rabin; Mathieu Perton; Daniel Lévesque; Jean-Pierre Monchalin; Martin Lord

    2012-07-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  10. Characterization of Sorolla's gouache pigments by means of spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán, Clodoaldo; Juanes, David; Ferrazza, Livio; Carballo, Jorgelina

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the characterization of the Joaquín Sorolla's gouache sketches for the oil on canvas series "Vision of Spain" commissioned by A. M. Huntington to decorate the library of the Hispanic Society of America in New York. The analyses were focused on the identification of the elemental composition of the gouache pigments by means of portable EDXRF spectrometry in a non-destructive mode. Additionally, SEM-EDX and FTIR analyses of a selected set of micro-samples were carried out to identify completely the pigments, the paint technique and the binding media. The obtained results have confirmed the identification of lead and zinc white, vermillion, earth pigments, ochre, zinc yellow, chrome yellow, ultramarine, Prussian blue, chromium based and copper-arsenic based green pigments, bone black and carbon based black pigments, and the use of gum arabic as binding media in the gouache pigments.

  11. Different techniques for characterizing single-walled carbon nanotube purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuca, Neslihan; Camtakan, Zeyneb; Karatepe, Nilgün

    2013-09-01

    Transition-metal catalysts, fullerenes, graphitic carbon, amorphous carbon, and graphite flakes are the main impurities in carbon nanotubes. In this study, we demonstrate an easy and optimum method of cleaning SWCNTs and evaluating their purity. The purification method, which employed oxidative heat treatment followed by 6M HNO3, H2SO4, HNO3:H2SO4 and HCl acid reflux for 6h at 120°C and microwave digestion with 1.5M HNO3 for 0.5h at 210°C which was straightforward, inexpensive, and fairly effective. The purified materials were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis and nuclear techniques such as INAA, XRF and XRD.

  12. Electrical Characterizations of Lightning Strike Protection Techniques for Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatkowski, George N.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Mielnik, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The growing application of composite materials in commercial aircraft manufacturing has significantly increased the risk of aircraft damage from lightning strikes. Composite aircraft designs require new mitigation strategies and engineering practices to maintain the same level of safety and protection as achieved by conductive aluminum skinned aircraft. Researchers working under the NASA Aviation Safety Program s Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Project are investigating lightning damage on composite materials to support the development of new mitigation, diagnosis & prognosis techniques to overcome the increased challenges associated with lightning protection on composite aircraft. This paper provides an overview of the electrical characterizations being performed to support IVHM lightning damage diagnosis research on composite materials at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  13. Nondestructive characterization of prepreg ageing using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Koeller, E.; Dobmann, G.; Kuhn, W. )

    1990-01-01

    Initial results are presented on the application of NMR techniques to prepregs in order to characterize the crosslink state under exposure to room and elevated (50 C) temperature. The experiments were conducted with a MSL-400 Bruker NMR spectrometer and microimaging system which works at 400 MHz. Aside from the sensitive measurement of the cross-link density there is also the potential to separate the influence of moisture content as a further parameter contributing to the aging process. It is shown that these experimental results correlate with results of destructive tests and document the potential of NMR as a NDT tool. An NMR-image of the moisture distribution in a glassfiber reinforced expoxy resin sample is shown. 17 refs.

  14. Laser shockwave technique for characterization of nuclear fuel plate interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Perton, M.; Levesque, D.; Monchalin, J.-P.; Lord, M.; Smith, J. A.; Rabin, B. H.

    2013-01-25

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  15. Scanning microwave microscopy technique for nanoscale characterization of magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, C. H.; Sardi, G. M.; Tuca, S. S.; Gramse, G.; Lucibello, A.; Proietti, E.; Kienberger, F.; Marcelli, R.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, microwave characterization of magnetic materials using the scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) technique is presented. The capabilities of the SMM are employed for analyzing and imaging local magnetic properties of the materials under test at the nanoscale. The analyses are performed by acquiring both amplitude and phase of the reflected microwave signal. The changes in the reflection coefficient S11 are related to the local properties of the material under investigation, and the changes in its magnetic properties have been studied as a function of an external DC magnetic bias. Yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films deposited by RF sputtering and grown by liquid phase epitaxial (LPE) on gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) substrates and permalloy samples have been characterized. An equivalent electromagnetic transmission line model is discussed for the quantitative analysis of the local magnetic properties. We also observed the hysteretic behavior of the reflection coefficient S11 with an external bias field. The imaging and spectroscopy analysis on the experimental results are evidently indicating the possibilities of measuring local changes in the intrinsic magnetic properties on the surface of the material.

  16. Eddy current techniques for super duplex stainless steel characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerini, C.; Sacramento, R.; Areiza, M. C.; Rocha, A.; Santos, R.; Rebello, J. M.; Pereira, G.

    2015-08-01

    Super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) is a two-phase material where the microstructure consists of grains of ferrite (δ) and austenite (γ). SDSS exhibit an attractive combination of properties, such as: strength, toughness and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Nevertheless, SDSS attain these properties after a controlled solution heat treatment, leading to a similar volumetric fraction of δ and γ. Any further heat treatment, welding operation for example, can change the balance of the original phases, or may also lead to precipitation of a deleterious phase, such as sigma (σ). For these situations, the material corrosion resistance is severely impaired. In the present study, several SDSS samples with low σ phase content and non-balanced microstructure were intentionally obtained by thermally treating SDSS specimens. Electromagnetic techniques, conventional Eddy Current Testing (ECT) and Saturated Low Frequency Eddy Current (SLOFEC), were employed to characterize the SDSS samples. The results showed that ECT and SLOFEC are reliable techniques to evaluate σ phase presence in SDSS and can provide an estimation of the δ content.

  17. An innovative approach to the development of a portable unit for analytical flame characterization in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubinskiy, Mark A.; Kamal, Mohammed M.; Misra, Prabhaker

    1995-01-01

    The availability of manned laboratory facilities in space offers wonderful opportunities and challenges in microgravity combustion science and technology. In turn, the fundamentals of microgravity combustion science can be studied via spectroscopic characterization of free radicals generated in flames. The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique is a noninvasive method of considerable utility in combustion physics and chemistry suitable for monitoring not only specific species and their kinetics, but it is also important for imaging of flames. This makes LIF one of the most important tools for microgravity combustion science. Flame characterization under microgravity conditions using LIF is expected to be more informative than other methods aimed at searching for effects like pumping phenomenon that can be modeled via ground level experiments. A primary goal of our work consisted in working out an innovative approach to devising an LIF-based analytical unit suitable for in-space flame characterization. It was decided to follow two approaches in tandem: (1) use the existing laboratory (non-portable) equipment and determine the optimal set of parameters for flames that can be used as analytical criteria for flame characterization under microgravity conditions; and (2) use state-of-the-art developments in laser technology and concentrate some effort in devising a layout for the portable analytical equipment. This paper presents an up-to-date summary of the results of our experiments aimed at the creation of the portable device for combustion studies in a microgravity environment, which is based on a portable UV tunable solid-state laser for excitation of free radicals normally present in flames in detectable amounts. A systematic approach has allowed us to make a convenient choice of species under investigation, as well as the proper tunable laser system, and also enabled us to carry out LIF experiments on free radicals using a solid-state laser tunable in the UV.

  18. The Sentence Stem Technique: An Innovative Interaction between Counselor and Client

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Shannon

    2011-01-01

    This column is designed to underscore relationally based creative interventions used by counselors and psychotherapists in their practices. Our intention is to provide examples of novel, innovative ways of working with clients in their efforts to deepen self-awareness and their connections with others. Although the interventions within this column…

  19. Peer Assessment Learning Sessions (PALS): An Innovative Feedback Technique for Large Engineering Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Moore, Liza; Baldock, Tom

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the development of innovative assessment sessions within two core technical courses in Civil Engineering at the University of Queensland. Peer Assessment Learning Sessions (PALS) facilitate a student's peer assessment of a colleague's problem-based learning assignment or tutorial within a "traditional" whole-class…

  20. Development of Innovative Radioactive Isotope Production Techniques at the Pennsylvania State University Radiation Science and Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsen, Amanda M.; Heidrich, Brenden; Durrant, Chad; Bascom, Andrew; Unlu, Kenan

    2013-08-15

    The Penn State Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR) at the Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC) has produced radioisotopes for research and commercial purposes since 1956. With the rebirth of the radiochemistry education and research program at the RSEC, the Center stands poised to produce a variety of radioisotopes for research and industrial work that is in line with the mission of the DOE Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, Isotope Development and Production Research and Application Program. The RSEC received funding from the Office of Science in 2010 to improve production techniques and develop new capabilities. Under this program, we improved our existing techniques to provide four radioisotopes (Mn-56, Br-82, Na-24, and Ar-41) to researchers and industry in a safe and efficient manner. The RSEC is also working to develop new innovative techniques to provide isotopes in short supply to researchers and others in the scientific community, specifically Cu-64 and Cu-67. Improving our existing radioisotopes production techniques and investigating new and innovative methods are two of the main initiatives of the radiochemistry research program at the RSEC.

  1. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask ‘how are nanoshapes created?’, ‘how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?’, ‘how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?’. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed. PMID:25485133

  2. Microstructural characterization of ferromagnetic materials using magnetic NDE techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjan, R.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic NDE techniques, namely, the acoustic Barkhausen noise, the magnetic Barkhausen noise, and the magnetic hysteresis curves were simultaneously used for microstructural characterization of nickel and steels. Results showed that, in nickel, the non-180/sup 0/ domain walls interact more strongly with dislocations than the 180/sup 0/ domain walls. A study of the grain-size effect on the magnetic and acoustic Barkhausen noises showed a great potential as a NDE grain-size-measurement tool. Moreover, the Barkhausen signals indicate that the 180/sup 0/ domain walls in nickel seem to have a stronger interaction with grain boundaries than the non-180/sup 0/ domain walls, as indicated by the acoustic Barkhausen signal. Based on the experimental observations, a theoretical model is being proposed to explain the grain size effect on the Barkhausen signals. The model takes into account the density of magnetic domain walls and their initial velocity, with both quantities being strongly dependent on microstructure. The acoustic and magnetic Barkhausen noises were also found to be very sensitive to the change in carbide morphology. It is proposed that the magnetic Barkhausen peak signal is caused by mainly domain nucleation and the acoustic Barkhausen peak signal due to domain growth.

  3. Microstructural characterization of ferromagnetic materials using magnetic NDE techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjan, R.

    1987-06-01

    Magnetic NDE techniques, namely, the acoustic Barkhausen noise, the magnetic Barkhausen noise and the magnetic hysteresis curves, were simultaneously used for microstructural characterization of nickel and steels. Results showed that, in nickel, the non-180/sup 0/ domain walls interact more strongly with dislocations than the 180/sup 0/ domain walls. A study of the grain size effect on the magnetic and acoustic Barkhausen noises showed a great potential as a NDE grain size measurement tool. Moreover, the Barkhausen signals indicate that the 180/sup 0/ domain walls in nickel seem to have a stronger interaction with grain boundaries than the non-180/sup 0/ domain walls, as indicated by the acoustic Barkhausen signal. A theoretical model is being proposed to explain the grain size effect on the Barkhausen signals. The model takes into account the density of magnetic domain walls and their initial velocity, with both quantities being strongly dependent on microstructure. The acoustic and magnetic Barkhausen noises were also found to be very sensitive to the change in carbide morphology. It is proposed that the magnetic Barkhausen peak signal is caused by mainly domain nucleation and the acoustic Barkhausen peak signal due to domain growth.

  4. Characterization of Lavandula spp. Honey Using Multivariate Techniques.

    PubMed

    Estevinho, Leticia M; Chambó, Emerson Dechechi; Pereira, Ana Paula Rodrigues; Carvalho, Carlos Alfredo Lopes de; Toledo, Vagner de Alencar Arnaut de

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, melissopalynological and physicochemical analyses have been the most used to determine the botanical origin of honey. However, when performed individually, these analyses may provide less unambiguous results, making it difficult to discriminate between mono and multifloral honeys. In this context, with the aim of better characterizing this beehive product, a selection of 112 Lavandula spp. monofloral honey samples from several regions were evaluated by association of multivariate statistical techniques with physicochemical, melissopalynological and phenolic compounds analysis. All honey samples fulfilled the quality standards recommended by international legislation, except regarding sucrose content and diastase activity. The content of sucrose and the percentage of Lavandula spp. pollen have a strong positive association. In fact, it was found that higher amounts of sucrose in honey are related with highest percentage of pollen of Lavandula spp.. The samples were very similar for most of the physicochemical parameters, except for proline, flavonoids and phenols (bioactive factors). Concerning the pollen spectrum, the variation of Lavandula spp. pollen percentage in honey had little contribution to the formation of samples groups. The formation of two groups regarding the physicochemical parameters suggests that the presence of other pollen types in small percentages influences the factor termed as "bioactive", which has been linked to diverse beneficial health effects.

  5. Characterization of Lavandula spp. Honey Using Multivariate Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, melissopalynological and physicochemical analyses have been the most used to determine the botanical origin of honey. However, when performed individually, these analyses may provide less unambiguous results, making it difficult to discriminate between mono and multifloral honeys. In this context, with the aim of better characterizing this beehive product, a selection of 112 Lavandula spp. monofloral honey samples from several regions were evaluated by association of multivariate statistical techniques with physicochemical, melissopalynological and phenolic compounds analysis. All honey samples fulfilled the quality standards recommended by international legislation, except regarding sucrose content and diastase activity. The content of sucrose and the percentage of Lavandula spp. pollen have a strong positive association. In fact, it was found that higher amounts of sucrose in honey are related with highest percentage of pollen of Lavandula spp.. The samples were very similar for most of the physicochemical parameters, except for proline, flavonoids and phenols (bioactive factors). Concerning the pollen spectrum, the variation of Lavandula spp. pollen percentage in honey had little contribution to the formation of samples groups. The formation of two groups regarding the physicochemical parameters suggests that the presence of other pollen types in small percentages influences the factor termed as “bioactive”, which has been linked to diverse beneficial health effects. PMID:27588420

  6. Thermal Characterization of Edible Oils by Using Photopyroelectric Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Hernández, G.; Suaste-Gómez, E.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Mendoza-Alvarez, J. G.; Sánchez-Sinéncio, F.; Valcárcel, J. P.; García-Quiroz, A.

    2013-05-01

    Thermal properties of several edible oils such as olive, sesame, and grape seed oils were obtained by using the photopyroelectric technique. The inverse photopyroelectric configuration was used in order to obtain the thermal effusivity of the oil samples. The theoretical equation for the photopyroelectric signal in this configuration, as a function of the incident light modulation frequency, was fitted to the experimental data in order to obtain the thermal effusivity of these samples. Also, the back photopyroelectric configuration was used to obtain the thermal diffusivity of these oils; this thermal parameter was obtained by fitting the theoretical equation for this configuration, as a function of the sample thickness (called the thermal wave resonator cavity), to the experimental data. All measurements were done at room temperature. A complete thermal characterization of these edible oils was achieved by the relationship between the obtained thermal diffusivities and thermal effusivities with their thermal conductivities and volumetric heat capacities. The obtained results are in agreement with the thermal properties reported for the case of the olive oil.

  7. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques.

    PubMed

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-11-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask 'how are nanoshapes created?', 'how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?', 'how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?'. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed.

  8. Characterization of a laser-beam spinning technique

    SciTech Connect

    Brandon, E.

    1990-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the beam spinning technique for bridging gaps in butt joints that are CO{sub 2} laser-welded. A device was designed and built to circularly oscillate a CO{sub 2} laser beam on the plant of a work surface. A series of welds was made using a continuous-wave output power of 805 watts, and the resultant weld bead profile was characterized as a function of three process parameters. From the experimental results, predictor equations were derived for laser-beam spinning speed and amplitude of the beam spinning pattern on the work surface. The data collected in this experiment indicate that the width of the weld bead is increased by oscillating the beam and that this increase may be made without significantly reducing the weld penetration. The increased width of the weld may offer a solution to variable gaps in weld joints, which has been a recurring production problem. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Use of non-standardised micro-destructive techniques in the characterization of traditional construction materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannou, Ioannis; Theodoridou, Magdalini; Modestou, Sevasti; Fournari, Revecca; Dagrain, Fabrice

    2013-04-01

    The characterization of material properties and the diagnosis of their state of weathering and conservation are three of the most important steps in the field of cultural heritage preservation. Several standardised experimental methods exist, especially for determining the material properties and their durability. However, they are limited in their application by the required size of test specimens and the controlled laboratory conditions needed to undertake the tests; this is especially true when the materials under study constitute immovable parts of heritage structures. The current use of other advanced methods of analysis, such as imaging techniques, in the aforementioned field of research offers invaluable results. However, these techniques may not always be accessible to the wider research community due to their complex nature and relatively high cost of application. This study presents innovative applications of two recently developed cutting techniques; the portable Drilling Resistance Measuring System (DRMS) and the scratch tool. Both methods are defined as micro-destructive, since they only destroy a very small portion of sample material. The general concept of both methods lies within the forces needed to cut a material by linear (scratch tool) or rotational (DRMS) cutting action; these forces are related to the mechanical properties of the material and the technological parameters applied on the tool. Therefore, for a given testing configuration, the only parameter influencing the forces applied is the strength of the material. These two techniques have been used alongside a series of standardised laboratory tests aiming at the correlation of various stone properties (density, porosity, dynamic elastic modulus and uniaxial compressive strength). The results prove the potential of both techniques in assessing the uniaxial compressive strength of stones. The scratch tool has also been used effectively to estimate the compressive strength of mud bricks. It

  10. Overview of Characterization Techniques for High Speed Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravi, K. V.

    1984-01-01

    Features of characterization requirements for crystals, devices and completed products are discussed. Key parameters of interest in semiconductor processing are presented. Characterization as it applies to process control, diagnostics and research needs is discussed with appropriate examples.

  11. Investigating flavour characteristics of British ale yeasts: techniques, resources and opportunities for innovation

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Neva; James, Steve; Dicks, Jo; Bond, Chris; Nueno-Palop, Carmen; White, Chris; Roberts, Ian N

    2015-01-01

    Five British ale yeast strains were subjected to flavour profiling under brewery fermentation conditions in which all other brewing parameters were kept constant. Significant variation was observed in the timing and quantity of flavour-related chemicals produced. Genetic tests showed no evidence of hybrid origins in any of the strains, including one strain previously reported as a possible hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. bayanus. Variation maintained in historical S. cerevisiae ale yeast collections is highlighted as a potential source of novelty in innovative strain improvement for bioflavour production. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25361168

  12. Investigating flavour characteristics of British ale yeasts: techniques, resources and opportunities for innovation.

    PubMed

    Parker, Neva; James, Steve; Dicks, Jo; Bond, Chris; Nueno-Palop, Carmen; White, Chris; Roberts, Ian N

    2015-01-01

    Five British ale yeast strains were subjected to flavour profiling under brewery fermentation conditions in which all other brewing parameters were kept constant. Significant variation was observed in the timing and quantity of flavour-related chemicals produced. Genetic tests showed no evidence of hybrid origins in any of the strains, including one strain previously reported as a possible hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. bayanus. Variation maintained in historical S. cerevisiae ale yeast collections is highlighted as a potential source of novelty in innovative strain improvement for bioflavour production.

  13. Innovative techniques, sensors, and approaches for imaging biofilms at different scales.

    PubMed

    Neu, Thomas R; Lawrence, John R

    2015-04-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy has become a standard technique for the investigation of hydrated interfacial microbial communities at the microscale. Multiphoton and spinning-disk microscopes provide new options for in situ imaging. Progress has been made in imaging structural aspects as well as interactions and processes. Advanced fluorescence techniques such as lifetime imaging and correlation spectroscopy are also available. Newly developed target-specific probes allow investigation of new aspects of microbial communities. Several new laser-based techniques are available including nanoscopy and mesoscale techniques. Nanoscopy techniques offer access to unprecedented resolution of hydrated microbiological samples at the scale of fluorescent gene products and macromolecules. Mesoscale approaches are important to address larger features and statistical issues of microbiological samples. This review presents the state of the art in situ biofilm imaging and assesses the pros and cons of laser-based imaging techniques in combination with a variety of sensor types at different scales.

  14. An innovative impression technique for fabrication of a custom made ocular prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tripuraneni, Sunil Chandra; Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Ravikiran, P; Nirupama, N

    2015-01-01

    Various impression and fitting techniques have been described in the past for restoring ocular defects. The present article describes a new direct impression technique for recording and rehabilitating ocular defects, by custom-made ocular prosthesis. All the techniques described in the history, mainly concentrated in recording the tissue surface of the defect, which made it difficult to contour the palpebral surface resulting in the poor esthetics of the prosthesis. The present impression technique uses heavy bodied polyvinyl siloxane impression material, which facilitates accurate recording of the tissue surface and the palpebral surface of the defect, resulting in the fabrication of functionally and esthetically acceptable prosthesis. PMID:26265651

  15. Joint application of non-invasive techniques to characterize the dynamic behaviuor of engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallipoli, M. R.; Perrone, A.; Stabile, T. A.; Ponzo, F. C.; Ditommaso, R.

    2012-04-01

    The systematic monitoring of strategic civil infrastructures such as bridges, large dams or high-rise buildings in order to ensure their structural stability is a strategic issue particularly in earthquake-prone regions. Nevertheless, in areas less exposed to seismic hazard, the monitoring is also an important tool for civil engineers, for instance if they have to deal with structures exposed to heavy operational demands for extended periods of time and whose structural integrity might be in question or at risk. A continuous monitoring of such structures allows the identification of their fundamental response characteristics and the changes of these over time, the latter representing indicators for potential structural degradation. The aim of this paper is the estimation of fundamental dynamic parameters of some civil infrastructures by the joint application of fast executable, non-invasive techniques such as the Ambient Noise Standard Spectral Ratio, and Ground-Based microwave Radar Interferometer techniques. The joint approach combine conventional, non-conventional and innovative techniques in order to set up a non destructive evaluation procedure allowing for a multi-sensing monitoring at a multi-scale and multi-depth levels (i.e. with different degrees of spatial resolution and different subsurface depths). In particular, techniques based on ambient vibration recordings have become a popular tool for characterizing the seismic response and state-of-health of strategic civil infrastructure. The primary advantage of these approaches lies in the fact that no transient earthquake signals or even active excitation of the structure under investigation are required. The microwave interferometry radar technology, it has proven to be a powerful remote sensing tool for vibration measurement of structures, such as bridge, heritage architectural structures, vibrating stay cables, and engineering structures. The main advantage of this radar technique is the possibility to

  16. New Ways in Teaching Adults. New Ways in TESOL Series II: Innovative Classroom Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Marilyn, Ed.

    The guide offers over 100 classroom activities and techniques for teaching English as a second language to adults, all provided by experienced teachers who have found them useful. They are divided into ten categories: (1) activities using materials or techniques from radio, television, and print news media; (2) exercises for teaching English for…

  17. Characterizing Subglacial Interfaces With Airborne Radar Sounding Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, M. E.; Blankenship, D. D.; Morse, D. L.

    2004-12-01

    Ice sheets are sensitive indicators of global change including sea-level rise. An ice sheet's subglacial interface is an important factor controlling its dynamic behavior. In particular, the grounding zones of ice streams and subglacial lakes are complex systems involving the interaction of the moving ice mass with underlying materials such as liquid water, saturated lubricating tills, and rough or frozen bedrock sticky spots. Imaging and characterizing the subglacial environment of ice sheets is fundamental to understanding these complex systems. Airborne radar sounding is a powerful and well-known technique for studying ice sheets and glaciers and their contiguous underlying environments. We present results from data acquired in 2001 over the ice stream C grounding zone in West Antarctica, as well as over a hypothesized subglacial lake near the South Pole. These data were acquired using a uniquely configured coherent airborne radar system. Our focus has been to characterize the subglacial interface through radar echo analysis based on reflection and scattering theory. The radar system uses a programmable signal source linked to a 10 kW transmitter and a dual-channel coherent down-conversion receiver. The radar operates in chirped pulse mode at 60 MHz with 15 MHz bandwidth. High and low-gain channels allow for recording a wide dynamic range of echoes simultaneously and without range-dependent gain control. Data acquisition includes integrations of 16 returned radar signals about every 15 cm along-track. Pulse compression and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing were components of data analysis. Subglacial echoes are influenced by the physical properties of the interface such as the composition and roughness of the materials at the interface. Other important factors include dielectric losses and volumetric scattering losses from propagation through the ice as well as transmission and refraction at the air-ice interface. Unfocussed SAR narrows the along

  18. Microbe-Clay Mineral Reactions and Characterization Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, H.; Zhang, G.; Ji, S.; Jaisi, D.; Kim, J.

    2008-12-01

    Clays and clay minerals are ubiquitous in soils, sediments, and sedimentary rocks. They play an important role in environmental processes such as nutrient cycling, plant growth, contaminant migration, organic matter maturation, and petroleum production. The changes in the oxidation state of the structural iron in clay minerals, in part, control their physical and chemical properties in natural environments, such as clay particle flocculation, dispersion, swelling, hydraulic conductivity, surface area, cation and anion exchange capacity, and reactivity towards organic and inorganic contaminants. The structural ferric iron [Fe(III)] in clay minerals can be reduced either chemically or biologically. Many different chemical reductants have been tried, but the most commonly used agent is dithionite. Biological reductants are bacteria, including dissimilatory iron reducing prokaryotes (DIRP) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). A wide variety of DIRP have been used to reduce ferric iron in clay minerals, including mesophilic, thermophilic, and hyperthermophilic prokaryotes. Multiple clay minerals have been used for microbial reduction studies, including smectite, nontronite (iron-rich smectite variety), illite, illite/smectite, chlorite, and their various mixtures. All these clay minerals are reducible by microorganisms under various conditions with smectite (nontronite) being the most reducible. The reduction extent and rate of ferric iron in clay minerals are measured by wet chemistry, and the reduced clay mineral products are typically characterized with chemical methods, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis spectroscopy, and synchrotron-based techniques (such as EXAFS). Microbially reduced smectites (nontronites) have been found to be reactive in reducing a variety of organic and inorganic contaminants. Degradable organic contaminants include pesticides

  19. The Use of Electrochemical Techniques to Characterize Wet Steam Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce W. Bussert; John A. Crowley; Kenneth J. Kimball; Brian J. Lashway

    2003-04-30

    The composition of a steam phase in equilibrium with a water phase at high temperature is remarkably affected by the varying capabilities of the water phase constituents to partition into the steam. Ionic impurities (sodium, chloride, sulfate, etc.) tend to remain in the water phase, while weakly ionic or gaseous species (oxygen) partition into the steam. Analysis of the water phase can provide misleading results concerning the steam phase composition or environment. This paper describes efforts that were made to use novel electrochemical probes and sampling techniques to directly characterize a wet steam phase environment in equilibrium with high temperature water. Probes were designed to make electrochemical measurements in the thin film of water existing on exposed surfaces in steam over a water phase. Some of these probes were referenced against a conventional high temperature electrode located in the water phase. Others used two different materials (typically tungsten and platinum) to make measurements without a true reference electrode. The novel probes were also deployed in a steam space removed from the water phase. It was necessary to construct a reservoir and an external, air-cooled condenser to automatically keep the reservoir full of condensed steam. Conventional reference and working electrodes were placed in the water phase of the reservoir and the novel probes protruded into the vapor space above it. Finally, water phase probes (both reference and working electrodes) were added to the hot condensed steam in the external condenser. Since the condensing action collapsed the volatiles back into the water phase, these electrodes proved to be extremely sensitive at detecting oxygen, which is one of the species of highest concern in high temperature power systems. Although the novel steam phase probes provided encouraging initial results, the tendency for tungsten to completely corrode away in the steam phase limited their usefulness. However, the

  20. Novel surgical techniques, regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and innovative immunosuppression in kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nowacki, Maciej; Nazarewski, Łukasz; Tyloch, Dominik; Pokrywczyńska, Marta; Pietkun, Katarzyna; Jundziłł, Arkadiusz; Tyloch, Janusz; Habib, Samy L.; Drewa, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    On the 60th anniversary of the first successfully performed renal transplantation, we summarize the historical, current and potential future status of kidney transplantation. We discuss three different aspects with a potential significant influence on kidney transplantation progress: the development of surgical techniques, the influence of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, and changes in immunosuppression. We evaluate the standard open surgical procedures with modern techniques and compare them to less invasive videoscopic as well as robotic techniques. The role of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine as a potential method for future kidney regeneration or replacement and the interesting search for novel solutions in the field of immunosuppression will be discussed. After 60 years since the first successfully performed kidney transplantation, we can conclude that the greatest achievements are associated with the development of surgical techniques and with planned systemic immunosuppression. PMID:27695507

  1. Advanced NDE techniques for quantitative characterization of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Winfree, William P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) at NASA Langley Research Center and their applications that have resulted in quantitative assessment of material properties based on thermal and ultrasonic measurements are reviewed. Specific applications include ultrasonic determination of bolt tension, ultrasonic and thermal characterization of bonded layered structures, characterization of composite materials, and disbonds in aircraft skins.

  2. Minimally invasive scoliosis surgery: an innovative technique in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive spine surgery is becoming more common in the treatment of adult lumbar degenerative disorders. Minimally invasive techniques have been utilized for multilevel pathology, including adult lumbar degenerative scoliosis. The next logical step is to apply minimally invasive surgical techniques to the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). However, there are significant technical challenges of performing minimally invasive surgery on this patient population. For more than two years, we have been utilizing minimally invasive spine surgery techniques in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. We have developed the present technique to allow for utilization of all standard reduction maneuvers through three small midline skin incisions. Our technique allows easy passage of contoured rods, placement of pedicle screws without image guidance, and allows adequate facet osteotomy to enable fusion. There are multiple potential advantages of this technique, including: less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, earlier mobilization, and relatively less pain and need for pain medication. The operative time needed to complete this surgery is longer. We feel that a minimally invasive approach, although technically challenging, is a feasible option in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Although there are multiple perceived benefits, long term data is needed before it can be recommended for routine use. PMID:21834988

  3. Characterization and biological abatement of diffuse methane emissions and odour in an innovative wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Barcón, Tamara; Hernández, Jerónimo; Gómez-Cuervo, Santiago; Garrido, Juan M; Omil, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    An innovative and patented process for medium-high strength sewage which comprises an anaerobic step followed by a hybrid anoxic-aerobic chamber and a final ultrafiltration stage was characterized in terms of methane fugitive emissions as well as odours. The operation at ambient temperature implies higher methane content in the liquid anaerobic effluent, which finally causes concentrations around 0.01-2.4% in the off-gas released in the anoxic-aerobic chamber (1.25% average). Mass balances indicate that these emissions account for up to 30-35% of the total methane generated in the anaerobic reactor. A conventional biofilter (BF) operated at an empty bed residence time of 4 min was used to treat these emissions for 70 d. In spite of the fluctuations in the methane inlet concentrations derived from the operation of the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), it was possible to operate at pseudo-steady-state conditions, achieving average removal efficiencies of 76.5% and maximum elimination capacities of 30.1 g m(-3) h(-1). Odour removal was quantified as 99.1%. Fluorescence in situ hybridization probes as well as metabolic activity assays demonstrated the suitability of the biomass developed in the WWTP as inoculum to start up the BF due to the presence of methanotrophic bacteria.

  4. Innovative Direct Push Technologies for Characterization of the 216-Z-9 Trench at DOE's Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bratton, W.; Moser, K.; Holm, R.; Morse, J.; Tortoso, A.

    2008-07-01

    Because of the significant radiological and chemical hazards present at the 216-Z-9 Trench at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site, the only practical subsurface characterization methods are those that minimize or control airborne vapors and particles. This study evaluates and compares the performance of two Direct Push Technologies (Hydraulic Hammer Rig (HHR) and Cone Penetrometer Testing (CPT)) with traditional cable tool drilling in similar difficult geologic conditions. The performance was based on the depth of penetration, the ability to collect representative vadose zone soil samples, the penetration rate, and the relative cost. The HHR achieved deeper penetration depths and faster penetration rates than CPT techniques, while still maintaining the waste minimization benefits of direct push technologies. Although cable tool drilling achieved the deepest penetration, the safety and disposal concerns due to the soil cuttings that were generated made this drilling approach both slow and costly compared to the direct push techniques. (authors)

  5. Characterization of Deep Tunneling Activity through Remote-Sensing Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    R. G. Best, P. J. Etzler, and J. D. Bloom

    1997-10-01

    This work is a case study demonstrating the uses of multispectral and multi-temporal imagery to characterize deep tunneling activity. A drainage tunnel excavation in Quincy, MA is the case locality. Data used are aerial photographs (digitized) and Daedalus 3600 MSS image data that were collected in July and October of 1994. Analysis of the data includes thermal characterization, spectral characterization, multi-temporal analysis, and volume estimation using digital DEM generation. The results demonstrate the type of information that could be generated by multispectral, multi-temporal data if the study locality were a clandestine excavation site with restricted surface access.

  6. Manufactured gas plant sites: Characterization of wastes and IGT`s innovative remediation alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, V.J.

    1993-12-31

    Manufactured gas plants (MGP)--often referred to as town gas plants--have existed in many parts of the world, including the United States, during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Consequently, many of these plants disposed of process wastes and less valuable by-products onsite, contaminated with coal-tar wastes, light oils, naphthalene, etc. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are components of coal-tar wastes and other wastes that remain at many of these town gas sites. PAH- containing soils, as a result, represent the largest waste type at most MGP sites. Also, certain PAHs are recognized today as being potential animal and/or human carcinogens and, as such, represent an environmental hazard. The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has developed and/or evaluated several techniques/processes to improve the biodegradation of PAHs present at MGP sites. As a result of extensive studies, IGT has successfully developed and demonstrated an integrated Chemical/Biological Treatment (CBT) process that is capable of enhancing the rate as well as the extent of PAH degradation. This process combines two complementary as well as powerful remedial techniques: (1) chemical pretreatment using Fenton`s reagent and (2) a biological system using native aerobic microorganisms. This paper presents the general characteristics of MGP sites and wastes and the innovative IGT processes at various stages of development and demonstration. This paper also discusses the IGT/GRI treatability protocol that can be used to determine the potential of bioremediation for any MGP site soil within a 2 to 3-month period.

  7. INNOVATIVE EASY-TO-USE PASSIVE TECHNIQUE FOR 222RN AND 220RN DECAY PRODUCT DETECTION.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rosaline; Rout, R; Prajith, R; Jalalluddin, S; Sapra, B K; Mayya, Y S

    2016-10-01

    The decay products of radon and thoron are essentially the radioisotopes of polonium, bismuth and lead, and are solid particulates, which deposit in different parts of the respiratory tract upon inhalation, subsequently emitting high-energy alpha particles upon their radioactive decay. Development of passive deposition-based direct progeny sensors known as direct radon and thoron progeny sensors have provided an easy-to-use technique for time-integrated measurements of the decay products only. These dosemeters are apt for large-scale population dosimetry to assign inhalation doses to the public. The paper gives an insight into the technique, the calibration, comparison with the prevalently used active grab filter paper sampling technique, alpha track diameter analysis in these progeny sensors, progeny deposition velocity measurements carried out using these detector systems in the indoor as well as outdoor environment, and applications of these sensors for time-integrated unattached fraction estimation.

  8. Innovative vibration technique applied to polyurethane foam as a viable substitute for conventional fatigue testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Alexander; Just-Agosto, Frederick; Shafiq, Basir; Serrano, David

    2012-12-01

    Lifetime prediction using three-point bending (TPB) can at times be prohibitively time consuming and costly, whereas vibration testing at higher frequency may potentially save time and revenue. A vibration technique that obtains lifetimes that reasonably match those determined under flexural TPB fatigue is developed. The technique designs the specimen with a procedure based on shape optimization and finite element analysis. When the specimen is vibrated in resonance, a stress pattern that mimics the stress pattern observed under conventional TPB fatigue testing is obtained. The proposed approach was verified with polyurethane foam specimens, resulting in an average error of 4.5% when compared with TPB.

  9. Innovative techniques and tools for public participation in U.S. Department of Energy programs

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, A.H.; Henrich, D.L.; Kuhlman, C.A.; White, G.W.

    1995-07-01

    In early 1995, Jon Yerxa, Public Involvement Team Leader in the Office of External Affairs at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office, identified the need to ``provide Hanford`s Public Participation Program with input and advice concerning public involvement issues at Hanford.`` Yerxa identified the following committees: (1) Training, (2) Tri-Party Agreement/NEPA/ Environmental Justice, (3) Program, (4) Performance Evaluation, and (5) Communications Techniques and Technology. These committees were to be staffed by public involvement and communications staff from DOE and its contractors on the Hanford Site. This report describes the activities and recommendations of the Communications Techniques and Technology committee.

  10. Who is that masked educator? Deconstructing the teaching and learning processes of an innovative humanistic simulation technique.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Margaret; Searl, Kerry Reid; Davis, Susan

    2013-12-01

    Simulation learning in nursing has long made use of mannequins, standardized actors and role play to allow students opportunity to practice technical body-care skills and interventions. Even though numerous strategies have been developed to mimic or amplify clinical situations, a common problem that is difficult to overcome in even the most well-executed simulation experiences, is that students may realize the setting is artificial and fail to fully engage, remember or apply the learning. Another problem is that students may learn technical competence but remain uncertain about communicating with the person. Since communication capabilities are imperative in human service work, simulation learning that only achieves technical competence in students is not fully effective for the needs of nursing education. Furthermore, while simulation learning is a burgeoning space for innovative practices, it has been criticized for the absence of a basis in theory. It is within this context that an innovative simulation learning experience named "Mask-Ed (KRS simulation)", has been deconstructed and the active learning components examined. Establishing a theoretical basis for creative teaching and learning practices provides an understanding of how, why and when simulation learning has been effective and it may help to distinguish aspects of the experience that could be improved. Three conceptual theoretical fields help explain the power of this simulation technique: Vygotskian sociocultural learning theory, applied theatre and embodiment.

  11. An innovations-based noise cancelling technique on inverse kepstrum whitening filter and adaptive FIR filter in beamforming structure.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jinsoo

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an acoustic noise cancelling technique using an inverse kepstrum system as an innovations-based whitening application for an adaptive finite impulse response (FIR) filter in beamforming structure. The inverse kepstrum method uses an innovations-whitened form from one acoustic path transfer function between a reference microphone sensor and a noise source so that the rear-end reference signal will then be a whitened sequence to a cascaded adaptive FIR filter in the beamforming structure. By using an inverse kepstrum filter as a whitening filter with the use of a delay filter, the cascaded adaptive FIR filter estimates only the numerator of the polynomial part from the ratio of overall combined transfer functions. The test results have shown that the adaptive FIR filter is more effective in beamforming structure than an adaptive noise cancelling (ANC) structure in terms of signal distortion in the desired signal and noise reduction in noise with nonminimum phase components. In addition, the inverse kepstrum method shows almost the same convergence level in estimate of noise statistics with the use of a smaller amount of adaptive FIR filter weights than the kepstrum method, hence it could provide better computational simplicity in processing. Furthermore, the rear-end inverse kepstrum method in beamforming structure has shown less signal distortion in the desired signal than the front-end kepstrum method and the front-end inverse kepstrum method in beamforming structure.

  12. Innovations in surgery simulation: a review of past, current and future techniques

    PubMed Central

    Burtt, Karen; Solorzano, Carlos A.; Carey, Joseph N.

    2016-01-01

    As a result of recent work-hours limitations and concerns for patient safety, innovations in extraclinical surgical simulation have become a desired part of residency education. Current simulation models, including cadaveric, animal, bench-top, virtual reality (VR) and robotic simulators are increasingly used in surgical training programs. Advances in telesurgery, three-dimensional (3D) printing, and the incorporation of patient-specific anatomy are paving the way for simulators to become integral components of medical training in the future. Evidence from the literature highlights the benefits of including simulations in surgical training; skills acquired through simulations translate into improvements in operating room performance. Moreover, simulations are rapidly incorporating new medical technologies and offer increasingly high-fidelity recreations of procedures. As a result, both novice and expert surgeons are able to benefit from their use. As dedicated, structured curricula are developed that incorporate simulations into daily resident training, simulated surgeries will strengthen the surgeon’s skill set, decrease hospital costs, and improve patient outcomes. PMID:28090509

  13. Innovations in surgery simulation: a review of past, current and future techniques.

    PubMed

    Badash, Ido; Burtt, Karen; Solorzano, Carlos A; Carey, Joseph N

    2016-12-01

    As a result of recent work-hours limitations and concerns for patient safety, innovations in extraclinical surgical simulation have become a desired part of residency education. Current simulation models, including cadaveric, animal, bench-top, virtual reality (VR) and robotic simulators are increasingly used in surgical training programs. Advances in telesurgery, three-dimensional (3D) printing, and the incorporation of patient-specific anatomy are paving the way for simulators to become integral components of medical training in the future. Evidence from the literature highlights the benefits of including simulations in surgical training; skills acquired through simulations translate into improvements in operating room performance. Moreover, simulations are rapidly incorporating new medical technologies and offer increasingly high-fidelity recreations of procedures. As a result, both novice and expert surgeons are able to benefit from their use. As dedicated, structured curricula are developed that incorporate simulations into daily resident training, simulated surgeries will strengthen the surgeon's skill set, decrease hospital costs, and improve patient outcomes.

  14. Innovative Techniques for Large-Scale Collection, Processing, and Storage of Eelgrass (Zostera marina) Seeds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Delmarva Coastal Bays, USA. Aquatic Botany 84:26-36. Pickerell, C. H., S. Schott, and S. Wyllie- Echeverria . 2005. Buoy deployed seeding... Echeverria . 2006. Buoy-deployed seeding: A new low-cost technique for restoration of submerged aquatic vegetation from seed. SAV Technical Notes Collection

  15. Shape and Surface: The challenges and advantages of 3D techniques in innovative fashion, knitwear and product design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendt, E.

    2016-07-01

    The presentation wants to show what kind of problems fashion and textile designers are facing in 3D-knitwear design, especially regarding fashionable flat-knit styles, and how they can use different kinds of techniques and processes to generate new types of 3D-designs and structures. To create really new things we have to overcome standard development methods and traditional thinking and should start to open our minds again for the material itself to generate new advanced textile solutions. This paper mainly introduces different results of research projects worked out in the master program “Textile Produkte” during lectures in “Innovative Product Design” and “Experimental Knitting”.

  16. Critical incident technique: an innovative participatory approach to examine and document racial disparities in breast cancer healthcare services

    PubMed Central

    Yonas, Michael A.; Aronson, Robert; Schaal, Jennifer; Eng, Eugenia; Hardy, Christina; Jones, Nora

    2013-01-01

    Disproportionate and persistent inequities in quality of healthcare have been observed among persons of color in the United States. To understand and ultimately eliminate such inequities, several public health institutions have issued calls for innovative methods and approaches that examine determinants from the social, organizational and public policy contexts to inform the design of systems change interventions. The authors, including academic and community research partners in a community-based participatory research (CBPR) study, reflected together on the use and value of the critical incident technique (CIT) for exploring racial disparities in healthcare for women with breast cancer. Academic and community partners used initial large group discussion involving a large partnership of 35 academic and community researchers guided by principles of CBPR, followed by the efforts of a smaller interdisciplinary manuscript team of academic and community researchers to reflect, document summarize and translate this participatory research process, lessons learned and value added from using the CIT with principles of CBPR and Undoing Racism. The finding of this article is a discussion of the process, strengths and challenges of utilizing CIT with CBPR. The participation of community members at all levels of the research process including development, collection of the data and analysis of the data was enhanced by the CIT process. As the field of CBPR continues to mature, innovative processes which combine the expertise of community and academic partners can enhance the success of such partnerships. This report contributes to existing literature by illustrating a unique and participatory research application of CIT with principles of CBPR and Undoing Racism. Findings highlight the collaborative process used to identify and implement this novel method and the adaptability of this technique in the interdisciplinary exploration of system-level changes to understand and

  17. Endoscopic Debridement for Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciitis: An Innovative Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Cottom, James M; Maker, Jared M

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is one the most common pathologies seen by foot and ankle surgeons. When nonoperative therapy fails, surgical intervention is warranted. Various surgical procedures are available for the treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. The most common surgical management typically consists of open versus endoscopic plantar fascia release. The documented comorbidities associated with the release of the plantar fascia include lateral column overload and metatarsalgia. We present a new technique for this painful condition that is minimally invasive, allows visualization of the plantar fascia, and maintains the integrity of this fascia. Our hypothesis was that the use of endoscopic debridement of the plantar fascia would provide a minimally invasive technique with acceptable patient outcomes.

  18. Innovative Chimney-Graft Technique for Endovascular Repair of a Pararenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Galiñanes, Edgar Luis; Hernandez-Vila, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    After abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, progressive degeneration of the aneurysm can be challenging to treat. Multiple comorbidities and previous operations place such patients at high risk for repeat surgery. Endovascular repair is a possible alternative; however, challenging anatomy can push the limits of available technology. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man who presented with a 5.3-cm pararenal aneurysm 4 years after undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. To avoid reoperation, we excluded the aneurysm by endovascular means, using visceral-artery stenting, a chimney-graft technique. Low-profile balloons on a monorail system enabled the rapid exchange of coronary wires via a buddy-wire technique. This novel approach facilitated stenting and simultaneous angioplasty of multiple visceral vessels and the abdominal aorta. PMID:25873796

  19. Recovery Act Validation of Innovative Exploration Techniques Pilgrim Hot Springs, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Holdmann, Gwen

    2015-04-30

    Drilling and temperature logging campaigns between the late 1970's and early 1980’s measured temperatures at Pilgrim Hot Springs in excess of 90°C. Between 2010 and 2014 the University of Alaska used a variety of methods including geophysical surveys, remote sensing techniques, heat budget modeling, and additional drilling to better understand the resource and estimate the available geothermal energy.

  20. Testing techniques for mechanical characterization of rapidly solidified materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    Mechanical property testing techniques are reviewed for rapidly solidified materials. Mechanical testing of rapidly solidified materials is complicated by the fact that in most cases at least one dimension of the material is very small (less than 100 microns). For some geometries, i.e., powder or thin surface layers, microhardness is the only feasible mechanical test. The ribbon geometry which is obtained by the melt-spinning method, however, has been used for a variety of mechanical property measurements including elastic properties, tensile properties, fracture toughness, creep, and fatigue. These techniques are described with emphasis placed on the precautions required by the restricted geometry of rapidly solidified specimens.

  1. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Techniques for Person Characterization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrero, Salvador; Ivorra, Jose Luis; Garcia-Sogo, Magdalena; Martinez-Cortina, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    Using the traditional serological tests and the most novel techniques for DNA fingerprinting, forensic scientists scan different traits that vary from person to person and use the data to include or exclude suspects based on matching with the evidence obtained in a criminal case. Although the forensic application of these methods is well known,…

  2. An Innovative and Simple Technique of Hollow Maxillary Complete Denture Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Aras, Meena Ajay; Chitre, Vidya; Mysore, Ashwin; Da Costa, Godwin Clovis

    2016-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of severely atrophic ridges has always been an ordeal for the clinician due to decreased support, stability and retention. Because of severe resorption the restorative space between maxillary and mandibular residual ridges is increased. Rehabilitation in such cases may result in increased height and weight of the prosthesis further compromising its retention and stability. This in turn overloads the underlying hard and soft tissues exacerbating ridge resorption so, in order to break this vicious cycle, the weight of the prosthesis needs to be reduced which can be achieved by making hollow prosthesis. This article describes a novel technique of fabricating a hollow maxillary complete denture. PMID:27656580

  3. Innovative approaches to exoplanet detection and characterization: Notes from the Nov 10-13 Keck Institute for Space Studies workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Eliot; Traub, Wesley; Unwin, Stephen; Stapelfeldt, Karl

    2010-05-01

    A four-day workshop was convened on November 10-13, 2009 by the Keck Institute for Space Studies and JPL to consider innovative approaches to detecting and characterizing exoplanets and planetary systems. The program and many of the presentations can be found online: . We present some of the observational strategies discussed in this workshop and summarize some of the issues associated with them. In particular, we will highlight some of the advantages and shortcomings of suborbital and orbital (e.g., ESPA rings) observing platforms in the context of exoplanet detection and characterization.

  4. An innovative technique to simply fabricate ZrO₂-HA-TiO₂ nanostructured layers.

    PubMed

    Samanipour, F; Bayati, M R; Golestani-Fard, F; Zargar, H R; Troczynski, T; Mirhabibi, A R

    2011-08-01

    For the first time, ZrO₂-HA-TiO₂ layers were synthesized through EPD-Enhanced MAO (EEMAO) technique in only one step where no supplementary treatment was required. SEM, XRD, EDX, and XPS techniques were employed to propose a correlation between the growth parameters and the physical and chemical properties of the layers. The layers revealed a porous structure where applying higher voltages and/or utilizing higher concentrated electrolytes resulted in formation of wider pores and increasing the zirconium concentration in the layers; meanwhile, prolonging the growth time had the same effects. The layers mainly consisted of anatase, hydroxyapatite, monoclinic ZrO₂, and tetragonal ZrO₂ phases. Increasing the voltage, electrolyte concentration, and time, hydroxyapatite as well as tetragonal ZrO₂ was decomposed to α-TCP, monoclinic ZrO₂, and ZrO. The nanosized zirconia particles (d = 20-60 nm) were further accumulated on the vicinity of the layers when thicker electrolytes were utilized or higher voltages were applied. Emphasizing on the chemical and electrochemical foundations, a probable formation mechanism was finally put forward.

  5. Advancing the frontiers in nanocatalysis, biointerfaces, and renewable energy conversion by innovations of surface techniques.

    PubMed

    Somorjai, Gabor A; Frei, Heinz; Park, Jeong Y

    2009-11-25

    The challenge of chemistry in the 21st century is to achieve 100% selectivity of the desired product molecule in multipath reactions ("green chemistry") and develop renewable energy based processes. Surface chemistry and catalysis play key roles in this enterprise. Development of in situ surface techniques such as high-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, time-resolved Fourier transform infrared methods, and ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy enabled the rapid advancement of three fields: nanocatalysts, biointerfaces, and renewable energy conversion chemistry. In materials nanoscience, synthetic methods have been developed to produce monodisperse metal and oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in the 0.8-10 nm range with controlled shape, oxidation states, and composition; these NPs can be used as selective catalysts since chemical selectivity appears to be dependent on all of these experimental parameters. New spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed that operate under reaction conditions and reveal the dynamic change of molecular structure of catalysts and adsorbed molecules as the reactions proceed with changes in reaction intermediates, catalyst composition, and oxidation states. SFG vibrational spectroscopy detects amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces and monitors the change of surface structure and interactions with coadsorbed water. Exothermic reactions and photons generate hot electrons in metal NPs that may be utilized in chemical energy conversion. The photosplitting of water and carbon dioxide, an important research direction in renewable energy conversion, is discussed.

  6. [Proven and innovative operative techniques for reanimation of the paralyzed face].

    PubMed

    Frey, M; Michaelidou, M; Tzou, C-H J; Hold, A; Pona, I; Placheta, E

    2010-04-01

    This overview on the currently most effective reconstructive techniques for reanimation of the unilaterally or bilaterally paralysed face includes all important techniques of neuromuscular reconstruction as well as of supplementary static procedures, which contribute significantly to the efficiency and quality of the functional overall result. Attention is paid to the best indications at the best time since onset of the facial palsy, depending on the age of the patient, the cause of the lesion, and the compliance of the patient for a long-lasting and complex rehabilitation programme. Immediate neuromuscular reconstruction of mimic function is favourable by nerve suture or nerve grafting of the facial nerve, or by using the contralateral healthy facial nerve via cross-face nerve grafting as long as the time since onset of the irreversible palsy is short enough that the paralysed mimic muscles can still be reinnervated. For the most frequent indication, the unilateral irreversible and complete palsy, a three-stage concept is described including cross-face nerve grafting, free functional gracilis muscle transplantation, and several supplementary procedures. In patients with limited life expectancy, transposition of the masseteric muscles is favoured. Bilateral facial palsy is treated by bilateral free gracilis muscle transplantation with the masseteric nerve branches for motor reinnervation. Functional upgrading in incomplete lesions is achieved by cross-face nerve grafting with distal end-to-side neurorrhaphy or by functional muscle transplantation with ipsilateral facial nerve supply.

  7. An innovative privacy preserving technique for incremental datasets on cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Aldeen, Yousra Abdul Alsahib S; Salleh, Mazleena; Aljeroudi, Yazan

    2016-08-01

    Cloud computing (CC) is a magnificent service-based delivery with gigantic computer processing power and data storage across connected communications channels. It imparted overwhelming technological impetus in the internet (web) mediated IT industry, where users can easily share private data for further analysis and mining. Furthermore, user affable CC services enable to deploy sundry applications economically. Meanwhile, simple data sharing impelled various phishing attacks and malware assisted security threats. Some privacy sensitive applications like health services on cloud that are built with several economic and operational benefits necessitate enhanced security. Thus, absolute cyberspace security and mitigation against phishing blitz became mandatory to protect overall data privacy. Typically, diverse applications datasets are anonymized with better privacy to owners without providing all secrecy requirements to the newly added records. Some proposed techniques emphasized this issue by re-anonymizing the datasets from the scratch. The utmost privacy protection over incremental datasets on CC is far from being achieved. Certainly, the distribution of huge datasets volume across multiple storage nodes limits the privacy preservation. In this view, we propose a new anonymization technique to attain better privacy protection with high data utility over distributed and incremental datasets on CC. The proficiency of data privacy preservation and improved confidentiality requirements is demonstrated through performance evaluation.

  8. Advancing the Frontiers in Nanocatalysis, Biointerfaces, and Renewable Energy Conversion by Innovations of Surface Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, G.A.; Frei, H.; Park, J.Y.

    2009-07-23

    The challenge of chemistry in the 21st century is to achieve 100% selectivity of the desired product molecule in multipath reactions ('green chemistry') and develop renewable energy based processes. Surface chemistry and catalysis play key roles in this enterprise. Development of in situ surface techniques such as high-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, time-resolved Fourier transform infrared methods, and ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy enabled the rapid advancement of three fields: nanocatalysts, biointerfaces, and renewable energy conversion chemistry. In materials nanoscience, synthetic methods have been developed to produce monodisperse metal and oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in the 0.8-10 nm range with controlled shape, oxidation states, and composition; these NPs can be used as selective catalysts since chemical selectivity appears to be dependent on all of these experimental parameters. New spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed that operate under reaction conditions and reveal the dynamic change of molecular structure of catalysts and adsorbed molecules as the reactions proceed with changes in reaction intermediates, catalyst composition, and oxidation states. SFG vibrational spectroscopy detects amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces and monitors the change of surface structure and interactions with coadsorbed water. Exothermic reactions and photons generate hot electrons in metal NPs that may be utilized in chemical energy conversion. The photosplitting of water and carbon dioxide, an important research direction in renewable energy conversion, is discussed.

  9. From Brainstorming to C-Sketch to Principles of Historical Innovators: Ideation Techniques to Enhance Student Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Christina; Wood, Kristin; Jensen, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The heart and soul of engineering is innovation and our ability to improve the human condition through design. To enrich engineering education, it is critical that we advance our teaching in innovation and design processes. This research focuses on the ideation component of innovation through the investigation of a suite of concept generation…

  10. System and technique for ultrasonic characterization of settling suspensions

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, Margaret S.; Panetta, Paul D.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Pappas, Richard A.

    2006-11-28

    A system for determining properties of settling suspensions includes a settling container, a mixer, and devices for ultrasonic interrogation transverse to the settling direction. A computer system controls operation of the mixer and the interrogation devices and records the response to the interrogating as a function of settling time, which is then used to determine suspension properties. Attenuation versus settling time for dilute suspensions, such as dilute wood pulp suspension, exhibits a peak at different settling times for suspensions having different properties, and the location of this peak is used as one mechanism for characterizing suspensions. Alternatively or in addition, a plurality of ultrasound receivers are arranged at different angles to a common transmitter to receive scattering responses at a variety of angles during particle settling. Angular differences in scattering as a function of settling time are also used to characterize the suspension.

  11. An innovative air data system for the Space Shuttle Orbiter - Data analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. D.; Wolf, H.; Heck, M. L.; Siemers, P. M., III

    1981-01-01

    The Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS) is an experimental system designed to supply research quality air data and to meet Orbiter operational air data requirements throughout entry. SEADS incorporates no mechanical devices but is based on the concept that the fuselage proper, whether symmetrical or not, can be instrumented so as to function both as a pitot-static probe and as a differential pressure flow direction sensor. Specifically SEADS consists of 20 flush orifices, each routed to a pair of absolute pressure transducers. A computational technique has been developed capable of extracting air data parameters solely from surface pressure measurements. The digital filtering algorithm implemented in SEADS is the natural adaptation to air data sensing of a technology widely used in navigation, guidance, and control systems.

  12. A Innovative Technique - Modified Feeding Bottle for a Cleft Palate Infant

    PubMed Central

    Lingegowda, Ashwini Budunur; Rayannavar, Sounyala; Kumari, Nirmala

    2016-01-01

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are one of the most common craniofacial anomalies. Infants suffer a lot of difficulty in sucking during the initial few days after birth. There is even psychological stress to the parents due to improper feeding and the infants lose weight and are prone to nutritional insufficiency. Due to recent advancement in the medical field, there is a total repair of cleft lip and cleft palate and these procedures are performed in the later stages of infants. It is the multidisciplinary approach which includes pedodontist, oral surgeon, prosthodontist and speech therapist. In this article, the technique is highlighted to fulfill the feeding problem of infants in the early stages of birth with a modified feeding bottle. PMID:27190971

  13. A Innovative Technique - Modified Feeding Bottle for a Cleft Palate Infant.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Vinuta Siddayya; Lingegowda, Ashwini Budunur; Rayannavar, Sounyala; Kumari, Nirmala

    2016-04-01

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are one of the most common craniofacial anomalies. Infants suffer a lot of difficulty in sucking during the initial few days after birth. There is even psychological stress to the parents due to improper feeding and the infants lose weight and are prone to nutritional insufficiency. Due to recent advancement in the medical field, there is a total repair of cleft lip and cleft palate and these procedures are performed in the later stages of infants. It is the multidisciplinary approach which includes pedodontist, oral surgeon, prosthodontist and speech therapist. In this article, the technique is highlighted to fulfill the feeding problem of infants in the early stages of birth with a modified feeding bottle.

  14. An innovative technique to synthesize C-doped MgB2 by using chitosan as the carbon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovone, G.; Vignolo, M.; Bernini, C.; Kawale, S.; Siri, A. S.

    2014-02-01

    Here, we report a new technique to synthesize carbon-doped MgB2 powder. Chitosan was innovatively used as the carbon source during the synthesis of boron from boron oxide. This allowed the introduction of local defects, which later on served as pinning centers in MgB2, in the boron lattice itself, avoiding the traditional and time consuming ways of ex situ MgB2 doping (e.g. ball milling). Two volume percentages of C-doping have been tried and its effect on the superconducting properties, evaluated by magnetic and transport measurements, are discussed here. Morphological analysis by scanning electron microscopy revealed nano-metric grains’ distribution in the boron and MgB2 powder. Mono-filamentary MgB2 wires have been fabricated by an ex situ powder-in-tube technique by using the thus prepared carbon-doped MgB2 and pure MgB2 powders. Transport property measurements on these wires were made and compared with MgB2 wire produced using commercial boron.

  15. Discovery of naked charm particles and lifetime differences among charm species using nuclear emulsion techniques innovated in Japan

    PubMed Central

    NIU, Kiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    This is a historical review of the discovery of naked charm particles and lifetime differences among charm species. These discoveries in the field of cosmic-ray physics were made by the innovation of nuclear emulsion techniques in Japan. A pair of naked charm particles was discovered in 1971 in a cosmic-ray interaction, three years prior to the discovery of the hidden charm particle, J/Ψ, in western countries. Lifetime differences between charged and neutral charm particles were pointed out in 1975, which were later re-confirmed by the collaborative Experiment E531 at Fermilab. Japanese physicists led by K.Niu made essential contributions to it with improved emulsion techniques, complemented by electronic detectors. This review also discusses the discovery of artificially produced naked charm particles by us in an accelerator experiment at Fermilab in 1975 and of multiple-pair productions of charm particles in a single interaction in 1987 by the collaborative Experiment WA75 at CERN. PMID:18941283

  16. An innovative technique for damage by-pass in gravel packed completions using tip screen-out fracture prepacks

    SciTech Connect

    Montagna, J.N.; Saucier, R.J.; Kelly, P.

    1995-12-31

    An innovative completion technique is being used in wells that require sand control to help eliminate high skins and increase pay, or effective kh, and thus improve well productivity. The success of this technique lies in concentrating high conductivity proppants in the near-wellbore region. This is accomplished by creating and propping a properly designed, length limited, hydraulically-induced fracture in conjunction with an annular water gravel pack. The result is a highly conductive flow path from virgin formation, through the near-wellbore damaged zone, and into the wellbore that also controls formation sand. The limited fracture is designed with the intent of preserving the integrity of the near well gravel pack since this aspect is critical to realizing the full benefits of the fracture. Industry data indicates that optimum gravel packing is achieved with a brine proppant carrier. In some cases, the entire operation (limited fracture and gravel pack) may be completed with brine. However, in other cases, as discussed here, the high leak-off associated with brine is reduced by a product developed to overcome the excessive fluid leak-off. Brine following this material provides the carrier medium for proppant placement in the fracture and for the gravel pack. The process is described and examples of field applications and results will be presented.

  17. Advanced characterization of microscopic kidney biopsies utilizing image analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Goudas, Theodosios; Doukas, Charalampos; Chatziioannou, Aristotle; Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2012-01-01

    Correct annotation and identification of salient regions in Kidney biopsy images can provide an estimation of pathogenesis in obstructive nephropathy. This paper presents a tool for the automatic or manual segmentation of such regions along with methodology for their characterization in terms of the exhibited pathology. The proposed implementation is based on custom code written in Java and the utilization of open source tools (i.e. RapidMiner, ImageJ). The corresponding implementation details along with the initial evaluation of the proposed integrated system are also presented in the paper.

  18. Using data mining techniques to characterize participation in observational studies.

    PubMed

    Linden, Ariel; Yarnold, Paul R

    2016-12-01

    Data mining techniques are gaining in popularity among health researchers for an array of purposes, such as improving diagnostic accuracy, identifying high-risk patients and extracting concepts from unstructured data. In this paper, we describe how these techniques can be applied to another area in the health research domain: identifying characteristics of individuals who do and do not choose to participate in observational studies. In contrast to randomized studies where individuals have no control over their treatment assignment, participants in observational studies self-select into the treatment arm and therefore have the potential to differ in their characteristics from those who elect not to participate. These differences may explain part, or all, of the difference in the observed outcome, making it crucial to assess whether there is differential participation based on observed characteristics. As compared to traditional approaches to this assessment, data mining offers a more precise understanding of these differences. To describe and illustrate the application of data mining in this domain, we use data from a primary care-based medical home pilot programme and compare the performance of commonly used classification approaches - logistic regression, support vector machines, random forests and classification tree analysis (CTA) - in correctly classifying participants and non-participants. We find that CTA is substantially more accurate than the other models. Moreover, unlike the other models, CTA offers transparency in its computational approach, ease of interpretation via the decision rules produced and provides statistical results familiar to health researchers. Beyond their application to research, data mining techniques could help administrators to identify new candidates for participation who may most benefit from the intervention.

  19. Optical characterization of hydrogenated silicon thin films using interference technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Globus, Tatiana; Ganguly, Gautam; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2000-08-01

    This work introduces an application of an "interference spectroscopy technique" (IST) for determination of absorption coefficient and refractive index spectra of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and related thin film materials. The technique is based on computer analysis of measurements of optical transmission and specular reflection (T & R) of thin films (including the films on substrates) over a wide range of the incident photon energies (0.5-2.8 eV) using carefully controlled spectrometer conditions. IST is used to investigate the absorption spectrum in the sub-gap energy range (0.8-1.6 eV) of intrinsic and phosphorous-doped a-Si:H, "polymorphous-Si:H," and microcrystalline silicon films. The enhanced sensitivity of the technique over conventional analysis of T & R data results from utilization of interference to obtain absorption coefficient values at the maxima of transmission. The factors limiting the accuracy of the calculated absorption coefficient are discussed in detail. Measurement on films of thickness ranging from 0.1 to 5 μm identifies that the sub-gap absorption in these films arises from the bulk rather than the surface. A set of samples prepared under widely different conditions that appear to have overlapping (α=20 cm-1) sub-gap absorption spectra measured using photo-thermal deflection spectroscopy (PDS), reveal significant differences (α=10 to 100 cm-1) using IST. Changes (factor of 2) in sub-gap absorption spectra due to light soaking are also clearly observable using IST.

  20. Using morphometric and analytical techniques to characterize elephant ivory.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rina Rani; Goyal, Surendra Prakash; Khanna, Param Pal; Mukherjee, Pulok Kumar; Sukumar, Raman

    2006-10-16

    There is a need to characterize Asian elephant ivory and compare with African ivory for controlling illegal trade and implementation of national and international laws. In this paper, we characterize ivory of Asian and African elephants using Schreger angle measurements, elemental analysis {X-ray fluorescence (XRF), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS)} and isotopic analysis. We recorded Schreger angle characteristics of elephant ivory at three different zones in ivory samples of African (n=12) and Asian (n=28) elephants. The Schreger angle ranged from 32 degrees to 145 degrees and 30 degrees to 153 degrees in Asian and African ivory, respectively. Elemental analysis (for Asian and African ivory) by XRF, ICP-AES and ICP-MS provided preliminary data. We attempted to ascertain source of origin of Asian elephant ivory similarly as in African ivory based on isotopes of carbon, nitrogen and strontium. We determined isotopic ratios of carbon (n=31) and nitrogen (n=31) corresponding to diet and rainfall, respectively. Reference ivory samples from five areas within India were analyzed using collagen and powder sample and the latter was found more suitable for forensic analysis. During our preliminary analysis, the range of delta13C values (-13.6+/-0.15 per thousand and -25.6+/-0.15 per thousand) and delta15N values (10.2+/-0.15 per thousand and 3.5+/-0.15 per thousand) were noted.

  1. Simultaneous electronic and lattice characterization using coupled femtosecond spectroscopic techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Hopkins, Patrick E

    2009-09-01

    High-power electronics are central in the development of radar, solid-state lighting, and laser systems. Large powers, however, necessitate improved heat dissipation as heightened temperatures deleteriously affect both performance and reliability. Heat dissipation, in turn, is determined by the cascade of energy from the electronic to lattice system. Full characterization of the transport then requires analysis of each. In response, this four-month late start effort has developed a transient thermoreflectance (TTR) capability that probes the thermal response of electronic carriers with 100 fs resolution. Simultaneous characterization of the lattice carriers with this electronic assessment was then investigated by equipping the optical arrangement to acquire a Raman signal from radiation discarded during the TTR experiment. Initial results show only tentative acquisition of a Raman response at these timescales. Using simulations of the response, challenges responsible for these difficulties are then examined and indicate that with outlined refinements simultaneous acquisition of TTR/Raman signals remains attainable in the near term.

  2. Numerical analysis of radiation propagation in innovative volumetric receivers based on selective laser melting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Fabrizio; Santiago, Sergio; Roccabruna, Mattia; Luque, Salvador; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Jose; Crema, Luigi; Romero, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Volumetric absorbers constitute one of the key elements in order to achieve high thermal conversion efficiencies in concentrating solar power plants. Regardless of the working fluid or thermodynamic cycle employed, design trends towards higher absorber output temperatures are widespread, which lead to the general need of components of high solar absorptance, high conduction within the receiver material, high internal convection, low radiative and convective heat losses and high mechanical durability. In this context, the use of advanced manufacturing techniques, such as selective laser melting, has allowed for the fabrication of intricate geometries that are capable of fulfilling the previous requirements. This paper presents a parametric design and analysis of the optical performance of volumetric absorbers of variable porosity conducted by means of detailed numerical ray tracing simulations. Sections of variable macroscopic porosity along the absorber depth were constructed by the fractal growth of single-cell structures. Measures of performance analyzed include optical reflection losses from the absorber front and rear faces, penetration of radiation inside the absorber volume, and radiation absorption as a function of absorber depth. The effects of engineering design parameters such as absorber length and wall thickness, material reflectance and porosity distribution on the optical performance of absorbers are discussed, and general design guidelines are given.

  3. Innovative techniques for the production of low cost 2D laser diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-05-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a low cost fabrication method for high performance laser diode arrays. The program focussed on reliable and cost effective ways to grow, assemble and test diode bars of molecular beam epitaxy material. Quantum well laser structures were grown on 2 and 3 GaAs substrates. These wafers were photolithographically processed, scribed into bars, and the bars assembled by various techniques. The assemblies were tested for performance, reproducibility, and reliability. The originally proposed assembly, a grooved BeO block, was evaluated and abandoned as unreliable. However, a simplified bar and individual BeO substrate assembly method was developed, and state of the art results achieved on robust 1 cm linear diode arrays, which survived repeated high power testing to power level in excess of 80 watts/bar. This method may be scaled up for multiple bar assemblies without additional complexity by adding laser bars and BeO spacers as required. The BeO sub-mounts are coated prior to assembly in such a fashion to provide a low resistance series connection to each bar in the array, similar to the grooved substrate series connection geometry.

  4. An innovative antisolvent precipitation process as a promising technique to prepare ultrafine rifampicin particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viçosa, Alessandra; Letourneau, Jean-Jacques; Espitalier, Fabienne; Inês Ré, Maria

    2012-03-01

    Many existing and new drugs fail to be fully utilized because of their limited bioavailability due to poor solubility in aqueous media (BCS drug classes II and IV). In this work, for accelerating dissolution of this kind of poorly water-soluble drugs, an antisolvent precipitation method that does not require the use of conventional volatile organic solvents is proposed. To demonstrate this technique, ultrafine particles of rifampicin were prepared using a room temperature ionic liquid (1-ethyl 3- methyl imidazolium methyl-phosphonate) as an alternative solvent and a phosphate buffer as an antisolvent. Rifampicin solubility was measured in various solvents (1-ethyl 3-methyl imidazolium methylphosphonate, water and phosphate buffer), showing the RTIL good solvency for the model drug: rifampicin solubility was found to be higher than 90 mg/g in RTIL at 30 °C and lower than 1 mg/g in water at 25 °C. Additionally, it was demonstrated that introduction of rifampicin solution in 1-ethyl 3- methyl imidazolium methyl-phosphonate into the aqueous solution antisolvent can produce particles in the submicron range with or without hydroxypropyl methylcellulose as the stabilizer. The ultrafine particles (280-360 nm) are amorphous with enhanced solubility and faster dissolution rate. To our knowledge, this is the first published work examining the suitability of using RTILs for ultrafine drug nanoparticles preparation by an antisolvent precipitation process.

  5. Characterization of a Viking Blade Fabricated by Traditional Forging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, H.; Frazer, D.; Bailey, N.; Traylor, R.; Austin, J.; Pringle, J.; Bickel, J.; Connick, R.; Connick, W.; Hosemann, P.

    2016-12-01

    A team of students from the University of California, Berkeley, participated in a blade-smithing competition hosted by the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society at the TMS 2015 144th annual meeting and exhibition. Motivated by ancient forging methods, the UC Berkeley team chose to fabricate our blade from historical smithing techniques utilizing naturally-occurring deposits of iron ore. This approach resulted in receiving the "Best Example of a Traditional Blade Process/Ore Smelting Technique" award for our blade named "Berkelium." First, iron-enriched sand was collected from local beaches. Magnetite (Fe3O4) was then extracted from the sand and smelted into individual high- and low-carbon steel ingots. Layers of high- and low-carbon steels were forge-welded together, predominantly by hand, to form a composite material. Optical microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and Vickers hardness mechanical testing were conducted at different stages throughout the blade-making process to evaluate the microstructure and hardness evolution during formation. It was found that the pre-heat-treated blade microstructure was composed of ferrite and pearlite, and contained many nonmetallic inclusions. A final heat treatment was performed, which caused the average hardness of the blade edge to increase by more than a factor of two, indicating a martensitic transformation.

  6. Characterization of a Mycobacterium intracellulare Variant Strain by Molecular Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, M. C.; Palenque, E.; Navarro, M. C.; Nuñez, M. C.; Rebollo, M. J.; Garcia, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a Mycobacterium intracellulare variant strain causing an unusual infection. Several isolates obtained from an immunocompromised patient were identified as members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) by the commercial AccuProbe system and biochemical standard identification. Further molecular approaches were undertaken for a more accurate characterization of the bacteria. Up to seven different genomic sequences were analyzed, ranging from conserved mycobacterial genes such as 16S ribosomal DNA to MAC-specific genes such as mig (macrophage-induced gene). The results obtained identify the isolates as a variant of M. intracellulare, an example of the internal variability described for members of the MAC, particularly within that species. The application of other molecular approaches is recommended for more accurate identification of bacteria described as MAC members. PMID:11724827

  7. Thermal Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes by Photothermal Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahu, G.; Li Voti, R.; Larciprete, M. C.; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.; Nefedov, I.; Anoshkin, I. V.

    2015-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are multifunctional materials commonly used in a large number of applications in electronics, sensors, nanocomposites, thermal management, actuators, energy storage and conversion, and drug delivery. Despite recent important advances in the development of CNT purity assessment tools and atomic resolution imaging of individual nanotubes by scanning tunnelling microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, the macroscale assessment of the overall surface qualities of commercial CNT materials remains a great challenge. The lack of quantitative measurement technology to characterize and compare the surface qualities of bulk manufactured and engineered CNT materials has negative impacts on the reliable and consistent nanomanufacturing of CNT products. In this paper it is shown how photoacoustic spectroscopy and photothermal radiometry represent useful non-destructive tools to study the optothermal properties of carbon nanotube thin films.

  8. PIXE as a characterization technique in the cutting tool industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freemantle, C. S.; Sacks, N.; Topic, M.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Two WC-Co powders have been analyzed using micro-PIXE to identify elemental concentration and distribution. A powder recycled primarily from used mining components and a powder produced exclusively from fresh raw materials was studied. Elemental mapping of major elements as well as impurities, within powder granule cross sections, was performed. Contaminants (e.g. Fe and Ni) from manufacturing processes, as well as trace impurities (e.g. Cr, Cl, Ca and S) from recycling were detected, quantified and compared. The extent of increased concentrations of impurities resulting from recycling were observed, demonstrating the potential for PIXE as a characterization tool for detecting trace elements in cemented carbides, allowing for future improvements in the manufacturing and recycling processes.

  9. Ground Penetrating Radar technique for railway track characterization in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Chiara, Francesca; Fontul, Simona; Fortunato, Eduardo; D'Andrea, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Maintenance actions are significant for transport infrastructures but, today, costs have to be necessary limited. A proper quality control since the construction phase is a key factor for a long life cycle and for a good economy policy. For this reason, suitable techniques have to be chosen and non-destructive tests represent an efficient solution, as they allow to evaluate infrastructure characteristics in a continuous or quasi-continuous way, saving time and costs, enabling to make changes if tests results do not comply with the project requirements. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a quick and effective technique to evaluate infrastructure condition in a continuous manner, replacing or reducing the use of traditional drilling method. GPR application to railways infrastructures, during construction and monitoring phase, is relatively recent. It is based on the measuring of layers thicknesses and detection of structural changes. It also enables the assessment of materials properties that constitute the infrastructure and the evaluation of the different types of defects such as ballast pockets, fouled ballast, poor drainage, subgrade settlement and transitions problems. These deteriorations are generally the causes of vertical deviations in track geometry and they cannot be detected by the common monitoring procedures, namely the measurements of track geometry. Moreover, the development of new GPR systems with higher antenna frequencies, better data acquisition systems, more user friendly software and new algorithms for calculation of materials properties can lead to a regular use of GPR. Therefore, it represents a reliable technique to assess track geometry problems and consequently to improve maintenance planning. In Portugal, rail inspection is performed with Plasser & Theurer EM120 equipment and recently 400 MHz IDS antennas were installed on it. GPR tests were performed on the Portuguese rail network and, as case study in this paper, a renewed track was

  10. Characterizing a Brazilian sanitary landfill using geophysical seismic techniques.

    PubMed

    Abreu, A E S; Gandolfo, O C B; Vilar, O M

    2016-07-01

    Two different geophysical techniques, namely crosshole and multichannel analysis of surface waves - MASW, were applied to investigate the mechanical response of Municipal Solid Waste buried under humid, subtropical climate. Direct investigations revealed that the buried waste was composed mainly of soil-like material (51%) and plastics (31%) with moisture content average values of 43% near the surface and 53% after around 11m depth. Unit weight varied between 9kN/m(3) and 15kN/m(3). Seismic investigation of the landfill yielded shear wave velocities (VS) estimated from the crosshole tests ranging from 92 to 214m/s, while compression wave velocities (VP) ranged from 197 to 451m/s. Both velocities were influenced by vertical confining stress and thus tended to increase with depth. VS calculated from MASW tests were lower than the ones calculated from the crosshole tests, probably due to the different frequencies used in the tests. The results of both methods tended to configure a lower bound to the values reported in the technical literature in general, as expected for low compaction waste with small amounts of cover soil. Although VS did not show abrupt changes with depth, VP profile distribution combined with direct investigations results, such as temperature, in-place unit weight and moisture content, suggest that the waste body could be divided into two strata. The lower one is poorly drained and shows higher moisture content, as a consequence of the operational techniques used in the first years, while the upper stratum is probably related to a better drained waste stratum, resulting from the improvement of operational standards and increase in drainage facilities throughout the years.

  11. An Innovative Technique for Evaluating the Integrity and Durability of Wind Turbine Blade Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei

    2010-09-01

    Wind turbine blades are subjected to complex multiaxial stress states during operation. A review of the literature suggests that mixed mode fracture toughness can be significantly less than that of the tensile opening mode (Mode I), implying that fracture failure can occur at a much lower load capacity if the structure is subject to mixed-mode loading. Thus, it will be necessary to identify the mechanisms that might lead to failure in blade materials under mixed-mode loading conditions. Meanwhile, wind turbine blades are typically fabricated from fiber reinforced polymeric materials, e.g. fiber glass composites. Due to the large degree of anisotropy in mechanical properties that is usually associated with laminates, the fracture behavior of these composite materials is likely to be strongly dependent on the loading conditions. This may further strengthen the need to study the effect of mixed-mode loading on the integrity and durability of the wind turbine blade composites. To quantify the fracture behavior of composite structures under mixed mode loading conditions, particularly under combined Mode I (flexural or normal tensile stress) and Mode III (torsional shear stress) loading, a new testing technique is proposed based on the spiral notch torsion test (SNTT). As a 2002 R&D 100 Award winner, SNTT is a novel fracture testing technology. SNTT has many advantages over conventional fracture toughness methods and has been used to determine fracture toughness values on a wide spectrum of materials. The current project is the first attempt to utilize SNTT on polymeric and polymer-based composite materials. It is expected that mixed-mode failure mechanisms of wind turbine blades induced by typical in-service loading conditions, such as delamination, matrix cracking, fiber pull-out and fracture, can be effectively and economically investigated by using this methodology. This project consists of two phases. The Phase I (FY2010) effort includes (1) preparation of testing

  12. Hierarchical sampling of multiple strata: an innovative technique in exposure characterization.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Jonathon E; Gonzalez, Elisabeth J

    2003-07-01

    Sampling of multiple strata, or hierarchical sampling of various exposure sources and activity areas, has been tested and is suggested as a method to sample (or to locate) areas with a high prevalence of elevated blood lead in children. Hierarchical sampling was devised to supplement traditional soil lead sampling of a single stratum, either residential or fixed point source, using a multistep strategy. Blood lead (n=1141) and soil lead (n=378) data collected under the USEPA/UCI Tijuana Lead Project (1996-1999) were analyzed to evaluate the usefulness of sampling soil lead from background sites, schools and parks, point sources, and residences. Results revealed that industrial emissions have been a contributing factor to soil lead contamination in Tijuana. At the regional level, point source soil lead was associated with mean blood lead levels and concurrent high background, and point source soil lead levels were predictive of a high percentage of subjects with blood lead equal to or greater than 10 micro g/dL (pe 10). Significant relationships were observed between mean blood lead level and fixed point source soil lead (r=0.93; P<0.05; R(2)=0.72 using a quadratic model) and between residential soil lead and fixed point source soil lead (r=0.90; P<0.05; R(2)=0.86 using a cubic model). This study suggests that point sources alone are not sufficient for predicting the relative risk of exposure to lead in the urban environment. These findings will be useful in defining regions for targeted or universal soil lead sampling by site type. Point sources have been observed to be predictive of mean blood lead at the regional level; however, this relationship alone was not sufficient to predict pe 10. It is concluded that when apparently undisturbed sites reveal high soil lead levels in addition to local point sources, dispersion of lead is widespread and will be associated with a high prevalence of elevated blood lead in children. Multiple strata sampling was shown to be useful in differentiating among sources by site-specific association to mean blood lead and the prevalence of elevated blood lead at the regional level.

  13. Understanding, promoting and protecting geodiversity and geoheritage of the Piemonte region (Italy) through innovative techniques and public engagement in Earth Science studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardino, Marco; Lozar, Francesca; Perotti, Luigi; Palomba, Mauro; Groppo, Chiara; Natalicchio, Marcello; Ghiraldi, Luca; Beltramo, Riccardo; Lombardo, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    The onset of Antropocene demonstrates the importance of considering both 1) geodiversity and 2) geoheritage as parts of the landscape "interfaces" where relationships between natural and socio-economic systems can be studied and interpreted. By definition: 1) is the variety, recognizable in nature ("diversity"), of geological features (rocks, minerals, fossils…), of geomorphological environments (and related forms and processes) and of soil characteristics; 2) is an integral part of the global natural heritage focusing on unique, special and representative sites of geological interests (geosites l.s.). In the Antropocene, both 1) and 2) hold a dynamic character, as the result of actions and interactions of natural and/or human factors. Therefore, geodiversity and geoheritage studies are essential for breaking down geological environments and human territories into their main parts and to understand the variables and mechanisms that control their changes. In this perspective, results of the multidisciplinary project PROGEO-Piemonte ("PROactive management of GEOlogical heritage in the Piemonte Region") are presented here: an innovative approach for assessing geodiversity in order to select areas of high potential value of geoheritage to be enhanced by targeted management actions. Since the geodiversity of Piemonte is materialized by elements of high scientific, educational, tourism, etc. value, the geosites where this geoheritage is preserved have been comprehensively analysed and characterized for encompassing both public and private interests. 9 strategic geothematic areas have been selected in the Piemonte Region to test this approach, and to improve social engagement aimed at protecting and promoting geodiversity ad geoheritage. The investigated areas represent the multifaceted geodiversity of Piemonte; each area is characterized by high potential for scientific studies, enhancement of public understanding of science, recreation activities and for economic

  14. Novel Monitoring Techniques for Characterizing Frictional Interfaces in the Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Selvadurai, Paul A.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    A pressure-sensitive film was used to characterize the asperity contacts along a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) interface in the laboratory. The film has structural health monitoring (SHM) applications for flanges and other precision fittings and train rail condition monitoring. To calibrate the film, simple spherical indentation tests were performed and validated against a finite element model (FEM) to compare normal stress profiles. Experimental measurements of the normal stress profiles were within −7.7% to 6.6% of the numerical calculations between 12 and 50 MPa asperity normal stress. The film also possessed the capability of quantifying surface roughness, an important parameter when examining wear and attrition in SHM applications. A high definition video camera supplied data for photometric analysis (i.e., the measure of visible light) of asperities along the PMMA-PMMA interface in a direct shear configuration, taking advantage of the transparent nature of the sample material. Normal stress over individual asperities, calculated with the pressure-sensitive film, was compared to the light intensity transmitted through the interface. We found that the luminous intensity transmitted through individual asperities linearly increased 0.05643 ± 0.0012 candelas for an increase of 1 MPa in normal stress between normal stresses ranging from 23 to 33 MPa. PMID:25923930

  15. Hyperspectral imaging based techniques in ornamental stone characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia; Menesatti, Paolo

    2005-11-01

    Ornamental stones are usually utilized for many purposes, ranging from structural to aesthetic ones. In this wide range of utilization, many different industrial sectors are involved. For all of them it is very important, at a different level, that these materials satisfy not only specific physical-chemical-mechanical requirements, but also some attributes that are much more difficult to quantify, that is those attributes strictly related to the final pictorial aspect of the stone manufactured goods. Stone pictorial-aesthetic characteristics are strongly influenced by stone surface status, that is by the surfaces reflectance properties. Such a property depends from stone compositional-textural characteristics and from the working procedures applied. The first set of attributes are related to stone mineral composition and their micro/macro arrangement, the others are related to the tools utilized and the actions applied in terms of operation sequence and workers knowledge-expertise. Each stone and each macro-operation carried out lead to a stone product whose finishing has to follow a specific rule: "optimal" polishing procedures for a stone can lead to very poor results for others. The study was addressed to evaluate the possibility to introduce a new hyperspectral imaging based approach to quantify the level of polishing of stone products and, at the same time, trying to perform also a pictorial-aesthetic characterization trough the identification of natural and/or working defects.

  16. Diagnosis of industrial catalyst deactivation by surface characterization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, P.G. . Lab. voor Petrochemische Techniek Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg . Dept. of Engineering Chemistry)

    1994-06-01

    The exact nature of the catalyst surface and the various ways of catalyst deactivation are subjects of great scientific interest and enormous economic importance. A brief review like the present one has to be very selective, giving only the underlying principles and representative examples. The focus of this review is on industrial catalysts, in particular, on the most commonly used supported metal and mixed-oxide type catalysts. Here again, only typical examples are chosen and cited to illustrate the specific types of problems involved in catalyst deactivation and how these problems wee diagnosed by a judicious application of the experimental techniques available today. Of the types of catalyst deactivation caused by coking, poisoning, and solid-state transformations, the emphasis in this review is on the last type. Changes in the chemical composition of the catalyst surface, restructuring or reconstruction of the surface, phase transformations, gradual enrichment/depletion of a particular catalyst component on/from the catalyst surface, these are the topics of prominence in this review. Even here, emphasis is on normally unexpected or unsuspected types of deactivation and the catalyst metamorphosis produced by the catalytic reaction itself, as distinct from the purely thermal effects at the reaction temperature. This review is aimed to provide some essential background information and possibly to serve as a reference guide for trouble-shooting when a catalyst is deactivated for rather mysterious reasons. 147 refs.

  17. Characterization of Hardening by Design Techniques on Commercial, Small Feature Sized Field-Programmable Gate Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    AFIT/GE/ENG/09-43 CHARACTERIZATION OF HARDENING BY DESIGN TECHNIQUES ON COMMERCIAL, SMALL FEATURE SIZED FIELD-PROGRAMMABLE GATE ARRAYS THESIS...The purpose of which is to determine the radiation effects and characterize the improvements of various hardening by design techniques. The...Distributed RAM memory elements that are loaded both with ECC and non-error corrected data. The circuit is designed to check for errors in memory data, stuck

  18. Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers. Second technical annual progress report, October 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1992-12-31

    This second annual report on innovative uses of tracers for reservoir characterization contains four sections each describing a novel use of oilfield tracers. The first section describes and illustrates the use of a new single-well tracer test to estimate wettability. This test consists of the injection of brine containing tracers followed by oil containing tracers, a shut-in period to allow some of the tracers to react, and then production of the tracers. The inclusion of the oil injection slug with tracers is unique to this test, and this is what makes the test work. We adapted our chemical simulator, UTCHEM, to enable us to study this tracer method and made an extensive simulation study to evaluate the effects of wettability based upon characteristic curves for relative permeability and capillary pressure for differing wetting states typical of oil reservoirs. The second section of this report describes a new method for analyzing interwell tracer data based upon a type-curve approach. Theoretical frequency response functions were used to build type curves of ``transfer function`` and ``phase spectrum`` that have dimensionless heterogeneity index as a parameter to characterize a stochastic permeability field. We illustrate this method by analyzing field tracer data. The third section of this report describes a new theory for interpreting interwell tracer data in terms of channeling and dispersive behavior for reservoirs. Once again, a stochastic approach to reservoir description is taken. The fourth section of this report describes our simulation of perfluorocarbon gas tracers. This new tracer technology developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory is being tested at the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in California. We report preliminary simulations made of these tracers in one of the oil reservoirs under evaluation with these tracers in this field. Our compostional simulator (UTCOMP) was used for this simulation study.

  19. Innovative directional and position specific sampling technique: Phase I. Final report, July 28, 1992--April 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hutzel, W.J.; Foster, E.L.

    1993-04-01

    UTD, Incorporated has developed a unique real-time, in-situ POsition LOcation (POLO) device which will directly enhance the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program through improvements to finding contamination, identifying extent of contamination, remediating, and finally monitoring sites. POLO is smaller than existing technology and is unaffected by the presence of steel and other magnetic materials. The size of the device offers for the first time, the possibility to accurately determine the location of a penetrometer. It will be usable, in its present form, to map the position of a sampling device as that device is inserted into the hole. A three phase program with a 21 month period of performance was proposed to DOE to take the POLO system through the three levels of maturity prior to commercialization. The goal of Phase I of the contract, ``Innovative and Position Specific Sampling Technique`` was to analyze, test, and refine the individual subsystems of the POLO system. The goals were accomplished and the success criteria met by engineering design and precision construction of the various system components. A prototype module was designed, constructed, and calibrated. The final report presented here details the design, manufacture, and testing of each POLO component (sub-scale) in an experimental configuration. A comprehensive error analysis summarizes the performance and demonstrates that all project goals have been met. Plans for commercialization of POLO are discussed and highlight the expected smooth transition to full scale production.

  20. Application of plow-tillage as an innovative technique for eliminating overwintering cyanobacteria in eutrophic lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qilin; Liu, Cheng; Fan, Chengxin

    2016-12-01

    Surface sediment in eutrophic lakes is both a destination and a habitat for overwintering cyanobacteria. The resuspension and recovery of viable, overwintering cyanobacteria from the surface sediment during warm spring weather is usually the primary stage of cyanobacterial blooms (CBs) in shallow eutrophic lakes. Therefore, the elimination of overwintering cyanobacteria in sediment is vital to control CBs. In the present study, sediment plow-tillage (PT) was introduced as an innovative technique for eliminating overwintering cyanobacteria in sediments from Lake Chaohu. Four depths of PT (2, 5, 10, and 15 cm) were tested during the 42-day experiment. The results showed that rapid cell death during the first 0-7 d after PT was accompanied by high oxygen uptake rates. The viable cells in deeper sediment died more quickly and at a higher rate after PT. A PT depth of >10 cm effectively eliminated viable cyanobacteria (with a removal rate of 82.8%) from the sediment and prevented their resuspension. The activity of the viable cyanobacteria also decreased quickly as cyanobacteria were eliminated. It appears that the dark, anoxic environment of the deeper sediment after PT was responsible for the elimination of viable cells. Although high release rates of nitrogen and phosphorus were found to accompany the dying and decomposition of cyanobacteria during days 0-7 of the experiment, greater depth of PT was found to decrease nutrient concentrations in the overlying water. In conclusion, we recommend sediment PT as a new technique for eliminating overwintering algae in sediments. However, the release of nutrients from the sediment and the in situ control of CBs in lakes after PT should be further studied.

  1. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Frauk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2001-08-15

    Research continues on characterizing and modeling the behavior of naturally fractured reservoir systems. Work has progressed on developing techniques for estimating fracture properties from seismic and well log data, developing naturally fractured wellbore models, and developing a model to characterize the transfer of fluid from the matrix to the fracture system for use in the naturally fractured reservoir simulator.

  2. The option to abandon: stimulating innovative groundwater remediation technologies characterized by technological uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Compernolle, T; Van Passel, S; Huisman, K; Kort, P

    2014-10-15

    Many studies on technology adoption demonstrate that uncertainty leads to a postponement of investments by integrating a wait option in the economic analysis. The aim of this study however is to demonstrate how the investment in new technologies can be stimulated by integrating an option to abandon. Furthermore, this real option analysis not only considers the ex ante decision analysis of the investment in a new technology under uncertainty, but also allows for an ex post evaluation of the investment. Based on a case study regarding the adoption of an innovative groundwater remediation strategy, it is demonstrated that when the option to abandon the innovative technology is taken into account, the decision maker decides to invest in this technology, while at the same time it determines an optimal timing to abandon the technology if its operation proves to be inefficient. To reduce uncertainty about the effectiveness of groundwater remediation technologies, samples are taken. Our analysis shows that when the initial belief in an effective innovative technology is low, it is important that these samples provide correct information in order to justify the adoption of the innovative technology.

  3. High-resolution optical spectrum characterization using optical channel estimation and spectrum stitching technique.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chao; Bao, Yuan; Li, Zhaohui; Gui, Tao; Shang, Haiyan; Feng, Xinhuan; Li, Jianping; Yi, Xingwen; Yu, Changyuan; Li, Guifang; Lu, Chao

    2013-07-01

    A technique is proposed to measure the high-resolution and wide-band characterization of amplitude, phase responses, and polarization property of optical components. This technique combines the optical spectrum stitching and optical channel estimation methods. Two kinds of fiber Bragg grating based Fabry-Perot cavities with ultrafine structures have been characterized based on this technique. By using 1024 point fast Fourier transform and a narrow linewidth, wavelength-tunable laser source, a frequency resolution of ~10 MHz is realized with an optical measurement range beyond 250 GHz.

  4. Innovative Inspection Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Typical Headlamps ...................................... 23 Table 5 Typical Personal Flashlights ................................ 24 Table 6 Characteristics...increasingly large volume of constantly changing regulatory and reference materials are among the examples of administrative workload which inspectors referred...and reference materials would provide more benefits than the use of advanced NDT technology in inspections. As a general rule, inspectors felt that

  5. Techniques used for the isolation and characterization of extracellular vesicles: results of a worldwide survey

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Chris; Vizio, Dolores Di; Sahoo, Susmita; Théry, Clotilde; Witwer, Kenneth W.; Wauben, Marca; Hill, Andrew F.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent an important mode of intercellular communication. Research in this field has grown rapidly in the last few years, and there is a plethora of techniques for the isolation and characterization of EVs, many of which are poorly standardized. EVs are heterogeneous in size, origin and molecular constituents, with considerable overlap in size and phenotype between different populations of EVs. Little is known about current practices for the isolation, purification and characterization of EVs. We report here the first large, detailed survey of current worldwide practices for the isolation and characterization of EVs. Conditioned cell culture media was the most widely used material (83%). Ultracentrifugation remains the most commonly used isolation method (81%) with 59% of respondents use a combination of methods. Only 9% of respondents used only 1 characterization method, with others using 2 or more methods. Sample volume, sample type and downstream application all influenced the isolation and characterization techniques employed. PMID:27802845

  6. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Phase 2, Overfire air tests

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.L.; Hooper, M.P.

    1992-07-13

    This Phase 2 Test Report summarizes the testing activities and results for the second testing phase of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The second phase demonstrates the Advanced Overfire Air (AOFA) retrofit with existing Foster Wheeler (FWEC) burners. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data supported by short-term characterization data. Ultimately a fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction target using combinations of combustion modifications has been established for this project.

  7. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.L.; Hooper, M.P. )

    1992-07-13

    This Phase 2 Test Report summarizes the testing activities and results for the second testing phase of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The second phase demonstrates the Advanced Overfire Air (AOFA) retrofit with existing Foster Wheeler (FWEC) burners. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company's Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO[sub x] combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data supported by short-term characterization data. Ultimately a fifty percent NO[sub x] reduction target using combinations of combustion modifications has been established for this project.

  8. Nondestructive techniques for characterizing mechanical properties of structural materials - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Klima, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is presented to indicate the availability and application potentials of techniques for quantitative characterization of the mechanical properties of structural materials. The purpose is to review NDE techniques that go beyond the usual emphasis on flow detection and characterization. Discussed are current and emerging NDE techniques that can verify and monitor entrinsic properties (e.g., tensile, shear, and yield strengths; fracture toughness, hardness, ductility; elastic moduli) and underlying microstructural and morphological factors. Most of the techniques described are, at present, neither widely applied nor widely accepted in commerce and industry because they are still emerging from the laboratory. The limitations of the techniques may be overcome by advances in applications research and instrumentation technology and perhaps by accommodations for their use in the design of structural parts.

  9. Nondestructive techniques for characterizing mechanical properties of structural materials: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Klima, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is presented to indicate the availability and application potentials of techniques for quantitative characterization of the mechanical properties of structural materials. The purpose is to review NDE techniques that go beyond the usual emphasis on flaw detection and characterization. Discussed are current and emerging NDE techniques that can verify and monitor entrinsic properties (e.g., tensile, shear, and yield strengths; fracture toughness, hardness, ductility; elastic moduli) and underlying microstructural and morphological factors. Most of the techniques described are, at present, neither widely applied nor widely accepted in commerce and industry because they are still emerging from the laboratory. The limitations of the techniques may be overcome by advances in applications research and instrumentation technology and perhaps by accommodations for their use in the design of structural parts.

  10. Rapid Screening Technique To Identify Sudan Dyes (I to IV) in Adulterated Tomato Sauce, Chilli Powder, and Palm Oil by Innovative High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sciuto, Simona; Esposito, Giovanna; Dell'Atti, Luana; Guglielmetti, Chiara; Acutis, Pier Luigi; Martucci, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    Sudan dyes are synthetic azo dyes used by industry in a variety of applications. Classified as carcinogenic, they are not allowed in foodstuffs; however, their presence as adulterants in food products has been regularly reported. Here, we describe an innovative screening method to detect Sudan I, II, III, and IV in tomato sauce, palm oil, and chilli powder. The method entails minimal sample preparation, completely avoiding the liquid chromatography phase, followed by detection and identification through atmospheric pressure chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, in positive ionization mode. Analytes were efficiently identified and detected in samples, fortified both with individual analytes and with their mixture, with an error in mass identification less than 5 ppm. Limits of identification of the analytes in the fortified samples were 0.5 to 1 mg/kg, depending on the dye and matrix. The method had a linear range of 0.05 to 5 mg/kg and good linear relationships (R(2) > 0.98). Repeatability was satisfactory, with a coefficient of variation lower than 20%. The method was applied to detect the dyes in real adulterated chilli samples, previously found positive by confirmatory high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and ELISA, and in commercial products purchased from supermarkets. In all positive samples, analytes were correctly identified with an error in mass identification lower than 5 ppm, while none of the 45 commercial samples analyzed were found to be contaminated. The proposed new assay is sensitive, with a limit of identification, for all the three matrices, complying with the limits defined by the European Union (0.5 to 1 mg/kg) for analytical methods. Compared with conventional methods, the new assay is rapid and inexpensive and characterized by a high throughput; thus, it could be suitable as screening technique to identify Sudan dyes in adulterated food products.

  11. Characterization of a sulfadiazine-induced lithiasis calculus by physicochemical techniques.

    PubMed

    Cuervo, C; González, J; Rives, V; Vicente, M A

    2013-03-01

    Currently available information on drug lithiasis usually describes the calculi based on the prescriptions given to the patient, but without a physicochemical characterization of the calculi themselves. We here have applied different, complementary, physicochemical techniques for a complete characterization of an unusual urolithiasis calculus. The calculus was characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, 1H-NMR spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The precise nature of the calculus was identified, being formed by N4-acetylsulfadiazine, so being related to the drugs prescribed to the patient. Analytical techniques widely used in laboratories of Materials Chemistry have proven to be useful tools for characterizing the chemical nature of unusual urolithiasis.

  12. Ultrasound Imaging Techniques for Spatiotemporal Characterization of Composition, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties in Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Deng, Cheri X; Hong, Xiaowei; Stegemann, Jan P

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound techniques are increasingly being used to quantitatively characterize both native and engineered tissues. This review provides an overview and selected examples of the main techniques used in these applications. Grayscale imaging has been used to characterize extracellular matrix deposition, and quantitative ultrasound imaging based on the integrated backscatter coefficient has been applied to estimating cell concentrations and matrix morphology in tissue engineering. Spectral analysis has been employed to characterize the concentration and spatial distribution of mineral particles in a construct, as well as to monitor mineral deposition by cells over time. Ultrasound techniques have also been used to measure the mechanical properties of native and engineered tissues. Conventional ultrasound elasticity imaging and acoustic radiation force imaging have been applied to detect regions of altered stiffness within tissues. Sonorheometry and monitoring of steady-state excitation and recovery have been used to characterize viscoelastic properties of tissue using a single transducer to both deform and image the sample. Dual-mode ultrasound elastography uses separate ultrasound transducers to produce a more potent deformation force to microscale characterization of viscoelasticity of hydrogel constructs. These ultrasound-based techniques have high potential to impact the field of tissue engineering as they are further developed and their range of applications expands.

  13. Towards long lasting zirconia-based composites for dental implants. Part I: innovative synthesis, microstructural characterization and in vitro stability.

    PubMed

    Palmero, Paola; Fornabaio, Marta; Montanaro, Laura; Reveron, Helen; Esnouf, Claude; Chevalier, Jérôme

    2015-05-01

    In order to fulfill the clinical requirements for strong, tough and stable ceramics used in dental applications, we designed and developed innovative zirconia-based composites, in which equiaxial α-Al2O3 and elongated SrAl12O19 phases are dispersed in a ceria-stabilized zirconia matrix. The composite powders were prepared by an innovative surface coating route, in which commercial zirconia powders were coated by inorganic precursors of the second phases, which crystallize on the zirconia particles surface under proper thermal treatment. Samples containing four different ceria contents (in the range 10.0-11.5 mol%) were prepared by carefully tailoring the amount of the cerium precursor during the elaboration process. Slip cast green bodies were sintered at 1450 °C for 1 h, leading to fully dense materials. Characterization of composites by SEM and TEM analyses showed highly homogeneous microstructures with an even distribution of both equiaxial and elongated-shape grains inside a very fine zirconia matrix. Ce content plays a major role on aging kinetics, and should be carefully controlled: sample with 10 mol% of ceria were transformable, whereas above 10.5 mol% there is negligible or no transformation during autoclave treatment. Thus, in this paper we show the potential of the innovative surface coating route, which allows a perfect tailoring of the microstructural, morphological and compositional features of the composites; moreover, its processing costs and environmental impacts are limited, which is beneficial for further scale-up and real use in the biomedical field.

  14. An innovative multi-gap clutch based on magneto-rheological fluids and electrodynamic effects: magnetic design and experimental characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, R.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper an innovative multi-gap magnetorheological clutch is described. It is inspired by a device previously developed by the author’s research group and contains a novel solution based on electrodynamic effects, capable to considerably improve the transmissible torque during the engagement phase. Since this (transient) phase is characterized by a non-zero angular speed between the two clutch shafts, the rotation of a permanent magnets system, used to excite the fluid, induces eddy currents on some conductive material strategically positioned in the device. As a consequence, an electromagnetic torque is produced which is added to the torque transmitted by the magnetorheological fluid only. Once the clutch is completely engaged and the relative speed between the two shafts is zero, the electrodynamic effects vanish and the device operates like a conventional magnetorheological clutch. The system is investigated and designed by means a 3D FEM model and the performance of the device is experimentally validated on a prototype.

  15. A Systematic Characterization of Cognitive Techniques for Learning from Textual and Pictorial Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploetzner, Rolf; Lowe, Richard; Schlag, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Pictorial representations can play a pivotal role in both printed and digital learning material. Although there has been extensive research on cognitive techniques and strategies for learning from text, the same cannot be said for static and dynamic pictorial representations. In this paper we propose a systematic characterization of cognitive…

  16. The maturing of high contrast imaging and starlight suppression techniques for future NASA exoplanet characterization missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulter, Daniel R.; Gallagher, David B.; Siegler, Nicholas; Shaklan, Stuart; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Traub, Wesley A.

    2016-07-01

    Over 3000 exoplanets and hundreds of exoplanetary systems have been detected to date and we are now rapidly moving toward an era where the focus is shifting from detection to direct imaging and spectroscopic characterization of these new worlds and their atmospheres. NASA is currently studying several exoplanet characterization mission concepts for the 2020 Decadal Survey ranging from probe class to flagships. Detailed and comprehensive exoplanet characterization, particularly of exo-Earths, leading to assessment of habitability, or indeed detection of life, will require significant advances beyond the current state-of-the-art in high contrast imaging and starlight suppression techniques which utilize specially shaped precision optical elements to block the light from the parent star while controlling scattering and diffraction thus revealing and enabling spectroscopic study of the orbiting exoplanets in reflected light. In this paper we describe the two primary high contrast starlight suppression techniques currently being pursued by NASA: 1) coronagraphs (including several design variations) and 2) free-flying starshades. These techniques are rapidly moving from the technology development phase to the design and engineering phase and we discuss the prospects and projected performance for future exoplanet characterization missions utilizing these techniques coupled with large aperture telescopes in space.

  17. Characterization Techniques Employed to Determine the Energy Release of Reactive Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    high speed imaging, and radiography , data can be collected and processed to characterize the energy...the event consist of high speed imaging, emission spectroscopy, pyrometry, pressure measurements and radiography . Due to limited space, a series of... process . Three distinct high speed imaging techniques are incorporated into the testing process ; regular high speed , ultra high speed , and high

  18. A rapid feedback characterization technique for polymeric hollow fiber membranes using disperse dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Clausi, D.T.; Koros, W.J.

    1996-12-31

    The morphologies of advanced asymmetric gas separation membranes can be described in terms of porosity, pore size distribution, and pore connectivity. These complex morphologies are generated via a rapid non-solvent induced phase separation process to yield hollow fiber membranes. Manipulation and control of these microscopic features are accomplished through adjustment of an array of spinning process parameters. A serious limitation to research in hollow fiber membrane formation is the lengthy time lag between fiber spinning and the collection of characteristic data for process optimization. This lag time is due to the intensive downstream processing required before gas based permeation measurements can be conducted. A rapid feedback characterization technique will be discussed for use in polymeric hollow fiber membrane spinning applications utilizing commercially available disperse dyes. This technique involves dyeing wet hollow fibers immediately after spinning in an aqueous dye bath. In the present work, polysulfone fibers have been characterized using this method before lengthy downstream processing (i.e. solvent exchange, drying, and post-treatment). Dye uptake in the hollow fibers appears to be a function of skin porosity, thereby allowing quick evaluation of permeation characteristics. Dye uptake was measured both visually and using UV-visible spectrophotometry. Examples of fibers characterized using this technique and relationships between dye uptake and post-treated selectivity are shown and discussed. This technique allows characterization during the fiber spinning process, making on-line optimization of spinning parameters possible.

  19. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Baier, S.; Rochet, A.; Hofmann, G.; Kraut, M.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2015-06-15

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies.

  20. Basalt characterization by means of nuclear and electrical well logging techniques. Case study from Southern Syria.

    PubMed

    Asfahani, Jamal

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear well logging, including natural gamma ray, density, and neutron-porosity techniques are used with electrical well logging of long and short normal techniques to characterize the basaltic areas largely extended in Southern Syria. Statistical analysis approach with the threshold concept has been adapted for such characterization, where four kinds of basalt have been identified: very hard basalt, hard basalt, fractured basalt, and basalt alteration products. The spectrometric gamma technique has also been applied on the retrieved rock samples in order to determine the radioactive content (eU, eTh, and K%) of the basaltic section in the study area. No radioactive anomalies have been detected, the radioactive values are normal and in the expected range.

  1. Nondestructive evaluation techniques for development and characterization of carbon nanotube based superstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Wainwright, Elliot; Williams, Phillip; Siochi, Emile J.

    2015-03-01

    Recently, multiple commercial vendors have developed capability for the production of large-scale quantities of high-quality carbon nanotube sheets and yarns [1]. While the materials have found use in electrical shielding applications, development of structural systems composed of a high volume fraction of carbon nanotubes is still lacking [2]. A recent NASA program seeks to address this by prototyping a structural nanotube composite with strength-to-weight ratio exceeding current state-of-the-art carbon fiber composites. Commercially available carbon nanotube sheets, tapes, and yarns are being processed into high volume fraction carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites. Nondestructive evaluation techniques have been applied throughout this development effort for material characterization and process control. This paper will report on the progress of these efforts, including magnetic characterization of residual catalyst content, Raman scattering characterization of nanotube diameter and nanotube strain, and polarized Raman scattering for characterization of nanotube alignment.

  2. Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques for Development and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Based Superstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Wainwright, Elliot; Williams, Phillip; Siochi, Emile J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, multiple commercial vendors have developed capability for the production of large-scale quantities of high-quality carbon nanotube sheets and yarns. While the materials have found use in electrical shielding applications, development of structural systems composed of a high volume fraction of carbon nanotubes is still lacking. A recent NASA program seeks to address this by prototyping a structural nanotube composite with strength-toweight ratio exceeding current state-of-the-art carbon fiber composites. Commercially available carbon nanotube sheets, tapes, and yarns are being processed into high volume fraction carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites. Nondestructive evaluation techniques have been applied throughout this development effort for material characterization and process control. This paper will report on the progress of these efforts, including magnetic characterization of residual catalyst content, Raman scattering characterization of nanotube diameter, defect ratio, and nanotube strain, and polarized Raman scattering for characterization of nanotube alignment.

  3. Technique for the Characterization of Phospholipid Microbubbles Coatings by Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Owen, Joshua; Stride, Eleanor

    2015-12-01

    Gas microbubbles stabilized by a surfactant or polymer coating are of considerable clinical interest because of their imaging and drug delivery potential under ultrasound exposure. The utility of microbubbles for a given application is intrinsically linked to their structure and stability. These in turn are highly sensitive to coating composition and fabrication techniques. Various methods including fluorescence and atomic force microscopy have been applied to characterize microbubble properties, but direct observation of coating structure at the nanoscale still poses a considerable challenge. Here we describe a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique to observe the surface of microbubbles. Images from a series of phospholipid-coated microbubble systems, including those decorated with nanoparticles, are presented. They indicate that the technique enables visualization of the coating structure, in particular lipid discontinuities and nanoparticle distribution. This information can be used to better understand how microbubble surface structure relates to formulation and/or processing technique and ultimately to functionality.

  4. The thin electrolyte layer approach to corrosion testing of dental materials--characterization of the technique.

    PubMed

    Ledvina, M; Rigney, E D

    1998-12-01

    An innovative technique for corrosion testing of metallic dental materials is introduced. The thin electrolyte layer technique (TET) simulates the physical characteristics of the oral environment by employing a still, thin layer of an electrolyte, in contrast to bulk electrolyte techniques (BET) which utilize relatively large quantities of fluid. Limiting current density tests on a platinum electrode revealed a lower surface oxygen content for TET. Borate buffer (pH 6.8) was employed as an electrolyte. The effect of lower oxygen content in TET on passivation and polarization characteristics of 316L SS in 0.9% saline was investigated. The results revealed differences in the polarization resistance and open circuit potential development with time, as well as in anodic and cathodic polarization behavior. Lower O2 concentration in TET was attributed to different electrolyte convection characteristics under both testing conditions. Additionally, use of the TET resulted in better data reproducibility. Overall, this investigation led to a deeper understanding of the electrochemical processes inherent in thin electrolytes such as those found in the oral environment.

  5. Developing High-Frequency Quantitative Ultrasound Techniques to Characterize Three-Dimensional Engineered Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Karla Patricia E.

    Tissue engineering holds great promise for the repair or replacement of native tissues and organs. Further advancements in the fabrication of functional engineered tissues are partly dependent on developing new and improved technologies to monitor the properties of engineered tissues volumetrically, quantitatively, noninvasively, and nondestructively over time. Currently, engineered tissues are evaluated during fabrication using histology, biochemical assays, and direct mechanical tests. However, these techniques destroy tissue samples and, therefore, lack the capability for real-time, longitudinal monitoring. The research reported in this thesis developed nondestructive, noninvasive approaches to characterize the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of 3-D engineered tissues using high-frequency quantitative ultrasound and elastography technologies. A quantitative ultrasound technique, using a system-independent parameter known as the integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC), was employed to visualize and quantify structural properties of engineered tissues. Specifically, the IBC was demonstrated to estimate cell concentration and quantitatively detect differences in the microstructure of 3-D collagen hydrogels. Additionally, the feasibility of an ultrasound elastography technique called Single Tracking Location Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (STL-ARFI) imaging was demonstrated for estimating the shear moduli of 3-D engineered tissues. High-frequency ultrasound techniques can be easily integrated into sterile environments necessary for tissue engineering. Furthermore, these high-frequency quantitative ultrasound techniques can enable noninvasive, volumetric characterization of the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of engineered tissues during fabrication and post-implantation.

  6. CODEHOP-mediated PCR – A powerful technique for the identification and characterization of viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Timothy M

    2005-01-01

    Consensus-Degenerate Hybrid Oligonucleotide Primer (CODEHOP) PCR primers derived from amino acid sequence motifs which are highly conserved between members of a protein family have proven to be highly effective in the identification and characterization of distantly related family members. Here, the use of the CODEHOP strategy to identify novel viruses and obtain sequence information for phylogenetic characterization, gene structure determination and genome analysis is reviewed. While this review describes techniques for the identification of members of the herpesvirus family of DNA viruses, the same methodology and approach is applicable to other virus families. PMID:15769292

  7. Characterization of thermal desorption with the Deans-switch technique in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Huang, Ying-Xue; Huang, Ting-Jyun; Chen, Yong-Shen; Wang, Chieh-Heng; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2016-09-02

    This study presents a novel application based on the Deans-switch cutting technique to characterize the thermal-desorption (TD) properties for gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Flash-heating of the sorbent bed at high temperatures to desorb trapped VOCs to GC may easily produce severe asymmetric or tailing GC peaks affecting resolution and sensitivity if care is not taken to optimize the TD conditions. The TD peak without GC separation was first examined for the quality of the TD peak by analyzing a standard gas mixture from C2 to C12 at ppb level. The Deans switch was later applied in two different stages. First, it was used to cut the trailing tail of the TD peak, which, although significantly improved the GC peak symmetry, led to more loss of the higher boiling compounds than the low boiling ones, thus suggesting compound discrimination. Subsequently, the Deans switch was used to dissect the TD peak into six 30s slices in series, and an uneven distribution in composition between the slices were found. A progressive decrease in low boiling compounds and increase in higher boiling ones across the slices indicated severe inhomogeneity in the TD profile. This finding provided a clear evidence to answer the discrimination problem found with the tail cutting approach to improve peak symmetry. Through the use of the innovated slicing method based on the Deans-switch cutting technique, optimization of TD injection for highly resolved, symmetric and non-discriminated GC peaks can now be more quantitatively assessed and guided.

  8. JUST in time health emergency interventions: an innovative approach to training the citizen for emergency situations using virtual reality techniques and advanced IT tools (the VR Tool).

    PubMed

    Manganas, A; Tsiknakis, M; Leisch, E; Ponder, M; Molet, T; Herbelin, B; Magnetat-Thalmann, N; Thalmann, D; Fato, M; Schenone, A

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the second of the two systems developed by JUST, a collaborative project supported by the European Union under the Information Society Technologies (IST) Programme. The most innovative content of the project has been the design and development of a complementary training course for non-professional health emergency operators, which supports the traditional learning phase, and which purports to improve the retention capability of the trainees. This was achieved with the use of advanced information technology techniques, which provide adequate support and can help to overcome the present weaknesses of the existing training mechanisms.

  9. JUST in time health emergency interventions: an innovative approach to training the citizen for emergency situations using virtual reality techniques and advanced IT tools (the Web-CD).

    PubMed

    Manganas, A; Tsiknakis, M; Leisch, E; Karefilaki, L; Monsieurs, K; Bossaert, L L; Giorgini, F

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the first of the two systems developed by JUST, a collaborative project supported by the European Union under the Information Society Technologies (IST) Programme. The most innovative content of the project has been the design and development of a complementary training course for non-professional health emergency operators, which supports the traditional learning phase, and which purports to improve the retention capability of the trainees. This was achieved with the use of advanced information technology techniques, which provide adequate support and can help to overcome the present weaknesses of the existing training mechanisms.

  10. Treatment of gummy smile: Gingival recontouring with the containment of the elevator muscle of the upper lip and wing of nose. A surgery innovation technique

    PubMed Central

    Storrer, Carmen Lucia Mueller; Valverde, Fabiane Kristine Bochenek; Santos, Felipe Rychuv; Deliberador, Tatiana Miranda

    2014-01-01

    The containment of the elevator muscle of the upper lip and wing of nose was used for the treatment of patients with gummy smile. This technique had corrected esthetic alterations of smile, reducing the upper lip elevation, which results in a smaller gingival display. An upper lip lengthening as well as a reduction in the upper lip shortening when the patient smiled could be observed. The high smile line was corrected without compromising the labial harmony. This study presents an innovative and effective therapeutic option to obtain a natural and harmonious smile. The patient expressed a high degree of satisfaction. PMID:25425832

  11. Three-dimensional microstructural characterization of bulk plutonium and uranium metals using focused ion beam technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Brandon W.; Erler, Robert G.; Teslich, Nick E.

    2016-03-03

    Nuclear forensics requires accurate quantification of discriminating microstructural characteristics of the bulk nuclear material to identify its process history and provenance. Conventional metallographic preparation techniques for bulk plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) metals are limited to providing information in two-dimension (2D) and do not allow for obtaining depth profile of the material. In this contribution, use of dual-beam focused ion-beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) to investigate the internal microstructure of bulk Pu and U metals is demonstrated. Our results demonstrate that the dual-beam methodology optimally elucidate microstructural features without preparation artifacts, and the three-dimensional (3D) characterization of inner microstructures can reveal salient microstructural features that cannot be observed from conventional metallographic techniques. As a result, examples are shown to demonstrate the benefit of FIB-SEM in improving microstructural characterization of microscopic inclusions, particularly with respect to nuclear forensics.

  12. Three-dimensional microstructural characterization of bulk plutonium and uranium metals using focused ion beam technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Brandon W.; Erler, Robert G.; Teslich, Nick E.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear forensics requires accurate quantification of discriminating microstructural characteristics of the bulk nuclear material to identify its process history and provenance. Conventional metallographic preparation techniques for bulk plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) metals are limited to providing information in two-dimension (2D) and do not allow for obtaining depth profile of the material. In this contribution, use of dual-beam focused ion-beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) to investigate the internal microstructure of bulk Pu and U metals is demonstrated. Our results demonstrate that the dual-beam methodology optimally elucidate microstructural features without preparation artifacts, and the three-dimensional (3D) characterization of inner microstructures can reveal salient microstructural features that cannot be observed from conventional metallographic techniques. Examples are shown to demonstrate the benefit of FIB-SEM in improving microstructural characterization of microscopic inclusions, particularly with respect to nuclear forensics.

  13. Three-dimensional microstructural characterization of bulk plutonium and uranium metals using focused ion beam technique

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Brandon W.; Erler, Robert G.; Teslich, Nick E.

    2016-03-03

    Nuclear forensics requires accurate quantification of discriminating microstructural characteristics of the bulk nuclear material to identify its process history and provenance. Conventional metallographic preparation techniques for bulk plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) metals are limited to providing information in two-dimension (2D) and do not allow for obtaining depth profile of the material. In this contribution, use of dual-beam focused ion-beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) to investigate the internal microstructure of bulk Pu and U metals is demonstrated. Our results demonstrate that the dual-beam methodology optimally elucidate microstructural features without preparation artifacts, and the three-dimensional (3D) characterization of inner microstructures can revealmore » salient microstructural features that cannot be observed from conventional metallographic techniques. As a result, examples are shown to demonstrate the benefit of FIB-SEM in improving microstructural characterization of microscopic inclusions, particularly with respect to nuclear forensics.« less

  14. Spatially-Resolved Characterization Techniques to Investigate Impact Damage in Ultra-High Performance Concretes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    ER D C/ G SL T R -1 3 -1 7 Spatially-Resolved Characterization Techniques to Investigate Impact Damage in Ultra- High Performance...Impact Damage in Ultra- High Performance Concretes Robert D. Moser, Paul G. Allison, and Mei Q. Chandler Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory US...Portland Cement concrete (OPC) and Ultra- High Performance Concretes (UHPCs) under high -strain impact and penetration loads at lower length scales

  15. In Situ Mechanical Testing Techniques for Real-Time Materials Deformation Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Chris; Boesl, Benjamin; Agarwal, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    In situ mechanical property testing has the ability to enhance quantitative characterization of materials by revealing the occurring deformation behavior in real time. This article will summarize select recent testing performed inside a scanning electron microscope on various materials including metals, ceramics, composites, coatings, and 3-Dimensional graphene foam. Tensile and indentation testing methods are outlined with case studies and preliminary data. The benefits of performing a novel double-torsion testing technique in situ are also proposed.

  16. Characterization of nanomaterial dispersion in solution prior to in vitro exposure using dynamic light scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Murdock, Richard C; Braydich-Stolle, Laura; Schrand, Amanda M; Schlager, John J; Hussain, Saber M

    2008-02-01

    The need to characterize nanoparticles in solution before assessing the in vitro toxicity is a high priority. Particle size, size distribution, particle morphology, particle composition, surface area, surface chemistry, and particle reactivity in solution are important factors which need to be defined to accurately assess nanoparticle toxicity. Currently, there are no well-defined techniques for characterization of wet nanomaterials in aqueous or biological solutions. Previously reported nanoparticle characterization techniques in aqueous or biological solutions have consisted of the use of ultra-high illumination light microscopy and disc centrifuge sedimentation; however, these techniques are limited by the measurement size range. The current study focuses on characterizing a wide range of nanomaterials using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy, including metals, metal oxides, and carbon-based materials, in water and cell culture media, with and without serum. Cell viability and cell morphology studies were conducted in conjunction with DLS experiments to evaluate toxicological effects from observed agglomeration changes in the presence or absence of serum in cell culture media. Observations of material-specific surface properties were also recorded. It was also necessary to characterize the impact of sonication, which is implemented to aid in particle dispersion and solution mixture. Additionally, a stock solution of nanomaterials used for toxicology studies was analyzed for changes in agglomeration and zeta potential of the material over time. In summary, our results demonstrate that many metal and metal oxide nanomaterials agglomerate in solution and that depending upon the solution particle agglomeration is either agitated or mitigated. Corresponding toxicity data revealed that the addition of serum to cell culture media can, in some cases, have a significant effect on particle toxicity possibly due to changes in agglomeration

  17. Site and Event Characterization Using the CTBT On-Site Inspection Techniques (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labak, P.; Gaya Pique, L. R.; Rowlands, A. P.; Arndt, R. H.

    2013-12-01

    One of the four elements of the CTBT verification regime is On-Site Inspection (OSI). The sole purpose of an OSI is to clarify whether a nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion has been conducted in violation of the CTBT. An OSI would be conducted within an area no bigger than 1000 km2 and by no more than 40 inspectors at any one time, applying search logic and inspection techniques with the aim of collecting relevant information that will be the basis for the inspection report. During the course of an OSI less intrusive techniques applied over broad areas (usually with lower spatial resolution) are supplemented with more intrusive techniques applied to more targeted areas (usually at a higher spatial resolution). Environmental setting and the evolution of OSI-relevant observables over time will influence the application of OSI techniques. In the course of the development of OSI methodology and relevant techniques, field tests and exercises have been conducted. While earlier activities mainly focused on progress of individual techniques (such as visual observation, passive seismological monitoring for aftershocks and measurements of radioactivity), recent work covered both technique development (such as multi-spectral imaging including infrared measurements, and environmental sampling and analysis of solids, liquids and gases) as well as the integration of techniques, search logic and data flow. We will highlight examples of application of OSI technologies for site and event characterization from recently conducted field tests and exercises and demonstrate the synthesis of techniques and data necessary for the conduct of an OSI.

  18. Characterization of ultrafast hard x-ray pulses for LCLS using gas phase techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertlein, Marcus P.; Kienberger, Reinhard; Adaniya, Hidehito

    2005-05-01

    The availability of ultrafast (sub-100 fs) hard x-ray pulses (E > 1000 eV) promises new experimental opportunities, but also requires new techniques for their use. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is such a source that is expected to provide a high flux of 230 fs monochromatic x-ray photons with energy between 0.8 and 8 keV. Characterization methods for beams with such characteristics still need to be developed. We are presenting several techniques that show promise for the spatial and temporal characterization of ultrafast hard x-rays. They were developed and used at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), and will undergo further testing at the Sub-Picosecond Photon Source (SPPS) at SLAC. Our methods exploit effects such as ultrafast core-hole binding energy changes in atoms after laser excitation, and creation of energy sidebands on Auger electrons that are emitted in a laser field. We have demonstrated the usefulness of these effects on a picosecond time scale, but their use can be extended well into the femtosecond domain. We will also discuss time-of-flight techniques which offer the possibility of nondestructive x-ray spatial mode characterization. Our focus is on gas phase experiments, since they offer the possibility of nondestructive, transparent monitoring of the x-rays, leaving the main beam nearly undisturbed and available for experiments.

  19. Research Techniques Made Simple: Identification and Characterization of Long Noncoding RNA in Dermatological Research.

    PubMed

    Antonini, Dario; Mollo, Maria Rosaria; Missero, Caterina

    2017-03-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a functionally heterogeneous and abundant class of RNAs acting in all cellular compartments that can form complexes with DNA, RNA, and proteins. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing and techniques leading to the identification of DNA-RNA, RNA-RNA, and RNA-protein complexes have allowed the functional characterization of a small set of lncRNAs. However, characterization of the full repertoire of lncRNAs playing essential roles in a number of normal and dysfunctional cellular processes remains an important goal for future studies. Here we describe the most commonly used techniques to identify lncRNAs, and to characterize their biological functions. In addition, we provide examples of these techniques applied to cutaneous research in healthy skin, that is, epidermal differentiation, and in diseases such as cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas and psoriasis. As with protein-coding RNA transcripts, lncRNAs are differentially regulated in disease, and can serve as novel biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of skin diseases.

  20. State-of-the-art characterization techniques for advanced lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jun; Wu, Tianpin; Amine, Khalil

    2017-03-01

    To meet future needs for industries from personal devices to automobiles, state-of-the-art rechargeable lithium-ion batteries will require both improved durability and lowered costs. To enhance battery performance and lifetime, understanding electrode degradation mechanisms is of critical importance. Various advanced in situ and operando characterization tools developed during the past few years have proven indispensable for optimizing battery materials, understanding cell degradation mechanisms, and ultimately improving the overall battery performance. Here we review recent progress in the development and application of advanced characterization techniques such as in situ transmission electron microscopy for high-performance lithium-ion batteries. Using three representative electrode systems—layered metal oxides, Li-rich layered oxides and Si-based or Sn-based alloys—we discuss how these tools help researchers understand the battery process and design better battery systems. We also summarize the application of the characterization techniques to lithium-sulfur and lithium-air batteries and highlight the importance of those techniques in the development of next-generation batteries.

  1. A new surface characterization technique: RIMAPS (Rotated Image with Maximum Average Power Spectrum).

    PubMed

    Fuentes, N O; Favret, E A

    2002-04-01

    This work introduces a new imaging technique, Rotated Image with Maximum Average Power Spectrum (RIMAPS), for use in determining orientation and characteristics of surface topography. It consists of computing the maximum value of the averaged power spectrum, given by one step of the two-dimensional Fourier transform, for each angle of rotation of a digitized image. The basic measurement science of this technique is described and different cases are studied. The characterization of simple geometrical figures explains the meaning of peaks and their angular positions given by RIMAPS analysis. A known surface pattern made on a sample of pure copper, mechanically ground, is used to study reproducibility, dependence on image quality and topography scale relative to pixel size and magnification. Samples of pure zinc, mechanically ground and chemically etched, were used to show the main features of RIMAPS analysis when characterizing a more complicated pattern on a real surface. All the studies performed under different conditions for observation and acquisition of images give strong evidence of the stability and robustness of RIMAPS as a technique for the characterization of topography.

  2. Isolation, Identification, and Characterization of One Degradation Product in Ambroxol by HPLC-Hyphenated Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Thummala, Veera Raghava Raju; Ivaturi, Mrutyunjaya Rao; Nittala, Someswara Rao

    2014-01-01

    This study details the isolation, identification, and characterization of ambroxol’s unknown impurity. One unknown impurity of ambroxol was formed in the formulated drug under stress conditions [40°C /75% relative humidity (RH) for 6 months] with the relative retention time (RRT) 0.68 in RP-HPLC. The impurity was enriched by exposing it to heat and it was isolated by using preparative HPLC. The enriched impurity was purified and characterized using the following sophisticated techniques: 2D NMR (gDQ-COSY, gHSQC, and gHMBC), FTIR, and LC-MS/MS. On the basis of the spectral data, the impurity was characterized as trans-4-(6,8-dibromoquinazolin-3(4H)-yl)cyclohexanol. PMID:24959402

  3. Parametric techniques for characterizing myocardial tissue by magnetic resonance imaging (part 1): T1 mapping.

    PubMed

    Perea Palazón, R J; Ortiz Pérez, J T; Prat González, S; de Caralt Robira, T M; Cibeira López, M T; Solé Arqués, M

    2016-01-01

    The development of myocardial fibrosis is a common process in the appearance of ventricular dysfunction in many heart diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to accurately evaluate the structure and function of the heart, and its role in the macroscopic characterization of myocardial fibrosis by late enhancement techniques has been widely validated clinically. Recent studies have demonstrated that T1-mapping techniques can quantify diffuse myocardial fibrosis and the expansion of the myocardial extracellular space in absolute terms. However, further studies are necessary to validate the usefulness of this technique in the early detection of tissue remodeling at a time when implementing early treatment would improve a patient's prognosis. This article reviews the state of the art for T1 mapping of the myocardium, its clinical applications, and its limitations.

  4. Endoscopic Debridement for Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciitis: An Innovative Technique and Prospective Study of 46 Consecutive Patients.

    PubMed

    Cottom, James M; Maker, Jared M; Richardson, Phillip; Baker, Joseph S

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is one the most common pathologies treated by foot and ankle surgeons. When nonoperative therapy fails, surgical intervention might be warranted. Various surgical procedures are available for the treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. The most common surgical management typically consists of open versus endoscopic plantar fascia release. Comorbidities associated with the release of the plantar fascia have been documented, including lateral column overload and metatarsalgia. We present an innovative technique for this painful condition that is minimally invasive, allows visualization of the plantar fascia, and maintains the integrity of the fascia. Our hypothesis was that the use of endoscopic debridement of the plantar fascia with or without heel spur resection would provide a minimally invasive technique with acceptable patient outcomes.

  5. The innovative safe fixative for histology, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry techniques: "pilot study using shellac alcoholic solution fixative".

    PubMed

    Ali Jamal, Awatif; Abd El-Aziz, Gamal Said; Hamdy, Raid Mahmoud; Al-Hayani, Abdulmonem; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah

    2014-05-01

    The concerns over health and workplace hazards of formalin fixative, joined to its cross-linking of molecular groups that results in suboptimal immunohistochemistry, led us to search for an innovative safe fixative. Shellac is a natural material which is used as a preservative in foods and pharmaceutical industries. This study was undertaken to evaluate the fixation adequacy and staining quality of histopathological specimens fixed in the "shellac alcoholic solution" (SAS), and also to determine the validity of immunohistochemical staining of SAS-fixed material in comparison to those fixed in formalin. Fresh samples from 26 cases from various human tissues were collected at the frozen section room of King Abdulaziz University Hospital, and fixed in SAS fixative or in neutral buffered formaldehyde (NBF) for 12, 18, 24, and 48 h, and processed for paraffin sectioning. Deparaffinized sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and immunostained for different antigens. The tissues fixed in SAS for >18 h showed best staining quality of H&E comparable to NBF-fixed tissues. Comparison of the immunohistochemical staining of different tissues yielded nearly equivalent readings with good positive nuclear staining quality in both fixatives. These findings support the fixation and preservation adequacy of SAS. Furthermore, it was concluded that the good staining quality obtained with SAS-fixed tissues, which was more or less comparable with the quality obtained with the formalin fixed tissues, supports the validity of this new solution as a good innovative fixative.

  6. Structural characterization of low level degradants in aztreonam injection and an innovative approach to aid HPLC method validation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qingmei; Ding, Wei; Rinaldi, Frank; Huang, Yande; Miller, Scott A; Bolgar, Mark

    2016-05-30

    Three new degradants have been identified from drug product and active pharmaceutical ingredient stability samples of aztreonam, a marketed synthetic monocyclic beta-lactam antibiotic. The degradants were detected following the implementation of a new, more selective HPLC method for the determination of impurities and degradants. The new method was developed in response to changes in the regulatory requirement for mature products. Two of the new unknown Degradants (I and II) were observed in chromatograms from stability samples of aztreonam injection. The third new Degradant (III) was observed during a stability study of the aztreonam active pharmaceutical ingredient. These degradants were structurally characterized. A small amount (ca. 1-3mg) of each degradant was isolated via preparative HPLC for structure elucidation using accurate MS, one and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The small amount of each NMR sample was then reused as a standard for HPLC purity/impurity method validation. Their exact concentrations were determined using quantitative NMR which enabled the execution of the quantitative elements of the HPLC method validation. This innovative approach eliminated the need to isolate or synthesize larger quantities of markers for HPLC/UV method validation, thus saving significant time and reducing costs.

  7. X-ray Scattering Techniques for Characterization of Nanosystems in Lifescience

    SciTech Connect

    Saw, C K

    2005-04-11

    The intent of this chapter is to provide the basics of using x-ray diffraction techniques in order to obtain information on the structure and morphology of the nanosystems, and also to point out some of its strengths and weaknesses when compare to other characterization techniques. X-ray scattering examines over a wide range of density domains from a tenth to a thousandth angstrom. Essentially, this covers a whole range of condensed matter, including the structure and morphology of nanosystems, particularly useful for examining nanostructures in lifescience. This range of domain size requires both the wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) and small-angle (SAXS) x-ray scattering techniques. Roughly WAXS covers from 2 nm down, and SAXS covers from .5 nm to 100 nm and possibly 1,000 nm for a finely tuned instrument. Brief theoretical description of both WAXS and SAXS will be given in this chapter. WAXS, by itself is a powerful technique in providing information on the crystallographic structure or lack of structure, atomic positions and sizes in a unit cell, to some extend, chemical compositions and as well as chemical stoichiometry. Examples of such experiments will also be given. In order to be able to describe the technique of x-ray scattering, some historical and theoretical background will be given in the hope of making this subject interesting and simple.

  8. Frequency-domain Harman technique for rapid characterization of bulk and thin film thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Samuel

    Nanostructured thermoelectrics, often in the form of thin films, may potentially improve the generally poor efficiency of bulk thermoelectric power generators and coolers. In order to characterize the efficiency of these new materials it is necessary to measure their thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT. The only direct measurement of ZT is based on the Harman technique and relies on measuring the voltage drop across a sample subjected to a passing continuous current. Application of this technique to thin films is currently carried out as a time-domain measurement of the voltage as the thermal component decays after switching off an applied voltage. This work develops a technique for direct simultaneous measurement of figure of merit and Seebeck coefficient from the harmonic response of a thermoelectric material under alternating current excitation. A thermocouple mounted on the top surface measures voltage across the device as the frequency of the applied voltage is varied. A thermal model allows the sample thermal conductivity to also be determined and shows good agreement with measurements. This technique provides improved signal-to-noise ratio and accuracy compared to time-domain ZT measurements for comparable conditions while simultaneously measuring Seebeck coefficient. The technique is applied to both bulk and thin film thermoelectric samples.

  9. A Study of undulator magnets characterization using the Vibrating Wire technique

    SciTech Connect

    Temnykh, Alexander; Levashov, Yurii; Wolf, Zachary; /SLAC

    2011-02-07

    The vibrating wire (VW) technique employs a stretched wire as a magnetic field sensor. Because of the wire's small diameter ({approx}0.1mm or smaller) and because the wire can be supported from outside the magnet, this technique is very appealing for field measurements in small gap/bore undulators with small good field regions and with limited access to the tested field. In addition, in the case of elliptical undulators in which Hall probe (HP) measurements can be affected by the planar Hall effect, VW technique can be used as an independent method to verify and supplement HP measurements. In this article we studied the potential of the VW technique for measurement of magnetic field errors and for prediction of beam trajectories in undulator magnets using a 3.8m long LCLS undulator as a test bench. Introducing calibrated magnetic field distortion at various locations, we measured the sensitivity and spatial resolution of the method. The method demonstrated 0.9mm spatial resolution at a distance up to a few meters and 0.37Gcm sensitivity to the field integral. To compare Hall probe and Vibrating wire measurements side-by-side, we measured field errors in an LCLS undulator previously characterized by Hall probe measurements. The field errors found with the Vibrating Wire technique appeared to be in good agreement with errors measured with the Hall probe. Beam trajectory distortions calculated from both data sets are also in a good agreement.

  10. X-ray wavefront characterization using a rotating shearing interferometer technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongchang; Sawhney, Kawal; Berujon, Sébastien; Ziegler, Eric; Rutishauser, Simon; David, Christian

    2011-08-15

    A fast and accurate method to characterize the X-ray wavefront by rotating one of the two gratings of an X-ray shearing interferometer is described and investigated step by step. Such a shearing interferometer consists of a phase grating mounted on a rotation stage, and an absorption grating used as a transmission mask. The mathematical relations for X-ray Moiré fringe analysis when using this device are derived and discussed in the context of the previous literature assumptions. X-ray beam wavefronts without and after X-ray reflective optical elements have been characterized at beamline B16 at Diamond Light Source (DLS) using the presented X-ray rotating shearing interferometer (RSI) technique. It has been demonstrated that this improved method allows accurate calculation of the wavefront radius of curvature and the wavefront distortion, even when one has no previous information on the grating projection pattern period, magnification ratio and the initial grating orientation. As the RSI technique does not require any a priori knowledge of the beam features, it is suitable for routine characterization of wavefronts of a wide range of radii of curvature.

  11. X-ray wavefront characterization using a rotating shearing interferometer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchang; Sawhney, Kawal; Berujon, Sébastien; Ziegler, Eric; Rutishauser, Simon; David, Christian

    2011-08-01

    A fast and accurate method to characterize the X-ray wavefront by rotating one of the two gratings of an X-ray shearing interferometer is described and investigated step by step. Such a shearing interferometer consists of a phase grating mounted on a rotation stage, and an absorption grating used as a transmission mask. The mathematical relations for X-ray Moiré fringe analysis when using this device are derived and discussed in the context of the previous literature assumptions. X-ray beam wavefronts without and after X-ray reflective optical elements have been characterized at beamline B16 at Diamond Light Source (DLS) using the presented X-ray rotating shearing interferometer (RSI) technique. It has been demonstrated that this improved method allows accurate calculation of the wavefront radius of curvature and the wavefront distortion, even when one has no previous information on the grating projection pattern period, magnification ratio and the initial grating orientation. As the RSI technique does not require any a priori knowledge of the beam features, it is suitable for routine characterization of wavefronts of a wide range of radii of curvature.

  12. Steering charge kinetics in photocatalysis: intersection of materials syntheses, characterization techniques and theoretical simulations.

    PubMed

    Bai, Song; Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Qun; Xiong, Yujie

    2015-05-21

    Charge kinetics is highly critical in determining the quantum efficiency of solar-to-chemical conversion in photocatalysis, and this includes, but is not limited to, the separation of photoexcited electron-hole pairs, utilization of plasmonic hot carriers and delivery of photo-induced charges to reaction sites, as well as activation of reactants by energized charges. In this review, we highlight the recent progress on probing and steering charge kinetics toward designing highly efficient photocatalysts and elucidate the fundamentals behind the combinative use of controlled synthesis, characterization techniques (with a focus on spectroscopic characterizations) and theoretical simulations in photocatalysis studies. We first introduce the principles of various processes associated with charge kinetics that account for or may affect photocatalysis, from which a set of parameters that are critical to photocatalyst design can be summarized. We then outline the design rules for photocatalyst structures and their corresponding synthetic approaches. The implementation of characterization techniques and theoretical simulations in different steps of photocatalysis, together with the associated fundamentals and working mechanisms, are also presented. Finally, we discuss the challenges and opportunities for photocatalysis research at this unique intersection as well as the potential impact on other research fields.

  13. Characterization and separation of ash from CANMET coprocessing residue by oil phase agglomeration techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Majid, A.; Coleman, R.D.; Toll, R.; Pleizier, G.; Deslandes, Y.; Sparks, B.D.; Ikura, M.

    1993-12-31

    CANMET`s coal/heavy oil coprocessing unit yields a solid residue that contains most of the ash originally associated with the feed coal as well as reacted catalyst solids. Removal of these ash solids would make it possible to recycle the material to extinction, thereby increasing production of lighter oils. In this investigation the authors have used surface characterization techniques such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDXA) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to characterize toluene insoluble solids associated with the pitch residue, in order to evaluate the separation potential using oil phase agglomeration techniques. Washability studies using float-sink tests were also carried out to determine empirically the level of ash separation attainable. Based on the results of these studies several tests were carried out to beneficiate the organic matter in the residue pitch, by using liquid phase agglomeration techniques. Levels of ash rejection in these tests ranged from 20% to 40%. SEM and EDXA analysis of the agglomerated product and the reject material and Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) analysis of the ash from both materials suggest that most of the iron from added catalyst is retained in the agglomerates.

  14. A review of the different techniques for solid surface acid-base characterization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chenhang; Berg, John C

    2003-09-18

    In this work, various techniques for solid surface acid-base (AB) characterization are reviewed. Different techniques employ different scales to rank acid-base properties. Based on the results from literature and the authors' own investigations for mineral oxides, these scales are compared. The comparison shows that Isoelectric Point (IEP), the most commonly used AB scale, is not a description of the absolute basicity or acidity of a surface, but a description of their relative strength. That is, a high IEP surface shows more basic functionality comparing with its acidic functionality, whereas a low IEP surface shows less basic functionality comparing with its acidic functionality. The choice of technique and scale for AB characterization depends on the specific application. For the cases in which the overall AB property is of interest, IEP (by electrokinetic titration) and H(0,max) (by indicator dye adsorption) are appropriate. For the cases in which the absolute AB property is of interest such as in the study of adhesion, it is more pertinent to use chemical shift (by XPS) and the heat of adsorption of probe gases (by calorimetry or IGC).

  15. Region-growing technique adapted to precise microcalcification characterization in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darboux, Michel; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Nicolas, Eric

    1996-11-01

    The early detection of breast cancer is essential for increasing the survival rate of the disease. Today, mammography is the only breast screening technique capable of detecting breast cancer at a very early stage. The presence of a breast tumor is indicated by some features on the mammogram. One sign of malignancy is the presence of clusters of fine, granular microcalcifications. We present here a three-step method for detecting and characterizing these microcalcifications. We begin with the detection of potential candidates. The aim of this first step is to detect all the pixels that could be a microcalcification. Then we focus on our specific region growing technique which provides an accurate extraction of the shape of the region corresponding to each detected growing technique which provides an accurate extraction of the shape of the region corresponding to each detected seed. This second step is essential because microcalcifications shape is a very important feature for the diagnosis. It is then possible to determine precise parameters to characterize these microcalcifications. This three-step method has been evaluated on a set of images form the mammographic image analysis society database.

  16. Off-label innovation: characterization through a case study of rhBMP-2 for spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Schnurman, Zane; Smith, Michael L; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Off-label therapies are widely used in clinical practice by spinal surgeons. Some patients and practitioners have advocated for increased regulation of their use, and payers have increasingly questioned reimbursment for off-label therapies. In this study, the authors applied a model that quantifies publication data to analyze the developmental process from initial on-label use to off-label innovation, using as an example recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) because of its wide off-label use. METHODS As a case study of off-label innovation, the developmental patterns of rhBMP-2 from FDA-approved use for anterior lumbar interbody fusion to several of its off-label uses, including posterolateral lumbar fusion, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, and posterior lumbar interbody fusion/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, were evaluated using the "progressive scholarly acceptance" (PSA) model. In this model, PSA is used as an end point indicating acceptance of a therapy or procedure by the relevant scientific community and is reached when the total number of peer-reviewed studies devoted to refinement or improvement of a therapy surpasses the total number assessing initial efficacy. Report characteristics, including the number of patients studied and study design, were assessed in addition to the time to and pattern of community acceptance, and results compared with previous developmental study findings. Disclosures and reported conflicts of interest for all articles were reviewed, and these data were also used in the analysis. RESULTS Publication data indicated that the acceptance of rhBMP-2 off-label therapies occurred more rapidly and with less evidence than previously studied on-label therapies. Additionally, the community appeared to respond more robustly (by rapidly changing publication patterns) to reports of adverse events than to new questions of efficacy. CONCLUSIONS The development of off-label therapies, including the

  17. The multianalyser system of the three axes neutron spectrometer PUMA: Pilot experiments with the innovative multiplex technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, Oleg; Hoffmann, Ron; Gibhardt, Holger; Jünke, Norbert; Knorr, Andreas; Meyer, Volker; Eckold, Götz

    2015-02-01

    A new type of multiplex technique for three axes neutron spectrometers has been realized and successfully commissioned at the PUMA spectrometer at FRM II. Consisting of eleven analyser-detector channels which can be configured individually, this technique is especially suitable for kinetic experiments where a single excitation spectrum is recorded as a function of time without the need to move the spectrometer. On a time-scale of seconds an entire spectrum can be recorded thus allowing users to monitor changes during fast kinetic processes in single shot experiments without the need for stroboscopic techniques. Moreover, the multianalyser system provides an efficient and rapid tool for mapping excitations in (Q,ω)-space. The results of pilot experiments demonstrate the performance of this new technique and a user-friendly software is presented which assists users during their experiments.

  18. Innovations and techniques for balloon-enteroscope-assisted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with altered gastrointestinal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Okuwaki, Kosuke; Miyazawa, Shiro; Iwai, Tomohisa; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) remains challenging in patients who have undergone surgical reconstruction of the intestine. Recently, many studies have reported that balloon-enteroscope-assisted ERCP (BEA-ERCP) is a safe and effective procedure. However, further improvements in outcomes and the development of simplified procedures are required. Percutaneous treatment, Laparoscopy-assisted ERCP, endoscopic ultrasound-guided anterograde intervention, and open surgery are effective treatments. However, treatment should be noninvasive, effective, and safe. We believe that these procedures should be performed only in difficult-to-treat patients because of many potential complications. BEA-ERCP still requires high expertise-level techniques and is far from a routinely performed procedure. Various techniques have been proposed to facilitate scope insertion (insertion with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) rendezvous technique, Short type single-balloon enteroscopes with passive bending section, Intraluminal injection of indigo carmine, CO2 inflation guidance), cannulation (PTBD or percutaneous transgallbladder drainage rendezvous technique, Dilation using screw drill, Rendezvous technique combining DBE with a cholangioscope, endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous technique), and treatment (overtube-assisted technique, Short type balloon enteroscopes) during BEA-ERCP. The use of these techniques may allow treatment to be performed by BEA-ERCP in many patients. A standard procedure for ERCP yet to be established for patients with a reconstructed intestine. At present, BEA-ERCP is considered the safest and most effective procedure and is therefore likely to be recommended as first-line treatment. In this article, we discuss the current status of BEA-ERCP in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy. PMID:26074685

  19. The German collaborative project SUGAR Utilization of a natural treasure - Developing innovative techniques for the exploration and production of natural gas from hydrate-bearing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeckel, M.; Bialas, J.; Wallmann, K. J.

    2009-12-01

    Gas hydrates occur in nature at all active and passive continental margins as well as in permafrost regions, and vast amounts of natural gas are bound in those deposits. Geologists estimate that twice as much carbon is bound in gas hydrates than in any other fossil fuel reservoir, such as gas, oil and coal. Hence, natural gas hydrates represent a huge potential energy resource that, in addition, could be utilized in a CO2-neutral and therefore environmentally friendly manner. However, the utilization of this natural treasure is not as easy as the conventional production of oil or natural gas and calls for new and innovative techniques. In the framework of the large-scale collaborative research project SUGAR (Submarine Deposits of Gas Hydrates - Exploration, Production and Transportation), we aim to produce gas from methane hydrates and to sequester carbon dioxide from power plants and other industrial sources as CO2 hydrates in the same host sediments. Thus, the SUGAR project addresses two of the most pressing and challenging topics of our time: development of alternative energy strategies and greenhouse gas mitigation techniques. The SUGAR project is funded by two federal German ministries and the German industry for an initial period of three years. In the framework of this project new technologies starting from gas hydrate exploration techniques over drilling technologies and innovative gas production methods to CO2 storage in gas hydrates and gas transportation technologies will be developed and tested. Beside the performance of experiments, numerical simulation studies will generate data regarding the methane production and CO2 sequestration in the natural environment. Reservoir modelling with respect to gas hydrate formation and development of migration pathways complete the project. This contribution will give detailed information about the planned project parts and first results with focus on the production methods.

  20. Characterization of the histone methyltransferase PRDM9 using biochemical, biophysical and chemical biology techniques.

    PubMed

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Poulsen, Anders; Li, Rong; Tan, Yvonne; Shim, Yoonjung; Min, Jung-Hyun; Wu, Liling; Ngo, Anna; Peng, Jianhe; Seetoh, Wei Guang; Cao, Jing; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Hung, Alvin; Lakshmanan, Umayal; Flotow, Horst; Guccione, Ernesto; Hill, Jeffrey

    2014-07-15

    PRDM proteins have emerged as important regulators of disease and developmental processes. To gain insight into the mechanistic actions of the PRDM family, we have performed comprehensive characterization of a prototype member protein, the histone methyltransferase PRDM9, using biochemical, biophysical and chemical biology techniques. In the present paper we report the first known molecular characterization of a PRDM9-methylated recombinant histone octamer and the identification of new histone substrates for the enzyme. A single C321P mutant of the PR/SET domain was demonstrated to significantly weaken PRDM9 activity. Additionally, we have optimized a robust biochemical assay amenable to high-throughput screening to facilitate the generation of small-molecule chemical probes for this protein family. The present study has provided valuable insight into the enzymology of an intrinsically active PRDM protein.

  1. Design and optimization of stepped austempered ductile iron using characterization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández-Rivera, J.L.; Garay-Reyes, C.G.; Campos-Cambranis, R.E.; Cruz-Rivera, J.J.

    2013-09-15

    Conventional characterization techniques such as dilatometry, X-ray diffraction and metallography were used to select and optimize temperatures and times for conventional and stepped austempering. Austenitization and conventional austempering time was selected when the dilatometry graphs showed a constant expansion value. A special heat color-etching technique was applied to distinguish between the untransformed austenite and high carbon stabilized austenite which had formed during the treatments. Finally, it was found that carbide precipitation was absent during the stepped austempering in contrast to conventional austempering, on which carbide evidence was found. - Highlights: • Dilatometry helped to establish austenitization and austempering parameters. • Untransformed austenite was present even for longer processing times. • Ausferrite formed during stepped austempering caused important reinforcement effect. • Carbide precipitation was absent during stepped treatment.

  2. Characterization of failure modes in deep UV and deep green LEDs utilizing advanced semiconductor localization techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Miller, Mary A.; Cole, Edward Isaac, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    We present the results of a two-year early career LDRD that focused on defect localization in deep green and deep ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs). We describe the laser-based techniques (TIVA/LIVA) used to localize the defects and interpret data acquired. We also describe a defect screening method based on a quick electrical measurement to determine whether defects should be present in the LEDs. We then describe the stress conditions that caused the devices to fail and how the TIVA/LIVA techniques were used to monitor the defect signals as the devices degraded and failed. We also describe the correlation between the initial defects and final degraded or failed state of the devices. Finally we show characterization results of the devices in the failed conditions and present preliminary theories as to why the devices failed for both the InGaN (green) and AlGaN (UV) LEDs.

  3. Evaluation of remote sensing and automatic data techniques for characterization of wetlands. [Atchafalaya River Basin, Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartmill, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    This investigation has been conducted in the Atchafalaya River Basin of South Central Louisiana. This is a humid area of heavily forested swamps with a large volume of flow mostly from a diversion of the lower Mississippi River. Techniques to obtain enlarged imagery from computer compatible tapes of ERTS data without photographic enlargement is explained and illustrated. Techniques of extraction of environmental information from single bands and multiband pattern recognition procedures are explained and evaluated. A comparison of pattern recognition classifications of the Atchafalaya Basin by aircraft multispectral scanner and ERTS MSS data is made. Data for this comparison were gathered within three weeks of each other in the winter of 1973. Scorecards of the accuracy of the classifications are presented. Recommendations are made concerning the utilization of each sensor platform to perform specific tasks of wetlands characterization.

  4. PDMS droplet formation and characterization by hydrodynamic flow focusing technique in a PDMS square microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, J.; Doutel, E.; Campos, J. B. L. M.; Miranda, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    This study reports the generation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) droplets by hydrodynamic flow focusing technique in a PDMS square microchannel. The droplet generation was characterized and a flow regime map addressed by the capillary numbers of each phase was assembled. Different flow regimes were found—dripping, jetting, threading and viscous displacement and the respective boundaries were sketched. Droplet size, breakup distance and formation frequency were analysed and quantified for the jetting and dripping regimes. The dripping regime showed better results for droplet formation, leading to the highest throughput of monodisperse droplets: formation frequency of  ≈12 Hz and droplets almost uniform in size (2.8% the coefficient of variance). The qualitative analysis and quantitative measurement of the different variables and their correlation within a capillary dependent regime map proved to be an invaluable tool to study droplet formation by hydrodynamic flow focusing technique in a PDMS square microchannel.

  5. Application of magnetoacoustic emission technique to temper embrittlement characterization of HY-80 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denale, R.; Namkung, M.; Todhunter, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic phenomena associated with the use of the magnetoacoustic emission technique for the temper embrittlement characterization of HY-80 steel are investigated in an attempt to explain some peculiarities observed in highly embrittled HY-80 samples. In particular, attention is given to the effects of the ac magnetic field frequency and shape. The peak amplitude of the magnetoacoustic burst, which is directly related to the width of the pulse height distribution, is shown to be a critical parameter in the determination of the degree of temper embrittlement in the steel.

  6. A review of electrical characterization techniques for ultrathin FDSOI materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristoloveanu, Sorin; Bawedin, Maryline; Ionica, Irina

    2016-03-01

    The characterization of nanosize SOI materials and devices is challenging because multiple oxides, interfaces and channels coexist. Conventional measurement methods need to be replaced, or at least updated. We review the routine techniques that proved efficient for the evaluation of bare SOI wafers (essentially the pseudo-MOSFET) and of MOS structures (transistors and gated diodes). Informative examples are selected to illustrate the typical properties of advanced SOI wafers and MOSFETs. We will show how the ultrathin film and short-channel effects affect the interpretation of the experimental data.

  7. Characterization of copper selenide thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mamun; Islam, A. B. M. O.

    2004-11-01

    A low-cost chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique has been used for the preparation of Cu2-xSe thin films onto glass substrates and deposited films were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis spectrophotometry. Good quality thin films of smooth surface of copper selenide thin films were deposited using sodium selenosulfate as a source of selenide ions. The structural and optical behaviour of the films are discussed in the light of the observed data.

  8. Whole body MRI: Improved Lesion Detection and Characterization With Diffusion Weighted Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Attariwala, Rajpaul; Picker, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is an established functional imaging technique that interrogates the delicate balance of water movement at the cellular level. Technological advances enable this technique to be applied to whole-body MRI. Theory, b-value selection, common artifacts and target to background for optimized viewing will be reviewed for applications in the neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis. Whole-body imaging with DWI allows novel applications of MRI to aid in evaluation of conditions such as multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and skeletal metastases, while the quantitative nature of this technique permits evaluation of response to therapy. Persisting signal at high b-values from restricted hypercellular tissue and viscous fluid also permits applications of DWI beyond oncologic imaging. DWI, when used in conjunction with routine imaging, can assist in detecting hemorrhagic degradation products, infection/abscess, and inflammation in colitis, while aiding with discrimination of free fluid and empyema, while limiting the need for intravenous contrast. DWI in conjunction with routine anatomic images provides a platform to improve lesion detection and characterization with findings rivaling other combined anatomic and functional imaging techniques, with the added benefit of no ionizing radiation. PMID:23960006

  9. A preliminary evaluation of certain NDA techniques for RH-TRU characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwell, J.K.; Yoon, W.Y.; Peterson, H.K.

    1997-11-01

    This report presents the results of modeling efforts to evaluate selected NDA assay methods for RH-TRU waste characterization. The target waste stream was Content Code 104/107 113-liter waste drums that comprise the majority of the INEL`s RH-TRU waste inventory. Two NDA techniques are treated in detail. One primary NDA technique examined is gamma-ray spectrometry to determine the drum fission and activation product content, and fuel sample inventory calculations using the ORIGEN code to predict the total drum inventory. A heavily shielded and strongly collimated HPGe spectrometer system was designed using MCNP modeling. Detection limits and expected precision of this approach were estimated by a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and synthetic gamma-ray spectrum generation. This technique may allow the radionuclide content of these wastes to be determined with relative standard deviations of 20 to 50% depending on the drum matrix and radionuclide. The INEL Passive/Active Neutron (PAN) assay system is the second primary technique considered. A shielded overpack for the 113-liter CC104/107 RH-TRU drums was designed to shield the PAN detectors from excessive gamma radiation. MCNP modeling suggests PAN detection limits of about 0.06 g {sup 235}U and 0.04 g {sup 239}Pu during active assays. 12 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. M-BAND IMAGING OF THE HR 8799 PLANETARY SYSTEM USING AN INNOVATIVE LOCI-BASED BACKGROUND SUBTRACTION TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    Galicher, Raphael; Marois, Christian; Macintosh, Bruce; Konopacky, Quinn; Barman, Travis

    2011-10-01

    Multi-wavelength observations/spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres are the basis of the emerging exciting field of comparative exoplanetology. The HR 8799 planetary system is an ideal laboratory to study our current knowledge gap between massive field brown dwarfs and the cold 5 Gyr old solar system planets. The HR 8799 planets have so far been imaged at J- to L-band, with only upper limits available at M-band. We present here deep high-contrast Keck II adaptive optics M-band observations that show the imaging detection of three of the four currently known HR 8799 planets. Such detections were made possible due to the development of an innovative LOCI-based background subtraction scheme that is three times more efficient than a classical median background subtraction for Keck II AO data, representing a gain in telescope time of up to a factor of nine. These M-band detections extend the broadband photometric coverage out to {approx}5 {mu}m and provide access to the strong CO fundamental absorption band at 4.5 {mu}m. The new M-band photometry shows that the HR 8799 planets are located near the L/T-type dwarf transition, similar to what was found by other studies. We also confirm that the best atmospheric fits are consistent with low surface gravity, dusty, and non-equilibrium CO/CH{sub 4} chemistry models.

  11. M-band imaging of the HR 8799 planetary system using an innovative LOCI-based background subtraction technique

    DOE PAGES

    Galicher, Raphael; Marois, Christian; Macintosh, Bruce; ...

    2011-09-02

    Multi-wavelength observations/spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres are the basis of the emerging exciting field of comparative exoplanetology. The HR 8799 planetary system is an ideal laboratory to study our current knowledge gap between massive field brown dwarfs and the cold 5 Gyr old solar system planets. The HR 8799 planets have so far been imaged at J- to L-band, with only upper limits available at M-band. We present here deep high-contrast Keck II adaptive optics M-band observations that show the imaging detection of three of the four currently known HR 8799 planets. Such detections were made possible due to the developmentmore » of an innovative LOCI-based background subtraction scheme that is three times more efficient than a classical median background subtraction for Keck II AO data, representing a gain in telescope time of up to a factor of nine. These M-band detections extend the broadband photometric coverage out to ~5 μm and provide access to the strong CO fundamental absorption band at 4.5 μm. The new M-band photometry shows that the HR 8799 planets are located near the L/T-type dwarf transition, similar to what was found by other studies. Finally, we also confirm that the best atmospheric fits are consistent with low surface gravity, dusty, and non-equilibrium CO/CH4 chemistry models.« less

  12. Development of innovative techniques and principles that may be used as models to improve plant performance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, Wayne W.; Burton, Glenn W.

    2000-06-25

    We developed fundamental methods and techniques for transferring germplasm from wild to cultivated species. Germplasm transferred included diverse cytoplasms, new genes for pest resistance, genes controlling dry matter yield and apomixis. Some of the germplasm has been shown to be valuable in plant breeding and has been incorporated into commercial cultivators.

  13. Development of techniques to characterize particulates emitted from gas turbine exhausts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. P.; Hilton, M.; Waterman, D. R.; Black, J. D.

    2003-07-01

    Particles emitted from aircraft play a role in the formation of contrails and it is essential to characterize them to understand the physical and chemical processes that are happening. Current methods for measuring aircraft particulate emissions study the reflectance of samples collected in filter papers. A series of experiments to more fully characterize particulates has been performed on a small-scale gas turbine engine. An intrusive sampling system conforming to current ICAO regulations for aircraft emissions was used with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). Non-intrusive measurements were made using laser induced incandescence (LII) and samples were taken from the exhaust to analyse using a transmission electron microscope. Results obtained from different techniques showed good agreement with each other. As engine power conditions increased, both the SMPS and LII indicated that the mass of soot had decreased. Differences were observed between measurements of diluted and undiluted samples. The mean particle size decreased with dilution but the size distribution became bi-modal. The study has shown how significant the sampling environment is for measuring particulates and careful techniques need to be used to ensure that accurate, consistent results can be obtained.

  14. Isolation and characterization of anti ROR1 single chain fragment variable antibodies using phage display technique.

    PubMed

    Aghebati-Maleki, Leili; Younesi, Vahid; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Baradaran, Behzad; Majidi, Jafar; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor (ROR1) belongs to one of the families of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). RTKs are involved in the various physiologic cellular functions including proliferation, migration, survival, signaling and differentiation. Several RTKs are deregulated in various cancers implying the targeting potential of these molecules in cancer therapy. ROR1 has recently been shown to be expressed in various types of cancer cells but not in normal adult cells. Hence a molecular inhibitor of extracellular domain of ROR1 that inhibits ROR1-cell surface interaction is of great therapeutic importance. In an attempt to develop molecular inhibitors of ROR1, we screened single chain variable fragment (scFv) phage display libraries, Tomlinson I + J, against one specific synthetic oligopeptide from extracellular domain of ROR1 and selected scFvs were characterized using various immunological techniques. Several ROR1 specific scFvs were selected following five rounds of panning procedure. The scFvs showed specific binding to ROR1 using immunological techniques. Our results demonstrate successful isolation and characterization of specific ROR1 scFvs that may have great therapeutic potential in cancer immunotherapy.

  15. Dosimetric characterization and optimization of a customized Stanford total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) technique.

    PubMed

    Luĉić, Felipe; Sánchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Caprile, Paola; Zelada, Gabriel; Goset, Karen

    2013-09-06

    Total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) has been used as a treatment for mycosis fungoides. Our center has implemented a modified Stanford technique with six pairs of 6 MeV adjacent electron beams, incident perpendicularly on the patient who remains lying on a translational platform, at 200 cm from the source. The purpose of this study is to perform a dosimetric characterization of this technique and to investigate its optimization in terms of energy characteristics, extension, and uniformity of the treatment field. In order to improve the homogeneity of the distribution, a custom-made polyester filter of variable thickness and a uniform PMMA degrader plate were used. It was found that the characteristics of a 9 MeV beam with an 8 mm thick degrader were similar to those of the 6 MeV beam without filter, but with an increased surface dose. The combination of the degrader and the polyester filter improved the uniformity of the distribution along the dual field (180cm long), increasing the dose at the borders of field by 43%. The optimum angles for the pair of beams were ± 27°. This configuration avoided displacement of the patient, and reduced the treatment time and the positioning problems related to the abutting superior and inferior fields. Dose distributions in the transversal plane were measured for the six incidences of the Stanford technique with film dosimetry in an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom. This was performed for the optimized treatment and compared with the previously implemented technique. The comparison showed an increased superficial dose and improved uniformity of the 85% isodose curve coverage for the optimized technique.

  16. Development of innovative techniques and principles that may be used as models to improve plant performance: Technical progress report, February 1, 1988--January 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, W.W.

    1988-09-01

    We propose to help develop innovative techniques to improve plant performance. Cytoplasms from wild Pennisetum species have been identified that affect forage yields, days to anthesis, head length, seed weight, and cytoplasmic-genic male sterility (cms). A number of new cytoplasms for cms are being identified. The A' genome from the secondary gene pool in Pennisetum is proving to be a valuable source of genes that can be rapidly used to improve cultivated pearl millet. The discovery and use of this germplasm may have a significant impact on developing pearl millet as a new drought tolerant grain crop for the US. Significant progress is being made in transferring gene(s) controlling apomixis from wild P. squamulatum to cultivated pearl millet for the purpose of producing true-breeding hybrids. 27 refs.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES AND PRODUCTION MODELS FOR EXPLOITING NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Wiggins; Raymon L. Brown; Faruk Civan; Richard G. Hughes

    2002-12-31

    For many years, geoscientists and engineers have undertaken research to characterize naturally fractured reservoirs. Geoscientists have focused on understanding the process of fracturing and the subsequent measurement and description of fracture characteristics. Engineers have concentrated on the fluid flow behavior in the fracture-porous media system and the development of models to predict the hydrocarbon production from these complex systems. This research attempts to integrate these two complementary views to develop a quantitative reservoir characterization methodology and flow performance model for naturally fractured reservoirs. The research has focused on estimating naturally fractured reservoir properties from seismic data, predicting fracture characteristics from well logs, and developing a naturally fractured reservoir simulator. It is important to develop techniques that can be applied to estimate the important parameters in predicting the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. This project proposes a method to relate seismic properties to the elastic compliance and permeability of the reservoir based upon a sugar cube model. In addition, methods are presented to use conventional well logs to estimate localized fracture information for reservoir characterization purposes. The ability to estimate fracture information from conventional well logs is very important in older wells where data are often limited. Finally, a desktop naturally fractured reservoir simulator has been developed for the purpose of predicting the performance of these complex reservoirs. The simulator incorporates vertical and horizontal wellbore models, methods to handle matrix to fracture fluid transfer, and fracture permeability tensors. This research project has developed methods to characterize and study the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs that integrate geoscience and engineering data. This is an important step in developing exploitation strategies for

  18. Boards and panels aren`t just wood products anymore: Two innovative customer feedback techniques at Duke Power

    SciTech Connect

    Ireland, G.

    1994-11-01

    In their push to become truly customer-driven, utilities have come to require a greater amount of customer input and feedback than ever before. Likewise, in this changing environment, speed and cost-effectiveness have become the name of the game in all that they do. In response to these demands and pressures, Duke Power has developed two methods of getting residential customer feedback and input in a cost-effective and timely way: the Board of Customers (for qualitative feedback) and the Consumer Panel (for quantitative applications). These feedback tools have been used successfully at Duke Power for a variety of applications, including gleaning customer reaction to customer service options, concept-testing product ideas, and assessing corporate image and reputation. With both qualitative and quantitative capabilities in place, Duke Power has the ability to respond quickly to a variety of needs and situations. For example, Duke used the Consumer Panel to implement a lengthy mail survey on image and reputation in a total of 25 days. Likewise, using a regularly scheduled quarterly meeting of the Board of Customers, Duke was able to provide customer reactions to a product concept within 48 hours of the client`s request. As the nature of competition continues to change in the utility industry, the ability to gather cost-effective customer input for quick, concise decision-making will be even more vital to maintaining the competitive edge. This paper describes the design, implementation and applications of the Board of Customers and the Consumer Panel, and how these two innovative tools translate to the bottom line in cost-effective decision-making at Duke Power.

  19. An Innovative Technique for Evaluating the Integrity and Durability of Wind Turbine Blade Composites - Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Tan, Ting; Mandell, John; Agastra, Pancasatya

    2011-11-01

    To build increasingly larger, lightweight, and robust wind turbine blades for improved power output and cost efficiency, durability of the blade, largely resulting from its structural composites selection and aerodynamic shape design, is of paramount concern. The safe/reliable operation of structural components depends critically on the selection of materials that are resistant to damage and failure in the expected service environment. An effective surveillance program is also necessary to monitor the degradation of the materials in the course of service. Composite materials having high specific strength/stiffness are desirable for the construction of wind turbines. However, most high-strength materials tend to exhibit low fracture toughness. That is why the fracture toughness of the composite materials under consideration for the manufacture of the next generation of wind turbines deserves special attention. In order to achieve the above we have proposed to develop an innovative technology, based on spiral notch torsion test (SNTT) methodology, to effectively investigate the material performance of turbine blade composites. SNTT approach was successfully demonstrated and extended to both epoxy and glass fiber composite materials for wind turbine blades during the performance period. In addition to typical Mode I failure mechanism, the mixed-mode failure mechanism induced by the wind turbine service environments and/or the material mismatch of the composite materials was also effectively investigated using SNTT approach. The SNTT results indicate that the proposed protocol not only provides significant advance in understanding the composite failure mechanism, but also can be readily utilized to assist the development of new turbine blade composites.

  20. Characterization of the microbial acid mine drainage microbial community using culturing and direct sequencing techniques.

    PubMed

    Auld, Ryan R; Myre, Maxine; Mykytczuk, Nadia C S; Leduc, Leo G; Merritt, Thomas J S

    2013-05-01

    We characterized the bacterial community from an AMD tailings pond using both classical culturing and modern direct sequencing techniques and compared the two methods. Acid mine drainage (AMD) is produced by the environmental and microbial oxidation of minerals dissolved from mining waste. Surprisingly, we know little about the microbial communities associated with AMD, despite the fundamental ecological roles of these organisms and large-scale economic impact of these waste sites. AMD microbial communities have classically been characterized by laboratory culturing-based techniques and more recently by direct sequencing of marker gene sequences, primarily the 16S rRNA gene. In our comparison of the techniques, we find that their results are complementary, overall indicating very similar community structure with similar dominant species, but with each method identifying some species that were missed by the other. We were able to culture the majority of species that our direct sequencing results indicated were present, primarily species within the Acidithiobacillus and Acidiphilium genera, although estimates of relative species abundance were only obtained from direct sequencing. Interestingly, our culture-based methods recovered four species that had been overlooked from our sequencing results because of the rarity of the marker gene sequences, likely members of the rare biosphere. Further, direct sequencing indicated that a single genus, completely missed in our culture-based study, Legionella, was a dominant member of the microbial community. Our results suggest that while either method does a reasonable job of identifying the dominant members of the AMD microbial community, together the methods combine to give a more complete picture of the true diversity of this environment.

  1. Characterization of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose films using microwave non-destructive testing technique.

    PubMed

    Anuar, Nor Khaizan; Wui, Wong Tin; Ghodgaonkar, Deepak K; Taib, Mohd Nasir

    2007-01-17

    The applicability of microwave non-destructive testing (NDT) technique in characterization of matrix property of pharmaceutical films was investigated. Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose and loratadine were selected as model matrix polymer and drug, respectively. Both blank and drug loaded hydroxypropylmethylcellulose films were prepared using the solvent-evaporation method and were conditioned at the relative humidity of 25, 50 and 75% prior to physicochemical characterization using microwave NDT technique as well as ultraviolet spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques. The results indicated that blank hydroxypropylmethylcellulose film exhibited a greater propensity of polymer-polymer interaction at the O-H and C-H domains of the polymer chains upon conditioned at a lower level of relative humidity. In the case of loratadine loaded films, a greater propensity of polymer-polymer and/or drug-polymer interaction via the O-H moiety was mediated in samples conditioned at the lower level of relative humidity, and via the C-H moiety when 50% relative humidity was selected as the condition for sample storage. Apparently, the absorption and transmission characteristics of both blank and drug loaded films for microwave varied with the state of polymer-polymer and/or drug-polymer interaction involving the O-H and C-H moieties. The measurement of microwave NDT test at 8GHz was sensitive to the chemical environment involving O-H moiety while it was greatly governed by the C-H moiety in test conducted at a higher frequency band of microwave. Similar observation was obtained with respect to the profiles of microwave NDT measurements against the state of polymer-polymer and/or drug-polymer interaction of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose films containing chlorpheniramine maleate. The microwave NDT measurement is potentially suitable for use as an apparent indicator of the state of polymer-polymer and drug

  2. The Role of Lattice Matching Techniques in the Characterization of Polymorphic Forms

    PubMed Central

    Mighell, Alan D.

    2011-01-01

    An inspection of the recent literature reveals that polymorphism is a frequently encountered phenomenon. The recognition of polymorphic forms plays a vital role in the materials sciences because such structures are characterized by different crystal packing and accordingly have different physical properties. In the pharmaceutical industry, recognition of polymorphic forms can be critical for, in certain cases, a polymorphic form of a drug may be an ineffective therapeutic agent due to its unfavorable physical properties. A check of the recent literature has revealed that in some cases new polymorphic forms are not recognized. In other instances, a supposedly new polymeric form is actually the result of an incorrect structure determination. Fortunately, lattice-matching techniques, which have proved invaluable in the identification and characterization of crystal structures, represent a powerful tool for analyzing polymorphic forms. These lattice-matching methods are based on either of two strategies: (a) the reduced cell strategy–the matching of reduced cells of the respective lattices or (b) the matrix strategy–the determination of a matrix or matrices relating the two lattices coupled with an analysis of the matrix elements. Herein, these techniques are applied to three typical cases–(a) the identification of a new polymorphic form, (b) the demonstration that a substance may not be a new polymorphic form due to missed symmetry, and (c) the evaluation of pseudo polymorphism because of a missed lattice. To identify new polymorphic forms and to prevent errors, it is recommended that these lattice matching techniques become an integral part of the editorial review process of crystallography journals. PMID:26989586

  3. Evaluation of Characterization Techniques for Iron Pipe Corrosion Products and Iron Oxide Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Borch, Thomas; Camper, Anne K.; Biederman, Joel A.; Butterfield, Phillip; Gerlach, Robin; Amonette, James E.

    2008-10-01

    A common problem faced by drinking water studies is that of properly characterizing the corrosion products (CP) in iron pipescor synthetic Fe (hydr)oxides used to simulate the iron pipe used in municipal drinking-water systems. The present work compares the relative applicability of a suite of imaging and analytical techniques for the characterization of CPs and synthetic Fe oxide thin films and provide an overview of the type of data that each instrument can provide as well as their limitations to help researchers and consultants choose the best technique for a given task. Crushed CP from a water distribution system and synthetic Fe oxide thin films formed on glass surfaces were chosen as test samples for this evaluation. The CP and synthetic Fe oxide thin films were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), grazing incident diffractometry (GID), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared, Mössbauer spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller N2 adsorption and Fe concentration was determined by the ferrozine method. XRD and GID were found to be the most suitable techniques for identification of the mineralogical composition of CP and synthetic Fe oxide thin films, respectively. AFM and a combined ToF-SIMS-AFM approach proved excellent for roughness and depth profiling analysis of synthetic Fe oxide thin films, respectively. Corrosion products were difficult to study by AFM due to their surface roughness, while synthetic Fe oxide thin films resisted most spectroscopic methods due to their limited thickness (118 nm). XPS analysis is not recommended for mixtures of Fe (hydr)oxides due to their spectral similarities. SEM and TEM provided great detail on mineralogical morphology.

  4. Combined scanning probe nanotomography and optical microspectroscopy: a correlative technique for 3D characterization of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Mochalov, Konstantin E; Efimov, Anton E; Bobrovsky, Alexey; Agapov, Igor I; Chistyakov, Anton A; Oleinikov, Vladimir; Sukhanova, Alyona; Nabiev, Igor

    2013-10-22

    Combination of 3D structural analysis with optical characterization of the same sample area on the nanoscale is a highly demanded approach in nanophotonics, materials science, and quality control of nanomaterial. We have developed a correlative microscopy technique where the 3D structure of the sample is reconstructed on the nanoscale by means of a "slice-and-view" combination of ultramicrotomy and scanning probe microscopy (scanning probe nanotomography, SPNT), and its optical characteristics are analyzed using microspectroscopy. This approach has been used to determine the direct quantitative relationship of the 3D structural characteristics of nanovolumes of materials with their microscopic optical properties. This technique has been applied to 3D structural and optical characterization of a hybrid material consisting of cholesteric liquid crystals doped with fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) that can be used for photochemical patterning and image recording through the changes in the dissymmetry factor of the circular polarization of QD emission. The differences in the polarization images and fluorescent spectra of this hybrid material have proved to be correlated with the arrangement of the areas of homogeneous distribution and heterogeneous clustering of QDs. The reconstruction of the 3D nanostructure of the liquid crystal matrix in the areas of homogeneous QDs distribution has shown that QDs do not perturb the periodic planar texture of the cholesteric liquid crystal matrix, whereas QD clusters do perturb it. The combined microspectroscopy-nanotomography technique will be important for evaluating the effects of nanoparticles on the structural organization of organic and liquid crystal matrices and biomedical materials, as well as quality control of nanotechnology fabrication processes and products.

  5. A characterization technique for nanosecond gated CMOS x-ray cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayton, M.; Carpenter, A.; Chen, H.; Palmer, N.; Datte, P.; Bell, P.; Sanchez, M.; Claus, L.; Robertson, G.; Porter, J.

    2016-09-01

    We present a characterization technique for nanosecond gated CMOS cameras designed and built by Sandia National Laboratory under their Ultra-Fast X-ray Imager program. The cameras have been used to record images during HED physics experiments at Sandia's Z Facility and at LLNL's National Ignition Facility. The behavior of the camera's fast shutters was not expected to be ideal since they propagate over a large pixel array of 25 mm x 12 mm, which could result in shutter timing skew, variations in the FWHM, and variations in the shutter's peak response. Consequently, a detailed characterization of the camera at the pixel level was critical for interpreting the images. Assuming the pixel's photo-response was linear, the shutter profiles for each pixel were simplified to a pair of sigmoid functions using standard non-linear fitting methods to make the subsequent analysis less computationally intensive. A pixel-level characterization of a "Furi" camera showed frame-to-frame gain variations that could be normalized with a gain mask and significant timing skew at the sensor's center column that could not be corrected. The shutter profiles for Furi were then convolved with data generated from computational models to forward fit images collected with the camera.

  6. Multi and hyperspectral digital-imaging-based techniques for agricultural soil characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Menesatti, Paolo; Millozza, Mario

    2004-11-01

    Soil characterization and monitoring in agriculture represent the primary key-factors influencing its productivity and the quality of the produced products. A correct and continuous knowledge of agricultural soil characteristics can help to optimize its use and its degree of exploitation both in absolute terms and with reference to specific cultivations. Soil characterization is conventionally performed adopting integrated physical-chemical analyses based on soil portion (samples), properly sampled, classified and then delivered to specialized laboratories. Such an approach obviously requires a chain of actions and it is time consuming. In this work it is examined the possibility offered by multi and hyperspectral digital imaging based spectrophotometric techniques in order to perform fast, reliable and low cost "in situ" analyses to identify and quantify specific soil attributes, of primary importance in agriculture, as: water, basic nutrients and organic matter content. The proposed hardware and software (HW&SW) integrated architecture have been specifically developed, and their response investigated, with the specific aim to contribute to study a set of "flexible", and very simple, procedures to apply in order to be utilized to operate, not only in agricultural soil characterization, but also in other fields as the environmental monitoring and polluted soils reclamation.

  7. A multi-technique chemical characterization of a Stradivari decorated violin top plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malagodi, M.; Canevari, C.; Bonizzoni, L.; Galli, A.; Maspero, F.; Martini, M.

    2013-08-01

    This paper focuses on the characterization of the materials of a violin top plate made by Antonio Stradivari (17th century), with different diagnostic techniques and with an integrated and non-destructive analytical methodology to study surface coatings and decorations. The UV-induced visible fluorescence, optical digital microscopy, ED-XRF associated with micro-FTIR spectroscopy analysis, and dendrochronology were performed. The investigations were aimed to identify the presence of original varnish layers and to characterize the composition of the decorations, either the inlaid purflings or the composite false-inlay strip between them. Several results were achieved: (i) evidence of the absence of varnish layers on the surface as a result of extended and inappropriate restoring; (ii) identification of the dye used for the black layers of the purflings; (iii) characterization of the black matrix and the white elements of the decoration. Furthermore, a dendrochronological dating was performed. A copy of the top plate was realized with materials similar to those identified on the Stradivari original; the same analyses performed on the original model were carried out on the same areas of the copy.

  8. Innovative techniques in evaluating the esophagus; imaging of esophageal morphology and function; and drugs for esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Helmut; Neurath, Markus F; Vieth, Michael; Lever, Frederiek M; Meijer, Gert J; Lips, Irene M; McMahon, Barry P; Ruurda, J P; van Hillegersberg, R; Siersema, P; Levine, Marc S; Scharitzer, Martina; Pokieser, Peter; Zerbib, Frank; Savarino, Vincenzo; Zentilin, Patrizia; Savarino, Edoardo; Chan, Walter W

    2013-10-01

    This paper reporting on techniques for esophageal evaluation and imaging and drugs for esophageal disease includes commentaries on endoscopy techniques including dye-based high-resolution and dye-less high-definition endoscopy; the shift from CT to MRI guidance in tumor delineation for radiation therapy; the role of functional lumen imaging in measuring esophageal distensibility; electrical stimulation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) as an alternative to fundoduplication for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); the morphological findings of reflux esophagitis and esophageal dysmotility on double-contrast esophagography; the value of videofluoroscopy in assessing protecting mechanisms in patients with chronic reflux or swallowing disorders; targeting visceral hypersensitivity in the treatment of refractory GERD; and the symptoms and treatments of nighttime reflux and nocturnal acid breakthrough (NAB).

  9. Human Milk Processing: A Systematic Review of Innovative Techniques to Ensure the Safety and Quality of Donor Milk.

    PubMed

    Peila, Chiara; Emmerik, Nikki E; Giribaldi, Marzia; Stahl, Bernd; Ruitenberg, Joost E; van Elburg, Ruurd M; Moro, Guido E; Bertino, Enrico; Coscia, Alessandra; Cavallarin, Laura

    2017-03-01

    Pasteurization, performed at 62.5°C for 30 minutes (holder pasteurization), is currently recommended in all international human milk banks guidelines, but it affects some human milk bioactive and nutritive components. The present systematic review is aimed at critically reviewing evidence on the suitability of human milk processing techniques other than holder pasteurization, both thermal and nonthermal, to ensure microbiological safety, and on the effects of these techniques on biologically active donor milk components. A systematic review of English and non-English articles using Medline, PubMed, Embase, SCOPUS, and CAB Abstracts, with no restriction in publication date was performed. Search terms included: human, breast, donor, or banked milk, breastmilk, breast fed, breastfed, breastfeed; HTST, Flash, High Pressure, UV, ultrasonic or nonthermal; process, pasteuris, pasteuriz. Only primary research articles published in peer-reviewed journals were included, providing or not a comparison with holder pasteurized human milk, provided that the pasteurization technique was clearly described, and not intended for domestic use. Additional studies were identified by searching bibliographies of relevant articles. Twenty-six studies were identified as being relevant. Two examined both High Pressure Processing and High-Temperature-Short-Time pasteurization; 10 only examined High Pressure Processing; 10 only examined High-Temperature-Short-Time; 2 articles examined ultraviolet irradiation; 2 articles examined (thermo-)ultrasonic processing. The results indicate that data about safety for microbiological control are still scarce for most of the novel technologies, and that consensus on processing conditions is necessary for nonthermal technologies, before any conclusions on the qualitative and nutritional advantages of these techniques can be drawn.

  10. Thermal characterization of a liquid resin for 3D printing using photothermal techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Pérez, José L.; Pincel, Pavel Vieyra; Cruz-Orea, Alfredo; Correa-Pacheco, Zormy N.

    2016-05-01

    Thermal properties of a liquid resin were studied by thermal lens spectrometry (TLS) and open photoacoustic cell (OPC), respectively. In the case of the TLS technique, the two mismatched mode experimental configuration was used with a He-Ne laser, as a probe beam and an Argon laser was used as the excitation source. The characteristic time constant of the transient thermal lens was obtained by fitting the theoretical expression to the experimental data in order to obtain the thermal diffusivity ( α) of the resin. On the other hand, the sample thermal effusivity ( e) was obtained by using the OPC technique. In this technique, an Argon laser was used as the excitation source and was operated at 514 nm with an output power of 30 mW. From the obtained thermal diffusivity ( α) and thermal effusivity ( e) values, the thermal conductivity ( k) and specific heat capacity per unit volume ( ρc) of resin were calculated through the relationships k = e( α)1/2 and ρc = e/( α)1/2. The obtained thermal parameters were compared with the thermal parameters of the literature. To our knowledge, the thermal characterization of resin has not been reported until now. The present study has applications in laser stereo-lithography to manufacture 3D printing pieces.

  11. PARTITIONING INTERWELL TRACER TEST FOR NAPL SOURCE CHARACTERIZATION: A GENERAL OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Innovative and nondestructive characterization techniques have been developed to locate and quantify nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in the vadose and saturated zones in the subsurface environment. One such technique is the partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT). The PITT i...

  12. Characterization of Defects on MOCVD Grown Gallium Nitride Using Transient Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasani, Sujan Phani Kumar

    Since the invention of the first visible spectrum (red) LED by Holonyak in 1962, there has been a need for more efficient, more reliable and less expensive LEDs. The III-nitrides revolutionized semiconductor technology with their applications in the blue LED's. However the internal quantum efficiency of LED's are limited by the deep level traps in GaN substrate. Traps are defects in the crystal lattice, which depends on growth parameters. These traps act as non-radiative centers where non-radiative recombination occurs without conversion of available energy into light. Characterization of these traps in a material is necessary for better understanding of the material growth quality and resulting device performance. In this work Capacitance-Voltage (C-V) and Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) are conducted which provide electronic properties of trap centers like activation energy, doping concentration and capture cross-section. In n-GaN grown by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on Sapphire two defects types are detected and are characterized by Capacitance-Voltage and Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy. Two deep levels E1 and E2 are typically observed in n-GaN with the activation energies of 0.21eV and 0.53eV at 125°K and 325°K, respectively. The deep level E1 is caused by linear line defects along dislocation cores while deep level E2 is related to point defects. The characterization techniques, experimental systems and preliminary characterization results are discussed in detail.

  13. Innovative techniques for the production of energetic radicals for lunar materials processing including photogeneration via concentrated solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, D. E.; Lynch, D. C.; Fozzolari, R.

    1991-01-01

    A technique for photo generation of radicals is discussed that can be used in the recovery of oxygen and metals from extraterrestrial resources. The concept behind this work was to examine methods whereby radicals can be generated and used in the processing of refractory materials. In that regard, the focus is on the use of sunlight. Sunlight provides useful energy for processing in the forms of both thermal and quantum energy. A number of experiments were conducted in the chlorination of metals with and without the aid of UV and near UV light. The results of some of those experiments are discussed.

  14. An Optical Characterization Technique for Parabolic Trough Solar Collectors Using Images of the Absorber Reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owkes, Jeanmarie Kathleen

    As the concentrating solar power industry competes to develop a less-expensive parabolic trough collector, assurance is needed that new parabolic trough collectors maintain accurate optical alignment. Previous optical characterization techniques are either too slow, ill-suited for field testing, or do not allow the collector to be tested in realistic orientations. The Observer method presented here enables the rapid optical characterization of parabolic trough collectors in any orientation in the field. The Observer method directly measures the combined optical angular errors in the reflector surface shape and the absorber position, which can be separated into its two components: reflector surface slope and absorber misalignment. The data acquisition requires the placement of photogrammetry targets on and around the collector. Multiple photographs of the absorber and its reflection are taken with a digital camera from different angles with respect to the collector. The images are processed to determine the camera location of each image using photogrammetry bundle analysis. The absorber and its reflection are found in the photographs using image-processing techniques. A Monte Carlo uncertainty model was developed to determine the uncertainty in the Observer measurements. The uncertainty was estimated for a wide array of measurement test scenarios to demonstrate the user's control over the measurement uncertainty. To validate the Observer method, the absorber alignment technique was compared to traditional photogrammetry; the absorber position measured with the two methods compared with a root-mean-square difference of 1.5 mm in the transverse direction and 0.86 mm along the optical axis. The reflector surface slope error measurement was compared to both VSHOT and SOFAST, two well-established optical characterization tools, by measuring a single reflector panel in the laboratory. The VSHOT and SOFAST measurements agreed with the Observer with a root

  15. An innovative technique for displaying three dimensional radiographic anatomy of synovial structures in the equine distal limb.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexander J; Felstead, Christopher W; Lawson, Jack S; Weller, Renate

    2009-01-01

    Radiography is the most commonly applied imaging modality in equine practice and forms an essential part of the diagnostic work-up of lame horses. Radiographic signs of musculoskeletal pathology are frequently localized at sites of soft tissue attachment, which are often not clearly visible on radiographs. Different lesions carry different prognoses and require a variety of treatments, and a good knowledge of the position of the synovial structures in the distal limb of the horse is essential for practitioners in the interpretation of radiographs. This study describes a new technique for creating three-dimensional (3D) models of the synovial structures and superimposing them onto radiographs for the purpose of teaching radiographic anatomy. A set of standard radiographs was acquired of the metacarpophalangeal and the distal interphalangeal joints of a fresh cadaver leg while the leg was positioned in a material-testing machine to mimic the weight-bearing horse. Computed tomography of the same regions was performed after injection of negative contrast medium into the joints. 3D reconstructions of the joints were created using grayscale thresholding and polynomial surface meshing in Mimics. The resulting 3D reconstructions were superimposed on top of the radiographs using Adobe Photoshop CS3 Extended, thus allowing the visualization of the joint anatomy in relation to the bone on all projections. The main advantage of this technique is that it allows synovial structures to be visualized on radiographs where they are normally indistinct, which will serve as a teaching aid for anatomy.

  16. Study to perform preliminary experiments to evaluate particle generation and characterization techniques for zero-gravity cloud physics experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, U.

    1982-01-01

    Methods of particle generation and characterization with regard to their applicability for experiments requiring cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) of specified properties were investigated. Since aerosol characterization is a prerequisite to assessing performance of particle generation equipment, techniques for characterizing aerosol were evaluated. Aerosol generation is discussed, and atomizer and photolytic generators including preparation of hydrosols (used with atomizers) and the evaluation of a flight version of an atomizer are studied.

  17. Re-exploring the high-throughput potential of microextraction techniques, SPME and MEPS, as powerful strategies for medical diagnostic purposes. Innovative approaches, recent applications and future trends.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jorge; Silva, Catarina Luís; Perestrelo, Rosa; Gonçalves, João; Alves, Vera; Câmara, José S

    2014-03-01

    The human population continues to grow exponentially in the fast developing and most populated countries, whereas in Western Europe it is getting older and older each year. This inevitably raises the demand for better and more efficient medical services without increasing the economic burden in the same proportion. To meet these requirements, improvement of medical diagnosis is certainly a key aspect to consider. Therefore, we need powerful analytical methodologies able to go deeper and further in the characterization of human metabolism and identification of disease biomarkers and endogenous molecules in body fluids and tissues. The ultimate goal is to have a reliable and early medical diagnosis, mitigating the disease complications as much as possible. Microextraction techniques (METs) represent a key step in these analytical methodologies by providing samples in the suitable volumes and purification levels necessary for the characterization of the target analytes. In this aspect, solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and, more recently, microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS), are powerful sample preparation techniques, characterized by their reduced time of analysis, low solvent consumption, and broad application. Moreover, as miniaturized techniques, they can be easily automatized to have a high-throughput performance in the clinical environment. In this review, we explore some of the most interesting MEPS and SPME applications, focusing on recent trends and applications to medical diagnostic, particularly the in vivo and near real time applications.

  18. Characterization of protein N-glycosylation by tandem mass spectrometry using complementary fragmentation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Kristina L.; Zeng, Wei; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Bacic, Antony

    2015-08-28

    The analysis of post-translational modifications (PTMs) by proteomics is regarded as a technically challenging undertaking. While in recent years approaches to examine and quantify protein phosphorylation have greatly improved, the analysis of many protein modifications, such as glycosylation, are still regarded as problematic. Limitations in the standard proteomics workflow, such as use of suboptimal peptide fragmentation methods, can significantly prevent the identification of glycopeptides. The current generation of tandem mass spectrometers has made available a variety of fragmentation options, many of which are becoming standard features on these instruments. Lastly, we have used three common fragmentation techniques, namely CID, HCD, and ETD, to analyze a glycopeptide and highlight how an integrated fragmentation approach can be used to identify the modified residue and characterize the N-glycan on a peptide.

  19. Forward-Inverse Adaptive Techniques for Reservoir Characterization and Simulation: Theory and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, S D; Ezzedine, S; Gelinas, R; Chawathe, A

    2001-06-11

    A novel approach called Forward-Inverse Adaptive Techniques (FIAT) for reservoir characterization is developed and applied to three representative exploration cases. Inverse modeling refers to the determination of the entire reservoir permeability under steady state single-phase flow regime, given only field permeability, pressure and production well measurements. FIAT solves the forward and inverse partial differential equations (PDEs) simultaneously by adding a regularization term and filtering pressure gradients. An implicit adaptive-grid, Galerkin, numerical scheme is used to numerically solve the set of PDEs subject to pressure and permeability boundary conditions. Three examples are presented. Results from all three cases demonstrate attainable and reasonably accurate solutions and, more importantly, provide insights into the consequences of data undersampling.

  20. Characterization of nonlinear ultrasonic effects using the dynamic wavelet fingerprint technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Hongtao; Jiao, Jingpin; Meng, Xiangji; He, Cunfu; Wu, Bin

    2017-02-01

    An improved dynamic wavelet fingerprint (DWFP) technique was developed to characterize nonlinear ultrasonic effects. The white area in the fingerprint was used as the nonlinear feature to quantify the degree of damage. The performance of different wavelet functions, the effect of scale factor and white subslice ratio on the nonlinear feature extraction were investigated, and the optimal wavelet function, scale factor and white subslice ratio for maximum damage sensitivity were determined. The proposed DWFP method was applied to the analysis of experimental signals obtained from nonlinear ultrasonic harmonic and wave-mixing experiments. It was demonstrated that the proposed DWFP method can be used to effectively extract nonlinear features from the experimental signals. Moreover, the proposed nonlinear fingerprint coefficient was sensitive to micro cracks and correlated well with the degree of damage.

  1. Diffusion and ideal MRI techniques to characterize limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Salazar, G.; Hidalgo-Tobon, S.; Vargas-Cañas, S.; Marrufo-Melendez, O.; Solis-Najera, S.; Taboada-Barajas, J.; Rodríguez, A. O.; Delgado-Hernández, R.

    2012-10-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a group of autosomal dominantly or recessively inherited muscular dystrophies that also present with primary proximal (limb-girdle) muscle weakness. In the thigh, muscles at the back are affected, with a tendency to preserve the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius. The aim of this study was to compare quantitative MRI measurements from IDEAL-based imaging and DW imaging in the thigh muscles of adults with LGMDs and healthy volunteers(HC). Six women (three patients and three healthy volunteers) were examined. Imaging experiments were conducted on a 1.5T GE scanner (General Electric Medical Systems. Milwaukee). T1 IDEAL 2D images and diffusion images were acquired. Results demonstrated that the use of noninvasive MRI techniques may provide the means to characterize the muscle through quantitative methods to determine the percentage of fat and ADC values.

  2. Characterization of protein N-glycosylation by tandem mass spectrometry using complementary fragmentation techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Ford, Kristina L.; Zeng, Wei; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; ...

    2015-08-28

    The analysis of post-translational modifications (PTMs) by proteomics is regarded as a technically challenging undertaking. While in recent years approaches to examine and quantify protein phosphorylation have greatly improved, the analysis of many protein modifications, such as glycosylation, are still regarded as problematic. Limitations in the standard proteomics workflow, such as use of suboptimal peptide fragmentation methods, can significantly prevent the identification of glycopeptides. The current generation of tandem mass spectrometers has made available a variety of fragmentation options, many of which are becoming standard features on these instruments. Lastly, we have used three common fragmentation techniques, namely CID, HCD,more » and ETD, to analyze a glycopeptide and highlight how an integrated fragmentation approach can be used to identify the modified residue and characterize the N-glycan on a peptide.« less

  3. Mechanical characterization of TiO{sub 2} nanofibers produced by different electrospinning techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Vahtrus, Mikk; Šutka, Andris; Vlassov, Sergei; Šutka, Anna; Polyakov, Boris; Saar, Rando; Dorogin, Leonid; Lõhmus, Rünno

    2015-02-15

    In this work TiO{sub 2} nanofibers produced by needle and needleless electrospinning processes from the same precursor were characterized and compared using Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and in situ SEM nanomechanical testing. Phase composition, morphology, Young's modulus and bending strength values were found. Weibull statistics was used to evaluate and compare uniformity of mechanical properties of nanofibers produced by two different methods. It is shown that both methods yield nanofibers with very similar properties. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} nanofibers were produced by needle and needleless electrospinning processes. • Structure was studied by Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy methods. • Mechanical properties were measured using advanced in situ SEM cantilevered beam bending technique. • Both methods yield nanofibers with very similar properties.

  4. Innovative techniques for the production of energetic radicals for lunar materials processing including photogeneration via concentrated solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, D. E.; Lynch, D. C.; Fazzolari, R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) is investigating the use of monatomic chlorine produced in a cold plasma to recover oxygen and metallurgically significant metals from lunar materials. Development of techniques for the production of the chlorine radical (and other energetic radicals for these processes) using local planetary resources is a key step for a successful approach. It was demonstrated terrestrially that the use of UV light to energize the photogeneration of OH radicals from ozone or hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solutions can lead to rapid reaction rates for the breakdown of toxic organic compounds in water. A key question is how to use the expanded solar resource at the lunar surface to generate process-useful radicals. This project is aimed at investigating that question.

  5. An Innovative Scalp-Dyeing Technique with Gentian Violet Solution During Follicular Unit Extraction for White-Haired Follicular Units

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Min Seon

    2017-01-01

    There exist some restrictions and difficulties in performing follicular unit extraction (FUE) in white-haired patients, for several reasons. In this paper, we introduce a novel technique for visualizing white hair during the punching procedure and graft preparation in FUE for white-haired patients. In white-haired older male patients, we dyed the surrounding scalp skin purple with a gentian violet solution-stained toothpick. Our method has several advantages: surgeons can easily focus on the center of the follicular unit and rapidly perform punching, they can recognize the condition of the harvested follicular units during FUE, and the hair transplant team can secure a clear view for trimming and loading into the implanter. We suggest that scalp dyeing in difficult FUE procedures, especially in patients with white hair, may be a simple method that provides a good visualization for donor site harvesting and for microdissection. PMID:28352608

  6. Microwave non-destructive testing technique for characterization of HPMC-PEG 3000 films.

    PubMed

    Wong, T W; Deepak, K G; Taib, M N; Anuar, N K

    2007-10-01

    The capacity of microwave non-destructive testing (NDT) technique to characterize the matrix property of binary polymeric films for use as transdermal drug delivery system was investigated. Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3000 were the choice of polymeric matrix and plasticizer, respectively with loratadine as the model drug. Both blank and drug loaded HPMC-PEG 3000 films were prepared using the solvent-evaporation method. These films were conditioned at the relative humidity of 25, 50 and 75% prior to physicochemical characterization using the established methods of ultra-violet spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy methods, as well as, novel microwave NDT technique. Blank films exhibited a greater propensity of polymer-polymer interaction at the O-H domain upon storage at a lower level of relative humidity, whereas drug loaded films exhibited a greater propensity of polymer-polymer, polymer-plasticizer and/or drug-polymer interaction via the O-H, C-H and/or aromatic C=C functional groups when they were stored at a lower or moderate level of relative humidity. The absorption and transmission characteristics of both blank and drug loaded films for microwave varied with the state of polymer-polymer, polymer-plasticizer, and/or drug-polymer interaction of the matrix. The measurements of microwave NDT test at 8 and 12 GHz were sensitive to the polar fraction of film involving functional group such as O-H moiety and the less polar environment of matrix consisting of functional groups such as C-H and aromatic C=C moieties. The state of interaction between polymer, plasticizer and/or drug of a binary polymeric film can be elucidated through its absorption and transmission profiles of microwave.

  7. Optimization of site characterization and remediation methods using 3-D geoscience modeling and visualization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hedegaard, R.F.; Ho, J.; Eisert, J.

    1996-12-31

    Three-dimensional (3-D) geoscience volume modeling can be used to improve the efficiency of the environmental investigation and remediation process. At several unsaturated zone spill sites at two Superfund (CERCLA) sites (Military Installations) in California, all aspects of subsurface contamination have been characterized using an integrated computerized approach. With the aide of software such as LYNX GMS{trademark}, Wavefront`s Data Visualizer{trademark} and Gstools (public domain), the authors have created a central platform from which to map a contaminant plume, visualize the same plume three-dimensionally, and calculate volumes of contaminated soil or groundwater above important health risk thresholds. The developed methodology allows rapid data inspection for decisions such that the characterization process and remedial action design are optimized. By using the 3-D geoscience modeling and visualization techniques, the technical staff are able to evaluate the completeness and spatial variability of the data and conduct 3-D geostatistical predictions of contaminant and lithologic distributions. The geometry of each plume is estimated using 3-D variography on raw analyte values and indicator thresholds for the kriged model. Three-dimensional lithologic interpretation is based on either {open_quote}linked{close_quote} parallel cross sections or on kriged grid estimations derived from borehole data coded with permeability indicator thresholds. Investigative borings, as well as soil vapor extraction/injection wells, are sighted and excavation costs are estimated using these results. The principal advantages of the technique are the efficiency and rapidity with which meaningful results are obtained and the enhanced visualization capability which is a desirable medium to communicate with both the technical staff as well as nontechnical audiences.

  8. Characterization of ion-induced radiation effects in nuclear materials using synchrotron x-ray techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Maik; Tracy, Cameron L.; Palomares, Raul I.; Zhang, Fuxiang; Severin, Daniel; Bender, Markus; Trautmann, Christina; Park, Changyong; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Skuratov, Vladimir A.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2015-05-01

    Recent efforts to characterize the nanoscale structural and chemical modifications induced by energetic ion irradiation in nuclear materials have greatly benefited from the application of synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques. Key to the study of actinide-bearing materials has been the use of small sample volumes, which are particularly advantageous, as the small quantities minimize the level of radiation exposure at the ion-beam and synchrotron user facility. This approach utilizes energetic heavy ions (energy range: 100 MeV–3 GeV) that pass completely through the sample thickness and deposit an almost constant energy per unit length along their trajectory. High energy x-rays (25–65 keV) from intense synchrotron light sources are then used in transmission geometry to analyze ion-induced structural and chemical modifications throughout the ion tracks. We describe in detail the experimental approach for utilizing synchrotron radiation (SR) to study the radiation response of a range of nuclear materials (e.g., ThO2 and Gd2TixZr2–xO7). Also addressed is the use of high-pressure techniques, such as the heatable diamond anvil cell, as a new means to expose irradiated materials to well-controlled high-temperature (up to 1000 °C) and/or high-pressure (up to 50 GPa) conditions. Furthermore, this is particularly useful for characterizing the annealing kinetics of irradiation-induced material modifications.

  9. Characterization of ion-induced radiation effects in nuclear materials using synchrotron x-ray techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Lang, Maik; Tracy, Cameron L.; Palomares, Raul I.; ...

    2015-05-01

    Recent efforts to characterize the nanoscale structural and chemical modifications induced by energetic ion irradiation in nuclear materials have greatly benefited from the application of synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques. Key to the study of actinide-bearing materials has been the use of small sample volumes, which are particularly advantageous, as the small quantities minimize the level of radiation exposure at the ion-beam and synchrotron user facility. This approach utilizes energetic heavy ions (energy range: 100 MeV–3 GeV) that pass completely through the sample thickness and deposit an almost constant energy per unit length along theirmore » trajectory. High energy x-rays (25–65 keV) from intense synchrotron light sources are then used in transmission geometry to analyze ion-induced structural and chemical modifications throughout the ion tracks. We describe in detail the experimental approach for utilizing synchrotron radiation (SR) to study the radiation response of a range of nuclear materials (e.g., ThO2 and Gd2TixZr2–xO7). Also addressed is the use of high-pressure techniques, such as the heatable diamond anvil cell, as a new means to expose irradiated materials to well-controlled high-temperature (up to 1000 °C) and/or high-pressure (up to 50 GPa) conditions. Furthermore, this is particularly useful for characterizing the annealing kinetics of irradiation-induced material modifications.« less

  10. Chemical and mineralogical characterizations of LD converter steel slags: A multi-analytical techniques approach

    SciTech Connect

    Waligora, J.; Bulteel, D.; Degrugilliers, P.; Damidot, D.; Potdevin, J.L.; Measson, M.

    2010-01-15

    The use of LD converter steel slags (coming from Linz-Donawitz steelmaking process) as aggregates in road construction can in certain cases lead to dimensional damage due to a macroscopic swelling that is the consequence of chemical reactions. The aim of this study was to couple several analytical techniques in order to carefully undertake chemical and mineralogical characterizations of LD steel slags and identify the phases that are expected to be responsible for their instability. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalyses revealed that LD steel slags mainly contain calcium silicates, dicalcium ferrites, iron oxides and lime. However, as a calcium silicate phase is heterogeneous, Raman microspectrometry and transmitted electron microscopy had to be used to characterize it more precisely. Results showed that lime is present under two forms in slag grains: some nodules observed in the matrix whose size ranges from 20 to 100 {mu}m and some micro-inclusions, enclosed in the heterogeneous calcium silicate phase whose size ranges from 1 to 3 {mu}m. It was also established that without the presence of magnesia, lime is expected to be the only phase responsible for LD steel slags instability. Nevertheless, the distribution of lime between nodules and micro-inclusions may play a major role and could explain that similar amounts of lime can induce different instabilities. Thus, it appears that lime content of LD steel slags is not the only parameter to explain their instability.

  11. Characterization of Dickeya and Pectobacterium species by capillary electrophoretic techniques and MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Šalplachta, Jiří; Kubesová, Anna; Horký, Jaroslav; Matoušková, Hana; Tesařová, Marie; Horká, Marie

    2015-10-01

    Dickeya and Pectobacterium species represent an important group of broad-host-range phytopathogens responsible for blackleg and soft rot diseases on numerous plants including many economically important plants. Although these species are commonly detected using cultural, serological, and molecular methods, these methods are sometimes insufficient to classify the bacteria correctly. On that account, this study was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of three individual analytical techniques, capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF), and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), for reliable classification of Dickeya and Pectobacterium species. Forty-three strains, representing different Dickeya and Pectobacterium species, namely Dickeya dianthicola, Dickeya dadantii, Dickeya dieffenbachiae, Dickeya chrysanthemi, Dickeya zeae, Dickeya paradisiaca, Dickeya solani, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and Pectobacterium atrosepticum, were selected for this purpose. Furthermore, the selected bacteria included one strain which could not be classified using traditional microbiological methods. Characterization of the bacteria was based on different pI values (CIEF), migration velocities (CZE), or specific mass fingerprints (MALDI-TOF MS) of intact cells. All the examined strains, including the undetermined bacterium, were characterized and classified correctly into respective species. MALDI-TOF MS provided the most reliable results in this respect.

  12. Nanotribological and nanomechanical characterization of human hair using a nanoscratch technique.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guohua; Bhushan, Bharat

    2006-01-01

    Human hair ( approximately 50-100 microm in diameter) is a nanocomposite biological fiber with well-characterized microstructures, and is of great interest for both cosmetic science and materials science. Characterization of nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of human hair including the coefficient of friction and scratch resistance is essential to develop better shampoo and conditioner products and advance biological and cosmetic science. In this paper, the coefficient of friction and scratch resistance of Caucasian and Asian hair at virgin, chemo-mechanically damaged, and conditioner-treated conditions are measured using a nanoscratch technique with a Nano Indenter II system. The scratch tests were performed on both the single cuticle cell and multiple cuticle cells of each hair sample, and the scratch wear tracks were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after the scratch tests. The effect of soaking on the coefficient of friction, scratch resistance, hardness and Young's modulus of hair surface were also studied by performing experiments on hair samples which had been soaked in de-ionized water for 5 min. The nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of human hair as a function of hair structure (hair of different ethnicity), damage, treatment and soaking are discussed.

  13. Characterization of plant food allergens: an overview on physicochemical and immunological techniques.

    PubMed

    Harrer, Andrea; Egger, Matthias; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Erler, Anja; Hauser, Michael; Ferreira, Fátima; Himly, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Allergy to plant-derived foods is a highly complex disorder with clinical manifestations ranging from mild oral, gastrointestinal, and cutaneous symptoms to life-threatening systemic conditions. This heterogeneity in clinical manifestations has been attributed to different properties of allergenic molecules. Based on this fact, symptom elicitors were grouped into class I and pollinosis-associated class II food allergens, but clear distinction is rather ambiguous. Moreover, mechanisms underlying food sensitization are not fully understood yet, and food allergy management most often relies on patient's compliance to avoid suspected foods. Therefore, recent efforts aim at the investigation of plant food allergies at the molecular level. This review provides an overview on currently available techniques for allergen characterization and discusses their application for investigation of plant food allergens. Data obtained by an array of physicochemical analyses, such as allergen structure, integrity, aggregation, and stability, need to be linked to results from immunological methods at the level of IgE and T-cell reactivity. Such knowledge allows the development of computational algorithms to predict allergenicity of novel foods being introduced by biotechnological industry. Furthermore, molecular characterization is an indispensable tool for molecule-based diagnosis and future development of safer patient-tailored specific immunotherapy in plant food allergy.

  14. In vitro characterization of the technique of portal vein embolization by injection of a surgical glue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Sandulache, Mihai-Cristinel; Lancon, Oceane; El Kadri Benkara, Khadija

    2012-11-01

    Partial embolization of the portal trunk by glue injection is a minimally invasive technique used in the case of malignant liver tumors. It is conducted few weeks prior to partial liver ablation, when the volume of the remnant liver section is too small to allow hepatectomy. The limitation of glue embolotherapy is that its clinical practice is based on empirical knowledge. The present objective is to study glue injection in a confined blood flow and investigate how the injection dynamics is coupled with glue polymerization. We first characterize polymerization under static conditions for various glue concentrations and then consider the influence of injection. An experimental setup reproduces the co-flow of two immiscible fluids. The glue mixture is injected through a capillary tube into a saline solution with the same ionic concentration, pH and viscosity as blood, flowing steadily in a straight cylindrical tube. The injected phase is visualized with a high-speed imaging system and results are compared with those obtained for non-reacting fluids. These experiments have enabled us to characterize the characteristic times of polymerization of the glue mixtures under static and dynamic conditions and understand how they affect the flow topology of the glue once injected. Biomechanics and Bioengineering Laboratory (UMR CNRS 7338).

  15. Characterization of Nanocellulose Using Small-Angle Neutron, X-ray, and Dynamic Light Scattering Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yimin; Liu, Kai; Zhan, Chengbo; Geng, Lihong; Chu, Benjamin; Hsiao, Benjamin S

    2017-02-16

    Nanocellulose extracted from wood pulps using TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidation and sulfuric acid hydrolysis methods was characterized by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The dimensions of this nanocellulose (TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofiber (TOCN) and sulfuric acid hydrolyzed cellulose nanocrystal (SACN)) revealed by the different scattering methods were compared with those characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The SANS and SAXS data were analyzed using a parallelepiped-based form factor. The width and thickness of the nanocellulose cross section were ∼8 and ∼2 nm for TOCN and ∼20 and ∼3 nm for SACN, respectively, where the fitting results from SANS and SAXS profiles were consistent with each other. DLS was carried out under both the VV mode with the polarizer and analyzer parallel to each other and the HV mode having them perpendicular to each other. Using rotational and translational diffusion coefficients obtained under the HV mode yielded a nanocellulose length qualitatively consistent with that observed by TEM, whereas the length derived by the translational diffusion coefficient under the VV mode appeared to be overestimated.

  16. NATALIE: a 32 detector integrated acquisition system to characterize laser produced energetic particles with nuclear techniques.

    PubMed

    Tarisien, M; Plaisir, C; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Aléonard, M M; Rebii, A

    2011-02-01

    We present a stand-alone system to characterize the high-energy particles emitted in the interaction of ultrahigh intensity laser pulses with matter. According to the laser and target characteristics, electrons or protons are produced with energies higher than a few mega electron volts. Selected material samples can, therefore, be activated via nuclear reactions. A multidetector, named NATALIE, has been developed to count the β(+) activity of these irradiated samples. The coincidence technique used, designed in an integrated system, results in very low background in the data, which is required for low activity measurements. It, therefore, allows a good precision on the nuclear activation yields of the produced radionuclides. The system allows high counting rates and online correction of the dead time. It also provides, online, a quick control of the experiment. Geant4 simulations are used at different steps of the data analysis to deduce, from the measured activities, the energy and angular distributions of the laser-induced particle beams. Two applications are presented to illustrate the characterization of electrons and protons.

  17. NATALIE: A 32 detector integrated acquisition system to characterize laser produced energetic particles with nuclear techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tarisien, M.; Plaisir, C.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Aleonard, M. M.; Rebii, A.

    2011-02-15

    We present a stand-alone system to characterize the high-energy particles emitted in the interaction of ultrahigh intensity laser pulses with matter. According to the laser and target characteristics, electrons or protons are produced with energies higher than a few mega electron volts. Selected material samples can, therefore, be activated via nuclear reactions. A multidetector, named NATALIE, has been developed to count the {beta}{sup +} activity of these irradiated samples. The coincidence technique used, designed in an integrated system, results in very low background in the data, which is required for low activity measurements. It, therefore, allows a good precision on the nuclear activation yields of the produced radionuclides. The system allows high counting rates and online correction of the dead time. It also provides, online, a quick control of the experiment. Geant4 simulations are used at different steps of the data analysis to deduce, from the measured activities, the energy and angular distributions of the laser-induced particle beams. Two applications are presented to illustrate the characterization of electrons and protons.

  18. Analytical model for Transient Current Technique (TCT) signal prediction and analysis for thin interface characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronuzzi, J.; Mapelli, A.; Sallese, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    A silicon wafer bonding technique has been recently proposed for the fabrication of monolithic silicon radiation detectors. This new process would enable direct bonding of a read-out electronic chip wafer on a highly resistive silicon substrate wafer. Therefore, monolithic silicon detectors could be fabricated in this way which would allow the free choice of electronic chips and high resistive silicon bulk, even from different providers. Moreover, a monolithic detector with a high resistive bulk would also be available. Electrical properties of the bonded interface are then critical for this application. Indeed, mobile charges generated by radiation inside the bonded bulk are expected to transit through the interface to be collected by the read-out electronics. In order to characterize this interface, the concept of Transient Current Technique (TCT) has been explored by means of numerical simulations combined with a physics based analytical model. In this work, the analytical model giving insight into the physics behind the TCT dependence upon interface traps is validated using both TCAD simulations and experimental measurements.

  19. Fundamental characterization of shrink techniques on negative tone development based dense contact holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Kaveri; Light, Scott L.

    2016-03-01

    Enormous advances have been made in recent years to design sub 40nm dense contact hole pattern with local CD uniformity (CDU) that the process can tolerate. Negative tone development process (NTD) on 193nm photoresists has achieved this to a large extent without the requirement of additional processing steps on the patterned layer. With further shrinking of size of the subsequent nodes, the demand to produce smaller patterns with wider process window, low defectivity, and improved CDU is increasing, and reaching beyond what can be achieved through NTD alone. A number of techniques are in practice today to achieve this, most notably, implementation of a collar of Atomic Layer Deposited SiO2 (ALD) on photoresist or substrate. However, in recent years, various material suppliers have also proposed shrink chemistries to achieve this. In this paper, we have provided fundamental characterization of shrink via application of spin-on agents (organic as well as aqueous) on the post-imaged pattern. We have also compared them for their shrink capacity, defect tendency, dry etch capability and ease of implementation in the process flow. In addition, we have provided recommendations on which technique is suitable for a given set of process prerequisites.

  20. Characterization of (Th,U)O 2 fuel pellets made by impregnation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutty, T. R. G.; Nair, M. R.; Sengupta, P.; Basak, U.; Kumar, Arun; Kamath, H. S.

    2008-02-01

    Impregnation technique is an attractive alternative for manufacturing highly radiotoxic 233U bearing thoria based mixed oxide fuel pellets, which are remotely treated in hot cell or shielded glove-box facilities. This technique is being investigated to fabricate the fuel for the forthcoming Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR). In the impregnation process, porous ThO 2 pellets are prepared in an unshielded facility which are then impregnated with 1.5 molar uranyl nitrate solution in a shielded facility. The resulting composites are dried and denitrated at 500 °C and then sintered in reducing/oxidizing atmosphere to obtain high density (Th,U)O 2 pellets. In this work, the densification behaviour of ThO 2-2% UO 2 and ThO 2-4% UO 2 pellets was studied in reducing and oxidizing atmospheres using a high temperature dilatometer. Densification was found to be larger in air than in Ar-8% H 2. The characterization of the sintered pellets was made by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The grain structure of ThO 2-2% UO 2 and ThO 2-4% UO 2 pellets was uniform. The EPMA data confirmed that the uranium concentration was slightly higher at the periphery of the pellet than that at the centre.

  1. Experimental characterization of sulfate damage of concrete based on the harmonic wave modulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Tingyuan; Meng, Wanlin; Talebzadeh, Neda; Chen, Jun

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to characterize cracking progression of concrete samples subjected to sulfate attack cycles by employment of a nonlinear wave modulation technique. The sidebands in frequency domain (f1±f2) are produced due to the modulation of two ultrasonic waves (high frequency f1 and low frequency f2) and the relative amplitude of sidebands is defined as the nonlinear parameter considered as a caliber for structural damage. Different from previous work where the low frequency signal was generated by the instrumented hammer, the low frequency signal in this research is a harmonic wave produced by an electromagnetic exciter to avoid the uncertainty of man-made influence. Experimental results show that the nonlinear parameter presents an excellent correlation with the progress of material deterioration, indicating that the wave modulation method is capable of discriminating different states of damage. The work validates the feasibility and sensitivity of nonlinear wave modulation technique based on harmonic signals for the damage detection of concrete materials suffered from typical durability problems.

  2. Development and Optimization of Dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy Techniques with Applications in Soft Matter Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Babak

    The overall goals of this project are (i) to improve the current dynamic modes of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with the focus of multifrequency AFM measurements on soft matters in ambient air and liquid environments and (ii) to develop a new methodology for mechanically characterizing the subsurface of soft samples, allowing users to gradually, controllably and reversibly reveal features that are buried under the surface. This dissertation includes a wide range of studies on multifrequency atomic force microscopy. Firstly, the imaging parameters (drive amplitude and frequency) of each eigenmode is studied, optimized based on the observables. Secondly, a new mutltifrequency AFM technique with capability of imaging subsurface features has been developed and verified through experiments. Based on the first goal of the project, an experimental protocol to select excitation frequency in air for single tapping mode and bimodal AFM are provided. Additionally, a rigorous guideline for the selection of drive frequency in ambient air, liquid environment based on the energy quantities and slope of the cantilever's phase response is established. Finally, an advantage of using higher and stiffer eigenmodes for imaging soft matters has been proposed and verified experimentally. By this technique, subsurface imaging capabilities of AFM are expanded.

  3. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques Applied to the Quantitative Characterization of Textile Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1998-01-01

    An overall goal of this research has been to enhance our understanding of the scientific principles necessary to develop advanced ultrasonic nondestructive techniques for the quantitative characterization of advanced composite structures. To this end, we have investigated a thin woven composite (5-harness biaxial weave). We have studied the effects that variations of the physical parameters of the experimental setup can have on the ultrasonic determination of the material properties for this thin composite. In particular, we have considered the variation of the nominal center frequency and the f-number of the transmitting transducer which in turn address issues such as focusing and beam spread of ultrasonic fields. This study has employed a planar, two-dimensional, receiving pseudo-array that has permitted investigation of the diffraction patterns of ultrasonic fields. Distortion of the ultrasonic field due to the spatial anisotropy of the thin composite has prompted investigation of the phenomenon of phase cancellation at the face of a finite-aperture, piezoelectric receiver. We have performed phase-sensitive and phase-insensitive analyses to provide a measure of the amount of phase cancellation at the face of a finite-aperture, piezoelectric receiver. The pursuit of robust measurements of received energy (i.e., those not susceptible to phase cancellation at the face of a finite-aperture, piezoelectric receiver) supports the development of robust techniques to determine material properties from measure ultrasonic parameters.

  4. Structural characterization of bacterial lipopolysaccharides with mass spectrometry and on- and off-line separation techniques.

    PubMed

    Kilár, Anikó; Dörnyei, Ágnes; Kocsis, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this review is the application of mass spectrometry to the structural characterization of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), also referred to as "endotoxins," because they elicit the strong immune response in infected organisms. Recently, a wide variety of MS-based applications have been implemented to the structure elucidation of LPS. Methodological improvements, as well as on- and off-line separation procedures, proved the versatility of mass spectrometry to study complex LPS mixtures. Special attention is given in the review to the tandem mass spectrometric methods and protocols for the analyses of lipid A, the endotoxic principle of LPS. We compare and evaluate the different ionization techniques (MALDI, ESI) in view of their use in intact R- and S-type LPS and lipid A studies. Methods for sample preparation of LPS prior to mass spectrometric analysis are also described. The direct identification of intrinsic heterogeneities of most intact LPS and lipid A preparations is a particular challenge, for which separation techniques (e.g., TLC, slab-PAGE, CE, GC, HPLC) combined with mass spectrometry are often necessary. A brief summary of these combined methodologies to profile LPS molecular species is provided.

  5. Dimensional characterization of a quasispherical resonator by microwave and coordinate measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, R.; Flack, D.; Morantz, P.; Sutton, G.; Shore, P.; de Podesta, M.

    2011-02-01

    We describe the dimensional characterization of copper quasisphere NPL-Cranfield 2. The quasisphere is assembled from two hemispheres such that the internal shape is a triaxial ellipsoid, the major axes of which have nominal radii 62.000 mm, 62.031 mm and 62.062 mm. The artefact has been manufactured using diamond-turning technology and shows a deviation from design form of less than ±1 µm over most of its surface. Our characterization involves both coordinate measuring machine (CMM) experiments and microwave resonance spectroscopy. We have sought to reduce the dimensional uncertainty below the maximum permissible error of the CMM by comparative measurements with silicon and Zerodur spheres of known volume. Using this technique we determined the equivalent radius with an uncertainty of u(k = 1) = 114 nm, a fractional uncertainty of 1.8 parts in 106. Due to anisotropy of the probe response, we could only determine the eccentricities of the quasihemispheres with a fractional uncertainty of approximately 2%. Our microwave characterization uses the TM11 to TM18 resonances. We find the equivalent radius inferred from analysis of these modes to be consistent within ±4 nm with an overall uncertainty u(k = 1) = 11 nm. We discuss corrections for surface conductivity, waveguide perturbations and dielectric surface layers. We find that the CMM radius estimates derived from each hemisphere cannot be used to accurately predict the equivalent radius of the assembled resonator for two reasons. Firstly, the equatorial flanges are flat only to within ±1 µm, leading to an equatorial 'gap' whose dimension cannot be reliably estimated. Secondly, the resonator undergoes significant elastic distortion when the bolts connecting the hemispheres are tightened. We provide CMM and microwave measurements to support these conclusions in addition to finite-element modelling. Finally, we consider the implications of this work on a forthcoming experiment to determine the Boltzmann constant

  6. Bio-Impedance Characterization Technique with Implantable Neural Stimulator Using Biphasic Current Stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yi-Kai; Chang, Chih-Wei; Liu, Wentai

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the bio-impedance and its equivalent circuit model at the electrode-electrolyte/tissue interface is important in the application of functional electrical stimulation. Impedance can be used as a merit to evaluate the proximity between electrodes and targeted tissues. Understanding the equivalent circuit parameters of the electrode can further be leveraged to set a safe boundary for stimulus parameters in order not to exceed the water window of electrodes. In this paper, we present an impedance characterization technique and implement a proof-of-concept system using an implantable neural stimulator and an off-the-shelf microcontroller. The proposed technique yields the parameters of the equivalent circuit of an electrode through large signal analysis by injecting a single low-intensity biphasic current stimulus with deliberately inserted inter-pulse delay and by acquiring the transient electrode voltage at three well-specified timings. Using low-intensity stimulus allows the derivation of electrode double layer capacitance since capacitive charge-injection dominates when electrode overpotential is small. Insertion of the inter-pulse delay creates a controlled discharge time to estimate the Faradic resistance. The proposed method has been validated by measuring the impedance of a) an emulated Randles cells made of discrete circuit components and b) a custom-made platinum electrode array in-vitro, and comparing estimated parameters with the results derived from an impedance analyzer. The proposed technique can be integrated into implantable or commercial neural stimulator system at low extra power consumption, low extra-hardware cost, and light computation. PMID:25569999

  7. Applied Protein and Molecular Techniques for Characterization of B Cell Neoplasms in Horses

    PubMed Central

    Badial, Peres R.; Tallmadge, Rebecca L.; Miller, Steven; Stokol, Tracy; Richards, Kristy; Borges, Alexandre S.

    2015-01-01

    Mature B cell neoplasms cover a spectrum of diseases involving lymphoid tissues (lymphoma) or blood (leukemia), with an overlap between these two presentations. Previous studies describing equine lymphoid neoplasias have not included analyses of clonality using molecular techniques. The objective of this study was to use molecular techniques to advance the classification of B cell lymphoproliferative diseases in five adult equine patients with a rare condition of monoclonal gammopathy, B cell leukemia, and concurrent lymphadenopathy (lymphoma/leukemia). The B cell neoplasms were phenotypically characterized by gene and cell surface molecule expression, secreted immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype concentrations, Ig heavy-chain variable (IGHV) region domain sequencing, and spectratyping. All five patients had hyperglobulinemia due to IgG1 or IgG4/7 monoclonal gammopathy. Peripheral blood leukocyte immunophenotyping revealed high proportions of IgG1- or IgG4/7-positive cells and relative T cell lymphopenia. Most leukemic cells lacked the surface B cell markers CD19 and CD21. IGHG1 or IGHG4/7 gene expression was consistent with surface protein expression, and secreted isotype and Ig spectratyping revealed one dominant monoclonal peak. The mRNA expression of the B cell-associated developmental genes EBF1, PAX5, and CD19 was high compared to that of the plasma cell-associated marker CD38. Sequence analysis of the IGHV domain of leukemic cells revealed mutated Igs. In conclusion, the protein and molecular techniques used in this study identified neoplastic cells compatible with a developmental transition between B cell and plasma cell stages, and they can be used for the classification of equine B cell lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:26311245

  8. Characterization of Deficiencies in the Frequency Domain Forced Response Analysis Technique for Supersonic Turbine Bladed Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Schmauch, Preston

    2011-01-01

    Turbine blades in rocket and jet engine turbomachinery experience enormous harmonic loading conditions. These loads result from the integer number of upstream and downstream stator vanes as well as the other turbine stages. Assessing the blade structural integrity is a complex task requiring an initial characterization of whether resonance is possible and then performing a forced response analysis if that condition is met. The standard technique for forced response analysis in rocket engines is to decompose a CFD-generated flow field into its harmonic components, and to then perform a frequency response analysis at the problematic natural frequencies. Recent CFD analysis and water-flow testing at NASA/MSFC, though, indicates that this technique may miss substantial harmonic and non-harmonic excitation sources that become present in complex flows. A substantial effort has been made to account for this denser spatial Fourier content in frequency response analysis (described in another paper by the author), but the question still remains whether the frequency response analysis itself is capable of capturing the excitation content sufficiently. Two studies comparing frequency response analysis with transient response analysis, therefore, of bladed-disks undergoing this complex flow environment have been performed. The first is of a bladed disk with each blade modeled by simple beam elements. Six loading cases were generated by varying a baseline harmonic excitation in different ways based upon cold-flow testing from Heritage Fuel Air Turbine Test. It was hypothesized that the randomness and other variation from the standard harmonic excitation would reduce the blade structural response, but the results showed little reduction. The second study was of a realistic model of a bladed-disk excited by the same CFD used in the J2X engine program. It was hypothesized that enforcing periodicity in the CFD (inherent in the frequency response technique) would overestimate the

  9. An innovative application of a small-scale motion analysis technique to quantify human skin deformation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, Jamaluddin; Holt, Cathy A; Evans, Sam L

    2010-03-22

    This study highlights a new experimental method developed to measure full-field deformation of human skin in vivo. The technique uses a small-scale Qualisys (Sweden) 3D motion capture system and an array of reflective markers placed on the forearm of five healthy volunteers. A load of up to 1.5N was applied to induce skin deformation by pulling a fine wire attached to the centre of the marker configuration. Loading and marker displacements were recorded simultaneously. 3D marker trajectory data was generated for three different load directions. Tests were repeated to investigate accuracy and repeatability. Calibration results indicate the accuracy of the motion capture system with an average residual of 0.05 mm. The procedure was found to be repeatable and accurate for five repeated tests of measured displacements with a maximum variance of 5%. Experimental data are presented to demonstrate robustness and the ability to produce significant outputs. For all five subjects, at 1N load, the mean and standard deviations of skin axial and lateral displacements were found to be 11.7+/-1.6mm and 12.3+/-3.3mm, respectively. The axial displacements ratio (u(90)/u(0)) ranges from 0.63 to 1.45 with mean+/-standard deviation of 0.982+/-0.34 and 0.982+/-0.32 for left and right arms, respectively. The experiments generated useful and accurate data that can be used to study the viscoelastic, hyperelastic or anisotropic behaviour of human skin. The measured displacements will be analysed further to determine the mechanical properties of skin using inverse Finite Element Analysis and Ogden model.

  10. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-03

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company's Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an Advanced Overfire Air (AOFA) system followed by Low NO{sub x} Burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

  11. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, third quarter 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-03

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an Advanced Overfire Air (AOFA) system followed by Low NO{sub x} Burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

  12. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-24

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (No[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company's Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO[sub x] combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO[sub x] reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO[sub x] burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

  13. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, Second quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-24

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (No{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

  14. Meso-scale characterization of lithium distribution in lithium-ion batteries using ion beam analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Arrabal, R.; Panizo-Laiz, M.; Fujita, K.; Mima, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Kamiya, T.; Orikasa, Y.; Uchimoto, Y.; Sawada, H.; Okuda, C.; Kato, Y.; Perlado, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The performance of a Li-ion battery (LIB) is mainly governed by the diffusion capabilities of lithium in the electrodes. Thus, for LIB improvement it is essential to characterize the lithium distribution. Most of the traditionally used techniques for lithium characterization give information about the local scale or in the macroscopic scale. However, the lithium behavior at the local scale is not mirrored at the macroscopic scale. Therefore, the lithium characterization in the mesoscopic scale would be of help to understand and to connect the mechanisms taking place in the two spatial scales. In this paper, we show a general description of the capabilities and limitations of ion beam analysis techniques to study the distributions of lithium and other elements present in the electrodes in the mesoscopic scale. The potential of the 7Li(p,α0)4He nuclear reaction to non-invasively examine the lithium distribution as a function of depth is illustrated. The lithium spatial distribution is characterized using particle induced γ-ray (μ-PIGE) spectroscopy. This technique allows estimating the density of the active particles in the electrode effectively contributing to the Li intercalation and/or de-intercalation. The advantages of the use of ion beam analysis techniques in comparison to more traditional techniques for electrode characterization are discussed.

  15. Electrical characterization of dislocations in gallium nitride using advanced scanning probe techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpkins, Blake Shelley Ginsberg

    GaN-based materials are promising for high speed and power applications such as amplifier and communications circuits. Ga, In, and AIN-based alloys span a wide optical range (2--6.1 eV) and exhibit strong polarizations making them useful in many devices; however, films are highly defective (˜10 8 dislocations cm-2) due to lack of suitable substrates. Thus, nanoscale electronic characterization of these dislocations is critical for device and growth optimization. Scanning probe techniques enable characterization at length-scales unattainable by conventional techniques. First, scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) was used to image surface potential variations due to charged dislocations in HVPE-grown GaN. The film's structural evolution "with thickness was monitored showing a decrease in dislocation density, likely through dislocation reaction. Numerical simulations were used to investigate tip-size effects when imaging highly localized (tens of nm) potential variations indicating that measured dislocation induced potential features in GaN can be much smaller (˜80%) than true variations. Next, capacitance variations in MBE-grown HFETs, due to dislocations-induced carrier depletion, were imaged with scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM). The distribution of these charged centers was correlated with buffer schemes showing that an AIN buffer leads to pseudomorphic (2D) nucleation and randomly distributed misfit dislocations while deposition directly on SiC results in island (3D) nucleation and a domain structure with dislocations grouped at domain boundaries. Hall measurements and numerical simulations were also carried out to further study the implications of these microstructures. Numerical results indicated that randomly distributed dislocations deplete a larger fraction of free carriers than the same density of grouped dislocations and correlated favorably with Hall results. Correlated SKPM and conductive AFM (C-AFM) measurements were then used to study

  16. Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330 steel with kolsky bar techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

    2010-08-01

    There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical

  17. Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330-V steel with kolsky bar techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

    2010-09-01

    There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical

  18. Characterization of a constrained paired-view technique in iterative reconstruction for breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Gang; Yaffe, Martin J.; Mainprize, James G.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: The order in which the projection views are employed in the reconstruction of tomosynthesis by iterative algorithms, such as simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique and maximum likelihood, has a strong effect on the rate of convergence, accuracy, and the edge-blurring artifacts in the reconstructed image. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize and evaluate the effects of ordering schemes on image quality for breast tomosynthesis reconstruction and to explore a new constrained paired-view technique that could provide reduction of reconstruction artifacts. In this work, the authors compared several different ordering schemes and characterized the image quality and the formation of out-of-plane artifacts. Furthermore, a new normalization method is presented. It produces more accurate reconstructions with reduced artifacts comparing to the standard method of sequential ordering.Methods: In addition to visual assessment of image quality, several indices such as the signal-difference-to-noise ratio, the artifact-spread function, and the lesion detectability (d{sup ′}) were computed to quantitatively evaluate the effect of ordering scheme. The sets of breast tomosynthesis projection images were simulated for reconstruction; one set had uniform background (white noise only) and the other two contained both anatomic background and quantum noise. Clinical breast images were also studied for comparison.Results: The authors have quantified the image quality in reconstructed slices for a range of tumor sizes. The authors’ proposed method provides better performance for all of the metrics tested (contrast, d{sup ′}, and the level of artifacts) both for the uniform phantom case and in the presence of anatomical structure.Conclusions: The paired projection normalization provides better performance in the image quality of the reconstructed slices, and results in a lower level of artifacts in the Z direction. This implies that even a relatively

  19. Analytical characterization of cyclodextrins: History, official methods and recommended new techniques.

    PubMed

    Szente, Lajos; Szemán, Julianna; Sohajda, Tamás

    2016-10-25

    The main goal of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview on the methods used for analysis of cyclodextrins (CDs) and CD-derivatives. The paper intends to act as a guide for the readers in looking around the classical and modern instrumental analytical methods suitable for identification, characterization and determination of CDs themselves, CDs in finished products or even in biological samples. At present, in the European and United States Pharmacopoeias, the three parent CDs and two synthetic derivatives, namely the (2-hydroxypropyl)-beta-CD and sulfobutylether-beta-CD Na salt are official. Besides these modified CDs, two other derivatives are approved as excipients in human pharmaceutical products: the (2-hydroxypropyl)-gamma-CD and the randomly methylated-beta-CD. Although most of the official analysis methods in the pharmacopoeias have been well used for decades, new aspects of the functional excipient CD characterization suggest a need to revisit compendial methods. Comparison of strengths and weaknesses of current official methods with new improved techniques intends to help analysts to decide on changing traditional analytical methods with improved new ones. This review also deals with the analytical aspects of the first single isomer CD derivative approved as a drug active (Sugammadex/Bridion(®)) as well as analytical considerations of using CDs themselves as active pharmaceutical ingredients. Stability-indicating instrumental methods suitable to adequately follow chemical- and enzymatic degradation of CDs will also be discussed. Challenges in the determination of CDs in different biological matrices will be illustrated on real pharmaco- and toxicokinetic studies of CD-enabled drug formulations.

  20. Potential and limitations of microanalysis SEM techniques to characterize borides in brazed Ni-based superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Vargas, J.; Siredey-Schwaller, N.; Noyrez, P.; Mathieu, S.; Bocher, P.; and others

    2014-08-15

    Brazed Ni-based superalloys containing complex phases of different Boron contents remain difficult to characterize at the micrometer scale. Indeed Boron is a light element difficult to measure precisely. The state-of-the-art microanalysis systems have been tested on a single crystal MC2 based metal brazed with BNi-2 alloy to identify boride precipitates. Effort has been made to evaluate the accuracy in Boron quantitation. Energy-dispersive and wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy attached to a Scanning Electron Microscope have first been used to determine the elemental composition of Boron-free phases, and then applied to various types of borides. Results have been compared to the ones obtained using a dedicated electron probe microanalysis, considered here as the reference technique. The most accurate method to quantify Boron using EDS is definitely by composition difference. A precision of 5 at.% could be achieved with optimized data acquisition and post-processing schemes. Attempts that aimed at directly quantifying Boron with various standards using EDS or coupled EDS/WDS gave less accurate results. Ultimately, Electron Backscatter Diffraction combined with localized EDS analysis has proved invaluable in conclusively identifying micrometer sized boride precipitates; thus further improving the characterization of brazed Ni-based superalloys. - Highlights: • We attempt to accurately identify Boron-rich phases in Ni-based superalloys. • EDS, WDS, EBSD systems are tested for accurate identification of these borides. • Results are compared with those obtained by electron probe microanalysis. • Boron was measured with EDS by composition difference with a precision of 5 at. %. • Additional EBSD in phase identification mode conclusively identifies the borides.

  1. Hydrogeologic facies characterization of an alluvial fan near Fresno, California, using geophysical techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burow, Karen R.; Weissmann, G.S.; Miller, R.D.; Placzek, Gary

    1997-01-01

    DBCP (1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane) contamination in the sole source aquifer near Fresno, California, has significantly affected drinking-water supplies. Borehole and surface geophysical data were integrated with borehole textural data to characterize the Kings River alluvial fan sediments and to provide a framework for computer modeling of pesticide transport in ground water. Primary hydrogeologic facies units, such as gravel, coarse sand or gravel, fine sand, and silt and clay, were identified in cores collected from three borings located on a 4.6-kilometer transect of multilevel monitoring wells. Borehole geophysical logs collected from seven wells and surface geophysical surveys were used to extrapolate hydrogeologic facies to depths of about 82meters and to correlate the facies units with neighboring drilling sites. Thickness ranged from 0.3to 13 meters for sand and gravel units, and from 0.3 to 17 meters for silt and clay. The lateral extent of distinct silt and clay layers was mapped using shallow seismic reflection and ground-penetrating radar techniques. About 3.6 kilometers of seismic reflection data were collected; at least three distinct fine-grained layers were mapped. The depth of investigation of the seismic survey ranged from 34 to 107 meters below land surface, and vertical resolution was about 3.5 meters. The ground-penetrating radar survey covered 3.6kilometers and imaged a 1.5-meters thick, continuous fine-grained layer located at a depth of about 8 meters. Integrated results from the borehole sediment descriptions and geophysical surveys provided a detailed characterization over a larger areal extent than traditional hydrogeologic methods alone.

  2. Extraction techniques using isopropanol and Tenax to characterize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons bioavailability in sediment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Xu, Xiaoyi; Chen, Xi; Ji, Fangying; Hu, Bibo

    2017-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacterium strain J1-q (Sphingomonas pseudosanguinis strain J1-q) was isolated from Yangtze River surface sediment in the downtown area of Chongqing in a previous study. Isopropanol and Tenax extraction techniques were used to characterize the bioavailability of target PAH compounds. Phenanthrene (Phe) and fluoranthene (Fluo) were the target PAHs due to their significant background concentrations in surface sediment samples. Isopropanol solutions at concentrations of 50-100% and residual Phe and Fluo concentrations in sediment were correlated, with R(2) values of 0.9846 and 0.9649, respectively. The quantities of the Phe and Fluo fractions extracted for 3days with isopropanol from sediment were closely related with the corresponding quantities of PAHs degraded by bacterial strain J1-q when the extracting concentrations were 55% and 80%, respectively. The quantity of Phe extracted by Tenax agreed with the total quantity biodegraded when the Tenax: sediment mass ratio was 0.25 and the target PAHs were degraded for 30d, whereas the extracted quantity of Fluo accounted for 93.30% of the total quantity biodegraded by the bacterium. The triphasic model was appropriate to simulate the consecutive Phe and Fluo extraction process using Tenax at various Tenax: sediment ratios, and all simulated correlation coefficients were >0.9151. A 24-h extraction period was adequate to estimate the rapidly desorbing fractions when they were extracted with Tenax. Isopropanol extraction was preferable to characterize Phe and Fluo bioavailability under the experimental conditions, whereas Tenax extraction was useful to predict bioavailability of the two target PAHs with particular selectivity.

  3. Characterization and performance evaluation of an innovative mesoporous activated carbon used for drinking water purification in comparison with commercial carbons.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xu-Jin; Li, Wei-Guang; Wang, Guang-Zhi; Zhang, Duo-Ying; Fan, Wen-Biao; Yin, Zhao-Dong

    2015-09-01

    The preparation, characterization, and performance evaluation of an innovative mesoporous activated carbon (C-XHIT) were conducted in this study. Comparative evaluation with commercial carbons (C-PS and C-ZJ15) and long-term performance evaluation of C-XHIT were conducted in small-scale system-A (S-A) and pilot-scale system-B (S-B-1 and S-B-2 in series), respectively, for treating water from Songhua River. The cumulative uptake of micropollutants varied with KBV (water volume fed to columns divided by the mass of carbons, m(3) H2O/kg carbon) was employed in the performance evaluation. The results identified that mesoporous and microporous volumes were simultaneously well-developed in C-XHIT. Higher mesoporosity (63.94 %) and average pore width (37.91 Å) of C-XHIT ensured a higher adsorption capacity for humic acid compared to C-PS and C-ZJ15. When the KBV of S-A reached 12.58 m(3) H2O/kg carbon, cumulative uptake of organic pollutants achieved by C-XHIT increased by 32.82 and 156.29 % for DOC (QC) and 22.53 and 112.48 % for UV254 (QUV) compared to C-PS and C-ZJ15, respectively; in contrast, the adsorption capacity of NH4 (+)-N did not improve significantly. C-XHIT achieved high average removal efficiencies for DOC (77.43 ± 16.54 %) and UV254 (83.18 ± 13.88 %) in S-B over 253 days of operation (KBV = 62 m(3) H2O/kg carbon). Adsorption dominated the removal of DOC and UV254 in the initial phases of KBV (0-15 m(3) H2O/kg carbon), and simultaneous biodegradation and adsorption were identified as the mechanisms for organic pollutant uptake at KBV above 25 m(3) H2O/kg carbon. The average rates contributed by S-B-1 and S-B-2 for QC and QUV were approximately 0.75 and 0.25, respectively. Good linear and exponential correlations were observed between S-A and S-B in terms of QC and QUV obtained by C-XHIT, respectively, for the same KBV ranges, indicating a rapid and cost-saving evaluation method. The linear correlation between mesoporosity and QC

  4. Optomechatronic Techniques to Characterize the Topography of a MW Satellite Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölck, Daniel; Molina, Alejandro R. Roldán; Fluxá, Patricio E.; Zerbino, Lía M.; Bava, José A.; Cortizo, Eduardo C.; Garavaglia, Mario

    2008-04-01

    We describe several optomecatronic techniques to characterize the topographic changes due to thermomechanical deformations of models of an off-set MW satellite antenna. The surface of the antennas is a paraboloidal torus. This type of antenna will be installed in the SAC-D/AQUARIUS Satellite Mission; this mission is a collaboration between the NASA from the USA and the Comisión Nacional de Actividades Espaciales (CONAE), Argentina. Two antennas will serve at 23.8 GHz and 36.5 GHz radiometers to study the global water cycle by analyzing various geophysical parameters. The used optomecatronic techniques were Structured illumination (SI), Differential Structured Illumination (DSI), Moiré Profilometry (MP), and Fourier Transform Profilometry (FTP). The temporal changes of temperature and the spatial thermal gradients were recorded by using Infrared Thermography (IRT). Optical measurements were compared with those obtained by a mechanical dial indicator. The quality of the mechanical measurements is of the order of λ/100, where λ is the wavelength of the MW radiation at 23.8 GHz and 36.5 GHz, that is, λ/100 is of the order of 80 μm. This figure of merit is enough for this type of antennas. On the other hand, the quality of the present optical measurement reached a value of λ/30, that is, 270 μm. In spite of the fact that mechanical measurements look better than photomechanical measurements, it was decided to carry on with the application of the SI, DSI, MP and FTP, because they are non contacting procedures which will be used in testing the antennas along warm-up and warm-down cycles in a vacuum, to experimentally simulate their space environment behavior.

  5. Routine characterization of 3-D profiles of SRF cavity defects using replica techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, M.; Wu, G.; Burk, D.; Ozelis, J.; Harms, E.; Sergatskov, D.; Hicks, D.; Cooley, L.D.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Recent coordination of thermometry with optical images has shown that obvious defects at specific locations produce heat or even quench superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities, imposing a significant limit on the overall accelerating gradient produced by the cavity. Characterization of the topography at such locations provides clues about how the defects originated, from which schemes for their prevention might be devised. Topographic analyses also provide understanding of the electromagnetic mechanism by which defects limit cavity performance, from which viability of repair techniques might be assessed. In this article we discuss how a variety of two-component silicone-based room-temperature vulcanizing agents can be routinely used to make replicas of the cavity surface and extract topographic details of cavity defects. Previously, this level of detail could only be obtained by cutting suspect regions from the cavity, thus destroying the cavity. We show 3-D profiles extracted from several different 1.3 GHz cavities. The defect locations, which were all near cavity welds, compelled us to develop extraction techniques for both equator and iris welds as well as from deep inside long 9-cell cavities. Profilometry scans of the replicas yield micrometer-scale information, and we describe various curious features, such as small peaks at the bottom of pits, which were not apparent in previous optical inspections. We also discuss contour information in terms of electromagnetic mechanisms proposed by others for local cavity heating. We show that production of the replica followed by high-pressure rinsing dose not adversely affect the cavity RF performance.

  6. Characterization of Porosity Development in Oxidized Graphite using Automated Image Analysis Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Burchell, Timothy D

    2009-09-01

    This document reports on initial activities at ORNL aimed at quantitative characterization of porosity development in oxidized graphite specimens using automated image analysis (AIA) techniques. A series of cylindrical shape specimens were machined from nuclear-grade graphite (type PCEA, from GrafTech International). The specimens were oxidized in air to various levels of weight loss (between 5 and 20 %) and at three oxidation temperatures (between 600 and 750 oC). The procedure used for specimen preparation and oxidation was based on ASTM D-7542-09. Oxidized specimens were sectioned, resin-mounted and polished for optical microscopy examination. Mosaic pictures of rectangular stripes (25 mm x 0.4 mm) along a diameter of sectioned specimens were recorded. A commercial software (ImagePro) was evaluated for automated analysis of images. Because oxidized zones in graphite are less reflective in visible light than the pristine, unoxidized material, the microstructural changes induced by oxidation can easily be identified and analyzed. Oxidation at low temperatures contributes to development of numerous fine pores (< 100 m2) distributed more or less uniformly over a certain depth (5-6 mm) from the surface of graphite specimens, while causing no apparent external damage to the specimens. In contrast, oxidation at high temperatures causes dimensional changes and substantial surface damage within a narrow band (< 1 mm) near the exposed graphite surface, but leaves the interior of specimens with little or no changes in the pore structure. Based on these results it appears that weakening and degradation of mechanical properties of graphite materials produced by uniform oxidation at low temperatures is related to the massive development of fine pores in the oxidized zone. It was demonstrated that optical microscopy enhanced by AIA techniques allows accurate determination of oxidant penetration depth and of distribution of porosity in oxidized graphite materials.

  7. Novel techniques for characterization of hydrocarbon emission sources in the Barnett Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, Brian Joseph

    Changes in ambient atmospheric hydrocarbon concentrations can have both short-term and long-term effects on the atmosphere and on human health. Thus, accurate characterization of emissions sources is critically important. The recent boom in shale gas production has led to an increase in hydrocarbon emissions from associated processes, though the exact extent is uncertain. As an original quantification technique, a model airplane equipped with a specially-designed, open-path methane sensor was flown multiple times over a natural gas compressor station in the Barnett Shale in October 2013. A linear optimization was introduced to a standard Gaussian plume model in an effort to determine the most probable emission rate coming from the station. This is shown to be a suitable approach given an ideal source with a single, central plume. Separately, an analysis was performed to characterize the nonmethane hydrocarbons in the Barnett during the same period. Starting with ambient hourly concentration measurements of forty-six hydrocarbon species, Lagrangian air parcel trajectories were implemented in a meteorological model to extend the resolution of these measurements and achieve domain-fillings of the region for the period of interest. A self-organizing map (a type of unsupervised classification) was then utilized to reduce the dimensionality of the total multivariate set of grids into characteristic one-dimensional signatures. By also introducing a self-organizing map classification of the contemporary wind measurements, the spatial hydrocarbon characterizations are analyzed for periods with similar wind conditions. The accuracy of the classification is verified through assessment of observed spatial mixing ratio enhancements of key species, through site-comparisons with a related long-term study, and through a random forest analysis (an ensemble learning method of supervised classification) to determine the most important species for defining key classes. The hydrocarbon

  8. Novel Techniques for Optical Characterization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit, Jason K.

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for characterizing the structure and optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) samples. This thesis will discuss the development and application of new fluorescence-based methods designed to fully characterize bulk SWCNT suspensions by length and structural composition. An efficient new method is demonstrated to measure length distributions of aqueous SWCNT samples by analyzing the diffusional motions of many individual nanotubes captured in sequences of short-wave infrared (SWIR) fluorescence images. This method, termed length analysis by nanotube diffusion (LAND), provides distributions in very good agreement with those obtained by conventional atomic force microscopy analysis. A novel microscopy technique is described to measure the peak emission wavelengths of many individual nanotubes without the use of a spectrometer. We exploit the chromatic aberration of an objective lens to deduce emission wavelength from focal depth. Spectral measurements successfully reproduce bulk emission spectra and also provide relative abundances of specific SWCNT structures. A new approach is applied to find nanotube concentrations by directly counting SWCNTs in SWIR fluorescence images. Concentrations are used to rigorously determine absolute absorption cross sections for the E11 and E22 electronic transitions of the (6,5), (7,5), (7,6), (8,6), (8,7) and (9,7) SWCNT species. It is found that the absorption cross section per carbon atom decreases with increasing nanotube diameter. Finally, the spectral analysis of fluorescence fluctuations (SAFF) method is developed and used to characterize SWCNT samples by structural composition, sample quality, and aggregation state. Fluorescence spectra are sequentially measured from small volumes of slowly flowing dilute samples and the intensity fluctuations resulting from small statistical variations in nanotube concentration are analyzed. The ratio of the squared

  9. Characterization of Microstructure and Molecular Dynamics with High Frequency Oscillatory Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remmler, Torsten; Amin, Samiul; Ferrante, Andrea; Pechhold, Wolfgang

    2009-07-01

    To characterize the rheological behaviour of complex viscoelastic fluids, polymer melts and other soft materials, motor-drive controlled rheometers are mainly used, either at constant stress or strain rate, or in the oscillatory mode. The latter has proved advantageous to discover the viscoelastic functions G*, η*, J* as fingerprints of the material under investigation, it's composition, molecular modelling and applicability. A conclusive analysis of such a viscoelastic spectrum can only be achieved if the amplitudes chosen guarantee linearity and if the frequency range covers more than 6 decades to reach the low kHz-domain. Investigations of many materials with motor-drive controlled rheometers are limited at higher frequencies and reach the above mentioned goal by applying the time-temperature superposition principle, i.e. the mastercurve technique. Since this method is restricted to rheologically simple materials (e.g. some polymer melts), but exclude those of small activation energies and others with temperature-sensitive chemical/physical structures including phase transitions, oscillating rheometry should be extended into higher real-frequency ranges, to establish useful linear viscoelastic spectroscopy. Since complex fluids can have structural arrangement over a wide range of lengthscales and their relaxation mechanisms can impact the dynamics over a wide range of timescales, multiple techniques need to be employed in order to accurately and fully establish the links between rheology, microstructure & dynamics. This is also critical information, required for fully validating developed theory and models. In this talk, advantages and limits of classical oscillatory rheometry will be covered, handling and principle of operation of two high frequency options are introduced and typical examples for real frequency spectra on soft matter, such as polymer melts, polymer solutions and weak gels will be shown. A xanthum gum based system has been investigated not only

  10. Phase topography-based characterization of thermal effects on materials and joining techniques.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Hagen; Beckert, Erik; Schödel, René

    2015-03-10

    There are growing demands to characterize the stability of assemblies of optical components for ultrahigh-precision instruments. In this paper we demonstrate how absolute length measurements by interferometry can be applied to measure the thermal and dimensional stability of connections. In order to enable investigation of common joining techniques, including wringing, screwing, and gluing, as well as specialized, inorganic joining techniques such as silicatic bonding, thin-film soldering, and solderjet bumping, representative connections were fabricated. By using gage blocks or prismatic bodies as joining parts, parallelism and flatness were provided which are needed for precision interferometric length measurements. The stability of connection elements used in ultrahigh-precision instruments was investigated longitudinally and laterally to the connection interface, and also mutual tilting of the parts was detected by analysis of the phase topographies. The measurements have an accuracy level of about 1 nm, and the traditional wringing method was also considered as a reference joining technique. The long-term behavior was studied within a period of about 1 year under constant temperature. Further, the thermal dilatation and the reaction of connections to thermal stress were measured. Results show that screwed connections do not exhibit a significant drift of length or orientation. They also did not show response to temperature variations of ±10°C. This is different for adhesive connections, where dimensional changes of up to 100 nm were observed. The specimens produced by using thin-film soldering as well as silicatic bonding revealed stability of length better than 5 nm per year and angular stability within ±0.1   arcsec. Furthermore, these specimens were shown to be insensitive to a temporary temperature variation in a range from 10°C to 40°C. This situation is slightly different for the sample connections produced by solderjet bumping, which show a

  11. Does Your Culture Encourage Innovation?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    ca te d Sc ie nc e an d En gi ne er in g La...directly an organization’s support for innovation. This theory was successfully tested utilizing a mathematica l technique ca lled str uctura l equation... ca l R at io p -v al ue Support for Innovation ← Resource Supply for Innovation 1.87 .553 3.39 <.001 Support for Innovation ← Collaboration

  12. Characterization of Air Plane Soot Surrogates using Raman spectroscopy and laser ablation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazallon, Bertrand; Ortega, Ismael Kenneth; Ikhenazene, Raouf; Pirim, Claire; Carpentier, Yvain; Irimiea, Cornelia; Focsa, Cristian; Ouf, François-Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Aviation alters the composition of the atmosphere globally and can thus drive climate change and ozone depletion [1]. Aircraft exhaust plumes contain species (gases and soot particles) produced by the combustion of kerosene with ambient air in the combustion chamber of the engine. Soot particles emitted by air-planes produce persistent contrails in the upper troposphere in ice-supersaturated air masses that contribute to cloudiness and impact the radiative properties of the atmosphere. These aerosol-cloud interactions represent one of the largest sources of uncertainty in global climate models [2]. Though the formation of atmospheric ice particles has been studied for many years [3], there are still numerous opened questions on nucleation properties of soot particles [4], as the ice nucleation experiments showed a large spread in results depending on the nucleation mode chosen and origin of the soot produced. The reasons behind these discrepancies reside in the different physico-chemical properties (composition, structure) of soot particles produced in different conditions, e.g., with respect to fuel or combustion techniques. In this work, we use Raman microscopy (514 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths) and ablation techniques (Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry, and Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry) to characterize soot particle surrogates produced from a CAST generator (propane fuel, four different global equivalence ratios). They are produced as analogues of air-plane soot collected at different engine regimes (PowerJet SaM-146 turbofan) simulating a landing and take-off (LTO) cycle (MERMOSE project (http://mermose.onera.fr/)) [6]. The spectral parameters of the first-order Raman bands of these soot samples are analyzed using a de-convolution approach described by Sadezky et al. (2005) [5]. A systematic Raman analysis is carried out to select a number of parameters (laser wavelength, irradiance at sample, exposure time) that will alter the sample and the

  13. Dynamic High-Temperature Tensile Characterization of an Iridium Alloy with Kolsky Tension Bar Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald; Bignell, John; Ulrich, G. B.; George, Easo P.

    2015-05-29

    In this study, conventional Kolsky tension bar techniques were modified to characterize an iridium alloy in tension at elevated strain rates and temperatures. The specimen was heated to elevated temperatures with an induction coil heater before dynamic loading; whereas, a cooling system was applied to keep the bars at room temperature during heating. A preload system was developed to generate a small pretension load in the bar system during heating in order to compensate for the effect of thermal expansion generated in the high-temperature tensile specimen. A laser system was applied to directly measure the displacements at both ends of the tensile specimen in order to calculate the strain in the specimen. A pair of high-sensitivity semiconductor strain gages was used to measure the weak transmitted force due to the low flow stress in the thin specimen at elevated temperatures. The dynamic high-temperature tensile stress–strain curves of a DOP-26 iridium alloy were experimentally obtained at two different strain rates (~1000 and 3000 s-1) and temperatures (~750 and 1030°C). The effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile stress–strain response of the iridium alloy were determined. Finally, the iridium alloy exhibited high ductility in stress–strain response that strongly depended on strain-rate and temperature.

  14. Dynamic High-Temperature Tensile Characterization of an Iridium Alloy with Kolsky Tension Bar Techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald; ...

    2015-05-29

    In this study, conventional Kolsky tension bar techniques were modified to characterize an iridium alloy in tension at elevated strain rates and temperatures. The specimen was heated to elevated temperatures with an induction coil heater before dynamic loading; whereas, a cooling system was applied to keep the bars at room temperature during heating. A preload system was developed to generate a small pretension load in the bar system during heating in order to compensate for the effect of thermal expansion generated in the high-temperature tensile specimen. A laser system was applied to directly measure the displacements at both ends ofmore » the tensile specimen in order to calculate the strain in the specimen. A pair of high-sensitivity semiconductor strain gages was used to measure the weak transmitted force due to the low flow stress in the thin specimen at elevated temperatures. The dynamic high-temperature tensile stress–strain curves of a DOP-26 iridium alloy were experimentally obtained at two different strain rates (~1000 and 3000 s-1) and temperatures (~750 and 1030°C). The effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile stress–strain response of the iridium alloy were determined. Finally, the iridium alloy exhibited high ductility in stress–strain response that strongly depended on strain-rate and temperature.« less

  15. Microchannels created by sugar and metal microneedles: characterization by microscopy, macromolecular flux and other techniques.

    PubMed

    Li, Guohua; Badkar, Advait; Kalluri, Haripriya; Banga, Ajay K

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using microneedle technology to enhance transcutaneous permeation of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) across hairless rat skin. Microchannels created by maltose and metal (DermaRoller) microneedles were characterized by techniques such as methylene blue staining, histological examination, and calcein imaging. Methylene blue staining and histological sections of treated skin showed that maltose microneedles and DermaRoller breached the skin barrier by creating microchannels in the skin with an average depth of approximately 150 microm, as imaged by confocal microscopy. Calcein imaging and pore permeability index values suggested the uniformity of the created pores in microneedle-treated skin. Transdermal studies with IgG indicated a flux rate of 45.96 ng/cm(2)/h, in vitro, and a C(max) of 7.27 ng/mL, in vivo, for maltose microneedles-treated skin while a flux rate of 353.17 ng/cm(2)/h, in vitro, and a C(max) of 9.33 ng/mL, in vivo, was achieved for DermaRoller-treated skin. Transepidermal water loss measurements and methylene blue staining, in vivo, indicated the presence of microchannels for upto 24 h, when occluded. In conclusion, the microchannels created by maltose microneedles and DermaRoller resulted in the percutaneous enhancement of a macromolecule, human IgG.

  16. Collection and characterization of aerosols from metal cutting techniques typically used in decommissioning nuclear facilities.

    PubMed

    Newton, G J; Hoover, M D; Barr, E B; Wong, B A; Ritter, P D

    1987-11-01

    This study was designed to collect and characterize aerosols released during metal cutting activities typically used in decommissioning radioactively contaminated facilities. Such information can guide in the selection of appropriate control technologies for these airborne materials. Mechanical cutting tools evaluated included a multi-wheel pipe cutter, reciprocating saw, band saw, chop saw, and large and small grinding wheels. Melting-vaporization cutting techniques included an oxy-acetylene torch, electric arc cut rod and plasma torch. With the exception of the multi-wheel pipe cutter, all devices created aerosols in the respirable size range (less than 10 micron aerodynamic diameter). Time required to cut 2-in. (5-cm) Schedule 40, Type 304L, stainless steel ranged from about 0.6 min for the plasma torch to about 3.0 min for the reciprocating saw. Aerosol production rate ranged from less than 10 mg/min for the reciprocating saw to more than 3000 mg/min for the electric arc cut rod. Particles from mechanical tools were irregular in shape, whereas particles from vaporization tools were spheres and ultrafine branched-chain aggregates.

  17. Formulation, Characterization and Evaluation of Paclitaxel loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Prepared by Temperature Modulated Solidification Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Ameya Abhay

    The aim of this research was to formulate, characterize, and evaluate the paclitaxel loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) prepared by a temperature modulated solidification technique developed and optimized in our laboratory. The particle size analysis through dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed and confirmed the spherical shape and nanometer size range of the formulated nanoparticles. Zeta potential measurements confirmed the physical stability of the SLNs with a negative surface charge. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies were done to study the surface topography and particle size and shape. AFM data showed minimal aggregation and more or less spherical SLNs. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (P-XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) confirmed the conversion of bulk lipid into SLNs and high entrapment of paclitaxel into the lipid matrix. The optimized formulation had an entrapment efficiency of approximately 62%. The in-vitro drug release depicted a sustained release of paclitaxel from the SLNs over duration of one week. The drug release data was found to best fit and hence followed the Higuchi drug-release model.

  18. Characterization of organic precursors for chlorinous odor before and after ozonation by a fractionation technique.

    PubMed

    Phattarapattamawong, Songkeart; Echigo, Shinya; Itoh, Sadahiko

    2016-01-01

    To identify the primary fraction of dissolved organic matter (DOM) responsible for chlorinous odor, waters treated by the conventional treatment (i.e., coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation and rapid sand filtration (RSF)) and ozonation were characterized by a fractionation technique prior to chlorination. Furthermore, chlorinous odor strengths originated from organic fractions were compared with that resulted from trichloramine (NCl3). Odor strengths and trichloramine concentrations were determined by the triangle sensory test and head space-GC/MS, respectively. The major DOM fraction for outlet water of RSF was hydrophobic acid (HoA), whereas the hydrophilic acid (HiA) fraction was dominant in the ozonated water. For a fixed DOC level (1 mgC/L), the base (Bas) or hydrophilic base (HiB) fraction was found to be the major organic precursor of chlorinous odor for the effluent of RSF. Even the mass percentages of DOM fractions in RSF water were considered, Bas was the major DOM fractions responsible for chlorinous odor. For ozonated water, two major precursors of chlorinous odor were HiA and hydrophilic neutral (HiN) fractions. Furthermore, the influence of trichloramine on chlorinous odor intensity for ozonated water should not be negligible. Under variation of seasonal organic contents, changes in precursors of chlorinous odor were observed.

  19. Experimental techniques for the characterization of carbon nanoparticles – a brief overview

    PubMed Central

    Łoś, Szymon; Kempiński, Mateusz; Markowski, Damian

    2014-01-01

    Summary The review of four experimental methods: X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance and four-point electrical conductivity measurements is presented to characterize carbon nanoparticles. Two types of carbon nanoparticle systems are discussed: one comprising the powder of individual carbon nanoparticles and the second as a structurally interconnected nanoparticle matrix in the form of a fiber. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy reveal the atomic structure of the carbon nanoparticles and allow for observation of the changes in the quasi-graphitic ordering induced by ultrasonic irradiation and with the so-called quasi-high pressure effect under adsorption conditions. Structural changes have strong influence on the electronic properties, especially the localization of charge carriers within the nanoparticles, which can be observed with the EPR technique. This in turn can be well-correlated with the four-point electrical conductivity measurements which directly show the character of the charge carrier transport within the examined structures. PMID:25383287

  20. Characterization and analysis of surface notches on Ti-alloy plates fabricated by additive manufacturing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.

    2015-12-01

    Rectangular plates of Ti-6Al-4V with extra low interstitial (ELI) were fabricated by layer-by-layer deposition techniques that included electron beam melting (EBM) and laser beam melting (LBM). The surface conditions of these plates were characterized using x-ray micro-computed tomography. The depth and radius of surface notch-like features on the LBM and EBM plates were measured from sectional images of individual virtual slices of the rectangular plates. The stress concentration factors of individual surface notches were computed and analyzed statistically to determine the appropriate distributions for the notch depth, notch radius, and stress concentration factor. These results were correlated with the fatigue life of the Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloys from an earlier investigation. A surface notch analysis was performed to assess the debit in the fatigue strength due to the surface notches. The assessment revealed that the fatigue lives of the additively manufactured plates with rough surface topographies and notch-like features are dominated by the fatigue crack growth of large cracks for both the LBM and EBM materials. The fatigue strength reduction due to the surface notches can be as large as 60%-75%. It is concluded that for better fatigue performance, the surface notches on EBM and LBM materials need to be removed by machining and the surface roughness be improved to a surface finish of about 1 μm.

  1. Immunological techniques as tools to characterize the subsurface microbial community at a trichloroethylene contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Dougherty, J.M.; Franck, M.M.; McKinzey, P.C.; Hazen, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    Effective in situ bioremediation strategies require an understanding of the effects pollutants and remediation techniques have on subsurface microbial communities. Therefore, detailed characterization of a site's microbial communities is important. Subsurface sediment borings and water samples were collected from a trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated site, before and after horizontal well in situ air stripping and bioventing, as well as during methane injection for stimulation of methane-utilizing microorganisms. Subsamples were processed for heterotrophic plate counts, acridine orange direct counts (AODC), community diversity, direct fluorescent antibodies (DFA) enumeration for several nitrogen-transforming bacteria, and Biolog [reg sign] evaluation of enzyme activity in collected water samples. Plate counts were higher in near-surface depths than in the vadose zone sediment samples. During the in situ air stripping and bioventing, counts increased at or near the saturated zone, remained elevated throughout the aquifer, but did not change significantly after the air stripping. Sporadic increases in plate counts at different depths as well as increased diversity appeared to be linked to differing lithologies. AODCs were orders of magnitude higher than plate counts and remained relatively constant with depth except for slight increases near the surface depths and the capillary fringe. Nitrogen-transforming bacteria, as measured by serospecific DFA, were greatly affected both by the in situ air stripping and the methane injection. Biolog[reg sign] activity appeared to increase with subsurface stimulation both by air and methane. The complexity of subsurface systems makes the use of selective monitoring tools imperative.

  2. Immunological techniques as tools to characterize the subsurface microbial community at a trichloroethylene contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Dougherty, J.M.; Franck, M.M.; McKinzey, P.C.; Hazen, T.C.

    1992-12-31

    Effective in situ bioremediation strategies require an understanding of the effects pollutants and remediation techniques have on subsurface microbial communities. Therefore, detailed characterization of a site`s microbial communities is important. Subsurface sediment borings and water samples were collected from a trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated site, before and after horizontal well in situ air stripping and bioventing, as well as during methane injection for stimulation of methane-utilizing microorganisms. Subsamples were processed for heterotrophic plate counts, acridine orange direct counts (AODC), community diversity, direct fluorescent antibodies (DFA) enumeration for several nitrogen-transforming bacteria, and Biolog {reg_sign} evaluation of enzyme activity in collected water samples. Plate counts were higher in near-surface depths than in the vadose zone sediment samples. During the in situ air stripping and bioventing, counts increased at or near the saturated zone, remained elevated throughout the aquifer, but did not change significantly after the air stripping. Sporadic increases in plate counts at different depths as well as increased diversity appeared to be linked to differing lithologies. AODCs were orders of magnitude higher than plate counts and remained relatively constant with depth except for slight increases near the surface depths and the capillary fringe. Nitrogen-transforming bacteria, as measured by serospecific DFA, were greatly affected both by the in situ air stripping and the methane injection. Biolog{reg_sign} activity appeared to increase with subsurface stimulation both by air and methane. The complexity of subsurface systems makes the use of selective monitoring tools imperative.

  3. A Review of the Principles and Applications of the NMR Technique for Near-Surface Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behroozmand, Ahmad A.; Keating, Kristina; Auken, Esben

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive review of the recent advances in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements for near-surface characterization using laboratory, borehole, and field technologies. During the last decade, NMR has become increasingly popular in near-surface geophysics due to substantial improvements in instrumentation, data processing, forward modeling, inversion, and measurement techniques. This paper starts with a description of the principal theory and applications of NMR. It presents a basic overview of near-surface NMR theory in terms of its physical background and discusses how NMR relaxation times are related to different relaxation processes occurring in porous media. As a next step, the recent and seminal near-surface NMR developments at each scale are discussed, and the limitations and challenges of the measurement are examined. To represent the growth of applications of near-surface NMR, case studies in a variety of different near-surface environments are reviewed and, as examples, two recent case studies are discussed in detail. Finally, this review demonstrates that there is a need for continued research in near-surface NMR and highlights necessary directions for future research. These recommendations include improving the signal-to-noise ratio, reducing the effective measurement dead time, and improving production rate of surface NMR (SNMR), reducing the minimum echo time of borehole NMR (BNMR) measurements, improving petrophysical NMR models of hydraulic conductivity and vadose zone parameters, and understanding the scale dependency of NMR properties.

  4. Single crystal growth by gel technique and characterization of lithium hydrogen tartrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nazir; Ahmad, M. M.; Kotru, P. N.

    2015-02-01

    Single crystal growth of lithium hydrogen tartrate by gel encapsulation technique is reported. Dependence of crystal count on gel density, gel pH, reactant concentration and temperature are studied and the optimum conditions for these crystals are worked out. The stoichiometric composition of the grown crystals is determined using EDAX/AES and CH analysis. The grown crystals are characterized by X-ray diffraction, FTIR and Uv-Visible spectroscopy. It is established that crystal falls under orthorhombic system and space group P222 with the cell parameters as: a=10.971 Å, b=13.125 Å and c=5.101 Å; α=90.5o, β=γ=90°. The morphology of the crystals as revealed by SEM is illustrated. Crystallite size, micro strain, dislocation density and distortion parameters are calculated from the powder XRD results of the crystal. UV-vis spectroscopy shows indirect allowed transition with an optical band gap of~4.83 eV. The crystals are also shown to have high transmittance in the entire visible region. Dependence of dielectric constant, dielectric loss and conductivity on frequency of the applied ac field is analyzed. The frequency-dependent real part of the complex ac conductivity is found to follow the universal dielectric response: σac (ω)~ωs. The trend in the variation of frequency exponent with frequency corroborates the fact that correlated barrier hopping is the dominant charge-transport mechanism in the present system.

  5. A plume capture technique for the remote characterization of aircraft engine emissions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G R; Mazaheri, M; Ristovski, Z D; Morawska, L

    2008-07-01

    A technique for capturing and analyzing plumes from unmodified aircraft or other combustion sources under real world conditions is described and applied to the task of characterizing plumes from commercial aircraft during the taxiing phase of the Landing/Take-Off (LTO) cycle. The method utilizes a Plume Capture and Analysis System (PCAS) mounted in a four-wheel drive vehicle which is positioned in the airfield 60 to 180 m downwind of aircraft operations. The approach offers low test turnaround times with the ability to complete careful measurements of particle and gaseous emission factors and sequentially scanned particle size distributions without distortion due to plume concentration fluctuations. These measurements can be performed for individual aircraft movements at five minute intervals. A Plume Capture Device (PCD) collected samples of the naturally diluted plume in a 200 L conductive membrane conforming to a defined shape. Samples from over 60 aircraft movements were collected and analyzed in situ for particulate and gaseous concentrations and for particle size distribution using a Scanning Particle Mobility Sizer (SMPS). Emission factors are derived for particle number, NO(x), and PM2.5 for a widely used commercial aircraft type, Boeing 737 airframes with predominantly CFM56 class engines, during taxiing. The practical advantages of the PCAS include the capacity to perform well targeted and controlled emission factor and size distribution measurements using instrumentation with varying response times within an airport facility, in close proximity to aircraft during their normal operations.

  6. Detailed characterization of lithium diffusion mechanisms in crystalline silicon using the kinetic Activation-Relaxation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trochet, Mickaël; Restrepo Gutierrez, Oscar Antonio; Mousseau, Normand

    Silicon displays a potential for high-capacity anode material for lithium-ion batteries as it can absorb large quantities of this metal. Yet, very little is understood about the evolution of diffusion mechanisms and migration barriers as the concentration of lithium increases. Until now, for example, simulations studies were limited by the time scale over which diffusion takes place. Here, we use the kinetic activation relaxation technique (kART), an unbiased off-lattice Monte Carlo method with on-the fly catalog building, coupled with the ReaxFF forcefield to follow diffusion of Li in c - Si over timescale of seconds and more at room temperature, obtaining detailed information about the whole set of possible diffusion mechanisms as the local environment evolves. We first present a detailed characterization of Li diffusion in the presence of 1 to 3 impurities and then show the evolution of systems with a higher concentration of solute as Li aggregate. These results provide a first detailed picture of the onset of Li aggregating into this high-capacity material, as it modifies the structure through local rearrangements and long-range elastic deformations, crucial information for the development of the next generation of high-capacity anode. ∖pard ∖pard.

  7. Multiscale analysis of replication technique efficiency for 3D roughness characterization of manufactured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, S.; Mezghani, S.; El Mansori, M.

    2016-09-01

    The replication of topography has been generally restricted to optimizing material processing technologies in terms of statistical and single-scale features such as roughness. By contrast, manufactured surface topography is highly complex, irregular, and multiscale. In this work, we have demonstrated the use of multiscale analysis on replicates of surface finish to assess the precise control of the finished replica. Five commercial resins used for surface replication were compared. The topography of five standard surfaces representative of common finishing processes were acquired both directly and by a replication technique. Then, they were characterized using the ISO 25178 standard and multiscale decomposition based on a continuous wavelet transform, to compare the roughness transfer quality at different scales. Additionally, atomic force microscope force modulation mode was used in order to compare the resins’ stiffness properties. The results showed that less stiff resins are able to replicate the surface finish along a larger wavelength band. The method was then tested for non-destructive quality control of automotive gear tooth surfaces.

  8. Mass spectrometric techniques for characterizing low-molecular-weight resins used as paint varnishes.

    PubMed

    Bonaduce, I; Colombini, M P; Degano, I; Di Girolamo, F; La Nasa, J; Modugno, F; Orsini, S

    2013-01-01

    The molecular structure of three low-molecular-weight resins used as paint varnishes has been characterized by use of an approach based on three different mass spectrometric techniques. We investigated the ketone resin MS2A, the aldehyde resin Laropal A81, and the hydrocarbon resin Regalrez 1094, now commonly used in restoration. To date, the molecular structures of these resins have not been completely elucidated. To improve current knowledge of the chemical composition of these materials, information obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py/GC/MS), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-ToF) was combined. Analysis, in solution, of the whole polymeric fraction of the resins by flow-injection ESI-Q-ToF, and of the non-polymeric fraction by GC-MS, enabled us to identify previously unreported features of the polymer structures. In addition, the Py-GC/MS profiles that we obtained will help to enhance the databases currently available in the literature. The proposed approach can be extended to other low-molecular-weight resins used as varnishes in conservation.

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Cholesterol Nano Particles by Using w/o Microemulsion Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Poorvesh M.; Vasant, Sonal R.; Hajiyani, Rakesh R.; Joshi, Mihir J.

    2010-10-01

    Cholesterol is one of the most abundant and well known steroids in the animal kingdom. Cholesterol rich micro-emulsions and nano-emulsions are useful for the treatment of breast cancer and gynecologic cancers. The nano particles of cholesterol and other pharmaceutically important materials have been reported. In the present investigation, the nano particles of cholesterol were synthesized by direct precipitation technique using triton X-100/water/n-butanol micro-emulsion. The average particle size of cholesterol nano particles was estimated by applying Scherrer's formula to the powder X-ray diffraction pattern, which was found to be 22 nm. The nanoparticles of cholesterol were observed by using TEM and the particle size was found within the range from 15 nm-31 nm. The distribution of particle size was studied through DLS. The nanoparticles of cholesterol were characterized by using FT-IR spectroscopy and the force constant was also calculated for O-H, C-H and C-O bonds. The thermal response of nanoparticles of cholesterol was studied by TGA, which showed that the nanoparticles were stable up to 200 °C and then decomposed. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of decomposition process were also calculated by applying Coats and Redfern formula to thermo-gram.

  10. Nondestructive characterization of thermal barrier coating by noncontact laser ultrasonic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Chen, Jianwei; Zhang, Zhenzhen

    2015-09-01

    We present the application of a laser ultrasonic technique in nondestructive characterization of the bonding layer (BL) in a thermal barrier coating (TBC). A physical mode of a multilayered medium is established to describe the propagation of a longitudinal wave generated by a laser in a TBC system. Furthermore, the theoretical analysis on the ultrasonic transmission in TBC is carried out in order to derive the expression of the BL transmission coefficient spectrum (TCS) which is used to determine the velocity of the longitudinal wave in the BL. We employ the inversion method combined with TCS to ascertain the attenuation coefficient of the BL. The experimental validations are performed with TBC specimens produced by an electron-beam physical vapor deposition method. In those experiments, a pulsed laser with a width of 10 ns is used to generate an ultrasonic signal while a two-wave mixing interferometer is created to receive the ultrasonic signals. By introducing the wavelet soft-threshold method that improves the signal-to-noise ratio, the laser ultrasonic testing results of TBC with an oxidation of 1 cycle, 10 cycles, and 100 cycles show that the attenuation coefficients of the BL become larger with an increase in the oxidation time, which is evident for the scanning electron microscopy observations, in which the thickness of the thermally grown oxide increases with oxidation time.

  11. Structural and Physicochemical Characterization of Spirulina (Arthrospira maxima) Nanoparticles by High-Resolution Electron Microscopic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Neri-Torres, Elier Ekberg; Chanona-Pérez, Jorge J; Calderón, Hector A; Torres-Figueredo, Neil; Chamorro-Cevallos, German; Calderón-Domínguez, Georgina; Velasco-Bedrán, Hugo

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this work was to obtain Spirulina (Arthrospira maxima) nanoparticles (SNPs) by using high-impact mechanical milling and to characterize them by electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. The milling products were analyzed after various processing times (1-4 h), and particle size distribution and number mean size (NMS) were determined by analysis of high-resolution scanning electron microscopic images. The smallest particles are synthesized after 3 h of milling, had an NMS of 55.6±3.6 nm, with 95% of the particles being smaller than 100 nm. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed lattice spacing of ~0.27±0.015 nm for SNPs. The corresponding chemical composition was obtained by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and showed the presence of Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, and Zn. The powder flow properties showed that the powder density was higher when the average nanoparticle size is smaller. They showed free flowability and an increase in their specific surface area (6.89±0.23 m2/g) up to 12-14 times larger than the original material (0.45±0.02 m2/g). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy suggested that chemical damage related to the milling is not significant.

  12. Development of ICP-MS based nanometrology techniques for characterization of silver nanoparticles in environmental systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrano, Denise Marie

    The ubiquitous use of goods containing nanoparticles (NPs) will lead inevitably to environmental release and interaction with biota. Methods to detect, quantify, and characterize NPs in environmental matrices are highlighted as one of the areas of highest priority research in understanding potential environmental and health risks. Specifically, techniques are needed to determine the size and concentration of NPs in complex matrices. Particular analytical challenges include distinguishing NPs from other constituents of the matrix (i.e. natural particles, humic substances, and debris), method detection limits are often higher than exposure concentrations, and differentiating dissolved metal and NPs. This work focuses on the development and optimization of two methods that address a number of challenges for nanometrology: single particle (sp)ICP-MS and asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation (AF4)-ICP-MS. Advancements in the spICP-MS method included systematic studies on distinction between ionic and NP fractions, resolution of polydisperse NP samples, and defining the techniques' dynamic range (in terms of both particle size and concentration). Upon application of the technique, silver (Ag) NPs were discovered in raw wastewater treatment plant influent and effluent. Furthermore, methodical Ag NP stability studies determined the influence of particle capping agents and water chemistry parameters in a variety of synthetic, natural and processed waters. Method development for AF4-ICP-MS revolved around optimizing run conditions (i.e. operational flows, carrier fluid, membrane choice) to study detection limits, sample recovery, and resolution of polydisperse samples. Practical studies included sizing Ag NP in a sediment-dwelling, freshwater oligochaete (Lumbriculus variegatus) and the kinetics of accumulation of protein bound Ag+. In direct comparison, spICP-MS was found to be more versatile with less sample preparation and lower total analyte detection limit (ng/L vs

  13. Materials and characterization techniques for high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary The performance of high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFC) is critically dependent on the selection of materials and optimization of individual components. A conventional high-temperature membrane electrode assembly (HT-MEA) primarily consists of a polybenzimidazole (PBI)-type membrane containing phosphoric acid and two gas diffusion electrodes (GDE), the anode and the cathode, attached to the two surfaces of the membrane. This review article provides a survey on the materials implemented in state-of-the-art HT-MEAs. These materials must meet extremely demanding requirements because of the severe operating conditions of HT-PEMFCs. They need to be electrochemically and thermally stable in highly acidic environment. The polymer membranes should exhibit high proton conductivity in low-hydration and even anhydrous states. Of special concern for phosphoric-acid-doped PBI-type membranes is the acid loss and management during operation. The slow oxygen reduction reaction in HT-PEMFCs remains a challenge. Phosphoric acid tends to adsorb onto the surface of the platinum catalyst and therefore hampers the reaction kinetics. Additionally, the binder material plays a key role in regulating the hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity of the catalyst layer. Subsequently, the binder controls the electrode–membrane interface that establishes the triple phase boundary between proton conductive electrolyte, electron conductive catalyst, and reactant gases. Moreover, the elevated operating temperatures promote carbon corrosion and therefore degrade the integrity of the catalyst support. These are only some examples how materials properties affect the stability and performance of HT-PEMFCs. For this reason, materials characterization techniques for HT-PEMFCs, either in situ or ex situ, are highly beneficial. Significant progress has recently been made in this field, which enables us to gain a better understanding of underlying processes occurring during

  14. Characterization of Mineral Assemblages in Ancient Roman Maritime Concrete with Synchrotron X-ray Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meral, C.; Jackson, M. D.; Monteiro, P. J.; Wenk, H.

    2012-12-01

    Romans used lime and aluminosilicate-rich volcanic ash to bind tuff aggregates in concrete structures that have remained durable for 2000 years. A major accomplishment of Roman engineers was to construct enduring coastal underwater structures in seawater, which were important to long-distance trade and military endeavors. Two millennia later, the reasons for the extraordinary durability of the maritime structures remain enigmatic. The concretes are highly complex composites composed of relict lime, tuff and pumice clasts and pozzolanic reaction products. Calcium-chloroaluminates and sulfoaluminates occur in certain relict voids. Further understanding of their mineralogical components would provide guidelines in designing future structures. Here, we use synchroton radiation applications to characterize certain phases within a Roman maritime mortar specimen from a breakwater in Pozzuoli Bay, Baianus Sinus, near Naples. We performed X-ray computed micro-tomography (μ-XCT) at beamline 8.3.2 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories to segment the complex composite without damaging the specimen. We isolated certain relict sub-spherical voids and illustrated crystal morphologies with 3-D reconstructions. We then used beamline 12.3.2 at the ALS to provide highly accurate identifications of diverse crystal phases in various mortar components - relict lime clasts, tuff or pumice clasts, cementitious matrix and relict voids - in sites previously identified and characterized with petrogaphic techniques. X-ray micro-fluorescence (μ-XRF) mapping provided calcium and iron maps of the sites, which were useful in selecting fine-scale areas for scanning transmission X-ray micro-diffraction (μ-XRD) mapping at high spatial resolution, about 1 micron. The μ-XRD analyses utilized both monochromatic and polychromatic light measurements. Polychromatic light was more appropriate for phases with grain sizes larger than the doubly focused X-ray beam, about 1 x

  15. Surface acoustic wave technique for the characterization of porous properties of microporous silicate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietala, Susan Leslie

    1997-12-01

    Features of gas adsorption onto sol-gel derived microporous silicate thin films, for characterization of porous properties, are detailed using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) technique. Mass uptake and film effective modulus changes calculated from the SAW data are investigated in detail. The effects of stress and surface tension on the SAW sensor are calculated and found to be negligible in these experiments. Transient behavior recorded during nitrogen adsorption at 77 K is discussed in the context of mass uptake and effective modulus contributions. The time constant associated with the effective modulus calculation is consistent with that of diffusivity of nitrogen into a 5A zeolite. Further calculations indicate that the transient behavior is not due to thermal effects. A unique dual sensor SAW experiment to decouple the mass and effective modulus contributions to the frequency response was performed in conjunction with a Silicon beam-bending experiment. The beam-bending experiment results in a calculation of stress induced during adsorption of methanol on a microporous silicate thin film. The decoupled mass and effective modulus calculated from the SAW data have similar shaped isotherms, and are quite different from that of the stress developed in the Silicon beam. The total effective modulus change calculated from the SAW data is consistent with that calculated using Gassmann's equation. The SAW system developed for this work included unique electronics and customized hardware which is suitable for work under vacuum and at temperatures from 77K to 473K. This unique setup is suitable for running thin film samples on a Micromeritics ASAP 2000 Gas Adsorption unit in automatic mode. This setup is also general enough to be compatible with a custom gas adsorption unit and the beam bending apparatus, both using standard vacuum assemblies.

  16. Frit inlet field-flow fractionation techniques for the characterization of polyion complex self-assemblies.

    PubMed

    Till, Ugo; Gaucher, Mireille; Amouroux, Baptiste; Gineste, Stéphane; Lonetti, Barbara; Marty, Jean-Daniel; Mingotaud, Christophe; Bria, Carmen R M; Williams, S Kim Ratanathanawongs; Violleau, Frédéric; Mingotaud, Anne-Françoise

    2017-01-20

    Polymer self-assemblies joining oppositely charged chains, known as polyion complexes (PICs), have been formed using poly(ethyleneoxide - b - acrylic acid)/poly(l-lysine), poly(ethyleneoxide-b-acrylic acid)/dendrigraft poly(l-lysine) and poly[(3-acrylamidopropyl) trimethylammonium chloride - b - N - isopropyl acrylamide]/poly(acrylic acid). The self-assemblies have been first characterized in batch by Dynamic Light Scattering. In a second step, their analysis by Flow Field-Flow Fractionation techniques (FlFFF) was examined. They were shown to be very sensitive to shearing, especially during the focus step of the fractionation, and this led to an incompatibility with asymmetrical FlFFF. On the other hand, Frit Inlet FlFFF proved to be very efficient to observe them, either in its symmetrical (FI-FlFFF) or asymmetrical version (FI-AsFlFFF). Conditions of elution were found to optimize the sample recovery in pure water. Spherical self-assemblies were detected, with a size range between 70-400nm depending on the polymers. Compared to batch DLS, FI-AsFlFFF clearly showed the presence of several populations in some cases. The influence of salt on poly(ethyleneoxide-b-acrylic acid) (PEO-PAA) 6000-3000/dendrigraft poly(l-lysine) (DGL 3) was also assessed in parallel in batch DLS and FI-AsFlFFF. Batch DLS revealed a first process of swelling of the self-assembly for low concentrations up to 0.8M followed by the dissociation. FI-AsFlFFF furthermore indicated a possible ejection of DGL3 from the PIC assembly for concentrations as low as 0.2M, which could not be observed in batch DLS.

  17. Isolation and characterization of Mycobacterium bovis strains from indigenous Zambian cattle using Spacer oligonucleotide typing technique

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Bovine tuberculosis (BTB), caused by Mycobacterium bovis, has remained a major source of concern to public health officials in Zambia. Previous investigations have used traditional epidemiological methods that are unable to identify the causative agent and from which dynamics of disease dispersion is difficult to discern. The objective of this study was to isolate, characterize and determine the genetic diversity and relatedness of M. bovis from major cattle rearing districts in Zambia by spoligotyping. A total of 695 carcasses were examined and 98 tissues had gross post-mortem lesions compatible with BTB. Results Forty-two out of the ninety-eight suspected tissues examined had culture properties characteristic of mycobacteria from which 31 isolates yielded interpretable spoligotypes. This technique showed good discriminatory power (HGDI = 0.98), revealing 10 different spoligotype patterns. Twenty-seven isolates belonged to one cluster with more than 95% similarity and inside the cluster, one predominant spoligotype was found in 20 (64.5%) of the isolates tested. The highest number of spoligotypes was observed among samples from Namwala district. Spoligotypes from 26 (83.9%) of the isolates belonged to five spoligotypes that have been reported before while the remaining 5 (16.1%) isolates had unique spoligotypes that are being reported for the first time; these have been assigned numbers SB1763 to SB1767. Five of the 6 districts had the predominant spoligotype (SB0120). Conclusion The study has described the dispersion patterns of M. bovis in Zambian cattle for the first time and has identified 5 spoligotype patterns specific to Zambia. The observation of an overlap in the spoligotype pattern SB0120 in 5 of the 6 districts suggests the probability of sharing a common source of infection. PMID:19619309

  18. A new technique of characterization of the intrapixel response of astronomical detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketchazo, C.; Viale, T.; Boulade, O.; Druart, G.; Moreau, V.; Mugnier, L.; Dubreuil, D.; Derelle, S.; Ronayette, S.; Guérineau, N.; Berthe, M.

    2014-07-01

    This paper is devoted to the presentation of a new technique of characterization of the Intra-Pixel Sensitivity Variations (IPSVs) of astronomical detectors. The IPSV is the spatial variation of the sensitivity within a pixel and it was demonstrated that this variation can contribute to the instrument global error. Then IPSV has not to be neglected especially in the case of under-sampled instruments for high quality imaging and accurate photometry. The common approaches to measure the IPSV consist in determining the pixel response function (PRF) by scanning an optical probe through the detector. These approaches require high-aperture optics, high precision mechanical devices and are time consuming. The original approach we will present in this paper consists in projecting high-resolution periodic patterns onto the whole sensor without classic optics but using the self-imaging property (the Talbot effect) of a Continuously Self Imaging Grating (CSIG) illuminated by a plane wave. This paper describes the test bench and its design rules. The methodology of the measurement is also presented. Two measurement procedures are available: global and local. In the global procedure, the mean PRF corresponding to the whole Focal Plane Array (FPA) or a sub-area of the FPA is evaluated. The results obtained applying this procedure on e2v CCD 204 are presented and discussed in detail. In the local procedure, a CSIG is moved in front of each pixel and a pixel PRF is reconstructed by resolving the inverse problem. The local procedure is presented and validated by simulations.

  19. Preparation, characterization and optoelectronic properties of nanodiamonds doped zinc oxide nanomaterials by a ball milling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Hameed; Sohail, Muhammad; Malik, Uzma; Ali, Naveed; Bangash, Masroor Ahmad; Nawaz, Mohsan

    2016-07-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is one of the very important metal oxides (MOs) for applications in optoelectronic devices which work in the blue and UV regions. However, to meet the challenges of obtaining ZnO nanomaterials suitable for practical applications, various modifications in physico-chemical properties are highly desirable. One of the ways adopted for altering the properties is to synthesize composite(s) of ZnO with various reinforcements. Here we report on the tuning of optoelectronic properties of ZnO upon doping by nanodiamonds (NDs) using the ball milling technique. A varying weight percent (wt.%) of NDs were ball milled for 2 h with ZnO nanoparticles prepared by a simple precipitation method. The effects of different parameters, the calcination temperature of ZnO, wt.% of NDs and mechanical milling upon the optoelectronic properties of the resulting ZnO-NDs nanocomposites have been investigated. The ZnO-NDs nanocomposites were characterized by IR spectroscopy, powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The UV-vis spectroscopy revealed the alteration in the bandgap energy (Eg ) of ZnO as a function of the calcination temperature of ZnO, changing the concentration of NDs, and mechanical milling of the resulting nanocomposites. The photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy showed a decrease in the deep level emission (DLE) peaks and an increase in near-band-edge transition peaks as a result of the increasing concentration of NDs. The decrease in DLE and increase in band to band transition peaks were due to the strong interaction between the NDs and the Zn+; consequently, the Zn+ concentration decreased on the interstitial sites.

  20. Characterization of Deficiencies in the Frequency Domain Forced Response Analysis Technique for Supersonic Turbine Bladed Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Schmauch, Preston

    2012-01-01

    Turbine blades in rocket and jet engine turbomachinery experience enormous harmonic loading conditions. These loads result from the integer number of upstream and downstream stator vanes as well as the other turbine stages. Assessing the blade structural integrity is a complex task requiring an initial characterization of whether resonance is possible and then performing a forced response analysis if that condition is met. The standard technique for forced response analysis in rocket engine turbines is to decompose a computational fluid dynamics (CFD).generated flow field into its harmonic components, and to then perform a frequency response analysis at the problematic natural frequencies using cyclically symmetric structural dynamic models. Recent CFD analysis and water-flow testing at NASA/MSFC, though, indicates that this technique may miss substantial harmonic and non ]harmonic excitation sources that become present in complex flows. This complex content can only be captured by a CFD flow field encompassing at least an entire revolution. A substantial development effort to create a series of software programs to enable application of the 360 degree forcing function in a frequency response analysis on cyclic symmetric models has been completed (to be described in a future paper), but the question still remains whether the frequency response analysis itself is capable of capturing the excitation content sufficiently. Two studies comparing frequency response analysis with transient response analysis, therefore, of bladed-disks undergoing this complex flow environment have been performed. The first is of a bladed disk with each blade modeled by simple beam elements and the disk modeled with plates (using the finite element code MSC/NASTRAN). The focus of this model is to be representative of response of realistic bladed disks, and so the dimensions are roughly equivalent to the new J2X rocket engine 1st stage fuel pump turbine. The simplicity of the model allows

  1. Characterization of the electronic properties of magnetic and semiconductor devices using scanning probe techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaadt, Daniel Maria

    In the first part of this dissertation, scanning probe techniques are used in the study of localized charge deposition and subsequent transport in Co nanoclusters embedded in a SiO2 matrix are presented, and the application of this material in a hybrid magneto-electronic device for magnetic field sensing is described. Co nanoclusters are charged by applying a bias voltage pulse between a conductive tip and the sample, and electrostatic force microscopy is used to image charged areas. An exponential decay in the peak charge density is observed with decay times dependent on the nominal Co film thickness and on the sign of the deposited charge. The results are interpreted as a consequence of Coulomb-blockade effects. This study leads to the design of a hybrid magneto-electronic device, in which Co nanoclusters embedded in SiO2 are incorporated into the gate of a Si metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor. Current flow through the Co nanoclusters leads to a buildup of electronic charge within the gate, and consequently to a transistor threshold voltage shift that varies with applied external magnetic field. The shift in threshold voltage results in an exponential change in subthreshold current and a quadratic change in saturation current. A detailed analysis of the device operation is presented. The second part of this dissertation focuses on the characterization of electronic properties of GaN-based heterostructure devices. Scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) and spectroscopy (SCS) are used to investigate lateral variations in the transistor threshold voltage and the frequency-dependent response of surface charges and of charge in the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). The technique is described in detail, electrostatic simulations performed to study the influence of the probe tip geometry on the measured dC/dV spectra are presented, and the limitations of the SCS technique in a variety of applications are evaluated. Features in SCM images and maps of

  2. A fast and innovative microextraction technique, μSPEed, followed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography for the analysis of phenolic compounds in teas.

    PubMed

    Porto-Figueira, Priscilla; Figueira, José A; Pereira, Jorge A M; Câmara, José S

    2015-12-11

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a promising solid phase microextraction technique, μSPEed, in the analysis of selected phenolic compounds from teas by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection (μSPEed/UHPLC-PDA). The innovative μSPEed configuration uses 3-μm sorbent particles tightly packed in a disposable needle equipped with a pressure-driven valve to withdraw samples in a single direction. The system was operated by the electronic pipette eVol® and different parameters influencing the extraction efficiency, as the nature of sorbent, pH, loading and elution conditions, and solvents were optimized. The best extracting conditions were obtained by loading twice 100μL of tea samples through the PS/DVB-RP sorbent and eluting with 50μL of acidified MeOH 95%. The following chromatographic separation was carried out in an Acquity C18 BEH capillary column using a gradient of 0.1% FA and acetonitrile. The optimized μSPEed/UHPLC-PDA methodology is selective and specific and was properly validated for 8 phenolic compounds widely reported in different teas. Overall, an excellent analytical performance was obtained in the 0.2-20μg/L linear dynamic range (LDR), with very low limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs), ranging between 3.5-16.8ng/mL and 10.6-50.6ng/mL, respectively, high recoveries (89.3-103.3%), good precision (RSD<5%) and negligible matrix effect. The methodology was used to assess the target polyphenols concentration in several tea samples. Rutin and quercetin-3-glucoside were the most abundant phenolics in all tea samples analysed and, with exception of naringenin and cinnamic acid, which are present in high amounts in the investigated citric teas, remain phenolic compounds are present in trace levels.

  3. Technology Innovation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA produces innovative technologies and facilitates their creation in line with the Agency mission to create products such as the stormwater calculator, remote sensing, innovation clusters, and low-cost air sensors.

  4. Research Innovation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA provides innovative research activities that help transform the protection of human health and the environment with high-risk, high-reward Pathfinder Innovation Projects, the P3 student competition, and low-cost air monitoring.

  5. Characterization of Carbon Dioxide Washout Measurement Techniques in the Mark-III Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, J.; Bekdash, O.; Meginnis, I.

    2016-01-01

    Providing adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout is essential to the reduction of risk in performing suited operations. Long term CO2 exposure can lead to symptoms such as headache, lethargy, dizziness, and in severe cases can lead to unconsciousness and death. Thus maintaining adequate CO2 washout in both ground testing and during in flight EVAs is a requirement of current and future suit designs. It is necessary to understand the inspired CO2 of suit wearers such that future requirements for space suits appropriately address the risk of inadequate washout. Testing conducted by the EVA Physiology Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center aimed to characterize a method for noninvasively measuring inspired oronasal CO2 under pressurized suited conditions in order to better inform requirements definition and verification techniques for future CO2 washout limits in space suits. Prior work conducted by the EPL examined several different wearable, respirator style, masks that could be used to sample air from the vicinity surround the nose and mouth of a suited test subject. Previously published studies utilized these masks, some being commercial products and some novel designs, to monitor CO2 under various exercise and flow conditions with mixed results for repeatability and/or consistency between subjects. Based on a meta-analysis of those studies it was decided to test a nasal cannula as it is a commercially available device that is placed directly in the flow path of the user as they breathe. A nasal cannula was used to sample air inhaled by the test subjects during both rest and exercise conditions. Eight subjects were tasked with walking on a treadmill or operating an arm ergometer to reach target metabolic rates of 1000, 2000, and 3000 BTU/hr. Suit pressure was maintained at 4.3 psid for all tests, with supply flow rates of 6, 4, and 2 actual cubic feet per minute depending on the test condition. Each test configuration was conducted twice with subjects breathing

  6. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, Fourth quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x } reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. Baseline, AOFA, and LNB without AOFA test segments have been completed. Analysis of the 94 days of LNB tong-term data collected show the full load NO{sub x} emission levels to be approximately 0.65 lb/MBtu. Flyash LOI values for the LNB configuration are approximately 8 percent at full load. Corresponding values for the AOFA configuration are 0.94 lb/MBtu and approximately 10 percent. Abbreviated diagnostic tests for the LNB+AOFA configuration indicate that at 500 MWe, NO{sub x} emissions are approximately 0.55 lb/MBtu with corresponding flyash LOI values of approximately 11 percent. For comparison, the long-term, full load, baseline NO{sub x} emission level was approximately 1.24 lb/MBtu at 5.2 percent LOI. Comprehensive testing of the LNB+AOFA configuration will be performed when the stack particulate emissions issue is resolved.

  7. Common Practice Lightning Strike Protection Characterization Technique to Quantify Damage Mechanisms on Composite Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatkowski, George N.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Ticatch, Larry A.; Mielnik, John J.; Mcneill, Patrick A.

    2013-01-01

    heating parameters which occur during lightning attachment. Following guidance defined in the universal common practice LSP test documents, protected and unprotected CFRP panels were evaluated at 20, 40 and 100KAmps. This report presents analyzed data demonstrating the scientific usefulness of the common practice approach. Descriptions of the common practice CFRP test articles, LSP test bed fixture, and monitoring techniques to capture the electrical, mechanical and thermal parameters during lightning attachment are presented here. Two methods of measuring the electrical currents were evaluated, inductive current probes and a newly developed fiberoptic sensor. Two mechanical displacement methods were also examined, optical laser measurement sensors and a digital imaging correlation camera system. Recommendations are provided to help users implement the common practice test approach and obtain LSP test characterizations comparable across data sets.

  8. A method to obtain reference images for evaluation of ultrasonic tissue characterization techniques.

    PubMed

    Jensen, M S; Wilhjelm, J E; Sahl, B; Brandt, T; Martinsen, K; Jespersen, S K; Falk, E

    2002-05-01

    A general problem when evaluating ultrasonic methods for tissue characterization is that "a golden standard" is seldom known. This paper describes a manual method to obtain a reference image, with the same geometry as the ultrasound image, indicating spatial location of the different tissue types present in the biological tissue scanned in vitro. A 30 x 10 x 2 mm3 piece of formalin fixed porcine tissue was molded into an agar block, which on the top surface, contained a set of fiducial markers, spaced 2.5 mm. The block was submerged into 20 degrees C water and a set of parallel 7.5 MHz spatial compound ultrasound images of tissue and fiducial markers were recorded each 0.5 mm. Guided by the fiducial markers, the agar block was subsequently cut into slices 2.5 mm thick, photographed and finally analyzed histologically identifying these tissues: collagen rich, collagen poor, micro vessels and muscle fibres. Due to: (1) the cutting procedure, (2) the finite size of the ultrasound beam and (3) the spatial variation in propagation velocity, the macroscopic photographs did not align completely with the ultrasound images. Likewise, the histological image is a geometrically distorted version of the macroscopic photograph, due to the histological preparation process. The histological information was "mapped back" into the format of the ultrasound images the following way: On the macroscopic images, outlines were drawn manually which defined the border of the tissue. These outlines were superimposed on the corresponding ultrasound images (identified via the fiducial markers) and modified to encompass what appeared to be tissue regions on the ultrasound images and subsequently re-applied to the macroscopic image. This modified macroscopic outline was used as guideline when drawing outlines identifying regions of the various tissue types. Specifically, the macroscopic image revealed the borders between the different tissues, while the histological image identified the four

  9. Characterization of Carbon Dioxide Washout Measurement Techniques in the Mark-III Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meginnis, I; Norcross, J.; Bekdash, O.

    2016-01-01

    It is essential to provide adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout in a space suit to reduce the risks associated with manned operations in space suits. Symptoms of elevated CO2 levels range from reduced cognitive performance and headache to unconsciousness and death at high levels of CO2. Because of this, NASA imposes limits on inspired CO2 levels for space suits when they are used in space and for ground testing. Testing and/or analysis must be performed to verify that a space suit meets CO2 washout requirements. Testing for developmental space suits has traditionally used an oronasal mask that collects CO2 samples at the left and rights sides of the mouth. Testing with this mask resulted in artificially elevated CO2 concentration measurements, which is most likely due to the dead space volume at the front of the mask. The mask also extends outward and into the supply gas stream, which may disrupt the washout effect of the suit supply gas. To mitigate these problems, a nasal cannula was investigated as a method for measuring inspired CO2 based on the assumptions that it is low profile and would not interfere with the designed suit gas flow path, and it has reduced dead space. This test series compared the performance of a nasal cannula to the oronasal mask in the Mark III space suit. Inspired CO2 levels were measured with subjects at rest and at metabolic workloads of 1000, 2000, and 3000 BTU/hr. Workloads were achieved by use of an arm ergometer or treadmill. Test points were conducted at air flow rates of 2, 4, and 6 actual cubic feet per minute, with a suit pressure of 4.3 psid. Results from this test series will evaluate the accuracy and repeatability across subjects of the nasal cannula collection method, which will provide rationale for using a nasal cannula as the new method for measuring inspired CO2 in a space suit. Proper characterization of sampling methods and of suit CO2 washout capability will better inform requirements definition and verification

  10. Development of nanoindentation techniques for characterizing local mechanical properties of soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Charles David

    Indentation has become a popular mechanical characterization technique due to the promise of high-resolution maps of material stiffness. Due to the far-reaching nature of the testing framework, indentation tests can occur on nearly any material type and on any length scale. In this dissertation, we will look at three different materials systems and demonstrate new and unique uses for the indentation framework. These results will provide information not available by other methodologies, thereby proving its universal value. Two different indentation schemes are employed, either probing the top surface of cross-section samples or by probing into the thickness of a thin film. The differences between each of the studies highlight the importance of sample geometry/orientation, contact conditions, material response, etc. First, we will use indentation to probe local regions near carbon nanotube/glass fiber hybrid composites in an epoxy matrix. Indentations were performed to determine the radial gradient of modulus enhancements from the glass fiber surface. The results from indentation demonstrated that spatial reinforcement due to the presence of nanotubes was tied to fiber morphology and not the local morphology of carbon nanotubes. Secondly, we look at rubber and filler interaction on two different levels; macroscale and nanoscale. On the nanoscale, we show that interactions at the filler/polymer interface create regions of altered polymer mobility. These regions are influenced by geometric and chemical confinement, which increase the stiffness of these small regions (< 200nm). We employ two different indentation methods to highlight how contact orientation determines the nature of our results. Ultra-soft materials, such as hydrogels and tissues, pose rather unique challenges when they are tested mechanically. However, with tissues and gels, the sensitivity of the machines is challenged and therefore protocols must be developed to produce accurate results. We validate

  11. Nondestructive evaluation/characterization of composite materials and structures using the acousto-ultrasonic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dos Reis, H. L. M.; Vary, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper introduces the nature and the underlying rational of the acousto-ultrasonic stress wave factor technique and some of its applications to composite materials and structures. Furthermore, two examples of successful application of the acousto-ultrasonic technique are presented in detail. In the first example, the acousto-ultrasonic technique is used to evaluate the adhesive bond strength between rubber layers and steel plates, and in the seocnd example the tehcnique is used to monitor progressive damage in wire rope.

  12. Innovative Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barsi, Louis M.; Kaebnick, Gweneth W.

    1989-01-01

    The phenomenon of innovation within the university is examined, noting the possibility of innovation as a key to college vitality. A study was conducted using a group of institutions that demonstrated recent innovative spirit. Members of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), each has been recognized in an annual…

  13. Electromagnetic diagnostic techniques for hypervelocity projectile detection, velocity measurement, and size characterization: Theoretical concept and first experimental test

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlig, W. Casey; Heine, Andreas

    2015-11-14

    A new measurement technique is suggested to augment the characterization and understanding of hypervelocity projectiles before impact. The electromagnetic technique utilizes magnetic diffusion principles to detect particles, measure velocity, and indicate relative particle dimensions. It is particularly suited for detection of small particles that may be difficult to track utilizing current characterization methods, such as high-speed video or flash radiography but can be readily used for large particle detection, where particle spacing or location is not practical for other measurement systems. In this work, particles down to 2 mm in diameter have been characterized while focusing on confining the detection signal to enable multi-particle characterization with limited particle-to-particle spacing. The focus of the paper is on the theoretical concept and the analysis of its applicability based on analytical and numerical calculation. First proof-of-principle experimental tests serve to further validate the method. Some potential applications are the characterization of particles from a shaped-charge jet after its break-up and investigating debris in impact experiments to test theoretical models for the distribution of particles size, number, and velocity.

  14. Contact angle hysteresis on polymer substrates established with various experimental techniques, its interpretation, and quantitative characterization.

    PubMed

    Bormashenko, Edward; Bormashenko, Yelena; Whyman, Gene; Pogreb, Roman; Musin, Albina; Jager, Rachel; Barkay, Zahava

    2008-04-15

    The effect of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) was studied on various polymer substrates with traditional and new experimental techniques. The new experimental technique presented in the article is based on the slow deformation of the droplet, thus CAH is studied under the constant volume of the drop in contrast to existing techniques when the volume of the drop is changed under the measurement. The energy of hysteresis was calculated in the framework of the improved Extrand approach. The advancing contact angle established with a new technique is in a good agreement with that measured with the needle-syringe method. The receding angles measured with three experimental techniques demonstrated a very significant discrepancy. The force pinning the triple line responsible for hysteresis was calculated.

  15. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Novel analytical techniques for coal liquefaction: Fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, R.F.; Hower, J.C.; Derbyshire, F.J.

    1991-10-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using fluorescence and reflectance microscopy techniques for the examination of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. Resid, as defined here, is the 850{degrees}F{sup +} portion of the process stream, and includes soluble organics, insoluble organics and ash. The technique can be used to determine the degree of hydrogenation and the presence of multiple phases occurring within a resid sample. It can also be used to infer resid reactivity. The technique is rapid, requiring less than one hour for sample preparation and examination, and thus has apparent usefulness for process monitoring. Additionally, the technique can distinguish differences in samples produced under various process conditions. It can, therefore, be considered a potentially useful technique for the process developer. Further development and application of this analytical method as a process development tool is justified based on these results.

  16. Innovation network

    PubMed Central

    Acemoglu, Daron; Akcigit, Ufuk; Kerr, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Technological progress builds upon itself, with the expansion of invention in one domain propelling future work in linked fields. Our analysis uses 1.8 million US patents and their citation properties to map the innovation network and its strength. Past innovation network structures are calculated using citation patterns across technology classes during 1975–1994. The interaction of this preexisting network structure with patent growth in upstream technology fields has strong predictive power on future innovation after 1995. This pattern is consistent with the idea that when there is more past upstream innovation for a particular technology class to build on, then that technology class innovates more. PMID:27681628

  17. Innovation network.

    PubMed

    Acemoglu, Daron; Akcigit, Ufuk; Kerr, William R

    2016-10-11

    Technological progress builds upon itself, with the expansion of invention in one domain propelling future work in linked fields. Our analysis uses 1.8 million US patents and their citation properties to map the innovation network and its strength. Past innovation network structures are calculated using citation patterns across technology classes during 1975-1994. The interaction of this preexisting network structure with patent growth in upstream technology fields has strong predictive power on future innovation after 1995. This pattern is consistent with the idea that when there is more past upstream innovation for a particular technology class to build on, then that technology class innovates more.

  18. Analytical techniques for characterization of raw materials in cell culture media.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Chandana; Drew, Barry; Head, Kevin; Pusuluri, Rani; Caple, Matthew V

    2011-01-01

    Raw materials are a critical part of any cell culture medium; therefore, it is of utmost importance to understand and characterize them for high-quality product. The raw material characterization (RMC) program at SAFC focuses on individual screening of raw materials both analytically and biologically. The goal of the program is to develop the best-in-class knowledge base of the raw materials used in SAFC's media formulations and their impact on performance of products.

  19. Characterization of Apollo Regolith by X-Ray and Electron Microbeam Techniques: An Analog for Future Sample Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, Ryan A.

    2015-01-01

    The Apollo missions collected 382 kg of rock and regolith from the Moon; approximately 1/3 of the sample mass collected was regolith. Lunar regolith consists of well mixed rocks, minerals, and glasses less than 1-centimeter n size. The majority of most surface regolith samples were sieved into less than 1, 1-2, 2-4, and 4-10- millimiter size fractions; a portion of most samples was re-served unsieved. The initial characterization and classification of most Apollo regolith particles was done primarily by binocular microscopy. Optical classification of regolith is difficult because (1) the finest fraction of the regolith coats and obscures the textures of the larger particles, and (b) not all lithologies or minerals are uniquely identifiable optically. In recent years, we have begun to use more modern x-ray beam techniques [1-3], coupled with high resolution 3D optical imaging techniques [4] to characterize Apollo and meteorite samples as part of the curation process. These techniques, particularly in concert with SEM imaging of less than 1-millimeter regolith grain mounts, allow for the rapid characterization of the components within a regolith.

  20. Characterizing the intrinsic bioremediation potential of 1,4-dioxane and trichloroethene using innovative environmental diagnostic tools.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Sheau-Yun Dora; Mora, Rebecca; Diguiseppi, William H; Davis, Greg; Sublette, Kerry; Gedalanga, Phillip; Mahendra, Shaily

    2012-09-01

    An intrinsic biodegradation study involving the design and implementation of innovative environmental diagnostic tools was conducted to evaluate whether monitored natural attenuation (MNA) could be considered as part of the remedial strategy to treat an aerobic aquifer contaminated with 1,4-dioxane and trichloroethene (TCE). In this study, advanced molecular biological and stable isotopic tools were applied to confirm in situ intrinsic biodegradation of 1,4-dioxane and TCE. Analyses of Bio-Trap® samplers and groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells verified the abundance of bacteria and enzymes capable of aerobically degrading TCE and 1,4-dioxane. Furthermore, phospholipid fatty acid analysis with stable isotope probes (PLFA-SIP) of the microbial community validated the ability for microbial degradation of TCE and 1,4-dioxane. Compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of groundwater samples for TCE resulted in δ(13)C values that indicated likely biodegradation of TCE in three of the four monitoring wells sampled. Results of the MNA evaluation showed that enzymes capable of aerobically degrading TCE and 1,4-dioxane were present, abundant, and active in the aquifer. Taken together, these results provide direct evidence of the occurrence of TCE and 1,4-dioxane biodegradation at the study site, supporting the selection of MNA as part of the final remedy at some point in the future.

  1. Characterization of Si-SiO2 interface states in MOS capacitors by using DLTS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Liwu; G, Groesendken; C, Hasenack

    1989-12-01

    The Dit (interface states density) in p-type MOS capacitors subjected to a preoxidation heat treatment was investigated by using DLTS (Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy) technique. It is found that the strong dependence of the Dit on POHT (Preoxidation Heat Treatment) and starting oxygen content of substrates is expected. The DLTS technique can detects the presence of bulk defect (Et - Ev = 0.29eV) at the interface presumably due to chlorine species.

  2. Industrial fouling: problem characterization, economic assessment, and review of prevention, mitigation, and accommodation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett-Price, B.A.; Smith, S.A.; Watts, R.L.

    1984-02-01

    A comprehensive overview of heat exchanger fouling in the manufacturing industries is provided. Specifically, this overview addresses: the characteristics of industrial fouling problems; the mitigation and accommodation techniques currently used by industry; and the types and magnitude of costs associated with industrial fouling. A detailed review of the fouling problems, costs and mitigation techniques is provided for the food, textile, pulp and paper, chemical, petroleum, cement, glass and primary metals industries.

  3. An X-band waveguide measurement technique for the accurate characterization of materials with low dielectric loss permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Kenneth W.; Scott, Mark M.; Reid, David R.; Bean, Jeffrey A.; Ellis, Jeremy D.; Morris, Andrew P.; Marsh, Jeramy M.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we present a new X-band waveguide (WR90) measurement method that permits the broadband characterization of the complex permittivity for low dielectric loss tangent material specimens with improved accuracy. An electrically long polypropylene specimen that partially fills the cross-section is inserted into the waveguide and the transmitted scattering parameter (S21) is measured. The extraction method relies on computational electromagnetic simulations, coupled with a genetic algorithm, to match the experimental S21 measurement. The sensitivity of the technique to sample length was explored by simulating specimen lengths from 2.54 to 15.24 cm, in 2.54 cm increments. Analysis of our simulated data predicts the technique will have the sensitivity to measure loss tangent values on the order of 10-3 for materials such as polymers with relatively low real permittivity values. The ability to accurately characterize low-loss dielectric material specimens of polypropylene is demonstrated experimentally. The method was validated by excellent agreement with a free-space focused-beam system measurement of a polypropylene sheet. This technique provides the material measurement community with the ability to accurately extract material properties of low-loss material specimen over the entire X-band range. This technique could easily be extended to other frequency bands.

  4. Complementary use of flow and sedimentation field-flow fractionation techniques for size characterizing biodegradable poly(lactic acid) nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Contado, Catia; Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Leo, Eliana; Zborowski, Maciej; Williams, P. Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles were synthesized using a modified evaporation method, testing two different surfactants (sodium cholate and Pluronic F68) for the process. During their formulation the prodrug 5′-octanoyl-CPA (Oct-CPA) of the antiischemic N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) was encapsulated. Three different purification methods were compared with respect to the influence of surfactant on the size characteristics of the final nanoparticle product. Flow and sedimentation field-flow fractionation techniques (FlFFF and SdFFF, respectively) were used to size characterize the five poly(lactic acid) particle samples. Two different combinations of carrier solution (mobile phase) were employed in the FlFFF analyses, while a solution of poly(vinyl alcohol) was used as mobile phase for the SdFFF runs. The separation performances of the two techniques were compared and the particle size distributions, derived from the fractograms, were interpreted with the support of observations by scanning electron microscopy. Some critical aspects, such as the carrier choice and the channel thickness determination for the FlFFF, have been investigated. This is the first comprehensive comparison of the two FFF techniques for characterizing non standard particulate materials. The two FFF techniques proved to be complementary and gave good, congruent and very useful information on the size distributions of the five poly(lactic acid) particle samples. PMID:17482199

  5. Characterization of the Etna volcanic emissions through an active biomonitoring technique (moss-bags): part 2--morphological and mineralogical features.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, S; D'Alessandro, W

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic emissions were studied at Mount Etna (Italy) by using moss-bags technique. Mosses were exposed around the volcano at different distances from the active vents to evaluate the impact of volcanic emissions in the atmosphere. Morphology and mineralogy of volcanic particulate intercepted by mosses were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Particles emitted during passive degassing activity from the two active vents, Bocca Nuova and North East Crater (BNC and NEC), were identified as silicates, sulfates and halide compounds. In addition to volcanic particles, we found evidences also of geogenic, anthropogenic and marine spray input. The study has shown the robustness of this active biomonitoring technique to collect particles, very useful in active volcanic areas characterized by continuous degassing and often not easily accessible to apply conventional sampling techniques.

  6. Statistical factor analysis technique for characterizing basalt through interpreting nuclear and electrical well logging data (case study from Southern Syria).

    PubMed

    Asfahani, Jamal

    2014-02-01

    Factor analysis technique is proposed in this research for interpreting the combination of nuclear well logging, including natural gamma ray, density and neutron-porosity, and the electrical well logging of long and short normal, in order to characterize the large extended basaltic areas in southern Syria. Kodana well logging data are used for testing and applying the proposed technique. The four resulting score logs enable to establish the lithological score cross-section of the studied well. The established cross-section clearly shows the distribution and the identification of four kinds of basalt which are hard massive basalt, hard basalt, pyroclastic basalt and the alteration basalt products, clay. The factor analysis technique is successfully applied on the Kodana well logging data in southern Syria, and can be used efficiently when several wells and huge well logging data with high number of variables are required to be interpreted.

  7. The use of synchrotron radiation techniques in the characterization of strained semiconductor heterostructures and thin films [review article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, C.

    2004-05-01

    In the last couple of decades, high-performance electronic and optoelectronic devices based on semiconductor heterostructures have been required to obtain increasingly strict and well-defined performances, needing a detailed control, at the atomic level, of the structural composition of the buried interfaces. This goal has been achieved by an improvement of the epitaxial growth techniques and by the parallel use of increasingly sophisticated characterization techniques. Among them, a leading role has been certainly played by those exploiting synchrotron radiation (SR) sources. In fact synchrotron radiation has distinct advantages as a photon source, notably high brilliance and continuous energy spectrum; by using the latter characteristic atomic selectivity can be obtained and this is of fundamental help to investigate the structural environment of atoms present only in a few angstrom (Å) thick interface layers of heterostructures. The third generation synchrotron radiation sources have allowed to reach the limit of measuring a monolayer of material, corresponding to about 10 14 atoms/cm 2. Since, in the last decade, the use of intentionally strained heterostructures has greatly enhanced the performance of electrical and electro-optical semiconductor, a particular attention will be devoted to intentionally strained superlattices. First the effect of strain on the band lineups alignments in strained heterostructures will be discussed deeply. Then the attention will be focused on to review the most important results obtained by several groups in the characterization of semiconductor heterostructures using the following structural SR techniques: (i) X-ray absorption-based techniques such as EXAFS, polarization-dependent EXAFS, surface EXAFS and NEXAFS (or XANES); (ii) X-ray diffraction-based techniques such as high-resolution XRD, grazing incidence XRD, XRD reciprocal space maps, X-ray standing waves and diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS); (iii

  8. Characterization of controlled bone defects using 2D and 3D ultrasound imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Biren J; Longsine, Whitney; Sabonghy, Eric P; Han, Arum; Tasciotti, Ennio; Weiner, Bradley K; Ferrari, Mauro; Righetti, Raffaella

    2010-08-21

    Ultrasound is emerging as an attractive alternative modality to standard x-ray and CT methods for bone assessment applications. As of today, however, there is a lack of systematic studies that investigate the performance of diagnostic ultrasound techniques in bone imaging applications. This study aims at understanding the performance limitations of new ultrasound techniques for imaging bones in controlled experiments in vitro. Experiments are performed on samples of mammalian and non-mammalian bones with controlled defects with size ranging from 400 microm to 5 mm. Ultrasound findings are statistically compared with those obtained from the same samples using standard x-ray imaging modalities and optical microscopy. The results of this study demonstrate that it is feasible to use diagnostic ultrasound imaging techniques to assess sub-millimeter bone defects in real time and with high accuracy and precision. These results also demonstrate that ultrasound imaging techniques perform comparably better than x-ray imaging and optical imaging methods, in the assessment of a wide range of controlled defects both in mammalian and non-mammalian bones. In the future, ultrasound imaging techniques might provide a cost-effective, real-time, safe and portable diagnostic tool for bone imaging applications.

  9. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2003-02-11

    This research was directed toward developing a systematic reservoir characterization methodology which can be used by the petroleum industry to implement infill drilling programs and/or enhanced oil recovery projects in naturally fractured reservoir systems in an environmentally safe and cost effective manner. It was anticipated that the results of this research program will provide geoscientists and engineers with a systematic procedure for properly characterizing a fractured reservoir system and a reservoir/horizontal wellbore simulator model which can be used to select well locations and an effective EOR process to optimize the recovery of the oil and gas reserves from such complex reservoir systems.

  10. Rapid Identification and Characterization of Francisella by Molecular Biology and Other Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xin-He; Zhao, Long-Fei; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative pathogen of tularemia and a Tier 1 bioterror agent on the CDC list. Considering the fact that some subpopulation of the F. tularensis strains is more virulent, more significantly associated with mortality, and therefore poses more threat to humans, rapid identification and characterization of this subpopulation strains is of invaluable importance. This review summarizes the up-to-date developments of assays for mainly detecting and characterizing F. tularensis and a touch of caveats of some of the assays. PMID:27335619

  11. Thermal characterization of starch-water system by photopyroelectric technique and adiabatic scanning calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Orea, A.; Bentefour, E. H.; Jamée, P.; Chirtoc, M.; Glorieux, C.; Pitsi, G.; Thoen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Starch is one of the most important carbohydrate sources in human nutrition. For the thermal analysis of starch, techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry have been extensively used. As an alternative, we have applied a photopyroelectric (PPE) configuration and adiabatic scanning calorimetry (ASC) to study the thermal properties of starch-water systems. For this study we used nixtamalized corn flour and potato starch with different quantities of distilled water, in order to obtain samples with different moisture content. By using PPE and ASC methods we have measured, for each technique separately, the heat capacity by unit volume (ρcp) at room temperature for a corn flour sample at 90% moisture. The obtained values agree within experimental uncertainty. By using these techniques we also studied the thermal behavior of potato starch, at 80% moisture, in the temperature range where phase transitions occur. In this case the PPE signal phase could be used as a sensitive and versatile monitor for phase transitions.

  12. Advanced atomic force microscopy techniques for characterizing the properties of cellulosic nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Ryan Bradley

    The measurement of nanomechanical properties is of great interest to science and industry. Key to progress in this area is the development of new techniques and analysis methods to identify, measure, and quantify these properties. In this dissertation, new data analysis methods and experimental techniques for measuring nanomechanical properties with the atomic force microscope (AFM) are considered. These techniques are then applied to the study of cellulose nanoparticles, an abundant, plant derived nanomaterial. Quantifying uncertainty is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nano-engineered materials and products. However, rigorous uncertainty quantification is rarely applied for material property measurements with the AFM. A framework is presented to ascribe uncertainty to local nanomechanical properties of any nanoparticle or surface measured with the AFM by taking into account the main uncertainty sources inherent in such measurements. This method is demonstrated by quantifying uncertainty in force displacement AFM based measurements of the transverse elastic modulus of tunicate cellulose nanocrystals. Next, a more comprehensive study of different types of cellulose nanoparticles is undertaken with contact resonance (CR) AFM. CR-AFM is a dynamic AFM technique that exploits the resonance frequency of the AFM cantilever while it is permanent contact with the sample surface to predict nanomechanical properties. This technique offers improved measurement sensitivity over static AFM methods for some material systems. The effects of cellulose source material and processing technique on the properties of cellulose nanoparticles are compared. Finally, dynamic AFM cantilever vibration shapes are studied. Many AFM modes exploit the dynamic response of a cantilever in permanent contact with a sample to extract local material properties. A common challenge to these modes is that they assume a certain shape of cantilever vibration, which is not accessible in

  13. Micro-structural characterization of materials using synchrotron hard X-ray imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Ashish Singh, Balwant; Kashyap, Yogesh; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar

    2015-06-24

    X-ray imaging has been an important tool to study the materials microstructure with the laboratory based sources however the advent of third generation synchrotron sources has introduced new concepts in X-ray imaging such as phase contrast imaging, micro-tomography, fluorescence imaging and diffraction enhance imaging. These techniques are being used to provide information of materials about their density distribution, porosity, geometrical and morphological characteristics at sub-micron scalewith improved contrast. This paper discusses the development of various imaging techniques at synchrotron based imaging beamline Indus-2 and few recent experiments carried out at this facility.

  14. Characterization Techniques for a MEMS Electric-Field Sensor in Vacuum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    characterize their sensor re- sponse without the complexities associated with vacuum packaging . ARL has previously shown that the accuracy of the generated...active research and de- velopment with several design iterations that must be tested, vacuum packaging is a more complicated and expensive process that

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF FUNGI FROM HYPERSALINE ENVIRONMENTS OF SOLAR SALTERNS USING MORPHOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cabo Rojo Solar Salterns located on the southwest coast of Puerto Rico are composed of two main ecosystems (i.e., salt ponds and microbial mats). Even though these locations are characterized by high solar radiation (mean light intensity of 39 mol photons m-2d-1) they harbor ...

  16. Recent advances in electrophoretic techniques for the characterization of protein biomolecules: a poker of aces.

    PubMed

    Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Candiano, Giovanni

    2011-12-09

    The four classical modes of electrophoresis of protein molecules (sodium dodecyl sulphate electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE, isoelectric focusing, IEF, and immobilized pH gradients, IPGs, two-dimensional maps, 2D, and capillary electrophoresis, CE) are here reviewed, with special emphasis on recent innovations. Thus, in the case of SDS-PAGE, a novel method, consisting in focusing SDS-protein micelles against a gradient of cationic charges grafted onto a polyacrylamide gel is presented. In the case of IEF, the recent decoding of the structure, polydispersity, molecular mass distribution and buffering properties of the soluble carrier ampholyte buffers are here discussed. In regard to two dimensional mapping, recent instrumentation for performing 2D maps in horizontal, large gel slabs (up to 30 cm × 40 cm) and in a radial format for the SDS dimension is here evaluated. Finally, in the case of CE, three major applications are presented: a thorough study of capillary IEF and of all experimental variables, a method of importance in screening of rDNA products; the possibility of running proteins and peptide separations in very acidic, amphoteric, isoelectric buffers in absence of any capillary coating; finally, the possibility of producing a facile, user friendly, covalent coating of the wall silanols via bonding of quaternarized piperazines endowed with an iodinated tail. In acidic, volatile buffers, such protein/peptide runs can be directly interfaced with mass spectrometry instrumentation.

  17. Innovation @ NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Juan A.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the activities National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is doing to encourage innovation across the agency. All information provided is available publicly.

  18. Characterization of Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion and Sodium Ion Batteries using Synchrotron Radiation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Apurva; Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource; Doeff, Marca M.; Chen, Guoying; Cabana, Jordi; Richardson, Thomas J.; Mehta, Apurva; Shirpour, Mona; Duncan, Hugues; Kim, Chunjoong; Kam, Kinson C.; Conry, Thomas

    2013-04-30

    We describe the use of synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques to probe details of intercalation/deintercalation processes in electrode materials for Li ion and Na ion batteries. Both in situ and ex situ experiments are used to understand structural behavior relevant to the operation of devices.

  19. Characterization and performance of carbon films deposited by plasma and ion beam based techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, K C; Kung, H; Levine, T

    1994-12-31

    Plasma and ion beam based techniques have been used to deposit carbon-based films. The ion beam based method, a cathodic arc process, used a magnetically mass analyzed beam and is inherently a line-of-sight process. Two hydrocarbon plasma-based, non-line-of-sight techniques were also used and have the advantage of being capable of coating complicated geometries. The self-bias technique can produce hard carbon films, but is dependent on rf power and the surface area of the target. The pulsed-bias technique can also produce hard carbon films but has the additional advantage of being independent of rf power and target surface area. Tribological results indicated the coefficient of friction is nearly the same for carbon films from each deposition process, but the wear rate of the cathodic arc film was five times less than for the self-bias or pulsed-bias films. Although the cathodic arc film was the hardest, contained the highest fraction of sp{sup 3} bonds and exhibited the lowest wear rate, the cathodic arc film also produced the highest wear on the 440C stainless steel counterface during tribological testing. Thus, for tribological applications requiring low wear rates for both counterfaces, coating one surface with a very hard, wear resistant film may detrimentally affect the tribological behavior of the counterface.

  20. Advance development of a technique for characterizing the thermomechanical properties of thermally stable polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillham, J. K.; Stadnicki, S. J.; Hazony, Y.

    1974-01-01

    The torsional braid experiment has been interfaced with a centralized hierarchical computing system for data acquisition and data processing. Such a system, when matched by the appropriate upgrading of the monitoring techniques, provides high resolution thermomechanical spectra of rigidity and damping, and their derivatives with respect to temperature.

  1. Mechanical characterization of thin film structures using a laser spallation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianxin

    The laser spallation technique has been developed to measure the interface strength between different materials, especially thin film structures. In this work, it is refined and applied to various material systems. With these advances, the laser spallation technique is now fully mature for applications not only to measurement of material interface strength, but also to the study of laser-material interaction, dynamic fracture mechanics, as well as to the measurement of material bulk properties. In the first part of this work, the laser spallation technique was examined quantitatively for signal processing and stress wavefield recovery. It is shown that the short time Fourier transformation is another appropriate means for recovering the free surface displacement from the acquired optical signal. Two methods have been chosen to recover the stress field inside the sample. When the displacement of the coating's free surface is recorded directly, it is convenient to use a special finite difference strategy. When the free surface displacement is recorded on the bare substrate surface, it is more convenient to use the finite element method to calculate the interface strength. The application work includes several topics. The first one was the evaluation of the effect of substrate orientation and deposition mode on the interface strength of Nb-sapphire interfaces. The interface strength is higher for the sapphire substrate with prismatic orientation, and RF deposition mode yields higher interface strength than the DC mode. The second application estimated the effect of substrate roughness on the interface strength of Nb-alumina system. The effect of chemical composition of thin films on the interface strength was also investigated. The final application investigated the dynamic fracture mechanics of thin film structures. The purpose of this chapter is to clarify the controversial topic regarding the limit speed of bimaterial interface crack propagation. We were successful

  2. Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: An innovative approach for the characterization of the gaseous emissions from residual MSW bio-drying

    SciTech Connect

    Ragazzi, M.; Rada, E.C.; Antolini, D.

    2011-09-15

    In the sector of residual municipal solid waste management an increasing attention is put towards the role of biological treatments like bio-drying and bio-stabilization in order to decrease the need of landfilling volumes. The literature shows a lack of information concerning the emission factor of pollutants released from these processes. The available data are generally spot characterizations of concentration and air flow-rate that are used together in order to assess the emission factors. This approach caused significant differences among the available data as the release of pollutants is not steady. This paper belongs to a group of six papers concerning a research on material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems, developed by a network of five universities. The contribution of the University of Trento, focuses on the bio-drying process with the following targets: (a) developing an innovative low cost method of sampling/measurement able to take into account the dynamics of release of pollutants; (b) checking the efficiency of a bio-filter; (c) verifying the variability of generation of some pollutants; (d) generating emission factors. The research was developed using a bio-drying pilot plant. As a treatment of the process air, the bio-reactor was coupled with a bio-filter. The emissions were characterized using an original approach based on the adoption of two measurement chambers suitable for hosting passive samplers. The passive samplers allowed the characterization of VOCs, N{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S. A bio-chemical model, useful for energy and mass balances, supported the interpretation of the presented bio-drying run.

  3. Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: an innovative approach for the characterization of the gaseous emissions from residual MSW bio-drying.

    PubMed

    Ragazzi, M; Rada, E C; Antolini, D

    2011-01-01

    In the sector of residual municipal solid waste management an increasing attention is put towards the role of biological treatments like bio-drying and bio-stabilization in order to decrease the need of landfilling volumes. The literature shows a lack of information concerning the emission factor of pollutants released from these processes. The available data are generally spot characterizations of concentration and air flow-rate that are used together in order to assess the emission factors. This approach caused significant differences among the available data as the release of pollutants is not steady. This paper belongs to a group of six papers concerning a research on material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems, developed by a network of five universities. The contribution of the University of Trento, focuses on the bio-drying process with the following targets: (a) developing an innovative low cost method of sampling/measurement able to take into account the dynamics of release of pollutants; (b) checking the efficiency of a bio-filter; (c) verifying the variability of generation of some pollutants; (d) generating emission factors. The research was developed using a bio-drying pilot plant. As a treatment of the process air, the bio-reactor was coupled with a bio-filter. The emissions were characterized using an original approach based on the adoption of two measurement chambers suitable for hosting passive samplers. The passive samplers allowed the characterization of VOCs, N(2)O, NH(3) and H(2)S. A bio-chemical model, useful for energy and mass balances, supported the interpretation of the presented bio-drying run.

  4. Innovative approaches to establish and characterize primary cultures: an ex vivo 3D system and the zebrafish model

    PubMed Central

    Liverani, Chiara; La Manna, Federico; Groenewoud, Arwin; Mercatali, Laura; Van Der Pluijm, Gabri; Pieri, Federica; Cavaliere, Davide; De Vita, Alessandro; Spadazzi, Chiara; Miserocchi, Giacomo; Bongiovanni, Alberto; Recine, Federica; Riva, Nada; Amadori, Dino; Tasciotti, Ennio; Snaar-Jagalska, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Patient-derived specimens are an invaluable resource to investigate tumor biology. However, in vivo studies on primary cultures are often limited by the small amount of material available, while conventional in vitro systems might alter the features and behavior that characterize cancer cells. We present our data obtained on primary dedifferentiated liposarcoma cells cultured in a 3D scaffold-based system and injected into a zebrafish model. Primary cells were characterized in vitro for their morphological features, sensitivity to drugs and biomarker expression, and in vivo for their engraftment and invasiveness abilities. The 3D culture showed a higher enrichment in cancer cells than the standard monolayer culture and a better preservation of liposarcoma-associated markers. We also successfully grafted primary cells into zebrafish, showing their local migratory and invasive abilities. Our work provides proof of concept of the ability of 3D cultures to maintain the original phenotype of ex vivo cells, and highlights the potential of the zebrafish model to provide a versatile in vivo system for studies with limited biological material. Such models could be used in translational research studies for biomolecular analyses, drug screenings and tumor aggressiveness assays. PMID:27895047

  5. Design Concepts, Fabrication and Advanced Characterization Methods of Innovative Piezoelectric Sensors Based on ZnO Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Araneo, Rodolfo; Rinaldi, Antonio; Notargiacomo, Andrea; Bini, Fabiano; Pea, Marialilia; Celozzi, Salvatore; Marinozzi, Franco; Lovat, Giampiero

    2014-12-08

    Micro- and nano-scale materials and systems based on zinc oxide are expected to explode in their applications in the electronics and photonics, including nano-arrays of addressable optoelectronic devices and sensors, due to their outstanding properties, including semiconductivity and the presence of a direct bandgap, piezoelectricity, pyroelectricity and biocompatibility. Most applications are based on the cooperative and average response of a large number of ZnO micro/nanostructures. However, in order to assess the quality of the materials and their performance, it is fundamental to characterize and then accurately model the specific electrical and piezoelectric properties of single ZnO structures. In this paper, we report on focused ion beam machined high aspect ratio nanowires and their mechanical and electrical (by means of conductive atomic force microscopy) characterization. Then, we investigate the suitability of new power-law design concepts to accurately model the relevant electrical and mechanical size-effects, whose existence has been emphasized in recent reviews.

  6. Design Concepts, Fabrication and Advanced Characterization Methods of Innovative Piezoelectric Sensors Based on ZnO Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Araneo, Rodolfo; Rinaldi, Antonio; Notargiacomo, Andrea; Bini, Fabiano; Pea, Marialilia; Celozzi, Salvatore; Marinozzi, Franco; Lovat, Giampiero

    2014-01-01

    Micro- and nano-scale materials and systems based on zinc oxide are expected to explode in their applications in the electronics and photonics, including nano-arrays of addressable optoelectronic devices and sensors, due to their outstanding properties, including semiconductivity and the presence of a direct bandgap, piezoelectricity, pyroelectricity and biocompatibility. Most applications are based on the cooperative and average response of a large number of ZnO micro/nanostructures. However, in order to assess the quality of the materials and their performance, it is fundamental to characterize and then accurately model the specific electrical and piezoelectric properties of single ZnO structures. In this paper, we report on focused ion beam machined high aspect ratio nanowires and their mechanical and electrical (by means of conductive atomic force microscopy) characterization. Then, we investigate the suitability of new power-law design concepts to accurately model the relevant electrical and mechanical size-effects, whose existence has been emphasized in recent reviews. PMID:25494351

  7. Development of phased array techniques to improve characterization of defect located in a component of complex geometry.

    PubMed

    Mahaut, Steve; Roy, Olivier; Beroni, Claude; Rotter, Bernhard

    2002-05-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of complex geometry components has to cope with different problems: limited access of the area assumed to be insonified, beam misorientation and distortions, loss of sensitivity. Those harmful effects can lead to inspection performance degradations, especially in terms of defect detection and characterization. Phased array techniques may be used to overcome such difficulties, as they can provide an optimal mastering of the ultrasonic beam radiated through the inspected component. This paper presents some applications of phased array inspections carried out by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and the French Company of Electricity (EDF) in the framework of R&D studies. Inspections of components with varying profile (of planar and cylindrical parts, misalignment and local depression), and containing artificial reflectors have been carried out with pulse echo immersion techniques, using standard and phased arrays transducers. Optimal delay laws have been applied to preserve the beam characteristics in spite of the varying profile geometry encountered as the phased array transducer was moved over the component. Those delay laws allow to efficiently compensate the beam distortions generated by the profile geometry. They were computed using a specific model and compared to experimental delays obtained using through transmission tests. Experimental and simulation results showed that the defect detection and characterization performances were greatly enhanced using phased array techniques. In the presented examples, with standard transducers, defects located below the irregular parts of the specimen were partially detected, in accurately located or even missed, whereas phased array inspections enabled to detect and locate all of these defects.

  8. Structural characterization of electrospun micro/nanofibrous scaffolds by liquid extrusion porosimetry: a comparison with other techniques.

    PubMed

    Cortez Tornello, Pablo R; Caracciolo, Pablo C; Cuadrado, Teresita R; Abraham, Gustavo A

    2014-08-01

    Poly(ε-caprolactone) micro/nanofibrous scaffolds obtained by electrospinning technique from polymer solutions were characterized in terms of fiber diameter (as measured by scanning electron microscopy-SEM), pore size and its distribution (as measured by liquid extrusion porosimetry), and porosity (as determined by gravimetric measurement, liquid intrusion method, SEM image analysis and liquid extrusion porosimetry - LEP). Nonwoven micro/nanofibrous scaffolds were formed by uniform bead-free fibers with mean diameters in the range of 0.4 to 7 μm. The results indicate that pore size and pore size distribution are strongly associated to fiber diameter. Porosity results were analyzed taking into account the accuracy and limitations of each method. LEP resulted as the most suitable technique for measuring through-pore diameter and porosity. In order to compare empirical data of pore size from LEP, a theoretical multiplanar model for stochastic fiber networks was applied. The results predicted by the model were in good agreement with the experimental data provided by LEP for mean diameters higher than 1 μm. The present study shows the potential of LEP as a valuable instrumental technique for characterizing the porous structure of electrospun fibrous scaffolds.

  9. Characterization of silicon-germanium epitaxial layer by photoluminescence intensity and reflectance measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Back, Dohyun; Lee, Jaehyeong

    2014-12-01

    Si(1-x)Ge(x) epitaxial layers with various Ge fractions sample were characterized by photoluminescence intensity method at room temperature. Photoluminescence intensity was affected by minority carrier lifetime, defect density, and surface condition. PL intensity profile showed misfit dislocation on epitaxial layer for 15%, 21%, 24%, and 26%, since dislocations were one of minority carrier lifetime degradation parameters. It clearly showed misfit dislocation profiles, cross-hatch, and PL intensity was low at dislocation region.

  10. Multi-scale characterization of rock mass discontinuities and rock slope geometry using terrestrial remote sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturzenegger, Matthieu

    Terrestrial remote sensing techniques including both digital photogrammetry and laser scanning, represent useful complements to conventional field mapping and rock mass discontinuity characterization. Several studies have highlighted practical advantages at close-range (< 300 m), including the ability to map inaccessible rock exposures and hazard reduction related to both traffic and rockfall along investigated outcrops. In addition, several authors have demonstrated their potential to provide adequate quantification of discontinuity parameters. Consequently, their incorporation into rock slope stability investigations and design projects has grown substantially over recent years. As these techniques are increasingly applied by geologists and geological engineers, it is important that their use be properly evaluated. Furthermore, guidelines to optimize their application are required in a similar manner to standardization of conventional discontinuity mapping techniques. An important thesis objective is to develop recommendations for optimal applications of terrestrial remote sensing techniques for discontinuity characterization, based on a quantitative evaluation of various registration approaches, sampling bias and extended manual mapping of 3D digital models. It is shown that simple registration networks can provide adequate measurement of discontinuity geometry for engineering purposes. The bias associated with remote sensing mapping is described. The advantages of these techniques over conventional mapping are demonstrated, including reliable discontinuity orientation measurements. Persistence can be precisely quantified instead of approximately estimated, resulting in a new class for extremely persistent discontinuities being suggested. Secondary roughness and curvature can also be considered at larger scales. The techniques are suitable for the definition of discontinuity sets, and the estimation of both trace intensity and block size/shape, if sampling bias

  11. Characterization of defects in colloidal CdSe nanocrystals by the modified thermostimulated luminescence technique

    SciTech Connect

    Katsaba, A. V. Fedyanin, V. V.; Ambrozevich, S. A.; Vitukhnovsky, A. G.; Lobanov, A. N.; Selyukov, A. S.; Vasiliev, R. B.; Samatov, I. G.; Brunkov, P. N.

    2013-10-15

    The temperature dependencies of the luminescence spectra of 5-nm-diameter CdSe semiconductor nanocrystals synthesized by colloidal-chemistry methods are investigated. The two bands observed in these spectra around 2.01 and 1.37 eV correspond to band-to-band transitions and luminescence of defect states, respectively. A model explaining the temperature behavior of the luminescence band intensities both upon cooling and heating is put forward. A new modification of spectrally resolved thermostimulated luminescence technique making it possible to determine the activation energies and the character of traps responsible for the temperature dependence of the luminescence intensities is suggested. This technique is used to obtain the activation energies of the emission and capture of electrons at traps (190 and 205 meV, respectively) and to determine the depth of the electron level (57 meV) responsible for luminescence in the 1.37-eV region.

  12. Techniques for improving the Si-SiO2 interface characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Hoffman, H. J.; Su, P.; Tsuo, Y. H.

    1983-01-01

    The two techniques which have provided most of the information on interface states in MIS-C (metal-insulator-semiconductor-capacitor) structures are the 'quasi-static method' and the 'conductance method'. Sher et al. (1979) and Su et al. (1980) have suggested a number of improvements concerning these methods. The present investigation has the objective to extend the earlier results and to offer a new tentative interpretation of the data. A critical review is conducted of the data collection and reduction techniques for the quasi-static method, taking into account the sample, the quasi-static capacitance, and the surface potential. In connection with a discussion of the conductance method, attention is given to parallel conductance and capacitance measurements, interface-state densities, time constants, and measurements on a (110) surface orientation.

  13. An approximate numerical technique for characterizing optical pulse propagation in inhomogeneous biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Handapangoda, Chintha C; Premaratne, Malin

    2008-01-01

    An approximate numerical technique for modeling optical pulse propagation through weakly scattering biological tissue is developed by solving the photon transport equation in biological tissue that includes varying refractive index and varying scattering/absorption coefficients. The proposed technique involves first tracing the ray paths defined by the refractive index profile of the medium by solving the eikonal equation using a Runge-Kutta integration algorithm. The photon transport equation is solved only along these ray paths, minimizing the overall computational burden of the resulting algorithm. The main advantage of the current algorithm is that it enables to discretise the pulse propagation space adaptively by taking optical depth into account. Therefore, computational efficiency can be increased without compromising the accuracy of the algorithm.

  14. Energy efficient facile extraction process of cellulose nanofibres and their dimensional characterization using light scattering techniques.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Chandravati; Saini, Arun; Maji, Pradip K

    2017-06-01

    A chemi-mechanical approach was used to extract cellulose nanofibres (CNFs) from waste mango wood scraps using a mild chemical treatment ensuring no acid hydrolysis. The dimensional analysis for CNFs has been done by taking into account both the microscopic and light scattering techniques. The FESEM (field emission scanning electron microscopy) analysis revealed the diameter of obtained CNFs in the range of 5-40nm with an average diameter of approximately 12nm. The AFM (atomic force microscopy) analysis gave a more precise average diameter value of 5nm for the obtained CNFs. The aspect ratio as determined by applying mathematical calculations on the data revealed through dynamic and static light scattering techniques (DLS, SLS) was approximately 200. The characteristic shape determined by fractal dimension investigation from SLS measurement revealed the rod/thread like shape of CNFs at lower concentrations.

  15. Characterizing Si:P quantum dot qubits with spin resonance techniques

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Chin-Yi; Klimeck, Gerhard; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Rahman, Rajib

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dots patterned by atomically precise placement of phosphorus donors in single crystal silicon have long spin lifetimes, advantages in addressability, large exchange tunability, and are readily available few-electron systems. To be utilized as quantum bits, it is important to non-invasively characterise these donor quantum dots post fabrication and extract the number of bound electron and nuclear spins as well as their locations. Here, we propose a metrology technique based on electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements with the on-chip circuitry already needed for qubit manipulation to obtain atomic scale information about donor quantum dots and their spin configurations. Using atomistic tight-binding technique and Hartree self-consistent field approximation, we show that the ESR transition frequencies are directly related to the number of donors, electrons, and their locations through the electron-nuclear hyperfine interaction. PMID:27550779

  16. Background characterization techniques for target detection using scene metrics and pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noah, Paul V.; Noah, Meg A.; Schroeder, John W.; Chernick, Julian A.

    1990-09-01

    The U.S. Army has a requirement to develop systems for the detection and identification of ground targets in a clutter environment. Autonomous Homing Munitions (AHM) using infrared, visible, millimeter wave and other sensors are being investigated for this application. Advanced signal processing and computational approaches using pattern recognition and artificial intelligence techniques combined with multisensor data fusion have the potential to meet the Army's requirements for next generation ARM.

  17. Uniaxial Pre-strain and Free Recovery (UPFR) as a Flexible Technique for Nitinol Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadelli, A.; Manjeri, R. M.; Sczerzenie, F.; Coda, A.

    2016-03-01

    The measurement of phase transformation temperatures of superelastic (SE) and shape memory (SM) NiTi alloy products and components was studied in this work. The transformation temperatures of a set of twenty different 300 μm NiTi superelastic wires were measured by two well-established and standardized techniques, namely differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and bend and free recovery (BFR) and then compared with the results from the Uniaxial Pre-Strain and Free Recovery (UPFR) test. UPFR is a tension-based test, whose aim is to overcome the limitations associated with BFR testing. Within this work, a test procedure has been set up and validated. UPFR is found to be the only method showing a very strong correlation with the mechanical properties measured using the standard uniaxial tensile test method for superelastic NiTi alloy. Further, UPFR has been validated as a robust technique for measuring the R-phase and austenitic transformation temperatures in specimens of various sizes, composition, and of different geometries. This technique overcomes the limitations of BFR and DSC which cannot be used for testing products such as 25 μm SM wire, a 50 μm SE strip, and different springs and microsprings for actuation.

  18. Computer Vision Techniques Applied to Space Object Detect, Track, ID, Characterize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewelling, B.

    2014-09-01

    Space-based object detection and tracking represents a fundamental step necessary for detailed analysis of space objects. Initial observations of a resident space object (RSO) may result from careful sensor tasking to observe an object with well understood dynamics, or measurements-of-opportunity on an object with poorly understood dynamics. Dim and eccentric objects present a particular challenge which requires more dynamic use of imaging systems. As a result of more stressing data acquisition strategies, advanced techniques for the accurate processing of both point and streaking sources are needed. This paper will focus on two key methods in computer vision used to determine interest points within imagery. The Harris Corner method and the method of Phase Congruency can be used to effectively extract static and streaking point sources and to indicate when apparent motion is present within an observation. The geometric inferences which can be made from the resulting detections will be discussed, including a method to evaluate the localization uncertainty of the extracted detections which is based on the computation of the Hessian of the detector response. Finally a technique which exploits the additional information found in detected streak endpoints to provide a better centroid in the presence of curved streaks is explained and additional applications for the presented techniques are discussed.

  19. Characterization of Ni-Cr alloys using different casting techniques and molds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Teng, Fu-Yuan; Hung, Chun-Cheng

    2014-02-01

    This study differentiated the mechanical properties of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys under various casting techniques (different casting molds and casting atmospheres). These techniques were sampled by a sand mold using a centrifugal machine in ambient air (group I) and electromagnetic induction in an automatic argon castimatic casting machine (group II). The specimen casting used a graphite mold by a castimatic casting machine (group III). The characteristics of the Ni-Cr alloys, yield and ultimate tensile strength, bending modulus, microhardness, diffraction phase, grindability, ability to spring back, as well as ground microstructure and pattern under different casting conditions were evaluated. The group III specimens exhibited the highest values in terms of strength, modulus, hardness, and grindability at a grind rate of 500 rpm. Moreover, group III alloys exhibited smaller grain sizes, higher ability to spring back, and greater ductility than those casted by sand investment (groups I and II). The main factor, "casting mold," significantly influenced all mechanical properties. The graphite mold casting of the Ni-Cr dental alloys in a controlled atmosphere argon casting system provided an excellent combination of high mechanical properties and good ability to spring back, and preserved the ductile properties for application in Ni-Cr porcelain-fused system. The results can offer recommendations to assist a prosthetic technician in selecting the appropriate casting techniques to obtain the desired alloy properties.

  20. Mass Spectrometry as a Powerful Analytical Technique for the Structural Characterization of Synthesized and Natural Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es-Safi, Nour-Eddine; Essassi, El Mokhtar; Massoui, Mohamed; Banoub, Joseph

    Mass spectrometry is an important tool for the identification and structural elucidation of natural and synthesized compounds. Its high sensitivity and the possibility of coupling liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection make it a technique of choice for the investigation of complex mixtures like raw natural extracts. The mass spectrometer is a universal detector that can achieve very high sensitivity and provide information on the molecular mass. More detailed information can be subsequently obtained by resorting to collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (CID-MS/MS). In this review, the application of mass spectrometric techniques for the identification of natural and synthetic compounds is presented. The gas-phase fragmentation patterns of a series of four natural flavonoid glycosides, three synthesized benzodiazepines and two synthesized quinoxalinone derivatives were investigated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry techniques. Exact accurate masses were measured using a modorate resolution quadrupole orthogonal time-of-flight QqTOF-MS/MS hybrid mass spectrometer instrument. Confirmation of the molecular masses and the chemical structures of the studied compounds were achieved by exploring the gas-phase breakdown routes of the ionized molecules. This was rationalized by conducting low-energy collision CID-MS/MS analyses (product ion- and precursor ion scans) using a conventional quadrupole hexapole-quadrupole (QhQ) tandem mass spectrometer.

  1. Finite element analysis and experimental verification of multilayered tissue characterization using the thermal technique.

    PubMed

    Kharalkar, Nachiket M; Valvano, Jonathan W

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop noninvasive techniques to determine thermal properties of layered biologic structures based on measurements from the surface. The self-heated thermistor technique is evaluated both numerically and experimentally. The finite element analyses, which confirm the experimental results, are used to study the temperature profiles occurring in the thermistor-tissue system. An in vitro tissue model was constructed by placing Teflon of varying thickness between the biologic tissue and the self-heated thermistor. The experiments were performed using two different-sized thermistors on six tissue samples. A self-heated thermistor was used to determine the thermal conductivity of tissue covered by a thin layer Teflon. The results from experimental data clearly indicate that this technique can penetrate below the thin layers of Teflon and thus is sensitive to the thermal properties of the underlying tissue. The factors which may introduce error in the experimental data are (i) poor thermal/physical contact between the thermistor probe and tissue sample, and (ii) water loss from tissue during the course of experimentation. The finite element analysis was used to simulate the experimental conditions and to calculate transient temperature profile generated by the thermistor bead. The results of finite element analysis are in accordance with the experimental data.

  2. Glycoengineered cell models for the characterization of cancer O-glycoproteome: an innovative strategy for biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Campos, Diana; Freitas, Daniela; Gomes, Joana; Reis, Celso A

    2015-08-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most abundant forms of protein posttranslational modification. O-glycosylation is a major type of protein glycosylation, comprising different types and structures expressed in several physiologic and pathologic conditions. The understanding of protein attachment site and glycan structure is of the utmost importance for the clarification of the role glycosylation plays in normal cells and in pathological conditions. Neoplastic transformation frequently shows the expression of immature truncated O-glycans. These aberrantly expressed O-glycans have been shown to induce oncogenic properties and can be detected in premalignant lesions, meaning that they are an important source of biomarkers. This article addresses the recent application of genetically engineered cancer cell models to produce simplified homogenous O-glycans allowing the characterization of cancer cells O-glycoproteomes, using advanced mass spectrometry methods and the identification of potential cancer-specific O-glycosylation sites. This article will also discuss possible applications of these biomarkers in the cancer field.

  3. Managing Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Marilyn Gell

    1991-01-01

    Describes one library's use of technological innovation to provide Associated Press updates over the library's 24-hour dial-up service during the Persian Gulf War. Suggests five rules for innovation: (1) develop a shared vision; (2) foster frequent, formal, and informal communication; (3) empower employees; (4) take limited risks; and (5) use, but…

  4. Characterization of Ferrite in Tempered Martensite of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Using the Electron Backscattered Diffraction Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, C. R.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Murty, B. S.

    2011-12-01

    Ferrite was identified and characterized in tempered martensitic modified 9Cr-1Mo steel using the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. Microstructural examination of the as-received modified 9Cr-1Mo steel revealed the presence of polycrystalline grains without lath morphology having low hardness within a predominantly tempered lath martensitic matrix. These grains were identified as the ferrite phase, and subsequent EBSD data analysis confirmed that the image quality (IQ) index of these grains is higher and boundary line length per unit area is lower than those of martensitic matrix. Therefore, it is proposed that characterization of ferrite phase in martensitic matrix can be carried out using microstructural parameters such as IQ index and boundary line length per unit area obtained from EBSD data analysis.

  5. Characterization of Bond Strength of U-Mo Fuel Plates Using the Laser Shockwave Technique: Capabilities and Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Smith; D. L. Cottle; B. H. Rabin

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes work conducted to-date on the implementation of new laser-based capabilities for characterization of bond strength in nuclear fuel plates, and presents preliminary results obtained from fresh fuel studies on as-fabricated monolithic fuel consisting of uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum alloys clad in 6061 aluminum by hot isostatic pressing. Characterization involves application of two complementary experimental methods, laser-shock testing and laser-ultrasonic imaging, collectively referred to as the Laser Shockwave Technique (LST), that allows the integrity, physical properties and interfacial bond strength in fuel plates to be evaluated. Example characterization results are provided, including measurement of layer thicknesses, elastic properties of the constituents, and the location and nature of generated debonds (including kissing bonds). LST provides spatially localized, non-contacting measurements with minimum specimen preparation, and is ideally suited for applications involving radioactive materials, including irradiated materials. The theoretical principles and experimental approaches employed in characterizing nuclear fuel plates are described, and preliminary bond strength measurement results are discussed, with emphasis on demonstrating the capabilities and limitations of these methods. These preliminary results demonstrate the ability to distinguish bond strength variations between different fuel plates. Although additional development work is necessary to validate and qualify the test methods, these results suggest LST is viable as a method to meet fuel qualification requirements to demonstrate acceptable bonding integrity.

  6. Characterization of soil water content variability and soil texture using GPR groundwave techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, K.; Anger, C.; Kelly, B.; Hubbard, S.; Rubin, Y.

    2010-08-15

    Accurate characterization of near-surface soil water content is vital for guiding agricultural management decisions and for reducing the potential negative environmental impacts of agriculture. Characterizing the near-surface soil water content can be difficult, as this parameter is often both spatially and temporally variable, and obtaining sufficient measurements to describe the heterogeneity can be prohibitively expensive. Understanding the spatial correlation of near-surface soil water content can help optimize data acquisition and improve understanding of the processes controlling soil water content at the field scale. In this study, ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods were used to characterize the spatial correlation of water content in a three acre field as a function of sampling depth, season, vegetation, and soil texture. GPR data were acquired with 450 MHz and 900 MHz antennas, and measurements of the GPR groundwave were used to estimate soil water content at four different times. Additional water content estimates were obtained using time domain reflectometry measurements, and soil texture measurements were also acquired. Variograms were calculated for each set of measurements, and comparison of these variograms showed that the horizontal spatial correlation was greater for deeper water content measurements than for shallower measurements. Precipitation and irrigation were both shown to increase the spatial variability of water content, while shallowly-rooted vegetation decreased the variability. Comparison of the variograms of water content and soil texture showed that soil texture generally had greater small-scale spatial correlation than water content, and that the variability of water content in deeper soil layers was more closely correlated to soil texture than were shallower water content measurements. Lastly, cross-variograms of soil texture and water content were calculated, and co-kriging of water content estimates and soil texture

  7. Raman spectrosopic characterization of human malignant tissues: implications for a percutaneous optical biopsy technique for in-situ tissue diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redd, Douglas C. B.; Frank, Christopher J.; Feng, Zhe Chuan; Gansler, Ted S.; McCreery, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advancements in the technique of Raman spectroscopy now make it possible to achieve rapid, minimally invasive and non-destructive characterization of tissues. In order to evaluate the efficacy of this technique for diagnosis, the Raman spectra of normal and neoplastic human tissues (e.g., breast, kidney, liver and colon) were obtained utilizing visible and near-IR excitation. Normal breast tissue and colon adenocarcinoma showed major Raman features due to the presence of carotenoids and lipids. In breast carcinoma, the features due to lipids were attenuated and as fibrosis (desmoplasia) increased, new spectral features attributable to collagen were observed. Samples of normal and neoplastic liver and kidney show unique spectral differences sufficient to permit tissue differentiation.

  8. A revisit to high-rate mode-II fracture characterization of composites with Kolsky bar techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Song, Bo; Jin, Huiqing

    2010-03-01

    Nowadays composite materials have been extensively utilized in many military and industrial applications. For example, the newest Boeing 787 uses 50% composite (mostly carbon fiber reinforced plastic) in production. However, the weak delamination strength of fiber reinforced composites, when subjected to external impact such as ballistic impact, has been always potential serious threats to the safety of passengers. Dynamic fracture toughness is a critical indicator of the performance from delamination in such impact events. Quasi-static experimental techniques for fracture toughness have been well developed. For example, end notched flexure (ENF) technique, which is illustrated in Fig. 1, has become a typical method to determined mode-II fracture toughness for composites under quasi-static loading conditions. However, dynamic fracture characterization of composites has been challenging. This has resulted in conflictive and confusing conclusions in regard to strain rate effects on fracture toughness of composites.

  9. Non-destructive and micro-invasive testing techniques for characterizing materials, structures and restoration problems in mural paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, Mariagrazia; Sfarra, Stefano; Chiarini, Marco; Daniele, Valeria; Taglieri, Giuliana; Cerichelli, Giorgio

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, chemical and structural studies of medieval wall paintings in Ocre (L'Aquila, Italy) are presented. During the latest restoration campaign, non-destructive (Near-Infrared Reflectography and Infrared Thermography) and micro-invasive (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, μ-Raman, Scanning Electron Microscopy with X-ray Microanalysis, X-Ray Diffraction, X-Ray Fluorescence, Optical Microscopy, Mass Spectrometry, Thermogravimetry) analyses were performed in order to determine the detachments of wall surfaces and the characterization of original and restoration materials. Data integration allowed to reconstruct the conservative history, the execution techniques and the conservation problems of the artefact, as well as to assess the effectiveness of restoration activities adopted. The combined use of physical and micro-chemical techniques proved to be effective for an in-depth study of materials stratification of paintings.

  10. Microstructure Characterization and Corrosion Resistance Behavior of New Cobalt-Free Maraging Steel Produced Through ESR Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seikh, Asiful H.; Halfa, Hossam; Baig, Muneer; Khan, Sohail M. A.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, two different grades (M23 and M29) of cobalt-free low nickel maraging steel have been produced through electroslag remelting (ESR) process. The corrosion resistance of these ESR steels was investigated in 1 M H2SO4 solution using linear potentiodynamic polarization (LPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The experiments were performed for different immersion time and solution temperature. To evaluate the corrosion resistance of the ESR steels, some significant characterization parameters from LPP and EIS curves were analyzed and compared with that of conventional C250 maraging steel. Irrespective of measurement techniques used, the results show that the corrosion resistance of the ESR steels was higher than the C250 steel. The microstructure of ESR steels was composed of uniform and well-distributed martensite accompanied with little amount of retained austenite in comparison with C250 steel.

  11. A review of chromatographic characterization techniques for biodiesel and biodiesel blends.

    SciTech Connect

    Pauls, R. E.

    2011-05-01

    This review surveys chromatographic technology that has been applied to the characterization of biodiesel and its blends. Typically, biodiesel consists of fatty acid methyl esters produced by transesterification of plant or animal derived triacylglycerols. Primary attention is given to the determination of trace impurities in biodiesel, such as methanol, glycerol, mono-, di-, and triacylglycerols, and sterol glucosides. The determination of the fatty acid methyl esters, trace impurities in biodiesel, and the determination of the biodiesel content of commercial blends of biodiesel in conventional diesel are also addressed.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Different Measurement Techniques for MLC Characterization: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Celis, M. A.

    2008-08-11

    Radiation transmission, leakage and beam penumbra are essential dosimetric parameters related to the commissioning of a multileaf collimation system. This work shows a comparative analysis of commonly used film detectors: X-OMAT V2 and EDR2 radiographic films, and GafChromic EBT registered radiochromic film. The results show that X-OMAT over-estimates radiation leakage and 80-20% beam penumbra. However, according to the reference values reported by the manufacturer for these dosimetric parameters, all three films are adequate for MLC dosimetric characterization, but special care must be taken when X-OMAT V2 film is used due to its low energy photon dependence.

  13. Dynamic characterization, monitoring and control of rotating flexible beam-mass structures via piezo-embedded techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Steven H.-Y.

    1992-01-01

    A variational principle and a finite element discretization technique were used to derive the dynamic equations for a high speed rotating flexible beam-mass system embedded with piezo-electric materials. The dynamic equation thus obtained allows the development of finite element models which accommodate both the original structural element and the piezoelectric element. The solutions of finite element models provide system dynamics needed to design a sensing system. The characterization of gyroscopic effect and damping capacity of smart rotating devices are addressed. Several simulation examples are presented to validate the analytical solution.

  14. An inverse light scattering technique for morphological characterization of irregular particles based on the Gaussian-random-sphere model.

    PubMed

    Hajihashemi, M Reza; Jiang, Huabei

    2012-06-01

    The Gaussian-random-sphere model is employed for morphological characterization of nonspherical, irregular particles using an inverse light scattering technique. The synthetic measurement data consist of reduced scattering spectra caused by an aggregate of irregular particles randomly oriented in turbid media and are generated using the discrete dipole approximation. The proposed method simultaneously retrieves the concentration and shape parameters of particles using the data collected at multiple wavelengths. The performance of the inverse algorithm is tested using noise-corrupted data, in which up to 50% noise may be added to the observed scattering spectra.

  15. Structural and optoelectronic characterization of TiO2 films prepared using the sol gel technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez González, A. E.; Gelover Santiago, S.

    2007-07-01

    TiO2 is a versatile material that makes for fascinating study in any of its several physical forms: monocrystal, polycrystal, powder or thin film. Its enhanced photosensitivity to UV radiation and excellent chemical stability in acidic and aqueous media point to its excellent potential for use in a variety of applications, such as solar cells, electronic devices, chemical sensors and photocatalysts. Of late, thin films of TiO2 have permitted the study of physical and chemical properties that are almost impossible to examine in powders. Using the sol-gel technique, it was possible to prepare TiO2 films, and to specifically modify their characteristic properties by means of annealing treatments. Optical measurements carried out on sol-gel derived films produced results similar to those found in films prepared using the sputtering technique. The use of TiO2 films facilitates the study of the behaviour of crystalline structure, grain size, photoresponse, electrical conductivity in both darkness and light and energy band gap (Eg) as a function of treatment temperature. For the first time, it has been demonstrated that the photoconductivity of TiO2 becomes apparent at a treatment temperature of 350 °C, which means that below this temperature the material is not photosensitive. The photosensitivity (S) of TiO2 films prepared by the sol-gel technique reaches values between 100 and 104, surpassing by more than two orders of magnitude the photosensitivity of TiO2 in powder form. In addition, it was possible to study the surface crystalline structure, where TEM studies clearly revealed both the polycrystalline order and the atomic arrangements of the TiO2 films. Our findings will afford us an opportunity to better study the nature of TiO2 and to enhance its performance with respect to the above-mentioned applications.

  16. Morphostructural characterization of the western edge of the Huila Plateau (SW Angola), based on remote sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Fernando Carlos; Pereira, Alcides José; Mantas, Vasco Manuel; Mpengo, Horácio Kativa

    2016-05-01

    Recognition of the main morphostructural features of the western edge of the Huila Plateau (SW Angola) can be done by using remote sensing techniques associated with field work. A digital elevation model (DEM) of the area was built for this purpose. This model is based on altimeter data acquired from the Aster sensor, on which image processing techniques such as enhancement techniques, contrast change and filtering were applied. Other techniques, such as RGB colour composition, were also tested. The processed satellite images were interpreted by visual process and the results were then compared with available geological maps (scale 1: 1 000 000). To facilitate both analysis and interpretation, the edge of the plateau was divided into three sectors: northern (or Chongoroi Edge), central (or Humpata Edge) and southern (or Oncocua Edge). For each sector, the main morphological aspects and main lineament systems were identified and characterized. In the specific case of the central sector, these parameters were also confirmed by field work. This study shows that the morphology of the western edge of the plateau is dominated by N50°W-N60°W, N60°E and N-S trending main tectonic systems. These results have important implications in terms of geological mapping and regional tectonics as well as in land-use planning and other areas, such as hydrogeology or geotechnics.

  17. Technique development for modulus, microcracking, hermeticity, and coating evaluation capability characterization of SiC/SiC tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xunxiang; Ang, Caen K.; Singh, Gyanender P.; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-08-01

    Driven by the need to enlarge the safety margins of nuclear fission reactors in accident scenarios, research and development of accident-tolerant fuel has become an important topic in the nuclear engineering and materials community. A continuous-fiber SiC/SiC composite is under consideration as a replacement for traditional zirconium alloy cladding owing to its high-temperature stability, chemical inertness, and exceptional irradiation resistance. An important task is the development of characterization techniques for SiC/SiC cladding, since traditional work using rectangular bars or disks cannot directly provide useful information on the properties of SiC/SiC composite tubes for fuel cladding applications. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, experimental capabilities are under development to characterize the modulus, microcracking, and hermeticity of as-fabricated, as-irradiated SiC/SiC composite tubes. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy has been validated as a promising technique to evaluate the elastic properties of SiC/SiC composite tubes and microcracking within the material. A similar technique, impulse excitation, is efficient in determining the basic mechanical properties of SiC bars prepared by chemical vapor deposition; it also has potential for application in studying the mechanical properties of SiC/SiC composite tubes. Complete evaluation of the quality of the developed coatings, a major mitigation strategy against gas permeation and hydrothermal corrosion, requires the deployment of various experimental techniques, such as scratch indentation, tensile pulling-off tests, and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, a comprehensive permeation test station is being established to assess the hermeticity of SiC/SiC composite tubes and to determine the H/D/He permeability of SiC/SiC composites. This report summarizes the current status of the development of these experimental capabilities.

  18. The preparation and characterization of a lithium borate glass prepared by the gel technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, M. C.; Neilson, G. F.; Smith, G. L.; Dunn, B.; Moore, G. S.; Mackenzie, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The preparation of an amorphous lithium borate gel by the metal organic procedure is described. In addition, a preliminary evaluation of the behavior of the gel upon heating is given. In particular the crystallization tendency of the gel is studied with the aid of DTA and X-ray diffraction, and the structural changes in the gel are monitored with the aid of IR spectroscopy. The glass produced from the lithium borate gel is compared to both the gel precursor material and a glass of similar composition prepared by conventional techniques. Specifically, the relevant water contents, crystallization behavior, and structural features are contrasted.

  19. Micro-spectroscopic techniques applied to characterization of varnished archeological findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, G.; Ioppolo, S.; Majolino, D.; Migliardo, P.; Ponterio, R.

    2000-04-01

    This work reports an analysis on terracotta varnished finding recovered in east Sicily area (Messina). We have performed FTIR micro-spectroscopy and electronic microscopy (SEM)measurements in order to recognize the elemental constituents of the varnished surfaces. Furthermore, for all the samples, a study on the bulk has been performed by Fourier Transform Infrared Absorption. The analyzed samples consist of a number of pottery fragments belonging to archaic and classical ages, varnished in black and red colors. The obtained data furnished useful information about composition of decorated surfaces and bulk matrixes, about baking temperature, manufacture techniques and alteration mechanisms of findings due to the long burial.

  20. Processing and characterization of natural fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites using micro-braiding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Ogihara, Shinji

    In the present study, we investigate fatigue properties of green composites. A hemp fiber yarn reinforced poly(lactic acid) composite was selected as a green composite. Unidirectional (UD) and textile (Textile) composites were fabricated using micro-braiding technique. Fatigue tests results indicated that fatigue damages in UD composites was splitting which occurred just before the final fracture, while matrix crack and debonding between matrix and fiber yarn occurred and accumulated stably in Textile composites. These results were consistent with modulus reduction and acoustic emission measurement during fatigue tests.

  1. A multi-technique approach for the characterization of Roman mural paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toschi, Francesco; Paladini, Alessandra; Colosi, Francesca; Cafarelli, Patrizia; Valentini, Veronica; Falconieri, Mauro; Gagliardi, Serena; Santoro, Paola

    2013-11-01

    In the frame of an ongoing archeological study on the Sabina area, a countryside close to Rome, white and red samples of roman wall paintings have been investigated by combining X-ray diffraction and different spectroscopic methodologies, namely laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, μ-Raman and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy. The used multi-technique approach has allowed the unambiguous identification of the red pigment as red ochre and has provided insight on the provenance of both the pigment and the material used for the realization of the wall paintings. The experimental results have confirmed some assumptions on the use of local materials in roman rural architecture.

  2. Fast characterization of two ultrasound longitudinal waves in cancellous bone using an adaptive beamforming technique.

    PubMed

    Taki, Hirofumi; Nagatani, Yoshiki; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Sato, Toru

    2015-04-01

    The received signal in through-transmission ultrasound measurements of cancellous bone consists of two longitudinal waves, called the fast and slow waves. Analysis of these fast and slow waves may reveal characteristics of the cancellous bone that would be good indicators of osteoporosis. Because the two waves often overlap, decomposition of the received signal is an important problem in the characterization of bone quality. This study proposes a fast and accurate decomposition method based on the frequency domain interferometry imaging method with a modified wave transfer function that uses a phase rotation parameter. The proposed method accurately characterized the fast and slow waves in the experimental study, and the residual intensity, which was normalized with respect to the received signal intensity, was less than -20 dB over the bone specimen thickness range from 6 to 15 mm. In the simulation study, the residual intensity was less than -20 dB over the specimen thickness range from 3 to 8 mm. Decomposition of a single received signal takes only 5 s using a laptop personal computer with a single central processing unit. The proposed method has great potential to provide accurate and rapid measurements of indicators of osteoporosis in cancellous bone.

  3. Simultaneous virus identification and characterization of severe unexplained pneumonia cases using a metagenomics sequencing technique.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaohui; Tang, Guangpeng; Zhao, Xiang; Huang, Yan; Chen, Tao; Lei, Mingyu; Chen, Wenbing; Yang, Lei; Zhu, Wenfei; Zhuang, Li; Yang, Jing; Feng, Zhaomin; Wang, Dayan; Wang, Dingming; Shu, Yuelong

    2017-03-01

    Many viruses can cause respiratory diseases in humans. Although great advances have been achieved in methods of diagnosis, it remains challenging to identify pathogens in unexplained pneumonia (UP) cases. In this study, we applied next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and a metagenomic approach to detect and characterize respiratory viruses in UP cases from Guizhou Province, China. A total of 33 oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from hospitalized UP patients and subjected to NGS. An unbiased metagenomic analysis pipeline identified 13 virus species in 16 samples. Human rhinovirus C was the virus most frequently detected and was identified in seven samples. Human measles virus, adenovirus B 55 and coxsackievirus A10 were also identified. Metagenomic sequencing also provided virus genomic sequences, which enabled genotype characterization and phylogenetic analysis. For cases of multiple infection, metagenomic sequencing afforded information regarding the quantity of each virus in the sample, which could be used to evaluate each viruses' role in the disease. Our study highlights the potential of metagenomic sequencing for pathogen identification in UP cases.

  4. Measuring the food environment: a systematic technique for characterizing food stores using display counts.

    PubMed

    Miller, Cassandra; Bodor, J Nicholas; Rose, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Marketing research has documented the influence of in-store characteristics-such as the number and placement of display stands-on consumer purchases of a product. However, little information exists on this topic for key foods of interest to those studying the influence of environmental changes on dietary behavior. This study demonstrates a method for characterizing the food environment by measuring the number of separate displays of fruits, vegetables, and energy-dense snack foods (including chips, candies, and sodas) and their proximity to cash registers in different store types. Observations in New Orleans stores (N = 172) in 2007 and 2008 revealed significantly more displays of energy-dense snacks than of fruits and vegetables within all store types, especially supermarkets. Moreover, supermarkets had an average of 20 displays of energy-dense snacks within 1 meter of their cash registers, yet none of them had even a single display of fruits or vegetables near their cash registers. Measures of the number of separate display stands of key foods and their proximity to a cash register can be used by researchers to better characterize food stores and by policymakers to address improvements to the food environment.

  5. Fast and accurate roughness characterization techniques for wafers and hard disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothe, Hendrik; Kasper, Andre

    1996-11-01

    Especially for wafers, hard disks and flat panel displays fast and accurate technical means for roughness characterization are needed. However, speed and accuracy are contradictory. Generally speaking, fast roughness sensors are not accurate, and precise instruments are slow. It turned out in the last years that with multi aperture fiber optic sensors which acquire ARS/TIS data a very fast estimation of surface roughness is possible. But it is rather difficult to convince e.g. chip manufacturers that the results of such sensors are reliable, because there are no accepted international standards for these kinds of optical measurements. Therefore we decided to establish a setup of our ARS/TIS sensor for roughness characterization and an instrument for roughness measurement in a cleanroom consisting of the following parts: (1) 200 X 200 mm stages, speed 0.4 ms-1, +/- 1 micron accuracy, acceleration 1 g; (2) visual inspection head consisting of 50 X objective and CCD camera; (3) AFM scan head; (4) ARS/TIS fiber optic sensor; and (5) laminar box. Topics of the paper are measurement philosophy, specs of the setup, architecture of the fiber optic ARS/TIS head, as well as data processing algorithms and software.

  6. Pipe Crawler{reg_sign} internal piping characterization system - deactivation and decommissioning focus area. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    Pipe Crawler{reg_sign} is a pipe surveying system for performing radiological characterization and/or free release surveys of piping systems. The technology employs a family of manually advanced, wheeled platforms, or crawlers, fitted with one or more arrays of thin Geiger Mueller (GM) detectors operated from an external power supply and data processing unit. Survey readings are taken in a step-wise fashion. A video camera and tape recording system are used for video surveys of pipe interiors prior to and during radiological surveys. Pipe Crawler{reg_sign} has potential advantages over the baseline and other technologies in areas of cost, durability, waste minimization, and intrusiveness. Advantages include potentially reduced cost, potential reuse of the pipe system, reduced waste volume, and the ability to manage pipes in place with minimal disturbance to facility operations. Advantages over competing technologies include potentially reduced costs and the ability to perform beta-gamma surveys that are capable of passing regulatory scrutiny for free release of piping systems.

  7. Development and characterization of an innovative heparin coating to stabilize and protect liposomes against adverse immune reactions.

    PubMed

    Duehrkop, Claudia; Leneweit, Gero; Heyder, Christoph; Fromell, Karin; Edwards, Katarina; Ekdahl, Kristina N; Nilsson, Bo

    2016-05-01

    Liposomes have been recognized as excellent drug delivery systems, but when they come in direct contact with different blood components they may trigger an immediate activation of the innate immune system. The aim of the present study was to produce long-circulating, blood-compatible liposomes by developing a construct of liposomes covered by a novel unique heparin complex (CHC; 70 heparin molecules per complex) to avoid recognition by the innate immune system. Unilamellar, cationic liposomes were produced by hand extrusion through a 100-nm polycarbonate membrane. Coating of liposomes with the macromolecular CHC was accomplished by electrostatic interactions. Dynamic light scattering as well as QCM-D measurements were used to verify the electrostatic deposition of the negatively charged CHC to cationic liposomes. The CHC-coated liposomes did not aggregate when in contact with lepirudin anti-coagulated plasma. Unlike previous attempts to coat liposomes with heparin, this technique produced freely moveable heparin strands sticking out from the liposome surface, which exposed AT binding sites reflecting the anticoagulant potentials of the liposomes. In experiments using lepirudin-anticoagulated plasma, CHC-coated liposomes, in contrast to non-coated control liposomes, did not activate the complement system, as evidenced by low C3a and sC5b-9 generation and reduced leakage from the liposomes. In conclusion, we show that liposomes can be successfully coated with the biopolymer CHC, resulting in biocompatible and stable liposomes that have significant application potential.

  8. Characterization of Deficiencies in the Frequency Domain Forced Response Analysis Technique for Turbine Bladed Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Schmauch, Preston

    2012-01-01

    Turbine blades in rocket and jet engine turbomachinery experience enormous harmonic loading conditions. These loads result from the integer number of upstream and downstream stator vanes as well as the other turbine stages. The standard technique for forced response analysis to assess structural integrity is to decompose a CFD generated flow field into its harmonic components, and to then perform a frequency response analysis at the problematic natural frequencies. Recent CFD analysis and water-flow testing at NASA/MSFC, though, indicates that this technique may miss substantial harmonic and non-harmonic excitation sources that become present in complex flows. These complications suggest the question of whether frequency domain analysis is capable of capturing the excitation content sufficiently. Two studies comparing frequency response analysis with transient response analysis, therefore, have been performed. The first is of a bladed disk with each blade modeled by simple beam elements. It was hypothesized that the randomness and other variation from the standard harmonic excitation would reduce the blade structural response, but the results showed little reduction. The second study was of a realistic model of a bladed-disk excited by the same CFD used in the J2X engine program. The results showed that the transient analysis results were up to 10% higher for "clean" nodal diameter excitations and six times larger for "messy" excitations, where substantial Fourier content around the main harmonic exists.

  9. Preparation and characterization WDM technique for linear disturbance localization in fibre optical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Życzkowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.; Szustakowski, M.

    2007-10-01

    Ordinary perimeter security systems consist of many individual sensors with detection range 200-300 meters. These limitations are connected with physical phenomena that are used in microwave and infrared barriers as well as in ground and fence cable sensors. On the contrary, fiber optic perimeter sensors can be applied in the range of many kilometers and zone length 200-300 meters is degradation of their possibilities. This paper presents investigation results of a new generation of the fiber optic perimeter sensor using WDM technique. These systems can detect a potential intruder and determine its position along a protected zone. The work presents a method of linear localization of disturbance point in the two-interferometer and modalmertic fiber optic sensors in one optical fiber. These sensors are in one fiber optic cable with two- interferometers (Sagnac) and in transmissive configuration. Using WDM technique makes it possible to obtain new technical properties that can broaden effectiveness and scope of application. Arrangement of a laboratory model of the sensors and its signal processing scheme is presented. During research of a laboratory model, it was possible to detect the position of the disturbance in one optical fiber with resolution of about 50m along a 10-km long sensor.

  10. Coastal typology: An integrative "neutral" technique for coastal zone characterization and analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buddemeier, R.W.; Smith, S.V.; Swaney, D.P.; Crossland, C.J.; Maxwell, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    Typology, the 'study or systematic classification of types that have characteristics or traits in common', has become a commonly used term and technique in coastal zone studies over the past two decades. At least part of this is due to adoption by the first Land-Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone (LOICZ) project of a typological approach as a way to understand and organize the daunting diversity of natural and human systems comprising the world coastal zone, and to the concurrent development of tools and databases to support systematic applications. This paper reviews some of the history of the term 'typology' and the concepts and techniques that it subsumes, and discusses its adoption and adaptation in coastal studies. It also addresses the continued and increasing relevance of typology to the continuation of the LOICZ project and its objectives, and outlines the opportunities and challenges involved in realizing the potentials of the approach - both within LOICZ and for the scientific and coastal zone communities in general. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fabrication of flex sensors through direct ink write technique and its electrical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abas, Muhammad; Rahman, Khalid

    2016-11-01

    The present work is intended to fabricate low-cost flex sensor from conductive carbon paste using direct ink write (DIW) technique. DIW method is one of the additive manufacturing processes, which is capable to deposit a variety of material on a variety of substrates by a different mechanism to feature resolution at a microns level. It is widely used in the electronic industry for fabrication of PCBS and electrodes for different electronic devices. The DIW system in present study extrudes material stored in the syringe barrel through nozzle using compressed air. This mechanism will assist in creating patterns on a variety of substrates. Pneumatic controller is employed to control deposition of material, while computer-controlled X-Y stage is employed to control pattern generation. For effective and control patterning, printing parameters were optimized using Taguchi design optimization technique. The conductive carbon paste is used as ink for pattern generation on flexible PET substrate. Samples of flex sensor having different dimensions are prepared through DIW. The fabricated sensors were used as flexion sensor, and its electrical characteristic was evaluated. The obtained sensors are stable and reliable in performance.

  12. Characterization of Some Iraqi Archaeological Samples Using IBA, Analytical X-ray and Other Complementary Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shihab Al-Sarraj, Ziyad; Roumie, Mohamad; Damboos, Hassan I.

    2012-07-01

    The present work aimed at investigating the compositions and microstructures of some archaeological samples which dated back to various periods of the ancient Iraqi civilizations using PIXE, XRF, XRD, and SEM techniques. The models selected for the study (ceramics, glaze, etc.) were diverse in size and nature, therefore a limited number of samples were then butted from them by a small diamond wheel. Conventional powder metallurgy method was then used to prepare the samples. Dried samples were then coated with a thin layer of carbon, and analyzed using the ion beam accelerator of the LAEC. Three other groups of samples were also prepared for the purpose of analysis by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Analysis results of the chemical composition showed good agreement between the various techniques as well as for phases, while the fine structure analysis obtained by optical and scanning microscopy exhibited features of a structure where it got an intensified densification in the final stage of sintering and accompanied by quasi-homogeneous distribution of the closed pores. This will lead to the conclusion that the temperature used for sintering by ancient Iraqi was sufficient and it may fall in the range between 950-1200°C, also the mixes and the forming methods used by them, were both suitable to obtain good sintered bodies with even distribution of pores. A ring-shaped trace noticed in SEM micrographs need more work and study to explain what it is?

  13. Cross-site study of the implementation of information technology innovations in health sciences centers.

    PubMed Central

    Ash, J.

    1995-01-01

    An interpretive oral history technique was used to identify factors most important in the implementation stage of information technology innovation diffusion. Electronic mail, end user literature searching, and aspects of the computer-based patient record were the innovations selected for study at academic health sciences centers. Transcripts of thirty-four interviews with key individuals were analyzed to determine six categories of factors. Word counts were then used to determine underlying emphases. Analysis of variance tested whether there were significant differences in uses of words by categories of individuals, by those at different institutions, and when different innovations were described. Results indicate that the innovations themselves correlate significantly with different word categories, where category of individual and institution do not. Words related to the computer based patient record characterize further critical factors in implementing that particular innovation. PMID:8563400

  14. Electro-optic phase-modulated polarimetry: Instrumentation and signal analysis techniques for the characterization of material properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Jeffrey Richard

    Novel compact and robust phase-modulated electro-optic birefringence and material stress measurement instrumentation is needed for the study of anisotropic materials such as non-Newtonian polymers, crystalline structures, biological fluids and many other optically active materials. This instrumentation developed by the research presented in this dissertation utilizes many different modulation approaches in order to incorporate heterodyning signal recovery techniques that improve measurement sensitivity by several orders of magnitude over simple crossed-polarizer methods. Modulation methods include photoelastic techniques, liquid-crystal variable retarder methods, dual-crystal transverse electro-optic modulation and dual lasers sinusoidally intensity-modulated with a pi-phase lag between them. The theoretical framework governing the development of this instrumentation using the Mueller-Stokes polarization matrices and heterodyning signal recovery methods is discussed in detail. Many experiments are performed to compare the measurements obtained by the instrumentation with the results derived theoretically. Results from the experimental material characterization instrumentation agree well with the predicted signal theory. Signal analysis was further refined through the use of wavelet-based denoising techniques. These denoising techniques resulted in improved measurement accuracy and sensitivity. The measurement theory is also adapted to solve several other applications including electro-optic force, pressure and acceleration measurements which use a polymer linkage to infer stresses from the physical system to data that can be analyzed by the material characterization instrumentation. The best commercially available force transducers capable of measuring transient responses have a lower resolution of approximately 10-5 N. Research with the rheology of fluids, transient flows of pharmaceuticals in combinatorial research, biological tissue response, and biomimetic

  15. Multi-MeV laser-produced particle sources: Characterization by activation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbaux, M.; Aléonard, M. M.; Claverie, G.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Malka, G.; Scheurer, J. N.; Tarisien, M.; Méot, V.; Morel, P.; Faure, J.; Glinec, Y.; Guemnie-Tafo, A.; Malka, V.; Manclossi, M.; Santos, J.

    2006-06-01

    We present here results obtained in an experiment carried out using the CPA beam of the “Salle Jaune” laser system at Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée (LOA). The generation of high energy electrons and protons escaping from the plasma has been investigated in the interaction of a 2 J, 30 fs laser with CH or metallic foils. The energy and angular distributions of the supra-thermal electrons produced with different targets are characterized by using both an electron spectrometer and bremsstrahlung induced (γ ,n) reactions. We measured simultaneously the number of energetic protons produced using (p,n) reactions. A correlation between the electrons and the protons production is observed together with a dependence of the number of supra-thermal electrons on the atomic number of the target element.

  16. Characterization of porous materials using combined small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Naiping; Borkar, Neha; Kohls, Doug; Schaefer, Dale W.

    2014-09-24

    A combination of ultra small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) and ultra small angle neutron scattering (USANS) is used to characterize porous materials. The analysis methods yield quantitative information, including the mean skeletal chord length, mean pore chord length, skeletal density, and composition. A mixed cellulose ester (MCE) membrane with a manufacturer-labeled pore size of 0.1 {mu}m was used as a model to elucidate the specifics of the method. Four approaches describing four specific scenarios (different known parameters and form of the scattering data) are compared. Pore chords determined using all four approaches are in good agreement with the scanning electron microscopy estimates but are larger than the manufacturer's nominal pore size. Our approach also gives the average chord of the skeletal solid (struts) of the membrane, which is also consistent for all four approaches. Combined data from USAXS and USANS gives the skeletal density and the strut composition.

  17. Emittance characterization of thermal control paints, coatings and surfaces using a calorimetric technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal control surfaces are used in every spacecraft thermal management system to dissipate heat through radiant heat transfer. This paper describes the thermal performance of several thermal control paints, coatings, and surfaces, as characterized by a calorimetric vacuum emissometer. The emissometer is designed to measure the functional emittance of a surface based on heat transfer from an underlying substrate to the surface and from the surface or near surface to a surrounding cold wall. Emittance measurements were made between 200 and 350 K. Polished aluminum, used here as a standard, was found to have a total hemispherical emittance of 0.06, as expected. A velvet black paint, also used here as a standard, was found to have an emittance of 0.94 at room temperature. Other surfaces of interest included a polyurethane-based black paint designated Z-306, a highly polished 316L stainless steel, and an atomic oxygen beam-textured carbon-carbon composite.

  18. Emittance characterization of thermal control paints, coatings and surfaces using a calorimetric technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    1994-12-01

    Thermal control surfaces are used in every spacecraft thermal management system to dissipate heat through radiant heat transfer. This paper describes the thermal performance of several thermal control paints, coatings, and surfaces, as characterized by a calorimetric vacuum emissometer. The emissometer is designed to measure the functional emittance of a surface based on heat transfer from an underlying substrate to the surface and from the surface or near surface to a surrounding cold wall. Emittance measurements were made between 200 and 350 K. Polished aluminum, used here as a standard, was found to have a total hemispherical emittance of 0.06, as expected. A velvet black paint, also used here as a standard, was found to have an emittance of 0.94 at room temperature. Other surfaces of interest included a polyurethane-based black paint designated Z-306, a highly polished 316L stainless steel, and an atomic oxygen beam-textured carbon-carbon composite.

  19. Molecular characterization of the plant biopolyester cutin by AFM and spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Benítez, José J; Matas, Antonio J; Heredia, Antonio

    2004-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance have been used to improve our current knowledge on the molecular characteristics of the biopolyester cutin, the main component of the plant cuticle. After comparison of samples of cutin isolated from young and mature tomato fruit cuticles has been possible to establish different degrees of cross-linking in the biopolymer and that the polymer is mainly formed after esterification of secondary hydroxyl groups of the monomers that form this type of cutin. Atomic force microscopy gave useful structural information on the molecular topography of the outer surface of the isolated samples. The texture of these samples is a consequence of the cross-linking degree or chemical status of the polymer. Thus, the more dense and cross-linked cutin from ripe or mature tomato fruit is characterized by a flatter and more globular texture in addition to the development of elongated and orientated superstructures.

  20. Optimization, formulation, and characterization of multiflavonoids-loaded flavanosome by bulk or sequential technique

    PubMed Central

    Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Masarudin, Mas Jaffri; Kura, Aminu Umar; Abas, Faridah; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2016-01-01

    This study involves adaptation of bulk or sequential technique to load multiple flavonoids in a single phytosome, which can be termed as “flavonosome”. Three widely established and therapeutically valuable flavonoids, such as quercetin (Q), kaempferol (K), and apigenin (A), were quantified in the ethyl acetate fraction of Moringa oleifera leaves extract and were commercially obtained and incorporated in a single flavonosome (QKA–phosphatidylcholine) through four different methods of synthesis – bulk (M1) and serialized (M2) co-sonication and bulk (M3) and sequential (M4) co-loading. The study also established an optimal formulation method based on screening the synthesized flavonosomes with respect to their size, charge, polydispersity index, morphology, drug–carrier interaction, antioxidant potential through in vitro 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl kinetics, and cytotoxicity evaluation against human hepatoma cell line (HepaRG). Furthermore, entrapment and loading efficiency of flavonoids in the optimal flavonosome have been identified. Among the four synthesis methods, sequential loading technique has been optimized as the best method for the synthesis of QKA–phosphatidylcholine flavonosome, which revealed an average diameter of 375.93±33.61 nm, with a zeta potential of −39.07±3.55 mV, and the entrapment efficiency was >98% for all the flavonoids, whereas the drug-loading capacity of Q, K, and A was 31.63%±0.17%, 34.51%±2.07%, and 31.79%±0.01%, respectively. The in vitro 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl kinetics of the flavonoids indirectly depicts the release kinetic behavior of the flavonoids from the carrier. The QKA-loaded flavonosome had no indication of toxicity toward human hepatoma cell line as shown by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide result, wherein even at the higher concentration of 200 µg/mL, the flavonosomes exert >85% of cell viability. These results suggest that sequential loading technique may be a