Science.gov

Sample records for innovative characterization techniques

  1. Characterization of Electronic Materials HgZnSe and HgZnTe Using Innovative and Conventional Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanton, George; Kesmodel, Roy; Burden, Judy; Su, Ching-Hua; Cobb, Sharon D.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    HgZnSe and HgZnTe are electronic materials of interest for potential IR detector and focal plane array applications due to their improved strength and compositional stability over HgCdTe, but they are difficult to grow on Earth and to fully characterize. Conventional contact methods of characterization, such as Hall and van der Paw, although adequate for many situations are typically labor intensive and not entirely suitable where only very small samples are available. To adequately characterize and compare properties of electronic materials grown in low earth orbit with those grown on Earth, innovative techniques are needed that complement existing methods. This paper describes the implementation and test results of a unique non-contact method of characterizing uniformity, mobility, and carrier concentration together with results from conventional methods applied to HgZnSe and HgZnTe. The innovative method has advantages over conventional contact methods since it circumvents problems of possible contamination from alloying electrical contacts to a sample and also has the capability to map a sample. Non- destructive mapping, the determination of the carrier concentration and mobility at each place on a sample, provides a means to quantitatively compare, at high spatial resolution, effects of microgravity on electronic properties and uniformity of electronic materials grown in low-Earth orbit with Earth grown materials. The mapping technique described here uses a 1mm diameter polarized beam of radiation to probe the sample. Activation of a magnetic field, in which the sample is placed, causes the plane of polarization of the probe beam to rotate. This Faraday rotation is a function of the free carrier concentration and the band parameters of the material. Maps of carrier concentration, mobility, and transmission generated from measurements of the Faraday rotation angles over the temperature range from 300K to 77K will be presented. New information on band parameters

  2. Innovative hyperspectral imaging (HSI) based techniques applied to end-of-life concrete drill core characterization for optimal dismantling and materials recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Picone, Nicoletta; Serranti, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    The reduction of EOL concrete disposal in landfills, together with a lower exploitation of primary raw materials, generates a strong interest to develop, set-up and apply innovative technologies to maximize Construction and Demolition Waste (C&DW) conversion into useful secondary raw materials. Such a goal can be reached starting from a punctual in-situ efficient characterization of the objects to dismantle in order to develop demolition actions aimed to set up innovative mechanical-physical processes to recover the different materials and products to recycle. In this paper an innovative recycling-oriented characterization strategy based on HyperSpectral Imaging (HSI) is described in order to identify aggregates and mortar in drill core samples from end-of-life concrete. To reach this goal, concrete drill cores from a demolition site were systematically investigated by HSI in the short wave infrared field (1000-2500 nm). Results obtained by the adoption of the HSI approach showed as this technology can be successfully applied to analyze quality and characteristics of C&DW before dismantling and as final product to reutilise after demolition-milling-classification actions. The proposed technique and the related recognition logics, through the spectral signature detection of finite physical domains (i.e. concrete slice and/or particle) of different nature and composition, allows; i) to develop characterization procedures able to quantitatively assess end-of-life concrete compositional/textural characteristics and ii) to set up innovative sorting strategies to qualify the different materials constituting drill core samples.

  3. Innovative Techniques Simplify Vibration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In the early years of development, Marshall Space Flight Center engineers encountered challenges related to components in the space shuttle main engine. To assess the problems, they evaluated the effects of vibration and oscillation. To enhance the method of vibration signal analysis, Marshall awarded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts to AI Signal Research, Inc. (ASRI), in Huntsville, Alabama. ASRI developed a software package called PC-SIGNAL that NASA now employs on a daily basis, and in 2009, the PKP-Module won Marshall s Software of the Year award. The technology is also used in many industries: aircraft and helicopter, rocket engine manufacturing, transportation, and nuclear power."

  4. Innovative application of classic and newer techniques for the characterization of haemocytes in the New Zealand black-footed abalone (Haliotis iris).

    PubMed

    Grandiosa, Roffi; Mérien, Fabrice; Pillay, Krish; Alfaro, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Haemocytes play an important role in innate immune responses within invertebrate organisms. However, identification and quantification of different types of haemocytes can be extremely challenging, and has led to numerous inconsistencies and misinterpretations within the literature. As a step to rectify this issue, we present a comprehensive and detailed approach to characterize haemocytes using a combination of classical (cytochemical and phagocytosis assays with optical microscopy) and novel (flow cytometry with Sysmex XN-1000 and Muse(®) Cell analyser) techniques. The Sysmex XN-1000 is an innovative fluorescent flow cytometric analyser that can effectively detect, identify and count haemocytes, while the Muse(®) Cell analyser provides accurate and rapid haemocyte cell counts and viability. To illustrate this approach, we present the first report on morphological and functional features of New Zealand black-footed abalone (Haliotis iris) haemocyte cells. Two types of haemocytes were identified in this study, including type I (monocyte-like) and type II (lymphocyte-like) cells. Granular cells, which have been reported in other molluscan species, were not detected in H. iris. Cell types were categorized based on shape, size, internal structures and function. The lymphocyte-like haemocytes were the most abundant hemocytes in the haemolymph samples, and they had large nuclei and basic cytoplasms. Monocyte-like cells generally were larger cells compared to lymphocyte-like cells, and had low nucleus-cytoplasm ratios. Monocyte-like cells showed higher phagocytic activity when encountering Zymosan A particles compared to lymphocyte-like cells. The present study provides a comprehensive and accurate new approach to identify and quantify haemocyte cells for future comparative studies on the immune system of abalone and other molluscan species. PMID:26672903

  5. Innovative sensing techniques and data analysis for characterizing the spatial and temporal dynamics of soil moisture patterns at the hillslope scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Edoardo; Wollschläger, Ute; Kögler, Simon; Behrens, Thorsten; Dietrich, Peter; Reinstorf, Frido; Schmidt, Karsten; Weiler, Markus; Werban, Ulrike; Zacharias, Steffen

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture plays a critical role in every hydrological or meteorological model; nevertheless, it is still a great challenge to provide adequate information on soil moisture distribution beyond the point scale. Mobile geophysical methods such as electromagnetic induction (EMI) have been widely used for mapping soil water content at the field scale with high spatial resolution. Recent advances in wireless sensor technology allow monitoring of soil moisture dynamics with high temporal resolution at varying scales. The objective of this study was to characterize the spatio-temporal pattern of soil moisture at the hillslope scale and infer the controlling hydrological processes, integrating well established and innovative sensing techniques, as well as new statistical methods. We combined soil hydrological and pedological expertise with geophysical measurements and methods from digital soil mapping for designing the monitoring setup of a wireless sensor network for a grassland hillslope in the Schäfertal catchment, Central Germany. At the same site, we measured soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) using EMI devices. Hypothesizing a wet and a dry soil moisture state to be characteristic of the spatial pattern of soil moisture, we tested a new method of analysis based on the Spearman rank correlation coefficient for describing the spatial and temporal evolution of such patterns. Based on this approach, we described the persistence and switching mechanisms of the two characteristic states, inferring the local properties that control the observed spatial patterns and the hydrological processes driving the transitions. The method showed to provide valuable insight into the persistence of characteristic states of soil moisture and the mechanisms of transition, and to be suitable for highlighting events for which specific hydrological processes occurred. The spatial organization of soil moisture was observed to be controlled by different processes in different soil

  6. 40 CFR 35.935-20 - Innovative processes and techniques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Innovative processes and techniques. 35... § 35.935-20 Innovative processes and techniques. If the grantee receives 85-percent grant assistance for innovative processes and techniques, the following conditions apply during the 5-year...

  7. 40 CFR 35.935-20 - Innovative processes and techniques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Innovative processes and techniques. 35... § 35.935-20 Innovative processes and techniques. If the grantee receives 85-percent grant assistance for innovative processes and techniques, the following conditions apply during the 5-year...

  8. 40 CFR 35.935-20 - Innovative processes and techniques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Innovative processes and techniques. 35... § 35.935-20 Innovative processes and techniques. If the grantee receives 85-percent grant assistance for innovative processes and techniques, the following conditions apply during the 5-year...

  9. 40 CFR 35.935-20 - Innovative processes and techniques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Innovative processes and techniques. 35... § 35.935-20 Innovative processes and techniques. If the grantee receives 85-percent grant assistance for innovative processes and techniques, the following conditions apply during the 5-year...

  10. 40 CFR 35.935-20 - Innovative processes and techniques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Innovative processes and techniques. 35... § 35.935-20 Innovative processes and techniques. If the grantee receives 85-percent grant assistance for innovative processes and techniques, the following conditions apply during the 5-year...

  11. Innovative coke-oven repair techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Emish, G.J.; Ramani, R.V.

    1995-10-01

    Certain innovative coke-oven repair techniques are reviewed that represent an engineered approach to a successful rehabilitation of all types of coke-oven batteries. These techniques have been developed during the last 10 years and experience gained on a number of repair projects has shown that these techniques operate as a cohesive and comprehensive method of end flue and through-wall repairs to gain additional years of operating life to coke-oven batteries. Extended operations approaching 10 to 15 additional years of service at lower costs than a pad-up rebuild and, while meeting the environmental emission regulations, are attainable using the techniques of: Proper tie-in joint preparation; Improved bricking up methodology; Preheating refractory during bricking up; Installation of spring-loaded bracing system; and installation of flexible coke-oven doors. Repair methods that do not incorporate the above techniques are subject to premature failure of the refractory. The old methods of wall cool down and installing refractory as if the battery was brand new are outdated technology. A technology supplier, with new techniques, can coordinate the construction contractor and the battery heating to obtain a successful coke-oven and flue or through-wall repair.

  12. Using Innovative Information Systems Techniques To Teach Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chimi, Carl J.; Gordon, Gene M.

    This paper discusses a number of innovative techniques that were used to teach courses in Information Systems to undergraduate and graduate students. While none of these techniques is individually innovative, the combination of techniques provides a true "hands-on" environment for students; because of the way that the components of the courses are…

  13. Integration of traditional and innovative characterization techniques for flux-based assessment of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) sites.

    PubMed

    Basu, Nandita B; Suresh, P; Rao, C; Poyer, Irene C; Nandy, Subhas; Mallavarapu, Megharaj; Naidu, Ravi; Davis, Greg B; Patterson, Bradley M; Annable, Michael D; Hatfield, Kirk

    2009-04-01

    Key attributes of the source zone and the expanding dissolved plume at a trichloroethene (TCE) site in Australia were evaluated using trends in groundwater monitoring data along with data from on-line volatile organic compound (VOC) samplers and passive flux meters (PFMs) deployed in selected wells. These data indicate that: (1) residual TCE source mass in the saturated zone, estimated using two innovative techniques, is small ( approximately 10 kg), which is also reflected in small source mass discharge ( approximately 3 g/day); (2) the plume is disconnecting, based on TCE concentration contours and TCE fluxes in wells along a longitudinal transect; (3) there is minimal biodegradation, based on TCE mass discharge of approximately 6 g/day at a plume control plane approximately 175 m from source, which is also consistent with aerobic geochemical conditions observed in the plume; and (4) residual TCE in the vadose zone provides episodic inputs of TCE mass to the plume during infiltration/recharge events. TCE flux data also suggest that the small residual TCE source mass is present in the low-permeability zones, thus making source treatment difficult. Our analysis, based on a synthesis of the archived data and new data, suggests that source treatment is unwarranted, and that containment of the large TCE plume (approximately 1.2 km long, approximately 0.3 km wide; 17 m deep; approximately 2000-2500 kg TCE mass) or institutional controls, along with a long-term flux monitoring program, might be necessary. The flux-based site management approach outlined in this paper provides a novel way of looking beyond the complexities of groundwater contamination in heterogeneous domains, to make intelligent and informed site decisions based on strategic measurement of the appropriate metrics.

  14. Innovative Tools Advance Revolutionary Weld Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    The iconic, orange external tank of the space shuttle launch system not only contains the fuel used by the shuttle s main engines during liftoff but also comprises the shuttle s backbone, supporting the space shuttle orbiter and solid rocket boosters. Given the tank s structural importance and the extreme forces (7.8 million pounds of thrust load) and temperatures it encounters during launch, the welds used to construct the tank must be highly reliable. Variable polarity plasma arc welding, developed for manufacturing the external tank and later employed for building the International Space Station, was until 1994 the best process for joining the aluminum alloys used during construction. That year, Marshall Space Flight Center engineers began experimenting with a relatively new welding technique called friction stir welding (FSW), developed in 1991 by The Welding Institute, of Cambridge, England. FSW differs from traditional fusion welding in that it is a solid-state welding technique, using frictional heat and motion to join structural components without actually melting any of the material. The weld is created by a shouldered pin tool that is plunged into the seam of the materials to be joined. The tool traverses the line while rotating at high speeds, generating friction that heats and softens but does not melt the metal. (The heat produced approaches about 80 percent of the metal s melting temperature.) The pin tool s rotation crushes and stirs the plasticized metal, extruding it along the seam as the tool moves forward. The material cools and consolidates, resulting in a weld with superior mechanical properties as compared to those weld properties of fusion welds. The innovative FSW technology promises a number of attractive benefits. Because the welded materials are not melted, many of the undesirables associated with fusion welding porosity, cracking, shrinkage, and distortion of the weld are minimized or avoided. The process is more energy efficient, safe

  15. Single Cell Electrical Characterization Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mansor, Muhammad Asraf; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    Electrical properties of living cells have been proven to play significant roles in understanding of various biological activities including disease progression both at the cellular and molecular levels. Since two decades ago, many researchers have developed tools to analyze the cell's electrical states especially in single cell analysis (SCA). In depth analysis and more fully described activities of cell differentiation and cancer can only be accomplished with single cell analysis. This growing interest was supported by the emergence of various microfluidic techniques to fulfill high precisions screening, reduced equipment cost and low analysis time for characterization of the single cell's electrical properties, as compared to classical bulky technique. This paper presents a historical review of single cell electrical properties analysis development from classical techniques to recent advances in microfluidic techniques. Technical details of the different microfluidic techniques are highlighted, and the advantages and limitations of various microfluidic devices are discussed. PMID:26053399

  16. Single Cell Electrical Characterization Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mansor, Muhammad Asraf; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    Electrical properties of living cells have been proven to play significant roles in understanding of various biological activities including disease progression both at the cellular and molecular levels. Since two decades ago, many researchers have developed tools to analyze the cell’s electrical states especially in single cell analysis (SCA). In depth analysis and more fully described activities of cell differentiation and cancer can only be accomplished with single cell analysis. This growing interest was supported by the emergence of various microfluidic techniques to fulfill high precisions screening, reduced equipment cost and low analysis time for characterization of the single cell’s electrical properties, as compared to classical bulky technique. This paper presents a historical review of single cell electrical properties analysis development from classical techniques to recent advances in microfluidic techniques. Technical details of the different microfluidic techniques are highlighted, and the advantages and limitations of various microfluidic devices are discussed. PMID:26053399

  17. Background Characterization Techniques For Pattern Recognition Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noah, Meg A.; Noah, Paul V.; Schroeder, John W.; Kessler, Bernard V.; Chernick, Julian A.

    1989-08-01

    The Department of Defense has a requirement to investigate technologies for the detection of air and ground vehicles in a clutter environment. The use of autonomous systems using infrared, visible, and millimeter wave detectors has the potential to meet DOD's needs. In general, however, the hard-ware technology (large detector arrays with high sensitivity) has outpaced the development of processing techniques and software. In a complex background scene the "problem" is as much one of clutter rejection as it is target detection. The work described in this paper has investigated a new, and innovative, methodology for background clutter characterization, target detection and target identification. The approach uses multivariate statistical analysis to evaluate a set of image metrics applied to infrared cloud imagery and terrain clutter scenes. The techniques are applied to two distinct problems: the characterization of atmospheric water vapor cloud scenes for the Navy's Infrared Search and Track (IRST) applications to support the Infrared Modeling Measurement and Analysis Program (IRAMMP); and the detection of ground vehicles for the Army's Autonomous Homing Munitions (AHM) problems. This work was sponsored under two separate Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) programs by the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), White Oak MD, and the Army Material Systems Analysis Activity at Aberdeen Proving Ground MD. The software described in this paper will be available from the respective contract technical representatives.

  18. Surface Characterization Techniques: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2002-01-01

    To understand the benefits that surface modifications provide, and ultimately to devise better ones, it is necessary to study the physical, mechanical, and chemical changes they cause. This chapter surveys classical and leading-edge developments in surface structure and property characterization methodologies. The primary emphases are on the use of these techniques as they relate to surface modifications, thin films and coatings, and tribological engineering surfaces and on the implications rather than the instrumentation.

  19. [Applicability of new diagnostic techniques in microbiology; technological innovation].

    PubMed

    Cantón, Rafael; Loza, Elena; Romero, José

    2015-09-01

    Different new techniques have been introduced in microbiology laboratories during the last years, including mass spectrometry and next generation sequencing. These techniques, in addition to automation, microfludics, nanotechnology and informatics, have impelled innovation in the prevention and management of patients with infectious diseases. These approaches are relevant for revitalization and consolidation Clinical Microbiology laboratories. PMID:26365725

  20. Innovative production technique for PEFC electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bevers, D.; Guelzow, E.; Helmbold, A.; Mueller, B.

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cells are high efficient and low polluting energy conversation devices. Using hydrogen as a fuel gas they are applicable to solve environmental problems e.g. CO{sub 2} impact on the climate. Thus international research efforts have been increased in recent years. Low temperature fuel cells e.g. the PEFC are specially applicable for future transportation and stationary energy supply systems. Application and economics success of his technology is obstructed by the high investment costs with respect to conventional energy conversion devices. The intent of our activities is the improvement of electrodes and membrane-electrode-assemblies as used in PEFC. Commercial and technical aspects of electrode manufacturing have been considered in early stages of the development of the production procedure. Two different techniques are developed at DLR. The first is a rolling procedure as used for production for batteries and alkaline fuel cells which has been modified and adapted to the specific demand of PEFC electrodes. The second technique is a new printing process to produce ultra thin layers of catalyst directly on the electrolyte. In this paper we will show the first results of the first electrode technique which have been tested in fuel cells and a short description of the second very new method.

  1. Light weight dentures: An innovative technique.

    PubMed

    Gundawar, Sham; Zamad, Aakanksha; Gundawar, Sneha

    2014-01-01

    Retention, stability and support are the basic principles on which the success of a complete denture relies. The severely resorbed maxillary and mandibular edentulous arches that are narrow and constricted with increased interarch space provide decreased support, retention and stability. To decrease the leverage, reduction in the weight of the prosthesis was recommended and also found beneficial. This article describes a simple procedure to reduce the weight of maxillary complete denture by use of an autopolymerizing acrylic resin shell which is incorporated during the packing stage. This method has the advantage of being easy and requires very little additional time. Hollow maxillary complete denture considerably reduces the weight of the prosthesis, which in turn prevents transmission of detrimental forces by reducing leverage action. This results in increased retention and stability and up to some extent it also preserves the existing residual alveolar ridge. The technique uses a clear matrix of trial denture to facilitate shaping of dough spacer to ensure an even thickness of acrylic to resist deformation and prevent seepage of saliva into the cavity making this technique more predictable. An autopolymerizing acrylic resin shell which creates hollow space and also has strength. Technique is simple to execute, easy economical and matching the shade of autopolymerizing acrylic resin with heat cures acrylic resin enhances esthetics. Light weight hollow dentures provide healthy and comfortable living for the geriatric edentulous patient.

  2. Innovative Balloon Buoyancy Techniques for Atmospheric Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J.

    2000-01-01

    Until quite recently, the only practical means to control balloon buoyancy, and thus altitude, required consuming large amounts of fuel or the limited venting of helium balloons and/or dropping of ballast. With recent discoveries at JPL, novel long-life, balloon buoyancy techniques have been discovered that for the first time allow balloons to float in the primarily hydrogen atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune (using ambient fill-gas), and by using renewable energy sources, allow multiple controlled landings on Venus (using atmospheric temperature differences), Mars (solar heat), Titan (RTG heat), and Earth (planet radiant heat).

  3. Comparison of Traditional and Innovative Techniques to Solve Technical Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of traditional and innovative techniques to solve technical challenges in food storage technology. The planning for a mission to Mars is underway, and the food storage technology improvements requires that improvements be made. This new technology is required, because current food storage technology is inadequate,refrigerators or freezers are not available for food preservation, and that a shelf life of 5 years is expected. A 10 year effort to improve food packaging technology has not enhanced significantly food packaging capabilities. Two innovation techniques were attempted InnoCentive and Yet2.com and have provided good results, and are still under due diligence for solver verification.

  4. Electrical characterization of a Mapham inverter using pulse testing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, E. D.; Myers, I. T.; Hammoud, A. N.

    1990-01-01

    The use of a multiple pulse testing technique to determine the electrical characteristics of large megawatt-level power systems for aerospace missions is proposed. An innovative test method based on the multiple pulse technique is demonstrated on a 2-kW Mapham inverter. The concept of this technique shows that characterization of large power systems under electrical equilibrium at rated power can be accomplished without large costly power supplies. The heat generation that occurs in systems when tested in a continuous mode is eliminated. The results indicate that there is a good agreement between this testing technique and that of steady state testing.

  5. Ambient air contamination: Characterization and detection techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nulton, C. P.; Silvus, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques to characterize and detect sources of ambient air contamination are described. Chemical techniques to identify indoor contaminants are outlined, they include gas chromatography, or colorimetric detection. Organics generated from indoor materials at ambient conditions and upon combustion are characterized. Piezoelectric quartz crystals are used as precision frequency determining elements in electronic oscillators.

  6. Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, G.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of this research is to develop an advanced, innovative technique for the description of reservoir heterogeneity. This proposed method consists of using tracers in single-well backflow tests. The general idea is to make use of fluid drift in the reservoir either due to naturally occurring pressure gradients in the reservoir, or by deliberately imposed pressure gradients using adjacent injection and production wells in the same reservoir. The analytical tool that will be used to design and interpret these tests is a compositional reservoir simulator with special features added and tested specifically for this purpose. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  7. An innovative technique to probe the middle and upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assink, Jelle; Smets, Pieter; Le Pichon, Alexis; Evers, Läslo

    2016-04-01

    The middle atmosphere has gained more and more importance for the purpose of weather and climate prediction, since increasing evidence has indicated that the troposphere and stratosphere are more closely coupled than assumed before. Significant effort has been made towards a more comprehensive representation of the atmosphere to better capture the stratospheric variability as well as the stratospheric-tropospheric interactions, for example during Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW) events. Despite these advances, it remains difficult to measure in the upper layers of the atmosphere. Over recent years, new developments in the field of low-frequency inaudible sound (infrasound) have lead to an innovative method for evaluating numerical weather prediction models. In this presentation, the general technique is described and a case study is presented in which stratospheric forecasts of the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) of the 2013 major SSW are evaluated.

  8. Expedited site characterization. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) has been developed, demonstrated, and deployed as a new time-saving, cost-effective approach for hazardous waste site investigations. ESC is an alternative approach that effectively shortens the length of the assessment period and may significantly reduce costs at many sites. It is not a specific technology or system but is a methodology for most effectively conducting a site characterization. The principal elements of ESC are: a field investigation conducted by an integrated team of experienced professionals working in the field at the same time, analysis, integration and initial validation of the characterization data as they are obtained in the field, and a dynamic work plan that enables the team to take advantage of new insights from recent data to adjust the work plan in the field. This report covers demonstrations that took place between 1989 and 1996. This paper gives a description of the technology and discusses its performance, applications, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  9. Halstedian technique revisited. Innovations in teaching surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Barnes, R W; Lang, N P; Whiteside, M F

    1989-07-01

    This paper reviews the laboratory models used to teach fundamental surgical skills in our general surgery residency. The laboratory modules allow supervision and self-instruction, practice, and videotape monitoring of the following techniques: skin incision, suturing, knot tying, hemostasis, vascular anastomosis, and intestinal anastomosis. Pigs' feet simulate human skin for exercises in skin incision, lesion excision, suturing, and basic plastic surgical techniques. Latex tubing and penrose drains allow experience in suturing, knot tying, and hemostasis. Polytetrafluoroethylene vascular prostheses permit quantification of the precision of needle passage and suturing by measurement of leakage of water through a vascular anastomosis. Reconstituted, lyophilized, irradiated bovine arteries and ileum provide models of biologic tissue for creating handsewn vascular anastomoses and sutured or stapled gastrointestinal anastomoses. A headlamp videocamera allows unobstructive recording of the resident's technical performance and provides subsequent visual feedback for self-improvement when compared to reference instructional videotapes. We feel that these innovations may enhance surgical dexterity of residents without the need for animal sacrifice. Our goal is to foreshorten the learning curve for basic surgical skills and improve performance in the clinical operating room.

  10. AN INNOVATIVE TECHNIQUE FOR THIN FILM INTERFACE TOUGHNESS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.J.

    2004-11-01

    scale and MA956 substrate is 3.7 N-m/m{sup 2}, and the estimated equivalent Mode I fracture toughness is 1.1 MPa {radical}m. This innovative technique is expected to greatly assist the development of coating materials with improved protective capabilities and provide a reliable method for use in assessing material performance.

  11. Arc Plasma Synthesis of Nanostructured Materials: Techniques and Innovations

    SciTech Connect

    Das, A. K.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Kakati, M.; Karmakar, Soumen

    2008-10-23

    Arc plasma aided synthesis of nanostructured materials has the potential of producing complex nano phase structures in bulk quantities. Successful implementation of this potential capability to industrial scale nano generation needs establishment of a plasma parameter control regime in terms of plasma gas, flow pattern, pressure, local temperature and the plasma fields to obtain the desired nano phase structures. However, there is a need to design innovative in situ experiments for generation of an extensive database and subsequently to correlate plasma parameters to the size, shape and phase of the generated nanostructures. The present paper reviews the various approaches utilized in the field of arc plasma nanosynthesis in general and in the authors' laboratories in particular. Simple plasma diagnostics and monitoring schemes have been used in conjunction with nano materials characterization tools to explore the possibility of controlling the size, shape, yield and phase composition of the arc generated nanostructures through plasma control. Case studies related to synthesis of AlN, Al2O3, TiO2, ZrO2, ZnO), magnetic (e.g. {gamma}-Fe2O3, Fe3O4) and single elemental materials (e.g. carbon nanotubes) are presented.

  12. Techniques for Characterizing Microwave Printed Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee; Lee, Richard Q.

    2003-01-01

    The combination of a de-embedding technique and a direct on-substrate measurement technique has been devised to enable measurement of the electrical characteristics (impedances, scattering parameters, and gains) of microwave printed antennas that may be formed integrally with feed networks that include slot lines, coplanar striplines, and/or coplanar waveguides. The combination of techniques eliminates the need for custom test fixtures, including transitions between (1) coaxial or waveguide feed lines in typical test equipment and (2) the planar waveguide structures of the printed circuits under test. The combination of techniques can be expected to be especially useful for rapid, inexpensive, and accurate characterization of antennas for miniature wireless communication units that operate at frequencies from a few to tens of gigahertz.

  13. SITE PROGRAM CURRENT AND FUTURE INNOVATIVE TECHNIQUES FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Research and Development (ORD) conducts research related to the demonstration and evaluation of innovative cleanup technologies. One of the mechanisms for the evaluation of innovative field-scale technologies for hazardous ...

  14. New characterization techniques for LSST sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Nomerotski, A.

    2015-06-18

    Fully depleted, thick CCDs with extended infra-red response have become the sensor of choice for modern sky surveys. The charge transport effects in the silicon and associated astrometric distortions could make mapping between the sky coordinates and sensor coordinates non-trivial, and limit the ultimate precision achievable with these sensors. Two new characterization techniques for the CCDs, which both could probe these issues, are discussed: x-ray flat fielding and imaging of pinhole arrays.

  15. New Techniques in Characterization of Ferroelectric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehirlioglu, Alp

    2008-01-01

    Two new techniques have been developed to characterize Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) based ferroelectric single crystals: (i) electro-thermal imaging, and (ii) single crystal x-ray diffraction in the transmission mode. (i) Electro-thermal imaging is a remote sensing technique that can detect the polarization direction and poling state of a whole crystal slice. This imaging technique utilizes an IR camera to determine the field induced temperature change and does not require any special or destructive sample preparation. In the resulting images it is possible to distinguish regions of 180 deg domains. This powerful technique can be used remotely during poling to determine the poling state of the crystal to avoid over-poling that can result in inferior properties and/or cracking of the crystals. Electro-thermal imaging produced the first direct observations of polarization rotation. Under bipolar field, the domains near the corners were the first to switch direction. As the field increased above the coercive field, domains at the center part of the crystals switched direction. (ii) X-ray diffraction in the transmission mode has long been used in structure determination of organic crystals and proteins; however, it is not used much to characterize inorganic systems. 0.7Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.3PbTiO3 single crystals were examined by this XRD technique for the first time, and a never-before-seen super-lattice was revealed with a doubling of the unit cell in all three directions, giving a cell volume eight times that of a traditional perovskite unit cell. The significance of the super-lattice peaks increased with poling, indicating a structural contribution to ordering. Lack of such observations by electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope examinations suggests the presence of a bulk effect.

  16. Techniques for physicochemical characterization of nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ping-Chang; Lin, Stephen; Wang, Paul C.; Sridhar, Rajagopalan

    2014-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have opened up a new era of diagnosis, prevention and treatment of diseases and traumatic injuries. Nanomaterials, including those with potential for clinical applications, possess novel physicochemical properties that have an impact on their physiological interactions, from the molecular level to the systemic level. There is a lack of standardized methodologies or regulatory protocols for detection or characterization of nanomaterials. This review summarizes the techniques that are commonly used to study the size, shape, surface properties, composition, purity and stability of nanomaterials, along with their advantages and disadvantages. At present there are no FDA guidelines that have been developed specifically for nanomaterial based formulations for diagnostic or therapeutic use. There is an urgent need for standardized protocols and procedures for the characterization of nanoparticles, especially those that are intended for use as theranostics. PMID:24252561

  17. Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

    1981-04-01

    A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

  18. Enhanced Landfill Mining case study: Innovative separation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuyvers, Lars; Moerenhout, Tim; Helsen, Stefan; Van de Wiele, Katrien; Behets, Tom; Umans, Luk; Wille, Eddy

    2014-05-01

    In 2011, a corporate vision on Enhanced Landfill Mining (ELFM)1 was approved by the OVAM Board of directors, which resulted in an operational programme over the period 2011-2015. OVAM (Public Waste Agency of Flanders) is the competent authority in charge of waste, Sustainable Materials Management (SMM) and contaminated soil management in Flanders. The introduction of the ELFM concept needs to be related with the concept of SMM and the broader shift to a circular economy. Within the concept of ELFM, landfills are no longer considered to be a final and static situation, but a dynamic part of the materials cycle. The main goal of this research programme is to develop a comprehensive policy on resource management to deal with the issue of former landfills. In order to investigate the opportunities of ELFM, the OVAM is applying a three step approach including mapping, surveying and mining of these former landfills. As a result of the mapping part over 2,000 landfill sites, that will need to be dealt with, were revealed. The valorisation potential of ELFM could be assigned to different goals, according to the R³P-concept : Recycling of Materials, Recovery of Energy, Reclamation of Land and Protection of drinking water supply. . On behalf of the OVAM, ECOREM was assigned to follow-up a pilot case executed on a former landfill, located in Zuienkerke, Flanders. Within this case study some technical tests were carried out on the excavated waste material to investigate the possibilities for a waste to resource conversion. The performance of both on site and off site techniques were evaluated. These testings also contribute to the mapping part of OVAM's research programme on ELFM and reveal more information on the composition of former landfills dating from different era's. In order to recover as many materials as possible, five contractors were assigned to perform separation tests on the bulk material from the Zuienkerke landfill. All used techniques were described

  19. Photographic techniques for characterizing streambed particle sizes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, M.S.; Moran, E.H.; Ourso, R.T.

    2003-01-01

    We developed photographic techniques to characterize coarse (>2-mm) and fine (???2-mm) streambed particle sizes in 12 streams in Anchorage, Alaska. Results were compared with current sampling techniques to assess which provided greater sampling efficiency and accuracy. The streams sampled were wade-able and contained gravel - cobble streambeds. Gradients ranged from about 5% at the upstream sites to about 0.25% at the downstream sites. Mean particle sizes and size-frequency distributions resulting from digitized photographs differed significantly from those resulting from Wolman pebble counts for five sites in the analysis. Wolman counts were biased toward selecting larger particles. Photographic analysis also yielded a greater number of measured particles (mean = 989) than did the Wolman counts (mean = 328). Stream embeddedness ratings assigned from field and photographic observations were significantly different at 5 of the 12 sites, although both types of ratings showed a positive relationship with digitized surface fines. Visual estimates of embeddedness and digitized surface fines may both be useful indicators of benthic conditions, but digitizing surface fines produces quantitative rather than qualitative data. Benefits of the photographic techniques include reduced field time, minimal streambed disturbance, convenience of postfield processing, easy sample archiving, and improved accuracy and replication potential.

  20. Distributive Marketing Education: Innovative Instructional Techniques in Distributive Marketing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    The conference featured more than 40 presentations representing existing and planned innovative programs in all levels of distributive marketing education in six States. In addition to the presentations (not reproduced in their entirety in the report), there were sessions and workshops for secondary, post secondary, and adult levels and for city…

  1. Innovative green technique for preparing of flame retardant cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to its environmentally benign character, microwave-assisted or supercritical carbon dioxide high pressure reactors are considered in green chemistry as a substitute for organic solvents in chemical reactions. In this paper, an innovative approach for preparation of flame retardant cotton fabric ...

  2. The NLP Swish Pattern: An Innovative Visualizing Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Betsy J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes swish pattern, one of many innovative therapeutic interventions that developers of neurolinguistic programing (NLP) have contributed to counseling profession. Presents brief overview of NLP followed by an explanation of the basic theory and expected outcomes of the swish. Presents description of the intervention process and case studies…

  3. UTILITY EXPERIENCE WITH INNOVATIVE WATER MAIN REHAB TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    All utilities are motivated to renew their aging infrastructure in the most efficient manner with respect to cost and minimal disruption to the community. American Water was given an opportunity to participate in an EPA funded project to demonstrate innovative water (and wastewa...

  4. INNOVATIONS IN EQUIPMENT AND TECHNIQUES FOR THE BIOLOGY TEACHING LABORATORY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BARTHELEMY, RICHARD E.; AND OTHERS

    LABORATORY TECHNIQUES AND EQUIPMENT APPROPRIATE FOR TEACHING BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE CURRICULUM STUDY BIOLOGY ARE EMPHASIZED. MAJOR CATEGORIES INCLUDE (1) LABORATORY FACILITIES, (2) EQUIPMENT AND TECHNIQUES FOR CULTURE OF MICRO-ORGANISMS, (3) LABORATORY ANIMALS AND THEIR HOUSING, (4) TECHNIQUES FOR STUDYING PLANT GROWTH, (5) TECHNIQUES FOR STUDYING…

  5. Waste minimization in analytical chemistry through innovative sample preparation techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L. L.

    1998-05-28

    Because toxic solvents and other hazardous materials are commonly used in analytical methods, characterization procedures result in significant and costly amount of waste. We are developing alternative analytical methods in the radiological and organic areas to reduce the volume or form of the hazardous waste produced during sample analysis. For the radiological area, we have examined high-pressure, closed-vessel microwave digestion as a way to minimize waste from sample preparation operations. Heated solutions of strong mineral acids can be avoided for sample digestion by using the microwave approach. Because reactivity increases with pressure, we examined the use of less hazardous solvents to leach selected contaminants from soil for subsequent analysis. We demonstrated the feasibility of this approach by extracting plutonium from a NET reference material using citric and tartaric acids with microwave digestion. Analytical results were comparable to traditional digestion methods, while hazardous waste was reduced by a factor often. We also evaluated the suitability of other natural acids, determined the extraction performance on a wider variety of soil types, and examined the extraction efficiency of other contaminants. For the organic area, we examined ways to minimize the wastes associated with the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in environmental samples. Conventional methods for analyzing semivolatile organic compounds are labor intensive and require copious amounts of hazardous solvents. For soil and sediment samples, we have a method to analyze PCBs that is based on microscale extraction using benign solvents (e.g., water or hexane). The extraction is performed at elevated temperatures in stainless steel cells containing the sample and solvent. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to quantitate the analytes in the isolated extract. More recently, we developed a method utilizing solid-phase microextraction (SPME) for natural

  6. Characterization of nutraceuticals and functional foods by innovative HPLC methods.

    PubMed

    Corradini, Claudio; Galanti, Roberta; Nicoletti, Isabella

    2002-04-01

    In recent years there is a growing interest in food and food ingredient which may provide health benefits. Food as well as food ingredients containing health-preserving components, are not considered conventional food, but can be defined as functional food. To characterise such foods, as well as nutraceuticals specific, high sensitive and reproducible analytical methodologies are needed. In light of this importance we set out to develop innovative HPLC methods employing reversed phase narrow bore column and high-performance anion-exchange chromatographic methods coupled with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD), which are specific for carbohydrate analysis. The developed methods were applied for the separation and quantification of citrus flavonoids and to characterize fructooligosaccharide (FOS) and fructans added to functional foods and nutraceuticals.

  7. Innovative Techniques for Teaching about Landslides and Triggered Landslide Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, F. E.; Malamud, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    When we think of a landslide (mass wasting), both the public and scientists often envisage an individual movement of earth material down a slope. Yet, landslides often occur not as individuals, but as parts of a triggered landslide event. This is where a trigger (e.g., an earthquake or heavy rainfall) results in up to tens of thousands of landslides in a region in the minutes to days after the trigger. In this paper, we will present ideas for innovative demonstrations, teaching practicals and projects, ranging from low-cost low-tech to more advanced digital methods, to communicate the ideas of landslides and triggered landslide events to the public and students. This paper is aimed at those in secondary school/university education and the public sector looking for examples to interest and inform their respective audiences about landslides, triggered landslide events, and the importance and implications of considering landslides not just as individuals, but as populations.

  8. Denture bar-coding: An innovative technique in forensic dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Venkateshwaran, Rajendran; Vidhya, J.; Anuradha, R.; Mary, Gold Pealin; Pradeep, R.; Senthileagappan, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Denture markers play an important role in forensic odontology and also in identifying a person. A number of methods are there for identifying dentures from a less expensive technique to a more expensive technique. Out of different denture markers, the bar-coding system is a way of collecting data from the mobile. Even a huge amount of data can be stored in that. It can be easily incorporated during acrylization of the denture and thus could be helpful in identification. This article reviews the strengths of bar-coding and how easily it can be used in the routine procedure. PMID:26538876

  9. Characterizing odors from cattle feedlots with different odor techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Odors from cattle feedlots negatively affect local communities. The purpose of this study was to characterize odors and odorants using different odor sampling techniques. Odors were characterized with field olfactometers (Nasal Ranger®), sensory techniques (GC-O) and analytical techniques (sorbent t...

  10. Innovative techniques to analyze time series of geomagnetic activity indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Potirakis, Stelios M.; Eftaxias, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic storms are undoubtedly among the most important phenomena in space physics and also a central subject of space weather. The non-extensive Tsallis entropy has been recently introduced, as an effective complexity measure for the analysis of the geomagnetic activity Dst index. The Tsallis entropy sensitively shows the complexity dissimilarity among different "physiological" (normal) and "pathological" states (intense magnetic storms). More precisely, the Tsallis entropy implies the emergence of two distinct patterns: (i) a pattern associated with the intense magnetic storms, which is characterized by a higher degree of organization, and (ii) a pattern associated with normal periods, which is characterized by a lower degree of organization. Other entropy measures such as Block Entropy, T-Complexity, Approximate Entropy, Sample Entropy and Fuzzy Entropy verify the above mentioned result. Importantly, the wavelet spectral analysis in terms of Hurst exponent, H, also shows the existence of two different patterns: (i) a pattern associated with the intense magnetic storms, which is characterized by a fractional Brownian persistent behavior (ii) a pattern associated with normal periods, which is characterized by a fractional Brownian anti-persistent behavior. Finally, we observe universality in the magnetic storm and earthquake dynamics, on a basis of a modified form of the Gutenberg-Richter law for the Tsallis statistics. This finding suggests a common approach to the interpretation of both phenomena in terms of the same driving physical mechanism. Signatures of discrete scale invariance in Dst time series further supports the aforementioned proposal.

  11. Comparison of Traditional and Innovative Techniques to Solve Technical Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Although NASA has an adequate food system for current missions, research is required to accommodate new requirements for future NASA exploration missions. The Inadequate Food System risk reflects the need to develop requirements and technologies that will enable NASA to provide the crew with a safe, nutritious and acceptable food system while effectively balancing appropriate resources such as mass, volume, and crew time in exploratory missions. As we go deeper into space or spend more time on the International Space Station (ISS), there will be requirements for packaged food to be stored for 3 5 years. New food packaging technologies are needed that have adequate oxygen and water barrier properties to maintain the foods' quality over this extended shelf life. NASA has been unsuccessful in identify packaging materials that meet the necessary requirements when using several traditional routes including literature reviews, workshops, and internal shelf life studies on foods packaged in various packaging materials. Small Business Innovative Research grants were used for accelerating food packaging materials research with limited success. In order to accelerate the process, a theoretical challenge was submitted to InnoCentive resulting in a partial award. A similar food packaging challenge was submitted to Yet2.com and several potential commercial packaging material suppliers were identified that, at least partially, met the requirements. Comparisons and results of these challenges will be discussed.

  12. Filtrates and Residues: Gel Filtration--An Innovative Separation Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenfeld, Fred; Gardner, James

    1985-01-01

    Gel filtration is a form of liquid chromatography that separates molecules primarily on the basis of their size. Advantages of using this technique, theoretical aspects, and experiments (including procedures used) are discussed. Several questions for students to answer (with answers) are also provided. (JN)

  13. INNOVATIVE TECHNIQUE TO EVALUATE LINT CLEANER GRID BAR DESIGNS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Photographic techniques were used to show the path that fibers attached to a gin saw take as they are drawn over a lint cleaner cleaning grid bar. A 1979 study showed that fibers were swept backwards, closer to the saw, as saw speed increased. The angle between the tip of the saw tooth and the fib...

  14. Innovative Reactive and Proactive Graduate Student Recruiting Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Hugh E., II

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of the recruiting techniques used by the University of Arizona's pharmacology and toxicology graduate program are described, considerations in the development of recruitment efforts are discussed, and issues for the profession to examine in developing a long-term strategy for recruiting students are outlined. (MSE)

  15. X-ray techniques for innovation in industry.

    PubMed

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, Krystyna; Cutler, Jeffrey

    2014-11-01

    The smart specialization declared in the European program Horizon 2020, and the increasing cooperation between research and development found in companies and researchers at universities and research institutions have created a new paradigm where many calls for proposals require participation and funding from public and private entities. This has created a unique opportunity for large-scale facilities, such as synchrotron research laboratories, to participate in and support applied research programs. Scientific staff at synchrotron facilities have developed many advanced tools that make optimal use of the characteristics of the light generated by the storage ring. These tools have been exceptionally valuable for materials characterization including X-ray absorption spectroscopy, diffraction, tomography and scattering, and have been key in solving many research and development issues. Progress in optics and detectors, as well as a large effort put into the improvement of data analysis codes, have resulted in the development of reliable and reproducible procedures for materials characterization. Research with photons has contributed to the development of a wide variety of products such as plastics, cosmetics, chemicals, building materials, packaging materials and pharma. In this review, a few examples are highlighted of successful cooperation leading to solutions of a variety of industrial technological problems which have been exploited by industry including lessons learned from the Science Link project, supported by the European Commission, as a new approach to increase the number of commercial users at large-scale research infrastructures.

  16. X-ray techniques for innovation in industry

    PubMed Central

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, Krystyna; Cutler, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The smart specialization declared in the European program Horizon 2020, and the increasing cooperation between research and development found in companies and researchers at universities and research institutions have created a new paradigm where many calls for proposals require participation and funding from public and private entities. This has created a unique opportunity for large-scale facilities, such as synchrotron research laboratories, to participate in and support applied research programs. Scientific staff at synchrotron facilities have developed many advanced tools that make optimal use of the characteristics of the light generated by the storage ring. These tools have been exceptionally valuable for materials characterization including X-ray absorption spectroscopy, diffraction, tomography and scattering, and have been key in solving many research and development issues. Progress in optics and detectors, as well as a large effort put into the improvement of data analysis codes, have resulted in the development of reliable and reproducible procedures for materials characterization. Research with photons has contributed to the development of a wide variety of products such as plastics, cosmetics, chemicals, building materials, packaging materials and pharma. In this review, a few examples are highlighted of successful cooperation leading to solutions of a variety of industrial technological problems which have been exploited by industry including lessons learned from the Science Link project, supported by the European Commission, as a new approach to increase the number of commercial users at large-scale research infrastructures. PMID:25485139

  17. Hubble Servicing Challenges Drive Innovation of Shuttle Rendezvous Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.; Walker, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing, performed by Space Shuttle crews, has contributed to what is arguably one of the most successful astronomy missions ever flown. Both nominal and contingency proximity operations techniques were developed to enable successful servicing, while lowering the risk of damage to HST systems, and improve crew safety. Influencing the development of these techniques were the challenges presented by plume impingement and HST performance anomalies. The design of both the HST and the Space Shuttle was completed before the potential of HST contamination and structural damage by shuttle RCS jet plume impingement was fully understood. Relative navigation during proximity operations has been challenging, as HST was not equipped with relative navigation aids. Since HST reached orbit in 1990, proximity operations design for servicing missions has evolved as insight into plume contamination and dynamic pressure has improved and new relative navigation tools have become available. Servicing missions have provided NASA with opportunities to gain insight into servicing mission design and development of nominal and contingency procedures. The HST servicing experiences and lessons learned are applicable to other programs that perform on-orbit servicing and rendezvous, both human and robotic.

  18. Innovative Seismological Techniques for Investigating the Interior Structure of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. J.; Cutts, J. A.; Mimoun, D.

    2014-12-01

    The formation, evolution and structure of Venus remain a mystery more than fifty years after the first visit by a robotic spacecraft. Radar images have revealed a surface that is much younger than those of the Moon, Mercury and Mars as well as a variety of enigmatic volcanic and tectonic features quite unlike those generated by plate tectonics on Earth. To understand how Venus works as a planet it is necessary to probe the interior of Venus. To accomplish this seismology must play a key role. Conventional seismology employs sensors in contact with the planetary surface but for Venus theses sensors must tolerate the Venus environment (460oC and 90 bars) for up to a year. The dense atmosphere of Venus, which efficiently couples seismic energy into the atmosphere as infrasonic waves, enables an alternative: detection of infrasonic waves in the upper atmosphere using either high altitude balloons or orbiting spacecraft. In June 2014, the Keck Institute for Space Studies (KISS) at the California Institute of Technology sponsored a one week workshop with 30 specialists in the key techniques and technologies that can bring these technique to readiness. In this paper, we describe the key synergies with earth science drawing on methods from terrestrial seismology and oceanography and identify key technical issues that need to be solved as well as important precursor measurements that should be made.

  19. An innovative coating technique for light and electron microscopic autoradiography.

    PubMed

    Kornhauser, G V; Krum, J M; Rosenstein, J M

    1992-06-01

    We describe a modified nuclear emulsion coating technique for both electron and light microscopic autoradiography. We propose that by reversing the application of formvar film so that it adheres to and covers thin sections placed on grids, we have developed a technically accessible methodology that produces optimal conditions for the tracing of specific nuclear activity. A smooth, continuous base is formed over the sections on which a monolayer of evenly packed silver halide crystals can be applied by dip-coating. The same principle is applied to pre-stained 1-micron plastic sections of glass slides. We suggest that the application of formvar film over thin sections does not impede or interfere with the exposure of the emulsion by the labeled tissue. On the contrary, it virtually eliminates contamination and background radiation, enhancing the specificity and quality of resolution at even low magnifications. This technical modification, which facilitates the application of the emulsion, could render electron microscopic autoradiography a routine laboratory procedure, allowing for easily reproducible results and quantitative evaluation. At the light microscopic level, this technique prevents chemical fogging caused by certain stains, and thus allows routine pre-staining before coating with emulsion.

  20. Photogrammetric detection technique for rotor blades structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enei, C.; Bernardini, G.; Serafini, J.; Mattioni, L.; Ficuciello, C.; Vezzari, V.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes an innovative use of photogrammetric detection techniques to experimentally estimate structural/inertial properties of helicopter rotor blades. The identification algorithms for the evaluation of mass and flexural stiffness distributions are an extension of the ones proposed by Larsen, whereas the procedure for torsional properties determination (stiffness and shear center position) is based on the Euler-Prandtl beam theory. These algorithms rely on measurements performed through photogrammetric detection, which requires the collection of digital photos allowing the identification of 3D coordinates of labeled points (markers) on the structure through the correlation of 2D pictures. The displacements are evaluated by comparing the positions of markers in loaded and reference configuration. Being the applied loads known, the structural characteristics can be directly obtained from the measured displacements. The accuracy of the proposed identification algorithms has been firstly verified by comparison with numerical and experimental data, and then applied to the structural characterization of two main rotor blades, designed for ultra-light helicopter applications.

  1. DEPLOYMENT OF INNOVATIVE CHARACTERIZATION TECHNOLOGIES AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MARSSIM PROCESS AT RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED SITES.

    SciTech Connect

    KALB,P.D.; MILIAN,L.; LUCKETT,L.; WATTERS,D.; MILLER,K.M.; GOGOLAK,C.

    2001-05-01

    The success of this Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) project is measured on several levels. First, the deployment of this innovative approach using in situ characterization, portable field laboratory measurements, and implementation of MARSSIM was successfully established for all three phases of D and D characterization, i.e., pre-job scoping, on-going disposition of waste, and final status surveys upon completion of the activity. Unlike traditional D and D projects, since the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Decommissioning Project (BGRR-DP) is operating on an accelerated schedule, much of the work is being carried out simultaneously. Rather than complete a full characterization of the facility before D and D work begins, specific removal actions require characterization as the activity progresses. Thus, the need for rapid and cost-effective techniques for characterization is heightened. Secondly, since the approach used for this ASTD project was not thoroughly proven prior to deployment, a large effort was devoted to demonstrating technical comparability to project managers, regulators and stakeholders. During the initial phases, large numbers of replicate samples were taken and analyzed by conventional baseline techniques to ensure that BGRR-DP quality assurance standards were met. ASTD project staff prepared comparisons of data gathered using ISOCS and BetaScint with traditional laboratory methods and presented this information to BGRR-DP staff and regulators from EPA Region II, NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, and the Suffolk County Board of Health. As the results of comparability evaluations became available, approval for these methods was received and the techniques associated with in situ characterization, portable field laboratory measurements, and implementation of MARSSIM were gradually integrated into BGRR-DP procedures.

  2. Innovative techniques for sampling stream-inhabiting salamanders

    SciTech Connect

    T.M. Luhring; C.A. Young

    2006-01-01

    Although salamanders are excellent indicators of environmental health, the ability to catch them efficiently without substantially disrupting their habitat is not always practical or even possible with current techniques. Ripping open logs and raking leaf packs onto shore (Bruce 1972) are examples of such practices that are disruptive but widely used by herpetologists who have no other means of efficient collection. Drift fences with pitfall traps are effective in catching animals moving within or between habitats but are time consuming and require an initial financial investment and constant upkeep to maintain functionality and prevent animal fatalities (Gibbons and Semlitsch 1981). One current alternative to drift fences is the use of coverboards (Grant et al. 1992), which require less maintenance and sampling effort than drift fences. However, coverboards do not integrate captures over a long time period and often result in a lower number of captures per trap (Grant et al. 1992).

  3. Innovative Visualization Techniques applied to a Flood Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcão, António; Ho, Quan; Lopes, Pedro; Malamud, Bruce D.; Ribeiro, Rita; Jern, Mikael

    2013-04-01

    The large and ever-increasing amounts of multi-dimensional, time-varying and geospatial digital information from multiple sources represent a major challenge for today's analysts. We present a set of visualization techniques that can be used for the interactive analysis of geo-referenced and time sampled data sets, providing an integrated mechanism and that aids the user to collaboratively explore, present and communicate visually complex and dynamic data. Here we present these concepts in the context of a 4 hour flood scenario from Lisbon in 2010, with data that includes measures of water column (flood height) every 10 minutes at a 4.5 m x 4.5 m resolution, topography, building damage, building information, and online base maps. Techniques we use include web-based linked views, multiple charts, map layers and storytelling. We explain two of these in more detail that are not currently in common use for visualization of data: storytelling and web-based linked views. Visual storytelling is a method for providing a guided but interactive process of visualizing data, allowing more engaging data exploration through interactive web-enabled visualizations. Within storytelling, a snapshot mechanism helps the author of a story to highlight data views of particular interest and subsequently share or guide others within the data analysis process. This allows a particular person to select relevant attributes for a snapshot, such as highlighted regions for comparisons, time step, class values for colour legend, etc. and provide a snapshot of the current application state, which can then be provided as a hyperlink and recreated by someone else. Since data can be embedded within this snapshot, it is possible to interactively visualize and manipulate it. The second technique, web-based linked views, includes multiple windows which interactively respond to the user selections, so that when selecting an object and changing it one window, it will automatically update in all the other

  4. The Elnady Technique: An innovative, new method for tissue preservation.

    PubMed

    Elnady, Fawzy A

    2016-01-01

    At the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cairo University, there is an increasing number of students but a limited availability of animal cadavers used for dissection, and student exposure to formalin is a known hazard. In order to address these challenges, a new method for tissue preservation was developed, the "Elnady Technique." This method is a modified form of plastination, where the chemicals used are not patented, are inexpensive and locally available, and the process is performed at room temperature. The produced specimens are realistic, durable, have no offensive odor, and are dry, soft and flexible. They can be used to replace the use of animals killed for teaching basic anatomy, embryology, pathology, parasitology and forensic medicine. They have great potential to support training in clinical skills and surgery, including for clinical examination, endoscopy, surgical sutures, and obstetrics simulation. PMID:26821550

  5. The innovative application of surface geophysical techniques for remedial investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, W.R.; Smith, S.; Gilmore, P.; Cox, S.

    1993-03-01

    When researchers are investigating potential subsurface contamination at hazardous waste landfills, the surface geophysical techniques they may use are often limited. Many geophysical surveys are concerned with areas next to and not directly within the landfill units. The highly variable properties of the materials within the landfill may result in geophysical data that are either difficult or impossible to interpret. Therefore, contamination at these sites may not be detected until substantial lateral migration away from the unit has occurred. In addition, because of the poor resolution of some techniques, the landfill as a whole must be considered as a source, where discrete disposal areas within landfill units may be the actual point sources of contaminants. In theory, if specific sources within the landfill are identified and isolated, then reduced time, effort, and expenditures will be required for remediation activities. In the summer of 1989, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) investigated a small potentially hazardous waste landfill to determine if contaminant hot spots could be identified within the landfill and to determine if significant vertical and lateral migration of contaminants was occurring away from these locations. Based on the present hydrogeologic conditions, researchers anticipated that subsurface flow would be primarily vertical, with the zone of saturation at a depth greater than 150 meters. This necessitated that the survey be performed, for the most part, directly on the capped portion of the landfill. Focused geophysical surveys conducted off the landfill would not have provided useful information concerning conditions directly beneath the landfill. This paper discusses the planning, application, and analysis of four combined sensing methods: two methods of electromagnetic induction [low induction (Em) and time domain (TEM)], ground penetrating radar (GPR), and soil gas.

  6. Innovation for reducing blood culture contamination: initial specimen diversion technique.

    PubMed

    Patton, Richard G; Schmitt, Timothy

    2010-12-01

    We hypothesized that diversion of the first milliliter of venipuncture blood-the initial specimen diversion technique (ISDT)-would eliminate incompletely sterilized fragments of skin from the culture specimen and significantly reduce our blood culture contamination rate (R). We studied our hypothesis prospectively beginning with our control culture (C) definition: one venipuncture with two sequentially obtained specimens, 10 ml each, the first specimen (M1) for aerobic and the second (M2) for anaerobic media. The test ISDT culture (D) was identical, with the exception that each was preceded by diverting a 1-ml sample (DS) from the same venipuncture. During the first of two sequential 9-month periods, we captured D versus C data (n=3,733), where DMXR and CMXR are R for D and C specimens. Our hypothesis predicted DS would divert soiled skin fragments from DM1, and therefore, CM1R would be significantly greater than DM1R. This was confirmed by CM1R (30/1,061 [2.8%]) less DM1R (37/2,672 [1.4%]; P=0.005), which equals 1.4%. For the second 9-month follow-up period, data were compiled for all cultures (n=4,143), where ADMXR is R for all (A) diversion specimens, enabling comparison to test ISDT. Our hypothesis predicted no significant differences for test ISDT versus all ISDT. This was confirmed by DM1R (37/2,672 [1.4%]) versus ADM1R (42/4,143 [1.0%]; P=0.17) and DM2R (21/2,672 [0.80%]) versus ADM2R (39/4,143 [0.94%]; P=0.50). We conclude that our hypothesis is valid: venipuncture needles soil blood culture specimens with unsterilized skin fragments and increase R, and ISDT significantly reduces R from venipuncture-obtained blood culture specimens.

  7. Characterizing Hyperspectral Imagery (AVIRIS) Using Fractal Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Hong-Lie; Lam, Nina Siu-Ngan; Quattrochi, Dale

    1997-01-01

    With the rapid increase in hyperspectral data acquired by various experimental hyperspectral imaging sensors, it is necessary to develop efficient and innovative tools to handle and analyze these data. The objective of this study is to seek effective spatial analytical tools for summarizing the spatial patterns of hyperspectral imaging data. In this paper, we (1) examine how fractal dimension D changes across spectral bands of hyperspectral imaging data and (2) determine the relationships between fractal dimension and image content. It has been documented that fractal dimension changes across spectral bands for the Landsat-TM data and its value [(D)] is largely a function of the complexity of the landscape under study. The newly available hyperspectral imaging data such as that from the Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) which has 224 bands, covers a wider spectral range with a much finer spectral resolution. Our preliminary result shows that fractal dimension values of AVIRIS scenes from the Santa Monica Mountains in California vary between 2.25 and 2.99. However, high fractal dimension values (D > 2.8) are found only from spectral bands with high noise level and bands with good image quality have a fairly stable dimension value (D = 2.5 - 2.6). This suggests that D can also be used as a summary statistics to represent the image quality or content of spectral bands.

  8. Innovative directional and position specific sampling technique (POLO). Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-06-01

    The UTD Inc. Position Location (POLO) device is used for identifying the position of characterization sensors in the subsurface. POLO fits within a cone penetrometer rod to quickly and cost-effectively identify sample location, rod tip location, and track the rod path. UTD demonstrated the POLO device at a private site in Virginia and at the DOE Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Results show POLO as accurate as any alternative approach at less than 0.50% error, and at a fraction of the cost. POLO can be used in close proximity to tanks, pipelines, and buildings with greatly reduced risk of puncture and resulting spills--a major improvement over current approaches. POLO only adds about 4% to cost of penetrometer use.

  9. Characterizing ultrasonic transducers using pattern recognition techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ekis, J.W.

    1992-04-01

    This project's goal was to develop an automated ultrasonic transducer characterization system. A computer-based test system collected the test data for each of the given transducers. This data set was then processed by a number of pattern recognition algorithms. The results from these classifications placed the transducers into groups of similar units. All the transducers in a group will have similar performance characteristics. Each group was isolated from the others. 49 refs.

  10. Innovators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NEA Today, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes various innovations that have been developed to enhance education. These innovations include: helping educators help at-risk students succeed; promoting high school journalism; ensuring quality online learning experiences; developing a student performing group that uses theater to address social issues; and having students design their…

  11. Characterization of the solid-state: spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Bugay, D E

    2001-05-16

    The physical characterization of pharmaceutical solids is an integral aspect of the drug development process. This review summarizes the use of solid-state spectroscopy techniques used in the physical characterization of the active pharmaceutical ingredient, excipients, physical mixtures, and the final dosage form. A brief introduction to infrared, Raman, and solid-state NMR experimental techniques are described as well as a more thorough description of qualitative and quantitative applications. The use of solid-state imaging techniques such as IR, Raman, and TOF-SIMS is also introduced to the reader.

  12. Development of innovative techniques and principles that may be used as models to improve plant performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, W.W.; Burton, G.W.

    1989-06-01

    Plant breeding has made possible a large portion of the record yields of our major food crops, and can claim credit for at least half of their increased yield. It can continue to do this but the population explosion demands that it be done in less time. Innovative techniques must be developed. The purpose of this research is: to develop techniques and principles of transferring germplasm from the primary, secondary, and tertiary gene pools of the wild species to cultivated species and evaluate the transferred germplasm; to evaluate diverse cytoplasms from wild species in isogenic lines to detect cytoplasmic effects on agronomic characteristics; and to develop an obligate apomictic pearl millet. 32 refs.

  13. Innovative analytical tools to characterize prebiotic carbohydrates of functional food interest.

    PubMed

    Corradini, Claudio; Lantano, Claudia; Cavazza, Antonella

    2013-05-01

    Functional foods are one of the most interesting areas of research and innovation in the food industry. A functional food or functional ingredient is considered to be any food or food component that provides health benefits beyond basic nutrition. Recently, consumers have shown interest in natural bioactive compounds as functional ingredients in the diet owing to their various beneficial effects for health. Water-soluble fibers and nondigestible oligosaccharides and polysaccharides can be defined as functional food ingredients. Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) and inulin are resistant to direct metabolism by the host and reach the caecocolon, where they are used by selected groups of beneficial bacteria. Furthermore, they are able to improve physical and structural properties of food, such as hydration, oil-holding capacity, viscosity, texture, sensory characteristics, and shelf-life. This article reviews major innovative analytical developments to screen and identify FOS, inulins, and the most employed nonstarch carbohydrates added or naturally present in functional food formulations. High-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed electrochemical detection (HPAEC-PED) is one of the most employed analytical techniques for the characterization of those molecules. Mass spectrometry is also of great help, in particularly matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), which is able to provide extensive information regarding the molecular weight and length profiles of oligosaccharides and polysaccharides. Moreover, MALDI-TOF-MS in combination with HPAEC-PED has been shown to be of great value for the complementary information it can provide. Some other techniques, such as NMR spectroscopy, are also discussed, with relevant examples of recent applications. A number of articles have appeared in the literature in recent years regarding the analysis of inulin, FOS, and other carbohydrates of interest in the field and

  14. Female stress urinary incontinence: standard techniques revisited and critical evaluation of innovative techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Cornelia; de Riese, Werner T. W.

    2003-06-01

    Objectives: The treatment of female urinary incontinence (UI) is a growing health care concern in our aging society. Publications of recent innovations and modifications are creating expectations. This brief review provides some insight and structure regarding indications and expected outcomes for the different approaches. Materials: Data extraction is part of a Medline data base search, which was performed for "female stress incontinence" from 1960 until 2000. Additional literature search was performed to cover 2001 and 2002. Outcome data were extracted. Results: (1) INJECTION OF BULKING AGENTS (collagen, synthetic agents): The indication for mucosal coaptation was more clearly defined and in the majority of articles limited to ISD. (2) OPEN COLPOSUSPENSION (Burch, MMK): Best long-term results of all operative procedures, to date considered the gold standard. (3) LAPAROSCOPIC COLPOSUSPENSION (different modifications): Long-term success rates appear dependent on operator skills. There are few long-term data. (4) NEEDLE SUSPENSION: (Stamey, Pareyra and modifications): Initial results were equal to Burch with less morbidity, but long-term success rates are worse. (5) SLING PROCEDURES (autologous, synthetic, allogenic graft materials, different modes of support and anchoring, free tapes): The suburethral sling has traditionally been considered a procedure for those in whom suspension had failed and for those with severe ISD. The most current trend shows its use as a primary procedure for SUI. Long-term data beyond 5 years are insufficient. (6) EXTERNAL OCCLUSIVE DEVICES (vaginal sponges and pessaries, urethral insert): Both vaginal and urethral insert devices can be effective in selected patients. (7) IMPLANTABLE ARTEFICIAL URETHRAL SPHINCTERS: Modifications and improvements of the devices resulted in improved clinical results regarding durability and efficacy. CONCLUSION: (1) The Burch colposuspension is still considered the gold standard in the treatment of female

  15. Loop mediated isothermal amplification: An innovative gene amplification technique for animal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Pravas Ranjan; Sethy, Kamadev; Mohapatra, Swagat; Panda, Debasis

    2016-01-01

    India being a developing country mainly depends on livestock sector for its economy. However, nowadays, there is emergence and reemergence of more transboundary animal diseases. The existing diagnostic techniques are not so quick and with less specificity. To reduce the economy loss, there should be a development of rapid, reliable, robust diagnostic technique, which can work with high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Loop mediated isothermal amplification assay is a rapid gene amplification technique that amplifies nucleic acid under an isothermal condition with a set of designed primers spanning eight distinct sequences of the target. This assay can be used as an emerging powerful, innovative gene amplification diagnostic tool against various pathogens of livestock diseases. This review is to highlight the basic concept and methodology of this assay in livestock disease. PMID:27284221

  16. Loop mediated isothermal amplification: An innovative gene amplification technique for animal diseases.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Pravas Ranjan; Sethy, Kamadev; Mohapatra, Swagat; Panda, Debasis

    2016-05-01

    India being a developing country mainly depends on livestock sector for its economy. However, nowadays, there is emergence and reemergence of more transboundary animal diseases. The existing diagnostic techniques are not so quick and with less specificity. To reduce the economy loss, there should be a development of rapid, reliable, robust diagnostic technique, which can work with high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Loop mediated isothermal amplification assay is a rapid gene amplification technique that amplifies nucleic acid under an isothermal condition with a set of designed primers spanning eight distinct sequences of the target. This assay can be used as an emerging powerful, innovative gene amplification diagnostic tool against various pathogens of livestock diseases. This review is to highlight the basic concept and methodology of this assay in livestock disease. PMID:27284221

  17. Statistical techniques for the characterization of partially observed epidemics.

    SciTech Connect

    Safta, Cosmin; Ray, Jaideep; Crary, David; Cheng, Karen

    2010-11-01

    Techniques appear promising to construct and integrate automated detect-and-characterize technique for epidemics - Working off biosurveillance data, and provides information on the particular/ongoing outbreak. Potential use - in crisis management and planning, resource allocation - Parameter estimation capability ideal for providing the input parameters into an agent-based model, Index Cases, Time of Infection, infection rate. Non-communicable diseases are easier than communicable ones - Small anthrax can be characterized well with 7-10 days of data, post-detection; plague takes longer, Large attacks are very easy.

  18. Remote Underwater Characterization System - Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, W D

    1999-04-01

    Characterization and inspection of water-cooled and moderated nuclear reactors and fuel storage pools requires equipment capable of operating underwater. Similarly, the deactivation and decommissioning of older nuclear facilities often requires the facility owner to accurately characterize underwater structures and equipment which may have been sitting idle for years. The Remote Underwater Characterization System (RUCS) is a small, remotely operated submersible vehicle intended to serve multiple purposes in underwater nuclear operations. It is based on the commercially-available "Scallop" vehicle 1 , but has been modified by the Department of Energy's Robotics Technology Development Program to add auto-depth control, and vehicle orientation and depth monitoring at the operator control panel. The RUCS is designed to provide visual and gamma radiation characterization, even in confined or limited access areas. It was demonstrated in August 1998 at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as part of the INEEL Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project. During the demonstration it was compared in a "head-to-head" fashion with the baseline characterization technology. This paper summarizes the results of the demonstration and lessons learned; comparing and contrasting both technologies in the areas of cost, visual characterization, radiological characterization, and overall operations.

  19. Application of Material Characterization Techniques to Electrical Forensic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, T.D.

    2003-03-11

    The application of forensic science techniques to electrical equipment failure investigation has not been widely documented in the engineering world. This paper is intended to share an example of using material characterization techniques to support an initial cause determination of an electrical component failure event. The resulting conclusion supported the initial cause determination and ruled out the possibility of design deficiencies. Thus, the qualification testing of the equipment was allowed to continue to successful completion.

  20. Innovative sputtering techniques for CIS and CdTe submodule fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, J.M.; Misra, M.S.; Lanning, B. . Astronautics Group)

    1993-03-01

    This report describes work done during Phase 1 of the subject subcontract. The subcontract was designed to study innovative deposition techniques, such as the rotating cylindrical magnetron sputtering system and electrodeposition for large-area, low-cost copper indium diselenide (CIS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) devices. A key issue for photovoltaics (PV) in terrestrial and future space applications is producibility, particularly for applications using a large quantity of PV. Among the concerns for fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film PV, such as CIS and CdTe, are production volume, cost, and minimization of waste. Both rotating cylindrical magnetron (C-Mag[trademark]) sputtering and electrodeposition have tremendous potential for the fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film PV due to scaleability, efficient utilization of source materials, and inherently higher deposition rates. In the case of sputtering, the unique geometry of the C-Mae facilitates innovative cosputtering and reactive sputtering that could lead to greater throughput reduced health and safety risks, and, ultimately, lower fabrication cost. Electrodeposited films appear to be adherent and comparable with low-cost fabrication techniques. Phase I involved the initial film and device fabrication using the two techniques mentioned herein. Devices were tested by both internal facilities, as well as NREL and ISET.

  1. Innovative sputtering techniques for CIS and CdTe submodule fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, J. M.; Misra, M. S.; Lanning, B.

    1993-03-01

    This report describes work done during Phase 1 of the subject subcontract. The subcontract was designed to study innovative deposition techniques, such as the rotating cylindrical magnetron sputtering system and electrodeposition for large-area, low-cost copper indium diselenide (CIS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) devices. A key issue for photovoltaics (PV) in terrestrial and future space applications is producibility, particularly for applications using a large quantity of PV. Among the concerns for fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film PV, such as CIS and CdTe, are production volume, cost, and minimization of waste. Both rotating cylindrical magnetron (C-Mag(trademark)) sputtering and electrodeposition have tremendous potential for the fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film PV due to scaleability, efficient utilization of source materials, and inherently higher deposition rates. In the case of sputtering, the unique geometry of the C-Mag facilitates innovative cosputtering and reactive sputtering that could lead to greater throughput reduced health and safety risks, and, ultimately, lower fabrication cost. Electrodeposited films appear to be adherent and comparable with low-cost fabrication techniques. Phase 1 involved the initial film and device fabrication using the two techniques mentioned herein. Devices were tested by both internal facilities, as well as NREL and ISET.

  2. Remote Underwater Characterization System - Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, Walter David

    1999-04-01

    Characterization and inspection of water-cooled and moderated nuclear reactors and fuel storage pools requires equipment capable of operating underwater. Similarly, the deactivation and decommissioning of older nuclear facilities often requires the facility owner to accurately characterize underwater structures and equipment which may have been sitting idle for years. The underwater characterization equipment is often required to operate at depths exceeding 20 ft (6.1 m) and in relatively confined or congested spaces. The typical baseline approach has been the use of radiation detectors and underwater cameras mounted on long poles, or stationary cameras with pan and tilt features mounted on the sides of the underwater facility. There is a perceived need for an inexpensive, more mobile method of performing close-up inspection and radiation measurements in confined spaces underwater. The Remote Underwater Characterization System (RUCS) is a small, remotely operated submersible vehicle intended to serve multiple purposes in underwater nuclear operations. It is based on the commercially-available “Scallop” vehicle1, but has been modified by Department of Energy’s Robotics Technology Development Program to add auto-depth control, and vehicle orientation and depth monitoring at the operator control panel. The RUCS is designed to provide visual and gamma radiation characterization, even in confined or limited access areas. It was demonstrated in August 1998 at Idaho National Engineering and environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as part of the INEEL Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project. During the demonstration it was compared in a “head-tohead” fashion with the baseline characterization technology. This paper summarizes the results of the demonstration and lessons learned; comparing and contrasting both technologies in the areas of cost, visual characterization, radiological characterization, and overall operations.

  3. Innovative techniques in preventing and salvaging neurovascular pedicle flaps in reconstructive foot and ankle surgery.

    PubMed

    Zgonis, Thomas; Stapleton, John J

    2008-04-01

    Pedicle flaps to cover soft tissue defects of the foot, ankle, and lower extremity are invaluable. However, venous congestion and flap necrosis, a common complication, poses greater morbidity to the patient as few remaining options for attempted limb salvage remain. The authors discuss how to prevent flap failure by allowing close observation and strict offloading of the pedicle flap through current external fixation designs. This article also discusses the role of medicinal leeches in reestablishing blood flow through the pedicle flap to prevent tissue necrosis. In addition, the use of hydrosurgery as an innovative technique offers the surgeon another option if faced with pedicle flap necrosis. PMID:19825700

  4. Innovative technique for gastric retraction during laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy: the marionette

    PubMed Central

    Surjan, Rodrigo C.; Basseres, Tiago; Makdissi, Fabio F.; Machado, Marcel A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomies became more common in the past few years as a safe and effective treatment option for benign and low-grade malignant tumors of the body and tail of the pancreas. Adequate exposure and wide operative field are crucial to perform this procedure, and this is achieved by retraction of the stomach with an angled liver retractor or a grasper through a subxiphoid trocar, that is usually used only to this purpose. We developed an innovative technique to retract the stomach during laparoscopic distal pancreatectomies that provides excellent operative field and frees the subxiphoid trocar to be used in other tasks during the surgery. PMID:26690568

  5. Polarized light scattering technique for morphological characterization of waterborne pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarakonda, Venkat V.; Manickavasagam, Sivakumar

    2009-05-01

    We have recently developed an elliptically polarized light scattering (EPLS) technique to characterize the morphology of fine particles suspended in an optically non-absorbing medium such as water. This technique provides the size distribution, shape and agglomeration characteristics of suspended particles. This technique can be used to detect various types of biological pathogens such as bacteria, protozoa and viruses in potable water systems. Here we report results obtained from EPLS measurements on two strains of Bacillus spores suspended in water along with comparison with electron microscopy.

  6. Characterization and categorization of higher-dimensional presentation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cluff, Elizabeth; Burton, Robert P.; Barrett, William A.

    1990-09-01

    Existing, documented techniques for the presentation of higher dimensionaL information are characterized. Techniques include: Symbolic Star PLots, Chernoff Faces, Gtyphs, Boxes, Profile PLots, SymboLic Scatter PLots, KLeiner-Hartigan Tree SymboLs, GeneraLized Draftsman DispLays, Andrew's PLots, ParaLLeL Axes Graphics, and Cartesian Hyperspace Graphics. Each technique is evaLuated based on accuracy, simpLicity, clarity, appearance, well-designed structure, information leveL, dimansonaL capacity, flexibility, interpretability, visual impact, mastery time, and computational tractability. Strengths, weaknesses and applicabilities of each technique are determined. Techniques are categorized as symbolic and non-symbolic. Characteristics of each category are identified.

  7. Physical and chemical characterization techniques for metallic powders

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Stutzman, P. E.; Ferraris, C. F.; Watson, S. S.; Peltz, M. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Systematic studies have been carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. An extensive array of characterization techniques were applied to these two powders. The physical techniques included laser-diffraction particle-size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to chemistry included X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive analytical X-ray analysis. The background of these techniques will be summarized and some typical findings comparing different samples of virgin additive manufacturing powders, taken from the same lot, will be given. The techniques were used to confirm that different samples of powder from the same lot were essentially identical, within the uncertainty of the measurements.

  8. Analytical technique characterizes all trace contaminants in water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. N.; Lysyj, I.; Nelson, K. H.

    1967-01-01

    Properly programmed combination of advanced chemical and physical analytical techniques characterize critically all trace contaminants in both the potable and waste water from the Apollo Command Module. This methodology can also be applied to the investigation of the source of water pollution.

  9. Characterization of microstructure with low frequency electromagnetic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, Matthew R.; Sathish, Shamachary; Pilchak, Adam L.; Blodgett, Mark P.; Cherry, Aaron J.

    2014-02-18

    A new computational method for characterizing the relationship between surface crystallography and electrical conductivity in anisotropic materials with low frequency electromagnetic techniques is presented. The method is discussed from the standpoint of characterizing the orientation of a single grain, as well as characterizing statistical information about grain ensembles in the microstructure. Large-area electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data was obtained and used in conjunction with a synthetic aperture approach to simulate the eddy current response of beta annealed Ti-6Al-4V. Experimental eddy current results are compared to the computed eddy current approximations based on electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data, demonstrating good agreement. The detectability of notches in the presence of noise from microstructure is analyzed with the described simulation method and advantages and limitations of this method are discussed relative to other NDE techniques for such analysis.

  10. A new technique for the characterization of chaff elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholfield, David; Myat, Maung; Dauby, Jason; Fesler, Jonathon; Bright, Jonathan

    2011-07-01

    A new technique for the experimental characterization of electromagnetic chaff based on Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar is presented. This technique allows for the characterization of as few as one filament of chaff in a controlled anechoic environment allowing for stability and repeatability of experimental results. This approach allows for a deeper understanding of the fundamental phenomena of electromagnetic scattering from chaff through an incremental analysis approach. Chaff analysis can now begin with a single element and progress through the build-up of particles into pseudo-cloud structures. This controlled incremental approach is supported by an identical incremental modeling and validation process. Additionally, this technique has the potential to produce considerable savings in financial and schedule cost and provides a stable and repeatable experiment to aid model valuation.

  11. A new technique for the characterization of chaff elements.

    PubMed

    Scholfield, David; Myat, Maung; Dauby, Jason; Fesler, Jonathon; Bright, Jonathan

    2011-07-01

    A new technique for the experimental characterization of electromagnetic chaff based on Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar is presented. This technique allows for the characterization of as few as one filament of chaff in a controlled anechoic environment allowing for stability and repeatability of experimental results. This approach allows for a deeper understanding of the fundamental phenomena of electromagnetic scattering from chaff through an incremental analysis approach. Chaff analysis can now begin with a single element and progress through the build-up of particles into pseudo-cloud structures. This controlled incremental approach is supported by an identical incremental modeling and validation process. Additionally, this technique has the potential to produce considerable savings in financial and schedule cost and provides a stable and repeatable experiment to aid model valuation.

  12. Plant cell wall characterization using scanning probe microscopy techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yarbrough, John M; Himmel, Michael E; Ding, Shi-You

    2009-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is today considered a promising renewable resource for bioenergy production. A combined chemical and biological process is currently under consideration for the conversion of polysaccharides from plant cell wall materials, mainly cellulose and hemicelluloses, to simple sugars that can be fermented to biofuels. Native plant cellulose forms nanometer-scale microfibrils that are embedded in a polymeric network of hemicelluloses, pectins, and lignins; this explains, in part, the recalcitrance of biomass to deconstruction. The chemical and structural characteristics of these plant cell wall constituents remain largely unknown today. Scanning probe microscopy techniques, particularly atomic force microscopy and its application in characterizing plant cell wall structure, are reviewed here. We also further discuss future developments based on scanning probe microscopy techniques that combine linear and nonlinear optical techniques to characterize plant cell wall nanometer-scale structures, specifically apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. PMID:19703302

  13. Techniques for nonlinear optical characterization of materials: a review.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Cid B; Gomes, Anderson S L; Boudebs, Georges

    2016-03-01

    Various techniques to characterize the nonlinear (NL) optical response of centro-symmetric materials are presented and evaluated with emphasis on the relationship between the macroscopic measurable quantities and the microscopic properties of photonic materials. NL refraction and NL absorption of the materials are the phenomena of major interest. The dependence of the NL refraction and NL absorption coefficients on the nature of the materials was studied as well as on the laser excitation characteristics of wavelength, intensity, spatial profile, pulse duration and pulses repetition rate. Selected experimental results are discussed and illustrated. The various techniques currently available were compared and their relative advantages and drawbacks were evaluated. Critical comparisons among established techniques provided elements to evaluate their accuracies and sensitivities with respect to novel methods that present improvements with respect to the conventional techniques.

  14. Characterization techniques for gas diffusion layers for proton exchange membrane fuel cells - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvay, A.; Yli-Rantala, E.; Liu, C.-H.; Peng, X.-H.; Koski, P.; Cindrella, L.; Kauranen, P.; Wilde, P. M.; Kannan, A. M.

    2012-09-01

    The gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is one of the functional components that provide a support structure for gas and water transport. The GDL plays a crucial role when the oxidant is air, especially when the fuel cell operates in the higher current density region. There has been an exponential growth in research and development because the PEMFC has the potential to become the future energy source for automotive applications. In order to serve in this capacity, the GDL requires due innovative analysis and characterization toward performance and durability. It is possible to achieve the optimum fuel cell performance only by understanding the characteristics of GDLs such as structure, pore size, porosity, gas permeability, wettability, thermal and electrical conductivities, surface morphology and water management. This review attempts to bring together the characterization techniques for the essential properties of the GDLs as handy tools for R&D institutions. Topics are categorized based on the ex-situ and in-situ characterization techniques of GDLs along with related modeling and simulation. Recently reported techniques used for accelerated durability evaluation of the GDLs are also consolidated within the ex-situ and in-situ methods.

  15. Techniques for characterizing waveguide gratings and grating-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmeyer, Ernst; Kieckbusch, Sven; Knappe, Frank

    2006-09-01

    Waveguide gratings used in laser technology, optical sensing or optical communications have to serve different specific purposes and, hence, have to have specific optical properties which can be tailored to a large extent. Characterization methods are required not only to measure the actual effect of a Bragg grating or long period grating under consideration but also to unveil the cause, i.e. to determine its spatial structure. This paper reviews the present status of the respective experimental characterization techniques. The methods emphasized rely on phase sensitive reflectometry together with advanced inverse scattering evaluation algorithms.

  16. Innovative deposition techniques for the fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, J. H.; Lanning, B. R.; Misra, M. S.

    1992-12-01

    A key issue for photovoltaics (PV), both in terrestrial and future space applications, is producibility, particularly for applications utilizing a large volume of PV. Among the concerns for fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaics, such as copper-indium-diselenide (CIS) and cadmium-telluride (CdTe), are production volume, which translates directly related to cost, and minimization of waste. Both the rotating cylindrical magnetron (C-MagTM) and pulsed electrodeposition have tremendous potential for the fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaics due to scaleability, efficient utilization of source materials and inherently higher deposition rates. In the case of sputtering, the unique geometry of the C-MagTM facilitates innovative cosputtering and reactive sputtering that could lead to greater throughput, reduced health and safety risks, and ultimately lower fabrication cost. For pulsed electrodeposition, the films appear to be more tightly adherent and deposited at an enhanced rate when compared to conventional DC electrodeposition. This paper addresses Martin Marietta's investigation into innovative sputtering techniques and pulsed electrodeposition with a near-term goal of 930 cm2 (1 ft2) monolithically-integrated CIS and CdTe submodules.

  17. Innovative deposition techniques for the fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, J.H.; Lanning, B.R.; Misra, M.S. )

    1992-12-01

    A key issue for photovoltaics (PV), both in terrestrial and future space applications, is [ital producibility], particularly for applications utilizing a large volume of PV. Among the concerns for fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaics, such as copper-indium-diselenide (CIS) and cadmium-telluride (CdTe), are production volume, which translates directly related to cost, and minimization of waste. Both the rotating cylindrical magnetron (C-Mag[sup TM]) and pulsed electrodeposition have tremendous potential for the fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaics due to scaleability, efficient utilization of source materials and inherently higher deposition rates. In the case of sputtering, the unique geometry of the C-Mag[sup TM] facilitates innovative cosputtering and reactive sputtering that could lead to greater throughput, reduced health and safety risks, and ultimately lower fabrication cost. For pulsed electrodeposition, the films appear to be more tightly adherent and deposited at an enhanced rate when compared to conventional DC electrodeposition. This paper addresses Martin Marietta's investigation into innovative sputtering techniques and pulsed electrodeposition with a near-term goal of 930 cm[sup 2] (1 ft[sup 2]) monolithically-integrated CIS and CdTe submodules.

  18. Vadose Zone Characterization Techniques Developed by EMSP Research

    SciTech Connect

    Guillen, Donna P.

    2003-02-24

    This paper discusses research contributions made by Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research in the area of geophysical characterization of the subsurface. The goal of these EMSP research projects is to develop combined high-resolution measurement and interpretation packages that provide accurate, timely information needed to characterize the vadose zone. Various types of geophysical imaging techniques can be used to characterize the shallow subsurface. Since individual geophysical characterization tools all have specific limitations, many different techniques are being explored to provide more widespread applicability over a range of hydrogeologic settings. A combination of laboratory, field, theoretical, and computational studies are necessary to develop our understanding of how contaminants move through the vadose zone. This entails field tests with field-hardened systems, packaging and calibration of instrumentation, data processing and analysis algorithms, forward and inverse modeling, and so forth. DOE sites are seeking to team with EMSP researchers to leverage the basic science research investment and apply these advances to address subsurface contamination issues that plague many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites.

  19. Characterization of patinas by means of microscopic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez-Calvo, C.

    2007-11-15

    Many stone-made historic buildings have a yellowish layer called 'patina' on their external surface. In some cases, it is due to the natural ageing of the stone caused by chemical-physical reactions between the surface of the stone and the environment, and in other cases it is the result of biological activity. The origin of these patinas can be also be due to ancient protective treatments. The use of organic additives, such as protein-based compounds, in lime or gypsum-based patinas is a traditional technique, which has been used in past centuries for the conservation and protection of stone materials. The thinness of the patinas ensures that microscopic techniques are irreplaceable for their analysis. Optical Microscopy, Fluorescence Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy together with an Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer, and Electron Microprobe are the microscopic techniques used for the characterization of these coverings, providing very useful information on their composition, texture and structure.

  20. Application of impedance measurement techniques to accelerating cavity mode characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, S. M.; Stefan, P. M.

    1993-11-01

    Impedance measurements, using a central wire to simulate the electron beam, were performed on a 52 MHz accelerating cavity at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This cavity was recently installed in the X-ray storage ring at the NSLS as a part of an upgrade of the ring. To damp higher-order modes (HOM) in this cavity, damping antennas have been installed. We implemented the impedance measurement technique to characterize the cavity modes up to 1 GHz and confirm the effectiveness of the damping antennas. Scattering parameters were measured using a network analyzer (HP 8510B) with a personal computer as a controller. Analysis based on S and T parameters for the system was used to solve for the cavity impedance, Z( ω), as a function of the measured transmission response, S21( ω). Search techniques were used to find the shunt resistance Rsh, and Q from the calculated Z( ω) for different modes. Our results for {R}/{Q} showed good agreement with URMEL simulations. The values of Q were compared with other independent Q measurement techniques. Our analytical technique offers an alternative approach for cases where full thru-reflection-line (TRL) calibration is not feasible and a more time-effective technique for obtaining {R}/{Q}, compared with the bead-pull method.

  1. New and Evolving Techniques for the Characterization of Peptide Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    D'Addio, Suzanne M; Bothe, Jameson R; Neri, Claudia; Walsh, Paul L; Zhang, Jingtao; Pierson, Elizabeth; Mao, Yun; Gindy, Marian; Leone, Anthony; Templeton, Allen C

    2016-10-01

    Advances in technologies related to the design and manufacture of therapeutic peptides have enabled researchers to overcome the biological and technological challenges that have limited their application in the past. As a result, peptides of increasing complexity have become progressively important against a variety of disease targets. Developing peptide drug products brings with it unique scientific challenges consistent with the unique physicochemical properties of peptide molecules. The identification of the proper characterization tools is required in order to develop peptide formulations with the appropriate stability, manufacturability, and bioperformance characteristics. This knowledge supports the build of critical quality attributes and, ultimately, regulatory specifications. The purpose of this review article is to provide an overview of the techniques that are employed for analytical characterization of peptide drug products. The techniques covered are highlighted in the context of peptide drug product understanding and include chemical and biophysical approaches. Emphasis is placed on summarizing the recent literature experience in the field. Finally, the authors provide regulatory perspective on these characterization approaches and discuss some potential areas for further research in the field.

  2. Overview of multimodal techniques for the characterization of sport programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, Nicola; Leonardi, Riccardo; Migliorati, Pierangelo

    2003-06-01

    The problem of content characterization of sports videos is of great interest because sports video appeals to large audiences and its efficient distribution over various networks should contribute to widespread usage of multimedia services. In this paper we analyze several techniques proposed in literature for content characterization of sports videos. We focus this analysis on the typology of the signal (audio, video, text captions, ...) from which the low-level features are extracted. First we consider the techniques based on visual information, then the methods based on audio information, and finally the algorithms based on audio-visual cues, used in a multi-modal fashion. This analysis shows that each type of signal carries some peculiar information, and the multi-modal approach can fully exploit the multimedia information associated to the sports video. Moreover, we observe that the characterization is performed either considering what happens in a specific time segment, observing therefore the features in a "static" way, or trying to capture their "dynamic" evolution in time. The effectiveness of each approach depends mainly on the kind of sports it relates to, and the type of highlights we are focusing on.

  3. Application of physical and chemical characterization techniques to metallic powders

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Watson, S. S.; Stutzman, P. E.; Ferraris, C. F.; Peltz, M. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Systematic studies have been carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. The characterization of these powders is important in NIST efforts to develop appropriate measurements and standards for additive materials and to document the property of powders used in a NIST-led additive manufacturing material round robin. An extensive array of characterization techniques was applied to these two powders, in both virgin and recycled states. The physical techniques included laser diffraction particle size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to chemistry, including X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive analytical X-ray analysis using the X-rays generated during scanning electron microscopy, were also employed. Results of these analyses will be used to shed light on the question: how does virgin powder change after being exposed to and recycled from one or more additive manufacturing build cycles? In addition, these findings can give insight into the actual additive manufacturing process.

  4. Innovative techniques for estimating illegal activities in a human-wildlife-management conflict.

    PubMed

    Cross, Paul; St John, Freya A V; Khan, Saira; Petroczi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Effective management of biological resources is contingent upon stakeholder compliance with rules. With respect to disease management, partial compliance can undermine attempts to control diseases within human and wildlife populations. Estimating non-compliance is notoriously problematic as rule-breakers may be disinclined to admit to transgressions. However, reliable estimates of rule-breaking are critical to policy design. The European badger (Meles meles) is considered an important vector in the transmission and maintenance of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in cattle herds. Land managers in high bTB prevalence areas of the UK can cull badgers under license. However, badgers are also known to be killed illegally. The extent of illegal badger killing is currently unknown. Herein we report on the application of three innovative techniques (Randomized Response Technique (RRT); projective questioning (PQ); brief implicit association test (BIAT)) for investigating illegal badger killing by livestock farmers across Wales. RRT estimated that 10.4% of farmers killed badgers in the 12 months preceding the study. Projective questioning responses and implicit associations relate to farmers' badger killing behavior reported via RRT. Studies evaluating the efficacy of mammal vector culling and vaccination programs should incorporate estimates of non-compliance. Mitigating the conflict concerning badgers as a vector of bTB requires cross-disciplinary scientific research, departure from deep-rooted positions, and the political will to implement evidence-based management.

  5. Characterization of Tibetan Medicine Zuota by Multiple Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mei; Wang, Jing-Xia; Xu, Yun-Zhang; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Zhi-Feng; Lu, Lu-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Zuota is regarded as the king of Tibetan medicine. However, due to the confidentiality of this precious medicine, the scientific characterization of Zuota is very scarce, which limits the pharmacology and biosafety studies of Zuota. Herein, we collected four different Zuota samples from Tibet, Qinghai, Gansu, and Sichuan and characterized them by multiple techniques. Our results showed that Zuota was mainly an inorganic mixture of HgS, sulfur, and graphite. Morphologically, Zuota samples were composed of nanoparticles, which further aggregated into microsized particles. Chemically, the majorities of Zuota were S and Hg (in the forms of HgS and pure sulfur). All samples contained pure sulfur with orthorhombic crystalline. Zuota from Qinghai province had different HgS crystalline, namely, hexagonal crystalline. The others were all face-centered cubic crystalline. Carbon in Zuota NPs was in the form of graphite. The implication to future studies of Zuota was discussed. PMID:24093005

  6. Exploring Characterizations of Learning Object Repositories Using Data Mining Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura, Alejandra; Vidal, Christian; Menendez, Victor; Zapata, Alfredo; Prieto, Manuel

    Learning object repositories provide a platform for the sharing of Web-based educational resources. As these repositories evolve independently, it is difficult for users to have a clear picture of the kind of contents they give access to. Metadata can be used to automatically extract a characterization of these resources by using machine learning techniques. This paper presents an exploratory study carried out in the contents of four public repositories that uses clustering and association rule mining algorithms to extract characterizations of repository contents. The results of the analysis include potential relationships between different attributes of learning objects that may be useful to gain an understanding of the kind of resources available and eventually develop search mechanisms that consider repository descriptions as a criteria in federated search.

  7. Closing the gap: accelerating the translational process in nanomedicine by proposing standardized characterization techniques

    PubMed Central

    Khorasani, Ali A; Weaver, James L; Salvador-Morales, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    On the cusp of widespread permeation of nanomedicine, academia, industry, and government have invested substantial financial resources in developing new ways to better treat diseases. Materials have unique physical and chemical properties at the nanoscale compared with their bulk or small-molecule analogs. These unique properties have been greatly advantageous in providing innovative solutions for medical treatments at the bench level. However, nanomedicine research has not yet fully permeated the clinical setting because of several limitations. Among these limitations are the lack of universal standards for characterizing nanomaterials and the limited knowledge that we possess regarding the interactions between nanomaterials and biological entities such as proteins. In this review, we report on recent developments in the characterization of nanomaterials as well as the newest information about the interactions between nanomaterials and proteins in the human body. We propose a standard set of techniques for universal characterization of nanomaterials. We also address relevant regulatory issues involved in the translational process for the development of drug molecules and drug delivery systems. Adherence and refinement of a universal standard in nanomaterial characterization as well as the acquisition of a deeper understanding of nanomaterials and proteins will likely accelerate the use of nanomedicine in common practice to a great extent. PMID:25525356

  8. Characterization of Cavities Using the GPR, LIDAR and GNSS Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conejo-Martín, Miguel Angel; Herrero-Tejedor, Tomás Ramón; Lapazaran, Javier; Perez-Martin, Enrique; Otero, Jaime; Prieto, Juan F.; Velasco, Jesús

    2015-11-01

    The study of the many types of natural and manmade cavities in different parts of the world is important to the fields of geology, geophysics, engineering, architectures, agriculture, heritages and landscape. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is a noninvasive geodetection and geolocation technique suitable for accurately determining buried structures. This technique requires knowing the propagation velocity of electromagnetic waves (EM velocity) in the medium. We propose a method for calibrating the EM velocity using the integration of laser imaging detection and ranging (LIDAR) and GPR techniques using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) as support for geolocation. Once the EM velocity is known and the GPR profiles have been properly processed and migrated, they will also show the hidden cavities and the old hidden structures from the cellar. In this article, we present a complete study of the joint use of the GPR, LIDAR and GNSS techniques in the characterization of cavities. We apply this methodology to study underground cavities in a group of wine cellars located in Atauta (Soria, Spain). The results serve to identify construction elements that form the cavity and group of cavities or cellars. The described methodology could be applied to other shallow underground structures with surface connection, where LIDAR and GPR profiles could be joined, as, for example, in archaeological cavities, sewerage systems, drainpipes, etc.

  9. Hyperspectral-imaging-based techniques applied to wheat kernels characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serranti, Silvia; Cesare, Daniela; Bonifazi, Giuseppe

    2012-05-01

    Single kernels of durum wheat have been analyzed by hyperspectral imaging (HSI). Such an approach is based on the utilization of an integrated hardware and software architecture able to digitally capture and handle spectra as an image sequence, as they results along a pre-defined alignment on a surface sample properly energized. The study was addressed to investigate the possibility to apply HSI techniques for classification of different types of wheat kernels: vitreous, yellow berry and fusarium-damaged. Reflectance spectra of selected wheat kernels of the three typologies have been acquired by a laboratory device equipped with an HSI system working in near infrared field (1000-1700 nm). The hypercubes were analyzed applying principal component analysis (PCA) to reduce the high dimensionality of data and for selecting some effective wavelengths. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was applied for classification of the three wheat typologies. The study demonstrated that good classification results were obtained not only considering the entire investigated wavelength range, but also selecting only four optimal wavelengths (1104, 1384, 1454 and 1650 nm) out of 121. The developed procedures based on HSI can be utilized for quality control purposes or for the definition of innovative sorting logics of wheat.

  10. Ultrasonic wave techniques and characterization of filled elastomers and biodegradable polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsueh-Chang

    Ultrasonic wave technique is an excellent method for non-destructive testing and for the monitoring of polymer curing, fatigue damage and polymer transition. It is also a potentially effective tool to be applied in the characterization of high frequency viscoelastic properties of polymers. This research represents the effort to improve and further develop ultrasonic wave techniques and extend its applications to new material evaluation areas. The work is presented as followings: In chapter 1, the fundamental wave propagation theories and characterization of the viscoelastic properties of materials by acoustic parameters were briefly reviewed. In chapter 2, the effects of carbon black filler on the elastomers were studied by the longitudinal wave pulse-echo technique. It is found that the enhanced pulse-echo technique is able to characterize the effects of polymer base, filler loading level, type as well as temperature, on the acoustic properties of filled elastomers. In chapter 3, the application of longitudinal wave pulse-echo technique was extended to the monitoring of the degradation process of biodegradable polymers: poly (glycolic acid)(PGA), poly (lactic acid) (PLA) and their copolymer-poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PDLLG). It shows that the pulse-echo technique is able to differentiate the effects of polymer structure and preparation method on the degradation behavior of biopolymers. In chapter 4, the Young's modulus, shear modulus, bulk modulus and Poisson ratio of carbon black filled elastomers were determined by the longitudinal wave pulse-echo method and the shear wave through-transmission method. The effects of polymer base, filler loading and dispersion on the elastomers were also studied by the calculated elastic constants. In chapter 5, the effects of carbon black filler on the elastomers were studied by an innovative calibrated longitudinal and shear wave surface impedance technique. The results show that the effects of polymer base, filler loading

  11. Advanced techniques for characterization of ion beam modified materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Debelle, Aurélien; Boulle, Alexandre; Kluth, Patrick; Tuomisto, Filip

    2014-10-30

    Understanding the mechanisms of damage formation in materials irradiated with energetic ions is essential for the field of ion-beam materials modification and engineering. Utilizing incident ions, electrons, photons, and positrons, various analysis techniques, including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), electron RBS, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and positron annihilation spectroscopy, are routinely used or gaining increasing attention in characterizing ion beam modified materials. The distinctive information, recent developments, and some perspectives in these techniques are reviewed in this paper. Applications of these techniques are discussed to demonstrate their unique ability for studying ion-solid interactions and the corresponding radiation effects in modified depths ranging from a few nm to a few tens of μm, and to provide information on electronic and atomic structure of the materials, defect configuration and concentration, as well as phase stability, amorphization and recrystallization processes. Finally, such knowledge contributes to our fundamental understanding over a wide range of extreme conditions essential for enhancing material performance and also for design and synthesis of new materials to address a broad variety of future energy applications.

  12. Advanced techniques for characterization of ion beam modified materials

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Yanwen; Debelle, Aurélien; Boulle, Alexandre; Kluth, Patrick; Tuomisto, Filip

    2014-10-30

    Understanding the mechanisms of damage formation in materials irradiated with energetic ions is essential for the field of ion-beam materials modification and engineering. Utilizing incident ions, electrons, photons, and positrons, various analysis techniques, including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), electron RBS, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and positron annihilation spectroscopy, are routinely used or gaining increasing attention in characterizing ion beam modified materials. The distinctive information, recent developments, and some perspectives in these techniques are reviewed in this paper. Applications of these techniques are discussed to demonstrate their unique ability for studying ion-solid interactions and the corresponding radiationmore » effects in modified depths ranging from a few nm to a few tens of μm, and to provide information on electronic and atomic structure of the materials, defect configuration and concentration, as well as phase stability, amorphization and recrystallization processes. Finally, such knowledge contributes to our fundamental understanding over a wide range of extreme conditions essential for enhancing material performance and also for design and synthesis of new materials to address a broad variety of future energy applications.« less

  13. Demonstration of innovative techniques used for real-time closed-loop infrared scene generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Eric M.; Coker, Charles F.; Coker, Jason S.; Garbo, Dennis L.

    1998-07-01

    Real-time infrared (IR) scene generation for Hardware-in-the- Loop (HWIL) testing of IR seeker systems is a complex operation. High frame rates and high image fidelity are required to properly evaluate a seeker system's designation, identification, tracking, and aim-point selection tasks. Rapidly improving Commercial-off-the-Shelf (COTS) scene generation hardware has become a viable solution for HWIL test activities conducted at the Kinetic Kill Vehicle Hardware-in- the-Loop Simulator (KHILS) facility at Eglin AFB, Florida. A real-time IR scene generation implementation for a complete closed-loop guided missile simulation test entry was accomplished at KHILS. The scenarios used for the simulation were Theater Missile Defense (TMD) exo-atmospheric hit-to-kill intercepts of a re-entry target. Innovative scene generation techniques were devised to resolve issues concerning scene content and rendering accuracy while maintaining the required imaging frame rate. This paper focuses on the real-time scene generation requirements, issues, and solutions used for KHILS test entries.

  14. Scientific Tools and Techniques: An Innovative Introduction to Planetary Science / Astronomy for 9th Grade Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, Edward F.

    2014-11-01

    Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta, GA (USA) offers instruction in planetary science and astronomy to gifted 9th grade students within a program called "Scientific Tools and Techniques" (STT). Although STT provides a semester long overview of all sciences, the planetary science / astronomy section is innovative since students have access to instruction in the Center's Zeiss planetarium and observatory, which includes a 0.9 m cassegrain telescope. The curriculum includes charting the positions of planets in planetarium the sky; telescopic observations of the Moon and planets; hands-on access to meteorites and tektites; and an introduction to planetary spectroscopy utilizing LPI furnished ALTA reflectance spectrometers. In addition, students have the opportunity to watch several full dome planetary themed planetarium presentations, including "Back to the Moon for Good" and "Ring World: Cassini at Saturn." An overview of NASA's planetary exploration efforts is also considered, with special emphasis on the new Orion / Space Launch System for human exploration of the solar system. A primary goal of our STT program is to not only engage but encourage students to pursue careers in the field of science, with the hope of inspiring future scientists / leaders in the field of planetary science.

  15. Electrical conductivity measurements in sewage sludge pellets: innovative techniques for environmental management.

    PubMed

    Camilla, S; Jordan, M M

    2009-09-15

    This paper presents research on the behaviour of electrical conductivity of sludge pellets resulting from the treatment of urban wastewater at the drying grounds of the El Trebal wastewater processing plant, located in the Mapocho river basin of the Metropolitana Region, Santiago, Chile. In the methodology used samples were taken that correspond to three horizons of the sewage sludge pile. The first horizon made up the upper portion of the pile (the surface), the second the central portion (mesophilous), and the third the lower one (thermophilous). Electrical conductivity measurements were taken in sewage sludge pellets under pressures on the order of 15-50 MPa with currents of 10(-15)A. Electrical conductivity measurements were also taken for different horizons, and innovative techniques and methodologies for sludge samples presented in the form of pellets are used for this purpose. Such pellets are easily reproduced with sufficient precision, and at the same time allow modifying other variables like mass, sample dimensions and compaction levels. The trends of the conductivity curves are similar for the sludge from the isolation surface horizon (H1) as well as for the mesophilous area horizon (H2). In the case of the thermophilous area horizon (H3), the electrical conductivity shows extremely high values when compared to horizons H1 and H2. This paper could be useful in establishing a general rule for taking electrical conductivity measurements in sewage sludge samples. Such a rule could bring accurate reproducible values, and be used for other types of dry wastes.

  16. New Generation of High Resolution Ultrasonic Imaging Technique for Advanced Material Characterization: Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maev, R. Gr.

    The role of non-destructive material characterization and NDT is changing at a rapid rate, continuing to evolve alongside the dramatic development of novel techniques based on the principles of high-resolution imaging. The modern use of advanced optical, thermal, ultrasonic, laser-ultrasound, acoustic emission, vibration, electro-magnetic, and X-ray techniques, etc., as well as refined measurement and signal/data processing devices, allows for continuous generation of on-line information. As a result real-time process monitoring can be achieved, leading to the more effective and efficient control of numerous processes, greatly improving manufacturing as a whole. Indeed, concurrent quality inspection has become an attainable reality. With the advent of new materials for use in various structures, joints, and parts, however, innovative applications of modern NDT imaging techniques are necessary to monitor as many stages of manufacturing as possible. Simply put, intelligent advance manufacturing is impossible without actively integrating modern non-destructive evaluation into the production system.

  17. Laser shockwave technique for characterization of nuclear fuel plate interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Perton, M.; Levesque, D.; Monchalin, J.-P.; Lord, M.; Smith, J. A.; Rabin, B. H.

    2013-01-25

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  18. Laser Shockwave Technique For Characterization Of Nuclear Fuel Plate Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Barry H. Rabin; Mathieu Perton; Daniel Lévesque; Jean-Pierre Monchalin; Martin Lord

    2012-07-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  19. Characterization of Sorolla's gouache pigments by means of spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán, Clodoaldo; Juanes, David; Ferrazza, Livio; Carballo, Jorgelina

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the characterization of the Joaquín Sorolla's gouache sketches for the oil on canvas series "Vision of Spain" commissioned by A. M. Huntington to decorate the library of the Hispanic Society of America in New York. The analyses were focused on the identification of the elemental composition of the gouache pigments by means of portable EDXRF spectrometry in a non-destructive mode. Additionally, SEM-EDX and FTIR analyses of a selected set of micro-samples were carried out to identify completely the pigments, the paint technique and the binding media. The obtained results have confirmed the identification of lead and zinc white, vermillion, earth pigments, ochre, zinc yellow, chrome yellow, ultramarine, Prussian blue, chromium based and copper-arsenic based green pigments, bone black and carbon based black pigments, and the use of gum arabic as binding media in the gouache pigments.

  20. Laser shockwave technique for characterization of nuclear fuel plate interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perton, M.; Lévesque, D.; Monchalin, J.-P.; Lord, M.; Smith, J. A.; Rabin, B. H.

    2013-01-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  1. Different techniques for characterizing single-walled carbon nanotube purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuca, Neslihan; Camtakan, Zeyneb; Karatepe, Nilgün

    2013-09-01

    Transition-metal catalysts, fullerenes, graphitic carbon, amorphous carbon, and graphite flakes are the main impurities in carbon nanotubes. In this study, we demonstrate an easy and optimum method of cleaning SWCNTs and evaluating their purity. The purification method, which employed oxidative heat treatment followed by 6M HNO3, H2SO4, HNO3:H2SO4 and HCl acid reflux for 6h at 120°C and microwave digestion with 1.5M HNO3 for 0.5h at 210°C which was straightforward, inexpensive, and fairly effective. The purified materials were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis and nuclear techniques such as INAA, XRF and XRD.

  2. Electrical Characterizations of Lightning Strike Protection Techniques for Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatkowski, George N.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Mielnik, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The growing application of composite materials in commercial aircraft manufacturing has significantly increased the risk of aircraft damage from lightning strikes. Composite aircraft designs require new mitigation strategies and engineering practices to maintain the same level of safety and protection as achieved by conductive aluminum skinned aircraft. Researchers working under the NASA Aviation Safety Program s Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Project are investigating lightning damage on composite materials to support the development of new mitigation, diagnosis & prognosis techniques to overcome the increased challenges associated with lightning protection on composite aircraft. This paper provides an overview of the electrical characterizations being performed to support IVHM lightning damage diagnosis research on composite materials at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  3. Structured Problem-Solving Techniques to Stimulate Innovation in New Product Development in UK SMEs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, D. M.; McKinna, A.; Thake, G.

    2003-01-01

    "Innovation" is an often used, yet much misunderstood term. Often innovation is left to chance or, at best, approached by relatively unstructured hard work and hard thinking. This paper describes a research programme known as the "Futures Project", which provides a "virtual" body of expertise that small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can…

  4. An Innovative Method for Dynamic Characterization of Fan FilterUnit Operation.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tengfang

    2006-12-21

    Fan filter units (FFU) are widely used to deliver re-circulated air while providing filtration control of particle concentration in controlled environments such as cleanrooms, minienvironments, and operating rooms in hospitals. The objective of this paper is to document an innovative method for characterizing operation and control of an individual fan filter unit within its operable conditions. Built upon the draft laboratory method previously published [1] , this paper presents an updated method including a testing procedure to characterize dynamic operation of fan filter units, i.e., steady-state operation conditions determined by varied control schemes, airflow rates, and pressure differential across the units. The parameters for dynamic characterization include total electric power demand, total pressure efficiency, airflow rate, pressure differential across fan filter units, and airflow uniformity.

  5. Innovative combination of spectroscopic techniques to reveal nanoparticle fate in a crop plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larue, Camille; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Stein, Ricardo J.; Fayard, Barbara; Pouyet, Emeline; Villanova, Julie; Magnin, Valérie; Pradas del Real, Ana-Elena; Trcera, Nicolas; Legros, Samuel; Sorieul, Stéphanie; Sarret, Géraldine

    2016-05-01

    Nanotechnology is the new industrial revolution of our century. Its development leads to an increasing use of nanoparticles and thus to their dissemination. Their fate in the environment is of great concern and especially their possible transfer in trophic chains might be an issue for food safety. However, so far our knowledge on this topic has been restricted by the lack of appropriate techniques to characterize their behavior in complex matrices. Here, we present in detail the use of cutting-edge beam-based techniques for nanoparticle in situ localization, quantification and speciation in a crop plant species (Lactuca sativa). Lettuce seedlings have been exposed to TiO2 and Ag nanoparticles and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry, micro-particle induced X-ray emission coupled to Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy on nuclear microprobe, micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The benefits and drawbacks of each technique are discussed, and the types of information that can be drawn, for example on the translocation to edible parts, change of speciation within the plant, detoxification mechanisms, or impact on the plant ionome, are highlighted. Such type of coupled approach would be an asset for nanoparticle risk assessment.

  6. Eddy current techniques for super duplex stainless steel characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerini, C.; Sacramento, R.; Areiza, M. C.; Rocha, A.; Santos, R.; Rebello, J. M.; Pereira, G.

    2015-08-01

    Super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) is a two-phase material where the microstructure consists of grains of ferrite (δ) and austenite (γ). SDSS exhibit an attractive combination of properties, such as: strength, toughness and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Nevertheless, SDSS attain these properties after a controlled solution heat treatment, leading to a similar volumetric fraction of δ and γ. Any further heat treatment, welding operation for example, can change the balance of the original phases, or may also lead to precipitation of a deleterious phase, such as sigma (σ). For these situations, the material corrosion resistance is severely impaired. In the present study, several SDSS samples with low σ phase content and non-balanced microstructure were intentionally obtained by thermally treating SDSS specimens. Electromagnetic techniques, conventional Eddy Current Testing (ECT) and Saturated Low Frequency Eddy Current (SLOFEC), were employed to characterize the SDSS samples. The results showed that ECT and SLOFEC are reliable techniques to evaluate σ phase presence in SDSS and can provide an estimation of the δ content.

  7. Innovation, Innovation, Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuller, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Innovation, Universities and Skills. The new title of the department offers much food for thought. The title is indeed an intriguing and important one. Bringing the idea of innovation right to the fore is, to use an overworked term, challenging. Pinning down what innovation means is not at all easy. There are three different lines of argument. The…

  8. Innovative application of optical techniques to comprehensive study of the etiology of osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2006-08-01

    Osteoarthritis is a painful condition, causing restricted mobility in the articular joints. In this paper we present a review of different optical techniques that might be used to clarify the etiology of degeneration of connective joint tissues, such as bone and articular cartilage. Significant correlation (R2 = 0.8) between bone mineral density and scattering coefficient of cortical bone tissue are found by using Integrating Sphere Technique. Optical Coherence Tomography and Polarization-Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography images of cartilage tissue are presented. They were performed as series of angle-dependant measurements for different location along the surface. Method for spatial mapping the birefringence of equine articular cartilage is proposed. Variations in band spacing of birefringence obtained from visually healthy and abnormal cartilage samples are compared. Visible osteoarthritic lesions are characterized by a loss of the regular birefringence bands shown by normal cartilage. We discuss the hypothesis that some of these variations may be due to changes in intrinsic structure of tissue.

  9. Innovative Surgical Management of the Synovial Chondromatosis of Temporo-Mandibular Joints: Highly Conservative Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Ionna, Franco; Amantea, Massimiliano; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Ballini, Andrea; Maglione, Maria Grazia; Aversa, Corrado; De Cecio, Rossella; Russo, Daniela; Marrelli, Massimo; Tatullo, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is an uncommon disease characterized by a benign nodular cartilaginous proliferation arising from the joint synovium, bursae, or tendon sheaths. Although the temporomandibular joint is rarely affected by neoplastic lesions, SC is the most common neoplastic lesion of this joint. The treatment of this disease consists in the extraoral surgery with a wide removal of the lesion; in this study, the authors described a more conservative intraoral surgical approach. Patient with SC of temporomandibular joint typically refer a limitation in the mouth opening, together with a persistent not physiological mandibular protrusion and an appearance of a neoformation located at the right preauricular region: the authors reported 1 scholar patient. After biopsy of the neoformation, confirming the synovial chondromatosis, the patient underwent thus to the surgical excision of the tumor, via authors' conservative transoral approach, to facilitate the enucleation of the neoformation. The mass fully involved the pterygo-maxillary fossa with involvement of the parotid lodge and of the right TMJ: this multifocal extension suggested for a trans-oral surgical procedure, in the light of the suspicion of a possible malignant nature of the neoplasm. Our intraoral conservative approach to surgery is aimed to reduce the presence of unaesthetic scars in preauricular and facial regions, with surgical results undoubtedly comparable to the traditional surgical techniques much more aggressive. Our technique could be a valid, alternative, and safe approach to treat this rare and complex kind of oncological disease.

  10. Linear and Nonlinear Optical Techniques to Characterize Narrow Gap Semiconductors:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, Stephen Warren

    Several methods have been developed and used to characterize the narrow gap semiconductors Hg(,1-x)Cd(,x)Te (HgCdTe) (0.20 < x < 0.32) and InSb both in the presence of CO(,2) laser radiation and in the dark. The results have allowed the determination of certain band parameters including the fundamental energy bandgap E(,g) which is directly related to x, the mole fraction of Cd. In the dark, characterization of several different samples of HgCdTe and InSb were carried out by analyzing the temperature dependence of the Hall coefficient and the magnetic field positions of the magnetophonon extrema from which their x-values were determined. The quality of the magnetophonon spectral is also shown to be related to the inhomogeneity (DELTA)x of the HgCdTe samples. One-photon magneto-absorption (OPMA) spectra have been obtained for x (TURN) 0.2 samples of p-HgCdTe thin films and n-HgCdTe bulk samples. Analysis of the OPMA transition energies allows the x-value to be determined to within (DBLTURN)(+OR-)0.001. A method is also discussed which can be used to estimate the sample inhomogeneity (DELTA)x. Nonlinear optical properties of semiconductors are not only scientifically interesting to study, but are also proving to be technologically important as various nonlinear optical devices are being developed. One of the most valuable nonlinear optical characterization method uses two-photon absorption (TPA). Two techniques using TPA processes were developed and used to measure the cut -off wavelength of several different samples of HgCdTe (x (TURN) 0.3) from which x-values were determined to within (DBLTURN)(+OR-)0.0005. Intensity and temperature dependent measurements on impurity and TPA processes have also been carried out and the results are compared with rate equations describing the photo-excited carrier dynamics. These results have yielded important information about the optical and material properties of HgCdTe such as the detection of impurity and trapping levels, TPA

  11. Thermal Characterization of Edible Oils by Using Photopyroelectric Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Hernández, G.; Suaste-Gómez, E.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Mendoza-Alvarez, J. G.; Sánchez-Sinéncio, F.; Valcárcel, J. P.; García-Quiroz, A.

    2013-05-01

    Thermal properties of several edible oils such as olive, sesame, and grape seed oils were obtained by using the photopyroelectric technique. The inverse photopyroelectric configuration was used in order to obtain the thermal effusivity of the oil samples. The theoretical equation for the photopyroelectric signal in this configuration, as a function of the incident light modulation frequency, was fitted to the experimental data in order to obtain the thermal effusivity of these samples. Also, the back photopyroelectric configuration was used to obtain the thermal diffusivity of these oils; this thermal parameter was obtained by fitting the theoretical equation for this configuration, as a function of the sample thickness (called the thermal wave resonator cavity), to the experimental data. All measurements were done at room temperature. A complete thermal characterization of these edible oils was achieved by the relationship between the obtained thermal diffusivities and thermal effusivities with their thermal conductivities and volumetric heat capacities. The obtained results are in agreement with the thermal properties reported for the case of the olive oil.

  12. Characterization of Lavandula spp. Honey Using Multivariate Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, melissopalynological and physicochemical analyses have been the most used to determine the botanical origin of honey. However, when performed individually, these analyses may provide less unambiguous results, making it difficult to discriminate between mono and multifloral honeys. In this context, with the aim of better characterizing this beehive product, a selection of 112 Lavandula spp. monofloral honey samples from several regions were evaluated by association of multivariate statistical techniques with physicochemical, melissopalynological and phenolic compounds analysis. All honey samples fulfilled the quality standards recommended by international legislation, except regarding sucrose content and diastase activity. The content of sucrose and the percentage of Lavandula spp. pollen have a strong positive association. In fact, it was found that higher amounts of sucrose in honey are related with highest percentage of pollen of Lavandula spp.. The samples were very similar for most of the physicochemical parameters, except for proline, flavonoids and phenols (bioactive factors). Concerning the pollen spectrum, the variation of Lavandula spp. pollen percentage in honey had little contribution to the formation of samples groups. The formation of two groups regarding the physicochemical parameters suggests that the presence of other pollen types in small percentages influences the factor termed as “bioactive”, which has been linked to diverse beneficial health effects. PMID:27588420

  13. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques.

    PubMed

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-11-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask 'how are nanoshapes created?', 'how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?', 'how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?'. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed.

  14. Characterization of Lavandula spp. Honey Using Multivariate Techniques.

    PubMed

    Estevinho, Leticia M; Chambó, Emerson Dechechi; Pereira, Ana Paula Rodrigues; Carvalho, Carlos Alfredo Lopes de; Toledo, Vagner de Alencar Arnaut de

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, melissopalynological and physicochemical analyses have been the most used to determine the botanical origin of honey. However, when performed individually, these analyses may provide less unambiguous results, making it difficult to discriminate between mono and multifloral honeys. In this context, with the aim of better characterizing this beehive product, a selection of 112 Lavandula spp. monofloral honey samples from several regions were evaluated by association of multivariate statistical techniques with physicochemical, melissopalynological and phenolic compounds analysis. All honey samples fulfilled the quality standards recommended by international legislation, except regarding sucrose content and diastase activity. The content of sucrose and the percentage of Lavandula spp. pollen have a strong positive association. In fact, it was found that higher amounts of sucrose in honey are related with highest percentage of pollen of Lavandula spp.. The samples were very similar for most of the physicochemical parameters, except for proline, flavonoids and phenols (bioactive factors). Concerning the pollen spectrum, the variation of Lavandula spp. pollen percentage in honey had little contribution to the formation of samples groups. The formation of two groups regarding the physicochemical parameters suggests that the presence of other pollen types in small percentages influences the factor termed as "bioactive", which has been linked to diverse beneficial health effects. PMID:27588420

  15. An ultrasonic array technique for material characterization of plate samples.

    PubMed

    Titov, Sergey; Maev, Roman Gr

    2013-07-01

    An ultrasonic system with a linear array for characterization of a layered specimen placed in immersion liquid parallel to the aperture of the array is considered. To estimate the longitudinal and transverse wave velocities as well as the thickness and density of the specimen, it is proposed to decompose the spatio-temporal data recorded by the array in a spectrum of plane pulse waves. Based on fitting the developed wave model of the system to the experimental data, it is shown that the relative delays and amplitudes of the spectral responses can be used for the estimation of the velocities and thickness of the layer and its density. The distortions of the plane wave spectrum caused by the spatial discretization of the array data are considered. It is proposed to suppress these distortions using individual interpolating processing of the received pulses separated in the spatio-temporal domain. The developed technique is experimentally verified on a fused quartz plate evaluated with a 17-MHz linear array. The relative reproducibility of the estimation is found to be 0.11% in the longitudinal wave velocity and thickness of the plate, and 0.5% and 5% in the transverse wave velocity and the density, respectively.

  16. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask ‘how are nanoshapes created?’, ‘how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?’, ‘how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?’. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed. PMID:25485133

  17. STATE-OF-THE-ART FIELD TECHNIQUES FOR SITE CHARACTERIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many of the traditional methods for characterizing the hydrogeologic properties and contaminant distribution of subsurface materials were derived from methods developed in the water supply industry. These methods generally result in the characterization of bulk aquifer propert...

  18. An innovative approach to the development of a portable unit for analytical flame characterization in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubinskiy, Mark A.; Kamal, Mohammed M.; Misra, Prabhaker

    1995-01-01

    The availability of manned laboratory facilities in space offers wonderful opportunities and challenges in microgravity combustion science and technology. In turn, the fundamentals of microgravity combustion science can be studied via spectroscopic characterization of free radicals generated in flames. The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique is a noninvasive method of considerable utility in combustion physics and chemistry suitable for monitoring not only specific species and their kinetics, but it is also important for imaging of flames. This makes LIF one of the most important tools for microgravity combustion science. Flame characterization under microgravity conditions using LIF is expected to be more informative than other methods aimed at searching for effects like pumping phenomenon that can be modeled via ground level experiments. A primary goal of our work consisted in working out an innovative approach to devising an LIF-based analytical unit suitable for in-space flame characterization. It was decided to follow two approaches in tandem: (1) use the existing laboratory (non-portable) equipment and determine the optimal set of parameters for flames that can be used as analytical criteria for flame characterization under microgravity conditions; and (2) use state-of-the-art developments in laser technology and concentrate some effort in devising a layout for the portable analytical equipment. This paper presents an up-to-date summary of the results of our experiments aimed at the creation of the portable device for combustion studies in a microgravity environment, which is based on a portable UV tunable solid-state laser for excitation of free radicals normally present in flames in detectable amounts. A systematic approach has allowed us to make a convenient choice of species under investigation, as well as the proper tunable laser system, and also enabled us to carry out LIF experiments on free radicals using a solid-state laser tunable in the UV.

  19. The Sentence Stem Technique: An Innovative Interaction between Counselor and Client

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Shannon

    2011-01-01

    This column is designed to underscore relationally based creative interventions used by counselors and psychotherapists in their practices. Our intention is to provide examples of novel, innovative ways of working with clients in their efforts to deepen self-awareness and their connections with others. Although the interventions within this column…

  20. Development of Innovative Radioactive Isotope Production Techniques at the Pennsylvania State University Radiation Science and Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsen, Amanda M.; Heidrich, Brenden; Durrant, Chad; Bascom, Andrew; Unlu, Kenan

    2013-08-15

    The Penn State Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR) at the Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC) has produced radioisotopes for research and commercial purposes since 1956. With the rebirth of the radiochemistry education and research program at the RSEC, the Center stands poised to produce a variety of radioisotopes for research and industrial work that is in line with the mission of the DOE Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, Isotope Development and Production Research and Application Program. The RSEC received funding from the Office of Science in 2010 to improve production techniques and develop new capabilities. Under this program, we improved our existing techniques to provide four radioisotopes (Mn-56, Br-82, Na-24, and Ar-41) to researchers and industry in a safe and efficient manner. The RSEC is also working to develop new innovative techniques to provide isotopes in short supply to researchers and others in the scientific community, specifically Cu-64 and Cu-67. Improving our existing radioisotopes production techniques and investigating new and innovative methods are two of the main initiatives of the radiochemistry research program at the RSEC.

  1. Joint application of non-invasive techniques to characterize the dynamic behaviuor of engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallipoli, M. R.; Perrone, A.; Stabile, T. A.; Ponzo, F. C.; Ditommaso, R.

    2012-04-01

    The systematic monitoring of strategic civil infrastructures such as bridges, large dams or high-rise buildings in order to ensure their structural stability is a strategic issue particularly in earthquake-prone regions. Nevertheless, in areas less exposed to seismic hazard, the monitoring is also an important tool for civil engineers, for instance if they have to deal with structures exposed to heavy operational demands for extended periods of time and whose structural integrity might be in question or at risk. A continuous monitoring of such structures allows the identification of their fundamental response characteristics and the changes of these over time, the latter representing indicators for potential structural degradation. The aim of this paper is the estimation of fundamental dynamic parameters of some civil infrastructures by the joint application of fast executable, non-invasive techniques such as the Ambient Noise Standard Spectral Ratio, and Ground-Based microwave Radar Interferometer techniques. The joint approach combine conventional, non-conventional and innovative techniques in order to set up a non destructive evaluation procedure allowing for a multi-sensing monitoring at a multi-scale and multi-depth levels (i.e. with different degrees of spatial resolution and different subsurface depths). In particular, techniques based on ambient vibration recordings have become a popular tool for characterizing the seismic response and state-of-health of strategic civil infrastructure. The primary advantage of these approaches lies in the fact that no transient earthquake signals or even active excitation of the structure under investigation are required. The microwave interferometry radar technology, it has proven to be a powerful remote sensing tool for vibration measurement of structures, such as bridge, heritage architectural structures, vibrating stay cables, and engineering structures. The main advantage of this radar technique is the possibility to

  2. Innovative Field Methods for Characterizing the Hydraulic Properties of a Complex Fractured Rock Aquifer (Ploemeur, Brittany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bour, O.; Le Borgne, T.; Longuevergne, L.; Lavenant, N.; Jimenez-Martinez, J.; De Dreuzy, J. R.; Schuite, J.; Boudin, F.; Labasque, T.; Aquilina, L.

    2014-12-01

    Characterizing the hydraulic properties of heterogeneous and complex aquifers often requires field scale investigations at multiple space and time scales to better constrain hydraulic property estimates. Here, we present and discuss results from the site of Ploemeur (Brittany, France) where complementary hydrological and geophysical approaches have been combined to characterize the hydrogeological functioning of this highly fractured crystalline rock aquifer. In particular, we show how cross-borehole flowmeter tests, pumping tests and frequency domain analysis of groundwater levels allow quantifying the hydraulic properties of the aquifer at different scales. In complement, we used groundwater temperature as an excellent tracer for characterizing groundwater flow. At the site scale, measurements of ground surface deformation through long-base tiltmeters provide robust estimates of aquifer storage and allow identifying the active structures where groundwater pressure changes occur, including those acting during recharge process. Finally, a numerical model of the site that combines hydraulic data and groundwater ages confirms the geometry of this complex aquifer and the consistency of the different datasets. The Ploemeur site, which has been used for water supply at a rate of about 106 m3 per year since 1991, belongs to the French network of hydrogeological sites H+ and is currently used for monitoring groundwater changes and testing innovative field methods.

  3. The Use of Electrochemical Techniques to Characterize Wet Steam Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce W. Bussert; John A. Crowley; Kenneth J. Kimball; Brian J. Lashway

    2003-04-30

    The composition of a steam phase in equilibrium with a water phase at high temperature is remarkably affected by the varying capabilities of the water phase constituents to partition into the steam. Ionic impurities (sodium, chloride, sulfate, etc.) tend to remain in the water phase, while weakly ionic or gaseous species (oxygen) partition into the steam. Analysis of the water phase can provide misleading results concerning the steam phase composition or environment. This paper describes efforts that were made to use novel electrochemical probes and sampling techniques to directly characterize a wet steam phase environment in equilibrium with high temperature water. Probes were designed to make electrochemical measurements in the thin film of water existing on exposed surfaces in steam over a water phase. Some of these probes were referenced against a conventional high temperature electrode located in the water phase. Others used two different materials (typically tungsten and platinum) to make measurements without a true reference electrode. The novel probes were also deployed in a steam space removed from the water phase. It was necessary to construct a reservoir and an external, air-cooled condenser to automatically keep the reservoir full of condensed steam. Conventional reference and working electrodes were placed in the water phase of the reservoir and the novel probes protruded into the vapor space above it. Finally, water phase probes (both reference and working electrodes) were added to the hot condensed steam in the external condenser. Since the condensing action collapsed the volatiles back into the water phase, these electrodes proved to be extremely sensitive at detecting oxygen, which is one of the species of highest concern in high temperature power systems. Although the novel steam phase probes provided encouraging initial results, the tendency for tungsten to completely corrode away in the steam phase limited their usefulness. However, the

  4. Advanced NDE techniques for quantitative characterization of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Winfree, William P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) at NASA Langley Research Center and their applications that have resulted in quantitative assessment of material properties based on thermal and ultrasonic measurements are reviewed. Specific applications include ultrasonic determination of bolt tension, ultrasonic and thermal characterization of bonded layered structures, characterization of composite materials, and disbonds in aircraft skins.

  5. Characterization of Deep Tunneling Activity through Remote-Sensing Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    R. G. Best, P. J. Etzler, and J. D. Bloom

    1997-10-01

    This work is a case study demonstrating the uses of multispectral and multi-temporal imagery to characterize deep tunneling activity. A drainage tunnel excavation in Quincy, MA is the case locality. Data used are aerial photographs (digitized) and Daedalus 3600 MSS image data that were collected in July and October of 1994. Analysis of the data includes thermal characterization, spectral characterization, multi-temporal analysis, and volume estimation using digital DEM generation. The results demonstrate the type of information that could be generated by multispectral, multi-temporal data if the study locality were a clandestine excavation site with restricted surface access.

  6. Innovative techniques, sensors, and approaches for imaging biofilms at different scales.

    PubMed

    Neu, Thomas R; Lawrence, John R

    2015-04-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy has become a standard technique for the investigation of hydrated interfacial microbial communities at the microscale. Multiphoton and spinning-disk microscopes provide new options for in situ imaging. Progress has been made in imaging structural aspects as well as interactions and processes. Advanced fluorescence techniques such as lifetime imaging and correlation spectroscopy are also available. Newly developed target-specific probes allow investigation of new aspects of microbial communities. Several new laser-based techniques are available including nanoscopy and mesoscale techniques. Nanoscopy techniques offer access to unprecedented resolution of hydrated microbiological samples at the scale of fluorescent gene products and macromolecules. Mesoscale approaches are important to address larger features and statistical issues of microbiological samples. This review presents the state of the art in situ biofilm imaging and assesses the pros and cons of laser-based imaging techniques in combination with a variety of sensor types at different scales.

  7. Investigating flavour characteristics of British ale yeasts: techniques, resources and opportunities for innovation.

    PubMed

    Parker, Neva; James, Steve; Dicks, Jo; Bond, Chris; Nueno-Palop, Carmen; White, Chris; Roberts, Ian N

    2015-01-01

    Five British ale yeast strains were subjected to flavour profiling under brewery fermentation conditions in which all other brewing parameters were kept constant. Significant variation was observed in the timing and quantity of flavour-related chemicals produced. Genetic tests showed no evidence of hybrid origins in any of the strains, including one strain previously reported as a possible hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. bayanus. Variation maintained in historical S. cerevisiae ale yeast collections is highlighted as a potential source of novelty in innovative strain improvement for bioflavour production. PMID:25361168

  8. Investigating flavour characteristics of British ale yeasts: techniques, resources and opportunities for innovation

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Neva; James, Steve; Dicks, Jo; Bond, Chris; Nueno-Palop, Carmen; White, Chris; Roberts, Ian N

    2015-01-01

    Five British ale yeast strains were subjected to flavour profiling under brewery fermentation conditions in which all other brewing parameters were kept constant. Significant variation was observed in the timing and quantity of flavour-related chemicals produced. Genetic tests showed no evidence of hybrid origins in any of the strains, including one strain previously reported as a possible hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. bayanus. Variation maintained in historical S. cerevisiae ale yeast collections is highlighted as a potential source of novelty in innovative strain improvement for bioflavour production. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25361168

  9. An innovative impression technique for fabrication of a custom made ocular prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tripuraneni, Sunil Chandra; Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Ravikiran, P; Nirupama, N

    2015-01-01

    Various impression and fitting techniques have been described in the past for restoring ocular defects. The present article describes a new direct impression technique for recording and rehabilitating ocular defects, by custom-made ocular prosthesis. All the techniques described in the history, mainly concentrated in recording the tissue surface of the defect, which made it difficult to contour the palpebral surface resulting in the poor esthetics of the prosthesis. The present impression technique uses heavy bodied polyvinyl siloxane impression material, which facilitates accurate recording of the tissue surface and the palpebral surface of the defect, resulting in the fabrication of functionally and esthetically acceptable prosthesis. PMID:26265651

  10. An innovative impression technique for fabrication of a custom made ocular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Tripuraneni, Sunil Chandra; Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Ravikiran, P; Nirupama, N

    2015-06-01

    Various impression and fitting techniques have been described in the past for restoring ocular defects. The present article describes a new direct impression technique for recording and rehabilitating ocular defects, by custom-made ocular prosthesis. All the techniques described in the history, mainly concentrated in recording the tissue surface of the defect, which made it difficult to contour the palpebral surface resulting in the poor esthetics of the prosthesis. The present impression technique uses heavy bodied polyvinyl siloxane impression material, which facilitates accurate recording of the tissue surface and the palpebral surface of the defect, resulting in the fabrication of functionally and esthetically acceptable prosthesis.

  11. Innovation in surfactant therapy I: surfactant lavage and surfactant administration by fluid bolus using minimally invasive techniques.

    PubMed

    Dargaville, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Innovation in the field of exogenous surfactant therapy continues more than two decades after the drug became commercially available. One such innovation, lung lavage using dilute surfactant, has been investigated in both laboratory and clinical settings as a treatment for meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). Studies in animal models of MAS have affirmed that dilute surfactant lavage can remove meconium from the lung, with resultant improvement in lung function. In human infants both non-randomised studies and two randomised controlled trials have demonstrated a potential benefit of dilute surfactant lavage over standard care. The largest clinical trial, performed by our research group in infants with severe MAS, found that lung lavage using two 15-ml/kg aliquots of dilute surfactant did not reduce the duration of respiratory support, but did appear to reduce the composite outcome of death or need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. A further trial of lavage therapy is planned to more precisely define the effect on survival. Innovative approaches to surfactant therapy have also extended to the preterm infant, for whom the more widespread use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has meant delaying or avoiding administration of surfactant. In an effort to circumvent this problem, less invasive techniques of bolus surfactant therapy have been trialled, including instillation directly into the pharynx, via laryngeal mask and via brief tracheal catheterisation. In a recent clinical trial, instillation of surfactant into the trachea using a flexible feeding tube was found to reduce the need for subsequent intubation. We have developed an alternative method of brief tracheal catheterisation in which surfactant is delivered via a semi-rigid vascular catheter inserted through the vocal cords under direct vision. In studies to date, this technique has been relatively easy to perform, and resulted in rapid improvement in lung function and reduced need for

  12. An Innovative Ultrasound Technique for Evaluation of Tumor Vascularity in Breast Cancers: Superb Micro-Vascular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ah Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Yeom, Suk Keu; Lee, Seung Wha; Chung, Hwan Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Tumor vascularity is an important indicator for differential diagnosis, tumor growth, and prognosis. Superb micro-vascular imaging (SMI) is an innovative ultrasound technique for vascular examination that uses a multidimensional filter to eliminate clutter and preserve extremely low-velocity flows. Theoretically, SMI could depict more vessels and more detailed vascular morphology, due to the increased sensitivity of slow blood flow. Here, we report the early experience of using SMI in 21 breast cancer patients. We evaluated tumor vascular features in breast cancer and compared SMI and conventional color or power Doppler imaging. SMI was superior to color or power Doppler imaging in detecting tumor vessels, the details of vessel morphology, and both peripheral and central vascular distribution. In conclusion, SMI is a promising ultrasound technique for evaluating microvascular information of breast cancers. PMID:27382399

  13. Fricke xylenol gel characterization using a photoacustic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, A. M. F.; de Almeida, A.; Neto, A. M.; Baesso, M. L.; Bento, A. C.; Silva, M. A.

    2007-11-01

    Fricke chemical dosimetry measurements of the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation depend on the quality and characteristics of the system that reads each dosimeter. The final accuracy is significantly dependent on the technique used for measuring the chemical concentration changes in the dosimeters. We have used a photoacoustic technique to detect the Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) optical absorbance. The FXG, a derivation of the aqueous Fricke dosimeter, is made more sensitive and stable with addition of gelatin (300 Bloom) and xylenol orange. The light intensity transmitted through an FXG sample before and after irradiation was measured with an acoustic detector. The incremental optical absorbance is directly proportional to the ionizing radiation absorbed dose. We present the optical absorbance measurements as a function of absorbed dose and of post-irradiation time. We apply our photoacoustic technique to determine absorbed dose profiles. The results show that the photoacoustic technique applied to FXG provides a new dosimetric system, as good as those already established using spectrophotometric techniques.

  14. Flaw imaging and ultrasonic techniques for characterizing sintered silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Abel, Phillip B.

    1987-01-01

    The capabilities were investigated of projection microfocus x-radiography, ultrasonic velocity and attenuation, and reflection scanning acoustic microscopy for characterizing silicon carbide specimens. Silicon carbide batches covered a range of densities and different microstructural characteristics. Room temperature, four point flexural strength tests were conducted. Fractography was used to identify types, sizes, and locations of fracture origins. Fracture toughness values were calculated from fracture strength and flaw characterization data. Detection capabilities of radiography and acoustic microscopy for fracture-causing flaws were evaluated. Applicability of ultrasonics for verifying material strength and toughness was examined.

  15. New Ways in Teaching Adults. New Ways in TESOL Series II: Innovative Classroom Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Marilyn, Ed.

    The guide offers over 100 classroom activities and techniques for teaching English as a second language to adults, all provided by experienced teachers who have found them useful. They are divided into ten categories: (1) activities using materials or techniques from radio, television, and print news media; (2) exercises for teaching English for…

  16. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Techniques for Person Characterization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrero, Salvador; Ivorra, Jose Luis; Garcia-Sogo, Magdalena; Martinez-Cortina, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    Using the traditional serological tests and the most novel techniques for DNA fingerprinting, forensic scientists scan different traits that vary from person to person and use the data to include or exclude suspects based on matching with the evidence obtained in a criminal case. Although the forensic application of these methods is well known,…

  17. Characterizing nonconstant instrumental variance in emerging miniaturized analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Noblitt, Scott D; Berg, Kathleen E; Cate, David M; Henry, Charles S

    2016-04-01

    Measurement variance is a crucial aspect of quantitative chemical analysis. Variance directly affects important analytical figures of merit, including detection limit, quantitation limit, and confidence intervals. Most reported analyses for emerging analytical techniques implicitly assume constant variance (homoskedasticity) by using unweighted regression calibrations. Despite the assumption of constant variance, it is known that most instruments exhibit heteroskedasticity, where variance changes with signal intensity. Ignoring nonconstant variance results in suboptimal calibrations, invalid uncertainty estimates, and incorrect detection limits. Three techniques where homoskedasticity is often assumed were covered in this work to evaluate if heteroskedasticity had a significant quantitative impact-naked-eye, distance-based detection using paper-based analytical devices (PADs), cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) with disposable carbon-ink electrode devices, and microchip electrophoresis (MCE) with conductivity detection. Despite these techniques representing a wide range of chemistries and precision, heteroskedastic behavior was confirmed for each. The general variance forms were analyzed, and recommendations for accounting for nonconstant variance discussed. Monte Carlo simulations of instrument responses were performed to quantify the benefits of weighted regression, and the sensitivity to uncertainty in the variance function was tested. Results show that heteroskedasticity should be considered during development of new techniques; even moderate uncertainty (30%) in the variance function still results in weighted regression outperforming unweighted regressions. We recommend utilizing the power model of variance because it is easy to apply, requires little additional experimentation, and produces higher-precision results and more reliable uncertainty estimates than assuming homoskedasticity. PMID:26995641

  18. Characterizing nonconstant instrumental variance in emerging miniaturized analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Noblitt, Scott D; Berg, Kathleen E; Cate, David M; Henry, Charles S

    2016-04-01

    Measurement variance is a crucial aspect of quantitative chemical analysis. Variance directly affects important analytical figures of merit, including detection limit, quantitation limit, and confidence intervals. Most reported analyses for emerging analytical techniques implicitly assume constant variance (homoskedasticity) by using unweighted regression calibrations. Despite the assumption of constant variance, it is known that most instruments exhibit heteroskedasticity, where variance changes with signal intensity. Ignoring nonconstant variance results in suboptimal calibrations, invalid uncertainty estimates, and incorrect detection limits. Three techniques where homoskedasticity is often assumed were covered in this work to evaluate if heteroskedasticity had a significant quantitative impact-naked-eye, distance-based detection using paper-based analytical devices (PADs), cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) with disposable carbon-ink electrode devices, and microchip electrophoresis (MCE) with conductivity detection. Despite these techniques representing a wide range of chemistries and precision, heteroskedastic behavior was confirmed for each. The general variance forms were analyzed, and recommendations for accounting for nonconstant variance discussed. Monte Carlo simulations of instrument responses were performed to quantify the benefits of weighted regression, and the sensitivity to uncertainty in the variance function was tested. Results show that heteroskedasticity should be considered during development of new techniques; even moderate uncertainty (30%) in the variance function still results in weighted regression outperforming unweighted regressions. We recommend utilizing the power model of variance because it is easy to apply, requires little additional experimentation, and produces higher-precision results and more reliable uncertainty estimates than assuming homoskedasticity.

  19. Application of Acoustic Techniques for Characterization of Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittmann, Bernhard R.; Ebert, Anne

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is emerging as a powerful tool in cell biology. Originally developed for high-resolution imaging purposes, the AFM also has unique capabilities as a nano-indenter to probe the dynamic viscoelastic material properties of living cells in culture. In particular, AFM elastography combines imaging and indentation modalities to map the spatial distribution of cell mechanical properties, which in turn reflect the structure and function of the underlying cytoskeleton. Such measurements have contributed to our understanding of cell mechanics and cell biology and appear to be sensitive to the presence of disease in individual cells. Examples of applications and considerations on the effective capability of ultrasonic AFM techniques on biological samples (both mammalian and plant) are reported in this chapter. Included in the discussion is scanning near-field ultrasound holography an acoustic technique which has been used to image structure and in particular nanoparticles inside cells. For illustration an example that is discussed in some detail is a technique for rapid in vitro single-cell elastography. The technique is based on atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) but (1) requires only a few minutes of scan time, (2) can be used on live cells briefly removed from most of the nutrient fluid, (3) does negligible harm or damage to the cell, (4) provides semi-quantitative information on the distribution of modulus across the cell, and (5) yields data with 1-10 nm resolution. The technique is shown to enable rapid assessment of physical/biochemical signals on the cell modulus and contributes to current understanding of cell mechanics.

  20. Novel surgical techniques, regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and innovative immunosuppression in kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nowacki, Maciej; Nazarewski, Łukasz; Tyloch, Dominik; Pokrywczyńska, Marta; Pietkun, Katarzyna; Jundziłł, Arkadiusz; Tyloch, Janusz; Habib, Samy L.; Drewa, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    On the 60th anniversary of the first successfully performed renal transplantation, we summarize the historical, current and potential future status of kidney transplantation. We discuss three different aspects with a potential significant influence on kidney transplantation progress: the development of surgical techniques, the influence of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, and changes in immunosuppression. We evaluate the standard open surgical procedures with modern techniques and compare them to less invasive videoscopic as well as robotic techniques. The role of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine as a potential method for future kidney regeneration or replacement and the interesting search for novel solutions in the field of immunosuppression will be discussed. After 60 years since the first successfully performed kidney transplantation, we can conclude that the greatest achievements are associated with the development of surgical techniques and with planned systemic immunosuppression. PMID:27695507

  1. Novel surgical techniques, regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and innovative immunosuppression in kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nowacki, Maciej; Nazarewski, Łukasz; Tyloch, Dominik; Pokrywczyńska, Marta; Pietkun, Katarzyna; Jundziłł, Arkadiusz; Tyloch, Janusz; Habib, Samy L.; Drewa, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    On the 60th anniversary of the first successfully performed renal transplantation, we summarize the historical, current and potential future status of kidney transplantation. We discuss three different aspects with a potential significant influence on kidney transplantation progress: the development of surgical techniques, the influence of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, and changes in immunosuppression. We evaluate the standard open surgical procedures with modern techniques and compare them to less invasive videoscopic as well as robotic techniques. The role of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine as a potential method for future kidney regeneration or replacement and the interesting search for novel solutions in the field of immunosuppression will be discussed. After 60 years since the first successfully performed kidney transplantation, we can conclude that the greatest achievements are associated with the development of surgical techniques and with planned systemic immunosuppression.

  2. System and technique for ultrasonic characterization of settling suspensions

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, Margaret S.; Panetta, Paul D.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Pappas, Richard A.

    2006-11-28

    A system for determining properties of settling suspensions includes a settling container, a mixer, and devices for ultrasonic interrogation transverse to the settling direction. A computer system controls operation of the mixer and the interrogation devices and records the response to the interrogating as a function of settling time, which is then used to determine suspension properties. Attenuation versus settling time for dilute suspensions, such as dilute wood pulp suspension, exhibits a peak at different settling times for suspensions having different properties, and the location of this peak is used as one mechanism for characterizing suspensions. Alternatively or in addition, a plurality of ultrasound receivers are arranged at different angles to a common transmitter to receive scattering responses at a variety of angles during particle settling. Angular differences in scattering as a function of settling time are also used to characterize the suspension.

  3. Demonstration to characterize watershed runoff potential by microwave techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    Characteristics such as storage capacity of the soil, volume of storage in vegetative matter, and volume of storage available in local depressions are expressed in empirical watershed runoff equations as one or more coefficients. Conventional techniques for estimating coefficients representing the spatial distribution of these characteristics over a watershed drainage area are subjective and produce significant errors. Characteristics of the wear surface are described as a single coefficient called the curve number.

  4. Characterization and biological abatement of diffuse methane emissions and odour in an innovative wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Barcón, Tamara; Hernández, Jerónimo; Gómez-Cuervo, Santiago; Garrido, Juan M; Omil, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    An innovative and patented process for medium-high strength sewage which comprises an anaerobic step followed by a hybrid anoxic-aerobic chamber and a final ultrafiltration stage was characterized in terms of methane fugitive emissions as well as odours. The operation at ambient temperature implies higher methane content in the liquid anaerobic effluent, which finally causes concentrations around 0.01-2.4% in the off-gas released in the anoxic-aerobic chamber (1.25% average). Mass balances indicate that these emissions account for up to 30-35% of the total methane generated in the anaerobic reactor. A conventional biofilter (BF) operated at an empty bed residence time of 4 min was used to treat these emissions for 70 d. In spite of the fluctuations in the methane inlet concentrations derived from the operation of the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), it was possible to operate at pseudo-steady-state conditions, achieving average removal efficiencies of 76.5% and maximum elimination capacities of 30.1 g m(-3) h(-1). Odour removal was quantified as 99.1%. Fluorescence in situ hybridization probes as well as metabolic activity assays demonstrated the suitability of the biomass developed in the WWTP as inoculum to start up the BF due to the presence of methanotrophic bacteria.

  5. Characterization of Magnetron Sputtered Coatings by Pulsed Eddy Current Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan, Chris; Lee Changqing; Danon, Yaron

    2005-04-09

    A method that uses induced pulsed eddy currents for characterization of thick magnetron sputtered Nb coatings on steel is presented in this paper. The objectives of this work are to develop a system for rapid quantitative nondestructive inspection of coatings as well as to determine the correlation between coating properties, such as density and purity, and eddy current measured resistivity of coatings. A two-probe differential system having higher sensitivity and less noise than a one-probe system with 2-D scanning ability was developed.

  6. Fluorescence spectroscopy: a powerful technique for the noninvasive characterization of artwork.

    PubMed

    Romani, Aldo; Clementi, Catia; Miliani, Costanza; Favaro, Gianna

    2010-06-15

    After electronic excitation by ultraviolet or visible radiation, atoms and molecules can undergo thermal or radiative deactivation processes before relaxing to the ground state. They can emit photons with longer wavelengths than the incoming exciting radiation, that is, they can fluoresce in the UV-vis-near-infrared (NIR) range. The study of fluorescence relaxation processes is one of the experimental bases on which modern theories of atomic and molecular structure are founded. Over the past few decades, technological improvements in both optics and electronics have greatly expanded fluorimetric applications, particularly in analytical fields, because of the high sensitivity and specificity afforded by the methods. Using fluorimetry in the study and conservation of cultural heritage is a recent innovation. In this Account, we briefly summarize the use of fluorescence-based techniques in examining the constituent materials of a work of art in a noninvasive manner. Many chemical components in artwork, especially those of an organic nature, are fluorescent materials, which can be reliably used for both diagnostic and conservative purposes. We begin by examining fluorimetry in the laboratory setting, considering the organic dyes and inorganic pigments that are commonly studied. For a number of reasons, works of art often cannot be moved into laboratories, so we continue with a discussion of portable instruments and a variety of successful "field applications" of fluorimetry to works of cultural heritage. These examples include studies of mural paintings, canvas paintings, tapestries, and parchments. We conclude by examining recent advances in treating the data that are generated in fluorescence studies. These new perspectives are focused on the spectral shape and lifetime of the emitted radiation. Recent developments have provided the opportunity to use various spectroscopic techniques on an increasing number of objects, as well as the ability to fully characterize

  7. An innovative technique for recording picture-in-picture ultrasound videos.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Sathish; Finnoff, Jonathan T

    2013-08-01

    Many ultrasound educational products and ultrasound researchers present diagnostic and interventional ultrasound information using picture-in-picture videos, which simultaneously show the ultrasound image and transducer and patient positions. Traditional techniques for creating picture-in-picture videos are expensive, nonportable, or time-consuming. This article describes an inexpensive, simple, and portable way of creating picture-in-picture ultrasound videos. This technique uses a laptop computer with a video capture device to acquire the ultrasound feed. Simultaneously, a webcam captures a live video feed of the transducer and patient position and live audio. Both sources are streamed onto the computer screen and recorded by screen capture software. This technique makes the process of recording picture-in-picture ultrasound videos more accessible for ultrasound educators and researchers for use in their presentations or publications. PMID:23887962

  8. Innovative techniques and tools for public participation in U.S. Department of Energy programs

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, A.H.; Henrich, D.L.; Kuhlman, C.A.; White, G.W.

    1995-07-01

    In early 1995, Jon Yerxa, Public Involvement Team Leader in the Office of External Affairs at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office, identified the need to ``provide Hanford`s Public Participation Program with input and advice concerning public involvement issues at Hanford.`` Yerxa identified the following committees: (1) Training, (2) Tri-Party Agreement/NEPA/ Environmental Justice, (3) Program, (4) Performance Evaluation, and (5) Communications Techniques and Technology. These committees were to be staffed by public involvement and communications staff from DOE and its contractors on the Hanford Site. This report describes the activities and recommendations of the Communications Techniques and Technology committee.

  9. Innovative vibration technique applied to polyurethane foam as a viable substitute for conventional fatigue testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Alexander; Just-Agosto, Frederick; Shafiq, Basir; Serrano, David

    2012-12-01

    Lifetime prediction using three-point bending (TPB) can at times be prohibitively time consuming and costly, whereas vibration testing at higher frequency may potentially save time and revenue. A vibration technique that obtains lifetimes that reasonably match those determined under flexural TPB fatigue is developed. The technique designs the specimen with a procedure based on shape optimization and finite element analysis. When the specimen is vibrated in resonance, a stress pattern that mimics the stress pattern observed under conventional TPB fatigue testing is obtained. The proposed approach was verified with polyurethane foam specimens, resulting in an average error of 4.5% when compared with TPB.

  10. Using morphometric and analytical techniques to characterize elephant ivory.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rina Rani; Goyal, Surendra Prakash; Khanna, Param Pal; Mukherjee, Pulok Kumar; Sukumar, Raman

    2006-10-16

    There is a need to characterize Asian elephant ivory and compare with African ivory for controlling illegal trade and implementation of national and international laws. In this paper, we characterize ivory of Asian and African elephants using Schreger angle measurements, elemental analysis {X-ray fluorescence (XRF), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS)} and isotopic analysis. We recorded Schreger angle characteristics of elephant ivory at three different zones in ivory samples of African (n=12) and Asian (n=28) elephants. The Schreger angle ranged from 32 degrees to 145 degrees and 30 degrees to 153 degrees in Asian and African ivory, respectively. Elemental analysis (for Asian and African ivory) by XRF, ICP-AES and ICP-MS provided preliminary data. We attempted to ascertain source of origin of Asian elephant ivory similarly as in African ivory based on isotopes of carbon, nitrogen and strontium. We determined isotopic ratios of carbon (n=31) and nitrogen (n=31) corresponding to diet and rainfall, respectively. Reference ivory samples from five areas within India were analyzed using collagen and powder sample and the latter was found more suitable for forensic analysis. During our preliminary analysis, the range of delta13C values (-13.6+/-0.15 per thousand and -25.6+/-0.15 per thousand) and delta15N values (10.2+/-0.15 per thousand and 3.5+/-0.15 per thousand) were noted.

  11. Simultaneous electronic and lattice characterization using coupled femtosecond spectroscopic techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Hopkins, Patrick E

    2009-09-01

    High-power electronics are central in the development of radar, solid-state lighting, and laser systems. Large powers, however, necessitate improved heat dissipation as heightened temperatures deleteriously affect both performance and reliability. Heat dissipation, in turn, is determined by the cascade of energy from the electronic to lattice system. Full characterization of the transport then requires analysis of each. In response, this four-month late start effort has developed a transient thermoreflectance (TTR) capability that probes the thermal response of electronic carriers with 100 fs resolution. Simultaneous characterization of the lattice carriers with this electronic assessment was then investigated by equipping the optical arrangement to acquire a Raman signal from radiation discarded during the TTR experiment. Initial results show only tentative acquisition of a Raman response at these timescales. Using simulations of the response, challenges responsible for these difficulties are then examined and indicate that with outlined refinements simultaneous acquisition of TTR/Raman signals remains attainable in the near term.

  12. Characterization of a Viking Blade Fabricated by Traditional Forging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, H.; Frazer, D.; Bailey, N.; Traylor, R.; Austin, J.; Pringle, J.; Bickel, J.; Connick, R.; Connick, W.; Hosemann, P.

    2016-09-01

    A team of students from the University of California, Berkeley, participated in a blade-smithing competition hosted by the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society at the TMS 2015 144th annual meeting and exhibition. Motivated by ancient forging methods, the UC Berkeley team chose to fabricate our blade from historical smithing techniques utilizing naturally-occurring deposits of iron ore. This approach resulted in receiving the "Best Example of a Traditional Blade Process/Ore Smelting Technique" award for our blade named "Berkelium." First, iron-enriched sand was collected from local beaches. Magnetite (Fe3O4) was then extracted from the sand and smelted into individual high- and low-carbon steel ingots. Layers of high- and low-carbon steels were forge-welded together, predominantly by hand, to form a composite material. Optical microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and Vickers hardness mechanical testing were conducted at different stages throughout the blade-making process to evaluate the microstructure and hardness evolution during formation. It was found that the pre-heat-treated blade microstructure was composed of ferrite and pearlite, and contained many nonmetallic inclusions. A final heat treatment was performed, which caused the average hardness of the blade edge to increase by more than a factor of two, indicating a martensitic transformation.

  13. New Techniques for Preparing Educational Personnel. Universalizing Education: Selected Innovative Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    This publication is a compilation of twenty-four studies on Asian experiences with new educational techniques for preparing educational personnel in response to demands for the universalization of education. Ten of the studies were originally presented at a study group which met in Bangkok, Thailand, in the fall of 1978. These studies have been…

  14. New Ways in Teaching Writing. New Ways in TESOL Series: Innovative Classroom Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Ronald V., Ed.

    This book presents a range of activities for writing instruction that develop different composing skills, attend to the social processes of reading and writing, involve the peer group in evaluating and responding to drafts, focus on different types and formats of writing, and stimulate these activities through diverse techniques and methods. The…

  15. Who is that masked educator? Deconstructing the teaching and learning processes of an innovative humanistic simulation technique.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Margaret; Searl, Kerry Reid; Davis, Susan

    2013-12-01

    Simulation learning in nursing has long made use of mannequins, standardized actors and role play to allow students opportunity to practice technical body-care skills and interventions. Even though numerous strategies have been developed to mimic or amplify clinical situations, a common problem that is difficult to overcome in even the most well-executed simulation experiences, is that students may realize the setting is artificial and fail to fully engage, remember or apply the learning. Another problem is that students may learn technical competence but remain uncertain about communicating with the person. Since communication capabilities are imperative in human service work, simulation learning that only achieves technical competence in students is not fully effective for the needs of nursing education. Furthermore, while simulation learning is a burgeoning space for innovative practices, it has been criticized for the absence of a basis in theory. It is within this context that an innovative simulation learning experience named "Mask-Ed (KRS simulation)", has been deconstructed and the active learning components examined. Establishing a theoretical basis for creative teaching and learning practices provides an understanding of how, why and when simulation learning has been effective and it may help to distinguish aspects of the experience that could be improved. Three conceptual theoretical fields help explain the power of this simulation technique: Vygotskian sociocultural learning theory, applied theatre and embodiment.

  16. PIXE as a characterization technique in the cutting tool industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freemantle, C. S.; Sacks, N.; Topic, M.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Two WC-Co powders have been analyzed using micro-PIXE to identify elemental concentration and distribution. A powder recycled primarily from used mining components and a powder produced exclusively from fresh raw materials was studied. Elemental mapping of major elements as well as impurities, within powder granule cross sections, was performed. Contaminants (e.g. Fe and Ni) from manufacturing processes, as well as trace impurities (e.g. Cr, Cl, Ca and S) from recycling were detected, quantified and compared. The extent of increased concentrations of impurities resulting from recycling were observed, demonstrating the potential for PIXE as a characterization tool for detecting trace elements in cemented carbides, allowing for future improvements in the manufacturing and recycling processes.

  17. Ground Penetrating Radar technique for railway track characterization in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Chiara, Francesca; Fontul, Simona; Fortunato, Eduardo; D'Andrea, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Maintenance actions are significant for transport infrastructures but, today, costs have to be necessary limited. A proper quality control since the construction phase is a key factor for a long life cycle and for a good economy policy. For this reason, suitable techniques have to be chosen and non-destructive tests represent an efficient solution, as they allow to evaluate infrastructure characteristics in a continuous or quasi-continuous way, saving time and costs, enabling to make changes if tests results do not comply with the project requirements. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a quick and effective technique to evaluate infrastructure condition in a continuous manner, replacing or reducing the use of traditional drilling method. GPR application to railways infrastructures, during construction and monitoring phase, is relatively recent. It is based on the measuring of layers thicknesses and detection of structural changes. It also enables the assessment of materials properties that constitute the infrastructure and the evaluation of the different types of defects such as ballast pockets, fouled ballast, poor drainage, subgrade settlement and transitions problems. These deteriorations are generally the causes of vertical deviations in track geometry and they cannot be detected by the common monitoring procedures, namely the measurements of track geometry. Moreover, the development of new GPR systems with higher antenna frequencies, better data acquisition systems, more user friendly software and new algorithms for calculation of materials properties can lead to a regular use of GPR. Therefore, it represents a reliable technique to assess track geometry problems and consequently to improve maintenance planning. In Portugal, rail inspection is performed with Plasser & Theurer EM120 equipment and recently 400 MHz IDS antennas were installed on it. GPR tests were performed on the Portuguese rail network and, as case study in this paper, a renewed track was

  18. Characterization of fiber composite flywheels by ultrasonic imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, M.C.; Grills, R.H.; Andrew, G.A.; Coppa, A.P.

    1983-01-01

    A set of flywheels of different fiber composites has been investigated ultrasonically by an ULTRA IMAGE III System developed by General Dynamics. The 40 cm (16 in.) in diameter and 4.3 cm (1.7 in.) thick flywheels have been studied in an immersion test with a 2.5 cm (1 in.) diameter, 1.5 MHz, conically focused transducer. By monitoring the amplitude of the back surface signals from the wheels and displaying the amplitude variations with different color bands, the internal structures of the wheels such as the fiber orientations and bonding distributions can be examined in detail. The baseline information concerning the integrity of these prototype flywheels, relative to different manufacturing processes, with and without ring shrink fit, has been recorded. This paper describes a consistent, reliance, and cost-effective nondestructive testing technique for analyzing the internal bonding structures of fiber composites.

  19. Stomatal Characterization of Grass Leaves by Four Preparation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Joyce Phillips; Anderson, Val Jo; Gardner, John S.

    1995-06-01

    Four leaf preparation techniques (air drying, tetramethylsilane air drying, critical point drying, and freeze substitution) used in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were evaluated with respect to the degree of cellular distortion they produce in stomatal guard cells of leaves of Dactylis glomerata and Elymus canadensis. Surface morphological distortion and cuticle disruption in the air-dried and tetramethylsilane air-dried leaves, and cuticle disruption within the critical point-dried tissue made it difficult to obtain measurements.The freeze-substituted tissue experienced little cuticle disturbance, and the cellular morphology appeared normal. The length of the guard cells did not significantly differ between the air-dried, tetramethylsilane air-dried, critical point-dried, or freeze-substituted samples. Widths did significantly vary, with the freeze-substituted tissue having lower values than tissues treated with the other treatments. Freeze substitution methodology produced SEM images that appear to be less distorted and allow easy and precise measurement.

  20. Fluorescent spectroscopy, a technique for characterizing surface films

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, Marvin C.; Devonald, David H.

    1973-01-01

    A relationship is established between fluorescent spectra obtained by using a light path through the liquid solution and the fluorescent spectra obtained by a direct reading of surface reflection (remote sensing). A brief review of quantum fundamentals provides the necessary information to conclude that "see-through" and reflectance spectra are identical in wavelength response. Many floating films contain fluorescent materials; thus fluorescent spectroscopic techniques were used to obtain the fluorescent spectra of lube oil, crude oil, andlignosulfonie acid in an effort to detect, identify, and quantify these representative fluorescent materials in water solutions. For each material tested the emission maximum was established. The emission maximum was then held constant while the absorption spectrum was recorded and the absorption maximum established. The complete spectral curves are presented.

  1. Characterizing a Brazilian sanitary landfill using geophysical seismic techniques.

    PubMed

    Abreu, A E S; Gandolfo, O C B; Vilar, O M

    2016-07-01

    Two different geophysical techniques, namely crosshole and multichannel analysis of surface waves - MASW, were applied to investigate the mechanical response of Municipal Solid Waste buried under humid, subtropical climate. Direct investigations revealed that the buried waste was composed mainly of soil-like material (51%) and plastics (31%) with moisture content average values of 43% near the surface and 53% after around 11m depth. Unit weight varied between 9kN/m(3) and 15kN/m(3). Seismic investigation of the landfill yielded shear wave velocities (VS) estimated from the crosshole tests ranging from 92 to 214m/s, while compression wave velocities (VP) ranged from 197 to 451m/s. Both velocities were influenced by vertical confining stress and thus tended to increase with depth. VS calculated from MASW tests were lower than the ones calculated from the crosshole tests, probably due to the different frequencies used in the tests. The results of both methods tended to configure a lower bound to the values reported in the technical literature in general, as expected for low compaction waste with small amounts of cover soil. Although VS did not show abrupt changes with depth, VP profile distribution combined with direct investigations results, such as temperature, in-place unit weight and moisture content, suggest that the waste body could be divided into two strata. The lower one is poorly drained and shows higher moisture content, as a consequence of the operational techniques used in the first years, while the upper stratum is probably related to a better drained waste stratum, resulting from the improvement of operational standards and increase in drainage facilities throughout the years. PMID:27107707

  2. Characterizing a Brazilian sanitary landfill using geophysical seismic techniques.

    PubMed

    Abreu, A E S; Gandolfo, O C B; Vilar, O M

    2016-07-01

    Two different geophysical techniques, namely crosshole and multichannel analysis of surface waves - MASW, were applied to investigate the mechanical response of Municipal Solid Waste buried under humid, subtropical climate. Direct investigations revealed that the buried waste was composed mainly of soil-like material (51%) and plastics (31%) with moisture content average values of 43% near the surface and 53% after around 11m depth. Unit weight varied between 9kN/m(3) and 15kN/m(3). Seismic investigation of the landfill yielded shear wave velocities (VS) estimated from the crosshole tests ranging from 92 to 214m/s, while compression wave velocities (VP) ranged from 197 to 451m/s. Both velocities were influenced by vertical confining stress and thus tended to increase with depth. VS calculated from MASW tests were lower than the ones calculated from the crosshole tests, probably due to the different frequencies used in the tests. The results of both methods tended to configure a lower bound to the values reported in the technical literature in general, as expected for low compaction waste with small amounts of cover soil. Although VS did not show abrupt changes with depth, VP profile distribution combined with direct investigations results, such as temperature, in-place unit weight and moisture content, suggest that the waste body could be divided into two strata. The lower one is poorly drained and shows higher moisture content, as a consequence of the operational techniques used in the first years, while the upper stratum is probably related to a better drained waste stratum, resulting from the improvement of operational standards and increase in drainage facilities throughout the years.

  3. A New Spitzer IRAC Technique to Characterize Exoplanet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krick, Jessica; Ingalls, J.; Carey, S.; von Braun, K.

    2012-05-01

    Spitzer’s extended warm mission gives us the opportunity to contribute to its legacy by performing comparative science on atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Observation of phase curves produce maps of the longitudinal brightness/temperature distributions in the planetary atmospheres, which are then used to calculate energy redistribution efficiencies between the hot dayside and cooler nightside - exoplanetary weather. Recent improvements in the calibration of IRAC make possible a new observing technique which will be much more efficient than standard staring mode observations by using snapshot observations to emulate a full phase curve. The challenge with using snapshot observations is in making sure all observing epochs can be tied together with high enough photometric precision. The dominant source of error in this task is intrapixel gain variations on sub pixel levels. We have effectively removed this source of error by using the Pointing Calibration and Reference Sensor (PCRS) onboard Spitzer for pointing repeatability that is significantly better than random pointing. Because we have achieved this excellent repeatability, we are able to build up a map of the intrapixel gain, which is then used to independently correct IRAC photometry as a function of position on the pixel. We discuss additional sources of noise below the gain variations, at the sub percent level, such as pixel-wise nonlinearities, and our efforts to remove them. We present preliminary 4.5 micron data of HD209458 where we compare staring mode observations to snapshots taken with this new technique, corrected by the gain and residual nonlinearity map, and comment on the scientific implications of the resultant phase curve.

  4. Overview of seismic imagery techniques applied to landslides characterization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandjean, Gilles; Romdhane, Anouar; Bitri, Adnand

    2010-05-01

    From numerous studies, geophysical methods based on seismic surveying appear to be well-adapted to investigate the morpho-structure of landslides and to progress in understanding the related mechanisms. Indeed, these methods allow direct and non-intrusive measurements of acoustic (Vp) or shear (Vs) wave velocity, two important physical parameters for estimating mechanical properties of reworked moving materials. Different processing techniques and inversion strategies were applied on the La Valette and Super-Sauze mudslides (French South Alps) as well as on the Ballandaz landslide (Savoie, France) to retrieve these parameters. On each of these sites, measurements were recorded along 2D profiles of several hundred meters length, with sensor spacing from 2 to 5m. (of about few meters). A first approach, based on first breaks acoustic inversion for estimating Vp distribution on the Super-Sauze and La Valette sites was carried out; then, SASW (spectral analysis of surface waves) was performed to image Vs distribution on the same site. In order to produce a more geotechnical diagnosis of these sections, a fuzzy logic fusion was used to assimilate both of these parameters into a highest level of interpretation. This approach has (also) the advantage to take into account the resolution and accuracy of each individual method. Finally, a 2D elastic full-waveform inversion test was carried out on a synthetic seismic data set computed from a conceptual Super-Sauze velocity model. This test highlights the difficulty to manage highly contrasted media in terms of velocity but also of topography. Nevertheless, the integration in the inversion process of the whole seismic signal produce a more coherent model in terms of Vp and Vs distribution compared to above-cited conventional techniques.

  5. Shape and Surface: The challenges and advantages of 3D techniques in innovative fashion, knitwear and product design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendt, E.

    2016-07-01

    The presentation wants to show what kind of problems fashion and textile designers are facing in 3D-knitwear design, especially regarding fashionable flat-knit styles, and how they can use different kinds of techniques and processes to generate new types of 3D-designs and structures. To create really new things we have to overcome standard development methods and traditional thinking and should start to open our minds again for the material itself to generate new advanced textile solutions. This paper mainly introduces different results of research projects worked out in the master program “Textile Produkte” during lectures in “Innovative Product Design” and “Experimental Knitting”.

  6. Endoscopic Debridement for Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciitis: An Innovative Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Cottom, James M; Maker, Jared M

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is one the most common pathologies seen by foot and ankle surgeons. When nonoperative therapy fails, surgical intervention is warranted. Various surgical procedures are available for the treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. The most common surgical management typically consists of open versus endoscopic plantar fascia release. The documented comorbidities associated with the release of the plantar fascia include lateral column overload and metatarsalgia. We present a new technique for this painful condition that is minimally invasive, allows visualization of the plantar fascia, and maintains the integrity of this fascia. Our hypothesis was that the use of endoscopic debridement of the plantar fascia would provide a minimally invasive technique with acceptable patient outcomes.

  7. Endoscopic Debridement for Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciitis: An Innovative Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Cottom, James M; Maker, Jared M

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is one the most common pathologies seen by foot and ankle surgeons. When nonoperative therapy fails, surgical intervention is warranted. Various surgical procedures are available for the treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. The most common surgical management typically consists of open versus endoscopic plantar fascia release. The documented comorbidities associated with the release of the plantar fascia include lateral column overload and metatarsalgia. We present a new technique for this painful condition that is minimally invasive, allows visualization of the plantar fascia, and maintains the integrity of this fascia. Our hypothesis was that the use of endoscopic debridement of the plantar fascia would provide a minimally invasive technique with acceptable patient outcomes. PMID:26952313

  8. Innovative chimney-graft technique for endovascular repair of a pararenal abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Galiñanes, Edgar Luis; Hernandez-Vila, Eduardo A; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2015-02-01

    After abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, progressive degeneration of the aneurysm can be challenging to treat. Multiple comorbidities and previous operations place such patients at high risk for repeat surgery. Endovascular repair is a possible alternative; however, challenging anatomy can push the limits of available technology. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man who presented with a 5.3-cm pararenal aneurysm 4 years after undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. To avoid reoperation, we excluded the aneurysm by endovascular means, using visceral-artery stenting, a chimney-graft technique. Low-profile balloons on a monorail system enabled the rapid exchange of coronary wires via a buddy-wire technique. This novel approach facilitated stenting and simultaneous angioplasty of multiple visceral vessels and the abdominal aorta.

  9. Innovative Chimney-Graft Technique for Endovascular Repair of a Pararenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Galiñanes, Edgar Luis; Hernandez-Vila, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    After abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, progressive degeneration of the aneurysm can be challenging to treat. Multiple comorbidities and previous operations place such patients at high risk for repeat surgery. Endovascular repair is a possible alternative; however, challenging anatomy can push the limits of available technology. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man who presented with a 5.3-cm pararenal aneurysm 4 years after undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. To avoid reoperation, we excluded the aneurysm by endovascular means, using visceral-artery stenting, a chimney-graft technique. Low-profile balloons on a monorail system enabled the rapid exchange of coronary wires via a buddy-wire technique. This novel approach facilitated stenting and simultaneous angioplasty of multiple visceral vessels and the abdominal aorta. PMID:25873796

  10. Critical incident technique: an innovative participatory approach to examine and document racial disparities in breast cancer healthcare services.

    PubMed

    Yonas, Michael A; Aronson, Robert; Schaal, Jennifer; Eng, Eugenia; Hardy, Christina; Jones, Nora

    2013-10-01

    Disproportionate and persistent inequities in quality of healthcare have been observed among persons of color in the United States. To understand and ultimately eliminate such inequities, several public health institutions have issued calls for innovative methods and approaches that examine determinants from the social, organizational and public policy contexts to inform the design of systems change interventions. The authors, including academic and community research partners in a community-based participatory research (CBPR) study, reflected together on the use and value of the critical incident technique (CIT) for exploring racial disparities in healthcare for women with breast cancer. Academic and community partners used initial large group discussion involving a large partnership of 35 academic and community researchers guided by principles of CBPR, followed by the efforts of a smaller interdisciplinary manuscript team of academic and community researchers to reflect, document summarize and translate this participatory research process, lessons learned and value added from using the CIT with principles of CBPR and Undoing Racism. The finding of this article is a discussion of the process, strengths and challenges of utilizing CIT with CBPR. The participation of community members at all levels of the research process including development, collection of the data and analysis of the data was enhanced by the CIT process. As the field of CBPR continues to mature, innovative processes which combine the expertise of community and academic partners can enhance the success of such partnerships. This report contributes to existing literature by illustrating a unique and participatory research application of CIT with principles of CBPR and Undoing Racism. Findings highlight the collaborative process used to identify and implement this novel method and the adaptability of this technique in the interdisciplinary exploration of system-level changes to understand and

  11. Critical incident technique: an innovative participatory approach to examine and document racial disparities in breast cancer healthcare services

    PubMed Central

    Yonas, Michael A.; Aronson, Robert; Schaal, Jennifer; Eng, Eugenia; Hardy, Christina; Jones, Nora

    2013-01-01

    Disproportionate and persistent inequities in quality of healthcare have been observed among persons of color in the United States. To understand and ultimately eliminate such inequities, several public health institutions have issued calls for innovative methods and approaches that examine determinants from the social, organizational and public policy contexts to inform the design of systems change interventions. The authors, including academic and community research partners in a community-based participatory research (CBPR) study, reflected together on the use and value of the critical incident technique (CIT) for exploring racial disparities in healthcare for women with breast cancer. Academic and community partners used initial large group discussion involving a large partnership of 35 academic and community researchers guided by principles of CBPR, followed by the efforts of a smaller interdisciplinary manuscript team of academic and community researchers to reflect, document summarize and translate this participatory research process, lessons learned and value added from using the CIT with principles of CBPR and Undoing Racism. The finding of this article is a discussion of the process, strengths and challenges of utilizing CIT with CBPR. The participation of community members at all levels of the research process including development, collection of the data and analysis of the data was enhanced by the CIT process. As the field of CBPR continues to mature, innovative processes which combine the expertise of community and academic partners can enhance the success of such partnerships. This report contributes to existing literature by illustrating a unique and participatory research application of CIT with principles of CBPR and Undoing Racism. Findings highlight the collaborative process used to identify and implement this novel method and the adaptability of this technique in the interdisciplinary exploration of system-level changes to understand and

  12. Recovery Act Validation of Innovative Exploration Techniques Pilgrim Hot Springs, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Holdmann, Gwen

    2015-04-30

    Drilling and temperature logging campaigns between the late 1970's and early 1980’s measured temperatures at Pilgrim Hot Springs in excess of 90°C. Between 2010 and 2014 the University of Alaska used a variety of methods including geophysical surveys, remote sensing techniques, heat budget modeling, and additional drilling to better understand the resource and estimate the available geothermal energy.

  13. Innovative technique for tailoring intrinsic stress in reactively sputtered piezoelectric aluminum nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Felmetsger, V. V.; Laptev, P. N.; Tanner, S. M.

    2009-05-15

    Novel technical and technological solutions enabling effective stress control in highly textured polycrystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films deposited with ac (40 kHz) reactive sputtering processes are discussed. Residual stress in the AlN films deposited by a dual cathode S-Gun magnetron is well controlled by varying Ar gas pressure, however, since deposition rate and film thickness uniformity depend on gas pressure too, an independent stress control technique has been developed. The technique is based on regulation of the flux of the charged particles from ac plasma discharge to the substrate. In the ac powered S-Gun, a special stress adjustment unit (SAU) is employed for reducing compressive stress in the film by means of redistribution of discharge current between electrodes of the S-Gun leading to controllable suppression of bombardment of the growing film. This technique is complementary to AlN deposition with rf substrate bias which increases ion bombardment and shifts stress in the compressive direction, if required. Using SAU and rf bias functions ensures tailoring intrinsic stress in piezoelectric AlN films for a particular application from high compressive -700 MPa to high tensile +300 MPa and allows the gas pressure to be adjusted independently to fine control the film uniformity. The AlN films deposited on Si substrates and Mo electrodes have strong (002) texture with full width at half maximum ranging from 2 degree sign for 200 nm to 1 degree sign for 2000 nm thick films.

  14. Novel Monitoring Techniques for Characterizing Frictional Interfaces in the Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Selvadurai, Paul A.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    A pressure-sensitive film was used to characterize the asperity contacts along a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) interface in the laboratory. The film has structural health monitoring (SHM) applications for flanges and other precision fittings and train rail condition monitoring. To calibrate the film, simple spherical indentation tests were performed and validated against a finite element model (FEM) to compare normal stress profiles. Experimental measurements of the normal stress profiles were within −7.7% to 6.6% of the numerical calculations between 12 and 50 MPa asperity normal stress. The film also possessed the capability of quantifying surface roughness, an important parameter when examining wear and attrition in SHM applications. A high definition video camera supplied data for photometric analysis (i.e., the measure of visible light) of asperities along the PMMA-PMMA interface in a direct shear configuration, taking advantage of the transparent nature of the sample material. Normal stress over individual asperities, calculated with the pressure-sensitive film, was compared to the light intensity transmitted through the interface. We found that the luminous intensity transmitted through individual asperities linearly increased 0.05643 ± 0.0012 candelas for an increase of 1 MPa in normal stress between normal stresses ranging from 23 to 33 MPa. PMID:25923930

  15. Novel monitoring techniques for characterizing frictional interfaces in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Selvadurai, Paul A; Glaser, Steven D

    2015-01-01

    A pressure-sensitive film was used to characterize the asperity contacts along a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) interface in the laboratory. The film has structural health monitoring (SHM) applications for flanges and other precision fittings and train rail condition monitoring. To calibrate the film, simple spherical indentation tests were performed and validated against a finite element model (FEM) to compare normal stress profiles. Experimental measurements of the normal stress profiles were within -7.7% to 6.6% of the numerical calculations between 12 and 50 MPa asperity normal stress. The film also possessed the capability of quantifying surface roughness, an important parameter when examining wear and attrition in SHM applications. A high definition video camera supplied data for photometric analysis (i.e., the measure of visible light) of asperities along the PMMA-PMMA interface in a direct shear configuration, taking advantage of the transparent nature of the sample material. Normal stress over individual asperities, calculated with the pressure-sensitive film, was compared to the light intensity transmitted through the interface. We found that the luminous intensity transmitted through individual asperities linearly increased 0.05643 ± 0.0012 candelas for an increase of 1 MPa in normal stress between normal stresses ranging from 23 to 33 MPa. PMID:25923930

  16. Characterization of pyrocarbon coated materials using laboratory based x-ray phase contrast imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Y S; Roy, Tushar; Sarkar, P S; Yadav, P S; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar; Dasgupta, K; Sathiyamoorthy, D

    2007-08-01

    In-line x-ray phase contrast is an emerging x-ray imaging technique that promises to improve the contrast in x-ray imaging process. This technique is most suited for x-ray imaging of soft materials, low atomic number elements such as carbon composite fibers, very thin coatings, etc. We have used this new emerging technique for visualization and characterization of the pyrocarbon coated materials using a combination of microfocus x-ray source and x-ray charge coupled device detector. These studies are important for characterization of coating and optimization of various process parameters during deposition. These experiments will help us to exploit the potential of this technique for studies in other areas of material science such as characterization of carbon fibered structures and detection of cracks and flaws in materials. The characterization of the imaging system and optimization of some process parameters for carbon deposition are also described in detail. PMID:17764325

  17. Characterization of the active site of chloroperoxidase using physical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    Chloroperoxidase (CPO) and Cytochrome P-450, two very different hemeproteins, have been shown to have similar active sites by several techniques. Recent work has demonstrated thiolate ligation from a cysteine residue to the iron in P-450. A major portion of this research has been devoted to obtaining direct evidence that CPO also has a thiolate 5th ligand from a cysteine residue. This information will provide the framework for a detailed analysis of the structure-function relationships between peroxidases, catalase and cytochrome P-450 hemeproteins. To determine whether the 5th ligand is a cysteine, methionine or a unique amino acid, specific isotope enrichment experiments were used. Preliminary /sup 1/H-NMR studies show that the carbon monoxide-CPO complex has a peak in the upfield region corresponding to alpha-protons of a thiolate amino acid. C. fumago was grown on 95% D/sub 2/O media with a small amount of /sup 1/H-cysteine added. Under these conditions C. fumago slows down the biosynthesis of cysteine by at least 50% and utilizes the exogenous cysteine in the media. GC-MS was able to show that the methylene protons next to the sulfur atom in cysteine are 80-90% protonated while these positions in methionine are approximately 73% deuterated. Comparison of the /sup 1/H-NMR spectra of CO-CPO and CO-CPO indicate the presence of a cysteine ligand in chloroperoxidase.

  18. Diagnosis of industrial catalyst deactivation by surface characterization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, P.G. . Lab. voor Petrochemische Techniek Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg . Dept. of Engineering Chemistry)

    1994-06-01

    The exact nature of the catalyst surface and the various ways of catalyst deactivation are subjects of great scientific interest and enormous economic importance. A brief review like the present one has to be very selective, giving only the underlying principles and representative examples. The focus of this review is on industrial catalysts, in particular, on the most commonly used supported metal and mixed-oxide type catalysts. Here again, only typical examples are chosen and cited to illustrate the specific types of problems involved in catalyst deactivation and how these problems wee diagnosed by a judicious application of the experimental techniques available today. Of the types of catalyst deactivation caused by coking, poisoning, and solid-state transformations, the emphasis in this review is on the last type. Changes in the chemical composition of the catalyst surface, restructuring or reconstruction of the surface, phase transformations, gradual enrichment/depletion of a particular catalyst component on/from the catalyst surface, these are the topics of prominence in this review. Even here, emphasis is on normally unexpected or unsuspected types of deactivation and the catalyst metamorphosis produced by the catalytic reaction itself, as distinct from the purely thermal effects at the reaction temperature. This review is aimed to provide some essential background information and possibly to serve as a reference guide for trouble-shooting when a catalyst is deactivated for rather mysterious reasons. 147 refs.

  19. Innovative High-Accuracy Lidar Bathymetric Technique for the Frequent Measurement of River Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisler, A.; Crowley, G.; Thayer, J. P.; Thompson, G. S.; Barton-Grimley, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Lidar (light detection and ranging) provides absolute depth and topographic mapping capability compared to other remote sensing methods, which is useful for mapping rapidly changing environments such as riverine systems. Effectiveness of current lidar bathymetric systems is limited by the difficulty in unambiguously identifying backscattered lidar signals from the water surface versus the bottom, limiting their depth resolution to 0.3-0.5 m. Additionally these are large, bulky systems that are constrained to expensive aircraft-mounted platforms and use waveform-processing techniques requiring substantial computation time. These restrictions are prohibitive for many potential users. A novel lidar device has been developed that allows for non-contact measurements of water depth down to 1 cm with an accuracy and precision of < 1 cm by exploiting the polarization properties of the light-surface interaction. This system can transition seamlessly from ranging over land to shallow to deep water allowing for shoreline charting, measuring water volume, mapping bottom topology, and identifying submerged objects. The scalability of the technique opens up the ability for handheld or UAS-mounted lidar bathymetric systems, which provides for potential applications currently unavailable to the community. The high laser pulse repetition rate allows for very fine horizontal resolution while the photon-counting technique permits real-time depth measurement and object detection. The enhanced measurement capability, portability, scalability, and relatively low-cost creates the opportunity to perform frequent high-accuracy monitoring and measuring of aquatic environments which is crucial for understanding how rivers evolve over many timescales. Results from recent campaigns measuring water depth in flowing creeks and murky ponds will be presented which demonstrate that the method is not limited by rough water surfaces and can map underwater topology through moderately turbid water.

  20. An Innovative and Simple Technique of Hollow Maxillary Complete Denture Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Aras, Meena Ajay; Chitre, Vidya; Mysore, Ashwin; Da Costa, Godwin Clovis

    2016-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of severely atrophic ridges has always been an ordeal for the clinician due to decreased support, stability and retention. Because of severe resorption the restorative space between maxillary and mandibular residual ridges is increased. Rehabilitation in such cases may result in increased height and weight of the prosthesis further compromising its retention and stability. This in turn overloads the underlying hard and soft tissues exacerbating ridge resorption so, in order to break this vicious cycle, the weight of the prosthesis needs to be reduced which can be achieved by making hollow prosthesis. This article describes a novel technique of fabricating a hollow maxillary complete denture. PMID:27656580

  1. Developing neonatal minimally invasive surgery: Innovation, techniques, and helping an industry to change.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Steven S

    2015-02-01

    The field of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in neonates and infants is a relatively new field, evolving over the last 20years. This has required the development of not only new techniques but new instruments. The process has resulted in a unique partnership between pediatric minimally invasive surgeons and industry, as both groups have struggled to find the right mix of need, technical viability, and economic sustainability. The results have spawned a new generation of MIS instrumentation that not only enables the neonatal MIS surgeon but also leads the way in the field of mini-laparoscopy in children and adults.

  2. An Innovative and Simple Technique of Hollow Maxillary Complete Denture Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Qanungo, Anchal; Aras, Meena Ajay; Chitre, Vidya; Mysore, Ashwin; Da Costa, Godwin Clovis

    2016-08-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of severely atrophic ridges has always been an ordeal for the clinician due to decreased support, stability and retention. Because of severe resorption the restorative space between maxillary and mandibular residual ridges is increased. Rehabilitation in such cases may result in increased height and weight of the prosthesis further compromising its retention and stability. This in turn overloads the underlying hard and soft tissues exacerbating ridge resorption so, in order to break this vicious cycle, the weight of the prosthesis needs to be reduced which can be achieved by making hollow prosthesis. This article describes a novel technique of fabricating a hollow maxillary complete denture. PMID:27656580

  3. Innovative Approaches for Rapid Subsurface Characterization Compared at a Rural Megasite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rein, A.; Holm, O.; Popp, S.; Bittens, M.; Rotard, W.; Dietrich, P.

    2008-12-01

    Megasites often are characterized by extended areas which are contaminated in soil and groundwater. In view of sustainable land management, the revitalization of such sites may significantly contribute to the reduction of land consumption. Furthermore, potential external effects need to be assessed, such as contaminant discharge via groundwater and potential impacts to off-site receptors. Due to multiple contaminant sources and high uncertainties concerning the possible distribution of contamination in the subsurface, information on the whole site may be required. Respective site investigation needs to be reliable and cost-effective, facing limited budgets especially for rural or suburban areas, i.e. due to a lower pressure of development compared to urban locations. At a former military site near Berlin, Germany, adaptive strategies and technologies for a risk-based site characterization and monitoring were developed and applied and compared to conventional techniques. Direct-push (DP)-based groundwater screening and tree core sampling, i.e. considering contaminant uptake into trees as an indirect indication of organic pollutions in the subsurface, were performed along a wide- meshed grid covering the whole site of approx. 120 hectares. Tree core sampling also covered the downstream area of the site, which is characterized by wetlands that are not accessible for DP, in order to investigate the plume extension. The DP-based groundwater screening was performed within a short time period, i.e. less than three weeks, at significantly lower costs compared to investigations based upon conventional groundwater wells (which characterized areas of suspected contamination, only). Findings of monitoring at the conventional wells could be confirmed, and new and unexpected areas of groundwater contamination at the site were identified. Results of groundwater sampling were in a good accordance to results of the tree core sampling campaign. Consequently, this novel investigation

  4. An innovative technique to simply fabricate ZrO₂-HA-TiO₂ nanostructured layers.

    PubMed

    Samanipour, F; Bayati, M R; Golestani-Fard, F; Zargar, H R; Troczynski, T; Mirhabibi, A R

    2011-08-01

    For the first time, ZrO₂-HA-TiO₂ layers were synthesized through EPD-Enhanced MAO (EEMAO) technique in only one step where no supplementary treatment was required. SEM, XRD, EDX, and XPS techniques were employed to propose a correlation between the growth parameters and the physical and chemical properties of the layers. The layers revealed a porous structure where applying higher voltages and/or utilizing higher concentrated electrolytes resulted in formation of wider pores and increasing the zirconium concentration in the layers; meanwhile, prolonging the growth time had the same effects. The layers mainly consisted of anatase, hydroxyapatite, monoclinic ZrO₂, and tetragonal ZrO₂ phases. Increasing the voltage, electrolyte concentration, and time, hydroxyapatite as well as tetragonal ZrO₂ was decomposed to α-TCP, monoclinic ZrO₂, and ZrO. The nanosized zirconia particles (d = 20-60 nm) were further accumulated on the vicinity of the layers when thicker electrolytes were utilized or higher voltages were applied. Emphasizing on the chemical and electrochemical foundations, a probable formation mechanism was finally put forward.

  5. Advancing the frontiers in nanocatalysis, biointerfaces, and renewable energy conversion by innovations of surface techniques.

    PubMed

    Somorjai, Gabor A; Frei, Heinz; Park, Jeong Y

    2009-11-25

    The challenge of chemistry in the 21st century is to achieve 100% selectivity of the desired product molecule in multipath reactions ("green chemistry") and develop renewable energy based processes. Surface chemistry and catalysis play key roles in this enterprise. Development of in situ surface techniques such as high-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, time-resolved Fourier transform infrared methods, and ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy enabled the rapid advancement of three fields: nanocatalysts, biointerfaces, and renewable energy conversion chemistry. In materials nanoscience, synthetic methods have been developed to produce monodisperse metal and oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in the 0.8-10 nm range with controlled shape, oxidation states, and composition; these NPs can be used as selective catalysts since chemical selectivity appears to be dependent on all of these experimental parameters. New spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed that operate under reaction conditions and reveal the dynamic change of molecular structure of catalysts and adsorbed molecules as the reactions proceed with changes in reaction intermediates, catalyst composition, and oxidation states. SFG vibrational spectroscopy detects amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces and monitors the change of surface structure and interactions with coadsorbed water. Exothermic reactions and photons generate hot electrons in metal NPs that may be utilized in chemical energy conversion. The photosplitting of water and carbon dioxide, an important research direction in renewable energy conversion, is discussed.

  6. An innovative privacy preserving technique for incremental datasets on cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Aldeen, Yousra Abdul Alsahib S; Salleh, Mazleena; Aljeroudi, Yazan

    2016-08-01

    Cloud computing (CC) is a magnificent service-based delivery with gigantic computer processing power and data storage across connected communications channels. It imparted overwhelming technological impetus in the internet (web) mediated IT industry, where users can easily share private data for further analysis and mining. Furthermore, user affable CC services enable to deploy sundry applications economically. Meanwhile, simple data sharing impelled various phishing attacks and malware assisted security threats. Some privacy sensitive applications like health services on cloud that are built with several economic and operational benefits necessitate enhanced security. Thus, absolute cyberspace security and mitigation against phishing blitz became mandatory to protect overall data privacy. Typically, diverse applications datasets are anonymized with better privacy to owners without providing all secrecy requirements to the newly added records. Some proposed techniques emphasized this issue by re-anonymizing the datasets from the scratch. The utmost privacy protection over incremental datasets on CC is far from being achieved. Certainly, the distribution of huge datasets volume across multiple storage nodes limits the privacy preservation. In this view, we propose a new anonymization technique to attain better privacy protection with high data utility over distributed and incremental datasets on CC. The proficiency of data privacy preservation and improved confidentiality requirements is demonstrated through performance evaluation. PMID:27369566

  7. An innovative privacy preserving technique for incremental datasets on cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Aldeen, Yousra Abdul Alsahib S; Salleh, Mazleena; Aljeroudi, Yazan

    2016-08-01

    Cloud computing (CC) is a magnificent service-based delivery with gigantic computer processing power and data storage across connected communications channels. It imparted overwhelming technological impetus in the internet (web) mediated IT industry, where users can easily share private data for further analysis and mining. Furthermore, user affable CC services enable to deploy sundry applications economically. Meanwhile, simple data sharing impelled various phishing attacks and malware assisted security threats. Some privacy sensitive applications like health services on cloud that are built with several economic and operational benefits necessitate enhanced security. Thus, absolute cyberspace security and mitigation against phishing blitz became mandatory to protect overall data privacy. Typically, diverse applications datasets are anonymized with better privacy to owners without providing all secrecy requirements to the newly added records. Some proposed techniques emphasized this issue by re-anonymizing the datasets from the scratch. The utmost privacy protection over incremental datasets on CC is far from being achieved. Certainly, the distribution of huge datasets volume across multiple storage nodes limits the privacy preservation. In this view, we propose a new anonymization technique to attain better privacy protection with high data utility over distributed and incremental datasets on CC. The proficiency of data privacy preservation and improved confidentiality requirements is demonstrated through performance evaluation.

  8. Advancing the Frontiers in Nanocatalysis, Biointerfaces, and Renewable Energy Conversion by Innovations of Surface Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, G.A.; Frei, H.; Park, J.Y.

    2009-07-23

    The challenge of chemistry in the 21st century is to achieve 100% selectivity of the desired product molecule in multipath reactions ('green chemistry') and develop renewable energy based processes. Surface chemistry and catalysis play key roles in this enterprise. Development of in situ surface techniques such as high-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, time-resolved Fourier transform infrared methods, and ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy enabled the rapid advancement of three fields: nanocatalysts, biointerfaces, and renewable energy conversion chemistry. In materials nanoscience, synthetic methods have been developed to produce monodisperse metal and oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in the 0.8-10 nm range with controlled shape, oxidation states, and composition; these NPs can be used as selective catalysts since chemical selectivity appears to be dependent on all of these experimental parameters. New spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed that operate under reaction conditions and reveal the dynamic change of molecular structure of catalysts and adsorbed molecules as the reactions proceed with changes in reaction intermediates, catalyst composition, and oxidation states. SFG vibrational spectroscopy detects amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces and monitors the change of surface structure and interactions with coadsorbed water. Exothermic reactions and photons generate hot electrons in metal NPs that may be utilized in chemical energy conversion. The photosplitting of water and carbon dioxide, an important research direction in renewable energy conversion, is discussed.

  9. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Frauk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2001-08-15

    Research continues on characterizing and modeling the behavior of naturally fractured reservoir systems. Work has progressed on developing techniques for estimating fracture properties from seismic and well log data, developing naturally fractured wellbore models, and developing a model to characterize the transfer of fluid from the matrix to the fracture system for use in the naturally fractured reservoir simulator.

  10. From Brainstorming to C-Sketch to Principles of Historical Innovators: Ideation Techniques to Enhance Student Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Christina; Wood, Kristin; Jensen, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The heart and soul of engineering is innovation and our ability to improve the human condition through design. To enrich engineering education, it is critical that we advance our teaching in innovation and design processes. This research focuses on the ideation component of innovation through the investigation of a suite of concept generation…

  11. A Innovative Technique - Modified Feeding Bottle for a Cleft Palate Infant.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Vinuta Siddayya; Lingegowda, Ashwini Budunur; Rayannavar, Sounyala; Kumari, Nirmala

    2016-04-01

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are one of the most common craniofacial anomalies. Infants suffer a lot of difficulty in sucking during the initial few days after birth. There is even psychological stress to the parents due to improper feeding and the infants lose weight and are prone to nutritional insufficiency. Due to recent advancement in the medical field, there is a total repair of cleft lip and cleft palate and these procedures are performed in the later stages of infants. It is the multidisciplinary approach which includes pedodontist, oral surgeon, prosthodontist and speech therapist. In this article, the technique is highlighted to fulfill the feeding problem of infants in the early stages of birth with a modified feeding bottle. PMID:27190971

  12. Mini-FLOTAC, an Innovative Direct Diagnostic Technique for Intestinal Parasitic Infections: Experience from the Field

    PubMed Central

    Barda, Beatrice Divina; Rinaldi, Laura; Ianniello, Davide; Zepherine, Henry; Salvo, Fulvio; Sadutshang, Tsetan; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Clementi, Massimo; Albonico, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Background Soil-transmitted helminths and intestinal protozoa infection are widespread in developing countries, yet an accurate diagnosis is rarely performed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the recently developed mini–FLOTAC method and to compare with currently more widely used techniques for the diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections in different settings. Methodology/Principal Findings The study was carried out in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh, India, and in Bukumbi, Tanzania. A total of 180 pupils from two primary schools had their stool analyzed (n = 80 in Dharamsala and n = 100 in Bukumbi) for intestinal parasitic infections with three diagnostic methods: direct fecal smear, formol-ether concentration method (FECM) and mini-FLOTAC. Overall, 72% of the pupils were positive for any intestinal parasitic infection, 24% carried dual infections and 11% three infections or more. The most frequently encountered intestinal parasites were Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Giardia intestinalis, hookworm, (and Schistosoma mansoni, in Tanzania). Statistically significant differences were found in the detection of parasitic infections among the three methods: mini-FLOTAC was the most sensitive method for helminth infections (90% mini-FLOTAC, 60% FECM, and 30% direct fecal smear), whereas FECM was most sensitive for intestinal protozoa infections (88% FECM, 70% direct fecal smear, and 68% mini-FLOTAC). Conclusion/Significance We present the first experiences with the mini-FLOTAC for the diagnosis of intestinal helminths and protozoa. Our results suggest that it is a valid, sensitive and potentially low-cost alternative technique that could be used in resource-limited settings — particularly for helminth diagnosis. PMID:23936577

  13. Discovery of naked charm particles and lifetime differences among charm species using nuclear emulsion techniques innovated in Japan

    PubMed Central

    NIU, Kiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    This is a historical review of the discovery of naked charm particles and lifetime differences among charm species. These discoveries in the field of cosmic-ray physics were made by the innovation of nuclear emulsion techniques in Japan. A pair of naked charm particles was discovered in 1971 in a cosmic-ray interaction, three years prior to the discovery of the hidden charm particle, J/Ψ, in western countries. Lifetime differences between charged and neutral charm particles were pointed out in 1975, which were later re-confirmed by the collaborative Experiment E531 at Fermilab. Japanese physicists led by K.Niu made essential contributions to it with improved emulsion techniques, complemented by electronic detectors. This review also discusses the discovery of artificially produced naked charm particles by us in an accelerator experiment at Fermilab in 1975 and of multiple-pair productions of charm particles in a single interaction in 1987 by the collaborative Experiment WA75 at CERN. PMID:18941283

  14. An innovative technique to synthesize C-doped MgB2 by using chitosan as the carbon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovone, G.; Vignolo, M.; Bernini, C.; Kawale, S.; Siri, A. S.

    2014-02-01

    Here, we report a new technique to synthesize carbon-doped MgB2 powder. Chitosan was innovatively used as the carbon source during the synthesis of boron from boron oxide. This allowed the introduction of local defects, which later on served as pinning centers in MgB2, in the boron lattice itself, avoiding the traditional and time consuming ways of ex situ MgB2 doping (e.g. ball milling). Two volume percentages of C-doping have been tried and its effect on the superconducting properties, evaluated by magnetic and transport measurements, are discussed here. Morphological analysis by scanning electron microscopy revealed nano-metric grains’ distribution in the boron and MgB2 powder. Mono-filamentary MgB2 wires have been fabricated by an ex situ powder-in-tube technique by using the thus prepared carbon-doped MgB2 and pure MgB2 powders. Transport property measurements on these wires were made and compared with MgB2 wire produced using commercial boron.

  15. Adapting of the Background-Oriented Schlieren (BOS) Technique in the Characterization of the Flow Regimes in Thermal Spraying Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Abdulgader, M.; Rademacher, H. G.; Anjami, N.; Hagen, L.

    2014-01-01

    In thermal spraying technique, the changes in the in-flight particle velocities are considered to be only a function of the drag forces caused by the dominating flow regimes in the spray jet. Therefore, the correct understanding of the aerodynamic phenomena occurred at nozzle out let and at the substrate interface is an important task in the targeted improvement in the nozzle and air-cap design as well as in the spraying process in total. The presented work deals with the adapting of an innovative technique for the flow characterization called background-oriented Schlieren. The flow regimes in twin wire arc spraying (TWAS) and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) were analyzed with this technique. The interfering of the atomization gas flow with the intersected wires causes in case of TWAS process a deformation of the jet shape. It leads also to areas with different aero dynamic forces. The configurations of the outlet air-caps in TWAS effect predominantly the outlet flow characteristics. The ratio between fuel and oxygen determine the dominating flow regimes in the HVOF spraying jet. Enhanced understanding of the aerodynamics at outlet and at the substrate interface could lead to a targeted improvement in thermal spraying processes.

  16. Mechanism for single-event burnout of power MOSFETs and its characterization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboyama, S.; Matsuda, S.; Kanno, T.; Ishii, T.

    1992-12-01

    A novel characterization technique for single event burnout (SEB) of power MOSFETs was developed. The technique is based on a pulse-height analyzer system for charge collection measurement with a modified charge-sensitive amplifier which has a very wide dynamic range. The data obtained by this technique give detailed information about the SEB mechanism of power MOSFETs. The experimental data suggested a position-independent charge collection mechanism along an ion track, and a new parameter for SEB hardness was proposed.

  17. Capreomycin inhalable powders prepared with an innovative spray-drying technique.

    PubMed

    Schoubben, Aurélie; Giovagnoli, Stefano; Tiralti, Maria Cristina; Blasi, Paolo; Ricci, Maurizio

    2014-07-20

    The aim of the work was to produce inhalable capreomycin powders using a novel spray-drying technology. A 2(3) factorial design was used to individuate the best working conditions. The maximum desirability was identified at the smallest mean volume diameter (dv) and span, and the highest yield. Powders were characterized for size, morphology, flowability and aerodynamic properties. Mathematical models showed a good predictivity with biases lower than 20%. The maximum conformity with desirability criteria was obtained spraying a 10mg/mL bacitracin solution at 111 °C with the 4 μm pore size membrane. By processing capreomycin sulfate with the parameters optimized for bacitracin, an inhalable powder was obtained (i.e., yield of 82%, dv of 3.83 μm, and span of 1.04). By further optimization, capreomycin sulfate powder characteristics were improved (i.e., yield, ∼71%; dv, 3.25 μm; span, 0.95). After formulation with lactose, emitted dose and respirable fraction of 87% and ∼27% were obtained, respectively. Two capreomycin sulfate powders with suitable properties for inhalation were produced using the nano spray-dryer B-90. PMID:24747443

  18. The use of fluidized sand bed as an innovative technique for heat treating aluminum based castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragab, Khaled

    The current study was carried out to arrive at a better understanding of the influences of the fluidized sand bed heat treatment on the tensile properties and quality indices of A356.2 and B319.2 casting alloys. For the purposes of validating the use of fluidized sand bed furnaces in industrial applications for heat treatment of 356 and 319 castings, the tensile properties and the quality indices of these alloys were correlated with the most common metallurgical parameters, such as strontium modification, grain refining, solutionizing time, aging parameters and quenching media. Traditional heat treatment technology, employing circulating air convection furnaces, was used to establish a relevant comparison with fluidized sand beds for the heat treatment of the alloys investigated, employing T6 continuous aging cycles or multi-temperature aging cycles. Quality charts were used to predict and/or select the best heat treatment conditions and techniques to be applied in industry in order to obtain the optimum properties required for particular engineering applications. The results revealed that the strength values achieved in T6-tempered 319 and 356 alloys are more responsive to fluidized bed (FB) heat treatment than to conventional convection furnace (CF) treatment for solution treatment times of up to 8 hours. Beyond this solution time, no noticeable difference in properties is observed with the two techniques. A significant increase in strength is observed in the FB heat-treated samples after short aging times of 0.5 and 1 hour, the trend continuing up to 5 hours. The 319 alloys show signs of overaging after 8 hours of aging using a conventional furnace, whereas with a fluidized bed, overaging occurs after 12 hours. Analysis of the tensile properties in terms of quality index charts showed that both modified and non-modified 319 and 356 alloys display the same, or better, quality, after only a 2-hr treatment in an FB compared to 10 hours when using a CF. The quality

  19. Numerical analysis of radiation propagation in innovative volumetric receivers based on selective laser melting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Fabrizio; Santiago, Sergio; Roccabruna, Mattia; Luque, Salvador; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Jose; Crema, Luigi; Romero, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Volumetric absorbers constitute one of the key elements in order to achieve high thermal conversion efficiencies in concentrating solar power plants. Regardless of the working fluid or thermodynamic cycle employed, design trends towards higher absorber output temperatures are widespread, which lead to the general need of components of high solar absorptance, high conduction within the receiver material, high internal convection, low radiative and convective heat losses and high mechanical durability. In this context, the use of advanced manufacturing techniques, such as selective laser melting, has allowed for the fabrication of intricate geometries that are capable of fulfilling the previous requirements. This paper presents a parametric design and analysis of the optical performance of volumetric absorbers of variable porosity conducted by means of detailed numerical ray tracing simulations. Sections of variable macroscopic porosity along the absorber depth were constructed by the fractal growth of single-cell structures. Measures of performance analyzed include optical reflection losses from the absorber front and rear faces, penetration of radiation inside the absorber volume, and radiation absorption as a function of absorber depth. The effects of engineering design parameters such as absorber length and wall thickness, material reflectance and porosity distribution on the optical performance of absorbers are discussed, and general design guidelines are given.

  20. Innovative techniques for analyzing the three-dimensional behavioral results from acoustically tagged fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steig, Tracey W.; Timko, Mark A.

    2005-04-01

    Acoustic tags were used to monitor the swimming patterns of downstream migrating salmon smolts approaching various dams on the Columbia River, USA. Downstream migrating yearling chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka), and sub-yearling chinook smolts were surgically implanted with acoustic tags. Fish were tracked in three-dimensions as they approached and passed into the turbine intakes, spillways, and surface bypass channel entrances at the dams during the 2004 spring and summer outmigrations. A number of advances in the analysis techniques and software have been made over the past few years. Some of these improvements include the development of various fish density algorithms, stream trace modeling analysis, and advances of three-dimensional animation programs. Three-dimensional tracks of fish approaching the turbine intakes, spillways, and surface bypass channel entrances will be presented. Concentrations of fish passage will be presented as three-dimensional fish densities superimposed over dam structures. Stream trace modeling animation will be presented showing predicted fish passage routes.

  1. Innovative techniques for extending the range and node limits in Bluetooth-based wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Matthew J.; James, Daniel A.; Thiel, David V.

    2005-12-01

    Wireless networks for sensor applications are required to support an adequate data throughput, range, node density and must consume as little power as possible. The Bluetooth specification has been designed for low power, medium data rate, cable replacement solutions and is therefore useful for wireless sensor networks. However it has a limitation of a maximum number of eight active devices per Bluetooth network (piconet). To be useful in wireless sensor networks a Bluetooth piconet requires a means to communicate to more than the maximum of eight active devices. This paper demonstrates techniques for expanding the usefulness of Bluetooth for wireless sensor networks. This has been done by using multiple access points, sharing the active member addresses of the Bluetooth piconet and utilising multiple piconet and scatternet tree structures. A comparison of existing piconet handoff mechanisms has been conducted and these have been evaluated for feasibility with the available hardware's limitations. Scatternet and piconet sharing mechanisms have been developed that allow a Bluetooth structure to support more than eight devices. These structures have been implemented with existing Bluetooth hardware and are compared via theoretical simulation and experimental results. The developed network of multiple Bluetooth access points combined with the developed Bluetooth structures provides several wireless networks suitable for sensor applications.

  2. Innovative frequency measurement technique used in the design of a single channel frequency to digital converter ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalingam, Neranjen; Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1996-09-01

    The frequency to digital converter (FDC) is an application specific integrated circuit. The chip has been designed to handle one input channel but can easily be expanded to handle multiple channels of frequencies. The channel is capable of measuring frequencies from 100 Hz to 100 kHz. The power consumption of the chip is very low. The frequency measurement accuracy is better than 0.1 percent. The conversion rate per channel is 100 samples/second which can be carried too. The chip has a built-in test equipment to verify its operation. It is able to generate frequencies like 8 Mhz, 4Mhz, 2Mhz and 1Mhz which can be fed as optional clock frequencies depending on the accuracy desired. The FDC chip can be interfaced to a 16 bit bus. To meet these stringent specifications of the FDC chip an innovative frequency measurement technique has been devised called the hybrid technique of frequency measurement. The technique proves to be very accurate and it is found that by varying the sampling rate the range of input frequencies over which this accuracy can be achieved also changes. The specifications are particularly strict so that it is possible to use the chip for any military application for which a very reliable operation is demanded. The FDC chip is hence ideal for control and guidance purposes. The chip has wide ranging applications. In conjunction with sensors such as accelerometers it can be used to design smart sensors. The chip can play a vital role in engine controllers and in pressure measurements using vibrating type transducers. Sometimes to isolate transducers, the output is converted to frequency and isolation is achieved using opto-isolators; then by measuring the frequency using this chip this can be converted to digital information.

  3. An Innovative Technique for Evaluating the Integrity and Durability of Wind Turbine Blade Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei

    2010-09-01

    Wind turbine blades are subjected to complex multiaxial stress states during operation. A review of the literature suggests that mixed mode fracture toughness can be significantly less than that of the tensile opening mode (Mode I), implying that fracture failure can occur at a much lower load capacity if the structure is subject to mixed-mode loading. Thus, it will be necessary to identify the mechanisms that might lead to failure in blade materials under mixed-mode loading conditions. Meanwhile, wind turbine blades are typically fabricated from fiber reinforced polymeric materials, e.g. fiber glass composites. Due to the large degree of anisotropy in mechanical properties that is usually associated with laminates, the fracture behavior of these composite materials is likely to be strongly dependent on the loading conditions. This may further strengthen the need to study the effect of mixed-mode loading on the integrity and durability of the wind turbine blade composites. To quantify the fracture behavior of composite structures under mixed mode loading conditions, particularly under combined Mode I (flexural or normal tensile stress) and Mode III (torsional shear stress) loading, a new testing technique is proposed based on the spiral notch torsion test (SNTT). As a 2002 R&D 100 Award winner, SNTT is a novel fracture testing technology. SNTT has many advantages over conventional fracture toughness methods and has been used to determine fracture toughness values on a wide spectrum of materials. The current project is the first attempt to utilize SNTT on polymeric and polymer-based composite materials. It is expected that mixed-mode failure mechanisms of wind turbine blades induced by typical in-service loading conditions, such as delamination, matrix cracking, fiber pull-out and fracture, can be effectively and economically investigated by using this methodology. This project consists of two phases. The Phase I (FY2010) effort includes (1) preparation of testing

  4. Nondestructive techniques for characterizing mechanical properties of structural materials: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Klima, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is presented to indicate the availability and application potentials of techniques for quantitative characterization of the mechanical properties of structural materials. The purpose is to review NDE techniques that go beyond the usual emphasis on flaw detection and characterization. Discussed are current and emerging NDE techniques that can verify and monitor entrinsic properties (e.g., tensile, shear, and yield strengths; fracture toughness, hardness, ductility; elastic moduli) and underlying microstructural and morphological factors. Most of the techniques described are, at present, neither widely applied nor widely accepted in commerce and industry because they are still emerging from the laboratory. The limitations of the techniques may be overcome by advances in applications research and instrumentation technology and perhaps by accommodations for their use in the design of structural parts.

  5. Understanding, promoting and protecting geodiversity and geoheritage of the Piemonte region (Italy) through innovative techniques and public engagement in Earth Science studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardino, Marco; Lozar, Francesca; Perotti, Luigi; Palomba, Mauro; Groppo, Chiara; Natalicchio, Marcello; Ghiraldi, Luca; Beltramo, Riccardo; Lombardo, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    The onset of Antropocene demonstrates the importance of considering both 1) geodiversity and 2) geoheritage as parts of the landscape "interfaces" where relationships between natural and socio-economic systems can be studied and interpreted. By definition: 1) is the variety, recognizable in nature ("diversity"), of geological features (rocks, minerals, fossils…), of geomorphological environments (and related forms and processes) and of soil characteristics; 2) is an integral part of the global natural heritage focusing on unique, special and representative sites of geological interests (geosites l.s.). In the Antropocene, both 1) and 2) hold a dynamic character, as the result of actions and interactions of natural and/or human factors. Therefore, geodiversity and geoheritage studies are essential for breaking down geological environments and human territories into their main parts and to understand the variables and mechanisms that control their changes. In this perspective, results of the multidisciplinary project PROGEO-Piemonte ("PROactive management of GEOlogical heritage in the Piemonte Region") are presented here: an innovative approach for assessing geodiversity in order to select areas of high potential value of geoheritage to be enhanced by targeted management actions. Since the geodiversity of Piemonte is materialized by elements of high scientific, educational, tourism, etc. value, the geosites where this geoheritage is preserved have been comprehensively analysed and characterized for encompassing both public and private interests. 9 strategic geothematic areas have been selected in the Piemonte Region to test this approach, and to improve social engagement aimed at protecting and promoting geodiversity ad geoheritage. The investigated areas represent the multifaceted geodiversity of Piemonte; each area is characterized by high potential for scientific studies, enhancement of public understanding of science, recreation activities and for economic

  6. Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers. Second technical annual progress report, October 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1992-12-31

    This second annual report on innovative uses of tracers for reservoir characterization contains four sections each describing a novel use of oilfield tracers. The first section describes and illustrates the use of a new single-well tracer test to estimate wettability. This test consists of the injection of brine containing tracers followed by oil containing tracers, a shut-in period to allow some of the tracers to react, and then production of the tracers. The inclusion of the oil injection slug with tracers is unique to this test, and this is what makes the test work. We adapted our chemical simulator, UTCHEM, to enable us to study this tracer method and made an extensive simulation study to evaluate the effects of wettability based upon characteristic curves for relative permeability and capillary pressure for differing wetting states typical of oil reservoirs. The second section of this report describes a new method for analyzing interwell tracer data based upon a type-curve approach. Theoretical frequency response functions were used to build type curves of ``transfer function`` and ``phase spectrum`` that have dimensionless heterogeneity index as a parameter to characterize a stochastic permeability field. We illustrate this method by analyzing field tracer data. The third section of this report describes a new theory for interpreting interwell tracer data in terms of channeling and dispersive behavior for reservoirs. Once again, a stochastic approach to reservoir description is taken. The fourth section of this report describes our simulation of perfluorocarbon gas tracers. This new tracer technology developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory is being tested at the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in California. We report preliminary simulations made of these tracers in one of the oil reservoirs under evaluation with these tracers in this field. Our compostional simulator (UTCOMP) was used for this simulation study.

  7. The option to abandon: stimulating innovative groundwater remediation technologies characterized by technological uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Compernolle, T; Van Passel, S; Huisman, K; Kort, P

    2014-10-15

    Many studies on technology adoption demonstrate that uncertainty leads to a postponement of investments by integrating a wait option in the economic analysis. The aim of this study however is to demonstrate how the investment in new technologies can be stimulated by integrating an option to abandon. Furthermore, this real option analysis not only considers the ex ante decision analysis of the investment in a new technology under uncertainty, but also allows for an ex post evaluation of the investment. Based on a case study regarding the adoption of an innovative groundwater remediation strategy, it is demonstrated that when the option to abandon the innovative technology is taken into account, the decision maker decides to invest in this technology, while at the same time it determines an optimal timing to abandon the technology if its operation proves to be inefficient. To reduce uncertainty about the effectiveness of groundwater remediation technologies, samples are taken. Our analysis shows that when the initial belief in an effective innovative technology is low, it is important that these samples provide correct information in order to justify the adoption of the innovative technology.

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW Organic photovoltaics: principles and techniques for nanometre scale characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Patrick G.; Castro, Fernando A.

    2010-12-01

    The photoconversion efficiency of state-of-the-art organic solar cells has experienced a remarkable increase in the last few years, with reported certified efficiency values of up to 8.3%. This increase has been due to an improved understanding of the underlying physics, synthetic discovery and the realization of the pivotal role that morphological optimization plays. Advances in nanometre scale characterization have underpinned all three factors. Here we give an overview of the current understanding of the fundamental processes in organic photovoltaic devices, on optimization considerations and on recent developments in nanometre scale measuring techniques. Finally, recommendations for future developments from the perspective of characterization techniques are set forth.

  9. Ultrasound Imaging Techniques for Spatiotemporal Characterization of Composition, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties in Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Deng, Cheri X; Hong, Xiaowei; Stegemann, Jan P

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound techniques are increasingly being used to quantitatively characterize both native and engineered tissues. This review provides an overview and selected examples of the main techniques used in these applications. Grayscale imaging has been used to characterize extracellular matrix deposition, and quantitative ultrasound imaging based on the integrated backscatter coefficient has been applied to estimating cell concentrations and matrix morphology in tissue engineering. Spectral analysis has been employed to characterize the concentration and spatial distribution of mineral particles in a construct, as well as to monitor mineral deposition by cells over time. Ultrasound techniques have also been used to measure the mechanical properties of native and engineered tissues. Conventional ultrasound elasticity imaging and acoustic radiation force imaging have been applied to detect regions of altered stiffness within tissues. Sonorheometry and monitoring of steady-state excitation and recovery have been used to characterize viscoelastic properties of tissue using a single transducer to both deform and image the sample. Dual-mode ultrasound elastography uses separate ultrasound transducers to produce a more potent deformation force to microscale characterization of viscoelasticity of hydrogel constructs. These ultrasound-based techniques have high potential to impact the field of tissue engineering as they are further developed and their range of applications expands.

  10. Template Synthesis Of Copper Nanowires Via Electrodeposition Technique And Their Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Narinder; Kumar, Rajesh; Kumar, Sushil; Chakarvarti, S. K.

    2011-12-12

    Copper nanowires have been synthesized successfully using template assisted electrodeposition technique. Commercial polycarbonate membrane (Whatman, Japan) having pore diameter 100 nm, thickness 10 {mu}m and pore density 10{sup 7} pores/cm{sup 2} was used as template. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques were used to characterize the synthesized copper nanowires. XRD and SEM results reveal that polycrystalline copper nanowires were obtained with fcc lattice structure having diameter equal to the diameter of the template used.

  11. Analytical techniques for characterization of cyclodextrin complexes in the solid state: A review.

    PubMed

    Mura, Paola

    2015-09-10

    Cyclodextrins are cyclic oligosaccharides able to form inclusion complexes with a variety of hydrophobic guest molecules, positively modifying their physicochemical properties. A thorough analytical characterization of cyclodextrin complexes is of fundamental importance to provide an adequate support in selection of the most suitable cyclodextrin for each guest molecule, and also in view of possible future patenting and marketing of drug-cyclodextrin formulations. The demonstration of the actual formation of a drug-cyclodextrin inclusion complex in solution does not guarantee its existence also in the solid state. Moreover, the technique used to prepare the solid complex can strongly influence the properties of the final product. Therefore, an appropriate characterization of the drug-cyclodextrin solid systems obtained has also a key role in driving in the choice of the most effective preparation method, able to maximize host-guest interactions. The analytical characterization of drug-cyclodextrin solid systems and the assessment of the actual inclusion complex formation is not a simple task and involves the combined use of several analytical techniques, whose results have to be evaluated together. The objective of the present review is to present a general prospect of the principal analytical techniques which can be employed for a suitable characterization of drug-cyclodextrin systems in the solid state, evidencing their respective potential advantages and limits. The applications of each examined technique are described and discussed by pertinent examples from literature.

  12. A Systematic Characterization of Cognitive Techniques for Learning from Textual and Pictorial Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploetzner, Rolf; Lowe, Richard; Schlag, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Pictorial representations can play a pivotal role in both printed and digital learning material. Although there has been extensive research on cognitive techniques and strategies for learning from text, the same cannot be said for static and dynamic pictorial representations. In this paper we propose a systematic characterization of cognitive…

  13. The maturing of high contrast imaging and starlight suppression techniques for future NASA exoplanet characterization missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulter, Daniel R.; Gallagher, David B.; Siegler, Nicholas; Shaklan, Stuart; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Traub, Wesley A.

    2016-07-01

    Over 3000 exoplanets and hundreds of exoplanetary systems have been detected to date and we are now rapidly moving toward an era where the focus is shifting from detection to direct imaging and spectroscopic characterization of these new worlds and their atmospheres. NASA is currently studying several exoplanet characterization mission concepts for the 2020 Decadal Survey ranging from probe class to flagships. Detailed and comprehensive exoplanet characterization, particularly of exo-Earths, leading to assessment of habitability, or indeed detection of life, will require significant advances beyond the current state-of-the-art in high contrast imaging and starlight suppression techniques which utilize specially shaped precision optical elements to block the light from the parent star while controlling scattering and diffraction thus revealing and enabling spectroscopic study of the orbiting exoplanets in reflected light. In this paper we describe the two primary high contrast starlight suppression techniques currently being pursued by NASA: 1) coronagraphs (including several design variations) and 2) free-flying starshades. These techniques are rapidly moving from the technology development phase to the design and engineering phase and we discuss the prospects and projected performance for future exoplanet characterization missions utilizing these techniques coupled with large aperture telescopes in space.

  14. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Baier, S.; Rochet, A.; Hofmann, G.; Kraut, M.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2015-06-15

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies.

  15. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, S.; Rochet, A.; Hofmann, G.; Kraut, M.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2015-06-01

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies.

  16. Basalt characterization by means of nuclear and electrical well logging techniques. Case study from Southern Syria.

    PubMed

    Asfahani, Jamal

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear well logging, including natural gamma ray, density, and neutron-porosity techniques are used with electrical well logging of long and short normal techniques to characterize the basaltic areas largely extended in Southern Syria. Statistical analysis approach with the threshold concept has been adapted for such characterization, where four kinds of basalt have been identified: very hard basalt, hard basalt, fractured basalt, and basalt alteration products. The spectrometric gamma technique has also been applied on the retrieved rock samples in order to determine the radioactive content (eU, eTh, and K%) of the basaltic section in the study area. No radioactive anomalies have been detected, the radioactive values are normal and in the expected range.

  17. Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques for Development and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Based Superstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Wainwright, Elliot; Williams, Phillip; Siochi, Emile J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, multiple commercial vendors have developed capability for the production of large-scale quantities of high-quality carbon nanotube sheets and yarns. While the materials have found use in electrical shielding applications, development of structural systems composed of a high volume fraction of carbon nanotubes is still lacking. A recent NASA program seeks to address this by prototyping a structural nanotube composite with strength-toweight ratio exceeding current state-of-the-art carbon fiber composites. Commercially available carbon nanotube sheets, tapes, and yarns are being processed into high volume fraction carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites. Nondestructive evaluation techniques have been applied throughout this development effort for material characterization and process control. This paper will report on the progress of these efforts, including magnetic characterization of residual catalyst content, Raman scattering characterization of nanotube diameter, defect ratio, and nanotube strain, and polarized Raman scattering for characterization of nanotube alignment.

  18. Evaluating Local Primary Dendrite Arm Spacing Characterization Techniques Using Synthetic Directionally Solidified Dendritic Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschopp, Mark A.; Miller, Jonathan D.; Oppedal, Andrew L.; Solanki, Kiran N.

    2015-10-01

    Microstructure characterization continues to play an important bridge to understanding why particular processing routes or parameters affect the properties of materials. This statement certainly holds true in the case of directionally solidified dendritic microstructures, where characterizing the primary dendrite arm spacing is vital to developing the process-structure-property relationships that can lead to the design and optimization of processing routes for defined properties. In this work, four series of simulations were used to examine the capability of a few Voronoi-based techniques to capture local microstructure statistics (primary dendrite arm spacing and coordination number) in controlled (synthetically generated) microstructures. These simulations used both cubic and hexagonal microstructures with varying degrees of disorder (noise) to study the effects of length scale, base microstructure, microstructure variability, and technique parameters on the local PDAS distribution, local coordination number distribution, bulk PDAS, and bulk coordination number. The Voronoi tesselation technique with a polygon-side-length criterion correctly characterized the known synthetic microstructures. By systematically studying the different techniques for quantifying local primary dendrite arm spacings, we have evaluated their capability to capture this important microstructure feature in different dendritic microstructures, which can be an important step for experimentally correlating with both processing and properties in single crystal nickel-based superalloys.

  19. Characterization techniques to validate models of density variations in pressed powder compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Garino, T.; Mahoney, M.; Readey, M.; Ewsuk, K.; Gieske, J.; Stoker, G.; Min, S.

    1995-07-01

    Techniques for characterizing density gradients generated during typical powder compaction processes are reviewed and several are evaluated. The techniques reviewed are ultrasonic velocity measurements, laser ultrasonic velocity measurements, x-ray radiography, autoradiography, computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and simple image analysis of polished cross-sections. Experimental results are reported for all of these techniques except autoradiography, CT and MRI. The test specimens examined were right circular cylinders of a high length/diameter ratio (to ensure significant density variation) pressed from commercial spray-dried alumina powders. Although the density gradients could be detected with all four techniques, ultrasonic velocity measurements gave the best contour map of gradients and is therefore most suitable for model validation. On the other hand, it was concluded that x-ray radiography is preferable in situations where cost and/or number of samples are more important that high resolution.

  20. In situ attosecond pulse characterization techniques to measure the electromagnetic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanner, M.; Bertrand, J. B.; Villeneuve, D. M.

    2016-08-01

    A number of techniques have been developed to characterize the attosecond emission from high-order-harmonic sources. These techniques are broadly classified as ex situ, where the attosecond pulse train photoionizes a target gas in the presence of an infrared field, and in situ, where the measurement takes place in the medium in which the attosecond pulses are generated. It is accepted that ex situ techniques measure the characteristics of the electromagnetic field, including the phase of the recombination transition moment of the emitting atom or molecule, when the phase of the second medium is known. However, there is debate about whether in situ techniques measure the electromagnetic field, or only the characteristics of the recolliding electron before recombination occurs. We show numerically that in situ measurements are not sensitive to the recombination phase, when implemented in the perturbative regime as originally envisioned, and that they do not measure the electromagnetic phase of the emission.

  1. Development and application of techniques for the microstructural characterization of hydrogen permeability in zirconium oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavicic, Michael G.

    Equipment and techniques have been developed for the microstructural characterization of Zirconium Oxide films grown on Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tubes. A thin film texture apparatus was constructed and used to measure the texture and stress present in thin zirconium oxide films. The general techniques developed employ a grazing incidence geometry which allows the texture and stress present in thin films (<1mum) of any type to be examined. In addition, a technique for the quantitative phase analysis of textured ZrO2 films grown on zirconium alloys using pole figure data has also been developed. Moreover, equipment was constructed to determine the relative porosity of oxide films grown on a metal substrate using an electrochemical method that measures the effective non-porous oxide thickness. The described equipment and techniques were then used to characterize a test matrix of specimens whose relative hydrogen pick-up was measured by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The application of beat treatments to the substrates prior to oxide growth was found to have a pronounced effect upon the sharpness of the oxide texture. A correlation between the degree of sharpness of the oxide texture and hydrogen pick-up and corrosion rate of the substrate was also determined. In addition, based upon the new techniques developed it was determined that the tetragonal phase of the oxide is stress stabilized in a region close to the metal/oxide interface.

  2. Developing High-Frequency Quantitative Ultrasound Techniques to Characterize Three-Dimensional Engineered Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Karla Patricia E.

    Tissue engineering holds great promise for the repair or replacement of native tissues and organs. Further advancements in the fabrication of functional engineered tissues are partly dependent on developing new and improved technologies to monitor the properties of engineered tissues volumetrically, quantitatively, noninvasively, and nondestructively over time. Currently, engineered tissues are evaluated during fabrication using histology, biochemical assays, and direct mechanical tests. However, these techniques destroy tissue samples and, therefore, lack the capability for real-time, longitudinal monitoring. The research reported in this thesis developed nondestructive, noninvasive approaches to characterize the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of 3-D engineered tissues using high-frequency quantitative ultrasound and elastography technologies. A quantitative ultrasound technique, using a system-independent parameter known as the integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC), was employed to visualize and quantify structural properties of engineered tissues. Specifically, the IBC was demonstrated to estimate cell concentration and quantitatively detect differences in the microstructure of 3-D collagen hydrogels. Additionally, the feasibility of an ultrasound elastography technique called Single Tracking Location Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (STL-ARFI) imaging was demonstrated for estimating the shear moduli of 3-D engineered tissues. High-frequency ultrasound techniques can be easily integrated into sterile environments necessary for tissue engineering. Furthermore, these high-frequency quantitative ultrasound techniques can enable noninvasive, volumetric characterization of the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of engineered tissues during fabrication and post-implantation.

  3. Characterization of third-degree burned skin by nonlinear microscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Moisés O.; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Cesar, Carlos L.; Correa, Paulo R.; Zorn, Telma Maria T.; Zezell, Denise M.

    2011-03-01

    Nonlinear microscopy imaging technique enable take both images of collagen fibers in dermis through second harmonic generation (SHG) signal and elastic fibers by two-photon emission fluorescence microscopy (TPEFM). These techniques are the most commonly used technique for turbid and thick tissue imaging and also to image biological samples which presents highly ordered structural proteins without any exogenous label. The objective of this study is characterizing dermis of third-degree burned skin by TPEFM and SHG technique. The modelocked laser (Spectra Physics) source used in this study with pulse width of approximately 100 fs at 80 MHz was directed into a multiphoton microscope using a laser scanning unit (Olympus Fluoview 300), mounted on an inverted confocal system microscope (Olympus IX81), with focusing objective (40x, NA = 1.30). The samples were obtained from Wistar rats, male, adult. One dorsum area was submitted to burn caused by vapour exposure. The biopsies obtained were cryosectioned in slices of 20 μm width. Selected area of interface between the injured and healthy subdermal burned skin were imaged by TPEFM and SHG technique. Two different autofluorescence signals are observed as a function of excitation wavelength. The autofluorescence observed at 760 nm and 690 nm suggest components of extracellular matrix at differents depths. In SHG images, collagen fibers are visible. According to the images obtained, these methodologies can be used to characterize dermis of burned tissue as its healing process with reduced out-of-plane photobleaching and phototoxicity.

  4. Towards long lasting zirconia-based composites for dental implants. Part I: innovative synthesis, microstructural characterization and in vitro stability.

    PubMed

    Palmero, Paola; Fornabaio, Marta; Montanaro, Laura; Reveron, Helen; Esnouf, Claude; Chevalier, Jérôme

    2015-05-01

    In order to fulfill the clinical requirements for strong, tough and stable ceramics used in dental applications, we designed and developed innovative zirconia-based composites, in which equiaxial α-Al2O3 and elongated SrAl12O19 phases are dispersed in a ceria-stabilized zirconia matrix. The composite powders were prepared by an innovative surface coating route, in which commercial zirconia powders were coated by inorganic precursors of the second phases, which crystallize on the zirconia particles surface under proper thermal treatment. Samples containing four different ceria contents (in the range 10.0-11.5 mol%) were prepared by carefully tailoring the amount of the cerium precursor during the elaboration process. Slip cast green bodies were sintered at 1450 °C for 1 h, leading to fully dense materials. Characterization of composites by SEM and TEM analyses showed highly homogeneous microstructures with an even distribution of both equiaxial and elongated-shape grains inside a very fine zirconia matrix. Ce content plays a major role on aging kinetics, and should be carefully controlled: sample with 10 mol% of ceria were transformable, whereas above 10.5 mol% there is negligible or no transformation during autoclave treatment. Thus, in this paper we show the potential of the innovative surface coating route, which allows a perfect tailoring of the microstructural, morphological and compositional features of the composites; moreover, its processing costs and environmental impacts are limited, which is beneficial for further scale-up and real use in the biomedical field.

  5. Innovative Techniques of Multiphase Flow in Pipeline System for Oil-Gas Gathering and Transportation with Energy-Saving and Emission-Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Bofeng; Guo, Liejin; Zhang, Shaojun; Zhang, Ximin; Gu, Hanyang

    2010-03-01

    Multiphase flow measurement, desanding, dehumidification and heat furnace are critical techniques for the oil and gas gathering and transportation, which influnce intensively the energy-saving and emission-reduction in the petroleum industry. Some innovative techniques were developed for the first time by the present research team, including an online recognation instrument of multiphase flow regime, a water fraction instrument for multuphase flow, a coiled tube desanding separator with low pressure loss and high efficiency, a supersonic swirling natural gas dehumifier, and a vacuum phase-change boiler. With an integration of the above techniques, a new oil gas gathering and transpotation system was proposed, which reduced the establishment of one metering station and several transfer stations compared with the tranditional system. The oil and gas mixture transpotation in single pipes was realized. The improved techniques were applied in the oilfields in China and promoted the productivity of the oilfields by low energy consumption, low emissions, high efficiency and great security.

  6. Three-dimensional microstructural characterization of bulk plutonium and uranium metals using focused ion beam technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Brandon W.; Erler, Robert G.; Teslich, Nick E.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear forensics requires accurate quantification of discriminating microstructural characteristics of the bulk nuclear material to identify its process history and provenance. Conventional metallographic preparation techniques for bulk plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) metals are limited to providing information in two-dimension (2D) and do not allow for obtaining depth profile of the material. In this contribution, use of dual-beam focused ion-beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) to investigate the internal microstructure of bulk Pu and U metals is demonstrated. Our results demonstrate that the dual-beam methodology optimally elucidate microstructural features without preparation artifacts, and the three-dimensional (3D) characterization of inner microstructures can reveal salient microstructural features that cannot be observed from conventional metallographic techniques. Examples are shown to demonstrate the benefit of FIB-SEM in improving microstructural characterization of microscopic inclusions, particularly with respect to nuclear forensics.

  7. SELEX Modifications and Bioanalytical Techniques for Aptamer-Target Binding Characterization.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sze Y; Acquah, Caleb; Sidhu, Amandeep; Ongkudon, Clarence M; Yon, L S; Danquah, Michael K

    2016-11-01

    The quest to improve the detection of biomolecules and cells in health and life sciences has led to the discovery and characterization of various affinity bioprobes. Libraries of synthetic oligonucleotides (ssDNA/ssRNA) with randomized sequences are employed during Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) to select highly specific affinity probes called aptamers. With much focus on the generation of aptamers for a variety of target molecules, conventional SELEX protocols have been modified to develop new and improved SELEX protocols yielding highly specific and stable aptamers. Various techniques have been used to analyze the binding interactions between aptamers and their cognate molecules with associated merits and limitations. This article comprehensively reviews research advancements in the generation of aptamers, analyses physicochemical conditions affecting their binding characteristics to cellular and biomolecular targets, and discusses various field applications of aptameric binding. Biophysical techniques employed in the characterization of the molecular and binding features of aptamers to their cognate targets are also discussed.

  8. Optical techniques for remote and in-situ characterization of particles pertinent to GEOTRACES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Emmanuel; Guidi, Lionel; Richardson, Mary Jo; Stemmann, Lars; Gardner, Wilford; Bishop, James K. B.; Anderson, Robert F.; Sherrell, Robert M.

    2015-04-01

    Field and laboratory characterization of marine particles is laborious and expensive. Proxies of particle properties have been developed that allow researchers to obtain high frequency distributions of such properties in space or time. We focus on optical techniques used to characterize marine particles in-situ, with a focus on GEOTRACES-relevant properties, such as bulk properties including particle mass, cross-sectional area, particle size distribution, particle shape information, and also single particle optical properties, such as individual particle type and size. We also address the use of optical properties of particles to infer particulate organic or inorganic carbon. In addition to optical sensors we review advances in imaging technology and its use to study marine particles in situ. This review addresses commercially available technology and techniques that can be used as a proxy for particle properties and the associated uncertainties with particular focus to open ocean environments, the focus of GEOTRACES.

  9. Three-dimensional microstructural characterization of bulk plutonium and uranium metals using focused ion beam technique

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Brandon W.; Erler, Robert G.; Teslich, Nick E.

    2016-03-03

    Nuclear forensics requires accurate quantification of discriminating microstructural characteristics of the bulk nuclear material to identify its process history and provenance. Conventional metallographic preparation techniques for bulk plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) metals are limited to providing information in two-dimension (2D) and do not allow for obtaining depth profile of the material. In this contribution, use of dual-beam focused ion-beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) to investigate the internal microstructure of bulk Pu and U metals is demonstrated. Our results demonstrate that the dual-beam methodology optimally elucidate microstructural features without preparation artifacts, and the three-dimensional (3D) characterization of inner microstructures can revealmore » salient microstructural features that cannot be observed from conventional metallographic techniques. As a result, examples are shown to demonstrate the benefit of FIB-SEM in improving microstructural characterization of microscopic inclusions, particularly with respect to nuclear forensics.« less

  10. In Situ Mechanical Testing Techniques for Real-Time Materials Deformation Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Chris; Boesl, Benjamin; Agarwal, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    In situ mechanical property testing has the ability to enhance quantitative characterization of materials by revealing the occurring deformation behavior in real time. This article will summarize select recent testing performed inside a scanning electron microscope on various materials including metals, ceramics, composites, coatings, and 3-Dimensional graphene foam. Tensile and indentation testing methods are outlined with case studies and preliminary data. The benefits of performing a novel double-torsion testing technique in situ are also proposed.

  11. Thermal characterization and tomography of carbon fiber reinforced plastics using individual identification technique

    SciTech Connect

    Vavilov, V.P.; Grinzato, E.; Bison, P.G.; Marinetti, S.; Bressan, C.

    1996-05-01

    A method for thermal characterization of defect depth and thickness using individual inversion functions is described. Experimental results are obtained with standard carbon fiber reinforced plastic specimens which contained Teflon inserts and impact damage. Accuracy in determining defect dimensions was about 10 percent for defect depth and 33 percent for defect thickness. A technique to synthesize images of defect parameters is proposed. Thermal tomography advantages in analyzing defect in-depth propagation are illustrated.

  12. Characterization of thermal desorption with the Deans-switch technique in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Huang, Ying-Xue; Huang, Ting-Jyun; Chen, Yong-Shen; Wang, Chieh-Heng; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2016-09-01

    This study presents a novel application based on the Deans-switch cutting technique to characterize the thermal-desorption (TD) properties for gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Flash-heating of the sorbent bed at high temperatures to desorb trapped VOCs to GC may easily produce severe asymmetric or tailing GC peaks affecting resolution and sensitivity if care is not taken to optimize the TD conditions. The TD peak without GC separation was first examined for the quality of the TD peak by analyzing a standard gas mixture from C2 to C12 at ppb level. The Deans switch was later applied in two different stages. First, it was used to cut the trailing tail of the TD peak, which, although significantly improved the GC peak symmetry, led to more loss of the higher boiling compounds than the low boiling ones, thus suggesting compound discrimination. Subsequently, the Deans switch was used to dissect the TD peak into six 30s slices in series, and an uneven distribution in composition between the slices were found. A progressive decrease in low boiling compounds and increase in higher boiling ones across the slices indicated severe inhomogeneity in the TD profile. This finding provided a clear evidence to answer the discrimination problem found with the tail cutting approach to improve peak symmetry. Through the use of the innovated slicing method based on the Deans-switch cutting technique, optimization of TD injection for highly resolved, symmetric and non-discriminated GC peaks can now be more quantitatively assessed and guided. PMID:27492597

  13. Characterization of thermal desorption with the Deans-switch technique in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Huang, Ying-Xue; Huang, Ting-Jyun; Chen, Yong-Shen; Wang, Chieh-Heng; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2016-09-01

    This study presents a novel application based on the Deans-switch cutting technique to characterize the thermal-desorption (TD) properties for gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Flash-heating of the sorbent bed at high temperatures to desorb trapped VOCs to GC may easily produce severe asymmetric or tailing GC peaks affecting resolution and sensitivity if care is not taken to optimize the TD conditions. The TD peak without GC separation was first examined for the quality of the TD peak by analyzing a standard gas mixture from C2 to C12 at ppb level. The Deans switch was later applied in two different stages. First, it was used to cut the trailing tail of the TD peak, which, although significantly improved the GC peak symmetry, led to more loss of the higher boiling compounds than the low boiling ones, thus suggesting compound discrimination. Subsequently, the Deans switch was used to dissect the TD peak into six 30s slices in series, and an uneven distribution in composition between the slices were found. A progressive decrease in low boiling compounds and increase in higher boiling ones across the slices indicated severe inhomogeneity in the TD profile. This finding provided a clear evidence to answer the discrimination problem found with the tail cutting approach to improve peak symmetry. Through the use of the innovated slicing method based on the Deans-switch cutting technique, optimization of TD injection for highly resolved, symmetric and non-discriminated GC peaks can now be more quantitatively assessed and guided.

  14. Spatio-temporal characterization techniques of high-power femtosecond laser chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Valentin; Pariente, Gustave; Kahaly, Subhendu; Gobert, Olivier; Quéré, Fabien

    2014-03-01

    In this letter, we propose two techniques capable of spatio-temporally characterizing high-power femtosecond laser chains. We demonstrate a new implementation of SEA TADPOLE. To avoid the problems induced by the the significant spatial jittering of the focal spot on high-power laser chains, our setup is adapted to collimated beams. In addition, a fibered light source is also used to correct the phase fluctuations. This experimental setup allows identifying any spatiotemporal distortions such as the pulse front tilt for instance. In this paper, to the best of our knowledge, we present the very first spatio-temporal characterization done on a TW laser. However, a SEA TADPOLE measurement is not immediate since it requires scanning the beam over the two transverse dimensions which prevent us from studying the shot-to-shot laser fluctuations. This is why, we developed MUFFIN, a single-shot technique capable of spatio-temporally characterizing a laser pulse along its two transverse dimensions. First experimental results obtained with this technique are presented here.

  15. Site and Event Characterization Using the CTBT On-Site Inspection Techniques (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labak, P.; Gaya Pique, L. R.; Rowlands, A. P.; Arndt, R. H.

    2013-12-01

    One of the four elements of the CTBT verification regime is On-Site Inspection (OSI). The sole purpose of an OSI is to clarify whether a nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion has been conducted in violation of the CTBT. An OSI would be conducted within an area no bigger than 1000 km2 and by no more than 40 inspectors at any one time, applying search logic and inspection techniques with the aim of collecting relevant information that will be the basis for the inspection report. During the course of an OSI less intrusive techniques applied over broad areas (usually with lower spatial resolution) are supplemented with more intrusive techniques applied to more targeted areas (usually at a higher spatial resolution). Environmental setting and the evolution of OSI-relevant observables over time will influence the application of OSI techniques. In the course of the development of OSI methodology and relevant techniques, field tests and exercises have been conducted. While earlier activities mainly focused on progress of individual techniques (such as visual observation, passive seismological monitoring for aftershocks and measurements of radioactivity), recent work covered both technique development (such as multi-spectral imaging including infrared measurements, and environmental sampling and analysis of solids, liquids and gases) as well as the integration of techniques, search logic and data flow. We will highlight examples of application of OSI technologies for site and event characterization from recently conducted field tests and exercises and demonstrate the synthesis of techniques and data necessary for the conduct of an OSI.

  16. Isolation, Identification, and Characterization of One Degradation Product in Ambroxol by HPLC-Hyphenated Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Thummala, Veera Raghava Raju; Ivaturi, Mrutyunjaya Rao; Nittala, Someswara Rao

    2014-01-01

    This study details the isolation, identification, and characterization of ambroxol’s unknown impurity. One unknown impurity of ambroxol was formed in the formulated drug under stress conditions [40°C /75% relative humidity (RH) for 6 months] with the relative retention time (RRT) 0.68 in RP-HPLC. The impurity was enriched by exposing it to heat and it was isolated by using preparative HPLC. The enriched impurity was purified and characterized using the following sophisticated techniques: 2D NMR (gDQ-COSY, gHSQC, and gHMBC), FTIR, and LC-MS/MS. On the basis of the spectral data, the impurity was characterized as trans-4-(6,8-dibromoquinazolin-3(4H)-yl)cyclohexanol. PMID:24959402

  17. Clinical decision support systems for brain tumor characterization using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Tsolaki, Evangelia; Kousi, Evanthia; Svolos, Patricia; Kapsalaki, Efthychia; Theodorou, Kyriaki; Kappas, Constastine; Tsougos, Ioannis

    2014-04-28

    In recent years, advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging and perfusion weighted imaging have been used in order to resolve demanding diagnostic problems such as brain tumor characterization and grading, as these techniques offer a more detailed and non-invasive evaluation of the area under study. In the last decade a great effort has been made to import and utilize intelligent systems in the so-called clinical decision support systems (CDSS) for automatic processing, classification, evaluation and representation of MRI data in order for advanced MRI techniques to become a part of the clinical routine, since the amount of data from the aforementioned techniques has gradually increased. Hence, the purpose of the current review article is two-fold. The first is to review and evaluate the progress that has been made towards the utilization of CDSS based on data from advanced MRI techniques. The second is to analyze and propose the future work that has to be done, based on the existing problems and challenges, especially taking into account the new imaging techniques and parameters that can be introduced into intelligent systems to significantly improve their diagnostic specificity and clinical application.

  18. Experimental source characterization techniques for studying the acoustic properties of perforates under high level acoustic excitation.

    PubMed

    Bodén, Hans

    2011-11-01

    This paper discusses experimental techniques for obtaining the acoustic properties of in-duct samples with non-linear acoustic characteristic. The methods developed are intended both for studies of non-linear energy transfer to higher harmonics for samples only accessible from one side such as wall treatment in aircraft engine ducts or automotive exhaust systems and for samples accessible from both sides such as perforates or other top sheets. When harmonic sound waves are incident on the sample nonlinear energy transfer results in sound generation at higher harmonics at the sample (perforate) surface. The idea is that these sources can be characterized using linear system identification techniques similar to one-port or two-port techniques which are traditionally used for obtaining source data for in-duct sources such as IC-engines or fans. The starting point will be so called polyharmonic distortion modeling which is used for characterization of nonlinear properties of microwave systems. It will be shown how acoustic source data models can be expressed using this theory. Source models of different complexity are developed and experimentally tested. The results of the experimental tests show that these techniques can give results which are useful for understanding non-linear energy transfer to higher harmonics.

  19. Characterization of hard coatings produced by laser cladding using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, J. A.; Amado, J. M.; Tobar, M. J.; Mateo, M. P.; Yañez, A.; Nicolas, G.

    2015-05-01

    Protective coatings with a high abrasive wear resistance can be obtained from powders by laser cladding technique, in order to extend the service life of some industrial components. In this work, laser clad layers of self-fluxing NiCrBSi alloy powder mixed with WC powder have been produced on stainless steel substrates of austenitic type (AISI 304) in a first step and then chemically characterized by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. With the suitable laser processing parameters (mainly output power, beam scan speed and flow rate) and powders mixture proportions between WC ceramics and NiCrBSi alloys, dense pore free layers have been obtained on single tracks and on large areas with overlapped tracks. The results achieved by LIBS technique and applied for the first time to the analysis of laser clads provided the chemical composition of the tungsten carbides in metal alloy matrix. Different measurement modes (multiple point analyses, depth profiles and chemical maps) have been employed, demonstrating the usefulness of LIBS technique for the characterization of laser clads based on hardfacing alloys. The behavior of hardness can be explained by LIBS maps which evidenced the partial dilution of some WC spheres in the coating.

  20. A new technique of characterization of intrapixel response dedicated to astronomical detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketchazo, C.; Viale, T.; Boulade, O.; Druart, G.; Moreau, V.; Mugnier, L.; Dubrueil, D.; Derelle, S.; Ronayette, S.; Guérineau, N.; Berthé, M.

    2015-07-01

    This paper is devoted to the presentation of a new technique of characterization of the intra-pixel sensitivity variations (IPSVs) of astronomical detectors. The IPSV is the spatial variation of the pixel response function (PRF). In the case of under-sampled instruments for high quality imaging and accurate photometry, IPSV can contribute to the instrument global error and it should be considered carefully. Our measurement technique is based in the Fourier transform (FT) approach. It consists into the sampling of the pixel transfer function (PTF) by projecting high-resolution periodic patterns onto the whole sensor without classic optics but using the self-imaging property (the Talbot effect) of a continuously self imaging grating (CSIG) illuminated by a plane wave. The PRF is determined by computing the inverse FT. Our measurement technique permits to determine the PRF with a resolution of pixel/10 (10 times Nyquist frequency).

  1. Parametric techniques for characterizing myocardial tissue by magnetic resonance imaging (part 1): T1 mapping.

    PubMed

    Perea Palazón, R J; Ortiz Pérez, J T; Prat González, S; de Caralt Robira, T M; Cibeira López, M T; Solé Arqués, M

    2016-01-01

    The development of myocardial fibrosis is a common process in the appearance of ventricular dysfunction in many heart diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to accurately evaluate the structure and function of the heart, and its role in the macroscopic characterization of myocardial fibrosis by late enhancement techniques has been widely validated clinically. Recent studies have demonstrated that T1-mapping techniques can quantify diffuse myocardial fibrosis and the expansion of the myocardial extracellular space in absolute terms. However, further studies are necessary to validate the usefulness of this technique in the early detection of tissue remodeling at a time when implementing early treatment would improve a patient's prognosis. This article reviews the state of the art for T1 mapping of the myocardium, its clinical applications, and its limitations.

  2. Towards convective heat transfer enhancement: surface modification, characterization and measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, T. J.; Thakur, D. B.; Van der Meer, T. H.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, heat transfer surface modification and heat transfer measurement technique is developed. Heat transfer investigation was aimed to study the effect of carbon nano fibers (extremely high thermal conductive material) on the enhancement level in heat transfer. Synthesis of these carbon nano structures is achieved using thermal catalytic chemical vapor deposition process (TCCVD) on a 50 μm pure nickel (Ni270) wire. The micro wire samples covered with CNF layers were subjected to a uniform flow from a nozzle. Heat transfer measurement was achieved by a controlled heat dissipation through the micro wire to attain a constant temperature during the flow. This measurement technique is adopted from hot wire anemometry calibration method. Synthesis of carbon nano structures, heat transfer surface characterization and measurement technique are evaluated. Preliminary results indicate that an average enhancement in Nusselt Number of 17% is achieved.

  3. Parametric techniques for characterizing myocardial tissue by magnetic resonance imaging (part 1): T1 mapping.

    PubMed

    Perea Palazón, R J; Ortiz Pérez, J T; Prat González, S; de Caralt Robira, T M; Cibeira López, M T; Solé Arqués, M

    2016-01-01

    The development of myocardial fibrosis is a common process in the appearance of ventricular dysfunction in many heart diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to accurately evaluate the structure and function of the heart, and its role in the macroscopic characterization of myocardial fibrosis by late enhancement techniques has been widely validated clinically. Recent studies have demonstrated that T1-mapping techniques can quantify diffuse myocardial fibrosis and the expansion of the myocardial extracellular space in absolute terms. However, further studies are necessary to validate the usefulness of this technique in the early detection of tissue remodeling at a time when implementing early treatment would improve a patient's prognosis. This article reviews the state of the art for T1 mapping of the myocardium, its clinical applications, and its limitations. PMID:26944850

  4. A novel optical technique to characterize fiberization of textured vegetable proteins under high-moisture extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Gang; Liu, Keshun; Hsieh, Fu-Hung

    2004-11-01

    There have been great interests in using twin-screw extruders under high moisture conditions to produce textured vegetable proteins. Unlike the low moisture extrusion counterpart, a product extruded under high moisture can have well-defined fiber orientation and bears a strong resemblance to muscle meat. The textural properties of such extruded products are important for consumer acceptance. In this study, we developed a novel fluorescence polarization based technique that measures the fiber formation of extruded protein products. The experimental results using our new technique showed good agreements with results obtained from visual inspection and digital imaging of the dissected samples. The new technique provides an in vivo and noninvasive approach to characterize the fiber formation of textured vegetable proteins under high moisture extrusion. It has a potential to be used as a real time monitoring tool in food extrusion studies.

  5. Damage characterization in engineering materials using a combination of optical, acoustic, and thermal techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tragazikis, I. K.; Exarchos, D. A.; Dalla, P. T.; Matikas, T. E.

    2016-04-01

    This paper deals with the use of complimentary nondestructive methods for the evaluation of damage in engineering materials. The application of digital image correlation (DIC) to engineering materials is a useful tool for accurate, noncontact strain measurement. DIC is a 2D, full-field optical analysis technique based on gray-value digital images to measure deformation, vibration and strain a vast variety of materials. In addition, this technique can be applied from very small to large testing areas and can be used for various tests such as tensile, torsion and bending under static or dynamic loading. In this study, DIC results are benchmarked with other nondestructive techniques such as acoustic emission for damage localization and fracture mode evaluation, and IR thermography for stress field visualization and assessment. The combined use of these three nondestructive methods enables the characterization and classification of damage in materials and structures.

  6. X-ray Scattering Techniques for Characterization of Nanosystems in Lifescience

    SciTech Connect

    Saw, C K

    2005-04-11

    The intent of this chapter is to provide the basics of using x-ray diffraction techniques in order to obtain information on the structure and morphology of the nanosystems, and also to point out some of its strengths and weaknesses when compare to other characterization techniques. X-ray scattering examines over a wide range of density domains from a tenth to a thousandth angstrom. Essentially, this covers a whole range of condensed matter, including the structure and morphology of nanosystems, particularly useful for examining nanostructures in lifescience. This range of domain size requires both the wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) and small-angle (SAXS) x-ray scattering techniques. Roughly WAXS covers from 2 nm down, and SAXS covers from .5 nm to 100 nm and possibly 1,000 nm for a finely tuned instrument. Brief theoretical description of both WAXS and SAXS will be given in this chapter. WAXS, by itself is a powerful technique in providing information on the crystallographic structure or lack of structure, atomic positions and sizes in a unit cell, to some extend, chemical compositions and as well as chemical stoichiometry. Examples of such experiments will also be given. In order to be able to describe the technique of x-ray scattering, some historical and theoretical background will be given in the hope of making this subject interesting and simple.

  7. A Study of undulator magnets characterization using the Vibrating Wire technique

    SciTech Connect

    Temnykh, Alexander; Levashov, Yurii; Wolf, Zachary; /SLAC

    2011-02-07

    The vibrating wire (VW) technique employs a stretched wire as a magnetic field sensor. Because of the wire's small diameter ({approx}0.1mm or smaller) and because the wire can be supported from outside the magnet, this technique is very appealing for field measurements in small gap/bore undulators with small good field regions and with limited access to the tested field. In addition, in the case of elliptical undulators in which Hall probe (HP) measurements can be affected by the planar Hall effect, VW technique can be used as an independent method to verify and supplement HP measurements. In this article we studied the potential of the VW technique for measurement of magnetic field errors and for prediction of beam trajectories in undulator magnets using a 3.8m long LCLS undulator as a test bench. Introducing calibrated magnetic field distortion at various locations, we measured the sensitivity and spatial resolution of the method. The method demonstrated 0.9mm spatial resolution at a distance up to a few meters and 0.37Gcm sensitivity to the field integral. To compare Hall probe and Vibrating wire measurements side-by-side, we measured field errors in an LCLS undulator previously characterized by Hall probe measurements. The field errors found with the Vibrating Wire technique appeared to be in good agreement with errors measured with the Hall probe. Beam trajectory distortions calculated from both data sets are also in a good agreement.

  8. Experimental techniques for characterizing the thermo-electro-mechanical shakedown response of SMA wires and tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher B.

    Shape Memory Alloys (SMAs) are a unique and valuable group of active materials. NiTi, the most popular SMA, has a power density orders of magnitude greater than any other known material, making it valuable in the medical and transportation industries where weight and space are at a premium. In the nearly half-century since its discovery, the adoption of NiTi has been slowed primarily by the engineering difficulties associated with its use: strong thermal coupling, material level instabilities, and rapid shakedown of material properties during cycling. Material properties change drastically with minute changes in alloy composition, so it is common to require a variety of experiments to fully characterize a new SMA material, all of which must be performed and interpreted with specialized techniques. This thesis collects many of these techniques into a series of characterization experiments, documenting several new phenomena in the process. First, three different alloys of NiTi wire are characterized through differential scanning calorimetry, isothermal tension, and constant load thermal cycling experiments. New techniques are presented for ER measurement and temperature control of SMA wires and temperature measurement of SMA tubes. It is shown that the shakedown of material properties with thermal cycling is not only dependent on the applied load and number of cycles, but has a large association with the direction of phase transformation. Several of these techniques are then applied to a systematic characterization of NiTi tubes in tension, compression, and bending. Particular attention is given to the nucleation and propagation of transformation fronts in tensile specimens. Compression experiments show dramatic asymmetry in the uniaxial response, with compression characterized by a lower transformation strain, higher transformation stress, and uniform transformations (no fronts). A very simple SMA actuator model is introduced. After identifying the relevant non

  9. Characterizing surface features on conducting specimens through an insulation layer using the capacitive imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Yin, Xiaokang; Yan, An; Li, Wei; Chen, Guoming

    2016-02-01

    Capacitive imaging (CI) technique is a novel electromagnetic NDE technique. It uses a carefully designed probe with a pair of metal electrodes. Interaction between the Quasi-static electromagnetic field from the electrode pair and the testing material causes changes in signal when the electrical properties of the sample themselves change, leading to the possibility of imaging. Due to its capacitive nature, the CI technique requires single side non-contact access to the testing material and little sample surface preparation. In addition, it provides a very clear and simple defect indication. Previous work [1] has demonstrated the feasibility of the CI technique to the detection of surface features on conducting specimens. It is found that the CI technique is useful to confirm the presence of a defect but cannot further characterize it due to the "blurring effect". The problem caused by the blurring effect is more significant, when trying to image smaller feature though a thicker insulation layer (comparing to the dimensions of the CI probe). This paper aims to tackle this problem using a two dimensional deconvolution method based on the analysis of the measurement sensitivity distribution. In this paper, the trade-offs between penetration depth, signal strength and imaging resolution of the CI technique are discussed. The blurring effect due to the CI probe geometry is explained. The proposed method to retrieve the real shape of the feature is then described in details, and its feasibility is also demonstrated. The results indicated that the CI technique could be useful to detect Corrosion Under Insulation (CUI).

  10. Steering charge kinetics in photocatalysis: intersection of materials syntheses, characterization techniques and theoretical simulations.

    PubMed

    Bai, Song; Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Qun; Xiong, Yujie

    2015-05-21

    Charge kinetics is highly critical in determining the quantum efficiency of solar-to-chemical conversion in photocatalysis, and this includes, but is not limited to, the separation of photoexcited electron-hole pairs, utilization of plasmonic hot carriers and delivery of photo-induced charges to reaction sites, as well as activation of reactants by energized charges. In this review, we highlight the recent progress on probing and steering charge kinetics toward designing highly efficient photocatalysts and elucidate the fundamentals behind the combinative use of controlled synthesis, characterization techniques (with a focus on spectroscopic characterizations) and theoretical simulations in photocatalysis studies. We first introduce the principles of various processes associated with charge kinetics that account for or may affect photocatalysis, from which a set of parameters that are critical to photocatalyst design can be summarized. We then outline the design rules for photocatalyst structures and their corresponding synthetic approaches. The implementation of characterization techniques and theoretical simulations in different steps of photocatalysis, together with the associated fundamentals and working mechanisms, are also presented. Finally, we discuss the challenges and opportunities for photocatalysis research at this unique intersection as well as the potential impact on other research fields.

  11. A review of the different techniques for solid surface acid-base characterization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chenhang; Berg, John C

    2003-09-18

    In this work, various techniques for solid surface acid-base (AB) characterization are reviewed. Different techniques employ different scales to rank acid-base properties. Based on the results from literature and the authors' own investigations for mineral oxides, these scales are compared. The comparison shows that Isoelectric Point (IEP), the most commonly used AB scale, is not a description of the absolute basicity or acidity of a surface, but a description of their relative strength. That is, a high IEP surface shows more basic functionality comparing with its acidic functionality, whereas a low IEP surface shows less basic functionality comparing with its acidic functionality. The choice of technique and scale for AB characterization depends on the specific application. For the cases in which the overall AB property is of interest, IEP (by electrokinetic titration) and H(0,max) (by indicator dye adsorption) are appropriate. For the cases in which the absolute AB property is of interest such as in the study of adhesion, it is more pertinent to use chemical shift (by XPS) and the heat of adsorption of probe gases (by calorimetry or IGC).

  12. Innovative sputtering techniques for CIS and CdTe submodule fabrication. Annual subcontract report, 1 September 1991--31 August 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, J.M.; Misra, M.S.; Lanning, B.

    1993-03-01

    This report describes work done during Phase 1 of the subject subcontract. The subcontract was designed to study innovative deposition techniques, such as the rotating cylindrical magnetron sputtering system and electrodeposition for large-area, low-cost copper indium diselenide (CIS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) devices. A key issue for photovoltaics (PV) in terrestrial and future space applications is producibility, particularly for applications using a large quantity of PV. Among the concerns for fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film PV, such as CIS and CdTe, are production volume, cost, and minimization of waste. Both rotating cylindrical magnetron (C-Mag{trademark}) sputtering and electrodeposition have tremendous potential for the fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film PV due to scaleability, efficient utilization of source materials, and inherently higher deposition rates. In the case of sputtering, the unique geometry of the C-Mae facilitates innovative cosputtering and reactive sputtering that could lead to greater throughput reduced health and safety risks, and, ultimately, lower fabrication cost. Electrodeposited films appear to be adherent and comparable with low-cost fabrication techniques. Phase I involved the initial film and device fabrication using the two techniques mentioned herein. Devices were tested by both internal facilities, as well as NREL and ISET.

  13. Treatment of gummy smile: Gingival recontouring with the containment of the elevator muscle of the upper lip and wing of nose. A surgery innovation technique

    PubMed Central

    Storrer, Carmen Lucia Mueller; Valverde, Fabiane Kristine Bochenek; Santos, Felipe Rychuv; Deliberador, Tatiana Miranda

    2014-01-01

    The containment of the elevator muscle of the upper lip and wing of nose was used for the treatment of patients with gummy smile. This technique had corrected esthetic alterations of smile, reducing the upper lip elevation, which results in a smaller gingival display. An upper lip lengthening as well as a reduction in the upper lip shortening when the patient smiled could be observed. The high smile line was corrected without compromising the labial harmony. This study presents an innovative and effective therapeutic option to obtain a natural and harmonious smile. The patient expressed a high degree of satisfaction. PMID:25425832

  14. Spectroscopic techniques applied to the characterization of decorated potteries from Caltagirone (Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barilaro, D.; Barone, G.; Crupi, V.; Donato, M. G.; Majolino, D.; Messina, G.; Ponterio, R.

    2005-06-01

    The aim of the present work is the characterization of decorated pottery samples from Caltagirone (Sicily, Italy), a renowned production centre of this kind of artwork. These fragments were found during archaeological excavations and were attributed to historical periods extremely far in time from each other (from XVIII century b.C. to XVI a.C.). Therefore, we expect that the manufacture techniques result rather different over so long time. The measurements, performed by Fourier Transform-InfraRed (FT-IR) absorbance and micro-Raman scattering, allowed us a non-destructive study of so precious artefacts. Some pigments were identified, various elements of ceramic paste and glazed layer were characterized.

  15. Secondary side photographic techniques used in characterization of Surry steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, R.B.

    1984-10-01

    Characterization of the generator's secondary side prior to destructive removal of tubing presents a significant challenge. Information must be obtained in a radioactive field (up to 15 R/h) throughout the tightly spaced bundle of steam generator tubes. This report discusses the various techniques employed, along with their respective advantages and disadvantages. The most successful approach to nondestructive secondary side characterization and documentation was through use of in-house developed pinhole cameras. These devices provided accurate photographic documentation of generator condition. They could be fabricated in geometries allowing access to all parts of the generator. Semi-remote operation coupled with large area coverage per investigation and short at-location times resulted in significant personnel exposure advantages. The fabrication and use of pinhole cameras for remote inspection is discussed in detail.

  16. Innovative instrumentation for microarray scanning and analysis: application for characterization of oligonucleotide duplexes behavior.

    PubMed

    Khomyakova, E B; Dreval, E V; Tran-Dang, M; Potier, M C; Soussaline, F P

    2004-05-01

    Accuracy in microarray technology requires new approaches to microarray reader development. A microarray reader system (optical scanning array or OSA reader) based on automated microscopy with large field of view, high speed 3 axis scanning at multiple narrow-band spectra of excitation light has been developed. It allows fast capture of high-resolution, multi-fluorescence images and is characterized by a linear dynamic range and sensitivity comparable to commonly used photo-multiplier tube (PMT)-based laser scanner. Controlled by high performance software, the instrument can be used for scanning and quantitative analysis of any type of dry microarray. Studies implying temperature-controlled hybridization chamber containing a microarray can also be performed. This enables the registration of kinetics and melting curves. This feature is required in a wide range of on-chip chemical and enzymatic reactions including on-chip PCR amplification. We used the OSA reader for the characterization of hybridization and melting behaviour of oligonucleotide:oligonucleotide duplexes on three-dimensional Code Link slides. PMID:15209342

  17. NanoXCT—A High-Resolution Technique For TSV Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niese, Sven; Krueger, Peter; Zschech, Ehrenfried

    2011-09-01

    Lab-based Transmission X-ray Microscopy and X-ray Computed Tomography (TXM/XCT) with sub-100 nm resolution are evaluated for their application in process and quality control in microelectronics, particularly for TSV characterization. These are the techniques of choice to localize defects in copper TSVs for 3D IC integration. In contrast to other techniques like Focused Ion Beam cross-sectioning and subsequent Scanning Electron Microscopy imaging, the region of interest, i.e. the TSV, is imaged nondestructively and three dimensionally. For flat samples like thinned wafers, the tilted rotational axis tomography is proposed instead of the limited angle tomography since the better in-plane resolution increases the quality of the resulting tomogram. Yield- and reliability-limiting processes in 3D TSV technology like voids and incomplete filled vias can be made visible for an array of adjacent TSVs during one measurement without affecting the TSV.

  18. NanoXCT - A High-Resolution Technique For TSV Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Niese, Sven; Krueger, Peter; Zschech, Ehrenfried

    2011-09-12

    Lab-based Transmission X-ray Microscopy and X-ray Computed Tomography (TXM/XCT) with sub-100 nm resolution are evaluated for their application in process and quality control in microelectronics, particularly for TSV characterization. These are the techniques of choice to localize defects in copper TSVs for 3D IC integration. In contrast to other techniques like Focused Ion Beam cross-sectioning and subsequent Scanning Electron Microscopy imaging, the region of interest, i.e. the TSV, is imaged nondestructively and three dimensionally. For flat samples like thinned wafers, the tilted rotational axis tomography is proposed instead of the limited angle tomography since the better in-plane resolution increases the quality of the resulting tomogram. Yield- and reliability-limiting processes in 3D TSV technology like voids and incomplete filled vias can be made visible for an array of adjacent TSVs during one measurement without affecting the TSV.

  19. PDMS droplet formation and characterization by hydrodynamic flow focusing technique in a PDMS square microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, J.; Doutel, E.; Campos, J. B. L. M.; Miranda, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    This study reports the generation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) droplets by hydrodynamic flow focusing technique in a PDMS square microchannel. The droplet generation was characterized and a flow regime map addressed by the capillary numbers of each phase was assembled. Different flow regimes were found—dripping, jetting, threading and viscous displacement and the respective boundaries were sketched. Droplet size, breakup distance and formation frequency were analysed and quantified for the jetting and dripping regimes. The dripping regime showed better results for droplet formation, leading to the highest throughput of monodisperse droplets: formation frequency of  ≈12 Hz and droplets almost uniform in size (2.8% the coefficient of variance). The qualitative analysis and quantitative measurement of the different variables and their correlation within a capillary dependent regime map proved to be an invaluable tool to study droplet formation by hydrodynamic flow focusing technique in a PDMS square microchannel.

  20. X-ray characterization of bulk AIN single crystals grown by the sublimation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.; Rojo, J. C.; Morgan, K.; Schowalter, L. J.

    2003-03-01

    Bulk AlN single crystal boules have been grown using the sublimation technique and several substrates have been prepared from them. Microstructural characterization of these substrates has been performed using synchrotron white beam X-ray topography (SWBXT) and high-resolution triple axis X-ray diffraction. Our study has revealed that AlN single crystal boules grown by the sublimation technique can possess a high structural quality with dislocation densities of 800-1000/cm 2 and rocking curves with a full-width at half-maximum of less than 10 arcsec. The distribution of dislocations is inhomogeneous with large areas of the wafer free from dislocations. Inclusions are also observed (density of the order of 10 5/cm 3) and their distribution is also inhomogeneous.

  1. A comparison of conventional and advanced ultrasonic inspection techniques in the characterization of TMC materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Mark R.; Handley, Scott M.; Miller, James G.; Reighard, Mark K.

    1992-01-01

    Results obtained with a conventional ultrasonic inspection technique as well as those obtained with more advanced ultrasonic NDE methods in the characterization of an 8-ply quasi-isotropic titanium matrix composite (TMC) specimen are presented. Images obtained from a conventional ultrasonic inspection of TMC material are compared with those obtained using more sophisticated ultrasonic inspection methods. It is suggested that the latter techniques are able to provide quantitative images of TMC material. They are able to reveal the same potential defect indications while simultaneously providing more quantitative information concerning the material's inherent properties. Band-limited signal loss and slope-of-attenuation images provide quantitative data on the inherent material characteristics and defects in TMC.

  2. Characterization of failure modes in deep UV and deep green LEDs utilizing advanced semiconductor localization techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Miller, Mary A.; Cole, Edward Isaac, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    We present the results of a two-year early career LDRD that focused on defect localization in deep green and deep ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs). We describe the laser-based techniques (TIVA/LIVA) used to localize the defects and interpret data acquired. We also describe a defect screening method based on a quick electrical measurement to determine whether defects should be present in the LEDs. We then describe the stress conditions that caused the devices to fail and how the TIVA/LIVA techniques were used to monitor the defect signals as the devices degraded and failed. We also describe the correlation between the initial defects and final degraded or failed state of the devices. Finally we show characterization results of the devices in the failed conditions and present preliminary theories as to why the devices failed for both the InGaN (green) and AlGaN (UV) LEDs.

  3. Design and optimization of stepped austempered ductile iron using characterization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández-Rivera, J.L.; Garay-Reyes, C.G.; Campos-Cambranis, R.E.; Cruz-Rivera, J.J.

    2013-09-15

    Conventional characterization techniques such as dilatometry, X-ray diffraction and metallography were used to select and optimize temperatures and times for conventional and stepped austempering. Austenitization and conventional austempering time was selected when the dilatometry graphs showed a constant expansion value. A special heat color-etching technique was applied to distinguish between the untransformed austenite and high carbon stabilized austenite which had formed during the treatments. Finally, it was found that carbide precipitation was absent during the stepped austempering in contrast to conventional austempering, on which carbide evidence was found. - Highlights: • Dilatometry helped to establish austenitization and austempering parameters. • Untransformed austenite was present even for longer processing times. • Ausferrite formed during stepped austempering caused important reinforcement effect. • Carbide precipitation was absent during stepped treatment.

  4. Characterization of the silicon+6LiF thermal neutron detection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, A.; Barbagallo, M.; Cosentino, L.; Marchetta, C.; Musumarra, A.; Scirè, C.; Scirè, S.; Vecchio, G.; Finocchiaro, P.

    2016-02-01

    The worldwide need to replace 3He for neutron detection has triggered research and development on new technologies and methods. A promising one is based on commercial solid state silicon detectors coupled with thin neutron converter layers containing 6Li. After proving the feasibility of this technique, we characterized the behavior of such a detector with different converter layer thicknesses. In this paper we also disentangle other contributions to the overall spectrum shape observed with this kind of detector, proving that its detection efficiency can be made reasonably high and that the gamma/neutron discrimination capability is comparable to that of 3He tubes.

  5. A preliminary evaluation of certain NDA techniques for RH-TRU characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwell, J.K.; Yoon, W.Y.; Peterson, H.K.

    1997-11-01

    This report presents the results of modeling efforts to evaluate selected NDA assay methods for RH-TRU waste characterization. The target waste stream was Content Code 104/107 113-liter waste drums that comprise the majority of the INEL`s RH-TRU waste inventory. Two NDA techniques are treated in detail. One primary NDA technique examined is gamma-ray spectrometry to determine the drum fission and activation product content, and fuel sample inventory calculations using the ORIGEN code to predict the total drum inventory. A heavily shielded and strongly collimated HPGe spectrometer system was designed using MCNP modeling. Detection limits and expected precision of this approach were estimated by a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and synthetic gamma-ray spectrum generation. This technique may allow the radionuclide content of these wastes to be determined with relative standard deviations of 20 to 50% depending on the drum matrix and radionuclide. The INEL Passive/Active Neutron (PAN) assay system is the second primary technique considered. A shielded overpack for the 113-liter CC104/107 RH-TRU drums was designed to shield the PAN detectors from excessive gamma radiation. MCNP modeling suggests PAN detection limits of about 0.06 g {sup 235}U and 0.04 g {sup 239}Pu during active assays. 12 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Technique for needle-free drop deposition: Pathway for precise characterization of superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waghmare, Prashant R.; Das, Siddhartha; Mitra, Sushanta K.

    2013-11-01

    The most important step for characterizing the wettability of a surface is to deposit a water drop on the surface and measure the contact angle made by the drop on the surface. This innocuously simple process relies on bringing a needle holding the water drop in close proximity to the surface, with a ``desire'' that the drop would spontaneously detach from the needle and get deposited on the surface. Problem occurs when the surface is superhydrophobic, expressing an ``unwillingness'' to ``see'' the water drop in preference to a much more ``water-loving'' needle surface. There exists no solution to this problem, and surfaces are invariably characterized where the drop-needle assembly contacts the superhydrophobic surface. Such a configuration will always lead to an incorrect estimation of the contact angle, as there is no certainty of the existence of the drop-surface contact. Here we shall discuss our recently invented technique, where we solve this long-standing problem-we indeed ensure a needle-free drop in contact with the superhydrophobic surface, thereby ascertaining precise determination of the contact angle. The successful application of the technique will address a major headache of the big research community interested in science and technology of superhydrophobic surfaces.

  7. Identification and characterization of related substances in pomalidomide by hyphenated LC-MS techniques.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Wang, Lei; Song, Min; Hang, Tai-Jun

    2015-10-10

    The current study dealt with the separation, identification and characterization of related substances in pomalidomide by hyphenated techniques. Complete separation was obtained with an Inertsil ODS-SP column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) by linear gradient elution using a mobile phase consisting of 0.1% formic acid solution and acetonitrile. They were characterized by hyphenated chromatographic techniques with the accurate mass determination using high resolution LC-TOF-MS methods as well as the product MS spectra determination and elucidation. The degradation behaviors of pomalidomide under ICH prescribed stress conditions were also conducted. Pomalidomide was found to be labile to degrade under acid, alkaline, oxidative and thermal stress conditions, while it was relatively stable to photolytic stress. 13 related substances were detected and identified to be 10 degradation products and three process related substances. The hyphenated LC-MS method with high resolution accurate mass determination facilitated the qualitative analysis of the unknown compounds than that of the conventional HPLC-UV. The related compounds identified are valuable for pomalidomide manufacturing process optimization and quality control.

  8. Identifying reaction intermediates and catalytic active sites through in situ characterization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Andrew J.; Lobo, Raul F

    2010-01-01

    This tutorial review centers on recent advances and applications of experimental techniques that help characterize surface species and catalyst structures under in situ conditions. We start by reviewing recent applications of IR spectroscopy of working catalysis, emphasizing newer approaches such as Sum Frequency Generation and Polarization Modulation-infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. This is followed by a section on solid-state NMR spectroscopy for the detection of surface species and reaction intermediates. These two techniques provide information mainly about the concentration and identity of the prevalent surface species. The following sections center on methods that provide structural and chemical information about the catalyst surface. The increasingly important role of high-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in catalyst characterization is evident from the new and interesting information obtained on supported catalysts as presented in recent reports. X-Ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) is used increasingly under reaction conditions to great advantage, although is inherently limited to systems where the bulk of the species in the sample are surface species. However, the ability of X-rays to penetrate the sample has been used cleverly by a number of groups to understand how changing reaction conditions change the structure and composition of surface atoms on supported catalyst.

  9. Characterization of volatile corrosion inhibitors using the quartz crystal microbalance and supporting techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, P.F.

    1997-08-01

    Corrosion inhibitors such as Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors (VCI`s) and Contact Corrosion Inhibitors have become loosely ambiguous and differentiating between the two can become a gray area. For example, and the most common mistake is, classifying a material as a VCI when it is a contact inhibitor. Analytical techniques to qualify a material as a VCI have been investigated in order to clarify this ambiguity and to qualify the techniques and equipment for use in the determination of a VCI. The Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) and an atmospheric corrosion monitor were used to characterize adsorption effects and corrosion monitoring of two commercially known inhibitors, sodium nitrite and dicyclohexylammonium nitrite on evaporated iron during atmospheric conditions. Two devices will be used for in situ measurements of adsorption, the QCM and an atmospheric corrosion monitor. During the adsorption process the QCM measures a frequency change that can be associated to a mass change due to adsorption of the inhibitor it is also capable of in situ monitoring corrosion rates of the substrate in a corrosive atmosphere. From experience and in theory the corrosion rate is expected to decrease due to the adsorption of the VCI. Which has been observed from in situ measurements using the QCM. The atmospheric corrosion monitor measures the resistance of oxides of a substrate due to corrosion in reference to a non-corrosive element. It is tested here to measure its sensitivity in comparison to the QCM and to characterize its response during the adsorption of a VCI.

  10. Endoscopic Debridement for Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciitis: An Innovative Technique and Prospective Study of 46 Consecutive Patients.

    PubMed

    Cottom, James M; Maker, Jared M; Richardson, Phillip; Baker, Joseph S

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is one the most common pathologies treated by foot and ankle surgeons. When nonoperative therapy fails, surgical intervention might be warranted. Various surgical procedures are available for the treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. The most common surgical management typically consists of open versus endoscopic plantar fascia release. Comorbidities associated with the release of the plantar fascia have been documented, including lateral column overload and metatarsalgia. We present an innovative technique for this painful condition that is minimally invasive, allows visualization of the plantar fascia, and maintains the integrity of the fascia. Our hypothesis was that the use of endoscopic debridement of the plantar fascia with or without heel spur resection would provide a minimally invasive technique with acceptable patient outcomes.

  11. Endoscopic Debridement for Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciitis: An Innovative Technique and Prospective Study of 46 Consecutive Patients.

    PubMed

    Cottom, James M; Maker, Jared M; Richardson, Phillip; Baker, Joseph S

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is one the most common pathologies treated by foot and ankle surgeons. When nonoperative therapy fails, surgical intervention might be warranted. Various surgical procedures are available for the treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. The most common surgical management typically consists of open versus endoscopic plantar fascia release. Comorbidities associated with the release of the plantar fascia have been documented, including lateral column overload and metatarsalgia. We present an innovative technique for this painful condition that is minimally invasive, allows visualization of the plantar fascia, and maintains the integrity of the fascia. Our hypothesis was that the use of endoscopic debridement of the plantar fascia with or without heel spur resection would provide a minimally invasive technique with acceptable patient outcomes. PMID:27066869

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES AND PRODUCTION MODELS FOR EXPLOITING NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Wiggins; Raymon L. Brown; Faruk Civan; Richard G. Hughes

    2002-12-31

    For many years, geoscientists and engineers have undertaken research to characterize naturally fractured reservoirs. Geoscientists have focused on understanding the process of fracturing and the subsequent measurement and description of fracture characteristics. Engineers have concentrated on the fluid flow behavior in the fracture-porous media system and the development of models to predict the hydrocarbon production from these complex systems. This research attempts to integrate these two complementary views to develop a quantitative reservoir characterization methodology and flow performance model for naturally fractured reservoirs. The research has focused on estimating naturally fractured reservoir properties from seismic data, predicting fracture characteristics from well logs, and developing a naturally fractured reservoir simulator. It is important to develop techniques that can be applied to estimate the important parameters in predicting the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. This project proposes a method to relate seismic properties to the elastic compliance and permeability of the reservoir based upon a sugar cube model. In addition, methods are presented to use conventional well logs to estimate localized fracture information for reservoir characterization purposes. The ability to estimate fracture information from conventional well logs is very important in older wells where data are often limited. Finally, a desktop naturally fractured reservoir simulator has been developed for the purpose of predicting the performance of these complex reservoirs. The simulator incorporates vertical and horizontal wellbore models, methods to handle matrix to fracture fluid transfer, and fracture permeability tensors. This research project has developed methods to characterize and study the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs that integrate geoscience and engineering data. This is an important step in developing exploitation strategies for

  13. A novel and innovative technique of using a disposable syringe and mesh for harvesting fat for structural fat grafting

    PubMed Central

    Ashok, B. C.; Nagaraj, Pradeep Kumar; Ananteshwar, Y. N.; Srikanth, V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Successful restoration of structure and function using autologous free fat grafts has remained elusive. Review of literature shows that various harvesting and preparation techniques have been suggested. The goal of these techniques is to obtain greater adipocyte cell survival and consequently more reliable clinical results. Materials and Methods: In our technique, a piece of mesh is kept at one end of the lipoaspiration syringe, which is then connected to the Suction pump. As one syringe fills, it is replaced by another one until the required amount of fat is obtained. Results: By using a polypropylene mesh in our technique, we can separate the transfusate from the harvested fat graft during harvesting itself. The fat graft thus obtained is dense and concentrated, with fewer impurities. Conclusion: Hence, we recommend our technique as a reliable method for extracting sterile emulsified fat in an economical way. PMID:25991892

  14. A multi-technique chemical characterization of a Stradivari decorated violin top plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malagodi, M.; Canevari, C.; Bonizzoni, L.; Galli, A.; Maspero, F.; Martini, M.

    2013-08-01

    This paper focuses on the characterization of the materials of a violin top plate made by Antonio Stradivari (17th century), with different diagnostic techniques and with an integrated and non-destructive analytical methodology to study surface coatings and decorations. The UV-induced visible fluorescence, optical digital microscopy, ED-XRF associated with micro-FTIR spectroscopy analysis, and dendrochronology were performed. The investigations were aimed to identify the presence of original varnish layers and to characterize the composition of the decorations, either the inlaid purflings or the composite false-inlay strip between them. Several results were achieved: (i) evidence of the absence of varnish layers on the surface as a result of extended and inappropriate restoring; (ii) identification of the dye used for the black layers of the purflings; (iii) characterization of the black matrix and the white elements of the decoration. Furthermore, a dendrochronological dating was performed. A copy of the top plate was realized with materials similar to those identified on the Stradivari original; the same analyses performed on the original model were carried out on the same areas of the copy.

  15. Analytical techniques for characterization of cyclodextrin complexes in aqueous solution: a review.

    PubMed

    Mura, Paola

    2014-12-01

    Cyclodextrins are cyclic oligosaccharides endowed with a hydrophilic outer surface and a hydrophobic inner cavity, able to form inclusion complexes with a wide variety of guest molecules, positively affecting their physicochemical properties. In particular, in the pharmaceutical field, cyclodextrin complexation is mainly used to increase the aqueous solubility and dissolution rate of poorly soluble drugs, and to enhance their bioavailability and stability. Analytical characterization of host-guest interactions is of fundamental importance for fully exploiting the potential benefits of complexation, helping in selection of the most appropriate cyclodextrin. The assessment of the actual formation of a drug-cyclodextrin inclusion complex and its full characterization is not a simple task and often requires the use of different analytical methods, whose results have to be combined and examined together. The purpose of the present review is to give, as much as possible, a general overview of the main analytical tools which can be employed for the characterization of drug-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes in solution, with emphasis on their respective potential merits, disadvantages and limits. Further, the applicability of each examined technique is illustrated and discussed by specific examples from literature.

  16. Isolation and characterization of related substances in alogliptin benzoate by LC-QTOF mass spectrometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuting; Yang, Danyi; Li, Zhiyu; Hang, Taijun; Song, Min

    2016-09-01

    A highly specific and efficient LC-QTOF mass spectrometric method was developed for the separation and characterization of process related substances and the major degradation products in alogliptin benzoate and its tablets. The separation was performed on Phenomenex Gemini-NX C18 column (250mm×4.6mm, 5μm) using 0.2% formic acid-0.2% ammonium acetate in water as mobile phase A, acetonitrile and methanol (60:40, v/v) as mobile phase B in linear gradient elution mode. Forced degradation studies were also conducted under ICH prescribed stress conditions. Alogliptin benzoate and its tablets were tending to degrade under acid, alkaline, oxidative and thermal stresses, while relatively stable to photolytic stress. A total of seven related substances were detected and characterized through liquid chromatography-high resolution QTOF mass spectrometry techniques, including process related substances and degradation products, and two of them were further synthesized and characterized by NMR spectroscopy. Based on the related substances elucidation and the plausible formation mechanisms, efficient approaches were proposed to reduce or eliminate related substances, and in consequence the quality of alogliptin benzoate and its tablets have been promoted obviously. Therefore, the impurity profiles obtained are critical to the quality control and manufacturing processes optimization and monitoring of alogliptin benzoate and its tablets. PMID:27281581

  17. Characterization of the microbial acid mine drainage microbial community using culturing and direct sequencing techniques.

    PubMed

    Auld, Ryan R; Myre, Maxine; Mykytczuk, Nadia C S; Leduc, Leo G; Merritt, Thomas J S

    2013-05-01

    We characterized the bacterial community from an AMD tailings pond using both classical culturing and modern direct sequencing techniques and compared the two methods. Acid mine drainage (AMD) is produced by the environmental and microbial oxidation of minerals dissolved from mining waste. Surprisingly, we know little about the microbial communities associated with AMD, despite the fundamental ecological roles of these organisms and large-scale economic impact of these waste sites. AMD microbial communities have classically been characterized by laboratory culturing-based techniques and more recently by direct sequencing of marker gene sequences, primarily the 16S rRNA gene. In our comparison of the techniques, we find that their results are complementary, overall indicating very similar community structure with similar dominant species, but with each method identifying some species that were missed by the other. We were able to culture the majority of species that our direct sequencing results indicated were present, primarily species within the Acidithiobacillus and Acidiphilium genera, although estimates of relative species abundance were only obtained from direct sequencing. Interestingly, our culture-based methods recovered four species that had been overlooked from our sequencing results because of the rarity of the marker gene sequences, likely members of the rare biosphere. Further, direct sequencing indicated that a single genus, completely missed in our culture-based study, Legionella, was a dominant member of the microbial community. Our results suggest that while either method does a reasonable job of identifying the dominant members of the AMD microbial community, together the methods combine to give a more complete picture of the true diversity of this environment. PMID:23485423

  18. Combined scanning probe nanotomography and optical microspectroscopy: a correlative technique for 3D characterization of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Mochalov, Konstantin E; Efimov, Anton E; Bobrovsky, Alexey; Agapov, Igor I; Chistyakov, Anton A; Oleinikov, Vladimir; Sukhanova, Alyona; Nabiev, Igor

    2013-10-22

    Combination of 3D structural analysis with optical characterization of the same sample area on the nanoscale is a highly demanded approach in nanophotonics, materials science, and quality control of nanomaterial. We have developed a correlative microscopy technique where the 3D structure of the sample is reconstructed on the nanoscale by means of a "slice-and-view" combination of ultramicrotomy and scanning probe microscopy (scanning probe nanotomography, SPNT), and its optical characteristics are analyzed using microspectroscopy. This approach has been used to determine the direct quantitative relationship of the 3D structural characteristics of nanovolumes of materials with their microscopic optical properties. This technique has been applied to 3D structural and optical characterization of a hybrid material consisting of cholesteric liquid crystals doped with fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) that can be used for photochemical patterning and image recording through the changes in the dissymmetry factor of the circular polarization of QD emission. The differences in the polarization images and fluorescent spectra of this hybrid material have proved to be correlated with the arrangement of the areas of homogeneous distribution and heterogeneous clustering of QDs. The reconstruction of the 3D nanostructure of the liquid crystal matrix in the areas of homogeneous QDs distribution has shown that QDs do not perturb the periodic planar texture of the cholesteric liquid crystal matrix, whereas QD clusters do perturb it. The combined microspectroscopy-nanotomography technique will be important for evaluating the effects of nanoparticles on the structural organization of organic and liquid crystal matrices and biomedical materials, as well as quality control of nanotechnology fabrication processes and products.

  19. Combined scanning probe nanotomography and optical microspectroscopy: a correlative technique for 3D characterization of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Mochalov, Konstantin E; Efimov, Anton E; Bobrovsky, Alexey; Agapov, Igor I; Chistyakov, Anton A; Oleinikov, Vladimir; Sukhanova, Alyona; Nabiev, Igor

    2013-10-22

    Combination of 3D structural analysis with optical characterization of the same sample area on the nanoscale is a highly demanded approach in nanophotonics, materials science, and quality control of nanomaterial. We have developed a correlative microscopy technique where the 3D structure of the sample is reconstructed on the nanoscale by means of a "slice-and-view" combination of ultramicrotomy and scanning probe microscopy (scanning probe nanotomography, SPNT), and its optical characteristics are analyzed using microspectroscopy. This approach has been used to determine the direct quantitative relationship of the 3D structural characteristics of nanovolumes of materials with their microscopic optical properties. This technique has been applied to 3D structural and optical characterization of a hybrid material consisting of cholesteric liquid crystals doped with fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) that can be used for photochemical patterning and image recording through the changes in the dissymmetry factor of the circular polarization of QD emission. The differences in the polarization images and fluorescent spectra of this hybrid material have proved to be correlated with the arrangement of the areas of homogeneous distribution and heterogeneous clustering of QDs. The reconstruction of the 3D nanostructure of the liquid crystal matrix in the areas of homogeneous QDs distribution has shown that QDs do not perturb the periodic planar texture of the cholesteric liquid crystal matrix, whereas QD clusters do perturb it. The combined microspectroscopy-nanotomography technique will be important for evaluating the effects of nanoparticles on the structural organization of organic and liquid crystal matrices and biomedical materials, as well as quality control of nanotechnology fabrication processes and products. PMID:23991901

  20. Characterization and source identification of hydrocarbons in water samples using multiple analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhendi; Li, K; Fingas, M; Sigouin, L; Ménard, L

    2002-09-20

    This paper describes a case study in which multiple analytical techniques were used to identify and characterize trace petroleum-related hydrocarbons and other volatile organic compounds in groundwater samples collected in a bedrock aquifer exploited for drinking water purposes. The objective of the study was to confirm the presence of gasoline and other petroleum products or other volatile organic pollutants in those samples in order to assess the respective implication of each of the potentially responsible parties to the contamination of the aquifer. In addition, the degree of contamination at different depths in the aquifer was also of interest. The analytical techniques used for analyses of water samples included gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and capillary GC with flame-ionization detection, solid-phase microextraction and headspace GC-MS techniques. Chemical characterization results revealed the following: (1) The hydrocarbons in sample A (near-surface groundwater, 0-5 m) were clearly of two types, one being gasoline and the other a heavy petroleum product. The significant distribution of five target petroleum-characteristic alkylkated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon homologues and biomarkers confirmed the presence of another heavy petroleum product. The concentrations of the TPHs (total petroleum hydrocarbons) and BTEX (collective name of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and p-, m-, and o-xylenes) were determined to be 1070 and 155 microg/kg of water for sample A, respectively. (2) The deepest groundwater (sample B, collected at a depth ranging between 15 and 60 m) was also contaminated, but to a much lesser degree. The concentrations of the TPH and BTEX were determined to be only 130 and 2.6 microg/kg of water for sample B, respectively. (3) The presence of a variety of volatile chlorinated compounds to the groundwater was also clearly identified. PMID:12350112

  1. Characterization and source identification of hydrocarbons in water samples using multiple analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhendi; Li, K; Fingas, M; Sigouin, L; Ménard, L

    2002-09-20

    This paper describes a case study in which multiple analytical techniques were used to identify and characterize trace petroleum-related hydrocarbons and other volatile organic compounds in groundwater samples collected in a bedrock aquifer exploited for drinking water purposes. The objective of the study was to confirm the presence of gasoline and other petroleum products or other volatile organic pollutants in those samples in order to assess the respective implication of each of the potentially responsible parties to the contamination of the aquifer. In addition, the degree of contamination at different depths in the aquifer was also of interest. The analytical techniques used for analyses of water samples included gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and capillary GC with flame-ionization detection, solid-phase microextraction and headspace GC-MS techniques. Chemical characterization results revealed the following: (1) The hydrocarbons in sample A (near-surface groundwater, 0-5 m) were clearly of two types, one being gasoline and the other a heavy petroleum product. The significant distribution of five target petroleum-characteristic alkylkated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon homologues and biomarkers confirmed the presence of another heavy petroleum product. The concentrations of the TPHs (total petroleum hydrocarbons) and BTEX (collective name of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and p-, m-, and o-xylenes) were determined to be 1070 and 155 microg/kg of water for sample A, respectively. (2) The deepest groundwater (sample B, collected at a depth ranging between 15 and 60 m) was also contaminated, but to a much lesser degree. The concentrations of the TPH and BTEX were determined to be only 130 and 2.6 microg/kg of water for sample B, respectively. (3) The presence of a variety of volatile chlorinated compounds to the groundwater was also clearly identified.

  2. Evaluation of Characterization Techniques for Iron Pipe Corrosion Products and Iron Oxide Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Borch, Thomas; Camper, Anne K.; Biederman, Joel A.; Butterfield, Phillip; Gerlach, Robin; Amonette, James E.

    2008-10-01

    A common problem faced by drinking water studies is that of properly characterizing the corrosion products (CP) in iron pipescor synthetic Fe (hydr)oxides used to simulate the iron pipe used in municipal drinking-water systems. The present work compares the relative applicability of a suite of imaging and analytical techniques for the characterization of CPs and synthetic Fe oxide thin films and provide an overview of the type of data that each instrument can provide as well as their limitations to help researchers and consultants choose the best technique for a given task. Crushed CP from a water distribution system and synthetic Fe oxide thin films formed on glass surfaces were chosen as test samples for this evaluation. The CP and synthetic Fe oxide thin films were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), grazing incident diffractometry (GID), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared, Mössbauer spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller N2 adsorption and Fe concentration was determined by the ferrozine method. XRD and GID were found to be the most suitable techniques for identification of the mineralogical composition of CP and synthetic Fe oxide thin films, respectively. AFM and a combined ToF-SIMS-AFM approach proved excellent for roughness and depth profiling analysis of synthetic Fe oxide thin films, respectively. Corrosion products were difficult to study by AFM due to their surface roughness, while synthetic Fe oxide thin films resisted most spectroscopic methods due to their limited thickness (118 nm). XPS analysis is not recommended for mixtures of Fe (hydr)oxides due to their spectral similarities. SEM and TEM provided great detail on mineralogical morphology.

  3. Structural characterization of low level degradants in aztreonam injection and an innovative approach to aid HPLC method validation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qingmei; Ding, Wei; Rinaldi, Frank; Huang, Yande; Miller, Scott A; Bolgar, Mark

    2016-05-30

    Three new degradants have been identified from drug product and active pharmaceutical ingredient stability samples of aztreonam, a marketed synthetic monocyclic beta-lactam antibiotic. The degradants were detected following the implementation of a new, more selective HPLC method for the determination of impurities and degradants. The new method was developed in response to changes in the regulatory requirement for mature products. Two of the new unknown Degradants (I and II) were observed in chromatograms from stability samples of aztreonam injection. The third new Degradant (III) was observed during a stability study of the aztreonam active pharmaceutical ingredient. These degradants were structurally characterized. A small amount (ca. 1-3mg) of each degradant was isolated via preparative HPLC for structure elucidation using accurate MS, one and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The small amount of each NMR sample was then reused as a standard for HPLC purity/impurity method validation. Their exact concentrations were determined using quantitative NMR which enabled the execution of the quantitative elements of the HPLC method validation. This innovative approach eliminated the need to isolate or synthesize larger quantities of markers for HPLC/UV method validation, thus saving significant time and reducing costs. PMID:26991056

  4. Analysis and evaluation of interwell seismic logging techniques for hydrocarbon reservoir characterization. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, J.O.; Zook, B.J.; Sturdivant, V.R.

    1994-06-01

    The work reported herein represents the third year work in evaluating high-resolution interwell seismic logging techniques for hydrocarbon reservoir characterization. The objective of this project is to investigate interwell seismic logging techniques for indirectly interpreting oil and gas reservoir geology and rock physical properties. The work involves a balanced study of theoretical and numerical modeling of seismic waves transmitted between pairs of wells combined with experimental data acquisition and processing at controlled field conditions. The field applications of this reservoir probing concept are aimed at demonstrating high resolution measurements and detailed interpretation of heterogeneous hydrocarbon-bearing formations. The first part of this third year project efforts was devoted to thoroughly evaluating interwell seismic logging and reverse VSP in a hydrocarbon-bearing formation at the Buckhorn test site in Illinois. Specifically, the data from the experiments conducted in the second year of this project were analyzed to delineate geological structures and to extract rock physical parameters. The second part of this project is devoted to the evaluation of continuity logging techniques for hydrocarbon reservoir continuity. Specifically, this part of the project includes the evaluation of methods of measurements, modeling and data processing to delineate the reservoir architecture and relate dispersion and attenuation measurements to rock physical properties.

  5. Thermal characterization of a liquid resin for 3D printing using photothermal techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Pérez, José L.; Pincel, Pavel Vieyra; Cruz-Orea, Alfredo; Correa-Pacheco, Zormy N.

    2016-05-01

    Thermal properties of a liquid resin were studied by thermal lens spectrometry (TLS) and open photoacoustic cell (OPC), respectively. In the case of the TLS technique, the two mismatched mode experimental configuration was used with a He-Ne laser, as a probe beam and an Argon laser was used as the excitation source. The characteristic time constant of the transient thermal lens was obtained by fitting the theoretical expression to the experimental data in order to obtain the thermal diffusivity ( α) of the resin. On the other hand, the sample thermal effusivity ( e) was obtained by using the OPC technique. In this technique, an Argon laser was used as the excitation source and was operated at 514 nm with an output power of 30 mW. From the obtained thermal diffusivity ( α) and thermal effusivity ( e) values, the thermal conductivity ( k) and specific heat capacity per unit volume ( ρc) of resin were calculated through the relationships k = e( α)1/2 and ρc = e/( α)1/2. The obtained thermal parameters were compared with the thermal parameters of the literature. To our knowledge, the thermal characterization of resin has not been reported until now. The present study has applications in laser stereo-lithography to manufacture 3D printing pieces.

  6. Characterization of Defects on MOCVD Grown Gallium Nitride Using Transient Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasani, Sujan Phani Kumar

    Since the invention of the first visible spectrum (red) LED by Holonyak in 1962, there has been a need for more efficient, more reliable and less expensive LEDs. The III-nitrides revolutionized semiconductor technology with their applications in the blue LED's. However the internal quantum efficiency of LED's are limited by the deep level traps in GaN substrate. Traps are defects in the crystal lattice, which depends on growth parameters. These traps act as non-radiative centers where non-radiative recombination occurs without conversion of available energy into light. Characterization of these traps in a material is necessary for better understanding of the material growth quality and resulting device performance. In this work Capacitance-Voltage (C-V) and Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) are conducted which provide electronic properties of trap centers like activation energy, doping concentration and capture cross-section. In n-GaN grown by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on Sapphire two defects types are detected and are characterized by Capacitance-Voltage and Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy. Two deep levels E1 and E2 are typically observed in n-GaN with the activation energies of 0.21eV and 0.53eV at 125°K and 325°K, respectively. The deep level E1 is caused by linear line defects along dislocation cores while deep level E2 is related to point defects. The characterization techniques, experimental systems and preliminary characterization results are discussed in detail.

  7. The multianalyser system of the three axes neutron spectrometer PUMA: Pilot experiments with the innovative multiplex technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, Oleg; Hoffmann, Ron; Gibhardt, Holger; Jünke, Norbert; Knorr, Andreas; Meyer, Volker; Eckold, Götz

    2015-02-01

    A new type of multiplex technique for three axes neutron spectrometers has been realized and successfully commissioned at the PUMA spectrometer at FRM II. Consisting of eleven analyser-detector channels which can be configured individually, this technique is especially suitable for kinetic experiments where a single excitation spectrum is recorded as a function of time without the need to move the spectrometer. On a time-scale of seconds an entire spectrum can be recorded thus allowing users to monitor changes during fast kinetic processes in single shot experiments without the need for stroboscopic techniques. Moreover, the multianalyser system provides an efficient and rapid tool for mapping excitations in (Q,ω)-space. The results of pilot experiments demonstrate the performance of this new technique and a user-friendly software is presented which assists users during their experiments.

  8. Innovations and techniques for balloon-enteroscope-assisted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with altered gastrointestinal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Okuwaki, Kosuke; Miyazawa, Shiro; Iwai, Tomohisa; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) remains challenging in patients who have undergone surgical reconstruction of the intestine. Recently, many studies have reported that balloon-enteroscope-assisted ERCP (BEA-ERCP) is a safe and effective procedure. However, further improvements in outcomes and the development of simplified procedures are required. Percutaneous treatment, Laparoscopy-assisted ERCP, endoscopic ultrasound-guided anterograde intervention, and open surgery are effective treatments. However, treatment should be noninvasive, effective, and safe. We believe that these procedures should be performed only in difficult-to-treat patients because of many potential complications. BEA-ERCP still requires high expertise-level techniques and is far from a routinely performed procedure. Various techniques have been proposed to facilitate scope insertion (insertion with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) rendezvous technique, Short type single-balloon enteroscopes with passive bending section, Intraluminal injection of indigo carmine, CO2 inflation guidance), cannulation (PTBD or percutaneous transgallbladder drainage rendezvous technique, Dilation using screw drill, Rendezvous technique combining DBE with a cholangioscope, endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous technique), and treatment (overtube-assisted technique, Short type balloon enteroscopes) during BEA-ERCP. The use of these techniques may allow treatment to be performed by BEA-ERCP in many patients. A standard procedure for ERCP yet to be established for patients with a reconstructed intestine. At present, BEA-ERCP is considered the safest and most effective procedure and is therefore likely to be recommended as first-line treatment. In this article, we discuss the current status of BEA-ERCP in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy. PMID:26074685

  9. Off-label innovation: characterization through a case study of rhBMP-2 for spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Schnurman, Zane; Smith, Michael L; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Off-label therapies are widely used in clinical practice by spinal surgeons. Some patients and practitioners have advocated for increased regulation of their use, and payers have increasingly questioned reimbursment for off-label therapies. In this study, the authors applied a model that quantifies publication data to analyze the developmental process from initial on-label use to off-label innovation, using as an example recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) because of its wide off-label use. METHODS As a case study of off-label innovation, the developmental patterns of rhBMP-2 from FDA-approved use for anterior lumbar interbody fusion to several of its off-label uses, including posterolateral lumbar fusion, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, and posterior lumbar interbody fusion/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, were evaluated using the "progressive scholarly acceptance" (PSA) model. In this model, PSA is used as an end point indicating acceptance of a therapy or procedure by the relevant scientific community and is reached when the total number of peer-reviewed studies devoted to refinement or improvement of a therapy surpasses the total number assessing initial efficacy. Report characteristics, including the number of patients studied and study design, were assessed in addition to the time to and pattern of community acceptance, and results compared with previous developmental study findings. Disclosures and reported conflicts of interest for all articles were reviewed, and these data were also used in the analysis. RESULTS Publication data indicated that the acceptance of rhBMP-2 off-label therapies occurred more rapidly and with less evidence than previously studied on-label therapies. Additionally, the community appeared to respond more robustly (by rapidly changing publication patterns) to reports of adverse events than to new questions of efficacy. CONCLUSIONS The development of off-label therapies, including the

  10. Off-label innovation: characterization through a case study of rhBMP-2 for spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Schnurman, Zane; Smith, Michael L; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Off-label therapies are widely used in clinical practice by spinal surgeons. Some patients and practitioners have advocated for increased regulation of their use, and payers have increasingly questioned reimbursment for off-label therapies. In this study, the authors applied a model that quantifies publication data to analyze the developmental process from initial on-label use to off-label innovation, using as an example recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) because of its wide off-label use. METHODS As a case study of off-label innovation, the developmental patterns of rhBMP-2 from FDA-approved use for anterior lumbar interbody fusion to several of its off-label uses, including posterolateral lumbar fusion, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, and posterior lumbar interbody fusion/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, were evaluated using the "progressive scholarly acceptance" (PSA) model. In this model, PSA is used as an end point indicating acceptance of a therapy or procedure by the relevant scientific community and is reached when the total number of peer-reviewed studies devoted to refinement or improvement of a therapy surpasses the total number assessing initial efficacy. Report characteristics, including the number of patients studied and study design, were assessed in addition to the time to and pattern of community acceptance, and results compared with previous developmental study findings. Disclosures and reported conflicts of interest for all articles were reviewed, and these data were also used in the analysis. RESULTS Publication data indicated that the acceptance of rhBMP-2 off-label therapies occurred more rapidly and with less evidence than previously studied on-label therapies. Additionally, the community appeared to respond more robustly (by rapidly changing publication patterns) to reports of adverse events than to new questions of efficacy. CONCLUSIONS The development of off-label therapies, including the

  11. Development of high sensitivity techniques for characterizing outgassing of polymeric construction materials for microenvironments

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, D.C.; Thornberg, S.M.; Liang, A.Y.; Bender, S.F.A.; Lujan, R.D.

    1994-05-01

    Further reductions in particulate contamination in semiconductor device manufacturing environments will be required to meet the future challenges of producing devices with decreased dimensions. Using pods (microenvironments) to provide very clean environments on a local (wafer level) scale is an alternative that may reduce the technological demands and cost of providing comparable contamination levels in an entire clean-room manufacturing facility. It has been demonstrated that pods can provide wafer environments that have lower and less variable levels of particulate contamination than conventional clean-room manufacturing environments. However, there have also been indications that outgassed constituents from polymeric pod materials can condense on wafers during storage. A standard technique to evaluate outgassing of polymers is needed so that: (1) manufacturers can make reliable comparisons of the outgassing potential of materials being considered for use and (2) microenvironment users can make judgments on the relative outgassing threats from different manufacturers` products. The goal of the work that is summarized below has been to develop standard high sensitivity (10--100 ppb) testing techniques for evaluation of outgassing from polymeric pod materials in a temperature range from 30 C--75 C. This paper will briefly review outgassing data from polycarbonate materials that was obtained using thermal desorption combined with detection using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy wit volatile pre-concentration or using a flame ionization detector (FID). Although the focus of this program has been on developing techniques to evaluate pod materials of construction, the techniques that have been evaluated may be useful for characterizing outgassing from other polymeric materials found in cleanrooms.

  12. Study to perform preliminary experiments to evaluate particle generation and characterization techniques for zero-gravity cloud physics experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, U.

    1982-01-01

    Methods of particle generation and characterization with regard to their applicability for experiments requiring cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) of specified properties were investigated. Since aerosol characterization is a prerequisite to assessing performance of particle generation equipment, techniques for characterizing aerosol were evaluated. Aerosol generation is discussed, and atomizer and photolytic generators including preparation of hydrosols (used with atomizers) and the evaluation of a flight version of an atomizer are studied.

  13. Allowance for thermodynamic nonideality in the characterization of protein interactions by spectral techniques.

    PubMed

    Wills, Peter R; Winzor, Donald J

    2011-09-01

    Theory is developed for the characterization of protein interactions by spectral techniques, where the constraints of constant temperature and pressure demand that thermodynamic activity be defined on the molal concentration scale. The customary practice of defining the equilibrium constant (K) on a molar basis is accommodated by developing expressions to convert those experimental values (K(molar)) to their thermodynamically more rigorous counterparts (K(molal)). Such procedures are illustrated by reanalysis of published results for the effects of molecular crowding agents on the isomerisation of α-chymotrypsin and reversible complex formation between catalase and superoxide dismutase. Although those reanalyses have led to only minor refinements of the quantitative interpretation, it is clearly preferable to adopt thermodynamic rigor throughout future spectral studies by employing the molal concentration scale from the outset. PMID:21550711

  14. Characterization of protein N-glycosylation by tandem mass spectrometry using complementary fragmentation techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Ford, Kristina L.; Zeng, Wei; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Bacic, Antony

    2015-08-28

    The analysis of post-translational modifications (PTMs) by proteomics is regarded as a technically challenging undertaking. While in recent years approaches to examine and quantify protein phosphorylation have greatly improved, the analysis of many protein modifications, such as glycosylation, are still regarded as problematic. Limitations in the standard proteomics workflow, such as use of suboptimal peptide fragmentation methods, can significantly prevent the identification of glycopeptides. The current generation of tandem mass spectrometers has made available a variety of fragmentation options, many of which are becoming standard features on these instruments. Lastly, we have used three common fragmentation techniques, namely CID, HCD,more » and ETD, to analyze a glycopeptide and highlight how an integrated fragmentation approach can be used to identify the modified residue and characterize the N-glycan on a peptide.« less

  15. Characterization of protein N-glycosylation by tandem mass spectrometry using complementary fragmentation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Kristina L.; Zeng, Wei; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Bacic, Antony

    2015-08-28

    The analysis of post-translational modifications (PTMs) by proteomics is regarded as a technically challenging undertaking. While in recent years approaches to examine and quantify protein phosphorylation have greatly improved, the analysis of many protein modifications, such as glycosylation, are still regarded as problematic. Limitations in the standard proteomics workflow, such as use of suboptimal peptide fragmentation methods, can significantly prevent the identification of glycopeptides. The current generation of tandem mass spectrometers has made available a variety of fragmentation options, many of which are becoming standard features on these instruments. Lastly, we have used three common fragmentation techniques, namely CID, HCD, and ETD, to analyze a glycopeptide and highlight how an integrated fragmentation approach can be used to identify the modified residue and characterize the N-glycan on a peptide.

  16. Nanogels based on alginic aldehyde and gelatin by inverse miniemulsion technique: synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Sarika, P R; Anil Kumar, P R; Raj, Deepa K; James, Nirmala Rachel

    2015-03-30

    Nanogels were developed from alginic aldehyde and gelatin by an inverse miniemulsion technique. Stable inverse miniemulsions were prepared by sonication of noncontinuous aqueous phase (mixture of alginic aldehyde and gelatin) in a continuous organic phase (Span 20 dissolved in cyclohexane). Cross-linking occurred between alginic aldehyde (AA) and gelatin (gel) in the presence of borax by Schiff's base reaction during the formation of inverse miniemulsion. The effects of surfactant (Span 20) concentration, volume of the aqueous phase and AA/gel weight ratio on the size of the alginic aldehyde-gelatin (AA-gel) nanoparticles were studied. Nanogels were characterized by DLS, FT-IR spectroscopy, TGA, SEM and TEM. DLS, TEM and SEM studies demonstrated nanosize and spherical morphology of the nanogels. Hemocompatibility and in vitro cytocompatibility analyses of the nanogels proved their nontoxicity. The results indicated the potential of the present nanogel system as a candidate for drug- and gene-delivery applications.

  17. A study of the stress wave factor technique for the characterization of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henneke, E. G., II; Duke, J. C., Jr.; Stinchcomb, W. W.; Govada, A.; Lemascon, A.

    1983-01-01

    A testing program was undertaken to provide an independent investigation and evaluation of the stress wave factor for characterizing the mechanical behavior of composite laminates. Some of the data which was obtained after performing a very large number of tests to determine the reproducibility of the SWF measurement is presented. It was determined that, with some optimizing of experimental parameters, the SWF value can be reproduced to within + or - 10%. Results are also given which show that, after careful calibration procedures, the lowest SWF value along the length of a specimen will correlate very closely to the site of final failure when the specimen is loaded in tension. Finally, using a moire interferometry technique, it was found that local regions having the highest in plane strains under tensile loading also had the lowest SWF values.

  18. A first look at roadheader construction and estimating techniques for site characterization at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Neil, D.M.; Taylor, D.L.

    1991-12-31

    The Yucca Mountain site characterization program will be based on mechanical excavation techniques for the mined repository construction and development. Tunnel Boring Machines (TBM`s), Mobile Miners (MM), Raiseborers (RB), Blind Hole Shaft Boring Machines (BHSB), and Roadheaders (RH) have been selected as the mechanical excavation machines most suited to mine the densely welded and non-welded tuffs of the Topopah Springs and Calico Hills members. Heavy duty RH in the 70 to 100 ton class with 300 Kw cutter motors have been evaluated and formulas developed to predict machine performance based on the rock physical properties and the results of Linear Cutting Machine (LCM) tests done at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) for Sandia National Labs. (SNL).

  19. Forward-Inverse Adaptive Techniques for Reservoir Characterization and Simulation: Theory and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, S D; Ezzedine, S; Gelinas, R; Chawathe, A

    2001-06-11

    A novel approach called Forward-Inverse Adaptive Techniques (FIAT) for reservoir characterization is developed and applied to three representative exploration cases. Inverse modeling refers to the determination of the entire reservoir permeability under steady state single-phase flow regime, given only field permeability, pressure and production well measurements. FIAT solves the forward and inverse partial differential equations (PDEs) simultaneously by adding a regularization term and filtering pressure gradients. An implicit adaptive-grid, Galerkin, numerical scheme is used to numerically solve the set of PDEs subject to pressure and permeability boundary conditions. Three examples are presented. Results from all three cases demonstrate attainable and reasonably accurate solutions and, more importantly, provide insights into the consequences of data undersampling.

  20. Characterization of a one dimensional focusing compound refractive lens using the rotating shearing interferometer technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Sawhney, Kawal

    2012-07-31

    A one dimensional (1D) compound refractive lens (CRL) has been characterized using the grating based rotating shearing interferometer technique. The method is based on the calculation of moire fringes orientation to sense wavefront information. The phase shift and the optical aberration introduced by the 1D CRL on an X-ray beam were retrieved from a single moire fringe image. The radius of curvature of the lens at the apex was derived. This physical radius of the CRL, which is also closely related to the focal length of the 1D CRL, was shown to vary with the incident angle of the incoming X-ray beam onto the CRL. The experimental measurement agreed very well with the theoretical expectations.

  1. Characterization of PE-g-HEMA films prepared by gamma irradiation through nuclear microprobe techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. M.; Leal, J. P.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Alves, L. C.; Falcão, A. N.; Gil, M. H.

    2012-09-01

    PE-g-HEMA films with different grafting yields prepared by mutual gamma irradiation method at a 60Co source were characterized with ion beam analytical techniques using a nuclear microprobe. Qualitative analysis showed a random and heterogeneous distribution of contaminant elements, independent of the grafting degree, suggesting the existence of several sources of contamination at different stages of their preparation. Results also suggest that this "phased" contamination occurs simultaneously with mechanisms of agglomeration/entrapment of impurities during the gamma induced copolymerization reaction. Moreover, quantitative data showed that all contaminants found in the copolymeric films are natural contaminants of their reagents of preparation, although at concentrations without toxicological hazard, which points to a low cytotoxic potential.

  2. Impact of advanced microstructural characterization techniques on modeling and analysis of radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Odette, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of radiation-induced alterations of dimensional and mechanical properties has been shown to be a direct and often predictable consequence of radiation-induced microstructural changes. Recent advances in understanding of the nature and role of each microstructural component in determining the property of interest has led to a reappraisal of the type and priority of data needed for further model development. This paper presents an overview of the types of modeling and analysis activities in progress, the insights that prompted these activities, and specific examples of successful and ongoing efforts. A review is presented of some problem areas that in the authors' opinion are not yet receiving sufficient attention and which may benefit from the application of advanced techniques of microstructural characterization. Guidelines based on experience gained in previous studies are also provided for acquisition of data in a form most applicable to modeling needs.

  3. Nanogels based on alginic aldehyde and gelatin by inverse miniemulsion technique: synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Sarika, P R; Anil Kumar, P R; Raj, Deepa K; James, Nirmala Rachel

    2015-03-30

    Nanogels were developed from alginic aldehyde and gelatin by an inverse miniemulsion technique. Stable inverse miniemulsions were prepared by sonication of noncontinuous aqueous phase (mixture of alginic aldehyde and gelatin) in a continuous organic phase (Span 20 dissolved in cyclohexane). Cross-linking occurred between alginic aldehyde (AA) and gelatin (gel) in the presence of borax by Schiff's base reaction during the formation of inverse miniemulsion. The effects of surfactant (Span 20) concentration, volume of the aqueous phase and AA/gel weight ratio on the size of the alginic aldehyde-gelatin (AA-gel) nanoparticles were studied. Nanogels were characterized by DLS, FT-IR spectroscopy, TGA, SEM and TEM. DLS, TEM and SEM studies demonstrated nanosize and spherical morphology of the nanogels. Hemocompatibility and in vitro cytocompatibility analyses of the nanogels proved their nontoxicity. The results indicated the potential of the present nanogel system as a candidate for drug- and gene-delivery applications. PMID:25563951

  4. Diffusion and ideal MRI techniques to characterize limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Salazar, G.; Hidalgo-Tobon, S.; Vargas-Cañas, S.; Marrufo-Melendez, O.; Solis-Najera, S.; Taboada-Barajas, J.; Rodríguez, A. O.; Delgado-Hernández, R.

    2012-10-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a group of autosomal dominantly or recessively inherited muscular dystrophies that also present with primary proximal (limb-girdle) muscle weakness. In the thigh, muscles at the back are affected, with a tendency to preserve the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius. The aim of this study was to compare quantitative MRI measurements from IDEAL-based imaging and DW imaging in the thigh muscles of adults with LGMDs and healthy volunteers(HC). Six women (three patients and three healthy volunteers) were examined. Imaging experiments were conducted on a 1.5T GE scanner (General Electric Medical Systems. Milwaukee). T1 IDEAL 2D images and diffusion images were acquired. Results demonstrated that the use of noninvasive MRI techniques may provide the means to characterize the muscle through quantitative methods to determine the percentage of fat and ADC values.

  5. Mechanical characterization of TiO{sub 2} nanofibers produced by different electrospinning techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Vahtrus, Mikk; Šutka, Andris; Vlassov, Sergei; Šutka, Anna; Polyakov, Boris; Saar, Rando; Dorogin, Leonid; Lõhmus, Rünno

    2015-02-15

    In this work TiO{sub 2} nanofibers produced by needle and needleless electrospinning processes from the same precursor were characterized and compared using Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and in situ SEM nanomechanical testing. Phase composition, morphology, Young's modulus and bending strength values were found. Weibull statistics was used to evaluate and compare uniformity of mechanical properties of nanofibers produced by two different methods. It is shown that both methods yield nanofibers with very similar properties. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} nanofibers were produced by needle and needleless electrospinning processes. • Structure was studied by Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy methods. • Mechanical properties were measured using advanced in situ SEM cantilevered beam bending technique. • Both methods yield nanofibers with very similar properties.

  6. Optimization of site characterization and remediation methods using 3-D geoscience modeling and visualization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hedegaard, R.F.; Ho, J.; Eisert, J.

    1996-12-31

    Three-dimensional (3-D) geoscience volume modeling can be used to improve the efficiency of the environmental investigation and remediation process. At several unsaturated zone spill sites at two Superfund (CERCLA) sites (Military Installations) in California, all aspects of subsurface contamination have been characterized using an integrated computerized approach. With the aide of software such as LYNX GMS{trademark}, Wavefront`s Data Visualizer{trademark} and Gstools (public domain), the authors have created a central platform from which to map a contaminant plume, visualize the same plume three-dimensionally, and calculate volumes of contaminated soil or groundwater above important health risk thresholds. The developed methodology allows rapid data inspection for decisions such that the characterization process and remedial action design are optimized. By using the 3-D geoscience modeling and visualization techniques, the technical staff are able to evaluate the completeness and spatial variability of the data and conduct 3-D geostatistical predictions of contaminant and lithologic distributions. The geometry of each plume is estimated using 3-D variography on raw analyte values and indicator thresholds for the kriged model. Three-dimensional lithologic interpretation is based on either {open_quote}linked{close_quote} parallel cross sections or on kriged grid estimations derived from borehole data coded with permeability indicator thresholds. Investigative borings, as well as soil vapor extraction/injection wells, are sighted and excavation costs are estimated using these results. The principal advantages of the technique are the efficiency and rapidity with which meaningful results are obtained and the enhanced visualization capability which is a desirable medium to communicate with both the technical staff as well as nontechnical audiences.

  7. Application of different molecular techniques for characterization of catalase-positive cocci isolated from sucuk.

    PubMed

    Kesmen, Zülal; Yarimcam, Burcu; Aslan, Hakiye; Ozbekar, Esra; Yetim, Hasan

    2014-02-01

    This study was carried out for the characterization and discrimination of the indigenous Gram positive, catalase-positive cocci (GCC) population in sucuk, a traditional Turkish dry-fermented sausage. Sucuk samples, produced by the traditional method without starter culture were collected from 8 local producers in Kayseri/Turkey and a total of 116 GCC isolates were identified by using different molecular techniques. Two different molecular fingerprinting methods; namely, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD-PCR) and repetitive extragenic palindrome-PCR (rep-PCR), were used for the clustering of isolates and identification at species level was carried out by full length sequencing of 16S rDNA. Combining the results obtained from molecular fingerprinting and 16S rDNA sequencing showed that the dominant GCC species isolated from the sucuk samples was Staphylococcus saprophyticus followed by Staphylococcus succinus and Staphylococcus equorum belonging to the Staphylococcus genus. Real-time PCR DNA melting curve analysis and high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis targeting the V1 + V3 regions of 16S rDNA were also applied for the discrimination of isolates belonging to different species. It was observed statistically different Tm values and species-specific HRM profiles for all except 2 species (S. saprophyticus and Staphylococcus xylosus) that have high 16S rDNA sequence similarity. The combination of rep-PCR and/or PCR-RAPD with 16S rRNA gene sequencing was an efficient approach for the characterization and identification of the GCC population in spontaneously fermented sucuk. On the other hand, intercalating dye assays were found to be a simple and very promising technique for the differentiation of the GCC population at species level.

  8. Mathematical techniques to characterize nitrogen isotherms from eroded sediments under conventional tillage and no tillage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinho, M. D.; Paz-Ferreiro, J.

    2011-12-01

    Soil specific surface area (SSA) is one of the most important soil properties as it affects chemical reactivity, cation exchange capacity and, in general, nutrient holding capacity. The SSA of a soil mainly depends on texture, clay type and organic matter content, which in turn are factors affecting the erosion potential. An important consideration in the link between soil erosion and nutrient transfer to waters is the well-documented relation between SSA (or particle size distribution) and nutrient losses. Because, sediment erosion and transport processes are particle size dependent, they influence also SSA. Characterization of both, soil nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms by monofractal and multifractal analysis has been demonstrated to be an useful tool, which allows a better understanding of the organization of the soil colloidal complex. Here, we report measures of nitrogen isotherm in sediments produced under three different management histories and we characterize them by various mathematical techniques including fractal and multifractal analysis. Soil and water losses from an Oxisol were evaluated under natural rain, at the experimental station of UNICAMP/ FEAGRI, Campinas, SP, Brazil. Experimental plots were 20 m x 30 m (i.e. 600 m2) and the management systems compared were no-tillage and two different conventional tillage techniques. Specific surface area determined by the classical BET method was significantly lower in sediments eroded from the no-tilled than from the tilled plots. The scaling properties of both nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms from all the studied sediment samples could be fitted reasonably well with multifractal models. Various fractal and multifractal parameters obtained from the adsorption and desorption characteristics also were useful to differentiate the impact of tillage treatment on the adsorption and desorption characteristics of the eroded sediments. Reasons for such differences have been already explored.

  9. Two-port transmission line technique for dielectric property characterization of polymer electrolyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zijie; Lanagan, Michael; Manias, Evangelos; Macdonald, Digby D

    2009-10-15

    Performance improvements of perfluorosulfonic acid membranes, such as Nafion and Flemion, underline a need for dielectric characterization of these materials toward a quantitative understanding of the dynamics of water molecules and protons within the membranes. In this Article, a two-port transmission line technique for measuring the complex permittivity spectra of polymeric electrolytes in the microwave region is described, and the algorithms for permittivity determination are presented. The technique is experimentally validated with liquid water and polytertrafluoroethylene film, whose dielectric properties are well-known. Further, the permittivity spectra of dry and hydrated Flemion SH150 membranes are measured and compared to those of Nafion 117. Two water relaxation modes are observed in the microwave region (0.045-26 GHz) at 25 degrees C. The higher-frequency process observed is identified as the cooperative relaxation of bulk-like water, whose amount was found to increase linearly with water content in the polymer. The lower-frequency process, characterized by longer relaxation times in the range of 20-70 ps, is attributed to water molecules that are loosely bound to sulfonate groups. The loosely bound water amount was found to increase with hydration level at low water content and levels off at higher water contents. Flemion SH150, which has an equivalent weight of 909 g/equiv, displays higher dielectric strengths for both of these water modes as compared to Nafion 117 (equivalent weight of 1100 g/equiv), which probably reflects the effect of equivalent weight on the polymers' hydrated structure, and in particular its effect on the extended ionic cluster domains.

  10. Application of different molecular techniques for characterization of catalase-positive cocci isolated from sucuk.

    PubMed

    Kesmen, Zülal; Yarimcam, Burcu; Aslan, Hakiye; Ozbekar, Esra; Yetim, Hasan

    2014-02-01

    This study was carried out for the characterization and discrimination of the indigenous Gram positive, catalase-positive cocci (GCC) population in sucuk, a traditional Turkish dry-fermented sausage. Sucuk samples, produced by the traditional method without starter culture were collected from 8 local producers in Kayseri/Turkey and a total of 116 GCC isolates were identified by using different molecular techniques. Two different molecular fingerprinting methods; namely, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD-PCR) and repetitive extragenic palindrome-PCR (rep-PCR), were used for the clustering of isolates and identification at species level was carried out by full length sequencing of 16S rDNA. Combining the results obtained from molecular fingerprinting and 16S rDNA sequencing showed that the dominant GCC species isolated from the sucuk samples was Staphylococcus saprophyticus followed by Staphylococcus succinus and Staphylococcus equorum belonging to the Staphylococcus genus. Real-time PCR DNA melting curve analysis and high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis targeting the V1 + V3 regions of 16S rDNA were also applied for the discrimination of isolates belonging to different species. It was observed statistically different Tm values and species-specific HRM profiles for all except 2 species (S. saprophyticus and Staphylococcus xylosus) that have high 16S rDNA sequence similarity. The combination of rep-PCR and/or PCR-RAPD with 16S rRNA gene sequencing was an efficient approach for the characterization and identification of the GCC population in spontaneously fermented sucuk. On the other hand, intercalating dye assays were found to be a simple and very promising technique for the differentiation of the GCC population at species level. PMID:24410408

  11. Chemical and mineralogical characterizations of LD converter steel slags: A multi-analytical techniques approach

    SciTech Connect

    Waligora, J.; Bulteel, D.; Degrugilliers, P.; Damidot, D.; Potdevin, J.L.; Measson, M.

    2010-01-15

    The use of LD converter steel slags (coming from Linz-Donawitz steelmaking process) as aggregates in road construction can in certain cases lead to dimensional damage due to a macroscopic swelling that is the consequence of chemical reactions. The aim of this study was to couple several analytical techniques in order to carefully undertake chemical and mineralogical characterizations of LD steel slags and identify the phases that are expected to be responsible for their instability. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalyses revealed that LD steel slags mainly contain calcium silicates, dicalcium ferrites, iron oxides and lime. However, as a calcium silicate phase is heterogeneous, Raman microspectrometry and transmitted electron microscopy had to be used to characterize it more precisely. Results showed that lime is present under two forms in slag grains: some nodules observed in the matrix whose size ranges from 20 to 100 {mu}m and some micro-inclusions, enclosed in the heterogeneous calcium silicate phase whose size ranges from 1 to 3 {mu}m. It was also established that without the presence of magnesia, lime is expected to be the only phase responsible for LD steel slags instability. Nevertheless, the distribution of lime between nodules and micro-inclusions may play a major role and could explain that similar amounts of lime can induce different instabilities. Thus, it appears that lime content of LD steel slags is not the only parameter to explain their instability.

  12. Material characterization in cemented radioactive waste with the associated particle technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carasco, C.; Perot, B.; Mariani, A.; El Kanawati, W.; Valkovic, V.; Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J.

    2010-07-01

    The elemental characterization of materials constituting radioactive waste is of great importance for the management of storage and repository facilities. To complement the information brought by gamma or X-ray imaging, the performance of a fast neutron interrogation system based on the associated particle technique (APT) has been investigated by using MCNP simulations and by performing proof-of-principle experiments. APT provides a 3D localisation of the emission of fast neutron induced gamma rays, whose spectroscopic analysis allows to identify the elements present in specific volumes of interest in the waste package. Monte Carlo calculations show that it is possible to identify materials enclosed behind the thick outer envelop of a ≈1 m 3 cemented waste drum, provided the excited nuclei emit gamma rays with a sufficient energy to limit photon attenuation. Neutron attenuation and scattering are also predominant effects that reduce the sensitivity and spatial selectivity of APT, but it is still possible to localise items in the waste by neutron time-of-flight and gamma-ray spectroscopy. Experimental tests confirm that the elemental characterization is possible across thick mortar slabs.

  13. Characterization of itraconazole semisolid dosage forms prepared by hot melt technique.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sang-Young; Ji, Chang-Won; Sah, Hongkee; Park, Eun-Seok; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this study was to formulate itraconazole semisolid dosage forms and characterize their physicochemical properties. Itraconazole and excipients such as polysorbate 80, fatty acids, fatty alcohols, oils and organic acids were melted at 160 degrees C. The fused solution was then cooled immediately at -10 degrees C to make wax-like semisolid preparations. Their physicochemical attributes were first characterized using differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. The solubility of itraconazole in semisolid preparations and their dispersability in the simulated gastric fluid were also determined. Our semisolid preparations did not show any distinct endothermic peak of a crystalline form of itraconazole around 160-163 degrees C. This suggested that it was changed into amorphous one, when it was formulated into semisolid preparations. In addition, the distinctive functional peaks and chemical shifts of itraconazole were well retained after processing into semisolid preparations. It could be inferred from the data that itraconazole was stable during incorporation into semisolid preparations by the hot melt technique. In particular, itraconazole semisolid preparations composed of polysorbate 80, fatty acids and organic acids showed good solubility and dissolution when dispersed in an aqueous medium. It was anticipated that the semisolid dosage forms would be industrially applicable to improving the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. PMID:17146976

  14. Characterization of itraconazole semisolid dosage forms prepared by hot melt technique.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sang-Young; Ji, Chang-Won; Sah, Hongkee; Park, Eun-Seok; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this study was to formulate itraconazole semisolid dosage forms and characterize their physicochemical properties. Itraconazole and excipients such as polysorbate 80, fatty acids, fatty alcohols, oils and organic acids were melted at 160 degrees C. The fused solution was then cooled immediately at -10 degrees C to make wax-like semisolid preparations. Their physicochemical attributes were first characterized using differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. The solubility of itraconazole in semisolid preparations and their dispersability in the simulated gastric fluid were also determined. Our semisolid preparations did not show any distinct endothermic peak of a crystalline form of itraconazole around 160-163 degrees C. This suggested that it was changed into amorphous one, when it was formulated into semisolid preparations. In addition, the distinctive functional peaks and chemical shifts of itraconazole were well retained after processing into semisolid preparations. It could be inferred from the data that itraconazole was stable during incorporation into semisolid preparations by the hot melt technique. In particular, itraconazole semisolid preparations composed of polysorbate 80, fatty acids and organic acids showed good solubility and dissolution when dispersed in an aqueous medium. It was anticipated that the semisolid dosage forms would be industrially applicable to improving the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs.

  15. Fluorescence microscopy techniques for characterizing the microscale mechanical response of entangled actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Savanna; Falzone, Tobias; Robertson-Anderson, Rae

    2015-03-01

    Actin filaments are semiflexible polymers that display complex viscoelastic properties when entangled in networks. In order to characterize the molecular-level physical and mechanical properties of entangled actin networks it is important to know the in-network length distribution and the response of entangled filaments to local forcing. Here we describe two single-molecule microscopy protocols developed to investigate these properties. Using confocal fluorescence microscopy and ImageJ image analysis we have developed a protocol to accurately measure the in-network actin length distribution. To characterize the deformation of actin filaments in response to perturbation, we trap micron size beads embedded in the network with optical tweezers and propagate the beads through the entangled filaments while simultaneously recording images of fluorescent-labeled filaments in the network. A sparse number of labeled filaments dispersed throughout the network allow us to visualize the movement of individual filaments during perturbation. Analysis of images taken during forcing is carried out using a combination of vector mapping and skeletonization techniques to directly reveal the deformation and subsequent relaxation modes induced in entangled actin filaments by microscale strains. We also determine the dependence of deformation modes on the relative filament position relative to the strain.

  16. Characterization of natural resin materials using water adsorption and various advanced techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favvas, Evangelos P.; Kouvelos, Evangelos P.; Papageorgiou, Sergios K.; Tsanaktsidis, Constantinos G.; Mitropoulos, Athanasios Ch.

    2015-05-01

    A physicochemical characterization of natural raw resin material was evaluated and reported. The studied material is a natural resin, a natural product from pinus halepensis trees which is collected from the forests of Chalkidiki region of North Greece. The plurality of this product combined with its special property of removing water from commercial liquid fuels commands the detailed physicochemical characterization of this material. In particular, various techniques, such as water adsorption at 22 °C, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, were used in order to evaluate the structural and surface properties of the material. The water adsorption isotherm was also measured and fitted using the Guggenheim, Anderson and De Boer model in order to correlate the water activity characteristics. In addition, the kinetics of the adsorption was also fitted with good accuracy using the exponential Chapman model. Furthermore, as the results show, the natural resin presents good thermal characteristics. Finally, the studied material presents efficient water adsorption properties, up to 246.8 mmol/g, and it can be proposed as a promising dehydration material.

  17. Laser ultrasound technique applied in material characterization of thermally sprayed nickel aluminum coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, C. H.; Yang, C. H.; Hsiao, W. T.; Su, C.-Y.

    2012-05-01

    Thermal spraying processing usually uses a nickel-aluminum alloy system as the major powder due to its strong adhesion to substrates. The contents of powder material and the processing parameters used in the spraying process cause material properties of coatings exhibiting a wide variation. This research aims at nondestructive characterization of thermal spraying coatings. A laser-generation/laser-detection laser ultrasound technique (LUT) is used for the measurements of dispersion spectra of surface waves propagating along the coated surfaces. Theoretical model for surface waves propagating along a multi-layered structure with coating and substrate is used to model the sprayed coatings. An inversion algorithm based on Shuffled Complex Evolution (SCE-UA) is used to extract mechanical properties from the measured dispersion spectra cooperating with theoretical model. Three coatings with different sprayed powders and powder processing are investigated. Results indicate that substantial linear scatterings are observed for the inverted properties due to the measured dispersion spectra with limited bandwidth inherited from the relatively high attenuations. The slope of linear scattering can be used to distinguish the coating properties. The ANiBNb sample with ball-milled coating has the best properties based on its highest velocity and least attenuation. This method is potentially useful to characterize the mechanical properties of thermally spraying coating in a nondestructive way.

  18. Electrical characterization of grain boundaries of CZTS thin films using conductive atomic force microscopy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Muhunthan, N.; Singh, Om Pal; Toutam, Vijaykumar; Singh, V.N.

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Experimental setup for conducting AFM (C-AFM). - Highlights: • Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) thin film was grown by reactive co-sputtering. • The electronic properties were probed using conducting atomic force microscope, scanning Kelvin probe microscopy and scanning capacitance microscopy. • C-AFM current flow mainly through grain boundaries rather than grain interiors. • SKPM indicated higher potential along the GBs compared to grain interiors. • The SCM explains that charge separation takes place at the interface of grain and grain boundary. - Abstract: Electrical characterization of grain boundaries (GB) of Cu-deficient CZTS (Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide) thin films was done using atomic force microscopic (AFM) techniques like Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM), Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM). Absorbance spectroscopy was done for optical band gap calculations and Raman, XRD and EDS for structural and compositional characterization. Hall measurements were done for estimation of carrier mobility. CAFM and KPFM measurements showed that the currents flow mainly through grain boundaries (GB) rather than grain interiors. SCM results showed that charge separation mainly occurs at the interface of grain and grain boundaries and not all along the grain boundaries.

  19. A novel optical coherence tomography-based micro-indentation technique for mechanical characterization of hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O; Ahearne, Mark; Wang, Ruikang K; Liu, Kuo-Kang

    2007-12-22

    Depth-sensing micro-indentation has been well recognized as a powerful tool for characterizing mechanical properties of solid materials due to its non-destructive approach. Based on the depth-sensing principle, we have developed a new indentation method combined with a high-resolution imaging technique, optical coherence tomography, which can accurately measure the deformation of hydrogels under a spherical indenter at constant force. The Hertz contact theory has been applied for quantitatively correlating the indentation force and the deformation with the mechanical properties of the materials. Young's moduli of hydrogels estimated by the new method are comparable with those measured by conventional depth-sensing micro-indentation. The advantages of this new method include its capability to characterize mechanical properties of bulk soft materials and amenability to perform creeping tests. More importantly, the measurement can be performed under sterile conditions allowing non-destructive, in situ and real-time investigations on the changes in mechanical properties of soft materials (e.g. hydrogel). This unique character can be applied for various biomechanical investigations such as monitoring reconstruction of engineered tissues.

  20. In vitro characterization of the technique of portal vein embolization by injection of a surgical glue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Sandulache, Mihai-Cristinel; Lancon, Oceane; El Kadri Benkara, Khadija

    2012-11-01

    Partial embolization of the portal trunk by glue injection is a minimally invasive technique used in the case of malignant liver tumors. It is conducted few weeks prior to partial liver ablation, when the volume of the remnant liver section is too small to allow hepatectomy. The limitation of glue embolotherapy is that its clinical practice is based on empirical knowledge. The present objective is to study glue injection in a confined blood flow and investigate how the injection dynamics is coupled with glue polymerization. We first characterize polymerization under static conditions for various glue concentrations and then consider the influence of injection. An experimental setup reproduces the co-flow of two immiscible fluids. The glue mixture is injected through a capillary tube into a saline solution with the same ionic concentration, pH and viscosity as blood, flowing steadily in a straight cylindrical tube. The injected phase is visualized with a high-speed imaging system and results are compared with those obtained for non-reacting fluids. These experiments have enabled us to characterize the characteristic times of polymerization of the glue mixtures under static and dynamic conditions and understand how they affect the flow topology of the glue once injected. Biomechanics and Bioengineering Laboratory (UMR CNRS 7338).

  1. Dimensional characterization of a quasispherical resonator by microwave and coordinate measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, R.; Flack, D.; Morantz, P.; Sutton, G.; Shore, P.; de Podesta, M.

    2011-02-01

    We describe the dimensional characterization of copper quasisphere NPL-Cranfield 2. The quasisphere is assembled from two hemispheres such that the internal shape is a triaxial ellipsoid, the major axes of which have nominal radii 62.000 mm, 62.031 mm and 62.062 mm. The artefact has been manufactured using diamond-turning technology and shows a deviation from design form of less than ±1 µm over most of its surface. Our characterization involves both coordinate measuring machine (CMM) experiments and microwave resonance spectroscopy. We have sought to reduce the dimensional uncertainty below the maximum permissible error of the CMM by comparative measurements with silicon and Zerodur spheres of known volume. Using this technique we determined the equivalent radius with an uncertainty of u(k = 1) = 114 nm, a fractional uncertainty of 1.8 parts in 106. Due to anisotropy of the probe response, we could only determine the eccentricities of the quasihemispheres with a fractional uncertainty of approximately 2%. Our microwave characterization uses the TM11 to TM18 resonances. We find the equivalent radius inferred from analysis of these modes to be consistent within ±4 nm with an overall uncertainty u(k = 1) = 11 nm. We discuss corrections for surface conductivity, waveguide perturbations and dielectric surface layers. We find that the CMM radius estimates derived from each hemisphere cannot be used to accurately predict the equivalent radius of the assembled resonator for two reasons. Firstly, the equatorial flanges are flat only to within ±1 µm, leading to an equatorial 'gap' whose dimension cannot be reliably estimated. Secondly, the resonator undergoes significant elastic distortion when the bolts connecting the hemispheres are tightened. We provide CMM and microwave measurements to support these conclusions in addition to finite-element modelling. Finally, we consider the implications of this work on a forthcoming experiment to determine the Boltzmann constant

  2. Comparative analysis of different measurement techniques for characterizing soil surface roughness in agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Agirre, Alex; Álvarez-Mozos, Jesús; Valle, José Manuel; Rodríguez, Álvaro; Giménez, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    analysis was threefold: (1) comparison of raw data (point clouds), (2) comparison of interpolated DEMs considering different resolutions (2.5mm, 5mm and 10mm) and (3) comparison of roughness parameters. In all cases the profilometer was used as a reference because of its vertical accuracy and nadiral viewing geometry. Thus point clouds and interpolated DEMs were compared to the height profiles. The results showed that in most cases surface height discrepancies were below 10 mm for raw data and increased slightly when increasing the pixel size of DEMs. Finally, a thorough analysis of different roughness parameters proposed in the literature was carried out to find the most appropriate technique and parameter for the characterization of roughness in each case. Although still preliminary, results offer practical recommendations on the usefulness of each technique.

  3. Fundamental characterization of shrink techniques on negative tone development based dense contact holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Kaveri; Light, Scott L.

    2016-03-01

    Enormous advances have been made in recent years to design sub 40nm dense contact hole pattern with local CD uniformity (CDU) that the process can tolerate. Negative tone development process (NTD) on 193nm photoresists has achieved this to a large extent without the requirement of additional processing steps on the patterned layer. With further shrinking of size of the subsequent nodes, the demand to produce smaller patterns with wider process window, low defectivity, and improved CDU is increasing, and reaching beyond what can be achieved through NTD alone. A number of techniques are in practice today to achieve this, most notably, implementation of a collar of Atomic Layer Deposited SiO2 (ALD) on photoresist or substrate. However, in recent years, various material suppliers have also proposed shrink chemistries to achieve this. In this paper, we have provided fundamental characterization of shrink via application of spin-on agents (organic as well as aqueous) on the post-imaged pattern. We have also compared them for their shrink capacity, defect tendency, dry etch capability and ease of implementation in the process flow. In addition, we have provided recommendations on which technique is suitable for a given set of process prerequisites.

  4. An Application Specific Memory Characterization Technique for Co-processor Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Sadaf R; Smith, Melissa C; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2007-01-01

    Commodity accelerator technologies including reconfigurable devices and graphical processing units (GPUs) provide an order of magnitude performance improvement compared to mainstream microprocessor systems. A number of compute-intensive, scientific applications, therefore, can potentially benefit from commodity computing devices available in the form of co-processor accelerators. However, there has been little progress in accelerating production-level scientific applications using these technologies due to several programming and performance challenges. One of the key performance challenges is performance sustainability. While computation is often accelerated substantially by accelerator devices, the achievable performance is significantly lower once the data transfer costs and overheads are incorporated. We present an application-specific memory characterization technique for an FPGA-accelerated system that enabled us to reduce data transfer overhead for a scientific application by a factor of 5. We classify large data structures in the application according to their read and write characteristics and access patterns. This classification in turn enabled us to sustain a speedup of over three for a full-scale scientific application. Our proposed technique extends to applications that exhibit similar memory behavior and to co-processor accelerator systems that support data streaming and pipelining, and allow overlapped execution between the host and the accelerator device.

  5. Nonlinear optical characterization of graphite oxide thin film by open aperture Z-scan technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, V. G.; Cheruvalathu, Ajina; Reshmi, R.; Devasia, Sebin; Anila, E. I.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we explore the structural characterization of graphite oxide powder prepared from graphite powder by oxidation via modified Hummers method. The nonlinear optical properties of the spin coated graphite oxide thin film is also explored by open aperture Z-Scan technique. Structural and physiochemical properties of the samples were investigated with the help of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman Spectroscopy (Raman).The results of FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy showed that the graphite is oxidized by strong oxidants and the oxygen atoms are introduced into the graphite layers forming C=C, O-H and -C-H groups. The synthesized sample has good crystalline nature with lesser defects. The nonlinear optical property of GO thin film was studied by open aperture Z-Scan technique using Q-switched Nd-Yag Laser at 532nm. The Z-scan plot showed that the investigated GO thin film has saturable absorption behavior. The nonlinear absorption coefficient and saturation intensity were also estimated to explore its applications in Q switched mode locking laser systems.

  6. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques Applied to the Quantitative Characterization of Textile Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1998-01-01

    An overall goal of this research has been to enhance our understanding of the scientific principles necessary to develop advanced ultrasonic nondestructive techniques for the quantitative characterization of advanced composite structures. To this end, we have investigated a thin woven composite (5-harness biaxial weave). We have studied the effects that variations of the physical parameters of the experimental setup can have on the ultrasonic determination of the material properties for this thin composite. In particular, we have considered the variation of the nominal center frequency and the f-number of the transmitting transducer which in turn address issues such as focusing and beam spread of ultrasonic fields. This study has employed a planar, two-dimensional, receiving pseudo-array that has permitted investigation of the diffraction patterns of ultrasonic fields. Distortion of the ultrasonic field due to the spatial anisotropy of the thin composite has prompted investigation of the phenomenon of phase cancellation at the face of a finite-aperture, piezoelectric receiver. We have performed phase-sensitive and phase-insensitive analyses to provide a measure of the amount of phase cancellation at the face of a finite-aperture, piezoelectric receiver. The pursuit of robust measurements of received energy (i.e., those not susceptible to phase cancellation at the face of a finite-aperture, piezoelectric receiver) supports the development of robust techniques to determine material properties from measure ultrasonic parameters.

  7. Operando characterization of nanocatalysts via spectroscopy, scattering and imaging techniques in the same micro-reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly; Baumann, Philipp; Tappero, Ryan; Zakharov, Dmitri; Stach, Eric; Elsen, Annika; Jung, Ulrich; Nuzzo, Ralph

    2014-03-01

    The increasing demand to rationally design new catalysts for energy generation/conversion calls for improvements in research methodology which enables multi-technique investigations of working catalysts in reaction conditions. Using the operando approach is necessary to establish structure activity/selectivity relationship. However, this approach is hindered by many challenges, e.g., the incompatibility of different characterization methods with respect to the sample concentration and environment, and, hence, the need to use multiple in situ reactor designs. We report on the development and tests of the single, portable reactor compatible with most useful techniques for operando studies of nanocatalysts: X-ray absorption, transmission electron microscopy, infrared and Raman spectroscopies. The test system was Pt/SiO2 nanocatalyst and the reaction was the ethylene hydrogenation. The reactor was a closed cell with SiN windows enabled catalytic reactions under atmospheric pressure. Both XAFS and TEM experiments were conducted in identical conditions, while monitoring the product formation using mass spectrometry. Comparison of TEM and XAFS results provided new information on the structure-activity relationship of these catalysts.

  8. Development of DNA affinity techniques for the functional characterization of purified RNA polymerase II transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Garfinkel, S.; Thompson, J.A.; Cohen, R.B.; Brendler, T.; Safer, B.

    1987-05-01

    Affinity adsorption, precipitation, and partitioning techniques have been developed to purify and characterize RNA Pol II transcription components from whole cell extracts (WCE) (HeLa) and nuclear extracts (K562). The titration of these extracts with multicopy constructs of the Ad2 MLP but not pUC8, inhibits transcriptional activity. DNA-binding factors precipitated by this technique are greatly enriched by centrifugation. Using this approach, factors binding to the upstream promoter sequence (UPS) of the Ad2 MLP have been rapidly isolated by Mono Q, Mono S, and DNA affinity chromatography. By U.V. crosslinking to nucleotides containing specific TSP-phosphodiester bonds within the recognition sequence, this factor is identified as a M/sub r/ = 45,000 polypeptide. To generate an assay system for the functional evaluation of single transcription components, a similar approach using synthetic oligonucleotide sequences spanning single promoter binding sites has been developed. The addition of a synthetic 63-mer containing the UPS element of the Ad2 MLP to HeLa WCE inhibited transcription by 60%. The addition of partially purified UPS binding protein, but not RNA Pol II, restored transcriptional activity. The addition of synthetic oligonucleotides containing other regulatory sequences not present in the Ad2 MLP was without effect.

  9. Innovative optical scanning technique and device for three-dimensional full-scale measurement of wind-turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ho-Ling; Fan, Kuang-Chao; Huang, Yu-Jan; Hu, Ming-Kai

    2014-12-01

    A full-scale three-dimensional profile measurement system with an innovative optical setup for measuring the geometric shape of large wind-turbine blades in high accuracy is developed. A normal full-scale wind blade geometry measurement system can be very expensive. The presented system is low cost, but it can yield a high accuracy for geometric dimensions by error compensation from its measured data. It consists of a low cost long linear stage driven by a direct current motor with linear scale feedback for position and velocity control, and two line-scan optical heads mounted on opposite sides. The line image of the sectional shape profile can be captured by two charge-coupled devices. By scanning the optical head throughout the full length of the blade, the image of the whole profile can be collected. The shape parameters of the wind-turbine blades can thus be determined. A special effort has been employed to improve the straightness and positioning accuracy of the linear stage by error compensation. With system calibration of the stage and the cameras, experimental results show high accuracy of the developed system. This low-cost optical system is expected to measure any full-scale wind blade profile up to several meters in length.

  10. M-BAND IMAGING OF THE HR 8799 PLANETARY SYSTEM USING AN INNOVATIVE LOCI-BASED BACKGROUND SUBTRACTION TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    Galicher, Raphael; Marois, Christian; Macintosh, Bruce; Konopacky, Quinn; Barman, Travis

    2011-10-01

    Multi-wavelength observations/spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres are the basis of the emerging exciting field of comparative exoplanetology. The HR 8799 planetary system is an ideal laboratory to study our current knowledge gap between massive field brown dwarfs and the cold 5 Gyr old solar system planets. The HR 8799 planets have so far been imaged at J- to L-band, with only upper limits available at M-band. We present here deep high-contrast Keck II adaptive optics M-band observations that show the imaging detection of three of the four currently known HR 8799 planets. Such detections were made possible due to the development of an innovative LOCI-based background subtraction scheme that is three times more efficient than a classical median background subtraction for Keck II AO data, representing a gain in telescope time of up to a factor of nine. These M-band detections extend the broadband photometric coverage out to {approx}5 {mu}m and provide access to the strong CO fundamental absorption band at 4.5 {mu}m. The new M-band photometry shows that the HR 8799 planets are located near the L/T-type dwarf transition, similar to what was found by other studies. We also confirm that the best atmospheric fits are consistent with low surface gravity, dusty, and non-equilibrium CO/CH{sub 4} chemistry models.

  11. Development of innovative techniques and principles that may be used as models to improve plant performance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, Wayne W.; Burton, Glenn W.

    2000-06-25

    We developed fundamental methods and techniques for transferring germplasm from wild to cultivated species. Germplasm transferred included diverse cytoplasms, new genes for pest resistance, genes controlling dry matter yield and apomixis. Some of the germplasm has been shown to be valuable in plant breeding and has been incorporated into commercial cultivators.

  12. Headspace Theater: An Innovative Method for Experiential Learning of Psychiatric Symptomatology Using Modified Role-Playing and Improvisational Theater Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballon, Bruce C.; Silver, Ivan; Fidler, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Headspace Theater has been developed to allow small group learning of psychiatric conditions by creating role-play situations in which participants are placed in a scenario that simulates the experience of the condition. Method: The authors conducted a literature review of role-playing techniques, interactive teaching, and experiential…

  13. PARTITIONING INTERWELL TRACER TEST FOR NAPL SOURCE CHARACTERIZATION: A GENERAL OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Innovative and nondestructive characterization techniques have been developed to locate and quantify nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in the vadose and saturated zones in the subsurface environment. One such technique is the partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT). The PITT i...

  14. Threading Dislocation Characterization and Stress Mapping Depth Profiling via Ray Tracing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tianyi

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has been well known as a transparent, dielectric, piezoelectric and wide band gap material. The potential capabilities have been demonstrated for a wide range of applications such as piezoelectric transducer, gas sensor, optical waveguides and transparent electrode. It could also be applied as a substrate material for GaN-based devices. However, while some applications have already been realized, issues relating to crystalline defects remain a barrier to the successful realization of several others. In this thesis, the central focus of Chapter II is to characterize threading dislocations in hydrothermal grown ZnO substrates through simulation work as well as other techniques. The goal of this study is to find the origin of threading dislocations and design strategies to mitigate their negative effects by either reducing their densities or completely eliminating them. In Chapter III, the technique of SMART (stress mapping analysis via ray tracing) is discussed in detail to measure residue stress in packaged silicon circuits. Residual stress plays an important role in the performance and lifetime of single crystal device material. There are mainly two advantages of SMART compared with other techniques: (a) all six components of the stress tensor could be evaluated; (b) it is non-destructive and no damaging trace will be left on the sample. In this study, our goal is to build a relationship between stress distribution and depth. The concept of penetration depth is critically important in this study and its value may cause great changes for real space stress distribution. A new function is applied to get better fitting curves. Data in this study is obtained from various penetration depth, which represents exponentially decaying weighted average of actual stress value or in other words this stress profile is Laplace transform of real stress profile. Mathematical procedure is described to determine real stress profile from Laplace profile. Experiment

  15. Applied Protein and Molecular Techniques for Characterization of B Cell Neoplasms in Horses

    PubMed Central

    Badial, Peres R.; Tallmadge, Rebecca L.; Miller, Steven; Stokol, Tracy; Richards, Kristy; Borges, Alexandre S.

    2015-01-01

    Mature B cell neoplasms cover a spectrum of diseases involving lymphoid tissues (lymphoma) or blood (leukemia), with an overlap between these two presentations. Previous studies describing equine lymphoid neoplasias have not included analyses of clonality using molecular techniques. The objective of this study was to use molecular techniques to advance the classification of B cell lymphoproliferative diseases in five adult equine patients with a rare condition of monoclonal gammopathy, B cell leukemia, and concurrent lymphadenopathy (lymphoma/leukemia). The B cell neoplasms were phenotypically characterized by gene and cell surface molecule expression, secreted immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype concentrations, Ig heavy-chain variable (IGHV) region domain sequencing, and spectratyping. All five patients had hyperglobulinemia due to IgG1 or IgG4/7 monoclonal gammopathy. Peripheral blood leukocyte immunophenotyping revealed high proportions of IgG1- or IgG4/7-positive cells and relative T cell lymphopenia. Most leukemic cells lacked the surface B cell markers CD19 and CD21. IGHG1 or IGHG4/7 gene expression was consistent with surface protein expression, and secreted isotype and Ig spectratyping revealed one dominant monoclonal peak. The mRNA expression of the B cell-associated developmental genes EBF1, PAX5, and CD19 was high compared to that of the plasma cell-associated marker CD38. Sequence analysis of the IGHV domain of leukemic cells revealed mutated Igs. In conclusion, the protein and molecular techniques used in this study identified neoplastic cells compatible with a developmental transition between B cell and plasma cell stages, and they can be used for the classification of equine B cell lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:26311245

  16. Characterization of inhalation aerosols: a critical evaluation of cascade impactor analysis and laser diffraction technique.

    PubMed

    de Boer, A H; Gjaltema, D; Hagedoorn, P; Frijlink, H W

    2002-12-01

    Cascade impactor analysis is the standard technique for in vitro characterization of aerosol clouds generated by medical aerosol generators. One important reason for using this inertial separation principle is that drug fractions are classified into aerodynamic size ranges that are relevant to the deposition in the respiratory tract. Measurement of these fractions with chemical detection methods enables establishment of the particle size distribution of the drug in the presence of excipients. However, the technique is laborious and time consuming and most of the devices used for inhaler evaluation lack sufficient possibilities for automation. In addition to that, impactors often have to be operated under conditions for which they were not designed and calibrated. Particularly, flow rates through impactors are increased to values at which the flow through the nozzles is highly turbulent. This has an uncontrolled influence on the collection efficiencies and cut-off curves of these nozzles. Moreover, the cut-off value varies with the flow rate through an impactor nozzle. On the other hand, the high air flow resistances of most impactors are rather restricting to the attainable (fixed) inspiratory flow curves through these devices. Especially for breath actuated dry powder inhalers, higher flow rates and flow increase rates may be desirable than can be achieved in combination with a particular type of impactor. In this paper, the applicability of laser diffraction technology is evaluated as a very fast and highly reliable alternative for cascade impactor analysis. With this technique, aerodynamic diameters cannot be measured, but for comparative evaluation and development, comprising most in vitro applications, this is not necessary. Laser diffraction has excellent possibilities for automated recording of data and testing conditions, and the size classes are independent of the flow rate. Practical limitations can be overcome by using a special inhaler adapter which

  17. Bio-impedance characterization technique with implantable neural stimulator using biphasic current stimulus.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yi-Kai; Chang, Chih-Wei; Liu, Wentai

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the bio-impedance and its equivalent circuit model at the electrode-electrolyte/tissue interface is important in the application of functional electrical stimulation. Impedance can be used as a merit to evaluate the proximity between electrodes and targeted tissues. Understanding the equivalent circuit parameters of the electrode can further be leveraged to set a safe boundary for stimulus parameters in order not to exceed the water window of electrodes. In this paper, we present an impedance characterization technique and implement a proof-of-concept system using an implantable neural stimulator and an off-the-shelf microcontroller. The proposed technique yields the parameters of the equivalent circuit of an electrode through large signal analysis by injecting a single low-intensity biphasic current stimulus with deliberately inserted inter-pulse delay and by acquiring the transient electrode voltage at three well-specified timings. Using low-intensity stimulus allows the derivation of electrode double layer capacitance since capacitive charge-injection dominates when electrode overpotential is small. Insertion of the inter-pulse delay creates a controlled discharge time to estimate the Faradic resistance. The proposed method has been validated by measuring the impedance of a) an emulated Randles cells made of discrete circuit components and b) a custom-made platinum electrode array in-vitro, and comparing estimated parameters with the results derived from an impedance analyzer. The proposed technique can be integrated into implantable or commercial neural stimulator system at low extra power consumption, low extra-hardware cost, and light computation.

  18. Use of microfocus computerized tomography as a new technique for characterizing bone tissue around oral implants.

    PubMed

    Van Oossterwyck, H; Duyck, J; Vander Sloten, J; Van der Perre, G; Jansen, J; Wevers, M; Naert, I

    2000-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of peri-implant tissues around retrieved oral implants is typically done by means of light microscopy on thin histological sections containing the metal surface and the undecalcified bone. It remains, however, a labor-intensive and thus time-consuming job. Moreover, it is a destructive technique that allows tissue quantification in only a limited number of two-dimensional sections. As an alternative, we evaluated the bone structure around screw-shaped titanium implants by means of microfocus computerized tomography (micro-CT) because it presents a number of advantages compared to conventional sectioning techniques: micro-CT is nondestructive, fast, and allows a fully three-dimensional characterization of the bone structure around the implant. Images can be reconstructed in an arbitrary plane, and three-dimensional reconstructions are also possible. Because of its high resolution, individual trabeculae can be visualized. The accuracy of micro-CT was qualitatively evaluated by comparing histological sections with the corresponding CT slices for the same specimen. The overall trabecular structure is very similar according to both techniques. Even very close to the interface, the titanium implant does not seem to produce significant artifacts. Furthermore, because the complete digital data on the trabecular bone structure around the implant is available, it is possible to create finite-element models of the bone-implant system that model the trabeculae in detail so that mechanical stress transfer at the interface can be studied at the level of individual trabeculae. Therefore, micro-CT seems to be very promising for the in vitro assessment of the three-dimensional bone structure around oral implants. Further research will be needed to evaluate its accuracy in a more quantitative way. PMID:11831302

  19. Characterization of Deficiencies in the Frequency Domain Forced Response Analysis Technique for Supersonic Turbine Bladed Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Schmauch, Preston

    2011-01-01

    Turbine blades in rocket and jet engine turbomachinery experience enormous harmonic loading conditions. These loads result from the integer number of upstream and downstream stator vanes as well as the other turbine stages. Assessing the blade structural integrity is a complex task requiring an initial characterization of whether resonance is possible and then performing a forced response analysis if that condition is met. The standard technique for forced response analysis in rocket engines is to decompose a CFD-generated flow field into its harmonic components, and to then perform a frequency response analysis at the problematic natural frequencies. Recent CFD analysis and water-flow testing at NASA/MSFC, though, indicates that this technique may miss substantial harmonic and non-harmonic excitation sources that become present in complex flows. A substantial effort has been made to account for this denser spatial Fourier content in frequency response analysis (described in another paper by the author), but the question still remains whether the frequency response analysis itself is capable of capturing the excitation content sufficiently. Two studies comparing frequency response analysis with transient response analysis, therefore, of bladed-disks undergoing this complex flow environment have been performed. The first is of a bladed disk with each blade modeled by simple beam elements. Six loading cases were generated by varying a baseline harmonic excitation in different ways based upon cold-flow testing from Heritage Fuel Air Turbine Test. It was hypothesized that the randomness and other variation from the standard harmonic excitation would reduce the blade structural response, but the results showed little reduction. The second study was of a realistic model of a bladed-disk excited by the same CFD used in the J2X engine program. It was hypothesized that enforcing periodicity in the CFD (inherent in the frequency response technique) would overestimate the

  20. Laboratory instrumentation and techniques for characterizing multi-junction solar cells for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodyard, James R.

    1995-01-01

    Multi-junction solar cells are attractive for space applications because they can be designed to convert a larger fraction of AMO into electrical power at a lower cost than single-junction cells. The performance of multi-junction cells is much more sensitive to the spectral irradiance of the illuminating source than single-junction cells. The design of high efficiency multi-junction cells for space applications requires matching the optoelectronic properties of the junctions to AMO spectral irradiance. Unlike single-junction cells, it is not possible to carry out quantum efficiency measurements using only a monochromatic probe beam and determining the cell short-circuit current assuming linearity of the quantum efficiency. Additionally, current-voltage characteristics can not be calculated from measurements under non-AMO light sources using spectral-correction methods. There are reports in the literature on characterizing the performance of multi junction cells by measuring and convoluting the quantum efficiency of each junction with the spectral irradiance; the technique is of limited value for the characterization of cell performance under AMO power-generating conditions. We report the results of research to develop instrumentation and techniques for characterizing multi junction solar cells for space . An integrated system is described which consists of a standard lamp, spectral radiometer, dual-source solar simulator, and personal computer based current-voltage and quantum efficiency equipment. The spectral radiometer is calibrated regularly using the tungsten-halogen standard lamp which has a calibration based on NIST scales. The solar simulator produces the light bias beam for current-voltage and cell quantum efficiency measurements. The calibrated spectral radiometer is used to 'fit' the spectral irradiance of the dual-source solar simulator to WRL AMO data. The quantum efficiency apparatus includes a monochromatic probe beam for measuring the absolute cell

  1. Development of innovative techniques and principles that may be used as models to improve plant performance: Technical progress report, February 1, 1988--January 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, W.W.

    1988-09-01

    We propose to help develop innovative techniques to improve plant performance. Cytoplasms from wild Pennisetum species have been identified that affect forage yields, days to anthesis, head length, seed weight, and cytoplasmic-genic male sterility (cms). A number of new cytoplasms for cms are being identified. The A' genome from the secondary gene pool in Pennisetum is proving to be a valuable source of genes that can be rapidly used to improve cultivated pearl millet. The discovery and use of this germplasm may have a significant impact on developing pearl millet as a new drought tolerant grain crop for the US. Significant progress is being made in transferring gene(s) controlling apomixis from wild P. squamulatum to cultivated pearl millet for the purpose of producing true-breeding hybrids. 27 refs.

  2. Boards and panels aren`t just wood products anymore: Two innovative customer feedback techniques at Duke Power

    SciTech Connect

    Ireland, G.

    1994-11-01

    In their push to become truly customer-driven, utilities have come to require a greater amount of customer input and feedback than ever before. Likewise, in this changing environment, speed and cost-effectiveness have become the name of the game in all that they do. In response to these demands and pressures, Duke Power has developed two methods of getting residential customer feedback and input in a cost-effective and timely way: the Board of Customers (for qualitative feedback) and the Consumer Panel (for quantitative applications). These feedback tools have been used successfully at Duke Power for a variety of applications, including gleaning customer reaction to customer service options, concept-testing product ideas, and assessing corporate image and reputation. With both qualitative and quantitative capabilities in place, Duke Power has the ability to respond quickly to a variety of needs and situations. For example, Duke used the Consumer Panel to implement a lengthy mail survey on image and reputation in a total of 25 days. Likewise, using a regularly scheduled quarterly meeting of the Board of Customers, Duke was able to provide customer reactions to a product concept within 48 hours of the client`s request. As the nature of competition continues to change in the utility industry, the ability to gather cost-effective customer input for quick, concise decision-making will be even more vital to maintaining the competitive edge. This paper describes the design, implementation and applications of the Board of Customers and the Consumer Panel, and how these two innovative tools translate to the bottom line in cost-effective decision-making at Duke Power.

  3. An Innovative Technique for Evaluating the Integrity and Durability of Wind Turbine Blade Composites - Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Tan, Ting; Mandell, John; Agastra, Pancasatya

    2011-11-01

    To build increasingly larger, lightweight, and robust wind turbine blades for improved power output and cost efficiency, durability of the blade, largely resulting from its structural composites selection and aerodynamic shape design, is of paramount concern. The safe/reliable operation of structural components depends critically on the selection of materials that are resistant to damage and failure in the expected service environment. An effective surveillance program is also necessary to monitor the degradation of the materials in the course of service. Composite materials having high specific strength/stiffness are desirable for the construction of wind turbines. However, most high-strength materials tend to exhibit low fracture toughness. That is why the fracture toughness of the composite materials under consideration for the manufacture of the next generation of wind turbines deserves special attention. In order to achieve the above we have proposed to develop an innovative technology, based on spiral notch torsion test (SNTT) methodology, to effectively investigate the material performance of turbine blade composites. SNTT approach was successfully demonstrated and extended to both epoxy and glass fiber composite materials for wind turbine blades during the performance period. In addition to typical Mode I failure mechanism, the mixed-mode failure mechanism induced by the wind turbine service environments and/or the material mismatch of the composite materials was also effectively investigated using SNTT approach. The SNTT results indicate that the proposed protocol not only provides significant advance in understanding the composite failure mechanism, but also can be readily utilized to assist the development of new turbine blade composites.

  4. An innovative, interdisciplinary, and multi-technique study of gilding and painting techniques in the decoration of the main altarpiece of Miranda do Douro Cathedral (XVII-XVIII(th) centuries, Portugal).

    PubMed

    Sandu, Irina Crina Anca; Murta, Elsa; Veiga, Rita; Muralha, Vânia Solange F; Pereira, Manuel; Kuckova, Stepanka; Busani, Tito

    2013-07-01

    The research results presented in this paper are part of a larger study on the materials and techniques used in polychrome altarpieces of gilded woodcarving decoration ("talha dourada") in Portugal. The paper focuses on a narrative Portuguese Altarpiece from Miranda do Douro, considered one of the masterpieces of "talha dourada" among all the retables of the Iberian Peninsula in XVII(th) and XVIII(th) centuries. Although on the Portuguese territory, the altarpiece was made by artists from the Royal Spanish school of Valladolid, under a mannerist style. Thus the study opens a window on the artists' circulation between Spain and Portugal and influences of the Spanish schools in Baroque epoch on the Portuguese "talha". During its history this altarpiece underwent several transformations and extensive conservation treatments in 1989. On this occasion more than 50 samples were collected and analyzed using an interdisciplinary multi-technique methodology. 27 of these samples are chosen for this study in order to investigate the chromatic palette, the materials and techniques used in the polychromy of the retable. A novel protocol of investigation using different conventional and unconventional analytical techniques (OM + fluorescent staining tests on cross-sections, Raman microscopy, XRD, XRF, X-ray micro-CT, SEM-EDX, MALDI-TOF-MS and LC-MS/MS) was established within an innovative research project (http://sites.fct.unl.pt/gilt-teller/) and applied on these samples. This protocol is necessary to confirm the results obtained in the 1989 campaign and to have further insight into the gilding and polychrome decoration materials and techniques and the additional information reported in the historical documents. The material and technical history of this important altarpiece will be thus re-documented from a scientific perspective, meant to confirm and bring new information on the decorative technique used in the creation of this complex Portuguese monument. PMID:23650028

  5. Meso-scale characterization of lithium distribution in lithium-ion batteries using ion beam analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Arrabal, R.; Panizo-Laiz, M.; Fujita, K.; Mima, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Kamiya, T.; Orikasa, Y.; Uchimoto, Y.; Sawada, H.; Okuda, C.; Kato, Y.; Perlado, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The performance of a Li-ion battery (LIB) is mainly governed by the diffusion capabilities of lithium in the electrodes. Thus, for LIB improvement it is essential to characterize the lithium distribution. Most of the traditionally used techniques for lithium characterization give information about the local scale or in the macroscopic scale. However, the lithium behavior at the local scale is not mirrored at the macroscopic scale. Therefore, the lithium characterization in the mesoscopic scale would be of help to understand and to connect the mechanisms taking place in the two spatial scales. In this paper, we show a general description of the capabilities and limitations of ion beam analysis techniques to study the distributions of lithium and other elements present in the electrodes in the mesoscopic scale. The potential of the 7Li(p,α0)4He nuclear reaction to non-invasively examine the lithium distribution as a function of depth is illustrated. The lithium spatial distribution is characterized using particle induced γ-ray (μ-PIGE) spectroscopy. This technique allows estimating the density of the active particles in the electrode effectively contributing to the Li intercalation and/or de-intercalation. The advantages of the use of ion beam analysis techniques in comparison to more traditional techniques for electrode characterization are discussed.

  6. Innovative techniques for the production of energetic radicals for lunar materials processing including photogeneration via concentrated solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, D. E.; Lynch, D. C.; Fozzolari, R.

    1991-01-01

    A technique for photo generation of radicals is discussed that can be used in the recovery of oxygen and metals from extraterrestrial resources. The concept behind this work was to examine methods whereby radicals can be generated and used in the processing of refractory materials. In that regard, the focus is on the use of sunlight. Sunlight provides useful energy for processing in the forms of both thermal and quantum energy. A number of experiments were conducted in the chlorination of metals with and without the aid of UV and near UV light. The results of some of those experiments are discussed.

  7. Hydrogeologic facies characterization of an alluvial fan near Fresno, California, using geophysical techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burow, Karen R.; Weissmann, G.S.; Miller, R.D.; Placzek, Gary

    1997-01-01

    DBCP (1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane) contamination in the sole source aquifer near Fresno, California, has significantly affected drinking-water supplies. Borehole and surface geophysical data were integrated with borehole textural data to characterize the Kings River alluvial fan sediments and to provide a framework for computer modeling of pesticide transport in ground water. Primary hydrogeologic facies units, such as gravel, coarse sand or gravel, fine sand, and silt and clay, were identified in cores collected from three borings located on a 4.6-kilometer transect of multilevel monitoring wells. Borehole geophysical logs collected from seven wells and surface geophysical surveys were used to extrapolate hydrogeologic facies to depths of about 82meters and to correlate the facies units with neighboring drilling sites. Thickness ranged from 0.3to 13 meters for sand and gravel units, and from 0.3 to 17 meters for silt and clay. The lateral extent of distinct silt and clay layers was mapped using shallow seismic reflection and ground-penetrating radar techniques. About 3.6 kilometers of seismic reflection data were collected; at least three distinct fine-grained layers were mapped. The depth of investigation of the seismic survey ranged from 34 to 107 meters below land surface, and vertical resolution was about 3.5 meters. The ground-penetrating radar survey covered 3.6kilometers and imaged a 1.5-meters thick, continuous fine-grained layer located at a depth of about 8 meters. Integrated results from the borehole sediment descriptions and geophysical surveys provided a detailed characterization over a larger areal extent than traditional hydrogeologic methods alone.

  8. Potential and limitations of microanalysis SEM techniques to characterize borides in brazed Ni-based superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Vargas, J.; Siredey-Schwaller, N.; Noyrez, P.; Mathieu, S.; Bocher, P.; and others

    2014-08-15

    Brazed Ni-based superalloys containing complex phases of different Boron contents remain difficult to characterize at the micrometer scale. Indeed Boron is a light element difficult to measure precisely. The state-of-the-art microanalysis systems have been tested on a single crystal MC2 based metal brazed with BNi-2 alloy to identify boride precipitates. Effort has been made to evaluate the accuracy in Boron quantitation. Energy-dispersive and wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy attached to a Scanning Electron Microscope have first been used to determine the elemental composition of Boron-free phases, and then applied to various types of borides. Results have been compared to the ones obtained using a dedicated electron probe microanalysis, considered here as the reference technique. The most accurate method to quantify Boron using EDS is definitely by composition difference. A precision of 5 at.% could be achieved with optimized data acquisition and post-processing schemes. Attempts that aimed at directly quantifying Boron with various standards using EDS or coupled EDS/WDS gave less accurate results. Ultimately, Electron Backscatter Diffraction combined with localized EDS analysis has proved invaluable in conclusively identifying micrometer sized boride precipitates; thus further improving the characterization of brazed Ni-based superalloys. - Highlights: • We attempt to accurately identify Boron-rich phases in Ni-based superalloys. • EDS, WDS, EBSD systems are tested for accurate identification of these borides. • Results are compared with those obtained by electron probe microanalysis. • Boron was measured with EDS by composition difference with a precision of 5 at. %. • Additional EBSD in phase identification mode conclusively identifies the borides.

  9. Influence of nanostructure composition on its morphometric characterization by different techniques.

    PubMed

    Carvalho Silva, Renata; Alexandre Muehlmann, Luis; Rodrigues Da Silva, Jaqueline; de Bentes Azevedo, Ricardo; Madeira Lucci, Carolina

    2014-09-01

    Morphometric characterization of nanoparticles is crucial to determine their biological effects and to obtain a formulation pattern. Determining the best technique requires knowledge of the particles being analyzed, the intended application of the particles, and the limitations of the techniques being considered. The aim of this article was to present transmission (TEM) and scanning (SEM) electron microscopy protocols for the analysis of two different nanostructures, namely polymeric nanoemulsion and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles, and to compare these results with conventional dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. The mean hydrodynamic diameter, the polydispersity index, and zeta potential of the nanostructures of polymeric nanoemulsion were 370.5 ± 0.8 nm, 0.133 ± 0.01, and -36.1 ± 0.15 mV, respectively, and for PLGA nanoparticles were 246.79 ± 5.03 nm, 0.096 ± 0.025, and -4.94 ± 0.86 mV, respectively. TEM analysis of polymeric nanoemulsion revealed a mean diameter of 374 ± 117 nm. SEM analysis showed a mean diameter of 368 ± 69 nm prior to gold coating and 448 ± 70 nm after gold coating. PLGA nanoparticles had a diameter of 131 ± 41.18 nm in TEM and 193 ± 101 nm in SEM. Morphologically, in TEM analysis, the polymeric nanoemulsions were spherical, with variable electron density, very few showing an electron-dense core and others an electron-dense surface. PLGA nanoparticles were round, with an electron-lucent core and electron-dense surface. In SEM, polymeric nanoemulsions were also spherical with a rough surface, and PLGA nanoparticles were round with a smooth surface. The results show that the "gold standards" for morphometric characterization of polymeric nanoemulsion and PLGA nanoparticles were, respectively, SEM without gold coating and TEM with negative staining.

  10. Characterization of 6111-like aluminum alloys using electrochemical techniques and electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Alan

    2003-10-01

    Aluminum and aluminum alloys are susceptible to localized corrosion in corrosive environments, particularly in halide-containing solutions. However, the mechanism(s) through which corrosion occurs on Al-Mg-Si alloys with or without Cu addition remained unclear. This dissertation reports on the investigation of pitting and IGC susceptibilities of three 6111-like aluminum alloys with 0%, 0.68%, and 1.47%Cu. The electrochemical behavior of the alloys was evaluated using open circuit exposure, conventional polarization techniques, and electrochemical noise technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the corrosion morphologies of the alloys. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was employed to characterize the alloys' microstructures. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and EDS nano-profiling were used to study the grain boundary characteristics of the three alloys. All three alloys are susceptible to pitting and IGC attack in chloride-containing electrolytes. Electrochemical noise measurements revealed that the induction time for localized corrosion to initiate was often on the order of hours if not less, even in solution containing merely 5 mM NaCl. Regardless the heat treatment conditions and degree of polarization, the 6111-like alloy with 0%Cu exhibited crystallographic tunneling morphology. Over-aging treatment transformed the nature of intragranular attack on the Cu-containing 6111-like alloys from the hemispherical micropitting to a mixture of hemispherical micropitting and crystallographic tunneling. STEM/X-ray microanalysis yielded some significant findings on the three as-received alloys, which were never reported before. 30˜70 run wide Mg and Si depleted regions and 10˜40 nm wide Cu-depleted regions along some high angle grain boundaries (GB) have been detected in the Cu-free and Cu-containing 6111-like alloys, respectively. The presence of an Al-Cu-Mg-Si phase at some high angle GBs of the Cu-containing alloys has

  11. Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330-V steel with kolsky bar techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

    2010-09-01

    There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical

  12. Characterization of Porosity Development in Oxidized Graphite using Automated Image Analysis Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Burchell, Timothy D

    2009-09-01

    This document reports on initial activities at ORNL aimed at quantitative characterization of porosity development in oxidized graphite specimens using automated image analysis (AIA) techniques. A series of cylindrical shape specimens were machined from nuclear-grade graphite (type PCEA, from GrafTech International). The specimens were oxidized in air to various levels of weight loss (between 5 and 20 %) and at three oxidation temperatures (between 600 and 750 oC). The procedure used for specimen preparation and oxidation was based on ASTM D-7542-09. Oxidized specimens were sectioned, resin-mounted and polished for optical microscopy examination. Mosaic pictures of rectangular stripes (25 mm x 0.4 mm) along a diameter of sectioned specimens were recorded. A commercial software (ImagePro) was evaluated for automated analysis of images. Because oxidized zones in graphite are less reflective in visible light than the pristine, unoxidized material, the microstructural changes induced by oxidation can easily be identified and analyzed. Oxidation at low temperatures contributes to development of numerous fine pores (< 100 m2) distributed more or less uniformly over a certain depth (5-6 mm) from the surface of graphite specimens, while causing no apparent external damage to the specimens. In contrast, oxidation at high temperatures causes dimensional changes and substantial surface damage within a narrow band (< 1 mm) near the exposed graphite surface, but leaves the interior of specimens with little or no changes in the pore structure. Based on these results it appears that weakening and degradation of mechanical properties of graphite materials produced by uniform oxidation at low temperatures is related to the massive development of fine pores in the oxidized zone. It was demonstrated that optical microscopy enhanced by AIA techniques allows accurate determination of oxidant penetration depth and of distribution of porosity in oxidized graphite materials.

  13. Routine characterization of 3-D profiles of SRF cavity defects using replica techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, M.; Wu, G.; Burk, D.; Ozelis, J.; Harms, E.; Sergatskov, D.; Hicks, D.; Cooley, L.D.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Recent coordination of thermometry with optical images has shown that obvious defects at specific locations produce heat or even quench superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities, imposing a significant limit on the overall accelerating gradient produced by the cavity. Characterization of the topography at such locations provides clues about how the defects originated, from which schemes for their prevention might be devised. Topographic analyses also provide understanding of the electromagnetic mechanism by which defects limit cavity performance, from which viability of repair techniques might be assessed. In this article we discuss how a variety of two-component silicone-based room-temperature vulcanizing agents can be routinely used to make replicas of the cavity surface and extract topographic details of cavity defects. Previously, this level of detail could only be obtained by cutting suspect regions from the cavity, thus destroying the cavity. We show 3-D profiles extracted from several different 1.3 GHz cavities. The defect locations, which were all near cavity welds, compelled us to develop extraction techniques for both equator and iris welds as well as from deep inside long 9-cell cavities. Profilometry scans of the replicas yield micrometer-scale information, and we describe various curious features, such as small peaks at the bottom of pits, which were not apparent in previous optical inspections. We also discuss contour information in terms of electromagnetic mechanisms proposed by others for local cavity heating. We show that production of the replica followed by high-pressure rinsing dose not adversely affect the cavity RF performance.

  14. Novel Techniques for Optical Characterization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit, Jason K.

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for characterizing the structure and optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) samples. This thesis will discuss the development and application of new fluorescence-based methods designed to fully characterize bulk SWCNT suspensions by length and structural composition. An efficient new method is demonstrated to measure length distributions of aqueous SWCNT samples by analyzing the diffusional motions of many individual nanotubes captured in sequences of short-wave infrared (SWIR) fluorescence images. This method, termed length analysis by nanotube diffusion (LAND), provides distributions in very good agreement with those obtained by conventional atomic force microscopy analysis. A novel microscopy technique is described to measure the peak emission wavelengths of many individual nanotubes without the use of a spectrometer. We exploit the chromatic aberration of an objective lens to deduce emission wavelength from focal depth. Spectral measurements successfully reproduce bulk emission spectra and also provide relative abundances of specific SWCNT structures. A new approach is applied to find nanotube concentrations by directly counting SWCNTs in SWIR fluorescence images. Concentrations are used to rigorously determine absolute absorption cross sections for the E11 and E22 electronic transitions of the (6,5), (7,5), (7,6), (8,6), (8,7) and (9,7) SWCNT species. It is found that the absorption cross section per carbon atom decreases with increasing nanotube diameter. Finally, the spectral analysis of fluorescence fluctuations (SAFF) method is developed and used to characterize SWCNT samples by structural composition, sample quality, and aggregation state. Fluorescence spectra are sequentially measured from small volumes of slowly flowing dilute samples and the intensity fluctuations resulting from small statistical variations in nanotube concentration are analyzed. The ratio of the squared

  15. Novel techniques for characterization of hydrocarbon emission sources in the Barnett Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, Brian Joseph

    Changes in ambient atmospheric hydrocarbon concentrations can have both short-term and long-term effects on the atmosphere and on human health. Thus, accurate characterization of emissions sources is critically important. The recent boom in shale gas production has led to an increase in hydrocarbon emissions from associated processes, though the exact extent is uncertain. As an original quantification technique, a model airplane equipped with a specially-designed, open-path methane sensor was flown multiple times over a natural gas compressor station in the Barnett Shale in October 2013. A linear optimization was introduced to a standard Gaussian plume model in an effort to determine the most probable emission rate coming from the station. This is shown to be a suitable approach given an ideal source with a single, central plume. Separately, an analysis was performed to characterize the nonmethane hydrocarbons in the Barnett during the same period. Starting with ambient hourly concentration measurements of forty-six hydrocarbon species, Lagrangian air parcel trajectories were implemented in a meteorological model to extend the resolution of these measurements and achieve domain-fillings of the region for the period of interest. A self-organizing map (a type of unsupervised classification) was then utilized to reduce the dimensionality of the total multivariate set of grids into characteristic one-dimensional signatures. By also introducing a self-organizing map classification of the contemporary wind measurements, the spatial hydrocarbon characterizations are analyzed for periods with similar wind conditions. The accuracy of the classification is verified through assessment of observed spatial mixing ratio enhancements of key species, through site-comparisons with a related long-term study, and through a random forest analysis (an ensemble learning method of supervised classification) to determine the most important species for defining key classes. The hydrocarbon

  16. Phase topography-based characterization of thermal effects on materials and joining techniques.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Hagen; Beckert, Erik; Schödel, René

    2015-03-10

    There are growing demands to characterize the stability of assemblies of optical components for ultrahigh-precision instruments. In this paper we demonstrate how absolute length measurements by interferometry can be applied to measure the thermal and dimensional stability of connections. In order to enable investigation of common joining techniques, including wringing, screwing, and gluing, as well as specialized, inorganic joining techniques such as silicatic bonding, thin-film soldering, and solderjet bumping, representative connections were fabricated. By using gage blocks or prismatic bodies as joining parts, parallelism and flatness were provided which are needed for precision interferometric length measurements. The stability of connection elements used in ultrahigh-precision instruments was investigated longitudinally and laterally to the connection interface, and also mutual tilting of the parts was detected by analysis of the phase topographies. The measurements have an accuracy level of about 1 nm, and the traditional wringing method was also considered as a reference joining technique. The long-term behavior was studied within a period of about 1 year under constant temperature. Further, the thermal dilatation and the reaction of connections to thermal stress were measured. Results show that screwed connections do not exhibit a significant drift of length or orientation. They also did not show response to temperature variations of ±10°C. This is different for adhesive connections, where dimensional changes of up to 100 nm were observed. The specimens produced by using thin-film soldering as well as silicatic bonding revealed stability of length better than 5 nm per year and angular stability within ±0.1   arcsec. Furthermore, these specimens were shown to be insensitive to a temporary temperature variation in a range from 10°C to 40°C. This situation is slightly different for the sample connections produced by solderjet bumping, which show a

  17. Innovative techniques for the production of energetic radicals for lunar materials processing including photogeneration via concentrated solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, D. E.; Lynch, D. C.; Fazzolari, R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) is investigating the use of monatomic chlorine produced in a cold plasma to recover oxygen and metallurgically significant metals from lunar materials. Development of techniques for the production of the chlorine radical (and other energetic radicals for these processes) using local planetary resources is a key step for a successful approach. It was demonstrated terrestrially that the use of UV light to energize the photogeneration of OH radicals from ozone or hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solutions can lead to rapid reaction rates for the breakdown of toxic organic compounds in water. A key question is how to use the expanded solar resource at the lunar surface to generate process-useful radicals. This project is aimed at investigating that question.

  18. Characterization of Air Plane Soot Surrogates using Raman spectroscopy and laser ablation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazallon, Bertrand; Ortega, Ismael Kenneth; Ikhenazene, Raouf; Pirim, Claire; Carpentier, Yvain; Irimiea, Cornelia; Focsa, Cristian; Ouf, François-Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Aviation alters the composition of the atmosphere globally and can thus drive climate change and ozone depletion [1]. Aircraft exhaust plumes contain species (gases and soot particles) produced by the combustion of kerosene with ambient air in the combustion chamber of the engine. Soot particles emitted by air-planes produce persistent contrails in the upper troposphere in ice-supersaturated air masses that contribute to cloudiness and impact the radiative properties of the atmosphere. These aerosol-cloud interactions represent one of the largest sources of uncertainty in global climate models [2]. Though the formation of atmospheric ice particles has been studied for many years [3], there are still numerous opened questions on nucleation properties of soot particles [4], as the ice nucleation experiments showed a large spread in results depending on the nucleation mode chosen and origin of the soot produced. The reasons behind these discrepancies reside in the different physico-chemical properties (composition, structure) of soot particles produced in different conditions, e.g., with respect to fuel or combustion techniques. In this work, we use Raman microscopy (514 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths) and ablation techniques (Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry, and Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry) to characterize soot particle surrogates produced from a CAST generator (propane fuel, four different global equivalence ratios). They are produced as analogues of air-plane soot collected at different engine regimes (PowerJet SaM-146 turbofan) simulating a landing and take-off (LTO) cycle (MERMOSE project (http://mermose.onera.fr/)) [6]. The spectral parameters of the first-order Raman bands of these soot samples are analyzed using a de-convolution approach described by Sadezky et al. (2005) [5]. A systematic Raman analysis is carried out to select a number of parameters (laser wavelength, irradiance at sample, exposure time) that will alter the sample and the

  19. A plume capture technique for the remote characterization of aircraft engine emissions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G R; Mazaheri, M; Ristovski, Z D; Morawska, L

    2008-07-01

    A technique for capturing and analyzing plumes from unmodified aircraft or other combustion sources under real world conditions is described and applied to the task of characterizing plumes from commercial aircraft during the taxiing phase of the Landing/Take-Off (LTO) cycle. The method utilizes a Plume Capture and Analysis System (PCAS) mounted in a four-wheel drive vehicle which is positioned in the airfield 60 to 180 m downwind of aircraft operations. The approach offers low test turnaround times with the ability to complete careful measurements of particle and gaseous emission factors and sequentially scanned particle size distributions without distortion due to plume concentration fluctuations. These measurements can be performed for individual aircraft movements at five minute intervals. A Plume Capture Device (PCD) collected samples of the naturally diluted plume in a 200 L conductive membrane conforming to a defined shape. Samples from over 60 aircraft movements were collected and analyzed in situ for particulate and gaseous concentrations and for particle size distribution using a Scanning Particle Mobility Sizer (SMPS). Emission factors are derived for particle number, NO(x), and PM2.5 for a widely used commercial aircraft type, Boeing 737 airframes with predominantly CFM56 class engines, during taxiing. The practical advantages of the PCAS include the capacity to perform well targeted and controlled emission factor and size distribution measurements using instrumentation with varying response times within an airport facility, in close proximity to aircraft during their normal operations.

  20. Mass spectrometric techniques for characterizing low-molecular-weight resins used as paint varnishes.

    PubMed

    Bonaduce, I; Colombini, M P; Degano, I; Di Girolamo, F; La Nasa, J; Modugno, F; Orsini, S

    2013-01-01

    The molecular structure of three low-molecular-weight resins used as paint varnishes has been characterized by use of an approach based on three different mass spectrometric techniques. We investigated the ketone resin MS2A, the aldehyde resin Laropal A81, and the hydrocarbon resin Regalrez 1094, now commonly used in restoration. To date, the molecular structures of these resins have not been completely elucidated. To improve current knowledge of the chemical composition of these materials, information obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py/GC/MS), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-ToF) was combined. Analysis, in solution, of the whole polymeric fraction of the resins by flow-injection ESI-Q-ToF, and of the non-polymeric fraction by GC-MS, enabled us to identify previously unreported features of the polymer structures. In addition, the Py-GC/MS profiles that we obtained will help to enhance the databases currently available in the literature. The proposed approach can be extended to other low-molecular-weight resins used as varnishes in conservation.

  1. Physical characterization of deep bulk levels by the MOS conductance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, M.; Fischetti, M. V.; Gastaldi, R.

    1982-01-01

    The a.c. response of SRH centers in the bulk silicon of an MOS capacitor is reconsidered in the case of traps far from midgap for which the dominant dissipative process is the a.c. delay in capture and emission of majority carriers. Following the Nicollian and Goetzberger's scheme the MOS admittance is calculated in the whole range of biases starting from a model equivalent circuit in which minority carriers are supposed to be disconnected from the bulk. Henceforth the conductance technique can be employed to characterize the deep bulk levels not only in strong inversion, as previously done by others Authors, but also in the depletion-weak inversion mode. This extension is accomplished without the need of extensive numerical computation and makes it possible to obtain from measurements performed at room temperature the physical parameters of the SRH centers, including their energy level and, in principle, their degeneracy factor. Results of measurements performed on <1, 0, 0>-oriented, CZ and FZ grown wafers are presented. Good correlation is obtained between theory and experiment for the trap conductance as a function of frequency at different values of the surface potential. The deduced density of SRH centers and energy level are also confirmed by DLTS and transient current measurements. Finally, evidence is reported for the existence of a two level trap, probably related to oxygen, in commercial CZ wafers.

  2. Generalized 1D photopyroelectric technique for optical and thermal characterization of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-López, J. A.

    2012-06-01

    The analytical solution for the one-dimensional heat diffusion problem for a three-layer system, in the Beer-Lambert model for light absorption, is used for the implementation of a photopyroelectric (PPE) methodology for thermal and optical characterization of pigments in liquid solution, even for those ones potentially harmful to the pyroelectric sensor, taking the liquid sample's thickness as the only variable. Exponential decay of the PPE amplitude followed by a constant PPE phase for solutions at low pigment concentration, and exponential decay of the PPE amplitude but a linear decrease of the PPE phase for the concentrated ones are theoretically shown, allowing measurements of the optical absorption coefficient (at the wavelength used for the analysis) and the thermal diffusivity for the liquid sample, respectively. This PPE methodology was tested by measuring the thermal diffusivity of a concentrated solution of methylene blue in distilled water and the optical absorption coefficient, at two wavelengths (658 and 785 nm), of water solutions of copper sulfate at various concentrations. These optical parameters were used for measuring the molar absorption coefficient of this last pigment in water solution at these two wavelengths. This last optical property was also measured using a commercial spectrometer, finding very good agreement with the corresponding ones using this PPE technique.

  3. Multiscale analysis of replication technique efficiency for 3D roughness characterization of manufactured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, S.; Mezghani, S.; El Mansori, M.

    2016-09-01

    The replication of topography has been generally restricted to optimizing material processing technologies in terms of statistical and single-scale features such as roughness. By contrast, manufactured surface topography is highly complex, irregular, and multiscale. In this work, we have demonstrated the use of multiscale analysis on replicates of surface finish to assess the precise control of the finished replica. Five commercial resins used for surface replication were compared. The topography of five standard surfaces representative of common finishing processes were acquired both directly and by a replication technique. Then, they were characterized using the ISO 25178 standard and multiscale decomposition based on a continuous wavelet transform, to compare the roughness transfer quality at different scales. Additionally, atomic force microscope force modulation mode was used in order to compare the resins’ stiffness properties. The results showed that less stiff resins are able to replicate the surface finish along a larger wavelength band. The method was then tested for non-destructive quality control of automotive gear tooth surfaces.

  4. Characterization and analysis of surface notches on Ti-alloy plates fabricated by additive manufacturing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.

    2015-12-01

    Rectangular plates of Ti-6Al-4V with extra low interstitial (ELI) were fabricated by layer-by-layer deposition techniques that included electron beam melting (EBM) and laser beam melting (LBM). The surface conditions of these plates were characterized using x-ray micro-computed tomography. The depth and radius of surface notch-like features on the LBM and EBM plates were measured from sectional images of individual virtual slices of the rectangular plates. The stress concentration factors of individual surface notches were computed and analyzed statistically to determine the appropriate distributions for the notch depth, notch radius, and stress concentration factor. These results were correlated with the fatigue life of the Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloys from an earlier investigation. A surface notch analysis was performed to assess the debit in the fatigue strength due to the surface notches. The assessment revealed that the fatigue lives of the additively manufactured plates with rough surface topographies and notch-like features are dominated by the fatigue crack growth of large cracks for both the LBM and EBM materials. The fatigue strength reduction due to the surface notches can be as large as 60%-75%. It is concluded that for better fatigue performance, the surface notches on EBM and LBM materials need to be removed by machining and the surface roughness be improved to a surface finish of about 1 μm.

  5. Characterization of Carbon Dioxide Washout Measurement Techniques in the Mark-III Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekdash, O.; Norcross, J.; Meginnis, I.

    2016-01-01

    Providing adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout is essential to the reduction of risk in performing suited operations. Long term CO2 exposure can lead to symptoms such as headache, lethargy, and dizziness. Thus maintaining adequate CO2 washout in both ground testing and during in flight EVAs is a requirement of current and future suit designs. It is necessary to understand the inspired CO2 of suit wearers such that future requirements for space suits appropriately address the risk of inadequate washout. Testing conducted by the EVA Physiology Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center aimed to characterize a method for noninvasively measuring inspired oronasal CO2 under pressurized suited conditions in order to better inform requirements definition and verification techniques for future CO2 washout limits in space suits. Based on a meta-analysis of those studies it was decided to test a nasal cannula as it is a commercially available device, would not impede suit ventilation delivery, and is placed directly in the breathing path of the user.

  6. Immunological techniques as tools to characterize the subsurface microbial community at a trichloroethylene contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Dougherty, J.M.; Franck, M.M.; McKinzey, P.C.; Hazen, T.C.

    1992-12-31

    Effective in situ bioremediation strategies require an understanding of the effects pollutants and remediation techniques have on subsurface microbial communities. Therefore, detailed characterization of a site`s microbial communities is important. Subsurface sediment borings and water samples were collected from a trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated site, before and after horizontal well in situ air stripping and bioventing, as well as during methane injection for stimulation of methane-utilizing microorganisms. Subsamples were processed for heterotrophic plate counts, acridine orange direct counts (AODC), community diversity, direct fluorescent antibodies (DFA) enumeration for several nitrogen-transforming bacteria, and Biolog {reg_sign} evaluation of enzyme activity in collected water samples. Plate counts were higher in near-surface depths than in the vadose zone sediment samples. During the in situ air stripping and bioventing, counts increased at or near the saturated zone, remained elevated throughout the aquifer, but did not change significantly after the air stripping. Sporadic increases in plate counts at different depths as well as increased diversity appeared to be linked to differing lithologies. AODCs were orders of magnitude higher than plate counts and remained relatively constant with depth except for slight increases near the surface depths and the capillary fringe. Nitrogen-transforming bacteria, as measured by serospecific DFA, were greatly affected both by the in situ air stripping and the methane injection. Biolog{reg_sign} activity appeared to increase with subsurface stimulation both by air and methane. The complexity of subsurface systems makes the use of selective monitoring tools imperative.

  7. Immunological techniques as tools to characterize the subsurface microbial community at a trichloroethylene contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Dougherty, J.M.; Franck, M.M.; McKinzey, P.C.; Hazen, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    Effective in situ bioremediation strategies require an understanding of the effects pollutants and remediation techniques have on subsurface microbial communities. Therefore, detailed characterization of a site's microbial communities is important. Subsurface sediment borings and water samples were collected from a trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated site, before and after horizontal well in situ air stripping and bioventing, as well as during methane injection for stimulation of methane-utilizing microorganisms. Subsamples were processed for heterotrophic plate counts, acridine orange direct counts (AODC), community diversity, direct fluorescent antibodies (DFA) enumeration for several nitrogen-transforming bacteria, and Biolog [reg sign] evaluation of enzyme activity in collected water samples. Plate counts were higher in near-surface depths than in the vadose zone sediment samples. During the in situ air stripping and bioventing, counts increased at or near the saturated zone, remained elevated throughout the aquifer, but did not change significantly after the air stripping. Sporadic increases in plate counts at different depths as well as increased diversity appeared to be linked to differing lithologies. AODCs were orders of magnitude higher than plate counts and remained relatively constant with depth except for slight increases near the surface depths and the capillary fringe. Nitrogen-transforming bacteria, as measured by serospecific DFA, were greatly affected both by the in situ air stripping and the methane injection. Biolog[reg sign] activity appeared to increase with subsurface stimulation both by air and methane. The complexity of subsurface systems makes the use of selective monitoring tools imperative.

  8. Multi-technique characterization of poly-L-lysine dendrigrafts-Cu(II) complexes for biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Jean-Christophe; Maret, Barbara; Vidot, Kevin; Francoia, Jean-Patrick; Cangiotti, Michela; Lucchi, Susanna; Coppola, Concetta; Ottaviani, Maria Francesca

    2015-02-01

    Poly-L-lysine is a biocompatible polymer used for drug or gene delivery, for transport through cellular membranes, and as nanosized magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. Cu(II)-poly-L-lysine complexes are of particular interest for their role in biocatalysis. In this study, poly-L-lysine dendrigrafts (DGLs) at different generations (G2, G3, and G4) are synthesized and characterized in absence and presence of Cu(II) by means of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), UV-Vis, potentiometric titration and circular dichroism (CD). The analysis is performed as a function of the [Cu(II)]/[Lys] (=R) molar ratio, pH and generation by identifying differently flexible complexes in different dendrimer regions. The amine sites in the lateral chains become increasingly involved with the increase of pH. The good agreement and complementarity of the results from the different techniques provide an integrate view of the structural and dynamic properties of Cu(II)-DGL complexes implementing their use as biocatalysts.

  9. Structural and Physicochemical Characterization of Spirulina (Arthrospira maxima) Nanoparticles by High-Resolution Electron Microscopic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Neri-Torres, Elier Ekberg; Chanona-Pérez, Jorge J; Calderón, Hector A; Torres-Figueredo, Neil; Chamorro-Cevallos, German; Calderón-Domínguez, Georgina; Velasco-Bedrán, Hugo

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this work was to obtain Spirulina (Arthrospira maxima) nanoparticles (SNPs) by using high-impact mechanical milling and to characterize them by electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. The milling products were analyzed after various processing times (1-4 h), and particle size distribution and number mean size (NMS) were determined by analysis of high-resolution scanning electron microscopic images. The smallest particles are synthesized after 3 h of milling, had an NMS of 55.6±3.6 nm, with 95% of the particles being smaller than 100 nm. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed lattice spacing of ~0.27±0.015 nm for SNPs. The corresponding chemical composition was obtained by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and showed the presence of Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, and Zn. The powder flow properties showed that the powder density was higher when the average nanoparticle size is smaller. They showed free flowability and an increase in their specific surface area (6.89±0.23 m2/g) up to 12-14 times larger than the original material (0.45±0.02 m2/g). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy suggested that chemical damage related to the milling is not significant.

  10. Evaluation of sampling techniques to characterize topographically-dependent variability for soil moisture downscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werbylo, Kevin L.; Niemann, Jeffrey D.

    2014-08-01

    Downscaling methods have been proposed to estimate catchment-scale soil moisture patterns from coarser resolution patterns. These methods usually infer the fine-scale variability in soil moisture using variations in ancillary variables like topographic attributes that have relationships to soil moisture. Previously, such relationships have been observed in catchments using soil moisture observations taken on uniform grids at hundreds of locations on multiple dates, but collecting data in this manner limits the applicability of this approach. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of two strategic sampling techniques for characterizing the relationships between topographic attributes and soil moisture for the purpose of constraining downscaling methods. The strategic sampling methods are conditioned Latin hypercube sampling (cLHS) and stratified random sampling (SRS). Each sampling method is used to select a limited number of locations or dates for soil moisture monitoring at three catchments with detailed soil moisture datasets. These samples are then used to calibrate two available downscaling methods, and the effectiveness of the sampling methods is evaluated by the ability of the downscaling methods to reproduce the known soil moisture patterns. cLHS outperforms random sampling in almost every case considered. SRS usually performs better than cLHS when very few locations are sampled, but it can perform worse than random sampling for intermediate and large numbers of locations.

  11. Structural and Physicochemical Characterization of Spirulina (Arthrospira maxima) Nanoparticles by High-Resolution Electron Microscopic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Neri-Torres, Elier Ekberg; Chanona-Pérez, Jorge J; Calderón, Hector A; Torres-Figueredo, Neil; Chamorro-Cevallos, German; Calderón-Domínguez, Georgina; Velasco-Bedrán, Hugo

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this work was to obtain Spirulina (Arthrospira maxima) nanoparticles (SNPs) by using high-impact mechanical milling and to characterize them by electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. The milling products were analyzed after various processing times (1-4 h), and particle size distribution and number mean size (NMS) were determined by analysis of high-resolution scanning electron microscopic images. The smallest particles are synthesized after 3 h of milling, had an NMS of 55.6±3.6 nm, with 95% of the particles being smaller than 100 nm. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed lattice spacing of ~0.27±0.015 nm for SNPs. The corresponding chemical composition was obtained by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and showed the presence of Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, and Zn. The powder flow properties showed that the powder density was higher when the average nanoparticle size is smaller. They showed free flowability and an increase in their specific surface area (6.89±0.23 m2/g) up to 12-14 times larger than the original material (0.45±0.02 m2/g). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy suggested that chemical damage related to the milling is not significant. PMID:27515227

  12. Characterization techniques for the high-brightness particle beams of the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1993-08-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) will be a third-generation synchrotron radiation (SR) user facility in the hard x-ray regime (10--100 keV). The design objectives for the 7-GeV storage ring include a positron beam natural emittance of 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} m-rad at an average current of 100 mA. Proposed methods for measuring the transverse and longitudinal profiles will be described. Additionally, a research and development effort using an rf gun as a low-emittance source of electrons for injection into the 200- to 650-MeV linac subsystem is underway. This latter system is projected to produce electron beams with a normalized, rms emittance of {approximately}2 {pi} mm-mrad at peak currents of near one hundred amps. This interesting characterization problem will also be briefly discussed. The combination of both source types within one laboratory facility will stimulate the development of diagnostic techniques in these parameter spaces.

  13. The use of laser-induced plasma spectroscopy technique for the characterization of boiler tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, G.; Mateo, M. P.; Yañez, A.

    2007-12-01

    The present work focuses on the characterization of boiler tube walls using laser-induced plasma spectroscopy technique with visual inspection by optical and scanning electron microscopy of the cross-sections of these tubes. In a watertube boiler, water runs through tubes that are surrounded by a heating source. As a result, the water is heated to very high temperatures, causing accumulation of deposits on the inside surfaces of the tubes. These deposits play an important role in the efficiency of the boiler tube because they produce a reduction of the boiler heat rate and an increase in the number of tube failures. The objectives are to determine the thickness and arrangement of deposits located on the highest heat area of the boiler and compare them with tube parts where the heat flux is lower. The major deposits found were copper and magnetite. These deposits come mainly from the boiler feedwater and from the reaction between iron and water, and they do not form on the tube walls at a uniform rate over time. Their amount depends on the areas where they are collected. A Nd:YAG laser operating at 355 nm has been used to perform laser-induced plasma spectra and depth profiles of the deposits.

  14. Experimental characterization of the ISIS technique for volume selected NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Keevil, S F; Porter, D A; Smith, M A

    1992-01-01

    As clinical applications of MRS grow in number and complexity, there is a need for standardized methods for characterizing the performance of volume selection techniques. The results are presented of a thorough evaluation of a particular implementation of ISIS performed using a procedure which forms the basis of the method adopted by the European Community Concerted Action on MRS and MRI. We have found that ISIS localization is optimal when the volume of interest is slightly smaller than the region we wish to study. Contamination with extraneous signal has little T1 dependence so long as TR greater than T1 and the detection pulse angle is 90 degrees. However, a poorly optimized detection pulse results in T1-weighted contamination unless TR greater than 3T1. In the clinical context, this corresponds to a different degree of contamination for each peak in the spectrum. Adiabatic detection pulses were used in an attempt to overcome this problem without resorting to unacceptable TR values, but these were found to function less well than properly optimized rectangular pulses, even if the power was increased above the level determined by the system for B1 insensitivity. These detailed results pertain only to our system, but illustrate the importance of performing similar measurements as part of clinical spectroscopy programmes at other centres. PMID:1449956

  15. Phytochemical fingerprint and chemometrics for natural food preparation pattern recognition: an innovative technique in food supplement quality control.

    PubMed

    Donno, D; Boggia, R; Zunin, P; Cerutti, A K; Guido, M; Mellano, M G; Prgomet, Z; Beccaro, G L

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the fingerprint approach using chromatography has become one of the most effective tools for quality assessment of herbal medicines and food supplements: due to the complexity of the chromatographic fingerprint and the irreproducibility of chromatographic instruments and experimental conditions, chemometric approach is employed to deal with the chromatographic fingerprint. The study was aimed at developing new analytical methods for the multivariate phytochemical fingerprinting of bioactive compounds in eight tree-species bud-preparations, commonly used in phytotherapy. Methods was used to identify and quantify the main bioactive compounds (polyphenols, organic acids and vitamins), and obtain a specific botanical profile in order to assess the contribution of each single bioactive class to the total bud preparation phytocomplex. A chemometric approach was used to distinguish among different genotypes assuring the identity, safety and quality of the botanical raw materials. The established protocol was simple, sensitive and reliable and it could be used for the evaluation and quality control of bud-extracts and natural food supplements: the proposed method was successfully applied to the characterization of commercial bud-preparations, demonstrating to be an effective tool for the fingerprinting of this plant material. The new approach developed in this study represents a good alternative for improving the classification results of herbal materials with complex chromatograms. It should be necessary to develop a "multivariate chromatographic fingerprint", in order to differentiate the herbal preparations according to their genotype, avoiding substitutions, changes or adulterations with other species or synthetic drugs. PMID:27162387

  16. Development of ICP-MS based nanometrology techniques for characterization of silver nanoparticles in environmental systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrano, Denise Marie

    The ubiquitous use of goods containing nanoparticles (NPs) will lead inevitably to environmental release and interaction with biota. Methods to detect, quantify, and characterize NPs in environmental matrices are highlighted as one of the areas of highest priority research in understanding potential environmental and health risks. Specifically, techniques are needed to determine the size and concentration of NPs in complex matrices. Particular analytical challenges include distinguishing NPs from other constituents of the matrix (i.e. natural particles, humic substances, and debris), method detection limits are often higher than exposure concentrations, and differentiating dissolved metal and NPs. This work focuses on the development and optimization of two methods that address a number of challenges for nanometrology: single particle (sp)ICP-MS and asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation (AF4)-ICP-MS. Advancements in the spICP-MS method included systematic studies on distinction between ionic and NP fractions, resolution of polydisperse NP samples, and defining the techniques' dynamic range (in terms of both particle size and concentration). Upon application of the technique, silver (Ag) NPs were discovered in raw wastewater treatment plant influent and effluent. Furthermore, methodical Ag NP stability studies determined the influence of particle capping agents and water chemistry parameters in a variety of synthetic, natural and processed waters. Method development for AF4-ICP-MS revolved around optimizing run conditions (i.e. operational flows, carrier fluid, membrane choice) to study detection limits, sample recovery, and resolution of polydisperse samples. Practical studies included sizing Ag NP in a sediment-dwelling, freshwater oligochaete (Lumbriculus variegatus) and the kinetics of accumulation of protein bound Ag+. In direct comparison, spICP-MS was found to be more versatile with less sample preparation and lower total analyte detection limit (ng/L vs

  17. Teaching innovation.

    PubMed

    Lachman, Vicki D; Glasgow, Mary Ellen Smith; Donnelly, Gloria F

    2009-01-01

    Innovation in healthcare is essential to solve the "wicked problems" currently facing healthcare. This article focuses on nature of innovation and how it operates, how innovators think and view problems, how the theory and practice of innovation can be taught in novel ways, and how organizational cultures foster or suppress innovation. Examples of teaching strategies and nurse-driven innovation illustrate the theory and practice of innovation.

  18. Climatology of Vertical Air Motion During Rainfall in Niamey, Niger and Black Forest, Germany using an Innovative Cloud Radar Retrieval Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, E. P.; Giangrande, S. E.; Kollias, P.

    2008-12-01

    In recent years, the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has deployed its ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to collect continuous measurements in several climatologically distinct locations, including a year-long stay in Niamey, Niger and eight months in Germany's Black Forest. The AMF includes a vertically pointing 95 GHz cloud radar, a tool of choice for profiling non-precipitating clouds at high spatial and temporal resolutions, but commonly considered poorly suited to the quantitative study of precipitation, due in large part to attenuation. However, an innovative technique first explored by Lhermitte in the late 1980s, and subsequently by others, sidesteps much of the quantitative uncertainty imposed by attenuation by exploiting non-Rayleigh resonance effects of scattering from raindrops at 95 GHz. Given a modest range of suitable drop sizes, non-Rayleigh resonances appear as distinct peaks and valleys in Doppler spectra, which once identified, can be directly mapped to known drop sizes by Mie theory. Although attenuation in rain at 95 GHz is substantial, key to the technique is that all non-Rayleigh peaks and valleys in a given Doppler spectrum are affected equally, preserving their relative positions and magnitudes (barring feature extinction). Vertical air motion is retrieved very accurately by taking the difference between the measured Doppler velocity of a resonance feature (usually the first valley) and the known terminal velocity of its associated drop size. We have achieved promising retrieval accuracies at spatial and temporal resolutions of 30 meters and 2 seconds. Here we present lessons learned when the retrieval technique is automated and applied to measurements taken in rain over the full durations of the Niamey and Black Forest AMF deployments, comparing vertical air velocity patterns of monsoonal precipitation over the African desert with those of the orographically influenced precipitation in Germany's mountains.

  19. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-24

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (No[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company's Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO[sub x] combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO[sub x] reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO[sub x] burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

  20. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, Second quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-24

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (No{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

  1. Materials and characterization techniques for high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary The performance of high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFC) is critically dependent on the selection of materials and optimization of individual components. A conventional high-temperature membrane electrode assembly (HT-MEA) primarily consists of a polybenzimidazole (PBI)-type membrane containing phosphoric acid and two gas diffusion electrodes (GDE), the anode and the cathode, attached to the two surfaces of the membrane. This review article provides a survey on the materials implemented in state-of-the-art HT-MEAs. These materials must meet extremely demanding requirements because of the severe operating conditions of HT-PEMFCs. They need to be electrochemically and thermally stable in highly acidic environment. The polymer membranes should exhibit high proton conductivity in low-hydration and even anhydrous states. Of special concern for phosphoric-acid-doped PBI-type membranes is the acid loss and management during operation. The slow oxygen reduction reaction in HT-PEMFCs remains a challenge. Phosphoric acid tends to adsorb onto the surface of the platinum catalyst and therefore hampers the reaction kinetics. Additionally, the binder material plays a key role in regulating the hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity of the catalyst layer. Subsequently, the binder controls the electrode–membrane interface that establishes the triple phase boundary between proton conductive electrolyte, electron conductive catalyst, and reactant gases. Moreover, the elevated operating temperatures promote carbon corrosion and therefore degrade the integrity of the catalyst support. These are only some examples how materials properties affect the stability and performance of HT-PEMFCs. For this reason, materials characterization techniques for HT-PEMFCs, either in situ or ex situ, are highly beneficial. Significant progress has recently been made in this field, which enables us to gain a better understanding of underlying processes occurring during

  2. Characterization of Mineral Assemblages in Ancient Roman Maritime Concrete with Synchrotron X-ray Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meral, C.; Jackson, M. D.; Monteiro, P. J.; Wenk, H.

    2012-12-01

    Romans used lime and aluminosilicate-rich volcanic ash to bind tuff aggregates in concrete structures that have remained durable for 2000 years. A major accomplishment of Roman engineers was to construct enduring coastal underwater structures in seawater, which were important to long-distance trade and military endeavors. Two millennia later, the reasons for the extraordinary durability of the maritime structures remain enigmatic. The concretes are highly complex composites composed of relict lime, tuff and pumice clasts and pozzolanic reaction products. Calcium-chloroaluminates and sulfoaluminates occur in certain relict voids. Further understanding of their mineralogical components would provide guidelines in designing future structures. Here, we use synchroton radiation applications to characterize certain phases within a Roman maritime mortar specimen from a breakwater in Pozzuoli Bay, Baianus Sinus, near Naples. We performed X-ray computed micro-tomography (μ-XCT) at beamline 8.3.2 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories to segment the complex composite without damaging the specimen. We isolated certain relict sub-spherical voids and illustrated crystal morphologies with 3-D reconstructions. We then used beamline 12.3.2 at the ALS to provide highly accurate identifications of diverse crystal phases in various mortar components - relict lime clasts, tuff or pumice clasts, cementitious matrix and relict voids - in sites previously identified and characterized with petrogaphic techniques. X-ray micro-fluorescence (μ-XRF) mapping provided calcium and iron maps of the sites, which were useful in selecting fine-scale areas for scanning transmission X-ray micro-diffraction (μ-XRD) mapping at high spatial resolution, about 1 micron. The μ-XRD analyses utilized both monochromatic and polychromatic light measurements. Polychromatic light was more appropriate for phases with grain sizes larger than the doubly focused X-ray beam, about 1 x

  3. Preparation, characterization and optoelectronic properties of nanodiamonds doped zinc oxide nanomaterials by a ball milling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Hameed; Sohail, Muhammad; Malik, Uzma; Ali, Naveed; Bangash, Masroor Ahmad; Nawaz, Mohsan

    2016-07-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is one of the very important metal oxides (MOs) for applications in optoelectronic devices which work in the blue and UV regions. However, to meet the challenges of obtaining ZnO nanomaterials suitable for practical applications, various modifications in physico-chemical properties are highly desirable. One of the ways adopted for altering the properties is to synthesize composite(s) of ZnO with various reinforcements. Here we report on the tuning of optoelectronic properties of ZnO upon doping by nanodiamonds (NDs) using the ball milling technique. A varying weight percent (wt.%) of NDs were ball milled for 2 h with ZnO nanoparticles prepared by a simple precipitation method. The effects of different parameters, the calcination temperature of ZnO, wt.% of NDs and mechanical milling upon the optoelectronic properties of the resulting ZnO-NDs nanocomposites have been investigated. The ZnO-NDs nanocomposites were characterized by IR spectroscopy, powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The UV-vis spectroscopy revealed the alteration in the bandgap energy (Eg ) of ZnO as a function of the calcination temperature of ZnO, changing the concentration of NDs, and mechanical milling of the resulting nanocomposites. The photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy showed a decrease in the deep level emission (DLE) peaks and an increase in near-band-edge transition peaks as a result of the increasing concentration of NDs. The decrease in DLE and increase in band to band transition peaks were due to the strong interaction between the NDs and the Zn+; consequently, the Zn+ concentration decreased on the interstitial sites.

  4. A new technique of characterization of the intrapixel response of astronomical detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketchazo, C.; Viale, T.; Boulade, O.; Druart, G.; Moreau, V.; Mugnier, L.; Dubreuil, D.; Derelle, S.; Ronayette, S.; Guérineau, N.; Berthe, M.

    2014-07-01

    This paper is devoted to the presentation of a new technique of characterization of the Intra-Pixel Sensitivity Variations (IPSVs) of astronomical detectors. The IPSV is the spatial variation of the sensitivity within a pixel and it was demonstrated that this variation can contribute to the instrument global error. Then IPSV has not to be neglected especially in the case of under-sampled instruments for high quality imaging and accurate photometry. The common approaches to measure the IPSV consist in determining the pixel response function (PRF) by scanning an optical probe through the detector. These approaches require high-aperture optics, high precision mechanical devices and are time consuming. The original approach we will present in this paper consists in projecting high-resolution periodic patterns onto the whole sensor without classic optics but using the self-imaging property (the Talbot effect) of a Continuously Self Imaging Grating (CSIG) illuminated by a plane wave. This paper describes the test bench and its design rules. The methodology of the measurement is also presented. Two measurement procedures are available: global and local. In the global procedure, the mean PRF corresponding to the whole Focal Plane Array (FPA) or a sub-area of the FPA is evaluated. The results obtained applying this procedure on e2v CCD 204 are presented and discussed in detail. In the local procedure, a CSIG is moved in front of each pixel and a pixel PRF is reconstructed by resolving the inverse problem. The local procedure is presented and validated by simulations.

  5. Preparation, characterization and optoelectronic properties of nanodiamonds doped zinc oxide nanomaterials by a ball milling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Hameed; Sohail, Muhammad; Malik, Uzma; Ali, Naveed; Bangash, Masroor Ahmad; Nawaz, Mohsan

    2016-07-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is one of the very important metal oxides (MOs) for applications in optoelectronic devices which work in the blue and UV regions. However, to meet the challenges of obtaining ZnO nanomaterials suitable for practical applications, various modifications in physico-chemical properties are highly desirable. One of the ways adopted for altering the properties is to synthesize composite(s) of ZnO with various reinforcements. Here we report on the tuning of optoelectronic properties of ZnO upon doping by nanodiamonds (NDs) using the ball milling technique. A varying weight percent (wt.%) of NDs were ball milled for 2 h with ZnO nanoparticles prepared by a simple precipitation method. The effects of different parameters, the calcination temperature of ZnO, wt.% of NDs and mechanical milling upon the optoelectronic properties of the resulting ZnO–NDs nanocomposites have been investigated. The ZnO–NDs nanocomposites were characterized by IR spectroscopy, powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The UV-vis spectroscopy revealed the alteration in the bandgap energy (Eg ) of ZnO as a function of the calcination temperature of ZnO, changing the concentration of NDs, and mechanical milling of the resulting nanocomposites. The photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy showed a decrease in the deep level emission (DLE) peaks and an increase in near-band-edge transition peaks as a result of the increasing concentration of NDs. The decrease in DLE and increase in band to band transition peaks were due to the strong interaction between the NDs and the Zn+; consequently, the Zn+ concentration decreased on the interstitial sites.

  6. Surface acoustic wave technique for the characterization of porous properties of microporous silicate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietala, Susan Leslie

    1997-12-01

    Features of gas adsorption onto sol-gel derived microporous silicate thin films, for characterization of porous properties, are detailed using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) technique. Mass uptake and film effective modulus changes calculated from the SAW data are investigated in detail. The effects of stress and surface tension on the SAW sensor are calculated and found to be negligible in these experiments. Transient behavior recorded during nitrogen adsorption at 77 K is discussed in the context of mass uptake and effective modulus contributions. The time constant associated with the effective modulus calculation is consistent with that of diffusivity of nitrogen into a 5A zeolite. Further calculations indicate that the transient behavior is not due to thermal effects. A unique dual sensor SAW experiment to decouple the mass and effective modulus contributions to the frequency response was performed in conjunction with a Silicon beam-bending experiment. The beam-bending experiment results in a calculation of stress induced during adsorption of methanol on a microporous silicate thin film. The decoupled mass and effective modulus calculated from the SAW data have similar shaped isotherms, and are quite different from that of the stress developed in the Silicon beam. The total effective modulus change calculated from the SAW data is consistent with that calculated using Gassmann's equation. The SAW system developed for this work included unique electronics and customized hardware which is suitable for work under vacuum and at temperatures from 77K to 473K. This unique setup is suitable for running thin film samples on a Micromeritics ASAP 2000 Gas Adsorption unit in automatic mode. This setup is also general enough to be compatible with a custom gas adsorption unit and the beam bending apparatus, both using standard vacuum assemblies.

  7. Characterization of Deficiencies in the Frequency Domain Forced Response Analysis Technique for Supersonic Turbine Bladed Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Schmauch, Preston

    2012-01-01

    Turbine blades in rocket and jet engine turbomachinery experience enormous harmonic loading conditions. These loads result from the integer number of upstream and downstream stator vanes as well as the other turbine stages. Assessing the blade structural integrity is a complex task requiring an initial characterization of whether resonance is possible and then performing a forced response analysis if that condition is met. The standard technique for forced response analysis in rocket engine turbines is to decompose a computational fluid dynamics (CFD).generated flow field into its harmonic components, and to then perform a frequency response analysis at the problematic natural frequencies using cyclically symmetric structural dynamic models. Recent CFD analysis and water-flow testing at NASA/MSFC, though, indicates that this technique may miss substantial harmonic and non ]harmonic excitation sources that become present in complex flows. This complex content can only be captured by a CFD flow field encompassing at least an entire revolution. A substantial development effort to create a series of software programs to enable application of the 360 degree forcing function in a frequency response analysis on cyclic symmetric models has been completed (to be described in a future paper), but the question still remains whether the frequency response analysis itself is capable of capturing the excitation content sufficiently. Two studies comparing frequency response analysis with transient response analysis, therefore, of bladed-disks undergoing this complex flow environment have been performed. The first is of a bladed disk with each blade modeled by simple beam elements and the disk modeled with plates (using the finite element code MSC/NASTRAN). The focus of this model is to be representative of response of realistic bladed disks, and so the dimensions are roughly equivalent to the new J2X rocket engine 1st stage fuel pump turbine. The simplicity of the model allows

  8. Rock surface roughness measurement using CSI technique and analysis of surface characterization by qualitative and quantitative results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhtar, Husneni; Montgomery, Paul; Gianto; Susanto, K.

    2016-01-01

    In order to develop image processing that is widely used in geo-processing and analysis, we introduce an alternative technique for the characterization of rock samples. The technique that we have used for characterizing inhomogeneous surfaces is based on Coherence Scanning Interferometry (CSI). An optical probe is first used to scan over the depth of the surface roughness of the sample. Then, to analyse the measured fringe data, we use the Five Sample Adaptive method to obtain quantitative results of the surface shape. To analyse the surface roughness parameters, Hmm and Rq, a new window resizing analysis technique is employed. The results of the morphology and surface roughness analysis show micron and nano-scale information which is characteristic of each rock type and its history. These could be used for mineral identification and studies in rock movement on different surfaces. Image processing is thus used to define the physical parameters of the rock surface.

  9. Nondestructive technique for the characterization of the pore size distribution of soft porous constructs for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Safinia, Laleh; Mantalaris, Athanasios; Bismarck, Alexander

    2006-03-28

    Polymer scaffolds tailored for tissue engineering applications possessing the desired pore structure require reproducible fabrication techniques. Nondestructive, quantitative methods for pore characterization are required to determine the pore size and its distribution. In this study, a promising alternative to traditional pore size characterization techniques is presented. We introduce a quantitative, nondestructive and inexpensive method to determine the pore size distribution of large soft porous solids based on the on the displacement of a liquid, that spreads without limits though a porous medium, by nitrogen. The capillary pressure is measured and related to the pore sizes as well as the pore size distribution of the narrowest bottlenecks of the largest interconnected pores in a porous medium. The measured pore diameters correspond to the narrowest bottleneck of the largest pores connecting the bottom with the top surface of a given porous solid. The applicability and reproducibility of the breakthrough technique is demonstrated on two polyurethane foams, manufactured using the thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) process, with almost identical overall porosity (60-70%) but very different pore morphology. By selecting different quenching temperatures to induce polymer phase separation, the pore structure could be regulated while maintaining the overall porosity. Depending on the quenching temperature, the foams exhibited either longitudinally oriented tubular macropores interconnected with micropores or independent macropores connected to adjacent pores via openings in the pore walls. The pore size and its distribution obtained by the breakthrough test were in excellent agreement to conventional characterization techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy combined with image analysis, BET technique, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. This technique is suitable for the characterization of the micro- and macropore structure of soft porous solids

  10. Characterization and performance evaluation of an innovative mesoporous activated carbon used for drinking water purification in comparison with commercial carbons.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xu-Jin; Li, Wei-Guang; Wang, Guang-Zhi; Zhang, Duo-Ying; Fan, Wen-Biao; Yin, Zhao-Dong

    2015-09-01

    The preparation, characterization, and performance evaluation of an innovative mesoporous activated carbon (C-XHIT) were conducted in this study. Comparative evaluation with commercial carbons (C-PS and C-ZJ15) and long-term performance evaluation of C-XHIT were conducted in small-scale system-A (S-A) and pilot-scale system-B (S-B-1 and S-B-2 in series), respectively, for treating water from Songhua River. The cumulative uptake of micropollutants varied with KBV (water volume fed to columns divided by the mass of carbons, m(3) H2O/kg carbon) was employed in the performance evaluation. The results identified that mesoporous and microporous volumes were simultaneously well-developed in C-XHIT. Higher mesoporosity (63.94 %) and average pore width (37.91 Å) of C-XHIT ensured a higher adsorption capacity for humic acid compared to C-PS and C-ZJ15. When the KBV of S-A reached 12.58 m(3) H2O/kg carbon, cumulative uptake of organic pollutants achieved by C-XHIT increased by 32.82 and 156.29 % for DOC (QC) and 22.53 and 112.48 % for UV254 (QUV) compared to C-PS and C-ZJ15, respectively; in contrast, the adsorption capacity of NH4 (+)-N did not improve significantly. C-XHIT achieved high average removal efficiencies for DOC (77.43 ± 16.54 %) and UV254 (83.18 ± 13.88 %) in S-B over 253 days of operation (KBV = 62 m(3) H2O/kg carbon). Adsorption dominated the removal of DOC and UV254 in the initial phases of KBV (0-15 m(3) H2O/kg carbon), and simultaneous biodegradation and adsorption were identified as the mechanisms for organic pollutant uptake at KBV above 25 m(3) H2O/kg carbon. The average rates contributed by S-B-1 and S-B-2 for QC and QUV were approximately 0.75 and 0.25, respectively. Good linear and exponential correlations were observed between S-A and S-B in terms of QC and QUV obtained by C-XHIT, respectively, for the same KBV ranges, indicating a rapid and cost-saving evaluation method. The linear correlation between mesoporosity and QC

  11. Characterization and performance evaluation of an innovative mesoporous activated carbon used for drinking water purification in comparison with commercial carbons.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xu-Jin; Li, Wei-Guang; Wang, Guang-Zhi; Zhang, Duo-Ying; Fan, Wen-Biao; Yin, Zhao-Dong

    2015-09-01

    The preparation, characterization, and performance evaluation of an innovative mesoporous activated carbon (C-XHIT) were conducted in this study. Comparative evaluation with commercial carbons (C-PS and C-ZJ15) and long-term performance evaluation of C-XHIT were conducted in small-scale system-A (S-A) and pilot-scale system-B (S-B-1 and S-B-2 in series), respectively, for treating water from Songhua River. The cumulative uptake of micropollutants varied with KBV (water volume fed to columns divided by the mass of carbons, m(3) H2O/kg carbon) was employed in the performance evaluation. The results identified that mesoporous and microporous volumes were simultaneously well-developed in C-XHIT. Higher mesoporosity (63.94 %) and average pore width (37.91 Å) of C-XHIT ensured a higher adsorption capacity for humic acid compared to C-PS and C-ZJ15. When the KBV of S-A reached 12.58 m(3) H2O/kg carbon, cumulative uptake of organic pollutants achieved by C-XHIT increased by 32.82 and 156.29 % for DOC (QC) and 22.53 and 112.48 % for UV254 (QUV) compared to C-PS and C-ZJ15, respectively; in contrast, the adsorption capacity of NH4 (+)-N did not improve significantly. C-XHIT achieved high average removal efficiencies for DOC (77.43 ± 16.54 %) and UV254 (83.18 ± 13.88 %) in S-B over 253 days of operation (KBV = 62 m(3) H2O/kg carbon). Adsorption dominated the removal of DOC and UV254 in the initial phases of KBV (0-15 m(3) H2O/kg carbon), and simultaneous biodegradation and adsorption were identified as the mechanisms for organic pollutant uptake at KBV above 25 m(3) H2O/kg carbon. The average rates contributed by S-B-1 and S-B-2 for QC and QUV were approximately 0.75 and 0.25, respectively. Good linear and exponential correlations were observed between S-A and S-B in terms of QC and QUV obtained by C-XHIT, respectively, for the same KBV ranges, indicating a rapid and cost-saving evaluation method. The linear correlation between mesoporosity and QC

  12. Characterization of Carbon Dioxide Washout Measurement Techniques in the Mark-III Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, J.; Bekdash, O.; Meginnis, I.

    2016-01-01

    Providing adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout is essential to the reduction of risk in performing suited operations. Long term CO2 exposure can lead to symptoms such as headache, lethargy, dizziness, and in severe cases can lead to unconsciousness and death. Thus maintaining adequate CO2 washout in both ground testing and during in flight EVAs is a requirement of current and future suit designs. It is necessary to understand the inspired CO2 of suit wearers such that future requirements for space suits appropriately address the risk of inadequate washout. Testing conducted by the EVA Physiology Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center aimed to characterize a method for noninvasively measuring inspired oronasal CO2 under pressurized suited conditions in order to better inform requirements definition and verification techniques for future CO2 washout limits in space suits. Prior work conducted by the EPL examined several different wearable, respirator style, masks that could be used to sample air from the vicinity surround the nose and mouth of a suited test subject. Previously published studies utilized these masks, some being commercial products and some novel designs, to monitor CO2 under various exercise and flow conditions with mixed results for repeatability and/or consistency between subjects. Based on a meta-analysis of those studies it was decided to test a nasal cannula as it is a commercially available device that is placed directly in the flow path of the user as they breathe. A nasal cannula was used to sample air inhaled by the test subjects during both rest and exercise conditions. Eight subjects were tasked with walking on a treadmill or operating an arm ergometer to reach target metabolic rates of 1000, 2000, and 3000 BTU/hr. Suit pressure was maintained at 4.3 psid for all tests, with supply flow rates of 6, 4, and 2 actual cubic feet per minute depending on the test condition. Each test configuration was conducted twice with subjects breathing

  13. Characterization of Carbon Dioxide Washout Measurement Techniques in the Mark-III Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meginnis, I; Norcross, J.; Bekdash, O.

    2016-01-01

    It is essential to provide adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout in a space suit to reduce the risks associated with manned operations in space suits. Symptoms of elevated CO2 levels range from reduced cognitive performance and headache to unconsciousness and death at high levels of CO2. Because of this, NASA imposes limits on inspired CO2 levels for space suits when they are used in space and for ground testing. Testing and/or analysis must be performed to verify that a space suit meets CO2 washout requirements. Testing for developmental space suits has traditionally used an oronasal mask that collects CO2 samples at the left and rights sides of the mouth. Testing with this mask resulted in artificially elevated CO2 concentration measurements, which is most likely due to the dead space volume at the front of the mask. The mask also extends outward and into the supply gas stream, which may disrupt the washout effect of the suit supply gas. To mitigate these problems, a nasal cannula was investigated as a method for measuring inspired CO2 based on the assumptions that it is low profile and would not interfere with the designed suit gas flow path, and it has reduced dead space. This test series compared the performance of a nasal cannula to the oronasal mask in the Mark III space suit. Inspired CO2 levels were measured with subjects at rest and at metabolic workloads of 1000, 2000, and 3000 BTU/hr. Workloads were achieved by use of an arm ergometer or treadmill. Test points were conducted at air flow rates of 2, 4, and 6 actual cubic feet per minute, with a suit pressure of 4.3 psid. Results from this test series will evaluate the accuracy and repeatability across subjects of the nasal cannula collection method, which will provide rationale for using a nasal cannula as the new method for measuring inspired CO2 in a space suit. Proper characterization of sampling methods and of suit CO2 washout capability will better inform requirements definition and verification

  14. Common Practice Lightning Strike Protection Characterization Technique to Quantify Damage Mechanisms on Composite Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatkowski, George N.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Ticatch, Larry A.; Mielnik, John J.; Mcneill, Patrick A.

    2013-01-01

    heating parameters which occur during lightning attachment. Following guidance defined in the universal common practice LSP test documents, protected and unprotected CFRP panels were evaluated at 20, 40 and 100KAmps. This report presents analyzed data demonstrating the scientific usefulness of the common practice approach. Descriptions of the common practice CFRP test articles, LSP test bed fixture, and monitoring techniques to capture the electrical, mechanical and thermal parameters during lightning attachment are presented here. Two methods of measuring the electrical currents were evaluated, inductive current probes and a newly developed fiberoptic sensor. Two mechanical displacement methods were also examined, optical laser measurement sensors and a digital imaging correlation camera system. Recommendations are provided to help users implement the common practice test approach and obtain LSP test characterizations comparable across data sets.

  15. Development of nanoindentation techniques for characterizing local mechanical properties of soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Charles David

    Indentation has become a popular mechanical characterization technique due to the promise of high-resolution maps of material stiffness. Due to the far-reaching nature of the testing framework, indentation tests can occur on nearly any material type and on any length scale. In this dissertation, we will look at three different materials systems and demonstrate new and unique uses for the indentation framework. These results will provide information not available by other methodologies, thereby proving its universal value. Two different indentation schemes are employed, either probing the top surface of cross-section samples or by probing into the thickness of a thin film. The differences between each of the studies highlight the importance of sample geometry/orientation, contact conditions, material response, etc. First, we will use indentation to probe local regions near carbon nanotube/glass fiber hybrid composites in an epoxy matrix. Indentations were performed to determine the radial gradient of modulus enhancements from the glass fiber surface. The results from indentation demonstrated that spatial reinforcement due to the presence of nanotubes was tied to fiber morphology and not the local morphology of carbon nanotubes. Secondly, we look at rubber and filler interaction on two different levels; macroscale and nanoscale. On the nanoscale, we show that interactions at the filler/polymer interface create regions of altered polymer mobility. These regions are influenced by geometric and chemical confinement, which increase the stiffness of these small regions (< 200nm). We employ two different indentation methods to highlight how contact orientation determines the nature of our results. Ultra-soft materials, such as hydrogels and tissues, pose rather unique challenges when they are tested mechanically. However, with tissues and gels, the sensitivity of the machines is challenged and therefore protocols must be developed to produce accurate results. We validate

  16. Porous structure of fibre networks formed by a foaming process: a comparative study of different characterization techniques.

    PubMed

    Al-Qararah, Ahmad M; Ekman, Axel; Hjelt, Tuomo; Kiiskinen, Harri; Timonen, Jussi; Ketoja, Jukka A

    2016-10-01

    Recent developments in making fibre materials using the foam-forming technology have raised a need to characterize the porous structure at low material density. In order to find an effective choice among all structure-characterization methods, both two-dimensional and three-dimensional techniques were used to explore the porous structure of foam-formed samples made with two different types of cellulose fibre. These techniques included X-ray microtomography, scanning electron microscopy, light microscopy, direct surface imaging using a CCD camera and mercury intrusion porosimetry. The mean pore radius for a varying type of fibre and for varying foam properties was described similarly by all imaging methods. X-ray microtomography provided the most extensive information about the sheet structure, and showed more pronounced effects of varying foam properties than the two-dimensional imaging techniques. The two-dimensional methods slightly underestimated the mean pore size of samples containing stiff CTMP fibres with void radii exceeding 100 μm, and overestimated the pore size for the samples containing flexible kraft fibres with all void radii below 100 μm. The direct rapid surface imaging with a CCD camera showed surprisingly strong agreement with the other imaging techniques. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was able to characterize pore sizes also in the submicron region and led to an increased relative volume of the pores in the range of the mean bubble size of the foam. This may be related to the penetration channels created by the foam-fibre interaction.

  17. Electromagnetic diagnostic techniques for hypervelocity projectile detection, velocity measurement, and size characterization: Theoretical concept and first experimental test

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlig, W. Casey; Heine, Andreas

    2015-11-14

    A new measurement technique is suggested to augment the characterization and understanding of hypervelocity projectiles before impact. The electromagnetic technique utilizes magnetic diffusion principles to detect particles, measure velocity, and indicate relative particle dimensions. It is particularly suited for detection of small particles that may be difficult to track utilizing current characterization methods, such as high-speed video or flash radiography but can be readily used for large particle detection, where particle spacing or location is not practical for other measurement systems. In this work, particles down to 2 mm in diameter have been characterized while focusing on confining the detection signal to enable multi-particle characterization with limited particle-to-particle spacing. The focus of the paper is on the theoretical concept and the analysis of its applicability based on analytical and numerical calculation. First proof-of-principle experimental tests serve to further validate the method. Some potential applications are the characterization of particles from a shaped-charge jet after its break-up and investigating debris in impact experiments to test theoretical models for the distribution of particles size, number, and velocity.

  18. Electromagnetic diagnostic techniques for hypervelocity projectile detection, velocity measurement, and size characterization: Theoretical concept and first experimental test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, W. Casey; Heine, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    A new measurement technique is suggested to augment the characterization and understanding of hypervelocity projectiles before impact. The electromagnetic technique utilizes magnetic diffusion principles to detect particles, measure velocity, and indicate relative particle dimensions. It is particularly suited for detection of small particles that may be difficult to track utilizing current characterization methods, such as high-speed video or flash radiography but can be readily used for large particle detection, where particle spacing or location is not practical for other measurement systems. In this work, particles down to 2 mm in diameter have been characterized while focusing on confining the detection signal to enable multi-particle characterization with limited particle-to-particle spacing. The focus of the paper is on the theoretical concept and the analysis of its applicability based on analytical and numerical calculation. First proof-of-principle experimental tests serve to further validate the method. Some potential applications are the characterization of particles from a shaped-charge jet after its break-up and investigating debris in impact experiments to test theoretical models for the distribution of particles size, number, and velocity.

  19. Advanced analytical techniques for the extraction and characterization of plant-derived essential oils by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Rabia; Low, Kah Hin

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, essential oils have received a growing interest because of the positive health effects of their novel characteristics such as antibacterial, antifungal, and antioxidant activities. For the extraction of plant-derived essential oils, there is the need of advanced analytical techniques and innovative methodologies. An exhaustive study of hydrodistillation, supercritical fluid extraction, ultrasound- and microwave-assisted extraction, solid-phase microextraction, pressurized liquid extraction, pressurized hot water extraction, liquid-liquid extraction, liquid-phase microextraction, matrix solid-phase dispersion, and gas chromatography (one- and two-dimensional) hyphenated with mass spectrometry for the extraction through various plant species and analysis of essential oils has been provided in this review. Essential oils are composed of mainly terpenes and terpenoids with low-molecular-weight aromatic and aliphatic constituents that are particularly important for public health.

  20. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Novel analytical techniques for coal liquefaction: Fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, R.F.; Hower, J.C.; Derbyshire, F.J.

    1991-10-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using fluorescence and reflectance microscopy techniques for the examination of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. Resid, as defined here, is the 850{degrees}F{sup +} portion of the process stream, and includes soluble organics, insoluble organics and ash. The technique can be used to determine the degree of hydrogenation and the presence of multiple phases occurring within a resid sample. It can also be used to infer resid reactivity. The technique is rapid, requiring less than one hour for sample preparation and examination, and thus has apparent usefulness for process monitoring. Additionally, the technique can distinguish differences in samples produced under various process conditions. It can, therefore, be considered a potentially useful technique for the process developer. Further development and application of this analytical method as a process development tool is justified based on these results.

  1. A fast and innovative microextraction technique, μSPEed, followed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography for the analysis of phenolic compounds in teas.

    PubMed

    Porto-Figueira, Priscilla; Figueira, José A; Pereira, Jorge A M; Câmara, José S

    2015-12-11

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a promising solid phase microextraction technique, μSPEed, in the analysis of selected phenolic compounds from teas by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection (μSPEed/UHPLC-PDA). The innovative μSPEed configuration uses 3-μm sorbent particles tightly packed in a disposable needle equipped with a pressure-driven valve to withdraw samples in a single direction. The system was operated by the electronic pipette eVol® and different parameters influencing the extraction efficiency, as the nature of sorbent, pH, loading and elution conditions, and solvents were optimized. The best extracting conditions were obtained by loading twice 100μL of tea samples through the PS/DVB-RP sorbent and eluting with 50μL of acidified MeOH 95%. The following chromatographic separation was carried out in an Acquity C18 BEH capillary column using a gradient of 0.1% FA and acetonitrile. The optimized μSPEed/UHPLC-PDA methodology is selective and specific and was properly validated for 8 phenolic compounds widely reported in different teas. Overall, an excellent analytical performance was obtained in the 0.2-20μg/L linear dynamic range (LDR), with very low limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs), ranging between 3.5-16.8ng/mL and 10.6-50.6ng/mL, respectively, high recoveries (89.3-103.3%), good precision (RSD<5%) and negligible matrix effect. The methodology was used to assess the target polyphenols concentration in several tea samples. Rutin and quercetin-3-glucoside were the most abundant phenolics in all tea samples analysed and, with exception of naringenin and cinnamic acid, which are present in high amounts in the investigated citric teas, remain phenolic compounds are present in trace levels.

  2. A fast and innovative microextraction technique, μSPEed, followed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography for the analysis of phenolic compounds in teas.

    PubMed

    Porto-Figueira, Priscilla; Figueira, José A; Pereira, Jorge A M; Câmara, José S

    2015-12-11

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a promising solid phase microextraction technique, μSPEed, in the analysis of selected phenolic compounds from teas by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection (μSPEed/UHPLC-PDA). The innovative μSPEed configuration uses 3-μm sorbent particles tightly packed in a disposable needle equipped with a pressure-driven valve to withdraw samples in a single direction. The system was operated by the electronic pipette eVol® and different parameters influencing the extraction efficiency, as the nature of sorbent, pH, loading and elution conditions, and solvents were optimized. The best extracting conditions were obtained by loading twice 100μL of tea samples through the PS/DVB-RP sorbent and eluting with 50μL of acidified MeOH 95%. The following chromatographic separation was carried out in an Acquity C18 BEH capillary column using a gradient of 0.1% FA and acetonitrile. The optimized μSPEed/UHPLC-PDA methodology is selective and specific and was properly validated for 8 phenolic compounds widely reported in different teas. Overall, an excellent analytical performance was obtained in the 0.2-20μg/L linear dynamic range (LDR), with very low limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs), ranging between 3.5-16.8ng/mL and 10.6-50.6ng/mL, respectively, high recoveries (89.3-103.3%), good precision (RSD<5%) and negligible matrix effect. The methodology was used to assess the target polyphenols concentration in several tea samples. Rutin and quercetin-3-glucoside were the most abundant phenolics in all tea samples analysed and, with exception of naringenin and cinnamic acid, which are present in high amounts in the investigated citric teas, remain phenolic compounds are present in trace levels. PMID:26585207

  3. Diagnostics of thermal spray processes by in-flight measurement of particle size and shape with innovative particle-shape-imaging (PSI) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streibl, Tilo; Duda, Thomas; Landes, Klaus D.

    2001-04-01

    In the simplest terms possible, thermal spraying coating involves heating a material, in powder or wire form, to a molten or semi-molten state. The material is propelled using a heat source, e.g. a very high temperature plasma flame to deposit it, creating a surface structure on a given substrate. The process is very complex because it depends on numerous parameters influencing each other. A necessary condition to improve process efficiency and quality of produced coatings is the determination of in-flight particle properties. The innovative Particle-Shape-Imaging (PSI) technique offers a new potential in particle diagnostics. It is intended for the analysis of size and shape of single particles within the plasma jet. The method is based on telemicroscopic imaging of the particle shades. A cw-laser beam is split into two beams of equal intensities, which are superimposed in the focal plane of a long-distance-microscope. The detection system consists of a CCD camera with a Micro- Channel-Plate intensifier allowing exposure times of a few nanoseconds. When a particle passes the measuring volume, the laser beams generate two individual shades. The position of the particle relatively to the focal plane is determined from the separation of the two shades in the image plane. From the evaluation of area and contour of the shades, particles can be classified in regard to size and form. Corresponding distributions of the particles within the plasma jet as well as changes of the particle form in the melting process can be determined.

  4. Characterization of Apollo Regolith by X-Ray and Electron Microbeam Techniques: An Analog for Future Sample Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, Ryan A.

    2015-01-01

    The Apollo missions collected 382 kg of rock and regolith from the Moon; approximately 1/3 of the sample mass collected was regolith. Lunar regolith consists of well mixed rocks, minerals, and glasses less than 1-centimeter n size. The majority of most surface regolith samples were sieved into less than 1, 1-2, 2-4, and 4-10- millimiter size fractions; a portion of most samples was re-served unsieved. The initial characterization and classification of most Apollo regolith particles was done primarily by binocular microscopy. Optical classification of regolith is difficult because (1) the finest fraction of the regolith coats and obscures the textures of the larger particles, and (b) not all lithologies or minerals are uniquely identifiable optically. In recent years, we have begun to use more modern x-ray beam techniques [1-3], coupled with high resolution 3D optical imaging techniques [4] to characterize Apollo and meteorite samples as part of the curation process. These techniques, particularly in concert with SEM imaging of less than 1-millimeter regolith grain mounts, allow for the rapid characterization of the components within a regolith.

  5. Industrial fouling: problem characterization, economic assessment, and review of prevention, mitigation, and accommodation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett-Price, B.A.; Smith, S.A.; Watts, R.L.

    1984-02-01

    A comprehensive overview of heat exchanger fouling in the manufacturing industries is provided. Specifically, this overview addresses: the characteristics of industrial fouling problems; the mitigation and accommodation techniques currently used by industry; and the types and magnitude of costs associated with industrial fouling. A detailed review of the fouling problems, costs and mitigation techniques is provided for the food, textile, pulp and paper, chemical, petroleum, cement, glass and primary metals industries.

  6. Nondestructive Characterization by Advanced Synchrotron Light Techniques: Spectromicroscopy and Coherent Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Margaritondo, Giorgio; Hwu, Yeukuang; Je, Jung Ho

    2008-01-01

    The advanced characteristics of synchrotron light has led in recent years to the development of a series of new experimental techniques to investigate chemical and physical properties on a microscopic scale. Although originally developed for materials science and biomedical research, such techniques find increasing applications in other domains – and could be quite useful for the study and conservation of cultural heritage. Specifically, they can nondestructively provide detailed chemical composition information that can be useful for the identification of specimens, for the discovery of historical links based on the sources of chemical raw materials and on chemical processes, for the analysis of damage, their causes and remedies and for many other issues. Likewise, morphological and structural information on a microscopic scale is useful for the identification, study and preservation of many different cultural and historical specimens. We concentrate here on two classes of techniques: in the first case, photoemission spectromicroscopy. This is the result of the advanced evolution of photoemission techniques like ESCA (Electron Microscopy for Chemical Analysis). By combining high lateral resolution to spectroscopy, photoemission spectromicroscopy can deliver fine chemical information on a microscopic scale in a nondestructive fashion. The second class of techniques exploits the high lateral coherence of modern synchrotron sources, a byproduct of the quest for high brightness or brilliance. We will see that such techniques now push radiology into the submicron scale and the submillisecond time domain. Furthermore, they can be implemented in a tomographic mode, increasing the information and becoming potentially quite useful for the analysis of cultural heritage specimens.

  7. Complementary use of flow and sedimentation field-flow fractionation techniques for size characterizing biodegradable poly(lactic acid) nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Contado, Catia; Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Leo, Eliana; Zborowski, Maciej; Williams, P. Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles were synthesized using a modified evaporation method, testing two different surfactants (sodium cholate and Pluronic F68) for the process. During their formulation the prodrug 5′-octanoyl-CPA (Oct-CPA) of the antiischemic N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) was encapsulated. Three different purification methods were compared with respect to the influence of surfactant on the size characteristics of the final nanoparticle product. Flow and sedimentation field-flow fractionation techniques (FlFFF and SdFFF, respectively) were used to size characterize the five poly(lactic acid) particle samples. Two different combinations of carrier solution (mobile phase) were employed in the FlFFF analyses, while a solution of poly(vinyl alcohol) was used as mobile phase for the SdFFF runs. The separation performances of the two techniques were compared and the particle size distributions, derived from the fractograms, were interpreted with the support of observations by scanning electron microscopy. Some critical aspects, such as the carrier choice and the channel thickness determination for the FlFFF, have been investigated. This is the first comprehensive comparison of the two FFF techniques for characterizing non standard particulate materials. The two FFF techniques proved to be complementary and gave good, congruent and very useful information on the size distributions of the five poly(lactic acid) particle samples. PMID:17482199

  8. An X-band waveguide measurement technique for the accurate characterization of materials with low dielectric loss permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Kenneth W.; Scott, Mark M.; Reid, David R.; Bean, Jeffrey A.; Ellis, Jeremy D.; Morris, Andrew P.; Marsh, Jeramy M.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we present a new X-band waveguide (WR90) measurement method that permits the broadband characterization of the complex permittivity for low dielectric loss tangent material specimens with improved accuracy. An electrically long polypropylene specimen that partially fills the cross-section is inserted into the waveguide and the transmitted scattering parameter (S21) is measured. The extraction method relies on computational electromagnetic simulations, coupled with a genetic algorithm, to match the experimental S21 measurement. The sensitivity of the technique to sample length was explored by simulating specimen lengths from 2.54 to 15.24 cm, in 2.54 cm increments. Analysis of our simulated data predicts the technique will have the sensitivity to measure loss tangent values on the order of 10-3 for materials such as polymers with relatively low real permittivity values. The ability to accurately characterize low-loss dielectric material specimens of polypropylene is demonstrated experimentally. The method was validated by excellent agreement with a free-space focused-beam system measurement of a polypropylene sheet. This technique provides the material measurement community with the ability to accurately extract material properties of low-loss material specimen over the entire X-band range. This technique could easily be extended to other frequency bands.

  9. An X-band waveguide measurement technique for the accurate characterization of materials with low dielectric loss permittivity.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kenneth W; Scott, Mark M; Reid, David R; Bean, Jeffrey A; Ellis, Jeremy D; Morris, Andrew P; Marsh, Jeramy M

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we present a new X-band waveguide (WR90) measurement method that permits the broadband characterization of the complex permittivity for low dielectric loss tangent material specimens with improved accuracy. An electrically long polypropylene specimen that partially fills the cross-section is inserted into the waveguide and the transmitted scattering parameter (S21) is measured. The extraction method relies on computational electromagnetic simulations, coupled with a genetic algorithm, to match the experimental S21 measurement. The sensitivity of the technique to sample length was explored by simulating specimen lengths from 2.54 to 15.24 cm, in 2.54 cm increments. Analysis of our simulated data predicts the technique will have the sensitivity to measure loss tangent values on the order of 10(-3) for materials such as polymers with relatively low real permittivity values. The ability to accurately characterize low-loss dielectric material specimens of polypropylene is demonstrated experimentally. The method was validated by excellent agreement with a free-space focused-beam system measurement of a polypropylene sheet. This technique provides the material measurement community with the ability to accurately extract material properties of low-loss material specimen over the entire X-band range. This technique could easily be extended to other frequency bands. PMID:27250447

  10. Characterization of the Etna volcanic emissions through an active biomonitoring technique (moss-bags): part 2--morphological and mineralogical features.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, S; D'Alessandro, W

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic emissions were studied at Mount Etna (Italy) by using moss-bags technique. Mosses were exposed around the volcano at different distances from the active vents to evaluate the impact of volcanic emissions in the atmosphere. Morphology and mineralogy of volcanic particulate intercepted by mosses were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Particles emitted during passive degassing activity from the two active vents, Bocca Nuova and North East Crater (BNC and NEC), were identified as silicates, sulfates and halide compounds. In addition to volcanic particles, we found evidences also of geogenic, anthropogenic and marine spray input. The study has shown the robustness of this active biomonitoring technique to collect particles, very useful in active volcanic areas characterized by continuous degassing and often not easily accessible to apply conventional sampling techniques.

  11. Statistical factor analysis technique for characterizing basalt through interpreting nuclear and electrical well logging data (case study from Southern Syria).

    PubMed

    Asfahani, Jamal

    2014-02-01

    Factor analysis technique is proposed in this research for interpreting the combination of nuclear well logging, including natural gamma ray, density and neutron-porosity, and the electrical well logging of long and short normal, in order to characterize the large extended basaltic areas in southern Syria. Kodana well logging data are used for testing and applying the proposed technique. The four resulting score logs enable to establish the lithological score cross-section of the studied well. The established cross-section clearly shows the distribution and the identification of four kinds of basalt which are hard massive basalt, hard basalt, pyroclastic basalt and the alteration basalt products, clay. The factor analysis technique is successfully applied on the Kodana well logging data in southern Syria, and can be used efficiently when several wells and huge well logging data with high number of variables are required to be interpreted.

  12. Characterization of the Etna volcanic emissions through an active biomonitoring technique (moss-bags): part 2--morphological and mineralogical features.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, S; D'Alessandro, W

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic emissions were studied at Mount Etna (Italy) by using moss-bags technique. Mosses were exposed around the volcano at different distances from the active vents to evaluate the impact of volcanic emissions in the atmosphere. Morphology and mineralogy of volcanic particulate intercepted by mosses were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Particles emitted during passive degassing activity from the two active vents, Bocca Nuova and North East Crater (BNC and NEC), were identified as silicates, sulfates and halide compounds. In addition to volcanic particles, we found evidences also of geogenic, anthropogenic and marine spray input. The study has shown the robustness of this active biomonitoring technique to collect particles, very useful in active volcanic areas characterized by continuous degassing and often not easily accessible to apply conventional sampling techniques. PMID:25311770

  13. Innovations in mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Branson, Richard D; Johannigman, Jay A

    2009-07-01

    New features of mechanical ventilators are frequently introduced, including new modes, monitoring techniques, and triggering techniques. But new rarely translates into any measureable improvement in outcome. We describe 4 new techniques and attempt to define what is a new invention versus what is innovative-a technique that significantly improves a measurable variable. We describe and review the literature on automated weaning, automated measurement of functional residual capacity, neural triggering, and novel displays of respiratory mechanics. PMID:19558743

  14. Characterization of controlled bone defects using 2D and 3D ultrasound imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Biren J; Longsine, Whitney; Sabonghy, Eric P; Han, Arum; Tasciotti, Ennio; Weiner, Bradley K; Ferrari, Mauro; Righetti, Raffaella

    2010-08-21

    Ultrasound is emerging as an attractive alternative modality to standard x-ray and CT methods for bone assessment applications. As of today, however, there is a lack of systematic studies that investigate the performance of diagnostic ultrasound techniques in bone imaging applications. This study aims at understanding the performance limitations of new ultrasound techniques for imaging bones in controlled experiments in vitro. Experiments are performed on samples of mammalian and non-mammalian bones with controlled defects with size ranging from 400 microm to 5 mm. Ultrasound findings are statistically compared with those obtained from the same samples using standard x-ray imaging modalities and optical microscopy. The results of this study demonstrate that it is feasible to use diagnostic ultrasound imaging techniques to assess sub-millimeter bone defects in real time and with high accuracy and precision. These results also demonstrate that ultrasound imaging techniques perform comparably better than x-ray imaging and optical imaging methods, in the assessment of a wide range of controlled defects both in mammalian and non-mammalian bones. In the future, ultrasound imaging techniques might provide a cost-effective, real-time, safe and portable diagnostic tool for bone imaging applications.

  15. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2003-02-11

    This research was directed toward developing a systematic reservoir characterization methodology which can be used by the petroleum industry to implement infill drilling programs and/or enhanced oil recovery projects in naturally fractured reservoir systems in an environmentally safe and cost effective manner. It was anticipated that the results of this research program will provide geoscientists and engineers with a systematic procedure for properly characterizing a fractured reservoir system and a reservoir/horizontal wellbore simulator model which can be used to select well locations and an effective EOR process to optimize the recovery of the oil and gas reserves from such complex reservoir systems.

  16. Rapid Identification and Characterization of Francisella by Molecular Biology and Other Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xin-He; Zhao, Long-Fei; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative pathogen of tularemia and a Tier 1 bioterror agent on the CDC list. Considering the fact that some subpopulation of the F. tularensis strains is more virulent, more significantly associated with mortality, and therefore poses more threat to humans, rapid identification and characterization of this subpopulation strains is of invaluable importance. This review summarizes the up-to-date developments of assays for mainly detecting and characterizing F. tularensis and a touch of caveats of some of the assays. PMID:27335619

  17. Thermal characterization of starch-water system by photopyroelectric technique and adiabatic scanning calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Orea, A.; Bentefour, E. H.; Jamée, P.; Chirtoc, M.; Glorieux, C.; Pitsi, G.; Thoen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Starch is one of the most important carbohydrate sources in human nutrition. For the thermal analysis of starch, techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry have been extensively used. As an alternative, we have applied a photopyroelectric (PPE) configuration and adiabatic scanning calorimetry (ASC) to study the thermal properties of starch-water systems. For this study we used nixtamalized corn flour and potato starch with different quantities of distilled water, in order to obtain samples with different moisture content. By using PPE and ASC methods we have measured, for each technique separately, the heat capacity by unit volume (ρcp) at room temperature for a corn flour sample at 90% moisture. The obtained values agree within experimental uncertainty. By using these techniques we also studied the thermal behavior of potato starch, at 80% moisture, in the temperature range where phase transitions occur. In this case the PPE signal phase could be used as a sensitive and versatile monitor for phase transitions.

  18. Geostatistical characterization of the soil of Aguascalientes, México, by using spatial estimation techniques.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno-Márquez, Ricardo; de la Luz Pérez-Rea, María; Castaño, Víctor M

    2016-01-01

    Four spatial estimation techniques available in commercial computational packages are evaluated and compared, namely: regularized splines interpolation, tension splines interpolation, inverse distance weighted interpolation, and ordinary Kriging estimation, in order to establish the best representation for the shallow stratigraphic configuration in the city of Aguascalientes, in Central Mexico. Data from 478 sample points along with the software ArcGIS (Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI), ArcGIS, ver. 9.3, Redlands, California 2008) to calculate the spatial estimates. Each technique was evaluated based on the root mean square error, calculated from a validation between the generated estimates and measured data from 64 sample points which were not used in the spatial estimation process. The present study shows that, for the estimation of the hard-soil layer, ordinary Kriging offered the best performance among the evaluated techniques.

  19. Advanced atomic force microscopy techniques for characterizing the properties of cellulosic nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Ryan Bradley

    The measurement of nanomechanical properties is of great interest to science and industry. Key to progress in this area is the development of new techniques and analysis methods to identify, measure, and quantify these properties. In this dissertation, new data analysis methods and experimental techniques for measuring nanomechanical properties with the atomic force microscope (AFM) are considered. These techniques are then applied to the study of cellulose nanoparticles, an abundant, plant derived nanomaterial. Quantifying uncertainty is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nano-engineered materials and products. However, rigorous uncertainty quantification is rarely applied for material property measurements with the AFM. A framework is presented to ascribe uncertainty to local nanomechanical properties of any nanoparticle or surface measured with the AFM by taking into account the main uncertainty sources inherent in such measurements. This method is demonstrated by quantifying uncertainty in force displacement AFM based measurements of the transverse elastic modulus of tunicate cellulose nanocrystals. Next, a more comprehensive study of different types of cellulose nanoparticles is undertaken with contact resonance (CR) AFM. CR-AFM is a dynamic AFM technique that exploits the resonance frequency of the AFM cantilever while it is permanent contact with the sample surface to predict nanomechanical properties. This technique offers improved measurement sensitivity over static AFM methods for some material systems. The effects of cellulose source material and processing technique on the properties of cellulose nanoparticles are compared. Finally, dynamic AFM cantilever vibration shapes are studied. Many AFM modes exploit the dynamic response of a cantilever in permanent contact with a sample to extract local material properties. A common challenge to these modes is that they assume a certain shape of cantilever vibration, which is not accessible in

  20. Optoelectronic technique for the characterization of high concentration gas-solid suspension.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, A; Rendina, I; Arena, U; Marzocchella, A; Massimilla, L

    1990-03-20

    We describe a simple technique for measuring high (up to 0.16) time-averaged solids volumetric concentration in a two-phase flow. The technique is based on a properly modified version of the forward scattering of laser light. It is useful in a variety of practical configurations, and, in particular, it is instrumental in the diagnostics of particle flow in the free board of bubbling fluidized beds and in the circulating fluidized beds. A fallout of this work is the measurement of the extinction coefficient of the solid material tested.

  1. Characterization of nanostructured HfO2 films using Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcante, F. H. M.; Gomes, M. R.; Carbonari, A. W.; Pereira, L. F. D.; Rossetto, D. A.; Costa, M. S.; Redondo, L. M.; Mestnik-Filho, J.; Saxena, R. N.; Soares, J. C.

    2010-06-01

    The hyperfine field at 181Ta lattice sites in nanostructured HfO2 thin films was studied by the Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) technique. Thin oxide films were deposited by Electron Beam Evaporation on a silicon substrate. The thickness of the films was ~100 nm and ~250 nm. Radioactive 181Hf nuclei were produced by neutron activation of the film samples in the Brazilian Research Reactor (IPEN IEA-R1) by the reaction 180Hf(n, γ)181Hf. PAC measurements were carried out after annealing at 1473 K. The PAC technique allows the determination of the electric field gradient (EFG) at the probe sites.

  2. Micro-structural characterization of materials using synchrotron hard X-ray imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Ashish Singh, Balwant; Kashyap, Yogesh; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar

    2015-06-24

    X-ray imaging has been an important tool to study the materials microstructure with the laboratory based sources however the advent of third generation synchrotron sources has introduced new concepts in X-ray imaging such as phase contrast imaging, micro-tomography, fluorescence imaging and diffraction enhance imaging. These techniques are being used to provide information of materials about their density distribution, porosity, geometrical and morphological characteristics at sub-micron scalewith improved contrast. This paper discusses the development of various imaging techniques at synchrotron based imaging beamline Indus-2 and few recent experiments carried out at this facility.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF FUNGI FROM HYPERSALINE ENVIRONMENTS OF SOLAR SALTERNS USING MORPHOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cabo Rojo Solar Salterns located on the southwest coast of Puerto Rico are composed of two main ecosystems (i.e., salt ponds and microbial mats). Even though these locations are characterized by high solar radiation (mean light intensity of 39 mol photons m-2d-1) they harbor ...

  4. Porous structure of fibre networks formed by a foaming process: a comparative study of different characterization techniques.

    PubMed

    Al-Qararah, Ahmad M; Ekman, Axel; Hjelt, Tuomo; Kiiskinen, Harri; Timonen, Jussi; Ketoja, Jukka A

    2016-10-01

    Recent developments in making fibre materials using the foam-forming technology have raised a need to characterize the porous structure at low material density. In order to find an effective choice among all structure-characterization methods, both two-dimensional and three-dimensional techniques were used to explore the porous structure of foam-formed samples made with two different types of cellulose fibre. These techniques included X-ray microtomography, scanning electron microscopy, light microscopy, direct surface imaging using a CCD camera and mercury intrusion porosimetry. The mean pore radius for a varying type of fibre and for varying foam properties was described similarly by all imaging methods. X-ray microtomography provided the most extensive information about the sheet structure, and showed more pronounced effects of varying foam properties than the two-dimensional imaging techniques. The two-dimensional methods slightly underestimated the mean pore size of samples containing stiff CTMP fibres with void radii exceeding 100 μm, and overestimated the pore size for the samples containing flexible kraft fibres with all void radii below 100 μm. The direct rapid surface imaging with a CCD camera showed surprisingly strong agreement with the other imaging techniques. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was able to characterize pore sizes also in the submicron region and led to an increased relative volume of the pores in the range of the mean bubble size of the foam. This may be related to the penetration channels created by the foam-fibre interaction. PMID:27159162

  5. Site characterization techniques used at a low-level waste shallow land burial field demonstration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.C.; Boegly, W.J. Jr.; Rothschild, E.R.; Spalding, B.P.; Vaughan, N.D.; Haase, C.S.; Huff, D.D.; Lee, S.Y.; Walls, E.C.; Newbold, J.D.

    1984-07-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been investigating improved shallow land burial technology for application in the humd eastern United States. As part of this effort, a field demonstration facility (Engineered Test Facility, or ETF) has been established in Solid Waste Storage Area 6 for purposes of investigatig the ability of two trench treatments (waste grouting prior to cover emplacement and waste isolation with trench liners) to prevent water-waste contact and thus minimize waste leaching. As part of the experimental plan, the ETF site has been characterized for purposes of constructing a hydrologic model. Site characterization is an extremely important component of the waste disposal site selection process; during these activities, potential problems, which might obviate the site from further consideration, may be found. This report describes the ETF site characterization program and identifies and, where appropriate, evaluates those tests that are of most value in model development. Specific areas covered include site geology, soils, and hydrology. Each of these areas is further divided into numerous subsections, making it easy for the reader to examine a single area of interest. Site characterization is a multidiscipliary endeavor with voluminous data, only portions of which are presented and analyzed here. The information in this report is similar to that which will be required of a low-level waste site developer in preparing a license application for a potential site in the humid East, (a discussion of licensing requirements is beyond its scope). Only data relevant to hydrologic model development are included, anticipating that many of these same characterization methods will be used at future disposal sites with similar water-related problems.

  6. Characterization of Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion and Sodium Ion Batteries using Synchrotron Radiation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Apurva; Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource; Doeff, Marca M.; Chen, Guoying; Cabana, Jordi; Richardson, Thomas J.; Mehta, Apurva; Shirpour, Mona; Duncan, Hugues; Kim, Chunjoong; Kam, Kinson C.; Conry, Thomas

    2013-04-30

    We describe the use of synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques to probe details of intercalation/deintercalation processes in electrode materials for Li ion and Na ion batteries. Both in situ and ex situ experiments are used to understand structural behavior relevant to the operation of devices.

  7. Advance development of a technique for characterizing the thermomechanical properties of thermally stable polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillham, J. K.; Stadnicki, S. J.; Hazony, Y.

    1974-01-01

    The torsional braid experiment has been interfaced with a centralized hierarchical computing system for data acquisition and data processing. Such a system, when matched by the appropriate upgrading of the monitoring techniques, provides high resolution thermomechanical spectra of rigidity and damping, and their derivatives with respect to temperature.

  8. Characterization and performance of carbon films deposited by plasma and ion beam based techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, K.C.; Kung, H.; Levine, T.

    1994-12-31

    Plasma and ion beam based techniques have been used to deposit carbon-based films. The ion beam based method, a cathodic arc process, used a magnetically mass analyzed beam and is inherently a line-of-sight process. Two hydrocarbon plasma-based, non-line-of-sight techniques were also used and have the advantage of being capable of coating complicated geometries. The self-bias technique can produce hard carbon films, but is dependent on rf power and the surface area of the target. The pulsed-bias technique can also produce hard carbon films but has the additional advantage of being independent of rf power and target surface area. Tribological results indicated the coefficient of friction is nearly the same for carbon films from each deposition process, but the wear rate of the cathodic arc film was five times less than for the self-bias or pulsed-bias films. Although the cathodic arc film was the hardest, contained the highest fraction of sp{sup 3} bonds and exhibited the lowest wear rate, the cathodic arc film also produced the highest wear on the 440C stainless steel counterface during tribological testing. Thus, for tribological applications requiring low wear rates for both counterfaces, coating one surface with a very hard, wear resistant film may detrimentally affect the tribological behavior of the counterface.

  9. Structural characterization of MG and pre-MG states of proteins by MD simulations, NMR, and other techniques.

    PubMed

    Naiyer, Abdullah; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Islam, Asimul; Sundd, Monica; Ahmad, Faizan

    2015-01-01

    Almost all proteins fold via a number of partially structured intermediates such as molten globule (MG) and pre-molten globule states. Understanding the structure of these intermediates at atomic level is often a challenge, as these states are observed under extreme conditions of pH, temperature, and chemical denaturants. Furthermore, several other processes such as chemical modification, site-directed mutagenesis (or point mutation), and cleavage of covalent bond of natural proteins often lead to MG like partially unfolded conformation. However, the dynamic nature of proteins in these states makes them unsuitable for most structure determination at atomic level. Intermediate states studied so far have been characterized mostly by circular dichroism, fluorescence, viscosity, dynamic light scattering measurements, dye binding, infrared techniques, molecular dynamics simulations, etc. There is a limited amount of structural data available on these intermediate states by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and hence there is a need to characterize these states at the molecular level. In this review, we present characterization of equilibrium intermediates by biophysical techniques with special reference to NMR. PMID:25586676

  10. Characterization of silicon-germanium epitaxial layer by photoluminescence intensity and reflectance measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Back, Dohyun; Lee, Jaehyeong

    2014-12-01

    Si(1-x)Ge(x) epitaxial layers with various Ge fractions sample were characterized by photoluminescence intensity method at room temperature. Photoluminescence intensity was affected by minority carrier lifetime, defect density, and surface condition. PL intensity profile showed misfit dislocation on epitaxial layer for 15%, 21%, 24%, and 26%, since dislocations were one of minority carrier lifetime degradation parameters. It clearly showed misfit dislocation profiles, cross-hatch, and PL intensity was low at dislocation region.

  11. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, M.L.; Evans, R.D.; Brown, R.L.; Gupta, A.

    2001-03-28

    This report focuses on integrating geoscience and engineering data to develop a consistent characterization of the naturally fractured reservoirs. During this reporting period, effort was focused on relating seismic data to reservoir properties of naturally fractured reservoirs, scaling well log data to generate interwell descriptors of these reservoirs, enhancing and debugging a naturally fractured reservoir simulator, and developing a horizontal wellbore model for use in the simulator.

  12. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, Michael L; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2002-10-08

    During this reporting period, research was continued on characterizing and modeling the behavior of naturally fractured reservoir systems. This report proposed a model to relate the seismic response to production data to determine crack spacing and aperture, provided details of tests of proposed models to obtain fracture properties from conventional well logs with actual field data, and verification of the naturally fractured reservoir simulator developed in this project.

  13. Multi-scale characterization of rock mass discontinuities and rock slope geometry using terrestrial remote sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturzenegger, Matthieu

    Terrestrial remote sensing techniques including both digital photogrammetry and laser scanning, represent useful complements to conventional field mapping and rock mass discontinuity characterization. Several studies have highlighted practical advantages at close-range (< 300 m), including the ability to map inaccessible rock exposures and hazard reduction related to both traffic and rockfall along investigated outcrops. In addition, several authors have demonstrated their potential to provide adequate quantification of discontinuity parameters. Consequently, their incorporation into rock slope stability investigations and design projects has grown substantially over recent years. As these techniques are increasingly applied by geologists and geological engineers, it is important that their use be properly evaluated. Furthermore, guidelines to optimize their application are required in a similar manner to standardization of conventional discontinuity mapping techniques. An important thesis objective is to develop recommendations for optimal applications of terrestrial remote sensing techniques for discontinuity characterization, based on a quantitative evaluation of various registration approaches, sampling bias and extended manual mapping of 3D digital models. It is shown that simple registration networks can provide adequate measurement of discontinuity geometry for engineering purposes. The bias associated with remote sensing mapping is described. The advantages of these techniques over conventional mapping are demonstrated, including reliable discontinuity orientation measurements. Persistence can be precisely quantified instead of approximately estimated, resulting in a new class for extremely persistent discontinuities being suggested. Secondary roughness and curvature can also be considered at larger scales. The techniques are suitable for the definition of discontinuity sets, and the estimation of both trace intensity and block size/shape, if sampling bias

  14. Characterizing Si:P quantum dot qubits with spin resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Chin-Yi; Klimeck, Gerhard; Simmons, Michelle Y; Rahman, Rajib

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dots patterned by atomically precise placement of phosphorus donors in single crystal silicon have long spin lifetimes, advantages in addressability, large exchange tunability, and are readily available few-electron systems. To be utilized as quantum bits, it is important to non-invasively characterise these donor quantum dots post fabrication and extract the number of bound electron and nuclear spins as well as their locations. Here, we propose a metrology technique based on electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements with the on-chip circuitry already needed for qubit manipulation to obtain atomic scale information about donor quantum dots and their spin configurations. Using atomistic tight-binding technique and Hartree self-consistent field approximation, we show that the ESR transition frequencies are directly related to the number of donors, electrons, and their locations through the electron-nuclear hyperfine interaction.

  15. An Approximate Numerical Technique for Characterizing Optical Pulse Propagation in Inhomogeneous Biological Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Handapangoda, Chintha C.; Premaratne, Malin

    2008-01-01

    An approximate numerical technique for modeling optical pulse propagation through weakly scattering biological tissue is developed by solving the photon transport equation in biological tissue that includes varying refractive index and varying scattering/absorption coefficients. The proposed technique involves first tracing the ray paths defined by the refractive index profile of the medium by solving the eikonal equation using a Runge-Kutta integration algorithm. The photon transport equation is solved only along these ray paths, minimizing the overall computational burden of the resulting algorithm. The main advantage of the current algorithm is that it enables to discretise the pulse propagation space adaptively by taking optical depth into account. Therefore, computational efficiency can be increased without compromising the accuracy of the algorithm. PMID:18317526

  16. Dual-sensor technique for characterization of carrier lifetime decay transients in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrenkiel, R. K.; Johnston, S. W.; Kuciauskas, D.; Tynan, Jerry

    2014-12-07

    This work addresses the frequent discrepancy between transient photoconductive (PC) decay and transient photoluminescence (PL) decay. With this dual- sensor technique, one measures the transient PC and PL decay simultaneously with the same incident light pulse, removing injection-level uncertainty. Photoconductive decay measures the transient photoconductivity, Δσ(t). PCD senses carriers released from shallow traps as well as the photo-generated electron-hole pairs. In addition, variations in carrier mobility with injection level (and time) contribute to the decay time. PL decay senses only electron-hole recombination via photon emission. Theory and experiment will show that the time dependence of the two techniques can be quite different at high injection.

  17. Characterizing Si:P quantum dot qubits with spin resonance techniques

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Chin-Yi; Klimeck, Gerhard; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Rahman, Rajib

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dots patterned by atomically precise placement of phosphorus donors in single crystal silicon have long spin lifetimes, advantages in addressability, large exchange tunability, and are readily available few-electron systems. To be utilized as quantum bits, it is important to non-invasively characterise these donor quantum dots post fabrication and extract the number of bound electron and nuclear spins as well as their locations. Here, we propose a metrology technique based on electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements with the on-chip circuitry already needed for qubit manipulation to obtain atomic scale information about donor quantum dots and their spin configurations. Using atomistic tight-binding technique and Hartree self-consistent field approximation, we show that the ESR transition frequencies are directly related to the number of donors, electrons, and their locations through the electron-nuclear hyperfine interaction. PMID:27550779

  18. Characterizing Si:P quantum dot qubits with spin resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Chin-Yi; Klimeck, Gerhard; Simmons, Michelle Y; Rahman, Rajib

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dots patterned by atomically precise placement of phosphorus donors in single crystal silicon have long spin lifetimes, advantages in addressability, large exchange tunability, and are readily available few-electron systems. To be utilized as quantum bits, it is important to non-invasively characterise these donor quantum dots post fabrication and extract the number of bound electron and nuclear spins as well as their locations. Here, we propose a metrology technique based on electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements with the on-chip circuitry already needed for qubit manipulation to obtain atomic scale information about donor quantum dots and their spin configurations. Using atomistic tight-binding technique and Hartree self-consistent field approximation, we show that the ESR transition frequencies are directly related to the number of donors, electrons, and their locations through the electron-nuclear hyperfine interaction. PMID:27550779

  19. Characterizing Si:P quantum dot qubits with spin resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Chin-Yi; Klimeck, Gerhard; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Rahman, Rajib

    2016-08-01

    Quantum dots patterned by atomically precise placement of phosphorus donors in single crystal silicon have long spin lifetimes, advantages in addressability, large exchange tunability, and are readily available few-electron systems. To be utilized as quantum bits, it is important to non-invasively characterise these donor quantum dots post fabrication and extract the number of bound electron and nuclear spins as well as their locations. Here, we propose a metrology technique based on electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements with the on-chip circuitry already needed for qubit manipulation to obtain atomic scale information about donor quantum dots and their spin configurations. Using atomistic tight-binding technique and Hartree self-consistent field approximation, we show that the ESR transition frequencies are directly related to the number of donors, electrons, and their locations through the electron-nuclear hyperfine interaction.

  20. Fresnel zone and reflectarray antennas for space missions: Concepts, computational techniques and characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayatian, Behrouz

    Reflector antennas generally employ parabolic shaped main reflectors and have found a wide range of applications for both earth stations and satellite systems. Increasingly, one may find many advantages in minimizing antenna shaping requirement and weight as well as more compact designs by employing flat reflectors (either on the main reflector or on the subreflector) which can achieve a desired set of criteria for antenna performance. Two electrically large antennas which use flat min reflectors are Fresnel Zone (FZ) and reflectarray antennas which are being addressed in this dissertation. Analytical techniques are proposed, implemented, and verified to analyze these reflector geometries. A two dimensional (2-D) multi-scatterer analysis is formulated and implemented using various electromagnetic scattering techniques such as Physical Optics (PO), Method of Moments (MoM), and Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD). The capability of the 2-D technique is further extended for dual reflector analysis with flat subreflector panels as well as design and analysis of FZ antennas with a proposed space missions application in solar sailing. FZ antenna design is based on establishing regions of quasi-uniform phases according to the PO current on the reflector face. The concepts extracted from the 2-D analysis of FZ reflectors is carried to the three dimensional (3-D) cases and incorporated into a multi reflector code, which has been widely used in variety of reflector applications. Like FZ antennas, reflectarrays work according to a similar set of principals by achieving a uniform phase current on the flat reflectarray surface. Accordingly, an analytical methodology is proposed and implemented within the structure of the multi-reflector code to analyze and give design criteria for both single and dual reflectarray configurations. This technique is compared to measured results published for single reflectarrays and is investigated for near-field Gregorian reflectarrays with

  1. Growth and characterization of 4-chloro-3-nitrobenzophenone single crystals using vertical Bridgman technique

    SciTech Connect

    Aravinth, K. Babu, G. Anandha Ramasamy, P.

    2014-04-24

    4-chloro-3-nitrobenzophenone (4C3N) has been grown by using vertical Bridgman technique. The grown crystal was confirmed by Powder X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystalline perfection of the grown crystal was examined by high-resolution X-ray diffraction study. The fluorescence spectra of grown 4C3N single crystals exhibit emission peak at 575 nm. The micro hardness measurements were used to analyze the mechanical property of the grown crystal.

  2. Characterization of carbon fiber reinforced resin composites by the nanoindentation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuli; Zuo, Dunwen; Cao, Lianjing; Lu, Wenzhuang; Zhu, Yongwei; Li, Jun

    2013-08-01

    The mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced resin composites (CFRP) including the epoxy matrix, the carbon fiber and the interface of the carbon fiber/epoxy composites were investigated by means of nanoindentation technique. The hardness, Young's modulus of the components in CFRP were obtained. The results show that the hardness and Young's modulus have a gradient variation from the epoxy matrix to carbon fiber.

  3. Mass Spectrometry as a Powerful Analytical Technique for the Structural Characterization of Synthesized and Natural Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es-Safi, Nour-Eddine; Essassi, El Mokhtar; Massoui, Mohamed; Banoub, Joseph

    Mass spectrometry is an important tool for the identification and structural elucidation of natural and synthesized compounds. Its high sensitivity and the possibility of coupling liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection make it a technique of choice for the investigation of complex mixtures like raw natural extracts. The mass spectrometer is a universal detector that can achieve very high sensitivity and provide information on the molecular mass. More detailed information can be subsequently obtained by resorting to collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (CID-MS/MS). In this review, the application of mass spectrometric techniques for the identification of natural and synthetic compounds is presented. The gas-phase fragmentation patterns of a series of four natural flavonoid glycosides, three synthesized benzodiazepines and two synthesized quinoxalinone derivatives were investigated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry techniques. Exact accurate masses were measured using a modorate resolution quadrupole orthogonal time-of-flight QqTOF-MS/MS hybrid mass spectrometer instrument. Confirmation of the molecular masses and the chemical structures of the studied compounds were achieved by exploring the gas-phase breakdown routes of the ionized molecules. This was rationalized by conducting low-energy collision CID-MS/MS analyses (product ion- and precursor ion scans) using a conventional quadrupole hexapole-quadrupole (QhQ) tandem mass spectrometer.

  4. Characterization of Ni-Cr alloys using different casting techniques and molds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Teng, Fu-Yuan; Hung, Chun-Cheng

    2014-02-01

    This study differentiated the mechanical properties of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys under various casting techniques (different casting molds and casting atmospheres). These techniques were sampled by a sand mold using a centrifugal machine in ambient air (group I) and electromagnetic induction in an automatic argon castimatic casting machine (group II). The specimen casting used a graphite mold by a castimatic casting machine (group III). The characteristics of the Ni-Cr alloys, yield and ultimate tensile strength, bending modulus, microhardness, diffraction phase, grindability, ability to spring back, as well as ground microstructure and pattern under different casting conditions were evaluated. The group III specimens exhibited the highest values in terms of strength, modulus, hardness, and grindability at a grind rate of 500 rpm. Moreover, group III alloys exhibited smaller grain sizes, higher ability to spring back, and greater ductility than those casted by sand investment (groups I and II). The main factor, "casting mold," significantly influenced all mechanical properties. The graphite mold casting of the Ni-Cr dental alloys in a controlled atmosphere argon casting system provided an excellent combination of high mechanical properties and good ability to spring back, and preserved the ductile properties for application in Ni-Cr porcelain-fused system. The results can offer recommendations to assist a prosthetic technician in selecting the appropriate casting techniques to obtain the desired alloy properties. PMID:24411373

  5. Characterization of fresh and aged natural ingredients used in historical ointments by molecular spectroscopic techniques: IR, Raman and fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, L; Riedo, C; Baraldi, C; Nevin, A; Gamberini, M C; D'Andrea, C; Chiantore, O; Goidanich, S; Toniolo, L

    2011-10-01

    Natural organic materials used to prepare pharmaceutical mixtures including ointments and balsams have been characterized by a combined non-destructive spectroscopic analytical approach. Three classes of materials which include vegetable oils (olive, almond and palm tree), gums (Arabic and Tragacanth) and beeswax are considered in this study according to their widespread use reported in ancient recipes. Micro-FTIR, micro-Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies have been applied to fresh and mildly thermally aged samples. Vibrational characterization of these organic compounds is reported together with tabulated frequencies, highlighting all spectral features and changes in spectra which occur following artificial aging. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy has been shown to be particularly useful for the assessment of changes in oils after aging; spectral difference between Tragacanth and Arabic gum could be due to variations in origin and processing of raw materials. Analysis of these materials using non-destructive spectroscopic techniques provided important analytical information which could be used to guide further study.

  6. Characterization of Bond Strength of U-Mo Fuel Plates Using the Laser Shockwave Technique: Capabilities and Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Smith; D. L. Cottle; B. H. Rabin

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes work conducted to-date on the implementation of new laser-based capabilities for characterization of bond strength in nuclear fuel plates, and presents preliminary results obtained from fresh fuel studies on as-fabricated monolithic fuel consisting of uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum alloys clad in 6061 aluminum by hot isostatic pressing. Characterization involves application of two complementary experimental methods, laser-shock testing and laser-ultrasonic imaging, collectively referred to as the Laser Shockwave Technique (LST), that allows the integrity, physical properties and interfacial bond strength in fuel plates to be evaluated. Example characterization results are provided, including measurement of layer thicknesses, elastic properties of the constituents, and the location and nature of generated debonds (including kissing bonds). LST provides spatially localized, non-contacting measurements with minimum specimen preparation, and is ideally suited for applications involving radioactive materials, including irradiated materials. The theoretical principles and experimental approaches employed in characterizing nuclear fuel plates are described, and preliminary bond strength measurement results are discussed, with emphasis on demonstrating the capabilities and limitations of these methods. These preliminary results demonstrate the ability to distinguish bond strength variations between different fuel plates. Although additional development work is necessary to validate and qualify the test methods, these results suggest LST is viable as a method to meet fuel qualification requirements to demonstrate acceptable bonding integrity.

  7. Split-Bolus Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography Technique for Characterization of Focal Liver Lesions in Oncologic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scialpi, Michele; Pierotti, Luisa; Gravante, Sabrina; Rebonato, Alberto; Piscioli, Irene; D’Andrea, Alfredo; Schiavone, Raffaele; Palumbo, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background In oncologic patients, the liver is the most common target for metastases. An accurate detection and characterization of focal liver lesions in patients with known primary extrahepatic malignancy are essential to define management and prognosis. Objectives To assess the diagnostic accuracy of the split-bolus multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) protocol in the characterization of focal liver lesions in oncologic patients. Patients and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the follow-up split-bolus 64-detector row CT protocol in 36 oncologic patients to characterize focal liver lesions. The split-bolus MDCT protocol by intravenous injection of two boluses of contrast medium combines the hepatic arterial phase (HAP) and hepatic enhancement during the portal venous phase (PVP) in a single-pass. Results The split-bolus MDCT protocol detected 208 lesions and characterized 186 (89.4%) of them: typical hemangiomas (n = 9), atypical hemangiomas (n = 3), cysts (n = 78), hypovascular (n = 93) and hypervascular (n = 3) metastases. Twenty two (10.6%) hypodense lesions were categorized as indeterminate (≤5 mm). The mean radiation dose was 24.5±6.5 millisieverts (mSv). Conclusion The designed split-bolus MDCT technique can be proposed alternatively to triphasic MDCT and in a single-pass to PVP in the initial staging and in the follow-up respectively in oncologic patients.

  8. Characterization of soil water content variability and soil texture using GPR groundwave techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, K.; Anger, C.; Kelly, B.; Hubbard, S.; Rubin, Y.

    2010-08-15

    Accurate characterization of near-surface soil water content is vital for guiding agricultural management decisions and for reducing the potential negative environmental impacts of agriculture. Characterizing the near-surface soil water content can be difficult, as this parameter is often both spatially and temporally variable, and obtaining sufficient measurements to describe the heterogeneity can be prohibitively expensive. Understanding the spatial correlation of near-surface soil water content can help optimize data acquisition and improve understanding of the processes controlling soil water content at the field scale. In this study, ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods were used to characterize the spatial correlation of water content in a three acre field as a function of sampling depth, season, vegetation, and soil texture. GPR data were acquired with 450 MHz and 900 MHz antennas, and measurements of the GPR groundwave were used to estimate soil water content at four different times. Additional water content estimates were obtained using time domain reflectometry measurements, and soil texture measurements were also acquired. Variograms were calculated for each set of measurements, and comparison of these variograms showed that the horizontal spatial correlation was greater for deeper water content measurements than for shallower measurements. Precipitation and irrigation were both shown to increase the spatial variability of water content, while shallowly-rooted vegetation decreased the variability. Comparison of the variograms of water content and soil texture showed that soil texture generally had greater small-scale spatial correlation than water content, and that the variability of water content in deeper soil layers was more closely correlated to soil texture than were shallower water content measurements. Lastly, cross-variograms of soil texture and water content were calculated, and co-kriging of water content estimates and soil texture

  9. Validation of technique to hyperspectrally characterize the lower atmosphere with limited surface observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Robb M.; Fiorino, Steven T.; Via, Michelle F.; Downs, Adam D.

    2011-06-01

    This paper demonstrates the capability of AFIT/CDE's Laser Environmental Effects Definition and Reference (LEEDR) model to accurately characterize the meteorological parameters and radiative transfer effects of the atmospheric boundary layer with only surface observations of temperature, pressure, and humidity. The LEEDR model is a fastcalculating, first principles, worldwide surface to 100 km, atmospheric propagation and characterization package. This package enables the creation of profiles of temperature, pressure, water vapor content, optical turbulence, atmospheric particulates and hydrometeors as they relate to line-by-line layer transmission, path and background radiance at wavelengths from the ultraviolet to radio frequencies. Physics-based cloud and precipitation characterizations are coupled with a probability of cloud free line of sight (CFLOS) algorithm for air-to-air, air-to-surface, and surface-to-air (or space) look angles. In general, LEEDR defines the well-mixed atmospheric boundary layer with a worldwide, probabilistic surface climatology based on season and time of day, and then computes the radiative transfer and propagation effects from the vertical profile of meteorological variables. However, the LEEDR user can also directly input surface observations. This research compares the LEEDR vertical profiles created from input surface observations to actual observations from balloon launches. Results are then compared to the LEEDR ExPERT climatological sounding for the same time of day and season. RMSE are calculated and it was found that closer for those profiles made from surface observations than those made from climatological data for the same season and time. Impacts of those differences are shown with a relevant tactical scenario in AFIT/CDE HELEEOS program.

  10. A review of chromatographic characterization techniques for biodiesel and biodiesel blends.

    SciTech Connect

    Pauls, R. E.

    2011-05-01

    This review surveys chromatographic technology that has been applied to the characterization of biodiesel and its blends. Typically, biodiesel consists of fatty acid methyl esters produced by transesterification of plant or animal derived triacylglycerols. Primary attention is given to the determination of trace impurities in biodiesel, such as methanol, glycerol, mono-, di-, and triacylglycerols, and sterol glucosides. The determination of the fatty acid methyl esters, trace impurities in biodiesel, and the determination of the biodiesel content of commercial blends of biodiesel in conventional diesel are also addressed.

  11. Comparative Analysis of Different Measurement Techniques for MLC Characterization: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Celis, M. A.

    2008-08-11

    Radiation transmission, leakage and beam penumbra are essential dosimetric parameters related to the commissioning of a multileaf collimation system. This work shows a comparative analysis of commonly used film detectors: X-OMAT V2 and EDR2 radiographic films, and GafChromic EBT registered radiochromic film. The results show that X-OMAT over-estimates radiation leakage and 80-20% beam penumbra. However, according to the reference values reported by the manufacturer for these dosimetric parameters, all three films are adequate for MLC dosimetric characterization, but special care must be taken when X-OMAT V2 film is used due to its low energy photon dependence.

  12. Characterization of cellular chemical dynamics using combined microfluidic and Raman techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xunli; Yin, Huabing; Cooper, Jon M; Haswell, Stephen J

    2008-02-01

    The integration of a range of technologies including microfluidics, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and confocal microspectroscopy has been successfully used to characterize in situ single living CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells with a high degree of spatial (in three dimensions) and temporal (1 s per spectrum) resolution. Following the introduction of a continuous flow of ionomycin, the real time spectral response from the cell was monitored during the agonist-evoked Ca(2+) flux process. The methodology described has the potential to be used for the study of the cellular dynamics of a range of signalling processes.

  13. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes by CVD and Spray Pyrolysis and Their Characterization by Scattering Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, J.; Prakash, J.; Sen, D.; Mazumder, S.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.

    2011-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition and spray pyrolysis methods. Synthesized nanotubes were characterized by Small-angle neutron scattering, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Scattering data reveals the aggregated nature of nanotubes, the average diameter and average length have also been estimated. It has been observed that the nanotubes, synthesized by spray pyrolysis methods, possess fewer defects in their graphitic nature of wall. The X-ray diffraction data reveals that the nanotubes possess metal oxide impurities.

  14. Deposition And Characterization of (Ti,Zr)N Thin Films Grown Through PAPVD By The Pulsed Arc Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Marulanda, D. M.; Trujillo, O.; Devia, A.

    2006-12-04

    The Plasma Assisted Physic Vapor Deposition (PAPVD) by the pulsed arc technique has been used for deposition of Titanium Zirconium Nitride (Ti,Zr)N coatings, using a segmented target of TiZr. The deposition was performed in a vacuum chamber with two faced electrodes (target and substrate) using nitrogen as working gas, and a power-controlled source used to produce the arc discharges. Films were deposited on stainless steel 304, and they were characterized using the X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Energy Dispersion Spectroscopy (EDS) and Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) techniques. The XRD patterns show different planes in which the film grows. Through SPM, using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Lateral Force Microscopy (LFM) modes, a nanotribologic study of the thin film was made, determining hardness and friction coefficient.

  15. Non-destructive and micro-invasive testing techniques for characterizing materials, structures and restoration problems in mural paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, Mariagrazia; Sfarra, Stefano; Chiarini, Marco; Daniele, Valeria; Taglieri, Giuliana; Cerichelli, Giorgio

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, chemical and structural studies of medieval wall paintings in Ocre (L'Aquila, Italy) are presented. During the latest restoration campaign, non-destructive (Near-Infrared Reflectography and Infrared Thermography) and micro-invasive (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, μ-Raman, Scanning Electron Microscopy with X-ray Microanalysis, X-Ray Diffraction, X-Ray Fluorescence, Optical Microscopy, Mass Spectrometry, Thermogravimetry) analyses were performed in order to determine the detachments of wall surfaces and the characterization of original and restoration materials. Data integration allowed to reconstruct the conservative history, the execution techniques and the conservation problems of the artefact, as well as to assess the effectiveness of restoration activities adopted. The combined use of physical and micro-chemical techniques proved to be effective for an in-depth study of materials stratification of paintings.

  16. Characterization of uranium bearing material using x-ray fluorescence and direct gamma-rays measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujaini, M.; Chankow, N.; Yusoff, M. Z.; Hamid, N. A.

    2016-01-01

    Uranium ore can be easily detected due to various gamma-ray energies emitted from uranium daughters particularly from 238U daughters such as 214Bi, 214Pb and 226Ra. After uranium is extracted from uranium ore, only low energy gamma-rays emitted from 235U may be detected if the detector is placed in close contact to the specimen. In this research, identification and characterization of uranium bearing materials is experimentally investigated using direct measurement of gamma-rays from 235U in combination with the x-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique. Measurement of gamma-rays can be conducted by using high purity germanium (HPGe) detector or cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector while a 57Coradioisotope-excited XRF spectrometer using CdTe detector is used for elemental analysis. The proposed technique was tested with various uranium bearing specimens containing natural, depleted and enriched uranium in both metallic and powder forms.

  17. Characterization of laser-fired contacts in PERC solar cells: SIMS and TEM analysis applying advanced preparation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastrow, U.; Houben, L.; Meertens, D.; Grohe, A.; Brammer, T.; Schneiderlöchner, E.

    2006-07-01

    In this study we apply ion-beam supported preparation techniques for both mesa formation by trench sputtering and FIB 'lift-out' lamella cutting for dynamic SIMS and TEM analysis of laser-fired Al point contacts on Si, respectively. Detailed compositional and structural informations about the metallurgical contact formation process are obtained combining both characterization techniques. While TEM micrographs and microdiffraction patterns reveal a mixture of Al- and Si-crystals within the ˜1 μm thick Al rich re-solidified surface layer according to the Al-Si phase diagram, spatially resolved SIMS depth profiling indicates ppm-range Al-diffusion a few hundred nm into the buried, substantially undisturbed Si-lattice.

  18. High resolution characterization of uranium in sediments by DGT and DET techniques ACA-S-12-2197.

    PubMed

    Gregusova, Michaela; Docekal, Bohumil

    2013-02-01

    Diffusive equilibrium (DET) and diffusive gradient in thin film (DGT) techniques with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection of elements were applied to characterize uranium, manganese, iron and (238)U/(235)U isotopic ratio depth profiles in sediment pore water at high spatial resolution and to monitor uranium uptake/remobilization processes in uranium spiked sediment core samples under laboratory, well controlled conditions. Modified constrained sediment DGT probes, packed with Spheron-Oxin(®) resin gel, were employed for selective uranium measurements. Spatially resolved DET and DGT responses were indicative of local redistribution of uranium in naturally uranium poor and rich sediments. PMID:23340286

  19. Dynamic characterization, monitoring and control of rotating flexible beam-mass structures via piezo-embedded techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Steven H.-Y.

    1992-01-01

    A variational principle and a finite element discretization technique were used to derive the dynamic equations for a high speed rotating flexible beam-mass system embedded with piezo-electric materials. The dynamic equation thus obtained allows the development of finite element models which accommodate both the original structural element and the piezoelectric element. The solutions of finite element models provide system dynamics needed to design a sensing system. The characterization of gyroscopic effect and damping capacity of smart rotating devices are addressed. Several simulation examples are presented to validate the analytical solution.

  20. Spectral characterization of porous dielectric subwavelength THz fibers fabricated using a microstructured molding technique.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Alexandre; Mazhorova, Anna; Désévédavy, Frédéric; Rozé, Mathieu; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2010-06-21

    We report two novel fabrication techniques, as well as THz spectral transmission and propagation loss measurements of subwavelength plastic wires with highly porous (up to 86%) and non-porous transverse geometries. The two fabrication techniques we describe are based on the microstructured molding approach. In one technique the mold is made completely from silica by stacking and fusing silica capillaries to the bottom of a silica ampoule. The melted material is then poured into the silica mold to cast the microstructured preform. Another approach uses a microstructured mold made of a sacrificial plastic which is co-drawn with a cast preform. Material from the sacrificial mold is then dissolved after fi ber drawing. We also describe a novel THz-TDS setup with an easily adjustable optical path length, designed to perform cutback measurements using THz fibers of up to 50 cm in length. We fi nd that while both porous and non-porous subwavelength fibers of the same outside diameter have low propagation losses (alpha

  1. Kinetics and characterization of conducting and insulating polymers by in situ and ex situ techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, Y.K.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of polypyrrole, polyaniline, polystyrene and polyurethane syntheses were examined using in-situ techniques. The resulting polymers were analyzed by ex-situ analytical techniques. Comparison of results obtained by different techniques was made. Polypyrrole was synthesized by the chemical oxidative route. The polymerization using polymerization using potassium ferricyanide was monitored by Raman spectroscopy, potentiometry and microelectrode analysis. The kinetics were found to resemble exponential decay. The stoichiometry of the polymerization remained constant throughout the experimental period. The polymerization of aniline by ammonium peroxysulfate was monitored by Raman, potentiometry, calorimetry, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), conductance measurements, viscometry and visible absorption spectroscopy. QCM and visible absorption spectroscopy were used to probe the nucleation stage. The results showed polymerization occurred following an induction period. The induction period of aniline-peroxysulfate system can be reduced by using mixed oxidizers. Cerium(IV) was used as co-oxidant with peroxysulfate. A significant decrease in the induction period was observed with 0.01% of cerium(IV). This effect can also be achieved by adding polyaniline to provide reaction sites for the monomers. The kinetics of styrene polymerization were monitored by Raman. The decrease in the 1630 cm[sup [minus]1] aliphatic C[double bond]C stretching was interpreted as percent styrene conversion. The 1600 cm[sup [minus]1] aromatic C[double bond]C stretching was used as a standard. UV absorption spectroscopy was used to quantify the amount of styrene in the polymerizing mixture. IR spectroscopy and Raman were used to monitor the reaction of modified diphenylmethane-4-4[prime]-diisocyanate (MDI) and polyether polyol (polyol). In the Raman experiment, the decrease in the 1060 cm[sup [minus]1] peak and the increase in the 1140 cm[sup [minus]1] peak were analyzed.

  2. Micro-spectroscopic techniques applied to characterization of varnished archeological findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, G.; Ioppolo, S.; Majolino, D.; Migliardo, P.; Ponterio, R.

    2000-04-01

    This work reports an analysis on terracotta varnished finding recovered in east Sicily area (Messina). We have performed FTIR micro-spectroscopy and electronic microscopy (SEM)measurements in order to recognize the elemental constituents of the varnished surfaces. Furthermore, for all the samples, a study on the bulk has been performed by Fourier Transform Infrared Absorption. The analyzed samples consist of a number of pottery fragments belonging to archaic and classical ages, varnished in black and red colors. The obtained data furnished useful information about composition of decorated surfaces and bulk matrixes, about baking temperature, manufacture techniques and alteration mechanisms of findings due to the long burial.

  3. Effect of processing variables on characterization of ofloxacin loaded lipospheres prepared by melt dispersion technique.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Satheesh Babu; Lakshmanan, Prabakaran

    2013-10-01

    A melt dispersion technique was employed to prepare ofloxacin lipospheres, by using cetyl alcohol (polar lipid). Effects of various process parameters such as selection of surfactants (gelatin, Tween 40 and poly vinyl alcohol) and selection of stirring speed were studied. Lipospheres were evaluated for morphology, drug entrapment and in vitro drug release profiles. The optimized liposphere batch was selected and formulated as tablets and evaluated the in vitro drug release profile. These studies showed that ofloxacin loaded lipospheres were able to control the drug release for a period of 16h.

  4. Processing and characterization of natural fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites using micro-braiding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Ogihara, Shinji

    In the present study, we investigate fatigue properties of green composites. A hemp fiber yarn reinforced poly(lactic acid) composite was selected as a green composite. Unidirectional (UD) and textile (Textile) composites were fabricated using micro-braiding technique. Fatigue tests results indicated that fatigue damages in UD composites was splitting which occurred just before the final fracture, while matrix crack and debonding between matrix and fiber yarn occurred and accumulated stably in Textile composites. These results were consistent with modulus reduction and acoustic emission measurement during fatigue tests.

  5. A multi-technique approach for the characterization of Roman mural paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toschi, Francesco; Paladini, Alessandra; Colosi, Francesca; Cafarelli, Patrizia; Valentini, Veronica; Falconieri, Mauro; Gagliardi, Serena; Santoro, Paola

    2013-11-01

    In the frame of an ongoing archeological study on the Sabina area, a countryside close to Rome, white and red samples of roman wall paintings have been investigated by combining X-ray diffraction and different spectroscopic methodologies, namely laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, μ-Raman and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy. The used multi-technique approach has allowed the unambiguous identification of the red pigment as red ochre and has provided insight on the provenance of both the pigment and the material used for the realization of the wall paintings. The experimental results have confirmed some assumptions on the use of local materials in roman rural architecture.

  6. Morphostructural characterization of the western edge of the Huila Plateau (SW Angola), based on remote sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Fernando Carlos; Pereira, Alcides José; Mantas, Vasco Manuel; Mpengo, Horácio Kativa

    2016-05-01

    Recognition of the main morphostructural features of the western edge of the Huila Plateau (SW Angola) can be done by using remote sensing techniques associated with field work. A digital elevation model (DEM) of the area was built for this purpose. This model is based on altimeter data acquired from the Aster sensor, on which image processing techniques such as enhancement techniques, contrast change and filtering were applied. Other techniques, such as RGB colour composition, were also tested. The processed satellite images were interpreted by visual process and the results were then compared with available geological maps (scale 1: 1 000 000). To facilitate both analysis and interpretation, the edge of the plateau was divided into three sectors: northern (or Chongoroi Edge), central (or Humpata Edge) and southern (or Oncocua Edge). For each sector, the main morphological aspects and main lineament systems were identified and characterized. In the specific case of the central sector, these parameters were also confirmed by field work. This study shows that the morphology of the western edge of the plateau is dominated by N50°W-N60°W, N60°E and N-S trending main tectonic systems. These results have important implications in terms of geological mapping and regional tectonics as well as in land-use planning and other areas, such as hydrogeology or geotechnics.

  7. Structural Characterization of Humic Materials Using ^13C NMR Techniques: A Comparison of Solution- and Solid-State Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clewett, Catherine; Alam, Todd; Osantowski, Eric; Pullin, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The analysis of the carbon type distribution and chemical structure of natural organic matter (NOM) by ^13C NMR spectroscopy is an important technique for understanding its origins and reactivity. While prior work has used solution-state NMR techniques, solid-state NMR has the potential to provide this information using less instrument time and sample manipulation, while providing an array of advanced filtering techniques. Analyses of four isolated humic materials with ^13C solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR techniques are described, including three commercially available samples and one fulvic acid sample isolated from the Rio Grande in New Mexico. This study demonstrates the utility of solid-state ^13C NMR for aquatic NOM structural characterization, comparing these results to the existing solution-state determinations. The solid-state ^13C MAS NMR results are used to determine % carbon distribution, estimates of elemental composition (%C, %H, %(O+N)), aromatic fraction (fa), nonprotonated aromatic fraction (faN), an estimate of aromatic cluster size, and ratio of sp^2 to sp^3 carbons. A Gaussian deconvolution method is introduced that allows for a detailed analysis of carbon type.

  8. Fast characterization of two ultrasound longitudinal waves in cancellous bone using an adaptive beamforming technique.

    PubMed

    Taki, Hirofumi; Nagatani, Yoshiki; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Sato, Toru

    2015-04-01

    The received signal in through-transmission ultrasound measurements of cancellous bone consists of two longitudinal waves, called the fast and slow waves. Analysis of these fast and slow waves may reveal characteristics of the cancellous bone that would be good indicators of osteoporosis. Because the two waves often overlap, decomposition of the received signal is an important problem in the characterization of bone quality. This study proposes a fast and accurate decomposition method based on the frequency domain interferometry imaging method with a modified wave transfer function that uses a phase rotation parameter. The proposed method accurately characterized the fast and slow waves in the experimental study, and the residual intensity, which was normalized with respect to the received signal intensity, was less than -20 dB over the bone specimen thickness range from 6 to 15 mm. In the simulation study, the residual intensity was less than -20 dB over the specimen thickness range from 3 to 8 mm. Decomposition of a single received signal takes only 5 s using a laptop personal computer with a single central processing unit. The proposed method has great potential to provide accurate and rapid measurements of indicators of osteoporosis in cancellous bone.

  9. Estimation of aerosol type from airborne hyperspectral data: a new technique designed for industrial plume characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, A.; Marion, R.; Foucher, P.-Y.; Briottet, X.

    2012-11-01

    The determination of the aerosol type in a plume from remotely sensed data without any a priori knowledge is a challenging task. If several methods have already been developed to characterize the aerosols from multi or hyperspectral data, they are not suited for industrial particles, which have specific physical and optical properties, changing quickly and in a complex way with the distance from the source emission. From radiative transfer equations, we have developed an algorithm, based on a Look-Up Table approach, enabling the determination of the type of this kind of particles from hyperspectral data. It consists in the selection of pixels pairs, located at the transitions between two kinds of grounds (or between an illuminated and a shadow area), then in the comparison between normalized estimated Aerosol Optical Thicknesses (AOTs) and pre-calculated AOTs. The application of this algorithm to simulated data leads to encouraging results: the selection of only six pixels pairs allows the algorithm to differentiate aerosols emitted by a metallurgical plant from biomass burning particles, urban aerosols and particles from an oil depot explosion, regardless the size and the aerosol concentration. The algorithm performances are better for a relatively high AOT but the single scattering approximation does not enable the characterization of thick plumes (AOT above 2.0). However, the choice of transitions (type of grounds) does not seem to significantly affect the results.

  10. Nanoscale Characterization of Organometal Trihalide Perovskite using Photothermal Induced Resonance (PTIR) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Jungseok; Centrone, Andrea; Yuan, Yongbo; Shao, Yuchuan; Wang, Qi; Xiao, Zhengguo; Dong, Qingfeng; Huang, Jinsong

    Further improvement of the performance of organometal trihalide perovskites (OTP) solar cells can be aided by nanoscale characterization. Photothermal induced resonance (PTIR), is a novel scanning probe method that enable measuring vibrational and electronic absorption maps and spectra with a resolution as high as 20 nm. In this presentation, the chemical composition and bandgap of OTP thin films was characterized with PTIR: 1) to identify the origin of the switchable photovoltaic effect and 2) to quantify the local chloride content in mixed-halide perovskites. PTIR vibrational maps recorded in correspondence of methyl ammonium ions (MA +) for a as prepared lateral structure solar cell were uniform but displayed stronger intensity in proximity of the cathode after electric poling. Those measurements provide the first direct proof of ion electron migration in OTP devices. Because chloride incorporation modifies the bandgap in MAPbI3-xClx perovskites, PTIR electronic maps and spectra were used to extract the local chloride content as a function of annealing. Results show that the as-prepared sample consist of a mixture of Cl-rich and Cl-poor phases that evolves into a homogenous Cl-poorer phase upon annealing. This measurement suggests that Cl- is progressively expelled from the film.

  11. Measuring the food environment: a systematic technique for characterizing food stores using display counts.

    PubMed

    Miller, Cassandra; Bodor, J Nicholas; Rose, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Marketing research has documented the influence of in-store characteristics-such as the number and placement of display stands-on consumer purchases of a product. However, little information exists on this topic for key foods of interest to those studying the influence of environmental changes on dietary behavior. This study demonstrates a method for characterizing the food environment by measuring the number of separate displays of fruits, vegetables, and energy-dense snack foods (including chips, candies, and sodas) and their proximity to cash registers in different store types. Observations in New Orleans stores (N = 172) in 2007 and 2008 revealed significantly more displays of energy-dense snacks than of fruits and vegetables within all store types, especially supermarkets. Moreover, supermarkets had an average of 20 displays of energy-dense snacks within 1 meter of their cash registers, yet none of them had even a single display of fruits or vegetables near their cash registers. Measures of the number of separate display stands of key foods and their proximity to a cash register can be used by researchers to better characterize food stores and by policymakers to address improvements to the food environment.

  12. Innovative Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barsi, Louis M.; Kaebnick, Gweneth W.

    1989-01-01

    The phenomenon of innovation within the university is examined, noting the possibility of innovation as a key to college vitality. A study was conducted using a group of institutions that demonstrated recent innovative spirit. Members of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), each has been recognized in an annual…

  13. Encouraging innovation.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Anthony A

    2014-02-01

    Innovation is central to the scientific endeavor, and yet the current system of funding in the United States discourages innovation, especially in the young. Subtle alterations to the funding system, guided in part by the success of the European Research Council, could have major effects on encouraging innovation.

  14. Preparation and characterization WDM technique for linear disturbance localization in fibre optical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Życzkowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.; Szustakowski, M.

    2007-10-01

    Ordinary perimeter security systems consist of many individual sensors with detection range 200-300 meters. These limitations are connected with physical phenomena that are used in microwave and infrared barriers as well as in ground and fence cable sensors. On the contrary, fiber optic perimeter sensors can be applied in the range of many kilometers and zone length 200-300 meters is degradation of their possibilities. This paper presents investigation results of a new generation of the fiber optic perimeter sensor using WDM technique. These systems can detect a potential intruder and determine its position along a protected zone. The work presents a method of linear localization of disturbance point in the two-interferometer and modalmertic fiber optic sensors in one optical fiber. These sensors are in one fiber optic cable with two- interferometers (Sagnac) and in transmissive configuration. Using WDM technique makes it possible to obtain new technical properties that can broaden effectiveness and scope of application. Arrangement of a laboratory model of the sensors and its signal processing scheme is presented. During research of a laboratory model, it was possible to detect the position of the disturbance in one optical fiber with resolution of about 50m along a 10-km long sensor.

  15. Characterization of Deficiencies in the Frequency Domain Forced Response Analysis Technique for Turbine Bladed Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Schmauch, Preston

    2012-01-01

    Turbine blades in rocket and jet engine turbomachinery experience enormous harmonic loading conditions. These loads result from the integer number of upstream and downstream stator vanes as well as the other turbine stages. The standard technique for forced response analysis to assess structural integrity is to decompose a CFD generated flow field into its harmonic components, and to then perform a frequency response analysis at the problematic natural frequencies. Recent CFD analysis and water-flow testing at NASA/MSFC, though, indicates that this technique may miss substantial harmonic and non-harmonic excitation sources that become present in complex flows. These complications suggest the question of whether frequency domain analysis is capable of capturing the excitation content sufficiently. Two studies comparing frequency response analysis with transient response analysis, therefore, have been performed. The first is of a bladed disk with each blade modeled by simple beam elements. It was hypothesized that the randomness and other variation from the standard harmonic excitation would reduce the blade structural response, but the results showed little reduction. The second study was of a realistic model of a bladed-disk excited by the same CFD used in the J2X engine program. The results showed that the transient analysis results were up to 10% higher for "clean" nodal diameter excitations and six times larger for "messy" excitations, where substantial Fourier content around the main harmonic exists.

  16. Evaluation of a potential borehole televiewer technique for characterizing lost circulation zones

    SciTech Connect

    Glowka, D.A.; Loeppke, G.E.; Lysne, P.C. ); Wright, E.K. )

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study is described that evaluates the potential for using an acoustic borehole television technique to measure fracture dimensions in lost circulation zones encountered in geothermal drilling. A simulated wellbore was constructed of sandstone blocks with adjustable, inclined fractures, stacked in a barrel filled with water. A slim-hole televiewer was used to log the wellbore, and a computer was used to digitize and analyze the data. Televiewer signal perturbations caused by the fractures were studied to evaluate the effects of fracture thickness and signal amplification on the width of the signal perturbation in the digital record. It was found that the signal amplification is applied. Two techniques for determining the correct amplification are described. With the televiewer used in the present study, fractures thicker than 0.15 inch in a 5.1-inch wellbore can be measured to within an accuracy of 5--15%. Fractures as small as 0.031 inch can be detected but cannot be accurately and reliably measured. 1 ref., 15 figs.

  17. Complementary techniques for the characterization of thin film Ti/Nb multilayers.

    PubMed

    Genç, Arda; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Thompson, Gregory B; Maher, Dennis M; Johnson, Andrew W; Fraser, Hamish L

    2009-09-01

    An aberration corrector on the probe-forming lens of a scanning TEM (STEM) equipped with an electron energy-loss spectrometer (EELS) and X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometer (XEDS) has been employed to investigate the compositional variations as a function of length scale in nanoscale Ti/Nb metallic multilayers. The composition profiles of EELS and XEDS were compared with the profiles obtained from the complementary technique of 3D atom probe tomography. At large layer widths (h > or = 7 nm, where h is the layer width) of Ti and Nb, XEDS composition profiles of Ti/Nb metallic multilayers are in good agreement with the EELS results. However, at reduced layer widths (h approximately 2 nm), profiles of EELS and atom probe exhibited similar compositional variations, whereas XEDS results have shown a marked difference. This difference in the composition profiling of the layers has been addressed with reference to the effects of beam broadening and the origin of the signals collected in these techniques. The advantage of using EELS over XEDS for these nanoscaled multilayered materials is demonstrated. PMID:19553019

  18. Electrochemical techniques for characterization of stem-loop probe and linear probe-based DNA sensors.

    PubMed

    Lai, Rebecca Y; Walker, Bryce; Stormberg, Kent; Zaitouna, Anita J; Yang, Weiwei

    2013-12-15

    Here we present a summary of the sensor performance of the stem-loop probe (SLP) and linear probe (LP) electrochemical DNA sensors when interrogated using alternating current voltammetry (ACV), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Specifically, we identified one critical parameter for each voltammetric technique that can be adjusted for optimal sensor performance. Overall, the SLP sensor displayed good sensor performance (i.e., 60+% signal attenuation in the presence of the target) over a wider range of experimental conditions when compared to the LP sensor. When used with ACV, the optimal frequency range was found to be between 5 and 5000 Hz, larger than the 5-100 Hz range observed with the LP sensor. A similar trend was observed for the two sensors in CV; the LP sensor was operational only at scan rates between 30 and 100 V/s, whereas the SLP sensor performed well at scan rates between 1 and 1000 V/s. Unlike ACV and CV, DPV has demonstrated to be a more versatile sensor interrogation technique for this class of sensors. Despite the minor differences in total signal attenuation upon hybridization to the target DNA, both SLP and LP sensors performed optimally under most pulse widths used in this study. More importantly, when used with longer pulse widths, both sensors showed "signal-on" behavior, which is generally more desirable for sensor applications.

  19. Characterization of Some Iraqi Archaeological Samples Using IBA, Analytical X-ray and Other Complementary Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shihab Al-Sarraj, Ziyad; Roumie, Mohamad; Damboos, Hassan I.

    2012-07-01

    The present work aimed at investigating the compositions and microstructures of some archaeological samples which dated back to various periods of the ancient Iraqi civilizations using PIXE, XRF, XRD, and SEM techniques. The models selected for the study (ceramics, glaze, etc.) were diverse in size and nature, therefore a limited number of samples were then butted from them by a small diamond wheel. Conventional powder metallurgy method was then used to prepare the samples. Dried samples were then coated with a thin layer of carbon, and analyzed using the ion beam accelerator of the LAEC. Three other groups of samples were also prepared for the purpose of analysis by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Analysis results of the chemical composition showed good agreement between the various techniques as well as for phases, while the fine structure analysis obtained by optical and scanning microscopy exhibited features of a structure where it got an intensified densification in the final stage of sintering and accompanied by quasi-homogeneous distribution of the closed pores. This will lead to the conclusion that the temperature used for sintering by ancient Iraqi was sufficient and it may fall in the range between 950-1200°C, also the mixes and the forming methods used by them, were both suitable to obtain good sintered bodies with even distribution of pores. A ring-shaped trace noticed in SEM micrographs need more work and study to explain what it is?

  20. Coastal typology: An integrative "neutral" technique for coastal zone characterization and analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buddemeier, R.W.; Smith, S.V.; Swaney, D.P.; Crossland, C.J.; Maxwell, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    Typology, the 'study or systematic classification of types that have characteristics or traits in common', has become a commonly used term and technique in coastal zone studies over the past two decades. At least part of this is due to adoption by the first Land-Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone (LOICZ) project of a typological approach as a way to understand and organize the daunting diversity of natural and human systems comprising the world coastal zone, and to the concurrent development of tools and databases to support systematic applications. This paper reviews some of the history of the term 'typology' and the concepts and techniques that it subsumes, and discusses its adoption and adaptation in coastal studies. It also addresses the continued and increasing relevance of typology to the continuation of the LOICZ project and its objectives, and outlines the opportunities and challenges involved in realizing the potentials of the approach - both within LOICZ and for the scientific and coastal zone communities in general. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.