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Sample records for ino2-dependent transcriptional activation

  1. Sry is a transcriptional activator.

    PubMed

    Dubin, R A; Ostrer, H

    1994-09-01

    The SRY gene functions as a genetic switch in gonadal ridge initiating testis determination. The mouse Sry and human SRY open reading frames (ORFs) share a conserved DNA-binding domain (the HMG-box) yet exhibit no additional homology outside this region. As judged by the accumulation of lacZ-SRY hybrid proteins in the nucleus, both the human and mouse SRY ORFs contain a nuclear localization signal. The mouse Sry HMG-box domain selectively binds the sequence NACAAT in vitro when challenged with a random pool of oligonucleotides and binds AACAAT with the highest affinity. When put under the control of a heterologous promotor, the mouse Sry gene activated transcription of a reporter gene containing multiple copies of the AACAAT binding site. Activation was likewise observed for a GAL4-responsive reporter gene, when the mouse Sry gene was linked to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. Using this system, the activation function was mapped to a glutamine/histidine-rich domain. In addition, LexA-mouse Sry fusion genes activated a LexA-responsive reporter gene in yeast. In contrast, a GAL4-human SRY fusion gene did not cause transcriptional activation. These studies suggest that both the human and the mouse SRY ORFs encode nuclear, DNA-binding proteins and that the mouse Sry ORF can function as a transcriptional activator with separable DNA-binding and activator domains.

  2. Linking Smads and transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Inman, Gareth J

    2005-02-15

    TGF-beta1 (transforming growth factor-beta1) is the prototypical member of a large family of pleiotropic cytokines that regulate diverse biological processes during development and adult tissue homoeostasis. TGF-beta signals via membrane bound serine/threonine kinase receptors which transmit their signals via the intracellular signalling molecules Smad2, Smad3 and Smad4. These Smads contain conserved MH1 and MH2 domains separated by a flexible linker domain. Smad2 and Smad3 act as kinase substrates for the receptors, and, following phosphorylation, they form complexes with Smad4 and translocate to the nucleus. These Smad complexes regulate gene expression and ultimately determine the biological response to TGF-beta. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal, Wang et al. have shown that, like Smad4, the linker domain of Smad3 contains a Smad transcriptional activation domain. This is capable of recruiting the p300 transcriptional co-activator and is required for Smad3-dependent transcriptional activation. This study raises interesting questions about the nature and regulation of Smad-regulated gene activation and elevates the status of the linker domain to rival that of the much-lauded MH1 and MH2 domains.

  3. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-05

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division.

  4. Chromatin insulation by a transcriptional activator

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Nathan B.; Scalzo, David; Fiering, Steven; Groudine, Mark; Martin, David I. K.

    2003-01-01

    In eukaryotic genomes, transcriptionally active regions are interspersed with silent chromatin that may repress genes in its vicinity. Chromatin insulators are elements that can shield a locus from repressive effects of flanking chromatin. Few such elements have been characterized in higher eukaryotes, but transcriptional activating elements are an invariant feature of active loci and have been shown to suppress transgene silencing. Hence, we have assessed the ability of a transcriptional activator to cause chromatin insulation, i.e., to relieve position effects at transgene integration sites in cultured cells. The transgene contained a series of binding sites for the metal-inducible transcriptional activator MTF, linked to a GFP reporter. Clones carrying single integrated transgenes were derived without selection for expression, and in most clones the transgene was silent. Induction of MTF resulted in transition of the transgene from the silent to the active state, prolongation of the active state, and a marked narrowing of the range of expression levels at different genomic sites. At one genomic site, prolonged induction of MTF resulted in suppression of transgene silencing that persisted after withdrawal of the induction stimulus. These results are consistent with MTF acting as a chromatin insulator and imply that transcriptional activating elements can insulate active loci against chromatin repression. PMID:12547916

  5. Transcriptional regulation by post-transcriptional modification--role of phosphorylation in Sp1 transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shijian

    2012-10-15

    Sp1 is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor involved in the regulation of a large number of genes including housekeeping genes as well as actively regulated genes. Although Sp1 was discovered nearly three decades ago, its functional diversity is still not completely understood. One of the ways that make Sp1 versatile in transcriptional regulation is its post-transcriptional modification, which alters Sp1 structure in different cells and at different times. Compared to other types of modifications of the Sp1 protein, phosphorylation has been studied far more extensively. This review focuses on the inducers, pathways, enzymes, and biological effects of Sp1 phosphorylation. Recent data are beginning to reveal the biological significance and universal presence of Sp1 phosphorylation-related cell/molecular responses. Studies in this field provide a quick glance at how a simple chemical modification of a transcription factor could produce significant functional diversity of the protein.

  6. Rad51 activates polyomavirus JC early transcription.

    PubMed

    White, Martyn K; Kaminski, Rafal; Khalili, Kamel; Wollebo, Hassen S

    2014-01-01

    The human neurotropic polyomavirus JC (JCV) causes the fatal CNS demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). JCV infection is very common and after primary infection, the virus is able to persist in an asymptomatic state. Rarely, and usually only under conditions of immune impairment, JCV re-emerges to actively replicate in the astrocytes and oligodendrocytes of the brain causing PML. The regulatory events involved in the reactivation of active viral replication in PML are not well understood but previous studies have implicated the transcription factor NF-κB acting at a well-characterized site in the JCV noncoding control region (NCCR). NF-κB in turn is regulated in a number of ways including activation by cytokines such as TNF-α, interactions with other transcription factors and epigenetic events involving protein acetylation--all of which can regulate the transcriptional activity of JCV. Active JCV infection is marked by the occurrence of rapid and extensive DNA damage in the host cell and the induction of the expression of cellular proteins involved in DNA repair including Rad51, a major component of the homologous recombination-directed double-strand break DNA repair machinery. Here we show that increased Rad51 expression activates the JCV early promoter. This activation is co-operative with the stimulation caused by NF-κB p65, abrogated by mutation of the NF-κB binding site or siRNA to NFκB p65 and enhanced by the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate. These data indicate that the induction of Rad51 resulting from infection with JCV acts through NF-κB via its binding site to stimulate JCV early transcription. We suggest that this provides a novel positive feedback mechanism to enhance viral gene expression during the early stage of JCV infection.

  7. In vitro squelching of activated transcription by serum response factor: evidence for a common coactivator used by multiple transcriptional activators.

    PubMed Central

    Prywes, R; Zhu, H

    1992-01-01

    Low amounts of serum response factor (SRF) activate transcription in vitro from a fos promoter construct containing an SRF binding site. Using this human HeLa cell-derived in vitro transcription system, we have found that high amounts of SRF inhibited, or 'squelched', transcription from this construct. Transcription from several other promoters activated by different gene-specific factors, including CREB and the acidic activator VP16, was also inhibited by high amounts of SRF. Basal transcription, from TATA-only promoters, however, was not inhibited. These results suggest that SRF binds to a common factor(s) (termed coactivator) required for activated transcription by a diverse group of transcriptional activators. Inhibition of transcription by SRF could be blocked by a double stranded oligonucleotide containing an SRF binding site. Mutations in SRF which abolished its DNA binding activity also reduced its ability to inhibit transcription. In addition, a C-terminal truncation of SRF which reduced its ability to activate transcription also reduced SRF's ability to inhibit transcription. These results suggest that activation and inhibition of transcription may be mediated by SRF binding to the same factor and that SRF can only bind to this factor when SRF is bound to plasmid DNA. Images PMID:1531519

  8. Transcriptional activation of ribosomal RNA genes during compensatory renal hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Ouellette, A.J.; Moonka, R.; Zelenetz, A.; Malt, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    The overall rate of rDNA transcription increases by 50% during the first 24 hours of compensatory renal hypertrophy in the mouse. To study mechanisms of ribosome accumulation after uninephrectomy, transcription rates were measured in isolated kidneys by transcriptional runoff. /sup 32/P-labeled nascent transcripts were hybridized to blots containing linearized, denatured cloned rDNA, and hybridization was quantitated autoradiographically and by direct counting. Overall transcriptional activity of rDNA was increased by 30% above control levels at 6 hrs after nephrectomy and by 50% at 12, 18, and 24 hrs after operation. Hybridizing RNA was insensitive to inhibiby alpha-amanitin, and no hybridization was detected to vector DNA. Thus, accelerated rDNA transcription is one regulatory element in the accretion of ribosomes in renal growth, and the regulatory event is an early event. Mechanisms of activation may include enhanced transcription of active genes or induction of inactive DNA.

  9. Transcription activation by the adenovirus E1a protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillie, James W.; Green, Michael R.

    1989-03-01

    The adenovirus Ela protein stimulates transcription of a wide variety of viral and cellular genes. It is shown here that Ela has the two functions characteristic of a typical cellular activator: one direct Ela to the promoter, perhaps by interacting with a DMA-bound protein, and the other, an activating region, enables the bound activator to stimulate transcription.

  10. The Smad3 linker region contains a transcriptional activation domain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guannan; Long, Jianyin; Matsuura, Isao; He, Dongming; Liu, Fang

    2005-02-15

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta)/Smads regulate a wide variety of biological responses through transcriptional regulation of target genes. Smad3 plays a key role in TGF-beta/Smad-mediated transcriptional responses. Here, we show that the proline-rich linker region of Smad3 contains a transcriptional activation domain. When the linker region is fused to a heterologous DNA-binding domain, it activates transcription. We show that the linker region physically interacts with p300. The adenovirus E1a protein, which binds to p300, inhibits the transcriptional activity of the linker region, and overexpression of p300 can rescue the linker-mediated transcriptional activation. In contrast, an adenovirus E1a mutant, which cannot bind to p300, does not inhibit the linker-mediated transcription. The native Smad3 protein lacking the linker region is unable to mediate TGF-beta transcriptional activation responses, although it can be phosphorylated by the TGF-beta receptor at the C-terminal tail and has a significantly increased ability to form a heteromeric complex with Smad4. We show further that the linker region and the C-terminal domain of Smad3 synergize for transcriptional activation in the presence of TGF-beta. Thus our findings uncover an important function of the Smad3 linker region in Smad-mediated transcriptional control.

  11. Cooperative activation of Xenopus rhodopsin transcription by paired-like transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, rod photoreceptor-specific gene expression is regulated by the large Maf and Pax-like transcription factors, Nrl/LNrl and Crx/Otx5. The ubiquitous occurrence of their target DNA binding sites throughout rod-specific gene promoters suggests that multiple transcription factor interactions within the promoter are functionally important. Cooperative action by these transcription factors activates rod-specific genes such as rhodopsin. However, a quantitative mechanistic explanation of transcriptional rate determinants is lacking. Results We investigated the contributions of various paired-like transcription factors and their cognate cis-elements to rhodopsin gene activation using cultured cells to quantify activity. The Xenopus rhodopsin promoter (XOP) has a bipartite structure, with ~200 bp proximal to the start site (RPP) coordinating cooperative activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 and the adjacent 5300 bp upstream sequence increasing the overall expression level. The synergistic activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 also occurred when XOP was stably integrated into the genome. We determined that Crx/Otx5 synergistically activated transcription independently and additively through the two Pax-like cis-elements, BAT1 and Ret4, but not through Ret1. Other Pax-like family members, Rax1 and Rax2, do not synergistically activate XOP transcription with Nrl/LNrl and/or Crx/Otx5; rather they act as co-activators via the Ret1 cis-element. Conclusions We have provided a quantitative model of cooperative transcriptional activation of the rhodopsin promoter through interaction of Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl at two paired-like cis-elements proximal to the NRE and TATA binding site. Further, we have shown that Rax genes act in cooperation with Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl as co-activators of rhodopsin transcription. PMID:24499263

  12. The transcriptional activity of human Chromosome 22

    PubMed Central

    Rinn, John L.; Euskirchen, Ghia; Bertone, Paul; Martone, Rebecca; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Hartman, Stephen; Harrison, Paul M.; Nelson, F. Kenneth; Miller, Perry; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Snyder, Michael

    2003-01-01

    A DNA microarray representing nearly all of the unique sequences of human Chromosome 22 was constructed and used to measure global-transcriptional activity in placental poly(A)+ RNA. We found that many of the known, related and predicted genes are expressed. More importantly, our study reveals twice as many transcribed bases as have been reported previously. Many of the newly discovered expressed fragments were verified by RNA blot analysis and a novel technique called differential hybridization mapping (DHM). Interestingly, a significant fraction of these novel fragments are expressed antisense to previously annotated introns. The coding potential of these novel expressed regions is supported by their sequence conservation in the mouse genome. This study has greatly increased our understanding of the biological information encoded on a human chromosome. To facilitate the dissemination of these results to the scientific community, we have developed a comprehensive Web resource to present the findings of this study and other features of human Chromosome 22 at http://array.mbb.yale.edu/chr22. PMID:12600945

  13. Stress-Induced Activation of Heterochromatic Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tittel-Elmer, Mireille; Bucher, Etienne; Broger, Larissa; Mathieu, Olivier; Paszkowski, Jerzy; Vaillant, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    Constitutive heterochromatin comprising the centromeric and telomeric parts of chromosomes includes DNA marked by high levels of methylation associated with histones modified by repressive marks. These epigenetic modifications silence transcription and ensure stable inheritance of this inert state. Although environmental cues can alter epigenetic marks and lead to modulation of the transcription of genes located in euchromatic parts of the chromosomes, there is no evidence that external stimuli can globally destabilize silencing of constitutive heterochromatin. We have found that heterochromatin-associated silencing in Arabidopsis plants subjected to a particular temperature regime is released in a genome-wide manner. This occurs without alteration of repressive epigenetic modifications and does not involve common epigenetic mechanisms. Such induced release of silencing is mostly transient, and rapid restoration of the silent state occurs without the involvement of factors known to be required for silencing initiation. Thus, our results reveal new regulatory aspects of transcriptional repression in constitutive heterochromatin and open up possibilities to identify the molecular mechanisms involved. PMID:21060865

  14. Regulation of maternal transcript destabilization during egg activation in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Tadros, Wael; Houston, Simon A; Bashirullah, Arash; Cooperstock, Ramona L; Semotok, Jennifer L; Reed, Bruce H; Lipshitz, Howard D

    2003-01-01

    In animals, the transfer of developmental control from maternal RNAs and proteins to zygotically derived products occurs at the midblastula transition. This is accompanied by the destabilization of a subset of maternal transcripts. In Drosophila, maternal transcript destabilization occurs in the absence of fertilization and requires specific cis-acting instability elements. We show here that egg activation is necessary and sufficient to trigger transcript destabilization. We have identified 13 maternal-effect lethal loci that, when mutated, result in failure of maternal transcript degradation. All mutants identified are defective in one or more additional processes associated with egg activation. These include vitelline membrane reorganization, cortical microtubule depolymerization, translation of maternal mRNA, completion of meiosis, and chromosome condensation (the S-to-M transition) after meiosis. The least pleiotropic class of transcript destabilization mutants consists of three genes: pan gu, plutonium, and giant nuclei. These three genes regulate the S-to-M transition at the end of meiosis and are thought to be required for the maintenance of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity during this cell cycle transition. Consistent with a possible functional connection between this S-to-M transition and transcript destabilization, we show that in vitro-activated eggs, which exhibit aberrant postmeiotic chromosome condensation, fail to initiate transcript degradation. Several genetic tests exclude the possibility that reduction of CDK/cyclin complex activity per se is responsible for the failure to trigger transcript destabilization in these mutants. We propose that the trigger for transcript destabilization occurs coincidently with the S-to-M transition at the end of meiosis and that pan gu, plutonium, and giant nuclei regulate maternal transcript destabilization independent of their role in cell cycle regulation. PMID:12871909

  15. SUMOylation of ROR{alpha} potentiates transcriptional activation function

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Eun Ju; Lee, Ji Min; Jeong, Jiyeong; Park, Joo Hyeon; Yang, Young; Lim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Jung Hwa; Baek, Sung Hee; Kim, Keun Il

    2009-01-16

    SUMOylation regulates a variety of cellular processes, including control of transcriptional activities of nuclear receptors. Here, we present SUMOylation of orphan nuclear receptor, ROR{alpha} by both SUMO-1 and SUMO-2. SUMOylation of ROR{alpha} occurred on the 240th lysine residue at the hinge region of human protein. PIAS family members, PIASx{alpha}, PIAS3, and PIASy, increased SUMOylation of ROR{alpha}, whereas SENP2 specifically removed SUMO from ROR{alpha}. SUMOylation-defective mutant form of ROR{alpha} exhibited decreased transcriptional activity on ROR{alpha}-responsive promoters indicating that SUMOylation may positively regulate transcriptional function of ROR{alpha}.

  16. Sumoylation delays the ATF7 transcription factor subcellular localization and inhibits its transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Hamard, Pierre-Jacques; Boyer-Guittaut, Michaël; Camuzeaux, Barbara; Dujardin, Denis; Hauss, Charlotte; Oelgeschläger, Thomas; Vigneron, Marc; Kedinger, Claude; Chatton, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    Over the past few years, small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) modification has emerged as an important regulator of diverse pathways and activities including protein localization and transcriptional regulation. We identified a consensus sumoylation motif (IKEE), located within the N-terminal activation domain of the ATF7 transcription factor and thus investigated the role of this modification. ATF7 is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor, homologous to ATF2, that binds to CRE elements within specific promoters. This protein is able to heterodimerize with Jun or Fos proteins and its transcriptional activity is mediated by interaction with TAF12, a subunit of the general transcription factor TFIID. In the present article, we demonstrate that ATF7 is sumoylated in vitro (using RanBP2 as a E3-specific ligase) and in vivo. Moreover, we show that ATF7 sumoylation affects its intranuclear localization by delaying its entry into the nucleus. Furthermore, SUMO conjugation inhibits ATF7 transactivation activity by (i) impairing its association with TAF12 and (ii) blocking its binding-to-specific sequences within target promoters.

  17. The EDLL motif: a potent plant transcriptional activation domain from AP2/ERF transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Shiv B; Belachew, Alemu; Ma, Siu Fong; Young, Melinda; Ade, Jules; Shen, Yu; Marion, Colleen M; Holtan, Hans E; Bailey, Adina; Stone, Jeffrey K; Edwards, Leslie; Wallace, Andreah D; Canales, Roger D; Adam, Luc; Ratcliffe, Oliver J; Repetti, Peter P

    2012-06-01

    In plants, the ERF/EREBP family of transcriptional regulators plays a key role in adaptation to various biotic and abiotic stresses. These proteins contain a conserved AP2 DNA-binding domain and several uncharacterized motifs. Here, we describe a short motif, termed 'EDLL', that is present in AtERF98/TDR1 and other clade members from the same AP2 sub-family. We show that the EDLL motif, which has a unique arrangement of acidic amino acids and hydrophobic leucines, functions as a strong activation domain. The motif is transferable to other proteins, and is active at both proximal and distal positions of target promoters. As such, the EDLL motif is able to partly overcome the repression conferred by the AtHB2 transcription factor, which contains an ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif. We further examined the activation potential of EDLL by analysis of the regulation of flowering time by NF-Y (nuclear factor Y) proteins. Genetic evidence indicates that NF-Y protein complexes potentiate the action of CONSTANS in regulation of flowering in Arabidopsis; we show that the transcriptional activation function of CONSTANS can be substituted by direct fusion of the EDLL activation motif to NF-YB subunits. The EDLL motif represents a potent plant activation domain that can be used as a tool to confer transcriptional activation potential to heterologous DNA-binding proteins.

  18. Transcriptionally active genome regions are preferred targets for retrovirus integration.

    PubMed Central

    Scherdin, U; Rhodes, K; Breindl, M

    1990-01-01

    We have analyzed the transcriptional activity of cellular target sequences for Moloney murine leukemia virus integration in mouse fibroblasts. At least five of the nine random, unselected integration target sequences studied showed direct evidence for transcriptional activity by hybridization to nuclear run-on transcripts prepared from uninfected cells. At least four of the sequences contained multiple recognition sites for several restriction enzymes that cut preferentially in CpG-rich islands, indicating integration into 5' or 3' ends or flanking regions of genes. Assuming that only a minor fraction (less than 20%) of the genome is transcribed in mammalian cells, we calculated the probability that this association of retroviral integration sites with transcribed sequences is due to chance to be very low (1.6 x 10(-2]. Thus, our results strongly suggest that transcriptionally active genome regions are preferred targets for retrovirus integration. Images PMID:2296087

  19. Promoter-proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Pia K.; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites on transcription requires promoter proximity, as demonstrated using artificial constructs and supported by a genome-wide data set. Importantly, transcription down-regulation can be recapitulated in a gene context devoid of splice sites by placing a functional bona fide pA site/transcription terminator within ∼500 base pairs of the promoter. In contrast, promoter-proximal positioning of a pA site-independent histone gene terminator supports high transcription levels. We propose that optimal communication between a pA site-dependent gene terminator and its promoter critically depends on gene length and that short RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes use specialized termination mechanisms to maintain high transcription levels. PMID:23028143

  20. Theory on the dynamic memory in the transcription-factor-mediated transcription activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, R.

    2011-04-01

    We develop a theory to explain the origin of the static and dynamical memory effects in transcription-factor-mediated transcription activation. Our results suggest that the following inequality conditions should be satisfied to observe such memory effects: (a) τL≫max(τR,τE), (b) τLT≫τT, and (c) τI⩾(τEL+τTR) where τL is the average time required for the looping-mediated spatial interactions of enhancer—transcription-factor complex with the corresponding promoter—RNA-polymerase or eukaryotic RNA polymerase type II (PolII in eukaryotes) complex that is located L base pairs away from the cis-acting element, (τR,τE) are respectively the search times required for the site-specific binding of the RNA polymerase and the transcription factor with the respective promoter and the cis-regulatory module, τLT is the time associated with the relaxation of the looped-out segment of DNA that connects the cis-acting site and promoter, τT is the time required to generate a complete transcript, τI is the transcription initiation time, τEL is the elongation time, and τTR is the termination time. We have theoretically derived the expressions for the various searching, looping, and loop-relaxation time components. Using the experimentally determined values of various time components we further show that the dynamical memory effects cannot be experimentally observed whenever the segment of DNA that connects the cis-regulatory element with the promoter is not loaded with bulky histone bodies. Our analysis suggests that the presence of histone-mediated compaction of the connecting segment of DNA can result in higher values of looping and loop-relaxation times, which is the origin of the static memory in the transcription activation that is mediated by the memory gene loops in eukaryotes.

  1. Theory on the dynamic memory in the transcription-factor-mediated transcription activation.

    PubMed

    Murugan, R

    2011-04-01

    We develop a theory to explain the origin of the static and dynamical memory effects in transcription-factor-mediated transcription activation. Our results suggest that the following inequality conditions should be satisfied to observe such memory effects: (a) τ(L)≫max(τ(R),τ(E)), (b) τ(LT)≫τ(T), and (c) τ(I)≥(τ(EL)+τ(TR)) where τ(L) is the average time required for the looping-mediated spatial interactions of enhancer-transcription-factor complex with the corresponding promoter--RNA-polymerase or eukaryotic RNA polymerase type II (PolII in eukaryotes) complex that is located L base pairs away from the cis-acting element, (τ(R),τ(E)) are respectively the search times required for the site-specific binding of the RNA polymerase and the transcription factor with the respective promoter and the cis-regulatory module, τ(LT) is the time associated with the relaxation of the looped-out segment of DNA that connects the cis-acting site and promoter, τ(T) is the time required to generate a complete transcript, τ(I) is the transcription initiation time, τ(EL) is the elongation time, and τ(TR) is the termination time. We have theoretically derived the expressions for the various searching, looping, and loop-relaxation time components. Using the experimentally determined values of various time components we further show that the dynamical memory effects cannot be experimentally observed whenever the segment of DNA that connects the cis-regulatory element with the promoter is not loaded with bulky histone bodies. Our analysis suggests that the presence of histone-mediated compaction of the connecting segment of DNA can result in higher values of looping and loop-relaxation times, which is the origin of the static memory in the transcription activation that is mediated by the memory gene loops in eukaryotes.

  2. Resveratrol regulates gene transcription via activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Gerald; Rössler, Oliver G

    2017-03-01

    Resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenolic phytoalexin of grapes and other fruits and plants, is a common constituent of our diet and of dietary supplements. Many health-promoting benefits have been connected with resveratrol in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, inflammation, neurodegeneration, and diseases connected with aging. To explain the pleiotropic effects of resveratrol, the molecular targets of this compound have to be identified on the cellular level. Resveratrol induces intracellular signal transduction pathways which ultimately lead to changes in the gene expression pattern of the cells. Here, we review the effect of resveratrol on the activation of the stimulus-responsive transcription factors CREB, AP-1, Egr-1, Elk-1, and Nrf2. Following activation, these transcription factors induce transcription of delayed response genes. The gene products of these delayed response genes are ultimately responsible for the changes in the biochemistry and physiology of resveratrol-treated cells. The activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors may explain many of the intracellular activities of resveratrol. However, results obtained in vitro may not easily be transferred to in vivo systems.

  3. Targeting Gli Transcription Activation by Small Molecule Suppresses Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bosco-Clément, Geneviève; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Zhao; Zhou, Hai-Meng; Li, Hui; Mikami, Iwao; Hirata, Tomomi; Yagui-Beltran, Adam; Lui, Natalie; Do, Hanh T.; Cheng, Tiffany; Tseng, Hsin-Hui; Choi, Helen; Fang, Li-Tai; Kim, Il-Jin; Yue, Dongsheng; Wang, Changli; Zheng, Qingfeng; Fujii, Naoaki; Mann, Michael; Jablons, David M.; He, Biao

    2014-01-01

    Targeted inhibition of Hedgehog signaling at the cell membrane has been associated with anti-cancer activity in preclinical and early clinical studies. Hedgehog signaling involves activation of Gli transcription factors that can also be induced by alternative pathways. In this study we identified an interaction between Gli proteins and a transcription co-activator TAF9, and validated its functional relevance in regulating Gli transactivation. We also describe a novel, synthetic small molecule, FN1-8, that efficiently interferes with Gli/TAF9 interaction and down-regulate Gli/TAF9 dependent transcriptional activity. More importantly, FN1-8 suppresses cancer cell proliferation in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Our results suggest that blocking Gli transactivation, a key control point of multiple oncogenic pathways, may be an effective anti-cancer strategy. PMID:23686308

  4. HTLV-1 Tax activates HIV-1 transcription in latency models.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Victor Emmanuel Viana; José, Diego Pandeló; Leal, Fabio E; Nixon, Douglas F; Tanuri, Amilcar; Aguiar, Renato Santana

    2017-04-01

    HIV-1 latency is a major obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Coinfection with HTLV-1 has been associated with faster progression to AIDS. HTLV-1 encodes the transactivator Tax which can activate both HTLV-1 and HIV-1 transcription. Here, we demonstrate that Tax activates HIV transcription in latent CD4(+) T cells. Tax promotes the activation of P-TEFb, releasing CDK9 and Cyclin T1 from inactive forms, promoting transcription elongation and reactivation of latent HIV-1. Tax mutants lacking interaction with the HIV-1-LTR promoter were not able to activate P-TEFb, with no subsequent activation of latent HIV. In HIV-infected primary resting CD4(+) T cells, Tax-1 reactivated HIV-1 transcription up to five fold, confirming these findings in an ex vivo latency model. Finally, our results confirms that HTLV-1/Tax hijacks cellular partners, promoting HIV-1 transcription, and this interaction should be further investigated in HIV-1 latency studies in patients with HIV/HTLV-1 co-infection.

  5. Transcription through the HIV-1 nucleosomes: Effects of the PBAF complex in Tat activated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Easley, Rebecca; Carpio, Lawrence; Dannenberg, Luke; Choi, Soyun; Alani, Dowser; Van Duyne, Rachel; Guendel, Irene; Klase, Zachary; Agbottah, Emmanuel; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2010-01-01

    The SWI/SNF complex remodels nucleosomes, allowing RNA Polymerase II access to the HIV-1 proviral DNA. It has not been determined which SWI/SNF complex (BAF or PBAF) remodels nucleosomes at the transcription start site. These complexes differ in only three subunits and determining which subunit(s) is required could explain the regulation of Tat activated transcription. We show that PBAF is required for chromatin remodeling at the nuc-1 start site and transcriptional elongation. We find that Baf200 is required to ensure activation at the LTR level and for viral production. Interestingly, the BAF complex was observed on the LTR whereas PBAF was present on both LTR and Env regions. We found that Tat activated transcription facilitates removal of histones H2A and H2B at the LTR, and that the FACT complex may be responsible for their removal. Finally, the BAF complex may play an important role in regulating splicing of the HIV-1 genome. PMID:20599239

  6. HMG Proteins and DNA Flexibility in Transcription Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Eric D.; Hardwidge, Philip R.; Maher, L. James

    2001-01-01

    The relative stiffness of naked DNA is evident from measured values of longitudinal persistence length (∼150 bp) and torsional persistence length (∼180 bp). These parameters predict that certain arrangements of eukaryotic transcription activator proteins in gene promoters should be much more effective than others in fostering protein-protein interactions with the basal RNA polymerase II transcription apparatus. Thus, if such interactions require some kind of DNA looping, DNA loop energies should depend sensitively on helical phasing of protein binding sites, loop size, and intrinsic DNA curvature within the loop. Using families of artificial transcription templates where these parameters were varied, we were surprised to find that the degree of transcription activation by arrays of Gal4-VP1 transcription activators in HeLa cell nuclear extract was sensitive only to the linear distance separating a basal promoter from an array of bound activators on DNA templates. We now examine the hypothesis that this unexpected result is due to factors in the extract that act to enhance apparent DNA flexibility. We demonstrate that HeLa cell nuclear extract is rich in a heat-resistant activity that dramatically enhances apparent DNA longitudinal and torsional flexibility. Recombinant mammalian high-mobility group 2 (HMG-2) protein can substitute for this activity. We propose that the abundance of HMG proteins in eukaryotic nuclei provides an environment in which DNA is made sufficiently flexible to remove many constraints on protein binding site arrangements that would otherwise limit efficient transcription activation to certain promoter geometries. PMID:11533247

  7. Identification of active transcriptional regulatory elements with GRO-seq

    PubMed Central

    Danko, Charles G.; Hyland, Stephanie L.; Core, Leighton J.; Martins, Andre L.; Waters, Colin T; Lee, Hyung Won; Cheung, Vivian G.; Kraus, W. Lee; Lis, John T.; Siepel, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulatory elements (TREs), including enhancers and promoters, determine the transcription levels of associated genes. We have recently shown that global run-on and sequencing (GRO-seq) with enrichment for 5'-capped RNAs reveals active TREs with high accuracy. Here, we demonstrate that active TREs can be identified by applying sensitive machine-learning methods to standard GRO-seq data. This approach allows TREs to be assayed together with gene expression levels and other transcriptional features in a single experiment. Our prediction method, called discriminative Regulatory Element detection from GRO-seq (dREG), summarizes GRO-seq read counts at multiple scales and uses support vector regression to identify active TREs. The predicted TREs are more strongly enriched for several marks of transcriptional activation, including eQTL, GWAS-associated SNPs, H3K27ac, and transcription factor binding than those identified by alternative functional assays. Using dREG, we survey TREs in eight human cell types and provide new insights into global patterns of TRE function. PMID:25799441

  8. The murine Sry gene encodes a nuclear transcriptional activator

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, R.A.; Ostrer, H.

    1994-09-01

    The Sry gene functions as a genetic switch in gonadal ridge initiating testis determination. The murine Sry and human SRY open reading frames (ORF) share a conserved 79 amino acid motif, the HMG-box, that binds DNA. Outside this region the two genes share no additional homology. These studies were undertaken to determine whether the Sry/SRY genes encode nuclear transcriptional regulators. As judged by the accumulation of lacZ-SRY hybrid proteins in the nucleus, both the human and murine SRY ORFs contain a nuclear localization signal. The murine Sry HMG-box selectively binds the sequence NACAAT in vitro when presented with a random pool of oligonucleotides and binds AACAAT with the highest affinity. The murine Sry ORF, when expressed in HeLa cells, activates transcription of a reporter gene containing multiple copies of the AACAAT binding site. Activation was observed for a GAL4-responsive gene when the murine Sry ORF was linked to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. Using this system, the activation function was mapped to a C-terminal glutamine/histidine-rich domain. In addition, LexA-Sry fusion genes activated a LexA-responsive gene in yeast. In contrast, a GAL4-human SRY fusion gene did not cause transcriptional activation. These studies suggest that both the human and mouse SRY ORFs encode nuclear, DNA-binding proteins, and that the mouse Sry ORF can function as a transcriptional activator with separable DNA-binding and activator domains.

  9. Transcriptional activity of transposable elements in coelacanth.

    PubMed

    Forconi, Mariko; Chalopin, Domitille; Barucca, Marco; Biscotti, Maria Assunta; De Moro, Gianluca; Galiana, Delphine; Gerdol, Marco; Pallavicini, Alberto; Canapa, Adriana; Olmo, Ettore; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    The morphological stasis of coelacanths has long suggested a slow evolutionary rate. General genomic stasis might also imply a decrease of transposable elements activity. To evaluate the potential activity of transposable elements (TEs) in "living fossil" species, transcriptomic data of Latimeria chalumnae and its Indonesian congener Latimeria menadoensis were compared through the RNA-sequencing mapping procedures in three different organs (liver, testis, and muscle). The analysis of coelacanth transcriptomes highlights a significant percentage of transcribed TEs in both species. Major contributors are LINE retrotransposons, especially from the CR1 family. Furthermore, some particular elements such as a LF-SINE and a LINE2 sequences seem to be more expressed than other elements. The amount of TEs expressed in testis suggests possible transposition burst in incoming generations. Moreover, significant amount of TEs in liver and muscle transcriptomes were also observed. Analyses of elements displaying marked organ-specific expression gave us the opportunity to highlight exaptation cases, that is, the recruitment of TEs as new cellular genes, but also to identify a new Latimeria-specific family of Short Interspersed Nuclear Elements called CoeG-SINEs. Overall, transcriptome results do not seem to be in line with a slow-evolving genome with poor TE activity.

  10. Effect Of Simulated Microgravity On Activated T Cell Gene Transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Maureen A.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of T lymphocytes under the shear stress environment of clinorotation have demonstrated an inhibition of activation in response to TCR mediated signaling. These results mimic those observed during space flight. This work investigates the molecular signaling events of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation. Purified human T lymphocytes and the T cell clone Jurkat exhibit an uncoupling of signaling as mediated through the TCR. Activation of the transcription factor AP-1 is inhibited while activation of NFAT occurs. NFAT dephosphorylation and activation is dependent on sustained Ca(++) influx. Alternatively, AP-1, which consists of two transcription factors, jun and fos, is activated by PKC and Ras mediated pathways. TCR signaling is known to be dependent on cytoskeletal rearrangements, in particular, raft aggregation is critical. Raft aggregation, as mediated through GM, crosslinking, overcomes the inhibition of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation, indicating that the block is occurring upstream of raft aggregation. Clinorotation is shown to have an effect similar to a weak TCR signal.

  11. PKG-1α mediates GATA4 transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanlin; Wang, Jun; Yu, Yanhong; Schwartz, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    GATA4, a zinc-finger transcription factor, is central for cardiac development and diseases. Here we show that GATA4 transcriptional activity is mediated by cell signaling via cGMP dependent PKG-1α activity. Protein kinase G (PKG), a serine/tyrosine specific kinase is the major effector of cGMP signaling. We observed enhanced transcriptional activity elicited by co-expressed GATA4 and PKG-1α. Phosphorylation of GATA4 by PKG-1α was detected on serine 261 (S261), while the C-terminal activation domain of GATA4 associated with PKG-1α. GATA4's DNA binding activity was enhanced by PKG-1α via by both phosphorylation and physical association. More importantly, a number of human disease-linked GATA4 mutants exhibited impaired S261 phosphorylation, pointing to defective S261 phosphorylation in the elaboration of human heart diseases. We showed S261 phosphorylation was favored by PKG-1α but not by PKA, and several other kinase signaling pathways such as MAPK and PKC. Our observations demonstrate that cGMP-PKG signaling mediates transcriptional activity of GATA4 and links defective GATA4 and PKG-1α mutations to the development of human heart disease.

  12. Physical coupling of activation and derepression activities to maintain an active transcriptional state at FLC

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongchun; Howard, Martin; Dean, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Establishment and maintenance of gene expression states is central to development and differentiation. Transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms interconnect in poorly understood ways to determine these states. We explore these mechanisms through dissection of the regulation of Arabidopsis thaliana FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). FLC can be present in a transcriptionally active state marked by H3K36me3 or a silent state marked by H3K27me3. Here, we investigate the trans factors modifying these opposing histone states and find a physical coupling in vivo between the H3K36 methyltransferase, SDG8, and the H3K27me3 demethylase, ELF6. Previous modeling has predicted this coupling would exist as it facilitates bistability of opposing histone states. We also find association of SDG8 with the transcription machinery, namely RNA polymerase II and the PAF1 complex. Delivery of the active histone modifications is therefore likely to be through transcription at the locus. SDG8 and ELF6 were found to influence the localization of each other on FLC chromatin, showing the functional importance of the interaction. In addition, both influenced accumulation of the associated H3K27me3 and H3K36me3 histone modifications at FLC. We propose the physical coupling of activation and derepression activities coordinates transcriptional activity and prevents ectopic silencing. PMID:27482092

  13. Aerobic glycolysis tunes YAP/TAZ transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Enzo, Elena; Santinon, Giulia; Pocaterra, Arianna; Aragona, Mariaceleste; Bresolin, Silvia; Forcato, Mattia; Grifoni, Daniela; Pession, Annalisa; Zanconato, Francesca; Guzzo, Giulia; Bicciato, Silvio; Dupont, Sirio

    2015-01-01

    Increased glucose metabolism and reprogramming toward aerobic glycolysis are a hallmark of cancer cells, meeting their metabolic needs for sustained cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming is usually considered as a downstream consequence of tumor development and oncogene activation; growing evidence indicates, however, that metabolism on its turn can support oncogenic signaling to foster tumor malignancy. Here, we explored how glucose metabolism regulates gene transcription and found an unexpected link with YAP/TAZ, key transcription factors regulating organ growth, tumor cell proliferation and aggressiveness. When cells actively incorporate glucose and route it through glycolysis, YAP/TAZ are fully active; when glucose metabolism is blocked, or glycolysis is reduced, YAP/TAZ transcriptional activity is decreased. Accordingly, glycolysis is required to sustain YAP/TAZ pro-tumorigenic functions, and YAP/TAZ are required for the full deployment of glucose growth-promoting activity. Mechanistically we found that phosphofructokinase (PFK1), the enzyme regulating the first committed step of glycolysis, binds the YAP/TAZ transcriptional cofactors TEADs and promotes their functional and biochemical cooperation with YAP/TAZ. Strikingly, this regulation is conserved in Drosophila, where phosphofructokinase is required for tissue overgrowth promoted by Yki, the fly homologue of YAP. Moreover, gene expression regulated by glucose metabolism in breast cancer cells is strongly associated in a large dataset of primary human mammary tumors with YAP/TAZ activation and with the progression toward more advanced and malignant stages. These findings suggest that aerobic glycolysis endows cancer cells with particular metabolic properties and at the same time sustains transcription factors with potent pro-tumorigenic activities such as YAP/TAZ. PMID:25796446

  14. Aerobic glycolysis tunes YAP/TAZ transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Enzo, Elena; Santinon, Giulia; Pocaterra, Arianna; Aragona, Mariaceleste; Bresolin, Silvia; Forcato, Mattia; Grifoni, Daniela; Pession, Annalisa; Zanconato, Francesca; Guzzo, Giulia; Bicciato, Silvio; Dupont, Sirio

    2015-05-12

    Increased glucose metabolism and reprogramming toward aerobic glycolysis are a hallmark of cancer cells, meeting their metabolic needs for sustained cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming is usually considered as a downstream consequence of tumor development and oncogene activation; growing evidence indicates, however, that metabolism on its turn can support oncogenic signaling to foster tumor malignancy. Here, we explored how glucose metabolism regulates gene transcription and found an unexpected link with YAP/TAZ, key transcription factors regulating organ growth, tumor cell proliferation and aggressiveness. When cells actively incorporate glucose and route it through glycolysis, YAP/TAZ are fully active; when glucose metabolism is blocked, or glycolysis is reduced, YAP/TAZ transcriptional activity is decreased. Accordingly, glycolysis is required to sustain YAP/TAZ pro-tumorigenic functions, and YAP/TAZ are required for the full deployment of glucose growth-promoting activity. Mechanistically we found that phosphofructokinase (PFK1), the enzyme regulating the first committed step of glycolysis, binds the YAP/TAZ transcriptional cofactors TEADs and promotes their functional and biochemical cooperation with YAP/TAZ. Strikingly, this regulation is conserved in Drosophila, where phosphofructokinase is required for tissue overgrowth promoted by Yki, the fly homologue of YAP. Moreover, gene expression regulated by glucose metabolism in breast cancer cells is strongly associated in a large dataset of primary human mammary tumors with YAP/TAZ activation and with the progression toward more advanced and malignant stages. These findings suggest that aerobic glycolysis endows cancer cells with particular metabolic properties and at the same time sustains transcription factors with potent pro-tumorigenic activities such as YAP/TAZ.

  15. RNA-directed DNA methylation induces transcriptional activation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shibuya, Kenichi; Fukushima, Setsuko; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    A class-C floral homeotic gene of Petunia, pMADS3, is specifically expressed in the stamen and carpels of developing flowers. We had previously reported the ect-pMADS3 phenomenon in which introduction of a part of the pMADS3 genomic sequence, including intron 2, induces ectopic expression of endogenous pMADS3. Unlike transcriptional or posttranscriptional gene silencing triggered by the introduction of homologous sequences, this observation is unique in that the gene expression is up-regulated. In this study, we demonstrated that the ect-pMADS3 phenomenon is due to transcriptional activation based on RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) occurring in a particular CG in a putative cis-element in pMADS3 intron 2. The CG methylation was maintained over generations, along with pMADS3 ectopic expression, even in the absence of RNA triggers. These results demonstrate a previously undescribed transcriptional regulatory mechanism that could lead to the generation of a transcriptionally active epiallele, thereby contributing to plant evolution. Our results also reveal a putative negative cis-element for organ-specific transcriptional regulation of class-C floral homeotic genes, which could be difficult to identify by other approaches. PMID:19164525

  16. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  17. [Transcription activator-like effectors(TALEs)based genome engineering].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mei-Wei; Duan, Cheng-Li; Liu, Jiang

    2013-10-01

    Systematic reverse-engineering of functional genome architecture requires precise modifications of gene sequences and transcription levels. The development and application of transcription activator-like effectors(TALEs) has created a wealth of genome engineering possibilities. TALEs are a class of naturally occurring DNA-binding proteins found in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas species. The DNA-binding domain of each TALE typically consists of tandem 34-amino acid repeat modules rearranged according to a simple cipher to target new DNA sequences. Customized TALEs can be used for a wide variety of genome engineering applications, including transcriptional modulation and genome editing. Such "genome engineering" has now been established in human cells and a number of model organisms, thus opening the door to better understanding gene function in model organisms, improving traits in crop plants and treating human genetic disorders.

  18. Transcriptional Regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Transcription Factor Regulation and Function, Mechanisms of Initiation, and Roles of Activators and Coactivators

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Steven; Young, Elton T.

    2011-01-01

    Here we review recent advances in understanding the regulation of mRNA synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Many fundamental gene regulatory mechanisms have been conserved in all eukaryotes, and budding yeast has been at the forefront in the discovery and dissection of these conserved mechanisms. Topics covered include upstream activation sequence and promoter structure, transcription factor classification, and examples of regulated transcription factor activity. We also examine advances in understanding the RNA polymerase II transcription machinery, conserved coactivator complexes, transcription activation domains, and the cooperation of these factors in gene regulatory mechanisms. PMID:22084422

  19. Activation of polyomavirus DNA replication by yeast GAL4 is dependent on its transcriptional activation domains.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett-Cook, E R; Hassell, J A

    1991-01-01

    The polyomavirus replication origin contains transcriptional regulatory sequences. To determine how these elements function in DNA replication, and to learn whether a common mechanism underlies the activation of transcription and DNA replication, we tested whether a well-characterized transcriptional activator, yeast GAL4, was capable of stimulating DNA replication and transcription in the same mammalian cell line. We observed that GAL4 activated polyomavirus DNA replication in mouse cells when its binding site was juxtaposed to the late border of the polyomavirus origin core. Synergistic activation of DNA replication was achieved by multimerization of the GAL4 binding site. Analysis of GAL4 mutant proteins, GAL4 hybrid proteins and mutants of the latter revealed that the activation domains of these transcriptional activators were required to stimulate DNA replication. In agreement with previously published data, the activation domains of GAL4 were also required to enhance transcription in the same mouse cell line. These observations implicate transcriptional activators in Py DNA replication and suggest that similar mechanisms govern the activation of transcription and DNA replication. Images PMID:1849079

  20. Human DJ-1-specific Transcriptional Activation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice. PMID:20938049

  1. Human DJ-1-specific transcriptional activation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2010-12-17

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice.

  2. In vitro activation of the transcription of araBAD operon by araC activator.

    PubMed

    Lee, N; Wilcox, G; Gielow, W; Arnold, J; Cleary, P; Englesberg, E

    1974-03-01

    The transcription of araBAD operon requires araC activator and cyclic AMP. D-Fucose inhibits ara mRNA synthesis. Our results indicate that the positive control by araC activator is exerted at the level of transcription.

  3. A transcription activator-like effector toolbox for genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Sanjana, Neville E; Cong, Le; Zhou, Yang; Cunniff, Margaret M; Feng, Guoping; Zhang, Feng

    2012-01-05

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are a class of naturally occurring DNA-binding proteins found in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas sp. The DNA-binding domain of each TALE consists of tandem 34-amino acid repeat modules that can be rearranged according to a simple cipher to target new DNA sequences. Customized TALEs can be used for a wide variety of genome engineering applications, including transcriptional modulation and genome editing. Here we describe a toolbox for rapid construction of custom TALE transcription factors (TALE-TFs) and nucleases (TALENs) using a hierarchical ligation procedure. This toolbox facilitates affordable and rapid construction of custom TALE-TFs and TALENs within 1 week and can be easily scaled up to construct TALEs for multiple targets in parallel. We also provide details for testing the activity in mammalian cells of custom TALE-TFs and TALENs using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and Surveyor nuclease, respectively. The TALE toolbox described here will enable a broad range of biological applications.

  4. A proximal activator of transcription in epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Venkov, Christo D.; Link, Andrew J.; Jennings, Jennifer L.; Plieth, David; Inoue, Tsutomu; Nagai, Kojiro; Xu, Carol; Dimitrova, Yoana N.; Rauscher, Frank J.; Neilson, Eric G.

    2007-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important mechanism for phenotypic conversion in normal development and disease states such as tissue fibrosis and metastasis. While this conversion of epithelia is under tight transcriptional control, few of the key transcriptional proteins are known. Fibroblasts produced by EMT express a gene encoding fibroblast-specific protein 1 (FSP1), which is regulated by a proximal cis-acting promoter element called fibroblast transcription site–1 (FTS-1). In mass spectrometry, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and siRNA studies, we used FTS-1 as a unique probe for mediators of EMT and identified a complex of 2 proteins, CArG box–binding factor–A (CBF-A) and KRAB-associated protein 1 (KAP-1), that bind this site. Epithelial cells engineered to conditionally express recombinant CBF-A (rCBF-A) activate the transcription of FSP1 and undergo EMT. The FTS-1 response element also exists in the promoters modulating a broader EMT transcriptome, including Twist, and Snail, as well as E-cadherin, β-catenin, ZO 1, vimentin, α1(I) collagen, and α–smooth muscle actin, and the induction of rCBF-A appropriately alters their expression as well. We believe formation of the CBF-A/KAP-1/FTS-1 complex is sufficient for the induction of FSP1 and a novel proximal activator of EMT. PMID:17273560

  5. A proximal activator of transcription in epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Venkov, Christo D; Link, Andrew J; Jennings, Jennifer L; Plieth, David; Inoue, Tsutomu; Nagai, Kojiro; Xu, Carol; Dimitrova, Yoana N; Rauscher, Frank J; Neilson, Eric G

    2007-02-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important mechanism for phenotypic conversion in normal development and disease states such as tissue fibrosis and metastasis. While this conversion of epithelia is under tight transcriptional control, few of the key transcriptional proteins are known. Fibroblasts produced by EMT express a gene encoding fibroblast-specific protein 1 (FSP1), which is regulated by a proximal cis-acting promoter element called fibroblast transcription site-1 (FTS-1). In mass spectrometry, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and siRNA studies, we used FTS-1 as a unique probe for mediators of EMT and identified a complex of 2 proteins, CArG box-binding factor-A (CBF-A) and KRAB-associated protein 1 (KAP-1), that bind this site. Epithelial cells engineered to conditionally express recombinant CBF-A (rCBF-A) activate the transcription of FSP1 and undergo EMT. The FTS-1 response element also exists in the promoters modulating a broader EMT transcriptome, including Twist, and Snail, as well as E-cadherin, beta-catenin, ZO 1, vimentin, alpha1(I) collagen, and alpha-smooth muscle actin, and the induction of rCBF-A appropriately alters their expression as well. We believe formation of the CBF-A/KAP-1/FTS-1 complex is sufficient for the induction of FSP1 and a novel proximal activator of EMT.

  6. Transcription Activator Interactions with Multiple SWI/SNF Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Kristen E.; Hassan, Ahmed H.; Brown, Christine E.; Howe, LeAnn; Workman, Jerry L.

    2002-01-01

    We have previously shown that the yeast SWI/SNF complex stimulates in vitro transcription from chromatin templates in an ATP-dependent manner. SWI/SNF function in this regard requires the presence of an activator with which it can interact directly, linking activator recruitment of SWI/SNF to transcriptional stimulation. In this study, we determine the SWI/SNF subunits that mediate its interaction with activators. Using a photo-cross-linking label transfer strategy, we show that the Snf5, Swi1, and Swi2/Snf2 subunits are contacted by the yeast acidic activators, Gcn4 and Hap4, in the context of the intact native SWI/SNF complex. In addition, we show that the same three subunits can interact individually with acidic activation domains, indicating that each subunit contributes to binding activators. Furthermore, mutations that reduce the activation potential of these activators also diminish its interaction with each of these SWI/SNF subunits. Thus, three distinct subunits of the SWI/SNF complex contribute to its interactions with activation domains. PMID:11865042

  7. Osterix represses adipogenesis by negatively regulating PPARγ transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Younho; Kim, Chae Yul; Cheong, Heesun; Lee, Kwang Youl

    2016-10-18

    Osterix is a novel bone-related transcription factor involved in osteoblast differentiation, and bone maturation. Because a reciprocal relationship exists between adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells, we hypothesized that Osterix might have a role in adipogenesis. Ablation of Osterix enhanced adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells, whereas overexpression suppressed this process and inhibited the expression of adipogenic markers including CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Further studies indicated that Osterix significantly decreased PPARγ-induced transcriptional activity. Using co-immunoprecipitation and GST-pull down analysis, we found that Osterix directly interacts with PPARγ. The ligand-binding domain (LBD) of PPARγ was responsible for this interaction, which was followed by repression of PPARγ-induced transcriptional activity, even in the presence of rosiglitazone. Taken together, we identified the Osterix has an important regulatory role on PPARγ activity, which contributed to the mechanism of adipogenesis.

  8. RSUME Enhances Glucocorticoid Receptor SUMOylation and Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Druker, Jimena; Liberman, Ana C.; Antunica-Noguerol, María; Gerez, Juan; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Rein, Theo; Iñiguez-Lluhí, Jorge A.; Holsboer, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity is modulated by posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and SUMOylation. The GR has three SUMOylation sites: lysine 297 (K297) and K313 in the N-terminal domain (NTD) and K721 within the ligand-binding domain. SUMOylation of the NTD sites mediates the negative effect of the synergy control motifs of GR on promoters with closely spaced GR binding sites. There is scarce evidence on the role of SUMO conjugation to K721 and its impact on GR transcriptional activity. We have previously shown that RSUME (RWD-containing SUMOylation enhancer) increases protein SUMOylation. We now demonstrate that RSUME interacts with the GR and increases its SUMOylation. RSUME regulates GR transcriptional activity and the expression of its endogenous target genes, FKBP51 and S100P. RSUME uncovers a positive role for the third SUMOylation site, K721, on GR-mediated transcription, demonstrating that GR SUMOylation acts positively in the presence of a SUMOylation enhancer. Both mutation of K721 and small interfering RNA-mediated RSUME knockdown diminish GRIP1 coactivator activity. RSUME, whose expression is induced under stress conditions, is a key factor in heat shock-induced GR SUMOylation. These results show that inhibitory and stimulatory SUMO sites are present in the GR and at higher SUMOylation levels the stimulatory one becomes dominant. PMID:23508108

  9. Elucidation of Small RNAs that Activate Transcription in Bacteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Synthesis of the target and bait vectors .......................................................................... 16 3.2 Expression of pTRG-var and pBT...coat protein and the MS2 RNA hairpin. The bait plasmid (pBT) was modified by inserting the coding sequence for a MS2 coat protein dimer (Genescript...Figure 1. Screening for RNA transcriptional activation 6 Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. A) The bait plasmid

  10. Oncogenes Activate an Autonomous Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit That Drives Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dinesh K; Kollipara, Rahul K; Vemireddy, Vamsidara; Yang, Xiao-Li; Sun, Yuxiao; Regmi, Nanda; Klingler, Stefan; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Raisanen, Jack; Cho, Steve K; Sirasanagandla, Shyam; Nannepaga, Suraj; Piccirillo, Sara; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Wang, Shan; Humphries, Caroline G; Mickey, Bruce; Maher, Elizabeth A; Zheng, Hongwu; Kim, Ryung S; Kittler, Ralf; Bachoo, Robert M

    2017-01-24

    Efforts to identify and target glioblastoma (GBM) drivers have primarily focused on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Clinical benefits, however, have been elusive. Here, we identify an SRY-related box 2 (SOX2) transcriptional regulatory network that is independent of upstream RTKs and capable of driving glioma-initiating cells. We identified oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 (OLIG2) and zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1), which are frequently co-expressed irrespective of driver mutations, as potential SOX2 targets. In murine glioma models, we show that different combinations of tumor suppressor and oncogene mutations can activate Sox2, Olig2, and Zeb1 expression. We demonstrate that ectopic co-expression of the three transcription factors can transform tumor-suppressor-deficient astrocytes into glioma-initiating cells in the absence of an upstream RTK oncogene. Finally, we demonstrate that the transcriptional inhibitor mithramycin downregulates SOX2 and its target genes, resulting in markedly reduced proliferation of GBM cells in vivo.

  11. Identification of Post-Transcriptional Modulators of Breast Cancer Transcription Factor Activity Using MINDy

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Thomas M.; Castro, Mauro A. A.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently identified transcription factors (TFs) that are key drivers of breast cancer risk. To better understand the pathways or sub-networks in which these TFs mediate their function we sought to identify upstream modulators of their activity. We applied the MINDy (Modulator Inference by Network Dynamics) algorithm to four TFs (ESR1, FOXA1, GATA3 and SPDEF) that are key drivers of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer risk, as well as cancer progression. Our computational analysis identified over 500 potential modulators. We assayed 189 of these and identified 55 genes with functional characteristics that were consistent with a role as TF modulators. In the future, the identified modulators may be tested as potential therapeutic targets, able to alter the activity of TFs that are critical in the development of breast cancer. PMID:27997592

  12. Control of butanol formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum by transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Thormann, Kai; Feustel, Lothar; Lorenz, Karin; Nakotte, Stephan; Dürre, Peter

    2002-04-01

    The sol operon of Clostridium acetobutylicum is the essential transcription unit for formation of the solvents butanol and acetone. The recent proposal that transcriptional regulation of this operon is controlled by the repressor Orf5/SolR (R. V. Nair, E. M. Green, D. E. Watson, G. N. Bennett, and E. T. Papoutsakis, J. Bacteriol. 181:319-330, 1999) was found to be incorrect. Instead, regulation depends on activation, most probably by the multivalent transcription factor Spo0A. The operon is transcribed from a single promoter. A second signal identified in primer extension studies results from mRNA processing and can be observed only in the natural host, not in a heterologous host. The first structural gene in the operon (adhE, encoding a bifunctional butyraldehyde/butanol dehydrogenase) is translated into two different proteins, the mature AdhE enzyme and the separate butanol dehydrogenase domain. The promoter of the sol operon is preceded by three imperfect repeats and a putative Spo0A-binding motif, which partially overlaps with repeat 3 (R3). Reporter gene analysis performed with the lacZ gene of Thermoanaerobacterium thermosulfurigenes and targeted mutations of the regulatory region revealed that the putative Spo0A-binding motif, R3, and R1 are essential for control. The data obtained also indicate that an additional activator protein is involved.

  13. Transcriptional activation of virulence genes of Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luyao; Lacroix, Benoît; Guo, Jianhua; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2017-01-09

    Recently, Rhizobium etli has emerged, in addition to Agrobacterium spp., as a prokaryotic species that encodes a functional machinery for DNA transfer to plant cells. To understand this R. etli-mediated genetic transformation, it would be useful to define how its vir genes respond to the host plants. Here, we explored the transcriptional activation of the vir genes contained on the R. etli p42a plasmid. Using a reporter construct harboring lacZ under the control of the R. etli virE promoter, we showed that the signal phenolic molecule acetosyringone (AS) induced R. etli vir gene expression both in R. etli and in A. tumefaciens background. Furthermore, in both bacterial backgrounds, the p42a plasmid also promoted plant genetic transformation with a reporter T-DNA. Importantly, the R. etli vir genes were transcriptionally activated by AS in a bacterial species-specific fashion in regard to the VirA/VirG signal sensor system, and this activation was induced by signals from the natural host species of this bacterium, but not from non-host plants. Early kinetics of transcriptional activation of the major vir genes of R. etli also revealed several features distinct from those known for A. tumefaciens: the expression of the virG gene reached saturation relatively quickly, and virB2, which in R. etli is located outside of the virB operon, was expressed only at low levels and did not respond to AS. These differences in vir gene transcription may contribute to the lower efficiency of T-DNA transfer of R. etli p42a versus pTiC58 of A. tumefaciens IMPORTANCE: The region encoding homologs of Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence genes in the Rhizobium etli CE3 p42a plasmid was the first endogenous virulence system encoded by a non-Agrobacterium species demonstrated to be functional in DNA transfer and stable integration into plant cell genome. In this study, we explore the transcriptional regulation and induction of virulence genes in R. etli and show similarities and differences

  14. Physical association with WWOX suppresses c-Jun transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Gaudio, Eugenio; Palamarchuk, Alexey; Palumbo, Tiziana; Trapasso, Francesco; Pekarsky, Yuri; Croce, Carlo M; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2006-12-15

    WWOX is a tumor suppressor that functions as a modular protein partner of transcription factors. WWOX contains two WW domains that mediate protein-protein interactions. In this report, we show that WWOX, via its first WW domain, specifically associates with the proline-rich motif of c-Jun proto-oncogene. Our data show that phosphorylation of c-Jun caused by overexpression of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (Mekk1), an upstream activator of c-Jun, enhances the interaction of c-Jun with WWOX. Furthermore, exposure of HaCaT keratinocytes to UVC radiation resulted in the association of endogenous WWOX and c-Jun. The WWOX-c-Jun complexes mainly occur in the cytoplasm. Expression of WWOX attenuates the ability of MEKK1 to increase the activity of a c-Jun-driven activating protein-1 (AP-1)-luciferase reporter plasmid. In contrast, a point mutation in the first WW domain of WWOX has no effect on transactivation of AP-1 when coexpressed with c-Jun protein. Our findings reveal a novel functional cross-talk between c-Jun transcription factor and WWOX tumor suppressor protein.

  15. Activating transcription factor 6 derepression mediates neuroprotection in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, José R; Zhang, Hongyu; Villar, Diego; González, Paz; Dopazo, Xose M; Morón-Oset, Javier; Higueras, Elena; Oliveros, Juan C; Arrabal, María D; Prieto, Angela; Cercós, Pilar; González, Teresa; De la Cruz, Alicia; Casado-Vela, Juan; Rábano, Alberto; Valenzuela, Carmen; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Marta; Li, Jia-Yi; Mellström, Britt

    2016-02-01

    Deregulated protein and Ca2+ homeostasis underlie synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD); however, the factors that disrupt homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we determined that expression of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, is reduced in murine in vivo and in vitro HD models and in HD patients. DREAM downregulation was observed early after birth and was associated with endogenous neuroprotection. In the R6/2 mouse HD model, induced DREAM haplodeficiency or blockade of DREAM activity by chronic administration of the drug repaglinide delayed onset of motor dysfunction, reduced striatal atrophy, and prolonged life span. DREAM-related neuroprotection was linked to an interaction between DREAM and the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Repaglinide blocked this interaction and enhanced ATF6 processing and nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active ATF6, improving prosurvival UPR function in striatal neurons. Together, our results identify a role for DREAM silencing in the activation of ATF6 signaling, which promotes early neuroprotection in HD.

  16. Activating transcription factor 6 derepression mediates neuroprotection in Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, José R.; Zhang, Hongyu; Villar, Diego; González, Paz; Dopazo, Xose M.; Morón-Oset, Javier; Higueras, Elena; Oliveros, Juan C.; Arrabal, María D.; Prieto, Angela; Cercós, Pilar; González, Teresa; De la Cruz, Alicia; Casado-Vela, Juan; Rábano, Alberto; Valenzuela, Carmen; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Marta; Li, Jia-Yi; Mellström, Britt

    2016-01-01

    Deregulated protein and Ca2+ homeostasis underlie synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD); however, the factors that disrupt homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we determined that expression of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, is reduced in murine in vivo and in vitro HD models and in HD patients. DREAM downregulation was observed early after birth and was associated with endogenous neuroprotection. In the R6/2 mouse HD model, induced DREAM haplodeficiency or blockade of DREAM activity by chronic administration of the drug repaglinide delayed onset of motor dysfunction, reduced striatal atrophy, and prolonged life span. DREAM-related neuroprotection was linked to an interaction between DREAM and the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Repaglinide blocked this interaction and enhanced ATF6 processing and nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active ATF6, improving prosurvival UPR function in striatal neurons. Together, our results identify a role for DREAM silencing in the activation of ATF6 signaling, which promotes early neuroprotection in HD. PMID:26752648

  17. Visualization of Estrogen Receptor Transcriptional Activation in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Marnie E.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogens regulate a diverse range of physiological processes and affect multiple tissues. Estrogen receptors (ERs) regulate transcription by binding to DNA at conserved estrogen response elements, and such elements have been used to report ER activity in cultured cells and in transgenic mice. We generated stable, transgenic zebrafish containing five consecutive elements upstream of a c-fos minimal promoter and green fluorescent protein (GFP) to visualize and quantify transcriptional activation in live larvae. Transgenic larvae show robust, dose-dependent estrogen-dependent fluorescent labeling in the liver, consistent with er gene expression, whereas ER antagonists inhibit GFP expression. The nonestrogenic steroids dexamethasone and progesterone fail to activate GFP, confirming ER selectivity. Natural and synthetic estrogens activated the transgene with varying potency, and two chemicals, genistein and bisphenol A, preferentially induce GFP expression in the heart. In adult fish, fluorescence was observed in estrogenic tissues such as the liver, ovary, pituitary gland, and brain. Individual estrogen-responsive neurons and their projections were visualized in the adult brain, and GFP-positive neurons increased in number after 17β-estradiol exposure. The transgenic estrogen-responsive zebrafish allow ER signaling to be monitored visually and serve as in vivo sentinels for detection of estrogenic compounds. PMID:21540282

  18. Clinical application of transcriptional activators of bile salt transporters☆

    PubMed Central

    Baghdasaryan, Anna; Chiba, Peter; Trauner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Hepatobiliary bile salt (BS) transporters are critical determinants of BS homeostasis controlling intracellular concentrations of BSs and their enterohepatic circulation. Genetic or acquired dysfunction of specific transport systems causes intrahepatic and systemic retention of potentially cytotoxic BSs, which, in high concentrations, may disturb integrity of cell membranes and subcellular organelles resulting in cell death, inflammation and fibrosis. Transcriptional regulation of canalicular BS efflux through bile salt export pump (BSEP), basolateral elimination through organic solute transporters alpha and beta (OSTα/OSTβ) as well as inhibition of hepatocellular BS uptake through basolateral Na+-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) represent critical steps in protection from hepatocellular BS overload and can be targeted therapeutically. In this article, we review the potential clinical implications of the major BS transporters BSEP, OSTα/OSTβ and NTCP in the pathogenesis of hereditary and acquired cholestatic syndromes, provide an overview on transcriptional control of these transporters by the key regulatory nuclear receptors and discuss the potential therapeutic role of novel transcriptional activators of BS transporters in cholestasis. PMID:24333169

  19. The transcriptionally active regions in the genome of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Simon; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Jarmer, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    The majority of all genes have so far been identified and annotated systematically through in silico gene finding. Here we report the finding of 3662 strand-specific transcriptionally active regions (TARs) in the genome of Bacillus subtilis by the use of tiling arrays. We have measured the genome-wide expression during mid-exponential growth on rich (LB) and minimal (M9) medium. The identified TARs account for 77.3% of the genes as they are currently annotated and additionally we find 84 putative non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and 127 antisense transcripts. One ncRNA, ncr22, is predicted to act as a translational control on cstA and an antisense transcript was observed opposite the housekeeping sigma factor sigA. Through this work we have discovered a long conserved 3′ untranslated region (UTR) in a group of membrane-associated genes that is predicted to fold into a large and highly stable secondary structure. One of the genes having this tail is efeN, which encodes a target of the twin-arginine translocase (Tat) protein translocation system. PMID:19682248

  20. Adenovirus E1A protein activates transcription of the E1A gene subsequent to transcription complex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Schaack, J; Logan, J; Vakalopoulou, E; Shenk, T

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of transcriptional activation of the adenovirus E1A and E3 genes by E1A protein during infection was examined by using transcription-competition assays. Infection of HeLa cells with one virus led to inhibition of mRNA accumulation from a superinfecting virus. Synthesis of the E1A 289R protein by the first virus to infect reduced inhibition of transcription of the superinfecting virus, indicating that the E1A 289R protein was limiting for E1A-activated transcription. Infection with an E1A- virus, followed 6 h later by superinfection with a wild-type virus, led to preferential transcriptional activation of the E1A gene of the first virus, suggesting that a host transcription component(s) stably associated with the E1A promoter in the absence of E1A protein and that this complex was the substrate for transcriptional activation by E1A protein. The limiting host transcription component(s) bound to the E1A promoter to form a complex with a half-life greater than 24 h in the absence of E1A 289R protein, as demonstrated in a challenge assay with a large excess of superinfecting virus. In the presence of the E1A 289R protein, the E1A gene of the superinfecting virus was gradually activated with a reduction in E1A mRNA accumulation from the first virus. The kinetics of the activation suggest that this was due to an indirect effect rather than to destabilization of stable transcription complexes by the 289R protein. Images PMID:1825853

  1. Activation of p53 Transcriptional Activity by SMRT: a Histone Deacetylase 3-Independent Function of a Transcriptional Corepressor

    PubMed Central

    Adikesavan, Anbu Karani; Karmakar, Sudipan; Pardo, Patricia; Wang, Liguo; Liu, Shuang; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) is an established histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3)-dependent transcriptional corepressor. Microarray analyses of MCF-7 cells transfected with control or SMRT small interfering RNA revealed SMRT regulation of genes involved in DNA damage responses, and the levels of the DNA damage marker γH2AX as well as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage were elevated in SMRT-depleted cells treated with doxorubicin. A number of these genes are established p53 targets. SMRT knockdown decreased the activity of two p53-dependent reporter genes as well as the expression of p53 target genes, such as CDKN1A (which encodes p21). SMRT bound directly to p53 and was recruited to p53 binding sites within the p21 promoter. Depletion of GPS2 and TBL1, components of the SMRT corepressor complex, but not histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) decreased p21-luciferase activity. p53 bound to the SMRT deacetylase activation domain (DAD), which mediates HDAC3 binding and activation, and HDAC3 could attenuate p53 binding to the DAD region of SMRT. Moreover, an HDAC3 binding-deficient SMRT DAD mutant coactivated p53 transcriptional activity. Collectively, these data highlight a biological role for SMRT in mediating DNA damage responses and suggest a model where p53 binding to the DAD limits HDAC3 interaction with this coregulator, thereby facilitating SMRT coactivation of p53-dependent gene expression. PMID:24449765

  2. Rethinking Transcriptional Activation in the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Fogelmark, Karl; Troein, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks are biological timekeepers that allow living cells to time their activity in anticipation of predictable daily changes in light and other environmental factors. The complexity of the circadian clock in higher plants makes it difficult to understand the role of individual genes or molecular interactions, and mathematical modelling has been useful in guiding clock research in model organisms such as Arabidopsis thaliana. We present a model of the circadian clock in Arabidopsis, based on a large corpus of published time course data. It appears from experimental evidence in the literature that most interactions in the clock are repressive. Hence, we remove all transcriptional activation found in previous models of this system, and instead extend the system by including two new components, the morning-expressed activator RVE8 and the nightly repressor/activator NOX. Our modelling results demonstrate that the clock does not need a large number of activators in order to reproduce the observed gene expression patterns. For example, the sequential expression of the PRR genes does not require the genes to be connected as a series of activators. In the presented model, transcriptional activation is exclusively the task of RVE8. Predictions of how strongly RVE8 affects its targets are found to agree with earlier interpretations of the experimental data, but generally we find that the many negative feedbacks in the system should discourage intuitive interpretations of mutant phenotypes. The dynamics of the clock are difficult to predict without mathematical modelling, and the clock is better viewed as a tangled web than as a series of loops. PMID:25033214

  3. The Transcription Factor p53 Influences Microglial Activation Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jayadev, Suman; Nesser, Nicole K.; Hopkins, Stephanie; Myers, Scott J.; Case, Amanda; Lee, Rona J.; Seaburg, Luke A.; Uo, Takuma; Murphy, Sean P.; Morrison, Richard S.; Garden, Gwenn A.

    2011-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases are influenced by the innate immune response in the central nervous system (CNS). Microglia, have pro-inflammatory and subsequently neurotoxic actions as well as anti-inflammatory functions that promote recovery and repair. Very little is known about the transcriptional control of these specific microglial behaviors. We have previously shown that in HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), the transcription factor p53 accumulates in microglia and that microglial p53 expression is required for the in vitro neurotoxicity of the HIV coat glycoprotein gp120. These findings suggested a novel function for p53 in regulating microglial activation. Here we report that in the absence of p53, microglia demonstrate a blunted response to interferon-γ, failing to increase expression of genes associated with classical macrophage activation or secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. Microarray analysis of global gene expression profiles revealed increased expression of genes associated with anti-inflammatory functions, phagocytosis and tissue repair in p53 knockout (p53−/−) microglia compared with those cultured from strain matched p53 expressing (p53+/+) mice. We further observed that p53−/− microglia demonstrate increased phagocytic activity in vitro and expression of markers for alternative macrophage activation both in vitro and in vivo. In HAND brain tissue, the alternative activation marker CD163 was expressed in a separate subset of microglia than those demonstrating p53 accumulation. These data suggest that p53 influences microglial behavior, supporting the adoption of a pro-inflammatory phenotype, while p53 deficiency promotes phagocytosis and gene expression associated with alternative activation and anti-inflammatory functions. PMID:21598312

  4. Yeast Recombination Enhancer Is Stimulated by Transcription Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, Sevinc; Reese, Joseph C.; Workman, Jerry L.; Simpson, Robert T.

    2005-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating type switching is a gene conversion event that exhibits donor preference. MATa cells choose HMLα for recombination, and MATα cells choose HMRa. Donor preference is controlled by the recombination enhancer (RE), located between HMLα and MATa on the left arm of chromosome III. A number of a-cell specific noncoding RNAs are transcribed from the RE locus. Mcm1 and Fkh1 regulate RE activity in a cells. Here we show that Mcm1 binding is required for both the transcription of the noncoding RNAs and Fkh1 binding. This requirement can be bypassed by inserting another promoter into the RE. Moreover, the insertion of this promoter increases donor preference and opens the chromatin structure around the conserved domains of RE. Additionally, we determined that the level of Fkh1 binding positively correlates with the level of donor preference. We conclude that the role of Mcm1 in RE is to open chromatin around the conserved domains and activate transcription; this facilitates Fkh1 binding and the level of this binding determines the level of donor preference. PMID:16135790

  5. Crx activates opsin transcription by recruiting HAT-containing co-activators and promoting histone acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Guang-Hua; Chen, Shiming

    2008-01-01

    The homeodomain transcription factor Crx is required for expression of many photoreceptor genes in the mammalian retina. The mechanism by which Crx activates transcription remains to be determined. Using protein–protein interaction assays, Crx was found to interact with three co-activator proteins (complexes): STAGA, Cbp and p300, all of which possess histone acetyl-transferase (HAT) activity. To determine the role of Crx–HAT interactions in target gene chromatin modification and transcriptional activation, quantitative RT–PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation were performed on Crx target genes, rod and cone opsins, in developing mouse retina. Although cone opsins are transcribed earlier than rhodopsin during development, the transcription of each gene is preceded by the same sequence of events in their promoter and enhancer regions: (i) binding of Crx, followed by (ii) binding of HATs, (iii) the acetylation of histone H3, then (iv) binding of other photoreceptor transcription factors (Nrl and Nr2e3) and RNA polymerase II. In Crx knockout mice (Crx−/−), the association of HATs and AcH3 with target promoter/enhancer regions was significantly decreased, which correlates with aberrant opsin transcription and photoreceptor dysfunction in these mice. Similar changes to the opsin chromatin were seen in Y79 retinoblastoma cells, where opsin genes are barely transcribed. These defects in Y79 cells can be reversed by expressing a recombinant Crx or applying histone deacetylase inhibitors. Altogether, these results suggest that one mechanism for Crx-mediated transcriptional activation is to recruit HATs to photoreceptor gene chromatin for histone acetylation, thereby inducing and maintaining appropriate chromatin configurations for transcription. PMID:17656371

  6. RNA polymerase active center: the molecular engine of transcription.

    PubMed

    Nudler, Evgeny

    2009-01-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a complex molecular machine that governs gene expression and its regulation in all cellular organisms. To accomplish its function of accurately producing a full-length RNA copy of a gene, RNAP performs a plethora of chemical reactions and undergoes multiple conformational changes in response to cellular conditions. At the heart of this machine is the active center, the engine, which is composed of distinct fixed and moving parts that serve as the ultimate acceptor of regulatory signals and as the target of inhibitory drugs. Recent advances in the structural and biochemical characterization of RNAP explain the active center at the atomic level and enable new approaches to understanding the entire transcription mechanism, its exceptional fidelity and control.

  7. Activator protein 1 promotes the transcriptional activation of IRAK-M.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peipei; Bo, Lulong; Liu, Yongjian; Lu, Wenbin; Lin, Shengwei; Bian, Jinjun; Deng, Xiaoming

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase M (IRAK-M) is a well-known negative regulator for Toll-like receptor signaling, which can regulate immune homeostasis and tolerance in a number of pathological settings. However, the mechanism for IRAK-M regulation at transcriptional level remains largely unknown. In this study, a 1.4kb upstream sequence starting from the major IRAK-M transcriptional start site was cloned into luciferase reporter vector pGL3-basic to construct the full-length IRAK-M promoter. Luciferase reporter plasmids harboring the full-length and the deletion mutants of IRAK-M were transfected into 293T and A549 cells, and their relative luciferase activity was measured. The results demonstrated that activator protein 1(AP-1) cis-element plays a crucial role in IRAK-M constitutive gene transcription. Silencing of c-Fos and/or c-Jun expression suppressed the IRAK-M promoter activity as well as its mRNA and protein expressions. As a specific inhibitor for AP-1 activation, SP600125 also significantly suppressed the basal transcriptional activity of IRAK-M, the binding activity of c-Fos/c-Jun with IRAK-M promoter, and IRAK-M protein expression. Taken together, the result of this study highlights the importance of AP-1 in IRAK-M transcription, which offers more information on the role of IRAK-M in infectious and non-infectious diseases.

  8. Conversion of the LIN-1 ETS protein of Caenorhabditis elegans from a SUMOylated transcriptional repressor to a phosphorylated transcriptional activator.

    PubMed

    Leight, Elizabeth R; Murphy, John T; Fantz, Douglas A; Pepin, Danielle; Schneider, Daniel L; Ratliff, Thomas M; Mohammad, Duaa H; Herman, Michael A; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2015-03-01

    The LIN-1 ETS transcription factor plays a pivotal role in controlling cell fate decisions during development of the Caenorhabditis elegans vulva. Prior to activation of the RTK/Ras/ERK-signaling pathway, LIN-1 functions as a SUMOylated transcriptional repressor that inhibits vulval cell fate. Here we demonstrate using the yeast two-hybrid system that SUMOylation of LIN-1 mediates interactions with a protein predicted to be involved in transcriptional repression: the RAD-26 Mi-2β/CHD4 component of the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylation (NuRD) transcriptional repression complex. Genetic studies indicated that rad-26 functions to inhibit vulval cell fates in worms. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we showed that the EGL-27/MTA1 component of the NuRD complex binds the carboxy-terminus of LIN-1 independently of LIN-1 SUMOylation. EGL-27 also binds UBC-9, an enzyme involved in SUMOylation, and MEP-1, a zinc-finger protein previously shown to bind LIN-1. Genetic studies indicate that egl-27 inhibits vulval cell fates in worms. These results suggest that LIN-1 recruits multiple proteins that repress transcription via both the SUMOylated amino-terminus and the unSUMOylated carboxy-terminus. Assays in cultured cells showed that the carboxy-terminus of LIN-1 was converted to a potent transcriptional activator in response to active ERK. We propose a model in which LIN-1 recruits multiple transcriptional repressors to inhibit the 1° vulval cell fate, and phosphorylation by ERK converts LIN-1 to a transcriptional activator that promotes the 1° vulval cell fate.

  9. The metabolic activator FOXO1 binds hepatitis B virus DNA and activates its transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Shlomai, Amir; Shaul, Yosef

    2009-04-17

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a small DNA virus that targets the liver and infects humans worldwide. Recently we have shown that the metabolic regulator PGC-1{alpha} coactivates HBV transcription thereby rendering the virus susceptible to fluctuations in the nutritional status of the liver. PGC-1{alpha} coactivation of HBV is mediated through the liver-enriched nuclear receptor HNF4{alpha} and through another yet unknown transcription factor(s). Here we show that the forkhead transcription factor FOXO1, a known target for PGC-1{alpha} coactivation and a central mediator of glucose metabolism in the liver, binds HBV core promoter and activates its transcription. This activation is further enhanced in the presence of PGC-1{alpha}, implying that FOXO1 is a target for PGC-1{alpha} coactivation of HBV transcription. Thus, our results identify another key metabolic regulator as an activator of HBV transcription, thereby supporting the principle that HBV gene expression is regulated in a similar way to key hepatic metabolic genes.

  10. Feedback regulation of PRL secretion is mediated by the transcription factor, signal transducer, and activator of transcription 5b.

    PubMed

    Grattan, D R; Xu, J; McLachlan, M J; Kokay, I C; Bunn, S J; Hovey, R C; Davey, H W

    2001-09-01

    PRL secretion from the anterior pituitary gland is inhibited by dopamine produced in the tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons of the hypothalamus. The activity of tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons is stimulated by PRL; thus, PRL regulates its own secretion by a negative feedback mechanism. PRL receptors are expressed on tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons, but the intracellular signaling pathway is not known. We have observed that mice with a disrupted signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b gene have grossly elevated serum PRL concentrations. Despite this hyperprolactinemia, mRNA levels and immunoreactivity of tyrosine hydroxylase, the key enzyme in dopamine synthesis, were significantly lower in the tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons of these signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b-deficient mice. Concentrations of the dopamine metabolite dihydroxyphenylacetic acid in the median eminence were also significantly lower in signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b-deficient mice than in wild-type mice. No changes were observed in nonhypothalamic dopaminergic neuronal populations, indicating that the effects were selective to tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons. These data indicate that in the absence of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b, PRL signal transduction in tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons is impaired, and they demonstrate that this transcription factor plays an obligatory and nonredundant role in mediating the negative feedback action of PRL on tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons.

  11. Berberine Suppresses Adipocyte Differentiation via Decreasing CREB Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Tang, Hongju; Deng, Ruyuan; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Yuqing; Wang, Yao; Liu, Yun; Li, Fengying; Wang, Xiao; Zhou, Libin

    2015-01-01

    Berberine, one of the major constituents of Chinese herb Rhizoma coptidis, has been demonstrated to lower blood glucose, blood lipid, and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The anti-obesity effect of berberine has been attributed to its anti-adipogenic activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. In the present study, we found that berberine significantly suppressed the expressions of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)α, peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor γ2 (PPARγ2), and other adipogenic genes in the process of adipogenesis. Berberine decreased cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and C/EBPβ expression at the early stage of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation. In addition, CREB phosphorylation and C/EBPβ expression induced by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) and forskolin were also attenuated by berberine. The binding activities of cAMP responsive element (CRE) stimulated by IBMX and forskolin were inhibited by berberine. The binding of phosphorylated CREB to the promoter of C/EBPβ was abrogated by berberine after the induction of preadipocyte differentiation. These results suggest that berberine blocks adipogenesis mainly via suppressing CREB activity, which leads to a decrease in C/EBPβ-triggered transcriptional cascades.

  12. Activating transcription factor 3 regulates immune and metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rynes, Jan; Donohoe, Colin D; Frommolt, Peter; Brodesser, Susanne; Jindra, Marek; Uhlirova, Mirka

    2012-10-01

    Integration of metabolic and immune responses during animal development ensures energy balance, permitting both growth and defense. Disturbed homeostasis causes organ failure, growth retardation, and metabolic disorders. Here, we show that the Drosophila melanogaster activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) safeguards metabolic and immune system homeostasis. Loss of Atf3 results in chronic inflammation and starvation responses mounted primarily by the larval gut epithelium, while the fat body suffers lipid overload, causing energy imbalance and death. Hyperactive proinflammatory and stress signaling through NF-κB/Relish, Jun N-terminal kinase, and FOXO in atf3 mutants deregulates genes important for immune defense, digestion, and lipid metabolism. Reducing the dose of either FOXO or Relish normalizes both lipid metabolism and gene expression in atf3 mutants. The function of Atf3 is conserved, as human ATF3 averts some of the Drosophila mutant phenotypes, improving their survival. The single Drosophila Atf3 may incorporate the diversified roles of two related mammalian proteins.

  13. Localized recruitment of a chromatin-remodeling activity by an activator in vivo drives transcriptional elongation

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Laura L.; Weirich, Christine S.; Benjamin, Ivor J.; Kingston, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    To understand the role of chromatin-remodeling activities in transcription, it is necessary to understand how they interact with transcriptional activators in vivo to regulate the different steps of transcription. Human heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) stimulates both transcriptional initiation and elongation. We replaced mouse HSF1 in fibroblasts with wild-type and mutant human HSF1 constructs and characterized regulation of an endogenous mouse hsp70 gene. A mutation that diminished transcriptional initiation led to twofold reductions in hsp70 mRNA induction and recruitment of a SWI/SNF remodeling complex. In contrast, a mutation that diminished transcriptional elongation abolished induction of full-length mRNA, SWI/SNF recruitment, and chromatin remodeling, but minimally impaired initiation from the hsp70 promoter. Another remodeling factor, SNF2h, is constitutively present at the promoter irrespective of the genotype of HSF1. These data suggest that localized recruitment of SWI/SNF drives a specialized remodeling reaction necessary for the production of full-length hsp70 mRNA. PMID:12782657

  14. Histone Acetyltransferase Complexes Can Mediate Transcriptional Activation by the Major Glucocorticoid Receptor Activation Domain

    PubMed Central

    Wallberg, Annika E.; Neely, Kristen E.; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Workman, Jerry L.; Wright, Anthony P. H.; Grant, Patrick A.

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the Ada adapter proteins are important for glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated gene activation in yeast. The N-terminal transactivation domain of GR, τ1, is dependent upon Ada2, Ada3, and Gcn5 for transactivation in vitro and in vivo. Using in vitro techniques, we demonstrate that the GR-τ1 interacts directly with the native Ada containing histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex SAGA but not the related Ada complex. Mutations in τ1 that reduce τ1 transactivation activity in vivo lead to a reduced binding of τ1 to the SAGA complex and conversely, mutations increasing the transactivation activity of τ1 lead to an increased binding of τ1 to SAGA. In addition, the Ada-independent NuA4 HAT complex also interacts with τ1. GAL4-τ1-driven transcription from chromatin templates is stimulated by SAGA and NuA4 in an acetyl coenzyme A-dependent manner. Low-activity τ1 mutants reduce SAGA- and NuA4-stimulated transcription while high-activity τ1 mutants increase transcriptional activation, specifically from chromatin templates. Our results demonstrate that the targeting of native HAT complexes by the GR-τ1 activation domain mediates transcriptional stimulation from chromatin templates. PMID:10454542

  15. Fluorescence probes for studying the mechanisms of transcription activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyduk, Tomasz; Callaci, Sandhya

    1994-08-01

    Regulation of transcription involves a complex interplay between protein-ligand, protein-DNA, and protein-protein interactions. Fluorescence probes seem to be very well suited to study such complex systems since the selectivity and sensitivity of fluorescence makes possible to select only a part of the system for observation leaving the rest of it transparent to the technique. We have used fluorescence spectroscopy to study the activation of E.coli RNA polymerase by cAMP receptor protein (CRP). The cAMP interactions with CRP, domain flexibility in CRP molecule, the structure of CRP-DNA complex, and interaction of CRP with RNA-polymerase have been studied. Here we report the preparation and properties of 5-OH-Trp derivative of the sigma subunit of E.coli RNA polymerase. This subunit is responsible for specific promoter recognition. The obtained results show that the biological activities of the derivative are identical as observed for the native protein. Comparison of fluorescence properties of the 5-OH-Trp sigma derivative free and bound to the core RNA polymerase suggests a conformational change in the sigma protein induced by this interaction. These data show that replacement of Trp residues with 5-OH-Trp can be a very useful approach to prepare specific fluorescence derivatives of multimeric proteins.

  16. Molecular Dynamics of "Fuzzy" Transcriptional Activator-Coactivator Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Scholes, Natalie S.; Weinzierl, Robert O. J.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional activation domains (ADs) are generally thought to be intrinsically unstructured, but capable of adopting limited secondary structure upon interaction with a coactivator surface. The indeterminate nature of this interface made it hitherto difficult to study structure/function relationships of such contacts. Here we used atomistic accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations to study the conformational changes of the GCN4 AD and variants thereof, either free in solution, or bound to the GAL11 coactivator surface. We show that the AD-coactivator interactions are highly dynamic while obeying distinct rules. The data provide insights into the constant and variable aspects of orientation of ADs relative to the coactivator, changes in secondary structure and energetic contributions stabilizing the various conformers at different time points. We also demonstrate that a prediction of α-helical propensity correlates directly with the experimentally measured transactivation potential of a large set of mutagenized ADs. The link between α-helical propensity and the stimulatory activity of ADs has fundamental practical and theoretical implications concerning the recruitment of ADs to coactivators. PMID:27175900

  17. SUMO modification regulates the transcriptional activity of FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Alm-Kristiansen, Anne Hege; Norman, Ingrid Louise; Matre, Vilborg; Gabrielsen, Odd Stokke

    2009-09-25

    FLASH is a huge multifunctional nuclear protein that has been linked to apoptotic signalling, transcriptional control and Cajal body function. To gain further insight into the functions of the FLASH protein, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening with FLASH as bait and identified the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 as an interaction partner. The main interaction surface for Ubc9 was found in the C-terminal part of FLASH, which is also a target for sumoylation. We identified K1813 as the major sumoylation site in FLASH, being enhanced by the SUMO E3 ligases Pc2 and PIASy. Disruption of this SUMO-conjugation site did not change the speckled subnuclear localization of FLASH, but it caused a reduction in FLASH activity as measured in a Gal4-tethering assay. Interestingly, the SUMO-specific protease SENP1 activated FLASH in the same assay. Overall, our results point to a complex involvement of sumoylation in modulating the function of FLASH.

  18. Human transcriptional coactivator PC4 stimulates DNA end joining and activates DSB repair activity.

    PubMed

    Batta, Kiran; Yokokawa, Masatoshi; Takeyasu, Kunio; Kundu, Tapas K

    2009-01-23

    Human transcriptional coactivator PC4 is a highly abundant nuclear protein that is involved in diverse cellular processes ranging from transcription to chromatin organization. Earlier, we have shown that PC4, a positive activator of p53, overexpresses upon genotoxic insult in a p53-dependent manner. In the present study, we show that PC4 stimulates ligase-mediated DNA end joining irrespective of the source of DNA ligase. Pull-down assays reveal that PC4 helps in the association of DNA ends through its C-terminal domain. In vitro nonhomologous end-joining assays with cell-free extracts show that PC4 enhances the joining of noncomplementary DNA ends. Interestingly, we found that PC4 activates double-strand break (DSB) repair activity through stimulation of DSB rejoining in vivo. Together, these findings demonstrate PC4 as an activator of nonhomologous end joining and DSB repair activity.

  19. Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are a framework for predicting quantitative relationships between molecular initiatin...

  20. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Afsar U.; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Hannigan, Gregory E.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding. PMID:26569329

  1. Activator control of nucleosome occupancy in activation and repression of transcription.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Gene O; Prabhu, Vidya; Floer, Monique; Wang, Xin; Spagna, Dan; Schreiber, David; Ptashne, Mark

    2008-12-23

    The relationship between chromatin structure and gene expression is a subject of intense study. The universal transcriptional activator Gal4 removes promoter nucleosomes as it triggers transcription, but how it does so has remained obscure. The reverse process, repression of transcription, has often been correlated with the presence of nucleosomes. But it is not known whether nucleosomes are required for that effect. A new quantitative assay describes, for any given location, the fraction of DNA molecules in the population that bears a nucleosome at any given instant. This allows us to follow the time courses of nucleosome removal and reformation, in wild-type and mutant cells, upon activation (by galactose) and repression (by glucose) of the GAL genes of yeast. We show that upon being freed of its inhibitor Gal80 by the action of galactose, Gal4 quickly recruits SWI/SNF to the genes, and that nucleosome "remodeler" rapidly removes promoter nucleosomes. In the absence of SWI/SNF, Gal4's action also results in nucleosome removal and the activation of transcription, but both processes are significantly delayed. Addition of glucose to cells growing in galactose represses transcription. But if galactose remains present, Gal4 continues to work, recruiting SWI/SNF and maintaining the promoter nucleosome-free despite it being repressed. This requirement for galactose is obviated in a mutant in which Gal4 works constitutively. These results show how an activator's recruiting function can control chromatin structure both during gene activation and repression. Thus, both under activating and repressing conditions, the activator can recruit an enzymatic machine that removes promoter nucleosomes. Our results show that whereas promoter nucleosome removal invariably accompanies activation, reformation of nucleosomes is not required for repression. The finding that there are two routes to nucleosome removal and activation of transcription-one that requires the action of SWI

  2. SRY: A transcriptional activator of mammalian testis determination.

    PubMed

    Sekido, Ryohei

    2010-03-01

    Sry (sex-determining region Y) is the sex-determining gene on the mammalian Y chromosome, which encodes a transcription factor containing a DNA-binding domain characteristic of some high mobility group proteins (HMG box). It is the founder member of the Sox (Sry-related HMG box) gene family and is therefore classified in the Sox A group. In mice, the transient expression of Sry between 10.5 and 12.5 dpc triggers the differentiation of Sertoli cells from the supporting cell precursor lineage, which would otherwise give rise to granulosa cells in ovaries. However, little was known about the target genes of SRY and molecular mechanisms how SRY leads to testis development. Recent work has provided evidence that SRY binds directly to a testis-specific enhancer of Sox9 (TES) and activates Sox9 expression in co-operation with steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1). Furthermore, this SRY action is limited to a certain time period during embryogenesis.

  3. Transcription activation parameters at ara pBAD.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Reeder, T; Schleif, R

    1996-04-26

    We studied the formation of open complexes of RNA polymerase and promoter DNA as activated by the AraC protein at the Escherichia coli araBAD promoter pBAD and by the cyclic AMP receptor protein at the galKTE promoter P1. The DNA migration retardation assay was demonstrated to be suitable for the detection and quantitation of open complexes by the correspondence in the properties of open complexes in solution and retarded complexes observed in gels. These included, on the ara promoter, heparin resistance, lifetime, DNAseI footprinting, exonuclease III footprinting, permanganate footprinting and disappearance upon transcription, and on the gal promoter, the correspondence between the kinetic parameters Kd and k2 obtained with established techniques and those obtained with the migration retardation assay. On the pBAD promoter we obtained kinetic parameters of Kd = 0.3 nM and K2 = 1 minute(-1). The unusually tight binding of polymerase in the presence of AraC suggests that AraC binds polymerase tightly.

  4. Activating Transcription Factor 3 Regulates Immune and Metabolic Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Rynes, Jan; Donohoe, Colin D.; Frommolt, Peter; Brodesser, Susanne; Jindra, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Integration of metabolic and immune responses during animal development ensures energy balance, permitting both growth and defense. Disturbed homeostasis causes organ failure, growth retardation, and metabolic disorders. Here, we show that the Drosophila melanogaster activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) safeguards metabolic and immune system homeostasis. Loss of Atf3 results in chronic inflammation and starvation responses mounted primarily by the larval gut epithelium, while the fat body suffers lipid overload, causing energy imbalance and death. Hyperactive proinflammatory and stress signaling through NF-κB/Relish, Jun N-terminal kinase, and FOXO in atf3 mutants deregulates genes important for immune defense, digestion, and lipid metabolism. Reducing the dose of either FOXO or Relish normalizes both lipid metabolism and gene expression in atf3 mutants. The function of Atf3 is conserved, as human ATF3 averts some of the Drosophila mutant phenotypes, improving their survival. The single Drosophila Atf3 may incorporate the diversified roles of two related mammalian proteins. PMID:22851689

  5. The effect of phenobarbital on the transcriptional activity of liver.

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, J P; Schwalm, F; Richardson, A

    1983-01-01

    The effect of phenobarbital on the transcriptional activity of liver was studied by measuring the synthesis of RNA by suspensions of hepatocytes isolated from rats treated with phenobarbital for various time periods. The absolute rates of RNA synthesis by isolated hepatocytes were determined by measuring the incorporation of [3H]orotic acid into RNA as UMP and the specific radioactivity of the UTP pool. The specific radioactivity of the UTP extracted from hepatocytes isolated from phenobarbital-treated rats was consistently lower than that of the UTP pool of hepatocytes from untreated rats. Phenobarbital treatment increased the rate of RNA synthesis 10-fold over that observed for hepatocytes from untreated rats. The maximum rate of RNA synthesis was observed 16-18 h after phenobarbital administration. Phenobarbital treatment also affected the nuclear-cytoplasmic transport of RNA by isolated hepatocytes. Immediately after phenobarbital treatment, the transport of RNA decreased; however, 24 h after phenobarbital administration, the transport of RNA was increased 4-fold. An increase in the synthesis of RNA in vivo by liver was found 18 h after phenobarbital treatment, and the incubation of suspensions of hepatocytes with various concentrations of phenobarbital increased RNA synthesis significantly. PMID:6190479

  6. Direct transcriptional activation of BT genes by NLP transcription factors is a key component of the nitrate response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takeo; Maekawa, Shugo; Konishi, Mineko; Yoshioka, Nozomi; Sasaki, Yuki; Maeda, Haruna; Ishida, Tetsuya; Kato, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Junji; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2017-01-29

    Nitrate modulates growth and development, functioning as a nutrient signal in plants. Although many changes in physiological processes in response to nitrate have been well characterized as nitrate responses, the molecular mechanisms underlying the nitrate response are not yet fully understood. Here, we show that NLP transcription factors, which are key regulators of the nitrate response, directly activate the nitrate-inducible expression of BT1 and BT2 encoding putative scaffold proteins with a plant-specific domain structure in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, the 35S promoter-driven expression of BT2 partially rescued growth inhibition caused by reductions in NLP activity in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, simultaneous disruption of BT1 and BT2 affected nitrate-dependent lateral root development. These results suggest that direct activation of BT1 and BT2 by NLP transcriptional activators is a key component of the molecular mechanism underlying the nitrate response in Arabidopsis.

  7. The Transcription Activity of Gis1 Is Negatively Modulated by Proteasome-mediated Limited Proteolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nianshu; Oliver, Stephen G.

    2010-01-01

    The transcriptional response to environmental changes has to be prompt but appropriate. Previously, it has been shown that the Gis1 transcription factor is responsible for regulating the expression of postdiauxic shift genes in response to nutrient starvation, and this transcription regulation is dependent upon the Rim15 kinase. Here we demonstrate that the activity of Gis1 is negatively modulated by proteasome-mediated limited proteolysis. Limited degradation of Gis1 by the proteasome leads to the production of smaller variants, which have weaker transcription activities than the full-length protein. The coiled-coil domain, absent from the smaller variants, is part of the second transcription activation domain in Gis1 and is essential for both the limited proteolysis of Gis1 and its full activity. Endogenous Gis1 and its variants, regardless of their transcription capabilities, activate transcription in a Rim15-dependent manner. However, when the full-length Gis1 accumulates in cells due to overexpression or inhibition of the proteasome function, transcription activation by Gis1 is no longer solely controlled by Rim15. Together, these data strongly indicate that the function of the limited degradation is to ensure that Gis1-dependent transcription is strictly regulated by the Rim15 kinase. Furthermore, we have revealed that the kinase activity of Rim15 is essential for this regulation. PMID:20022953

  8. RNase H Activity: Structure, Specificity, and Function in Reverse Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Sharon J.; Champoux, James J.

    2008-01-01

    This review compares the well-studied RNase H activities of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) and Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) reverse transcriptases. The RNase H domains of HIV-1 and MoMLV are structurally very similar, with functions assigned to conserved subregions like the RNase H primer grip and the connection subdomain, as well as to distinct features like the C-helix and loop in MoMLV RNase H. Like cellular RNases H, catalysis by the retroviral enzymes appears to involve a two-metal ion mechanism. Unlike cellular RNases H, the retroviral RNases H display three different modes of cleavage: internal, DNA 3′ end-directed, and RNA 5′ end-directed. All three modes of cleavage appear to have roles in reverse transcription. Nucleotide sequence is an important determinant of cleavage specificity with both enzymes exhibiting a preference for specific nucleotides at discrete positions flanking an internal cleavage site as well as during tRNA primer removal and plus-strand primer generation. RNA 5′ end-directed and DNA 3′ end-directed cleavages show similar sequence preferences at the positions closest to a cleavage site. A model for how RNase H selects cleavage sites is presented that incorporates both sequence preferences and the concept of a defined window for allowable cleavage from a recessed end. Finally, the RNase H activity of HIV-1 is considered as a target for anti-virals as well as a participant in drug resistance. PMID:18261820

  9. Aurora kinase B activity is modulated by thyroid hormone during transcriptional activation of pituitary genes.

    PubMed

    Tardáguila, Manuel; González-Gugel, Elena; Sánchez-Pacheco, Aurora

    2011-03-01

    Covalent histone modifications clearly play an essential role in ligand-dependent transcriptional regulation by nuclear receptors. One of the predominant mechanisms used by nuclear receptors to activate or repress target-gene transcription is the recruitment of coregulatory factors capable of covalently modify the amino terminal ends of histones. Here we show that the thyroid hormone (T3) produces a rapid increase in histone H3Ser10 phosphorylation (H3Ser10ph) concomitant to the rapid displacement of the heterochromatin protein 1β (HP1β) to the nuclear periphery. Moreover, we found that T3-mediated pituitary gene transcription is associated with an increase in H3Ser10ph. Interestingly, the Aurora kinase B inhibitor ZM443979 abolishes the effect of T3 on H3Ser10ph, blocks HP1β delocalization, and significantly reduces ligand-dependent transactivation. Similar effects were shown when Aurora kinase B expression was abrogated in small interfering RNA assays. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanism by which T3 increases H3Ser10ph, we demonstrate that liganded thyroid hormone receptor directly interacts with Aurora kinase B, increasing its kinase activity. Moreover, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we have shown that Aurora kinase B participates of a mechanism that displaces HP1β from promoter region, thus preparing the chromatin for the transcriptional activation of T3 regulated genes. Our findings reveal a novel role for Aurora kinase B during transcriptional initiation in GO/G1, apart from its well-known mitotic activity.

  10. Improving fold activation of small transcription activating RNAs (STARs) with rational RNA engineering strategies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Sarai; Chappell, James; Sankar, Sitara; Chew, Rebecca; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory RNAs have become integral components of the synthetic biology and bioengineering toolbox for controlling gene expression. We recently expanded this toolbox by creating small transcription activating RNAs (STARs) that act by disrupting the formation of a target transcriptional terminator hairpin placed upstream of a gene. While STARs are a promising addition to the repertoire of RNA regulators, much work remains to be done to optimize the fold activation of these systems. Here we apply rational RNA engineering strategies to improve the fold activation of two STAR regulators. We demonstrate that a combination of promoter strength tuning and multiple RNA engineering strategies can improve fold activation from 5.4-fold to 13.4-fold for a STAR regulator derived from the pbuE riboswitch terminator. We then validate the generality of our approach and show that these same strategies improve fold activation from 2.1-fold to 14.6-fold for an unrelated STAR regulator, opening the door to creating a range of additional STARs to use in a broad array of biotechnologies. We also establish that the optimizations preserve the orthogonality of these STARs between themselves and a set of RNA transcriptional repressors, enabling these optimized STARs to be used in sophisticated circuits.

  11. Activation of tissue plasminogen activator gene transcription by Neovastat, a multifunctional antiangiogenic agent.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Denis; Nyalendo, Carine; Di Tomasso, Geneviève; Annabi, Borhane; Béliveau, Richard

    2004-07-16

    We recently reported that Neovastat, an antiangiogenic drug that is currently undergoing Phase III clinical trials for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, may inhibit angiogenesis through an increase in tPA activity. Here, we show that Neovastat also stimulates tPA gene transcription in endothelial cells, in a TNFalpha-like manner. RT-PCR analysis and gene reporter assays using the human tPA promoter indicated that upregulation of the tPA gene transcription by both Neovastat and TNFalpha was correlated with the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 and of IkappaB and that SP600125 and BAY11-7082, inhibitors of JNK and IkappaK, respectively, inhibit the increase of tPA gene transcription induced by Neovastat and TNFalpha. These results suggest that Neovastat induces tPA gene transcription through activation of the JNK and NFkappaB signaling pathways, leading to an increase of tPA secretion by endothelial cells. This may lead to the localized destruction of the fibrin provisional matrix that is necessary for neovessel formation and thus contribute to the reported antiangiogenic properties of this compound.

  12. Jun Dimerization Protein 2 Activates Mc2r Transcriptional Activity: Role of Phosphorylation and SUMOylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chiung-Min; Wang, Raymond X.; Liu, Runhua; Yang, Wei-Hsiung

    2017-01-01

    Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a basic leucine zipper transcription factor, is involved in numerous biological and cellular processes such as cancer development and regulation, cell-cycle regulation, skeletal muscle and osteoclast differentiation, progesterone receptor signaling, and antibacterial immunity. Though JDP2 is widely expressed in mammalian tissues, its function in gonads and adrenals (such as regulation of steroidogenesis and adrenal development) is largely unknown. Herein, we find that JDP2 mRNA and proteins are expressed in mouse adrenal gland tissues. Moreover, overexpression of JDP2 in Y1 mouse adrenocortical cancer cells increases the level of melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R) protein. Notably, Mc2r promoter activity is activated by JDP2 in a dose-dependent manner. Next, by mapping the Mc2r promoter, we show that cAMP response elements (between −1320 and −720-bp) are mainly required for Mc2r activation by JDP2 and demonstrate that −830-bp is the major JDP2 binding site by real-time chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis. Mutations of cAMP response elements on Mc2r promoter disrupts JDP2 effect. Furthermore, we demonstrate that removal of phosphorylation of JDP2 results in attenuated transcriptional activity of Mc2r. Finally, we show that JDP2 is a candidate for SUMOylation and SUMOylation affects JDP2-mediated Mc2r transcriptional activity. Taken together, JDP2 acts as a novel transcriptional activator of the mouse Mc2r gene, suggesting that JDP2 may have physiological functions as a novel player in MC2R-mediated steroidogenesis as well as cell signaling in adrenal glands. PMID:28146118

  13. A modified reverse one-hybrid screen identifies transcriptional activation in Phyochrome-Interacting Factor 3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptional activation domains (TAD) are difficult to predict and identify, since they are not conserved and have little consensus. Here, we describe a yeast-based screening method that is able to identify individual amino acid residues involved in transcriptional activation in a high throughput...

  14. Extensive mutagenesis of a transcriptional activation domain identifies single hydrophobic and acidic amino acids important for activation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, M B; Goff, S A; Chandler, V L

    1997-01-01

    C1 is a transcriptional activator of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes of the maize anthocyanin pigment pathway. C1 has an amino terminus homologous to Myb DNA-binding domains and an acidic carboxyl terminus that is a transcriptional activation domain in maize and yeast cells. To identify amino acids critical for transcriptional activation, an extensive random mutagenesis of the C1 carboxyl terminus was done. The C1 activation domain is remarkably tolerant of amino acid substitutions, as changes at 34 residues had little or no effect on transcriptional activity. These changes include introduction of helix-incompatible amino acids throughout the C1 activation domain and alteration of most single acidic amino acids, suggesting that a previously postulated amphipathic alpha-helix is not required for activation. Substitutions at two positions revealed amino acids important for transcriptional activation. Replacement of leucine 253 with a proline or glutamine resulted in approximately 10% of wild-type transcriptional activation. Leucine 253 is in a region of C1 in which several hydrophobic residues align with residues important for transcriptional activation by the herpes simplex virus VP16 protein. However, changes at all other hydrophobic residues in C1 indicate that none are critical for C1 transcriptional activation. The other important amino acid in C1 is aspartate 262, as a change to valine resulted in only 24% of wild-type transcriptional activation. Comparison of our C1 results with those from VP16 reveal substantial differences in which amino acids are required for transcriptional activation in vivo by these two acidic activation domains. PMID:8972191

  15. Human ZCCHC12 activates AP-1 and CREB signaling as a transcriptional co-activator.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Liu, Qian; Hu, Xiang; Feng, Du; Xiang, Shuanglin; He, Zhicheng; Hu, Xingwang; Zhou, Jianlin; Ding, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Chang; Zhang, Jian

    2009-07-01

    Mouse zinc finger CCHC domain containing 12 gene (ZCCHC12) has been identified as a transcriptional co-activator of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, and human ZCCHC12 was reported to be related to non-syndromic X-linked mental retardation (NS-XLMR). However, the details of how human ZCCHC12 involve in the NS-XLMR still remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the middle of human ZCCHC12 protein which is responsible for the nuclear localization. Multiple-tissue northern blot analysis indicated that ZCCHC12 is highly expressed in human brain. Furthermore, in situ hybridization showed that ZCCHC12 is specifically expressed in neuroepithelium of forebrain, midbrain, and diencephalon regions of mouse E10.5 embryos. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that ZCCHC12 enhanced the transcriptional activities of activator protein 1 (AP-1) and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) as a coactivator. In conclusion, we identified a new NLS in ZCCHC12 and figured out that ZCCHC12 functions as a transcriptional co-activator of AP-1 and CREB.

  16. Maximal stimulation of meiotic recombination by a yeast transcription factor requires the transcription activation domain and a DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, D T; Fan, Q; Petes, T D

    1999-01-01

    The DNA sequences located upstream of the yeast HIS4 represent a very strong meiotic recombination hotspot. Although the activity of this hotspot requires the transcription activator Rap1p, the level of HIS4 transcription is not directly related to the level of recombination. We find that the recombination-stimulating activity of Rap1p requires the transcription activation domain of the protein. We show that a hybrid protein with the Gal4p DNA-binding domain and the Rap1p activation domain can stimulate recombination in a strain in which Gal4p-binding sites are inserted upstream of HIS4. In addition, we find recombination hotspot activity associated with the Gal4p DNA-binding sites that is independent of known transcription factors. We suggest that yeast cells have two types of recombination hotspots, alpha (transcription factor dependent) and beta (transcription factor independent). PMID:10224246

  17. Thyroid hormone stimulates the renal Na/H exchanger NHE3 by transcriptional activation

    PubMed Central

    CANO, ADRIANA; BAUM, MICHEL; MOE, ORSON W.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone stimulates renal proximal tubule NaCl and NaHCO3 absorption in part by activating the apical membrane Na/H exchanger NHE3. We used a renal epithelial cell line, the opossum kidney (OK) cell, to define the mechanism by which 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine (T3) increases NHE3 activity. T3 stimulated NHE3 activity, an effect that was blocked by inhibition of cellular transcription or translation. The increase in activity was associated with increases in steady-state cell surface and total cellular NHE3 protein and NHE3 transcript abundance. T3 stimulated transcription of the NHE3 gene and had no effect on NHE3 transcript stability. The transcriptional activity of the 5′-flanking region of the rat NHE3 gene was stimulated by T3 when expressed in OK cells. When heterologously expressed rat NHE3 transcript levels were clamped constant with a constitutive promoter in OK cells, T3 has no effect on rat NHE3 protein abundance, suggesting the absence of regulation of NHE3 protein stability or translation. These studies demonstrate that T3 stimulates NHE3 activity by activating NHE3 gene transcription and increasing NHE3 transcript and protein abundance. PMID:9886925

  18. Rapid neurogenesis through transcriptional activation in human stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Busskamp, Volker; Lewis, Nathan E; Guye, Patrick; Ng, Alex HM; Shipman, Seth L; Byrne, Susan M; Sanjana, Neville E; Murn, Jernej; Li, Yinqing; Li, Shangzhong; Stadler, Michael; Weiss, Ron; Church, George M

    2014-01-01

    Advances in cellular reprogramming and stem cell differentiation now enable ex vivo studies of human neuronal differentiation. However, it remains challenging to elucidate the underlying regulatory programs because differentiation protocols are laborious and often result in low neuron yields. Here, we overexpressed two Neurogenin transcription factors in human-induced pluripotent stem cells and obtained neurons with bipolar morphology in 4 days, at greater than 90% purity. The high purity enabled mRNA and microRNA expression profiling during neurogenesis, thus revealing the genetic programs involved in the rapid transition from stem cell to neuron. The resulting cells exhibited transcriptional, morphological and functional signatures of differentiated neurons, with greatest transcriptional similarity to prenatal human brain samples. Our analysis revealed a network of key transcription factors and microRNAs that promoted loss of pluripotency and rapid neurogenesis via progenitor states. Perturbations of key transcription factors affected homogeneity and phenotypic properties of the resulting neurons, suggesting that a systems-level view of the molecular biology of differentiation may guide subsequent manipulation of human stem cells to rapidly obtain diverse neuronal types. PMID:25403753

  19. Prediction of Pathway Activation by Xenobiotic-Responsive Transcription Factors in the Mouse Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals activate xenobioticresponsive transcription factors (TF). Identification of target genes of these factors would be useful in predicting pathway activation in in vitro chemical screening. Starting with a large compendium of Affymet...

  20. The transcription factor RFX5 is a transcriptional activator of the TPP1 gene in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yangjing; Xie, Xingwang; Liao, Weijia; Zhang, Henghui; Cao, Hui; Fei, Ran; Wang, Xueyan; Wei, Lai; Shao, Qixiang; Chen, Hongsong

    2017-01-01

    Regulatory factor X-5 (RFX5) was previously characterized as an essential and highly specific regulator of major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) gene expression in the immune system. We found that RFX5 is significantly upregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumors and cell lines compared with non-tumor tissues in mRNA expression levels, but it fails to induce the expression of MHCII. However, RFX5 can strongly bind to the tripeptidyl peptidase 1 (TPP1) promoter region and then increase its transcriptional activity. We also found that manipulation the expression of RFX5 can significantly affect the expression of TPP1 in HepG2, which suggested that RFX5 can transcriptionally activate TPP1 in HCC. Moreover, TPP1 is overexpressed in HCC tissues and significantly correlated with poor prognosis of HCC patients, suggesting that it may have potential biological implications in HCC.

  1. Active transcription and essential role of RNA polymerase II at the centromere during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, F. Lyn; Marshall, Owen J.; Saffery, Richard; Won Kim, Bo; Earle, Elizabeth; Choo, K. H. Andy; Wong, Lee H.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of the centromeric regions has been reported to occur in G1 and S phase in different species. Here, we investigate whether transcription also occurs and plays a functional role at the mammalian centromere during mitosis. We show the presence of actively transcribing RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and its associated transcription factors, coupled with the production of centromere satellite transcripts at the mitotic kinetochore. Specific inhibition of RNAPII activity during mitosis leads to a decrease in centromeric α-satellite transcription and a concomitant increase in anaphase-lagging cells, with the lagging chromosomes showing reduced centromere protein C binding. These findings demonstrate an essential role of RNAPII in the transcription of α-satellite DNA, binding of centromere protein C, and the proper functioning of the mitotic kinetochore. PMID:22308327

  2. Signal-Induced Transcriptional Activation by Dif Requires the dTRAP80 Mediator Module

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Mo; Kim, Jung Mo; Kim, Lark Kyun; Kim, Se Nyun; Kim-Ha, Jeongsil; Hoe Kim, Jung; Kim, Young-Joon

    2003-01-01

    The Mediator complex is the major multiprotein transcriptional coactivator complex in Drosophila melanogaster. Mediator components interact with diverse sets of transcriptional activator proteins to elicit the sophisticated regulation of gene expression. The distinct phenotypes associated with certain mutations in some of the Mediator genes and the specific in vitro interactions of Mediator gene products with transcriptional activator proteins suggest the presence of activator-specific binding subunits within the Mediator complex. However, the physiological relevance of these selective in vitro interactions has not been addressed. Therefore, we analyzed dTRAP80, one of the putative activator-binding subunits of the Mediator, for specificity of binding to a number of natural transcriptional activators from Drosophila. Among the group of activator proteins that requires the Mediator complex for transcriptional activation, only a subset of these proteins interacted with dTRAP80 in vitro and only these dTRAP80-interacting activators were defective for activation under dTRAP80-deficient in vivo conditions. In particular, activation of Drosophila antimicrobial peptide drosomycin gene expression by the NF-κB-like transcription factor Dif during induction of the Toll signaling pathway was dependent on the dTRAP80 module. These results, and the indirect support from the dTRAP80 artificial recruitment assay, indicate that dTRAP80 serves as a genuine activator-binding target responsible for a distinct group of activators. PMID:12556495

  3. Chromatin profiling of Drosophila CNS subpopulations identifies active transcriptional enhancers.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Joseph C; McKay, Daniel J; Lieb, Jason D; Crews, Stephen T

    2016-10-15

    One of the key issues in studying transcriptional regulation during development is how to employ genome-wide assays that reveals sites of open chromatin and transcription factor binding to efficiently identify biologically relevant genes and enhancers. Analysis of Drosophila CNS midline cell development provides a useful system for studying transcriptional regulation at the genomic level due to a large, well-characterized set of midline-expressed genes and in vivo validated enhancers. In this study, FAIRE-seq on FACS-purified midline cells was performed and the midline FAIRE data were compared with whole-embryo FAIRE data. We find that regions of the genome with a strong midline FAIRE peak and weak whole-embryo FAIRE peak overlap with known midline enhancers and provide a useful predictive tool for enhancer identification. In a complementary analysis, we compared a large dataset of fragments that drive midline expression in vivo with the FAIRE data. Midline enhancer fragments with a midline FAIRE peak tend to be near midline-expressed genes, whereas midline enhancers without a midline FAIRE peak were often distant from midline-expressed genes and unlikely to drive midline transcription in vivo.

  4. pilS loci in Neisseria gonorrhoeae are transcriptionally active

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, Jenny; Masters, Thao L.; Wachter, Shaun; Mason, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Piliation is an important virulence determinant for Neisseria gonorrhoeae. PilE polypeptide is the major protein subunit in the pilus organelle and engages in extensive antigenic variation due to recombination between pilE and a pilS locus. pilS were so-named as they are believed to be transcriptionally silent, in contrast to the pilE locus. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of a small, pil-specific RNA species. Through using a series of pilE deletion mutants, we show by Northern blotting and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis (qRT-PCR), that these smaller RNA species are not derived from the primary pilE transcript following some processing events, but rather, arose through transcription of the pilS loci. Small transcriptome analysis, in conjunction with analysis of pilS recombinants, identified both sense and anti-sense RNAs originating from most, but not all, of the pilS gene copies. Focusing on the MS11 pilS6 locus, we identified by site-directed mutagenesis a sense promoter located immediately upstream of pilS6 copy 2, as well as an anti-sense promoter immediately downstream of pilS6 copy 1. Whole transcriptome analysis also revealed the presence of pil-specific sRNA in both gonococci and meningococci. Overall, this study reveals an added layer of complexity to the pilE/pilS recombination scheme by demonstrating pil-specific transcription within genes that were previously thought to be transcriptionally silent. PMID:25701734

  5. Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunxiao; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2012-04-01

    It is well established that the ferric uptake regulatory protein (Fur) functions as a transcriptional repressor in diverse microorganisms. Recent studies demonstrated that Fur also functions as a transcriptional activator. In this study we defined Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the sexually transmitted disease pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Analysis of 37 genes which were previously determined to be iron induced and which contained putative Fur boxes revealed that only 30 of these genes exhibited reduced transcription in a gonococcal fur mutant strain. Fur-mediated activation was established by examining binding of Fur to the putative promoter regions of 16 Fur-activated genes with variable binding affinities observed. Only ∼50% of the newly identified Fur-regulated genes bound Fur in vitro, suggesting that additional regulatory circuits exist which may function through a Fur-mediated indirect mechanism. The gonococcal Fur-activated genes displayed variable transcription patterns in a fur mutant strain, which correlated with the position of the Fur box in each (promoter) region. These results suggest that Fur-mediated direct transcriptional activation is fulfilled by multiple mechanisms involving either competing with a repressor or recruiting RNA polymerase. Collectively, our studies have established that gonococcal Fur functions as an activator of gene transcription through both direct and indirect mechanisms.

  6. NprR, a moonlighting quorum sensor shifting from a phosphatase activity to a transcriptional activator

    PubMed Central

    Perchat, Stéphane; Talagas, Antoine; Zouhir, Samira; Poncet, Sandrine; Bouillaut, Laurent; Nessler, Sylvie; Lereclus, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of biological functions requires factors (proteins, peptides or chemicals) able to sense and translate environmental conditions or any circumstances in order to modulate the transcription of a gene, the stability of a transcript or the activity of a protein. Quorum sensing is a regulation mechanism connecting cell density to the physiological state of a single cell. In bacteria, quorum sensing coordinates virulence, cell fate and commitment to sporulation and other adaptation properties. The critical role of such regulatory systems was demonstrated in pathogenicity and adaptation of bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group (i.e. B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis). Furthermore, using insects as a model of infection, it was shown that sequential activation of several quorum sensing systems allowed bacteria to switch from a virulence state to a necrotrophic lifestyle, allowing their survival in the host cadaver, and ultimately to the commitment into sporulation. The chronological development of these physiological states is directed by quorum sensors forming the RNPP family. Among them, NprR combines two distinct functions connecting sporulation to necrotrophism in B. thuringiensis. In the absence of its cognate signaling peptide (NprX), NprR negatively controls sporulation by acting as a phosphatase. In the presence of NprX, it acts as a transcription factor regulating a set of genes involved in the survival of the bacteria in the insect cadaver. PMID:28357327

  7. Multiplex Eukaryotic Transcription (In)activation: Timing, Bursting and Cycling of a Ratchet Clock Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rybakova, Katja N; Bruggeman, Frank J; Tomaszewska, Aleksandra; Moné, Martijn J; Carlberg, Carsten; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2015-04-01

    Activation of eukaryotic transcription is an intricate process that relies on a multitude of regulatory proteins forming complexes on chromatin. Chromatin modifications appear to play a guiding role in protein-complex assembly on chromatin. Together, these processes give rise to stochastic, often bursting, transcriptional activity. Here we present a model of eukaryotic transcription that aims to integrate those mechanisms. We use stochastic and ordinary-differential-equation modeling frameworks to examine various possible mechanisms of gene regulation by multiple transcription factors. We find that the assembly of large transcription factor complexes on chromatin via equilibrium-binding mechanisms is highly inefficient and insensitive to concentration changes of single regulatory proteins. An alternative model that lacks these limitations is a cyclic ratchet mechanism. In this mechanism, small protein complexes assemble sequentially on the promoter. Chromatin modifications mark the completion of a protein complex assembly, and sensitize the local chromatin for the assembly of the next protein complex. In this manner, a strict order of protein complex assemblies is attained. Even though the individual assembly steps are highly stochastic in duration, a sequence of them gives rise to a remarkable precision of the transcription cycle duration. This mechanism explains how transcription activation cycles, lasting for tens of minutes, derive from regulatory proteins residing on chromatin for only tens of seconds. Transcriptional bursts are an inherent feature of such transcription activation cycles. Bursting transcription can cause individual cells to remain in synchrony transiently, offering an explanation of transcriptional cycling as observed in cell populations, both on promoter chromatin status and mRNA levels.

  8. HMGA proteins as modulators of chromatin structure during transcriptional activation

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Nihan; Singh, Indrabahadur; Mehta, Aditi; Braun, Thomas; Barreto, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    High mobility group (HMG) proteins are the most abundant non-histone chromatin associated proteins. HMG proteins bind to DNA and nucleosome and alter the structure of chromatin locally and globally. Accessibility to DNA within chromatin is a central factor that affects DNA-dependent nuclear processes, such as transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. HMG proteins associate with different multi-protein complexes to regulate these processes by mediating accessibility to DNA. HMG proteins can be subdivided into three families: HMGA, HMGB, and HMGN. In this review, we will focus on recent advances in understanding the function of HMGA family members, specifically their role in gene transcription regulation during development and cancer. PMID:25364713

  9. Synergistic cooperation of MDM2 and E2F1 contributes to TAp73 transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kasim, Vivi; Huang, Can; Zhang, Jing; Jia, Huizhen; Wang, Yunxia; Yang, Li; Miyagishi, Makoto; Wu, Shourong

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • MDM2 is a novel positive regulator of TAp73 transcriptional activity. • MDM2 colocalizes together and physically interacts with E2F1. • Synergistic cooperation of MDM2 and E2F1 is crucial for TAp73 transcription. • MDM2 regulates TAp73 transcriptional activity in a p53-independent manner. - Abstract: TAp73, a structural homologue of p53, plays an important role in tumorigenesis. E2F1 had been reported as a transcriptional regulator of TAp73, however, the detailed mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here we reported that MDM2-silencing reduced the activities of the TAp73 promoters and the endogenous TAp73 expression level significantly; while MDM2 overexpression upregulated them. We further revealed that the regulation of TAp73 transcriptional activity occurs as a synergistic effect of MDM2 and E2F1, most probably through their physical interaction in the nuclei. Furthermore, we also suggested that MDM2 might be involved in DNA damage-induced TAp73 transcriptional activity. Finally, we elucidated that MDM2-silencing reduced the proliferation rate of colon carcinoma cells regardless of the p53 status. Our data show a synergistic effect of MDM2 and E2F1 on TAp73 transcriptional activity, suggesting a novel regulation pathway of TAp73.

  10. The yeast regulator of transcription protein Rtr1 lacks an active site and phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kehui; Manley, James L; Tong, Liang

    2012-07-10

    The activity of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is controlled in part by the phosphorylation state of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. Recent reports have suggested that yeast regulator of transcription protein, Rtr1, and its human homologue RPAP2, possess Pol II CTD Ser5 phosphatase activity. Here we report the crystal structure of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1, which reveals a new type of zinc finger protein and does not have any close structural homologues. Importantly, the structure does not show evidence of an active site, and extensive experiments to demonstrate its CTD phosphatase activity have been unsuccessful, suggesting that Rtr1 has a non-catalytic role in CTD dephosphorylation.

  11. Inhibition of transcriptional activity of c-JUN by SIRT1

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Zhanguo; Ye Jianping

    2008-11-28

    c-JUN is a major component of heterodimer transcription factor AP-1 (Activator Protein-1) that activates gene transcription in cell proliferation, inflammation and stress responses. SIRT1 (Sirtuin 1) is a histone deacetylase that controls gene transcription through modification of chromatin structure. However, it is not clear if SIRT1 regulates c-JUN activity in the control of gene transcription. Here, we show that SIRT1 associated with c-JUN in co-immunoprecipitation of whole cell lysate, and inhibited the transcriptional activity of c-JUN in the mammalian two hybridization system. SIRT1 was found in the AP-1 response element in the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) promoter DNA leading to inhibition of histone 3 acetylation as shown in a ChIP assay. The SIRT1 signal was reduced by the AP-1 activator PMA, and induced by the SIRT1 activator Resveratrol in the promoter DNA. SIRT1-mediaetd inhibition of AP-1 was demonstrated in the MMP9 gene expression at the gene promoter, mRNA and protein levels. In mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) with SIRT1 deficiency (SIRT1{sup -/-}), mRNA and protein of MMP9 were increased in the basal condition, and the inhibitory activity of Resveratrol was significantly attenuated. Glucose-induced MMP9 expression was also inhibited by SIRT1 in response to Resveratrol. These data consistently suggest that SIRT1 directly inhibits the transcriptional activity of AP-1 by targeting c-JUN.

  12. Functional Interplay between CBP and PCAF in Acetylation and Regulation of Transcription Factor KLF13 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chao-Zhong; Keller, Kimberly; Chen, Yangchao; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    2010-01-01

    The transcriptional co-activators CBP/p300 and PCAF participate in transcriptional activation by many factors. We have shown that both CBP/p300 and PCAF stimulate the transcriptional activation by KLF13, a member of the KLF/Sp1 family, either individually or cooperatively. Here we further investigated how CBP and PCAF acetylation regulate KLF13 activity, and how these two co-activators functionally interplay in the regulation of KLF13 activity. We found that CBP and PCAF acetylated KLF13 at specific lysine residues in the zinc finger domain of KLF13. The acetylation by CBP, however, resulted in disruption of KLF13 DNA binding. Although the acetyltransferase activity of CBP is not required for stimulating the DNA binding activity of all of the transcription factors that we have examined, the disruption of factor DNA binding by CBP acetylation is factor-specific. We further showed that PCAF and CBP act synergistically and antagonistically to regulate KLF13 DNA binding depending on the status of acetylation. PCAF blocked CBP acetylation and disruption of KLF13 DNA binding. Conversely, acetylation of KLF13 by CBP prevented PCAF stimulation of KLF13 DNA binding. PCAF blocked CBP disruption of KLF13 DNA binding by preventing CBP acetylation of KLF13. These results demonstrate that acetylation by CBP has distinct effects on transcription factor DNA binding, and that CBP and PCAF regulate each other functionally in their regulation of transcription factor DNA binding. PMID:12758070

  13. The active site of RNA polymerase II participates in transcript cleavage within arrested ternary complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, M D; Izban, M G; Luse, D S

    1994-01-01

    RNA polymerase II may become arrested during transcript elongation, in which case the ternary complex remains intact but further RNA synthesis is blocked. To relieve arrest, the nascent transcript must be cleaved from the 3' end. RNAs of 7-17 nt are liberated and transcription continues from the newly exposed 3' end. Factor SII increases elongation efficiency by strongly stimulating the transcript cleavage reaction. We show here that arrest relief can also occur by the addition of pyrophosphate. This generates the same set of cleavage products as factor SII, but the fragments produced with pyrophosphate have 5'-triphosphate termini. Thus, the active site of RNA polymerase II, in the presence of pyrophosphate, appears to be capable of cleaving phosphodiester linkages as far as 17 nt upstream of the original site of polymerization, leaving the ternary complex intact and transcriptionally active. Images PMID:8058756

  14. Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression Exposure to many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals can cause adverse outcomes. These adverse outcomes, such as cancer, have been linked to mol...

  15. Dominance and interloci interactions in transcriptional activation cascades: models explaining compensatory mutations and inheritance patterns.

    PubMed

    Bost, Bruno; Veitia, Reiner A

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in human genes encoding transcription factors are often dominant because one active allele cannot ensure a normal phenotype (haploinsufficiency). In other instances, heterozygous mutations of two genes are required for a phenotype to appear (combined haploinsufficiency). Here, we explore with models (i) the basis of haploinsufficiency and combined haploinsufficiency owing to mutations in transcription activators, and (ii) how the effects of such mutations can be amplified or buffered by subsequent steps in a transcription cascade. We propose that the non-linear (sigmoidal) response of transcription to the concentration of activators can explain haploinsufficiency. We further show that the sigmoidal character of the output of a cascade increases with the number of steps involved, the settings of which will determine the buffering or enhancement of the effects of a decreased concentration of an upstream activator. This exploration provides insights into the bases of compensatory mutations and on interloci interactions underlying oligogenic inheritance patterns.

  16. Repression of the heat shock factor 1 transcriptional activation domain is modulated by constitutive phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Kline, M P; Morimoto, R I

    1997-01-01

    Heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) is constitutively expressed in mammalian cells and negatively regulated for DNA binding and transcriptional activity. Upon exposure to heat shock and other forms of chemical and physiological stress, these activities of HSF1 are rapidly induced. In this report, we demonstrate that constitutive phosphorylation of HSF1 at serine residues distal to the transcriptional activation domain functions to repress transactivation. Tryptic phosphopeptide analysis of a collection of chimeric GAL4-HSF1 deletion and point mutants identified a region of constitutive phosphorylation encompassing serine residues 303 and 307. The significance of phosphorylation at serines 303 and 307 in the regulation of HSF1 transcriptional activity was demonstrated by transient transfection and assay of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter construct. Whereas the transfected wild-type GAL4-HSF1 chimera is repressed for transcriptional activity and derepressed by heat shock, mutation of serines 303 and 307 to alanine results in derepression to a high level of constitutive activity. Similar results were obtained with mutation of these serine residues in the context of full-length HSF1. These data reveal that constitutive phosphorylation of serines 303 and 307 has an important role in the negative regulation of HSF1 transcriptional activity at control temperatures. PMID:9121459

  17. Tcra enhancer activation by inducible transcription factors downstream of pre-TCR signaling.

    PubMed

    del Blanco, Beatriz; García-Mariscal, Alberto; Wiest, David L; Hernández-Munain, Cristina

    2012-04-01

    The Tcra enhancer (Eα) is essential for pre-TCR-mediated activation of germline transcription and V(D)J recombination. Eα is considered an archetypical enhanceosome that acts through the functional synergy and cooperative binding of multiple transcription factors. Based on dimethylsulfate genomic footprinting experiments, there has been a long-standing paradox regarding Eα activation in the absence of differences in enhancer occupancy. Our data provide the molecular mechanism of Eα activation and an explanation of this paradox. We found that germline transcriptional activation of Tcra is dependent on constant phospholipase Cγ, as well as calcineurin- and MAPK/ERK-mediated signaling, indicating that inducible transcription factors are crucially involved. NFAT, AP-1, and early growth response factor 1, together with CREB-binding protein/p300 coactivators, bind to Eα as part of an active enhanceosome assembled during pre-TCR signaling. We favor a scenario in which the binding of lymphoid-restricted and constitutive transcription factors to Eα prior to its activation forms a regulatory scaffold to recruit factors induced by pre-TCR signaling. Thus, the combinatorial assembly of tissue- and signal-specific transcription factors dictates the Eα function. This mechanism for enhancer activation may represent a general paradigm in tissue-restricted and stimulus-responsive gene regulation.

  18. Interplay between SIRT1 and hepatitis B virus X protein in the activation of viral transcription.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jian-Jun; Kong, Ka-Yiu Edwin; Gao, Wei-Wei; Tang, Hei-Man Vincent; Chaudhary, Vidyanath; Cheng, Yun; Zhou, Jie; Chan, Chi-Ping; Wong, Danny Ka-Ho; Yuen, Man-Fung; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2017-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome is organized into a minichromosome known as covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), which serves as the template for all viral transcripts. SIRT1 is an NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase which activates HBV transcription by promoting the activity of cellular transcription factors and coactivators. How SIRT1 and viral transactivator X protein (HBx) might affect each other remains to be clarified. In this study we show synergy and mutual dependence between SIRT1 and HBx in the activation of HBV transcription. All human sirtuins SIRT1 through SIRT7 activated HBV gene expression. The steady-state levels of SIRT1 protein were elevated in HBV-infected liver tissues and HBV-replicating hepatoma cells. SIRT1 interacted with HBx and potentiated HBx transcriptional activity on precore promoter and covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) likely through a deacetylase-independent mechanism, leading to more robust production of cccDNA, pregenomic RNA and surface antigen. SIRT1 and HBx proteins were more abundant when both were expressed. SIRT1 promoted the recruitment of HBx as well as cellular transcriptional factors and coactivators such as PGC-1α and FXRα to cccDNA. Depletion of SIRT1 suppressed HBx recruitment. On the other hand, SIRT1 recruitment to cccDNA was compromised when HBx was deficient. Whereas pharmaceutical agonists of SIRT1 such as resveratrol activated HBV transcription, small-molecule inhibitors of SIRT1 including sirtinol and Ex527 exhibited anti-HBV activity. Taken together, our findings revealed not only the interplay between SIRT1 and HBx in the activation of HBV transcription but also new strategies and compounds for developing antivirals against HBV.

  19. Transcriptional activation of hedgehog pathway components in aggressive hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Wendling-Keim, Danielle S; Wanie, Lynn; Grantzow, Rainer; Kappler, Roland

    2017-03-31

    Infantile hemangioma is a vascular neoplasm and is one of the most common tumors diagnosed in young children. Although most hemangiomas are harmless and involute spontaneously, some show severe progression, leading to serious complications, such as high output cardiac failure, ulcerations, compression of the trachea or deprivation amblyopia, depending on their size and localization. However, the pathogenesis and cause of hemangioma are largely unknown to date. The goal of this study was to identify markers that could predict hemangiomas with aggressive growth and severe progression that would benefit from early intervention. By using a PCR-based screening approach, we first confirmed that previously known markers of hemangioma, namely FGF2 and GLUT1, are highly expressed in hemangioma. Nevertheless, these genes did not show any differential expression between severely progressing tumors and mild tumors. However, transcriptional upregulation of several Hedgehog signaling components, comprising the ligand Sonic Hedgehog (SHH),the transcription factor GLI2 and its target gene FOXA2 were detected in extremely aggressive hemangioma specimens during the proliferation phase. Notably, GLI2 was even overexpressed in involuting hemangiomas if they showed an aggressive growth pattern. In conclusion, our data suggest that overexpression of the Hedgehog components SHH, GLI2 and FOXA2 might be used as markers of an aggressive hemangioma that would benefit from too early intervention, while FGF2 and GLUT1 are more general markers of hemangiomas. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. The Chinese hamster dihydrofolate reductase replication origin decision point follows activation of transcription and suppresses initiation of replication within transcription units.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takayo; Ramanathan, Sunita; Okuno, Yukiko; Kumagai, Chiharu; Shaikh, Seemab S; Gilbert, David M

    2006-02-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells select specific replication origin sites within the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) locus at a discrete point during G1 phase, the origin decision point (ODP). Origin selection is sensitive to transcription but not protein synthesis inhibitors, implicating a pretranslational role for transcription in origin specification. We have constructed a DNA array covering 121 kb surrounding the DHFR locus, to comprehensively investigate replication initiation and transcription in this region. When nuclei isolated within the first 3 h of G1 phase were stimulated to initiate replication in Xenopus egg extracts, replication initiated without any detectable preference for specific sites. At the ODP, initiation became suppressed from within the Msh3, DHFR, and 2BE2121 transcription units. Active transcription was mostly confined to these transcription units, and inhibition of transcription by alpha-amanitin resulted in the initiation of replication within transcription units, indicating that transcription is necessary to limit initiation events to the intergenic region. However, the resumption of DHFR transcription after mitosis took place prior to the ODP and so is not on its own sufficient to suppress initiation of replication. Together, these results demonstrate a remarkable flexibility in sequence selection for initiating replication and implicate transcription as one important component of origin specification at the ODP.

  1. The Chinese Hamster Dihydrofolate Reductase Replication Origin Decision Point Follows Activation of Transcription and Suppresses Initiation of Replication within Transcription Units

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takayo; Ramanathan, Sunita; Okuno, Yukiko; Kumagai, Chiharu; Shaikh, Seemab S.; Gilbert, David M.

    2006-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells select specific replication origin sites within the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) locus at a discrete point during G1 phase, the origin decision point (ODP). Origin selection is sensitive to transcription but not protein synthesis inhibitors, implicating a pretranslational role for transcription in origin specification. We have constructed a DNA array covering 121 kb surrounding the DHFR locus, to comprehensively investigate replication initiation and transcription in this region. When nuclei isolated within the first 3 h of G1 phase were stimulated to initiate replication in Xenopus egg extracts, replication initiated without any detectable preference for specific sites. At the ODP, initiation became suppressed from within the Msh3, DHFR, and 2BE2121 transcription units. Active transcription was mostly confined to these transcription units, and inhibition of transcription by alpha-amanitin resulted in the initiation of replication within transcription units, indicating that transcription is necessary to limit initiation events to the intergenic region. However, the resumption of DHFR transcription after mitosis took place prior to the ODP and so is not on its own sufficient to suppress initiation of replication. Together, these results demonstrate a remarkable flexibility in sequence selection for initiating replication and implicate transcription as one important component of origin specification at the ODP. PMID:16428457

  2. The protein level and transcription activity of activating transcription factor 1 is regulated by prolyl isomerase Pin1 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo-Liang; Liao, Dan; Chen, Hua; Lu, Yan; Chen, Liyong; Li, Huahui; Li, Binbin; Liu, Weilong; Ye, Caiguo; Li, Tong; Zhu, Zhu; Wang, Jian; Uchida, Takafumi; Zou, Ying; Dong, Zigang; He, Zhiwei

    2016-12-29

    The function of activating transcription factor 1 (ATF1) and the mechanism about why ATF1 was over-phosphorylated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) progression is completely undiscovered. In this study, a series of experiments both in vitro and in vivo were used to characterize a promotive function of ATF1 in NPC tumorigenesis and identify prolyl isomerase Pin1 as a novel regulator of ATF1 at post-transcription. First, we found that overexpression of ATF1 promoted colony formation in NPC. However, the high protein level of ATF1 in NPC was not resulted from high mRNA level. Then, a direct interaction between Pin1 and ATF1 at Thr184 was demonstrated using mammalian two-hybrid assay and coimmunoprecipitation. Cycloheximide (CHX) treatment indicated Pin1 stabilized the expression of ATF1 at post-transcription level. We confirmed that Pin1 upregulated ATF1 transcriptional activity of Bcl-2 using luciferase reporter assay, quantitative RT-PCR and western blot. Furthermore, the newly identified phosphorylation of ATF1 at Thr184 was suggested to have an important role in ATF1 function of transcription and tumor promotion. Finally, high expression of Pin1 in NPC tissue was found to be positively correlated with ATF1. The ATF1 promoted NPC tumorigenesis was regulated by Pin1 both in vitro and in vivo. All these findings clearly state that Pin1 is a novel regulator of ATF1 at Thr184 and thereby enhances ATF1 transcription activity and tumorigenesis promotive function in NPC.

  3. The protein level and transcription activity of activating transcription factor 1 is regulated by prolyl isomerase Pin1 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guo-Liang; Liao, Dan; Chen, Hua; Lu, Yan; Chen, Liyong; Li, Huahui; Li, Binbin; Liu, Weilong; Ye, Caiguo; Li, Tong; Zhu, Zhu; Wang, Jian; Uchida, Takafumi; Zou, Ying; Dong, Zigang; He, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    The function of activating transcription factor 1 (ATF1) and the mechanism about why ATF1 was over-phosphorylated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) progression is completely undiscovered. In this study, a series of experiments both in vitro and in vivo were used to characterize a promotive function of ATF1 in NPC tumorigenesis and identify prolyl isomerase Pin1 as a novel regulator of ATF1 at post-transcription. First, we found that overexpression of ATF1 promoted colony formation in NPC. However, the high protein level of ATF1 in NPC was not resulted from high mRNA level. Then, a direct interaction between Pin1 and ATF1 at Thr184 was demonstrated using mammalian two-hybrid assay and coimmunoprecipitation. Cycloheximide (CHX) treatment indicated Pin1 stabilized the expression of ATF1 at post-transcription level. We confirmed that Pin1 upregulated ATF1 transcriptional activity of Bcl-2 using luciferase reporter assay, quantitative RT-PCR and western blot. Furthermore, the newly identified phosphorylation of ATF1 at Thr184 was suggested to have an important role in ATF1 function of transcription and tumor promotion. Finally, high expression of Pin1 in NPC tissue was found to be positively correlated with ATF1. The ATF1 promoted NPC tumorigenesis was regulated by Pin1 both in vitro and in vivo. All these findings clearly state that Pin1 is a novel regulator of ATF1 at Thr184 and thereby enhances ATF1 transcription activity and tumorigenesis promotive function in NPC. PMID:28032861

  4. Transcriptional activation domains stimulate initiation and elongation at different times and via different residues.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S A; Weirich, C S; Newton, E M; Kingston, R E

    1998-01-01

    Transcriptional activators can stimulate multiple steps in the transcription process. We have used GAL4 fusion proteins to characterize the ability of different transcriptional activation domains to stimulate transcriptional elongation on the hsp70 gene in vitro. Stimulation of elongation apparently occurs via a mechanistic pathway different from that of stimulation of initiation: the herpes simplex virus VP16, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and amphipathic helix (AH) activation domains all stimulate initiation, but only VP16 and HSF1 stimulate elongation; and mutations in hydrophobic residues of the HSF1 activation domains impair stimulation of elongation but not of initiation, while mutations in adjacent acidic residues impair stimulation of initiation more than of elongation. Experiments in which activators were exchanged between initiation and elongation demonstrate that the elongation function of HSF1 will stimulate RNA polymerase that has initiated and is transcriptionally engaged. Transcriptional activators thus appear to have at least two distinct functions that reside in the same domain, and that act at different times to stimulate initiation and elongation. PMID:9606196

  5. Chronic Mild Stress Modulates Activity-Dependent Transcription of BDNF in Rat Hippocampal Slices.

    PubMed

    Molteni, Raffaella; Rossetti, Andrea C; Savino, Elisa; Racagni, Giorgio; Calabrese, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Although activity-dependent transcription represents a crucial mechanism for long-lasting experience-dependent changes in the hippocampus, limited data exist on its contribution to pathological conditions. We aim to investigate the influence of chronic stress on the activity-dependent transcription of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The ex vivo methodology of acute stimulation of hippocampal slices obtained from rats exposed to chronic mild stress (CMS) was used to evaluate whether the adverse experience may alter activity-dependent BDNF gene expression. CMS reduces BDNF expression and that acute depolarization significantly upregulates total BDNF mRNA levels only in control animals, showing that CMS exposure may alter BDNF transcription under basal conditions and during neuronal activation. Moreover, while the basal effect of CMS on total BDNF reflects parallel modulations of all the transcripts examined, isoform-specific changes were found after depolarization. This different effect was also observed in the activation of intracellular signaling pathways related to the neurotrophin. In conclusion, our study discloses a functional alteration of BDNF transcription as a consequence of stress. Being the activity-regulated transcription a critical process in synaptic and neuronal plasticity, the different regulation of individual BDNF promoters may contribute to long-lasting changes, which are fundamental for the vulnerability of the hippocampus to stress-related diseases.

  6. Drosophila factor 2, an RNA polymerase II transcript release factor, has DNA-dependent ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Z; Price, D

    1997-12-12

    Drosophila factor 2 has been identified as a component of negative transcription elongation factor (N-TEF) that causes the release of RNA polymerase II transcripts in an ATP-dependent manner (Xie, Z. and Price D. H. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 11043-11046). We show here that the transcript release activity of factor 2 requires ATP or dATP and that adenosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) (ATPgammaS), adenosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imino)triphosphate (AMP-PNP), or other NTPs do not support the activity. Factor 2 demonstrated a strong DNA-dependent ATPase activity that correlated with its transcript release activity. At 20 microg/ml DNA, the ATPase activity of factor 2 had an apparent Km(ATP) of 28 microM and an estimated Kcat of 140 min-1. Factor 2 caused the release of nascent transcripts associated with elongation complexes generated by RNA polymerase II on a dC-tailed template. Therefore, no other protein cofactors are required for the transcript release activity of factor 2. Using the dC-tailed template assay, it was found that renaturation of the template was required for factor 2 function.

  7. Activation Domain-Specific and General Transcription Stimulation by Native Histone Acetyltransferase Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Keiko; Steger, David J.; Eberharter, Anton; Workman, Jerry L.

    1999-01-01

    Recent progress in identifying the catalytic subunits of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes has implicated histone acetylation in the regulation of transcription. Here, we have analyzed the function of two native yeast HAT complexes, SAGA (Spt-Ada-Gcn5 Acetyltransferase) and NuA4 (nucleosome acetyltransferase of H4), in activating transcription from preassembled nucleosomal array templates in vitro. Each complex was tested for the ability to enhance transcription driven by GAL4 derivatives containing either acidic, glutamine-rich, or proline-rich activation domains. On nucleosomal array templates, the SAGA complex selectively stimulates transcription driven by the VP16 acidic activation domain in an acetyl coenzyme A-dependent manner. In contrast, the NuA4 complex facilitates transcription mediated by any of the activation domains tested if allowed to preacetylate the nucleosomal template, indicating a general stimulatory effect of histone H4 acetylation. However, when the extent of acetylation by NuA4 is limited, the complex also preferentially stimulates VP16-driven transcription. SAGA and NuA4 interact directly with the VP16 activation domain but not with a glutamine-rich or proline-rich activation domain. These data suggest that recruitment of the SAGA and NuA4 HAT complexes by the VP16 activation domain contributes to HAT-dependent activation. In addition, extensive H4/H2B acetylation by NuA4 leads to a general activation of transcription, which is independent of activator-NuA4 interactions. PMID:9858608

  8. How glucocorticoid receptors modulate the activity of other transcription factors: a scope beyond tethering.

    PubMed

    Ratman, Dariusz; Vanden Berghe, Wim; Dejager, Lien; Libert, Claude; Tavernier, Jan; Beck, Ilse M; De Bosscher, Karolien

    2013-11-05

    The activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a nuclear receptor transcription factor belonging to subclass 3C of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily, is typically triggered by glucocorticoid hormones. Apart from driving gene transcription via binding onto glucocorticoid response elements in regulatory regions of particular target genes, GR can also inhibit gene expression via transrepression, a mechanism largely based on protein:protein interactions. Hereby GR can influence the activity of other transcription factors, without contacting DNA itself. GR is known to inhibit the activity of a growing list of immune-regulating transcription factors. Hence, GCs still rule the clinic for treatments of inflammatory disorders, notwithstanding concomitant deleterious side effects. Although patience is a virtue when it comes to deciphering the many mechanisms GR uses to influence various signaling pathways, the current review is testimony of the fact that groundbreaking mechanistic work has been accumulating over the past years and steadily continues to grow.

  9. C/EBP Transcription Factors Mediate Epicardial Activation During Heart Development and Injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guo N.; Thatcher, Jeffrey E.; McAnally, John; Kong, Yongli; Qi, Xiaoxia; Tan, Wei; DiMaio, J. Michael; Amatruda, James F.; Gerard, Robert D.; Hill, Joseph A.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2013-01-01

    The epicardium encapsulates the heart and functions as a source of multipotent progenitor cells and paracrine factors essential for cardiac development and repair. Injury of the adult heart results in reactivation of a developmental gene program in the epicardium, but the transcriptional basis of epicardial gene expression has not been delineated. We established a mouse embryonic heart organ culture and gene expression system that facilitated the identification of epicardial enhancers activated during heart development and injury. Epicardial activation of these enhancers depends on a combinatorial transcriptional code centered on CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) transcription factors. Disruption of C/EBP signaling in the adult epicardium reduced injury-induced neutrophil infiltration and improved cardiac function. These findings reveal a transcriptional basis for epicardial activation and heart injury, providing a platform for enhancing cardiac regeneration. PMID:23160954

  10. Partially phosphorylated Pho4 activates transcription of a subset of phosphate-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Springer, Michael; Wykoff, Dennis D; Miller, Nicole; O'Shea, Erin K

    2003-11-01

    A cell's ability to generate different responses to different levels of stimulus is an important component of an adaptive environmental response. Transcriptional responses are frequently controlled by transcription factors regulated by phosphorylation. We demonstrate that differential phosphorylation of the budding yeast transcription factor Pho4 contributes to differential gene expression. When yeast cells are grown in high-phosphate growth medium, Pho4 is phosphorylated on four critical residues by the cyclin-CDK complex Pho80-Pho85 and is inactivated. When yeast cells are starved for phosphate, Pho4 is dephosphorylated and fully active. In intermediate-phosphate conditions, a form of Pho4 preferentially phosphorylated on one of the four sites accumulates and activates transcription of a subset of phosphate-responsive genes. This Pho4 phosphoform binds differentially to phosphate-responsive promoters and helps to trigger differential gene expression. Our results demonstrate that three transcriptional outputs can be generated by a pathway whose regulation is controlled by one kinase, Pho80-Pho85, and one transcription factor, Pho4. Differential phosphorylation of Pho4 by Pho80-Pho85 produces phosphorylated forms of Pho4 that differ in their ability to activate transcription, contributing to multiple outputs.

  11. Partially Phosphorylated Pho4 Activates Transcription of a Subset of Phosphate-Responsive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Nicole

    2003-01-01

    A cell's ability to generate different responses to different levels of stimulus is an important component of an adaptive environmental response. Transcriptional responses are frequently controlled by transcription factors regulated by phosphorylation. We demonstrate that differential phosphorylation of the budding yeast transcription factor Pho4 contributes to differential gene expression. When yeast cells are grown in high-phosphate growth medium, Pho4 is phosphorylated on four critical residues by the cyclin–CDK complex Pho80–Pho85 and is inactivated. When yeast cells are starved for phosphate, Pho4 is dephosphorylated and fully active. In intermediate-phosphate conditions, a form of Pho4 preferentially phosphorylated on one of the four sites accumulates and activates transcription of a subset of phosphate-responsive genes. This Pho4 phosphoform binds differentially to phosphate-responsive promoters and helps to trigger differential gene expression. Our results demonstrate that three transcriptional outputs can be generated by a pathway whose regulation is controlled by one kinase, Pho80–Pho85, and one transcription factor, Pho4. Differential phosphorylation of Pho4 by Pho80–Pho85 produces phosphorylated forms of Pho4 that differ in their ability to activate transcription, contributing to multiple outputs. PMID:14624238

  12. SUMO functions in constitutive transcription and during activation of inducible genes in yeast.

    PubMed

    Rosonina, Emanuel; Duncan, Sarah M; Manley, James L

    2010-06-15

    Transcription factors represent one of the largest groups of proteins regulated by SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification, and their sumoylation is usually associated with transcriptional repression. To investigate whether sumoylation plays a general role in regulating transcription in yeast, we determined the occupancy of sumoylated proteins at a variety of genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) using an antibody that recognizes the yeast SUMO peptide. Surprisingly, we detected sumoylated proteins at all constitutively transcribed genes tested but not at repressed genes. Ubc9, the SUMO conjugation enzyme, was not present on these genes, but its inactivation reduced SUMO at the constitutive promoters and modestly decreased RNA polymerase II levels. In contrast, activation of the inducible GAL1, STL1, and ARG1 genes caused not only a striking accumulation of SUMO at all three promoter regions, but also recruitment of Ubc9, indicating that gene activation involves sumoylation of promoter-bound factors. However, Ubc9 inactivation, while reducing sumoylation at the induced promoters, paradoxically resulted in increased transcription. Providing an explanation for this, the reduced sumoylation impaired the cell's ability to appropriately shut off transcription of the induced ARG1 gene, indicating that SUMO can facilitate transcriptional silencing. Our findings thus establish unexpected roles for sumoylation in both constitutive and activated transcription, and provide a novel mechanism for regulating gene expression.

  13. Voltage-gated Na+ Channel Activity Increases Colon Cancer Transcriptional Activity and Invasion Via Persistent MAPK Signaling.

    PubMed

    House, Carrie D; Wang, Bi-Dar; Ceniccola, Kristin; Williams, Russell; Simaan, May; Olender, Jacqueline; Patel, Vyomesh; Baptista-Hon, Daniel T; Annunziata, Christina M; Gutkind, J Silvio; Hales, Tim G; Lee, Norman H

    2015-06-22

    Functional expression of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) has been demonstrated in multiple cancer cell types where channel activity induces invasive activity. The signaling mechanisms by which VGSCs promote oncogenesis remain poorly understood. We explored the signal transduction process critical to VGSC-mediated invasion on the basis of reports linking channel activity to gene expression changes in excitable cells. Coincidentally, many genes transcriptionally regulated by the SCN5A isoform in colon cancer have an over-representation of cis-acting sites for transcription factors phosphorylated by ERK1/2 MAPK. We hypothesized that VGSC activity promotes MAPK activation to induce transcriptional changes in invasion-related genes. Using pharmacological inhibitors/activators and siRNA-mediated gene knockdowns, we correlated channel activity with Rap1-dependent persistent MAPK activation in the SW620 human colon cancer cell line. We further demonstrated that VGSC activity induces downstream changes in invasion-related gene expression via a PKA/ERK/c-JUN/ELK-1/ETS-1 transcriptional pathway. This is the first study illustrating a molecular mechanism linking functional activity of VGSCs to transcriptional activation of invasion-related genes.

  14. Voltage-gated Na+ Channel Activity Increases Colon Cancer Transcriptional Activity and Invasion Via Persistent MAPK Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Carrie D.; Wang, Bi-Dar; Ceniccola, Kristin; Williams, Russell; Simaan, May; Olender, Jacqueline; Patel, Vyomesh; Baptista-Hon, Daniel T.; Annunziata, Christina M.; Silvio Gutkind, J.; Hales, Tim G.; Lee, Norman H.

    2015-06-01

    Functional expression of voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) has been demonstrated in multiple cancer cell types where channel activity induces invasive activity. The signaling mechanisms by which VGSCs promote oncogenesis remain poorly understood. We explored the signal transduction process critical to VGSC-mediated invasion on the basis of reports linking channel activity to gene expression changes in excitable cells. Coincidentally, many genes transcriptionally regulated by the SCN5A isoform in colon cancer have an over-representation of cis-acting sites for transcription factors phosphorylated by ERK1/2 MAPK. We hypothesized that VGSC activity promotes MAPK activation to induce transcriptional changes in invasion-related genes. Using pharmacological inhibitors/activators and siRNA-mediated gene knockdowns, we correlated channel activity with Rap1-dependent persistent MAPK activation in the SW620 human colon cancer cell line. We further demonstrated that VGSC activity induces downstream changes in invasion-related gene expression via a PKA/ERK/c-JUN/ELK-1/ETS-1 transcriptional pathway. This is the first study illustrating a molecular mechanism linking functional activity of VGSCs to transcriptional activation of invasion-related genes.

  15. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated activation by transcription- and topoisomerase I-induced DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Sordet, Olivier; Redon, Christophe E; Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Smith, Susan; Solier, Stéphanie; Douarre, Céline; Conti, Chiara; Nakamura, Asako J; Das, Benu B; Nicolas, Estelle; Kohn, Kurt W; Bonner, William M; Pommier, Yves

    2009-08-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), the deficiency of which causes a severe neurodegenerative disease, is a crucial mediator for the DNA damage response (DDR). As neurons have high rates of transcription that require topoisomerase I (TOP1), we investigated whether TOP1 cleavage complexes (TOP1cc)-which are potent transcription-blocking lesions-also produce transcription-dependent DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) with ATM activation. We show the induction of DSBs and DDR activation in post-mitotic primary neurons and lymphocytes treated with camptothecin, with the induction of nuclear DDR foci containing activated ATM, gamma-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX), activated CHK2 (checkpoint kinase 2), MDC1 (mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1) and 53BP1 (p53 binding protein 1). The DSB-ATM-DDR pathway was suppressed by inhibiting transcription and gamma-H2AX signals were reduced by RNase H1 transfection, which removes transcription-mediated R-loops. Thus, we propose that Top1cc produce transcription arrests with R-loop formation and generate DSBs that activate ATM in post-mitotic cells.

  16. SUMOylation of DRIL1 Directs Its Transcriptional Activity Towards Leukocyte Lineage-Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    van Lohuizen, Maarten; Peeper, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    DRIL1 is an ARID family transcription factor that can immortalize primary mouse fibroblasts, bypass RASV12-induced cellular senescence and collaborate with RASV12 or MYC in mediating oncogenic transformation. It also activates immunoglobulin heavy chain transcription and engages in heterodimer formation with E2F to stimulate E2F-dependent transcription. Little, however, is known about the regulation of DRIL1 activity. Recently, DRIL1 was found to interact with the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9, but the functional relevance of this association has not been assessed. Here, we show that DRIL1 is sumoylated both in vitro and in vivo at lysine 398. Moreover, we provide evidence that PIASy functions as a specific SUMO E3-ligase for DRIL1 and promotes its sumoylation both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, consistent with the subnuclear localization of PIASy in the Matrix-Associated Region (MAR), SUMO-modified DRIL1 species are found exclusively in the MAR fraction. This post-translational modification interferes neither with the subcellular localization nor the DNA-binding activity of the protein. In contrast, DRIL1 sumoylation impairs its interaction with E2F1 in vitro and modifies its transcriptional activity in vivo, driving transcription of subset of genes regulating leukocyte fate. Taken together, these results identify sumoylation as a novel post-translational modification of DRIL1 that represents an important mechanism for targeting and modulating DRIL1 transcriptional activity. PMID:19436740

  17. Altered activities of transcription factors and their related gene expression in cardiac tissues of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Y; Kashiwagi, A; Taki, H; Shinozaki, K; Maeno, Y; Kojima, H; Maegawa, H; Haneda, M; Hidaka, H; Yasuda, H; Horiike, K; Kikkawa, R

    1998-08-01

    Gene regulation in the cardiovascular tissues of diabetic subjects has been reported to be altered. To examine abnormal activities in transcription factors as a possible cause of this altered gene regulation, we studied the activity of two redox-sensitive transcription factors--nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and activating protein-1 (AP-1)--and the change in the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1, which is regulated by these transcription factors in the cardiac tissues of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Increased activity of NF-kappaB and AP-1 but not nuclear transcription-activating factor, as determined by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, was found in the hearts of 4-week diabetic rats. Glycemic control by a subcutaneous injection of insulin prevented these diabetes-induced changes in transcription factor activity. In accordance with these changes, the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1 was increased fourfold in 4-week diabetic rats and threefold in 24-week diabetic rats as compared with control rats (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). Insulin treatment also consistently prevented changes in the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1. The oral administration of an antioxidant, probucol, to these diabetic rats partially prevented the elevation of the activity of both NF-kappaB and AP-1, and normalized the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1 without producing any change in the plasma glucose concentration. These results suggest that elevated oxidative stress is involved in the activation of the transcription factors NF-kappaB and AP-1 in the cardiac tissues of diabetic rats, and that these abnormal activities of transcription factors could be associated with the altered gene regulation observed in the cardiovascular tissues of diabetic rats.

  18. Enhanced osteoclastogenesis by mitochondrial retrograde signaling through transcriptional activation of the cathepsin K gene.

    PubMed

    Guha, Manti; Srinivasan, Satish; Koenigstein, Alexander; Zaidi, Mone; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has emerged as an important factor in wide ranging human pathologies. We have previously defined a retrograde signaling pathway that originates from dysfunctional mitochondria (Mt-RS) and causes a global nuclear transcriptional reprograming as its end point. Mitochondrial dysfunction causing disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and consequent increase in cytosolic calcium [Ca(2) ](c) activates calcineurin and the transcription factors NF-κB, NFAT, CREB, and C/EBPδ. In macrophages, this signaling complements receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastic differentiation. Here, we show that the Mt-RS activated transcriptional coactivator heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2 (hnRNP A2) is induced by hypoxia in murine macrophages. We demonstrate that the cathepsin K gene (Ctsk), one of the key genes upregulated during osteoclast differentiation, is transcriptionally activated by Mt-RS factors. HnRNP A2 acts as a coactivator with nuclear transcription factors, cRel, and C/EBPδ for Ctsk promoter activation under hypoxic conditions. Notably, our study shows that hypoxia-induced activation of the stress target factors mediates effects similar to that of RANKL with regard to Ctsk activation. We therefore suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of Mt-RS, induced by various pathophysiologic conditions, is a potential risk factor for osteoclastogenesis and bone loss.

  19. Interaction of the Transcription Start Site Core Region and Transcription Factor YY1 Determine Ascorbate Transporter SVCT2 Exon 1a Promoter Activity

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Huan; May, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of the ascorbate transporter, SVCT2, is driven by two distinct promoters in exon 1 of the transporter sequence. The exon 1a promoter lacks a classical transcription start site and little is known about regulation of promoter activity in the transcription start site core (TSSC) region. Here we present evidence that the TSSC binds the multifunctional initiator-binding protein YY1. Electrophoresis shift assays using YY1 antibody showed that YY1 is present as one of two major complexes that specifically bind to the TSSC. The other complex contains the transcription factor NF-Y. Mutations in the TSSC that decreased YY1 binding also impaired the exon 1a promoter activity despite the presence of an upstream activating NF-Y/USF complex, suggesting that YY1 is involved in the regulation of the exon 1a transcription. Furthermore, YY1 interaction with NF-Y and/or USF synergistically enhanced the exon 1a promoter activity in transient transfections and co-activator p300 enhanced their synergistic activation. We propose that the TSSC plays a vital role in the exon 1a transcription and that this function is partially carried out by the transcription factor YY1. Moreover, co-activator p300 might be able to synergistically enhance the TSSC function via a “bridge” mechanism with upstream sequences. PMID:22532872

  20. Nuclear actin activates human transcription factor genes including the OCT4 gene.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; Tokunaga, Makio; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Harata, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    RNA microarray analyses revealed that nuclear actin activated many human transcription factor genes including OCT4, which is required for gene reprogramming. Oct4 is known to be activated by nuclear actin in Xenopus oocytes. Our findings imply that this process of OCT4 activation is conserved in vertebrates and among cell types and could be used for gene reprogramming of human cells.

  1. Prothymosin Alpha Selectively Enhances Estrogen Receptor Transcriptional Activity by Interacting with a Repressor of Estrogen Receptor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Paolo G. V.; Delage-Mourroux, Regis; Kraichely, Dennis M.; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.

    2000-01-01

    We find that prothymosin alpha (PTα) selectively enhances transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor (ER) but not transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors. This selectivity for ER is explained by PTα interaction not with ER, but with a 37-kDa protein denoted REA, for repressor of estrogen receptor activity, a protein that we have previously shown binds to ER, blocking coactivator binding to ER. We isolated PTα, known to be a chromatin-remodeling protein associated with cell proliferation, using REA as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen with a cDNA library from MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. PTα increases the magnitude of ERα transcriptional activity three- to fourfold. It shows lesser enhancement of ERβ transcriptional activity and has no influence on the transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors (progesterone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, thyroid hormone receptor, or retinoic acid receptor) or on the basal activity of ERs. In contrast, the steroid receptor coactivator SRC-1 increases transcriptional activity of all of these receptors. Cotransfection of PTα or SRC-1 with increasing amounts of REA, as well as competitive glutathione S-transferase pulldown and mammalian two-hybrid studies, show that REA competes with PTα (or SRC-1) for regulation of ER transcriptional activity and suppresses the ER stimulation by PTα or SRC-1, indicating that REA can function as an anticoactivator in cells. Our data support a model in which PTα, which does not interact with ER, selectively enhances the transcriptional activity of the ER but not that of other nuclear receptors by recruiting the repressive REA protein away from ER, thereby allowing effective coactivation of ER with SRC-1 or other coregulators. The ability of PTα to directly interact in vitro and in vivo with REA, a selective coregulator of the ER, thereby enabling the interaction of ER with coactivators, appears to explain its ability to selectively enhance

  2. Targeted HIV-1 Latency Reversal Using CRISPR/Cas9-Derived Transcriptional Activator Systems.

    PubMed

    Bialek, Julia K; Dunay, Gábor A; Voges, Maike; Schäfer, Carola; Spohn, Michael; Stucka, Rolf; Hauber, Joachim; Lange, Ulrike C

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 technology is currently considered the most advanced tool for targeted genome engineering. Its sequence-dependent specificity has been explored for locus-directed transcriptional modulation. Such modulation, in particular transcriptional activation, has been proposed as key approach to overcome silencing of dormant HIV provirus in latently infected cellular reservoirs. Currently available agents for provirus activation, so-called latency reversing agents (LRAs), act indirectly through cellular pathways to induce viral transcription. However, their clinical performance remains suboptimal, possibly because reservoirs have diverse cellular identities and/or proviral DNA is intractable to the induced pathways. We have explored two CRISPR/Cas9-derived activator systems as targeted approaches to induce dormant HIV-1 proviral DNA. These systems recruit multiple transcriptional activation domains to the HIV 5' long terminal repeat (LTR), for which we have identified an optimal target region within the LTR U3 sequence. Using this target region, we demonstrate transcriptional activation of proviral genomes via the synergistic activation mediator complex in various in culture model systems for HIV latency. Observed levels of induction are comparable or indeed higher than treatment with established LRAs. Importantly, activation is complete, leading to production of infective viral particles. Our data demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9-derived technologies can be applied to counteract HIV latency and may therefore represent promising novel approaches in the quest for HIV elimination.

  3. Phosphatidylserine enhances IKBKAP transcription by activating the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Donyo, Maya; Hollander, Dror; Abramovitch, Ziv; Naftelberg, Shiran; Ast, Gil

    2016-04-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a genetic disorder manifested due to abnormal development and progressive degeneration of the sensory and autonomic nervous system. FD is caused by a point mutation in the IKBKAP gene encoding the IKAP protein, resulting in decreased protein levels. A promising potential treatment for FD is phosphatidylserine (PS); however, the manner by which PS elevates IKAP levels has yet to be identified. Analysis of ChIP-seq results of the IKBKAP promoter region revealed binding of the transcription factors CREB and ELK1, which are regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. We show that PS treatment enhanced ERK phosphorylation in cells derived from FD patients. ERK activation resulted in elevated IKBKAP transcription and IKAP protein levels, whereas pretreatment with the MAPK inhibitor U0126 blocked elevation of the IKAP protein level. Overexpression of either ELK1 or CREB activated the IKBKAP promoter, whereas downregulation of these transcription factors resulted in a decrease of the IKAP protein. Additionally, we show that PS improves cell migration, known to be enhanced by MAPK/ERK activation and abrogated in FD cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PS activates the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway, resulting in activation of transcription factors that bind the promoter region of IKBKAP and thus enhancing its transcription. Therefore, compounds that activate the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway could constitute potential treatments for FD.

  4. Transcriptional activation by LR1 at the Eµ enhancer and switch region sites

    PubMed Central

    Hanakahi, L. A.; Maizels, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    LR1 is a B cell-specific, sequence-specific duplex DNA binding activity which is induced in B cells carrying out class switch recombination. Here we identify several properties of LR1 which enable it to function in transcriptional regulation. We show that LR1 contributes to transcriptional activation by the Eµ immunoglobulin heavy chain intron enhancer by binding to a site within the enhancer core. We further show that LR1 bends DNA upon binding. In addition, we show that LR1 is itself a bona fide transcriptional activator, as multimerized LR1 sites produce an element which can enhance transcription from a minimal promoter. In order for class switch recombination to occur, an activating signal must be transmitted via the Eµ core, and both S regions targeted for recombination must be actively transcribed. The properties of LR1 that we have identified suggest distinct potential functions of LR1 duplex DNA binding activity in class switch recombination. First, LR1 may contribute to recombinational activation by the Eµ core. Second, there are multiple potential LR1 duplex binding sites in each of the G-rich switch regions, and LR1 bound at contiguous sites may enhance recombination by stimulating transcription of the S regions. PMID:10908319

  5. Targeted HIV-1 Latency Reversal Using CRISPR/Cas9-Derived Transcriptional Activator Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bialek, Julia K.; Dunay, Gábor A.; Voges, Maike; Schäfer, Carola; Spohn, Michael; Stucka, Rolf; Hauber, Joachim; Lange, Ulrike C.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 technology is currently considered the most advanced tool for targeted genome engineering. Its sequence-dependent specificity has been explored for locus-directed transcriptional modulation. Such modulation, in particular transcriptional activation, has been proposed as key approach to overcome silencing of dormant HIV provirus in latently infected cellular reservoirs. Currently available agents for provirus activation, so-called latency reversing agents (LRAs), act indirectly through cellular pathways to induce viral transcription. However, their clinical performance remains suboptimal, possibly because reservoirs have diverse cellular identities and/or proviral DNA is intractable to the induced pathways. We have explored two CRISPR/Cas9-derived activator systems as targeted approaches to induce dormant HIV-1 proviral DNA. These systems recruit multiple transcriptional activation domains to the HIV 5’ long terminal repeat (LTR), for which we have identified an optimal target region within the LTR U3 sequence. Using this target region, we demonstrate transcriptional activation of proviral genomes via the synergistic activation mediator complex in various in culture model systems for HIV latency. Observed levels of induction are comparable or indeed higher than treatment with established LRAs. Importantly, activation is complete, leading to production of infective viral particles. Our data demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9-derived technologies can be applied to counteract HIV latency and may therefore represent promising novel approaches in the quest for HIV elimination. PMID:27341108

  6. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-04-28

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand.

  7. PLZF is a negative regulator of retinoic acid receptor transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Perrine J; Delmotte, Marie-Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2003-09-06

    BACKGROUND: Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are ligand-regulated transcription factors controlling cellular proliferation and differentiation. Receptor-interacting proteins such as corepressors and coactivators play a crucial role in specifying the overall transcriptional activity of the receptor in response to ligand treatment. Little is known however on how receptor activity is controlled by intermediary factors which interact with RARs in a ligand-independent manner. RESULTS: We have identified the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF), a transcriptional corepressor, to be a RAR-interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid assay. We confirmed this interaction by GST-pull down assays and show that the PLZF N-terminal zinc finger domain is necessary and sufficient for PLZF to bind RAR. The RAR ligand binding domain displayed the highest affinity for PLZF, but corepressor and coactivator binding interfaces did not contribute to PLZF recruitment. The interaction was ligand-independent and correlated to a decreased transcriptional activity of the RXR-RAR heterodimer upon overexpression of PLZF. A similar transcriptional interference could be observed with the estrogen receptor alpha and the glucocorticoid receptor. We further show that PLZF is likely to act by preventing RXR-RAR heterodimerization, both in-vitro and in intact cells. CONCLUSION: Thus RAR and PLZF interact physically and functionally. Intriguingly, these two transcription factors play a determining role in hematopoiesis and regionalization of the hindbrain and may, upon chromosomal translocation, form fusion proteins. Our observations therefore define a novel mechanism by which RARs activity may be controlled.

  8. Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibits the Transcriptional Activity of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Sandrine; Huaman Samanez, Carolina; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Briand, Olivier; Lien, Fleur; Dorchies, Emilie; Dumont, Julie; Postic, Catherine; Cariou, Bertrand; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The glucose-activated transcription factor carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) induces the expression of hepatic glycolytic and lipogenic genes. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear bile acid receptor controlling bile acid, lipid, and glucose homeostasis. FXR negatively regulates hepatic glycolysis and lipogenesis in mouse liver. The aim of this study was to determine whether FXR regulates the transcriptional activity of ChREBP in human hepatocytes and to unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms. Agonist-activated FXR inhibits glucose-induced transcription of several glycolytic genes, including the liver-type pyruvate kinase gene (L-PK), in the immortalized human hepatocyte (IHH) and HepaRG cell lines. This inhibition requires the L4L3 region of the L-PK promoter, known to bind the transcription factors ChREBP and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α). FXR interacts directly with ChREBP and HNF4α proteins. Analysis of the protein complex bound to the L4L3 region reveals the presence of ChREBP, HNF4α, FXR, and the transcriptional coactivators p300 and CBP at high glucose concentrations. FXR activation does not affect either FXR or HNF4α binding to the L4L3 region but does result in the concomitant release of ChREBP, p300, and CBP and in the recruitment of the transcriptional corepressor SMRT. Thus, FXR transrepresses the expression of genes involved in glycolysis in human hepatocytes. PMID:23530060

  9. Transcription factor Runx3 regulates interleukin-15-dependent natural killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Levanon, Ditsa; Negreanu, Varda; Lotem, Joseph; Bone, Karen Rae; Brenner, Ori; Leshkowitz, Dena; Groner, Yoram

    2014-03-01

    Natural killer cells belong to the family of innate lymphoid cells comprising the frontline defense against infected and transformed cells. Development and activation of natural killer cells is highly dependent on interleukin-15 signaling. However, very little is known about the transcription program driving this process. The transcription factor Runx3 is highly expressed in natural killer cells, but its function in these cells is largely unknown. We show that loss of Runx3 impaired interleukin-15-dependent accumulation of mature natural killer cells in vivo and under culture conditions and pregnant Runx3(-/-) mice completely lack the unique population of interleukin-15-dependent uterine natural killer cells. Combined chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and differential gene expression analysis of wild-type versus Runx3-deficient in vivo activated splenic natural killer cells revealed that Runx3 cooperates with ETS and T-box transcription factors to drive the interleukin-15-mediated transcription program during activation of these cells. Runx3 functions as a nuclear regulator during interleukin-15-dependent activation of natural killer cells by regulating the expression of genes involved in proliferation, maturation, and migration. Similar studies with additional transcription factors will allow the construction of a more detailed transcriptional network that controls natural killer cell development and function.

  10. Repression domains of class II ERF transcriptional repressors share an essential motif for active repression.

    PubMed

    Ohta, M; Matsui, K; Hiratsu, K; Shinshi, H; Ohme-Takagi, M

    2001-08-01

    We reported previously that three ERF transcription factors, tobacco ERF3 (NtERF3) and Arabidopsis AtERF3 and AtERF4, which are categorized as class II ERFs, are active repressors of transcription. To clarify the roles of these repressors in transcriptional regulation in plants, we attempted to identify the functional domains of the ERF repressor that mediates the repression of transcription. Analysis of the results of a series of deletions revealed that the C-terminal 35 amino acids of NtERF3 are sufficient to confer the capacity for repression of transcription on a heterologous DNA binding domain. This repression domain suppressed the intermolecular activities of other transcriptional activators. In addition, fusion of this repression domain to the VP16 activation domain completely inhibited the transactivation function of VP16. Comparison of amino acid sequences of class II ERF repressors revealed the conservation of the sequence motif (L)/(F)DLN(L)/(F)(x)P. This motif was essential for repression because mutations within the motif eliminated the capacity for repression. We designated this motif the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif, and we identified this motif in a number of zinc-finger proteins from wheat, Arabidopsis, and petunia plants. These zinc finger proteins functioned as repressors, and their repression domains were identified as regions that contained an EAR motif.

  11. Regulation of gene expression by manipulating transcriptional repressor activity using a novel CoSRI technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yue; Li, Song Feng; Parish, Roger W

    2016-12-20

    Targeted gene manipulation is a central strategy for studying gene function and identifying related biological processes. However, a methodology for manipulating the regulatory motifs of transcription factors is lacking as these factors commonly possess multiple motifs (eg. repression and activation motifs) which collaborate with each other to regulate multiple biological processes. We describe a novel approach designated Conserved Sequence-guided Repressor Inhibition (CoSRI) that can specifically reduce or abolish the repressive activities of transcription factors in vivo. The technology was evaluated using the chimeric MYB80-EAR transcription factor and subsequently the endogenous WUS transcription factor. The technology was employed to develop a reversible male sterility system applicable to hybrid seed production. In order to determine the capacity of the technology to regulate the activity of endogenous transcription factors, the WUS repressor was chosen. The WUS repression motif could be inhibited in vivo and the transformed plants exhibited the wus-1 phenotype. Consequently, the technology can be used to manipulate the activities of transcriptional repressor motifs regulating beneficial traits in crop plants and other eukaryotic organisms. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Rhodobacter sphaeroides LexA has dual activity: optimising and repressing recA gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tapias, Angels; Fernández, Silvia; Alonso, Juan C.; Barbé, Jordi

    2002-01-01

    Transcription of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides recA promoter (PrecA) is induced upon DNA damage in a lexA-dependent manner. In vivo experiments demonstrate that LexA protein represses and might also activate transcription of PrecA. Purified R.sphaeroides LexA protein specifically binds the SOS boxes located within the PrecA region. In vitro transcription analysis, using Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP), indicated that the presence of LexA may stimulate and repress transcription of PrecA. EMSA and DNase I footprinting experiments show that LexA and RNAP can bind simultaneously to PrecA. At low LexA concentrations it enhances RNAP binding to PrecA, stimulates open complex formation and strand separation beyond the transcription start site. At high LexA concentrations, however, RNAP-promoted strand separation is not observed beyond the +5 region. LexA might repress transcription by interfering with the clearance process instead of blocking the access of RNAP to the promoter region. Based on these findings we propose that the R.sphaeroides LexA protein performs fine tuning of the SOS response, which might provide a physiological advantage by enhancing transcription of SOS genes and delaying full activation of the response. PMID:11917014

  13. LRE2, an active human L1 element, has low level transcriptional activity and extremely low reverse transcriptase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, S.E.; Dombroski, B.A.; Sassaman, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    Previously, we found a 2 kb insertion containing a rearranged L1 element plus a unique sequence component (USC) within exon 48 of the dystrophin gene of a patient with muscular dystrophy. We used the USC to clone the precursor of this insertion, the second known {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} human L1 element. The locus LRE2 (L1 Retrotransposable Element 2) has an allele derived from the patient which matches the insertion sequence exactly. LRE2 has a perfect 13-15 bp target site duplication, 2 open reading frames (ORFs), and an unusual 21 bp truncation of the 5{prime} end in a region known to be important for L1 transcription. The truncated LRE2 promoter has about 20% of the transcriptional activity of a previously studied L1 promoter after transfection into NTera2D1 cells of a construct in which the L1 promoter drives the expression of a lacZ gene. In addition, the reverse transcriptase (RT) encoded by LRE2 is active in an in vivo pseudogene assay in yeast and an in vitro assay. However, in both assays the RT of LRE2 is 1-5% as active as that of LRE1. These data demonstrate that multiple {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} L1 elements exist in the human genome, and that active elements can have highly variable rates of transcription and reverse transcriptase activity. That the RT of LRE2 has extremely low activity suggests the possibility that retrotransposition of an L1 element may in some cases involve an RT encoded by another L1 element.

  14. Transcriptional Activation Domains of Human Heat Shock Factor 1 Recruit Human SWI/SNF

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, E. Kelly; Weirich, Christine S.; Guyon, Jeffrey R.; Sif, Saïd; Kingston, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling complexes such as SWI/SNF use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to remodel nucleosomal DNA and increase transcription of nucleosomal templates. Human heat shock factor one (hHSF1) is a tightly regulated activator that stimulates transcriptional initiation and elongation using different portions of its activation domains. Here we demonstrate that hHSF1 associates with BRG1, the ATPase subunit of human SWI/SNF (hSWI/SNF) at endogenous protein concentrations. We also show that hHSF1 activation domains recruit hSWI/SNF to a chromatin template in a purified system. Mutation of hHSF1 residues responsible for activation of transcriptional elongation has the most severe effect on recruitment of SWI/SNF and association of hHSF1 with BRG1, suggesting that recruitment of chromatin remodeling activity might play a role in stimulation of elongation. PMID:11486022

  15. SUMO represses transcriptional activity of the Drosophila SoxNeuro and human Sox3 central nervous system-specific transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Savare, Jean; Bonneaud, Nathalie; Girard, Franck

    2005-06-01

    Sry high mobility group (HMG) box (Sox) transcription factors are involved in the development of central nervous system (CNS) in all metazoans. Little is known on the molecular mechanisms that regulate their transcriptional activity. Covalent posttranslational modification by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) regulates several nuclear events, including the transcriptional activity of transcription factors. Here, we demonstrate that SoxNeuro, an HMG box-containing transcription factor involved in neuroblast formation in Drosophila, is a substrate for SUMO modification. SUMOylation assays in HeLa cells and Drosophila S2 cells reveal that lysine 439 is the major SUMO acceptor site. The sequence in SoxNeuro targeted for SUMOylation, IKSE, is part of a small inhibitory domain, able to repress in cis the activity of two adjacent transcriptional activation domains. Our data show that SUMO modification represses SoxNeuro transcriptional activity in transfected cells. Overexpression in Drosophila embryos of a SoxN form that cannot be targeted for SUMOylation strongly impairs the development of the CNS, suggesting that SUMO modification of SoxN is crucial for regulating its activity in vivo. Finally, we present evidence that SUMO modification of group B1 Sox factors was conserved during evolution, because Sox3, the human counterpart of SoxN, is also negatively regulated through SUMO modification.

  16. The novel secretory protein CGREF1 inhibits the activation of AP-1 transcriptional activity and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Weiwei; Wang, Lan; Xiong, Ying; Li, Jing; Wang, Ying; Shi, Taiping; Ma, Dalong

    2015-08-01

    The transcription factor AP-1 plays an important role in inflammation and cell survival. Using a dual-luciferase reporter assay system and a library of 940 candidate human secretory protein cDNA clones, we identified that CGREF1 can inhibit the transcriptional activity of AP-1. We demonstrated that CGREF1 is secreted via the classical secretory pathway through the ER-to-Golgi apparatus. Functional investigations revealed that overexpression of CGREF1 can significantly inhibit the phosphorylation of ERK and p38 MAPK, and suppress the proliferation of HEK293T and HCT116 cells. Conversely, specific siRNAs against CGREF1 can increase the transcriptional activity of AP-1. These results clearly indicated that CGREF1 is a novel secretory protein, and plays an important role in regulation of AP-1 transcriptional activity and cell proliferation.

  17. DNA double-strand breaks and ATM activation by transcription-blocking DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Sordet, Olivier; Nakamura, Asako J; Redon, Christophe E; Pommier, Yves

    2010-01-15

    A taxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), the deficiency of which causes a severe neurodegenerative disease, is a crucial mediator for the DNA double-strand break (DSB) response. We recently showed that transcription-blocking topoisomerase I cleavage complexes (TOP1cc) produce DSBs related to R-loop formation and activate ATM in post-mitotic neurons and lymphocytes. Here we discuss how TOP1cc can produce transcription arrest with R-loop formation and generate DSBs that activate ATM, as well as data suggesting that those transcription-dependent DSBs tend to form at the IgH locus and at specific genomic sites. We also address the potential roles of ATM in response to transcription-blocking TOP1cc.

  18. Transcriptional activation and repression by cellular DNA-binding protein C/EBP.

    PubMed Central

    Pei, D Q; Shih, C H

    1990-01-01

    A putative transcription factor, C/EBP, isolated from rat liver nuclei, has been shown to bind to at least two different sequence motifs: the CCAAT promoter domain and a core sequence [GTGG(T/A)(T/A)(T/A)G] common to many viral enhancers, including simian virus 40 and human hepatitis B virus. It has been proposed that C/EBP might function as a positive transcription factor by facilitating the communication between promoter and enhancer elements through its dual binding activities to DNA. Surprisingly, results from three different approaches suggest that C/EBP functions as a transcriptional repressor to hepatitis B virus and simian virus 40. Further investigation indicated that C/EBP can function as both a transcriptional activator and a repressor, depending on the reporter gene system. Images PMID:2157040

  19. Transcriptional activation of the herpes simplex virus type 1 UL38 promoter conferred by the cis-acting downstream activation sequence is mediated by a cellular transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Guzowski, J F; Singh, J; Wagner, E K

    1994-12-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 strict late (gamma) UL38 promoter contains three cis-acting transcriptional elements: a TATA box, a specific initiator element, and the downstream activation sequence (DAS). DAS is located between positions +20 and +33 within the 5' untranslated leader region and strongly influences transcript levels during productive infection. In this communication, we further characterize DAS and investigate its mechanism of action. DAS function has a strict spacing requirement, and DAS contains an essential 6-bp core element. A similarly positioned element from the gamma gC gene (UL44) has partial DAS function within the UL38 promoter context, and the promoter controlling expression of the gamma US11 transcript contains an identically located element with functional and sequence similarity to UL38 DAS. These data suggest that downstream elements are a common feature of many HSV gamma promoters. Results with recombinant viruses containing modifications of the TATA box or initiator element of the UL38 promoter suggest that DAS functions to increase transcription initiation and not the efficiency of transcription elongation. In vitro transcription assays using uninfected HeLa nuclear extracts show that, as in productive infection with recombinant viruses, the deletion of DAS from the UL38 promoter dramatically decreases RNA expression. Finally, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and UV cross-linking experiments show that DAS DNA forms a specific, stable complex with a cellular protein (the DAS-binding factor) of approximately 35 kDa. These data strongly suggest that the interaction of cellular DAS-binding factor with DAS is required for efficient expression of UL38 and other HSV late genes.

  20. Transcriptional pausing and stalling causes multiple clustered mutations by human activation-induced deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Canugovi, Chandrika; Samaranayake, Mala; Bhagwat, Ashok S.

    2009-01-01

    Transcription of the rearranged immunoglobulin gene and expression of the enzyme activation-induced deaminase (AID) are essential for somatic hypermutations of this gene during antibody maturation. While AID acts as a single-strand DNA-cytosine deaminase creating U · G mispairs that lead to mutations, the role played by transcription in this process is less clear. We have used in vitro transcription of the kan gene by the T7 RNA polymerase (RNAP) in the presence of AID and a genetic reversion assay for kanamycin-resistance to investigate the causes of multiple clustered mutations (MCMs) during somatic hypermutations. We find that, depending on transcription conditions, AID can cause single-base substitutions or MCMs. When wild-type RNAP is used for transcription at physiologically relevant concentrations of ribonucleoside triphosphates (NTPs), few MCMs are found. In contrast, slowing the rate of elongation by reducing the NTP concentration or using a mutant RNAP increases several-fold the percent of revertants containing MCMs. Arresting the elongation complexes by a quick removal of NTPs leads to formation of RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops). Treatment of these structures with AID results in a high percentage of KanR revertants with MCMs. Furthermore, selecting for transcription elongation complexes stalled near the codon that suffers mutations during acquisition of kanamycin-resistance results in an overwhelming majority of revertants with MCMs. These results show that if RNAP II pauses or stalls during transcription of immunoglobulin gene, AID is likely to promote MCMs. As changes in physiological conditions such as occurrence of certain DNA primary or secondary structures or DNA adducts are known to cause transcriptional pausing and stalling in mammalian cells, this process may cause MCMs during somatic hypermutation.—Canugovi, C., Samaranayake, M., Bhagwat, A. S. Transcriptional pausing and stalling causes multiple clustered mutations by human activation

  1. Redefining the transcriptional regulatory dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages by deepCAGE transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sugata; Schmeier, Sebastian; Arner, Erik; Alam, Tanvir; Parihar, Suraj P.; Ozturk, Mumin; Tamgue, Ousman; Kawaji, Hideya; de Hoon, Michiel J. L.; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Guler, Reto; Consortium, FANTOM; Brombacher, Frank; Suzuki, Harukazu

    2015-01-01

    Classically or alternatively activated macrophages (M1 and M2, respectively) play distinct and important roles for microbiocidal activity, regulation of inflammation and tissue homeostasis. Despite this, their transcriptional regulatory dynamics are poorly understood. Using promoter-level expression profiling by non-biased deepCAGE we have studied the transcriptional dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Transcription factor (TF) binding motif activity analysis revealed four motifs, NFKB1_REL_RELA, IRF1,2, IRF7 and TBP that are commonly activated but have distinct activity dynamics in M1 and M2 activation. We observe matching changes in the expression profiles of the corresponding TFs and show that only a restricted set of TFs change expression. There is an overall drastic and transient up-regulation in M1 and a weaker and more sustainable up-regulation in M2. Novel TFs, such as Thap6, Maff, (M1) and Hivep1, Nfil3, Prdm1, (M2) among others, were suggested to be involved in the activation processes. Additionally, 52 (M1) and 67 (M2) novel differentially expressed genes and, for the first time, several differentially expressed long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcriptome markers were identified. In conclusion, the finding of novel motifs, TFs and protein-coding and lncRNA genes is an important step forward to fully understand the transcriptional machinery of macrophage activation. PMID:26117544

  2. Transcription activation by GC-boxes: evaluation of kinetic and equilibrium contributions.

    PubMed Central

    Yean, D; Gralla, J

    1996-01-01

    Basal and GC-box activated transcription were compared by various assays in order to learn the basis for an 8-fold difference observed under standard conditions. The time required for forming pre-initiation complexes and initiating and elongating RNA synthesis, and the extent of transcription reinitiation were found to be quite similar for basal and activated transcription, with complex formation being the slow step in both cases. The extent of activation was found to vary widely with the amount of template DNA used. Activated pre-initiation complexes were found to have a higher stability than basal complexes. The data are interpreted to indicate that GC-box elements do not stimulate the rate constants for critical steps in this system but rather increase the equilibrium constant for pre-initiation complex formation, probably by 10-30-fold. PMID:8759003

  3. Transcriptional Regulation of Enhancers Active in Protodomains of the Developing Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pattabiraman, Kartik; Golonzhka, Olga; Lindtner, Susan; Nord, Alex S.; Taher, Leila; Hoch, Renee; Silberberg, Shanni N.; Zhang, Dongji; Chen, Bin; Zeng, HongKui; Pennacchio, Len; Puelles, Luis; Visel, Axel; Rubenstein, John L. R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Elucidating the genetic control of cerebral cortical (pallial) development is essential for understanding function, evolution, and disorders of the brain. Transcription factors (TFs) that embryonically regulate pallial regionalization are expressed in gradients, raising the question of how discrete domains are generated. We provide evidence that small enhancer elements active in protodomains integrate broad transcriptional information. CreERT2 and GFP expression from 14 different enhancer elements in stable transgenic mice allowed us to define the first comprehensive regional fate map of the pallium. We explored transcriptional mechanisms that control the activity of the enhancers using informatics, in vivo occupancy by TFs that regulate cortical patterning (CoupTFI, Pax6 and Pbx1), and analysis of enhancer activity in Pax6 mutants. Overall, the results provide novel insights into how broadly expressed patterning TFs regulate the activity of small enhancer elements that drive gene expression in pallial protodomains that fate map to distinct cortical regions. PMID:24814534

  4. Transcriptional Activity of rRNA Genes in Barley Cells after Mutagenic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the combination of the micronucleus test with analysis of the activity of the rRNA genes in mutagen-treated Hordeum vulgare (barley) by maleic hydrazide (MH) cells was performed. Simultaneously fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 25S rDNA as probes and an analysis of the transcriptional activity of 35S rRNA genes with silver staining were performed. The results showed that transcriptional activity is always maintained in the micronuclei although they are eliminated during the next cell cycle. The analysis of the transcriptional activity was extended to barley nuclei. MH influenced the fusion of the nucleoli in barley nuclei. The silver staining enabled detection of the nuclear bodies which arose after MH treatment. The results confirmed the usefulness of cytogenetic techniques in the characterization of micronuclei. Similar analyses can be now extended to other abiotic stresses to study the response of plant cells to the environment. PMID:27257817

  5. Systems analysis of transcription factor activities in environments with stable and dynamic oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Matthew D; Ocone, Andrea; Stapleton, Melanie R; Hall, Simon; Trotter, Eleanor W; Poole, Robert K; Sanguinetti, Guido; Green, Jeffrey

    2012-07-01

    Understanding gene regulation requires knowledge of changes in transcription factor (TF) activities. Simultaneous direct measurement of numerous TF activities is currently impossible. Nevertheless, statistical approaches to infer TF activities have yielded non-trivial and verifiable predictions for individual TFs. Here, global statistical modelling identifies changes in TF activities from transcript profiles of Escherichia coli growing in stable (fixed oxygen availabilities) and dynamic (changing oxygen availability) environments. A core oxygen-responsive TF network, supplemented by additional TFs acting under specific conditions, was identified. The activities of the cytoplasmic oxygen-responsive TF, FNR, and the membrane-bound terminal oxidases implied that, even on the scale of the bacterial cell, spatial effects significantly influence oxygen-sensing. Several transcripts exhibited asymmetrical patterns of abundance in aerobic to anaerobic and anaerobic to aerobic transitions. One of these transcripts, ndh, encodes a major component of the aerobic respiratory chain and is regulated by oxygen-responsive TFs ArcA and FNR. Kinetic modelling indicated that ArcA and FNR behaviour could not explain the ndh transcript profile, leading to the identification of another TF, PdhR, as the source of the asymmetry. Thus, this approach illustrates how systematic examination of regulatory responses in stable and dynamic environments yields new mechanistic insights into adaptive processes.

  6. Identifying transcription start sites and active enhancer elements using BruUV-seq.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, Brian; Veloso, Artur; Kirkconnell, Killeen S; de Andrade Lima, Leonardo Carmo; Paulsen, Michelle T; Ljungman, Emily A; Bedi, Karan; Prasad, Jayendra; Wilson, Thomas E; Ljungman, Mats

    2015-12-11

    BruUV-seq utilizes UV light to introduce transcription-blocking DNA lesions randomly in the genome prior to bromouridine-labeling and deep sequencing of nascent RNA. By inhibiting transcription elongation, but not initiation, pre-treatment with UV light leads to a redistribution of transcription reads resulting in the enhancement of nascent RNA signal towards the 5'-end of genes promoting the identification of transcription start sites (TSSs). Furthermore, transcripts associated with arrested RNA polymerases are protected from 3'-5' degradation and thus, unstable transcripts such as putative enhancer RNA (eRNA) are dramatically increased. Validation of BruUV-seq against GRO-cap that identifies capped run-on transcripts showed that most BruUV-seq peaks overlapped with GRO-cap signal over both TSSs and enhancer elements. Finally, BruUV-seq identified putative enhancer elements induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) treatment concomitant with expression of nearby TNF-induced genes. Taken together, BruUV-seq is a powerful new approach for identifying TSSs and active enhancer elements genome-wide in intact cells.

  7. Identifying transcription start sites and active enhancer elements using BruUV-seq

    PubMed Central

    Magnuson, Brian; Veloso, Artur; Kirkconnell, Killeen S.; Lima, Leonardo Carmo de Andrade; Paulsen, Michelle T.; Ljungman, Emily A.; Bedi, Karan; Prasad, Jayendra; Wilson, Thomas E.; Ljungman, Mats

    2015-01-01

    BruUV-seq utilizes UV light to introduce transcription-blocking DNA lesions randomly in the genome prior to bromouridine-labeling and deep sequencing of nascent RNA. By inhibiting transcription elongation, but not initiation, pre-treatment with UV light leads to a redistribution of transcription reads resulting in the enhancement of nascent RNA signal towards the 5′-end of genes promoting the identification of transcription start sites (TSSs). Furthermore, transcripts associated with arrested RNA polymerases are protected from 3′–5′ degradation and thus, unstable transcripts such as putative enhancer RNA (eRNA) are dramatically increased. Validation of BruUV-seq against GRO-cap that identifies capped run-on transcripts showed that most BruUV-seq peaks overlapped with GRO-cap signal over both TSSs and enhancer elements. Finally, BruUV-seq identified putative enhancer elements induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) treatment concomitant with expression of nearby TNF-induced genes. Taken together, BruUV-seq is a powerful new approach for identifying TSSs and active enhancer elements genome-wide in intact cells. PMID:26656874

  8. PDGF inactivates forkhead family transcription factor by activation of Akt in glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh Choudhury, Goutam; Lenin, Mahimainathan; Calhaun, Cheresa; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Abboud, Hanna E

    2003-02-01

    Regulation of the forkhead domain transcription factors by PDGF has not been studied. In this report, we investigated the role of PDGF-induced Akt in regulating forkhead domain protein FKHRL1 in glomerular mesangial cells. PDGF increased phosphorylation of FKHRL1 in a time- and PI 3 kinase-dependent manner. Expression of dominant negative Akt by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer blocked PDGF-induced FKHRL1 phosphorylation. PDGF inhibited transcription of a forkhead DNA binding element-driven reporter gene. This inhibition was mimicked by constitutively active myristoylated Akt. Moreover, FKHR1-mediated transcription of the reporter gene was completely attenuated by both PDGF and Myr-Akt. One of the targets of forkhead transcription factors is the proapoptotic Fas ligand (FasL) gene. PDGF, as well as Myr-Akt, inhibited transcription of FasL. In contrast, inhibition of PI 3 kinase and dominant negative Akt increased FasL gene transcription, suggesting that suppression of PI 3 kinase/Akt signalling may induce apoptosis in mesangial cells via upregulation of FasL expression. However, expression of dominant negative Akt by adenovirus did not induce apoptosis in mesangial cells, suggesting that Akt-independent antiapoptotic mechanisms also exist. Together, our data demonstrate for the first time that PDGF inactivates forkhead domain transcription factor by Akt-dependent phosphorylation and that suppression of Akt signalling is not sufficient to induce apoptosis in mesangial cells.

  9. Specific induction of endogenous viral restriction factors using CRISPR/Cas-derived transcriptional activators.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, Hal P; Kornepati, Anand V R; Marshall, Joy B; Kennedy, Edward M; Cullen, Bryan R

    2015-12-29

    Whereas several mammalian proteins can restrict the replication of HIV-1 and other viruses, these are often not expressed in relevant target cells. A potential method to inhibit viral replication might therefore be to use synthetic transcription factors to induce restriction factor expression. In particular, mutants of the RNA-guided DNA binding protein Cas9 that have lost their DNA cleavage activity could be used to recruit transcription activation domains to specific promoters. However, initial experiments revealed only weak activation unless multiple promoter-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) were used. Recently, the recruitment of multiple transcription activation domains by a single sgRNA, modified to contain MS2-derived stem loops that recruit fusion proteins consisting of the MS2 coat protein linked to transcription activation domains, was reported to induce otherwise silent cellular genes. Here, we demonstrate that such "synergistic activation mediators" can induce the expression of two restriction factors, APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3B (A3B), in human cells that normally lack these proteins. We observed modest activation of endogenous A3G or A3B expression using single sgRNAs but high expression when two sgRNAs were used. Whereas the induced A3G and A3B proteins both blocked infection by an HIV-1 variant lacking a functional vif gene by inducing extensive dC-to-dU editing, only the induced A3B protein inhibited wild-type HIV-1. These data demonstrate that Cas9-derived transcriptional activators have the potential to be used for screens for endogenous genes that affect virus replication and raise the possibility that synthetic transcription factors might prove clinically useful if efficient delivery mechanisms could be developed.

  10. Rcs signalling-activated transcription of rcsA induces strong anti-sense transcription of upstream fliPQR flagellar genes from a weak intergenic promoter: regulatory roles for the anti-sense transcript in virulence and motility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingfeng; Harshey, Rasika M

    2009-10-01

    In Salmonella enterica, an activated Rcs signalling system inhibits initiation of transcription of the flhD master operon. Under these conditions, where motility is shut down, microarray experiments showed an increased RNA signal for three flagellar genes -fliPQR- located upstream of rcsA. We show here that it is the anti-sense (AS) strand of these genes that is transcribed, originating at a weak promoter in the intergenic region between fliR and rcsA. RcsA is an auxiliary regulator for the Rcs system, whose transcription is dependent on the response regulator RcsB. Rcs-activated rightward transcription, but not translation, of rcsA is required for stimulation of leftward AS transcription. Our results implicate a combined action of RcsB and rcsA transcription in activating the AS promoter, likely by modulating DNA superhelicity in the intergenic region. We show that the AS transcript regulates many genes in the Rcs regulon, including SPI-1 and SPI-2 virulence and stress-response genes. In the wild-type strain the AS transcript is present in low amounts, independent of Rcs signalling. Here, AS transcription modulates complementary sense RNA levels and impacts swarming motility. It appears that the flagellar AS transcript has been co-opted by the Rcs system to regulate virulence.

  11. Patterns of Gene-Specific and Total Transcriptional Activity during the Plasmodium falciparum Intraerythrocytic Developmental Cycle ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Jennifer S.; Militello, Kevin T.; Sims, Peter A.; Patel, Vishal P.; Kasper, Jacob M.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    2009-01-01

    The relationships among gene regulatory mechanisms in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum throughout its asexual intraerythrocytic developmental cycle (IDC) remain poorly understood. To investigate the level and nature of transcriptional activity and its role in controlling gene expression during the IDC, we performed nuclear run-on on whole-transcriptome samples from time points throughout the IDC and found a peak in RNA polymerase II-dependent transcriptional activity related to both the number of nuclei per parasite and variable transcriptional activity per nucleus over time. These differential total transcriptional activity levels allowed the calculation of the absolute transcriptional activities of individual genes from gene-specific nuclear run-on hybridization data. For half of the genes analyzed, sense-strand transcriptional activity peaked at the same time point as total activity. The antisense strands of several genes were substantially transcribed. Comparison of the transcriptional activity of the sense strand of each gene to its steady-state RNA abundance across the time points assayed revealed both correlations and discrepancies, implying transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation, respectively. Our results demonstrate that such comparisons can effectively indicate gene regulatory mechanisms in P. falciparum and suggest that genes with diverse transcriptional activity levels and patterns combine to produce total transcriptional activity levels tied to parasite development during the IDC. PMID:19151330

  12. Prenylation inhibitors stimulate both estrogen receptor α transcriptional activity through AF-1 and AF-2 and estrogen receptor β transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Cestac, Philippe; Sarrabayrouse, Guillaume; Médale-Giamarchi, Claire; Rochaix, Philippe; Balaguer, Patrick; Favre, Gilles; Faye, Jean-Charles; Doisneau-Sixou, Sophie

    2005-01-01

    Introduction We showed in a previous study that prenylated proteins play a role in estradiol stimulation of proliferation. However, these proteins antagonize the ability of estrogen receptor (ER) α to stimulate estrogen response element (ERE)-dependent transcriptional activity, potentially through the formation of a co-regulator complex. The present study investigates, in further detail, how prenylated proteins modulate the transcriptional activities mediated by ERα and by ERβ. Methods The ERE-β-globin-Luc-SV-Neo plasmid was either stably transfected into MCF-7 cells or HeLa cells (MELN cells and HELN cells, respectively) or transiently transfected into MCF-7 cells using polyethylenimine. Cells deprived of estradiol were analyzed for ERE-dependent luciferase activity 16 hours after estradiol stimulation and treatment with FTI-277 (a farnesyltransferase inhibitor) or with GGTI-298 (a geranylgeranyltransferase I inhibitor). In HELN cells, the effect of prenyltransferase inhibitors on luciferase activity was compared after transient transfection of plasmids coding either the full-length ERα, the full-length ERβ, the AF-1-deleted ERα or the AF-2-deleted ERα. The presence of ERα was then detected by immunocytochemistry in either the nuclei or the cytoplasms of MCF-7 cells. Finally, Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme treatment was used to determine the involvement of Rho proteins in ERE-dependent luciferase activity. Results FTI-277 and GGTI-298 only stimulate ERE-dependent luciferase activity in stably transfected MCF-7 cells. They stimulate both ERα-mediated and ERβ-mediated ERE-dependent luciferase activity in HELN cells, in the presence of and in the absence of estradiol. The roles of both AF-1 and AF-2 are significant in this effect. Nuclear ERα is decreased in the presence of prenyltransferase inhibitors in MCF-7 cells, again in the presence of and in the absence of estradiol. By contrast, cytoplasmic ERα is mainly decreased after treatment with FTI

  13. PJA2 ubiquitinates the HIV-1 Tat protein with atypical chain linkages to activate viral transcription

    PubMed Central

    Faust, Tyler B.; Li, Yang; Jang, Gwendolyn M.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Yang, Shumin; Weiss, Amit; Krogan, Nevan J.; Frankel, Alan D.

    2017-01-01

    Transcription complexes that assemble at the HIV-1 promoter efficiently initiate transcription but generate paused RNA polymerase II downstream from the start site. The virally encoded Tat protein hijacks positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) to phosphorylate and activate this paused polymerase. In addition, Tat undergoes a series of reversible post-translational modifications that regulate distinct steps of the transcription cycle. To identify additional functionally important Tat cofactors, we performed RNAi knockdowns of sixteen previously identified Tat interactors and found that a novel E3 ligase, PJA2, ubiquitinates Tat in a non-degradative manner and specifically regulates the step of HIV transcription elongation. Interestingly, several different lysine residues in Tat can function as ubiquitin acceptor sites, and variable combinations of these lysines support both full transcriptional activity and viral replication. Further, the polyubiquitin chain conjugated to Tat by PJA2 can itself be assembled through variable ubiquitin lysine linkages. Importantly, proper ubiquitin chain assembly by PJA2 requires that Tat first binds its P-TEFb cofactor. These results highlight that both the Tat substrate and ubiquitin modification have plastic site usage, and this plasticity is likely another way in which the virus exploits the host molecular machinery to expand its limited genetic repertoire. PMID:28345603

  14. Novel FOXC2 Mutation in Hereditary Distichiasis Impairs DNA-Binding Activity and Transcriptional Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Leilei; He, Jie; Han, Bing; Lu, Linna; Fan, Jiayan; Zhang, He; Ge, Shengfang; Zhou, Yixiong; Jia, Renbing; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-01-01

    Distichiasis presents as double rows of eyelashes arising from aberrant differentiation of the meibomian glands of the eyelids, and it may be sporadic or hereditary. FOXC2 gene mutations in hereditary distichiasis are rarely reported. Here, we examined two generations of a Chinese family with hereditary distichiasis but without lymphedema or other features of LD syndrome. The FOXC2 gene was amplified and sequenced in all family members. Subcellular localization and luciferase assays were performed to assess the activity of the mutant FOXC2 protein. Clinical examinations showed distichiasis, lower eyelid ectropion, congenital ptosis and photophobia in all affected individuals. Sequence analysis revealed a novel frameshift mutation, c.964_965insG, in the coding region of the FOXC2 gene. This mutation caused protein truncation due to the presence of a premature stop codon. A fluorescence assay showed that this mutation did not change the nuclear localization of the protein. However, it impaired DNA-binding activity and decreased transcriptional activation. This is the first report of a FOXC2 mutation in hereditary distichiasis in the Chinese population. The findings of our study expand the FOXC2 mutation spectrum and contribute to the understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation of this disease. PMID:27570485

  15. A non canonical subtilase attenuates the transcriptional activation of defence responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Irene; Buscaill, Pierre; Audran, Corinne; Pouzet, Cécile; Jauneau, Alain; Rivas, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Proteases play crucial physiological functions in all organisms by controlling the lifetime of proteins. Here, we identified an atypical protease of the subtilase family [SBT5.2(b)] that attenuates the transcriptional activation of plant defence independently of its protease activity. The SBT5.2 gene produces two distinct transcripts encoding a canonical secreted subtilase [SBT5.2(a)] and an intracellular protein [SBT5.2(b)]. Concomitant to SBT5.2(a) downregulation, SBT5.2(b) expression is induced after bacterial inoculation. SBT5.2(b) localizes to endosomes where it interacts with and retains the defence-related transcription factor MYB30. Nuclear exclusion of MYB30 results in its reduced transcriptional activation and, thus, suppressed resistance. sbt5.2 mutants, with abolished SBT5.2(a) and SBT5.2(b) expression, display enhanced defence that is suppressed in a myb30 mutant background. Moreover, overexpression of SBT5.2(b), but not SBT5.2(a), in sbt5.2 plants reverts the phenotypes displayed by sbt5.2 mutants. Overall, we uncover a regulatory mode of the transcriptional activation of defence responses previously undescribed in eukaryotes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19755.001 PMID:27685353

  16. A non canonical subtilase attenuates the transcriptional activation of defence responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Irene; Buscaill, Pierre; Audran, Corinne; Pouzet, Cécile; Jauneau, Alain; Rivas, Susana

    2016-09-29

    Proteases play crucial physiological functions in all organisms by controlling the lifetime of proteins. Here, we identified an atypical protease of the subtilase family [SBT5.2(b)] that attenuates the transcriptional activation of plant defence independently of its protease activity. The SBT5.2 gene produces two distinct transcripts encoding a canonical secreted subtilase [SBT5.2(a)] and an intracellular protein [SBT5.2(b)]. Concomitant to SBT5.2(a) downregulation, SBT5.2(b) expression is induced after bacterial inoculation. SBT5.2(b) localizes to endosomes where it interacts with and retains the defence-related transcription factor MYB30. Nuclear exclusion of MYB30 results in its reduced transcriptional activation and, thus, suppressed resistance. sbt5.2 mutants, with abolished SBT5.2(a) and SBT5.2(b) expression, display enhanced defence that is suppressed in a myb30 mutant background. Moreover, overexpression of SBT5.2(b), but not SBT5.2(a), in sbt5.2 plants reverts the phenotypes displayed by sbt5.2 mutants. Overall, we uncover a regulatory mode of the transcriptional activation of defence responses previously undescribed in eukaryotes.

  17. Transcription and activation under environmental stress of the complex telomeric repeats of Chironomus thummi.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Guitarte, J L; Díez, J L; Morcillo, G

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to their traditional role, telomeres seem to behave as transcriptionally active regions. RNAs complementary to the short DNA repeats characteristic of telomerase-maintained telomeres have recently been identified in various mammalian cell lines, representing a new and unexpected element in telomere architecture. Here, we report the existence of transcripts complementary to telomeric sequences characteristic of Chironomus thummi telomeres. As in other Diptera, the non-canonical telomeres of chironomids lack the simple telomerase repeats and have instead more complex repetitive sequences. Northern blots of total RNA hybridized with telomere probes and RT-PCR with telomere-specific tailed primers confirm the existence of small non-coding RNAs of around 200 bp, the size of the DNA repeated telomeric unit. Telomere transcripts are heterogeneous in length, and they appear as a ladder pattern that probably corresponds to multimers of the repeat. Moreover, telomeres are activated under conditions of environmental stress, such as heat shock, appearing highly decondensed and densely labelled with acetylated H4 histone, as well as with RNA polymerase II antibodies, both marks of transcriptional activity. Changes in the expression levels of telomeric RNA were detected after heat shock. These findings provide evidence that transcriptional activity of the repetitive telomere sequences is an evolutionarily conserved feature, not limited to telomerase telomeres. The functional significance of this non-coding RNA as a new additional element in the context of telomere biology remains to be explained.

  18. Nitrogen-regulated transcription and enzyme activities in continuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Raeven, L J; Boonstra, J; Verkleij, A J; Verrips, C T

    1995-05-01

    Variations in the transcription of nitrogen-regulated genes and in the activities of nitrogen-regulated enzymes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied by changing the carbon and nitrogen fluxes. S. cerevisiae was grown in continuous culture at various dilution rates (D) under nitrogen limitation with NH4Cl as sole nitrogen source. With an increase in D from 0.05 to 0.29 h-1, both the glucose and the ammonia flux increased sixfold. The activities of the two ammonia-incorporating enzymes, NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADPH-GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS), encoded by GDH1 and GLN1, respectively, increased with increasing D, while the activity of the glutamate-degrading enzyme, NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH), decreased. Surprisingly, no changes were observed in the transcription of GDH1 and GLN1; however increased D was accompanied by an increase in GAP1 transcription. At the metabolite level, the increase in the glucose and nitrogen flux did not result in changes in the intracellular 2-oxoglutarate, glutamate or glutamine concentrations. It is shown that growth on ammonia alone is not sufficient to cause repression of GAP1 and GLN1 transcription and that the regulation of GAP1 transcription and both NADPH-GDH and GS activity is not an on/off switch, but is gradually modulated in correlation with the ammonia concentration.

  19. Nutritional conditions regulate transcriptional activity of SF-1 by controlling sumoylation and ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiwon; Yang, Dong Joo; Lee, Syann; Hammer, Gary D.; Kim, Ki Woo; Elmquist, Joel K.

    2016-01-01

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is a transcription factor expressed in the ventral medial nucleus of the hypothalamus that regulates energy homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanisms of SF-1 in the control of energy balance are largely unknown. Here, we show that nutritional conditions, such as the presence or absence of serum, affect SF-1 action. Serum starvation significantly decreased hypothalamic SF-1 levels by promoting ubiquitin-dependent degradation, and sumoylation was required for this process. SF-1 transcriptional activity was also differentially regulated by nutritional status. Under normal conditions, the transcriptional activity of hypothalamic SF-1 was activated by SUMO, but this was attenuated during starvation. Taken together, these results indicate that sumoylation and ubiquitination play crucial roles in the regulation of SF-1 function and that these effects are dependent on nutritional conditions, further supporting the importance of SF-1 in the control of energy homeostasis. PMID:26750456

  20. Gene deregulation and chronic activation in natural killer cells deficient in the transcription factor ETS1.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Kevin; Chandler, Katherine J; Spaulding, Christina; Zandi, Sasan; Sigvardsson, Mikael; Graves, Barbara J; Kee, Barbara L

    2012-06-29

    Multiple transcription factors guide the development of mature functional natural killer (NK) cells, yet little is known about their function. We used global gene expression and genome-wide binding analyses combined with developmental and functional studies to unveil three roles for the ETS1 transcription factor in NK cells. ETS1 functions at the earliest stages of NK cell development to promote expression of critical transcriptional regulators including T-BET and ID2, NK cell receptors (NKRs) including NKp46, Ly49H, and Ly49D, and signaling molecules essential for NKR function. As a consequence, Ets1(-/-) NK cells fail to degranulate after stimulation through activating NKRs. Nonetheless, these cells are hyperresponsive to cytokines and have characteristics of chronic stimulation including increased expression of inhibitory NKRs and multiple activation-associated genes. Therefore, ETS1 regulates a broad gene expression program in NK cells that promotes target cell recognition while limiting cytokine-driven activation.

  1. Non-Canonical EZH2 Transcriptionally Activates RelB in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Cortney L.; Baldwin, Albert S.

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homology 2 (EZH2) is the methyltransferase component of the polycomb repressive complex (PRC2) which represses gene transcription via histone H3 trimethylation at lysine 23 (H3K27me3). EZH2 activity has been linked with oncogenesis where it is thought to block expression of certain tumor suppressors. Relative to a role in cancer, EZH2 functions to promote self-renewal and has been shown to be important for the tumor-initiating cell (TIC) phenotype in breast cancer. Recently a non-canonical role for EZH2 has been identified where it promotes transcriptional activation of certain genes. Here we show that EZH2, through a methyltransferase-independent mechanism, promotes the transcriptional activation of the non-canonical NF-κB subunit RelB to drive self-renewal and the TIC phenotype of triple-negative breast cancer cells. PMID:27764181

  2. Expression and Activation of STAT Transcription Factors in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-08

    several other studies suggest that estrogen given in low doses to relieve menopausal symptoms probably does not increase the incidence of breast cancer...breast cancer. ’It was recently demonstrated that, while .overall STAT DNA-bindinq activity is low in normal breast and benign lesions, it is...adjuvant anticancer treatment, particularly in chronic myelogenous leukemia, maliqnant melanoma, low · grade lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and midgut

  3. An inhibitory RNA aptamer against the lambda cI repressor shows transcriptional activator activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ohuchi, Shoji; Suess, Beatrix

    2017-04-13

    An RNA aptamer is one of the promising components for constructing artificial genetic circuits. In this study, we developed a transcriptional activator based on an RNA aptamer against one of the most frequently applied repressor proteins, lambda phage cI. In vitro selection (SELEX), followed by in vivo screening identified an RNA aptamer with the intended transcriptional activator activity from an RNA pool containing a 40-nucleotide long random region. Quantitative analysis showed 35-fold elevation of reporter expression upon aptamer expression. These results suggest that the diversity of artificial transcriptional activators can be extended by employing RNA aptamers against repressor proteins to broaden the tools available for constructing genetic circuits. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhibition of Phosphatase Activity Follows Decline in Sulfatase Activity and Leads to Transcriptional Effects through Sustained Phosphorylation of Transcription Factor MITF

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Feferman, Leo; Tobacman, Joanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Arylsulfatase B (B-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase; ARSB) is the enzyme that removes 4-sulfate groups from the non-reducing end of the glycosaminoglycans chondroitin 4-sulfate and dermatan sulfate. Decline in ARSB has been shown in malignant prostate, colonic, and mammary cells and tissues, and decline in ARSB leads to transcriptional events mediated by galectin-3 with AP-1 and Sp1. Increased mRNA expression of GPNMB (transmembrane glycoprotein NMB) in HepG2 cells and in hepatic tissue from ARSB-deficient mice followed decline in expression of ARSB and was mediated by the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), but was unaffected by silencing galectin-3. Since GPNMB is increased in multiple malignancies, studies were performed to determine how decline in ARSB increased GPNMB expression. The mechanism by which decline in ARSB increased nuclear phospho-MITF was due to reduced activity of SHP2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase with Src homology (SH2) domains that regulates multiple cellular processes. SHP2 activity declined due to increased binding with chondroitin 4-sulfate when ARSB was reduced. When SHP2 activity was inhibited, phosphorylations of p38 mitogen-associated phosphokinase (MAPK) and of MITF increased, leading to GPNMB promoter activation. A dominant negative SHP2 construct, the SHP2 inhibitor PHSP1, and silencing of ARSB increased phospho-p38, nuclear MITF, and GPNMB. In contrast, constitutively active SHP2 and overexpression of ARSB inhibited GPNMB expression. The interaction between chondroitin 4-sulfate and SHP2 is a novel intersection between sulfation and phosphorylation, by which decline in ARSB and increased chondroitin 4-sulfation can inhibit SHP2, thereby regulating downstream tyrosine phosphorylations by sustained phosphorylations with associated activation of signaling and transcriptional events. PMID:27078017

  5. NACK is an integral component of the Notch transcriptional activation complex and is critical for development and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Kelly L; Alves-Guerra, Marie-Clotilde; Jin, Ke; Wang, Zhiqiang; Han, Xiaoqing; Ranganathan, Prathibha; Zhu, Xiaoxia; DaSilva, Thiago; Liu, Wei; Ratti, Francesca; Demarest, Renee M; Tzimas, Cristos; Rice, Meghan; Vasquez-Del Carpio, Rodrigo; Dahmane, Nadia; Robbins, David J; Capobianco, Anthony J

    2014-09-01

    The Notch signaling pathway governs many distinct cellular processes by regulating transcriptional programs. The transcriptional response initiated by Notch is highly cell context dependent, indicating that multiple factors influence Notch target gene selection and activity. However, the mechanism by which Notch drives target gene transcription is not well understood. Herein, we identify and characterize a novel Notch-interacting protein, Notch activation complex kinase (NACK), which acts as a Notch transcriptional coactivator. We show that NACK associates with the Notch transcriptional activation complex on DNA, mediates Notch transcriptional activity, and is required for Notch-mediated tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that Notch1 and NACK are coexpressed during mouse development and that homozygous loss of NACK is embryonic lethal. Finally, we show that NACK is also a Notch target gene, establishing a feed-forward loop. Thus, our data indicate that NACK is a key component of the Notch transcriptional complex and is an essential regulator of Notch-mediated tumorigenesis and development.

  6. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C-C; Cole, S W

    2016-05-24

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1-4 (EGR1-4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators.

  7. Molecular basis for designing selective modulators of retinoic acid receptor transcriptional activities.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, P

    2001-08-01

    Retinoic acid receptors are ligand-regulated transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, which comprises 49 members in the human genome. all-trans retinoic acid and 9-cis retinoic acid receptors (RARs and RXRs) are each encoded by three distinct genes and several isoforms arise from alternative splicing and the use of different promoters. While RXRs are promiscuous dimerization partners of several other nuclear receptors, RARs are active, in-vivo, when associated to RXRs. Retinoids are therefore regulators of multiple physiological processes, from embryogenesis to metabolism. Different combinations of RXR:RAR heterodimers occur as a function of their tissue-specific expression and their activity is mostly conditioned by the activation status of RAR. These heterodimers are defined as non permissive heterodimers, in opposition to permissive dimers whose transcriptional activity may be modulated through RXR and its dimerization partner. The transcriptional activity of these dimers also relies on their ability to recruit nuclear coactivators and corepressors, which function as multi proteic complexes harboring several enzymatic activities (acetylases, kinases). The structure of the ligand bound to the RAR moiety of the dimer, as well as the nature of the DNA sequence to which dimers are bound, dictate the relative affinity of dimers for coactivators and thus its overall transcriptional activity. RARs are also able to repress the activity of unrelated transcription factors such as AP1 and NF-kappa-B, and therefore have potent anti proliferative and anti inflammatory properties. This review summarizes our current view of molecular mechanisms governing these various activities and emphasizes the need for a detailed understanding of how retinoids may dictate transactivating and transrepressive properties of RARs and RXRs, which may be considered as highly valuable therapeutic targets in many diseases such as cancer, skin hyperproliferation and

  8. Transcription factor activation following exposure of an intact lung preparation to metallic particulate matter.

    PubMed Central

    Samet, James M; Silbajoris, Robert; Huang, Tony; Jaspers, Ilona

    2002-01-01

    Metallic constituents contained in ambient particulate matter have been associated with adverse effects in a number of epidemiologic, in vitro, and in vivo studies. Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) is a metallic by-product of the combustion of fossil fuel oil, which has been shown to induce a variety of proinflammatory responses in lung cells. We have examined signaling pathways activated in response to ROFA exposure and recently reported that ROFA treatment activates multiple mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases in the rat lung. In the present study we extended our investigations on the mechanism of toxicity of ROFA to include transcription factors whose activities are regulated by MAP kinases as well as possible effectors of transcriptional changes that mediate the effects of ROFA. We applied immunohistochemical methods to detect ROFA-induced activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF kappa B), activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2), c-Jun, and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in intact lung tissue and confirmed and characterized their functional activation using DNA binding assays. We performed these studies using a perfused rabbit lung model that is devoid of blood elements in order to distinguish between intrinsic lung cell effects and effects that are secondary to inflammatory cell influx. We report here that exposure to ROFA results in a rapid activation of all of the transcription factors studied by exerting direct effects on lung cells. These findings validate the use of immunohistochemistry to detect transcription factor activation in vivo and demonstrate the utility of studying signaling changes in response to environmental exposures. PMID:12361922

  9. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C -C; Cole, S W

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1–4 (EGR1–4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators. PMID:27187237

  10. Cytokinin Response Factor 5 has transcriptional activity governed by its C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Striberny, Bernd; Melton, Anthony E; Schwacke, Rainer; Krause, Kirsten; Fischer, Karsten; Goertzen, Leslie R; Rashotte, Aaron M

    2017-02-01

    Cytokinin Response Factors (CRFs) are AP2/ERF transcription factors involved in cytokinin signal transduction. CRF proteins consist of a N-terminal dimerization domain (CRF domain), an AP2 DNA-binding domain, and a clade-specific C-terminal region of unknown function. Using a series of sequential deletions in yeast-2-hybrid assays, we provide evidence that the C-terminal region of Arabidopsis CRF5 can confer transactivation activity. Although comparative analyses identified evolutionarily conserved protein sequence within the C-terminal region, deletion experiments suggest that this transactivation domain has a partially redundant modular structure required for activation of target gene transcription.

  11. AKAP-anchored PKA maintains neuronal L-type calcium channel activity and NFAT transcriptional signaling.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jonathan G; Sanderson, Jennifer L; Gorski, Jessica A; Scott, John D; Catterall, William A; Sather, William A; Dell'Acqua, Mark L

    2014-06-12

    L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (LTCC) couple neuronal excitation to gene transcription. LTCC activity is elevated by the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and depressed by the Ca2+-dependent phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), and both enzymes are localized to the channel by A-kinase anchoring protein 79/150 (AKAP79/150). AKAP79/150 anchoring of CaN also promotes LTCC activation of transcription through dephosphorylation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). We report here that the basal activity of AKAP79/150-anchored PKA maintains neuronal LTCC coupling to CaN-NFAT signaling by preserving LTCC phosphorylation in opposition to anchored CaN. Genetic disruption of AKAP-PKA anchoring promoted redistribution of the kinase out of postsynaptic dendritic spines, profound decreases in LTCC phosphorylation and Ca2+ influx, and impaired NFAT movement to the nucleus and activation of transcription. Thus, LTCC-NFAT transcriptional signaling in neurons requires precise organization and balancing of PKA and CaN activities in the channel nanoenvironment, which is only made possible by AKAP79/150 scaffolding.

  12. Visualization of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) activation in living cells.

    PubMed

    Fujinaga, Koh; Luo, Zeping; Schaufele, Fred; Peterlin, B Matija

    2015-01-16

    Regulation of transcription elongation by positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) plays a central role in determining the state of cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation. In cells, P-TEFb exists in active and inactive forms. Its release from the inactive 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex is a critical step for P-TEFb to activate transcription elongation. However, no good method exists to analyze this P-TEFb equilibrium in living cells. Only inaccurate and labor-intensive cell-free biochemical assays are currently available. In this study, we present the first experimental system to monitor P-TEFb activation in living cells. We created a bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay to detect interactions between P-TEFb and its substrate, the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II. When cells were treated with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, which releases P-TEFb from the 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein, they turned green. Other known P-TEFb-releasing agents, including histone deacetylase inhibitors, bromodomain and extraterminal bromodomain inhibitors, and protein kinase C agonists, also scored positive in this assay. Finally, we identified 5'-azacytidine as a new P-TEFb-releasing agent. This release of P-TEFb correlated directly with activation of human HIV and HEXIM1 transcription. Thus, our visualization of P-TEFb activation by fluorescent complementation assay could be used to find new P-TEFb-releasing agents, compare different classes of agents, and assess their efficacy singly and/or in combination.

  13. Synchronous activation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene transcription and secretion by pulsatile kisspeptin stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Han Kyoung; Kim, Hee-Dae; Park, Sung Ho; Lee, Han-Woong; Park, Jae-Yong; Seong, Jae Young; Lightman, Stafford L.; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin

    2013-01-01

    Pulsatile release of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is essential for pituitary gonadotrope function. Although the importance of pulsatile GnRH secretion has been recognized for several decades, the mechanisms underlying GnRH pulse generation in hypothalamic neural networks remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate the ultradian rhythm of GnRH gene transcription in single GnRH neurons using cultured hypothalamic slices prepared from transgenic mice expressing a GnRH promoter-driven destabilized luciferase reporter. Although GnRH promoter activity in each GnRH neuron exhibited an ultradian pattern of oscillations with a period of ∼10 h, GnRH neuronal cultures exhibited partially synchronized bursts of GnRH transcriptional activity at ∼2-h intervals. Surprisingly, pulsatile administration of kisspeptin, a potent GnRH secretagogue, evoked dramatic synchronous activation of GnRH gene transcription with robust stimulation of pulsatile GnRH secretion. We also addressed the issue of hierarchical interaction between the circadian and ultradian rhythms by using Bmal1-deficient mice with defective circadian clocks. The circadian molecular oscillator barely affected basal ultradian oscillation of GnRH transcription but was heavily involved in kisspeptin-evoked responses of GnRH neurons. In conclusion, we have clearly shown synchronous bursts of GnRH gene transcription in the hypothalamic GnRH neuronal population in association with episodic neurohormone secretion, thereby providing insight into GnRH pulse generation. PMID:23509283

  14. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L; Rosen, Barry P; Tamás, Markus J

    2015-12-28

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)] in vitro and in vivo and that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation.

  15. TRIM33 switches off Ifnb1 gene transcription during the late phase of macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Federica; Parcelier, Aude; Petit, Vanessa; Gallouet, Anne-Sophie; Lewandowski, Daniel; Dalloz, Marion; van den Heuvel, Anita; Kolovos, Petros; Soler, Eric; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; De Palma, Michele; Davidson, Irwin; Rousselet, Germain; Romeo, Paul-Henri

    2015-01-01

    Despite its importance during viral or bacterial infections, transcriptional regulation of the interferon-β gene (Ifnb1) in activated macrophages is only partially understood. Here we report that TRIM33 deficiency results in high, sustained expression of Ifnb1 at late stages of toll-like receptor-mediated activation in macrophages but not in fibroblasts. In macrophages, TRIM33 is recruited by PU.1 to a conserved region, the Ifnb1 Control Element (ICE), located 15 kb upstream of the Ifnb1 transcription start site. ICE constitutively interacts with Ifnb1 through a TRIM33-independent chromatin loop. At late phases of lipopolysaccharide activation of macrophages, TRIM33 is bound to ICE, regulates Ifnb1 enhanceosome loading, controls Ifnb1 chromatin structure and represses Ifnb1 gene transcription by preventing recruitment of CBP/p300. These results characterize a previously unknown mechanism of macrophage-specific regulation of Ifnb1 transcription whereby TRIM33 is critical for Ifnb1 gene transcription shutdown. PMID:26592194

  16. Characterization of fhlA mutations resulting in ligand-independent transcriptional activation and ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Korsa, I; Böck, A

    1997-01-01

    The FhlA protein belongs to the NtrC family of transcriptional regulators. It induces transcription from the -12/-24 promoters of the genes of the formate regulon by sigma54 RNA polymerase. FhlA is activated by binding of the ligand formate and does not require phosphorylation. A mutational analysis of the fhLA gene portion coding for the A and C domains was conducted with the aim of gaining information on the interaction between formate binding and ATP hydrolysis plus transcription activation. Four mutations were identified, all located in the A domain; one of them rendered transcription completely independent from the presence of formate, and the others conferred a semiconstitutive phenotype. The FhlA protein of one of the semiconstitutive variants was purified. Catalytic efficiency of ATP hydrolysis of the mutant FhlA was increased in the absence of formate in the same manner as formate influences the activity of wild-type FhlA. Moreover, in vitro transcription occurred at much lower threshold concentrations of the mutant protein and of nucleoside triphosphates than with the wild-type FhlA. PMID:8981978

  17. TRIM33 switches off Ifnb1 gene transcription during the late phase of macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Federica; Parcelier, Aude; Petit, Vanessa; Gallouet, Anne-Sophie; Lewandowski, Daniel; Dalloz, Marion; van den Heuvel, Anita; Kolovos, Petros; Soler, Eric; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; De Palma, Michele; Davidson, Irwin; Rousselet, Germain; Romeo, Paul-Henri

    2015-11-23

    Despite its importance during viral or bacterial infections, transcriptional regulation of the interferon-β gene (Ifnb1) in activated macrophages is only partially understood. Here we report that TRIM33 deficiency results in high, sustained expression of Ifnb1 at late stages of toll-like receptor-mediated activation in macrophages but not in fibroblasts. In macrophages, TRIM33 is recruited by PU.1 to a conserved region, the Ifnb1 Control Element (ICE), located 15 kb upstream of the Ifnb1 transcription start site. ICE constitutively interacts with Ifnb1 through a TRIM33-independent chromatin loop. At late phases of lipopolysaccharide activation of macrophages, TRIM33 is bound to ICE, regulates Ifnb1 enhanceosome loading, controls Ifnb1 chromatin structure and represses Ifnb1 gene transcription by preventing recruitment of CBP/p300. These results characterize a previously unknown mechanism of macrophage-specific regulation of Ifnb1 transcription whereby TRIM33 is critical for Ifnb1 gene transcription shutdown.

  18. Transcription Factor Arabidopsis Activating Factor1 Integrates Carbon Starvation Responses with Trehalose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garapati, Prashanth; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John Edward; Van Dijck, Patrick; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    Plants respond to low carbon supply by massive reprogramming of the transcriptome and metabolome. We show here that the carbon starvation-induced NAC (for NO APICAL MERISTEM/ARABIDOPSIS TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATION FACTOR/CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON) transcription factor Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Transcription Activation Factor1 (ATAF1) plays an important role in this physiological process. We identified TREHALASE1, the only trehalase-encoding gene in Arabidopsis, as a direct downstream target of ATAF1. Overexpression of ATAF1 activates TREHALASE1 expression and leads to reduced trehalose-6-phosphate levels and a sugar starvation metabolome. In accordance with changes in expression of starch biosynthesis- and breakdown-related genes, starch levels are generally reduced in ATAF1 overexpressors but elevated in ataf1 knockout plants. At the global transcriptome level, genes affected by ATAF1 are broadly associated with energy and carbon starvation responses. Furthermore, transcriptional responses triggered by ATAF1 largely overlap with expression patterns observed in plants starved for carbon or energy supply. Collectively, our data highlight the existence of a positively acting feedforward loop between ATAF1 expression, which is induced by carbon starvation, and the depletion of cellular carbon/energy pools that is triggered by the transcriptional regulation of downstream gene regulatory networks by ATAF1.

  19. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K.; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)] in vitro and in vivo and that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation. PMID:26711267

  20. Cloning and transcriptional activity analysis of the porcine cofilin 2 gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Mei; Lang, Bin; Zhu, Hong-yan; Du, Hai-ting; Tian, Yu-min; Su, Yu-hong

    2014-09-01

    Cofilins (CFL), including CFL1 and CFL2, are members of the family of actin-binding proteins in eukaryote. CFL2 is predominantly expressed in mammalian skeletal muscle and heart and is important to muscle fiber formation and muscular regeneration. To study transcriptional regulation of porcine CFL2, a 2.5 kb upstream sequence starting from the major CFL2 transcriptional start site was cloned by genome walking. Twelve DNA fragments of the 5' flank region of the porcine CFL2 gene were further isolated from porcine genomic DNA via PCR and inserted into the luciferase reporter vector pGL4.10 to make 12 CFL2 reporter constructs. All reporter vectors were transfected into C2C12, NIH3T3, or Hela cells and their relative luciferase activity measured after 48 h, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that there were two TATA-boxes at the -508 bp and -453 bp, as well as a GC-box and a CAAT-box in this sequence. Additional transcription factor binding sites including SP1, AP1, AP2, and GATA-1 sites were also predicted. The transcriptional activity of pGL4.10-1554 (1502 bp to +51 bp) was the strongest, and the promoter's active region was mapped to a region from -1502 bp to -1317 bp. Our data provide a foundation for future studies into transcriptional regulation of CFL2.

  1. Model of transcriptional activation by MarA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wall, Michael E; Markowitz, David A; Rosner, Judah L; Martin, Robert G

    2009-12-01

    The AraC family transcription factor MarA activates approximately 40 genes (the marA/soxS/rob regulon) of the Escherichia coli chromosome resulting in different levels of resistance to a wide array of antibiotics and to superoxides. Activation of marA/soxS/rob regulon promoters occurs in a well-defined order with respect to the level of MarA; however, the order of activation does not parallel the strength of MarA binding to promoter sequences. To understand this lack of correspondence, we developed a computational model of transcriptional activation in which a transcription factor either increases or decreases RNA polymerase binding, and either accelerates or retards post-binding events associated with transcription initiation. We used the model to analyze data characterizing MarA regulation of promoter activity. The model clearly explains the lack of correspondence between the order of activation and the MarA-DNA affinity and indicates that the order of activation can only be predicted using information about the strength of the full MarA-polymerase-DNA interaction. The analysis further suggests that MarA can activate without increasing polymerase binding and that activation can even involve a decrease in polymerase binding, which is opposite to the textbook model of activation by recruitment. These findings are consistent with published chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of interactions between polymerase and the E. coli chromosome. We find that activation involving decreased polymerase binding yields lower latency in gene regulation and therefore might confer a competitive advantage to cells. Our model yields insights into requirements for predicting the order of activation of a regulon and enables us to suggest that activation might involve a decrease in polymerase binding which we expect to be an important theme of gene regulation in E. coli and beyond.

  2. Model of transcriptional activation by MarA in escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Michael E; Rosner, Judah L; Martin, Robert G

    2009-01-01

    The AraC family transcription factor MarA activates approximately 40 genes (the marA/soxS/rob regulon) of the Escherichia coli chromosome resulting in different levels of resistance to a wide array of antibiotics and to superoxides. Activation of marA/soxS/rob regulon promoters occurs in a well-defined order with respect to the level of MarA; however, the order of activation does not parallel the strength of MarA binding to promoter sequences. To understand this lack of correspondence, we developed a computational model of transcriptional activation in which a transcription factor either increases or decreases RNA polymerase binding, and either accelerates or retards post-binding events associated with transcription initiation. We used the model to analyze data characterizing MarA regulation of promoter activity. The model clearly explains the lack of correspondence between the order of activation and the MarA-DNA affinity and indicates that the order of activation can only be predicted using information about the strength of the full MarA-polymerase-DNA interaction. The analysis further suggests that MarA can activate without increasing polymerase binding and that activation can even involve a decrease in polymerase binding, which is opposite to the textbook model of activation by recruitment. These findings are consistent with published chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of interactions between polymerase and the E. coli chromosome. We find that activation involving decreased polymerase binding yields lower latency in gene regulation and therefore might confer a competitive advantage to cells. Our model yields insights into requirements for predicting the order of activation of a regulon and enables us to suggest that activation might involve a decrease in polymerase binding which we expect to be an important theme of gene regulation in E. coli and beyond.

  3. Genetic analysis of transcriptional activation and repression in the Tn21 mer operon. [Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.; Park, S.J.; Summers, A.O. )

    1989-07-01

    Transcription of the Tn21 mercury resistance operon (mer) is controlled by the toxic metal cation Hg(II). This control is mediated by the product of the merR gene, a 144-amino-acid protein which represses transcription of the structural genes (merTPCAD) in the absence of Hg(II) and activates transcription in the presence of Hg(II). We have used a mer-lac transcriptional fusion to obtain regulatory mutants in this metal-responsive system. Some mutants were defective in Hg(II)-induced activation while retaining repression function, others were defective in repression but not activation, and some had lost both functions. Mutations in three of the four cysteine residues of merR resulted in complete loss of Hg(II)-inducible activation but retention of the repressor function. Other lesions adjacent to or very near these cysteines exhibited severely reduced activation and also retained repressor function. There were two putative helix-turn-helix (HTH) domains in merR, and mutants in each had very different phenotypes. A partially dominant mutation in the more amino-terminal region of the two putative HTH regions resulted in loss of both activation and repression, consistent with a role for this region in DNA binding. Mutations in the more centrally located HTH region resulted only in loss of Hg(II)-induced activation. Lesions in the central and in the carboxy-terminal regions of merR exhibited both Hg(II)-independent and Hg(II)-dependent transcriptional activation. The sole cis-acting mutant obtained with this operon fusion strategy, a down-promoter mutation, lies in a highly conserved base in the -35 region of the merTPCAD promoter.

  4. Transcriptional activation of cloned human beta-globin genes by viral immediate-early gene products.

    PubMed

    Green, M R; Treisman, R; Maniatis, T

    1983-11-01

    When the human beta-globin gene is transfected into Hela cells, no beta-globin RNA is detected unless the gene is linked to a viral transcription enhancer. In this paper we show that trans-acting adenovirus and herpesvirus (pseudorabies) transcriptional regulatory proteins can circumvent this enhancer requirement for detectable beta-globin transcription in transient expression assays. The viral gene products can be provided by constitutively expressed, integrated viral genes in established cell lines, by viral infection of permissive cells, or by transfection of cells with bacterial plasmids carrying the viral immediate-early genes. These results demonstrate the utility of transient expression assays for studying regulatory mechanisms involving trans-acting factors. Analysis of beta-globin promoter mutants indicates that between 75 and 128 bp of sequence 5' to the mRNA cap site is required for enhancer-dependent transcription in Hela cells. In contrast, beta-globin transcription in the presence of viral immediate-early gene products requires only 36 bp of 5'-flanking sequence, which includes the TATA box. Thus both cis and trans-acting viral factors activate beta-globin gene transcription in transient expression experiments, but the mechanisms by which they act appear to be fundamentally different.

  5. Nerve growth factor enhances the CRE-dependent transcriptional activity activated by nobiletin in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Takito, Jiro; Kimura, Junko; Kajima, Koji; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Masanori; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Prevention and treatment of Alzheimer disease are urgent problems for elderly people in developed countries. We previously reported that nobiletin, a poly-methoxylated flavone from the citrus peel, improved the symptoms in various types of animal models of memory loss and activated the cAMP responsive element (CRE)-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Nobiletin activated the cAMP/PKA/MEK/Erk/MAPK signaling pathway without using the TrkA signaling activated by nerve growth factor (NGF). Here, we examined the effect of combination of nobiletin and NGF on the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Although NGF alone had little effect on the CRE-dependent transcription, NGF markedly enhanced the CRE-dependent transcription induced by nobiletin. The NGF-induced enhancement was neutralized by a TrkA antagonist, K252a. This effect of NGF was effective on the early signaling event elicited by nobiletin. These results suggested that there was crosstalk between NGF and nobiletin signaling in activating the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells.

  6. Core promoter specificities of the Sp1 and VP16 transcriptional activation domains.

    PubMed Central

    Emami, K H; Navarre, W W; Smale, S T

    1995-01-01

    The core promoter compositions of mammalian protein-coding genes are highly variable; some contain TATA boxes, some contain initiator (Inr) elements, and others contain both or neither of these basal elements. The underlying reason for this heterogeneity remains a mystery, as recent studies have suggested that TATA-containing and Inr-containing core promoters direct transcription initiation by similar mechanisms and respond similarly to a wide variety of upstream activators. To analyze in greater detail the influence of core promoter structure on transcriptional activation, we compared activation by GAL4-VP16 and Sp1 through synthetic core promoters containing a TATA box, an Inr, or both TATA and Inr. Striking differences were found between the two activators, most notably in the relative strengths of the TATA/Inr and Inr core promoters: the TATA/Inr promoter was much stronger than the Inr promoter when transcription was activated by GAL4-VP16, but the strengths of the two promoters were more comparable when transcription was activated by Sp1. To define the domains of Sp1 responsible for efficient activation through an Inr, several Sp1 deletion mutants were tested as GAL4 fusion proteins. The results reveal that the glutamine-rich activation domains, which previously were found to interact with Drosophila TAF110, preferentially stimulate Inr-containing core promoters. In contrast, efficient activation through TATA appears to require additional domains of Sp1. These results demonstrate that activation domains differ in their abilities to function with specific core promoters, suggesting that the core promoter structure found in a given gene may reflect a preference of the regulators of that gene. Furthermore, the core promoter preference of an activation domain may be related to a specific mechanism of action, which may provide a functional criterion for grouping activation domains into distinct classes. PMID:7565743

  7. Plants contain a novel multi-member class of heat shock factors without transcriptional activator potential.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka-Verner, E; Yuan, C X; Scharf, K D; Englich, G; Gurley, W B

    2000-07-01

    Based on phylogeny of DNA-binding domains and the organization of hydrophobic repeats, two families of heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) exist in plants. Class A HSFs are involved in the activation of the heat shock response, but the role of class B HSFs is not clear. When transcriptional activities of full-length HSFs were monitored in tobacco protoplasts, no class B HSFs from soybean or Arabidopsis showed activity under control or heat stress conditions. Additional assays confirmed the finding that the class B HSFs lacked the capacity to activate transcription. Fusion of a heterologous activation domain from human HSF1 (AD2) to the C-terminus of GmHSFB1-34 gave no evidence of synergistic enhancement of AD2 activity, which would be expected if weak activation domains were present. Furthermore, activity of AtHSFB1-4 (class B) was not rescued by coexpression with AtHSFA4-21 (class A) indicating that the class A HSF was not able to provide a missing function required for class B activity. The transcriptional activation potential of Arabidopsis AtHSFA4-21 was mapped primarily to a 39 amino acid fragment in the C-terminus enriched in bulky hydrophobic and acidic residues. Deletion mutagenesis of the C-terminal activator regions of tomato and Arabidopsis HSFs indicated that these plant HSFs lack heat-inducible regulatory regions analogous to those of mammalian HSF1. These findings suggest that heat shock regulation in plants may differ from metazoans by partitioning negative and positive functional domains onto separate HSF proteins. Class A HSFs are primarily responsible for stress-inducible activation of heat shock genes whereas some of the inert class B HSFs may be specialized for repression, or down-regulation, of the heat shock response.

  8. A Modified Reverse One-Hybrid Screen Identifies Transcriptional Activation Domains in PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 3

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Jutta C.; Bätz, Ulrike; Liu, Jason; Curie, Gemma L.; Quail, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional activation domains (TADs) are difficult to predict and identify, since they are not conserved and have little consensus. Here, we describe a yeast-based screening method that is able to identify individual amino acid residues involved in transcriptional activation in a high throughput manner. A plant transcriptional activator, PIF3 (phytochrome interacting factor 3), was fused to the yeast GAL4-DNA-binding Domain (BD), driving expression of the URA3 (Orotidine 5′-phosphate decarboxylase) reporter, and used for negative selection on 5-fluroorotic acid (5FOA). Randomly mutagenized variants of PIF3 were then selected for a loss or reduction in transcriptional activation activity by survival on FOA. In the process, we developed a strategy to eliminate false positives from negative selection that can be used for both reverse-1- and 2-hybrid screens. With this method we were able to identify two distinct regions in PIF3 with transcriptional activation activity, both of which are functionally conserved in PIF1, PIF4, and PIF5. Both are collectively necessary for full PIF3 transcriptional activity, but neither is sufficient to induce transcription autonomously. We also found that the TAD appear to overlap physically with other PIF3 functions, such as phyB binding activity and consequent phosphorylation. Our protocol should provide a valuable tool for identifying, analyzing and characterizing novel TADs in eukaryotic transcription factors, and thus potentially contribute to the unraveling of the mechanism underlying transcriptional activation. PMID:27379152

  9. Cks1-dependent proteasome recruitment and activation of CDC20 transcription in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Morris, May C; Kaiser, Peter; Rudyak, Stanislav; Baskerville, Chris; Watson, Mark H; Reed, Steven I

    2003-06-26

    Cks proteins are small evolutionarily conserved proteins that interact genetically and physically with cyclin-dependent kinases. However, in spite of a large body of genetic, biochemical and structural research, no compelling unifying model of their functions has emerged. Here we show, by investigating the essential role of Cks1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that the protein is primarily involved in promoting mitosis by modulating the transcriptional activation of the APC/C protein-ubiquitin ligase activator Cdc20. Cks1 is required for both the periodic dissociation of Cdc28 kinase from the CDC20 promoter and the periodic association of the proteasome with the promoter. We propose that the essential role of Cks1 is to recruit the proteasome to, and/or dissociate the Cdc28 kinase from, the CDC20 promoter, thus facilitating transcription by remodelling transcriptional complexes or chromatin associated with the CDC20 gene.

  10. The glucocorticoid receptor hormone binding domain mediates transcriptional activation in vitro in the absence of ligand.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, J; Stunnenberg, H G

    1993-01-01

    We show that recombinant rat glucocorticoid receptor (vvGR) expressed using vaccinia virus is indistinguishable from authentic GR with respect to DNA and hormone binding. In the absence of hormone, vvGR is mainly found in the cytoplasm in a complex with heat shock protein 90. Upon incubation with ligand, vvGR is released from this complex and translocated to the nucleus. Thus, the ligand binding domain displays the known biochemical properties. However, in vitro, transcription from a synthetic promoter and from the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter is enhanced by recombinant GR in a ligand independent manner. Both transactivation domains contribute to the transcriptional activity, additively on a synthetic promoter and cooperatively on the MMTV promoter. We thus provide the first evidence that in vitro the hormone binding domain has a transcriptional activity even in the absence of ligand. Images PMID:8392705

  11. ZEB1 turns into a transcriptional activator by interacting with YAP1 in aggressive cancer types.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Waltraut; Mossmann, Dirk; Kleemann, Julia; Mock, Kerstin; Meisinger, Chris; Brummer, Tilman; Herr, Ricarda; Brabletz, Simone; Stemmler, Marc P; Brabletz, Thomas

    2016-02-15

    Early dissemination, metastasis and therapy resistance are central hallmarks of aggressive cancer types and the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. The EMT-inducing transcriptional repressor ZEB1 is a crucial stimulator of these processes, particularly by coupling the activation of cellular motility with stemness and survival properties. ZEB1 expression is associated with aggressive behaviour in many tumour types, but the potent effects cannot be solely explained by its proven function as a transcriptional repressor of epithelial genes. Here we describe a direct interaction of ZEB1 with the Hippo pathway effector YAP, but notably not with its paralogue TAZ. In consequence, ZEB1 switches its function to a transcriptional co-activator of a 'common ZEB1/YAP target gene set', thereby linking two pathways with similar cancer promoting effects. This gene set is a predictor of poor survival, therapy resistance and increased metastatic risk in breast cancer, indicating the clinical relevance of our findings.

  12. ZEB1 turns into a transcriptional activator by interacting with YAP1 in aggressive cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Waltraut; Mossmann, Dirk; Kleemann, Julia; Mock, Kerstin; Meisinger, Chris; Brummer, Tilman; Herr, Ricarda; Brabletz, Simone; Stemmler, Marc P.; Brabletz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Early dissemination, metastasis and therapy resistance are central hallmarks of aggressive cancer types and the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. The EMT-inducing transcriptional repressor ZEB1 is a crucial stimulator of these processes, particularly by coupling the activation of cellular motility with stemness and survival properties. ZEB1 expression is associated with aggressive behaviour in many tumour types, but the potent effects cannot be solely explained by its proven function as a transcriptional repressor of epithelial genes. Here we describe a direct interaction of ZEB1 with the Hippo pathway effector YAP, but notably not with its paralogue TAZ. In consequence, ZEB1 switches its function to a transcriptional co-activator of a ‘common ZEB1/YAP target gene set', thereby linking two pathways with similar cancer promoting effects. This gene set is a predictor of poor survival, therapy resistance and increased metastatic risk in breast cancer, indicating the clinical relevance of our findings. PMID:26876920

  13. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) {beta} has intrinsic, GR{alpha}-independent transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kino, Tomoshige; Manoli, Irini; Kelkar, Sujata; Wang, Yonghong; Su, Yan A.; Chrousos, George P.

    2009-04-17

    The human glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene produces C-terminal GR{beta} and GR{alpha} isoforms through alternative use of specific exons 9{beta} and {alpha}, respectively. We explored the transcriptional activity of GR{beta} on endogenous genes by developing HeLa cells stably expressing EGFP-GR{beta} or EGFP. Microarray analyses revealed that GR{beta} had intrinsic gene-specific transcriptional activity, regulating mRNA expression of a large number of genes negatively or positively. Majority of GR{beta}-responsive genes was distinct from those modulated by GR{alpha}, while GR{beta} and GR{alpha} mutually modulated each other's transcriptional activity in a subpopulation of genes. We did not observe in HCT116 cells nuclear translocation of GR{beta} and activation of this receptor by RU 486, a synthetic steroid previously reported to bind GR{beta} and to induce nuclear translocation. Our results indicate that GR{beta} has intrinsic, GR{alpha}-independent, gene-specific transcriptional activity, in addition to its previously reported dominant negative effect on GR{alpha}-induced transactivation of GRE-driven promoters.

  14. MiT/TFE transcription factors are activated during mitophagy downstream of Parkin and Atg5

    PubMed Central

    Nezich, Catherine L.; Wang, Chunxin; Fogel, Adam I.

    2015-01-01

    The kinase PINK1 and ubiquitin ligase Parkin can regulate the selective elimination of damaged mitochondria through autophagy (mitophagy). Because of the demand on lysosomal function by mitophagy, we investigated a role for the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, in this process. We show that during mitophagy TFEB translocates to the nucleus and displays transcriptional activity in a PINK1- and Parkin-dependent manner. MITF and TFE3, homologues of TFEB belonging to the same microphthalmia/transcription factor E (MiT/TFE) family, are similarly regulated during mitophagy. Unlike TFEB translocation after starvation-induced mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibition, Parkin-mediated TFEB relocalization required Atg9A and Atg5 activity. However, constitutively active Rag guanosine triphosphatases prevented TFEB translocation during mitophagy, suggesting cross talk between these two MiT/TFE activation pathways. Analysis of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats–generated TFEB/MITF/TFE3/TFEC single, double, and triple knockout cell lines revealed that these proteins partly facilitate Parkin-mediated mitochondrial clearance. These results illuminate a pathway leading to MiT/TFE transcription factor activation, distinct from starvation-induced autophagy, which occurs during mitophagy. PMID:26240184

  15. Inflammatory transcription factors as activation markers and functional readouts in immune-to-brain communication.

    PubMed

    Rummel, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Immune-to-brain communication pathways involve humoral mediators, including cytokines, central modulation by neuronal afferents and immune cell trafficking to the brain. During systemic inflammation these pathways contribute to mediating brain-controlled sickness symptoms including fever. Experimentally, activation of these signaling pathways can be mimicked and studied when injecting animals with pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPS). One central component of the brain inflammatory response, which leads, for example, to fever induction, is transcriptional activation of brain cells via cytokines and PAMPS. We and others have studied the spatiotemporal activation and the physiological significance of transcription factors for the induction of inflammation within the brain and the manifestation of fever. Evidence has revealed a role of nuclear factor (NF)κB in the initiation, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 in the maintenance and NF-interleukin (IL)6 in the maintenance or even termination of brain-inflammation and fever. Moreover, psychological stressors, such as exposure to a novel environment, leads to increased body core temperature and genomic NF-IL6-activation, suggesting a potential use of NF-IL6-immunohistochemistry as a multimodal brain cell activation marker and a role for NF-IL6 for differential brain activity. In addition, the nutritional status, as reflected by circulating levels of the cytokine-like hormone leptin, influence immune-to-brain communication and age-dependent changes in LPS-induced fever. Overall, transcription factors remain therapeutically important targets for the treatment of brain-inflammation and fever induction during infectious/non-infectious inflammatory and psychological stress. However, the exact physiological role and significance of these transcription factors requires to be further investigated.

  16. C3 exoenzyme impairs cell proliferation and apoptosis by altering the activity of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    von Elsner, Leonie; Hagemann, Sandra; Just, Ingo; Rohrbeck, Astrid

    2016-09-01

    C3 exoenzyme from C. botulinum is an ADP-ribosyltransferase that inactivates selectively RhoA, B, and C by coupling an ADP-ribose moiety. Rho-GTPases are involved in various cellular processes, such as regulation of actin cytoskeleton, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Previous studies of our group with the murine hippocampal cell line HT22 revealed a C3-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation after 48 h and a prevention of serum-starved cells from apoptosis. For both effects, alterations of various signaling pathways are already known, including also changes on the transcriptional level. Investigations on the transcriptional activity in HT22 cells treated with C3 for 48 h identified five out of 48 transcription factors namely Sp1, ATF2, E2F-1, CBF, and Stat6 with a significantly regulated activity. For validation of identified transcription factors, studies on the protein level of certain target genes were performed. Western blot analyses exhibited an enhanced abundance of Sp1 target genes p21 and COX-2 as well as an increase in phosphorylation of c-Jun. In contrast, the level of p53 and apoptosis-inducing GADD153, a target gene of ATF2, was decreased. Our results reveal that C3 regulates the transcriptional activity of Sp1 and ATF2 resulting downstream in an altered protein abundance of various target genes. As the affected proteins are involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis, thus the C3-mediated anti-proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects are consequences of the Rho-dependent alterations of the activity of certain transcriptional factors.

  17. PLZF is a negative regulator of retinoic acid receptor transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Perrine J; Delmotte, Marie-Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Background Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are ligand-regulated transcription factors controlling cellular proliferation and differentiation. Receptor-interacting proteins such as corepressors and coactivators play a crucial role in specifying the overall transcriptional activity of the receptor in response to ligand treatment. Little is known however on how receptor activity is controlled by intermediary factors which interact with RARs in a ligand-independent manner. Results We have identified the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF), a transcriptional corepressor, to be a RAR-interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid assay. We confirmed this interaction by GST-pull down assays and show that the PLZF N-terminal zinc finger domain is necessary and sufficient for PLZF to bind RAR. The RAR ligand binding domain displayed the highest affinity for PLZF, but corepressor and coactivator binding interfaces did not contribute to PLZF recruitment. The interaction was ligand-independent and correlated to a decreased transcriptional activity of the RXR-RAR heterodimer upon overexpression of PLZF. A similar transcriptional interference could be observed with the estrogen receptor alpha and the glucocorticoid receptor. We further show that PLZF is likely to act by preventing RXR-RAR heterodimerization, both in-vitro and in intact cells. Conclusion Thus RAR and PLZF interact physically and functionally. Intriguingly, these two transcription factors play a determining role in hematopoiesis and regionalization of the hindbrain and may, upon chromosomal translocation, form fusion proteins. Our observations therefore define a novel mechanism by which RARs activity may be controlled. PMID:14521715

  18. Zinc Coordination Is Required for and Regulates Transcription Activation by Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen 1

    PubMed Central

    Aras, Siddhesh; Singh, Gyanendra; Johnston, Kenneth; Foster, Timothy; Aiyar, Ashok

    2009-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for Epstein-Barr virus to immortalize naïve B-cells. Upon binding a cluster of 20 cognate binding-sites termed the family of repeats, EBNA1 transactivates promoters for EBV genes that are required for immortalization. A small domain, termed UR1, that is 25 amino-acids in length, has been identified previously as essential for EBNA1 to activate transcription. In this study, we have elucidated how UR1 contributes to EBNA1's ability to transactivate. We show that zinc is necessary for EBNA1 to activate transcription, and that UR1 coordinates zinc through a pair of essential cysteines contained within it. UR1 dimerizes upon coordinating zinc, indicating that EBNA1 contains a second dimerization interface in its amino-terminus. There is a strong correlation between UR1-mediated dimerization and EBNA1's ability to transactivate cooperatively. Point mutants of EBNA1 that disrupt zinc coordination also prevent self-association, and do not activate transcription cooperatively. Further, we demonstrate that UR1 acts as a molecular sensor that regulates the ability of EBNA1 to activate transcription in response to changes in redox and oxygen partial pressure (pO2). Mild oxidative stress mimicking such environmental changes decreases EBNA1-dependent transcription in a lymphoblastoid cell-line. Coincident with a reduction in EBNA1-dependent transcription, reductions are observed in EBNA2 and LMP1 protein levels. Although these changes do not affect LCL survival, treated cells accumulate in G0/G1. These findings are discussed in the context of EBV latency in body compartments that differ strikingly in their pO2 and redox potential. PMID:19521517

  19. Dynamic Effects of Topoisomerase I Inhibition on R-Loops and Short Transcripts at Active Promoters.

    PubMed

    Marinello, Jessica; Bertoncini, Stefania; Aloisi, Iris; Cristini, Agnese; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio; Forcato, Mattia; Sordet, Olivier; Capranico, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase I-DNA-cleavage complexes (Top1cc) stabilized by camptothecin (CPT) have specific effects at transcriptional levels. We recently reported that Top1cc increase antisense transcript (aRNAs) levels at divergent CpG-island promoters and, transiently, DNA/RNA hybrids (R-loop) in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of colon cancer HCT116 cells. However, the relationship between R-loops and aRNAs was not established. Here, we show that aRNAs can form R-loops in N-TERA-2 cells under physiological conditions, and that promoter-associated R-loops are somewhat increased and extended in length immediately upon cell exposure to CPT. In contrast, persistent Top1ccs reduce the majority of R-loops suggesting that CPT-accumulated aRNAs are not commonly involved in R-loops. The enhancement of aRNAs by Top1ccs is present both in human colon cancer HCT116 cells and WI38 fibroblasts suggesting a common response of cancer and normal cells. Although Top1ccs lead to DSB and DDR kinases activation, we do not detect a dependence of aRNA accumulation on ATM or DNA-PK activation. However, we showed that the cell response to persistent Top1ccs can involve an impairment of aRNA turnover rather than a higher synthesis rate. Finally, a genome-wide analysis shows that persistent Top1ccs also determine an accumulation of sense transcripts at 5'-end gene regions suggesting an increased occurrence of truncated transcripts. Taken together, the results indicate that Top1 may regulate transcription initiation by modulating RNA polymerase-generated negative supercoils, which can in turn favor R-loop formation at promoters, and that transcript accumulation at TSS is a response to persistent transcriptional stress by Top1 poisoning.

  20. Transcriptional activation of human CDCA8 gene regulated by transcription factor NF-Y in embryonic stem cells and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Can; Miao, Cong-Xiu; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Lv-Jun; Gu, Yi-Fan; Zhou, Di; Chen, Lian-Sheng; Lin, Ge; Lu, Guang-Xiu

    2015-09-11

    The cell division cycle associated 8 (CDCA8) gene plays an important role in mitosis. Overexpression of CDCA8 was reported in some human cancers and is required for cancer growth and progression. We found CDCA8 expression was also high in human ES cells (hESCs) but dropped significantly upon hESC differentiation. However, the regulation of CDCA8 expression has not yet been studied. Here, we characterized the CDCA8 promoter and identified its cis-elements and transcription factors. Three transcription start sites were identified. Reporter gene assays revealed that the CDCA8 promoter was activated in hESCs and cancer cell lines. The promoter drove the reporter expression specifically to pluripotent cells during early mouse embryo development and to tumor tissues in tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that CDCA8 is transcriptionally activated in hESCs and cancer cells. Mechanistically, two key activation elements, bound by transcription factor NF-Y and CREB1, respectively, were identified in the CDCA8 basic promoter by mutation analyses and electrophoretic motility shift assays. NF-Y binding is positively correlated with promoter activities in different cell types. Interestingly, the NF-YA subunit, binding to the promoter, is primarily a short isoform in hESCs and a long isoform in cancer cells, indicating a different activation mechanism of the CDCA8 transcription between hESCs and cancer cells. Finally, enhanced CDCA8 promoter activities by NF-Y overexpression and reduced CDCA8 transcription by NF-Y knockdown further verified that NF-Y is a positive regulator of CDCA8 transcription. Our study unearths the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of CDCA8 expression in hESCs and cancer cells, which provides a better understanding of its biological functions.

  1. Synergistic transcriptional enhancement does not depend on the number of acidic activation domains bound to the promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Oliviero, S; Struhl, K

    1991-01-01

    Many eukaryotic transcriptional activator proteins contain a DNA-binding domain that interacts with specific promoter sequences and an acidic activation region that is required to stimulate transcription. Transcriptional enhancement by such activator proteins is often synergistic and promiscuous; promoters containing multiple binding sites for an individual protein or even for unrelated proteins can be 10-100 times more active than promoters with single sites. It has been suggested that such synergy reflects a nonlinear response of the basic transcription machinery to the number and/or quality of acidic activation regions. Here, we determine the transcriptional activity of Jun-Fos heterodimers containing one or two GCN4 acidic activation regions on promoters containing one or two Ap-1 target sites. Surprisingly, heterodimers with one or two acidic regions activate transcription with similar efficiency and are equally synergistic (10- to 15-fold) on promoters containing two target sites. Thus, transcriptional synergy does not depend on the number of acidic activation regions but rather on the number of proteins bound to the promoter. This suggests that synergy is mediated either by cooperative DNA binding or by alternative mechanisms in which the DNA-binding domain plays a more direct role in transcription (e.g., changes in DNA structure, nucleosome displacement, or direct interactions with the transcriptional machinery). Images PMID:1898773

  2. NIR is a novel INHAT repressor that modulates the transcriptional activity of p53

    PubMed Central

    Hublitz, Philip; Kunowska, Natalia; Mayer, Ulrich P.; Müller, Judith M.; Heyne, Kristina; Yin, Na; Fritzsche, Claudia; Poli, Cecilia; Miguet, Laurent; Schupp, Ingo W.; van Grunsven, Leo A.; Potiers, Noëlle; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Metzger, Eric; Roemer, Klaus; Schüle, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Most transcriptional repression pathways depend on the targeted deacetylation of histone tails. In this report, we characterize NIR, a novel transcriptional corepressor with inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase (INHAT) activity. NIR (Novel INHAT Repressor) is ubiquitously expressed throughout embryonic development and adulthood. NIR is a potent transcriptional corepressor that is not blocked by histone deacetylase inhibitors and is capable of silencing both basal and activator-driven transcription. NIR directly binds to nucleosomes and core histones and prevents acetylation by histone acetyltransferases, thus acting as a bona fide INHAT. Using a tandem affinity purification approach, we identified the tumor suppressor p53 as a NIR-interacting partner. Association of p53 and NIR was verified in vitro and in vivo. Upon recruitment by p53, NIR represses transcription of both p53-dependent reporters and endogenous target genes. Knock-down of NIR by RNA interference significantly enhances histone acetylation at p53-regulated promoters. Moreover, p53-dependent apoptosis is robustly increased upon depletion of NIR. In summary, our findings describe NIR as a novel INHAT that plays an important role in the control of p53 function. PMID:16322561

  3. Multiple transcription factor codes activate epidermal wound-response genes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Joseph C; Juarez, Michelle T; Kim, Myungjin; Drivenes, Øyvind; McGinnis, William

    2009-02-17

    Wounds in Drosophila and mouse embryos induce similar genetic pathways to repair epidermal barriers. However, the transcription factors that transduce wound signals to repair epidermal barriers are largely unknown. We characterize the transcriptional regulatory enhancers of 4 genes-Ddc, ple, msn, and kkv-that are rapidly activated in epidermal cells surrounding wounds in late Drosophila embryos and early larvae. These epidermal wound enhancers all contain evolutionarily conserved sequences matching binding sites for JUN/FOS and GRH transcription factors, but vary widely in trans- and cis-requirements for these inputs and their binding sites. We propose that the combination of GRH and FOS is part of an ancient wound-response pathway still used in vertebrates and invertebrates, but that other mechanisms have evolved that result in similar transcriptional output. A common, but largely untested assumption of bioinformatic analyses of gene regulatory networks is that transcription units activated in the same spatial and temporal patterns will require the same cis-regulatory codes. Our results indicate that this is an overly simplistic view.

  4. Inhibition of constitutive signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation by novel platinum complexes with potent antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Turkson, James; Zhang, Shumin; Palmer, Jay; Kay, Heidi; Stanko, Joseph; Mora, Linda B; Sebti, Said; Yu, Hua; Jove, Richard

    2004-12-01

    DNA-alkylating agents that are platinum complexes induce apoptotic responses and have wide application in cancer therapy. The potential for platinum compounds to modulate signal transduction events that contribute to their therapeutic outcome has not been extensively examined. Among the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins, Stat3 activity is frequently up-regulated in many human tumors. Various lines of evidence have established a causal role for aberrant Stat3 activity in malignant transformation and provided validation for its targeting in the development of small-molecule inhibitors as novel cancer therapeutics. We report here that platinum-containing compounds disrupt Stat3 signaling and suppress its biological functions. The novel platinum (IV) compounds, CPA-1, CPA-7, and platinum (IV) tetrachloride block Stat3 activity in vitro at low micromolar concentrations. In malignant cells that harbor constitutively activated Stat3, CPA-1, CPA-7, and platinum (IV) tetrachloride inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in a manner that reflects the attenuation of persistent Stat3 activity. By contrast, cells that do not contain persistent Stat3 activity are marginally affected or are not affected by these compounds. Moreover, CPA-7 induces the regression of mouse CT26 colon tumor, which correlates with the abrogation of persistent Stat3 activity in tumors. Thus, the modulation of oncogenic signal transduction pathways, such as Stat3, may be one of the key molecular mechanisms for the antitumor effects of platinum (IV)-containing complexes.

  5. Fe65 does not stabilize AICD during activation of transcription in a luciferase assay

    SciTech Connect

    Huysseune, Sandra; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; Octave, Jean-Noel . E-mail: octave@nchm.ucl.ac.be

    2007-09-21

    The APP intracellular domain (AICD) could be involved in signaling via interaction with the adaptor protein Fe65, and with the histone acetyl transferase Tip60. However, the real function of AICD and Fe65 in regulation of transcription remains controversial. In this study, the human APPGal4 fusion protein was expressed in CHO cells and the transcriptional activity of AICDGal4 was measured in a luciferase-based reporter assay. AICDGal4 was stabilized by expression of Fe65 and levels of AICDGal4 controlled luciferase activity. On the contrary, when human APP was expressed in CHO cells, coexpression of Fe65 increased luciferase activity without affecting the amount of AICD fragment. AICD produced from APP was protected from degradation by orthophenanthroline, but not by lactacystine, indicating that AICD is not a substrate of the chymotryptic activity of the proteasome. It is concluded that Fe65 can control luciferase activity without stabilizing the labile AICD fragment.

  6. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-independent activation of estrogen receptor-dependent transcription by 3-methylcholanthrene.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Jonathan M; Waxman, David J

    2006-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that stimulates transcription directed by xenobiotic response elements upstream of target genes. Recently, AhR ligands were reported to induce formation of an AhR-estrogen receptor (ER) complex, which can bind to estrogen response elements (EREs) and stimulate transcription of ER target genes. Presently, we investigate the effect of the AhR ligands 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (BZ126) on ERE-regulated luciferase reporter activity and endogenous ER target gene expression. In MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, 3MC induced transcription of ER reporter genes containing native promoter sequences of the ER-responsive genes complement 3 and pS2 and heterologous promoters regulated by isolated EREs. Dose-response studies revealed that the concentration of 3MC required to half-maximally activate transcription (EC(50)) was >100-fold higher for an ER reporter (27-57 muM) than for an AhR reporter (86-250 nM) in both MCF-7 cells and in human endometrial cancer Ishikawa cells. 3MC also stimulated expression of the endogenous ER target genes amphiregulin, cathepsin D and progesterone receptor, albeit to a much lower extent than was achieved following stimulation with 17beta-estradiol. In Ishikawa cells, 3MC, but not BZ126 or TCDD, stimulated ERalpha-dependent reporter activity but did not induce expression of endogenous ER target genes. Finally, studies carried out in the AhR-positive rat hepatoma cell line 5L and the AhR-deficient variant BP8 demonstrated that ER reporter activity could be induced by 3MC in a manner that was independent of AhR and thus distinct from the AhR-ER 'hijacking' mechanism described recently. 3MC may thus elicit estrogenic activity by multiple mechanisms.

  7. RNA Polymerase II Regulates Topoisomerase 1 Activity to Favor Efficient Transcription.

    PubMed

    Baranello, Laura; Wojtowicz, Damian; Cui, Kairong; Devaiah, Ballachanda N; Chung, Hye-Jung; Chan-Salis, Ka Yim; Guha, Rajarshi; Wilson, Kelli; Zhang, Xiaohu; Zhang, Hongliang; Piotrowski, Jason; Thomas, Craig J; Singer, Dinah S; Pugh, B Franklin; Pommier, Yves; Przytycka, Teresa M; Kouzine, Fedor; Lewis, Brian A; Zhao, Keji; Levens, David

    2016-04-07

    We report a mechanism through which the transcription machinery directly controls topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) activity to adjust DNA topology throughout the transcription cycle. By comparing TOP1 occupancy using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) versus TOP1 activity using topoisomerase 1 sequencing (TOP1-seq), a method reported here to map catalytically engaged TOP1, TOP1 bound at promoters was discovered to become fully active only after pause-release. This transition coupled the phosphorylation of the carboxyl-terminal-domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) with stimulation of TOP1 above its basal rate, enhancing its processivity. TOP1 stimulation is strongly dependent on the kinase activity of BRD4, a protein that phosphorylates Ser2-CTD and regulates RNAPII pause-release. Thus the coordinated action of BRD4 and TOP1 overcame the torsional stress opposing transcription as RNAPII commenced elongation but preserved negative supercoiling that assists promoter melting at start sites. This nexus between transcription and DNA topology promises to elicit new strategies to intercept pathological gene expression.

  8. Analysis of the transcriptional networks underpinning the activation of murine macrophages by inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Raza, Sobia; Barnett, Mark W; Barnett-Itzhaki, Zohar; Amit, Ido; Hume, David A; Freeman, Tom C

    2014-08-01

    Macrophages respond to the TLR4 agonist LPS with a sequential transcriptional cascade controlled by a complex regulatory network of signaling pathways and transcription factors. At least two distinct pathways are currently known to be engaged by TLR4 and are distinguished by their dependence on the adaptor molecule MyD88. We have used gene expression microarrays to define the effects of each of three variables--LPS dose, LPS versus IFN-β and -γ, and genetic background--on the transcriptional response of mouse BMDMs. Analysis of correlation networks generated from the data has identified subnetworks or modules within the macrophage transcriptional network that are activated selectively by these variables. We have identified mouse strain-specific signatures, including a module enriched for SLE susceptibility candidates. In the modules of genes unique to different treatments, we found a module of genes induced by type-I IFN but not by LPS treatment, suggesting another layer of complexity in the LPS-TLR4 signaling feedback control. We also observe that the activation of the complement system, in common with the known activation of MHC class 2 genes, is reliant on IFN-γ signaling. Taken together, these data further highlight the exquisite nature of the regulatory systems that control macrophage activation, their likely relevance to disease resistance/susceptibility, and the appropriate response of these cells to proinflammatory stimuli.

  9. Longitudinal in vivo bioimaging of hepatocyte transcription factor activity following cholestatic liver injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Delhove, Juliette M. K. M.; Buckley, Suzanne M. K.; Perocheau, Dany P.; Karda, Rajvinder; Arbuthnot, Patrick; Henderson, Neil C.; Waddington, Simon N.; McKay, Tristan R.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms regulating liver repair following cholestatic injury remain largely unknown. We have combined a mouse model of acute cholestatic liver injury, partial bile duct ligation (pBDL), with a novel longitudinal bioimaging methodology to quantify transcription factor activity during hepatic injury and repair. We administered lentiviral transcription factor activated luciferase/eGFP reporter (TFAR) cassettes to neonatal mice enabling longitudinal TFAR profiling by continued bioimaging throughout the lives of the animals and following pBDL in adulthood. Neonatal intravascular injection of VSV-G pseudotyped lentivirus resulted in almost exclusive transduction of hepatocytes allowing analysis of hepatocyte-specific transcription factor activity. We recorded acute but transient responses with NF-κB and Smad2/3 TFAR whilst our Notch reporter was repressed over the 40 days of evaluation post-pBDL. The bipotent hepatic progenitor cell line, HepaRG, can be directed to differentiate into hepatocytes and biliary epithelia. We found that forced expression of the Notch inhibitor NUMB in HepaRG resulted in enhanced hepatocyte differentiation and proliferation whereas over-expressing the Notch agonist JAG1 resulted in biliary epithelial differentiation. In conclusion, our data demonstrates that hepatocytes rapidly upregulate NF-κB and Smad2/3 activity, whilst repressing Notch signalling. This transcriptional response to cholestatic liver injury likely promotes partial de-differentiation to allow pro-regenerative proliferation of hepatocytes. PMID:28157201

  10. Chromatin-dependent regulation of RNA polymerases II and III activity throughout the transcription cycle.

    PubMed

    Jordán-Pla, Antonio; Gupta, Ishaan; de Miguel-Jiménez, Lola; Steinmetz, Lars M; Chávez, Sebastián; Pelechano, Vicent; Pérez-Ortín, José E

    2015-01-01

    The particular behaviour of eukaryotic RNA polymerases along different gene regions and amongst distinct gene functional groups is not totally understood. To cast light onto the alternative active or backtracking states of RNA polymerase II, we have quantitatively mapped active RNA polymerases at a high resolution following a new biotin-based genomic run-on (BioGRO) technique. Compared with conventional profiling with chromatin immunoprecipitation, the analysis of the BioGRO profiles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that RNA polymerase II has unique activity profiles at both gene ends, which are highly dependent on positioned nucleosomes. This is the first demonstration of the in vivo influence of positioned nucleosomes on transcription elongation. The particular features at the 5' end and around the polyadenylation site indicate that this polymerase undergoes extensive specific-activity regulation in the initial and final transcription elongation phases. The genes encoding for ribosomal proteins show distinctive features at both ends. BioGRO also provides the first nascentome analysis for RNA polymerase III, which indicates that transcription of tRNA genes is poorly regulated at the individual copy level. The present study provides a novel perspective of the transcription cycle that incorporates inactivation/reactivation as an important aspect of RNA polymerase dynamics.

  11. Analysis of the transcriptional networks underpinning the activation of murine macrophages by inflammatory mediators

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Sobia; Barnett, Mark W.; Barnett-Itzhaki, Zohar; Amit, Ido; Hume, David A.; Freeman, Tom C.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages respond to the TLR4 agonist LPS with a sequential transcriptional cascade controlled by a complex regulatory network of signaling pathways and transcription factors. At least two distinct pathways are currently known to be engaged by TLR4 and are distinguished by their dependence on the adaptor molecule MyD88. We have used gene expression microarrays to define the effects of each of three variables—LPS dose, LPS versus IFN-β and -γ, and genetic background—on the transcriptional response of mouse BMDMs. Analysis of correlation networks generated from the data has identified subnetworks or modules within the macrophage transcriptional network that are activated selectively by these variables. We have identified mouse strain-specific signatures, including a module enriched for SLE susceptibility candidates. In the modules of genes unique to different treatments, we found a module of genes induced by type-I IFN but not by LPS treatment, suggesting another layer of complexity in the LPS-TLR4 signaling feedback control. We also observe that the activation of the complement system, in common with the known activation of MHC class 2 genes, is reliant on IFN-γ signaling. Taken together, these data further highlight the exquisite nature of the regulatory systems that control macrophage activation, their likely relevance to disease resistance/susceptibility, and the appropriate response of these cells to proinflammatory stimuli. PMID:24721704

  12. Butyrate-induced changes in nuclease sensitivity of chromatin cannot be correlated with transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Birren, B W; Taplitz, S J; Herschman, H R

    1987-01-01

    We examined in the H4IIE rat hepatoma cell line the relationship between butyrate-induced changes in the nuclease sensitivity of chromatin and changes in transcriptional activity of specific genes. The butyrate-inducible metallothionein I (MT-I) gene underwent a dramatic increase in DNase I sensitivity after 3 h of butyrate treatment. However, genes not transcribed in H4IIE cells underwent the same changes in DNase I sensitivity. Thus, butyrate-induced increases in DNase I sensitivity are not sufficient for the transcriptional activation of a gene. Butyrate treatment has also been reported to alter the sensitivity of sequences to micrococcal nuclease (MNase) in a manner reflecting their tissue-specific expression. Butyrate exposure caused increased digestion of the MT-I gene by MNase. However, butyrate-induced MNase sensitivity also occurred for genes which are neither transcribed in untreated cells nor butyrate inducible. Moreover, cadmium, a potent transcriptional activator of the MT-I gene, does not alter the sensitivity of the MT-I gene to MNase. Thus, the butyrate-induced alterations in MNase sensitivity are neither sufficient for, necessary for, nor indicative of transcriptional activation. Images PMID:3431545

  13. Physiological and transcriptional responses of nitrifying bacteria exposed to copper in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Fan; Zhai, Hongyan; Ji, Min; Zhang, Hongyang; Dong, Zhao

    2016-01-15

    Cu inhibition of gene transcription in ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were rarely studied simultaneously in activated sludge. In this study, the transcription of amoA (for AOB) and nxrB (for NOB), nitrification efficiencies, AOB and NOB respiratory rates, and Cu distribution were simultaneously investigated. Modeling the relationships among the aforementioned parameters revealed that in complex activated sludge systems, nitrification efficiency was an insensitive parameter for showing Cu inhibition. Respiration activities and gene transcription were sensitive to Cu and positively correlated with each other. The transcription of amoA and nxrB genes indicated that the Cu had different inhibitory effects on AOB and NOB. AOB were more susceptible to Cu toxicity than NOB. Moreover, the degree of Cu inhibition on ammonia oxidation was greater than on nitrite oxidation. The analysis and related modeling results indicate that the inhibitory actions of Cu on nitrifying bacteria could mainly be attributed to intracellular Cu. The findings from this study provide insight into the mechanism of Cu inhibition on nitrification in complex activated sludge systems.

  14. TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ACTIVATION FOLLOWING EXPOSURE OF AN INTACT LUNG PREPARATION TO METALLIC PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ACTIVATION FOLLOWING EXPOSURE OF AN INTACT LUNG PREPARATION TO METALLIC PARTICULATE MATTER

    James M. Samet1,2, Robert Silbajoris1, Tony Huang1 and Ilona Jaspers3

    1Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laborato...

  15. Longitudinal in vivo bioimaging of hepatocyte transcription factor activity following cholestatic liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Delhove, Juliette M K M; Buckley, Suzanne M K; Perocheau, Dany P; Karda, Rajvinder; Arbuthnot, Patrick; Henderson, Neil C; Waddington, Simon N; McKay, Tristan R

    2017-02-03

    Molecular mechanisms regulating liver repair following cholestatic injury remain largely unknown. We have combined a mouse model of acute cholestatic liver injury, partial bile duct ligation (pBDL), with a novel longitudinal bioimaging methodology to quantify transcription factor activity during hepatic injury and repair. We administered lentiviral transcription factor activated luciferase/eGFP reporter (TFAR) cassettes to neonatal mice enabling longitudinal TFAR profiling by continued bioimaging throughout the lives of the animals and following pBDL in adulthood. Neonatal intravascular injection of VSV-G pseudotyped lentivirus resulted in almost exclusive transduction of hepatocytes allowing analysis of hepatocyte-specific transcription factor activity. We recorded acute but transient responses with NF-κB and Smad2/3 TFAR whilst our Notch reporter was repressed over the 40 days of evaluation post-pBDL. The bipotent hepatic progenitor cell line, HepaRG, can be directed to differentiate into hepatocytes and biliary epithelia. We found that forced expression of the Notch inhibitor NUMB in HepaRG resulted in enhanced hepatocyte differentiation and proliferation whereas over-expressing the Notch agonist JAG1 resulted in biliary epithelial differentiation. In conclusion, our data demonstrates that hepatocytes rapidly upregulate NF-κB and Smad2/3 activity, whilst repressing Notch signalling. This transcriptional response to cholestatic liver injury likely promotes partial de-differentiation to allow pro-regenerative proliferation of hepatocytes.

  16. Modulation of CP2 family transcriptional activity by CRTR-1 and sumoylation.

    PubMed

    To, Sarah; Rodda, Stephen J; Rathjen, Peter D; Keough, Rebecca A

    2010-07-22

    CRTR-1 is a member of the CP2 family of transcription factors. Unlike other members of the family which are widely expressed, CRTR-1 expression shows specific spatio-temporal regulation. Gene targeting demonstrates that CRTR-1 plays a central role in the maturation and function of the salivary glands and the kidney. CRTR-1 has also recently been identified as a component of the complex transcriptional network that maintains pluripotency in embryonic stem (ES) cells. CRTR-1 was previously shown to be a repressor of transcription. We examine the activity of CRTR-1 in ES and other cells and show that CRTR-1 is generally an activator of transcription and that it modulates the activity of other family members, CP2, NF2d9 and altNF2d9, in a cell specific manner. We also demonstrate that CRTR-1 activity is regulated by sumoylation at a single major site, residue K30. These findings imply that functional redundancy with other family members may mask important roles for CRTR-1 in other tissues, including the blastocyst stage embryo and embryonic stem cells.

  17. Strong transcriptional activators isolated from viral DNA by the 'activator trap', a novel selection system in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Gstaiger, M; Schaffner, W

    1994-10-11

    Transcription factors often contain activation domains that interact with the basic transcription machinery. We have developed a functional screening strategy in mammalian cells to selectively isolate activation domains from a library of random DNA inserts. For this, sonicated DNA fragments are cloned next to the DNA binding domain of GAL4 factor in a plasmid that also contains the SV40 origin of replication. Pools of fusion protein clones are transfected into CV-1-5GT monkey cells containing an SV40 T antigen gene under the control of a promoter with GAL4 binding sites. Plasmids that express functional transactivating fusion proteins activate the T antigen gene, thus promoting selective amplification of the plasmid in the mammalian host cell line. Using this method, we were able to select strong enhancer-type activation domains from the immediate early regions of two herpesviruses, namely pseudorabies virus and bovine herpesvirus 1. In both cases, the activation domains selected were homologues of the ICP4 regulatory protein of herpes simplex virus. The activation domain from pseudorabies virus is four times stronger than the activation domain of herpes simplex virus protein VP16 (Vmw65), making it the strongest activation domain characterized so far. This activator trap method should be useful for precisely localizing activation domain(s) in known factors, or to identify mammalian transcriptional adaptors that do not bind DNA and which may escape conventional detection methods.

  18. Transcriptional activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} requires activation of both protein kinase A and Akt during adipocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-pil; Ha, Jung Min; Yun, Sung Ji; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Chung, Sung Woon; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae; Bae, Sun Sik

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} Elevated cAMP activates both PKA and Epac. {yields} PKA activates CREB transcriptional factor and Epac activates PI3K/Akt pathway via Rap1. {yields} Akt modulates PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity in concert with CREB. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR-{gamma}) is required for the conversion of pre-adipocytes. However, the mechanism underlying activation of PPAR-{gamma} is unclear. Here we showed that cAMP-induced activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and Akt is essential for the transcriptional activation of PPAR-{gamma}. Hormonal induction of adipogenesis was blocked by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor (LY294002), by a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor (H89), and by a Rap1 inhibitor (GGTI-298). Transcriptional activity of PPAR-{gamma} was markedly enhanced by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), but not insulin and dexamethasone. In addition, IBMX-induced PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity was blocked by PI3K/Akt, PKA, or Rap1 inhibitors. 8-(4-Chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyl-cAMP (8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP) which is a specific agonist for exchanger protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) significantly induced the activation of Akt. Furthermore, knock-down of Akt1 markedly attenuated PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity. These results indicate that both PKA and Akt signaling pathways are required for transcriptional activation of PPAR-{gamma}, suggesting post-translational activation of PPAR-{gamma} might be critical step for adipogenic gene expression.

  19. A conserved role for Snail as a potentiator of active transcription

    PubMed Central

    Rembold, Martina; Ciglar, Lucia; Yáñez-Cuna, J. Omar; Zinzen, Robert P.; Girardot, Charles; Jain, Ankit; Welte, Michael A.; Stark, Alexander; Leptin, Maria; Furlong, Eileen E.M.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factors of the Snail family are key regulators of epithelial–mesenchymal transitions, cell morphogenesis, and tumor metastasis. Since its discovery in Drosophila ∼25 years ago, Snail has been extensively studied for its role as a transcriptional repressor. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila Snail can positively modulate transcriptional activation. By combining information on in vivo occupancy with expression profiling of hand-selected, staged snail mutant embryos, we identified 106 genes that are potentially directly regulated by Snail during mesoderm development. In addition to the expected Snail-repressed genes, almost 50% of Snail targets showed an unanticipated activation. The majority of “Snail-activated” genes have enhancer elements cobound by Twist and are expressed in the mesoderm at the stages of Snail occupancy. Snail can potentiate Twist-mediated enhancer activation in vitro and is essential for enhancer activity in vivo. Using a machine learning approach, we show that differentially enriched motifs are sufficient to predict Snail's regulatory response. In silico mutagenesis revealed a likely causative motif, which we demonstrate is essential for enhancer activation. Taken together, these data indicate that Snail can potentiate enhancer activation by collaborating with different activators, providing a new mechanism by which Snail regulates development. PMID:24402316

  20. Conformational changes accompany activation of reovirus RNA-dependent RNA transcription

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Israel I.; Weiner, Scott G.; She, Yi-Min; Yeager, Mark; Coombs, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    Many critical biologic processes involve dynamic interactions between proteins and nucleic acids. Such dynamic processes are often difficult to delineate by conventional static methods. For example, while a variety of nucleic acid polymerase structures have been determined at atomic resolution, the details of how some multi-protein transcriptase complexes actively produce mRNA, as well as conformational changes associated with activation of such complexes, remain poorly understood. The mammalian reovirus innermost capsid (core) manifests all enzymatic activities necessary to produce mRNA from each of the 10 encased double-stranded RNA genes. We used rapid freezing and electron cryo-microscopy to trap and visualize transcriptionally active reovirus core particles and compared them to inactive core images. Rod-like density centered within actively transcribing core spike channels was attributed to exiting nascent mRNA. Comparative radial density plots of active and inactive core particles identified several structural changes in both internal and external regions of the icosahedral core capsid. Inactive and transcriptionally active cores were partially digested with trypsin and identities of initial tryptic peptides determined by mass spectrometry. Differentially-digested peptides, which also suggest transcription-associated conformational changes, were placed within the known 3-dimensional structures of major core proteins. PMID:18321727

  1. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Couvigny, Benoît; de Wouters, Tomas; Kaci, Ghalia; Jacouton, Elsa; Delorme, Christine; Doré, Joël; Renault, Pierre; Blottière, Hervé M.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB) in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor), we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health. PMID:25946041

  2. The 19S proteasomal lid subunit POH1 enhances the transcriptional activation by Mitf in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Toni; Sohn, Chee; Kaiser, Bria; Jensen, Eric D; Mansky, Kim C

    2010-04-01

    The microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) regulates gene expression required for osteoclast differentiation. Genes regulated by Mitf have been previously identified. However, proteins that interact and regulate Mitf's activity in osteoclasts are not well known. Here, we report that POH1, a subunit of the 19S proteasome lid is a regulator of Mitf. We show that POH1 and Mitf interact in osteoclasts and that this interaction is dependent on RANKL signaling. Overexpression of POH1 increased Mitf's activation of 5XGal4-TK and Acp5 promoters. The amino terminus of POH1 mediates the binding to Mitf and is sufficient to increase Mitf's transcriptional activity. Finally, we show that mutations in the JAMM motif of POH1 reduced Mitf activation of promoters. In summary, our results identify a novel mechanism of Mitf regulation in osteoclasts by POH1.

  3. Direct activation of Shroom3 transcription by Pitx proteins drives epithelial morphogenesis in the developing gut

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Mei-I; Nascone-Yoder, Nanette M.; Grover, Stephanie A.; Drysdale, Thomas A.; Wallingford, John B.

    2010-01-01

    Individual cell shape changes are essential for epithelial morphogenesis. A transcriptional network for epithelial cell shape change is emerging in Drosophila, but this area remains largely unexplored in vertebrates. The distinction is important as so far, key downstream effectors of cell shape change in Drosophila appear not to be conserved. Rather, Shroom3 has emerged as a central effector of epithelial morphogenesis in vertebrates, driving both actin- and microtubule-based cell shape changes. To date, the morphogenetic role of Shroom3 has been explored only in the neural epithelium, so the broad expression of this gene raises two important questions: what are the requirements for Shroom3 in non-neural tissues and what factors control Shroom3 transcription? Here, we show in Xenopus that Shroom3 is essential for cell shape changes and morphogenesis in the developing vertebrate gut and that Shroom3 transcription in the gut requires the Pitx1 transcription factor. Moreover, we show that Pitx proteins directly activate Shroom3 transcription, and we identify Pitx-responsive regulatory elements in the genomic DNA upstream of Shroom3. Finally, we show that ectopic expression of Pitx proteins is sufficient to induce Shroom3-dependent cytoskeletal reorganization and epithelial cell shape change. These data demonstrate new breadth to the requirements for Shroom3 in morphogenesis, and they also provide a cell-biological basis for the role of Pitx transcription factors in morphogenesis. More generally, these results provide a foundation for deciphering the transcriptional network that underlies epithelial cell shape change in developing vertebrates. PMID:20332151

  4. von Hippel-Lindau partner Jade-1 is a transcriptional co-activator associated with histone acetyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Panchenko, Maria V; Zhou, Mina I; Cohen, Herbert T

    2004-12-31

    Jade-1 was identified as a protein partner of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor pVHL. The interaction of Jade-1 and pVHL correlates with renal cancer risk. We have investigated the molecular function of Jade-1. Jade-1 has two zinc finger motifs called plant homeodomains (PHD). A line of evidence suggests that the PHD finger functions in chromatin remodeling and protein-protein interactions. We determined the cellular localization of Jade-1 and examined whether Jade-1 might have transcriptional and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) functions. Biochemical cell fractionation studies as well as confocal images of cells immunostained with a specific Jade-1 antibody revealed that endogenous Jade-1 is localized predominantly in the cell nucleus. Tethering of Gal4-Jade-1 fusion protein to Gal4-responsive promoters in co-transfection experiments activated transcription 5-6-fold, indicating that Jade-1 is a possible transcriptional activator. It was remarkable that overexpression of Jade-1 in cultured cells specifically increased levels of endogenous acetylated histone H4, but not histone H3, strongly suggesting that Jade-1 associates with HAT activity specific for histone H4. Deletion of the two PHD fingers completely abolished Jade-1 transcriptional and HAT activities, indicating that these domains are indispensable for Jade-1 nuclear functions. In addition, we demonstrated that TIP60, a known HAT with histone H4/H2A specificity, physically associates with Jade-1 and is able to augment Jade-1 HAT function in live cells, strongly suggesting that TIP60 might mediate Jade-1 HAT activity. Thus, Jade-1 is a novel candidate transcriptional co-activator associated with HAT activity and may play a key role in the pathogenesis of renal cancer and von Hippel-Lindau disease.

  5. DNA methylation regulates phenotype-dependent transcriptional activity in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Prashant K.; Baum, Mary; Carbon, John

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation is a common epigenetic signaling mechanism associated with silencing of repeated DNA and transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes. Here we report that DNA methylation in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans is primarily localized within structural genes and modulates transcriptional activity. Major repeat sequences and multigene families are largely free of DNA methylation. Among the genes subject to DNA methylation are those associated with dimorphic transition between yeast and hyphal forms, switching between white and opaque cells, and iron metabolism. Transcriptionally repressed methylated loci showed increased frequency of C-to-T transitions during asexual growth, an evolutionarily stable pattern of repression associated mutation that could bring about genetic alterations under changing environmental or host conditions. Dynamic differential DNA methylation of structural genes may be one factor contributing to morphological plasticity that is cued by nutrition and host interaction. PMID:21730141

  6. Rph1 mediates the nutrient-limitation signaling pathway leading to transcriptional activation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Amélie; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2015-04-03

    To maintain proper cellular homeostasis, the magnitude of autophagy activity has to be finely tuned in response to environmental changes. Many aspects of autophagy regulation have been extensively studied: pathways integrating signals through the master regulators TORC1 and PKA lead to multiple post-translational modifications affecting the functions, protein-protein interactions, and localization of Atg proteins. The expression of several ATG genes increases sharply upon autophagy induction conditions, and defects in ATG gene expression are associated with various diseases, pointing to the importance of transcriptional regulation of autophagy. Yet, how changes in ATG gene expression affect the rate of autophagy is not well characterized, and transcriptional regulators of the autophagy pathway remain largely unknown. To identify such regulators, we analyzed the expression of several ATG genes in a library of DNA-binding protein mutants. This led to the identification of Rph1 as a master transcriptional regulator of autophagy.

  7. Waves of early transcriptional activation and pluripotency program initiation during human preimplantation development

    PubMed Central

    Vassena, Rita; Boué, Stéphanie; González-Roca, Eva; Aran, Begoña; Auer, Herbert; Veiga, Anna; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua

    2011-01-01

    The events regulating human preimplantation development are still largely unknown owing to a scarcity of material, ethical and legal limitations and a lack of reliable techniques to faithfully amplify the transcriptome of a single cell. Nonetheless, human embryology is gathering renewed interest due to its close relationship with both stem cell biology and epigenetic reprogramming to pluripotency and their importance in regenerative medicine. Carefully timed genome-wide transcript analyses of single oocytes and embryos uncovered a series of successive waves of embryonic transcriptional initiation that start as early as the 2-cell stage. In addition, we identified the hierarchical activation of genes involved in the regulation of pluripotency. Finally, we developed HumER, a database of human preimplantation gene expression, to serve the scientific community. Importantly, our work links early transcription in the human embryo with the correct execution of the pluripotency program later in development and paves the way for the identification of factors to improve epigenetic reprogramming. PMID:21775417

  8. The t(8;21) fusion protein interferes with AML-1B-dependent transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, S; Lenny, N; Hiebert, S W

    1995-01-01

    The AML-1/CBF beta transcription factor complex is targeted by both the t(8;21) and the inv(16) chromosomal alterations, which are frequently observed in acute myelogenous leukemia. AML-1 is a site-specific DNA-binding protein that recognizes the enhancer core motif TGTGGT. The t(8;21) translocation fuses the first 177 amino acids of AML-1 to MTG8 (also known as ETO), generating a chimeric protein that retains the DNA-binding domain of AML-1. Analysis of endogenous AML-1 DNA-binding complexes suggested the presence of at least two AML-1 isoforms. Accordingly, we screened a human B-cell cDNA library and isolated a larger, potentially alternatively spliced, form of AML1, termed AML1B. AML-1B is a protein of 53 kDa that binds to a consensus AML-1-binding site and complexes with CBF beta. Subcellular fractionation experiments demonstrated that both AML-1 and AML-1/ETO are efficiently extracted from the nucleus under ionic conditions but that AML-1B is localized to a salt-resistant nuclear compartment. Analysis of the transcriptional activities of AML-1, AML-1B, and AML-1/ETO demonstrated that only AML-1B activates transcription from the T-cell receptor beta enhancer. Mixing experiments indicated that AML-1/ETO can efficiently block AML-1B-dependent transcriptional activation, suggesting that the t(8;21) translocation creates a dominant interfering protein. PMID:7891692

  9. SALSA, a variant of yeast SAGA, contains truncated Spt7, which correlates with activated transcription.

    PubMed

    Sterner, David E; Belotserkovskaya, Rimma; Berger, Shelley L

    2002-09-03

    Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) is a previously described histone acetyltransferase/transcriptional coactivator complex in yeast. At promoters of certain genes (HIS3 and TRP3), SAGA has an inhibitory function involving a nonproductive TATA-binding protein interaction mediated by the Spt3 and Spt8 subunits. Related to this, Spt8-less SAGA is a major form of the complex under activating conditions for these genes. In the present study, we purify this activation-specific complex, called SALSA (SAGA altered, Spt8 absent). Besides lacking Spt8, SALSA contains Spt7 subunit that is truncated. Examining the role of this subunit, we find that C-terminally truncated SPT7 resulted in derepressed HIS3 transcription. Furthermore, when grown in rich media (repressing conditions), wild-type cells yielded predominantly SAGA, but Spt7 C-terminal truncations resulted primarily in a form of complex similar to SALSA. Thus, SALSA-like structure and activating function can be partially recapitulated in yeast by truncating the C terminus of Spt7. Overall, these results lead to a model that for a subset of promoters SAGA is inhibitory through Spt3, Spt8, and an Spt8-interacting subdomain of Spt7, whereas SALSA is a form of complex for positive transcriptional regulation. These data clarify a mechanism by which a transcriptional regulatory complex can switch between positive and negative modulation.

  10. Suppression of FOXM1 Transcriptional Activities via a Single-Stranded DNA Aptamer Generated by SELEX.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qin; Tan, Guixiang; Jiang, Xia; Wu, Kuangpei; Tan, Weihong; Tan, Yongjun

    2017-03-30

    The transcription factor FOXM1 binds to its consensus sequence at promoters through its DNA binding domain (DBD) and activates proliferation-associated genes. The aberrant overexpression of FOXM1 correlates with tumorigenesis and progression of many cancers. Inhibiting FOXM1 transcriptional activities is proposed as a potential therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. In this study, we obtained a FOXM1-specific single stranded DNA aptamer (FOXM1 Apt) by SELEX with a recombinant FOXM1 DBD protein as the target of selection. The binding of FOXM1 Apt to FOXM1 proteins were confirmed with electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) and fluorescence polarization (FP) assays. Phosphorthioate-modified FOXM1 Apt (M-FOXM1 Apt) bound to FOXM1 as wild type FOXM1 Apt, and co-localized with FOXM1 in nucleus. M-FOXM1-Apt abolished the binding of FOXM1 on its consensus binding sites and suppressed FOXM1 transcriptional activities. Compared with the RNA interference of FOXM1 in cancer cells, M-FOXM1 Apt repressed cell proliferation and the expression of FOXM1 target genes without changing FOXM1 levels. Our results suggest that the obtained FOXM1 Apt could be used as a probe for FOXM1 detection and an inhibitor of FOXM1 transcriptional functions in cancer cells at the same time, providing a potential reagent for cancer diagnosis and treatment in the future.

  11. Sumoylation of TCF21 downregulates the transcriptional activity of estrogen receptor-alpha

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Xiang; Li, Shujing; Xu, Zhaowei; Yang, Yangyang; Chen, Min; Jiang, Xiao; Wu, Huijian

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant estrogen receptor-α (ERα) signaling is recognized as a major contributor to the development of breast cancer. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of ERα in breast cancer is still inconclusive. In this study, we showed that the transcription factor 21 (TCF21) interacted with ERα, and repressed its transcriptional activity in a HDACs-dependent manner. We also showed that TCF21 could be sumoylated by the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO1, and this modification could be reversed by SENP1. Sumoylation of TCF21 occurred at lysine residue 24 (K24). Substitution of K24 with arginine resulted in complete abolishment of sumoylation. Sumoylation stabilized TCF21, but did not affect its subcellular localization. Sumoylation of TCF21 also enhanced its interaction with HDAC1/2 without affecting its interaction with ERα. Moreover, sumoylation of TCF21 promoted its repression of ERα transcriptional activity, and increased the recruitment of HDAC1/2 to the pS2 promoter. Consistent with these observations, sumoylation of TCF21 could inhibit the growth of ERα-positive breast cancer cells and decreased the proportion of S-phase cells in the cell cycle. These findings suggested that TCF21 might act as a negative regulator of ERα, and its sumoylation inhibited the transcriptional activity of ERα through promoting the recruitment of HDAC1/2. PMID:27028856

  12. Suppression of FOXM1 Transcriptional Activities via a Single-Stranded DNA Aptamer Generated by SELEX

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Qin; Tan, Guixiang; Jiang, Xia; Wu, Kuangpei; Tan, Weihong; Tan, Yongjun

    2017-01-01

    The transcription factor FOXM1 binds to its consensus sequence at promoters through its DNA binding domain (DBD) and activates proliferation-associated genes. The aberrant overexpression of FOXM1 correlates with tumorigenesis and progression of many cancers. Inhibiting FOXM1 transcriptional activities is proposed as a potential therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. In this study, we obtained a FOXM1-specific single stranded DNA aptamer (FOXM1 Apt) by SELEX with a recombinant FOXM1 DBD protein as the target of selection. The binding of FOXM1 Apt to FOXM1 proteins were confirmed with electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) and fluorescence polarization (FP) assays. Phosphorthioate-modified FOXM1 Apt (M-FOXM1 Apt) bound to FOXM1 as wild type FOXM1 Apt, and co-localized with FOXM1 in nucleus. M-FOXM1-Apt abolished the binding of FOXM1 on its consensus binding sites and suppressed FOXM1 transcriptional activities. Compared with the RNA interference of FOXM1 in cancer cells, M-FOXM1 Apt repressed cell proliferation and the expression of FOXM1 target genes without changing FOXM1 levels. Our results suggest that the obtained FOXM1 Apt could be used as a probe for FOXM1 detection and an inhibitor of FOXM1 transcriptional functions in cancer cells at the same time, providing a potential reagent for cancer diagnosis and treatment in the future. PMID:28358012

  13. The product of the adenovirus intermediate gene IX is a transcriptional activator.

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, P; Rosa-Calatrava, M; Kedinger, C

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the functional properties of the product of the adenovirus type 5 gene IX. This gene, which is expressed at intermediate times postinfection, encodes a small polypeptide (pIX) of 140 residues that has previously been shown to be incorporated into the viral capsid. Here, we show that pIX, in addition to its structural contribution, exhibits transcriptional properties. In transient transfection experiments, expression of pIX stimulated adenovirus major late promoter activity. The effect was independent of other viral proteins, but the level of promoter activation appeared strongly pIX dose dependent; similar levels of induction were observed with other cellular or viral TATA-containing (but not with TATA-less) promoters. This promoter specificity could be reproduced in a cell-free transcription system by the addition of purified recombinant pIX, further stressing the transcriptional nature of the phenomenon. A preliminary structural analysis of pIX indicated that the integrity of a putative leucine zipper at the carboxy-terminal end of the molecule, as well as elements within the amino-terminal half, was critical for pIX transcriptional activity. The relevance of these findings in adenovirus infection is discussed. PMID:9188576

  14. Occludin controls HIV transcription in brain pericytes via regulation of SIRT-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Castro, Victor; Bertrand, Luc; Luethen, Mareen; Dabrowski, Sebastian; Lombardi, Jorge; Morgan, Laura; Sharova, Natalia; Stevenson, Mario; Blasig, Ingolf E; Toborek, Michal

    2016-03-01

    HIV invades the brain early after infection; however, its interactions with the cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remain poorly understood. Our goal was to evaluate the role of occludin, one of the tight junction proteins that regulate BBB functions in HIV infection of BBB pericytes. We provide evidence that occludin levels largely control the metabolic responses of human pericytes to HIV. Occludin in BBB pericytes decreased by 10% during the first 48 h after HIV infection, correlating with increased nuclear translocation of the gene repressor C-terminal-binding protein (CtBP)-1 and NFκB-p65 activation. These changes were associated with decreased expression and activation of the class III histone deacetylase sirtuin (SIRT)-1. Occludin levels recovered 96 h after infection, restoring SIRT-1 and reducing HIV transcription to 20% of its highest values. We characterized occludin biochemically as a novel NADH oxidase that controls the expression and activation of SIRT-1. The inverse correlation between occludin and HIV transcription was then replicated in human primary macrophages and differentiated monocytic U937 cells, in which occludin silencing resulted in 75 and 250% increased viral transcription, respectively. Our work shows that occludin has previously unsuspected metabolic properties and is a target of HIV infection, opening the possibility of designing novel pharmacological approaches to control HIV transcription.

  15. Brd4 Activates Early Viral Transcription upon Human Papillomavirus 18 Infection of Primary Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Caleb C.; Kim, Min Jung; Chen, Dan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) replicate in the cutaneous and mucosal epithelia, and the infectious cycle is synchronous with the differentiation program of the host keratinocytes. The virus initially infects dividing cells in the lower layers of the epithelium, where it establishes a persistent infection. The viral genome is maintained as a low-copy-number, extrachromosomal element in these proliferating cells but switches to the late stage of the life cycle in differentiated cells. The cellular chromatin adaptor protein Brd4 is involved in several stages and processes of the viral life cycle. In concert with the viral transcriptional regulator E2, Brd4 can repress transcription from the early viral promoter. Brd4 and E2 form a complex with the viral genome that associates with host chromosomes to partition the viral genome in dividing cells; Brd4 also localizes to active sites of productive HPV DNA replication. However, because of the difficulties in producing HPV viral particles, the role of Brd4 in modulating viral transcription and replication at the initial stage of infection is unclear. In this study, we have used an HPV18 quasivirus-based genome delivery system to assess the role of Brd4 in the initial infectivity of primary human keratinocytes. We show that, upon infection of primary human keratinocytes with HPV18 quasivirus, Brd4 activates viral transcription and replication. Furthermore, this activation is independent of the functional interaction between Brd4 and the HPV18 E2 protein. PMID:27879331

  16. Coordinated repression and activation of two transcriptional programs stabilizes cell fate during myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ciglar, Lucia; Girardot, Charles; Wilczyński, Bartek; Braun, Martina; Furlong, Eileen E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular models of cell fate specification typically focus on the activation of specific lineage programs. However, the concurrent repression of unwanted transcriptional networks is also essential to stabilize certain cellular identities, as shown in a number of diverse systems and phyla. Here, we demonstrate that this dual requirement also holds true in the context of Drosophila myogenesis. By integrating genetics and genomics, we identified a new role for the pleiotropic transcriptional repressor Tramtrack69 in myoblast specification. Drosophila muscles are formed through the fusion of two discrete cell types: founder cells (FCs) and fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs). When tramtrack69 is removed, FCMs appear to adopt an alternative muscle FC-like fate. Conversely, ectopic expression of this repressor phenocopies muscle defects seen in loss-of-function lame duck mutants, a transcription factor specific to FCMs. This occurs through Tramtrack69-mediated repression in FCMs, whereas Lame duck activates a largely distinct transcriptional program in the same cells. Lineage-specific factors are therefore not sufficient to maintain FCM identity. Instead, their identity appears more plastic, requiring the combination of instructive repressive and activating programs to stabilize cell fate. PMID:24961800

  17. Autogenous transcriptional activation of a thiostrepton-induced gene in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, D J; Caso, J L; Thompson, C J

    1993-01-01

    Although the antibiotic thiostrepton is best known as an inhibitor of protein synthesis, it also, at extremely low concentrations (< 10(-9) M), induces the expression of a regulon of unknown function in certain Streptomyces species. Here, we report the purification of a Streptomyces lividans thiostrepton-induced transcriptional activator protein, TipAL, whose N-terminus is similar to a family of eubacterial regulatory proteins represented by MerR. TipAL was first purified from induced cultures of S.lividans as a factor which bound to and activated transcription from its own promoter. The tipAL gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and TipAL protein purified in a single step using a thiostrepton affinity column. Thiostrepton enhanced binding of TipAL to the promoter and catalysed specific transcription in vitro. TipAS, a second gene product of the same open reading frame consisting of the C-terminal domain of TipAL, is apparently translated using its own in-frame initiation site. Since it is produced in large molar excess relative to TipAL after induction and also binds thiostrepton, it may competitively modulate transcriptional activation. Images PMID:7688297

  18. Modulating the potency of an activator in a yeast in vitro transcription system.

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Y; Brickman, J M; Furman, E; Middleton, B; Carey, M

    1994-01-01

    The intrinsic stimulatory potential or potency of a eukaryotic gene activator is controlled by the interaction between the activation domain and the transcriptional machinery. To further understand this interaction, we undertook a biochemical study to identify parameters that could be used to modulate activator potency. We considered how varying the number of activation domains, their flexibility, and the number of promoter sites affects potency in a yeast nuclear extract. The effects of GAL4 derivatives bearing either one, two, or four herpes simplex virus VP16 activation domains (amino acids 413 to 454) were measured on DNA templates containing one or two GAL4 sites in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear extract. We found that multimerized VP16 activation domains acted synergistically to increase the potency of the activators. The spacing between the activation domains was critical, such that the increased flexibility imparted by a protein linker contributed to increased activator potency. With highly potent activators, the levels of transcription stimulated on a single site were saturating, whereas the stimulatory effect of weaker activators increased with the number of sites. We discuss how these biochemical studies relate to the mechanism of gene activation and synergy in a yeast in vitro system. Images PMID:8139572

  19. Increased global transcription activity as a mechanism of replication stress in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kotsantis, Panagiotis; Silva, Lara Marques; Irmscher, Sarah; Jones, Rebecca M.; Folkes, Lisa; Gromak, Natalia; Petermann, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a disease associated with genomic instability that often results from oncogene activation. This in turn leads to hyperproliferation and replication stress. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie oncogene-induced replication stress are still poorly understood. Oncogenes such as HRASV12 promote proliferation by upregulating general transcription factors to stimulate RNA synthesis. Here we investigate whether this increase in transcription underlies oncogene-induced replication stress. We show that in cells overexpressing HRASV12, elevated expression of the general transcription factor TATA-box binding protein (TBP) leads to increased RNA synthesis, which together with R-loop accumulation results in replication fork slowing and DNA damage. Furthermore, overexpression of TBP alone causes the hallmarks of oncogene-induced replication stress, including replication fork slowing, DNA damage and senescence. Consequently, we reveal that increased transcription can be a mechanism of oncogene-induced DNA damage, providing a molecular link between upregulation of the transcription machinery and genomic instability in cancer. PMID:27725641

  20. Increased global transcription activity as a mechanism of replication stress in cancer.

    PubMed

    Kotsantis, Panagiotis; Silva, Lara Marques; Irmscher, Sarah; Jones, Rebecca M; Folkes, Lisa; Gromak, Natalia; Petermann, Eva

    2016-10-11

    Cancer is a disease associated with genomic instability that often results from oncogene activation. This in turn leads to hyperproliferation and replication stress. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie oncogene-induced replication stress are still poorly understood. Oncogenes such as HRAS(V12) promote proliferation by upregulating general transcription factors to stimulate RNA synthesis. Here we investigate whether this increase in transcription underlies oncogene-induced replication stress. We show that in cells overexpressing HRAS(V12), elevated expression of the general transcription factor TATA-box binding protein (TBP) leads to increased RNA synthesis, which together with R-loop accumulation results in replication fork slowing and DNA damage. Furthermore, overexpression of TBP alone causes the hallmarks of oncogene-induced replication stress, including replication fork slowing, DNA damage and senescence. Consequently, we reveal that increased transcription can be a mechanism of oncogene-induced DNA damage, providing a molecular link between upregulation of the transcription machinery and genomic instability in cancer.

  1. Insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity through interrogation of cis elements disrupted in human erythroid disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Aoi; Ulirsch, Jacob C.; Ludwig, Leif S.; Fiorini, Claudia; Yasuda, Makiko; Choudhuri, Avik; McDonel, Patrick; Zon, Leonard I.; Sankaran, Vijay G.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing has been incredibly successful in identifying causal genetic variants and has revealed a number of novel genes associated with blood and other diseases. One limitation of this approach is that it overlooks mutations in noncoding regulatory elements. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which mutations in transcriptional cis-regulatory elements result in disease remain poorly understood. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to interrogate three such elements harboring mutations in human erythroid disorders, which in all cases are predicted to disrupt a canonical binding motif for the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA1. Deletions of as few as two to four nucleotides resulted in a substantial decrease (>80%) in target gene expression. Isolated deletions of the canonical GATA1 binding motif completely abrogated binding of the cofactor TAL1, which binds to a separate motif. Having verified the functionality of these three GATA1 motifs, we demonstrate strong evolutionary conservation of GATA1 motifs in regulatory elements proximal to other genes implicated in erythroid disorders, and show that targeted disruption of such elements results in altered gene expression. By modeling transcription factor binding patterns, we show that multiple transcription factors are associated with erythroid gene expression, and have created predictive maps modeling putative disruptions of their binding sites at key regulatory elements. Our study provides insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity and may prove a useful resource for investigating the pathogenicity of noncoding variants in human erythroid disorders. PMID:27044088

  2. Yap5 Is an Iron-Responsive Transcriptional Activator That Regulates Vacuolar Iron Storage in Yeast▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liangtao; Bagley, Dustin; Ward, Diane M.; Kaplan, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    The transporter Ccc1 imports iron into the vacuole, which is the major site of iron storage in fungi and plants. CCC1 mRNA is destabilized under low-iron conditions by the binding of Cth1 and Cth2 to the 3′ untranslated region (S. Puig, E. Askeland, and D. J. Thiele, Cell 120:99-110, 2005). Here, we show that the transcription of CCC1 is stimulated by iron through a Yap consensus site in the CCC1 promoter. We identified YAP5 as being the iron-sensitive transcription factor and show that a yap5Δ strain is sensitive to high iron. Green fluorescent protein-tagged Yap5 is localized to the nucleus and occupies the CCC1 promoter independent of the iron concentration. Yap5 contains two cysteine-rich domains, and the mutation of the cysteines to alanines in each of the domains affects the transcription of CCC1 but not DNA binding. The fusion of the Yap5 cysteine-containing domains to a GAL4 DNA binding domain results in iron-sensitive GAL1-lacZ expression. Iron affects the sulfhydryl status of Yap5, which is indicative of the generation of intramolecular disulfide bonds. These results show that Yap5 is an iron-sensing transcription factor and that iron regulates transcriptional activation. PMID:18070921

  3. Yap5 is an iron-responsive transcriptional activator that regulates vacuolar iron storage in yeast.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangtao; Bagley, Dustin; Ward, Diane M; Kaplan, Jerry

    2008-02-01

    The transporter Ccc1 imports iron into the vacuole, which is the major site of iron storage in fungi and plants. CCC1 mRNA is destabilized under low-iron conditions by the binding of Cth1 and Cth2 to the 3' untranslated region (S. Puig, E. Askeland, and D. J. Thiele, Cell 120:99-110, 2005). Here, we show that the transcription of CCC1 is stimulated by iron through a Yap consensus site in the CCC1 promoter. We identified YAP5 as being the iron-sensitive transcription factor and show that a yap5Delta strain is sensitive to high iron. Green fluorescent protein-tagged Yap5 is localized to the nucleus and occupies the CCC1 promoter independent of the iron concentration. Yap5 contains two cysteine-rich domains, and the mutation of the cysteines to alanines in each of the domains affects the transcription of CCC1 but not DNA binding. The fusion of the Yap5 cysteine-containing domains to a GAL4 DNA binding domain results in iron-sensitive GAL1-lacZ expression. Iron affects the sulfhydryl status of Yap5, which is indicative of the generation of intramolecular disulfide bonds. These results show that Yap5 is an iron-sensing transcription factor and that iron regulates transcriptional activation.

  4. Protein-DNA array-based identification of transcription factor activities differentially regulated in obliterative bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ming; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Hong-Lin; Zhao, Yu-Xia; Jing, Ya-Qing; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Guo, Yi-Jiu; Chen, Xing-Long; Li, Ke-Qiu; Li, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation has already become the preferred treatment option for a variety of end-stage pulmonary failure. However the long-term results of lung transplantation are still not compelling and the major death reason is commonly due to obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) which is considered as chronic rejection presenting manifests physiologically as a progressive decline in FEV1. Transcription factors (TFs) play a key role in regulating gene expression and in providing an interconnecting regulatory between related pathway elements. Although the transcription factors are required for expression of the proinflammatory cytokines and immune proteins which are involved in obliterative bronchiolitis following lung transplantation, the alterations of the transcription factors in OB have not yet been revealed. Therefore, to investigate the alteration pattern of the transcription factors in OB, we used protein/DNA arrays. Mice orthotopic tracheal transplantation model was used in this studying. In this study, we explored the activity profiles of TFs in Protein/DNA array data of tracheal tissue in 14 and 28 day after transplanted. From a total of 345 screened TFs, we identified 42 TFs that showed associated with OB progression. Our data indicate that TFs may be potentially involved in the pathogenesis of OB, and can prevent, diagnose and treat OB after lung transplantation. In development of OB, some of the TFs may have ability to modulate the transcription of inflammatory proteins such cytokines, inflammatory enzymes and so on. PMID:26261607

  5. Transcription initiation in vivo without classical transactivators: DNA kinks flanking the core promoter of the housekeeping yeast adenylate kinase gene, AKY2, position nucleosomes and constitutively activate transcription.

    PubMed

    Angermayr, Michaela; Oechsner, Ulrich; Gregor, Kerstin; Schroth, Gary P; Bandlow, Wolfhard

    2002-10-01

    The housekeeping gene of the major adenylate kinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (AKY2, ADK1) is constitutively transcribed at a moderate level. The promoter has been dissected in order to define elements that effect constitutive transcription. Initiation of mRNA synthesis at the AKY2 promoter is shown to be mediated by a non-canonic core promoter, (TA)(6). Nucleotide sequences 5' of this element only marginally affect transcription suggesting that promoter activation can dispense with transactivators and essentially involves basal transcription. We show that the core promoter of AKY2 is constitutively kept free of nucleosomes. Analyses of permutated AKY2 promoter DNA revealed the presence of bent DNA. DNA structure analysis by computer and by mutation identified two kinks flanking an interstitial stretch of 65 bp of moderately bent core promoter DNA. Kinked DNA is likely incompatible with packaging into nucleosomes and responsible for positioning nucleosomes at the flanks allowing unimpeded access of the basal transcription machinery to the core promoter. The data show that in yeast, constitutive gene expression can dispense with classical transcriptional activator proteins, if two prerequisites are met: (i) the core promoter is kept free of nucleosomes; this can be due to structural properties of the DNA as an alternative to chromatin remodeling factors; and (ii) the core promoter is pre-bent to allow a high rate of basal transcription initiation.

  6. A central region of Gli2 regulates its localization to the primary cilium and transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Santos, Nicole; Reiter, Jeremy F

    2014-04-01

    Signaling through vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) proteins depends on the primary cilium. In response to Hh signals, the transcriptional activator of the pathway, Gli2, accumulates at the ciliary tip, raising the possibility that ciliary localization is important for Gli2 activation. To test this hypothesis, we used the Floxin system to create knock-in Gli2 alleles in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to allow methodical testing of which domains and residues are essential for the ciliary localization of Gli2. The Gli2 zinc fingers, transcriptional activation domain, repressor domain, phosphorylation cluster and a Sufu binding motif were each dispensable for ciliary localization. Mutating residues that are required for Gli2 sumoylation and nuclear trafficking also did not abrogate ciliary localization. By contrast, several other domains restricted Gli2 nuclear localization, and a central region, distinct from previously characterized domains, was required for ciliary localization. In addition to an inability to localize to cilia, Gli2 lacking this central domain was unable to activate target genes. Thus, our systematic analysis in ESCs reveals that distinct regions of Gli2 regulate its nuclear and ciliary localization. The identification of a domain essential for both ciliary localization and transcriptional activity suggests that ciliary localization of Gli2 is required for its activation.

  7. The role of transcriptional activator GATA-1 at human β-globin HS2

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Youngran; Song, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jong Joo; Choi, Narae; Kim, Chul Geun; Dean, Ann; Kim, AeRi

    2008-01-01

    GATA-1 is an erythroid activator that binds β-globin gene promoters and DNase I hypersensitive sites (HSs) of the β-globin locus control region (LCR). We investigated the direct role of GATA-1 interaction at the LCR HS2 enhancer by mutating its binding sites within minichromosomes in erythroid cells. Loss of GATA-1 in HS2 did not compromise interaction of NF-E2, a second activator that binds to HS2, nor was DNase I hypersensitivity at HS2 or the promoter of a linked ε-globin gene altered. Reduction of NF-E2 using RNAi confirmed the overall importance of this activator in establishing LCR HSs. However, recruitment of the histone acetyltransferase CBP and RNA pol II to HS2 was diminished by GATA-1 loss. Transcription of ε-globin was severely compromised with loss of RNA pol II from the transcription start site and reduction of H3 acetylation and H3K4 di- and tri-methylation in coding sequences. In contrast, widespread detection of H3K4 mono-methylation was unaffected by loss of GATA-1 in HS2. These results support the idea that GATA-1 interaction in HS2 has a prominent and direct role in co-activator and pol II recruitment conferring active histone tail modifications and transcription activation to a target gene but that it does not, by itself, play a major role in establishing DNase I hypersensitivity. PMID:18586828

  8. Conversion of the lac repressor into an allosterically regulated transcriptional activator for mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Labow, M A; Baim, S B; Shenk, T; Levine, A J

    1990-01-01

    A novel mammalian regulatory system was created by using the Escherichia coli lac repressor. The lac repressor was converted into a mammalian transcriptional activator by modifying the lac repressor coding region to include a nuclear localization signal from the simian virus 40 (SV40) large tumor antigen and the transcription activation domain from the herpes simplex virus type 1 virion protein 16. The lac activator protein (LAP) fusions were potent activators of several promoters containing lac operator sequences positioned either upstream or downstream of the transcription unit. A single lac operator allowed for transactivation, whereas multiple operators acted synergistically when separated by a small distance. Promoters containing 14 or 21 operator sequences were induced at least 1,000-fold in response to LAP, reaching levels of activity 20 to 30 times greater than that of the SV40 early promoter in HeLa cells. Activation was strongly inhibited by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG), indicating that LAP retained the functions needed for allosteric regulation. LAP was bifunctional, also acting as a repressor of expression of an SV40 promoter containing an operator immediately downstream of the TATA box. Finally, genetic selection schemes were developed such that LAP-expressing cell lines can be generated at high frequency from either established or primary cells in culture. Images PMID:2162473

  9. Locked and proteolysis-based transcription activator-like effector (TALE) regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lonzarić, Jan; Lebar, Tina; Majerle, Andreja; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Jerala, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Development of orthogonal, designable and adjustable transcriptional regulators is an important goal of synthetic biology. Their activity has been typically modulated through stimulus-induced oligomerization or interaction between the DNA-binding and activation/repression domain. We exploited a feature of the designable Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA-binding domain that it winds around the DNA which allows to topologically prevent it from binding by intramolecular cyclization. This new approach was investigated through noncovalent ligand-induced cyclization or through a covalent split intein cyclization strategy, where the topological inhibition of DNA binding by cyclization and its restoration by a proteolytic release of the topologic constraint was expected. We show that locked TALEs indeed have diminished DNA binding and regain full transcriptional activity by stimulation with the rapamycin ligand or site-specific proteolysis of the peptide linker, with much higher level of activation than rapamycin-induced heterodimerization. Additionally, we demonstrated reversibility, activation of genomic targets and implemented logic gates based on combinations of protein cyclization, proteolytic cleavage and ligand-induced dimerization, where the strongest fold induction was achieved by the proteolytic cleavage of a repression domain from a linear TALE. PMID:26748097

  10. Enhanced transcriptional activation by E2 proteins from the oncogenic human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Kovelman, R; Bilter, G K; Glezer, E; Tsou, A Y; Barbosa, M S

    1996-01-01

    A systematic comparison of transcriptional activation by papillomavirus E2 proteins revealed that the E2 proteins from high-risk human papillomaviruses (human papillomavirus type 16 [HPV-16] and HPV-18) are much more active than are the E2 proteins from low-risk HPVs (HPV-6b and HPV-11). Despite the tropism of HPVs for particular epithelial cell types, this difference in transcriptional activation was observed in a number of different epithelial and nonepithelial cells. The enhanced activities of the E2 proteins from high-risk HPVs did not result from higher steady-state levels of protein in vivo, and in vitro DNA-binding assays revealed similar binding properties for these two classes of E2 proteins. These results demonstrate that the E2 proteins from high-risk HPVs have an intrinsically enhanced potential to activate transcription from promoters with E2-responsive elements. We found that there are also substantial differences between the activation properties of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 protein and those of either of the two classes of HPV E2 proteins, especially with regard to requirements for particular configurations of E2 binding sites in the target promoter. Our results indicate that there are at least three distinct functional classes of E2 proteins and that these classes of E2 proteins may perform different roles during the respective viral life cycles. PMID:8892874

  11. P-TEFb Kinase Activity Is Essential for Global Transcription, Resumption of Meiosis and Embryonic Genome Activation in Pig

    PubMed Central

    Oqani, Reza K.; Lin, Tao; Lee, Jae Eun; Choi, Ki Myung; Shin, Hyun Young; Jin, Dong Il

    2016-01-01

    Positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) is a RNA polymerase II carboxyl-terminal domain (Pol II CTD) kinase that phosphorylates Ser2 of the CTD and promotes the elongation phase of transcription. Despite the fact that P-TEFb has role in many cellular processes, the role of this kinase complex remains to be understood in mammalian early developmental events. In this study, using immunocytochemical analyses, we found that the P-TEFb components, CDK9, Cyclin T1 and Cyclin T2 were localized to nuclear speckles, as well as in nucleolar-like bodies in pig germinal vesicle oocytes. Using nascent RNA labeling and small molecule inhibitors, we showed that inhibition of CDK9 activity abolished the transcription of GV oocytes globally. Moreover, using fluorescence in situ hybridization, in absence of CDK9 kinase activity the production of ribosomal RNAs was impaired. We also presented the evidences indicating that P-TEFb kinase activity is essential for resumption of oocyte meiosis and embryo development. Treatment with CDK9 inhibitors resulted in germinal vesicle arrest in maturing oocytes in vitro. Inhibition of CDK9 kinase activity did not interfere with in vitro fertilization and pronuclear formation. However, when in vitro produced zygotes were treated with CDK9 inhibitors, their development beyond the 4-cell stage was impaired. In these embryos, inhibition of CDK9 abrogated global transcriptional activity and rRNA production. Collectively, our data suggested that P-TEFb kinase activity is crucial for oocyte maturation, embryo development and regulation of RNA transcription in pig. PMID:27011207

  12. The AP-1 transcription factor homolog Pf-AP-1 activates transcription of multiple biomineral proteins and potentially participates in Pinctada fucata biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangnan; Cheng, Minzhang; Xiang, Liang; Liang, Jian; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-09-25

    Activator protein-1 (AP-1) is an important bZIP transcription factor that regulates a series of physiological processes by specifically activating transcription of several genes, and one of its well-chartered functions in mammals is participating in bone mineralization. We isolated and cloned the complete cDNA of a Jun/AP-1 homolog from Pinctada fucata and called it Pf-AP-1. Pf-AP-1 had a highly conserved bZIP region and phosphorylation sites compared with those from mammals. A tissue distribution analysis showed that Pf-AP-1 was ubiquitously expressed in P. fucata and the mRNA level of Pf-AP-1 is extremely high in mantle. Pf-AP-1 expression was positively associated with multiple biomineral proteins in the mantle. The luciferase reporter assay in a mammalian cell line showed that Pf-AP-1 significantly up-regulates the transcriptional activity of the promoters of KRMP, Pearlin, and Prisilkin39. Inhibiting the activity of Pf-AP-1 depressed the expression of multiple matrix proteins. Pf-AP-1 showed a unique expression pattern during shell regeneration and pearl sac development, which was similar to the pattern observed for biomineral proteins. These results suggest that the Pf-AP-1 AP-1 homolog is an important transcription factor that regulates transcription of several biomineral proteins simultaneously and plays a role in P. fucata biomineralization, particularly during pearl and shell formation.

  13. Copper is required for cobalt-induced transcriptional activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Liying; Ding, Xueqin; Zhang, Zhen; Kang, Y James

    2012-08-01

    Cobalt inhibits prolyl hydroxylases, leading to the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and a concomitant increase in the transcriptional activity of HIF-1. Therefore, cobalt has been under development as a drug for activating HIF-1 under some disease conditions. However, it has been shown that ischemic conditions resulted in the loss of copper, and the activation of HIF-1 would not occur unless copper was supplemented. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that copper is also required for the cobalt activation of HIF-1 transcriptional activity. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells subjected to treatment with cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)) at concentrations above 25 μM for 2 h resulted in an accumulation of HIF-1α, which was determined by Western blot analysis, and an increase in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which was determined by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis for mRNA levels and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis for protein levels. The copper chelator tetraethylenepentamine at 25 μM did not significantly affect the accumulation of HIF-1α but blocked increases in VEGF mRNA and protein levels, an effect that could be reversed by the addition of 25 μM copper sulfate (CuSO(4)). In addition, gene silencing of the copper chaperone for Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase blocked VEGF expression with little effect on cobalt-induced HIF-1α accumulation. The present study thus demonstrates that copper was required for cobalt-activated transcriptional activity of HIF-1, although copper did not affect cobalt-induced accumulation of HIF-1α in the cells.

  14. n-Butyrate inhibits Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activation and cytokine transcription in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diakos, Christos; Prieschl, Eva E.; Saeemann, Marcus D.; Boehmig, Georg A.; Csonga, Robert; Sobanov, Yury; Baumruker, Thomas; Zlabinger, Gerhard J. . E-mail: gerhard.zlabinger@meduniwien.ac.at

    2006-10-20

    Mast cells are well known to contribute to type I allergic conditions but only recently have been brought in association with chronic relapsing/remitting autoimmune diseases such as celiac disease and ulcerative colitis. Since the bacterial metabolite n-butyrate is considered to counteract intestinal inflammation we investigated the effects of this short chain fatty acid on mast cell activation. Using RNAse protection assays and reporter gene technology we show that n-butyrate downregulates TNF-{alpha} transcription. This correlates with an impaired activation of the Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) but not other MAP kinases such as ERK and p38 that are largely unaffected by n-butyrate. As a consequence, we observed a decreased nuclear activity of AP-1 and NF-AT transcription factors. These results indicate that n-butyrate inhibits critical inflammatory mediators in mast cells by relatively selectively targeting the JNK signalling.

  15. Design, Assembly, and Characterization of TALE-Based Transcriptional Activators and Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Thakore, Pratiksha I.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are modular DNA-binding proteins that can be fused to a variety of effector domains to regulate the epigenome. Nucleotide recognition by TALE monomers follows a simple cipher, making this a powerful and versatile method to activate or repress gene expression. Described here are methods to design, assemble, and test TALE transcription factors (TALE-TFs) for control of endogenous gene expression. In this protocol, TALE arrays are constructed by Golden Gate cloning and tested for activity by transfection and quantitative RT-PCR. These methods for engineering TALE-TFs are useful for studies in reverse genetics and genomics, synthetic biology, and gene therapy. PMID:26443215

  16. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-11-15

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4{sup +} T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. - Highlights: • X-ray irradiation

  17. Activation of the Escherichia coli marA/soxS/rob regulon in response to transcriptional activator concentration.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robert G; Bartlett, Emily S; Rosner, Judah L; Wall, Michael E

    2008-07-04

    The paralogous transcriptional activators MarA, SoxS, and Rob activate a common set of promoters, the marA/soxS/rob regulon of Escherichia coli, by binding a cognate site (marbox) upstream of each promoter. The extent of activation varies from one promoter to another and is only poorly correlated with the in vitro affinity of the activator for the specific marbox. Here, we examine the dependence of promoter activation on the level of activator in vivo by manipulating the steady-state concentrations of MarA and SoxS in Lon protease mutants and by measuring promoter activation using lacZ transcriptional fusions. We found that: (i) the MarA concentrations needed for half-maximal stimulation varied by at least 19-fold among the 10 promoters tested; (ii) most marboxes were not saturated when there were 24,000 molecules of MarA per cell; (iii) the correlation between the MarA concentration needed for half-maximal promoter activity in vivo and marbox binding affinity in vitro was poor; and (iv) the two activators differed in their promoter activation profiles. The marRAB and sodA promoters could both be saturated by MarA and SoxS in vivo. However, saturation by MarA resulted in greater marRAB and lesser sodA transcription than did saturation by SoxS, implying that the two activators interact with RNA polymerase in different ways at the different promoters. Thus, the concentration and nature of activator determine which regulon promoters are activated, as well as the extent of their activation.

  18. The Calmodulin-Binding Transcription Activator CAMTA1 Is Required for Long-Term Memory Formation in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bas-Orth, Carlos; Tan, Yan-Wei; Oliveira, Ana M. M.; Bengtson, C. Peter; Bading, Hilmar

    2016-01-01

    The formation of long-term memory requires signaling from the synapse to the nucleus to mediate neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription. Synapse-to-nucleus communication is initiated by influx of calcium ions through synaptic NMDA receptors and/or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and involves the activation of transcription factors by…

  19. DNA Damage-induced Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K SUMOylation Regulates p53 Transcriptional Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Pelisch, Federico; Pozzi, Berta; Risso, Guillermo; Muñoz, Manuel Javier; Srebrow, Anabella

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that is a key player in the p53-triggered DNA damage response, acting as a cofactor for p53 in response to DNA damage. hnRNP K is a substrate of the ubiquitin E3 ligase MDM2 and, upon DNA damage, is de-ubiquitylated. In sharp contrast with the role and consequences of the other post-translational modifications, nothing is known about the role of SUMO conjugation to hnRNP K in p53 transcriptional co-activation. In the present work, we show that hnRNP K is modified by SUMO in lysine 422 within its KH3 domain, and sumoylation is regulated by the E3 ligase Pc2/CBX4. Most interestingly, DNA damage stimulates hnRNP K sumoylation through Pc2 E3 activity, and this modification is required for p53 transcriptional activation. Abrogation of hnRNP K sumoylation leads to an aberrant regulation of the p53 target gene p21. Our findings link the DNA damage-induced Pc2 activation to the p53 transcriptional co-activation through hnRNP K sumoylation. PMID:22825850

  20. Myogenic transcriptional activation of MyoD mediated by replication-independent histone deposition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jae-Hyun; Song, Yunkyoung; Seol, Ja-Hwan; Park, Jin Young; Yang, Yong-Jin; Han, Jeung-Whan; Youn, Hong-Duk; Cho, Eun-Jung

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, the canonical histone H3 and the variant H3.3 are assembled into chromatin through replication-coupled and replication-independent (RI) histone deposition pathways, respectively, to play distinct roles in chromatin function. H3.3 is largely associated with transcriptionally active regions via the activity of RI histone chaperone, HIRA. However, the precise role of the RI pathway and HIRA in active transcription and the mechanisms by which H3.3 affects gene activity are not known. In this study, we show that HIRA is an essential factor for muscle development by establishing MyoD activation in myotubes. HIRA and Asf1a, but not CHD1 or Asf1b, mediate H3.3 incorporation in the promoter and the critical upstream regulatory regions of the MyoD gene. HIRA and H3.3 are required for epigenetic transition into the more permissive chromatin structure for polymerase II recruitment to the promoter, regardless of transcription-associated covalent modification of histones. Our results suggest distinct epigenetic management of the master regulator with RI pathway components for cellular differentiation. PMID:21173268

  1. Recognition of enhancer element-specific histone methylation by TIP60 in transcriptional activation

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kwang Won; Kim, Kyunghwan; Situ, Alan Jialun; Ulmer, Tobias S.; An, Woojin; Stallcup, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Many coregulator proteins are recruited by DNA-bound transcription factors to remodel chromatin and activate transcription. However, mechanisms for coordinating actions of multiple coregulator proteins are poorly understood. We demonstrate that multiple protein-protein interactions by protein acetyltransferase TIP60 are required for estrogen-induced transcription of a subset of estrogen receptor (ER) α target genes in human cells. Estrogen-induced recruitment of TIP60 requires direct binding of TIP60 to ERα and the action of chromatin remodeling ATPase BRG1, leading to increased recruitment of histone methyltransferase MLL1 and increased monomethylation of histone H3 at Lys4. TIP60 recruitment also requires preferential binding of the TIP60 chromodomain to histone H3 containing monomethylated Lys4, which marks active and poised enhancer elements. After recruitment, TIP60 increases acetylation of histone H2A at Lys5. Thus, complex cooperation of TIP60 with ERα and other chromatin remodeling enzymes is required for estrogen-induced transcription. PMID:22081016

  2. Transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 transcriptionally suppresses hepatitis B virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jinke; Zhang, Geng; Lin, Yong; Xie, Zhanglian; Liu, Hongyan; Tang, Libo; Lu, Mengji; Yan, Ran; Guo, Haitao; Sun, Jian; Hou, Jinlin; Zhang, Xiaoyong

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) replication in hepatocytes is restricted by the host innate immune system and related intracellular signaling pathways. Transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is a key mediator of toll-like receptors and pro-inflammatory cytokine signaling pathways. Here, we report that silencing or inhibition of endogenous TAK1 in hepatoma cell lines leads to an upregulation of HBV replication, transcription, and antigen expression. In contrast, overexpression of TAK1 significantly suppresses HBV replication, while an enzymatically inactive form of TAK1 exerts no effect. By screening TAK1-associated signaling pathways with inhibitors and siRNAs, we found that the MAPK-JNK pathway was involved in TAK1-mediated HBV suppression. Moreover, TAK1 knockdown or JNK pathway inhibition induced the expression of farnesoid X receptor α, a transcription factor that upregulates HBV transcription. Finally, ectopic expression of TAK1 in a HBV hydrodynamic injection mouse model resulted in lower levels of HBV DNA and antigens in both liver and serum. In conclusion, our data suggest that TAK1 inhibits HBV primarily at viral transcription level through activation of MAPK-JNK pathway, thus TAK1 represents an intrinsic host restriction factor for HBV replication in hepatocytes. PMID:28045080

  3. IQGAP1 Binds to Yes-associated Protein (YAP) and Modulates Its Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Sayedyahossein, Samar; Li, Zhigang; Hedman, Andrew C; Morgan, Chase J; Sacks, David B

    2016-09-09

    During development, the Hippo signaling pathway regulates key physiological processes, such as control of organ size, regeneration, and stem cell biology. Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a major transcriptional co-activator of the Hippo pathway. The scaffold protein IQGAP1 interacts with more than 100 binding partners to integrate diverse signaling pathways. In this study, we report that IQGAP1 binds to YAP and modulates its activity. IQGAP1 and YAP co-immunoprecipitated from cells. In vitro analysis with pure proteins demonstrated a direct interaction between IQGAP1 and YAP. Analysis with multiple fragments of each protein showed that the interaction occurs via the IQ domain of IQGAP1 and the TEAD-binding domain of YAP. The interaction between IQGAP1 and YAP has functional effects. Knock-out of endogenous IQGAP1 significantly increased the formation of nuclear YAP-TEAD complexes. Transcription assays were performed with IQGAP1-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts and HEK293 cells with IQGAP1 knockdown by CRISPR/Cas9. Quantification demonstrated that YAP-TEAD-mediated transcription in cells lacking IQGAP1 was significantly greater than in control cells. These data reveal that IQGAP1 binds to YAP and modulates its co-transcriptional function, suggesting that IQGAP1 participates in Hippo signaling.

  4. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells.

    PubMed

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-11-01

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4(+) T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4(+) T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4(+) T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the "Shock and Kill" strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells.

  5. Identification of Ind transcription activation and repression domains required for dorsoventral patterning of the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Von Ohlen, Tonia L.; Moses, Cade

    2009-01-01

    Specification of cell fates across the dorsoventral axis of the central nervous system in Drosophila involves the subdivision of the neuroectoderm into three domains that give rise to three columns of neural precursor cells called neuroblasts. Ventral nervous system defective (Vnd), Intermediate neuroblasts defective (Ind) and Muscle segment homeobox (Msh) are expressed in the three columns from ventral to dorsal, respectively. The products of these genes play multiple important roles in formation and specification of the embryonic nervous system. Ind for example is known to play roles in two important processes. First, Ind is essential for formation of neuroblasts conjunction with SoxB class transcription factors. Sox class transcription factors are known to specify neural stem cells in vertebrates. Second, Ind plays an important role in patterning the CNS in conjunction with, vnd and msh, which is also similar to how vertebrates pattern their neural tube. This work focuses two important aspects of Ind function. First, we used multiple approaches to identify and characterize specific domains within the protein that confer repressor or activator ability. Currently, little is known about the presence of activation or repression domains within Ind. Here we show that transcriptional repression by Ind requires multiple conserved domains within the protein, and that Ind has a transcriptional activation domain. Specifically, we have identified a novel domain, the Pst domain, that has transcriptional repression ability and appears to act independent of interaction with the co-repressor Groucho. This domain is highly conserved among insect species, but is not found in vertebrate Gsh class homeodomain proteins. Second, we show that Ind can and does repress vnd expression, but does so in a stage specific manner. We conclude from this that the function of Ind in regulating vnd expression is one of refinement and maintenance of the dorsal border. PMID:19348939

  6. A co-activator of nitrogen-regulated transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Soussi-Boudekou, S; André, B

    1999-02-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factors Gln3p and Nil1p of the GATA family play a determinant role in expression of genes that are subject to nitrogen catabolite repression. Here we report the isolation of a new yeast mutant, gan1-1, exhibiting dramatically decreased NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities. The GAN1 gene was cloned and found to encode a 488-amino-acid polypeptide bearing no typical DNA binding domain. Gan1p is required for full expression of GLN1, GDH2 and also other nitrogen utilization genes, including GAP1, PUT4, MEP2 and GDH1. The extent to which Gan1p is required, however, varies according to the gene and to the nitrogen source available. We show that Gan1p is in fact involved in Gln3p- and Nil1p-dependent transcription. In the case of Gln3p-dependent transcription, the degree to which Gan1p is required appears to be gene specific. The contribution of Gan1p to gene expression is also influenced by the nitrogen status of the cell. We found that GAN1 is identical to ADA1, which encodes a component of the ADA/GCN5 co-activator complex. Ada1/Gan1p thus represents the first reported case of an accessory protein (a co-activator) linking the GATA-binding proteins Gln3p and Nil1p, mediating nitrogen-regulated transcription, to the basal transcription machinery.

  7. Alternate RASSF1 Transcripts Control SRC Activity, E-Cadherin Contacts, and YAP-Mediated Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Vlahov, Nikola; Scrace, Simon; Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Grawenda, Anna M.; Bradley, Leanne; Pankova, Daniela; Papaspyropoulos, Angelos; Yee, Karen S.; Buffa, Francesca; Goding, Colin R.; Timpson, Paul; Sibson, Nicola; O’Neill, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tumor progression to invasive carcinoma is associated with activation of SRC family kinase (SRC, YES, FYN) activity and loss of cellular cohesion. The hippo pathway-regulated cofactor YAP1 supports the tumorigenicity of RAS mutations but requires both inactivation of hippo signaling and YES-mediated phosphorylation of YAP1 for oncogenic activity. Exactly how SRC kinases are activated and hippo signaling is lost in sporadic human malignancies remains unknown. Here, we provide evidence that hippo-mediated inhibition of YAP1 is lost upon promoter methylation of the RAS effector and hippo kinase scaffold RASSF1A. We find that RASSF1A promoter methylation reduces YAP phospho-S127, which derepresses YAP1, and actively supports YAP1 activation by switching RASSF1 transcription to the independently transcribed RASSF1C isoform that promotes Tyr kinase activity. Using affinity proteomics, proximity ligation, and real-time molecular visualization, we find that RASSF1C targets SRC/YES to epithelial cell-cell junctions and promotes tyrosine phosphorylation of E-cadherin, β-catenin, and YAP1. RASSF1A restricts SRC activity, preventing motility, invasion, and tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo, with epigenetic inactivation correlating with increased inhibitory pY527-SRC in breast tumors. These data imply that distinct RASSF1 isoforms have opposing functions, which provide a biomarker for YAP1 activation and explain correlations of RASSF1 methylation with advanced invasive disease in humans. The ablation of epithelial integrity together with subsequent YAP1 nuclear localization allows transcriptional activation of β-catenin/TBX-YAP/TEAD target genes, including Myc, and an invasive phenotype. These findings define gene transcript switching as a tumor suppressor mechanism under epigenetic control. PMID:26549256

  8. Benzimidazoles diminish ERE transcriptional activity and cell growth in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Payton-Stewart, Florastina; Tilghman, Syreeta L.; Williams, LaKeisha G.; Winfield, Leyte L.

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The methyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MDA-MB 231 cells. • The naphthyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MCF-7 cells than ICI. • The benzimidazole molecules demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction in ERE transcriptional activity. • The benzimidazole molecules had binding mode in ERα and ERβ comparable to that of the co-crystallized ligand. - Abstract: Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They regulate the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes and mediate numerous estrogen related diseases (i.e., fertility, osteoporosis, cancer, etc.). As such, ERs are potentially useful targets for developing therapies and diagnostic tools for hormonally responsive human breast cancers. In this work, two benzimidazole-based sulfonamides originally designed to reduce proliferation in prostate cancer, have been evaluated for their ability to modulate growth in estrogen dependent and independent cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB 231) using cell viability assays. The molecules reduced growth in MCF-7 cells, but differed in their impact on the growth of MDA-MB 231 cells. Although both molecules reduced estrogen response element (ERE) transcriptional activity in a dose dependent manner, the contrasting activity in the MDA-MB-231 cells seems to suggest that the molecules may act through alternate ER-mediated pathways. Further, the methyl analog showed modest selectivity for the ERβ receptor in an ER gene expression array panel, while the naphthyl analog did not significantly alter gene expression. The molecules were docked in the ligand binding domains of the ERα-antagonist and ERβ-agonist crystal structures to evaluate the potential of the molecules to interact with the receptors. The computational analysis complimented the results obtained in the assay of transcriptional activity and gene expression suggesting that the molecules

  9. O-GlcNAc modification of PPAR{gamma} reduces its transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Suena; Park, Sang Yoon; Roth, Juergen; Kim, Hoe Suk; Cho, Jin Won

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that PPAR{gamma} is modified by O-GlcNAc in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Thr54 of PPAR{gamma}1 is the major O-GlcNAc site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transcriptional activity of PPAR{gamma}1 was decreased on treatment with the OGA inhibitor. -- Abstract: The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is a key regulator of adipogenesis and is important for the homeostasis of the adipose tissue. The {beta}-O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification, a posttranslational modification on various nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins, is involved in the regulation of protein function. Here, we report that PPAR{gamma} is modified by O-GlcNAc in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Mass spectrometric analysis and mutant studies revealed that the threonine 54 of the N-terminal AF-1 domain of PPAR{gamma} is the major O-GlcNAc site. Transcriptional activity of wild type PPAR{gamma} was decreased 30% by treatment with the specific O-GlcNAcase (OGA) inhibitor, but the T54A mutant of PPAR{gamma} did not respond to inhibitor treatment. In 3T3-L1 cells, an increase in O-GlcNAc modification by OGA inhibitor reduced PPAR{gamma} transcriptional activity and terminal adipocyte differentiation. Our results suggest that the O-GlcNAc state of PPAR{gamma} influences its transcriptional activity and is involved in adipocyte differentiation.

  10. Uncoupling RARA transcriptional activation and degradation clarifies the bases for APL response to therapies.

    PubMed

    Ablain, Julien; Leiva, Magdalena; Peres, Laurent; Fonsart, Julien; Anthony, Elodie; de Thé, Hugues

    2013-04-08

    In PML/RARA-driven acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), retinoic acid (RA) induces leukemia cell differentiation and transiently clears the disease. Molecularly, RA activates PML/RARA-dependent transcription and also initiates its proteasome-mediated degradation. In contrast, arsenic, the other potent anti-APL therapy, only induces PML/RARA degradation by specifically targeting its PML moiety. The respective contributions of RA-triggered transcriptional activation and proteolysis to clinical response remain disputed. Here, we identify synthetic retinoids that potently activate RARA- or PML/RARA-dependent transcription, but fail to down-regulate RARA or PML/RARA protein levels. Similar to RA, these uncoupled retinoids elicit terminal differentiation, but unexpectedly fail to impair leukemia-initiating activity of PML/RARA-transformed cells ex vivo or in vivo. Accordingly, the survival benefit conferred by uncoupled retinoids in APL mice is dramatically lower than the one provided by RA. Differentiated APL blasts sorted from uncoupled retinoid-treated mice retain PML/RARA expression and reinitiate APL in secondary transplants. Thus, differentiation is insufficient for APL eradication, whereas PML/RARA loss is essential. These observations unify the modes of action of RA and arsenic and shed light on the potency of their combination in mice or patients.

  11. DNA-recognition by a σ54 transcriptional activator from Aquifex aeolicus

    PubMed Central

    Vidangos, Natasha K.; Heideker, Johanna; Lyubimov, Artem; Lamers, Meindert; Huo, Yixin; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Ton, Jimmy; Gralla, Jay; Berger, James; Wemmer, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription initiation by bacterial σ54-polymerase requires the action of a transcriptional activator protein. Activators bind sequence-specifically upstream of the transcription initiation site via a DNA-binding domain. The structurally characterized DNA-binding domains from activators all belong to the Factor for Inversion Stimulation (Fis) family of helix-turn-helix DNA-binding proteins. We report here structures of the free and DNA-bound forms of the DNA-binding domain of NtrC4 (4DBD) from Aquifex aeolicus, a member of the NtrC family of σ54 activators. Two NtrC4 binding sites were identified upstream (−145 and −85 base pairs) from the start of the lpxC gene, which is responsible for the first committed step in Lipid A biosynthesis. This is the first experimental evidence for σ54 regulation in lpxC expression. 4DBD was crystallized both without DNA and in complex with the −145 binding site. The structures, together with biochemical data, indicate that NtrC4 binds to DNA in a manner that is similar to that of its close homologue, Fis. The greater sequence specificity for the binding of 4DBD relative to Fis seems to arise from a larger number of base specific contacts contributing to affinity than for Fis. PMID:25158097

  12. SUMOylation regulates the transcriptional repression activity of FOG-2 and its association with GATA-4.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, José; Jiang, Xing-Mai; Carter, Daniel R; Khachigian, Levon M; Chong, Beng H

    2012-01-01

    Friend of GATA 2 (FOG-2), a co-factor of several GATA transcription factors (GATA-4, -5 and 6), is a critical regulator of coronary vessel formation and heart morphogenesis. Here we demonstrate that FOG-2 is SUMOylated and that this modification modulates its transcriptional activity. FOG-2 SUMOylation occurs at four lysine residues (K324, 471, 915, 955) [corrected]. Three of these residues are part of the characteristic SUMO consensus site (ψKXE), while K955 is found in the less frequent TKXE motif. Absence of SUMOylation did not affect FOG-2's nuclear localization. However, mutation of the FOG-2 SUMOylation sites, or de-SUMOylation, with SENP-1 or SENP-8 resulted in stronger transcriptional repression activity in both heterologous cells and cardiomyocytes. Conversely, increased FOG-2 SUMOylation by overexpression of SUMO-1 or expression of a SUMO-1-FOG-2 fusion protein rendered FOG-2 incapable of repressing GATA-4-mediated activation of the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) promoter. Moreover, we demonstrate both increased interaction between a FOG-2 SUMO mutant and GATA-4 and enhanced SUMOylation of wild-type FOG-2 by co-expression of GATA-4. These data suggest a new dynamics in which GATA-4 may alter the activity of FOG-2 by influencing its SUMOylation status.

  13. Uncoupling RARA transcriptional activation and degradation clarifies the bases for APL response to therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ablain, Julien; Leiva, Magdalena; Peres, Laurent; Fonsart, Julien; Anthony, Elodie

    2013-01-01

    In PML/RARA-driven acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), retinoic acid (RA) induces leukemia cell differentiation and transiently clears the disease. Molecularly, RA activates PML/RARA-dependent transcription and also initiates its proteasome-mediated degradation. In contrast, arsenic, the other potent anti-APL therapy, only induces PML/RARA degradation by specifically targeting its PML moiety. The respective contributions of RA-triggered transcriptional activation and proteolysis to clinical response remain disputed. Here, we identify synthetic retinoids that potently activate RARA- or PML/RARA-dependent transcription, but fail to down-regulate RARA or PML/RARA protein levels. Similar to RA, these uncoupled retinoids elicit terminal differentiation, but unexpectedly fail to impair leukemia-initiating activity of PML/RARA-transformed cells ex vivo or in vivo. Accordingly, the survival benefit conferred by uncoupled retinoids in APL mice is dramatically lower than the one provided by RA. Differentiated APL blasts sorted from uncoupled retinoid–treated mice retain PML/RARA expression and reinitiate APL in secondary transplants. Thus, differentiation is insufficient for APL eradication, whereas PML/RARA loss is essential. These observations unify the modes of action of RA and arsenic and shed light on the potency of their combination in mice or patients. PMID:23509325

  14. In vivo bioimaging with tissue-specific transcription factor activated luciferase reporters

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Suzanne M. K.; Delhove, Juliette M. K. M.; Perocheau, Dany P.; Karda, Rajvinder; Rahim, Ahad A.; Howe, Steven J.; Ward, Natalie J.; Birrell, Mark A.; Belvisi, Maria G.; Arbuthnot, Patrick; Johnson, Mark R.; Waddington, Simon N.; McKay, Tristan R.

    2015-01-01

    The application of transcription factor activated luciferase reporter cassettes in vitro is widespread but potential for in vivo application has not yet been realized. Bioluminescence imaging enables non-invasive tracking of gene expression in transfected tissues of living rodents. However the mature immune response limits luciferase expression when delivered in adulthood. We present a novel approach of tissue-targeted delivery of transcription factor activated luciferase reporter lentiviruses to neonatal rodents as an alternative to the existing technology of generating germline transgenic light producing rodents. At this age, neonates acquire immune tolerance to the conditionally responsive luciferase reporter. This simple and transferrable procedure permits surrogate quantitation of transcription factor activity over the lifetime of the animal. We show principal efficacy by temporally quantifying NFκB activity in the brain, liver and lungs of somatotransgenic reporter mice subjected to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation. This response is ablated in Tlr4−/− mice or when co-administered with the anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone. Furthermore, we show the malleability of this technology by quantifying NFκB-mediated luciferase expression in outbred rats. Finally, we use somatotransgenic bioimaging to longitudinally quantify LPS- and ActivinA-induced upregulation of liver specific glucocorticoid receptor and Smad2/3 reporter constructs in somatotransgenic mice, respectively. PMID:26138224

  15. FHL2 mediates p53-induced transcriptional activation through a direct association with HIPK2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Wang . E-mail: umsj@sejong.ac.kr

    2006-01-27

    To understand the molecular mechanism underlying HIPK2 regulation of the transcriptional activation by p53, we sought to identify the protein that interacts with HIPK2. From our yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that four and a half LIM domains 2 (FHL2) could bind to the C-terminal half of HIPK2. Further assays in yeast mapped the minimal interaction domain to amino acids 812-907 in HIPK2. The interaction was confirmed using a GST pull-down assay in vitro, and an immunoprecipitation (IP) assay and fluorescence microscopy in vivo. FHL2 alone spread throughout both the cytoplasm and nucleus but was redistributed to dot-like structures in the nucleus when HIPK2 was coexpressed in HEK293 cells. When tethered to the Gal4-responsive promoter through the Gal4 DBD fusion, FHL2 showed autonomous transcriptional activity that was enhanced by wild-type HIPK2, but not by the kinase-defective mutant. In addition, FHL2 increased the p53-dependent transcriptional activation and had an additive effect on the activation when coexpressed with HIPK2, which was again not observed with the kinase-defective mutant of HIPK2. Finally, we found a ternary complex of p53, HIPK2, and FHL2 using IP, and their recruitment to the p53-responsive p21Waf1 promoter in chromatin IP assays. Overall, our findings indicate that FHL2 can also regulate p53 via a direct association with HIPK2.

  16. The activating transcription factor 3 protein suppresses the oncogenic function of mutant p53 proteins.

    PubMed

    Wei, Saisai; Wang, Hongbo; Lu, Chunwan; Malmut, Sarah; Zhang, Jianqiao; Ren, Shumei; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Wei; Tang, Dale D; Yan, Chunhong

    2014-03-28

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) often acquire oncogenic activities, conferring drug resistance and/or promoting cancer cell migration and invasion. Although it has been well established that such a gain of function is mainly achieved through interaction with transcriptional regulators, thereby modulating cancer-associated gene expression, how the mutp53 function is regulated remains elusive. Here we report that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) bound common mutp53 (e.g. R175H and R273H) and, subsequently, suppressed their oncogenic activities. ATF3 repressed mutp53-induced NFKB2 expression and sensitized R175H-expressing cancer cells to cisplatin and etoposide treatments. Moreover, ATF3 appeared to suppress R175H- and R273H-mediated cancer cell migration and invasion as a consequence of preventing the transcription factor p63 from inactivation by mutp53. Accordingly, ATF3 promoted the expression of the metastasis suppressor SHARP1 in mutp53-expressing cells. An ATF3 mutant devoid of the mutp53-binding domain failed to disrupt the mutp53-p63 binding and, thus, lost the activity to suppress mutp53-mediated migration, suggesting that ATF3 binds to mutp53 to suppress its oncogenic function. In line with these results, we found that down-regulation of ATF3 expression correlated with lymph node metastasis in TP53-mutated human lung cancer. We conclude that ATF3 can suppress mutp53 oncogenic function, thereby contributing to tumor suppression in TP53-mutated cancer.

  17. Erythroblast transformation by FLI-1 depends upon its specific DNA binding and transcriptional activation properties.

    PubMed

    Ano, Sabine; Pereira, Rui; Pironin, Martine; Lesault, Isabelle; Milley, Caroline; Lebigot, Ingrid; Quang, Christine Tran; Ghysdael, Jacques

    2004-01-23

    FLI-1 is a transcriptional regulator of the ETS family of proteins. Insertional activation at the FLI-1 locus is an early event in F-murine leukemia virus-induced erythroleukemia. Consistent with its essential role in erythroid transformation, enforced expression of FLI-1 in primary erythroblasts strongly impairs the response of these cells to erythropoietin (Epo), a cytokine essential to erythropoiesis. We show here that point mutations in the ETS domain that abolished FLI-1 binding to specific DNA elements (ETS-binding sites) suppressed the ability of FLI-1 to transform erythroblasts. The exchange of the entire ETS domain (DNA binding domain) of FLI-1 for that of PU.1 changed the DNA binding specificity of FLI-1 for that of PU.1 and impaired FLI-1 transforming properties. In contrast, ETS domain swapping mutants that maintained the DNA binding specificity of FLI-1 did not affect the ability of FLI-1 to transform erythroblasts. Deletion and swapping mutants that failed to inhibit the DNA binding activity of FLI-1 but impaired its transcriptional activation properties were also transformation-defective. Taken together, these results show that both the ability of FLI-1 to inhibit Epo-induced differentiation of erythroblasts and to confer enhanced cell survival in the absence of Epo critically depend upon FLI-1 ETS-binding site-dependent transcriptional activation properties.

  18. DNA Recognition by a σ54 Transcriptional Activator from Aquifex aeolicus

    SciTech Connect

    Vidangos, Natasha K.; Heideker, Johanna; Lyubimov, Artem; Lamers, Meindert; Huo, Yixin; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Ton, Jimmy; Gralla, Jay; Berger, James; Wemmer, David E.

    2014-08-23

    Transcription initiation by bacterial σ54-polymerase requires the action of a transcriptional activator protein. Activators bind sequence-specifically upstream of the transcription initiation site via a DNA-binding domain. The structurally characterized DNA-binding domains from activators all belong to the Factor for Inversion Stimulation (Fis) family of helix-turn-helix DNA-binding proteins. We report here structures of the free and DNA-bound forms of the DNA-binding domain of NtrC4 (4DBD) from Aquifex aeolicus, a member of the NtrC family of σ54 activators. Two NtrC4 binding sites were identified upstream (-145 and -85 base pairs) from the start of the lpxC gene, which is responsible for the first committed step in Lipid A biosynthesis. This is the first experimental evidence for σ54 regulation in lpxC expression. 4DBD was crystallized both without DNA and in complex with the -145 binding site. The structures, together with biochemical data, indicate that NtrC4 binds to DNA in a manner that is similar to that of its close homologue, Fis. Ultimately, the greater sequence specificity for the binding of 4DBD relative to Fis seems to arise from a larger number of base specific contacts contributing to affinity than for Fis.

  19. DNA Recognition by a σ54 Transcriptional Activator from Aquifex aeolicus

    DOE PAGES

    Vidangos, Natasha K.; Heideker, Johanna; Lyubimov, Artem; ...

    2014-08-23

    Transcription initiation by bacterial σ54-polymerase requires the action of a transcriptional activator protein. Activators bind sequence-specifically upstream of the transcription initiation site via a DNA-binding domain. The structurally characterized DNA-binding domains from activators all belong to the Factor for Inversion Stimulation (Fis) family of helix-turn-helix DNA-binding proteins. We report here structures of the free and DNA-bound forms of the DNA-binding domain of NtrC4 (4DBD) from Aquifex aeolicus, a member of the NtrC family of σ54 activators. Two NtrC4 binding sites were identified upstream (-145 and -85 base pairs) from the start of the lpxC gene, which is responsible for themore » first committed step in Lipid A biosynthesis. This is the first experimental evidence for σ54 regulation in lpxC expression. 4DBD was crystallized both without DNA and in complex with the -145 binding site. The structures, together with biochemical data, indicate that NtrC4 binds to DNA in a manner that is similar to that of its close homologue, Fis. Ultimately, the greater sequence specificity for the binding of 4DBD relative to Fis seems to arise from a larger number of base specific contacts contributing to affinity than for Fis.« less

  20. Genetic factors affecting gene transcription and catalytic activity of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases in human liver.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanqing; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Gamazon, Eric R; Mirkov, Snezana; Chen, Peixian; Wu, Kehua; Sun, Chang; Cox, Nancy J; Cook, Edwin; Das, Soma; Ratain, Mark J

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to discover cis- and trans-acting factors significantly affecting mRNA expression and catalytic activity of human hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). Transcription levels of five major hepatic UGT1A (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A6 and UGT1A9) and five UGT2B (UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B10, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17) genes were quantified in human liver tissue samples (n = 125) using real-time PCR. Glucuronidation activities of 14 substrates were measured in 47 livers. We genotyped 167 tagSNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) in UGT1A (n = 43) and UGT2B (n = 124), as well as the known functional UGT1A1*28 and UGT2B17 CNV (copy number variation) polymorphisms. Transcription levels of 15 transcription factors (TFs) known to regulate these UGTs were quantified. We found that UGT expression and activity were highly variable among the livers (median and range of coefficient of variations: 135%, 74-217% and 52%, 39-105%, respectively). CAR, PXR and ESR1 were found to be the most important trans-regulators of UGT transcription (median and range of correlation coefficients: 46%, 6-58%; 47%, 9-58%; and 52%, 24-75%, respectively). Hepatic UGT activities were mainly determined by UGT gene transcription levels. Twenty-one polymorphisms were significantly (FDR-adjusted P < 0.05) associated with mRNA expression and/or activities of UGT1A1, UGT1A3 and UGT2B17. We found novel SNPs in the UGT2B17 CNV region accounting for variability in UGT2B17 gene transcription and testosterone glucuronidation rate, in addition to that attributable to the UGT2B17 CNV. Our study discovered novel pharmacogenetic markers and provided detailed insight into the genetic network regulating hepatic UGTs.

  1. Protein engineering of the transcriptional activator FhlA To enhance hydrogen production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Torres, Viviana; Maeda, Toshinari; Wood, Thomas K

    2009-09-01

    Escherichia coli produces H(2) from formate via the formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) complex during mixed acid fermentation; the FHL complex consists of formate dehydrogenase H (encoded by fdhF) for forming 2H(+), 2e(-), and CO(2) from formate and hydrogenase 3 (encoded by hycGE) for synthesizing H(2) from 2H(+) and 2e(-). FHL protein production is activated by the sigma(54) transcriptional activator FhlA, which activates transcription of fdhF and the hyc, hyp, and hydN-hypF operons. Here, through random mutagenesis using error-prone PCR over the whole gene, as well as over the fhlA region encoding the first 388 amino acids of the 692-amino-acid protein, we evolved FhlA to increase H(2) production. The amino acid replacements in FhlA133 (Q11H, L14V, Y177F, K245R, M288K, and I342F) increased hydrogen production ninefold, and the replacements in FhlA1157 (M6T, S35T, L113P, S146C, and E363K) increased hydrogen production fourfold. Saturation mutagenesis at the codons corresponding to the amino acid replacements in FhlA133 and at position E363 identified the importance of position L14 and of E363 for the increased activity; FhlA with replacements L14G and E363G increased hydrogen production (fourfold and sixfold, respectively) compared to FhlA. Whole-transcriptome and promoter reporter constructs revealed that the mechanism by which the FhlA133 changes increase hydrogen production is by increasing transcription of all of the genes activated by FhlA (the FHL complex). With FhlA133, transcription of P(fdhF) and P(hyc) is less sensitive to formate regulation, and with FhlA363 (E363G), P(hyc) transcription increases but P(hyp) transcription decreases and hydrogen production is less affected by the repressor HycA.

  2. Myb and Ets proteins cooperate in transcriptional activation of the mim-1 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, H; Tantravahi, R V; Rao, V N; Reddy, E S; Reddy, E P

    1992-01-01

    In the generation of the acutely transforming avian retrovirus E26, both myb and ets genes have been transduced, leading to the production of a Gag-Myb-Ets fusion protein. This co-occurrence of v-myb and v-ets oncogenes suggests that the two might have a functional relationship. To look for such a relationship, we tested the transcriptional activation activity of Myb alone or with coexpressed Ets-1 or Ets-2. Using the promoter of the v-Myb-inducible mim-1 gene as a target, we found that full-length c-Myb gene products were poor activators of transcription, while an oncogenic (truncated) form of this protein was a strong trans-activator. However, coexpression of Ets-2 with full-length or truncated forms of Myb greatly increased trans-activation. Coexpression of Ets-1, Fos, Jun, or Myc with Myb did not increase trans-activation of the mim-1 promoter. The ability of Myb and Ets-2 to transactivate was cooperative, since Ets-2 alone gave little or no activation. Bacterially synthesized Ets-2 protein was found to bind specifically to the mim-1 promoter, suggesting that it may be a target for both Myb and Ets proteins. Thus, Myb and Ets proteins can cooperate in transcriptional activation, and their co-occurrence in the E26 virus may reflect a functional relationship between these two oncoproteins. Truncated forms of Myb may have a reduced need for cooperating factors such as Ets-2, and this might constitute an important mechanism associated with oncogenic activation. Images PMID:1741383

  3. C. elegans GLP-1/Notch activates transcription in a probability gradient across the germline stem cell pool

    PubMed Central

    Lee, ChangHwan; Sorensen, Erika B; Lynch, Tina R; Kimble, Judith

    2016-01-01

    C. elegans Notch signaling maintains a pool of germline stem cells within their single-celled mesenchymal niche. Here we investigate the Notch transcriptional response in germline stem cells using single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled with automated, high-throughput quantitation. This approach allows us to distinguish Notch-dependent nascent transcripts in the nucleus from mature mRNAs in the cytoplasm. We find that Notch-dependent active transcription sites occur in a probabilistic fashion and, unexpectedly, do so in a steep gradient across the stem cell pool. Yet these graded nuclear sites create a nearly uniform field of mRNAs that extends beyond the region of transcriptional activation. Therefore, active transcription sites provide a precise view of where the Notch-dependent transcriptional complex is productively engaged. Our findings offer a new window into the Notch transcriptional response and demonstrate the importance of assaying nascent transcripts at active transcription sites as a readout for canonical signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18370.001 PMID:27705743

  4. Identification of the sequences recognized by phage phi 29 transcriptional activator: possible interaction between the activator and the RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Nuez, B; Rojo, F; Barthelemy, I; Salas, M

    1991-05-11

    Expression of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 late genes requires the transcriptional activator protein p4. This activator binds to a region of the late A3 promoter spanning nucleotides -56 to -102 relative to the transcription start site, generating a strong bending Tin the DNA. In this work the target sequences recognized by protein p4 in the phage phi 29 late A3 promoter have been characterized. The binding of protein p4 to derivatives of the late A3 promoter harbouring deletions in the protein p4 binding site has been studied. When protein p4 recognition sequences were altered, the activator could only bind to the promoter in the presence of RNA polymerase. This strong cooperativity in the binding of protein p4 and RNA polymerase to the promoter suggests the presence of direct protein-protein contacts between them.

  5. Generation of knockout rabbits using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Fan, Nana; Song, Jun; Zhong, Juan; Guo, Xiaogang; Tian, Weihua; Zhang, Quanjun; Cui, Fenggong; Li, Li; Newsome, Philip N; Frampton, Jon; Esteban, Miguel A; Lai, Liangxue

    2014-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases are novel gene-editing platforms contributing to redefine the boundaries of modern biological research. They are composed of a non-specific cleavage domain and a tailor made DNA-binding module, which enables a broad range of genetic modifications by inducing efficient DNA double-strand breaks at desired loci. Among other remarkable uses, these nucleases have been employed to produce gene knockouts in mid-size and large animals, such as rabbits and pigs, respectively. This approach is cost effective, relatively quick, and can produce invaluable models for human disease studies, biotechnology or agricultural purposes. Here we describe a protocol for the efficient generation of knockout rabbits using transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and a perspective of the field.

  6. Transcriptionally active chromatin recruits homologous recombination at DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Aymard, François; Bugler, Beatrix; Schmidt, Christine K; Guillou, Emmanuelle; Caron, Pierre; Briois, Sébastien; Iacovoni, Jason S; Daburon, Virginie; Miller, Kyle M; Jackson, Stephen P; Legube, Gaëlle

    2014-04-01

    Although both homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining can repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), the mechanisms by which one of these pathways is chosen over the other remain unclear. Here we show that transcriptionally active chromatin is preferentially repaired by HR. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) to analyze repair of multiple DSBs induced throughout the human genome, we identify an HR-prone subset of DSBs that recruit the HR protein RAD51, undergo resection and rely on RAD51 for efficient repair. These DSBs are located in actively transcribed genes and are targeted to HR repair via the transcription elongation-associated mark trimethylated histone H3 K36. Concordantly, depletion of SETD2, the main H3 K36 trimethyltransferase, severely impedes HR at such DSBs. Our study thereby demonstrates a primary role in DSB repair of the chromatin context in which a break occurs.

  7. Transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, Ksenia; Kayumov, Airat; Woyda, Kathrin; Ilinskaja, Olga; Forchhammer, Karl

    2013-05-02

    The Bacillus subtilis glutamine synthetase (GS) plays a dual role in cell metabolism by functioning as catalyst and regulator. GS catalyses the ATP-dependent synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonium. Under nitrogen-rich conditions, GS becomes feedback-inhibited by high intracellular glutamine levels and then binds transcription factors GlnR and TnrA, which control the genes of nitrogen assimilation. While GS-bound TnrA is no longer able to interact with DNA, GlnR-DNA binding is shown to be stimulated by GS complex formation. In this paper we show a new physiological feature of the interaction between glutamine synthetase and TnrA. The transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in vivo and in vitro, while the GlnR protein does not affect the activity of the enzyme.

  8. Transcript degradation and noise of small RNA-controlled genes in a switch activated network in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Tal, Asaf; Parasar, Bibudha; Dym, Alvah; Costantino, Nina; Muñoz-García, Javier; Court, Donald L; Stavans, Joel

    2016-08-19

    Post-transcriptional regulatory processes may change transcript levels and affect cell-to-cell variability or noise. We study small-RNA downregulation to elucidate its effects on noise in the iron homeostasis network of Escherichia coli In this network, the small-RNA RyhB undergoes stoichiometric degradation with the transcripts of target genes in response to iron stress. Using single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization, we measured transcript numbers of the RyhB-regulated genes sodB and fumA in individual cells as a function of iron deprivation. We observed a monotonic increase of noise with iron stress but no evidence of theoretically predicted, enhanced stoichiometric fluctuations in transcript numbers, nor of bistable behavior in transcript distributions. Direct detection of RyhB in individual cells shows that its noise is much smaller than that of these two targets, when RyhB production is significant. A generalized two-state model of bursty transcription that neglects RyhB fluctuations describes quantitatively the dependence of noise and transcript distributions on iron deprivation, enabling extraction of in vivo RyhB-mediated transcript degradation rates. The transcripts' threshold-linear behavior indicates that the effective in vivo interaction strength between RyhB and its two target transcripts is comparable. Strikingly, the bacterial cell response exhibits Fur-dependent, switch-like activation instead of a graded response to iron deprivation.

  9. Role of oxidants in NF-kappa B activation and TNF-alpha gene transcription induced by hypoxia and endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Chandel, N S; Trzyna, W C; McClintock, D S; Schumacker, P T

    2000-07-15

    The transcription factor NF-kappa B stimulates the transcription of proinflammatory cytokines including TNF-alpha. LPS (endotoxin) and hypoxia both induce NF-kappa B activation and TNF-alpha gene transcription. Furthermore, hypoxia augments LPS induction of TNF-alpha mRNA. Previous reports have indicated that antioxidants abolish NF-kappa B activation in response to LPS or hypoxia, which suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in NF-kappa B activation. This study tested whether mitochondrial ROS are required for both NF-kappaB activation and the increase in TNF-alpha mRNA levels during hypoxia and LPS. Our results indicate that hypoxia (1.5% O2) stimulates NF-kappa B and TNF-alpha gene transcription and increases ROS generation as measured by the oxidant sensitive dye 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate in murine macrophage J774.1 cells. The antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and pyrrolidinedithiocarbamic acid abolished the hypoxic activation of NF-kappa B, TNF-alpha gene transcription, and increases in ROS levels. Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I, abolished the increase in ROS signal, the activation of NF-kappa B, and TNF-alpha gene transcription during hypoxia. LPS stimulated NF-kappa B and TNF-alpha gene transcription but not ROS generation in J774.1 cells. Rotenone, pyrrolidinedithiocarbamic acid, and N-acetylcysteine had no effect on the LPS stimulation of NF-kappa B and TNF-alpha gene transcription, indicating that LPS activates NF-kappa B and TNF-alpha gene transcription through a ROS-independent mechanism. These results indicate that mitochondrial ROS are required for the hypoxic activation of NF-kappa B and TNF-alpha gene transcription, but not for the LPS activation of NF-kappa B.

  10. An active nuclear retention signal in the glucocorticoid receptor functions as a strong inducer of transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Carrigan, Amanda; Walther, Rhian F; Salem, Houssein Abdou; Wu, Dongmei; Atlas, Ella; Lefebvre, Yvonne A; Haché, Robert J G

    2007-04-13

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) cycles between a naive chaperone-complexed form in the cytoplasm and a transcriptionally active steroid-bound nuclear form. Nuclear import of GR occurs rapidly and is mediated through the importin alpha/beta karyopherin import pathway. By contrast, nuclear export of GR occurs only slowly under most conditions, despite a dependence on active signaling. In this study we have defined a nuclear retention signal (NRS) in the hinge region of GR that actively opposes the nuclear export of GR as well as the nuclear export mediated through an ectopic CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal (NES). The GR NRS overlaps closely with the basic NL1 nuclear localization signal (NLS) but can be distinguished from NL1 by targeted mutagenesis. Substitution of the classical NLS from SV40 T antigen for the GR NL1 results in a receptor in which nuclear export is accelerated. Remarkably, although the SV40-modified GR remains predominantly nuclear in the presence of steroid and is recruited to transcriptional regulatory regions indistinguishably from wild-type GR, the substitution dramatically weakens the ability of GR to activate transcription of a mouse mammary tumor virus reporter gene. These results suggest that active nuclear retention of GR plays an integral role in glucocorticoid signaling.

  11. Cyclin C regulates adipogenesis by stimulating transcriptional activity of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha.

    PubMed

    Song, Ziyi; Xiaoli, Alus M; Zhang, Quanwei; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Ellen S T; Wang, Sven; Chang, Rui; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Yang, Gongshe; Strich, Randy; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Yang, Fajun

    2017-03-28

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is important for maintaining energy homeostasis and adaptive thermogenesis in rodents and humans. As disorders arising from dysregulated energy metabolism, such as obesity and metabolic diseases, have increased, so has interest in the molecular mechanisms in adipocyte biology. Using a functional screen, we identified cyclin C (CycC), a conserved subunit of the Mediator complex, as a novel regulator for brown adipocyte formation. siRNA-mediated CycC knockdown (KD) in brown preadipocytes impaired the early transcriptional program of differentiation, and genetic knockout (KO) of CycC completely blocked the differentiation process. RNA-seq analyses of CycC-KD revealed a critical role of CycC in activating genes co-regulated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPα). Overexpression of PPARγ2 or addition of the PPARγ ligand rosiglitazone rescued the defects in CycC-KO brown preadipocytes, and efficiently activated the PPARγ-responsive promoters in both wild-type (WT) and CycC-KO cells, suggesting that CycC is not essential for PPARγ transcriptional activity. In contrast, CycC-KO significantly reduced C/EBPα-dependent gene expression. Unlike for PPARγ, overexpression of C/EBPα could not induce C/EBPα target gene expression in CycC-KO cells or rescue the CycC-KO defects in brown adipogenesis, suggesting that CycC is essential for C/EBPα-mediated gene activation. CycC physically interacted with C/EBPα and this interaction was required for C/EBPα transactivation domain activity. Consistent with the role of C/EBPα in white adipogenesis, CycC-KD also inhibited differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells into white adipocytes. Together, these data indicate that CycC activates adipogenesis by stimulating the transcriptional activity of C/EBPα.

  12. POZ domain transcription factor, FBI-1, represses transcription of ADH5/FDH by interacting with the zinc finger and interfering with DNA binding activity of Sp1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Kee; Suh, Dongchul; Edenberg, Howard J; Hur, Man-Wook

    2002-07-26

    The POZ domain is a protein-protein interaction motif that is found in many transcription factors, which are important for development, oncogenesis, apoptosis, and transcription repression. We cloned the POZ domain transcription factor, FBI-1, that recognizes the cis-element (bp -38 to -22) located just upstream of the core Sp1 binding sites (bp -22 to +22) of the ADH5/FDH minimal promoter (bp -38 to +61) in vitro and in vivo, as revealed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. The ADH5/FDH minimal promoter is potently repressed by the FBI-1. Glutathione S-transferase fusion protein pull-down showed that the POZ domains of FBI-1, Plzf, and Bcl-6 directly interact with the zinc finger DNA binding domain of Sp1. DNase I footprinting assays showed that the interaction prevents binding of Sp1 to the GC boxes of the ADH5/FDH promoter. Gal4-POZ domain fusions targeted proximal to the GC boxes repress transcription of the Gal4 upstream activator sequence-Sp1-adenovirus major late promoter. Our data suggest that POZ domain represses transcription by interacting with Sp1 zinc fingers and by interfering with the DNA binding activity of Sp1.

  13. Wavelet-based detection of transcriptional activity on a novel Staphylococcus aureus tiling microarray

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High-density oligonucleotide microarray is an appropriate technology for genomic analysis, and is particulary useful in the generation of transcriptional maps, ChIP-on-chip studies and re-sequencing of the genome.Transcriptome analysis of tiling microarray data facilitates the discovery of novel transcripts and the assessment of differential expression in diverse experimental conditions. Although new technologies such as next-generation sequencing have appeared, microarrays might still be useful for the study of small genomes or for the analysis of genomic regions with custom microarrays due to their lower price and good accuracy in expression quantification. Results Here, we propose a novel wavelet-based method, named ZCL (zero-crossing lines), for the combined denoising and segmentation of tiling signals. The denoising is performed with the classical SUREshrink method and the detection of transcriptionally active regions is based on the computation of the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT). In particular, the detection of the transitions is implemented as the thresholding of the zero-crossing lines. The algorithm described has been applied to the public Saccharomyces cerevisiae dataset and it has been compared with two well-known algorithms: pseudo-median sliding window (PMSW) and the structural change model (SCM). As a proof-of-principle, we applied the ZCL algorithm to the analysis of the custom tiling microarray hybridization results of a S. aureus mutant deficient in the sigma B transcription factor. The challenge was to identify those transcripts whose expression decreases in the absence of sigma B. Conclusions The proposed method archives the best performance in terms of positive predictive value (PPV) while its sensitivity is similar to the other algorithms used for the comparison. The computation time needed to process the transcriptional signals is low as compared with model-based methods and in the same range to those based on the use of

  14. Overcoming transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA binding domain sensitivity to cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Valton, Julien; Dupuy, Aurélie; Daboussi, Fayza; Thomas, Séverine; Maréchal, Alan; Macmaster, Rachel; Melliand, Kevin; Juillerat, Alexandre; Duchateau, Philippe

    2012-11-09

    Within the past 2 years, transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA binding domains have emerged as the new generation of engineerable platform for production of custom DNA binding domains. However, their recently described sensitivity to cytosine methylation represents a major bottleneck for genome engineering applications. Using a combination of biochemical, structural, and cellular approaches, we were able to identify the molecular basis of such sensitivity and propose a simple, drug-free, and universal method to overcome it.

  15. FLASH interacts with p160 coactivator subtypes and differentially suppresses transcriptional activity of steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Kino, Tomoshige; Ichijo, Takamasa; Chrousos, George P

    2004-12-01

    We previously reported that tumor necrosis factor alpha receptor- and Fas-associated FLASH interacts with one of the p160 nuclear receptor coactivators, glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein (GRIP) 1, at its nuclear receptor-binding (NRB) domain, and that inhibits the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) by interfering with association of GR and GRIP1. Here, we further examined the specificity of FLASH suppressive effect and the physical/functional interactions between this protein and two other p160 family subtypes. The suppressive effect of FLASH on GR transactivation was observed in several cell lines and on the chromatin-integrated mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter. FLASH strongly interacted with the NRB domain of the thyroid hormone receptor activator molecule (TRAM) 1, a member of the steroid hormone receptor coactivator (SRC) 3/nuclear receptor coactivator (N-CoA) 3 subtypes, as well as with SRC2/N-CoA2 p160 coactivator GRIP1, while its interaction with SRC1a, one of the SRC1/N-CoA1 proteins, was faint in yeast two-hybrid assays. Accordingly, FLASH strongly suppressed TRAM1- and GRIP1-induced enhancement of GR-stimulated transactivation of the MMTV promoter in HCT116 cells, while it did not affect SRC1a-induced potentiation of transcription. Furthermore, FLASH suppressed androgen- and progesterone receptor-induced transcriptional activity, but did not influence estrogen receptor-induced transactivation, possibly due to their preferential use of p160 coactivators in HCT116 and HeLa cells. Thus, FLASH differentially suppresses steroid hormone receptor-induced transcriptional activity by interfering with their association with SRC2/N-CoA2 and SRC3/N-CoA3 but not with SRC1/N-CoA1.

  16. Insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity through interrogation of cis elements disrupted in human erythroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Aoi; Ulirsch, Jacob C; Ludwig, Leif S; Fiorini, Claudia; Yasuda, Makiko; Choudhuri, Avik; McDonel, Patrick; Zon, Leonard I; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2016-04-19

    Whole-exome sequencing has been incredibly successful in identifying causal genetic variants and has revealed a number of novel genes associated with blood and other diseases. One limitation of this approach is that it overlooks mutations in noncoding regulatory elements. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which mutations in transcriptionalcis-regulatory elements result in disease remain poorly understood. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to interrogate three such elements harboring mutations in human erythroid disorders, which in all cases are predicted to disrupt a canonical binding motif for the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA1. Deletions of as few as two to four nucleotides resulted in a substantial decrease (>80%) in target gene expression. Isolated deletions of the canonical GATA1 binding motif completely abrogated binding of the cofactor TAL1, which binds to a separate motif. Having verified the functionality of these three GATA1 motifs, we demonstrate strong evolutionary conservation of GATA1 motifs in regulatory elements proximal to other genes implicated in erythroid disorders, and show that targeted disruption of such elements results in altered gene expression. By modeling transcription factor binding patterns, we show that multiple transcription factors are associated with erythroid gene expression, and have created predictive maps modeling putative disruptions of their binding sites at key regulatory elements. Our study provides insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity and may prove a useful resource for investigating the pathogenicity of noncoding variants in human erythroid disorders.

  17. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G.; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H.; Goodman, Myron F.; Rueda, David

    2015-12-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ~5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer.

  18. Post-transcription initiation function of the ubiquitous SAGA complex in tissue-specific gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Weake, Vikki M.; Dyer, Jamie O.; Seidel, Christopher; Box, Andrew; Swanson, Selene K.; Peak, Allison; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Abmayr, Susan M.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2011-01-01

    The Spt–Ada–Gcn5–acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex was discovered from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and has been well characterized as an important transcriptional coactivator that interacts both with sequence-specific transcription factors and the TATA-binding protein TBP. SAGA contains a histone acetyltransferase and a ubiquitin protease. In metazoans, SAGA is essential for development, yet little is known about the function of SAGA in differentiating tissue. We analyzed the composition, interacting proteins, and genomic distribution of SAGA in muscle and neuronal tissue of late stage Drosophila melanogaster embryos. The subunit composition of SAGA was the same in each tissue; however, SAGA was associated with considerably more transcription factors in muscle compared with neurons. Consistent with this finding, SAGA was found to occupy more genes specifically in muscle than in neurons. Strikingly, SAGA occupancy was not limited to enhancers and promoters but primarily colocalized with RNA polymerase II within transcribed sequences. SAGA binding peaks at the site of RNA polymerase pausing at the 5′ end of transcribed sequences. In addition, many tissue-specific SAGA-bound genes required its ubiquitin protease activity for full expression. These data indicate that in metazoans SAGA plays a prominent post-transcription initiation role in tissue-specific gene expression. PMID:21764853

  19. The nonlinear dynamics and fluctuations of mRNA levels in cross-talking pathway activated transcription.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianshe; Sun, Qiwen; Tang, Moxun

    2014-12-21

    Gene transcription is a stochastic process, and is often activated by multiple signal transduction pathways. In this work, we study gene transcription activated randomly by two cross-talking pathways, with the messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules being produced in a simple birth and death process. We derive the analytical formulas for the mean and the second moment of mRNA copy numbers and characterize the nature of transcription noise. We find that the stationary noise strength Φ is close to its baseline limit 1 when the mRNA level is high due to strong activation or stable transcription, or the mRNA level is low due to unstable transcription or ineffective mRNA production. If Φ stays well above 1, then the gene is infrequently active but mRNAs are accumulated rapidly once it is active. In this case, the system generates a transcriptional bursting, and the mean mRNA level peaks at a finite time. By examining the nonlinear dependance of Φ on transcriptional efficiency, we show that the maximum noise strength is attained only when the gene is silent in the majority of cells as observed in recent experiments. By comparing the current findings with our previous results in sequential pathway model, we come up with a profound conclusion that parallel, cross-talking pathways tend to increase transcription noise, whereas sequential pathways tend to reduce transcription noise. A further study on gene transcription activated by entangling pathways may help us reveal the subtle connection between the characteristics of transcription noise and the topology of genetic network.

  20. Chromatin Remodeling Mediated by Drosophila GAGA Factor and ISWI Activates fushi tarazu Gene Transcription In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Masahiro; Hirose, Susumu

    1998-01-01

    GAGA factor is known to remodel the chromatin structure in concert with nucleosome-remodeling factor NURF in a Drosophila embryonic S150 extract. The promoter region of the Drosophila fushi tarazu (ftz) gene carries several binding sites for GAGA factor. Both the GAGA factor-binding sites and GAGA factor per se are necessary for the proper expression of ftz in vivo. We observed transcriptional activation of the ftz gene when a preassembled chromatin template was incubated with GAGA factor and the S150 extract. The chromatin structure within the ftz promoter was specifically disrupted by incubation of the preassembled chromatin with GAGA factor and the S150 extract. Both transcriptional activation and chromatin disruption were blocked by an antiserum raised against ISWI or by base substitutions in the GAGA factor-binding sites in the ftz promoter region. These results demonstrate that GAGA factor- and ISWI-mediated disruption of the chromatin structure within the promoter region of ftz activates transcription on the chromatin template. PMID:9566866

  1. Diadenosine tetraphosphate hydrolase is part of the transcriptional regulation network in immunologically activated mast cells.

    PubMed

    Carmi-Levy, Irit; Yannay-Cohen, Nurit; Kay, Gillian; Razin, Ehud; Nechushtan, Hovav

    2008-09-01

    We previously discovered that microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF) and upstream stimulatory factor 2 (USF2) each forms a complex with its inhibitor histidine triad nucleotide-binding 1 (Hint-1) and with lysyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS). Moreover, we showed that the dinucleotide diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap(4)A), previously shown to be synthesized by LysRS, binds to Hint-1, and as a result the transcription factors are released from their suppression. Thus, transcriptional activity is regulated by Ap(4)A, suggesting that Ap(4)A is a second messenger in this context. For Ap(4)A to be unambiguously established as a second messenger, several criteria have to be fulfilled, including the presence of a metabolizing enzyme. Since several enzymes are able to hydrolyze Ap(4)A, we provided here evidence that the "Nudix" type 2 gene product, Ap(4)A hydrolase, is responsible for Ap(4)A degradation following the immunological activation of mast cells. The knockdown of Ap(4)A hydrolase modulated Ap(4)A accumulation, resulting in changes in the expression of MITF and USF2 target genes. Moreover, our observations demonstrated that the involvement of Ap(4)A hydrolase in gene regulation is not a phenomenon exclusive to mast cells but can also be found in cardiac cells activated with the beta-agonist isoproterenol. Thus, we have provided concrete evidence establishing Ap(4)A as a second messenger in the regulation of gene expression.

  2. BPTF is required for c-MYC transcriptional activity and in vivo tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Richart, Laia; Carrillo-de Santa Pau, Enrique; Río-Machín, Ana; de Andrés, Mónica P.; Cigudosa, Juan C.; Lobo, Víctor J. Sánchez-Arévalo; Real, Francisco X.

    2016-01-01

    c-MYC oncogene is deregulated in most human tumours. Histone marks associated with transcriptionally active genes define high-affinity c-MYC targets. The mechanisms involved in their recognition by c-MYC are unknown. Here we report that c-MYC interacts with BPTF, a core subunit of the NURF chromatin-remodelling complex. BPTF is required for the activation of the full c-MYC transcriptional programme in fibroblasts. BPTF knockdown leads to decreased c-MYC recruitment to DNA and changes in chromatin accessibility. In Bptf-null MEFs, BPTF is necessary for c-MYC-driven proliferation, G1–S progression and replication stress, but not for c-MYC-driven apoptosis. Bioinformatics analyses unveil that BPTF levels correlate positively with c-MYC-driven transcriptional signatures. In vivo, Bptf inactivation in pre-neoplastic pancreatic acinar cells significantly delays tumour development and extends survival. Our findings uncover BPTF as a crucial c-MYC co-factor required for its biological activity and suggest that the BPTF-c-MYC axis is a potential therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:26729287

  3. Polyunsaturated fatty acid inhibition of fatty acid synthase transcription is independent of PPAR activation.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S D; Turini, M; Jump, D B; Abraham, S; Reedy, M

    1998-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of the (n-6) and (n-3) families inhibit the rate of gene transcription for a number of hepatic lipogenic and glycolytic genes, e.g., fatty acid synthase (FAS). In contrast, saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids have no inhibitory capability. The suppression of gene transcription resulting from the addition of PUFA to a high carbohydrate diet: occurs quickly (< 3 h) after its addition to a high glucose diet; can be recreated with hepatocytes cultured in a serum-free medium containing insulin and glucocorticoids; can be demonstrated in diabetic rats fed fructose; and is independent of glucagon. While the nature of the intracellular PUFA inhibitor is unclear, it appears that delta-6 desaturation is a required step in the process. Recently, the fatty acid activated nuclear factor, peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) was suggested to be the PUFA-response factor. However, the potent PPAR activators ETYA and Wy-14643 did not suppress hepatic expression of FAS, but did induce the PPAR-responsive gene, acyl-CoA oxidase (AOX). Similarly, treating rat hepatocytes with 20:4 (n-6) suppressed FAS expression but had no effect on AOX. Thus, it appears that the PUFA regulation of gene transcription involves a PUFA-response factor that is independent from PPAR.

  4. DNase I sensitivity of transcriptionally active genes in intact nuclei and isolated chromatin of plants.

    PubMed Central

    Spiker, S; Murray, M G; Thompson, W F

    1983-01-01

    We have investigated the DNase I sensitivity of transcriptionally active DNA sequences in intact nuclei and isolated chromatin from embryos of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Nuclei or isolated chromatin was incubated with DNase I, and the extent of DNA digestion was monitored as percentage acid solubility. The resistant DNA and DNA from sham-digested controls were used to drive reassociation reactions with cDNA populations corresponding to either total poly(A)+RNA from unimbibed wheat embryos or polysomal poly(A)+RNA from embryos that had imbibed for 3 hr. Sequences complementary to either probe were depleted in DNase I-resistant DNA from nuclei and from chromatin isolated under low-ionic-strength conditions. This indicates that transcriptionally active sequences are preferentially DNase I sensitive in plants. In chromatin isolated at higher ionic strength, cDNA complementary sequences were not preferentially depleted by DNase I treatment. Therefore, the chromatin structure that confers preferential DNase I sensitivity to transcriptionally active genes appears to be lost when the higher-ionic-strength method of preparation is used. Treatment of wheat nuclei with DNase I causes the release of four prominent nonhistone chromosomal proteins that comigrate with wheat high mobility group proteins on NaDodSO4 gels. Images PMID:6219388

  5. The Role of Bacterial Enhancer Binding Proteins as Specialized Activators of σ54-Dependent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Bacterial enhancer binding proteins (bEBPs) are transcriptional activators that assemble as hexameric rings in their active forms and utilize ATP hydrolysis to remodel the conformation of RNA polymerase containing the alternative sigma factor σ54. We present a comprehensive and detailed summary of recent advances in our understanding of how these specialized molecular machines function. The review is structured by introducing each of the three domains in turn: the central catalytic domain, the N-terminal regulatory domain, and the C-terminal DNA binding domain. The role of the central catalytic domain is presented with particular reference to (i) oligomerization, (ii) ATP hydrolysis, and (iii) the key GAFTGA motif that contacts σ54 for remodeling. Each of these functions forms a potential target of the signal-sensing N-terminal regulatory domain, which can act either positively or negatively to control the activation of σ54-dependent transcription. Finally, we focus on the DNA binding function of the C-terminal domain and the enhancer sites to which it binds. Particular attention is paid to the importance of σ54 to the bacterial cell and its unique role in regulating transcription. PMID:22933558

  6. A prominent and conserved role for YY1 in Xist transcriptional activation

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Pablo; Neuillet, Damien; Rougeulle, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of the non-coding RNA Xist on one X chromosome in female cells is a hallmark of X-chromosome inactivation in eutherians. Here, we uncovered an essential function for the ubiquitous autosomal transcription factor Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) in the transcriptional activation of Xist in both human and mouse. We show that loss of YY1 prevents Xist up-regulation during the initiation and maintenance of X-inactivation, and that YY1 binds directly the Xist 5′ region to trigger the activity of the Xist promoter. Binding of YY1 to the Xist 5′ region prior to X-chromosome inactivation competes with the Xist repressor REX1 while DNA methylation controls mono-allelic fixation of YY1 to Xist at the onset of X-chromosome inactivation. YY1 is thus the first autosomal activating factor involved in a fundamental and conserved pathway of Xist regulation that ensures the asymmetric transcriptional up-regulation of the master regulator of X-chromosome inactivation. PMID:25209548

  7. Interaction between transcriptional activator protein LAC9 and negative regulatory protein GAL80.

    PubMed Central

    Salmeron, J M; Langdon, S D; Johnston, S A

    1989-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transcriptional activation mediated by the GAL4 regulatory protein is repressed in the absence of galactose by the binding of the GAL80 protein, an interaction that requires the carboxy-terminal 28 amino acids of GAL4. The homolog of GAL4 from Kluyveromyces lactis, LAC9, activates transcription in S. cerevisiae and is highly similar to GAL4 in its carboxyl terminus but is not repressed by wild-type levels of GAL80 protein. Here we show that GAL80 does repress LAC9-activated transcription in S. cerevisiae if overproduced. We sought to determine the molecular basis for the difference in the responses of the LAC9 and GAL4 proteins to GAL80. Our results indicate that this difference is due primarily to the fact that under wild-type conditions, the level of LAC9 protein in S. cerevisiae is much higher than that of GAL4, which suggests that LAC9 escapes GAL80-mediated repression by titration of GAL80 protein in vivo. The difference in response to GAL80 is not due to amino acid sequence differences between the LAC9 and GAL4 carboxyl termini. We discuss the implications of these results for the mechanism of galactose metabolism regulation in S. cerevisiae and K. lactis. Images PMID:2550790

  8. Atf4 regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation during endochondral ossification by activating Ihh transcription

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiguang; Lian, Na; Li, Lingzhen; Moss, Heather E.; Wang, Weixi; Perrien, Daniel S.; Elefteriou, Florent; Yang, Xiangli

    2009-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4) is a leucine-zipper-containing protein of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) family. Ablation of Atf4 (Atf4−/−) in mice leads to severe skeletal defects, including delayed ossification and low bone mass, short stature and short limbs. Atf4 is expressed in proliferative and prehypertrophic growth plate chondrocytes, suggesting an autonomous function of Atf4 in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification. In Atf4−/− growth plate, the typical columnar structure of proliferative chondrocytes is disturbed. The proliferative zone is shortened, whereas the hypertrophic zone is transiently expanded. The expression of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) is markedly decreased, whereas the expression of other chondrocyte marker genes, such as type II collagen (Col2a1), PTH/PTHrP receptor (Pth1r) and type X collagen (Col10a1), is normal. Furthermore, forced expression of Atf4 in chondrocytes induces endogenous Ihh mRNA, and Atf4 directly binds to the Ihh promoter and activates its transcription. Supporting these findings, reactivation of Hh signaling pharmacologically in mouse limb explants corrects the Atf4−/− chondrocyte proliferation and short limb phenotypes. This study thus identifies Atf4 as a novel transcriptional activator of Ihh in chondrocytes that paces longitudinal bone growth by controlling growth plate chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. PMID:19906842

  9. The metal-responsive transcription factor-1 contributes to HIF-1 activation during hypoxic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Brian J. . E-mail: brian.murphy@sri.com; Sato, Barbara G.; Dalton, Timothy P.; Laderoute, Keith R.

    2005-11-25

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), the major transcriptional regulator of the mammalian cellular response to low oxygen (hypoxia), is embedded within a complex network of signaling pathways. We have been investigating the importance of another stress-responsive transcription factor, MTF-1, for the adaptation of cells to hypoxia. This article reports that MTF-1 plays a central role in hypoxic cells by contributing to HIF-1 activity. Loss of MTF-1 in transformed Mtf1 null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) results in an attenuation of nuclear HIF-1{alpha} protein accumulation, HIF-1 transcriptional activity, and expression of an established HIF-1 target gene, glucose transporter-1 (Glut1). Mtf1 null (Mtf1 KO) MEFs also have constitutively higher levels of both glutathione (GSH) and the rate-limiting enzyme involved in GSH synthesis-glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit-than wild type cells. The altered cellular redox state arising from increased GSH may perturb oxygen-sensing mechanisms in hypoxic Mtf1 KO cells and decrease the accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} protein. Together, these novel findings define a role for MTF-1 in the regulation of HIF-1 activity.

  10. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Limits Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Activation in B Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Erik R.; Koganti, Siva; Zhi, Jizu; Megyola, Cynthia; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Tangye, Stuart G.; Farrell, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Lytic activation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is central to its life cycle and to most EBV-related diseases. However, not every EBV-infected B cell is susceptible to lytic activation. This lack of uniform susceptibility to lytic activation also directly impacts the success of viral oncolytic therapy for EBV cancers, yet determinants of susceptibility to lytic induction signals are not well understood. To determine if host factors influence susceptibility to EBV lytic activation, we developed a technique to separate lytic from refractory cells and reported that EBV lytic activation occurs preferentially in cells with lower levels of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Using this tool to detect single cells, we now extend the correlation between STAT3 and lytic versus refractory states to EBV-infected circulating B cells in patients with primary EBV infection, leading us to investigate whether STAT3 controls susceptibility to EBV lytic activation. In loss-of-function and gain-of-function studies in EBV-positive B lymphoma and lymphoblastoid cells, we found that the levels of functional STAT3 regulate susceptibility to EBV lytic activation. This prompted us to identify a pool of candidate cellular genes that might be regulated by STAT3 to limit EBV lytic activation. From this pool, we confirmed increases in transcript levels in refractory cells of a set of genes known to participate in transcription repression. Taken together, our findings place STAT3 at a critical crossroads between EBV latency and lytic activation, processes fundamental to EBV lymphomagenesis. PMID:23966384

  11. BFV activates the NF-kappaB pathway through its transactivator (BTas) to enhance viral transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jian; Tan Juan; Zhang Xihui; Guo Hongyan; Zhang Qicheng; Guo Tingting; Geng Yunqi; Qiao Wentao

    2010-05-10

    Multiple families of viruses have evolved sophisticated strategies to regulate nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) signaling, which plays a pivotal role in diverse cellular events, including virus-host interactions. In this study, we report that bovine foamy virus (BFV) is able to activate the NF-kappaB pathway through the action of its transactivator, BTas. Both cellular IKKbeta and IkappaBalpha also participate in this activation. In addition, we demonstrate that BTas induces the processing of p100, which implies that BTas can activate NF-kappaB through a noncanonical pathway as well. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis shows that BTas interacts with IKK catalytic subunits (IKKalpha and IKKbeta), which may be responsible for regulation of IKK kinase activity and persistent NF-kappaB activation. Furthermore, our results indicate that the level of BTas-mediated LTR transcription correlates with the activity of cellular NF-kappaB. Together, this study suggests that BFV activates the NF-kappaB pathway through BTas to enhance viral transcription.

  12. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-independent activation of estrogen receptor-dependent transcription by 3-methycholanthrene

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, Jonathan M.; Waxman, David J. . E-mail: djw@bu.edu

    2006-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that stimulates transcription directed by xenobiotic response elements upstream of target genes. Recently, AhR ligands were reported to induce formation of an AhR-estrogen receptor (ER) complex, which can bind to estrogen response elements (EREs) and stimulate transcription of ER target genes. Presently, we investigate the effect of the AhR ligands 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (BZ126) on ERE-regulated luciferase reporter activity and endogenous ER target gene expression. In MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, 3MC induced transcription of ER reporter genes containing native promoter sequences of the ER-responsive genes complement 3 and pS2 and heterologous promoters regulated by isolated EREs. Dose-response studies revealed that the concentration of 3MC required to half-maximally activate transcription (EC{sub 5}) was >100-fold higher for an ER reporter (27-57 {mu}M) than for an AhR reporter (86-250 nM) in both MCF-7 cells and in human endometrial cancer Ishikawa cells. 3MC also stimulated expression of the endogenous ER target genes amphiregulin, cathepsin D and progesterone receptor, albeit to a much lower extent than was achieved following stimulation with 17{beta}-estradiol. In Ishikawa cells, 3MC, but not BZ126 or TCDD, stimulated ER{alpha}-dependent reporter activity but did not induce expression of endogenous ER target genes. Finally, studies carried out in the AhR-positive rat hepatoma cell line 5L and the AhR-deficient variant BP8 demonstrated that ER reporter activity could be induced by 3MC in a manner that was independent of AhR and thus distinct from the AhR-ER 'hijacking' mechanism described recently. 3MC may thus elicit estrogenic activity by multiple mechanisms.

  13. Transcription Activation In Vitro by the Bradyrhizobium japonicum Regulatory Protein FixK2

    PubMed Central

    Mesa, Socorro; Ucurum, Zöhre; Hennecke, Hauke; Fischer, Hans-Martin

    2005-01-01

    In Bradyrhizobium japonicum, the N2-fixing root nodule endosymbiont of soybean, a group of genes required for microaerobic, anaerobic, or symbiotic growth is controlled by FixK2, a key regulator that is part of the FixLJ-FixK2 cascade. FixK2 belongs to the family of cyclic AMP receptor protein/fumarate and nitrate reductase (CRP/FNR) transcription factors that recognize a palindromic DNA motif (CRP/FNR box) associated with the regulated promoters. Here, we report on a biochemical analysis of FixK2 and its transcription activation activity in vitro. FixK2 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified as a soluble N-terminally histidine-tagged protein. Gel filtration experiments revealed that increasing the protein concentration shifts the monomer-dimer equilibrium toward the dimer. Purified FixK2 productively interacted with the B. japonicum σ80-RNA polymerase holoenzyme, but not with E. coli σ70-RNA polymerase holoenzyme, to activate transcription from the B. japonicum fixNOQP, fixGHIS, and hemN2 promoters in vitro. Furthermore, FixK2 activated transcription from the E. coli FF(−41.5) model promoter, again only in concert with B. japonicum RNA polymerase. All of these promoters are so-called class II CRP/FNR-type promoters. We showed by specific mutagenesis that the FixK2 box at nucleotide position −40.5 in the hemN2 promoter, but not that at −78.5, is crucial for activation both in vivo and in vitro, which argues against recognition of a potential class III promoter. Given the lack of any evidence for the presence of a cofactor in purified FixK2, we surmise that FixK2 alone is sufficient to activate in vitro transcription to at least a basal level. This contrasts with all well-studied CRP/FNR-type proteins, which do require coregulators. PMID:15866917

  14. Transcriptional activation of mouse mast cell Protease-7 by activin and transforming growth factor-beta is inhibited by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Funaba, Masayuki; Ikeda, Teruo; Murakami, Masaru; Ogawa, Kenji; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Sugino, Hiromu; Abe, Matanobu

    2003-12-26

    Previous studies have revealed that activin A and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) induced migration and morphological changes toward differentiation in bone marrow-derived cultured mast cell progenitors (BMCMCs). Here we show up-regulation of mouse mast cell protease-7 (mMCP-7), which is expressed in differentiated mast cells, by activin A and TGF-beta1 in BMCMCs, and the molecular mechanism of the gene induction of mmcp-7. Smad3, a signal mediator of the activin/TGF-beta pathway, transcriptionally activated mmcp-7. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), a tissue-specific transcription factor predominantly expressed in mast cells, melanocytes, and heart and skeletal muscle, inhibited Smad3-mediated mmcp-7 transcription. MITF associated with Smad3, and the C terminus of MITF and the MH1 and linker region of Smad3 were required for this association. Complex formation between Smad3 and MITF was neither necessary nor sufficient for the inhibition of Smad3 signaling by MITF. MITF inhibited the transcriptional activation induced by the MH2 domain of Smad3. In addition, MITF-truncated N-terminal amino acids could associate with Smad3 but did not inhibit Smad3-mediated transcription. The level of Smad3 was decreased by co-expression of MITF but not of dominant-negative MITF, which resulted from proteasomal protein degradation. The changes in the level of Smad3 protein were paralleled by those in Smad3-mediated signaling activity. These findings suggest that MITF negatively regulates Smad-dependent activin/TGF-beta signaling in a tissue-specific manner.

  15. Mitochondrial Ca2+ Cycling Facilitates Activation of the Transcription Factor NFAT in Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Man-Su; Usachev, Yuriy M.

    2009-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent gene regulation controls many aspects of neuronal plasticity. Significant progress has been made toward understanding the roles of voltage- and ligand-gated Ca2+ channels in triggering specific transcriptional responses. In contrast, the functional importance of Ca2+ buffers and Ca2+ transporters in neuronal gene regulation is less clear despite their critical contribution to the spatio-temporal control of Ca2+ signals. Here we examined the role of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and release in regulating the Ca2+-dependent transcription factor NFAT that has been implicated in synaptic plasticity, axonal growth and neuronal survival. Intense stimulation of sensory neurons by action potentials or TRPV1 agonists induced rapid activation and nuclear import of NFAT. Nuclear translocation of NFAT was associated with a characteristic prolonged [Ca2+]i elevation (plateau) that resulted from Ca2+ uptake by, and its subsequent release from mitochondria. Measurements using a mitochondrial Ca2+ indicator, mtPericam, showed that this process recruited mitochondria throughout the cell body, including the perinuclear region. [Ca2+]i levels attained during the plateau phase were similar to or higher than those required for NFAT activation (200–300 nM). The elimination of the [Ca2+]i plateau by blocking either mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake via the uniporter or Ca2+ release via the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger strongly reduced nuclear import of NFAT. Furthermore, preventing Ca2+ mobilization via the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger diminished NFAT-mediated transcription. Collectively, these data implicate activity-induced Ca2+ uptake and prolonged release from mitochondria as a novel regulatory mechanism in neuronal excitation-transcription coupling. PMID:19793968

  16. Molecular genetics of blood-fleshed peach reveals activation of anthocyanin biosynthesis by NAC transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Lin-Wang, Kui; Wang, Huiliang; Gu, Chao; Dare, Andrew P; Espley, Richard V; He, Huaping; Allan, Andrew C; Han, Yuepeng

    2015-04-01

    Anthocyanin pigmentation is an important consumer trait in peach (Prunus persica). In this study, the genetic basis of the blood-flesh trait was investigated using the cultivar Dahongpao, which shows high levels of cyanidin-3-glucoside in the mesocarp. Elevation of anthocyanin levels in the flesh was correlated with the expression of an R2R3 MYB transcription factor, PpMYB10.1. However, PpMYB10.1 did not co-segregate with the blood-flesh trait. The blood-flesh trait was mapped to a 200-kb interval on peach linkage group (LG) 5. Within this interval, a gene encoding a NAC domain transcription factor (TF) was found to be highly up-regulated in blood-fleshed peaches when compared with non-red-fleshed peaches. This NAC TF, designated blood (BL), acts as a heterodimer with PpNAC1 which shows high levels of expression in fruit at late developmental stages. We show that the heterodimer of BL and PpNAC1 can activate the transcription of PpMYB10.1, resulting in anthocyanin pigmentation in tobacco. Furthermore, silencing the BL gene reduces anthocyanin pigmentation in blood-fleshed peaches. The transactivation activity of the BL-PpNAC1 heterodimer is repressed by a SQUAMOSA promoter-binding protein-like TF, PpSPL1. Low levels of PpMYB10.1 expression in fruit at early developmental stages is probably attributable to lower levels of expression of PpNAC1 plus the presence of high levels of repressors such as PpSPL1. We present a mechanism whereby BL is the key gene for the blood-flesh trait in peach via its activation of PpMYB10.1 in maturing fruit. Partner TFs such as basic helix-loop-helix proteins and NAC1 are required, as is the removal of transcriptional repressors.

  17. A cis-regulatory module activating transcription in the suspensor contains five cis-regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Henry, Kelli F; Kawashima, Tomokazu; Goldberg, Robert B

    2015-06-01

    Little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which the embryo proper and suspensor of plant embryos activate specific gene sets shortly after fertilization. We analyzed the upstream region of the Scarlet Runner Bean (Phaseolus coccineus) G564 gene in order to understand how genes are activated specifically in the suspensor during early embryo development. Previously, we showed that a 54-bp fragment of the G564 upstream region is sufficient for suspensor transcription and contains at least three required cis-regulatory sequences, including the 10-bp motif (5'-GAAAAGCGAA-3'), the 10 bp-like motif (5'-GAAAAACGAA-3'), and Region 2 motif (partial sequence 5'-TTGGT-3'). Here, we use site-directed mutagenesis experiments in transgenic tobacco globular-stage embryos to identify two additional cis-regulatory elements within the 54-bp cis-regulatory module that are required for G564 suspensor transcription: the Fifth motif (5'-GAGTTA-3') and a third 10-bp-related sequence (5'-GAAAACCACA-3'). Further deletion of the 54-bp fragment revealed that a 47-bp fragment containing the five motifs (the 10-bp, 10-bp-like, 10-bp-related, Region 2 and Fifth motifs) is sufficient for suspensor transcription, and represents a cis-regulatory module. A consensus sequence for each type of motif was determined by comparing motif sequences shown to activate suspensor transcription. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the regulation of G564 is evolutionarily conserved. A homologous cis-regulatory module was found upstream of the G564 ortholog in the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), indicating that the regulation of G564 is evolutionarily conserved in closely related bean species.

  18. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT.

  19. CITED2 modulates estrogen receptor transcriptional activity in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Wen Min; Doucet, Michele; Huang, David; Weber, Kristy L.; Kominsky, Scott L.

    2013-07-26

    Highlights: •The effects of elevated CITED2 on ER function in breast cancer cells are examined. •CITED2 enhances cell growth in the absence of estrogen and presence of tamoxifen. •CITED2 functions as a transcriptional co-activator of ER in breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Cbp/p300-interacting transactivator with Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2) is a member of the CITED family of non-DNA binding transcriptional co-activators of the p300/CBP-mediated transcription complex. Previously, we identified CITED2 as being overexpressed in human breast tumors relative to normal mammary epithelium. Upon further investigation within the estrogen receptor (ER)-positive subset of these breast tumor samples, we found that CITED2 mRNA expression was elevated in those associated with poor survival. In light of this observation, we investigated the effect of elevated CITED2 levels on ER function. While ectopic overexpression of CITED2 in three ER-positive breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, and CAMA-1) did not alter cell proliferation in complete media, growth was markedly enhanced in the absence of exogenous estrogen. Correspondingly, cells overexpressing CITED2 demonstrated reduced sensitivity to the growth inhibitory effects of the selective estrogen receptor modulator, 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Subsequent studies revealed that basal ER transcriptional activity was elevated in CITED2-overexpressing cells and was further increased upon the addition of estrogen. Similarly, basal and estrogen-induced expression of the ER-regulated genes trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) and progesterone receptor (PGR) was higher in cells overexpressing CITED2. Concordant with this observation, ChIP analysis revealed higher basal levels of CITED2 localized to the TFF-1 and PGR promoters in cells with ectopic overexpression of CITED2, and these levels were elevated further in response to estrogen stimulation. Taken together, these data indicate that CITED2 functions as a transcriptional co-activator

  20. Genetic dissection of independent and cooperative transcriptional activation by the LysR-type activator ThnR at close divergent promoters.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Marín, Elena; Floriano, Belén; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-04-18

    Regulation of tetralin biodegradation operons is one of the examples of unconventional LysR-type mediated transcriptional regulation. ThnR activates transcription from two divergent and closely located promoters PB and PC. Although ThnR activates each promoter independently, transcription from each one increases when both promoters are together. Mutational analysis of the intergenic region shows that cooperative transcription is achieved through formation of a ThnR complex when bound to its respective sites at each promoter, via formation of a DNA loop. Mutations also defined ThnR contact sites that are important for independent transcriptional activation at each promoter. A mutation at the PB promoter region, which abolishes its independent transcription, does not affect at all PB transcription in the presence of the divergent promoter PC, thus indicating that the complex formed via DNA loop can compensate for the deficiencies in the correct protein-DNA interaction at one of the promoters. Combination of mutations in both promoters identifies a region at PC that is not important for its independent transcription but it is essential for cooperative transcription from both promoters. This work provides new insights into the diversity and complexity of activation mechanisms used by the most abundant type of bacterial transcriptional regulators.

  1. Cardiac hypertrophy induced by active Raf depends on Yorkie-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin; Daniels, Joseph P; Wu, Huihui; Wolf, Matthew J

    2015-02-03

    Organ hypertrophy can result from enlargement of individual cells or from cell proliferation or both. Activating mutations in the serine-threonine kinase Raf cause cardiac hypertrophy and contribute to Noonan syndrome in humans. Cardiac-specific expression of activated Raf also causes hypertrophy in Drosophila melanogaster. We found that Yorkie (Yki), a transcriptional coactivator in the Hippo pathway that regulates organ size, is required for Raf-induced cardiac hypertrophy in flies. Although aberrant activation of Yki orthologs stimulates cardiac hyperplasia in mice, cardiac-specific expression of an activated mutant form of Yki in fruit flies caused cardiac hypertrophy without hyperplasia. Knockdown of Yki caused cardiac dilation without loss of cardiomyocytes and prevented Raf-induced cardiac hypertrophy. In flies, Yki-induced cardiac hypertrophy required the TEA domain-containing transcription factor Scalloped, and, in mammalian cells, expression of mouse Raf(L613V), an activated form of Raf with a Noonan syndrome mutation, increased Yki-induced Scalloped activity. Furthermore, overexpression of Tgi (a Tondu domain-containing Scalloped-binding corepressor) in the fly heart abrogated Yki- or Raf-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Thus, crosstalk between Raf and Yki occurs in the heart and can influence Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy.

  2. Disrupting vesicular trafficking at the endosome attenuates transcriptional activation by Gcn4.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Gaur, Naseem A; Hasek, Jiri; Kim, Soon-ja; Qiu, Hongfang; Swanson, Mark J; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2008-11-01

    The late endosome (MVB) plays a key role in coordinating vesicular transport of proteins between the Golgi complex, vacuole/lysosome, and plasma membrane. We found that deleting multiple genes involved in vesicle fusion at the MVB (class C/D vps mutations) impairs transcriptional activation by Gcn4, a global regulator of amino acid biosynthetic genes, by decreasing the ability of chromatin-bound Gcn4 to stimulate preinitiation complex assembly at the promoter. The functions of hybrid activators with Gal4 or VP16 activation domains are diminished in class D mutants as well, suggesting a broader defect in activation. Class E vps mutations, which impair protein sorting at the MVB, also decrease activation by Gcn4, provided they elicit rapid proteolysis of MVB cargo proteins in the aberrant late endosome. By contrast, specifically impairing endocytic trafficking from the plasma membrane, or vesicular transport to the vacuole, has a smaller effect on Gcn4 function. Thus, it appears that decreasing cargo proteins in the MVB through impaired delivery or enhanced degradation, and not merely the failure to transport cargo properly to the vacuole or downregulate plasma membrane proteins by endocytosis, is required to attenuate substantially transcriptional activation by Gcn4.

  3. Activated STAT1 transcription factors conduct distinct saltatory movements in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Speil, Jasmin; Baumgart, Eugen; Siebrasse, Jan-Peter; Veith, Roman; Vinkemeier, Uwe; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2011-12-07

    The activation of STAT transcription factors is a critical determinant of their subcellular distribution and their ability to regulate gene expression. Yet, it is not known how activation affects the behavior of individual STAT molecules in the cytoplasm and nucleus. To investigate this issue, we injected fluorescently labeled STAT1 in living HeLa cells and traced them by single-molecule microscopy. We determined that STAT1 moved stochastically in the cytoplasm and nucleus with very short residence times (<0.03 s) before activation. Upon activation, STAT1 mobility in the cytoplasm decreased ∼2.5-fold, indicating reduced movement of STAT1/importinα/β complexes to the nucleus. In the nucleus, activated STAT1 displayed a distinct saltatory mobility, with residence times of up to 5 s and intermittent diffusive motion. In this manner, activated STAT1 factors can occupy their putative chromatin target sites within ∼2 s. These results provide a better understanding of the timescales on which cellular signaling and regulated gene transcription operate at the single-molecule level.

  4. Raloxifene upregulated mesangial cell MMP-2 activity via ER-β through transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ming; Wu, Xin-Chi; Huang, Wenlong

    2013-11-01

    Raloxifene, a second-generation selective estrogen receptor modulator, exerts estrogen-like effects in specific tissues. In this present study, we examined the effect of raloxifene on mesangial cell matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Raloxifene increased the MMP-2 level in a dose-dependent and receptor-mediated manner. An antibody against estrogen receptor-β (ER-β) blocked the effect of raloxifene on MMP-2 expression, suggesting that the effect of raloxifene on MMP-2 activity was mediated by ER-β. In addition, the transcription factor AP-2, that plays an important role in MMP-2 gene transcription, was overexpressed under raloxifene simulation. The effect of MMP-2 was blocked by a selective inhibitor of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) pathway, PD98059. Our results suggested that raloxifene-induced MMP-2 activity increases function through ERK/MAPK signaling via AP-2. In addition, we also found that the effect of raloxifene on MMP-2 expression was mediated via its binding to ER-β. However, at this stage of our investigation, (i) we could only show that both the binding to ER-β and the activation of the ERK/MAPK pathway impacted MMP-2 expression and (ii) we were unable to establish a relationship between ER-β binding and ERK/MAPK pathway activation.

  5. Histone H4 Lys 20 methyltransferase SET8 promotes androgen receptor-mediated transcription activation in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Lushuai; Li, Yanyan; Du, Fengxia; Han, Xiao; Li, Xiaohua; Niu, Yuanjie; Ren, Shancheng; Sun, Yingli

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Dihydrotestosterone stimulates H4K20me1 enrichment at the PSA promoter. • SET8 promotes AR-mediated transcription activation. • SET8 interacts with AR and promotes cell proliferation. - Abstract: Histone methylation status in different lysine residues has an important role in transcription regulation. The effect of H4K20 monomethylation (H4K20me1) on androgen receptor (AR)-mediated gene transcription remains unclear. Here we show that AR agonist stimulates the enrichment of H4K20me1 and SET8 at the promoter of AR target gene PSA in an AR dependent manner. Furthermore, SET8 is crucial for the transcription activation of PSA. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrate that SET8 interacts with AR. Therefore, we conclude that SET8 is involved in AR-mediated transcription activation, possibly through its interaction with AR and H4K20me1 modification.

  6. Activation of the Ig Iα1 promoter by the transcription factor Ets-1 triggers Ig Iα1-Cα1 germline transcription in epithelial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhi; Zheng, Hui; Xu, San; Jiang, Yiqun; Liu, Haidan; Li, Ming; Hu, Duosha; Li, Wei; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang; Cao, Ya

    2014-03-01

    Immunoglobulins (Igs) are known to be synthesized and secreted only by B lymphocytes. Class switch recombination (CSR) is a key event that enables B cells to express Igs, and one of the crucial steps for CSR initiation is the germline transcription of Ig genes. Surprisingly, recent studies have demonstrated that the Ig genes are also expressed in some epithelial cancer cells; however, the mechanisms underlying how cancer cells initiate CSR and express Igs are still unknown. In this study, we confirmed that the Ig Iα1 promoter in cancer cell lines was activated by the Ets-1 transcription factor, and the activity of the Ig Iα1 promoter and Ig Iα1-Cα1 germline transcription were attenuated after knockdown of Ets-1 by specific small interfering RNAs (siRNA). Furthermore, the expression of Ets-1 and Igα heavy chain in cancer cells was dose dependently upregulated by TGF-β1. These results indicate that activation of the Ig Iα1 promoter by the transcription factor Ets-1 is a critical pathway and provides a novel mechanism for Ig expression in non-B cell cancers.

  7. ELK3 suppresses angiogenesis by inhibiting the transcriptional activity of ETS-1 on MT1-MMP.

    PubMed

    Heo, Sun-Hee; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2014-01-01

    Ets transcription factors play important roles in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Knockout of the Ets gene family members in mice resulted in disrupted angiogenesis and malformed vascular systems. In this study, the role and mechanism of ELK3, an Ets factor, in angiogenesis was investigated using ELK3-specific siRNA in human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in vivo implantation assay. The suppression of ELK3 expression resulted in the reinforcement of VEGF-induced tube formation in HUVECs. The in vivo Matrigel plug assay also showed that ELK3 knockdown resulted in increased angiogenesis. Luciferase activity of the MT1-MMP promoter induced by ETS-1 factor was attenuated ELK3 co-transfection. CHIP assay showed the binding of ELK3 on the MT1-MMP promoter. MT1-MMP knockdown in the ELK3 knockdowned cells resulted in the decrease of tube formation suggesting that MT1-MMP transcriptional repression is required for ELK3-mediated anti-angiogenesis effect. Our data also showed that the suppressive effect of ELK3 on the angiogenesis was partly due to the inhibitory effect of ELK3 to the ETS-1 transcriptional activity on the MT1-MMP promoter rather than direct suppression of ELK3 on the target gene, since the expression level of co-repressor Sin3A is low in endothelial cells. Our results suggest that ELK3 plays a negative role of VEGF-induced angiogenesis through indirectly inhibiting ETS-1 function.

  8. Structural Analysis of the Phenol-Responsive Sensory Domain of the Transcription Activator PoxR.

    PubMed

    Patil, Vinod Vikas; Park, Kwang-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Goo; Woo, Euijeon

    2016-04-05

    Positive phenol-degradative gene regulator (PoxR) is a σ(54)-dependent AAA+ ATPase transcription activator that regulates the catabolism of phenols. The PoxR sensory domain detects phenols and relays signals for the activation of transcription. Here we report the first structure of the phenol sensory domain bound to phenol and five derivatives. It exists as a tightly intertwined homodimer with a phenol-binding pocket buried inside, placing two C termini on the same side of the dimer. His102 and Trp130 interact with the hydroxyl group of the phenol in a cavity surrounded by rigid hydrophobic residues on one side and a flexible region on the other. Each monomer has a V4R fold with a unique zinc-binding site. A shift at the C-terminal helix suggests that there is a possible conformational change upon ligand binding. The results provide a structural basis of chemical effector binding for transcriptional regulation with broad implications for protein engineering.

  9. A small circular TAR RNA decoy specifically inhibits Tat-activated HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Bohjanen, P R; Colvin, R A; Puttaraju, M; Been, M D; Garcia-Blanco, M A

    1996-01-01

    Linear TAR RNA has previously been used as a decoy to inhibit HIV-1 transcription in vitro and HIV-1 replication in vivo. A 48 nucleotide circular RNA containing the stem, bulge and loop of the HIV-1 TAR element was synthesized using the self-splicing activity of a group I permuted intron-exon and was tested for its ability to function as a TAR decoy in vitro. This small circular TAR molecule was exceptionally stable in HeLa nuclear extracts, whereas a similar linear TAR molecule was rapidly degraded. The TAR circle bound specifically to Tfr38, a peptide containing the TAR-binding region of Tat. The ability of Tat to trans-activate transcription from the HIV-1 promoter in vitro was efficiently inhibited by circular TAR RNA but not by TAR circles that contained either bulge or loop mutations. TAR circles did not inhibit transactivation exclusively by binding to Tat since this inhibition was not reversed by adding excess Tat to the transcription reaction. Together, these data suggest that TAR circles act as decoys that inhibit transactivation by binding to Tat and at least one cellular factor. These data also demonstrate the utility of small circular RNA molecules as tools for biochemical studies. PMID:8871552

  10. Statins Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Gene Transcription through a Pregnane X Receptor Regulated Element.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Frederick M; Linder, Kathryn M; Cardozo, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a multifunctional protein that has important roles in inflammation and wound healing. Its aberrant regulation may contribute to many disease processes such as heart disease. The PAI-1 promoter is responsive to multiple inputs including cytokines, growth factors, steroids and oxidative stress. The statin drugs, atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin, increased basal and stimulated expression of the PAI-1 promoter 3-fold. A statin-responsive, nuclear hormone response element was previously identified in the PAI-1 promoter, but it was incompletely characterized. We characterized this direct repeat (DR) of AGGTCA with a 3-nucleotide spacer at -269/-255 using deletion and directed mutagenesis. Deletion or mutation of this element increased basal transcription from the promoter suggesting that it repressed PAI-1 transcription in the unliganded state. The half-site spacing and the ligand specificity suggested that this might be a pregnane X receptor (PXR) responsive element. Computational molecular docking showed that atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin were structurally compatible with the PXR ligand-binding pocket in its agonist conformation. Experiments with Gal4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins showed that Gal4-PXR was activated by statins while other DR + 3 binding nuclear receptor fusions were not. Overexpression of PXR further enhanced PAI-1 transcription in response to statins. Finally, ChIP experiments using Halo-tagged PXR and RXR demonstrated that both components of the PXR-RXR heterodimer bound to this region of the PAI-1 promoter.

  11. Adenovirus E1A specifically blocks SWI/SNF-dependent transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M E; Cairns, B R; Levinson, R S; Yamamoto, K R; Engel, D A; Smith, M M

    1996-01-01

    Expression of the adenovirus E1A243 oncoprotein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces a slow-growth phenotype with accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This effect is due to the N-terminal and CR1 domains of E1A243, which in rodent cells are involved in triggering cellular transformation and also in binding to the cellular transcriptional coactivator p300. A genetic screen was undertaken to identify genes required for the function of E1A243 in S. cerevisiae. This screen identified SNF12, a gene encoding the 73-kDa subunit of the SWI/SNF transcriptional regulatory complex. Mutation of genes encoding known members of the SWI/SNF complex also led to loss of E1A function, suggesting that the SWI/SNF complex is a target of E1A243. Moreover, expression of E1A in wild-type cells specifically blocked transcriptional activation of the INO1 and SUC2 genes, whose activation pathways are distinct but have a common requirement for the SWI/SNF complex. These data demonstrate a specific functional interaction between E1A and the SWI/SNF complex and suggest that a similar interaction takes place in rodent and human cells. PMID:8816487

  12. The transcription activity of heat shock factor 4b is regulated by FGF2.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan-Zhong; Zhang, Jun; Li, Shulian; Wang, Chuan; Chu, Liujie; Zhang, Zhi; Ma, Zengyi; Wang, Mingli; Jiang, Qiying; Liu, Guangchao; Qi, Yijun; Ma, Yuanfang

    2013-02-01

    Heat shock factor 4b has been found to be closely associated with postnatal lens development. It expresses in postnatal lens epithelial and secondary fiber cells and controls the expression of small heat shock proteins which are important for lens homeostasis. However, the signal pathways underlying Hsf4b are still not completely understood. Here we present that Hsf4b transcription activity is regulated by FGF2 a key growth factor that is involved in regulating lens development at multiple stages. FGF2 can promote Hsf4b nuclear-translocation and the expression of Hsp25 and αB-crystallin, the key downstream targets of Hsf4b in the Hsf4b-reconstituted mouse hsf4-/- lens epithelial cells. Further study indicates that FGF2 can induce Hsf4b protein stabilization through ERK1/2-mediated posttranslational phosphorylation or sumoylation. Hsf4b can promote FGF2-induced morphology transition from lens epithelial cell to the fiber cell, and this morphology transition can be inhibited by ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Hsf4b is a novel downstream transcription factor of FGF2, and its transcription activity is associated with FGF2-modulated lens epithelial cell-fiber cell transition.

  13. EMT-activating transcription factors in cancer: beyond EMT and tumor invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Tilló, Ester; Liu, Yongqing; de Barrios, Oriol; Siles, Laura; Fanlo, Lucia; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Darling, Douglas S; Dean, Douglas C; Castells, Antoni; Postigo, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    Cancer is a complex multistep process involving genetic and epigenetic changes that eventually result in the activation of oncogenic pathways and/or inactivation of tumor suppressor signals. During cancer progression, cancer cells acquire a number of hallmarks that promote tumor growth and invasion. A crucial mechanism by which carcinoma cells enhance their invasive capacity is the dissolution of intercellular adhesions and the acquisition of a more motile mesenchymal phenotype as part of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Although many transcription factors can trigger it, the full molecular reprogramming occurring during an EMT is mainly orchestrated by three major groups of transcription factors: the ZEB, Snail and Twist families. Upregulated expression of these EMT-activating transcription factors (EMT-ATFs) promotes tumor invasiveness in cell lines and xenograft mice models and has been associated with poor clinical prognosis in human cancers. Evidence accumulated in the last few years indicates that EMT-ATFs also regulate an expanding set of cancer cell capabilities beyond tumor invasion. Thus, EMT-ATFs have been shown to cooperate in oncogenic transformation, regulate cancer cell stemness, override safeguard programs against cancer like apoptosis and senescence, determine resistance to chemotherapy and promote tumor angiogenesis. This article reviews the expanding portfolio of functions played by EMT-ATFs in cancer progression.

  14. Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STAT) Family Members in Helminth Infections

    PubMed Central

    Becerra-Díaz, Mireya; Valderrama-Carvajal, Héctor; Terrazas, Luis I.

    2011-01-01

    Helminth parasites are a diverse group of multicellular organisms. Despite their heterogeneity, helminths share many common characteristics, such as the modulation of the immune system of their hosts towards a permissive state that favors their development. They induce strong Th2-like responses with high levels of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 cytokines, and decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ. IL-4, IFN-γ and other cytokines bind with their specific cytokine receptors to trigger an immediate signaling pathway in which different tyrosine kinases (e.g. Janus kinases) are involved. Furthermore, a seven-member family of transcription factors named Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STAT) that initiate the transcriptional activation of different genes are also involved and regulate downstream the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. However, how helminths avoid and modulate immune responses remains unclear; moreover, information concerning STAT-mediated immune regulation during helminth infections is scarce. Here, we review the research on mice deficient in STAT molecules, highlighting the importance of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway in regulating susceptibility and/or resistance in these infections. PMID:22110388

  15. Transcriptional activation of melanocortin 2 receptor accessory protein by PPARγ in adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Nam Soo; Kim, Yoon-Jin; Cho, Si Young; Lee, Tae Ryong; Kim, Sang Hoon

    2013-09-27

    Highlights: •MRAP enhanced HSL expression. •ACTH-mediated MRAP reduced glycerol release. •PPARγ induced MRAP expression. •PPARγ bound to the MRAP promoter. -- Abstract: Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in rodents decreases lipid accumulation and body weight. Melanocortin receptor 2 (MC2R) and MC2R accessory protein (MRAP) are specific receptors for ACTH in adipocytes. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) plays a role in the transcriptional regulation of metabolic pathways such as adipogenesis and β-oxidation of fatty acids. In this study we investigated the transcriptional regulation of MRAP expression during differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells. Stimulation with ACTH affected lipolysis in murine mature adipocytes via MRAP. Putative peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE) was identified in the MRAP promoter region. In chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter assays, we observed binding of PPARγ to the MRAP promoter. The mutagenesis experiments showed that the −1209/−1198 region of the MRAP promoter could function as a PPRE site. These results suggest that PPARγ is required for transcriptional activation of the MRAP gene during adipogenesis, which contributes to understanding of the molecular mechanism of lipolysis in adipocytes.

  16. Statins Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Gene Transcription through a Pregnane X Receptor Regulated Element

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Frederick M.; Linder, Kathryn M.; Cardozo, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a multifunctional protein that has important roles in inflammation and wound healing. Its aberrant regulation may contribute to many disease processes such as heart disease. The PAI-1 promoter is responsive to multiple inputs including cytokines, growth factors, steroids and oxidative stress. The statin drugs, atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin, increased basal and stimulated expression of the PAI-1 promoter 3-fold. A statin-responsive, nuclear hormone response element was previously identified in the PAI-1 promoter, but it was incompletely characterized. We characterized this direct repeat (DR) of AGGTCA with a 3-nucleotide spacer at -269/-255 using deletion and directed mutagenesis. Deletion or mutation of this element increased basal transcription from the promoter suggesting that it repressed PAI-1 transcription in the unliganded state. The half-site spacing and the ligand specificity suggested that this might be a pregnane X receptor (PXR) responsive element. Computational molecular docking showed that atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin were structurally compatible with the PXR ligand-binding pocket in its agonist conformation. Experiments with Gal4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins showed that Gal4-PXR was activated by statins while other DR + 3 binding nuclear receptor fusions were not. Overexpression of PXR further enhanced PAI-1 transcription in response to statins. Finally, ChIP experiments using Halo-tagged PXR and RXR demonstrated that both components of the PXR-RXR heterodimer bound to this region of the PAI-1 promoter. PMID:26379245

  17. Transcript degradation and noise of small RNA-controlled genes in a switch activated network in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Tal, Asaf; Parasar, Bibudha; Dym, Alvah; Costantino, Nina; Muñoz-García, Javier; Court, Donald L.; Stavans, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulatory processes may change transcript levels and affect cell-to-cell variability or noise. We study small-RNA downregulation to elucidate its effects on noise in the iron homeostasis network of Escherichia coli. In this network, the small-RNA RyhB undergoes stoichiometric degradation with the transcripts of target genes in response to iron stress. Using single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization, we measured transcript numbers of the RyhB-regulated genes sodB and fumA in individual cells as a function of iron deprivation. We observed a monotonic increase of noise with iron stress but no evidence of theoretically predicted, enhanced stoichiometric fluctuations in transcript numbers, nor of bistable behavior in transcript distributions. Direct detection of RyhB in individual cells shows that its noise is much smaller than that of these two targets, when RyhB production is significant. A generalized two-state model of bursty transcription that neglects RyhB fluctuations describes quantitatively the dependence of noise and transcript distributions on iron deprivation, enabling extraction of in vivo RyhB-mediated transcript degradation rates. The transcripts’ threshold-linear behavior indicates that the effective in vivo interaction strength between RyhB and its two target transcripts is comparable. Strikingly, the bacterial cell response exhibits Fur-dependent, switch-like activation instead of a graded response to iron deprivation. PMID:27085802

  18. Efficient targeted gene disruption in Xenopus embryos using engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs).

    PubMed

    Lei, Yong; Guo, Xiaogang; Liu, Yun; Cao, Yang; Deng, Yi; Chen, Xiongfeng; Cheng, Christopher H K; Dawid, Igor B; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2012-10-23

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are an approach for directed gene disruption and have been proved to be effective in various animal models. Here, we report that TALENs can induce somatic mutations in Xenopus embryos with reliably high efficiency and that such mutations are heritable through germ-line transmission. We modified the Golden Gate method for TALEN assembly to make the product suitable for RNA transcription and microinjection into Xenopus embryos. Eight pairs of TALENs were constructed to target eight Xenopus genes, and all resulted in indel mutations with high efficiencies of up to 95.7% at the targeted loci. Furthermore, mutations induced by TALENs were highly efficiently passed through the germ line to F(1) frogs. Together with simple and reliable PCR-based approaches for detecting TALEN-induced mutations, our results indicate that TALENs are an effective tool for targeted gene editing/knockout in Xenopus.

  19. Transcription activator structure reveals redox control of a replication initiation reaction†

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Cyril M.; Sizov, Dmytro; Seavers, Philippa R.; Ortiz-Lombardía, Miguel; Antson, Alfred A.

    2007-01-01

    Redox changes are one of the factors that influence cell-cycle progression and that control the processes of cellular proliferation, differentiation, senescence and apoptosis. Proteins regulated through redox-sensitive cysteines have been characterized but specific ‘sulphydryl switches’ in replication proteins remain to be identified. In bovine papillomavirus type-1, DNA replication begins when the viral transcription factor E2 recruits the viral initiator protein E1 to the origin of DNA replication (ori). Here we show that a novel dimerization interface in the E2 transcription activation domain is stabilized by a disulphide bond. Oxidative cross-linking via Cys57 sequesters the interaction surface between E1 and E2, preventing pre-initiation and replication initiation complex formation. Our data demonstrate that as well as a mechanism for regulating DNA binding, redox reactions can control replication by modulating the tertiary structure of critical protein factors using a specific redox sensor. PMID:17478495

  20. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  1. WRKY6 Transcription Factor Restricts Arsenate Uptake and Transposon Activation in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Castrillo, Gabriel; Sánchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; de Lorenzo, Laura; Crevillén, Pedro; Fraile-Escanciano, Ana; TC, Mohan; Mouriz, Alfonso; Catarecha, Pablo; Sobrino-Plata, Juan; Olsson, Sanna; Leo del Puerto, Yolanda; Mateos, Isabel; Rojo, Enrique; Hernández, Luis E.; Jarillo, Jose A.; Piñeiro, Manuel; Paz-Ares, Javier; Leyva, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Stress constantly challenges plant adaptation to the environment. Of all stress types, arsenic was a major threat during the early evolution of plants. The most prevalent chemical form of arsenic is arsenate, whose similarity to phosphate renders it easily incorporated into cells via the phosphate transporters. Here, we found that arsenate stress provokes a notable transposon burst in plants, in coordination with arsenate/phosphate transporter repression, which immediately restricts arsenate uptake. This repression was accompanied by delocalization of the phosphate transporter from the plasma membrane. When arsenate was removed, the system rapidly restored transcriptional expression and membrane localization of the transporter. We identify WRKY6 as an arsenate-responsive transcription factor that mediates arsenate/phosphate transporter gene expression and restricts arsenate-induced transposon activation. Plants therefore have a dual WRKY-dependent signaling mechanism that modulates arsenate uptake and transposon expression, providing a coordinated strategy for arsenate tolerance and transposon gene silencing. PMID:23922208

  2. Fucose-Mediated Transcriptional Activation of the fcs Operon by FcsR in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Irfan; Shafeeq, Sulman; Afzal, Muhammad; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore the impact of fucose on the transcriptome of S. pneumoniae D39. The expression of various genes and operons, including the fucose uptake PTS and utilization operon (fcs operon) was altered in the presence of fucose. By means of quantitative RT-PCR and β-galactosidase analysis, we demonstrate the role of the transcriptional regulator FcsR, present upstream of the fcs operon, as a transcriptional activator of the fcs operon. We also predict a 19-bp putative FcsR regulatory site (5'-ATTTGAACATTATTCAAGT-3') in the promoter region of the fcs operon. The functionality of this predicted FcsR regulatory site was further confirmed by promoter-truncation experiments, where deletion of half of the FscR regulatory site or full deletion led to the abolition of expression of the fcs operon.

  3. Mercury Detoxification by Bacteria: Simulations of Transcription Activation and Mercury-Carbon Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hao-Bo; Parks, Jerry M; Johs, Alexander; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, we summarize recent work from our laboratory and provide new perspective on two important aspects of bacterial mercury resistance: the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by MerR, and the enzymatic cleavage of the Hg-C bond in methylmercury by the organomercurial lyase, MerB. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of MerR reveal an opening-and-closing dynamics, which may be involved in initiating transcription of mercury resistance genes upon Hg(II) binding. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on an active-site model of the enzyme reveal how MerB catalyzes the Hg-C bond cleavage using cysteine coordination and acid-base chemistry. These studies provide insight into the detailed mechanisms of microbial gene regulation and defense against mercury toxicity.

  4. Sucrose-mediated transcriptional regulation of sucrose symporter activity in the phloem.

    SciTech Connect

    Matt Vaughn Greg Harrington Daniel R Bush

    2002-08-06

    This project was based on our discovery that sucrose acts as a signaling molecule that regulates the activity of a proton-sucrose symporter in sugar beet leaf tissue. A major objective here was determining how sucrose transporter activity is being regulated. When sucrose accumulates in the phloem sucrose transport activity drops dramatically. Western blots of plasma membrane proteins isolated from sucrose treated leaves showed that the loss of sucrose transport activity was proportional to a decline in symporter abundance, demonstrating that sucrose transport is regulated by changes in the amount of BvSUT1 protein. BvSUT1 transcript levels decreased in parallel with the loss of sucrose transport activity. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated that BvSUT1 gene transcription was repressed significantly in nuclei from leaves fed 100 mM exogenous sucrose, showing that sucrose-dependent modulation of BvSUT1 mRNA levels is mediated by changes in transcription. To identify which secondary messenger systems might be involved in regulating symporter activity, we used a variety of pharmacological agents to probe for a role of calcium or protein phosphorylation in sucrose signaling. In a detailed analysis, only okadaic acid altered sucrose transport activity. These results suggest a protein phosphatase is involved. We hypothesized that protein kinase inhibitors would have a neutral affect or increase symporter transcription. Transpirational feeding of the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine had no impact on sucrose transport while calphostin C, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, caused a 60% increase. These data provided good evidence that protein phosphorylation plays a central role in regulating sucrose symporter expression and sucrose transport activity. To determine whether protein phosphorylation is involved in sucrose regulation of proton-sucrose symporter activity, we pre-fed leaves with staurosporine for 4 h and then fed the treated leaves water or 100 mM sucrose

  5. PcaU, a Transcriptional Activator of Genes for Protocatechuate Utilization in Acinetobacter†

    PubMed Central

    Gerischer, Ulrike; Segura, Ana; Ornston, L. Nicholas

    1998-01-01

    The Acinetobacter pcaIJFBDKCHG operon encodes the six enzymes that convert protocatechuate to citric acid cycle intermediates. Directly downstream from the operon are qui and pob genes encoding sets of enzymes that convert quinate and p-hydroxybenzoate, respectively, to protocatechuate. Prior to this investigation, the only known regulatory gene in the pca-qui-pob cluster was pobR, which encodes a transcriptional activator that responds to p-hydroxybenzoate and activates transcription of pobA. The pca and qui genes were known to be expressed in response to protocatechuate, but a protein that mediated this induction had not been identified. This study was initiated by characterization of a spontaneous mutation that mapped upstream from pcaI and prevented expression of the pca genes. Sequencing of wild-type DNA extending from the translational start of pcaI through and beyond the location of the mutation revealed a 282-bp intergenic region and a divergently transcribed open reading frame, designated pcaU. Downstream from pcaU are two open reading frames encoding proteins similar in amino acid sequence to those associated with the oxidation of acyl thioesters. Inactivation of pcaU reduced the induced expression of pca structural genes by about 90% and impeded but did not completely prevent growth of the mutant cells with protocatechuate. PcaU was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to bind to a portion of the pcaI-pcaU intergenic region containing a sequence identical in 16 of 19 nucleotide residues to a segment of the pob operator. Further similarity of the two regulatory systems is indicated by 54% amino acid sequence identity in the aligned primary structures of PobR and PcaU. The pob and pca systems were shown to differ, however, in the relative orientations of transcriptional starts with respect to the site where the activator binds to DNA, the size of the intergenic region, and the tightness of transcriptional control. The spontaneous mutation blocking pca

  6. Genetic variants in ABCA1 promoter affect transcription activity and plasma HDL level in pigs.

    PubMed

    Dang, Xiao-yong; Chu, Wei-wei; Shi, Heng-chuan; Yu, Shi-gang; Han, Hai-yin; Gu, Shu-Hua; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-25

    Excess accumulation of cholesterol in plasma may result in coronary artery disease. Numerous studies have demonstrated that ATP-binding cassette protein A1 (ABCA1) mediates the efflux of cholesterol and phospholipids to apolipoproteins, a process necessary for plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) formation. Higher plasma levels of HDL are associated with lower risk for cardiovascular disease. Studies of human disease and animal models had shown that an increased hepatic ABCA1 activity relates to an enhanced plasma HDL level. In this study, we hypothesized that functional mutations in the ABCA1 promoter in pigs may affect gene transcription activity, and consequently the HDL level in plasma. The promoter region of ABCA1 was comparatively scanned by direct sequencing with pool DNA of high- and low-HDL groups (n=30 for each group). Two polymorphisms, c. - 608A>G and c. - 418T>A, were revealed with reverse allele distribution in the two groups. The two polymorphisms were completely linked and formed only G-A or A-T haplotypes when genotyped in a larger population (n=526). Furthermore, we found that the G-A/G-A genotype was associated with higher HDL and ABCA1 mRNA level than A-T/A-T genotype. Luciferase assay also revealed that G-A haplotype promoter had higher activity than A-T haplotype. Single-nucleotide mutant assay showed that c.-418T>A was the causal mutation for ABCA1 transcription activity alteration. Conclusively, we identified two completely linked SNPs in porcine ABCA1 promoter region which have influence on the plasma HDL level by altering ABCA1 gene transcriptional activity.

  7. Borna Disease Virus Phosphoprotein Represses p53-Mediated Transcriptional Activity by Interference with HMGB1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guoqi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kamitani, Wataru; Komoto, Satoshi; Yamashita, Makiko; Baba, Satoko; Yanai, Hideyuki; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2003-01-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a noncytolytic, neurotropic RNA virus that has a broad host range in warm-blooded animals, probably including humans. Recently, it was demonstrated that a 24-kDa phosphoprotein (P) of BDV directly binds to a multifunctional protein, amphoterin-HMGB1, and inhibits its function in cultured neural cells (W. Kamitani, Y. Shoya, T. Kobayashi, M. Watanabe, B. J. Lee, G. Zhang, K. Tomonaga, and K. Ikuta, J. Virol. 75:8742-8751, 2001). This observation suggested that expression of BDV P may cause deleterious effects in cellular functions by interference with HMGB1. In this study, we further investigated the significance of the binding between P and HMGB1. We demonstrated that P directly binds to the A-box domain on HMGB1, which is also responsible for interaction with a tumor suppression factor, p53. Recent works have demonstrated that binding between HMGB1 and p53 enhances p53-mediated transcriptional activity. Thus, we examined whether BDV P affects the transcriptional activity of p53 by interference with HMGB1. Mammalian two-hybrid analysis revealed that p53 and P competitively interfere with the binding of each protein to HMGB1 in a p53-deficient cell line, NCI-H1299. In addition, P was able to significantly decrease p53-mediated transcriptional activation of the cyclin G promoter. Furthermore, we showed that activation of p21waf1 expression was repressed in cyclosporine-treated BDV-infected cells, as well as p53-transduced NCI-H1299 cells. These results suggested that BDV P may be a unique inhibitor of p53 activity via binding to HMGB1. PMID:14581561

  8. Stress-Activated Cap’n’collar Transcription Factors in Aging and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sykiotis, Gerasimos P.; Bohmann, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Cap’n’collar (Cnc) transcription factors are conserved in metazoans and have important developmental and homeostatic functions. The vertebrate Nrf1, Nrf2, and Nrf3, the Caenorhabditis elegans SKN-1, and the Drosophila CncC comprise a subgroup of Cnc factors that mediate adaptive responses to cellular stress. The most studied stress-activated Cnc factor is Nrf2, which orchestrates the transcriptional response of cells to oxidative stressors and electrophilic xenobiotics. In rodent models, signaling by Nrf2 defends against oxidative stress and aging-associated disorders, such as neurodegeneration, respiratory diseases, and cancer. In humans, polymorphisms that decrease Nrf2 abundance have been associated with various pathologies of the skin, respiratory system, and digestive tract. In addition to preventing disease in rodents and humans, Cnc factors have lifespan-extending and anti-aging functions in invertebrates. However, despite the pro-longevity and antioxidant roles of stress-activated Cnc factors, their activity paradoxically declines in aging model organisms and in humans suffering from progressing respiratory disease or neurodegeneration. We review the roles and regulation of stress-activated Cnc factors across species, present all reported instances in which their activity is paradoxically decreased in aging and disease, and discuss the possibility that the pharmacological restoration of Nrf2 signaling may be useful in the prevention and treatment of age-related diseases. PMID:20215646

  9. Tyrosine phosphorylation and protein degradation control the transcriptional activity of WRKY involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIQ) are among the most structurally diverse and pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. A plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, was isolated from Coptis japonica and identified as a transcriptional activator of BIQ biosynthesis. However, the expression of CjWRKY1 gene alone was not sufficient for the activation of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Here, we report the importance of post-translational regulation of CjWRKY1 in BIQ biosynthesis. First, we detected the differential accumulation of CjWRKY1 protein in two cell lines with similar CjWRKY1 gene expression but different levels of accumulated alkaloids. Further investigation of the WRKY protein identified the phosphorylation of the WRKYGQK core domain at Y115. The CjWRKYY115E phosphorylation-mimic mutant showed loss of nuclear localization, DNA-binding activity, and transactivation activity compared to wild-type CjWRKY1. Rapid degradation of the CjWRKY1 protein was also confirmed following treatment with inhibitors of the 26S proteasome and protease inhibitors. The existence of two independent degradation pathways as well as protein phosphorylation suggests the fine-tuning of CjWRKY1 activities is involved in the regulation of biosynthesis of BIQs. PMID:27552928

  10. dRYBP Counteracts Chromatin-Dependent Activation and Repression of Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Sarip, Adone; Verrijzer, C. Peter; Busturia, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin dependent activation and repression of transcription is regulated by the histone modifying enzymatic activities of the trithorax (trxG) and Polycomb (PcG) proteins. To investigate the mechanisms underlying their mutual antagonistic activities we analyzed the function of Drosophila dRYBP, a conserved PcG- and trxG-associated protein. We show that dRYBP is itself ubiquitylated and binds ubiquitylated proteins. Additionally we show that dRYBP maintains H2A monoubiquitylation, H3K4 monomethylation and H3K36 dimethylation levels and does not affect H3K27 trimethylation levels. Further we show that dRYBP interacts with the repressive SCE and dKDM2 proteins as well as the activating dBRE1 protein. Analysis of homeotic phenotypes and post-translationally modified histones levels show that dRYBP antagonizes dKDM2 and dBRE1 functions by respectively preventing H3K36me2 demethylation and H2B monoubiquitylation. Interestingly, our results show that inactivation of dBRE1 produces trithorax-like related homeotic transformations, suggesting that dBRE1 functions in the regulation of homeotic genes expression. Our findings indicate that dRYBP regulates morphogenesis by counteracting transcriptional repression and activation. Thus, they suggest that dRYBP may participate in the epigenetic plasticity important during normal and pathological development. PMID:25415640

  11. The Escherichia coli RNA polymerase alpha subunit and transcriptional activation by bacteriophage lambda CII protein.

    PubMed

    Gabig, M; Obuchowski, M; Ciesielska, A; Latała, B; Wegrzyn, A; Thomas, M S; Wegrzyn, G

    1998-01-01

    Bacteriophage lambda is not able to lysogenise the Escherichia coli rpoA341 mutant. This mutation causes a single amino acid substitution Lys271Glu in the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase alpha subunit (alphaCTD). Our previous studies indicated that the impaired lysogenisation of the rpoA341 host is due to a defect in transcriptional activation by the phage CII protein and suggested a role for alphaCTD in this process. Here we used a series of truncation and point mutants in the rpoA gene placed on a plasmid to investigate the process of transcriptional activation by the cII gene product. Our results indicate that amino-acid residues 265, 268 and 271 in the a subunit may play an important role in the CII-mediated activation of the pE promoter (most probably residue 271) or may be involved in putative interactions between alphaCTD and an UP-like element near pE (most probably residues 265 and 268). Measurement of the activity of pE-lacZ, pI-lacZ and p(aQ)-lacZ fusions in the rpoA+ and rpoA341 hosts demonstrated that the mechanism of activation of these CII-dependent promoters may be in each case different.

  12. dRYBP counteracts chromatin-dependent activation and repression of transcription.

    PubMed

    Fereres, Sol; Simón, Rocío; Mohd-Sarip, Adone; Verrijzer, C Peter; Busturia, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin dependent activation and repression of transcription is regulated by the histone modifying enzymatic activities of the trithorax (trxG) and Polycomb (PcG) proteins. To investigate the mechanisms underlying their mutual antagonistic activities we analyzed the function of Drosophila dRYBP, a conserved PcG- and trxG-associated protein. We show that dRYBP is itself ubiquitylated and binds ubiquitylated proteins. Additionally we show that dRYBP maintains H2A monoubiquitylation, H3K4 monomethylation and H3K36 dimethylation levels and does not affect H3K27 trimethylation levels. Further we show that dRYBP interacts with the repressive SCE and dKDM2 proteins as well as the activating dBRE1 protein. Analysis of homeotic phenotypes and post-translationally modified histones levels show that dRYBP antagonizes dKDM2 and dBRE1 functions by respectively preventing H3K36me2 demethylation and H2B monoubiquitylation. Interestingly, our results show that inactivation of dBRE1 produces trithorax-like related homeotic transformations, suggesting that dBRE1 functions in the regulation of homeotic genes expression. Our findings indicate that dRYBP regulates morphogenesis by counteracting transcriptional repression and activation. Thus, they suggest that dRYBP may participate in the epigenetic plasticity important during normal and pathological development.

  13. Dual transcriptional activities underlie opposing effects of retinoic acid on cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Schug, Thaddeus T; Berry, Daniel C.; Shaw, Natacha S.; Travis, Skylar N.; Noy, Noa

    2007-01-01

    Summary Transcriptional activation of the nuclear receptor RAR by retinoic acid (RA) often leads to inhibition of cell growth. However, in some tissues, RA promotes cell survival and hyperplasia, activities that are unlikely to be mediated by RAR. Here we show that, in addition to functioning through RAR, RA activates the ‘orphan’ nuclear receptor PPARβ/δ, which, in turn, induces the expression of pro-survival genes. Partitioning of RA between the two receptors is regulated by the intracellular lipid-binding proteins CRABP-II and FABP5. These proteins specifically deliver RA from the cytosol to nuclear RAR and PPARβ/δ, respectively, thereby selectively enhancing the transcriptional activity of their cognate receptors. Consequently, RA functions through RAR and is a pro-apoptotic agent in cells with high CRABP-II/FABP5 ratio, but it signals through PPARβ/δ and promotes survival in cells that highly express FABP5. Opposing effects of RA on cell growth thus emanate from alternate activation of two different nuclear receptors. PMID:17512406

  14. The Transcriptional Signature of Active Tuberculosis Reflects Symptom Status in Extra-Pulmonary and Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Blankley, Simon; Graham, Christine M.; Turner, Jacob; Berry, Matthew P. R.; Bloom, Chloe I.; Xu, Zhaohui; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; Breen, Ronan; Santis, George; Blankenship, Derek M.; Lipman, Marc; O’Garra, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is a leading cause of infectious death worldwide. Gene-expression microarray studies profiling the blood transcriptional response of tuberculosis (TB) patients have been undertaken in order to better understand the host immune response as well as to identify potential biomarkers of disease. To date most of these studies have focused on pulmonary TB patients with gene-expression profiles of extra-pulmonary TB patients yet to be compared to those of patients with pulmonary TB or sarcoidosis. Methods A novel cohort of patients with extra-pulmonary TB and sarcoidosis was recruited and the transcriptional response of these patients compared to those with pulmonary TB using a variety of transcriptomic approaches including testing a previously defined 380 gene meta-signature of active TB. Results The 380 meta-signature broadly differentiated active TB from healthy controls in this new dataset consisting of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB. The top 15 genes from this meta-signature had a lower sensitivity for differentiating extra-pulmonary TB from healthy controls as compared to pulmonary TB. We found the blood transcriptional responses in pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB to be heterogeneous and to reflect the extent of symptoms of disease. Conclusions The transcriptional signature in extra-pulmonary TB demonstrated heterogeneity of gene expression reflective of symptom status, while the signature of pulmonary TB was distinct, based on a higher proportion of symptomatic individuals. These findings are of importance for the rational design and implementation of mRNA based TB diagnostics. PMID:27706152

  15. Activity-Based Anorexia Alters the Expression of BDNF Transcripts in the Mesocorticolimbic Reward Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Emily V.; Klenotich, Stephanie J.; McMurray, Matthew S.; Dulawa, Stephanie C

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex eating disorder with severe dysregulation of appetitive behavior. The activity-based anorexia (ABA) paradigm is an animal model in which rodents exposed to both running wheels and scheduled feeding develop aspects of AN including paradoxical hypophagia, dramatic weight loss, and hyperactivity, while animals exposed to only one condition maintain normal body weight. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), an activity-dependent modulator of neuronal plasticity, is reduced in the serum of AN patients, and is a known regulator of feeding and weight maintenance. We assessed the effects of scheduled feeding, running wheel access, or both on the expression of BDNF transcripts within the mesocorticolimbic pathway. We also assessed the expression of neuronal cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) to explore the specificity of effects on BDNF within the mesocorticolimbic pathway. Scheduled feeding increased the levels of both transcripts in the hippocampus (HPC), increased NCAM1 mRNA expression in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and decreased BDNF mRNA levels in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In addition, wheel running increased BDNF mRNA expression in the VTA. No changes in either transcript were observed in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Furthermore, no changes in either transcript were induced by the combined scheduled feeding and wheel access condition. These data indicate that scheduled feeding or wheel running alter BDNF and NCAM1 expression levels in specific regions of the mesocorticolimbic pathway. These findings contribute to our current knowledge of the molecular alterations induced by ABA and may help elucidate possible mechanisms of AN pathology. PMID:27861553

  16. Dissection of TALE-dependent gene activation reveals that they induce transcription cooperatively and in both orientations

    PubMed Central

    Streubel, Jana; Baum, Heidi; Grau, Jan; Stuttman, Johannes; Boch, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Plant-pathogenic Xanthomonas bacteria inject transcription activator-like effector proteins (TALEs) into host cells to specifically induce transcription of plant genes and enhance susceptibility. Although the DNA-binding mode is well-understood it is still ambiguous how TALEs initiate transcription and whether additional promoter elements are needed to support this. To systematically dissect prerequisites for transcriptional initiation the activity of one TALE was compared on different synthetic Bs4 promoter fragments. In addition, a large collection of artificial TALEs spanning the OsSWEET14 promoter was compared. We show that the presence of a TALE alone is not sufficient to initiate transcription suggesting the requirement of additional supporting promoter elements. At the OsSWEET14 promoter TALEs can initiate transcription from various positions, in a synergistic manner of multiple TALEs binding in parallel to the promoter, and even by binding in reverse orientation. TALEs are known to shift the transcriptional start site, but our data show that this shift depends on the individual position of a TALE within a promoter context. Our results implicate that TALEs function like classical enhancer-binding proteins and initiate transcription in both orientations which has consequences for in planta target gene prediction and design of artificial activators. PMID:28301511

  17. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-01-01

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4+ T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4+ T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4+ T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. PMID:26184775

  18. A Trihelix DNA Binding Protein Counterbalances Hypoxia-Responsive Transcriptional Activation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Licausi, Francesco; Kosmacz, Monika; Oosumi, Teruko; van Dongen, Joost T.; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional activation in response to hypoxia in plants is orchestrated by ethylene-responsive factor group VII (ERF-VII) transcription factors, which are stable during hypoxia but destabilized during normoxia through their targeting to the N-end rule pathway of selective proteolysis. Whereas the conditionally expressed ERF-VII genes enable effective flooding survival strategies in rice, the constitutive accumulation of N-end-rule–insensitive versions of the Arabidopsis thaliana ERF-VII factor RAP2.12 is maladaptive. This suggests that transcriptional activation under hypoxia that leads to anaerobic metabolism may need to be fine-tuned. However, it is presently unknown whether a counterbalance of RAP2.12 exists. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses identified an uncharacterized trihelix transcription factor gene, which we named HYPOXIA RESPONSE ATTENUATOR1 (HRA1), as highly up-regulated by hypoxia. HRA1 counteracts the induction of core low oxygen-responsive genes and transcriptional activation of hypoxia-responsive promoters by RAP2.12. By yeast-two-hybrid assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrated that HRA1 interacts with the RAP2.12 protein but with only a few genomic DNA regions from hypoxia-regulated genes, indicating that HRA1 modulates RAP2.12 through protein–protein interaction. Comparison of the low oxygen response of tissues characterized by different levels of metabolic hypoxia (i.e., the shoot apical zone versus mature rosette leaves) revealed that the antagonistic interplay between RAP2.12 and HRA1 enables a flexible response to fluctuating hypoxia and is of importance to stress survival. In Arabidopsis, an effective low oxygen-sensing response requires RAP2.12 stabilization followed by HRA1 induction to modulate the extent of the anaerobic response by negative feedback regulation of RAP2.12. This mechanism is crucial for plant survival under suboptimal oxygenation conditions. The discovery of the feedback loop regulating the oxygen

  19. Control of 5S RNA transcription in Xenopus somatic cell chromatin: activation with an oocyte extract.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, W F; Bloomer, L S; Gottesfeld, J M

    1983-01-01

    A chromatin fraction enriched for Xenopus 5S RNA genes has been isolated by restriction endonuclease digestion and sucrose gradient velocity sedimentation. Soluble chromatin sedimenting at 70-80S contains approximately 50% of the oocyte-expressed 5S RNA genes and only 1.5-3% of total chromatin DNA; this represents a 15- to 30-fold purification of the 5S genes. Such chromatin isolated from somatic cells (blood and cultured kidney cells) retains the transcriptionally-inactive state of the oocyte-expressed 5S genes. Soluble chromatin from somatic cells prepared by micrococcal nuclease digestion also retains the inactive state of the oocyte-type 5S genes. It is likely that the level of chromatin structure responsible for inactivity of the oocyte genes in somatic cells is the nucleosome or short chains of nucleosomes and not supranucleosomal structures. The oocyte-type genes can be rendered transcriptionally active in somatic cell chromatin either by salt extraction of some chromosomal proteins or by treatment with the ion exchange resin Dowex A50W-X2. Alternatively, activation of these genes can be achieved by incubating somatic cell chromatin or nuclei with an extract prepared from Xenopus oocytes. This effect is not specific for 5S RNA genes as the transcription of other small RNAs (including pre-tRNA) is stimulated by the oocyte extract. The activating factor(s) is resistant to micrococcal nuclease, nondialyzable, heat labile and sensitive to trypsin; thus it is highly likely to be a protein or a group of proteins. Partial purification of the activating factor(s) has been achieved by ion exchange chromatography. Images PMID:6866764

  20. Epigenetic mediated transcriptional activation of WNT5A participates in arsenical-associated malignant transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Taylor J.; Wozniak, Ryan J.; Eblin, Kylee E.; Wnek, Sean M.; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2009-02-15

    Arsenic is a human carcinogen with exposure associated with cancer of the lung, skin, and bladder. Many potential mechanisms have been implicated as playing a role in the process of arsenical-induced malignancy including the perturbation of signaling pathways and aberrant epigenetic regulation. We initiated studies to examine the role of a member of the non-canonical WNT signaling pathway, WNT5A, in UROtsa cells and arsenite [URO-ASSC] and monomethylarsonous acid [URO-MSC] malignantly transformed variants. We present data herein that suggest that WNT5A is transcriptionally activated during arsenical-induced malignant transformation. This WNT5A transcriptional activation is correlated with the enrichment of permissive histone modifications and the reduction of repressive modifications in the WNT5A promoter region. The epigenetic activation of WNT5A expression and acetylation of its promoter remain after the removal of the arsenical, consistent with the maintenance of an anchorage independent growth phenotype in these cells. Additionally, treatment with epigenetic modifying drugs supports a functional role for these epigenetic marks in controlling gene expression. Reduction of WNT5A using lentiviral shRNA greatly attenuated the ability of these cells to grow in an anchorage independent fashion. Extension of our model into human bladder cancer cell lines indicates that each of the cell lines examined also express WNT5A. Taken together, these data suggest that the epigenetic remodeling of the WNT5A promoter is correlated with its transcriptional activation and this upregulation likely participates in arsenical-induced malignant transformation.

  1. The transcriptional repressor ARR1-SRDX suppresses pleiotropic cytokinin activities in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Heyl, Alexander; Ramireddy, Eswar; Brenner, Wolfram G; Riefler, Michael; Allemeersch, Joke; Schmülling, Thomas

    2008-07-01

    The signal transduction of the phytohormone cytokinin is mediated by a multistep histidine-to-aspartate phosphorelay system. One component of this system are B-type response regulators, transcription factors mediating at least part of the response to cytokinin. In planta functional analysis of this family is hampered by the high level of functional redundancy of its 11 members. We generated a dominant repressor version of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) response regulator ARR1 (ARR1-SRDX) using chimeric repressor silencing technology in order to study the extent of the contribution of B-type response regulators to cytokinin activities. In a protoplast test system, ARR1-SRDX suppressed ARR6:beta-glucuronidase reporter gene activation by different B-type ARRs. 35S:ARR1-SRDX transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed phenotypic changes reminiscent of plants with a reduced cytokinin status, such as a strongly reduced leaf size, an enhanced root system, and larger seeds. Several bioassays showed that 35S:ARR1-SRDX plants have an increased resistance toward cytokinin. The rapid induction of a large part of the cytokinin response genes was dampened. The transcript levels of more than 500 genes were more than 2.5-fold reduced in 35S:ARR1-SRDX transgenic seedlings, suggesting a broad function of B-type ARRs. Collectively, the suppression of pleiotropic cytokinin activities by a dominant repressor version of a B-type ARR indicates that this protein family is involved in mediating most, if not all, of the cytokinin activities in Arabidopsis. In addition, a role for B-type ARRs in mediating cross talk with other pathways is supported by the resistance of 35S:ARR1-SRDX seeds to phytochrome B-mediated inhibition of germination by far-red light. This study demonstrates the usefulness of chimeric repressor silencing technology to overcome redundancy in transcription factor families for functional studies.

  2. Exploring the transcription activator-like effectors scaffold versatility to expand the toolbox of designer nucleases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The past decade has seen the emergence of several molecular tools that render possible modification of cellular functions through accurate and easy addition, removal, or exchange of genomic DNA sequences. Among these technologies, transcription activator-like effectors (TALE) has turned out to be one of the most versatile and incredibly robust platform for generating targeted molecular tools as demonstrated by fusion to various domains such as transcription activator, repressor and nucleases. Results In this study, we generated a novel nuclease architecture based on the transcription activator-like effector scaffold. In contrast to the existing Tail to Tail (TtT) and head to Head (HtH) nuclease architectures based on the symmetrical association of two TALE DNA binding domains fused to the C-terminal (TtT) or N-terminal (HtH) end of FokI, this novel architecture consists of the asymmetrical association of two different engineered TALE DNA binding domains fused to the N- and C-terminal ends of FokI (TALE::FokI and FokI::TALE scaffolds respectively). The characterization of this novel Tail to Head (TtH) architecture in yeast enabled us to demonstrate its nuclease activity and define its optimal target configuration. We further showed that this architecture was able to promote substantial level of targeted mutagenesis at three endogenous loci present in two different mammalian cell lines. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that this novel functional TtH architecture which requires binding to only one DNA strand of a given endogenous locus has the potential to extend the targeting possibility of FokI-based TALE nucleases. PMID:24997498

  3. Epigenetic Mediated Transcriptional Activation of WNT5A Participates in Arsenical-Associated Malignant Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Taylor J.; Wozniak, Ryan J.; Eblin, Kylee E.; Wnek, Sean M.; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is a human carcinogen with exposure associated with cancer of the lung, skin, and bladder. Many potential mechanisms have been implicated as playing a role in the process of arsenical-induced malignancy including the perturbation of signaling pathways and aberrant epigenetic regulation. We initiated studies to examine the role of a member of the non-canonical WNT signaling pathway, WNT5A, in UROtsa cells and arsenite [URO-ASSC] and monomethylarsonous acid [URO-MSC] malignantly transformed variants. We present data herein that suggests that WNT5A is transcriptionally activated during arsenical-induced malignant transformation. This WNT5A transcriptional activation is correlated with the enrichment of permissive histone modifications and the reduction of repressive modifications in the WNT5A promoter region. The epigenetic activation of WNT5A expression and acetylation of its promoter remain after the removal of the arsenical, consistent with the maintenance of an anchorage independent growth phenotype in these cells. Additionally, treatment with epigenetic modifying drugs supports a functional role for these epigenetic marks in controlling gene expression. Reduction of WNT5A using lentiviral shRNA greatly attenuated the ability of these cells to grow in an anchorage independent fashion. Extension of our model into human bladder cancer cell lines indicate that each of the cell lines examined also express WNT5A. Taken together, these data suggest that the epigenetic remodeling of the WNT5A promoter is correlated with its transcriptional activation and this upregulation likely participates in arsenical-induced malignant transformation. PMID:19061910

  4. Epigenetic mediated transcriptional activation of WNT5A participates in arsenical-associated malignant transformation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Taylor J; Wozniak, Ryan J; Eblin, Kylee E; Wnek, Sean M; Gandolfi, A Jay; Futscher, Bernard W

    2009-02-15

    Arsenic is a human carcinogen with exposure associated with cancer of the lung, skin, and bladder. Many potential mechanisms have been implicated as playing a role in the process of arsenical-induced malignancy including the perturbation of signaling pathways and aberrant epigenetic regulation. We initiated studies to examine the role of a member of the non-canonical WNT signaling pathway, WNT5A, in UROtsa cells and arsenite [URO-ASSC] and monomethylarsonous acid [URO-MSC] malignantly transformed variants. We present data herein that suggest that WNT5A is transcriptionally activated during arsenical-induced malignant transformation. This WNT5A transcriptional activation is correlated with the enrichment of permissive histone modifications and the reduction of repressive modifications in the WNT5A promoter region. The epigenetic activation of WNT5A expression and acetylation of its promoter remain after the removal of the arsenical, consistent with the maintenance of an anchorage independent growth phenotype in these cells. Additionally, treatment with epigenetic modifying drugs supports a functional role for these epigenetic marks in controlling gene expression. Reduction of WNT5A using lentiviral shRNA greatly attenuated the ability of these cells to grow in an anchorage independent fashion. Extension of our model into human bladder cancer cell lines indicates that each of the cell lines examined also express WNT5A. Taken together, these data suggest that the epigenetic remodeling of the WNT5A promoter is correlated with its transcriptional activation and this upregulation likely participates in arsenical-induced malignant transformation.

  5. Activation of gene transcription via CIM0216, a synthetic ligand of transient receptor potential melastatin-3 (TRPM3) channels.

    PubMed

    Rubil, Sandra; Thiel, Gerald

    2017-01-02

    Several compounds have been proposed to stimulate TRPM3 Ca(2+) channels. We recently showed that stimulation of TRPM3 channels with pregnenolone sulfate activated the transcription factor AP-1, while other proposed TRPM3 ligands (nifedipine, D-erythro-sphingosine) exhibited either no or TRPM3-independent effects on gene transcription. Here, we have analyzed the transcriptional activity of CIM0216, a synthetic TRPM3 ligand proposed to have a higher potency and affinity for TRPM3 than pregnenolone sulfate. The results show that CIM0216 treatment of HEK293 cells expressing TRPM3 channels activated AP-1 and stimulated the transcriptional activation potential of c-Jun and c-Fos, 2 basic region leucine zipper transcription factors that constitute AP-1. CIM0216-induced gene transcription was attenuated by knock-down of TRPM3 or treatment with mefenamic acid, a TRPM3 inhibitor. CIM0216 was similarly or less capable in activating TRPM3-mediated gene transcription, suggesting that pregnenolone sulfate is still the ligand of choice for changing the gene expression pattern via TRPM3.

  6. Activating Transcription Factor 4 and X Box Binding Protein 1 of Litopenaeus vannamei Transcriptional Regulated White Spot Syndrome Virus Genes Wsv023 and Wsv083

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Yun; Pang, Li-Ran; Chen, Yong-Gui; Weng, Shao-Ping; Yue, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Ze-Zhi; Chen, Yi-Hong; He, Jian-Guo

    2013-01-01

    In response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, the signaling pathway termed unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated. To investigate the role of UPR in Litopenaeus vannamei immunity, the activating transcription factor 4 (designated as LvATF4) which belonged to a branch of the UPR, the [protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like ER kinase, (PERK)]-[eukaryotic initiation factor 2 subunit alpha (eIF2α)] pathway, was identified and characterized. The full-length cDNA of LvATF4 was 1972 bp long, with an open reading frame of 1299 bp long that encoded a 432 amino acid protein. LvATF4 was highly expressed in gills, intestines and stomach. For the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge, LvATF4 was upregulated in the gills after 3 hpi and increased by 1.9-fold (96 hpi) compared to the mock-treated group. The LvATF4 knock-down by RNA interference resulted in a lower cumulative mortality of L. vannamei under WSSV infection. Reporter gene assays show that LvATF4 could upregulate the expression of the WSSV gene wsv023 based on the activating transcription factor/cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate response element (ATF/CRE). Another transcription factor of L. vannamei, X box binding protein 1 (designated as LvXBP1), has a significant function in [inositol-requiring enzyme-1(IRE1) – (XBP1)] pathway. This transcription factor upregulated the expression of the WSSV gene wsv083 based on the UPR element (UPRE). These results suggest that in L. vannamei UPR signaling pathway transcription factors are important for WSSV and might facilitate WSSV infection. PMID:23638122

  7. MeCP2 regulates activity-dependent transcriptional responses in olfactory sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wooje; Yun, Jung-Mi; Woods, Rima; Dunaway, Keith; Yasui, Dag H.; Lasalle, Janine M.; Gong, Qizhi

    2014-01-01

    During postnatal development, neuronal activity controls the remodeling of initially imprecise neuronal connections through the regulation of gene expression. MeCP2 binds to methylated DNA and modulates gene expression during neuronal development and MECP2 mutation causes the autistic disorder Rett syndrome. To investigate a role for MeCP2 in neuronal circuit refinement and to identify activity-dependent MeCP2 transcription regulations, we leveraged the precise organization and accessibility of olfactory sensory axons to manipulation of neuronal activity through odorant exposure in vivo. We demonstrate that olfactory sensory axons failed to develop complete convergence when Mecp2 is deficient in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in an otherwise wild-type animal. Furthermore, we demonstrate that expression of selected adhesion genes was elevated in Mecp2-deficient glomeruli, while acute odor stimulation in control mice resulted in significantly reduced MeCP2 binding to these gene loci, correlating with increased expression. Thus, MeCP2 is required for both circuitry refinement and activity-dependent transcriptional responses in OSNs. PMID:25008110

  8. DNA damage induces N-acetyltransferase NAT10 gene expression through transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haijing; Ling, Yun; Gong, Yilei; Sun, Ying; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Bo

    2007-06-01

    NAT10 (N-acetyltransferase 10) is a protein with histone acetylation activity and primarily identified to be involved in regulation of telomerase activity. The presented research shows its transcriptional activation by genotoxic agents and possible role in DNA damage. NAT10 mRNA could be markedly increased by using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or cisplatin in a dose- and time-dependent way, and the immunofluorescent staining revealed that the treatment of H2O2 or cisplatin induced focal accumulation of NAT10 protein in cellular nuclei. Both H2O2 and cisplatin could stimulate the transcriptional activity of the NAT10 promoter through the upstream sequences from -615 bp to +110 bp, with which some nuclear proteins interacted. Ectopic expression of NAT10 could enhance the number of survival cells in the presence of H2O2 or cisplatin. The above results suggested that NAT10 could be involved in DNA damage response and increased cellular resistance to genotoxicity.

  9. FOS-1 functions as a transcriptional activator downstream of the C. elegans JNK homolog KGB-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Liu, Limeng; Twumasi-Boateng, Kwame; Block, Dena H S; Shapira, Michael

    2017-01-01

    JNK proteins are conserved stress-activated MAP kinases. In C. elegans, the JNK-homolog KGB-1 plays essential roles in protection from heavy metals and protein folding stress. However, the contributions of KGB-1 are age-dependent, providing protection in larvae, but reducing stress resistance and shortening lifespan in adults. Attenuation of DAF-16 was linked to the detrimental contributions of KGB-1 in adults, but its involvement in KGB-1-dependent protection in larvae remains unclear. To characterize age-dependent contributions of KGB-1, we used microarray analysis to measure gene expression following KGB-1 activation either in developing larvae or in adults, achieved by knocking down its negative phosphatase regulator vhp-1. This revealed a robust KGB-1 regulon, most of which consisting of genes induced following KGB-1 activation regardless of age; a smaller number of genes was regulated in an age-dependent manner. We found that the bZIP transcription factor FOS-1 was essential for age-invariant KGB-1-dependent gene induction, but not for age-dependent expression. The latter was more affected by DAF-16, which was further found to be required for KGB-1-dependent cadmium resistance in larvae. Our results identify FOS-1 as a transcriptional activator mediating age-invariant contributions of KGB-1, including a regulatory loop of KGB-1 signaling, but also stress the importance of DAF-16 as a mediator of age-dependent contributions.

  10. Regulation of WRKY46 Transcription Factor Function by Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Arsheed H.; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Pecher, Pascal; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Sinha, Alok K.; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are central signaling pathways activated in plants after sensing internal developmental and external stress cues. Knowledge about the downstream substrate proteins of MAPKs is still limited in plants. We screened Arabidopsis WRKY transcription factors as potential targets downstream of MAPKs, and concentrated on characterizing WRKY46 as a substrate of the MAPK, MPK3. Mass spectrometry revealed in vitro phosphorylation of WRKY46 at amino acid position S168 by MPK3. However, mutagenesis studies showed that a second phosphosite, S250, can also be phosphorylated. Elicitation with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the bacterial flagellin-derived flg22 peptide led to in vivo destabilization of WRKY46 in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Mutation of either phosphorylation site reduced the PAMP-induced degradation of WRKY46. Furthermore, the protein for the double phosphosite mutant is expressed at higher levels compared to wild-type proteins or single phosphosite mutants. In line with its nuclear localization and predicted function as a transcriptional activator, overexpression of WRKY46 in protoplasts raised basal plant defense as reflected by the increase in promoter activity of the PAMP-responsive gene, NHL10, in a MAPK-dependent manner. Thus, MAPK-mediated regulation of WRKY46 is a mechanism to control plant defense. PMID:26870073

  11. An inducible transcription factor activates expression of human immunodeficiency virus in T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Gary; Baltimore, David

    1987-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) production from latently infected T lymphocytes can be induced with compounds that activate the cells to secrete lymphokines1,2. The elements in the HIV genome which control activation are not known but expression might be regulated through a variety of DNA elements. The cis-acting control elements of the viral genome are enhancer and promoter regions. The virus also encodes trans-acting factors specified by the tat-III (refs 3-6) and art genes7. We have examined whether products specific to activated T cells might stimulate viral transcription by binding to regions on viral DNA. Activation of T cells, which increases HIV expression up to 50-fold, correlated with induction of a DNA binding protein indistinguishable from a recognized transcription factor, called NF-κB (ref. 8), with binding sites in the viral enhancer. Mutation of these binding sites abolished inducibility. That NF-κB acts in synergy with the viral tat-III gene product to enhance HIV expression in T cells may have implications for the pathogenesis of AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome).

  12. Transcriptional activation of the human cytotoxic serine protease gene CSP-B in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R D; Ley, T J

    1990-01-01

    The cytotoxic serine protease B (CSP-B) gene is activated during cytotoxic T-lymphocyte maturation. In this report, we demonstrate that the PEER T-cell line (bearing gamma/delta T-cell receptors) accumulates CSP-B mRNA following exposure to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and N6-2'-O-dibutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (bt2cAMP) because of transcriptional activation of the CSP-B gene. TPA and bt2cAMP act synergistically to induce CSP-B expression, since neither agent alone causes activation of CSP-B transcription or mRNA accumulation. Chromatin upstream from the CSP-B gene is resistant to DNase I digestion in untreated PEER cells, but becomes sensitive following TPA-bt2cAMP treatment. Upon activation of PEER cells, a DNase I-hypersensitive site forms upstream from the CSP-B gene within a region that is highly conserved in the mouse. Transient transfection of CSP-B promoter constructs identified two regulatory regions in the CSP-B 5'-flanking sequence, located at positions -609 to -202 and positions -202 to -80. The region from -615 to -63 is sufficient to activate a heterologous promoter in activated PEER cells, but activation is orientation specific, suggesting that this region behaves as an upstream promoter element rather than a classical enhancer. Consensus AP-1, AP-2, and cAMP response elements are found upstream from the CSP-B gene (as are several T-cell-specific consensus elements), but the roles of these elements in CSP-B gene activation have yet to be determined. Images PMID:2233710

  13. Extrachromosomal HPV-16 LCR transcriptional activation by HDACi opposed by cellular differentiation and DNA integration.

    PubMed

    Bojilova, Ekaterina Dimitrova; Weyn, Christine; Antoine, Marie-Hélène; Fontaine, Véronique

    2016-11-15

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have been shown to render HPV-carrying cells susceptible to intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signals. As such, these epigenetic drugs have entered clinical trials in the effort to treat cervical cancer. Here, we studied the effect of common HDACi, with an emphasis on Trichostatin A (TSA), on the transcriptional activity of the HPV-16 Long Control Region (LCR) in order to better understand the impact of these agents in the context of the HPV life cycle and infection. HDACi strongly induced transcription of the firefly luciferase reporter gene under the control of the HPV-16 LCR in a variety of cell lines. In the HaCaT keratinocyte cell line undergoing differentiation induced by TSA, we observed a reduction in LCR-controlled transcription. Three major AP-1 binding sites in the HPV-16 LCR are involved in the regulation by TSA. However, whatever the status of differentiation of the HaCaT cells, TSA induced integration of extra-chromosomal transfected DNA into the cellular genome. Although these data suggest caution using HDACi in the treatment of HR HPV infection, further in vivo studies are necessary to better assess the risk.

  14. Effects of Indole-3-Acetic Acid on the Transcriptional Activities and Stress Tolerance of Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Andrew J.; Lee, Hae-In; Leveau, Johan H. J.; Chang, Woo-Suk

    2013-01-01

    A genome-wide transcriptional profile of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, the nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont of the soybean plant, revealed differential expression of approximately 15% of the genome after a 1 mM treatment with the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). A total of 1,323 genes were differentially expressed (619 up-regulated and 704 down-regulated) at a two-fold cut off with q value ≤ 0.05. General stress response genes were induced, such as those involved in response to heat, cold, oxidative, osmotic, and desiccation stresses and in exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis. This suggests that IAA is effective in activating a generalized stress response in B. japonicum. The transcriptional data were corroborated by the finding that stress tolerance of B. japonicum in cell viability assays was enhanced when pre-treated with 1 mM IAA compared to controls. The IAA treatment also stimulated biofilm formation and EPS production by B. japonicum, especially acidic sugar components in the total EPS. The IAA pre-treatment did not influence the nodulation ability of B. japonicum. The data provide a comprehensive overview of the potential transcriptional responses of the symbiotic bacterium when exposed to the ubiquitous hormone of its plant host. PMID:24098533

  15. PML/RARa inhibits PTEN expression in hematopoietic cells by competing with PU.1 transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Noguera, Nélida Inés; Piredda, Maria Liliana; Taulli, Riccardo; Catalano, Gianfranco; Angelini, Giulia; Gaur, Girish; Nervi, Clara; Voso, Maria Teresa; Lunardi, Andrea; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocitic leukemia (APL) is characterized by the pathognomonic presence in leukemic blasts of the hybrid protein PML/RARA, that acts as a transcriptional repressor impairing the expression of genes that are critical to myeloid differentiation. Here, we show that primary blasts from APL patients express lower levels of the oncosuppressor protein PTEN, as compared to blast cells from other AML subtypes or normal bone marrow, and demonstrate that PML-RARA directly inhibits PTEN expression. We show that All-Trans Retinoic Acid (ATRA) triggers in APL cells an active chromatin status at the core regulatory region of the PTEN promoter, that allows the binding of the myeloid-regulating transcription factor PU.1, and, in turn, the transcriptional induction of PTEN. ATRA, via PML/RARA degradation, also promotes PTEN nuclear re-localization and decreases expression of the PTEN target Aurora A kinase. In conclusion, our findings support the notion that PTEN is one of the primary targets of PML/RARA in APL PMID:27626703

  16. The artificial zinc finger coding gene 'Jazz' binds the utrophin promoter and activates transcription.

    PubMed

    Corbi, N; Libri, V; Fanciulli, M; Tinsley, J M; Davies, K E; Passananti, C

    2000-06-01

    Up-regulation of utrophin gene expression is recognized as a plausible therapeutic approach in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have designed and engineered new zinc finger-based transcription factors capable of binding and activating transcription from the promoter of the dystrophin-related gene, utrophin. Using the recognition 'code' that proposes specific rules between zinc finger primary structure and potential DNA binding sites, we engineered a new gene named 'Jazz' that encodes for a three-zinc finger peptide. Jazz belongs to the Cys2-His2 zinc finger type and was engineered to target the nine base pair DNA sequence: 5'-GCT-GCT-GCG-3', present in the promoter region of both the human and mouse utrophin gene. The entire zinc finger alpha-helix region, containing the amino acid positions that are crucial for DNA binding, was specifically chosen on the basis of the contacts more frequently represented in the available list of the 'code'. Here we demonstrate that Jazz protein binds specifically to the double-stranded DNA target, with a dissociation constant of about 32 nM. Band shift and super-shift experiments confirmed the high affinity and specificity of Jazz protein for its DNA target. Moreover, we show that chimeric proteins, named Gal4-Jazz and Sp1-Jazz, are able to drive the transcription of a test gene from the human utrophin promoter.

  17. ATP-dependent motor activity of the transcription termination factor Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    D'Heygère, François; Schwartz, Annie; Coste, Franck; Castaing, Bertrand; Boudvillain, Marc

    2015-07-13

    The bacterial transcription termination factor Rho-a ring-shaped molecular motor displaying directional, ATP-dependent RNA helicase/translocase activity-is an interesting therapeutic target. Recently, Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbRho) has been proposed to operate by a mechanism uncoupled from molecular motor action, suggesting that the manner used by Rho to dissociate transcriptional complexes is not conserved throughout the bacterial kingdom. Here, however, we demonstrate that MtbRho is a bona fide molecular motor and directional helicase which requires a catalytic site competent for ATP hydrolysis to disrupt RNA duplexes or transcription elongation complexes. Moreover, we show that idiosyncratic features of the MtbRho enzyme are conferred by a large, hydrophilic insertion in its N-terminal 'RNA binding' domain and by a non-canonical R-loop residue in its C-terminal 'motor' domain. We also show that the 'motor' domain of MtbRho has a low apparent affinity for the Rho inhibitor bicyclomycin, thereby contributing to explain why M. tuberculosis is resistant to this drug. Overall, our findings support that, in spite of adjustments of the Rho motor to specific traits of its hosting bacterium, the basic principles of Rho action are conserved across species and could thus constitute pertinent screening criteria in high-throughput searches of new Rho inhibitors.

  18. EGR1 regulates hepatic clock gene amplitude by activating Per1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weiwei; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Qian; Lai, Shan-Shan; Jiang, Shan; Jiang, Chen; Xu, Ying; Xue, Bin; Du, Jie; Li, Chao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian clock system is composed of a master clock and peripheral clocks. At the molecular level, the rhythm-generating mechanism is controlled by a molecular clock composed of positive and negative feedback loops. However, the underlying mechanisms for molecular clock regulation that affect circadian clock function remain unclear. Here, we show that Egr1 (early growth response 1), an early growth response gene, is expressed in mouse liver in a circadian manner. Consistently, Egr1 is transactivated by the CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer through a conserved E-box response element. In hepatocytes, EGR1 regulates the transcription of several core clock genes, including Bmal1, Per1, Per2, Rev-erbα and Rev-erbβ, and the rhythm amplitude of their expression is dependent on EGR1’s transcriptional function. Further mechanistic studies indicated that EGR1 binds to the proximal region of the Per1 promoter to activate its transcription directly. When the peripheral clock is altered by light or feeding behavior transposition in Egr1-deficient mice, the expression phase of hepatic clock genes shifts normally, but the amplitude is also altered. Our data reveal a critical role for EGR1 in the regulation of hepatic clock circuitry, which may contribute to the rhythm stability of peripheral clock oscillators. PMID:26471974

  19. Extrachromosomal HPV-16 LCR transcriptional activation by HDACi opposed by cellular differentiation and DNA integration

    PubMed Central

    Bojilova, Ekaterina Dimitrova; Weyn, Christine; Antoine, Marie-Hélène; Fontaine, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have been shown to render HPV-carrying cells susceptible to intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signals. As such, these epigenetic drugs have entered clinical trials in the effort to treat cervical cancer. Here, we studied the effect of common HDACi, with an emphasis on Trichostatin A (TSA), on the transcriptional activity of the HPV-16 Long Control Region (LCR) in order to better understand the impact of these agents in the context of the HPV life cycle and infection. HDACi strongly induced transcription of the firefly luciferase reporter gene under the control of the HPV-16 LCR in a variety of cell lines. In the HaCaT keratinocyte cell line undergoing differentiation induced by TSA, we observed a reduction in LCR-controlled transcription. Three major AP-1 binding sites in the HPV-16 LCR are involved in the regulation by TSA. However, whatever the status of differentiation of the HaCaT cells, TSA induced integration of extra-chromosomal transfected DNA into the cellular genome. Although these data suggest caution using HDACi in the treatment of HR HPV infection, further in vivo studies are necessary to better assess the risk. PMID:27705914

  20. Age-associated changes in basal c-fos transcription factor binding activity in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Tsou, H; Azhar, G; Lu, X G; Kovacs, S; Peacocke, M; Wei, J Y

    1996-12-15

    The early response proto-oncogene c-fos is expressed at very low levels in the mammalian heart at baseline. To further investigate the mechanism of altered c-fos expression with age, we studied in the basal state the binding of five transcription proteins to their cognate sites in the c-fos promoter/enhancer region, in adult and old F344 rats. Our results show a reduced binding of E2F and AP1 proteins to the c-fos promoter in aging hearts. The major calcium/cyclic AMP response element (CRE) and SP1 binding was unchanged. The only increase seen with age was in the serum response element (SRE) binding proteins. SRE is the point of convergence of different signal transduction pathways (via MAP kinases and the Rho family of GTPases) at the c-fos promoter. Increased SRE binding may reflect a compensation for a decreased binding of other transcription proteins to the c-fos promoter, alteration in the phosphorylation status of SRF, or a change in the ternary complex factors Elk 1 or SAP 1. Other possibilities include defects in the signal transduction pathways with aging, which combine to produce an overall negative balance in the function of the c-fos promoter despite the increased SRE binding activity. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments have shown decreased c-fos expression with age. This may be due partly to alterations in the basal levels of transcription factor binding.

  1. Protective upregulation of activating transcription factor-3 against glutamate neurotoxicity in neuronal cells under ischemia.

    PubMed

    Takarada, Takeshi; Kou, Miki; Hida, Miho; Fukumori, Ryo; Nakamura, Saki; Kutsukake, Takaya; Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Hinoi, Eiichi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluates the pathological role of the stress sensor activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3) in ischemic neurotoxicity. Upregulation of the transcript and protein for ATF3 was seen 2-10 hr after reperfusion in the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere of mice with transient middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2 hr. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the expression of ATF3 by cells immunoreactive for a neuronal marker in neocortex, hippocampus, and striatum within 2 hr after reperfusion. In murine neocortical neurons previously cultured under ischemic conditions for 2 hr, transient upregulation of both Atf3 and ATF3 expression was similarly found during subsequent culture for 2-24 hr under normoxia. Lentiviral overexpression of ATF3 ameliorated the neurotoxicity of glutamate (Glu) in cultured murine neurons along with a slight but statistically significant inhibition of both Fluo-3 and rhodamine-2 fluorescence increases by N-methyl-D-aspartate. Similarly, transient upregulation was seen in Atf3 and ATF3 expression during the culture for 48 hr in neuronal Neuro2A cells previously cultured under ischemic conditions for 2 hr. Luciferase reporter analysis with ATF3 promoter together with immunoblotting revealed the possible involvement of several transcription factors responsive to extracellular and intracellular stressors in the transactivation of the Atf3 gene in Neuro2A cells. ATF3 could be upregulated to play a role in mechanisms underlying mitigation of the neurotoxicity mediated by the endogenous neurotoxin Glu at an early stage after ischemic signal inputs.

  2. Transcription is Associated with Z-DNA Formation in Metabolically Active Permeabilized Mammalian Cell Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, Burghardt; Dorbic, Tomislav; Rich, Alexander

    1991-03-01

    Mammalian cells have been encapsulated in agarose microbeads, and from these cells metabolically active permeabilized nuclei were prepared. Previously, we showed that biotin-labeled monoclonal antibodies against Z-DNA can be diffused into the nuclei and, over a specific concentration range, they will bind to Z-DNA within the nucleus in a concentration-independent manner. By using radiolabeled streptavidin, we showed that the amount of Z-DNA antibody bound is related to the torsional strain of the DNA in the nucleus. Relaxation of the DNA results in a decrease of Z-DNA formation, whereas increasing torsional strain through inhibiting topoisomerase I results in increased Z-DNA formation. Here we measure the influence of RNA transcription and DNA replication. Transcription is associated with a substantial increase in the binding of anti-Z-DNA antibodies, paralleling the increased level of RNA synthesized as the level of ribonucleoside triphosphate in the medium is increased. DNA replication yields smaller increases in the binding of Z-DNA antibodies. Stopping RNA transcription with inhibitors results in a large loss of Z-DNA antibody binding, whereas only a small decrease is associated with inhibition of DNA replication.

  3. Effects of indole-3-acetic acid on the transcriptional activities and stress tolerance of Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Donati, Andrew J; Lee, Hae-In; Leveau, Johan H J; Chang, Woo-Suk

    2013-01-01

    A genome-wide transcriptional profile of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, the nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont of the soybean plant, revealed differential expression of approximately 15% of the genome after a 1 mM treatment with the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). A total of 1,323 genes were differentially expressed (619 up-regulated and 704 down-regulated) at a two-fold cut off with q value ≤ 0.05. General stress response genes were induced, such as those involved in response to heat, cold, oxidative, osmotic, and desiccation stresses and in exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis. This suggests that IAA is effective in activating a generalized stress response in B. japonicum. The transcriptional data were corroborated by the finding that stress tolerance of B. japonicum in cell viability assays was enhanced when pre-treated with 1 mM IAA compared to controls. The IAA treatment also stimulated biofilm formation and EPS production by B. japonicum, especially acidic sugar components in the total EPS. The IAA pre-treatment did not influence the nodulation ability of B. japonicum. The data provide a comprehensive overview of the potential transcriptional responses of the symbiotic bacterium when exposed to the ubiquitous hormone of its plant host.

  4. cis and trans activation of globin gene transcription in transient assays.

    PubMed

    Treisman, R; Green, M R; Maniatis, T

    1983-12-01

    We examined the effects of the simian virus 40 enhancer sequence on transcription of cloned human alpha- and beta-globin genes shortly after their introduction into cultured mammalian cells. We find that (i) detectable transcription of the beta-globin gene but not the alpha-globin gene requires linkage to the enhancer; (ii) the enhancer increases the amount of beta-globin RNA at least 100-fold but results in only a 5- to 10-fold increase in the amount of alpha-globin RNA; (iii) plasmid replication does not increase the level of beta-globin RNA, regardless of linkage to the enhancer, but does result in an approximately equal to 50-fold increase in the level of alpha-globin RNA; (iv) the enhancer is not required for and does not increase transcription of either gene in 293 cells, an adenovirus 5-transformed human kidney cell line. We also show that an enhancer sequence is not required for activity of the normally enhancer-dependent simian virus 40 early promoter in 293 cells, indicating that these cells contain a trans-acting factor(s) that circumvents the requirement for the enhancer sequence.

  5. Pim1 promotes human prostate cancer cell tumorigenicity and c-MYC transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The serine/threonine kinase PIM1 has been implicated as an oncogene in various human cancers including lymphomas, gastric, colorectal and prostate carcinomas. In mouse models, Pim1 is known to cooperate with c-Myc to promote tumorigenicity. However, there has been limited analysis of the tumorigenic potential of Pim1 overexpression in benign and malignant human prostate cancer cells in vivo. Methods We overexpressed Pim1 in three human prostate cell lines representing different disease stages including benign (RWPE1), androgen-dependent cancer (LNCaP) and androgen-independent cancer (DU145). We then analyzed in vitro and in vivo tumorigenicity as well as the effect of Pim1 overexpression on c-MYC transcriptional activity by reporter assays and gene expression profiling using an inducible MYC-ER system. To validate that Pim1 induces tumorigenicity and target gene expression by modulating c-MYC transcriptional activity, we inhibited c-MYC using a small molecule inhibitor (10058-F4) or RNA interference. Results Overexpression of Pim1 alone was not sufficient to convert the benign RWPE1 cell to malignancy although it enhanced their proliferation rates when grown as xenografts in vivo. However, Pim1 expression enhanced the in vitro and in vivo tumorigenic potentials of the human prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and DU145. Reporter assays revealed increased c-MYC transcriptional activity in Pim1-expressing cells and mRNA expression profiling demonstrated that a large fraction of c-MYC target genes were also regulated by Pim1 expression. The c-MYC inhibitor 10058-F4 suppressed the tumorigenicity of Pim1-expressing prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, 10058-F4 treatment also led to a reduction of Pim1 protein but not mRNA. Knocking-down c-MYC using short hairpin RNA reversed the effects of Pim1 on Pim1/MYC target genes. Conclusion Our results suggest an in vivo role of Pim1 in promoting prostate tumorigenesis although it displayed distinct oncogenic activities

  6. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibits T-cell activation by targeting both nuclear factor of activated T-cells and NF-kappaB transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Nieves; Sancho, Rocío; Macho, Antonio; Calzado, Marco A; Fiebich, Bernd L; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2004-03-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), which is derived from the propolis of honeybee hives, has been shown to reveal anti-inflammatory properties. Since T-cells play a key role in the onset of several inflammatory diseases, we have evaluated the immunosuppressive activity of CAPE in human T-cells, discovering that this phenolic compound is a potent inhibitor of early and late events in T-cell receptor-mediated T-cell activation. Moreover, we found that CAPE specifically inhibited both interleukin (IL)-2 gene transcription and IL-2 synthesis in stimulated T-cells. To further characterize the inhibitory mechanisms of CAPE at the transcriptional level, we examined the DNA binding and transcriptional activities of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, nuclear factor of activated cells (NFAT), and activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factors in Jurkat cells. We found that CAPE inhibited NF-kappaB-dependent transcriptional activity without affecting the degradation of the cytoplasmic NF-kappaB inhibitory protein, IkappaBalpha. However, both NF-kappaB binding to DNA and transcriptional activity of a Gal4-p65 hybrid protein were clearly prevented in CAPE-treated Jurkat cells. Moreover, CAPE inhibited both the DNA-binding and transcriptional activity of NFAT, a result that correlated with its ability to inhibit phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin-induced NFAT1 dephosphorylation. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities of this natural compound.

  7. Activity of a C. elegans GATA transcription factor, ELT-1, expressed in yeast.

    PubMed

    Shim, Y H; Bonner, J J; Blumenthal, T

    1995-11-10

    The GATA motif (WGATAR) is found in the promoter regions of numerous Caenorhabditis elegans genes, including two intestine-specific genes, vit-2 and ges-1, in which it has been shown to be required for promoter function. The protein ELT-1, encoded by a single-copy gene homologous to the GATA family of vertebrate transcription factors, is potentially capable of interacting with this element. In order to determine whether ELT-1 is a transcriptional activator that recognizes this sequence, we have expressed it under the control of the GAL1 promoter in yeast. lacZ driven by the CYC1 promoter lacking an upstream activation sequence (UAS) but containing GATA sequences was used as a reporter. beta-Galactosidase was expressed upon induction only when GATA sequences were present, and expression was increased dramatically by additional binding sites. Deletion analysis demonstrated that the C terminus, containing only one of the two zinc fingers, is sufficient for activation. In addition, the DNA-binding domain and two transactivation regions were identified by fusing these isolated domains to previously defined domains of heterologous transcription factors. While most single base alterations in the GATA core sequence eliminated activity, an A to C change in position four, creating a GATC core, was found to increase activity significantly. The deleted ELT-1 protein containing only the C-terminal Zn finger was sufficient for activation in response to GATA, but both fingers were required for activation at GATC. A variety of sites with non-optimal sequences surrounding the GATA core also were found to be excluded better by the protein containing both Zn fingers. Furthermore, a fusion protein containing the entire ELT-1 DNA binding domain fused to the VP16 activation domain was found to have an even greater preference for the GATC core, as well as the optimal flanking bases. We conclude that, although ELT-1 having only its C-terminal finger is capable of activation in response to

  8. TATA-box DNA binding activity and subunit composition for RNA polymerase III transcription factor IIIB from Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    McBryant, S J; Meier, E; Leresche, A; Sharp, S J; Wolf, V J; Gottesfeld, J M

    1996-01-01

    The RNA polymerase III transcription initiation factor TFIIIB contains the TATA-box-binding protein (TBP) and polymerase III-specific TBP-associated factors (TAFs). Previous studies have shown that DNA oligonucleotides containing the consensus TATA-box sequence inhibit polymerase III transcription, implying that the DNA binding domain of TBP is exposed in TFIIIB. We have investigated the TATA-box DNA binding activity of Xenopus TFIIIB, using transcription inhibition assays and a gel mobility shift assay. Gel shift competition assays with mutant and nonspecific DNAs demonstrate the specificity of the TFIIIB-TATA box DNA complex. The apparent dissociation constant for this protein-DNA interaction is approximately 0.4 nM, similar to the affinity of yeast TBP for the same sequence. TFIIIB transcriptional activity and TATA-box binding activity cofractionate during a series of four ion-exchange chromatographic steps, and reconstituted transcription reactions demonstrate that the TATA-box DNA-protein complex contains TFIIIB TAF activity. Polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 75 and 92 kDa are associated with TBP in this complex. These polypeptides were renatured after elution from sodium dodecyl sulfate-gels and tested individually and in combination for TFIIIB TAF activity. Recombinant TBP along with protein fractions containing the 75- and 92-kDa polypeptides were sufficient to reconstitute TFIIIB transcriptional activity and DNA binding activity, suggesting that Xenopus TFIIIB is composed of TBP along with these polypeptides. PMID:8756620

  9. Conserved and Diverged Functions of the Calcineurin-Activated Prz1 Transcription Factor in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Chatfield-Reed, Kate; Vachon, Lianne; Kwon, Eun-Joo Gina; Chua, Gordon

    2016-04-01

    Gene regulation in response to intracellular calcium is mediated by the calcineurin-activated transcription factor Prz1 in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Genome-wide studies of the Crz1 and CrzA fungal orthologs have uncovered numerous target genes involved in conserved and species-specific cellular processes. In contrast, very few target genes of Prz1 have been published. This article identifies an extensive list of genes using transcriptome and ChIP-chip analyses under inducing conditions of Prz1, including CaCl2 and tunicamycin treatment, as well as a ∆pmr1 genetic background. We identified 165 upregulated putative target genes of Prz1 in which the majority contained a calcium-dependent response element in their promoters, similar to that of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog Crz1 These genes were functionally enriched for Crz1-conserved processes such as cell-wall biosynthesis. Overexpression of prz1(+)increased resistance to the cell-wall degradation enzyme zymolyase, likely from upregulation of theO-mannosyltransferase encoding gene omh1(+) Loss of omh1(+)abrogates this phenotype. We uncovered a novel inhibitory role in flocculation for Prz1. Loss of prz1(+)resulted in constitutive flocculation and upregulation of genes encoding the flocculins Gsf2 and Pfl3, as well as the transcription factor Cbf12. The constitutive flocculation of the ∆prz1 strain was abrogated by the loss of gsf2(+) or cbf12(+) This study reveals that Prz1 functions as a positive and negative transcriptional regulator of genes involved in cell-wall biosynthesis and flocculation, respectively. Moreover, comparison of target genes between Crz1/CrzA and Prz1 indicate some conservation in DNA-binding specificity, but also substantial rewiring of the calcineurin-mediated transcriptional regulatory network.

  10. Conserved and Diverged Functions of the Calcineurin-Activated Prz1 Transcription Factor in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Chatfield-Reed, Kate; Vachon, Lianne; Kwon, Eun-Joo Gina; Chua, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulation in response to intracellular calcium is mediated by the calcineurin-activated transcription factor Prz1 in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Genome-wide studies of the Crz1 and CrzA fungal orthologs have uncovered numerous target genes involved in conserved and species-specific cellular processes. In contrast, very few target genes of Prz1 have been published. This article identifies an extensive list of genes using transcriptome and ChIP-chip analyses under inducing conditions of Prz1, including CaCl2 and tunicamycin treatment, as well as a ∆pmr1 genetic background. We identified 165 upregulated putative target genes of Prz1 in which the majority contained a calcium-dependent response element in their promoters, similar to that of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog Crz1. These genes were functionally enriched for Crz1-conserved processes such as cell-wall biosynthesis. Overexpression of prz1+ increased resistance to the cell-wall degradation enzyme zymolyase, likely from upregulation of the O-mannosyltransferase encoding gene omh1+. Loss of omh1+ abrogates this phenotype. We uncovered a novel inhibitory role in flocculation for Prz1. Loss of prz1+ resulted in constitutive flocculation and upregulation of genes encoding the flocculins Gsf2 and Pfl3, as well as the transcription factor Cbf12. The constitutive flocculation of the ∆prz1 strain was abrogated by the loss of gsf2+ or cbf12+. This study reveals that Prz1 functions as a positive and negative transcriptional regulator of genes involved in cell-wall biosynthesis and flocculation, respectively. Moreover, comparison of target genes between Crz1/CrzA and Prz1 indicate some conservation in DNA-binding specificity, but also substantial rewiring of the calcineurin-mediated transcriptional regulatory network. PMID:26896331

  11. Controlled Osteogenic Differentiation of Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Tetracycline-Controlled Transcriptional Activation of Amelogenin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangfang; Okawa, Hiroko; Kamano, Yuya; Niibe, Kunimichi; Kayashima, Hiroki; Osathanon, Thanaphum; Pavasant, Prasit; Saeki, Makio; Yatani, Hirofumi; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative dental therapies for bone tissues rely on efficient targeting of endogenous and transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to guide bone formation. Amelogenin is the primary component of Emdogain, which is used to regenerate periodontal defects; however, the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects on alveolar bone remain unclear. The tetracycline (Tet)-dependent transcriptional regulatory system is a good candidate to investigate distinct roles of genes of interest during stem cell differentiation. Here, we investigated amelogenin-dependent regulation of osteogenesis in MSCs by establishing a Tet-controlled transcriptional activation system. Clonal mouse bone marrow-derived MSCs were lentivirally transduced with the Tet repressor (TetR) expression vector followed by drug selection to obtain MSCs constitutively expressing TetR (MSCs-TetR). Expression vectors that contained the Tet operator and amelogenin-coding (Amelx) cDNA fragments were constructed using the Gateway system and lentivirally introduced into MSCs-TetR to generate a Tet regulation system in MSCs (MSCs-TetR/Amelx). MSCs-TetR/Amelx significantly overexpressed the Amelx gene and protein in the presence of the tetracycline derivative doxycycline. Concomitant expression of osterix, bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteopontin, and osteocalcin was modulated by addition or removal of doxycycline under osteogenic guidance. During osteogenic induction, MSCs-TetR/Amelx treated with doxycycline showed significantly increased gene expression of osterix, type I collagen, BSP, and osteocalcin in addition to increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation. Enhanced extracellular matrix calcification was observed when forced Amelx expression commenced at the early stage but not at the intermediate or late stages of osteogenesis. These results suggest that a Tet-controlled Amelx gene regulation system for mouse MSCs was successfully established, in which transcriptional activation

  12. Autocrine activation of neuronal NMDA receptors by aspartate mediates dopamine- and cAMP-induced CREB-dependent gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Luis E. F.; Murray, Peter D.; Zielke, H. Ronald; Roby, Clinton D.; Kingsbury, Tami J.; Krueger, Bruce K.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic AMP can stimulate the transcription of many activity-dependent genes via activation of the transcription factor, CREB. However, in mouse cortical neuron cultures, prior to synaptogenesis, neither cAMP nor dopamine, which acts via cAMP, stimulated CREB-dependent gene transcription when NR2B-containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs) were blocked. Stimulation of transcription by cAMP was potentiated by inhibitors of excitatory amino acid uptake, suggesting a role for extracellular glutamate or aspartate in cAMP-induced transcription. Aspartate was identified as the extracellular messenger: enzymatic scavenging of L-aspartate, but not glutamate, blocked stimulation of CREB-dependent gene transcription by cAMP; moreover, cAMP induced aspartate but not glutamate release. Taken together, these results suggest that cAMP acts via an autocrine or paracrine pathway to release aspartate, which activates NR2B-containing NMDARs, leading to Ca2+ entry and activation of transcription. This cAMP/aspartate/NMDAR signaling pathway may mediate the effects of transmitters such as dopamine on axon growth and synaptogenesis in developing neurons or on synaptic plasticity in mature neural networks. PMID:19812345

  13. Anaerobic transcription activation in Bacillus subtilis: identification of distinct FNR-dependent and -independent regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz Ramos, H; Boursier, L; Moszer, I; Kunst, F; Danchin, A; Glaser, P

    1995-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is able to grow anaerobically using alternative electron acceptors, including nitrate or fumarate. We characterized an operon encoding the dissimilatory nitrate reductase subunits homologous to the Escherichia coli narGHJI operon and the narK gene encoding a protein with nitrite extrusion activity. Downstream from narK and co-transcribed with it a gene (fnr) encoding a protein homologous to E.coli FNR was found. Disruption of fnr abolished both nitrate and fumarate utilization as electron acceptors and anaerobic induction of narK. Four putative FNR binding sites were found in B.subtilis sequences. The consensus sequence, centred at position -41.5, is identical to the consensus for the DNA site for E.coli CAP. Bs-FNR contained a four cysteine residue cluster at its C-terminal end. This is in contrast to Ec-FNR, where a similar cluster is present at the N-terminal end. It is possible that oxygen modulates the activity of both activators by a similar mechanism involving iron. Unlike in E.coli, where fnr expression is weakly repressed by anaerobiosis, fnr gene expression in B.subtilis is strongly activated by anaerobiosis. We have identified in the narK-fnr intergenic region a promotor activated by anaerobiosis independently of FNR. Thus induction of genes involved in anaerobic respiration requires in B.subtilis at least two levels of regulation: activation of fnr transcription and activation of FNR to induce transcription of FNR-dependent promoters. Images PMID:8846791

  14. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs): a highly efficient and versatile tool for genome editing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ning; Zhao, Huimin

    2013-07-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs) have recently emerged as a revolutionary genome editing tool in many different organisms and cell types. The site-specific chromosomal double-strand breaks introduced by TALENs significantly increase the efficiency of genomic modification. The modular nature of the TALE central repeat domains enables researchers to tailor DNA recognition specificity with ease and target essentially any desired DNA sequence. Here, we comprehensively review the development of TALEN technology in terms of scaffold optimization, DNA recognition, and repeat array assembly. In addition, we provide some perspectives on the future development of this technology.

  15. The application of transcription activator-like effector nucleases for genome editing in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Yi, Peishan; Li, Wei; Ou, Guangshuo

    2014-08-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been a powerful model system for biomedical research in the past decades, however, the efficient genetic tools are still demanding for gene knockout, knock-in or conditional gene mutations. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that comprise a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain fused to a FokI nuclease domain facilitate the targeted genome editing in various cell types or organisms. Here we summarize the recent progresses and protocols using TALENs in C. elegans that generate gene mutations and knock-ins in the germ line and the conditional gene knockout in somatic tissues.

  16. The Baltic Sea Virome: Diversity and Transcriptional Activity of DNA and RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    McCrow, John P.; Ininbergs, Karolina; Dupont, Christopher L.; Badger, Jonathan H.; Hoffman, Jeffery M.; Ekman, Martin; Allen, Andrew E.; Bergman, Birgitta; Venter, J. Craig

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data were generated from size-fractionated samples from 11 sites within the Baltic Sea and adjacent marine waters of Kattegat and freshwater Lake Torneträsk in order to investigate the diversity, distribution, and transcriptional activity of virioplankton. Such a transect, spanning a salinity gradient from freshwater to the open sea, facilitated a broad genome-enabled investigation of natural as well as impacted aspects of Baltic Sea viral communities. Taxonomic signatures representative of phages within the widely distributed order Caudovirales were identified with enrichments in lesser-known families such as Podoviridae and Siphoviridae. The distribution of phage reported to infect diverse and ubiquitous heterotrophic bacteria (SAR11 clades) and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus sp.) displayed population-level shifts in diversity. Samples from higher-salinity conditions (>14 practical salinity units [PSU]) had increased abundances of viruses for picoeukaryotes, i.e., Ostreococcus. These data, combined with host diversity estimates, suggest viral modulation of diversity on the whole-community scale, as well as in specific prokaryotic and eukaryotic lineages. RNA libraries revealed single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and RNA viral populations throughout the Baltic Sea, with ssDNA phage highly represented in Lake Torneträsk. Further, our data suggest relatively high transcriptional activity of fish viruses within diverse families known to have broad host ranges, such as Nodoviridae (RNA), Iridoviridae (DNA), and predicted zoonotic viruses that can cause ecological and economic damage as well as impact human health. IMPORTANCE Inferred virus-host relationships, community structures of ubiquitous ecologically relevant groups, and identification of transcriptionally active populations have been achieved with our Baltic Sea study. Further, these data, highlighting the transcriptional activity of viruses, represent one of the more

  17. Genome Modification of Pluripotent Cells by Using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs).

    PubMed

    Taheri-Ghahfarokhi, Amir; Malaver-Ortega, Luis F; Sumer, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Interest is increasing in transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) as a tool to introduce targeted double-strand breaks into the large genomes of human and animal cell lines. The produced DNA lesions stimulate DNA repair pathways, error-prone but dominant non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and accurate but less occurring homology-directed repair (HDR), and as a result targeted genes can be modified. Here, we describe a modified Golden-Gate cloning method for generating TALENs and also details for targeting genes in mouse embryonic stem cells. The protocol described here can be used for modifying the genome of a broad range of pluripotent cell lines.

  18. The Baltic Sea Virome: Diversity and Transcriptional Activity of DNA and RNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Zeigler Allen, Lisa; McCrow, John P; Ininbergs, Karolina; Dupont, Christopher L; Badger, Jonathan H; Hoffman, Jeffery M; Ekman, Martin; Allen, Andrew E; Bergman, Birgitta; Venter, J Craig

    2017-01-01

    Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data were generated from size-fractionated samples from 11 sites within the Baltic Sea and adjacent marine waters of Kattegat and freshwater Lake Torneträsk in order to investigate the diversity, distribution, and transcriptional activity of virioplankton. Such a transect, spanning a salinity gradient from freshwater to the open sea, facilitated a broad genome-enabled investigation of natural as well as impacted aspects of Baltic Sea viral communities. Taxonomic signatures representative of phages within the widely distributed order Caudovirales were identified with enrichments in lesser-known families such as Podoviridae and Siphoviridae. The distribution of phage reported to infect diverse and ubiquitous heterotrophic bacteria (SAR11 clades) and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus sp.) displayed population-level shifts in diversity. Samples from higher-salinity conditions (>14 practical salinity units [PSU]) had increased abundances of viruses for picoeukaryotes, i.e., Ostreococcus. These data, combined with host diversity estimates, suggest viral modulation of diversity on the whole-community scale, as well as in specific prokaryotic and eukaryotic lineages. RNA libraries revealed single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and RNA viral populations throughout the Baltic Sea, with ssDNA phage highly represented in Lake Torneträsk. Further, our data suggest relatively high transcriptional activity of fish viruses within diverse families known to have broad host ranges, such as Nodoviridae (RNA), Iridoviridae (DNA), and predicted zoonotic viruses that can cause ecological and economic damage as well as impact human health. IMPORTANCE Inferred virus-host relationships, community structures of ubiquitous ecologically relevant groups, and identification of transcriptionally active populations have been achieved with our Baltic Sea study. Further, these data, highlighting the transcriptional activity of viruses, represent one of the more powerful uses of

  19. Transcriptional activation of NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 by nuclear receptor TLX

    SciTech Connect

    Iwahara, Naotoshi; Hisahara, Shin; Hayashi, Takashi; Horio, Yoshiyuki

    2009-09-04

    An orphan nuclear receptor TLX is a transcriptional repressor that promotes the proliferation and self-renewal of neural precursor cells (NPCs). SIRT1, an NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase, is highly expressed in the NPCs and participates in neurogenesis. Here, we found that TLX colocalized with SIRT1 and knockdown of TLX by small interfering RNAs decreased SIRT1 levels in NPCs. TLX increased the SIRT1 expression by binding to the newly identified TLX-activating element in the SIRT1 gene promoter in HEK293 cells. Thus, TLX is an inducer of SIRT1 and may contribute to neurogenesis both as a transactivator and as a repressor.

  20. Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALEN)-Mediated Targeted DNA Insertion in Potato Plants.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Adrienne; Weeks, Troy; Richael, Craig; Duan, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Targeted DNA integration into known locations in the genome has potential advantages over the random insertional events typically achieved using conventional means of genetic modification. Specifically integrated transgenes are guaranteed to co-segregate, and expression level is more predictable, which makes downstream characterization and line selection more manageable. Because the site of DNA integration is known, the steps to deregulation of transgenic crops may be simplified. Here we describe a method that combines transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated induction of double strand breaks (DSBs) and non-autonomous marker selection to insert a transgene into a pre-selected, transcriptionally active region in the potato genome. In our experiment, TALEN was designed to create a DSB in the genome sequence following an endogenous constitutive promoter. A cytokinin vector was utilized for TALENs expression and prevention of stable integration of the nucleases. The donor vector contained a gene of interest cassette and a promoter-less plant-derived herbicide resistant gene positioned near the T-DNA left border which was used to select desired transgenic events. Our results indicated that TALEN induced T-DNA integration occurred with high frequency and resulting events have consistent expression of the gene of interest. Interestingly, it was found that, in most lines integration took place through one sided homology directed repair despite the minimal homologous sequence at the right border. An efficient transient assay for TALEN activity verification is also described.

  1. Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Transcription Factor Nfatp Controls Superantigen-Induced Lethal Shock

    PubMed Central

    Tsytsykova, Alla V.; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2000-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is the key mediator of superantigen-induced T cell lethal shock. Here, we show that nuclear factor of activated T cells transcription factor, NFATp, controls susceptibility to superantigen-induced lethal shock in mice through its activation of TNF-α gene transcription. In NFATp-deficient mice, T cell stimulation leads to delayed induction and attenuation of TNF-α mRNA levels, decreased TNF-α serum levels, and resistance to superantigen-induced lethal shock. By contrast, after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, serum levels of TNF-α and susceptibility to shock are unaffected. These results demonstrate that NFATp is an essential activator of immediate early TNF-α gene expression in T cells and they present in vivo evidence of the inducer- and cell type–specific regulation of TNF-α gene expression. Furthermore, they suggest NFATp as a potential selective target in the treatment of superantigen-induced lethal shock. PMID:10952728

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis enhances human immunodeficiency virus-1 replication by transcriptional activation at the long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Nakata, K; Weiden, M; Rom, W N

    1995-01-01

    Tuberculosis has emerged as an epidemic fueled by the large number of individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, especially those who are injecting drug users. We found a striking increase from 4- to 208-fold in p24 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from involved sites of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection vs uninvolved sites in three HIV+ patients. We used an in vitro cell culture model to determine if tuberculosis could activate replication of HIV-1. Mononuclear phagocyte cell lines U937 and THP-1 infected with HIV-1JR-CSF, in vitro and stimulated with live M. tuberculosis H37Ra, had a threefold increase in p24 in culture supernatants. Using the HIV-1 long terminal repeat with a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter construct, live M. tuberculosis increased transcription 20-fold in THP-1 cells, and cell wall components stimulated CAT expression to a lesser extent. The nuclear factor-kappa B enhancer element was responsible for the majority of the increased CAT activity although two upstream nuclear factor-IL6 sites may also contribute to enhanced transcription. Antibodies to TNF-alpha and IL-1 inhibited the increase in CAT activity of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat by M. tuberculosis from 21-fold to 8-fold. Stimulation of HIV-1 replication by M. tuberculosis may exacerbate dysfunction of the host immune response in dually infected individuals. Images PMID:7738195

  3. Commensal gut bacteria modulate phosphorylation-dependent PPARγ transcriptional activity in human intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nepelska, Malgorzata; de Wouters, Tomas; Jacouton, Elsa; Béguet-Crespel, Fabienne; Lapaque, Nicolas; Doré, Joël; Arulampalam, Velmurugesan; Blottière, Hervé M.

    2017-01-01

    In healthy subjects, the intestinal microbiota interacts with the host’s epithelium, regulating gene expression to the benefit of both, host and microbiota. The underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood, however. Although many gut bacteria are not yet cultured, constantly growing culture collections have been established. We selected 57 representative commensal bacterial strains to study bacteria-host interactions, focusing on PPARγ, a key nuclear receptor in colonocytes linking metabolism and inflammation to the microbiota. Conditioned media (CM) were harvested from anaerobic cultures and assessed for their ability to modulate PPARγ using a reporter cell line. Activation of PPARγ transcriptional activity was linked to the presence of butyrate and propionate, two of the main metabolites of intestinal bacteria. Interestingly, some stimulatory CMs were devoid of these metabolites. A Prevotella and an Atopobium strain were chosen for further study, and shown to up-regulate two PPARγ-target genes, ANGPTL4 and ADRP. The molecular mechanisms of these activations involved the phosphorylation of PPARγ through ERK1/2. The responsible metabolites were shown to be heat sensitive but markedly diverged in size, emphasizing the diversity of bioactive compounds found in the intestine. Here we describe different mechanisms by which single intestinal bacteria can directly impact their host’s health through transcriptional regulation. PMID:28266623

  4. Commensal gut bacteria modulate phosphorylation-dependent PPARγ transcriptional activity in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nepelska, Malgorzata; de Wouters, Tomas; Jacouton, Elsa; Béguet-Crespel, Fabienne; Lapaque, Nicolas; Doré, Joël; Arulampalam, Velmurugesan; Blottière, Hervé M

    2017-03-07

    In healthy subjects, the intestinal microbiota interacts with the host's epithelium, regulating gene expression to the benefit of both, host and microbiota. The underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood, however. Although many gut bacteria are not yet cultured, constantly growing culture collections have been established. We selected 57 representative commensal bacterial strains to study bacteria-host interactions, focusing on PPARγ, a key nuclear receptor in colonocytes linking metabolism and inflammation to the microbiota. Conditioned media (CM) were harvested from anaerobic cultures and assessed for their ability to modulate PPARγ using a reporter cell line. Activation of PPARγ transcriptional activity was linked to the presence of butyrate and propionate, two of the main metabolites of intestinal bacteria. Interestingly, some stimulatory CMs were devoid of these metabolites. A Prevotella and an Atopobium strain were chosen for further study, and shown to up-regulate two PPARγ-target genes, ANGPTL4 and ADRP. The molecular mechanisms of these activations involved the phosphorylation of PPARγ through ERK1/2. The responsible metabolites were shown to be heat sensitive but markedly diverged in size, emphasizing the diversity of bioactive compounds found in the intestine. Here we describe different mechanisms by which single intestinal bacteria can directly impact their host's health through transcriptional regulation.

  5. Eccentric exercise activates novel transcriptional regulation of hypertrophic signaling pathways not affected by hormone changes.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, Lauren G; Melov, Simon; Hubbard, Alan E; Baker, Steven K; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2010-05-18

    Unaccustomed eccentric exercise damages skeletal muscle tissue, activating mechanisms of recovery and remodeling that may be influenced by the female sex hormone 17beta-estradiol (E2). Using high density oligonucleotide based microarrays, we screened for differences in mRNA expression caused by E2 and eccentric exercise. After random assignment to 8 days of either placebo (CON) or E2 (EXP), eighteen men performed 150 single-leg eccentric contractions. Muscle biopsies were collected at baseline (BL), following supplementation (PS), +3 hours (3H) and +48 hours (48H) after exercise. Serum E2 concentrations increased significantly with supplementation (P<0.001) but did not affect microarray results. Exercise led to early transcriptional changes in striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS), Rho family GTPase 3 (RND3), mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) regulation and the downstream transcription factor FOS. Targeted RT-PCR analysis identified concurrent induction of negative regulators of calcineurin signaling RCAN (P<0.001) and HMOX1 (P = 0.009). Protein contents were elevated for RND3 at 3H (P = 0.02) and FOS at 48H (P<0.05). These findings indicate that early RhoA and NFAT signaling and regulation are altered following exercise for muscle remodeling and repair, but are not affected by E2.

  6. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor modulates NADPH oxidase activity via direct transcriptional regulation of p40phox expression.

    PubMed

    Wada, Taira; Sunaga, Hiroshi; Ohkawara, Reiko; Shimba, Shigeki

    2013-05-01

    A member of the NADPH oxidase subunits, p40(phox) plays an important role in the regulation of NADPH oxidase activity and the subsequent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we show that mouse p40(phox) is a novel transcriptional target of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), known as a dioxin receptor or xenobiotic receptor, in the liver. Treatment of mice with 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC) increased p40(phox) gene expression in the liver, but this induction of p40(phox) gene expression was diminished by the deletion of the AhR gene in the liver. Consistent with the in vivo results, the expression of the p40(phox) gene was increased in 3MC-treated Hepa1c1c7 cells in an AhR-dependent manner. In addition, promoter analysis established p40(phox) as a transcriptional target of AhR. Studies using the RNA-interference technique revealed that p40(phox) is involved in the increase of NADPH oxidase activity and the subsequent ROS production in AhR-activated Hepa1c1c7 cells. Consequently, the results obtained here may provide a novel molecular mechanism for ROS production after exposure to dioxins.

  7. Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALEN)-Mediated Targeted DNA Insertion in Potato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Adrienne; Weeks, Troy; Richael, Craig; Duan, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Targeted DNA integration into known locations in the genome has potential advantages over the random insertional events typically achieved using conventional means of genetic modification. Specifically integrated transgenes are guaranteed to co-segregate, and expression level is more predictable, which makes downstream characterization and line selection more manageable. Because the site of DNA integration is known, the steps to deregulation of transgenic crops may be simplified. Here we describe a method that combines transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated induction of double strand breaks (DSBs) and non-autonomous marker selection to insert a transgene into a pre-selected, transcriptionally active region in the potato genome. In our experiment, TALEN was designed to create a DSB in the genome sequence following an endogenous constitutive promoter. A cytokinin vector was utilized for TALENs expression and prevention of stable integration of the nucleases. The donor vector contained a gene of interest cassette and a promoter-less plant-derived herbicide resistant gene positioned near the T-DNA left border which was used to select desired transgenic events. Our results indicated that TALEN induced T-DNA integration occurred with high frequency and resulting events have consistent expression of the gene of interest. Interestingly, it was found that, in most lines integration took place through one sided homology directed repair despite the minimal homologous sequence at the right border. An efficient transient assay for TALEN activity verification is also described. PMID:27826306

  8. Dynamic transcription factor activity and networks during ErbB2 breast oncogenesis and targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Weiss, M S; Peñalver Bernabé, B; Shin, S; Asztalos, S; Dubbury, S J; Mui, M D; Bellis, A D; Bluver, D; Tonetti, D A; Saez-Rodriguez, J; Broadbelt, L J; Jeruss, J S; Shea, L D

    2014-12-01

    Tissue development and disease progression are multi-stage processes controlled by an evolving set of key regulatory factors, and identifying these factors necessitates a dynamic analysis spanning relevant time scales. Current omics approaches depend on incomplete biological databases to identify critical cellular processes. Herein, we present TRACER (TRanscriptional Activity CEll aRrays), which was employed to quantify the dynamic activity of numerous transcription factor (TFs) simultaneously in 3D and networks for TRACER (NTRACER), a computational algorithm that allows for cellular rewiring to establish dynamic regulatory networks based on activity of TF reporter constructs. We identified major hubs at various stages of culture associated with normal and abnormal tissue growth (i.e., ELK-1 and E2F1, respectively) and the mechanism of action for a targeted therapeutic, lapatinib, through GATA-1, which were confirmed in human ErbB2 positive breast cancer patients and human ErbB2 positive breast cancer cell lines that were either sensitive or resistant to lapatinib.

  9. Hepatitis B virus X protein inhibits p53 sequence-specific DNA binding, transcriptional activity, and association with transcription factor ERCC3.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X W; Forrester, K; Yeh, H; Feitelson, M A; Gu, J R; Harris, C C

    1994-01-01

    Chronic active hepatitis caused by infection with hepatitis B virus, a DNA virus, is a major risk factor for human hepatocellular carcinoma. Since the oncogenicity of several DNA viruses is dependent on the interaction of their viral oncoproteins with cellular tumor-suppressor gene products, we investigated the interaction between hepatitis B virus X protein (HBX) and human wild-type p53 protein. HBX complexes with the wild-type p53 protein and inhibits its sequence-specific DNA binding in vitro. HBX expression also inhibits p53-mediated transcriptional activation in vivo and the in vitro association of p53 and ERCC3, a general transcription factor involved in nucleotide excision repair. Therefore, HBX may affect a wide range of p53 functions and contribute to the molecular pathogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma. Images PMID:8134379

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor activation of NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells)-dependent transcription: a role for the transcription factor NFATc4 in neurotrophin-mediated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Groth, Rachel D; Mermelstein, Paul G

    2003-09-03

    A member of the neurotrophin family, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates neuronal survival and differentiation during development. Within the adult brain, BDNF is also important in neuronal adaptive processes, such as the activity-dependent plasticity that underlies learning and memory. These long-term changes in synaptic strength are mediated through alterations in gene expression. However, many of the mechanisms by which BDNF is linked to transcriptional and translational regulation remain unknown. Recently, the transcription factor NFATc4 (nuclear factor of activated T-cells isoform 4) was discovered in neurons, where it is believed to play an important role in long-term changes in neuronal function. Interestingly, NFATc4 is particularly sensitive to the second messenger systems activated by BDNF. Thus, we hypothesized that NFAT-dependent transcription may be an important mediator of BDNF-induced plasticity. In cultured rat CA3-CA1 hippocampal neurons, BDNF activated NFAT-dependent transcription via TrkB receptors. Inhibition of calcineurin blocked BDNF-induced nuclear translocation of NFATc4, thus preventing transcription. Further, phospholipase C was a critical signaling intermediate between BDNF activation of TrkB and the initiation of NFAT-dependent transcription. Both inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3)-mediated release of calcium from intracellular stores and activation of protein kinase C were required for BDNF-induced NFAT-dependent transcription. Finally, increased expression of IP3 receptor 1 and BDNF after neuronal exposure to BDNF was linked to NFAT-dependent transcription. These results suggest that NFATc4 plays a crucial role in neurotrophin-mediated synaptic plasticity.

  11. Transgenic songbirds with suppressed or enhanced activity of CREB transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Kentaro; Matsui, Sumiko; Watanabe, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Songbirds postnatally develop their skill to utter and to perceive a vocal signal for communication. How genetic and environmental influences act in concert to regulate the development of such skill is not fully understood. Here, we report the phenotype of transgenic songbirds with altered intrinsic activity of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) transcription factor. By viral vector-mediated modification of genomic DNA, we established germ line-transmitted lines of zebra finches, which exhibited enhanced or suppressed activity of CREB. Although intrinsically acquired vocalizations or their hearing ability were not affected, the transgenic birds showed reduced vocal learning quality of their own songs and impaired audio-memory formation against conspecific songs. These results thus demonstrate that appropriate activity of CREB is necessary for the postnatal acquisition of learned behavior in songbirds, and the CREB transgenic birds offer a unique opportunity to separately manipulate both genetic and environmental factors that impinge on the postnatal song learning. PMID:26048905

  12. The oncoprotein HBXIP upregulates PDGFB via activating transcription factor Sp1 to promote the proliferation of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yingyi; Zhao, Yu; Li, Leilei; Shen, Yu; Cai, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •HBXIP is able to upregulate the expression of PDGFB in breast cancer cells. •HBXIP serves as a coactivator of activating transcription factor Sp1. •HBXIP stimulates the PDGFB promoter via activating transcription factor Sp1. •HBXIP promotes the proliferation of breast cancer cell via upregulating PDGFB. -- Abstract: We have reported that the oncoprotein hepatitis B virus X-interacting protein (HBXIP) acts as a novel transcriptional coactivator to promote proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Previously, we showed that HBXIP was able to activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in breast cancer cells. As an oncogene, the platelet-derived growth factor beta polypeptide (PDGFB) plays crucial roles in carcinogenesis. In the present study, we found that both HBXIP and PDGFB were highly expressed in breast cancer cell lines. Interestingly, HBXIP was able to increase transcriptional activity of NF-κB through PDGFB, suggesting that HBXIP is associated with PDGFB in the cells. Moreover, HBXIP was able to upregulate PDGFB at the levels of mRNA, protein and promoter in the cells. Then, we identified that HBXIP stimulated the promoter of PDGFB through activating transcription factor Sp1. In function, HBXIP enhanced the proliferation of breast cancer cells through PDGFB in vitro. Thus, we conclude that HBXIP upregulates PDGFB via activating transcription factor Sp1 to promote proliferation of breast cancer cells.

  13. The Ability to Associate with Activation Domains in vitro is not Required for the TATA Box-Binding Protein to Support Activated Transcription in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tansey, William P.; Herr, Winship

    1995-11-01

    The TATA box-binding protein (TBP) interacts in vitro with the activation domains of many viral and cellular transcription factors and has been proposed to be a direct target for transcriptional activators. We have examined the functional relevance of activator-TBP association in vitro to transcriptional activation in vivo. We show that alanine substitution mutations in a single loop of TBP can disrupt its association in vitro with the activation domains of the herpes simplex virus activator VP16 and of the human tumor suppressor protein p53; these mutations do not, however, disrupt the transcriptional response of TBP to either activation domain in vivo. Moreover, we show that a region of VP16 distinct from its activation domain can also tightly associate with TBP in vitro, but fails to activate transcription in vivo. These data suggest that the ability of TBP to interact with activation domains in vitro is not directly relevant to its ability to support activated transcription in vivo.

  14. Statistical reconstruction of transcription factor activity using Michaelis-Menten kinetics.

    PubMed

    Khanin, R; Vinciotti, V; Mersinias, V; Smith, C P; Wit, E

    2007-09-01

    The basic building block of a gene regulatory network consists of a gene encoding a transcription factor (TF) and the gene(s) it regulates. Considerable efforts have been directed recently at devising experiments and algorithms to determine TFs and their corresponding target genes using gene expression and other types of data. The underlying problem is that the expression of a gene coding for the TF provides only limited information about the activity of the TF, which can also be controlled posttranscriptionally. In the absence of a reliable technology to routinely measure the activity of regulators, it is of great importance to understand whether this activity can be inferred from gene expression data. We here develop a statistical framework to reconstruct the activity of a TF from gene expression data of the target genes in its regulatory module. The novelty of our approach is that we embed the deterministic Michaelis-Menten model of gene regulation in this statistical framework. The kinetic parameters of the gene regulation model are inferred together with the profile of the TF regulator. We also obtain a goodness-of-fit test to verify the fit of the model. The model is applied t