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Sample records for inoculated mammary carcinoma-associated

  1. The gene expression profiles of canine mammary cancer cells grown with carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) as a co-culture in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is supposed that fibroblasts present in tumour microenvironment increase cancer invasiveness and its ability to metastasize but the mechanisms have not been clearly defined yet. Thus, the current study was designed to assess changes in gene expression in five various cancer cell lines grown as a co-culture with the carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in vitro. Results A carcinoma-associated fibroblast cell line was isolated from a canine mammary cancer. Then, a co-culture of cancer cells with the CAFs was established and maintained for 72 hrs. Having sorted the cells, a global gene expression in cancer cells using DNA microarrays was examined. The analysis revealed an up-regulation of 100 genes and a down-regulation of 106 genes in the cancer cells grown as a co-culture with the CAFs in comparison to control conditions. The PANTHER binomial statistics tool was applied to determine statistically over-manifested pathways (p < 0.05). Bulk of the up-regulated genes are involved in the adhesion, the angiogenesis, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and generally take part in the developmental processes. These results were further confirmed using real-time qPCR. Moreover, a wound-healing assay and growth characteristics on Matrigel matrix showed that CAFs increase cancer cell migration and matrix invasion. Conclusion The results of the current study showed that the co-culturing of cancer cells and the CAFs caused significant changes to the cancer gene expression. The presence of the CAFs in a microenvironment of cancer cells promotes adhesion, angiogenesis and EMT. PMID:22453032

  2. Comparison of the Adipose and Luminal Mammary Gland Compartment as Orthotopic Inoculation Sites in a 4T1-Based Immunocompetent Preclinical Model for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Steenbrugge, Jonas; Breyne, Koen; Denies, Sofie; Dekimpe, Melissa; Demeyere, Kristel; De Wever, Olivier; Vermeulen, Peter; Van Laere, Steven; Sanders, Niek N; Meyer, Evelyne

    2016-12-01

    Breast tumorigenesis is classically studied in mice by inoculating tumor cells in the fat pad, the adipose compartment of the mammary gland. Alternatively, the mammary ducts, which constitute the luminal mammary gland compartment, also provide a suitable inoculation site to induce breast cancer in murine models. The microenvironments in these compartments influence tumor cell progression, yet this effect has not been investigated in an immunocompetent context. Here, we compared both mammary gland compartments as distinct inoculation sites, taking into account the immunological aspect by inoculating 4T1 tumor cells in immunocompetent mice. Following tumor cell inoculation in the adipose compartment of non-pretreated/naive, hormonally pretreated/naive and non-pretreated/lactating mice, the primary tumors developed similarly. However, a slower onset of primary tumor growth was found after inoculations in the luminal compartment of non-pretreated/lactating mice. Despite this difference in tumor development rate, metastasis to the liver and lungs was equally observed and was accompanied by lymphatic spreading of tumor cells and progressive splenomegaly with both inoculation types. Chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) and lipocalin 2 (LCN2) served as innovative biomarkers for disease progression showing increased levels in primary tumors and sera of the non-pretreated/lactating inoculation groups. A slower increase in circulating CHI3L1 but not LCN2 levels, was observed after inoculations in the luminal compartment which corroborated the slower tumor development at this inoculation site. Our results highlight the critical impact of different mammary gland compartments on tumor development in syngeneic murine models and support the use of novel tumor progression biomarkers in an immune-competent environment.

  3. A rat model of bone cancer pain induced by intra-tibia inoculation of Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mao-Ying, Q.-L.; Zhao Jun; Dong Zhiqiang; Wang Jun; Yu Jin; Yan Minfen; Zhang Yuqiu; Wu Gencheng; Wang Yanqing . E-mail: wangyanqing@shmu.edu.cn

    2006-07-14

    This study described a modified rat model of bone cancer pain. Syngeneic Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells were injected into the tibia medullary cavity via intercondylar eminence. Series of tests were carried out including bone radiology, bone histology, ambulatory pain, thermal hyperalgesia, mechanical allodynia, weight bearing ability, and electrophysiological recording from primary afferent fibers. The rats inoculated with carcinoma cells showed significant ambulatory pain, mechanical allodynia, and reduction in weight bearing, as well as increased incidence of spontaneous activity in A{beta} fibers in affected limb, whereas PBS (vehicle) or heat-killed cells (sham) injected rats showed no significant difference in comparison to normal rats. The pain hypersensitive behaviors were aggravated with time and destruction of bone. Interestingly, mechanical allodynia was also observed in the contralateral limb, indicating the involvement of 'mirror image' pain in bone cancer pain. In summary, the present study provided a useful and easily established rat model of bone cancer pain which will contribute to further study of the mechanisms underlying cancer pain.

  4. Persistence of Mycoplasma bovis infection in the mammary glands of lactating cows inoculated experimentally.

    PubMed

    Byrne, W; Markey, B; McCormack, R; Egan, J; Ball, H; Sachse, K

    2005-06-11

    To study the course of clinical mycoplasma mastitis and investigate its potential for persistence, 10(8) colony-forming units (cfu) of an Irish isolate of Mycoplasma bovis was inoculated aseptically into the right fore teat canal of three lactating cows. M bovis rapidly colonised the infected quarters and grew exponentially to more than 10(10) cfu/ml within the first three days, and spread to other quarters of each of the three cows within five to 10 days. After periods of between 24 and 72 hours the infected quarters became distended and sensitive to touch, and their secretions changed from containing visible particles, to a seropurulent exudate, to an aqueous suspension of fine particles which formed a sediment after a sample was collected. M bovis-specific antibody levels increased to varying degrees in all three cows. Subsequently, the concentrations of mycoplasma decreased to less than 10(7) cfu/ml in two of the cows, but remained at more than 10(8) cfu/ml to the end of the lactation of the other cow. Apparently normal milk was secreted by one of the cows within a month of the challenge, and by the other two cows at the start of their next lactation. However, in two of the cows subclinical M bovis infection persisted through the dry periods and into their next lactations.

  5. Mammary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Mammary neoplasia is one of the more common malignancies affecting domestic species. Despite their importance, they are often over- diagnosed, undertreated and subject to several misconceptions propagated by veterinarians and pet owners alike. Mammary neoplasia is the most frequent tumor type encountered in the female accounting for almost half of all malignancies reported. The canine has the highest incidence of mammary tumors of all domestic species. In the dog, about 65 percent of mammary tumors are benign mixed tumors, and 25 percent are carcinomas. The rest are adenomas, myoepitheliomas, and malignant mixed tumors. The age distribution of mammary tumors closely follows the age distribution of most tumors in the dog. Mammary tumors are rare in dogs 2 years old, but incidence begins to increase sharply at approximately 6 years of age. Median age at diagnosis is about 10 years. No breed predilection has been consistently reported.

  6. Mammary extracellular matrix directs differentiation of testicular and embryonic stem cells to form functional mammary glands in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Robert D.; Fleming, Jodie M.; George, Andrea L.; Boulanger, Corinne A.; Schedin, Pepper; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated the ability of the normal mammary microenvironment (niche) to direct non-mammary cells including testicular and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to adopt a mammary epithelial cell (MEC) fate. These studies relied upon the interaction of transplanted normal MECs with non-mammary cells within the mammary fat-pads of recipient mice that had their endogenous epithelium removed. Here, we tested whether acellular mammary extracellular matrix (mECM) preparations are sufficient to direct differentiation of testicular-derived cells and ESCs to form functional mammary epithelial trees in vivo. We found that mECMs isolated from adult mice and rats were sufficient to redirect testicular derived cells to produce normal mammary epithelial trees within epithelial divested mouse mammary fat-pads. Conversely, ECMs isolated from omental fat and lung did not redirect testicular cells to a MEC fate, indicating the necessity of tissue specific components of the mECM. mECM preparations also completely inhibited teratoma formation from ESC inoculations. Further, a phenotypically normal ductal outgrowth resulted from a single inoculation of ESCs and mECM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a tissue specific ECM driving differentiation of cells to form a functional tissue in vivo. PMID:28071703

  7. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts: orchestrating the composition of malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Gascard, Philippe; Tlsty, Thea D.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor stroma is no longer seen solely as physical support for mutated epithelial cells but as an important modulator and even a driver of tumorigenicity. Within the tumor stromal milieu, heterogeneous populations of fibroblast-like cells, collectively termed carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), are key players in the multicellular, stromal-dependent alterations that contribute to malignant initiation and progression. This review focuses on novel insights into the contributions of CAFs to disease progression, emergent events leading to the generation of CAFs, identification of CAF-specific biomarkers predictive of disease outcome, and recent therapeutic approaches aimed at blunting or reverting detrimental protumorigenic phenotypes associated with CAFs. PMID:27151975

  8. [A case of primary carcinoma associated with anal fistula].

    PubMed

    Nushijima, Youichirou; Nakano, Katsutoshi; Sugimoto, Keishi; Nakaguchi, Kazunori; Kan, Kazuomi; Maruyama, Hirohide; Doi, Sadayuki; Okamura, Shu; Murata, Kohei

    2014-11-01

    A 47-year-old man with no history of anal fistula was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of perianal pain. Computed tomography (CT) imaging revealed perianal abscess. Incision and drainage were performed under spinal anesthesia. Ten months after drainage, magnetic resonance imaging revealed anal fistula on the left side of the anus. Subsequently, core-out and seton procedures were performed for ischiorectalis type III anal fistula. Pathological examination of the resected specimen of anal fistula revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, leading to the diagnosis of carcinoma associated with anal fistula. No distant metastases or enlarged lymph nodes were observed on positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. We performed abdominoperineal resection with wide resection of ischiorectalis fat tissue. The pathology results were tub2, A, ly0, v0, n0, PM0, DM0, RM0, H0, P0, M0, Stage II. Negative pressure wound therapy was performed for perineum deficiency, after which rapid wound healing was observed. Left inguinal lymph node recurrence was detected 8 months after surgery, for which radiotherapy was administered. Distant metastasis was detected 11 months after surgery. The patient died 21 months after surgery.

  9. Inoculating for smallpox.

    PubMed

    Greene, Jan

    2003-04-01

    In California, one hospital decided the time was right to inoculate staff volunteers with the smallpox vaccine. Weighing the same pros and cons--civic responsibility, health risk, cost and reluctance of staff--other hospitals opted out of inoculations, at least for now. What led these organizations to such divergent decisions?

  10. Mammary Duct Ectasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... tenderness or inflammation of the clogged duct (periductal mastitis). Mammary duct ectasia most often occurs in women ... that's turned inward (inverted) A bacterial infection called mastitis also may develop in the affected milk duct, ...

  11. Inoculation lupus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, V N; Jain, S; Gupta, R

    1992-01-01

    An 11-years-old girl with lupus vulgaris on the right buttock following inoculation is described. The diagnosis was formed by the history, morphological characteristics, Mantoux test, histopathology, and was supported by an affirmative response to short course intensive chemotherapy (6 months). This route of infection acquires special significance with the worldwide-spread of HIV infection.

  12. Mammary cancers and pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J M

    1979-01-01

    Uncertainties persist about management and prognosis of mammary cancers that occur during and after pregnancy and during lactation. Pathological features of mammary cancers occurring during pregnancy are the same as those in non-pregnant women and survival rates are comparable. Management should be the same as in non-pregnant patients. Termination of pregnancy does not improve survival but it should be advised if the prognosis is poor. Mastectomy apparently presents little danger to the fetus, though treatment such as chemotherapy and irradiation should be avoided. Women who have received treatment for mammary cancer need not be advised against subsequent pregnancy. Routine ovarian radiation in non-pregnant premenopausal women is not generally to be recommended, since it does not prolong survival and would deprive some of the chance of further pregnancy. In lactating women who develop mammary cancers survival is apparently not adversely affected. Lactation should be suppressed initially and followed by mastectomy. Regimens of immunotherapy, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy may then be begun. Until results of current trials of combined treatments of mammary cancers associated with pregnancy are available, management should be neither aggressive nor tentative. It should be based on a well-balanced concept of applying all available treatments, as in non-pregnant patients. PMID:376044

  13. Mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Macias, Hector; Hinck, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    The mammary gland develops through several distinct stages. The first transpires in the embryo as the ectoderm forms a mammary line that resolves into placodes. Regulated by epithelial–mesenchymal interactions, the placodes descend into the underlying mesenchyme and produce the rudimentary ductal structure of the gland present at birth. Subsequent stages of development—pubertal growth, pregnancy, lactation, and involution—occur postnatally under the regulation of hormones. Puberty initiates branching morphogenesis, which requires growth hormone (GH) and estrogen, as well as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), to create a ductal tree that fills the fat pad. Upon pregnancy, the combined actions of progesterone and prolactin generate alveoli, which secrete milk during lactation. Lack of demand for milk at weaning initiates the process of involution whereby the gland is remodeled back to its prepregnancy state. These processes require numerous signaling pathways that have distinct regulatory functions at different stages of gland development. Signaling pathways also regulate a specialized subpopulation of mammary stem cells that fuel the dramatic changes in the gland occurring with each pregnancy. Our knowledge of mammary gland development and mammary stem cell biology has significantly contributed to our understanding of breast cancer and has advanced the discovery of therapies to treat this disease.

  14. [Design of SCM inoculation device].

    PubMed

    Qian, Mingli; Xie, Haiyuan

    2014-01-01

    The first step of bacilli culture is inoculation bacteria on culture medium. Designing a device to increase efficiency of inoculation is significative. The new device is controlled by SCM. The stepper motor can drive the culture medium rotating, accelerating, decelerating, overturn and suspending. The device is high practicability and efficient, let inoculation easy for operator.

  15. Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma Associated with Osteosarcoma in a True Malignant Mixed Tumor of the Submandibular Region.

    PubMed

    Marcotullio, Dario; de Vincentiis, Marco; Iannella, Giannicola; Cerbelli, Bruna; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. True malignant mixed tumor, also known as carcinosarcoma, is a rare tumor of the salivary gland composed of both malignant epithelial and malignant mesenchymal elements. Frequently carcinosarcoma arises in the background of a preexisting pleomorphic adenoma; however, if no evidence of benign mixed tumor is present, the lesion is known as carcinosarcoma "de novo." We reported the first case of true malignant mixed tumor of the submandibular gland composed of high grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma associated with osteosarcoma. Case Presentation. A 69-year-old Caucasian male came to our department complaining of the appearance of an asymptomatic left submandibular neoformation progressively increasing in size over 3 months. We opted for surgical treatment. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of carcinosarcoma with the coexistence of high grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma and osteosarcoma. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, in the true malignant mixed tumor of the submandibular gland, mucoepidermoid carcinoma associated with osteosarcoma has never been previously reported.

  16. Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma Associated with Osteosarcoma in a True Malignant Mixed Tumor of the Submandibular Region

    PubMed Central

    Marcotullio, Dario; de Vincentiis, Marco; Iannella, Giannicola; Cerbelli, Bruna; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. True malignant mixed tumor, also known as carcinosarcoma, is a rare tumor of the salivary gland composed of both malignant epithelial and malignant mesenchymal elements. Frequently carcinosarcoma arises in the background of a preexisting pleomorphic adenoma; however, if no evidence of benign mixed tumor is present, the lesion is known as carcinosarcoma “de novo.” We reported the first case of true malignant mixed tumor of the submandibular gland composed of high grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma associated with osteosarcoma. Case Presentation. A 69-year-old Caucasian male came to our department complaining of the appearance of an asymptomatic left submandibular neoformation progressively increasing in size over 3 months. We opted for surgical treatment. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of carcinosarcoma with the coexistence of high grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma and osteosarcoma. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, in the true malignant mixed tumor of the submandibular gland, mucoepidermoid carcinoma associated with osteosarcoma has never been previously reported. PMID:26600963

  17. [Laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection after preoperative chemoradiotherapy for advanced carcinoma associated with anal fistula].

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Takashi; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Sumi, Yasuo; Kanemitsu, Kiyonori; Yamamoto, Masashi; Kanaji, Shingo; Imanishi, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Tetsu; Suzuki, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kenichi; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2014-11-01

    The patient was a 71-year-old man who was diagnosed with anal fistula 50 years previously. He complained of mucous and bloody stools. He was diagnosed with a carcinoma associated with anal fistula after biopsy. Image examination showed that the tumor was filled with mucinous substances and that it had invaded the levator ani muscle, with left external iliac and left inguinal lymph node metastases. Therefore, preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cancer was administered. After chemoradiotherapy, the tumor and metastatic lymph nodes reduced in size. We performed laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection. Histopathologically, the tumor was revealed as a mucinous adenocarcinoma, but no cancer cells were present on the surgical margin. This case suggested that preoperative chemoradiotherapy could be effective for locally advanced carcinoma associated with anal fistula.

  18. Canine mammary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Sorenmo, Karin

    2003-05-01

    The National Consensus Group recommends that all women with tumors larger than 1 cm be offered chemotherapy regardless of tumor histology of lymph node status. This recommendation is to ensure that everyone at risk for failing, even though the risk may be low in women with relatively small tumors and favorable histology, has a choice and receives the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. This type of treatment recommendation may also be made in dogs based on recognized, well-accepted prognostic factors such as tumor size, stage, type, and histologic differentiation. Based on the limited clinical information available in veterinary medicine, the drugs that are effective in human breast cancer, such as cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, and doxorubicin, may also have a role in the treatment of malignant mammary gland tumors in dogs. Randomized prospective studies are needed, however, to evaluate the efficacy of chemotherapy in dogs with high-risk mammary gland tumors and to determine which drugs and protocols are the most efficacious. Until such studies are performed, the treatment of canine mammary gland tumors will be based on the individual oncologist's understanding of tumor biology, experience, interpretation of the available studies, and a little bit of gut-feeling. Table 2 is a proposal for treatment guidelines for malignant canine mammary gland tumors according to established prognostic factors, results from published veterinary studies, and current recommendations for breast cancer treatment in women.

  19. Stress inoculation modeled in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brockhurst, J; Cheleuitte-Nieves, C; Buckmaster, C L; Schatzberg, A F; Lyons, D M

    2015-01-01

    Stress inoculation entails intermittent exposure to mildly stressful situations that present opportunities to learn, practice and improve coping in the context of exposure psychotherapies and resiliency training. Here we investigate behavioral and hormonal aspects of stress inoculation modeled in mice. Mice randomized to stress inoculation or a control treatment condition were assessed for corticosterone stress hormone responses and behavior during open-field, object-exploration and tail-suspension tests. Stress inoculation training sessions that acutely increased plasma levels of corticosterone diminished subsequent immobility as a measure of behavioral despair on tail-suspension tests. Stress inoculation also decreased subsequent freezing in the open field despite comparable levels of thigmotaxis in mice from both treatment conditions. Stress inoculation subsequently decreased novel-object exploration latencies and reduced corticosterone responses to repeated restraint. These results demonstrate that stress inoculation acutely stimulates glucocorticoid signaling and then enhances subsequent indications of active coping behavior in mice. Unlike mouse models that screen for the absence of vulnerability to stress or presence of traits that occur in resilient individuals, stress inoculation training reflects an experience-dependent learning-like process that resembles interventions designed to build resilience in humans. Mouse models of stress inoculation may provide novel insights for new preventive strategies or therapeutic treatments of human psychiatric disorders that are triggered and exacerbated by stressful life events. PMID:25826112

  20. Humanization of the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Wronski, A; Arendt, L M; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Although mouse models have provided invaluable information on the mechanisms of mammary gland development, anatomical and developmental differences between human and mice limit full understanding of this fundamental process. Humanization of the mouse mammary gland by injecting immortalized human breast stromal cells into the cleared murine mammary fat pad enables the growth and development of human mammary epithelial cells or tissue. This facilitates the characterization of human mammary gland development or tumorigenesis by utilizing the mouse mammary fat pad. Here we describe the process of isolating human mammary stromal and epithelial cells as well as their introduction into the mammary fat pads of immunocompromised mice.

  1. Physiologically activated mammary fibroblasts promote postpartum mammary cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiuchen; Burchard, Julja; Spellman, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Women diagnosed with breast cancer within 5 years of childbirth have poorer prognosis than nulliparous or pregnant women. Weaning-induced breast involution is implicated, as the collagen-rich, immunosuppressive microenvironment of the involuting mammary gland is tumor promotional in mice. To investigate the role of mammary fibroblasts, isolated mammary PDGFRα+ cells from nulliparous and postweaning mice were assessed for activation phenotype and protumorigenic function. Fibroblast activation during involution was evident by increased expression of fibrillar collagens, lysyl oxidase, Tgfb1, and Cxcl12 genes. The ability of mammary tumors to grow in an isogenic, orthotopic transplant model was increased when tumor cells were coinjected with involution-derived compared with nulliparous-derived mammary fibroblasts. Mammary tumors in the involution-fibroblast group had increased Ly6C+ monocytes at the tumor border, and decreased CD8+ T cell infiltration and tumor cell death. Ibuprofen treatment suppressed involution-fibroblast activation and tumor promotional capacity, concurrent with decreases in tumor Ly6C+ monocytes, and increases in intratumoral CD8+ T cell infiltration, granzyme levels, and tumor cell death. In total, our data identify a COX/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)–dependent activated mammary fibroblast within the involuting mammary gland that displays protumorigenic, immunosuppressive activity, identifying fibroblasts as potential targets for the prevention and treatment of postpartum breast cancer. PMID:28352652

  2. Republished: Importance of carcinoma-associated fibroblast-derived proteins in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Valcz, Gabor; Sipos, Ferenc; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnar, Bela; Yagi, Yukako

    2015-05-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblast (CAF) as prominent cell type of the tumour microenvironment has complex interaction with both the cancer cells and other non-neoplastic surrounding cells. The CAF-derived regulators and extracellular matrix proteins can support cancer progression by providing a protective microenvironment for the cancer cells via reduction of chemotherapy sensitivity. On the other hand, these proteins may act as powerful prognostic markers as well as potential targets of anticancer therapy. In this review, we summarise the clinical importance of the major CAF-derived signals influencing tumour behaviour and determining the outcome of chemotherapy.

  3. Importance of carcinoma-associated fibroblast-derived proteins in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Valcz, Gabor; Sipos, Ferenc; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnar, Bela; Yagi, Yukako

    2014-12-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblast (CAF) as prominent cell type of the tumour microenvironment has complex interaction with both the cancer cells and other non-neoplastic surrounding cells. The CAF-derived regulators and extracellular matrix proteins can support cancer progression by providing a protective microenvironment for the cancer cells via reduction of chemotherapy sensitivity. On the other hand, these proteins may act as powerful prognostic markers as well as potential targets of anticancer therapy. In this review, we summarise the clinical importance of the major CAF-derived signals influencing tumour behaviour and determining the outcome of chemotherapy.

  4. Ductal barriers in mammary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Mark B; Hill, Arnold DK; Hopkins, Ann M

    2013-01-01

    Tissue barriers play an integral role in the biology and pathobiology of mammary ductal epithelium. In normal breast physiology, tight and adherens junctions undergo dynamic changes in permeability in response to hormonal and other stimuli, while several of their proteins are directly involved in mammary tumorigenesis. This review describes first the structure of mammary ductal epithelial barriers and their role in normal mammary development, examining the cyclical changes in response to puberty, pregnancy, lactation and involution. It then examines the role of adherens and tight junctions and the participation of their constituent proteins in mammary tumorigenic functions such as migration, invasion and metastasis. Finally, it discusses the potential of these adhesion proteins as both prognostic biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer. PMID:24665412

  5. Wwox inactivation enhances mammary tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Abdeen, S K; Salah, Z; Maly, B; Smith, Y; Tufail, R; Abu-Odeh, M; Zanesi, N; Croce, C M; Nawaz, Z; Aqeilan, R I

    2011-09-08

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Expression of the WWOX tumor suppressor is absent or reduced in a large proportion of breast tumors suggesting that loss of WWOX may contribute to breast tumorigenesis. Wwox-deficient mice die by 3-4 weeks of age precluding adult tumor analysis. To evaluate the effect of WWOX-altered expression on mammary tumor formation, the Wwox-heterozygous allele was back crossed onto the C3H mammary tumor-susceptible genetic background (Wwox(C3H)+/-) and incidence of mammary tumor formation was evaluated. Although 50% of the female Wwox(C3H)+/- mice developed mammary carcinomas, only 7% of Wwox(C3H)+/+ mice did. Intriguingly, mammary tumors in Wwox(C3H)+/- mice frequently lost WWOX protein expression suggesting a genetic predisposition toward mammary tumorigenesis. Immunohistochemical staining of hormone receptors revealed loss of estrogen receptor-α (ER) and progesterone receptor in the majority of these tumors. In vitro, depletion of WWOX in MCF7 ER-positive cells led to reduced ER expression and reduced sensitivity to tamoxifen and estrogen treatment and was associated with enhanced survival and anchorage-independent growth. Finally, cDNA array analyses of murine normal mammary epithelial cells and mammary tumors identified 163 significantly downreguated and 129 upregulated genes in the tumors. The majority of differentially expressed genes were part of pathways involved in cellular movement, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cellular development, cellular growth and proliferation and cell death. These changes in gene expression of mouse mammary tumors in Wwox(C3H)+/- mice resemble, at least in part, human breast cancer development. Our findings demonstrate the critical role that the WWOX tumor suppressor gene has in preventing tumorigenesis in breast cancer.

  6. Experimental mammary carcinogenesis - Rat models.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Antonieta; Faustino-Rocha, Ana I; Colaço, Bruno; Oliveira, Paula A

    2017-03-15

    Mammary cancer is one of the most common cancers, victimizing more than half a million of women worldwide every year. Despite all the studies in this field, the current therapeutic approaches are not effective and have several devastating effects for patients. In this way, the need to better understand the mammary cancer biopathology and find effective therapies led to the development of several rodent models over years. With this review, the authors intended to provide the readers with an overview of the rat models used to study mammary carcinogenesis, with a special emphasis on chemically-induced models.

  7. Expression of different phenotypes in cell lines from canine mammary spindle-cell tumours and osteosarcomas indicating a pluripotent mammary stem cell origin.

    PubMed

    Hellmén, E; Moller, M; Blankenstein, M A; Andersson, L; Westermark, B

    2000-06-01

    Mammary spindle-cell tumours and sarcomas seem to be restricted to dogs and humans. Two cell lines from spontaneous primary canine mammary spindle-cell tumours (CMT-U304 and CMT-U309) and two cell lines from spontaneous primary canine mammary osteosarcomas (CMT-U334 and CMT-U335) were established to study the mesenchymal phenotypes of mammary tumours in the female dog. The cells from the spindle-cell tumours expressed cytokeratin, vimentin and smooth muscle actin filaments. When these cells were inoculated subcutaneously into female and male nude mice they formed different types of mesenchymal tumours such as spindle-cell tumours, fibroma and rhabdomyoid tumours (n = 6/8). The cells from the osteosarcomas expressed vimentin filaments and also formed different types of mesenchymal tumours such as chondroid, rhabdomyoid, smooth muscle-like and spindle-cell tumours (n = 6/10). The cell lines CMT-U304, CMT-U309 and CMT-U335 had receptors for progesterone but none of the four cell lines had receptors for estrogen. All four cell lines and their corresponding primary tumours showed identical allelic patterns in microsatellite analysis. By in situ hybridization with genomic DNA we could verify that all formed tumours but one were of canine origin. Our results support the hypothesis that canine mammary tumours are derived from pluripotent stem cells.

  8. Human carcinoma-associated and salivary mucins detected by anti-bovine submaxillary mucin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Golubović, S J; Bojić-Trbojević, Z T

    2006-01-01

    Polyclonal rabbit anti-bovine submaxillary mucin antibodies, anti-BSM IgG, were analyzed by autoradiography and densitometry (after SDS electrophoresis and blotting), ELISA, and IRMA assays for reactivity against native antigen BSM, deglycosylated and desialylated BSM, and human salivary and carcinoma-associated mucins. Known human tumor marker CA19-9 antigen reacted with rabbit anti-BSM IgG under different conditions, either soluble or immobilized. As soluble antigen, in IRMA it reacted with anti-BSM antibodies used both as a catcher and a tracer, as well as in combination with monoclonal anti-CA19-9 antibodies as a catcher. MUC1 mucin is a carrier of this carbohydrate antigen, CA19-9, or sialyl-Lewis(a), as well as of CA15-3 antigen, a known breast tumor marker. Autoradiography and densitometry demonstrated binding of anti-BSM IgG to intact MUC1 in a sample of commercial standard preparation of CA19-9 antigen. The same method and analysis demonstrated binding of anti-BSM IgG to MUC1 and to smaller antigens of 85-120 kD in samples containing CA15-3 antigen: commercial standard preparation, human breast tissue, and human milk. In a sample of whole human saliva, reactions of both isoforms of MUC7 were detected by autoradiography, as bands of 85 and 115 kD, and densitogram analysis also demonstrated reaction with MUC5B. Chemical modifications performed as periodate oxidation and desialylation of the BSM demonstrated carbohydrate (i.e., sialic acid) epitope sensitivity for anti-BSM IgG. The results presented in this work indicate that polyclonal anti-BSM antibodies are specific for sialylated carbohydrate structure on mucins and could serve as a tool for investigation of human carcinoma-associated and salivary mucins.

  9. Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Todd M; Parekh, Vishwas

    2016-09-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described salivary gland tumor that shares the same histologic appearance and ETV6 gene (12p13) rearrangement as secretory carcinoma of the breast. Prior to its recognition, MASC cases were commonly labeled acinic cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified. Despite distinctive histologic features, MASC may be difficult to distinguish from other salivary gland tumors, in particular zymogen-poor acinic cell carcinoma and low-grade salivary duct carcinoma. Although characteristic morphologic and immunohistochemical features form the basis of a diagnosis of MASC, the presence of an ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion is confirmatory. Given its recent recognition the true prognostic import of MASC is not yet clearly defined.

  10. Cloning of Mammary Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    these parity-induced cells do represent a totipotent mammary stem cell population per se, but these cells might support stem cell maintenance as... Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Kay-Uwe Wagner CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Nebraska Medical Center Omaha, Nebraska 68198-6810 REPORT...Mammary Stem Cells DAMD17-00-1-0641 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Kay-Uwe Wagner 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT

  11. Mechanical inoculation of plant viruses.

    PubMed

    Hull, Roger

    2009-05-01

    This technique is for the mechanical inoculation of viruses to plants. It is used to diagnose a virus by its reactions in a variety of plant species, to test the infectivity of virus samples using local lesion hosts, and to propagate viruses. The virus preparation is rubbed onto the surface of the leaf in such a way as to break the surface cells without causing too much mechanical damage. The preparation of the virus sample, its application to the leaf, and the care of the plants before and after inoculation are described.

  12. Transcriptome analysis of embryonic mammary cells reveals insights into mammary lineage establishment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The mammary primordium forms during embryogenesis as a result of inductive interactions between its constitutive tissues, the mesenchyme and epithelium, and represents the earliest evidence of commitment to the mammary lineage. Previous studies of embryonic mouse mammary epithelium indicated that, by mid-gestation, these cells are determined to a mammary cell fate and that a stem cell population has been delimited. Mammary mesenchyme can induce mammary development from simple epithelium even across species and classes, and can partially restore features of differentiated tissue to mouse mammary tumours in co-culture experiments. Despite these exciting properties, the molecular identity of embryonic mammary cells remains to be fully characterised. Methods Here, we define the transcriptome of the mammary primordium and the two distinct cellular compartments that comprise it, the mammary primordial bud epithelium and mammary mesenchyme. Pathway and network analysis was performed and comparisons of embryonic mammary gene expression profiles to those of both postnatal mouse and human mammary epithelial cell sub-populations and stroma were made. Results Several of the genes we have detected in our embryonic mammary cell signatures were previously shown to regulate mammary cell fate and development, but we also identified a large number of novel candidates. Additionally, we determined genes that were expressed by both embryonic and postnatal mammary cells, which represent candidate regulators of mammary cell fate, differentiation and progenitor cell function that could signal from mammary lineage inception during embryogenesis through postnatal development. Comparison of embryonic mammary cell signatures with those of human breast cells identified potential regulators of mammary progenitor cell functions conserved across species. Conclusions These results provide new insights into genetic regulatory mechanisms of mammary development, particularly

  13. Insulin receptors in the mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Insulin binding studies were conducted using mammary membrane preparations to further the authors understanding of insulin's role in regulating mammary metabolism, particularly ruminant mammary metabolism. Specific objectives were to: (1) characterize insulin binding to bovine mammary microsomes and determine if the specificity and kinetics of binding indicate the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland; (2) examine and compare insulin binding by liver and mammary microsomes of the pig and dairy cow; (3) examine insulin binding to bovine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) and evaluate this model's usefulness in assessing insulin receptor regulation in the mammary gland of the cow; (4) examine the effect of dietary fat in insulin binding by rat mammary and liver microsomes. The specificity and kinetics of /sup 125/I-insulin binding of bovine mammary microsomes indicated the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland. Bovine liver and mammary microsomes specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did the corresponding porcine microsomes, and mammary microsomes, regardless of species, specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did liver microsomes. These differences in binding suggest differences in insulin responsiveness between pigs and cattle, as well as between the liver and mammary glands.

  14. The antitumor effect of locoregional magnetic cobalt ferrite in dog mammary adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şincai, Mariana; Gângǎ, Diana; Bica, Doina; Vékás, Ladislau

    2001-01-01

    The endocytosis of nanosized magnetic particles by tumor cells led to numerous tests to establish the use of this phenomenon in antitumor therapy. The direct antitumor effect of a biocompatible cobalt-ferrite-based magnetic fluid directly inoculated in bitch mammary tumors was studied. A direct correlation between tumor cell lysis and cobalt ferrite was established in tumors. Massive endocytosis of magnetic particles was observed 1 h after the contact of magnetic fluid with tumor cells.

  15. Mammary Cancer and Activation of Transposable Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0402 TITLE: Mammary Cancer and Activation...TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 Sep 2013 – 31 Aug 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Mammary Cancer and Activation of Transposable Elements 5a. CONTRACT...investigate molecular events occurring in the preclinical stages of mammary cancer. Specifically, the project investigates the intersection between the

  16. Metabolic reprogramming of carcinoma-associated fibroblasts and its impact on metabolic heterogeneity of tumors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Duojiao; Zhuo, Leying; Wang, Xiangdong

    2017-04-01

    Tumor metabolism is characterized with up-regulated glucose uptake and glycolytic rate of tumor cells as the source of ATP and tumors growth, and regulated by a poorly defined combination of cell-intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Metabolic heterogeneity of human tumors is dependent upon the mutational status of specific oncogenes and influenced by tumor microenvironment. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) adapt in a dynamic manner to the metabolic needs of cancer cells, associated with tumorigenesis and resistance to treatments. Importantly, CAFs could directly "feed" cancer cells essential nutrients and energy-rich metabolites, including lactate, ketone bodies, fatty acids, glutamine, and other amino acids through the induction of autophagy in a host-parasite pattern, to contribute to tumor growth and metastasis. To define the reciprocal metabolic interplay between CAFs and cancer cells will provide a better understanding of molecular mechanisms by which the treatment resistance occurs,and aid in the rational design of metabolism-based approaches to enhance the efficacy of immunotherapy.

  17. The Mesothelial Origin of Carcinoma Associated-Fibroblasts in Peritoneal Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Rynne-Vidal, Angela; Jiménez-Heffernan, José Antonio; Fernández-Chacón, Concepción; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Sandoval, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Solid tumors are complex and unstructured organs that, in addition to cancer cells, also contain other cell types. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) represent an important population in the tumor microenviroment and participate in several stages of tumor progression, including cancer cell migration/invasion and metastasis. During peritoneal metastasis, cancer cells detach from the primary tumor, such as ovarian or gastrointestinal, disseminate through the peritoneal fluid and colonize the peritoneum. Tumor cells metastasize by attaching to and invading through the mesothelial cell (MC) monolayer that lines the peritoneal cavity, then colonizing the submesothelial compact zone where CAFs accumulate. CAFs may derive from different sources depending on the surrounding metastatic niche. In peritoneal metastasis, a sizeable subpopulation of CAFs originates from MCs through a mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT), which promotes adhesion, invasion, vascularization and subsequent tumor growth. The bidirectional communication between cancer cells and MC-derived CAFs via secretion of a wide range of cytokines, growth factors and extracellular matrix components seems to be crucial for the establishment and progression of the metastasis in the peritoneum. This manuscript provides a comprehensive review of novel advances in understanding how peritoneal CAFs provide cancer cells with a supportive microenvironment, as well as the development of future therapeutic approaches by interfering with the MMT in the peritoneum. PMID:26426054

  18. Carcinoma-associated retinopathy in a young teenager with immature teratoma of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Turaka, Kiran; Kietz, Daniel; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Mitchell, Ellen; Scanga, Hannah; Fu, Valeria L N; Sylvester, Christin

    2014-08-01

    A 14-year-old African American girl presented with diminished vision in both eyes 1 week after undergoing an oophorectomy for a right ovarian mass. Systemic metastatic work-up was negative. Visual acuity was 20/40 in the right eye and 20/50 in the left eye. Slit-lamp biomicroscopy was unremarkable in both eyes. Fundus examination showed diffuse patchy areas of retinal pigment epithelial atrophy in the macula and peripheral retina bilaterally. Color vision had decreased in each eye. Electroretinography revealed nondetectable rod and cone responses. Both pattern and flash visual evoked potential (VEP) testing showed delayed latency in both eyes. She was treated with pulse intravenous methylprednisolone for 3 days along with intravenous immunoglobulins and rituximab, followed by systemic prednisolone and biweekly intravenous immunoglobulins and rituximab for 3 months. Antiretinal autoantibodies against 48-kDa (arrestin) and 64-kDa and 94-kDa proteins were positive, suggestive of carcinoma-associated retinopathy. After 3 months, visual acuity was 20/40 in each eye with improvement in color vision and VEP findings.

  19. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts affect sensitivity to oxaliplatin and 5FU in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves-Ribeiro, Samuel; Díaz-Maroto, Natalia Guillen; Berdiel-Acer, Mireia; Soriano, Antonio; Guardiola, Jordi; Martínez-Villacampa, Mercedes; Salazar, Ramon; Capellà, Gabriel; Villanueva, Alberto; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva; Molleví, David G.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of tumor microenvironment (TME) as a relevant contributor to cancer progression and its role in the development of de novo resistance to targeted therapies has become increasingly apparent. However, the mechanisms of microenvironment-mediated drug resistance for nonspecific conventional chemotherapeutic agents, such as platinum compounds or antimetabolites, are still unclear. Here we describe a mechanism induced by soluble factors released by carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) that induce the translocation of AKT, Survivin and P38 to the nucleus of tumor cells. These changes are guided to ensure DNA repair and the correct entrance and exit from mitosis in the presence of chemotherapy. We used conditioned media (CM) from normal-colonic fibroblasts and paired CAFs to assess dose response curves of oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil, separately or combined, compared with standard culture medium. We also evaluated a colony-forming assay and cell death to demonstrate the protective role of CAF-CM. Immunofluorescence confirmed the translocation of AKT, P38 and Survivin to the nucleus induced by CAF-soluble factors. We also have shown that STAT3 or P38 inhibition provides a promising strategy for overcoming microenvironment-mediated resistance. Conversely, pharmacologic AKT inhibition induces an antagonistic effect that relieves a cMET and STAT3-mediated compensatory feedback that might explain the failure of AKT inhibitors in the clinic so far. PMID:27517495

  20. The Impact of Intramammary Escherichia coli Challenge on Liver and Mammary Transcriptome and Cross-Talk in Dairy Cows during Early Lactation Using RNAseq

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, K. M.; Sørensen, P.; Bionaz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to identify the biological response and the cross-talk between liver and mammary tissue after intramammary infection (IMI) with Escherichia coli (E. coli) using RNAseq technology. Sixteen cows were inoculated with live E. coli into one mammary quarter at ~4–6 weeks in lactation. For all cows, biopsies were performed at -144, 12 and 24 h relative to IMI in liver and at 24 h post-IMI in infected and non-infected (control) mammary quarters. For a subset of cows (n = 6), RNA was extracted from both liver and mammary tissue and sequenced using a 100 bp paired-end approach. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and the Dynamic Impact Approach analysis of differentially expressed genes (overall effect False Discovery Rate≤0.05) indicated that IMI induced an overall activation of inflammation at 12 h post-IMI and a strong inhibition of metabolism, especially related to lipid, glucose, and xenobiotics at 24 h post-IMI in liver. The data indicated in mammary tissue an overall induction of inflammatory response with little effect on metabolism at 24 h post-IMI. We identified a large number of up-stream regulators potentially involved in the response to IMI in both tissues but a relatively small core network of transcription factors controlling the response to IMI for liver whereas a large network in mammary tissue. Transcriptomic results in liver and mammary tissue were supported by changes in inflammatory and metabolic mediators in blood and milk. The analysis of potential cross-talk between the two tissues during IMI uncovered a large communication from the mammary tissue to the liver to coordinate the inflammatory response but a relatively small communication from the liver to the mammary tissue. Our results indicate a strong induction of the inflammatory response in mammary tissue and impairment of liver metabolism 24h post-IMI partly driven by the signaling from infected mammary tissue. PMID:27336699

  1. FACS Sorting Mammary Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Iriondo, Oihana; Rábano, Miriam; Vivanco, María D M

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) represents one of the key techniques that have been used to isolate and characterize stem cells, including cells from the mammary gland. A combination of approaches, including recognition of cell surface antigens and different cellular activities, has facilitated the identification of stem cells from the healthy mammary gland and from breast tumors. In this chapter we describe the protocol to use FACS to separate breast cancer stem cells, but most of the general principles discussed could be applied to sort other types of cells.

  2. Mammary Gland Pathology Subsequent to Acute Infection with Strong versus Weak Biofilm Forming Staphylococcus aureus Bovine Mastitis Isolates: A Pilot Study Using Non-Invasive Mouse Mastitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi-Tiwari, Jully; Williams, Vincent; Waryah, Charlene Babra; Costantino, Paul; Al-Salami, Hani; Mathavan, Sangeetha; Wells, Kelsi; Tiwari, Harish Kumar; Hegde, Nagendra; Isloor, Shrikrishna; Al-Sallami, Hesham; Mukkur, Trilochan

    2017-01-01

    Background Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus is an important virulence attribute because of its potential to induce persistent antibiotic resistance, retard phagocytosis and either attenuate or promote inflammation, depending upon the disease syndrome, in vivo. This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential significance of strength of biofilm formation by clinical bovine mastitis-associated S. aureus in mammary tissue damage by using a mouse mastitis model. Methods Two S. aureus strains of the same capsular phenotype with different biofilm forming strengths were used to non-invasively infect mammary glands of lactating mice. Biofilm forming potential of these strains were determined by tissue culture plate method, ica typing and virulence gene profile per detection by PCR. Delivery of the infectious dose of S. aureus was directly through the teat lactiferous duct without invasive scraping of the teat surface. Both bacteriological and histological methods were used for analysis of mammary gland pathology of mice post-infection. Results Histopathological analysis of the infected mammary glands revealed that mice inoculated with the strong biofilm forming S. aureus strain produced marked acute mastitic lesions, showing profuse infiltration predominantly with neutrophils, with evidence of necrosis in the affected mammary glands. In contrast, the damage was significantly less severe in mammary glands of mice infected with the weak biofilm-forming S. aureus strain. Although both IL-1β and TNF-α inflammatory biomarkers were produced in infected mice, level of TNF-α produced was significantly higher (p<0.05) in mice inoculated with strong biofilm forming S. aureus than the weak biofilm forming strain. Conclusion This finding suggests an important role of TNF-α in mammary gland pathology post-infection with strong biofilm-forming S. aureus in the acute mouse mastitis model, and offers an opportunity for the development of novel strategies for reduction of

  3. Tumor-produced, active Interleukin-1 {beta} regulates gene expression in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Dudas, Jozsef; Fullar, Alexandra; Bitsche, Mario; Schartinger, Volker; Kovalszky, Ilona; Sprinzl, Georg Mathias; Riechelmann, Herbert

    2011-09-10

    Recently we described a co-culture model of periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts and SCC-25 lingual squamous carcinoma cells, which resulted in conversion of normal fibroblasts into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), and in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of SCC-25 cells. We have found a constitutive high interleukin-1{beta} (IL1-{beta}) expression in SCC-25 cells in normal and in co-cultured conditions. In our hypothesis a constitutive IL1-{beta} expression in SCC-25 regulates gene expression in fibroblasts during co-culture. Co-cultures were performed between PDL fibroblasts and SCC-25 cells with and without dexamethasone (DEX) treatment; IL1-{beta} processing was investigated in SCC-25 cells, tumor cells and PDL fibroblasts were treated with IL1-{beta}. IL1-{beta} signaling was investigated by western blot and immunocytochemistry. IL1-{beta}-regulated genes were analyzed by real-time qPCR. SCC-25 cells produced 16 kD active IL1-{beta}, its receptor was upregulated in PDL fibroblasts during co-culture, which induced phosphorylation of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK-1), and nuclear translocalization of NF{kappa}B{alpha}. Several genes, including interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (COX-2) were induced in CAFs during co-culture. The most enhanced induction was found for IL-6 and COX-2. Treatment of PDL fibroblasts with IL1-{beta} reproduced a time- and dose-dependent upregulation of IL1-receptor, IL-6 and COX-2. A further proof was achieved by DEX inhibition for IL1-{beta}-stimulated IL-6 and COX-2 gene expression. Constitutive expression of IL1-{beta} in the tumor cells leads to IL1-{beta}-stimulated gene expression changes in tumor-associated fibroblasts, which are involved in tumor progression. -- Graphical abstract: SCC-25 cells produce active, processed IL1-{beta}. PDL fibroblasts possess receptor for IL1-{beta}, and its expression is increased 4.56-times in the

  4. Inoculating against reactance to persuasive health messages.

    PubMed

    Richards, Adam S; Banas, John A

    2015-01-01

    This investigation examined the possibility of decreasing psychological reactance to health campaigns through the use of inoculation messages. It was hypothesized that an inoculation message, which forewarned of the potential of subsequent reactance, would decrease participants' likelihood of reacting negatively to a freedom-threatening message aimed to reduce excessive alcohol consumption. Participants (N = 275) who were inoculated against potential reactance felt less threatened and experienced less reactance compared to those who did not read an inoculation message. Structural equation modeling showed that inoculation indirectly predicted lower intention to drink alcohol via the theorized mediated reactance process. This research suggests that it is possible to inoculate against self-generated cognitions that might otherwise lead toward negative health behaviors.

  5. Prevention of Human Mammary Carcinogenesis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-07-01

    of HER-2/neu oncogene-transformed human mammary epithelial cells by a green tea polyphenol. Breast Cancer Res Treat 38:100; 1996 8. Telang NT, Katdare...apoptosis and anchorage-dependent colony forming efficiency. Appendix Figure 5 (AF-5): Effect of (-) epigallo catechin gallate (EGCG) on 184- B5/HER cells is... tea polyphenol. Ann. NY Acad. Sci. 768: 215- 222, 1995. Appendix Pubilcation 5 (AP-5): Fishman J, Osborne MP, Telang NT. The role of estrogen in

  6. Changes in rumen bacterial community composition following feeding of silage inoculated with a commercial silage inoculant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some silage inoculants yield an increase in milk production without increasing fiber digestibility, possibly through altering the rumen microflora. We hypothesized that silage treated with a commercial inoculant (Lactobacillus plantarum, LP) would improve milk production and would alter rumen bacter...

  7. Characterization of the autonomic innervation of mammary gland in lactating rats studied by retrograde transynaptic virus labeling and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Köves, Katalin; Györgyi, Z; Szabó, F K; Boldogkői, Zs

    2012-06-01

    The aim of experiments was to characterize the neurons of the autonomic chain that innervates the nipple and the mammary gland of lactating rats using retrograde transynaptic virus labeling and neurotransmitter and neuropeptide immunohistochemistry. Two days after injection of green fluorescence protein labeled virus in two nipples and underlying mammary glands, labeling was observed in the ipsilateral paravertebral sympathetic trunk and the lateral horn. Three days after inoculation the labeling appeared in the brain stem and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Above the spinal cord the labeling was bilateral. A subpopulation of virus labeled cells in the paraventricular nuclei synthesized oxytocin. Labeled neurons in the lateral horn showed cholinergic immunoreactivity. These cholinergic neurons innervated the paravertebral ganglia where the virus labeled neurons were partially noradrenergic. The noradrenergic fibers in the mammary gland innervate the smooth muscle wall of vessels, but not the mammary gland in rats. The neurons in the lateral horn receive afferents from the brain stem, and paraventricular nucleus and these afferents are noradrenergic and oxytocinergic. New findings in our work: Some oxytocinergic fibers may descend to the neurons of the lateral horn which innervate noradrenergic neurons in the paravertebral sympathetic trunk, and in turn these noradrenergic neurons reach the vessels of the mammary gland.

  8. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inspection of mammary glands. 310.17... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POST-MORTEM INSPECTION § 310.17 Inspection of mammary glands. (a) Lactating mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed...

  9. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Inspection of mammary glands. 310.17... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POST-MORTEM INSPECTION § 310.17 Inspection of mammary glands. (a) Lactating mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed...

  10. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inspection of mammary glands. 310.17... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POST-MORTEM INSPECTION § 310.17 Inspection of mammary glands. (a) Lactating mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed...

  11. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Inspection of mammary glands. 310.17... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POST-MORTEM INSPECTION § 310.17 Inspection of mammary glands. (a) Lactating mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed...

  12. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Inspection of mammary glands. 310.17... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POST-MORTEM INSPECTION § 310.17 Inspection of mammary glands. (a) Lactating mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed...

  13. Transplantation of a mammary stromal cell line into a mammary fat pad: development of the site-specific in vivo analysis system for mammary stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Hajime; Aoki, Naohito; Nadano, Daita; Matsuda, Tsukasa

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between mammary epithelial and stromal tissue is considered to be important in breast tissue development. In this study, we developed a transplantation procedure for the mammary stromal fibroblastic cell line (MSF) to examine its life in vivo. First we established MSF cells which stably expressed lacZ (lacZ/MSF) and had characteristics of mammary stromal cells. The lacZ/MSF cells were then transplanted into a cleared mammary fat pad of syngenic mice with and without mammary primary epithelial organoids. Whole mount X-gal and carmine staining of the transplants revealed that a number of undifferentiated lacZ/MSF cells survived around the mammary epithelial tissue when transplanted with organoids. These results indicate that transplantation of MSF cells into mammary fat pad was accomplished by co-transplantation with primary mammary organoids. Finally, we discuss the application of transplantation procedure for in vivo studies of the mammary stromal tissue development and stromal-epithelial interactions.

  14. Mammary Malignancy in The Male

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Leslie L.; Benninghoff, David L.; Camiel, Mortimer R.; Medina, Antonio

    1978-01-01

    Mammary carcinoma in the male, a relatively uncommon disease, represents about 0.9 to 1.5 percent of all breast cancers. 1,2 The authors reviewed 16 cases of male breast cancer seen in a 30-year period at the State University of New York, Kings County Hospital Medical Center in Brooklyn, and the North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset. Epidemiology, etiology, demography, signs and symptoms, management, and prognosis are discussed. A review of pertinent literature is presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:722829

  15. Immune responses to Mycoplasma bovis vaccination and experimental infection in the bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Boothby, J T; Schore, C E; Jasper, D E; Osburn, B I; Thomas, C B

    1988-01-01

    This study characterized the immune responses in four vaccinated and four control cows in response to vaccination and experimental intramammary inoculation with Mycoplasma bovis. Specific antibody responses occurred in serum and milk in response to vaccination and experimental infection. Lymphocytes from peripheral blood, but not from the mammary gland of vaccinated cows had increased responsiveness to mitogens. No lymphocytes tested were responsive to M. bovis antigen. Both vaccination and experimental infection resulted in skin test reactivity. These results imply that vaccination results in immune responses which may alter the course of experimental M. bovis mastitis, but may contribute to cellular inflammation. PMID:3167718

  16. Klebsiella pneumoniae inoculants for enhancing plant growth

    DOEpatents

    Triplett, Eric W.; Kaeppler, Shawn M.; Chelius, Marisa K.

    2008-07-01

    A biological inoculant for enhancing the growth of plants is disclosed. The inoculant includes the bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101, Pantoea agglomerans P102, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342, Klebsiella pneumoniae zmvsy, Herbaspirillum seropedicae Z152, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PA15, with or without a carrier. The inoculant also includes strains of the bacterium Pantoea agglomerans and K. pneumoniae which are able to enhance the growth of cereal grasses. Also disclosed are the novel bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101 and P102, and Klebsiella pneumoniae 342 and zmvsy.

  17. Mammary and extramammary Paget's disease*

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Lauro Lourival; Lopes, Ione Maria Ribeiro Soares; Lopes, Lauro Rodolpho Soares; Enokihara, Milvia M. S. S.; Michalany, Alexandre Osores; Matsunaga, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    Paget's disease, described by Sir James Paget in 1874, is classified as mammary and extramammary. The mammary type is rare and often associated with intraductal cancer (93-100% of cases). It is more prevalent in postmenopausal women and it appears as an eczematoid, erythematous, moist or crusted lesion, with or without fine scaling, infiltration and inversion of the nipple. It must be distinguished from erosive adenomatosis of the nipple, cutaneous extension of breast carcinoma, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, chronic eczema, lactiferous ducts ectasia, Bowen's disease, basal cell carcinoma, melanoma and intraductal papilloma. Diagnosis is histological and prognosis and treatment depend on the type of underlying breast cancer. Extramammary Paget's disease is considered an adenocarcinoma originating from the skin or skin appendages in areas with apocrine glands. The primary location is the vulvar area, followed by the perianal region, scrotum, penis and axillae. It starts as an erythematous plaque of indolent growth, with well-defined edges, fine scaling, excoriations, exulcerations and lichenification. In most cases it is not associated with cancer, although there are publications linking it to tumors of the vulva, vagina, cervix and corpus uteri, bladder, ovary, gallbladder, liver, breast, colon and rectum. Differential diagnoses are candidiasis, psoriasis and chronic lichen simplex. Histopathology confirms the diagnosis. Before treatment begins, associated malignancies should be investigated. Surgical excision and micrographic surgery are the best treatment options, although recurrences are frequent. PMID:25830993

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Genistein Mammary Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    pathways we found up-regulated P-ERK-1, but no significant short-term changes in the tyrosine hydroxylase and iNOS protein expressions in mammary glands...of 21 day old rats. At day 50, there was significant up-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase and VEGF-R2. This and previous work suggests that early...mammary glands of 21 day old rats only. In 50 day old rats, mammary tyrosine hydroxylase protein expression was up- regulated and now we report that

  19. Mammary gland tumors in captive African hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; Gerner, M

    2000-04-01

    From December 1995 to July 1999, eight mammary gland tumors were diagnosed in eight adult captive female African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris). The tumors presented as single or multiple subcutaneous masses along the cranial or caudal abdomen that varied in size for each hedgehog. Histologically, seven of eight (88%) mammary gland tumors were malignant. Tumors were classified as solid (4 cases), tubular (2 cases), and papillary (2 cases). Seven tumors had infiltrated into the surrounding stroma and three tumors had histologic evidence of neoplastic vascular invasion. Three hedgehogs had concurrent neoplasms. These are believed to be the first reported cases of mammary gland tumors in African hedgehogs.

  20. Serological screening for a mucine-like carcinoma-associated antigen (MCA) in patients with gastrointestinal tract malignancies.

    PubMed

    Scheithauer, W; Mairinger, D

    1989-01-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibody b-12 identifies a high-molecular-mass glycoprotein antigen strongly expressed by breast carcinoma cells. Since immunohistochemical studies have also demonstrated some reactivity with other epithelial neoplasms, and since "mucine-like carcinoma-associated antigen" (MCA) has gained considerable interest as a tumor marker in breast cancer, we have investigated 34 patients with histologically proven advanced gastrointestinal malignancies for the presence of elevated MCA serum levels. Our data suggest that screening for and/or monitoring of MCA in these tumors is unlikely to have any practical clinical relevance. The possible role of MCA as a marker in tissue specimens for abortive adenomatous differentiation in gastrointestinal (and other) neoplasms, however, remains to be determined.

  1. Artificial inoculation-perspectives in tailings phytostabilization.

    PubMed

    Petrisor, Ioana G; Dobrota, Smaranda; Komnitsas, Kostas; Lazar, Ioan; Kuperberg, J Michael; Serban, Mihai

    2004-01-01

    Intensive mining and processing activities worldwide resulted in the generation of huge amounts of waste (tailings), generally characterized as toxic, radioactive, and/or hazardous. The exposure potential and, hence, the risk posed by such wastes is enhanced by a general lack of vegetation. Phytostabilization has proven to be efficient in reducing this risk. However, establishing vegetation on tailing dumps may be expensive due to the intensive use of amendments and chemical fertilizers. In this article, investigations on artificial inoculation of mine tailings with bacterial strains as a means to improve the development of vegetative covers and reduce application cost by eliminating chemical fertilization are presented and discussed. The development of plants and microbial communities from tailings, as well as the impact of inoculation on metal uptake in plants, were studied. Experiments were carried out in greenhouse using two types of mine tailings (phosphogypsum and sulphidic tailings) from the Romanian Black Sea coast. Indigenous herbaceous plants were cultivated on tailings with the addition of chemical fertilizers versus bacterial inoculation. After a 6-month experimental period, excellent plant growth, which is associated with a rich microbial community, was observed in all inoculated treatments, in contrast with poor plant growth and microbiota from the chemical fertilization treatments alone. Additionally, artificial inoculation improved plant resistance to heavy metals by reducing the uptake of some toxic metals. Once a rich microbial community is established, inoculation may be discontinued. Based on these results, efficient and cost-effective phytostabilization schemes can be proposed.

  2. Trace element transport in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2007-01-01

    The mammary gland has a remarkable capacity to adapt to maternal deficiency or excess of iron, copper, and zinc and to homeostatically control milk concentrations of these essential nutrients. Similarly, it can regulate changes in concentrations of iron, copper, and zinc change during lactation. For iron, this regulation is achieved by transferrin receptor, DMT1, and ferroportin, whereas mammary gland copper metabolism is regulated by Ctr1, ATP7A, and ATP7B. Zinc homeostasis is complex, involving both zinc importers (Zip3) and zinc exporters (ZnT-1, ZnT-2, and ZnT-4). Both transcriptional and post-translational regulation can affect protein abundance and cellular localization of these transporters, finely orchestrating uptake, intracellular trafficking, and secretion of iron, copper, and zinc. The control of mammary gland uptake and milk secretion of iron, copper, and zinc protects both the mammary gland and the breast-fed infant against deficiency and excess of these nutrients.

  3. Mammary gland: From embryogenesis to adult life.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Aiello, Flavia Concetta; Vecchio, Giada Maria; Salvatorelli, Lucia; Magro, Gaetano; Imbesi, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to focus on the molecular factors that ensure the optimal development and maintenance of the mammary gland thanks to their integration and coordination. The development of the mammary gland is supported, not only by endocrine signals, but also by regulatory molecules, which are able to integrate signals from the surrounding microenvironment. A major role is certainly played by homeotic genes, but their incorrect expression during the spatiotemporal regulation of proliferative, functional and differentiation cycles of the mammary gland, may result in the onset of neoplastic processes. Attention is directed also to the endocrine aspects and sexual dimorphism of mammary gland development, as well as the role played by ovarian steroids and their receptors in adult life.

  4. Gordon Research Conference on Mammary Gland Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 conference was the tenth in the series of biennial Gordon Research Conferences on Mammary Gland Biology. Traditionally this conference brings together scientists from diverse backgrounds and experience but with a common interest in the biology of the mammary gland. Investigators from agricultural and medical schools, biochemists, cell and molecular biologists, endocrinologists, immunologists, and representatives from the emerging biotechnology industries met to discuss current concepts and results on the function and regulation of the normal and neoplastic mammary gland in a variety of species. Of the participants, approximately three-fourths were engaged in studying the normal mammary gland function, whereas the other quarter were engaged in studying the neoplastic gland. The interactions between scientists, clinicians, veterinarians examining both normal and neoplastic cell function serves to foster the multi-disciplinary goals of the conference and has stimulated many cooperative projects among participants in previous years.

  5. The mammary cellular hierarchy and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Samantha R; Gallego-Ortega, David; Ormandy, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Advances in the study of hematopoietic cell maturation have paved the way to a deeper understanding the stem and progenitor cellular hierarchy in the mammary gland. The mammary epithelium, unlike the hematopoietic cellular hierarchy, sits in a complex niche where communication between epithelial cells and signals from the systemic hormonal milieu, as well as from extra-cellular matrix, influence cell fate decisions and contribute to tissue homeostasis. We review the discovery, definition and regulation of the mammary cellular hierarchy and we describe the development of the concepts that have guided our investigations. We outline recent advances in in vivo lineage tracing that is now challenging many of our assumptions regarding the behavior of mammary stem cells, and we show how understanding these cellular lineages has altered our view of breast cancer.

  6. Survival of several Rhizobium/Bradyrhizobium strains on different inoculant formulations and inoculated seeds.

    PubMed

    Temprano, F J; Albareda, M; Camacho, M; Daza, A; Santamaría, C; Rodríguez-Navarro, D Nombre

    2002-06-01

    The effect of a variety factors on the survival of several rhizobia strains on inoculants and inoculated seeds has been evaluated. Since the rhizobia strains showed different cell-density-evolution patterns on peat-based inoculants and on inoculated seeds, several inoculant formulations with highly effective Rhizobium/Bradyrhizobium strains (for Lupinus, Hedysarum, Phaseolus and Glycine max.) were monitored under the following storage conditions: (a) the inoculants were kept refrigerated (at 4 degrees C), or (b) at room temperature (25 degrees C). The effect of water content (30-50%, w/w) in the inoculants as well as that of several seed-coating adhesives were also investigated. Alternative carriers including perlite and vermiculite were tested. For all of the strains, survival on sterile peat-based inoculants was higher than on the corresponding unsterile peat formulation; for the latter, refrigerated storage conditions are recommended to ensure high bacterial densities. The water content of the inoculants had a differential effect on strain survival depending on the sterility of the peat, such that a high water content was more detrimental when unsterilized peat was employed. The best adherent for rhizobia survival was a gum arabic/water solution. Perlite was as effective as peat in maintaining a high population of rhizobia, at least for 6 months of storage.

  7. Mammary fibroadenoma in a lamb

    PubMed Central

    Guvenc, Tolga; Yarim, Murat; Kabak, Yonca B.; Sozgen, Yuksel

    2007-01-01

    A fibroadenoma was diagnosed in the left udder of a 3-month-old female Chios lamb. No recurrence was observed after surgery. Grossly, the tumor had a whitish-gray lobular appearance, and the lobules were interlaced with thin septa. Microscopically, the tumor was composed of proliferating fibroepithelial tissue, including differentiated ducts lined by whorls and interlacing bundles of abundant loose fibrovascular stroma. Immunohistochemistry revealed the ductal epithelium to be positive for pancytokeratin (AE1/AE3) and loose fibrovascular stroma was positive for vimentin and basal cells covering the ductal epithelium of alpha-smooth-muscle actin. Immunostaining for the estrogen and progesterone receptors was negative. A diagnosis of mammary fibroadenoma was made based on the histological and immunohistochemical findings. PMID:17993758

  8. Identification of Mammary Specific Transcription Factors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...release; distribution unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) The Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) achieves its highest...levels of expression in the mammary glands of lactating mice . Previous work showed that the MMTV Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) has a modest level of

  9. The growth and persistence of foot-and-mouth disease virus in the bovine mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, R.; Mann, J. A.; Greig, A.; Chapman, W. G.; Goodridge, D.

    1971-01-01

    In animals exposed to foot-and-mouth disease virus by indirect contact, virus was recovered from the blood, milk, pharynx, vagina and rectum for variable periods of time before clinical disease was apparent. Virus instilled into the mammary gland multiplied rapidly and virus concentrations greater than 107 p.f.u./ml. were recorded within 8-32 hr., depending on the virus strain and dose inoculated. Virus multiplication was accompanied by clinical signs of mastitis but the classical signs of foot-and-mouth disease did not appear for 52-117 hr. Dissemination of virus from the mammary gland occurred within 4-24 hr. and in some animals samples taken from the pharynx, mouth, nose and vagina contained virus for periods up to 97 hr. before the appearance of vesicular lesions. Virus production in the udder declined with the appearance of virus neutralizing activity in the blood and the milk but persisted in some animals for periods of 3-7 weeks. The ability of foot-and-mouth disease virus to persist in mammary tissue was confirmed by the demonstration of virus multiplication in the udders of immune animals. PMID:4326249

  10. Stem cells and the developing mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Makarem, Maisam; Spike, Benjamin T; Dravis, Christopher; Kannan, Nagarajan; Wahl, Geoffrey M; Eaves, Connie J

    2013-06-01

    The mammary gland undergoes dynamic changes throughout life. In the mouse, these begin with initial morphogenesis of the gland in the mid-gestation embryo followed by hormonally regulated changes during puberty and later in adulthood. The adult mammary gland contains a hierarchy of cell types with varying potentials for self-maintenance and differentiation. These include cells able to produce complete, functional mammary glands in vivo and that contain daughter cells with the same remarkable regenerative potential, as well as cells with more limited clonogenic activity in vitro. Here we review how applying in vitro and in vivo methods for quantifying these cells in adult mammary tissue to fetal mammary cells has enabled the first cells fulfilling the functional criteria of transplantable, isolated mammary stem cells to be identified a few days before birth. Thereafter, the number of these cells increases rapidly. Populations containing these fetal stem cells display growth and gene expression programs that differ from their adult counterparts but share signatures characteristic of certain types of breast cancer. Such observations reinforce growing evidence of important differences between tissue-specific fetal and adult cells with stem cell properties and emphasize the merits of investigating their molecular basis.

  11. Morphological and histological characteristics of mammary dysplasias occurring in cell dissociation-derived murine mammary outgrowths

    SciTech Connect

    Ethier, S.P.; Adams, L.M.; Ullrich, R.L.

    1984-10-01

    The morphological and histological characteristics of ductal dysplasias that were observed in mammary outgrowths derived from monodispersed mammary cells of carcinogen-treated mice are described. Mammary outgrowths were derived by injecting either 10(4) or 10(5) enzymatically dissociated mammary cells, obtained from control or carcinogen-treated BALB/c mice, into gland-free mammary fat pads of syngeneic hosts. The mammary dysplasias observed varied considerably in morphological and histological characteristics. The majority of the lesions were ductal in origin and were associated with epithelial hyperplasia which ranged from mild hyperplasia, in which only a few extra layers of epithelium were present, to severe hyperplasia, in which the ducts and end buds were occluded and distended with epithelial cells. In addition, papillary and lobular lesions were observed which were also associated with varying degrees of hyperplasia. The range of mammary dysplasias observed in these outgrowths closely resembles that of lesions associated with the pathogenesis of mammary carcinoma in mice, rats, and humans.

  12. Automatic Surface Inoculation of Agar Trays1

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Judd R.; Mills, Stacey M.; Boykin, Elizabeth H.

    1972-01-01

    A machine is described which automatically inoculates a plastic tray containing agar media with a culture by use of either a conventional inoculating loop or a cotton swab. Isolated colonies were obtained with an inoculating loop when a heavy inoculum (109 cells/ml) was used or with a cotton swab when a light inoculum (ca. 104 cells/ml) was used. Trays containing combinations of differential or selective media were used to (i) separate mixtures of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, (ii) facilitate isolation of organisms from clinical specimens, and (iii) compare colony growth characteristics of pure cultures. The design of the machine is simple, it is easy to use, and it relieves the operator from the manual task of streaking cultures. Images PMID:16349943

  13. Comparison of Inoculation with the InoqulA and WASP Automated Systems with Manual Inoculation.

    PubMed

    Croxatto, Antony; Dijkstra, Klaas; Prod'hom, Guy; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-07-01

    The quality of sample inoculation is critical for achieving an optimal yield of discrete colonies in both monomicrobial and polymicrobial samples to perform identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Consequently, we compared the performance between the InoqulA (BD Kiestra), the WASP (Copan), and manual inoculation methods. Defined mono- and polymicrobial samples of 4 bacterial species and cloudy urine specimens were inoculated on chromogenic agar by the InoqulA, the WASP, and manual methods. Images taken with ImagA (BD Kiestra) were analyzed with the VisionLab version 3.43 image analysis software to assess the quality of growth and to prevent subjective interpretation of the data. A 3- to 10-fold higher yield of discrete colonies was observed following automated inoculation with both the InoqulA and WASP systems than that with manual inoculation. The difference in performance between automated and manual inoculation was mainly observed at concentrations of >10(6) bacteria/ml. Inoculation with the InoqulA system allowed us to obtain significantly more discrete colonies than the WASP system at concentrations of >10(7) bacteria/ml. However, the level of difference observed was bacterial species dependent. Discrete colonies of bacteria present in 100- to 1,000-fold lower concentrations than the most concentrated populations in defined polymicrobial samples were not reproducibly recovered, even with the automated systems. The analysis of cloudy urine specimens showed that InoqulA inoculation provided a statistically significantly higher number of discrete colonies than that with WASP and manual inoculation. Consequently, the automated InoqulA inoculation greatly decreased the requirement for bacterial subculture and thus resulted in a significant reduction in the time to results, laboratory workload, and laboratory costs.

  14. Prevalence of Glomerulopathies in Canine Mammary Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of paraneoplastic glomerulopathy, especially associated with carcinoma, are a matter of debate and the causal link between cancer and glomerular diseases remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate renal biopsies of selected bitches with spontaneous mammary gland carcinoma. We hypothesized that dogs with mammary carcinomas would show histologic evidence of glomerular pathology. A prospective study was performed in dogs with naturally occurring mammary carcinoma that were undergoing tumor resection and ovariohysterectomy. We evaluated renal biopsies of 32 bitches with spontaneous mammary gland carcinoma and 11 control dogs without mammary gland neoplasia. Samples were obtained from the left kidney and the biopsy material was divided for light microscopy (LM), immunofluorescence (IF) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Light microscopy abnormalities were identified in 78.1% of dogs with mammary carcinoma (n = 25) and in none of the dogs in the control group. Focal glomerular mesangial matrix expansion was the most common alteration (n = 15, 60.0%), but mesangial cell proliferation (n = 9, 36.0%) and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (n = 9, 36.0%), synechiae (n = 7, 28.0%), and globally sclerotic glomeruli (n = 6, 24.0%) were also frequent in dogs with malignancy. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed strong IgM staining was demonstrated in 64.3% (n = 18) of carcinoma dogs. Transmission electron microscopy from dogs with carcinoma revealed slight changes, the most frequent of which was faint sub-endothelial and mesangial deposits of electron-dense material (78%). Mesangial cell interpositioning and segmental effacement of podocyte foot processes were identified in some specimens (45%). Changes in the glomerulus and proteinuria are common in dogs with naturally occurring mammary carcinoma and this condition appears to provide an excellent large animal model for cancer-associated glomerulopathy in humans. PMID:27764139

  15. Hormone signaling requirements for the conversion of non-mammary mouse cells to mammary cell fate(s) in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Corinne A; Rosenfield, Sonia M; George, Andrea L; Smith, Gilbert H

    2015-06-01

    Mammotropic hormones and growth factors play a very important role in mammary growth and differentiation. Here, hormones including Estrogen, Progesterone, Prolactin, their cognate receptors, and the growth factor Amphiregulin, are tested with respect to their roles in signaling non-mammary cells from the mouse to redirect to mammary epithelial cell fate(s). This was done in the context of glandular regeneration in pubertal athymic female mice. Our previous studies demonstrated that mammary stem cell niches are recapitulated during gland regeneration in vivo. During this process, cells of exogenous origin cooperate with mammary epithelial cells to form mammary stem cell niches and thus respond to normal developmental signals. In all cases tested with the possible exception of estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α), hormone signaling is dispensable for non-mammary cells to undertake mammary epithelial cell fate(s), proliferate, and contribute progeny to chimeric mammary outgrowths. Importantly, redirected non-mammary cell progeny, regardless of their source, have the ability to self-renew and contribute offspring to secondary mammary outgrowths derived from transplanted chimeric mammary fragments; thus suggesting that some of these cells are capable of mammary stem cell/progenitor functions.

  16. Comparative aspects of mammary gland development and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Capuco, Anthony V; Ellis, Steven E

    2013-01-01

    Mammary glands are crucial to the reproductive strategy of mammals, and the milk of domesticated ruminants serves as an important source of nutrients for the human population. The majority of mammary gland development occurs postnatally, and the mammary gland undergoes cyclical periods of growth, differentiation, lactation, and regression that are coordinated to provide nutrients for offspring or are driven by strategies to manage reproduction and milk production of domesticated species. Growth and maintenance of the mammary epithelium depends on the function of mammary stem cells and progenitor cells. In this review, we provide an overview of postnatal mammary gland development, cyclical phases of mammary gland regression (regression during lactation and between successive lactations), and mammary stem cells and progenitor cells. Where possible, these processes are related to animal production and compared across species, particularly bovine, porcine, murine, and human.

  17. USF-1 as an Inhibitor of Mammary Gland Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    was targeted to the mammary gland under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (mmtv) long terminal repeat. Of eight lines of transgenic mice ...be explored by testing the hypothesis that targeted overexpression of USF-2 in the mammary glands of MMTV-myc transgenic mice will cause withdrawal...USF-2 under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat. Once in hand this new line of transgenic mice would be crossed with a

  18. Radiation promotes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and invasion of pancreatic cancer cell by activating carcinoma-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Doudou; Qu, Chao; Ning, Zhouyu; Wang, Haiyong; Zang, Kun; Zhuang, Liping; Chen, Lianyu; Wang, Peng; Meng, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is of crucial importance affecting treatment and prognosis. High degree of carcinoma-associated fibroblast (CAF) infiltration occurs in pancreatic cancer, though its effect on radiotherapy remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that radiation enhanced the migration- and invasion-promoting capacity of CAFs both in vitro and in vivo in a lung metastasis model. Radiation exposure increased the expression of CXCL12 by CAFs. CAF-derived CXCL12 promoted tumor cell EMT and invasion directly, acting through CXCR4 on pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, we showed that CXCL12-CXCR4 signaling promoted pancreatic cancer cell EMT and invasion by activating the P38 pathway. Therefore, our study concluded that radiation promoted pancreatic cancer cell invasion and EMT by activating CAFs, while inhibiting the CXCL12/CXCR4 interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and CAFs could potentially attenuate tumor cell invasion induced by radiation, which provides an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutic targets to improve the prognosis for human pancreatic cancer treated with radiation therapy. PMID:27822411

  19. Human carcinoma-associated mesenchymal stem cells promote ovarian cancer chemotherapy resistance via a BMP4/HH signaling loop.

    PubMed

    Coffman, Lan G; Choi, Yun-Jung; McLean, Karen; Allen, Benjamin L; di Magliano, Marina Pasca; Buckanovich, Ronald J

    2016-02-09

    The tumor microenvironment is critical to cancer growth and therapy resistance. We previously characterized human ovarian carcinoma-associated mesenchymal stem cells (CA-MSCs). CA-MSCs are multi-potent cells that can differentiate into tumor microenvironment components including fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and adipocytes. We previously reported CA-MSCs, compared to normal MSCs, express high levels of BMP proteins and promote tumor growth by increasing numbers of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). We demonstrate here that ovarian tumor cell-secreted Hedgehog (HH) induces CA-MSC BMP4 expression. CA-MSC-derived BMP4 reciprocally increases ovarian tumor cell HH expression indicating a positive feedback loop. Interruption of this loop with a HH pathway inhibitor or BMP4 blocking antibody decreases CA-MSC-derived BMP4 and tumor-derived HH preventing enrichment of CSCs and reversing chemotherapy resistance. The impact of HH inhibition was only seen in CA-MSC-containing tumors, indicating the importance of a humanized stroma. These results are reciprocal to findings in pancreatic and bladder cancer, suggesting HH signaling effects are tumor tissue specific warranting careful investigation in each tumor type. Collectively, we define a critical positive feedback loop between CA-MSC-derived BMP4 and ovarian tumor cell-secreted HH and present evidence for the further investigation of HH as a clinical target in ovarian cancer.

  20. Chromosomal aberrations in human hepatocellular carcinomas associated with hepatitis C virus infection detected by comparative genomic hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Sakakura, C; Hagiwara, A; Taniguchi, H; Yamaguchi, T; Yamagishi, H; Takahashi, T; Koyama, K; Nakamura, Y; Abe, T; Inazawa, J

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-five hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) were analysed by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), to screen for changes in copy-number of DNA sequences. Chromosomal losses were noted in 1p34–36 (37%), 4q12–21 (48%), 5q13–21 (35%), 6q13–16 (23%), 8p21–23 (28%), 13q (20%), 16q (33%) and 17p13 (37%). Gains were noted in 1q (46%), 6p (20%), 8q21–24 (31%) and 17q (43%). High level gains indicative of gene amplifications were found in 7q31 (3%), 11q13 (3%), 14q12 (6%) and 17q12 (3%); amplification at 14q12 may be characteristic for HCCs. No significant difference in chromosomal aberrations was noted between carcinomas associated with HCV-infection in our study and those reported earlier in HCCs infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), indicating that both HBV- and HCV-related carcinomas may progress through a similar cascade of molecular events. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10471057

  1. Long non-coding RNA urothelial carcinoma associated 1 induces cell replication by inhibiting BRG1 in 5637 cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, XIUJUAN; GONG, YANBING; JIN, BO; WU, CHENGLIN; YANG, JIANMING; WANG, LE; ZHANG, ZHENG; MAO, ZEBIN

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNA urothelial carcinoma associated 1 (UCA1) was first identified in bladder cancer tissues. High expression of UCA1 in bladder cancer has suggested it may serve as a potential diagnostic molecular marker for bladder cancer. Subsequent research in bladder cancer cell lines showed that UCA1 can promote cell proliferation, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In the present study, we identified BRG1 as a UCA1 binding partner using an in vitro RNA pull-down assay, and RNA-binding protein immunoprecipitation assay confirmed UCA1-BRG binding in bladder cancer cells in vivo. BRG1 is a chromatin remodeling factor with reported tumor suppressor activities that directly upregulates levels of the p21 cell cycle inhibitor by binding sequences in the p21 promoter. Depletion of UCA1 by RNAi resulted in upregulated p21 levels and inhibition of cell replication, while overexpressed UCA1 reduced p21 protein and promoted cell growth. Notably, UCA1 downregulation of p21 and induction of cell proliferation antagonized the function of BRG1. UCA1 highly expressed tissue samples are often with BRG1 high expression. Furthermore, we found that UCA1 impairs both binding of BRG1 to the p21 promoter and chromatin remodeling activity of BRG1. Collectively, these results demonstrate that UCA1 promotes bladder cancer cell proliferation by inhibiting BRG1. PMID:24993775

  2. Hepatocellular carcinoma associated with anabolic steroid therapy: report of a case and review of the Japanese literature.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, A; Takahashi, H; Yajima, Y; Tanaka, M; Okamura, K; Mizumoto, R; Katsuta, K

    1996-06-01

    We report herein the case of a 35-year-old woman with aplastic anemia who developed hepatocellular carcinoma after long-term therapy with oxymetholone. She was treated with 60 mg/day of oxymetholone for 3 years (total dose 64.8 g). Alpha-fetoprotein, hepatitis B surface antigen, and hepatitis C antibody were all negative, but serum titers of carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen were elevated. Lateral segmentectomy of the liver was performed. The histopathological findings were compatible with those of multiple hepatocellular carcinoma without liver cirrhosis. Three years since the operation, the patient is doing well and no signs of tumor recurrence have been detected. According to our review of Japanese cases of hepatocellular carcinoma associated with anabolic steroid therapy, in all instances the tumors developed after long-term administration of anabolic steroids for hematologic diseases. In patients under long-term anabolic steroid therapy, routine screening of the liver by ultrasonography and computed tomography should be performed to detect liver tumors in the early stages.

  3. Lactate is a mediator of metabolic cooperation between stromal carcinoma associated fibroblasts and glycolytic tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Rattigan, Yanique I.; Patel, Brijesh B.; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Sukenick, George; Koutcher, Jason A.; Glod, John W.; and others

    2012-02-15

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are bone marrow-derived stromal cells, which play a role in tumor progression. We have shown earlier that breast cancer cells secrete higher levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) under hypoxia, leading to the recruitment of hMSCs towards hypoxic tumor cells. We found that (i) MDA-MB-231 cells secrete significantly higher levels of lactate (3-fold more) under hypoxia (1% O{sub 2}) than under 20% O{sub 2} and (ii) lactate recruits hMSCs towards tumor cells by activating signaling pathways to enhance migration. The mRNA and protein expression of functional MCT1 in hMSCs is increased in response to lactate exposure. Thus, we hypothesized that hMSCs and stromal carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in the tumor microenvironment have the capacity to take up lactate expelled from tumor cells and use it as a source of energy. Our {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopic measurements indicate that {sup 13}C-lactate is converted to {sup 13}C-alpha ketoglutarate in hMSCs and CAFs supporting this hypothesis. To our knowledge this is the first in vitro model system demonstrating that hMSCs and CAFs can utilize lactate produced by tumor cells.

  4. Inoculation testing of Apollo 12 materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    E. Landrum Young, Brown and Root Northrop, injects a young Japanese quail with a suspension of pulvarized Apollo 12 lunar material within a quarantine cabinet in the Invertebrate, Aves and Fish Laboratory of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory, bldg 37, Manned Spacecraft Center. The bird is being inoculated in the abdominal cavity.

  5. Coping With Pain: Studies in Stress Inoculation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horan, John J.; And Others

    The stress-inoculation paradigm for helping clients deal with pain consists of education about the psychological dimensions of pain, training in a number of coping skills relevant to each dimension, and practice in applying these skills to the noxious stimulus. Presented are two studies, the first of which represents a component analysis of stress…

  6. Cutaneous metastases of a mammary carcinoma in a llama.

    PubMed Central

    Leichner, T L; Turner, O; Mason, G L; Barrington, G M

    2001-01-01

    An 8-year-old, female llama was evaluated for nonhealing, ulcerative, cutaneous lesions, which also involved the mammary gland. Biopsies of the lesions distant from and within the mammary gland area revealed an aggressive carcinoma. The tumor was confirmed at necropsy to be a mammary gland adenocarcinoma with cutaneous metastasis. Images Figure 1. PMID:11265189

  7. Pigmented mammary paget disease misdiagnosed as malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hye; Kim, Tae Hyung; Kim, Soo-Chan; Kim, You Chan; Roh, Mi Ryung

    2014-12-01

    Pigmented mammary Paget disease is a very rare clinicopathologic variant of mammary Paget disease. Diagnosis is often difficult because its clinical and histological features are very similar to those of malignant melanoma. Herein, we report a case of pigmented mammary Paget disease misdiagnosed as malignant melanoma.

  8. Comparative aspects of mammary gland development and homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary glands are crucial to the reproductive strategy of mammals and the milk of domesticated ruminants serves as an important source of nutrients for the human population. The majority of mammary gland development occurs postnatally and the mammary gland undergoes cyclical periods of growth, dif...

  9. Mammary phenotypic expression induced in epidermal cells by embryonic mammary mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Cunha, G R; Young, P; Christov, K; Guzman, R; Nandi, S; Talamantes, F; Thordarson, G

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this research was to establish methods for inducing mammary epithelial differentiation from nonmammary epithelium. For this purpose, mid-ventral or dorsal epidermis (skin epithelium; SKE) from 13-day rat or mouse embryos was associated with 13-day embryonic mouse mammary mesenchyme (mammary gland mesenchyme; MGM) (mouse MGM+rat or mouse SKE). The resultant MGM+SKE recombinants as well as controls (homotypic mouse mammary recombinants, homotypic mouse skin recombinants and mouse mammary mesenchyme by itself) were grafted under the renal capsule of syngeneic or athymic female nude mouse hosts. Most female hosts were induced to undergo lactogenesis by grafting an adult pituitary which elicited a state of hyperprolactinemia. Tissue recombinants of mouse MGM+rat or mouse SKE grown for 1 month in vivo formed a hair-bearing keratinized skin from which mammary ductal structures extended into the mesenchyme. The ducts were composed of columnar luminal epithelial cells as well as basal, actin-positive myoepithelial cells. When grown in pituitary-grafted hosts, the ductal epithelial cells expressed casein and alpha-lactalbumin as judged by immunocytochemistry. The expression of caseins in MGM+SKE recombinants was confirmed by Western blot. The epithelial cells in mouse MGM+rat SKE recombinants expressing milk proteins were shown to be rat cells while the surrounding connective tissue was composed of mouse cells based upon staining with Hoechst dye 33258. Using mammary-specific markers, these studies confirmed the earlier morphological studies of Propper and unequivocally demonstrated for the first time that embryonic mammary mesenchyme can induce morphological and functional mammary differentiation from nonmammary epithelium.

  10. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties

    PubMed Central

    Prater, Michael D.; Petit, Valérie; Russell, I. Alasdair; Giraddi, Rajshekhar; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F.; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M.; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A.; Stingl, John

    2014-01-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt acin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepithelial cells can give rise to a mammary repopulating unit (MRU). We demonstrate that myoepithelial cells, flow-sorted using 2 independent myoepithelial-specific reporter strategies, have MRU capacity. Using an inducible lineage tracing approach we follow the progeny of α-smooth muscle actin-expressing myoepithelial cells and show that they function as long-lived lineage-restricted stem cells in the virgin state and during pregnancy. PMID:25173976

  11. Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2007-06-01

    In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  12. Autocrine IL-1β-TRAF6 signalling promotes squamous cell carcinoma invasion through paracrine TNFα signalling to carcinoma-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Shahid I.; Hooper, Steven; Nye, Emma; Williamson, Peter; Harrington, Kevin; Sahai, Erik

    2012-01-01

    The invasion of Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Here we identify an E3 ligase, Traf6, and a de-ubiquitinating enzyme, Cezanne/ZA20D1, as important regulators of this process in organotypic models. Traf6 can promote the formation of Cdc42-dependent F-actin microspikes. Furthermore, Traf6 plays a key role in autocrine Interleukin-1β signalling in SCC cells which in turn is required to drive the expression of Tumour Necrosis Factor α (TNFα). TNFα acts in a paracrine manner to increase the invasion promoting potential of carcinoma-associated fibroblasts. Exogenous TNFα signalling can restore invasion in cells depleted of Traf6. In conclusion, Traf6 plays two important roles in SCC invasion: it promotes cell intrinsic Cdc42-dependent regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and enables production of the paracrine signal, TNFα, that enhances the activity of carcinoma-associated fibroblasts. PMID:22450746

  13. Stromal Effects on Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Bryony S.; Werb, Zena

    2002-05-01

    Breast cancer manifests itself in the mammary epithelium, yet there is a growing recognition that mammary stromal cells also play an important role in tumorigenesis. During its developmental cycle, the mammary gland displays many of the properties associated with breast cancer, and many of the stromal factors necessary for mammary development also promote or protect against breast cancer. Here we review our present knowledge of the specific factors and cell types that contribute to epithelial-stromal crosstalk during mammary development. To find cures for diseases like breast cancer that rely on epithelial-stromal crosstalk, we must understand how these different cell types communicate with each other.

  14. Canine mammary tumour cell lines established in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hellmén, E

    1993-01-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common tumours in the female dog. The tumours have a complex histology and exist in epithelial, mixed and mesenchymal forms. To study the biology of canine mammary tumours, five cell lines have been established and characterized. The results indicate that canine mammary tumours might be derived from mammary stem cells and that the tumour growth is independent of oestrogens. The established canine mammary tumour cell lines will be valuable tools in further studies of the histogenesis and pathogenesis of these tumours.

  15. Characterization of Human Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Appendix……………………………………………………………………………… 11 Eirew,P., Stingl,J., Raouf,A., Turashvili,G., Aparicio ,S., Emerman,J.T., and Eaves,C.J. A method for... Aparicio , Joanne Emerman and Connie Eaves. A method for quantifying normal human mammary epithelial stem cells with in vivo regenerative ability...Abstracts Peter Eirew, John Stingl, Afshin Raouf, Gulisa Turshvili, Sam Aparicio , Joanne Emerman and Connie Eaves, “Identification of Human Mammary

  16. Contribution of mammary epithelial cells to the immune response during early stages of a bacterial infection to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To differentiate between the contribution of mammary epithelial cells (MEC) and infiltrating immune cells to gene expression profiles of mammary tissue during early stage mastitis, we investigated in goats the in vivo transcriptional response of MEC to an experimental intra mammary infection (IMI) with Staphylococcus aureus, using a non-invasive RNA sampling method from milk fat globules (MFG). Microarrays were used to record gene expression patterns during the first 24 hours post-infection (hpi). This approach was combined with laser capture microdissection of MEC from frozen slides of mammary tissue to analyze some relevant genes at 30 hpi. During the early stages post-inoculation, MEC play an important role in the recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells through the IL-8 signalling pathway and initiate a sharp induction of innate immune genes predominantly associated with the pro-inflammatory response. At 30 hpi, MEC express genes encoding different acute phase proteins, including SAA3, SERPINA1 and PTX3 and factors, such as S100A12, that contribute directly to fighting the infection. No significant change in the expression of genes encoding caseins was observed until 24 hpi, thus validating our experimental model to study early stages of infection before the occurrence of tissue damage, since the milk synthesis function is still operative. This is to our knowledge the first report showing in vivo, in goats, how MEC orchestrate the innate immune response to an IMI challenge with S. aureus. Moreover, the non-invasive sampling method of mammary representative RNA from MFG provides a valuable tool to easily follow the dynamics of gene expression in MEC to search for sensitive biomarkers in milk for early detection of mastitis and therefore, to successfully improve the treatment and thus animal welfare. PMID:24521038

  17. Short communication: Staphylococcus aureus infection modulates expression of drug transporters and inflammatory biomarkers in mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Oskarsson, A; Yagdiran, Y; Nazemi, S; Tallkvist, J; Knight, C H

    2017-03-01

    Mastitis is the most common disease in dairy herds worldwide and is often caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Little is known about the effect of mastitis on transporters in the mammary gland and the effect on transporter-mediated secretion of drugs into milk. We studied gene expressions of ATP-binding cassette and solute carrier transporters in S. aureus-infected mammary glands of mice. On d 7 of lactation, NMRI mice were inoculated with 1,000 cfu of S. aureus in 2 mammary glands and with a saline vehicle in 2 control glands. Gene expression of the transporters, Bcrp, Mdr1, Mrp1, Oatp1a5, Octn1, and Oct1, and of Csn2, the gene encoding β-casein, were determined in mammary glands at 72 h after treatment. As biomarkers of the inflammatory response gene, expressions of the cytokines Il6, Tnfα, and the chemokine Cxcl2 were measured. Despite a high individual variation between the 6 animals, some characteristic patterns were evident. The 3 inflammatory biomarkers were upregulated in all animals; Csn2 was downregulated compared with controls in all animals, although not statistically significantly. Both Mrp1 and Oatp1a5 were statistically significantly upregulated and Bcrp was downregulated. Gene expression of Bcrp followed the expression of Csn2 in each of the animals, indicating a possible co-regulation. The findings demonstrate that S. aureus infection has an effect on expression of drug transporters in the mammary gland, which may affect secretion of drugs into milk and efficacy of drug therapy.

  18. Sequential inoculation versus co-inoculation in Cabernet Franc wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cañas, Pedro Miguel Izquierdo; Romero, Esteban García; Pérez-Martín, Fátima; Seseña, Susana; Palop, María Llanos

    2015-04-01

    A study has been carried out in order to determine the effect of the lactic acid bacteria inoculation time on the kinetic of vinification and on chemical and sensory characteristics of Cabernet Franc wines. Traditional vinifications, with lactic acid bacteria inoculated after completion of alcoholic fermentation were compared with vinifications where yeast and bacteria were co-inoculated at the beginning of vinification. One commercial yeast strain and an autochthonous Oenococcus oeni strain (C22L9), previously identified and selected at our laboratory, were used. Monitoring of alcoholic and malolactic fermentations was carried out by yeast and lactic acid bacteria counts and by measuring l-malic acid concentration. Wines were chemically characterized and analysed for volatile compounds content. A sensory analysis, consisting of a descriptive and a triangular test, was also carried out. Results from this study showed that the concurrent yeast/bacteria inoculation of musts at the beginning of vinification produced a reduction in duration of the process without an excessive increase in volatile acidity. Differences in volatile compounds content and the corresponding impact on the sensorial profile of wines were also displayed. These results suggest that co-inoculation is a worthwhile alternative for winemaking of Cabernet Franc wines, if compared with traditional post-alcoholic fermentation lactic acid bacteria inoculation.

  19. Positional variations in mammary gland development and cancer.

    PubMed

    Veltmaat, Jacqueline M; Ramsdell, Ann F; Sterneck, Esta

    2013-06-01

    Most mammals develop their mammary glands in pairs of which the two counterparts are symmetrically displaced away from the ventral midline. Based on this symmetry and the same functional outcome as a milk-producing organ, the mammary glands are easily presumed to be mere copies of one another. Based on our analysis of published data with inclusion of new results related to mammary development and pathology in mice, we argue that this presumption is incorrect: Between and within pairs, mammary glands differ from one another, and tumor incidence and biology depend on the position along the anterior-posterior and the left-right axis as well. This insight has implications for experimental designs with mouse models and for data extrapolation between mammary glands within and between species. We suggest that improved documentation of location-specific mammary gland features will lead to more insights into the molecular mechanisms of mammary gland development and cancer biology in both mice and humans.

  20. CLINICOPATHOLOGIC FEATURES OF MAMMARY MASSES IN CAPTIVE LIONS (PANTHERA LEO).

    PubMed

    Sadler, Ryan A; Craig, Linden E; Ramsay, Edward C; Helmick, Kelly; Collins, Darin; Garner, Michael M

    2016-03-01

    A multi-institutional retrospective analysis of 330 pathology accessions from 285 different lions found 15 captive, female African lions (Panthera leo) with confirmed mammary masses. Aside from the presence of a mammary mass, the most common initial clinical sign was inappetence. Histologic diagnoses were predominantly adenocarcinoma (n = 12), though two benign masses (mammary hyperplasia and a mammary cyst) and one squamous cell carcinoma were identified. Nine of 13 malignant tumors had metastasized to lymph nodes or viscera at the time of necropsy. Six lions with adenocarcinoma and two lions with benign mammary masses had received hormonal contraception, though little evidence of mammary lobular hyperplasia was seen in association with the adenocarcinomas. The most common concurrent disease processes found at necropsy were chronic urinary tract disease and other malignancies. These cases demonstrate that mammary malignancies occur in captive lions and frequently metastasize.

  1. Reciprocal Interaction between Carcinoma-Associated Fibroblasts and Squamous Carcinoma Cells through Interleukin-1α Induces Cancer Progression12

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jung Yoon; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Yang, Dong Hyun; Zhang, Xianglan; Park, Young-Jin; Lee, Doo Young; Che, Chung Min; Kim, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Crosstalk between cancer cells and carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) has earned recognition as an interaction that plays a pivotal role in carcinogenesis. Thus, we attempted to clarify whether increase in the level of CAFs promotes cancer progression by proportionally enhancing the interaction between cancer cells and CAFs. We first analyzed clinical correlation between the levels of fibroblasts and cancer progression and found that the level of CAFs made a noticeable difference on the prognosis of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In vivo animal study also demonstrated that tumor volume depended on the dose of CAFs that was co-injected with OSCC cells. The same tendency was observed in an in vitro study. We also found that interleukin-1α (IL-1α) secreted from OSCC cells had dual effects on CAFs: IL-1α not only promoted the proliferation of CAFs but also upregulated the secretion of cytokines in CAFs such as CCL7, CXCL1, and IL-8. The induction activity of cytokine secretion by IL-1α surpassed that of proliferation in OSCC cells. In summary, we unraveled an important interactive mechanism of carcinogenesis: IL-1α released from carcinoma stimulates the proliferation of CAFs and the simultaneous increase in cytokine secretion from CAFs promotes cancer progression in human OSCC. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the level of CAFs is eligible for being selected as a prognostic factor that will be useful in routine diagnosis. We also propose that blockage of reciprocal interaction between cancer cells and CAFs will provide an insight for developing novel chemotherapeutic strategy. PMID:25425967

  2. Stress Inoculation through Cognitive and Biofeedback Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE DEC 2010 2 . REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The2010 Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation & Education Conference (I/ITSEC), 29 Nov ? 2 Dec, Orlando, FL 14. ABSTRACT...Page 2 of 11 Stress Inoculation through Cognitive and Biofeedback Training LCDR Joseph Cohn, PhD Gershon Weltman, PhD, Raj Ratwani, PhD Don

  3. Inoculation Stress Hypothesis of Environmental Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Crofton, Elizabeth J.; Zhang, Yafang; Green, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    One hallmark of psychiatric conditions is the vast continuum of individual differences in susceptibility vs. resilience resulting from the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The environmental enrichment paradigm is an animal model that is useful for studying a range of psychiatric conditions, including protective phenotypes in addiction and depression models. The major question is how environmental enrichment, a non-drug and non-surgical manipulation, can produce such robust individual differences in such a wide range of behaviors. This paper draws from a variety of published sources to outline a coherent hypothesis of inoculation stress as a factor producing the protective enrichment phenotypes. The basic tenet suggests that chronic mild stress from living in a complex environment and interacting non-aggressively with conspecifics can inoculate enriched rats against subsequent stressors and/or drugs of abuse. This paper reviews the enrichment phenotypes, mulls the fundamental nature of environmental enrichment vs. isolation, discusses the most appropriate control for environmental enrichment, and challenges the idea that cortisol/corticosterone equals stress. The intent of the inoculation stress hypothesis of environmental enrichment is to provide a scaffold with which to build testable hypotheses for the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying these protective phenotypes and thus provide new therapeutic targets to treat psychiatric/neurological conditions. PMID:25449533

  4. Mouse mammary tumor virus-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Hsing-Yi; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chang, Chao-Chin; Wang, Szu-Pong; Lin, Kuan-Hsun; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Wong, Min-Liang; Chang, Shih-Chieh

    2010-12-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) has been speculated to be involved in human breast cancer. Companion animals, dogs, and cats with intimate human contacts may contribute to the transmission of MMTV between mouse and human. The aim of this study was to detect MMTV-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors by nested PCR. Results showed that the presence of MMTV-like env and LTR sequences in canine malignant mammary tumors was 3.49% (3/86) and 18.60% (16/86), respectively. For feline malignant mammary tumors, the presence of both env and LTR sequences was found to be 22.22% (2/9). Nevertheless, the MMTV-like LTR and env sequences also were detected in normal mammary glands of dogs and cats. In comparisons of the MMTV-like DNA sequences of our findings to those of NIH 3T3 (MMTV-positive murine cell line) and human breast cancer cells, the sequence similarities ranged from 94 to 98%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that intermixing among sequences identified from tissues of different hosts, i.e., mouse, dog, cat, and human, indicated the MMTV-like DNA existing in these hosts. Moreover, the env transcript was detected in 1 of the 19 MMTV-positive samples by reverse transcription-PCR. Taken together, our study provides evidence for the existence and expression of MMTV-like sequences in neoplastic and normal mammary glands of dogs and cats.

  5. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus-Like Nucleotide Sequences in Canine and Feline Mammary Tumors▿

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Hsing-Yi; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chang, Chao-Chin; Wang, Szu-Pong; Lin, Kuan-Hsun; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Wong, Min-Liang; Chang, Shih-Chieh

    2010-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) has been speculated to be involved in human breast cancer. Companion animals, dogs, and cats with intimate human contacts may contribute to the transmission of MMTV between mouse and human. The aim of this study was to detect MMTV-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors by nested PCR. Results showed that the presence of MMTV-like env and LTR sequences in canine malignant mammary tumors was 3.49% (3/86) and 18.60% (16/86), respectively. For feline malignant mammary tumors, the presence of both env and LTR sequences was found to be 22.22% (2/9). Nevertheless, the MMTV-like LTR and env sequences also were detected in normal mammary glands of dogs and cats. In comparisons of the MMTV-like DNA sequences of our findings to those of NIH 3T3 (MMTV-positive murine cell line) and human breast cancer cells, the sequence similarities ranged from 94 to 98%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that intermixing among sequences identified from tissues of different hosts, i.e., mouse, dog, cat, and human, indicated the MMTV-like DNA existing in these hosts. Moreover, the env transcript was detected in 1 of the 19 MMTV-positive samples by reverse transcription-PCR. Taken together, our study provides evidence for the existence and expression of MMTV-like sequences in neoplastic and normal mammary glands of dogs and cats. PMID:20881168

  6. Mammary Cancer and Activation of Transposable Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0401 TITLE: Mammary Cancer and Activation of Transposable Elements PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...way as transcripts from the regular gene promoter. Transcriptional activation of retrotransposons is strongly linked with their CpG DNA methylation

  7. Dietary genistein stimulates mammary development in gilts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The possible role of the phytoestrogen, genistein, on prepubertal development of mammary glands, hormonal status and bone resorption was investigated in gilts. Forty-five gilts were fed a control diet containing soya (CTLS, n = 15), a control diet without soya (CTL0, n = 15) or the CTLS diet supplem...

  8. Accessing inoculation methods of maize and wheat with Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Josiane; Nogueira, Marco Antonio; Araujo, Ricardo Silva; Hungria, Mariangela

    2016-03-01

    The utilization of inoculants containing Azospirillum is becoming more popular due to increasing reports of expressive gains in grain yields. However, incompatibility with pesticides used in seed treatments represents a main limitation for a successful inoculation. Therefore, in this study we searched for alternatives methods for seed inoculation of maize and wheat, aiming to avoid the direct contact of bacteria with pesticides. Different doses of inoculants containing Azospirillum brasilense were employed to perform inoculation in-furrow, via soil spray at sowing and via leaf spray after seedlings had emerged, in comparison to seed inoculation. Experiments were conducted first under greenhouse controlled conditions and then confirmed in the field at different locations in Brazil. In the greenhouse, most parameters measured responded positively to the largest inoculant dose used in foliar sprays, but benefits could also be observed from both in-furrow and soil spray inoculation. However, our results present evidence that field inoculation with plant-growth promoting bacteria must consider inoculant doses, and point to the need of fine adjustments to avoid crossing the threshold of growth stimulation and inhibition. All inoculation techniques increased the abundance of diazotrophic bacteria in plant tissues, and foliar spray improved colonization of leaves, while soil inoculations favored root and rhizosphere colonization. In field experiments, inoculation with A. brasilense allowed for a 25 % reduction in the need for N fertilizers. Our results have identified alternative methods of inoculation that were as effective as the standard seed inoculation that may represent an important strategy to avoid the incompatibility between inoculant bacteria and pesticides employed for seed treatment.

  9. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of mammary neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xiang, De-Bing; Wei, Bing; Abraham, Susan C; Huo, Lei; Albarracin, Constance T; Zhang, Hong; Babiera, Gildy; Caudle, Abigail S; Akay, Catherine L; Rao, Pulivarthi; Zhao, Yi-Jue; Lu, Xinyan; Wu, Yun

    2014-09-01

    Primary mammary neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) is an uncommon entity that accounts for 2% to 5% of breast carcinomas. Recent reports have shown that NEC of the breast is an aggressive subtype of mammary carcinoma that is distinct from invasive ductal carcinoma, not otherwise specified, and have suggested that these tumors have a poorer prognosis than invasive ductal carcinoma, not otherwise specified. In this study, we provide the first cytogenetic characterization of mammary NEC using both conventional G-banding and spectral karyotype on a group of 7 tumors. We identified clonal chromosomal aberrations in 5 (71.4%) cases, with 4 of them showing complex karyotypes. Of these, recurrent numerical aberrations included gain of chromosome 7 (n = 2) and loss of chromosome 15 (n = 2). Recurrent clonal structural chromosomal aberrations involved chromosomes 1 (n = 3), 3 (n = 2), 6q (n = 3), and 17q (n = 3). Of the 4 (57.1%) cases with complex karyotypes, 2 showed evidence of chromothripsis, a phenomenon in which tens to hundreds of genomic rearrangements occur in a one-off cellular crisis. One of these had evidence of chromothripsis involving chromosomes 1, 6, 8, and 15. The other also had evidence of chromosome 8 chromothripsis, making this a recurrent finding shared by both cases. We also found that mammary NEC shared some cytogenetic abnormalities--such as trisomy 7 and 12--with other neuroendocrine tumors in the lung and gastrointestinal tract, suggesting trisomy 7 and 12 as potential common molecular aberrations in neuroendocrine tumors. To our knowledge, this is the first report on molecular cytogenetic characterization of mammary NEC.

  10. 7 CFR 201.24a - Inoculated seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inoculated seed. 201.24a Section 201.24a Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.24a Inoculated seed. Seed claimed to be inoculated shall...

  11. CDP Is a Repressor of Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Expression in the Mammary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Quan; Gregg, Keqin; Lozano, Mary; Liu, Jinqi; Dudley, Jaquelin P.

    2000-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) transcription is highest in the lactating mammary gland but is detectable in a variety of other tissues. Previous results have shown that MMTV expression is suppressed in lymphoid and other tissues through the binding of the homeodomain-containing repressor special AT-rich binding protein 1 to a negative regulatory element (NRE) in the MMTV long terminal repeat (LTR). Another homeoprotein repressor, CCAAT displacement protein (CDP), also binds to the MMTV NRE, but a role for CDP in MMTV transcriptional suppression has not yet been demonstrated. In this paper, we show that the level of CDP decreases during development of the mammary gland and that this decline in CDP level correlates with the known increase in MMTV expression observed during mammary gland differentiation. Moreover, CDP overexpression was able to suppress MMTV LTR-reporter gene activity up to 20-fold in transient-transfection assays of mouse mammary cells. To determine if this effect was due to direct binding of CDP to the promoter-proximal NRE, we performed DNase I protection assays to map two CDP-binding sites from +835 to +845 and +920 to +931 relative to the first base of the LTR. Mutations engineered into each of these sites decreased CDP binding to the proximal NRE, whereas a combination of these mutations further reduced binding. Subsequently, each of these mutations was introduced into the full-length MMTV LTR upstream of the luciferase reporter gene. Analysis of stable transfectants of LTR constructs showed that CDP binding site mutations in the proximal NRE elevated reporter gene expression two- to sixfold compared to wild-type LTR constructs. Thus, MMTV expression increases during mammary gland development, in part due to decreased CDP levels and CDP binding to the LTR. Together, these experiments provide the first evidence that CDP acts as a repressor of MMTV transcription in the mammary gland. PMID:10864645

  12. Renal Cell Carcinoma Associated with Xp11.2 Translocation/TFE3 Gene Fusions: Clinical Features, Treatments and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Weidong; Xiong, Lei; Miao, Baolei; Chen, Xiancheng; Guo, Hongqian; Li, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the clinical characteristics, treatments and prognosis of renal cell carcinoma associated with Xp11.2 translocation/TFE3 gene fusions (Xp11.2 tRCC), the epidemiological features and treatment results of 34 cases of Xp11.2 tRCC, which were diagnosed by immunohistochemistry staining of TFE3 and fluorescence in situ hybridization at our center, were retrospectively reviewed. The 34 patients included 21 females and 13 males aged 3 to 64 years (median age: 27 years). Four patients were children or adolescents (<18 years of age), and 26 patients were young or middle-aged adults (18–45 years). Radical nephrectomy was performed on 25 patients. Laparoscopic nephron-sparing surgery was performed on 9 patients who presented with an isolated mass with a small diameter (<7 cm) and well-defined boundary on computed tomography imaging. Postoperative staging showed that 25 cases (73.53%) were at stage I/II, while 9 cases (26.47%) were at stage III/IV. All stage I/II patients received a favorable prognosis with a three-year overall survival rate of 100%, including the patients who underwent laparoscopic nephron-sparing surgery. With the exception of 2 children, the other 7 stage III/IV patients died or developed recurrence with a median follow-up of 29 months. On univariate analysis, maximum diameter, adjuvant treatment, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis, inferior vena cava tumor thrombosis and tumor boundary were identified as statistically significant factors impacting survival (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that TNM stage and inferior vena cava tumor thrombosis were independent prognostic factors (P<0.05). In conclusion, Xp11.2 tRCC is a rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma that mainly occurs in young females. Nephron-sparing surgery was confirmed effective preliminarily in the treatment of small Xp11.2 tRCCs with clear rims. Advanced TNM stage and inferior vena cava tumor thrombosis were associated with poor prognosis. PMID:27893792

  13. Histopathological findings in a highly invasive mouse mammary carcinoma transfected with human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1.

    PubMed

    Alonso, D F; Skilton, G; De Lorenzo, M S; Scursoni, A M; Yoshiji, H; Gomez, D E

    1998-01-01

    We have transfected a full-lenght cDNA-encoding human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) by lipofection in highly invasive F3II mouse mammary sarcomatoid carcinoma cells. In vitro, overexpression of TIMP-1 was associated with abrogation of metalloproteinase activity, extended doubling time, and a more flattened, epithelioid polyhedric morphology. Female Balb/c mice inoculated subcutaneously with TIMP-1 transfectant exhibited a prolonged tumor latency and tumor burden was significantly lower in early stages of tumor growth. Control F3II cells grew by invading the muscular and adipose layers of the subcutis, dermis, and dermal papillae. On the contrary, mammary carcinoma cells transfected with TIMP-1 grew without signs of active invasion of dermis. Tumors also revealed a decreased amount of necrosis and host inflammatory cell infiltrates. However, histological analysis did not demonstrate any change in vascular density. Animals bearing F3II tumors overexpressing TIMP-1 showed a significant reduction in the size of metastatic lung nodules. These data suggested that TIMP-1 overexpression may reduce local invasion and delay the progression of the metastatic disease in the present mammary tumor model.

  14. Investigating the Role of FIP200 in Mammary Carcinogenesis Using a Transgenic Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    in the mammary gland of virgin mice however, lactating mice have severe lobulo-alveolar hypoplasia in the mammary gland. 15. SUBJECT TERMS...mammary gland of virgin mice however, lactating mice have severe lobulo-alveolar hypoplasia in the mammary gland. Body Aim 1. Generation of mammary...leads to dwarfism and pregnant females have severe lobulo-alveolar hypoplasia affecting the mammary gland and, as a consequence, have difficulty

  15. Establishment and characterization of a new cell line of canine inflammatory mammary cancer: IPC-366.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Sara; Peña, Laura; de Andres, Paloma J; Illera, Maria J; Lopez, Mirtha S; Woodward, Wendy A; Reuben, James M; Illera, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) shares epidemiologic, histopathological and clinical characteristics with the disease in humans and has been proposed as a natural model for human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The aim of this study was to characterize a new cell line from IMC (IPC-366) for the comparative study of both IMC and IBC. Tumors cells from a female dog with clinical IMC were collected. The cells were grown under adherent conditions. The growth, cytological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics of IPC-366 were evaluated. Ten female Balb/SCID mice were inoculated with IPC-366 cells to assess their tumorigenicity and metastatic potential. Chromosome aberration test and Karyotype revealed the presence of structural aberration, numerical and neutral rearrangements, demonstrating a chromosomal instability. Microscopic examination of tumor revealed an epithelial morphology with marked anysocytosis. Cytological and histological examination of smears and ultrathin sections by electron microscopy revealed that IPC-366 is formed by highly malignant large round or polygonal cells characterized by marked atypia and prominent nucleoli and frequent multinucleated cells. Some cells had cytoplasmic empty spaces covered by cytoplasmic membrane resembling capillary endothelial cells, a phenomenon that has been related to s vasculogenic mimicry. IHC characterization of IPC-366 was basal-like: epithelial cells (AE1/AE3+, CK14+, vimentin+, actin-, p63-, ER-, PR-, HER-2, E-cadherin, overexpressed COX-2 and high Ki-67 proliferation index (87.15 %). At 2 weeks after inoculating the IPC-366 cells, a tumor mass was found in 100 % of mice. At 4 weeks metastases in lung and lymph nodes were found. Xenograph tumors maintained the original IHC characteristics of the female dog tumor. In summary, the cell line IPC-366 is a fast growing malignant triple negative cell line model of inflammatory mammary carcinoma that can be used for the comparative

  16. Establishment and Characterization of a New Cell Line of Canine Inflammatory Mammary Cancer: IPC-366

    PubMed Central

    Caceres, Sara; Peña, Laura; de Andres, Paloma J.; Illera, Maria J.; Lopez, Mirtha S.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Reuben, James M.; Illera, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) shares epidemiologic, histopathological and clinical characteristics with the disease in humans and has been proposed as a natural model for human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The aim of this study was to characterize a new cell line from IMC (IPC-366) for the comparative study of both IMC and IBC. Tumors cells from a female dog with clinical IMC were collected. The cells were grown under adherent conditions. The growth, cytological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics of IPC-366 were evaluated. Ten female Balb/SCID mice were inoculated with IPC-366 cells to assess their tumorigenicity and metastatic potential. Chromosome aberration test and Karyotype revealed the presence of structural aberration, numerical and neutral rearrangements, demonstrating a chromosomal instability. Microscopic examination of tumor revealed an epithelial morphology with marked anysocytosis. Cytological and histological examination of smears and ultrathin sections by electron microscopy revealed that IPC-366 is formed by highly malignant large round or polygonal cells characterized by marked atypia and prominent nucleoli and frequent multinucleated cells. Some cells had cytoplasmic empty spaces covered by cytoplasmic membrane resembling capillary endothelial cells, a phenomenon that has been related to s vasculogenic mimicry. IHC characterization of IPC-366 was basal-like: epithelial cells (AE1/AE3+, CK14+, vimentin+, actin-, p63-, ER-, PR-, HER-2, E-cadherin, overexpressed COX-2 and high Ki-67 proliferation index (87.15 %). At 2 weeks after inoculating the IPC-366 cells, a tumor mass was found in 100 % of mice. At 4 weeks metastases in lung and lymph nodes were found. Xenograph tumors maintained the original IHC characteristics of the female dog tumor. In summary, the cell line IPC-366 is a fast growing malignant triple negative cell line model of inflammatory mammary carcinoma that can be used for the comparative

  17. Mouse mammary tumor virus suppresses apoptosis of mammary epithelial cells through ITAM-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung H; Grande, Shannon M; Monroe, John G; Ross, Susan R

    2012-12-01

    Many receptors in hematopoietic cells use a common signaling pathway that relies on a highly conserved immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), which signals through Src family tyrosine kinases. ITAM-bearing proteins are also found in many oncogenic viruses, including the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) envelope (Env). We previously showed that MMTV Env expression transformed normal mammary epithelial cells and that Src kinases were important mediators in this transformation. To study how ITAM signaling affects mammary cell transformation, we utilized mammary cell lines expressing two different ITAM-containing proteins, one encoding a MMTV provirus and the other a B cell receptor fusion protein. ITAM-expressing cells were resistant to both serum starvation- and chemotherapeutic drug-induced apoptosis, whereas cells transduced with these molecules bearing ITAM mutations were indistinguishable from untransduced cells in their sensitivity to these treatments. We also found that Src kinase was activated in the MMTV-expressing cells and that MMTV-induced apoptosis resistance was completely restored by the Src inhibitor PP2. In vivo, MMTV infection delayed involution-induced apoptosis in the mouse mammary gland. Our results show that MMTV suppresses apoptosis through ITAM-mediated Src tyrosine kinase signaling. These studies could lead to the development of effective treatment of nonhematopoietic cell cancers in which ITAM-mediated signaling plays a role.

  18. The role of neutralizing antibodies for mouse mammary tumor virus transmission and mammary cancer development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, Daniela; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Acha-Orbea, Hans

    2003-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) infection establishes chronic germinal centers and a lifelong neutralizing Ab response. We show that removal of the draining lymph node after establishment of the germinal center reaction led to complete loss of neutralizing Abs despite comparable infection levels in peripheral lymphocytes. Importantly, in the absence of neutralization, only the exocrine organs mammary gland, salivary gland, pancreas, and skin showed strikingly increased infection, resulting in accelerated mammary tumor development. Induction of stronger neutralization did not influence chronic infection levels of peripheral lymphoid organs but strongly inhibited mammary gland infection and virus transmission to the next generation. Taken together, we provide evidence that a tight equilibrium in virus neutralization allows limited infection of exocrine organs and controls cancer development in susceptible mouse strains. These experiments show that a strong neutralizing Ab response induced after infection is not able to control lymphoid MMTV infection. Strong neutralization, however, is capable of blocking amplification of mammary gland infection, tumor development, and virus transmission to the next generation. The results also indicate a role of neutralization in natural resistance to MMTV infection.

  19. Genetic Susceptibility to Estrogen-Induced Mammary Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-11-01

    mammary glands were reflected in mammary histology. (A and E) Thin sections from Fig. 3. E2 induced pituitary growth and hyperprolactinemia similarly in...with E2 5 (33%) exhibited a normal DNA profile where the great for 12 wk induced pituitary growth and hyperprolactinemia in majority of cells displayed...etal. , " terone, or PRL. Hyperprolactinemia has been shown to be sufficient to induce mammary cancer in certain strains of mouse 1 , (29-31) and rat

  20. Radiologic and histologic presentation of male mammary myofibroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Omar, Lena A; Rojanapremsuk, Theera; Saluja, Karan; Merchant, Kanwal A; Sharma, Pooja B

    2016-07-01

    Mammary myofibroblastoma is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm that typically presents in older men and women. Less commonly, these benign tumors may also occur in soft tissues located outside of the breast, in which case they are referred to as mammary-type myofibroblastomas. The histologic composition of this benign spindle cell tumor can be markedly varied. We present a case of a large mammary myofibroblastoma in a male patient and discuss the typical imaging and histologic makeup of these tumors.

  1. USF-1 as an Inhibitor of Mammary Gland Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    The hypothesis tested in this proposal is that overexpression of USF in the mammary glands of transgenic mice will inhibit myc-dependent...tumorigenesis. To test this hypothesis, a transgene was constructed to target the overexpression of FLAG-tagged USF-2 to the mammary glands of transgenic mice ...under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (mmtv) long terminal repeat. A total of eight lines of transgenic mice were generated. Of these, one

  2. Influence of inoculation method, spot inoculation site, and inoculation size on the efficacy of acidic electrolyzed water against pathogens on lettuce.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Shigenobu; Yoshida, Kyoichiro; Kamitani, Yoshinori; Itoh, Kazuhiko

    2003-11-01

    The influence of bacterial inoculation methods on the efficacy of sanitizers against pathogens was examined. Dip and spot inoculation methods were employed in this study to evaluate the effectiveness of acidic electrolyzed water (AcEW) and chlorinated water (200 ppm free available chlorine) against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. Ten pieces of lettuce leaf (5 by 5 cm) were inoculated by each method then immersed in 1.5 liters of AcEW, chlorinated water, or sterile distilled water for 1 min with agitation (150 rpm) at room temperature. The outer (abaxial) and inner (adaxial) surfaces of the lettuce leaf were distinguished in the spot inoculation. Initial inoculated pathogen population was in the range 7.3 to 7.8 log CFU/g. Treatment with AcEW and chlorinated water resulted in a 1 log CFU/g or less reduction of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella populations inoculated with the dip method. Spot inoculation of the inner surface of the lettuce leaf with AcEW and chlorinated water reduced the number of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella by approximately 2.7 and 2.5 log CFU/g, respectively. Spot inoculation of the outer surface of the lettuce leaf with both sanitizers resulted in approximately 4.6 and 4.4 log CFU/g reductions of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella, respectively. The influence of inoculation population size was also examined. Each sanitizer could not completely eliminate the pathogens when E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella cells inoculated on the lettuce were of low population size (10(3) to 10(4) CFU/g), regardless of the inoculation technique.

  3. Establishment of mammary gland model in vitro: culture and evaluation of a yak mammary epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Fu, Mei; Chen, Yabing; Xiong, Xianrong; Lan, Daoliang; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to establish yak mammary epithelial cells (YMECs) for an in vitro model of yak mammary gland biology. The primary culture of YMECs was obtained from mammary gland tissues of lactating yak and then characterized using immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and western blot analysis. Whether foreign genes could be transfected into the YMECs were examined by transfecting the EGFP gene into the cells. Finally, the effect of Staphylococcus aureus infection on YMECs was determined. The established YMECs retained the mammary epithelial cell characteristics. A spontaneously immortalized yak mammary epithelial cell line was established and could be continuously subcultured for more than 60 passages without senescence. The EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the YMECs, and the transfected cells could be maintained for a long duration in the culture by continuous subculturing. The cells expressed more antimicrobial peptides upon S.aureus invasion. Therefore, the established cell line could be considered a model system to understand yak mammary gland biology.

  4. Inbreeding and canine mammary cancer: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Dorn, C R; Schneider, R

    1976-09-01

    Using files of the Animal Neoplasm Registry (ANR) in Alameda and Contra Costa Counties, California, we conducted a retrospective study to compare the degree of inbreeding in the ancestry of purebred dogs with mammary and other cancers, and of those without tumors. Wright's coefficients of inbreeding, calculated for all animals in the three groups, ranged from 0.000 to 0.535. The median inbreeding coefficients of the mammary cancer and comparison groups (consisting of other cancers) were approximately twice that of the nonneoplastic group, but neither difference was statistically significant. Dogs with mammary adenocarcinoma and mixed mammary cancer had similar degrees of inbreeding.

  5. Bovine mammary stem cells: new perspective for dairy science.

    PubMed

    Martignani, E; Cravero, D; Miretti, S; Accornero, P; Baratta, M

    2014-01-01

    Mammary stem cells provide opportunities for the cyclic remodelling of the bovine mammary gland. Therefore, understanding the character and regulation of mammary stem cells is important for increasing animal health and productivity. The exciting possibility that stem cell expansion can influence milk production is currently being investigated by several researchers. In fact, appropriate regulation of mammary stem cells could hopefully benefit milk yield, persistency of lactation, dry period management and tissue repair. Accordingly, we and others have attempted to characterize and regulate the function of bovine mammary stem cells. However, research on mammary stem cells requires tissue biopsies, which represents a limitation for the management of animal welfare. Interestingly, different studies recently reported the identification of putative mammary stem cells in human breast milk. The possible identification of primitive cell types within cow's milk may provide a non-invasive source of relevant mammary cells for a wide range of applications. In this review, we have summarized the main achievements in this field for dairy cow science and described the interesting perspectives open to manipulate milk persistency during lactation and to cope with oxidative stress during the transition period by regulating mammary stem cells.

  6. Growth requirements of human mammary epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Papadimitriou, J; Shearer, M; Stoker, M G

    1977-12-15

    Colony-forming epithelial cells can be separated from the non-dividing "foam cells" in human milk by differential adhesion to glass and freezing. The growth of such partially purified mammary epithelial cells is stimulated by co-culture with non-dividing feeder cells. Foam cells, mitomycin-treated mouse fibroblast lines and human mammary fibroblasts and calf lens epithelial cells are all effective in promoting mammary epithelial cell growth. Contact between epithelial cells and feeders is not required for the growth-promoting effect. The mitogenic effect of epidermal growth factor on mammary epithelial cells also requires feeder cell activity.

  7. Feline Mammary Carcinoma: A Retrospective Evaluation of 17 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, M. J.; Barteaux, L.; Ferns, L. E.; Angelopoulos, E.

    1984-01-01

    Seventeen biopsies of feline mammary carcinoma submitted to the Veterinary Pathology Laboratory, Nova Scotia Department of Agriculture and Marketing were reviewed. All 17 cases were female cats. Data on age, reproductive status (sexually intact vs. neutered), therapy, outcome of the cases and histological features were consistent with data on feline mammary carcinoma previously reported. Four of these 17 cats had a history of receiving exogenous progestin prior to tumor development. The possible role of progestins as initiators or promoters of feline mammary carcinoma was discussed. The use of feline mammary carcinoma as a model for carcinoma of the breast in women was reviewed. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:17422482

  8. Keeping abreast of the mammary epithelial hierarchy and breast tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Visvader, Jane E

    2009-11-15

    The epithelium of the mammary gland exists in a highly dynamic state, undergoing dramatic morphogenetic changes during puberty, pregnancy, lactation, and regression. The recent identification of stem and progenitor populations in mouse and human mammary tissue has provided evidence that the mammary epithelium is organized in a hierarchical manner. Characterization of these normal epithelial subtypes is an important step toward understanding which cells are predisposed to oncogenesis. This review summarizes progress in the field toward defining constituent cells and key molecular regulators of the mammary epithelial hierarchy. Potential relationships between normal epithelial populations and breast tumor subtypes are discussed, with implications for understanding the cellular etiology underpinning breast tumor heterogeneity.

  9. Apples prevent mammary tumors in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui Hai; Liu, Jiaren; Chen, Bingqing

    2005-03-23

    Regular consumption of fruits and vegetables has been consistently shown to be associated with reduced risk of developing chronic diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. Apples are commonly consumed and are the major contributors of phytochemicals in human diets. It was previously reported that apple extracts exhibit strong antioxidant and antiproliferative activities and that the major part of total antioxidant activity is from the combination of phytochemicals. Phytochemicals, including phenolics and flavonoids, are suggested to be the bioactive compounds contributing to the health benefits of apples. Here it is shown that whole apple extracts prevent mammary cancer in a rat model in a dose-dependent manner at doses comparable to human consumption of one, three, and six apples a day. This study demonstrated that whole apple extracts effectively inhibited mammary cancer growth in the rat model; thus, consumption of apples may be an effective strategy for cancer protection.

  10. Cytokine signalling in mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Watson, Christine J; Oliver, Carrie H; Khaled, Walid T

    2011-03-01

    Mammary gland development occurs in three distinct stages during the lifetime of the female mammal: in embryonic, pubertal and reproductive life. At each of these developmental stages, different signalling molecules induce changes in both the epithelium and the surrounding stroma. However, it is during pregnancy that the most dramatic changes occur, resulting in a massive increase in the number of epithelial cells and in their function. Pregnancy initiates the development of a new epithelial lineage, the alveolar cells, which form the milk-producing lobuloalveolar structures. These cells become redundant at the end of lactation and are removed in an exquisitely controlled process of tissue remodelling coupled with extensive cell death. All of these events require not only steroid hormones but also sequential signalling by cytokines. A recent surprising discovery was that the signalling pathways and cytokines that regulate lineage determination in T helper cells are also involved in mammary gland development during pregnancy.

  11. The evolving role of mammary ductoscopy.

    PubMed

    Mokbel, Kefah; Elkak, Abd Elrafea

    2002-01-01

    Mammary ductoscopy (MD) is an emerging technique that allows direct visualisation of the mammary duct system, and that produces sharp and clear video images and ductal washings for cytological analysis. There is a growing body of evidence that MD may have a role in the management of women with pathological nipple discharge, the guiding of breast conserving surgery for cancer, and the screening of high risk women. Further research is required to confirm these potential applications and the feasibility of its use in the rapid intervention and outpatient setting under local anaesthesia. Furthermore, the addition of molecular and genetic analysis of cells obtained by MD and the emergence of newer generations of microendoscopes are likely to enhance the use of this technique.

  12. Differential effects of dietary Oenothera, Zizyphus mistol, and corn oils, and essential fatty acid deficiency on the progression of a murine mammary gland adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, S E; Piegari, M; Guzmán, C A; Eynard, A R

    1999-03-01

    The modulating effect of dietary enrichment in mistol seed oil (MO) containing 25% of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), evening primrose oil (EPO) enriched in gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and corn oil (CO) as sources of omega-6 and omega-9 fatty acids on the growth parameters of one transplantable mammary tumor were compared. Mice fed on different lipid formulae were inoculated with a mammary gland adenocarcinoma and different growth development tumor parameters were recorded. Results showed that corn oil feeding slowed down most of the tumor growth parameters, as did the EPO diet. MO also showed antitumor activity. Olein feeding, which induces an essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD), increased the incidence and the multiplicity of metastases when compared with the controls. It may be concluded that a diet enriched in omega-6 fatty acids did not behave as a tumor promoter in this mammary gland tumor model. The antitumor activities of EPO and MO are corroborated in present experiments, suggesting that both oils may be of value in nutritional approaches of mammary gland tumor therapies. In addition, present data add further experimental proof about the proposed protumorigenic proneness induced by the EFAD state.

  13. [Secret excretion from the mouse mammary gland].

    PubMed

    Tolkunov, Iu A; Balakina, G B; Markov, A G

    2000-02-01

    Histological studies revealed that the mammary gland nipple have smooth muscle fibres along the nipple channel. These fibres infiltrate the connective tissue parallel to the skin. The ring muscles are not obvious. Delays in the milk excretion in mice may be due to specifics of allocation and functioning of the nipple smooth muscles. To obtain milk, a mechanical action upon the nipple and a synchronised release of oxitocin into the blood are necessary.

  14. Leukocytes in Mammary Development and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Coussens, Lisa M.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    Leukocytes, of both the innate and adaptive lineages, are normal cellular components of all tissues. These important cells not only are critical for regulating normal tissue homeostasis, but also are significant paracrine regulators of all physiologic and pathologic tissue repair processes. This article summarizes recent insights regarding the trophic roles of leukocytes at each stage of mammary gland development and during cancer development, with a focus on Murids and humans. PMID:21123394

  15. Characterization of Human Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    robust and reproducible methodology to detect, quantify and isolate stem cells in normal human mammary tissue, using a xenotransplantation system...covers the first year of the grant, during which substantial progress has been made in the development and validation of the xenotransplantation assay...Subrenal xenotransplantation surgery. The hair on the back of anesthetized mice was shaved, and the skin swabbed with 70% alcohol. An anterior to

  16. Oxytocin binding sites in bovine mammary tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin.

    1989-01-01

    Oxytocin binding sites were identified and characterized in bovine mammary tissue. ({sup 3}H)-oxytocin binding reached equilibrium by 50 min at 20{degree}C and by 8 hr at 4{degree}C. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. Thyrotropin releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, pentagastrin, bradykinin, xenopsin and L-valyl-histidyl-L-leucyl-L-threonyl-L-prolyl-L-valyl-L-glutamyl-L-lysine were not competitive. In the presence of 10 nM LiCl, addition of oxytocin to dispersed bovine mammary cells, in which phosphatidylinositol was pre-labelled, caused a time and dose-dependent increase in radioactive inositiol monophosphate incorporation. The possibility that there are distinct vasopressin receptors in bovine mammary tissue was investigated. ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding reached equilibrium by 40 min at 20{degree}. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. The ability of the peptides to inhibit ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding was: (Thr{sup 4},Gly{sup 7})-oxytocin > Arg{sup 8}-vasopressin > (lys{sup 8})-vasopressin > (Deamino{sup 1},D-arg{sup 8})-vasopressin > oxytocin > d (CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP.

  17. Mammary ductoscopy: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Bernadette; Mokbel, Kefah

    2005-04-01

    Mammary ductoscopy (MD) allows direct visual access to the mammary ducts, using fiberoptic microendoscopes inserted through the ductal opening onto the nipple surface. Therefore it has a potential role in the diagnosis and treatment of intraductal breast disease. This article describes the anatomy of the mammary ductal system, the early beginnings of MD, its ongoing evolution, and the need for further development for its future usage in increasing clinical indications. MD is a useful diagnostic adjunct in patients with pathological nipple discharge (PND) and can guide duct excision surgery. However, its potential use in the early detection of breast cancer, in guiding breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for cancer, and in the therapeutic ablation of intraductal disease, as well as in guiding risk-reducing strategies among high-risk women, requires further research and evaluation. The development of a biopsy kit that obtains adequate microbiopsy samples for histological diagnosis under direct visualization will enhance the use of this technique by breast surgeons and radiologists. Future developments also include combining MD with molecular diagnostic markers and optical biopsy systems for the diagnosis of premalignant and early malignant disease, and combining MD with radiofrequency for curative ablation of intraductal lesions.

  18. Mammary ductoscopy: current issues and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Ken; Fukushima, Hisaki; Toriumi, Yasuo; Kawase, Kazumi; Tabei, Isao; Yamashita, Akinori; Nogi, Hiroko

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, the mammary duct had not been directly observed in vivo. Starting with the success of Teboul et al., studies of mammary ductoscopy (MD) for nipple discharge have been performed in Japan and other East Asian countries. Ductal lavage screening trials for breast cancer started in the 2000s. Concurrently, the number of English-language articles about MD increased. Sixty-nine English-language and 74 Japanese-language papers published in the last 19 years were reviewed. Important reports and studies were analyzed. MD has undergone significant technological development, and studies of MD have taken place in many countries. As a result, endoscopic images of the mammary duct have developed, and the endoscopic diagnosis for nipple discharge has become possible. MD-guided biopsy and surgery have been studied. Findings of MD are useful for diagnosing intraductal lesions with nipple discharge. As a result, MD has reduced the number and extent of microdochectomies. MD is also helpful in guiding breast-conserving surgery. Many pioneers have tried direct biopsy or interventions under MD, but further developments are necessary for its practical use.

  19. Technical note: Mammary gland ultrasonography to evaluate mammary parenchymal composition in prepubertal heifers.

    PubMed

    Albino, R L; Guimarães, S E F; Daniels, K M; Fontes, M M S; Machado, A F; Dos Santos, G B; Marcondes, M I

    2017-02-01

    Bovine mammary gland development studies are often terminal or involve invasive biopsy procedures. Therefore, noninvasive means of assessing mammary development should be considered as alternative methods in live animals. The objective was to test if mammary ultrasonography can be used as a noninvasive way to estimate mammary parenchyma (PAR) composition in prepubertal dairy heifers with different average daily body weight gains. In the 84 d preceding, the ultrasound exam heifers were maintained in 1 of 3 treatment groups. Individual heifers were fed a high gain (1 kg/d; n = 6), low gain (0.5 kg/d, n = 6), or maintenance (n = 6) treatment diet. To achieve desired body weight gains, heifers were fed differing amounts of the same silage-based diet. Mammary glands of 18 crossbred heifers Holstein:Gyr underwent a single mammary ultrasound exam immediately before heifer slaughter, which took place when heifers weighed 142.0 ± 8.0 kg and were 200 d old. The 4 mammary glands of each heifer were evaluated using a real-time B-mode ultrasound machine equipped with a 6.5-MHz micro-convex transducer. Digital images (8-bit) of glands were obtained and PAR was identified within gland. Average pixel values per unit of PAR area were determined for each gland and analyzed at the level of heifer. Pixel results were interpreted on the basis that lower average pixel values reflect PAR with relatively high amounts of protein as opposed to fat. To help validate that the pixel value within PAR is associated with composition of PAR, pixel findings were compared with histological [number of adipocytes in PAR (Nad) and epithelial area in PAR (Ep)] and biochemical [percent crude protein in PAR (%CP), percent ether extract in PAR (%EE), PAR weight (WPAR), and mammary fat pad weight (WFAT)] composition of PAR in these same heifers. Within PAR, %EE and WFAT were positively correlated with pixel values, whereas %CP, Ep, and Nad were negatively correlated. Parenchyma weight did not correlate

  20. Yeast Interactions in Inoculated Wine Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Maurizio; Capece, Angela; Comitini, Francesca; Canonico, Laura; Siesto, Gabriella; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    The use of selected starter culture is widely diffused in winemaking. In pure fermentation, the ability of inoculated Saccharomyces cerevisiae to suppress the wild microflora is one of the most important feature determining the starter ability to dominate the process. Since the wine is the result of the interaction of several yeast species and strains, many studies are available on the effect of mixed cultures on the final wine quality. In mixed fermentation the interactions between the different yeasts composing the starter culture can led the stability of the final product and the analytical and aromatic profile. In the present review, we will discuss the recent developments regarding yeast interactions in pure and in mixed fermentation, focusing on the influence of interactions on growth and dominance in the process. PMID:27148235

  1. Keratin 6 is not essential for mammary gland development

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Sandra L; Bu, Wen; Longley, Mary Ann; Roop, Dennis R; Li, Yi; Rosen, Jeffrey M

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Keratin 6 (K6) has previously been identified as a marker of early mammary gland development and has also been proposed to be a marker of mammary gland progenitor cells. However, the function of K6 in the mammary gland was not known, so we examined the expression pattern of the protein during both embryonic and postnatal mammary development, as well as the mammary gland phenotype of mice that were null for both K6a and K6b isoforms. Method Immunostaining was performed to determine the expression pattern of K6a throughout mammary gland development, from the embryonic mammary bud to lactation. Double immunofluorescence was used to co-localize K6 with known markers of mammary gland development. Wild-type and K6ab-null mammary tissues were transplanted into the cleared fat pads of nude mice and the outgrowths were analyzed for morphology by whole-mount staining and for markers of mammary epithelium by immunostaining. Finally, progesterone receptor (PR) and bromodeoxyuridine co-localization was quantified by double immunofluorescence in wild-type and K6ab-null mammary outgrowths. Results Here we report that K6 is expressed earlier than described previously, by embryonic day 16.5. K6a is the predominant isoform expressed in the mammary gland, localized in the body cells and luminal epithelial cells but not in the cap cells or myoepithelial cells. Co-localization studies showed that most K6a-positive cells express steroid receptors but do not proliferate. When both the K6a and K6b genes are deleted, mammary gland development appears normal, with similar expression of most molecular markers examined in both the pubertal gland and the mature gland. Loss of K6a and K6b, however, leads to an increase in the number of steroid-receptor-positive cells, and increased co-localization of steroid receptor expression and proliferation was observed. Conclusion Although K6a was not essential for mammary gland development, loss of both K6a and K6b resulted in an increase in

  2. Influenza Transmission in the Mother-Infant Dyad Leads to Severe Disease, Mammary Gland Infection, and Pathogenesis by Regulating Host Responses

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Stephen S. H.; Almansa, Raquel; Leon, Alberto; Xu, Luoling; Bartoszko, Jessica; Kelvin, David J.; Kelvin, Alyson A.

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal influenza viruses are typically restricted to the human upper respiratory tract whereas influenza viruses with greater pathogenic potential often also target extra-pulmonary organs. Infants, pregnant women, and breastfeeding mothers are highly susceptible to severe respiratory disease following influenza virus infection but the mechanisms of disease severity in the mother-infant dyad are poorly understood. Here we investigated 2009 H1N1 influenza virus infection and transmission in breastfeeding mothers and infants utilizing our developed infant-mother ferret influenza model. Infants acquired severe disease and mortality following infection. Transmission of the virus from infants to mother ferrets led to infection in the lungs and mother mortality. Live virus was also found in mammary gland tissue and expressed milk of the mothers which eventually led to milk cessation. Histopathology showed destruction of acini glandular architecture with the absence of milk. The virus was localized in mammary epithelial cells of positive glands. To understand the molecular mechanisms of mammary gland infection, we performed global transcript analysis which showed downregulation of milk production genes such as Prolactin and increased breast involution pathways indicated by a STAT5 to STAT3 signaling shift. Genes associated with cancer development were also significantly increased including JUN, FOS and M2 macrophage markers. Immune responses within the mammary gland were characterized by decreased lymphocyte-associated genes CD3e, IL2Ra, CD4 with IL1β upregulation. Direct inoculation of H1N1 into the mammary gland led to infant respiratory infection and infant mortality suggesting the influenza virus was able to replicate in mammary tissue and transmission is possible through breastfeeding. In vitro infection studies with human breast cells showed susceptibility to H1N1 virus infection. Together, we have shown that the host-pathogen interactions of influenza virus

  3. Influenza Transmission in the Mother-Infant Dyad Leads to Severe Disease, Mammary Gland Infection, and Pathogenesis by Regulating Host Responses.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Stéphane G; Banner, David; Huang, Stephen S H; Almansa, Raquel; Leon, Alberto; Xu, Luoling; Bartoszko, Jessica; Kelvin, David J; Kelvin, Alyson A

    2015-10-01

    Seasonal influenza viruses are typically restricted to the human upper respiratory tract whereas influenza viruses with greater pathogenic potential often also target extra-pulmonary organs. Infants, pregnant women, and breastfeeding mothers are highly susceptible to severe respiratory disease following influenza virus infection but the mechanisms of disease severity in the mother-infant dyad are poorly understood. Here we investigated 2009 H1N1 influenza virus infection and transmission in breastfeeding mothers and infants utilizing our developed infant-mother ferret influenza model. Infants acquired severe disease and mortality following infection. Transmission of the virus from infants to mother ferrets led to infection in the lungs and mother mortality. Live virus was also found in mammary gland tissue and expressed milk of the mothers which eventually led to milk cessation. Histopathology showed destruction of acini glandular architecture with the absence of milk. The virus was localized in mammary epithelial cells of positive glands. To understand the molecular mechanisms of mammary gland infection, we performed global transcript analysis which showed downregulation of milk production genes such as Prolactin and increased breast involution pathways indicated by a STAT5 to STAT3 signaling shift. Genes associated with cancer development were also significantly increased including JUN, FOS and M2 macrophage markers. Immune responses within the mammary gland were characterized by decreased lymphocyte-associated genes CD3e, IL2Ra, CD4 with IL1β upregulation. Direct inoculation of H1N1 into the mammary gland led to infant respiratory infection and infant mortality suggesting the influenza virus was able to replicate in mammary tissue and transmission is possible through breastfeeding. In vitro infection studies with human breast cells showed susceptibility to H1N1 virus infection. Together, we have shown that the host-pathogen interactions of influenza virus

  4. Identification of rat mammary tumor-1 gene (RMT-1), which is highly expressed in rat mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Chiou, S; Yoo, J; Loh, K C; Guzman, R C; Gopinath, G R; Rajkumar, L; Chou, Y C; Yang, J; Popescu, N C; Nandi, S

    2001-12-10

    Full-term pregnancy early in life results in a permanent reduction in lifetime breast cancer risk in women. Parous rats and mice are also refractory to chemical carcinogenesis. Therefore, investigation of the differences between mammary glands from virgin and parous rats would provide valuable information regarding the protective effects of early full-term pregnancy. In this report, we examined the gene expression patterns in mammary glands from virgin and parous Lewis rats. Using differential display technology, a novel 4.2 kb cDNA, designated rat mammary tumor-1 (RMT-1) was isolated. Northern blot analysis of RMT-1 showed that RMT-1 expression was higher in the pre-pubertal and pubertal stages during rat mammary gland development while it was down-regulated in mammary glands from mature virgin and parous rats. RMT-1 expression was highest in rat mammary cancers compared with either the mammary glands of virgin or parous rats. At the Northern blot sensitivity level, RMT-1 expression was found only in the mammary gland. Northern blot analysis also showed that the expression of this gene was found in 74% of N-methyl-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mammary cancers while it was not found in MNU-induced cancers from other organs. The examination of the RMT-1 gene structure revealed that it consists of five exons spanning 5.9 kb. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, the gene was localized on rat chromosome 1 band q 43-51. The present data show that there is a correlation between high RMT-1 expression and rat mammary carcinogenesis or decreased RMT-1 expression and parity associated refractoriness to chemically induced mammary carcinogenesis. However, whether or not RMT-1 gene has a functional role in these processes remains to be investigated.

  5. A rare case of primary inoculation tuberculosis seen after varicella.

    PubMed

    Polat, Meltem; Kara, Soner Sertan; Tapısız, Anıl; Tezer, Hasan; Öğüt, Betül; Uluoğlu, Ömer

    2015-01-01

    Primary inoculation tuberculosis (TB) is a rare form of cutaneous TB resulting from direct introduction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis into the skin or mucosa of a previously uninfected, nonimmune person. We herein report the first case, to our knowledge, of primary inoculation TB to be seen after varicella; this case explains the possible mechanism of varicella-zoster virus-mediated transient cellular immune suppression that predisposed the patient to cutaneous TB. In this case, we believe that varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection predisposed the patient to primary inoculation TB by leading to direct inoculation of tuberculosis bacilli through vesicles or by suppressing cellular immunity.

  6. Bovine mammary stem cells: Cell biology meets production agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) provide for net growth, renewal and turnover of mammary epithelial cells, and are therefore potential targets for strategies to increase production efficiency. Appropriate regulation of MaSC can potentially benefit milk yield, persistency, dry period management and tissue ...

  7. Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of left internal mammary artery graft.

    PubMed

    Agathos, E A; Hussein, A; Trehan, H; Trenholme, S E; Floten, H S

    1993-10-01

    Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the left internal mammary artery was recognized as a possible causal factor in the early recurrence of angina in a 51-year-old man. This patient underwent reoperation for revascularization with the left internal mammary artery graft in situ.

  8. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: A Wnt Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qing Cissy; Verheyen, Esther M.; Zeng, Yi Arial

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt pathway has emerged as a key signaling cascade participating in mammary organogenesis and breast oncogenesis. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of how the pathway regulates stem cells and normal development of the mammary gland, and discuss how its various components contribute to breast carcinoma pathology. PMID:27420097

  9. The Krakatau syndrome; a late complication of retroglandular mammary augmentation.

    PubMed

    Vuursteen, P J

    1992-01-01

    A late complication of retroglandular mammary augmentation is described, in which severe fibrous capsular contraction with calcification of the capsule causes pressure atrophy of the centre of the mammary gland and sometimes even atrophy of the underlying pectoralis major muscle. The complication was observed in six patients. Two representative cases are described and the treatment is discussed.

  10. P-Cadherin Expression in Feline Mammary Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Figueira, Ana Catarina; Teodósio, Ana Sofia; Carvalheira, Júlio; Lacerda, Manuela; de Matos, Augusto; Gärtner, Fátima

    2012-01-01

    The search for molecular markers in the feline mammary gland, namely, the adhesion molecules belonging to the cadherin family, is useful in the understanding of the development of mammary carcinomas in felines and humans. To study P-cadherin expression in the feline mammary gland, 61 samples of normal (n = 4), hyperplastic (n = 12), and neoplastic (n = 45) feline mammary tissues were examined. In both normal and hyperplastic mammary tissues as well as in benign tumours, P-cadherin immunolabelling was restricted to myoepithelial cells. In malignant tumours, however, there was an aberrant epithelial P-cadherin immunoexpression in 64.1% (n = 25) of cases, with a membranous and/or cytoplasmic pattern of distribution. A statistically significant relationship was seen between epithelial P-cadherin expression and malignant mammary lesions (P = 0.0001). In malignant mammary tumours, there was likewise a statistically significant relationship between aberrant P-cadherin immunoexpression and histological grade (P = 0.0132). Aberrant epithelial P-cadherin expression seems to be related to malignancy in the feline mammary gland. To confirm the results of this investigation, further studies with larger samples and follow-up studies are warranted. PMID:23091776

  11. Pim-1 kinase expression during murine mammary development

    SciTech Connect

    Gapter, Leslie A.; Magnuson, Nancy S.; Ng, Ka-yun; Hosick, Howard L. . E-mail: hosick@wsu.edu

    2006-07-07

    Pim-1 kinase phosphorylates substrates whose activities are linked to proliferation, survival, differentiation, and apoptosis. Although pim-1 is induced by hormones and cytokines, the hormonal control and contribution of Pim-1 to mammary gland development have not been evaluated. We examined Pim-1 expression in mammary cell lines, investigated whether Pim-1 levels could be altered in breast epithelia by mammogenic hormones, and evaluated Pim-1 expression during mammary development. We found that Pim-1 was elevated in most mammary carcinoma cell lines and progesterone increased Pim-1 protein to some extent in non-tumorigenic mammary epithelia. Pim-1 expression in situ was consistent with the documented profile of progesterone activity in mouse mammary glands. Pim-1 nuclear localization correlated with cytoplasmic distribution for its substrate, p21{sup CIP/Waf1}, and we found that Pim-1 and p21 associate in vitro. Our results suggest that Pim-1 expression may be regulated by progesterone during mammary development and Pim-1 associates with p21 in mammary epithelial cells.

  12. Characterization of neutral TRH-like peptides in mammary gland, mammary tumors and milk.

    PubMed

    Ghilchik, M W; Tobaruela, M; del Rio-Garcia, J; Smyth, D G

    2000-06-01

    Three pyroglutamylpeptide amides, pGlu-Glu-Pro amide, pGlu-Phe-Pro amide and pGlu-Gln-Pro amide, with similar structures to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), have been identified previously in the male reproductive system. We report here that rat and human mammary gland contain neutral TRH-immunoreactive peptides which are not retained on cation or anion exchange chromatography and that similar peptides occur in the milk of rat, cow, ewe and sow. The TRH-like peptides in lyophilized milk from the cow were purified by gel exclusion chromatography, mini-column cation exchange chromatography and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the chromatographed peptides were located by TRH radioimmunoassay (RIA). In each chromatographic system the major TRH-immunoreactive peptide from cow milk exhibited identical behavior to pGlu-Phe-Pro amide; in addition there were two minor TRH-immunoreactive components. The possible physiological role of the TRH-like peptides in the mammary gland is discussed. In a series of patients with breast carcinoma, mammary tumor tissue was shown to contain approximately four times more TRH-like peptide than normal mammary tissue from the same patient, raising the possibility that the TRH-like peptides may be implicated in tumor development.

  13. Mammary gland stem cells and their application in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing; Wang, Hui; Jiao, Baowei

    2017-02-07

    The mammary gland is an organ comprising two primary lineages, specifically the inner luminal and the outer myoepithelial cell layers. Mammary gland stem cells (MaSCs) are highly dynamic and self-renewing, and can give rise to these mammary gland lineages. The lineages are responsible for gland generation during puberty as well as expansion during pregnancy. In recent years, researchers have focused on understanding how MaSCs are regulated during mammary gland development and transformation of breast cancer. Here, we summarize the identification of MaSCs, and how they are regulated by the signaling transduction pathways, mammary gland microenvironment, and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Moreover, we debate the evidence for their serving as the origin of breast cancer, and discuss the therapeutic perspectives of targeting breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). In conclusion, a better understanding of the key regulators of MaSCs is crucial for the clinical treatment of breast cancer.

  14. Proteomic analysis of microsomes from lactating bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lifeng; Rawson, Pisana; McLauchlan, Danyl; Lehnert, Klaus; Snell, Russell; Jordan, T William

    2008-04-01

    Mammary gland has multiple metabolic potential including for large-scale synthesis of milk proteins, carbohydrate, and lipids including nutrient triacylglycerols. We have carried out a proteomic analysis of mammary tissue to discover proteins that affect lipid metabolism. Unfractionated microsomes from lactating bovine mammary tissue were analyzed using one-dimensional SDS-PAGE with RPLC-ESI-MS/MS. This approach gave 703 proteins including 160 predicted transmembrane proteins. Proteins were classified according to their subcellular localizations and biological functions. Over 50 proteins were associated with cellular uptake, metabolism, and secretion of lipids, including some enzymes that have been previously associated with breast cancer and potential therapeutic targets. This database develops a proteomic view of the metabolic potential of mammary gland that can be expected to contribute to a greater understanding of gene expression and tissue remodeling associated with lactation, and to further dissection of normal and pathological processes in mammary tissue.

  15. Plk2 regulates mitotic spindle orientation and mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Elizabeth; Kabotyanski, Elena B; Shore, Amy N; Creighton, Chad J; Westbrook, Thomas F; Rosen, Jeffrey M

    2014-04-01

    Disruptions in polarity and mitotic spindle orientation contribute to the progression and evolution of tumorigenesis. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating these processes in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that Polo-like kinase 2 (Plk2) regulates mitotic spindle orientation in the mammary gland and that this might account for its suggested role as a tumor suppressor. Plk2 is highly expressed in the mammary gland and is required for proper mammary gland development. Loss of Plk2 leads to increased mammary epithelial cell proliferation and ductal hyperbranching. Additionally, a novel role for Plk2 in regulating the orientation of the mitotic spindle and maintaining proper cell polarity in the ductal epithelium was discovered. In support of a tumor suppressor function for Plk2, loss of Plk2 increased the formation of lesions in multiparous glands. Collectively, these results demonstrate a novel role for Plk2 in regulating mammary gland development.

  16. Luminal progenitors restrict their lineage potential during mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Rodilla, Veronica; Dasti, Alessandro; Huyghe, Mathilde; Lafkas, Daniel; Laurent, Cécile; Reyal, Fabien; Fre, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    The hierarchical relationships between stem cells and progenitors that guide mammary gland morphogenesis are still poorly defined. While multipotent basal stem cells have been found within the myoepithelial compartment, the in vivo lineage potential of luminal progenitors is unclear. Here we used the expression of the Notch1 receptor, previously implicated in mammary gland development and tumorigenesis, to elucidate the hierarchical organization of mammary stem/progenitor cells by lineage tracing. We found that Notch1 expression identifies multipotent stem cells in the embryonic mammary bud, which progressively restrict their lineage potential during mammary ductal morphogenesis to exclusively generate an ERαneg luminal lineage postnatally. Importantly, our results show that Notch1-labelled cells represent the alveolar progenitors that expand during pregnancy and survive multiple successive involutions. This study reveals that postnatal luminal epithelial cells derive from distinct self-sustained lineages that may represent the cells of origin of different breast cancer subtypes.

  17. Luminal Progenitors Restrict Their Lineage Potential during Mammary Gland Development

    PubMed Central

    Rodilla, Veronica; Dasti, Alessandro; Huyghe, Mathilde; Lafkas, Daniel; Laurent, Cécile; Reyal, Fabien; Fre, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchical relationships between stem cells and progenitors that guide mammary gland morphogenesis are still poorly defined. While multipotent basal stem cells have been found within the myoepithelial compartment, the in vivo lineage potential of luminal progenitors is unclear. Here we used the expression of the Notch1 receptor, previously implicated in mammary gland development and tumorigenesis, to elucidate the hierarchical organization of mammary stem/progenitor cells by lineage tracing. We found that Notch1 expression identifies multipotent stem cells in the embryonic mammary bud, which progressively restrict their lineage potential during mammary ductal morphogenesis to exclusively generate an ERαneg luminal lineage postnatally. Importantly, our results show that Notch1-labelled cells represent the alveolar progenitors that expand during pregnancy and survive multiple successive involutions. This study reveals that postnatal luminal epithelial cells derive from distinct self-sustained lineages that may represent the cells of origin of different breast cancer subtypes. PMID:25688859

  18. Stem cells in normal mammary gland and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Yin, Xin; Ma, Tao; Lu, Jun

    2010-04-01

    The mammary gland is a structurally dynamic organ that undergoes dramatic alterations with age, menstrual cycle, and reproductive status. Mammary gland stem cells, the minor cell population within the mature organ, are thought to have multiple functions in regulating mammary gland development, tissue maintenance, major growth, and structural remodeling. In addition, accumulative evidence suggests that breast cancers are initiated and maintained by a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell features (called cancer stem cells). A variety of methods have been developed to identify and characterize mammary stem cells, and several signal transduction pathways have been identified to be essential for the self-renewal and differentiation of mammary gland stem cells. Understanding the origin of breast cancer stem cells, their relationship to breast cancer development, and the differences between normal and cancer stem cells may lead to novel approaches to breast cancer diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  19. Mammary development and breast cancer: the role of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ercan, C; van Diest, P J; Vooijs, M

    2011-06-01

    The mammary gland is a highly regenerative organ that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation and involution, a process controlled by stem cells. The last decade much progress has been made in the identification of signaling pathways that function in these stem cells to control self-renewal, lineage commitment and epithelial differentiation in the normal mammary gland. The same signaling pathways that control physiological mammary development and homeostasis are also often found deregulated in breast cancer. Here we provide an overview on the functional and molecular identification of mammary stem cells in the context of both normal breast development and breast cancer. We discuss the contribution of some key signaling pathways with an emphasis on Notch receptor signaling, a cell fate determination pathway often deregulated in breast cancer. A further understanding of the biological roles of the Notch pathway in mammary stem cell behavior and carcinogenesis might be relevant for the development of future therapies.

  20. Genetic Mechanisms in Apc-Mediated Mammary Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kuraguchi, Mari; Ohene-Baah, Nana Yaw; Sonkin, Dmitriy; Bronson, Roderick Terry; Kucherlapati, Raju

    2009-01-01

    Many components of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway also play critical roles in mammary tumor development, yet the role of the tumor suppressor gene APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) in breast oncongenesis is unclear. To better understand the role of Apc in mammary tumorigenesis, we introduced conditional Apc mutations specifically into two different mammary epithelial populations using K14-cre and WAP-cre transgenic mice that express Cre-recombinase in mammary progenitor cells and lactating luminal cells, respectively. Only the K14-cre–mediated Apc heterozygosity developed mammary adenocarcinomas demonstrating histological heterogeneity, suggesting the multilineage progenitor cell origin of these tumors. These tumors harbored truncation mutation in a defined region in the remaining wild-type allele of Apc that would retain some down-regulating activity of β-catenin signaling. Activating mutations at codons 12 and 61 of either H-Ras or K-Ras were also found in a subset of these tumors. Expression profiles of acinar-type mammary tumors from K14-cre; ApcCKO/+ mice showed luminal epithelial gene expression pattern, and clustering analysis demonstrated more correlation to MMTV-neu model than to MMTV-Wnt1. In contrast, neither WAP-cre–induced Apc heterozygous nor homozygous mutations resulted in predisposition to mammary tumorigenesis, although WAP-cre–mediated Apc deficiency resulted in severe squamous metaplasia of mammary glands. Collectively, our results suggest that not only the epithelial origin but also a certain Apc mutations are selected to achieve a specific level of β-catenin signaling optimal for mammary tumor development and explain partially the colon- but not mammary-specific tumor development in patients that carry germline mutations in APC. PMID:19197353

  1. Genistein-mediated inhibition of mammary stromal adipocyte differentiation limits expansion of mammary stem/progenitor cells by paracrine signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary adiposity may contribute to breast cancer development and progression by releasing cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that promote mammary epithelial proliferation. We evaluated the effects of soy isoflavone genistein (GEN) on the adipogenic differentiation of a SV40-immortalized mou...

  2. Alcohol exposure in utero leads to enhanced prepubertal mammary development and alterations in mammary IGF and estradiol systems.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Tiffany A; Crismale-Gann, Catina; Cohick, Wendie S

    2011-08-01

    Exposure to alcohol during fetal development increases susceptibility to mammary cancer in adult rats. This study determined if early changes in mammary morphology and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)/estradiol axis are involved in the mechanisms that underlie this increased susceptibility. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a liquid diet containing 6.7% ethanol (alcohol), an isocaloric liquid diet (pair-fed), or rat chow ad libitum from days 11 to 21 of gestation. At birth, female pups were cross-fostered to ad libitum-fed control dams. Offspring were euthanized at postnatal days (PND) 20, 40, or 80. Animals were injected with BrdU before euthanasia, then mammary glands, serum, and livers were collected. Mammary glands from animals exposed to alcohol in utero displayed increased epithelial cell proliferation and aromatase expression at PND 20 and 40. Mammary IGF-I mRNA was higher in alcohol-exposed animals relative to controls at PND 20, while mammary IGFBP-5 mRNA was lower in this group at PND 40. Hepatic IGF-I mRNA expression was increased at all time points in alcohol-exposed animals, however, circulating IGF-I levels were not altered. These data indicate that alcohol exposure in utero may advance mammary development via the IGF and estradiol systems, which could contribute to increased susceptibility to mammary cancer later in life.

  3. Mammary epithelial cells isolated from milk are a valuable, non-invasive source of mammary transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Boutinaud, Marion; Herve, Lucile; Lollivier, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Milk is produced in the udder by mammary epithelial cells (MEC). Milk contains MEC, which are gradually exfoliated from the epithelium during lactation. Isolation of MEC from milk using immunomagnetic separation may be a useful non-invasive method to investigate transcriptional regulations in ruminants’ udder. This review aims to describe the process of isolating MEC from milk, to provide an overview on the studies that use this method to analyze gene expression by qRT PCR and to evaluate the validity of this method by analyzing and comparing the results between studies. In several goat and cow studies, consistent reductions in alpha-lactalbumin mRNA levels during once-daily milking (ODM) and in SLC2A1 mRNA level during feed restriction are observed. The effect of ODM on alpha-lactalbumin mRNA level was similarly observed in milk isolated MEC and mammary biopsy. Moreover, we and others showed decreasing alpha-lactalbumin and increasing BAX mRNA levels with advanced stages of lactation in dairy cows and buffalo. The relevance of using the milk-isolated MEC method to analyze mammary gene expression is proven, as the transcript variations were also consistent with milk yield and composition variations under the effect of different factors such as prolactin inhibition or photoperiod. However, the RNA from milk-isolated MEC is particularly sensitive to degradation. This could explain the differences obtained between milk-isolated MEC and mammary biopsy in two studies where gene expression was compared using qRT-PCR or RNA Sequencing analyses. As a conclusion, when the RNA quality is conserved, MEC isolated from milk are a valuable, non-invasive source of mammary mRNA to study various factors that impact milk yield and composition (ODM, feeding level, endocrine status, photoperiod modulation, and stage of lactation). PMID:26579195

  4. Immune cell location and function during post-natal mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Reed, Johanna R; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L

    2010-09-01

    Post-natal mammary gland development requires complex interactions between the epithelial cells and various cell types within the stroma. Recent studies have illustrated the importance of immune cells and their mediators during the various stages of mammary gland development. However, the mechanisms by which these immune cells functionally contribute to mammary gland development are only beginning to be understood. This review provides an overview of the localization of immune cells within the mammary gland during the various stages of post-natal mammary gland development. Furthermore, recent studies are summarized that illustrate the mechanisms by which these cells are recruited to the mammary gland and their functional roles in mammary gland development.

  5. Mammary Cancer and Activation of Transposable Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    cytes and ADS-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (ADS-iPSCs) (19) and primary mouse ES cells to isolated sperm and oocytes (20). We selected an...051 59 5 92% H9-IMR90 5875 7 669 782 605 58 91% oocyte - ES cell (mouse) 4727 1 204 883 334 25 93% sperm - ES cell (mouse) 4580 4 364 748 1027 104 91...collaborator, Dr. Anne Peaston, developed a genetically engineered mouse model in which a specific mammary cell population is fluorescently marked upon

  6. Mouse Mammary Cancer Models - Mechanisms and Markers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    Wipl knockout mouse model and have shown defects in cell cycle control in cells derived from Wipl null animals. We are crossing these mice to mammary...compartment of the testes (13,14). Mice lacking Wipl are viable, but males show a reduced longevity and frequent runting (14). Wipl null males also show...predominates and thus the other TG/p53 mouse . Wnt-1 TG mice contain several copies nontumor components should not obscure any strong of a germline Wnt-1

  7. Characterization of Human Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    9 Appendix……………………………………………………………………………… 10 Eirew,P., Stingl,J., Raouf,A., Turashvili,G., Aparicio ,S., Emerman,J.T., and Eaves,C.J. A...Peter Eirew, John Stingl, Afshin Raouf, Gulisa Turashvili, Samuel Aparicio , Joanne Emerman and Connie Eaves. A method for quantifying normal human...Eirew, Afshin Raouf, John Stingl, Gulisa Turashvili, Allen Delaney, Joanne Emerman, Marco Marra and Samuel Aparicio . “Stem Cells in the Mammary Gland

  8. Ink4a/Arf(-/-) and HRAS(G12V) transform mouse mammary cells into triple-negative breast cancer containing tumorigenic CD49f(-) quiescent cells.

    PubMed

    Kai, K; Iwamoto, T; Kobayashi, T; Arima, Y; Takamoto, Y; Ohnishi, N; Bartholomeusz, C; Horii, R; Akiyama, F; Hortobagyi, G N; Pusztai, L; Saya, H; Ueno, N T

    2014-01-23

    Intratumoral heterogeneity within individual breast tumors is a well-known phenomenon that may contribute to drug resistance. This heterogeneity is dependent on several factors, such as types of oncogenic drivers and tumor precursor cells. The purpose of our study was to engineer a mouse mammary tumor model with intratumoral heterogeneity by using defined genetic perturbations. To achieve this, we used mice with knockout (-/-) of Ink4a/Arf, a tumor suppressor locus; these mice are known to be susceptible to non-mammary tumors such as fibrosarcoma. To induce mammary tumors, we retrovirally introduced an oncogene, HRAS(G12V), into Ink4a/Arf(-/-) mammary cells in vitro, and those cells were inoculated into syngeneic mice mammary fat pads. We observed 100% tumorigenesis. The tumors formed were negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and HER2. Further, they had pathological features similar to those of human triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (for example, pushing borders, central necrosis). The tumors were found to be heterogeneous and included two subpopulations: CD49f(-) quiescent cells and CD49f(+)cells. Contrary to our expectation, CD49f(-) quiescent cells had high tumor-initiating potential and CD49f(+)cells had relatively low tumor-initiating potential. Gene expression analysis revealed that CD49f(-) quiescent cells overexpressed epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-driving genes, reminiscent of tumor-initiating cells and claudin-low breast cancer. Our animal model with intratumoral heterogeneity, derived from defined genetic perturbations, allows us to test novel molecular targeted drugs in a setting that mimics the intratumoral heterogeneity of human TNBC.

  9. Lactating cow response to lucerne silage inoculated with Lactobacillus plantarum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is unclear why bacterial silage inoculants improve milk production in lactating dairy cattle. However, recent in vitro results suggest that inoculated silage effects on milk production may be tied to greater production of rumen microorganisms. Our objective was to determine if alfalfa silage trea...

  10. Silage Inoculant Effects on In Vitro Rumen Fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four inoculants, B (Lactobacillus plantarum and Enterococcus faecium), C (Lactobacillus plantarum), D (Lactobacillus pentosus), E (Lactococcus lactis), were compared with an uninoculated treatment (A) on alfalfa (38% DM, AS), corn (36% DM, CS), and brown midrib corn (33% DM, BMR) silages. All inocul...

  11. Microbial inoculants for small scale composting of putrescible kitchen wastes.

    PubMed

    Nair, J; Okamitsu, K

    2010-06-01

    This research looked at the need for ligno-cellulolytic inoculants (EM bacteria and Trichoderma sp.) in small to medium scale composting of household wastes. A mixture of household organic waste comprised of kitchen waste, paper, grass clippings and composted material was subjected to various durations of thermo composting followed by vermicomposting with and without microbial inoculants for a total of 28days. The results revealed that ligno-celluloytic inoculants are not essential to speed up the process of composting for onsite small scale household organic waste treatment as no significant difference was observed between the control and those inoculated with Trichoderma and EM in terms of C:N ratio of the final product. However, it was observed that EM inoculation enhanced reproductive rate of earthworms, and so probably created the best environment for vermicomposting, in all treatment groups.

  12. Focal adhesion kinase knockdown in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts inhibits oral squamous cell carcinoma metastasis via downregulating MCP-1/CCL2 expression.

    PubMed

    Min, Anjie; Zhu, Chao; Wang, Jingyi; Peng, Shuping; Shuai, Cijun; Gao, Shan; Tang, Zhangui; Su, Tong

    2015-02-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) have been demonstrated to play an important role in the occurrence and development of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of CAFs on OSCC cells and to explore the role of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in this process. The results showed that oral CAFs expressed a higher level of FAK than normal human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs), and the conditioned medium (CM) of CAFs could induce the invasion and migration of SCC-25, one oral squamous carcinoma cell line. However, knockdown of FAK by small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in inhibition of CAF-CM induced cell invasion and migration in SCC-25, probably by reducing the production of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), one of downstream target chemokines. Therefore, our findings indicated that targeting FAK in CAFs might be a promising strategy for the treatment of OSCC in the future.

  13. Membrane-bound ICAM-1 contributes to the onset of proinvasive tumor stroma by controlling acto-myosin contractility in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Bonan, Stephanie; Albrengues, Jean; Grasset, Eloise; Kuzet, Sanya-Eduarda; Nottet, Nicolas; Bourget, Isabelle; Bertero, Thomas; Mari, Bernard; Meneguzzi, Guerrino; Gaggioli, Cedric

    2017-01-01

    Acto-myosin contractility in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts leads to assembly of the tumor extracellular matrix. The pro-inflammatory cytokine LIF governs fibroblast activation in cancer by regulating the myosin light chain 2 activity. So far, however, how LIF mediates cytoskeleton contractility remains unknown. Using phenotypic screening assays based on knock-down of LIF-dependent genes in fibroblasts, we identified the glycoprotein ICAM-1 as a crucial regulator of stroma fibroblast proinvasive matrix remodeling. We demonstrate that the membrane-bound ICAM-1 isoform is necessary and sufficient to promote inflammation-dependent extracellular matrix contraction, which favors cancer cell invasion. Indeed, ICAM-1 mediates generation of acto-myosin contractility downstream of the Src kinases in stromal fibroblasts. Moreover, acto-myosin contractility regulates ICAM-1 expression by establishing a positive feedback signaling. Thus, targeting stromal ICAM-1 might constitute a possible therapeutic mean to counteract tumor cell invasion and dissemination. PMID:27901489

  14. Disruption of reelin signaling alters mammary gland morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Khialeeva, Elvira; Lane, Timothy F.; Carpenter, Ellen M.

    2011-01-01

    Reelin signaling is required for appropriate cell migration and ductal patterning during mammary gland morphogenesis. Dab1, an intracellular adaptor protein activated in response to reelin signaling, is expressed in the developing mammary bud and in luminal epithelial cells in the adult gland. Reelin protein is expressed in a complementary pattern, first in the epithelium overlying the mammary bud during embryogenesis and then in the myoepithelium and periductal stroma in the adult. Deletion in mouse of either reelin or Dab1 induced alterations in the development of the ductal network, including significant retardation in ductal elongation, decreased terminal branching, and thickening and disorganization of the luminal wall. At later stages, some mutant glands overcame these early delays, but went on to exhibit enlarged and chaotic ductal morphologies and decreased terminal branching: these phenotypes are suggestive of a role for reelin in spatial patterning or structural organization of the mammary epithelium. Isolated mammary epithelial cells exhibited decreased migration in response to exogenous reelin in vitro, a response that required Dab1. These observations highlight a role for reelin signaling in the directed migration of mammary epithelial cells driving ductal elongation into the mammary fat pad and provide the first evidence that reelin signaling may be crucial for regulating the migration and organization of non-neural tissues. PMID:21266412

  15. STAT signaling in mammary gland differentiation, cell survival and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Haricharan, S; Li, Y

    2014-01-25

    The mammary gland is a unique organ that undergoes extensive and profound changes during puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, lactation and involution. The changes that take place during puberty involve large-scale proliferation and invasion of the fat-pad. During pregnancy and lactation, the mammary cells are exposed to signaling pathways that inhibit apoptosis, induce proliferation and invoke terminal differentiation. Finally, during involution the mammary gland is exposed to milk stasis, programmed cell death and stromal reorganization to clear the differentiated milk-producing cells. Not surprisingly, the signaling pathways responsible for bringing about these changes in breast cells are often subverted during the process of tumorigenesis. The STAT family of proteins is involved in every stage of mammary gland development, and is also frequently implicated in breast tumorigenesis. While the roles of STAT3 and STAT5 during mammary gland development and tumorigenesis are well studied, others members, e.g. STAT1 and STAT6, have only recently been observed to play a role in mammary gland biology. Continued investigation into the STAT protein network in the mammary gland will likely yield new biomarkers and risk factors for breast cancer, and may also lead to novel prophylactic or therapeutic strategies against breast cancer.

  16. A review of mammary ductoscopy in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daigo; Tanaka, Kanji

    2004-01-01

    Breast carcinoma and hyperplasia are thought to start in the lining of the breast duct. Mammary ductoscopy is an emerging technique allowing direct visual access of the ductal system of the breast through the nipple. This article reviews and discusses the utility of mammary ductoscopy. Abnormalities can be identified successfully by mammary ductoscopy, and intraductal biopsy can be used when the tumor is a polypoid type. Ductal lavage using microcatheters is effective in identifying malignant cells in high-risk women and this has stimulated interest in exploring the role of mammary ductoscopy in breast cancer screening. Mammary ductoscopy combined with ductal lavage may have a role in the management of patients with nipple discharge, the guiding of breast-conserving surgery for cancer, and in screening for high-risk women. The addition of molecular and genetic analysis of cells obtained by mammary ductoscopy are likely to enhance the use of this technique. Mammary ductoscopy techniques are safe and appear useful for detecting abnormalities in the breast. The additional molecular biologic study or ductal lavage may enhance the ability to direct and limit subsequent surgery when removing the offending lesions.

  17. Surface scanning: an application to mammary surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigotti, Camilla; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Aliverti, Andrea; Pedotti, Antonio

    1998-04-01

    The possibility of mathematically describing the body surface represents a useful tool for several medical sectors, such as prosthetics or plastic surgery, and could improve diagnosis and objective evaluation of deformities and the follow-up of progressive diseases. The approach presented is based on the acquisition of a surface scanned by a laser beam. The 3D coordinates of the spot generated on the surface by the laser beam are computed by an automatic image analyzer. Using at least two different views of the subject, the 3D coordinates are obtained by stereophotogrammetry. A software package for graphic representation and extraction of linear superficial and volumetric features from the acquired surface has been developed and some preliminary results with mammary reconstruction are presented. A good mammary reconstruction after mastectomy must achieve two results. First, the reconstruction should follow the patients' wishes and second, the reconstructed breast should be as similar as possible to the contralateral one. To achieve these goals, a knowledge of breast volume, area, and shape features are essential for the surgeon. In such a context, this system could be a valuable tool in improving breast reconstructive surgery.

  18. CELL CONTACTS IN THE MOUSE MAMMARY GLAND

    PubMed Central

    Pitelka, Dorothy R.; Hamamoto, Susan T.; Duafala, Joan G.; Nemanic, Michael K.

    1973-01-01

    The nature and distribution of cell contacts have been examined in thin sections and freeze-fracture replicas of mammary gland samples from female C3H/Crgl mice at stages from birth through pregnancy, lactation, and postweaning involution. Epithelial cells of major mammary ducts at all stages examined are linked at their luminal borders by junctional complexes consisting of tight junctions, variable intermediate junctions, occasional small gap junctions, and one or more series of desmosomes. Scattered desmosomes and gap junctions link ductal epithelial and myoepithelial cells in all combinations; hemidesmosomes attach myoepithelial cells to the basal lamina. Freeze-fracture replicas confirm the erratic distribution of gap junctions and reveal a loose, irregular network of ridges comprising the continuous tight-junctional belts. Alveoli develop early in gestation and initially resemble ducts. Later, as alveoli and small ducts become actively secretory, they lose all desmosomes and most intermediate junctions, whereas tight and gap junctions persist, The tight-junctional network becomes compact and orderly, its undulating ridges oriented predominantly parallel to the luminal surface. It is suggested that these changes in junctional morphology, occurring in secretory cells around parturition, may be related to the greatly enhanced rate of movement of milk precursors and products through the lactating epithelium, or to the profound and recurrent changes in shape of secretory cells that occur in relation to myoepithelial cell contraction, or to both. PMID:4569313

  19. Periareolar techniques for mammary reduction and elevation.

    PubMed

    de Benito, J; Sanza, I F

    1993-01-01

    Between June 1990 and June 1992 we carried out 56 breast operations: 18 reductions, 32 mastopexies, and 6 implant changes. The surgical techniques used in all cases basically consisted of three phases: the periareolar incision, the creation of the superior pedicle with two medial and lateral flaps, and the "anchoring," crossed by both flaps in order to hold up the mammary gland. The diameter of the "doughnut" of skin that we had to deepidermize varied between 5 and 15 cm, thus raising the nipple-areola complex by as much as 10 cm. The volume of tissue removed from the hypertrophic breast ranged from 70 to 520 g. In 24 of the 32 mastopexies, the use of a silicone implant was necessary in order to provide greater volume, texture, and better mammary contour. In these cases the size of the prostheses varied between 120 and 300 cc. All patients completed the postop followup in the normal way. Only three patients suffered a slight dehiscence of the periareolar suture, which was solved within a few days of the operation by means of a Friedreich. The periareolar cutaneous pleats and the hardness of the breast gradually disappeared, as predicted, within a period of 3-4 months; afterward the breast looked perfectly natural.

  20. Changes in ruminal bacterial community composition following feeding of alfalfa silage inoculated with a commercial silage inoculant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some silage inoculants promote an increase in milk production, possibly through altering the rumen microflora. In this study, dairy cows fed alfalfa silage treated with the inoculant, Lactobacillus plantarum MTD/1 (LPS), were compared to cows fed untreated silage (Ctrl) with the objectives: 1) to de...

  1. Tissue-specific ceruloplasmin gene expression in the mammary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, J L; Shimizu, N; Gitlin, J D

    1991-01-01

    Using a ceruloplasmin cDNA clone in RNA blot analysis, a single 3.7 kb ceruloplasmin-specific transcript was detected in rat mammary gland tissue from pregnant and lactating animals. Ceruloplasmin gene expression in the mammary gland was tissue-specific, with no evidence of expression in brain, heart or other extrahepatic tissues. Ceruloplasmin mRNA was also detected in mammary gland tissue from male, virgin female and non-pregnant/multiparous animals, and the abundance of ceruloplasmin-specific transcripts in virgin female rats was independent of their stage of oestrus. In virgin female mammary gland the content of ceruloplasmin mRNA was 20% of that in hepatic tissue from these animals and approx. 2-3-fold greater than that found in mammary gland tissue of pregnant or lactating animals. Development studies revealed ceruloplasmin gene expression in male and female mammary gland by only 2 weeks of age, prior to the onset of puberty. Biosynthetic studies indicated that the ceruloplasmin mRNA in mammary gland tissue was translated into a 132 kDa protein qualitatively similar to that synthesized in liver. By in situ hybridization, ceruloplasmin gene expression was localized to the epithelium lining the mammary gland alveolar ducts, without evidence of expression in the surrounding mesenchyme. Ceruloplasmin gene expression was also detected in a human breast adenocarcinoma cell line and in biopsy tissue from women with invasive ductal carcinoma. Taken together, these data indicate that the mammary gland is a prominent site of extrahepatic ceruloplasmin gene expression and add to the evidence that ceruloplasmin biosynthesis is associated with growth and differentiation in non-hepatic tissues. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:1764031

  2. Sequencing the transcriptome of milk production: milk trumps mammary tissue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies of normal human mammary gland development and function have mostly relied on cell culture, limited surgical specimens, and rodent models. Although RNA extracted from human milk has been used to assay the mammary transcriptome non-invasively, this assay has not been adequately validated in primates. Thus, the objectives of the current study were to assess the suitability of lactating rhesus macaques as a model for lactating humans and to determine whether RNA extracted from milk fractions is representative of RNA extracted from mammary tissue for the purpose of studying the transcriptome of milk-producing cells. Results We confirmed that macaque milk contains cytoplasmic crescents and that ample high-quality RNA can be obtained for sequencing. Using RNA sequencing, RNA extracted from macaque milk fat and milk cell fractions more accurately represented RNA from mammary epithelial cells (cells that produce milk) than did RNA from whole mammary tissue. Mammary epithelium-specific transcripts were more abundant in macaque milk fat, whereas adipose or stroma-specific transcripts were more abundant in mammary tissue. Functional analyses confirmed the validity of milk as a source of RNA from milk-producing mammary epithelial cells. Conclusions RNA extracted from the milk fat during lactation accurately portrayed the RNA profile of milk-producing mammary epithelial cells in a non-human primate. However, this sample type clearly requires protocols that minimize RNA degradation. Overall, we validated the use of RNA extracted from human and macaque milk and provided evidence to support the use of lactating macaques as a model for human lactation. PMID:24330573

  3. Angiotensin converting enzyme from sheep mammary, lingual and other tissues.

    PubMed

    Rao, N Mallikarjuna; Udupa, E G Padmanabha

    2007-11-01

    Occurrence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in mammary gland and tongue taste epithelium was demonstrated for the first time. Six times higher ACE activity in lactating mammary gland, than non-lactating mammary gland, suggested pregnancy and lactation hormonal dependent expression of ACE in female mammals. ACE activity was highest in choroid plexus, less in spinal cord and moderate in cerebrum, medulla, cerebellum and pons. Distribution of ACE in different regions of skin, kidney and among other tissues was different. Presence of ACE in adrenal glands, pancreas, bone marrow and thyroid gland indicated functions other than blood pressure homeostasis for this enzyme.

  4. Notch in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Politi, Katerina; Feirt, Nikki; Kitajewski, Jan

    2004-10-01

    Notch signaling has been implicated in many processes including cell fate determination and oncogenesis. In mice, the Notch1 and Notch4 genes are both targets for insertion and rearrangement by the mouse mammary tumor virus and these mutations promote epithelial mammary tumorigenesis. Moreover, expression of a constitutively active form of Notch4 in mammary epithelial cells inhibits epithelial differentiation and leads to tumor formation in this organ. These data implicate the Notch pathway in breast tumorigenesis and provide the foundation for future experiments that will aid in our understanding of the role of Notch in human breast cancer development. Here, we review studies of mammary tumorigenesis induced by Notch in mouse and in vitro culture models providing evidence that Notch activation is a causal factor in human breast cancer.

  5. Developmental biology: cell fate in the mammary gland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most breast cancers have their origin in the luminal epithelial cells of the mammary gland. Defining how a master regulator controls the development of this cell lineage could provide important hints about why this should be. ...

  6. Mammary Stem Cell Research in Veterinary Science: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Borena, Bizunesh M.; Bussche, Leen; Burvenich, Christian; Duchateau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    The mammary gland is an organ with a remarkable regenerative capacity that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation, and involution. Growing evidence suggests that these changes are driven by the coordinated division and differentiation of mammary stem cell populations (MaSC). Whereas information regarding MaSC and their role in comparative mammary gland physiology is readily available in human and mice, such information remains scarce in most veterinary mammal species such as cows, horses, sheep, goats, pigs, and dogs. We believe that a better knowledge on the MaSC in these species will not only help to gain more insights into mammary gland (patho) physiology in veterinary medicine, but will also be of value for human medicine. Therefore, this review summarizes the current knowledge on stem cell isolation and characterization in different mammals of veterinary importance. PMID:23360296

  7. Vaginal myofibroblastoma with glands expressing mammary and prostatic antigens.

    PubMed

    Wallenfels, I; Chlumská, A

    2012-01-01

    A case of unusual vaginal myofibroblastoma containing glands which expressed mammary and prostatic markers is described. The tumor occurred in 70-year-old woman in the proximal third of the vagina. It showed morphology and immunophenotype typical of so-called cervicovaginal myofibroblastoma. The peripheral zone of the lesion contained a few groups of glands suggesting vaginal adenosis or prostatic-type glands on initial examination. The glands showed a surprising simultaneous expression of mammary markers mammaglobin and GCDFP-15 and prostatic markers prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP). Immunostains for alpha-smooth muscle actin, p63 and CD10 highlighted the myoepithelial cell layer of the glands. The finding indicates that simultaneous use of both mammary and prostatic markers for examination of unusual glandular lesions in the vulvovaginal location can be helpful for an exact diagnosis, and can contribute to better understanding of prostatic and mammary differentiations in the female lower genital tract.

  8. Lessons Learned from Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Jaquelin P.; Golovkina, Tatyana V.; Ross, Susan R.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), which was discovered as a milk-transmitted, infectious, cancer-inducing agent in the 1930s, has been used as an animal model for the study of retroviral infection and transmission, antiviral immune responses, and breast cancer and lymphoma biology. The main target cells for MMTV infection in vivo are cells of the immune system and mammary epithelial cells. Although the host mounts an immune response to the virus, MMTV has evolved multiple means of evading this response. MMTV causes mammary tumors when the provirus integrates into the mammary epithelial and lymphoid cell genome during viral replication and thereby activates cellular oncogene expression. Thus, tumor induction is a by-product of the infection cycle. A number of important oncogenes have been discovered by carrying out MMTV integration site analysis, some of which may play a role in human breast cancer. PMID:27034391

  9. Genes affected by mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviral insertions in mouse mammary tumors are deregulated or mutated in primary human mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Robert; Mudunuri, Uma; Bargo, Sharon; Raafat, Ahmed; McCurdy, David; Boulanger, Corinne; Lowther, William; Stephens, Robert; Luke, Brian T.; Stewart, Claudia; Wu, Xiaolin; Munroe, David; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of mutations is a contributing factor in the initiation of premalignant mammary lesions and their progression to malignancy and metastasis. We have used a mouse model in which the carcinogen is the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) which induces clonal premalignant mammary lesions and malignant mammary tumors by insertional mutagenesis. Identification of the genes and signaling pathways affected in MMTV-induced mouse mammary lesions provides a rationale for determining whether genetic alteration of the human orthologues of these genes/pathways may contribute to human breast carcinogenesis. A high-throughput platform for inverse PCR to identify MMTV-host junction fragments and their nucleotide sequences in a large panel of MMTV-induced lesions was developed. Validation of the genes affected by MMTV-insertion was carried out by microarray analysis. Common integration site (CIS) means that the gene was altered by an MMTV proviral insertion in at least two independent lesions arising in different hosts. Three of the new genes identified as CIS for MMTV were assayed for their capability to confer on HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cells the ability for invasion, anchorage independent growth and tumor development in nude mice. Analysis of MMTV induced mammary premalignant hyperplastic outgrowth (HOG) lines and mammary tumors led to the identification of CIS restricted to 35 loci. Within these loci members of the Wnt, Fgf and Rspo gene families plus two linked genes (Npm3 and Ddn) were frequently activated in tumors induced by MMTV. A second group of 15 CIS occur at a low frequency (2-5 observations) in mammary HOGs or tumors. In this latter group the expression of either Phf19 or Sdc2 was shown to increase HC11 cells invasion capability. Foxl1 expression conferred on HC11 cells the capability for anchorage-independent colony formation in soft agar and tumor development in nude mice. The published transcriptome and nucleotide sequence analysis of gene

  10. [Estrogen receptors and the mammary gland].

    PubMed

    Barrón, A; Bermejo, L; Castro, I

    1997-01-01

    For several decades it has been known that steroid hormones, estrogen and progesterone, regulate some genes involved in the growth, proliferation and differentiation of the mammary-gland in animals and humans. In the last years, the presence or absence of the nuclear estrogen receptor has been used by clinicians as a marker for tumor malignancy, as a prognostic index or as an important parameter for hormonal therapy with anti-estrogenic compounds of some hormone-dependent breast cancers. This review shows some advances in the knowledge of the structure, function, molecular mechanisms of estrogenic activity, and interaction with proteins like protooncogenes and growth factors. Also, we refer to the role of the estrogen receptor in the physiophatology of breast cancer.

  11. Milk protein concentrations in galactorrhoeic mammary secretions.

    PubMed

    Yap, P L; Pryde, E A; McClelland, D B

    1980-02-01

    Milk protein concentrations were determined either by double antibody radioimmunoassay (IgA) or single radial immunodiffusion (IgG, lactoferrin, lysozyme and albumin) in the mammayr secretions of one nulliparous and three parous female patients with galactorrhoea due to hyperprolactinaemia. Concentrations of all the proteins studied were found to be similar to the concentrations observed in post-partum colostrum. In particular, secretory IgA was the only form of IgA detected in galactorrhoeic secretions. It is suggested that hyperprolactinaemia alone can result in increased mammary synthesis of the milk proteins since the steroid changes associated with a full-term pregnancy and delivery of the placenta did not immediately precede the galactorrhoea in three of the four patients studied.

  12. Effect of Reproductive History on Mammary Epithelial Biology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-01

    Reproductive History on Mammary Epithelial Biology PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lewis A. Chodosh, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION : University of Pennsylvania...9348 Organization : University of Pennsylvania Those portions of the technical data contained in this report marked as limited rights data shall not...History on Mammary Epithelial DAMD17-99-1-9348 Biology 6. AUTHOR(S) Lewis A. Chodosh, M.D., Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8

  13. Genomic and Phenomic Study of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Shlomo E.; Heller, Elimelech D.; Sela, Shlomo; Elad, Daniel; Edery, Nir; Leitner, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a major etiological agent of intra-mammary infections (IMI) in cows, leading to acute mastitis and causing great economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Particular strains cause persistent IMI, leading to recurrent mastitis. Virulence factors of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) involved pathogenesis of mastitis as well as those differentiating strains causing acute or persistent mastitis are largely unknown. This study aimed to identify virulence markers in MPEC through whole genome and phenome comparative analysis. MPEC strains causing acute (VL2874 and P4) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis were compared to an environmental strain (K71) and to the genomes of strains representing different E. coli pathotypes. Intra-mammary challenge in mice confirmed experimentally that the strains studied here have different pathogenic potential, and that the environmental strain K71 is non-pathogenic in the mammary gland. Analysis of whole genome sequences and predicted proteomes revealed high similarity among MPEC, whereas MPEC significantly differed from the non-mammary pathogenic strain K71, and from E. coli genomes from other pathotypes. Functional features identified in MPEC genomes and lacking in the non-mammary pathogenic strain were associated with synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and other membrane antigens, ferric-dicitrate iron acquisition and sugars metabolism. Features associated with cytotoxicity or intra-cellular survival were found specifically in the genomes of strains from severe and acute (VL2874) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis, respectively. MPEC genomes were relatively similar to strain K-12, which was subsequently shown here to be possibly pathogenic in the mammary gland. Phenome analysis showed that the persistent MPEC was the most versatile in terms of nutrients metabolized and acute MPEC the least. Among phenotypes unique to MPEC compared to the non-mammary pathogenic strain were uric acid and D-serine metabolism. This study

  14. Role of p53 Mammary Epithelial Cell Senescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    susceptibility to oncogenesis exist in the normal mammary tissue, the milk -forming ducts of the mammary gland (for review [2]). Coupled with information...HMECs [25]. proportion of preselection HMECs [8]. The senescence associated with the ’selection’ phase in Human milk is an easily available source of...which has precluded their detailed biochemical proliferation at this stage is dependent on the pRb/p16 study [2,18]. Most of the work on milk cells has

  15. Hippo pathway in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Peiguo; Feng, Jing; Chen, Ceshi

    2015-01-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that the Hippo signaling pathway plays crucial roles in mammary gland development and breast cancer. Key components of the Hippo pathway regulate breast epithelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and stemness. Additionally, the Hippo pathway regulates breast tumor growth, metastasis, and drug resistance. It is expected that the Hippo pathway will provide novel therapeutic targets for breast cancer. This review will discuss and summarize the roles of several core components of the Hippo pathway in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

  16. Mechanism of Environmental Carcinogen-Induced Mammary Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012. 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) Environmental pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons ( PAH ) are believed to...of treatment of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), a member of the PAH family. Estrogen is indispensable for the DMBA-mediated mammary...tumorigenesis. We hypothesize that DMBA-mediated rat mammary tumorigenesis involves in the activation of protooncogene Mdm2 which in turn negatively regulates

  17. Inoculation of culture plates: straightforward or is it?

    PubMed

    Carlin, E M; Hammond, J A; Boag, F C

    1997-04-01

    In view of the recent vogue in some genitourinary medicine (GUM) units towards selective microscopy we aimed to assess the adequacy of culture plate inoculation in our own GUM clinic by the visual examination of 350 consecutively inoculated plates. Seventy-five (21%) plates were inoculated so lightly that no indentation in the agar could be seen whilst in 20 (60%) the agar was shredded. Eighty-five per cent of inadequately plated samples were inoculated by the same staff members who were either relatively inexperienced, or well-distanced from their last in-service training. This has many important implications not only in the identification and control of infection but also with respect to staff training. We have now introduced practical plating instruction for all new members of clinical staff and additional in-service training. We plan to repeat the audit in 6 months' time to assess the effect of these changes.

  18. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1991-05-31

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. During the end of the last grant year and the first half of the current grant year, we have completed analyses and summarized for publication: investigations on the relationship between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamicpituitary axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH- (thyrotropin-) responsive sub-population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and the results of the large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. We are testing new techniques for the culture, cytofluorescent analysis and characterization mammary epithelial cells and of clonogens in a parallel project, and plan to apply similar technology to the thyroid epithelial cells and clonogen population. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cells interactions during the neoplastic process.

  19. Chemoprevention of Radiation Induced Rat Mammary Neoplasms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huso, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiations encountered in space include protons and heavy ions such as iron as well as their secondaries. The relative biological effect (RBE) of these ions is not known, particularly at the doses and dose-rates expected for planetary missions. Neutrons, are not particularly relevant to space travel, but have been found experimentally to have an increase in their RBE with decreasing dose. If a similar trend of increasing RBE with decreasing dose is present for heavy ions and protons during irradiation in space, the small doses received during space travel could potentially have substantial carcinogenic risk. Clearly more investigation of the effects of heavy ions and protons is needed before accurate risk assessment for prolonged travel in space can be done. One means to mitigate the increased risk of cancer due to radiation exposure in space is by developing effective countermeasures that can reduce the incidence of tumor development. Tamoxifen has recently been shown to be an effective chemopreventive agent in both animal models and humans for the prevention of mammary tumors. Tamoxifen is a unique drug, with a highly specific mechanism of action affecting a specific radiation-sensitive population of epithelial cells in the mammary gland. In human studies, the annual incidence of a primary tumor in the contralateral breast of women with previous breast cancer is about 8 per 1000, making them an exceedingly high-risk group for the development of breast cancer. In this high risk group, treated with tamoxifen, daily, for 2 years, the incidence of a new primary tumor in the contralateral breast was approximately one third of that noted in the non-tamoxifen treatment group. Tamoxifen antagonizes the action of estrogen by competing for the nuclear receptor complex thereby altering the association of the receptor complex and nuclear binding sites. Its effects in reducing the development of breast cancer could be accomplished by controlling clinically undetectable

  20. Attenuation of TGF-β signaling supports tumor progression of a mesenchymal-like mammary tumor cell line in a syngeneic murine model

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Tanuka; Gu, Xiang; Yang, Junhua; Ellies, Lesley G; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that TGF-β functions as a tumor promoter in metastatic, mesenchymal-like breast cancer cells and that TGF-β inhibitors can effectively abrogate tumor progression in several of these models. Here we report a novel observation with the use of genetic and pharmacological approaches, and murine mammary cell injection models in both syngeneic and immune compromised mice. We found that TGF-β receptor II (TβRII) knockdown in the MMTV-PyMT derived Py8119, a mesenchymal-like murine mammary tumor cell line, resulted in increased orthotopic tumor growth potential in a syngeneic background and a similar trend in an immune compromised background. Systemic treatment with a small-molecule TGF-β receptor I kinase inhibitor induced a trend towards increased metastatic colonization of distant organs following intra cardiac inoculation of Py8119 cells, with little effect on the colonization of luminal-like Py230 cells, also derived from MMTV-PyMT tumors. Taken together, our data suggest that the attenuation of TGF-β signaling in mesenchymal-like mammary tumors does not necessarily inhibit their malignant potential, and anti-TGF-β therapeutic intervention requires greater precision in identifying molecular markers in tumors with an indication of functional TGF-β signaling. PMID:24368187

  1. Mammary gene expression profiles during an intramammary challenge reveal potential mechanisms linking negative energy balance with impaired immune response

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, Kasey M.; Drackley, James K.; Morin, Dawn E.; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.; Everts, Robin E.; Lewin, Harris A.

    2010-01-01

    Our objective was to compare mammary tissue gene expression profiles during a Streptococcus uberis (S. uberis) mastitis challenge between lactating cows subjected to dietary-induced negative energy balance (NEB; n = 5) and cows fed ad libitum to maintain positive energy balance (PEB; n = 5) to better understand the mechanisms associated with NEB and risk of mastitis during the transition period. The NEB cows were feed-restricted to 60% of calculated net energy for lactation requirements for 7 days, and cows assigned to PEB were fed the same diet for ad libitum intake. Five days after feed restriction, one rear mammary quarter of each cow was inoculated with 5,000 cfu of S. uberis (O140J). At 20 h postinoculation, S. uberis-infected mammary quarters from all cows were biopsied for RNA extraction. Negative energy balance resulted in 287 differentially expressed genes (DEG; false discovery rate ≤ 0.05), with 86 DEG upregulated and 201 DEG downregulated in NEB vs. PEB. Canonical pathways most affected by NEB were IL-8 signaling (10 genes), glucocorticoid receptor signaling (13), and NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response (10). Among the genes differentially expressed by NEB, cell growth and proliferation (48) and cellular development (36) were the most enriched functions. Regarding immune response, HLA-A was upregulated due to NEB, whereas the majority of genes involved in immune response were downregulated (e.g., AKT1, IRAK1, MAPK9, and TRAF6). This study provided new avenues for investigation into the mechanisms relating NEB and susceptibility to mastitis in lactating dairy cows. PMID:20103698

  2. Mammary gene expression profiles during an intramammary challenge reveal potential mechanisms linking negative energy balance with impaired immune response.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Kasey M; Drackley, James K; Morin, Dawn E; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Everts, Robin E; Lewin, Harris A; Loor, Juan J

    2010-04-01

    Our objective was to compare mammary tissue gene expression profiles during a Streptococcus uberis (S. uberis) mastitis challenge between lactating cows subjected to dietary-induced negative energy balance (NEB; n = 5) and cows fed ad libitum to maintain positive energy balance (PEB; n = 5) to better understand the mechanisms associated with NEB and risk of mastitis during the transition period. The NEB cows were feed-restricted to 60% of calculated net energy for lactation requirements for 7 days, and cows assigned to PEB were fed the same diet for ad libitum intake. Five days after feed restriction, one rear mammary quarter of each cow was inoculated with 5,000 cfu of S. uberis (O140J). At 20 h postinoculation, S. uberis-infected mammary quarters from all cows were biopsied for RNA extraction. Negative energy balance resulted in 287 differentially expressed genes (DEG; false discovery rate ≤ 0.05), with 86 DEG upregulated and 201 DEG downregulated in NEB vs. PEB. Canonical pathways most affected by NEB were IL-8 signaling (10 genes), glucocorticoid receptor signaling (13), and NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response (10). Among the genes differentially expressed by NEB, cell growth and proliferation (48) and cellular development (36) were the most enriched functions. Regarding immune response, HLA-A was upregulated due to NEB, whereas the majority of genes involved in immune response were downregulated (e.g., AKT1, IRAK1, MAPK9, and TRAF6). This study provided new avenues for investigation into the mechanisms relating NEB and susceptibility to mastitis in lactating dairy cows.

  3. Establishment and characterization of mouse mammary carcinoma cell lines expressing RET with a multiple endocrine neoplasia 2A mutation.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kumi; Jijiwa, Mayumi; Shimono, Yohei; Kurokawa, Kei; Murakumo, Yoshiki; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2003-11-01

    We recently generated transgenic mice expressing the RET proto-oncogene with a multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A mutation (RET-MEN2A). Mammary tumors with frequent lung metastasis were developed in 22% of female transgenic mice in a stochastic fashion. In the current study, we established two cell lines (named MKK-f and MKK-s) from mammary tumors developed in RET-MEN2A transgenic mice. MKK-f and MKK-s were derived from well-differentiated ductal carcinoma and sarcomatous spindle cell carcinoma, respectively. MKK-f cells show epithelial-like morphology with a doubling time of 19 h, and MKK-s cells show spindle-shaped morphology with a doubling time of 15 h. When inoculated in immunodeficient mice, both cell lines were tumorigenic, metastasized to the lung and displayed histological features similar to those of the primary tumors. They maintained a high level of RET expression and activation of signaling molecules downstream of RET. Consistent with the histological phenotype, expression of E-cadherin was almost undetectable in MKK-s cells, whereas its expression was very high in MKK-f cells. When the difference of gene expression between the two cell lines was analyzed using cDNA microarrays including approximately 900 genes/ESTs, a total of 21 up- or down-regulated (> 2.0-fold) genes were identified. Differentially regulated genes included thymosin beta-10, fibroblast growth factor receptor 4, aldo-keto reductase and caspase 6 genes, which are known to be associated with tumor development and progression. These results may reflect the profiles of the transcriptional changes associated with dedifferentiation or progression of mammary carcinomas developed in genetically engineered mice.

  4. Inoculant effects on alfalfa silage: fermentation products and nutritive value.

    PubMed

    Filya, I; Muck, R E; Contreras-Govea, F E

    2007-11-01

    The effect of 14 microbial inoculants on the fermentation and nutritive value of alfalfa silages was studied under laboratory conditions. The first cut (477 g of dry matter/kg) and second cut (393 g of dry matter/kg) of a second-year alfalfa stand were ensiled in 2 trials. In both trials alfalfa was harvested with standard field equipment. All inoculants were applied at 1.0 x 10(6) cfu/g of crop. Uninoculated silages served as controls. After inoculants were added, the chopped forages were ensiled in 1.0- and 0.5-L anaerobic glass jars, respectively, at a density of 500 g/L. Each trial had 15 treatments (uninoculated control and 14 inoculants), with 4 silos per treatment. Silos were stored for a minimum of 30 d at room temperature (approximately 22 degrees C). In first-cut silage, all inoculants but one reduced pH relative to the uninoculated control, and all but 2 of the homofermentative strains shifted fermentation toward lactic acid. In second-cut silage, the epiphytic lactic acid bacterial population was 2.7 x 10(7) cfu/g, and only commercial inoculants produced significant shifts in fermentation. Overall, microbial inoculants generally had a positive effect on alfalfa silage characteristics in terms of lower pH and shifting fermentation toward lactic acid with homofermentative lactic acid bacteria or toward acetic acid with heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus buchneri. These effects were stronger in the commercial products tested. In spite of the positive effects on silage fermentation, 48-h in vitro true DM digestibility was not improved by inoculation with lactic acid bacteria.

  5. Production of huitlacoche, Ustilago maydis: timing inoculation and controlling pollination.

    PubMed

    Pataky, Jerald K; Chandler, Michael A

    2003-01-01

    Huitlacoche is the name given to young, fleshy, edible galls that form when ears of Zea mays are infected by Ustilago maydis. Huitlacoche is processed and sold fresh at markets in Mexico. Interest has increased recently in producing U. maydis as a specialty mushroom in the United States. Silk-channel inoculation methods developed to evaluate common smut resistance in maize can be used to produce huitlacoche commercially. This research assessed the effects of time of inoculation and preventing pollination on the severity of ear galls and yield of huitlacoche produced by inoculating silks with U. maydis. Yield of huitlacoche and severity of ear galls were closely related, as was evident from highly significant linear or curvilinear regressions. Severity and yield were greatest when ears were inoculated 4-8 d after the mid-silk growth stage. Ear galls were 5-15% more severe and yield of huitlacoche was 18-150% greater on ears that were not pollinated, compared to those that were pollinated. Maximum yield of huitlacoche was 131 g ear(-1) from unpollinated male-sterile field corn inoculated 6 d after the mid-silk growth stage and 92 g ear(-1) from detasseled sweet corn inoculated 6 d after mid-silk. About 25% of the total weight of ears consisted of marketable huitlacoche when yields were highest. Quality of huitlacoche was not affected by time of inoculation or pollination treatments, but quality of huitlacoche harvested 12-14 d after inoculation was unacceptable primarily due to lack of teliospores, which affected color and flavor.

  6. Soy isoflavones increase latency of spontaneous mammary tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zeming; MacDonald, Ruth S

    2002-10-01

    Soy protein, with and without isoflavones, is being added to foods by manufacturers in response to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved health claim for cardiovascular protection. Furthermore, soy isoflavones are increasingly consumed by women in the United States as an alternative to hormone replacement therapy. The role of these phytoestrogens in breast cancer is controversial. Although exposure of rodents to soy isoflavones during the perinatal period appears to reduce mammary cancer formation, exposure in utero or during adulthood may increase tumor growth. The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-neu mouse spontaneously develops mammary tumors due to overexpression of the ErbB-2/neu/HER2 oncogene. This model is comparable with human breast cancer because overexpression of the neu oncogene occurs in 20-40% of human breast cancers. We fed MMTV-neu mice AIN-93G diets containing no isoflavones, 250 mg/kg genistein, 250 mg/kg daidzein or an isoflavone mixture (NovaSoy, equivalent to 250 mg genistein/kg) from 7 wk of age. Mammary tumor latency was significantly delayed in mice fed isoflavones compared with the control. Once tumors formed, however, the isoflavones did not reduce the number or size of tumors such that at 34 wk of age there were no differences in tumor burden among the treatment groups. Hence, in the MMTV-neu mouse, soy isoflavones delayed mammary tumorigenesis. Further studies are warranted to define the cellular mechanisms through which these compounds affect mammary tumorigenesis in this model.

  7. Immunohistochemical characterization of mammary squamous cell carcinoma of the dog.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Francesco; Sarli, Giuseppe; Brunetti, Barbara; Morandi, Federico; Benazzi, Cinzia

    2008-11-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the mammary gland is rare in both veterinary and human medicine. Whereas human metaplastic and squamous variants are known, the objectives of the current study were to ascertain the presence of such entities in canine mammary tumors and to distinguish them from other (epidermal, sweat gland) squamous tumors that may develop in the same area. A panel of antibodies (anti-cytokeratin [CK] 19, CK 14, CK 5/6, pancytokeratin, and vimentin) was used on 18 mammary gland malignancies with squamous features and 16 malignant skin tumors (11 squamous cell carcinomas of the skin and 5 sweat glands). Fifteen of the 18 mammary carcinomas were classified as metaplastic carcinomas, and the remaining 3 were classified as squamous cell carcinomas. The 2 most useful markers to establish the histogenesis of mammary tumors were pancytokeratin and CK 19. All other antibodies were equally expressed (CK 14 and 5/6) in all histotypes. The antibody panel discriminated primary epidermal squamous tumors (pancytokeratin positive and CK 19 negative) from gland-derived squamous neoplasms (pancytokeratin positive and CK 19 positive) but failed to distinguish primary mammary tumors from other squamous tumors of glandular origin.

  8. Mammary hypoplasia: not every breast can produce sufficient milk.

    PubMed

    Arbour, Megan W; Kessler, Julia Lange

    2013-01-01

    Breast milk is considered the optimal form of nutrition for newborn infants. Current recommendations are to breastfeed for 6 months. Not all women are able to breastfeed. Mammary hypoplasia is a primary cause of failed lactogenesis II, whereby the mother is unable to produce an adequate milk volume. Women with mammary hypoplasia often have normal hormone levels and innervation but lack sufficient glandular tissue to produce an adequate milk supply to sustain their infant. The etiology of this rare condition is unclear, although there are theories that refer to genetic predisposition and estrogenic environmental exposures in select agricultural environments. Women with mammary hypoplasia may not exhibit the typical breast changes associated with pregnancy and may fail to lactate postpartum. Breasts of women with mammary hypoplasia may be widely spaced (1.5 inches or greater), asymmetric, or tuberous in nature. Awareness of the history and clinical signs of mammary hypoplasia during the prenatal period and immediate postpartum increases the likelihood that women will receive the needed education and physical and emotional support and encouragement. Several medications and herbs demonstrate some efficacy in increasing breast milk production in women with mammary hypoplasia.

  9. Mast cells in canine cutaneous hemangioma, hemangiosarcoma and mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Woldemeskel, Moges; Rajeev, Sreekumari

    2010-02-01

    Mast cell count (MCC) in 45 dogs with cutaneous hemangioma (HA, n = 12), hemangiosarcoma (HSA, n = 12), mammary adenoma (AD, n = 9) and mammary adenocarcinoma (AC, n = 12) was made using Toluidine blue stained sections. Antibodies against endothelial cell markers, Factor VIII and VEGF were used to visualize and determine the hot spot micro-vessel density (MVD). Total MCC and MCC along the invasive edges were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in canine mammary AC than in AD. The total MCC did not significantly differ (p > 0.05), in HSAs (8.6 +/- 3.3) than in HAs (5.5 +/- 2.8). There is a positive correlation (r = 0.14) between the hot spot MCC and MVD in mammary AC, although not significant (p = 0.3172), indicating that mast cells are associated with angiogenesis in canine mammary AC. This study suggests that mast cells may play an important role in neovascularization of canine cutaneous vascular and mammary neoplasms. Detailed studies encompassing correlation of MCC and MVD with clinical outcomes and prognosis in these neoplasms are recommended.

  10. The role of tight junctions in mammary gland function.

    PubMed

    Stelwagen, Kerst; Singh, Kuljeet

    2014-03-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) are cellular structures that facilitate cell-cell communication and are important in maintaining the three-dimensional structure of epithelia. It is only during the last two decades that the molecular make-up of TJ is becoming unravelled, with two major transmembrane-spanning structural protein families, called occludin and claudins, being the true constituents of the TJ. These TJ proteins are linked via specific scaffolding proteins to the cell's cytoskeleton. In the mammary gland TJ between adjacent secretory epithelial cells are formed during lactogenesis and are instrumental in establishing and maintaining milk synthesis and secretion, whereas TJ integrity is compromised during mammary involution and also as result of mastitis and periods of mammary inflamation (including mastitis). They prevent the paracellular transport of ions and small molecules between the blood and milk compartments. Formation of intact TJ at the start of lactation is important for the establishment of the lactation. Conversely, loss of TJ integrity has been linked to reduced milk secretion and mammary function and increased paracellular transport of blood components into the milk and vice versa. In addition to acting as a paracellular barrier, the TJ is increasingly linked to playing an active role in intracellular signalling. This review focusses on the role of TJ in mammary function of the normal, non-malignant mammary gland, predominantly in ruminants, the major dairy producing species.

  11. Technical note: Isolation and characterization of porcine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dahanayaka, S; Rezaei, R; Porter, W W; Johnson, G A; Burghardt, R C; Bazer, F W; Hou, Y Q; Wu, Z L; Wu, G

    2015-11-01

    Within the mammary gland, functional synthesis of milk is performed by its epithelial (alveolar) cells. The availability of a stable mammary epithelial cell line is essential for biochemical studies to elucidate cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for nutritional regulation of lactation. Therefore, porcine mammary epithelial cells (PMEC) were isolated from mammary glands of a 9-mo-old nonpregnant and nonlactating gilt and cultured to establish a nonimmortalized cell line. These cells were characterized by expression of cytokeratin-18 (an intermediate filament specific for epithelial cells), β-casein (a specific marker for mammary epithelial cells), and α-lactalbumin. In culture, the PMEC doubled in number every 24 h and maintained a cobblestone morphology, typical for cultured epithelial cells, for at least 15 passages. Addition of 0.2 to 2 μg/mL prolactin to culture medium for 3 d induced the production of β-casein and α-lactalbumin by PMEC in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we have successfully developed a useful PMEC line for future studies of cellular and molecular regulation of milk synthesis by mammary epithelial cells of the sow.

  12. Exploitation of genetically modified inoculants for industrial ecology applications.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, John P; Walsh, Ultan F; O'Donnell, Anne; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; O'Gara, Fergal

    2002-08-01

    The major growth seen in the biotechnology industry in recent decades has largely been driven by the exploitation of genetic engineering techniques. The initial benefits have been predominantly in the biomedical area, with products such as vaccines and hormones that have received broad public approval. In the environmental biotechnology and industrial ecology sectors, biotechnology has the potential to make significant advances through the use of genetically modified (GM) microbial inoculants that can reduce agri-chemical usage or remediate polluted environments. Although many GM inoculants have been developed and tested under laboratory conditions, commercial exploitation has lagged behind. Here, we review scientific and regulatory requirements that must be satisfied as part of that exploitation process. Particular attention is paid to new European Union (EU) regulations (Directives) that govern the testing and release of genetically modified organisms and microbial plant protection inoculants in the EU. With regard to the release of GM inoculants, the impact of the inoculant and the fate of modified genes are important concerns. Long term monitoring of release sites is necessary to address these issues. Data are reported from the monitoring of a site 6 years after release of GM Sinorhizobium meliloti strains. It was found that despite the absence of a host plant, the GM strains persisted in the soil for at least 6 years. Horizontal transfer and microevolution of a GM plasmid between S. meliloti strains was also observed. These data illustrate the importance of assessing the long-term persistence of GM inoculants.

  13. Endogenous Methyl Salicylate in Pathogen-Inoculated Tobacco Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Seskar, Mirjana; Shulaev, Vladimir; Raskin, Ilya

    1998-01-01

    The tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cultivar Xanthi-nc (genotype NN) produces high levels of salicylic acid (SA) after inoculation with the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Gaseous methyl salicylate (MeSA), a major volatile produced in TMV-inoculated tobacco plants, was recently shown to be an airborne defense signal. Using an assay developed to measure the MeSA present in tissue, we have shown that in TMV-inoculated tobacco plants the level of MeSA increases dramatically, paralleling increases in SA. MeSA accumulation was also observed in upper, noninoculated leaves. In TMV-inoculated tobacco shifted from 32 to 24°C, the MeSA concentration increased from nondetectable levels to 2318 ng/g fresh weight 12 h after the temperature shift, but subsequently decreased with the onset of the hypersensitive response. Similar results were observed in plants inoculated with Pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola, in which MeSA levels were highest just before the hypersensitive response-induced tissue desiccation. Transgenic NahG plants unable to accumulate SA also did not accumulate MeSA after TMV inoculation, and did not show increased resistance to TMV following MeSA treatment. Based on the spatial and temporal kinetics of its accumulation, we conclude that tissue MeSA may play a role similar to that of volatile MeSA in the pathogen-induced defense response.

  14. Mammary sensitivity to protein restriction and re-alimentation.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, M G; Jessop, N S; Oldham, J D

    1996-09-01

    The present study tested the influence of protein undernutrition and re-alimentation on mammary gland size and secretory cell activity in lactating rats. During gestation, female Sprague-Dawley rats were offered a high-protein diet (215 g crude protein (N x 6.25; CP)/kg DM; H); litters were standardized to twelve pups at parturition. During lactation, two diets were offered ad libitum, diet H and a low-protein diet (90 g CP/kg DM; L). Lactational dietary treatments were the supply ad libitum of either diet H (HHH) or diet L (LLL) for the first 12 d of lactation, or diet L transferring to diet H on either day 6 (LHH) or 9 (LLH) of lactation. On days 1, 6, 9 and 12 of lactation, rats from each group (n > or = 6) were used to estimate mammary dry mass, fat, protein, DNA and RNA; the activities of lactose synthetase (EC 2.4.1.22) enzyme and Na+,K(+)-ATPase (EC 3.6.1.37) were also measured. Rats offered a diet considered protein sufficient (H) from day 1 of lactation showed a decrease in mammary dry mass and fat but an increase in DNA, RNA and protein on day 6, after which there was no further change, except for mammary protein which continued to increase. However, rats offered diet L showed a steady loss in mammary mass and fat throughout the 12 d lactation period and no change in mammary DNA, RNA or protein. Rats previously protein restricted for either the first 6 or 9 d of lactation had their mammary dry mass and mammary fat loss halted and showed a rapid increase in mammary DNA, RNA and protein on re-alimentation. Lactose production in group HHH, as measured by lactose synthetase activity, was similar on days 1 and 6 of lactation, after which a significant increase was seen. Protein-restricted rats showed no change in lactose synthetase activity during the 12 d experimental period. Changing from diet L to diet H led to a significant increase in lactose synthetase activity to levels comparable with those offered diet H from day 1. These results show that rats

  15. Social isolation induces autophagy in the mouse mammary gland: link to increased mammary cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Sumis, Allison; Cook, Katherine L; Andrade, Fabia O; Hu, Rong; Kidney, Emma; Zhang, Xiyuan; Kim, Dominic; Carney, Elissa; Nguyen, Nguyen; Yu, Wei; Bouker, Kerrie B; Cruz, Idalia; Clarke, Robert; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena

    2016-10-01

    Social isolation is a strong predictor of early all-cause mortality and consistently increases breast cancer risk in both women and animal models. Because social isolation increases body weight, we compared its effects to those caused by a consumption of obesity-inducing diet (OID) in C57BL/6 mice. Social isolation and OID impaired insulin and glucose sensitivity. In socially isolated, OID-fed mice (I-OID), insulin resistance was linked to reduced Pparg expression and increased neuropeptide Y levels, but in group-housed OID fed mice (G-OID), it was linked to increased leptin and reduced adiponectin levels, indicating that the pathways leading to insulin resistance are different. Carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis was significantly higher in I-OID mice than in the other groups, but cancer risk was also increased in socially isolated, control diet-fed mice (I-C) and G-OID mice compared with that in controls. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling (GRP78; IRE1) was upregulated in the mammary glands of OID-fed mice, but not in control diet-fed, socially isolated I-C mice. In contrast, expression of BECLIN1, ATG7 and LC3II were increased, and p62 was downregulated by social isolation, indicating increased autophagy. In the mammary glands of socially isolated mice, but not in G-OID mice, mRNA expressions of p53 and the p53-regulated autophagy inducer Dram1 were upregulated, and nuclear p53 staining was strong. Our findings further indicated that autophagy and tumorigenesis were not increased in Atg7(+/-) mice kept in social isolation and fed OID. Thus, social isolation may increase breast cancer risk by inducing autophagy, independent of changes in body weight.

  16. Specific posttranslational modification regulates early events in mammary carcinoma formation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hua-Bei; Johnson, Heather; Randolph, Matthew; Nagy, Tamas; Blalock, Ryan; Pierce, Michael

    2010-12-07

    The expression of an enzyme, GnT-V, that catalyzes a specific posttranslational modification of a family of glycoproteins, namely a branched N-glycan, is transcriptionally up-regulated during breast carcinoma oncogenesis. To determine the molecular basis of how early events in breast carcinoma formation are regulated by GnT-V, we studied both the early stages of mammary tumor formation by using 3D cell culture and a her-2 transgenic mouse mammary tumor model. Overexpression of GnT-V in MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells in 3D culture disrupted acinar morphogenesis with impaired hollow lumen formation, an early characteristic of mammary neoplastic transformation. The disrupted acinar morphogenesis of mammary tumor cells in 3D culture caused by her-2 expression was reversed in tumors that lacked GnT-V expression. Moreover, her-2-induced mammary tumor onset was significantly delayed in the GnT-V null tumors, evidence that the lack of the posttranslational modification catalyzed by GnT-V attenuated tumor formation. Inhibited activation of both PKB and ERK signaling pathways was observed in GnT-V null tumor cells. The proportion of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in the mammary tumors from GnT-V null mice was significantly reduced compared with controls, and GnT-V null TICs displayed a reduced ability to form secondary tumors in NOD/SCID mice. These results demonstrate that GnT-V expression and its branched glycan products effectively modulate her-2-mediated signaling pathways that, in turn, regulate the relative proportion of tumor initiating cells and the latency of her-2-driven tumor onset.

  17. Neuropilin-2 promotes branching morphogenesis in the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Bae, Donggoo; Pursell, Bryan; Gouvin, Lindsey M; Lu, Shaolei; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2011-07-01

    Although the neuropilins were characterized as semaphorin receptors that regulate axon guidance, they also function as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors and contribute to the development of other tissues. Here, we assessed the role of NRP2 in mouse mammary gland development based on our observation that NRP2 is expressed preferentially in the terminal end buds of developing glands. A floxed NRP2 mouse was bred with an MMTV-Cre strain to generate a mammary gland-specific knockout of NRP2. MMTV-Cre;NRP2(loxP/loxP) mice exhibited significant defects in branching morphogenesis and ductal outgrowth compared with either littermate MMTV-Cre;NRP2(+/loxP) or MMTV-Cre mice. Mechanistic insight into this morphological defect was obtained from a mouse mammary cell line in which we observed that VEGF(165), an NRP2 ligand, induces branching morphogenesis in 3D cultures and that branching is dependent upon NRP2 as shown using shRNAs and a function-blocking antibody. Epithelial cells in the mouse mammary gland express VEGF, supporting the hypothesis that this NRP2 ligand contributes to mammary gland morphogenesis. Importantly, we demonstrate that VEGF and NRP2 activate focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and promote FAK-dependent branching morphogenesis in vitro. The significance of this mechanism is substantiated by our finding that FAK activation is diminished significantly in developing MMTV-Cre;NRP2(loxP/loxP) mammary glands compared with control glands. Together, our data reveal a VEGF/NRP2/FAK signaling axis that is important for branching morphogenesis and mammary gland development. In a broader context, our data support an emerging hypothesis that directional outgrowth and branching morphogenesis in a variety of tissues are influenced by signals that were identified initially for their role in axon guidance.

  18. Endocrine-active chemicals in mammary cancer causation and prevention.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Sarah; Betancourt, Angela M; Wang, Jun; Lamartiniere, Coral A

    2012-04-01

    Endocrine-active chemicals alter or mimic physiological hormones. These compounds are reported to originate from a wide variety of sources, and recent studies have shown widespread human exposure to several of these compounds. Given the role of the sex steroid hormone, estradiol, in human breast cancer causation, endocrine-active chemicals which interfere with estrogen signaling constitute one potential factor contributing to the high incidence of breast cancer. Thus, the aim of this review is to examine several common endocrine-active chemicals and their respective roles in breast cancer causation or prevention. The plastic component, bisphenol A (BPA), the synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), the by-product of organic combustion, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the soy component, genistein, and the red grape phytoalexin, resveratrol, have some degree of structural similarities to each other and estradiol. However, despite these structural similarities, the in vitro and in vivo properties of each of these chemicals vary greatly in terms of breast cancer causation and prevention. Early life exposure to BPA and DES increases rodent susceptibility to chemically induced mammary carcinogenesis, presumably through retardation of normal mammary gland maturation and/or disrupting the ratio of cell proliferation and apoptosis in the mammary gland. On the other hand, early exposures to genistein and resveratrol protect rodents against chemically induced and spontaneous mammary cancers. This is reported to occur through the ability of genistein and resveratrol to accelerate mammary gland maturation. Interestingly, TCDD, which is the most structurally dissimilar to the above chemicals and functions as an anti-estrogen, also increases chemically induced mammary carcinogenesis through retardation of mammary gland maturation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Endocrine disruptors'.

  19. Differential transformation of mammary epithelial cells by Wnt genes.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, G T; Gavin, B J; McMahon, A P

    1994-01-01

    The mouse Wnt family includes at least 10 genes that encode structurally related secreted glycoproteins. Wnt-1 and Wnt-3 were originally identified as oncogenes activated by the insertion of mouse mammary tumor virus in virus-induced mammary adenocarcinomas, although they are not expressed in the normal mammary gland. However, five other Wnt genes are differentially expressed during development of adult mammary tissue, suggesting that they may play distinct roles in various phases of mammary gland growth and development. Induction of transformation by Wnt-1 and Wnt-3 may be due to interference with these normal regulatory events; however, there is no direct evidence for this hypothesis. We have tested Wnt family members for the ability to induce transformation of cultured mammary cells. The results demonstrate that the Wnt gene family can be divided into three groups depending on their ability to induce morphological transformation and altered growth characteristics of the C57MG mammary epithelial cell line. Wnt-1, Wnt-3A, and Wnt-7A were highly transforming and induced colonies which formed and shed balls of cells. Wnt-2, Wnt-5B, and Wnt-7B also induced transformation but with a lower frequency and an apparent decrease in saturation density. In contrast, Wnt-6 and two other family members which are normally expressed in C57MG cells, Wnt-4 and Wnt-5A, failed to induce transformation. These data demonstrate that the Wnt genes have distinct effects on cell growth and should not be regarded as functionally equivalent. Images PMID:8065359

  20. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 disrupts mammary acinar architecture and initiates malignant transformation of mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Jessica L. F.; Shah, Raj; La Cava, Stephanie; Dolfi, Sonia C.; Mehta, Madhura S.; Kongara, Sameera; Price, Sandy; Ganesan, Shridar; Reuhl, Kenneth R.; Hirshfield, Kim M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1/Grm1) is a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, which was once thought to only participate in synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability, but has more recently been implicated in non-neuronal tissue functions. We previously described the oncogenic properties of Grm1 in cultured melanocytes in vitro and in spontaneous melanoma development with 100 % penetrance in vivo. Aberrant mGluR1 expression was detected in 60–80 % of human melanoma cell lines and biopsy samples. As most human cancers are of epithelial origin, we utilized immortalized mouse mammary epithelial cells (iMMECs) as a model system to study the transformative properties of Grm1. We introduced Grm1 into iMMECs and isolated several stable mGluR1-expressing clones. Phenotypic alterations in mammary acinar architecture were assessed using three-dimensional morphogenesis assays. We found that mGluR1-expressing iMMECs exhibited delayed lumen formation in association with decreased central acinar cell death, disrupted cell polarity, and a dramatic increase in the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Orthotopic implantation of mGluR1-expressing iMMEC clones into mammary fat pads of immunodeficient nude mice resulted in mammary tumor formation in vivo. Persistent mGluR1 expression was required for the maintenance of the tumorigenic phenotypes in vitro and in vivo, as demonstrated by an inducible Grm1-silencing RNA system. Furthermore, mGluR1 was found be expressed in human breast cancer cell lines and breast tumor biopsies. Elevated levels of extracellular glutamate were observed in mGluR1-expressing breast cancer cell lines and concurrent treatment of MCF7 xenografts with glutamate release inhibitor, riluzole, and an AKT inhibitor led to suppression of tumor progression. Our results are likely relevant to human breast cancer, highlighting a putative role of mGluR1 in the pathophysiology of breast cancer and the potential

  1. INDUCTION OF MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-ALPHA KNOCKOUT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary glands from the estrogen receptor knockout ( ERKO) mouse do not undergo ductal morphogenesis or alveolar development. Disrupted Er signaling may result in reduced estrogen-responsive gene products in the mammary gland or reduced mammotropic hormones that contribute t...

  2. A case of bilateral renal cell carcinoma associated with long-term dialysis showing false-positive immunoreactivity for TFE3 as Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kurisaki-Arakawa, Aiko; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Michiko; Mitani, Keiko; Fukumura, Yuki; Nagashima, Yoji; Argani, Pedrum; Yao, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Renal carcinomas associated with Xp11.2 translocations/transcription factor 3 (TFE3) gene fusion (Xp11 translocation RCC) are a rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma. A middle-aged Japanese man, who had a medical history of dialysis for more than 12 years, had bilateral renal cancers with a background of acquired cystic disease of the kidney and remarkable deposition of calcium oxalate in the tumorous area. The right renal tumor showed papillary architecture of clear cells with diffuse and strong immunoreactivity for TFE3 and focal and weak positivity for cathepsin K, suggesting a possibility of Xp11 translocation RCC. However, RT-PCR failed to detect any type of the reported fusion genes involving TFE3. Thus, the sample was sent for a TFE3 break-apart FISH assay in a renal tumor consultation service, which reported no evidence of TFE3 gene rearrangement. The right renal tumor was finally diagnosed as papillary renal cell carcinoma with cystic change. We report here a case of bilateral renal cell carcinoma in a patient undergoing long-term dialysis, which showed false-positive immunoreactivity for TFE3 immunostaining. Titration of TFE3 immunohistochemical staining (IHC) should be performed and cross-referenced with the FISH or RT-PCR results to avoid the misinterpretation of TFE3 IHC results.

  3. A NOVEL GAMMAHERPESVIRUS IN NORTHERN FUR SEALS (CALLORHINUS URSINUS) IS CLOSELY RELATED TO THE CALIFORNIA SEA LION (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS) CARCINOMA-ASSOCIATED OTARINE HERPESVIRUS-1.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Hinojosa, Galaxia; Gulland, Frances M D; DeLong, Robert; Gelatt, Tom; Archer, Linda; Wellehan, James F X

    2016-01-01

    Otarine herpesvirus 1 (OtHV1) is strongly associated with California sea lion (CSL, Zalophus californianus) urogenital carcinoma, the most common cancer documented in marine mammals. In addition to CSL, OtHV1 has also been found in association with carcinoma in South American fur seals (Arctocephalus australis), demonstrating it can infect related species. Northern fur seals (NFS, Callorhinus ursinus) are sympatric with CSL, and copulation between these species has been observed; yet, there are no reports of urogenital carcinoma in NFS. We describe a new Otarine herpesvirus found in vaginal swabs from NFS, herein called OtHV4. Partial sequencing of the polymerase gene and the glycoprotein B gene revealed OtHV4 is closely related to OtHV1, with 95% homology in the region of polymerase sequenced, and phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that they are sister taxa. An OtHV4-specific hydrolysis probe quantitative PCR was developed and validated, and its use on vaginal swabs revealed 16 of 50 (32%) wild adult female NFS were positive for OtHV4. The identification of a virus highly similar to the carcinoma-associated OtHV1 in a sympatric species without carcinoma suggests that comparative genomics of OtHV1 and OtHV4 may identify candidate viral oncogenes.

  4. Plant growth-promoting bacteria as inoculants in agricultural soils

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Rocheli; Ambrosini, Adriana; Passaglia, Luciane M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere are the determinants of plant health, productivity and soil fertility. Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) are bacteria that can enhance plant growth and protect plants from disease and abiotic stresses through a wide variety of mechanisms; those that establish close associations with plants, such as the endophytes, could be more successful in plant growth promotion. Several important bacterial characteristics, such as biological nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, ACC deaminase activity, and production of siderophores and phytohormones, can be assessed as plant growth promotion (PGP) traits. Bacterial inoculants can contribute to increase agronomic efficiency by reducing production costs and environmental pollution, once the use of chemical fertilizers can be reduced or eliminated if the inoculants are efficient. For bacterial inoculants to obtain success in improving plant growth and productivity, several processes involved can influence the efficiency of inoculation, as for example the exudation by plant roots, the bacterial colonization in the roots, and soil health. This review presents an overview of the importance of soil-plant-microbe interactions to the development of efficient inoculants, once PGPB are extensively studied microorganisms, representing a very diverse group of easily accessible beneficial bacteria. PMID:26537605

  5. Plant growth-promoting bacteria as inoculants in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rocheli de; Ambrosini, Adriana; Passaglia, Luciane M P

    2015-12-01

    Plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere are the determinants of plant health, productivity and soil fertility. Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) are bacteria that can enhance plant growth and protect plants from disease and abiotic stresses through a wide variety of mechanisms; those that establish close associations with plants, such as the endophytes, could be more successful in plant growth promotion. Several important bacterial characteristics, such as biological nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, ACC deaminase activity, and production of siderophores and phytohormones, can be assessed as plant growth promotion (PGP) traits. Bacterial inoculants can contribute to increase agronomic efficiency by reducing production costs and environmental pollution, once the use of chemical fertilizers can be reduced or eliminated if the inoculants are efficient. For bacterial inoculants to obtain success in improving plant growth and productivity, several processes involved can influence the efficiency of inoculation, as for example the exudation by plant roots, the bacterial colonization in the roots, and soil health. This review presents an overview of the importance of soil-plant-microbe interactions to the development of efficient inoculants, once PGPB are extensively studied microorganisms, representing a very diverse group of easily accessible beneficial bacteria.

  6. Windows in early mammary development: critical or not?

    PubMed

    Knight, C H; Sorensen, A

    2001-09-01

    Two critical windows in mammary development have been proposed. The first arises from observations in rodents that nutrition during fetal and neonatal periods can affect mammary ductular outgrowth, subsequent proliferative activity and, eventually, tumorigenesis, that is, potentially it could have a long-term effect on pathological outcome (breast cancer) in women. The second similarly involves early diet, but in this case the outcome is phenotypic, in that dairy heifers reared too quickly during the peripubertal period subsequently show impaired udder development and reduced milk yield persisting throughout life. Most mammary development occurs during pregnancy, but this period is usually thought of only in terms of the immediate outcome for the subsequent lactation; it is not believed to be a critical window, at least in terms of lifetime mammary productivity. This review examines the evidence underlying these various claims and attempts to define the mechanisms involved, and also considers whether derangements occurring earlier in life (prenatally) could also have long-term consequences for physiological or pathological mammary development.

  7. Quantification of progesterone binding in mammary tissue of pregnant ewes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.J.; Capuco, A.V.; Akers, R.M.

    1987-06-01

    Progestin-binding sites in mammary tissue from 14 prepartum, multiparous ewes at 50, 80, 115, and 140 d of gestation were demonstrated by the binding of (/sup 3/H) R5020 (17,21-dimethyl-19-nor-4,9-pregnadiene-3,20-dione) to ovine mammary cytosol in the presence of sodium molybdate and excess cortisol. Homogenization extracted 89% of total mammary receptors (nuclear) into cytosol. Binding was specific for progestins and was of high affinity. The average dissociation constant for (/sup 3/H) R5020 specifically bound to receptors extracted into mammary cytosol was 1.9 (+/- .4) x 10/sup -9/ M (n = 14) and did not change significantly over the test period. However, binding capacities (fmol/mg cytosolic protein) differed according to stage of gestation with averages of 125 +/- 53, 149 +/- 26, 656 +/- 216, 57 +/- 22 at 50, 80, 115, and 140 d of pregnancy, respectively. Increased number of progestin-binding sites at 115 d of gestation (whether data are expressed per unit of tissue weight, DNA, or cytosolic protein) suggests that an increase per mammary epithelial cell may be necessary to produce the full lobuloalveolar proliferation observed at this stage of gestation.

  8. Isolation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Fractions from Mammary Epithelial Tissue.

    PubMed

    Chanat, Eric; Le Parc, Annabelle; Lahouassa, Hichem; Badaoui, Bouabid

    2016-06-01

    In the mammary glands of lactating animals, the mammary epithelial cells that surround the lumen of the acini produce and secrete copious amounts of milk. Functional differentiation of these mammary epithelial cells depends on the development of high-efficiency secretory pathways, notably for protein and lipid secretion. Protein secretion is a fundamental process common to all animal cells that involves a subset of cellular organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. In contrast, en masse secretion of triglycerides and cholesterol esters in the form of milk fat globules is a unique feature of the mammary epithelial cell. Cytoplasmic lipid droplets, the intracellular precursors of milk fat globules, originate from the endoplasmic reticulum, as do most milk-specific proteins. This organelle is therefore pivotal in the biogenesis of milk components. Fractionation of the cell into its subcellular parts is an approach that has proven very powerful for understanding organelle function and for studying the specific role of an organelle in a given cell activity. Here we describe a method for the purification of both smooth and rough microsomes, the membrane-bound endoplasmic reticulum fragments that form from endoplasmic reticulum domains when cells are broken up, from mammary gland tissue at lactation.

  9. Hormonal regulation of the immune microenvironment in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Need, Eleanor F; Atashgaran, Vahid; Ingman, Wendy V; Dasari, Pallave

    2014-07-01

    It is well established that the development and homeostasis of the mammary gland are highly dependent upon the actions of ovarian hormones progesterone and estrogen, as well as the availability of prolactin for the pregnant and lactating gland. More recently it has become apparent that immune system cells and cytokines play essential roles in both mammary gland development as well as breast cancer. Here, we review hormonal effects on mammary gland biology during puberty, menstrual cycling, pregnancy, lactation and involution, and dissect how hormonal control of the immune system may contribute to mammary development at each stage via cytokine secretion and recruitment of macrophages, eosinophils, mast cells and lymphocytes. Collectively, these alterations may create an immunotolerant or inflammatory immune environment at specific developmental stages or phases of the menstrual cycle. Of particular interest for further research is investigation of the combinatorial actions of progesterone and estrogen during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and key developmental points where the immune system may play an active role both in mammary development as well as in the creation of an immunotolerant environment, thereby affecting breast cancer risk.

  10. Serotonin: a local regulator in the mammary gland epithelium.

    PubMed

    Horseman, Nelson D; Collier, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a very simple molecule that plays key roles in complex communication mechanisms within the animal body. In the mammary glands, serotonin biosynthesis and secretion are induced in response to dilation of the alveolar spaces. Since its discovery several years ago, mammary 5-HT has been demonstrated to perform two homeostatic functions. First, serotonin regulates lactation and initiates the transition into the earliest phases of involution. Second, serotonin is a local signal that induces parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), which allows the mammary gland to drive the mobilization of calcium from the skeleton. These processes use different receptor types, 5-HT7 and 5-HT2, respectively. In this review, we provide synthetic perspectives on the fundamental processes of lactation homeostasis and the adaptation of calcium homeostasis for lactation. We analyze the role of the intrinsic serotonin system in the physiological regulation of the mammary glands. We also consider the importance of the mammary serotonin system in pathologies and therapies associated with lactation and breast cancer.

  11. Bovine mammary stem cells: Transcriptome profiling and the stem cell niche

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification and transcriptome analysis of mammary stem cells (MaSC) are important steps toward understanding the molecular basis of mammary epithelial growth, homeostasis and tissue repair. Our objective was to evaluate the molecular profiles of four categories of cells within the bovine mammary ...

  12. Expression of novel, putative stem cell markers in prepubertal and lactating mammary glands of bovine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) are essential for growth and maintenance of the mammary epithelium. Two main phases of mammary growth include ductal elongation prior to puberty and lobulo-alveolar growth and development during pregnancy. Some studies have utilized morphological characteristics and retenti...

  13. Mammary carcinogenesis in rats: basic facts and recent results in Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect

    Shellabarger, C.J.; Stone, J.P.; Holtzman, s.

    1982-01-01

    Some research results from experiments investigating neutron-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rats are presented. The additive effects of neutrons and 3-methylcholanthrene on mammary adenocarcinoma were determined. Synergism between diethylstilbestrol and neutrons was likewise studied. Differences in mammary neoplastic response between strains of laboratory rats was also investigated. (ACR)

  14. The Analysis of Cell Population Dynamics in Mammary Gland Development and Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    processes of mammary epithelial cell differentiation during developmentand tumorigenesis. Using FACS, mammary epithelial cell ( MEC ) populations from tumors...developed techniques for viral transduction andtransplantation of primary MECs . 15. SUBJECT TERMS mammary, stem cell, lentivirus, FACS, cancer, imaging 16...epithelial cell ( MEC ) populations from tumors and wildtype tissue was investigated for their outgrowth potential or tumorigenic capacity. We also developed

  15. In vitro expansion of the mammary stem/progenitor cell population by xanthosinetreatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Mammary stem cells are critical for growth and maintenance of the mammary gland and therefore of considerable interest for improving productivity and efficiency of dairy animals. Xanthosine (Xs) treatment has been demonstrated to promote expansion of putative mammary stem cells in vivo ...

  16. Mammary fibroadenomatous hyperplasia in a young cat attributed to treatment with megestrol acetate

    PubMed Central

    MacDougall, Lori D.

    2003-01-01

    A male, neutered cat was presented for lethargy, reluctance to walk, and mammary enlargement after recent treatment with megestrol acetate. Mammary fibroadenomatous hyperplasia was diagnosed on the basis of history, clinical signs, and histopathological findings. Pathogenesis, clinical signs, and treatment options for mammary fibroadenomatous hyperplasia attributed to megestrol acetate treatment are discussed. PMID:12677692

  17. Mammary development, hyperestrogenemia, and hypocortisolemia in a male cat with an adrenal cortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nadolski, Amy C.; Markovich, Jessica E.; Jennings, Samuel H.; Mahony, Orla M.

    2016-01-01

    A 14-year-old neutered male domestic shorthaired cat was diagnosed with an adrenal cortical carcinoma causing hyperestrogenemia that resulted in mammary hyperplasia and sexual behavior. A right adrenalectomy and mammary gland biopsy were performed. Adrenal cortical neoplasia should be ruled out in any neutered male cat with mammary development and/or exhibiting sexual behavior. PMID:27708447

  18. Mammary development, hyperestrogenemia, and hypocortisolemia in a male cat with an adrenal cortical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nadolski, Amy C; Markovich, Jessica E; Jennings, Samuel H; Mahony, Orla M

    2016-10-01

    A 14-year-old neutered male domestic shorthaired cat was diagnosed with an adrenal cortical carcinoma causing hyperestrogenemia that resulted in mammary hyperplasia and sexual behavior. A right adrenalectomy and mammary gland biopsy were performed. Adrenal cortical neoplasia should be ruled out in any neutered male cat with mammary development and/or exhibiting sexual behavior.

  19. Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma mimicking salivary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lindsay; Chiosea, Simion I

    2013-12-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described salivary gland tumor characterized by ETV6 translocation. It appears that prior studies have identified MASC by reviewing salivary gland carcinomas, such as acinic cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified. To address the possibility of MASC mimicking benign salivary neoplasms we reviewed 12 salivary gland (cyst)adenomas diagnosed prior to the discovery of MASC. One encapsulated (cyst)adenoma of the parotid gland demonstrated features of MASC. The diagnosis was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with an ETV6 break-apart probe. An unusual complex pattern of ETV6 rearrangement with duplication of the telomeric/distal ETV6 probe was identified. This case illustrates that MASC may mimic salivary (cyst)adenomas. To more accurately assess true clinical and morphologic spectrum of MASC, future studies may have to include review of salivary (cyst)adenomas. The differential diagnosis of MASC may have to be expanded to include cases resembling salivary (cyst)adenomas.

  20. Modeling mechanical interactions between cancerous mammary acini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jeffrey; Liphardt, Jan; Rycroft, Chris

    2015-03-01

    The rules and mechanical forces governing cell motility and interactions with the extracellular matrix of a tissue are often critical for understanding the mechanisms by which breast cancer is able to spread through the breast tissue and eventually metastasize. Ex vivo experimentation has demonstrated the the formation of long collagen fibers through collagen gels between the cancerous mammary acini responsible for milk production, providing a fiber scaffolding along which cancer cells can disorganize. We present a minimal mechanical model that serves as a potential explanation for the formation of these collagen fibers and the resultant motion. Our working hypothesis is that cancerous cells induce this fiber formation by pulling on the gel and taking advantage of the specific mechanical properties of collagen. To model this system, we employ a new Eulerian, fixed grid simulation method to model the collagen as a nonlinear viscoelastic material subject to various forces coupled with a multi-agent model to describe individual cancer cells. We find that these phenomena can be explained two simple ideas: cells pull collagen radially inwards and move towards the tension gradient of the collagen gel, while being exposed to standard adhesive and collision forces.

  1. Breast cancer detection using mammary ductoscopy.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Edward

    2005-06-01

    Mammary ductoscopy (MD) has been used as a tool to evaluate the breast for cancer for over 10 years. MD allows the direct visualization of the duct lumen, providing a more targeted approach to the diagnosis of disease arising in the ductal system, since the lesion can be visualized and samples collected in the area of interest. Initial studies of MD evaluated women with pathologic spontaneous nipple discharge (PND), while more recent reports are also using MD to assess women without PND for the presence of breast cancer. Cytologic assessment of MD is highly specific but less sensitive in the detection of breast cancer. Nonetheless, a MD sample from a breast with PND may rarely undergo cytologic review and be interpreted as consistent with malignancy, only later to undergo surgical resection demonstrating benign pathology. For this reason, PND specimens interpreted as malignant on cytologic review require histopathologic confirmation prior to instituting therapy. Additional sample evaluation using image or molecular analysis may improve the sensitivity and specificity of MD in breast cancer detection.

  2. [Abortive infection of mice inoculated intraperitoneally with Chlamydia ovis].

    PubMed

    Rodolakis, A

    1976-01-01

    A mouse adaptated strain of Chlamydia ovis, when inoculated in the peritoneal cavity, caused the death of both pregnant and non pregnant mice. In addition, mice inoculated late in pregnancy (12 to 16 days after breeding) aborted 4 to 6 days after inoculation. Chlamydia was recovered from foetuses and from the organs of the mice (Liver, Spleen, Lungs). The severity of the disease was related to the inoculum concentration, so it was possible to induce late abortions with a rapid recovery of the females, like in the natural infection of the ewes. In the same conditions, the original Chlamydia strain maintained by passage on yolk sac, induced only an inapparent disease transmissible to the young mice.

  3. Inducing Resistance to Conspiracy Theory Propaganda: Testing Inoculation and Metainoculation Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banas, John A.; Miller, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    This investigation examined the boundaries of inoculation theory by examining how inoculation can be applied to conspiracy theory propaganda as well as inoculation itself (called metainoculation). A 3-phase experiment with 312 participants compared 3 main groups: no-treatment control, inoculation, and metainoculation. Research questions explored…

  4. Automatic inoculating apparatus. [includes movable carraige, drive motor, and swabbing motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An automatic inoculating apparatus for agar trays is described and using a simple inoculating element, such as a cotton swab or inoculating loop. The apparatus includes a movable carriage for supporting the tray to be inoculated, a drive motor for moving the tray along a trackway, and a swabbing motor for automatically swabbing the tray during the movement. An actuator motor controls lowering of the inoculating element onto the tray and lifting of the inoculating element. An electrical control system, including limit microswitches, enables automatic control of the actuator motor and return of the carriage to the initial position after inoculating is completed.

  5. Int-6, a highly conserved, widely expressed gene, is mutated by mouse mammary tumor virus in mammary preneoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, A; Buttitta, F; Miyazaki, S; Gallahan, D; Smith, G H; Callahan, R

    1995-01-01

    With a unique mouse mammary tumor model system in which mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) insertional mutations can be detected during progression from preneoplasia to frank malignancy, including metastasis, we have discovered a new common integration site (designated Int-6) for MMTV in mouse mammary tumors. MMTV was integrated into Int-6 in a mammary hyperplastic outgrowth line, its tumors and metastases, and two independent mammary tumors arising in unrelated mice. The Int-6 gene is ubiquitously expressed as a 1.4-kb RNA species in adult tissues and is detected beginning at day 8 of embryonic development. The nucleotide sequence of Int-6 is unrelated to any of the known genes in the GenBank database. MMTV integrates within introns of the gene in the opposite transcriptional orientation. In each tumor tested, this results in the expression of a truncated Int-6/long terminal repeat (LTR) chimeric RNA species which is terminated at a cryptic termination signal in the MMTV LTR. Since the nonrearranged Int-6 alleles in these tumors contain no mutations, we favor the conclusion that truncation of the Int-6 gene product either biologically activates its function or represents a dominant-negative mutation. PMID:7853537

  6. Effect of actinobacteria agent inoculation methods on cellulose degradation during composting based on redundancy analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Lu, Qian; Wei, Yuquan; Cui, Hongyang; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Xueqin; Shan, Si; Wei, Zimin

    2016-11-01

    In this study, actinobacteria agent including Streptomyces sp. and Micromonospora sp. were inoculated during chicken manure composting by different inoculation methods. The effect of different treatments on cellulose degradation and the relationship between inoculants and indigenous actinobacteria were investigated during composting. The results showed that inoculation in different stages of composting all improved the actinobacteria community diversity particularly in the cooling stage of composting (M3). Moreover, inoculation could distinctly accelerate the degradation of organic matters (OM) especially celluloses. Redundancy analysis indicated that the correlation between indigenous actinobacteria and degradation of OM and cellulose were regulated by inoculants and there were significant differences between different inoculation methods. Furthermore, synergy between indigenous actinobacteria and inoculants for degradation of OM and cellulose in M3 was better than other treatments. Conclusively, we suggested an inoculation method to regulate the indigenous actinobacteria based on the relationship between inoculants and indigenous actinobacteria and degradation content.

  7. Mammary blood flow regulation in the nursing rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, M.; Creasy, R.K.

    1984-11-01

    Cardiac output and mammary blood flow distribution prior to and after suckling were studied in 10 nursing rabbits by means of radionuclide-labeled microspheres. Suckling was followed by a 5.8% rise in cardiac output and a 20.4% rise in mammary blood flow. Determinations of intraglandular blood flow distribution have shown that there was a 43% increase in blood flow to the glands suckled from as compared to a 22.7% rise to the contralateral untouched glands and a 4.9% rise in the remainder of untouched glands. The conclusion is that a local mechanism may be involved in the regulation of mammary blood flow in the nursing rabbit.

  8. Malignant mammary tumor in female dogs: environmental contaminants.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Fábio He; Figueiroa, Fernanda C; Bersano, Paulo Ro; Bissacot, Denise Z; Rocha, Noeme S

    2010-06-30

    Mammary tumors of female dogs have greatly increased in recent years, thus demanding rapid diagnosis and effective treatment in order to determine the animal survival. There is considerable scientific interest in the possible role of environmental contaminants in the etiology of mammary tumors, specifically in relation to synthetic chemical substances released into the environment to which living beings are either directly or indirectly exposed. In this study, the presence of pyrethroid insecticide was observed in adjacent adipose tissue of canine mammary tumor. High Precision Liquid Chromatography - HPLC was adapted to detect and identify environmental contaminants in adipose tissue adjacent to malignant mammary tumor in nine female dogs, without predilection for breed or age. After surgery, masses were carefully examined for malignant neoplastic lesions. Five grams of adipose tissue adjacent to the tumor were collected to detect of environmental contaminants. The identified pyrethroids were allethrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and tetramethrin, with a contamination level of 33.3%. Histopathology demonstrated six female dogs (66.7%) as having complex carcinoma and three (33.3%) with simple carcinoma. From these tumors, seven (77.8%) presented aggressiveness degree III and two (22.2%) degree I. Five tumors were positive for estrogen receptors in immunohistochemical analysis. The contamination level was observed in more aggressive tumors. This was the first report in which the level of environmental contaminants could be detected in adipose tissue of female dogs with malignant mammary tumor, by HPLC. Results suggest the possible involvement of pyrethroid in the canine mammary tumor carcinogenesis. Hence, the dog may be used as a sentinel animal for human breast cancer, since human beings share the same environment and basically have the same eating habits.

  9. Malignant mammary tumor in female dogs: environmental contaminants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mammary tumors of female dogs have greatly increased in recent years, thus demanding rapid diagnosis and effective treatment in order to determine the animal survival. There is considerable scientific interest in the possible role of environmental contaminants in the etiology of mammary tumors, specifically in relation to synthetic chemical substances released into the environment to which living beings are either directly or indirectly exposed. In this study, the presence of pyrethroid insecticide was observed in adjacent adipose tissue of canine mammary tumor. High Precision Liquid Chromatography - HPLC was adapted to detect and identify environmental contaminants in adipose tissue adjacent to malignant mammary tumor in nine female dogs, without predilection for breed or age. After surgery, masses were carefully examined for malignant neoplastic lesions. Five grams of adipose tissue adjacent to the tumor were collected to detect of environmental contaminants. The identified pyrethroids were allethrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and tetramethrin, with a contamination level of 33.3%. Histopathology demonstrated six female dogs (66.7%) as having complex carcinoma and three (33.3%) with simple carcinoma. From these tumors, seven (77.8%) presented aggressiveness degree III and two (22.2%) degree I. Five tumors were positive for estrogen receptors in immunohistochemical analysis. The contamination level was observed in more aggressive tumors. This was the first report in which the level of environmental contaminants could be detected in adipose tissue of female dogs with malignant mammary tumor, by HPLC. Results suggest the possible involvement of pyrethroid in the canine mammary tumor carcinogenesis. Hence, the dog may be used as a sentinel animal for human breast cancer, since human beings share the same environment and basically have the same eating habits. PMID:20587072

  10. Biology of glucose transport in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2014-03-01

    Glucose is the major precursor of lactose, which is synthesized in Golgi vesicles of mammary secretory alveolar epithelial cells during lactation. Glucose is taken up by mammary epithelial cells through a passive, facilitative process, which is driven by the downward glucose concentration gradient across the plasma membrane. This process is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs), of which there are 14 known isoforms. Mammary glands mainly express GLUT1 and GLUT8, and GLUT1 is the predominant isoform with a Km of ~10 mM and transport activity for mannose and galactose in addition to glucose. Mammary glucose transport activity increases dramatically from the virgin state to the lactation state, with a concomitant increase in GLUT expression. The increased GLUT expression during lactogenesis is not stimulated by the accepted lactogenic hormones. New evidence indicates that a possible low oxygen tension resulting from increased metabolic rate and oxygen consumption may play a major role in stimulating glucose uptake and GLUT1 expression in mammary epithelial cells during lactogenesis. In addition to its primary presence on the plasma membrane, GLUT1 is also expressed on the Golgi membrane of mammary epithelial cells and is likely involved in facilitating the uptake of glucose and galactose to the site of lactose synthesis. Because lactose synthesis dictates milk volume, regulation of GLUT expression and trafficking represents potentially fruitful areas for further research in dairy production. In addition, this research will have pathological implications for the treatment of breast cancer because glucose uptake and GLUT expression are up-regulated in breast cancer cells to accommodate the increased glucose need.

  11. Mammary gland development: cell fate specification, stem cells and the microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Inman, Jamie L; Robertson, Claire; Mott, Joni D; Bissell, Mina J

    2015-03-15

    The development of the mammary gland is unique: the final stages of development occur postnatally at puberty under the influence of hormonal cues. Furthermore, during the life of the female, the mammary gland can undergo many rounds of expansion and proliferation. The mammary gland thus provides an excellent model for studying the 'stem/progenitor' cells that allow this repeated expansion and renewal. In this Review, we provide an overview of the different cell types that constitute the mammary gland, and discuss how these cell types arise and differentiate. As cellular differentiation cannot occur without proper signals, we also describe how the tissue microenvironment influences mammary gland development.

  12. The mammary glands of the Amazonian manatee, Trichechus inunguis (Mammalia: Sirenia): morphological characteristics and microscopic anatomy.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Fernanda Rosa; da Silva, Vera Maria Ferreira; Barcellos, José Fernando Marques

    2014-08-01

    The mammaries from carcasses of two female Amazonian manatees were examined. Trichechus inunguis possesses two axillary mammaries beneath the pectoral fins, one on each side of the body. Each papilla mammae has a small hole on its apex--the ostium papillare. The mammaries are covered by a stratified squamous keratinized epithelium. The epithelium of the mammary ducts became thinner more deeply in the tissue and varied from stratified to simple cuboidal. There was no evidence of glandular activity or secretion into the ducts of the mammary glands.

  13. The contribution of growth hormone to mammary neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Jo K; Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M; Emerald, B Starling; Mertani, Hichem C; Lobie, Peter E

    2008-01-01

    While the effects of growth hormone (GH) on longitudinal growth are well established, the observation that GH contributes to neoplastic progression is more recent. Accumulating literature implicates GH-mediated signal transduction in the development and progression of a wide range malignancies including breast cancer. Recently autocrine human GH been demonstrated to be an orthotopically expressed oncogene for the human mammary gland. This review will highlight recent evidence linking GH and mammary carcinoma and discuss GH-antagonism as a potential therapeutic approach for treatment of breast cancer. PMID:18253708

  14. Polyurethane-covered mammary implants: a 12-year experience.

    PubMed

    Gasperoni, C; Salgarello, M; Gargani, G

    1992-10-01

    Polyurethane-covered mammary implants are the implants of choice in aesthetic and reconstructive mammary surgery. These implants give very good results in regard to breast contour and consistency, and have a very low complication rate. We present our 12-year experience using polyurethane-covered prostheses. We place the implant mostly in the subglandular or subcutaneous site, and their capsular contracture rate is extremely low (3.3%). Based on our experience, we also review the other complications and side effects occurring with polyurethane prostheses and discuss them in detail.

  15. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1992-05-20

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. Previous results indicated that these clonogens are the precursor cells of radiogenic cancer, and that initiation, is common event at the clonegenic cell level. Detailed information on the physiologic control of clonogen proliferation, differentiation, and total numbers is thus essential to an understanding of the carcinogenic process. We report here studies on investigations on the relationships between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamus-pituitary feedback axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH-(thyrotropin-) responsive sub- population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and a large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cell interactions during the neoplastic process.

  16. Survival of Campylobacter jejuni inoculated into ground beef.

    PubMed

    Stern, N J; Kotula, A W

    1982-11-01

    Ground beef was inoculated with mixed cultures of Campylobacter jejuni, and the samples were subjected to various cooking and cold-storage temperatures. When samples were heated in an oven at either 190 or 218 degrees C, approximately 10(7) cells of C. jejuni per g were inactivated (less than 30 cells per g) in less than 10 min after the ground beef reached an internal temperature of 70 degrees C. When the samples were held at -15 degrees C over 14 days of storage, the numbers of C. jejuni declined by 3 log10. When inoculated samples were stored with an equal amount of Cary-Blair diluent at 4 degrees C, no changes in viability were observed over 14 days of storage. Twenty-five times as much C. jejuni was recovered from inoculated ground beef when either 10% glycerol or 10% dimethyl sulfoxide was added to an equal amount of ground beef before freezing as was recovered from peptone-diluted ground beef. Twice as much inoculated C. jejuni was recovered from ground beef plus Cary-Blair diluent as was recovered from ground beef plus peptone diluent.

  17. Inoculating against Pro-Plagiarism Justifications: Rational and Affective Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Josh; Pfau, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Student plagiarism continues to threaten academic integrity. This investigation assessed whether an inoculation message strategy could combat university plagiarism by protecting student attitudes against pro-plagiarism justification arguments. Additionally, we sought theoretical confirmation of previous findings on involvement and accessibility in…

  18. Matching Stress Inoculation's Treatment Components to Clients' Anxiety Mode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altmaier, Elizabeth M.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Speech-anxious students (N=69) classified as experiencing primarily cognitive or somatic symptoms of anxiety received cognitive restructuring, coping relaxation, a combined cognitive-somatic treatment (stress inoculation) or no treatment. Cognitive indices of anxiety indicated that matched treatments resulted in more facilitative patterns of…

  19. Three inoculation methods for evaluating Sclerotinia blight resistance in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory-based assays for screening germplasm for resistance to Sclerotinia blight in peanuts can be conducted year-round, and thus may accelerate progress in breeding for resistant plants. Three previously proposed inoculation methods (using main stems of intact plants, detached main stems, or de...

  20. Activation of p21(CIP1/WAF1) in mammary epithelium accelerates mammary tumorigenesis and promotes lung metastasis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaoyun; Xia, Weiya; Yang, Jer-Yen; Hsu, Jennifer L; Chou, Chao-Kai; Sun, Hui-Lung; Wyszomierski, Shannon L; Mills, Gordon B; Muller, William J; Yu, Dihua; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2010-12-03

    While p21 is well known to inhibit cyclin-CDK activity in the nucleus and it has also been demonstrated to have oncogenic properties in different types of human cancers. In vitro studies showed that the oncogenic function of p21is closely related to its cytoplasmic localization. However, it is unclear whether cytoplasmic p21 contributes to tumorigenesis in vivo. To address this question, we generated transgenic mice expressing the Akt-phosphorylated form of p21 (p21T145D) in the mammary epithelium. The results showed that Akt-activated p21 was expressed in the cytoplasm of mammary epithelium. Overexpression of Akt-activated p21 accelerated tumor onset and promoted lung metastasis in MMTV/neu mice, providing evidence that p21, especially cytoplasmic phosphorylated p21, has an oncogenic role in promoting mammary tumorigenesis and metastasis.

  1. Downregulation of ATM Gene and Protein Expression in Canine Mammary Tumors.

    PubMed

    Raposo-Ferreira, T M M; Bueno, R C; Terra, E M; Avante, M L; Tinucci-Costa, M; Carvalho, M; Cassali, G D; Linde, S D; Rogatto, S R; Laufer-Amorim, R

    2016-11-01

    The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene encodes a protein associated with DNA damage repair and maintenance of genomic integrity. In women, ATM transcript and protein downregulation have been reported in sporadic breast carcinomas, and the absence of ATM protein expression has been associated with poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate ATM gene and protein expression in canine mammary tumors and their association with clinical outcome. ATM gene and protein expression was evaluated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively, in normal mammary gland samples (n = 10), benign mammary tumors (n = 11), nonmetastatic mammary carcinomas (n = 19), and metastatic mammary carcinomas (n = 11). Lower ATM transcript levels were detected in benign mammary tumors and carcinomas compared with normal mammary glands (P = .011). Similarly, lower ATM protein expression was observed in benign tumors (P = .0003), nonmetastatic mammary carcinomas (P < .0001), and the primary sites of metastatic carcinomas (P < .0001) compared with normal mammary glands. No significant differences in ATM gene or protein levels were detected among benign tumors and nonmetastatic and metastatic mammary carcinomas (P > .05). The levels of ATM gene or protein expression were not significantly associated with clinical and pathological features or with survival. Similar to human breast cancer, the data in this study suggest that ATM gene and protein downregulation is involved in canine mammary gland tumorigenesis.

  2. Pueraria mirifica Exerts Estrogenic Effects in the Mammary Gland and Uterus and Promotes Mammary Carcinogenesis in Donryu Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kakehashi, Anna; Yoshida, Midori; Tago, Yoshiyuki; Ishii, Naomi; Okuno, Takahiro; Gi, Min; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Pueraria mirifica (PM), a plant whose dried and powdered tuberous roots are now widely used in rejuvenating preparations to promote youthfulness in both men and women, may have major estrogenic influence. In this study, we investigated modifying effects of PM at various doses on mammary and endometrial carcinogenesis in female Donryu rats. Firstly, PM administered to ovariectomized animals at doses of 0.03%, 0.3%, and 3% in a phytoestrogen-low diet for 2 weeks caused significant increase in uterus weight. Secondly, a 4 week PM application to non-operated rats at a dose of 3% after 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) initiation resulted in significant elevation of cell proliferation in the mammary glands. In a third experiment, postpubertal administration of 0.3% (200 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)/day) PM to 5-week-old non-operated animals for 36 weeks following initiation of mammary and endometrial carcinogenesis with DMBA and N-ethyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (ENNG), respectively, resulted in significant increase of mammary adenocarcinoma incidence. A significant increase of endometrial atypical hyperplasia multiplicity was also observed. Furthermore, PM at doses of 0.3%, and more pronouncedly, at 1% induced dilatation, hemorrhage and inflammation of the uterine wall. In conclusion, postpubertal long-term PM administration to Donryu rats exerts estrogenic effects in the mammary gland and uterus, and at a dose of 200 mg/kg b.w./day was found to promote mammary carcinogenesis initiated by DMBA. PMID:27827907

  3. The male mammary gland: a target for the xenoestrogen bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Vandenberg, Laura N; Schaeberle, Cheryl M; Rubin, Beverly S; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M

    2013-06-01

    Males of some strains of mice retain their mammary epithelium even in the absence of nipples. Here, we have characterized the mammary gland in male CD-1 mice both in whole mounts and histological sections. We also examined the effects of bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogen mimic that alters development of the female mouse mammary gland. BPA was administered at a range of environmentally relevant doses (0.25-250μg/kg/day) to pregnant and lactating mice and then the mammary glands of male offspring were examined at several periods in adulthood. We observed age- and dose-specific effects on mammary gland morphology, indicating that perinatal BPA exposures alter the male mammary gland in adulthood. These results may provide insight into gynecomastia, the most common male breast disease in humans, where proliferation of the mammary epithelium leads to breast enlargement.

  4. Quantification of mammary organoid toxicant response and mammary tissue motility using OCT fluctuation spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiao; Blackmon, Richard L.; Carabas-Hernendez, Patricia; Fuller, Ashley; Troester, Melissa A.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2016-03-01

    Mammary epithelial cell (MEC) organoids in 3D culture recapitulate features of breast ducts in vivo. OCT has the ability to monitor the evolution of MEC organoids non-invasively and longitudinally. The anti-cancer drug Doxorubicin (Dox) is able to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells and has been widely used for chemotherapy of breast cancers; while environmental toxins implicated in breast cancer such as estrogen regulates mammary tumor growth and stimulates the proliferation and metastatic potential of breast cancers. Here we propose a quantitative method for measuring motility of breast cells in 3D cultures based upon OCT speckle fluctuation spectroscopy. The metrics of the inverse power-law exponent (α) and fractional modulation amplitude (M) were extracted from speckle fluctuation spectra. These were used to quantify the responses of MEC organoids to Dox, and estrogen. We investigated MEC organoids comprised of two different MEC lines: MCF10DCIS.com exposed to Dox, and MCF7 exposed to estrogen. We found an increase (p<0.001) in α of MEC along time (t=0, 1 hour, 24 hours, 48 hours and 6 days) at each dose of Dox (0, 1 μM and 10 μM), indicating lower fluctuation intensity at higher frequencies. We also observed a decrease (p<0.001) in M for increasing time. However, both α and M of MCF7 treated with estrogen (0, 1 nM and 10 nM) exhibited the opposite trend along time. This novel technology provides rapid and non-invasive measurements of the effects of toxicants on MEC motility for understanding breast cancer development and assessing anti-cancer drugs.

  5. Effect of inoculation process on lycopene production by Blakeslea trispora in a stirred-tank reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Feng, Ling-Ran; Luo, Wei; Li, Han-Guang; Zhou, Ya; Yu, Xiao-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Lycopene biosynthesis by Blakeslea trispora was greatly enhanced in a stirred-tank reactor when a nonsynchronous inoculation process, in which the (+) mating type was inoculated after the (-) mating type has been grown for a certain period of time, was applied. The lycopene concentration with nonsynchronous inoculation in a 24-h inoculation interval was 33 % higher than that with synchronous inoculation. The optimum inoculation ratio was 1:2 (+/-) at the 36 and 48 h inoculum age of mating types (+) and (-), respectively. Fermentation time for the individual strains and mated conditions showed that the (+) mating type grows faster than the (-) mating type. Morphological observation showed that the mycelium ratio of B. trispora (-) in mating culture with nonsynchronous inoculation was higher than that with synchronous inoculation. The results indicated that nonsynchronous inoculation process increased the dominance of B. trispora (-) in joint cultivation and hence stimulated lycopene biosynthesis.

  6. Aflatoxins ingestion and canine mammary tumors: There is an association?

    PubMed

    Frehse, M S; Martins, M I M; Ono, E Y S; Bracarense, A P F R L; Bissoqui, L Y; Teixeira, E M K; Santos, N J R; Freire, R L

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence of mycotoxins on dogs feed and to explore the potential association between mycotoxins exposure and the chance of mamary tumors in a case-control study. The study included 256 female dogs from a hospital population, 85 with mammary tumors (case group) and 171 without mammary tumors (control group). An epidemiological questionnaire was applied to both groups, and the data were analyzed by the EpiInfo statistical package. For the study, 168 samples of the feed offered to dogs were analyzed for the presence of aflatoxins, fumonisins and zearalenone by high-performance liquid chromatography. Mycotoxins were found in 79 samples (100%) in the case group and 87/89 (97.8%) in the control group. Mycotoxins were detected in all types of feed, regardless feed quality. Level of aflatoxin B1 (p = 0.0356, OR = 2.74, 95%, CI 1.13 to 6.60), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1) (p = 0.00007, OR = 4.60, 95%, CI = 2.16 to 9.79), and aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) (p = 0.0133, OR = 9.91, 95%, CI 1.21 to 81.15) were statistically higher in case of mammary cancer. In contrast, neutering was a protective factor for mammary cancer (p = 0.0004, OR = 0.32, 95%, CI = 0.17 to 0.60).

  7. Laminin mediates tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelia

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium is dependent on the extracellular matrix as well as hormones. There is good evidence that the basement membrane provides signals for regulating beta-casein expression, and that integrins are involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of lactogenic hormones, laminin can direct expression of the beta-casein gene. Mouse mammary epithelial cells plated on gels of native laminin or laminin-entactin undergo functional differentiation. On tissue culture plastic, mammary cells respond to soluble basement membrane or purified laminin, but not other extracellular matrix components, by synthesizing beta-casein. In mammary cells transfected with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter constructs, laminin activates transcription from the beta- casein promoter through a specific enhancer element. The inductive effect of laminin on casein expression was specifically blocked by the E3 fragment of the carboxy terminal region of the alpha 1 chain of laminin, by antisera raised against the E3 fragment, and by a peptide corresponding to a sequence within this region. Our results demonstrate that laminin can direct tissue-specific gene expression in epithelial cells through its globular domain. PMID:7730398

  8. Distinct FAK activities determine progenitor and mammary stem cell characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Chen, Song; Liu, Suling; Wicha, Max S.; Guan, Jun-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Mammary stem (MaSCs) and progenitor cells are important for mammary gland development and maintenance and may give rise to mammary cancer stem cells (MaCSCs). Yet there remains limited understanding of how these cells contribute to tumorigenesis. Here we show that conditional deletion of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in embryonic mammary epithelial cells (MaECs) decreases luminal progenitors (LPs) and basal MaSCs, reducing their colony-forming and regenerative potentials in a cell autonomous manner. Loss of FAK kinase activity in MaECs specifically impaired LP proliferation and alveologenesis, whereas a kinase-independent activity of FAK supported ductal invasion and basal MaSC activity. Deficiency in LPs suppressed tumorigenesis and MaCSC formation in a mouse model of breast cancer. In contrast to the general inhibitory effect of FAK attenuation, inhibitors of FAK kinase preferentially inhibited proliferation and tumorsphere formation of LP-like, but not MaSC-like, human breast cancer cells. Our findings establish distinct kinase dependent and independent activities of FAK that differentially regulate LPs and basal MaSCs. We suggest that targeting these distinct functions may tailor therapeutic strategies to address breast cancer heterogeneity more effectively. PMID:23832665

  9. Precursors of hexoneogenesis within the human mammary gland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The human mammary gland is capable of de novo synthesis of glucose and galactose (hexoneogenesis); however, the carbon source is incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the role of acetate, glutamine, lactate and glycerol as potential carbon sources for hexoneogenesis. Healthy breast...

  10. The epigenetic landscape of mammary gland development and functional differentiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most of the development and functional differentiation in the mammary gland occur after birth. Epigenetics is defined as the stable alterations in gene expression potential that arise during development and proliferation. Epigenetic changes are mediated at the biochemical level by the chromatin conf...

  11. The Cellular Targets of Estrogen in Mammary Ductal Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    DAMD17-99-1-9109 Organization: University of California, San Francisco Those portions of the technical data contained in this report marked as limited...Src tyrosine kinase is required for the induction of mammary tumors in transgenic mice. Genes Dev, 8,23-32 Li, B., Rosen, J. M., McMenamin , B. J

  12. Altered oxidative stress and carbohydrate metabolism in canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jayasri, K.; Padmaja, K.; Saibaba, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Mammary tumors are the most prevalent type of neoplasms in canines. Even though cancer induced metabolic alterations are well established, the clinical data describing the metabolic profiles of animal tumors is not available. Hence, our present investigation was carried out with the aim of studying changes in carbohydrate metabolism along with the level of oxidative stress in canine mammary tumors. Materials and Methods: Fresh mammary tumor tissues along with the adjacent healthy tissues were collected from the college surgical ward. The levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), glutathione, protein, hexose, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) were analyzed in all the tissues. The results were analyzed statistically. Results: More than two-fold increase in TBARS and three-fold increase in glutathione levels were observed in neoplastic tissues. Hexokinase activity and hexose concentration (175%) was found to be increased, whereas glucose-6-phosphatase (33%), fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase (42%), and G6PD (5 fold) activities were reduced in tumor mass compared to control. Conclusion: Finally, it was revealed that lipid peroxidation was increased with differentially altered carbohydrate metabolism in canine mammary tumors. PMID:28096627

  13. Laminin Mediates Tissue-specific Gene Expression in Mammary Epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Streuli, Charles H; Schmidhauser, Christian; Bailey, Nina; Yurchenco, Peter; Skubitz, Amy P. N.; Roskelley, Calvin; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-04-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium is dependent on the extracellular matrix as well as hormones. There is good evidence that the basement membrane provides signals for regulating beta-casein expression, and that integrins are involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of lactogenic hormones, laminin can direct expression of the beta-casein gene. Mouse mammary epithelial cells plated on gels of native laminin or laminin-entactin undergo functional differentiation. On tissue culture plastic, mammary cells respond to soluble basement membrane or purified laminin, but not other extracellular matrix components, by synthesizing beta-casein. In mammary cells transfected with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter constructs, laminin activates transcription from the beta-casein promoter through a specific enhancer element. The inductive effect of laminin on casein expression was specifically blocked by the E3 fragment of the carboxy terminal region of the alpha 1 chain of laminin, by antisera raised against the E3 fragment, and by a peptide corresponding to a sequence within this region. Our results demonstrate that laminin can direct tissue-specific gene expression in epithelial cells through its globular domain.

  14. Mapping Mammary Carcinoma Suppressor Genes in the Laboratory Rat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    AD GRANT NUMBER DAMDI7-94-J-4040 TITLE: Mapping Mammary Carcinoma Suppressor Genes in the Laboratory Rat PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael Gould, Ph.D...Carcinoma Suppressor Genes in the Laboratory Rat DAMDI7-94-J-4040 6. AUTHOR(S) Michael Gould, Ph.D. Hong Lan, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND

  15. Notch3 marks clonogenic mammary luminal progenitor cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lafkas, Daniel; Rodilla, Veronica; Huyghe, Mathilde; Mourao, Larissa; Kiaris, Hippokratis

    2013-01-01

    The identity of mammary stem and progenitor cells remains poorly understood, mainly as a result of the lack of robust markers. The Notch signaling pathway has been implicated in mammary gland development as well as in tumorigenesis in this tissue. Elevated expression of the Notch3 receptor has been correlated to the highly aggressive “triple negative” human breast cancer. However, the specific cells expressing this Notch paralogue in the mammary gland remain unknown. Using a conditionally inducible Notch3-CreERT2SAT transgenic mouse, we genetically marked Notch3-expressing cells throughout mammary gland development and followed their lineage in vivo. We demonstrate that Notch3 is expressed in a highly clonogenic and transiently quiescent luminal progenitor population that gives rise to a ductal lineage. These cells are capable of surviving multiple successive pregnancies, suggesting a capacity to self-renew. Our results also uncover a role for the Notch3 receptor in restricting the proliferation and consequent clonal expansion of these cells. PMID:24100291

  16. Notch3 marks clonogenic mammary luminal progenitor cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lafkas, Daniel; Rodilla, Veronica; Huyghe, Mathilde; Mourao, Larissa; Kiaris, Hippokratis; Fre, Silvia

    2013-10-14

    The identity of mammary stem and progenitor cells remains poorly understood, mainly as a result of the lack of robust markers. The Notch signaling pathway has been implicated in mammary gland development as well as in tumorigenesis in this tissue. Elevated expression of the Notch3 receptor has been correlated to the highly aggressive "triple negative" human breast cancer. However, the specific cells expressing this Notch paralogue in the mammary gland remain unknown. Using a conditionally inducible Notch3-CreERT2(SAT) transgenic mouse, we genetically marked Notch3-expressing cells throughout mammary gland development and followed their lineage in vivo. We demonstrate that Notch3 is expressed in a highly clonogenic and transiently quiescent luminal progenitor population that gives rise to a ductal lineage. These cells are capable of surviving multiple successive pregnancies, suggesting a capacity to self-renew. Our results also uncover a role for the Notch3 receptor in restricting the proliferation and consequent clonal expansion of these cells.

  17. Cooperative Interactions During Human Mammary Epithelial Cell Immortalization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Immortal Transformation of Cultured Human Mammary Epithelial Cells. Cellular Oncology, 26:248-251, 2004. Rodier , F., Kim, S-H., Nijjar, T., Yaswen, P...Promoter, Mol. Cell Biol.: 25:3923-3933, 2005. Goldstein, J, Rodier , F, Garbe, J, Stampfer, M, Campisi, J, Caspase-independent cytochrome c release is a

  18. MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT: EARLY LIFE EFFECTS FROM THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary Gland Development: Early Life Effects from the Environment

    S.E. Fenton. Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory, ORD, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

    As signs of precocious puberty in girls reach ...

  19. Undergraduate Training in Mammary Gland Biology and Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Proiect (0704-0188), Washington, DC 20503 1. AGENCY USE ONLY 2. REPORT DATE 3 . REPORT TYPE AND... 3 Introduction .................................................................................... 5 Body...receptors that mediate cell-cell interactions ( 3 ). Studies have shown that when unirradiated non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial COMMA-D cells were

  20. Cholera toxin stimulation of human mammary epithelial cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, M.R.

    1982-06-01

    Addition of cholera toxin to human mammary epithelial cultures derived from reduction mammoplasties and primary carcinomas greatly stimulated cell growth and increased the number of times the cells could be successfully subcultured. Other agents known to increase intracellular cAMP levels were also growth stimulatory. The increased growth potential conferred by cholera toxin enhances the usefulness of this cell culture system.

  1. The role of activin in mammary gland development and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, Karen A; Schneyer, Alan L; Hagen, Mary J; Jerry, D Joseph

    2011-06-01

    TGFβ contributes to mammary gland development and has paradoxical roles in breast cancer because it has both tumor suppressor and tumor promoter activity. Another member of the TGFβ superfamily, activin, also has roles in the developing mammary gland, but these functions, and the role of activin in breast cancer, are not well characterized. TGFβ and activin share the same intracellular signaling pathways, but divergence in their signaling pathways are suggested. The purpose of this review is to compare the spatial and temporal expression of TGFβ and activin during mammary gland development, with consideration given to their functions during each developmental period. We also review the contributions of TGFβ and activin to breast cancer resistance and susceptibility. Finally, we consider the systemic contributions of activin in regulating obesity and diabetes; and the impact this regulation has on breast cancer. Elevated levels of activin in serum during pregnancy and its influence on pregnancy associated breast cancer are also considered. We conclude that evidence demonstrates that activin has tumor suppressing potential, without definitive indication of tumor promoting activity in the mammary gland, making it a good target for development of therapeutics.

  2. Amphiregulin: role in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    McBryan, Jean; Howlin, Jillian; Napoletano, Silvia; Martin, Finian

    2008-06-01

    Extensive epithelial cell proliferation underlies the ductal morphogenesis of puberty that generates the mammary tree that will eventually fill the fat pad. This estrogen-dependent process is believed to be essentially dependent on locally produced growth factors that act in a paracrine fashion. EGF-like growth factor ligands, acting through EGF receptors are some of the principal promoters of pubertal ductal morphogenesis. Amphiregulin is the most abundant EGF-like growth factor in the pubertal mammary gland. Its gene is transcriptionally regulated by ERalpha, and recent evidence identifies it as a key mediator of the estrogen-driven epithelial cell proliferation of puberty: The pubertal deficiency in mammary gland ductal morphogenesis in ERalpha, amphiregulin, and EGFR knockout mice phenocopy each other. As a prognostic indicator in human breast cancer, amphiregulin indicates an outcome identical to that predicted by ERalpha presence. Despite this, a range of studies both on preneoplastic human breast tissue and on cell culture based models of breast cancer, suggest a possibly significant role for amphiregulin in driving human breast cancer progression. Here we summarise our current understanding of amphiregulin's contribution to mammary gland development and breast cancer progression.

  3. Occurrence of mammary tumors in beagls given radium-226

    SciTech Connect

    Bruenger, F.W.; Lloyd, R.D.; Miller, S.C.; Taylor, G.N.; Angus, W.; Huth, D.A.

    1994-06-01

    A total of 128 primary mammary tumors (66 of them malignant) occurred in 35 female beagles injected with {sup 226}Ra at eight dose levels ranging from 0.2 to 440 kBq/kg body mass as young adults, while a total of 156 mammary tumors (57 of them malignant) were seen in 46 female control beagles not given any radioactivity. Sixty-three of 65 control dogs and 59 of 61 dogs given {sup 226}Ra survived the minimum age for diagnosis of mammary tumors of 3.75 years. Based on the observed age-dependent tumor incidence rates in the controls and on the corresponding number of dog-years at risk, the total number of observed malignant tumors in the radium group was statistically greater than the number of expected malignant tumors (66 observed vs 34 expected, P < 0.005). There was no such difference for the benign tumors. Cox regression analysis indicated no increased risk for the first tumor occurrence in irradiated dogs. Cox regression analysis of the multivariate risk sets showed no significantly increased risk for the occurrence of benign tumors but a statistically higher risk of 1.66 with a confidence interval of 1.15-2.40 for the occurrence of malignant tumors. The increased risk was dependent on dose, but a dependence on the frequency of previous occurrence of mammary tumors could not be confirmed. Censoring ovariectomized dogs at time of surgery decreased the relative risks slightly but did not alter the significance. Exposure to diagnostic X rays with cumulative exposures below 0.2 Gy had no effect on tumor formation. It is unknown whether the increased risk for malignant mammary tumors was due to some initial deposition of radium in sensitive tissue, a possible irradiation of fatty mammary tissue from transient radon {yields} polonium deposition, or a general effect of the overall radium deposition on the immune system of the dogs that lowered their resistance to formation of mammary tumors. 27 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Three-Dimensional Cultures of Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Rana; Bissell, Mina J.

    2013-01-01

    The mammary gland is an ideal “model organism” for studying tissue specificity and gene expression in mammals: it is one of the few organs that develop after birth and it undergoes multiple cycles of growth, differentiation and regression during the animal’s lifetime in preparation for the important function of lactation. The basic “functional differentiation” unit in the gland is the mammary acinus made up of a layer of polarized epithelial cells specialized for milk production surrounded by myoepithelial contractile cells, and the two-layered structure is surrounded by basement membrane. Much knowledge about the regulation of mammary gland development has been acquired from studying the physiology of the gland and of lactation in rodents. Culture studies, however, were hampered by the inability to maintain functional differentiation on conventional tissue culture plastic. We now know that the microenvironment, including the extracellular matrix and tissue architecture, plays a crucial role in directing functional differentiation of organs. Thus, in order for culture systems to be effective experimental models, they need to recapitulate the basic unit of differentiated function in the tissue or organ and to maintain its three-dimensional (3D) structure. Mouse mammary culture models evolved from basic monolayers of cells to an array of complex 3D systems that observe the importance of the microenvironment in dictating proper tissue function and structure. In this chapter, we focus on how 3D mouse mammary epithelial cultures have enabled investigators to gain a better understanding of the organization, development and function of the acinus, and to identify key molecular, structural, and mechanical cues important for maintaining mammary function and architecture. The accompanying chapter of Vidi et al. describes 3D models developed for human cells. Here, we describe how mouse primary epithelial cells and cell lines—essentially those we use in our

  5. Comparative expression pathway analysis of human and canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Uva, Paolo; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Watters, James; Loboda, Andrey; Kulkarni, Amit; Castle, John; Palombo, Fabio; Viti, Valentina; Mesiti, Giuseppe; Zappulli, Valentina; Marconato, Laura; Abramo, Francesca; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Lahm, Armin; La Monica, Nicola; de Rinaldis, Emanuele

    2009-01-01

    Background Spontaneous tumors in dog have been demonstrated to share many features with their human counterparts, including relevant molecular targets, histological appearance, genetics, biological behavior and response to conventional treatments. Mammary tumors in dog therefore provide an attractive alternative to more classical mouse models, such as transgenics or xenografts, where the tumour is artificially induced. To assess the extent to which dog tumors represent clinically significant human phenotypes, we performed the first genome-wide comparative analysis of transcriptional changes occurring in mammary tumors of the two species, with particular focus on the molecular pathways involved. Results We analyzed human and dog gene expression data derived from both tumor and normal mammary samples. By analyzing the expression levels of about ten thousand dog/human orthologous genes we observed a significant overlap of genes deregulated in the mammary tumor samples, as compared to their normal counterparts. Pathway analysis of gene expression data revealed a great degree of similarity in the perturbation of many cancer-related pathways, including the 'PI3K/AKT', 'KRAS', 'PTEN', 'WNT-beta catenin' and 'MAPK cascade'. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional relationships between different gene signatures observed in human breast cancer are largely maintained in the canine model, suggesting a close interspecies similarity in the network of cancer signalling circuitries. Conclusion Our data confirm and further strengthen the value of the canine mammary cancer model and open up new perspectives for the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics and the development of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers to be used in clinical studies. PMID:19327144

  6. RUNX2 in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Nicola; McDonald, Laura; Morris, Joanna S; Cameron, Ewan R; Blyth, Karen

    2013-06-01

    Runx2 is best known as an essential factor in osteoblast differentiation and bone development but, like many other transcription factors involved in development, is known to operate over a much wider tissue range. Our understanding of these other aspects of Runx2 function is still at a relatively early stage and the importance of its role in cell fate decisions and lineage maintenance in non-osseous tissues is only beginning to emerge. One such tissue is the mammary gland, where Runx2 is known to be expressed and participate in the regulation of mammary specific genes. Furthermore, differential and temporal expression of this gene is observed during mammary epithelial differentiation in vivo, strongly indicative of an important functional role. Although the precise nature of that role remains elusive, preliminary evidence hints at possible involvement in the regulation of mammary stem and/or progenitor cells. As with many genes important in regulating cell fate, RUNX2 has also been linked to metastatic cancer where in some established breast cell lines, retention of expression is associated with a more invasive phenotype. More recently, expression analysis has been extended to primary breast cancers where high levels of RUNX2 align with a specific subtype of the disease. That RUNX2 expression correlates with the so called "Triple Negative" subtype is particularly interesting given the known cross talk between Runx2 and estrogen receptor signaling pathways. This review summaries our current understanding of Runx2 in mammary gland development and cancer, and postulates a role that may link both these processes.

  7. Epimorphin Functions as a Key Morphoregulator for Mammary Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, H.; Lochter, A.; Galosy, S.; Koshida, S.; Niwa, S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1997-10-13

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and EGF have been reported to promote branching morphogenesis of mammary epithelial cells. We now show that it is epimorphin that is primarily responsible for this phenomenon. In vivo, epimorphin was detected in the stromal compartment but not in lumenal epithelial cells of the mammary gland; in culture, however, a subpopulation of mammary epithelial cells produced significant amounts of epimorphin. When epimorphin-expressing epithelial cell clones were cultured in collagen gels they displayed branching morphogenesis in the presence of HGF, EGF, keratinocyte growth factor, or fibroblast growth factor, a process that was inhibited by anti-epimorphin but not anti-HGF antibodies. The branch length, however, was roughly proportional to the ability of the factors to induce growth. Accordingly, epimorphin-negative epithelial cells simply grew in a cluster in response to the growth factors and failed to branch. When recombinant epimorphin was added to these collagen gels, epimorphin-negative cells underwent branching morphogenesis. The mode of action of epimorphin on morphogenesis of the gland, however, was dependent on how it was presented to the mammary cells. If epimorphin was overexpressed in epimorphin-negative epithelial cells under regulation of an inducible promoter or was allowed to coat the surface of each epithelial cell in a nonpolar fashion, the cells formed globular, alveoli-like structures with a large central lumen instead of branching ducts. This process was enhanced also by addition of HGF, EGF, or other growth factors and was inhibited by epimorphin antibodies. These results suggest that epimorphin is the primary morphogen in the mammary gland but that growth factors are necessary to achieve the appropriate cell numbers for the resulting morphogenesis to be visualized.

  8. Analysis of the transfer RNA population of mouse mammary glands infected with a latent mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Hentzen, D

    1976-09-01

    Mammary gland transfer RNA's (tRNA'S) of CEH mice infected with mammary tumor virus were analyzed in the preneoplastic state and compared to tRNAs of virus-free C3Hf mice and another uninfected strain, C57BL/6, which is completely resistant to cancer. This quantitative study was based on the ability of each tRNA to fix its corresponding amino acid. The amount of each of the 17 tRNA's tested was identical for the three mammary glands. In addition, tRNA populations during lactation correlated with the amino acids incorporated into the lactoproteins synthesized, which indicates adapation of the tRNA's to protein biosynthesis. Qualitative chromatographic studies on reverse phase capillary columns Type 5 of 10 aminoacyl-tRNA's did not reveal any difference in the isoacceptor elution profiles. This shows that no new isoaccepting tRNA is associated with the mammary tumor virus at that stage, and that no viral modification of a host tRNA has occurred.

  9. Regulation of adipocyte lipid homeostasis by genistein alters mammary epithelial cell differentiation: a paracrine mechanism for mammary tumor protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiological and animal studies have shown a negative correlation between breast cancer incidence and intake of soy rich foods. Our laboratory has studied soy protein isolate (SPI), the primary component of soy infant formula, as a paradigm to evaluate diet as a risk factor in mammary cancer. We ...

  10. Enhanced mammary progesterone receptor-A isoform activity in the promotion of mammary tumor progression by dietary soy in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary contribution to breast cancer risk, recurrence, and progression remains incompletely understood. Increased consumption of soy and soy isoflavones is associated with reduced mammary cancer susceptibility in women and in rodent models of carcinogenesis. In rats treated with N-Methyl-N-Nitrosou...

  11. A novel non-mouse mammary tumor virus activation of the Int-3 gene in a spontaneous mouse mammary tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Kordon, E C; Smith, G H; Callahan, R; Gallahan, D

    1995-01-01

    In a mouse mammary tumor model system in which carcinogenic progression can be investigated, we have found a unique mutation of Int-3 associated with progression from premalignant lobular hyperplasia to tumor. Sequence analysis of the rearranged fragment revealed an insertion of an intracisternal type A particle (IAP) within the Int-3 gene. Int-3 is mutated frequently in mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-induced mammary tumors by insertion of MMTV proviral DNA into this intragenic region. In these mutations, the insertion produces a chimeric Int-3 transcript encoding the cytoplasmic portion of the Int-3 protein driven by the MMTV long terminal repeat promoter. In this case, the IAP DNA was inserted in the opposite transcriptional orientation relative to Int-3; nevertheless, a similar chimeric RNA transcript driven by a cryptic promoter in the oppositely oriented 5' IAP long terminal repeat was generated. This is the first demonstration that an insertional mutation unrelated to MMTV activates an Int gene commonly associated with mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:7494323

  12. Mammary tumor modifiers in BALB/cJ mice heterozygous for p53.

    PubMed

    Koch, Joanna G; Gu, Xiangjun; Han, Younghun; El-Naggar, Adel K; Olson, Melissa V; Medina, Daniel; Jerry, D Joseph; Blackburn, Anneke C; Peltz, Gary; Amos, Christopher I; Lozano, Guillermina

    2007-05-01

    BALB/c mice are predisposed to developing spontaneous mammary tumors, which are further increased in a p53 heterozygous state. C57BL/6J mice are resistant to induced mammary tumors and develop less than 1% mammary tumors in both wild-type and p53+/- states. To map modifiers of mammary tumorigenesis, we have established F1 and F2 crosses and backcrosses to BALB/cJ (N2-BALB/cJ) and C57BL/6J (N2-C57BL/6J) strains. All cohorts developed mammary carcinomas in p53+/- females, suggesting that multiple loci dominantly and recessively contributed to mammary tumorigenesis. We mapped two modifiers of mammary tumorigenesis in the BALB/cJ strain. Mtsm1 (mammary tumor susceptibility modifier), a dominant-acting modifier, is located on chromosome 7. Mtsm1 is suggestive for linkage to mammary tumorigenesis (p = 0.001). We have analyzed the Mtsm1 region to locate candidate genes by comparing it to a rat modifier region, Mcs3, which shares syntenic conservation with Mtsm1. Expression data and SNPs were also taken into account. Five potential candidate genes within Mtsm1 are Aldh1a3, Chd2, Nipa2, Pcsk6, and Tubgcp5. The second modifier mapped is Mtsm2, a recessive-acting modifier. Mtsm2 is located on chromosome X and is significantly linked to mammary tumorigenesis (p = 1.03 x 10(-7)).

  13. Ectodysplasin/NF-κB Promotes Mammary Cell Fate via Wnt/β-catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Voutilainen, Maria; Lönnblad, Darielle; Shirokova, Vera; Elo, Teresa; Rysti, Elisa; Schmidt-Ullrich, Ruth; Schneider, Pascal; Mikkola, Marja L.

    2015-01-01

    Mammary gland development commences during embryogenesis with the establishment of a species typical number of mammary primordia on each flank of the embryo. It is thought that mammary cell fate can only be induced along the mammary line, a narrow region of the ventro-lateral skin running from the axilla to the groin. Ectodysplasin (Eda) is a tumor necrosis factor family ligand that regulates morphogenesis of several ectodermal appendages. We have previously shown that transgenic overexpression of Eda (K14-Eda mice) induces formation of supernumerary mammary placodes along the mammary line. Here, we investigate in more detail the role of Eda and its downstream mediator transcription factor NF-κB in mammary cell fate specification. We report that K14-Eda mice harbor accessory mammary glands also in the neck region indicating wider epidermal cell plasticity that previously appreciated. We show that even though NF-κB is not required for formation of endogenous mammary placodes, it is indispensable for the ability of Eda to induce supernumerary placodes. A genome-wide profiling of Eda-induced genes in mammary buds identified several Wnt pathway components as potential transcriptional targets of Eda. Using an ex vivo culture system, we show that suppression of canonical Wnt signalling leads to a dose-dependent inhibition of supernumerary placodes in K14-Eda tissue explants. PMID:26581094

  14. The prostaglandin E2 receptor EP2 is required for cyclooxygenase 2-mediated mammary hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sung-Hee; Ai, Youxi; Breyer, Richard M; Lane, Timothy F; Hla, Timothy

    2005-06-01

    Expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in breast cancer correlates with poor prognosis, and COX-2 enzyme inhibitors reduce breast cancer incidence in humans. We recently showed that COX-2 overexpression in the mammary gland of transgenic mice induced mammary cancer. Because prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is the major eicosanoid and because the EP2 subtype of the PGE2 receptor is highly expressed in the mammary tumors, we tested if this G protein-coupled receptor is required for tumorigenesis. We crossed the MMTV-COX-2 transgenic mice with Ep2-/- mice and studied tumor development in bigenic mice. Lack of EP2 receptor strongly suppressed COX-2-induced effects such as precocious development of the mammary gland in virgins and the development of mammary hyperplasia in multiparous female mice. Interestingly, the expression of amphiregulin, a potent mammary epithelial cell growth factor was down regulated in mammary glands of Ep2-/- mice. Total cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels were reduced in Ep2-/- mammary glands suggesting that PGE2 signaling via the EP2 receptor activates the Gs/cAMP/protein kinase A pathway. In mammary tumor cell lines, expression of the EP2 receptor followed by treatment with CAY10399, an EP2-specific agonist, strongly induced amphiregulin mRNA levels in a protein kinase A-dependent manner. These data suggest that PGE2 signaling via the EP2 receptor in mammary epithelial cells regulate mammary gland hyperplasia by the cAMP-dependent induction of amphiregulin. Inhibition of the EP2 pathway in the mammary gland may be a novel approach in the prevention and/or treatment of mammary cancer.

  15. Integrin β4 regulation of PTHrP underlies its contribution to mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiarong; Sun, Huayan; Feltri, M Laura; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2015-11-15

    The integrin α6β4 (referred to as β4) is expressed in epithelial cells where it functions as a laminin receptor. Although in vitro studies have implicated β4 in the biology of mammary epithelial cells, its contribution to mammary gland development has not been settled. To address this problem, we generated and analyzed itgb4(flox/flox)MMTV-Cre(-) and itgb4(flox/flox)MMTV-Cre(+) mice. The salient features of embryonic mammary tissue from itgb4(flox/flox)MMTV-Cre(+) mice were significantly smaller mammary buds and increased apoptosis in the surrounding mesenchyme. Also, compared to control glands, the itgb4-deleted mammary buds lacked expression of the progenitor cell marker CK14 and they were unable to generate mammary glands upon transplantation into cleared fat pads of recipient mice. Analysis of mammary glands at puberty and during pregnancy revealed that itgb4-diminished mammary tissue was unable to elongate and undergo branching morphogenesis. Micro-dissection of epithelial cells in the mammary bud and of the surrounding mesenchyme revealed that loss of β4 resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP) in epithelial cells and of target genes of the PTHrP receptor in mesenchymal cells. Given that the phenotype of the itgb4-deleted mammary tissue mimicked that of the PTHrP knockout, we hypothesized that β4 contributes to mammary gland development by sustaining PTHrP expression and enabling PTHrP signaling. Indeed, the inability of itgb4-deleted mammary buds to elongate was rescued by exogenous PTHrP. These data implicate a critical role for the β4 integrin in mammary gland development and provide a mechanism for this role.

  16. Contralateral compartment syndrome inoculated by invasive group A streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huiwen; Mcphillips, Sean Thomas; Chundi, Vishnu

    2016-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is a rare but a well-documented complication in patients with trauma-induced group A streptococcus infection. Here, we present a case of a male who developed compartment syndrome on the left lower extremity after an injury inoculated by group A streptococcus on the right lower extremity. The patient was resuscitated with antibiotics, urgent fasciotomy, and immunoglobulin. The patient was eventually transferred to a burn center for further care. PMID:27802865

  17. Degradation of PAHs in soil by indigenous and inoculated bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Aamand, J.; Bruntse, G.; Jepsen, M.; Joergensen, C.; Jensen, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    In soil heavily polluted by coal tar, the inherent mineralization of radio-labeled phenanthrene to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was relatively slow, and a stimulation of degradation was observed by inoculation with a mixed population of PAH-degrading bacteria. A much faster inherent mineralization of phenanthrene was observed in soil slightly polluted by coal tar, and inoculation of this soil had no effect. Several phenanthrene-degrading bacteria were isolated from different soils. Two strains were further characterized as an Arthrobacter sp. and a Pseudomonas sp. In an organic medium without phenanthrene, growth rates of 0.52 h{sup {minus}1} and 0.71 h{sup {minus}1} were measured for the Arthrobacter sp. and the Pseudomonas sp., respectively. Most isolates grown in the phenanthrene-free medium, including the Arthrobacter sp., rapidly adapted to phenanthrene degradation following transfer to a phenanthrene-containing medium. In contrast, the phenanthrene-degrading capability of other strains, including the Pseudomonas sp., was lost during growth in the phenanthrene-free medium. Growth in an organic medium without phenanthrene of strains that retain the ability to degrade phenanthrene could prove to be a useful technique for production of PAH-degrading bacteria on a larger scale for soil inoculation.

  18. Successive site translocating inoculation potentiates DNA/recombinant vaccinia vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Na; Hu, Weiguo; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing; Wan, Yanmin

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccines have advantages over traditional vaccine modalities; however the relatively low immunogenicity restrains its translation into clinical use. Further optimizations are needed to get the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine closer to the level required for human use. Here we show that intramuscularly inoculating into a different limb each time significantly improves the immunogenicities of both DNA and recombinant vaccinia vaccines during multiple vaccinations, compared to repeated vaccination on the same limb. We term this strategy successive site translocating inoculation (SSTI). SSTI could work in synergy with genetic adjuvant and DNA prime-recombinant vaccinia boost regimen. By comparing in vivo antigen expression, we found that SSTI avoided the specific inhibition of in vivo antigen expression, which was observed in the limbs being repeatedly inoculated. Employing in vivo T cell depletion and passive IgG transfer, we delineated that the inhibition was not mediated by CD8+ T cells but by specific antibodies. Finally, by using C3−/− mouse model and in vivo NK cells depletion, we identified that specific antibodies negatively regulated the in vivo antigen expression primarily in a complement depended way. PMID:26667202

  19. Stability of Bradyrhizobium japonicum Inoculants after Introduction into Soil

    PubMed Central

    Brunel, Brigitte; Cleyet-Marel, Jean-Claude; Normand, Philippe; Bardin, Rene

    1988-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 125-Sp, USDA 138, and USDA 138-Sm had been used as inoculants for soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) in soils previously free of B. japonicum. At 8 to 13 years after their release, these strains were reisolated from soil samples. A total of 115 isolates were obtained through nodules, and seven colonies were obtained directly by a serological method. The stability of the inoculants was confirmed by comparing the reisolated cultures with their respective parental strains which had been preserved by being lyophilized or stored on a yeast extract-mannitol agar slant at 4°C. Comparisons were made on morphological and serological characters, carbon compound utilization (8 tested), intrinsic antibiotic resistance (9 tested), and enzymatic activity (19 tested). Mucous and nonmucous isolates of serogroup 125 were analyzed for symbiotic effectiveness and restriction fragment hybridization with a DNA probe. Our data suggest that the B. japonicum inoculants have survived for up to 13 years in the soils without significant mutation except for two reisolates with a slightly increased kanamycin resistance level. Images PMID:16347768

  20. Successful inoculation of mature pine with Tricholoma matsutake.

    PubMed

    Guerin-Laguette, Alexis; Matsushita, Norihisa; Lapeyrie, Frédéric; Shindo, Katsumi; Suzuki, Kazuo

    2005-06-01

    Our finding demonstrates, for the first time, that the roots of mature pine trees can be successfully inoculated with a symbiotic ectomycorrhizal fungus, the valuable matsutake mushroom. Long root segments (ca. 5-10 mm in diameter, ca. 50 cm in length) of 50-year-old Pinus densiflora trees were excavated, washed, auxin-treated (2-5 mg indole butyric acid, IBA, per root) and incubated in moist Spagnum moss. Twelve months later, short roots were regenerated, of which approximately 90% were free of mycorrhizae. Mycorrhiza-free short roots were inoculated with mycelial pieces of Tricholoma matsutake and incubated further in a sterilized substrate. Four-and-a-half months later, roots putatively colonized by Matsutake were sampled near the inoculation points. A T. matsutake-specific ITS-rDNA fragment was amplified by nested PCR from approximately 80% of the root samples analyzed, whereas approximately 66% of the root samples processed for staining with Chlorazol black E displayed characteristic T. matsutake Hartig net structures. These results confirm the symbiotic infection of mature P. densiflora roots by matsutake.

  1. Successive site translocating inoculation potentiates DNA/recombinant vaccinia vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Na; Hu, Weiguo; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing; Wan, Yanmin

    2015-12-15

    DNA vaccines have advantages over traditional vaccine modalities; however the relatively low immunogenicity restrains its translation into clinical use. Further optimizations are needed to get the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine closer to the level required for human use. Here we show that intramuscularly inoculating into a different limb each time significantly improves the immunogenicities of both DNA and recombinant vaccinia vaccines during multiple vaccinations, compared to repeated vaccination on the same limb. We term this strategy successive site translocating inoculation (SSTI). SSTI could work in synergy with genetic adjuvant and DNA prime-recombinant vaccinia boost regimen. By comparing in vivo antigen expression, we found that SSTI avoided the specific inhibition of in vivo antigen expression, which was observed in the limbs being repeatedly inoculated. Employing in vivo T cell depletion and passive IgG transfer, we delineated that the inhibition was not mediated by CD8(+) T cells but by specific antibodies. Finally, by using C3(-/-) mouse model and in vivo NK cells depletion, we identified that specific antibodies negatively regulated the in vivo antigen expression primarily in a complement depended way.

  2. Regulation of mammary stem cell population with dietary intake of soy protein isolate reveals novel mechanisms for diet-mediated control of mammary tumorigenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Breast cancer risk is highly modified by environmental factors including diet. Previously, we showed that dietary intake of soy protein isolate (SPI) decreased mammary tumor incidence and increased mammary tumor latency in rats relative to those fed a control casein (CAS) diet, when exposed to the c...

  3. Aurora kinase-A overexpression in mouse mammary epithelium induces mammary adenocarcinomas harboring genetic alterations shared with human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Treekitkarnmongkol, Warapen; Katayama, Hiroshi; Kai, Kazuharu; Sasai, Kaori; Jones, Jennifer Carter; Wang, Jing; Shen, Li; Sahin, Aysegul A; Gagea, Mihai; Ueno, Naoto T; Creighton, Chad J; Sen, Subrata

    2016-12-01

    Recent data from The Cancer Genome Atlas analysis have revealed that Aurora kinase A (AURKA) amplification and overexpression characterize a distinct subset of human tumors across multiple cancer types. Although elevated expression of AURKA has been shown to induce oncogenic phenotypes in cells in vitro, findings from transgenic mouse models of Aurora-A overexpression in mammary glands have been distinct depending on the models generated. In the present study, we report that prolonged overexpression of AURKA transgene in mammary epithelium driven by ovine β-lactoglobulin promoter, activated through multiple pregnancy and lactation cycles, results in the development of mammary adenocarcinomas with alterations in cancer-relevant genes and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The tumor incidence was 38.9% (7/18) in Aurora-A transgenic mice at 16 months of age following 4-5 pregnancy cycles. Aurora-A overexpression in the tumor tissues accompanied activation of Akt, elevation of Cyclin D1, Tpx2 and Plk1 along with downregulation of ERα and p53 proteins, albeit at varying levels. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses of transgenic mouse mammary adenocarcinomas revealed copy gain of Glp1r and losses of Ercc5, Pten and Tcf7l2 loci. Review of human breast tumor transcriptomic data sets showed association of these genes at varying levels with Aurora-A gain of function alterations. Whole exome sequencing of the mouse tumors also identified gene mutations detected in Aurora-A overexpressing human breast cancers. Our findings demonstrate that prolonged overexpression of Aurora-A can be a driver somatic genetic event in mammary adenocarcinomas associated with deregulated tumor-relevant pathways in the Aurora-A subset of human breast cancer.

  4. The biology of zinc transport in mammary epithelial cells: implications for mammary gland development, lactation, and involution.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Nicholas H; Hennigar, Stephen R; Kiselyov, Kirill; Kelleher, Shannon L

    2014-03-01

    Zinc plays a critical role in a vast array of cellular functions including gene transcription, protein translation, cell proliferation, differentiation, bioenergetics, and programmed cell death. The mammary gland depends upon tight coordination of these processes during development and reproduction for optimal expansion, differentiation, and involution. For example, zinc is required for activation of matrix metalloproteinases, intracellular signaling cascades such as MAPK and PKC, and the activation of both mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis and lysosomal-mediated cell death. In addition to functional needs, during lactation the mammary gland must balance providing optimal zinc for cellular requirements with the need to secrete a substantial amount of zinc into milk to meet the requirements of the developing neonate. Finally, the mammary gland exhibits the most profound example of programmed cell death, which is driven by both apoptotic and lysosomal-mediated cell death. Two families of zinc-specific transporters regulate zinc delivery for these diverse functions. Members of the ZIP family of zinc transporters (ZIP1-14) import zinc into the cytoplasm from outside the cell or from subcellular organelles, while members of the ZnT family (ZnT1-10) export zinc from the cytoplasm. Recently, the ion channel transient receptor potential mucolipin 1 (TRPML1) has also been implicated in zinc transport. Herein, we review our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms through which mammary epithelial cells utilize zinc with a focus on the transport of zinc into discrete subcellular organelles for specific cellular functions during mammary gland development, lactation, and involution.

  5. Carcinoma-associated fucosylated antigens are markers of the epithelial state and can contribute to cell adhesion through CLEC17A (Prolectin)

    PubMed Central

    Breiman, Adrien; Robles, María Dolores López; de Carné Trécesson, Sophie; Echasserieau, Klara; Bernardeau, Karine; Drickamer, Kurt; Imberty, Anne; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Altare, Frédéric; Le Pendu, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Terminal fucosylated motifs of glycoproteins and glycolipid chains are often altered in cancer cells. We investigated the link between fucosylation changes and critical steps in cancer progression: epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and lymph node metastasis. Using mammary cell lines, we demonstrate that during EMT, expression of some fucosylated antigens (e.g.: Lewis Y) is decreased as a result of repression of the fucosyltransferase genes FUT1 and FUT3. Moreover, we identify the fucose-binding bacterial lectin BC2L-C-Nt as a specific probe for the epithelial state. Prolectin (CLEC17A), a human lectin found on lymph node B cells, shares ligand specificities with BC2L-C-Nt. It binds preferentially to epithelial rather than to mesenchymal cells, and microfluidic experiments showed that prolectin behaves as a cell adhesion molecule for epithelial cells. Comparison of paired primary tumors/lymph node metastases revealed an increase of prolectin staining in metastasis and high FUT1 and FUT3 mRNA expression was associated with poor prognosis. Our data suggest that tumor cells invading the lymph nodes and expressing fucosylated motifs associated with the epithelial state could use prolectin as a colonization factor. PMID:26908442

  6. Survival of Rhizobium phaseoli in coal-based legume inoculants applied to seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, S.L.; Berryhill, D.L.

    1983-02-01

    Eight coals used as carriers in legume inoculants promoted the survival of Rhizobium phaseoli on pinto bean seeds. Although peat was more protective, most coal-based inoculants provided >10/sup 4/ viable rhizobia per seed after 4 weeks.

  7. Optimization and characterization of an in vitro bovine mammary cell culture system to study regulation of milk protein synthesis and mammary differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Talhouk, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    A long term bovine mammary cell culture system that maintains normal mammary cell function was established and optimized to study milk protein synthesis and secretion and mammary differentiation. This culture system used bovine mammary acini isolated from developing or lactating mammary gland by enzymatic dissociation, and cryopreserved until thawed and plated for growth in vitro for these studies. Cells in M199 with lactogenic hormones {plus minus} fetal calf serum (FCS) were cultured on plastic, 100ul and 500ul type I collagen, and Matrigel, or embedded within type I collagen. Cell morphology, cell number, and total TCA-precipitable {sup 35}S-labelled proteins were monitored. Milk protein ({alpha}{sub s,1}-casein, lactoferrin (LF), {alpha}-lactalbumin, and {beta}-lactoglobulin) secretion and intracellular levels were determined by an ELISA assay.

  8. Phospholipid makeup of the breast adipose tissue is impacted by obesity and mammary cancer in the mouse: Results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Michael; Perez, Osvaldo; Martinez, Mitchell; Santander, Ana M; Mendez, Armando J; Nadji, Mehrdad; Nayer, Ali; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy; Torroella-Kouri, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, an established risk factor for breast cancer (BC), is associated with systemic inflammation. The breast contains adipose tissue (bAT), yet whether it plays a role in BC progression in obese females is being intensively studied. There is scarce knowledge on the lipid composition of bAT in health and disease. The purpose of this pilot study was: 1) to determine whether obesity and BC are associated with inflammatory changes in bAT 2) to analyze for the first time the lipid profile of bAT in obese and lean mammary tumor-bearing and normal mice. Syngeneic E0771 mammary tumor cells were implanted into the mammary fat pad of lean and diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice. BATs were analyzed four weeks after tumor cell inoculation by immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry. Phospholipids were identified and subjected to ratiometric quantification using a TSQ Quantum Access Max triple quadrupole mass spectrometer utilizing precursor ion scan or neutral ion loss scan employing appropriate class specific lipid standards in a two step quantification process. Four main classes of phospholipids were analyzed: phosphatidylcholines phosphatidylserines, phosphatidylethanolamines and phosphatidylinositols. Our results showed that bAT in obese (normal and tumor-bearing) mice contained hypertrophic adipocytes compared with their corresponding samples in lean mice; higher numbers of macrophages and crown-like structures were observed in obese tumor bearers compared to obese normal mice. BAT from normal obese mice revealed higher concentrations of phosphatidylethanolamines. Furthermore, bAT from tumor-bearing mice expressed higher phosphatidylcholines than that from non-tumor bearing mice, suggesting the presence of the tumor is associated with phosphatidylcholines. Conversion of phosphatidylethanolamines to phosphatidylcholines will be investigated in E0771 cells. Additional studies are projected to investigate macrophage activation by these specific classes of phospholipids

  9. Autocrine-paracrine regulation of the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Weaver, S R; Hernandez, L L

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland has a remarkable capacity for regulation at a local level, particularly with respect to its main function: milk secretion. Regulation of milk synthesis has significant effects on animal and human health, at the level of both the mother and the neonate. Control by the mammary gland of its essential function, milk synthesis, is an evolutionary necessity and is therefore tightly regulated at a local level. For at least the last 60 yr, researchers have been interested in elucidating the mechanisms underpinning the mammary gland's ability to self-regulate, largely without the influence from systemic hormones or signals. By the 1960s, scientists realized the importance of milk removal in the capacity of the gland to produce milk and that the dynamics of this removal, including emptying of the alveolar spaces and frequency of milking, were controlled locally as opposed to traditional systemic hormonal regulation. Using both in vitro systems and various mammalian species, including goats, marsupials, humans, and dairy cows, it has been demonstrated that the mammary gland is largely self-regulating in its capacity to support the young, which is the evolutionary basis for milk production. Local control occurs at the level of the mammary epithelial cell through pressure and stretching negative-feedback mechanisms, and also in an autocrine fashion through bioactive factors within the milk which act as inhibitors, regulating milk secretion within the alveoli themselves. It is only within the last 20 to 30 yr that potential candidates for these bioactive factors have been examined at a molecular level. Several, including parathyroid hormone-related protein, growth factors (transforming growth factor, insulin-like growth factor, epidermal growth factor), and serotonin, are synthesized within and act upon the gland and possess dynamic receptor activity resulting in diverse effects on growth, calcium homeostasis, and milk composition. This review will focus on the

  10. The rat mammary gland: morphologic changes as an indicator of systemic hormonal perturbations induced by xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Julia N; Rudmann, Daniel G; Credille, Kelly M; Irizarry, Armando R; Peter, Augustine; Snyder, Paul W

    2007-02-01

    The development and morphology of the rat mammary gland are dependent upon several hormones including estrogens, androgens, progesterone, growth hormone and prolactin. In toxicology studies, treatment with xenobiotics may alter these hormones resulting in changes in the morphology of reproductive tissues such as the mammary gland. In the rat, male and female mammary glands exhibit striking morphologic differences that can be altered secondary to hormonal perturbations. Recognizing these morphologic changes can help the pathologist predict potential xenobiotic-induced perturbations in the systemic hormonal milieu. This review examines the development of the rat mammary gland and the influence of sex hormones on the morphology of the adult male and female rat mammary gland. Specific case examples from the literature and data from our laboratory highlight the dynamic nature of the rat mammary gland in response to hormonal changes.

  11. Tenascin is a Stromal Marker for Epithelial Malignancy in the Mammary Gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackie, Eleanor J.; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Adams Pearson, Carolyn; Inaguma, Yutaka; Taya, Koji; Kawarada, Yoshifumi; Sakakura, Teruyo

    1987-07-01

    Tenascin is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein that is not present in the normal mature rat mammary gland. The distribution of tenascin was examined by immunohistochemistry in mammary tumors from carcinogen-treated and untreated rats, in virus-induced mammary tumors from mice, and in a variety of mammary gland lesions from humans. Tenascin was detectable in the stroma of the malignant but not of the benign tumors from all species. An inhibition ELISA, testing homogenates of rat tumors, confirmed that tenascin was present in malignant but not in benign tumors. Thus, tenascin was consistently found to be a stromal marker for epithelial malignancy in the mammary gland. It is concluded that tenascin may be involved in the interactions between the epithelial and mesenchyme-derived (stromal) components of the mammary gland, which are known to influence epithelial carcinogenesis in this organ.

  12. Similarity of GATA-3 Expression between Rat and Human Mammary Glands.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yuichi; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Emoto, Yuko; Yuki, Michiko; Yuri, Takashi; Shikata, Nobuaki; Tsubura, Airo

    2014-07-01

    The GATA family members are zinc finger transcription factors involved in cell differentiation and proliferation. In particular, GATA-3 is necessary for mammary gland maturation and is a useful marker in the characterization of mammary carcinoma in humans. The expression of GATA-3 protein in normal mammary glands, fibroadenomas and carcinomas was immunohistochemically compared in female rats and humans. In normal mammary glands of rats and humans, scattered luminal cells in the acini and whole ductal epithelial cells were positive for GATA-3 in the nuclei. No positive cells were detected in rat or human fibroadenomas. In rat and human mammary carcinomas, the nuclei of proliferating luminal-derived cancer cells expressed GATA-3. Therefore, GATA-3 protein is a candidate marker for mammary carcinoma in rats as well as humans.

  13. Muscarinic receptors participation in angiogenic response induced by macrophages from mammary adenocarcinoma-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Eulalia; Davel, Lilia; Jasnis, María A; Gotoh, Tomomi; de Lustig, Eugenia Sacerdote; Sales, María E

    2005-01-01

    Introduction The role of macrophages in tumor progression has generated contradictory evidence. We had previously demonstrated the ability of peritoneal macrophages from LMM3 murine mammary adenocarcinoma-bearing mice (TMps) to increase the angiogenicity of LMM3 tumor cells, mainly through polyamine synthesis. Here we investigate the ability of the parasympathetic nervous system to modulate angiogenesis induced by TMps through the activation of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAchR). Methods Peritoneal macrophages from female BALB/c mice bearing a 7-day LMM3 tumor were inoculated intradermally (3 × 105 cells per site) into syngeneic mice. Before inoculation, TMps were stimulated with the muscarinic agonist carbachol in the absence or presence of different muscarinic antagonists or enzyme inhibitors. Angiogenesis was evaluated by counting vessels per square millimeter of skin. The expression of mAchR, arginase and cyclo-oxygenase (COX) isoforms was analyzed by Western blotting. Arginase and COX activities were evaluated by urea and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, respectively. Results TMps, which stimulate neovascularization, express functional mAchR, because carbachol-treated TMps potently increased new blood vessels formation. This response was completely blocked by preincubating TMps with pirenzepine and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine (4-DAMP), M1 and M3 receptor antagonists, and partly by the M2 receptor antagonist methoctramine. M1 receptor activation by carbachol in TMps triggers neovascularization through arginase products because Nω-hydroxy-L-arginine reversed the agonist action. Preincubation of TMps with methoctramine partly prevented carbachol-stimulated urea formation. In addition, COX-derived liberation of PGE2 is responsible for the promotion of TMps angiogenic activity by M3 receptor. We also detected a higher expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in TMps than in macrophages from normal mice. Carbachol

  14. Effect of post-inoculation relative humidity on peanut infection by Sclerotinia minor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stems of six-week-old plants of the cv Okrun (susceptible to Sclerotinia blight) were inoculated with S. minor. Two post-inoculation humidity regimes of 100% RH were used. In the first RH regime, one inoculation chamber was kept open for the duration of experiment (DOE), and five were closed for d...

  15. The Potential of Inoculation in Promoting Resistance to the Effectiveness of Comparative Advertising Messages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfau, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Examines the potential of the inoculation message strategy to deflect the persuasiveness of comparative advertisements. Indicates modest potential for inoculation, confirming that inoculation pretreatments confer resistance to a comparative ad's influence on consumer attitudes, especially on behalf of high-involving products. (SR)

  16. Effect of post-inoculation relative humidity (RH) on peanut infection by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stems of six-week-old plants of the cv Okrun (susceptible to Sclerotinia blight) were inoculated with S. sclerotiorum, isolated from pumpkin. Two post-inoculation humidity regimes of 100% RH were used. In the first RH regime, one inoculation chamber was kept open for the duration of experiment (DO...

  17. Key stages in mammary gland development: the mammary end bud as a motile organ.

    PubMed

    Hinck, Lindsay; Silberstein, Gary B

    2005-01-01

    In the rodent, epithelial end buds define the tips of elongating mammary ducts. These highly motile structures undergo repeated dichotomous branching as they aggressively advance through fatty stroma and, turning to avoid other ducts, they finally cease growth leaving behind the open, tree-like framework on which secretory alveoli develop during pregnancy. This review identifies the motility of end buds as a unique developmental marker that represents the successful integration of systemic and local mammotrophic influences, and covers relevant advances in ductal growth regulation, extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, and cell adhesion in the inner end bud. An unexpected growth-promoting synergy between insulin-like growth factor-1 and progesterone, in which ducts elongate without forming new end buds, is described as well as evidence strongly supporting self-inhibition of ductal elongation by end-bud-secreted transforming growth factor-beta acting on stromal targets. The influence of the matrix metalloproteinase ECM-remodeling enzymes, notably matrix metalloproteinase-2, on end bud growth is discussed in the broader context of enzymes that regulate the polysaccharide-rich glycosaminoglycan elements of the ECM. Finally, a critical, motility-enabling role for the cellular architecture of the end bud is identified and the contribution of cadherins, the netrin/neogenin system, and ErbB2 to the structure and motility of end buds is discussed.

  18. A mammary cell-specific enhancer in mouse mammary tumor virus DNA is composed of multiple regulatory elements including binding sites for CTF/NFI and a novel transcription factor, mammary cell-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Mink, S; Härtig, E; Jennewein, P; Doppler, W; Cato, A C

    1992-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a milk-transmitted retrovirus involved in the neoplastic transformation of mouse mammary gland cells. The expression of this virus is regulated by mammary cell type-specific factors, steroid hormones, and polypeptide growth factors. Sequences for mammary cell-specific expression are located in an enhancer element in the extreme 5' end of the long terminal repeat region of this virus. This enhancer, when cloned in front of the herpes simplex thymidine kinase promoter, endows the promoter with mammary cell-specific response. Using functional and DNA-protein-binding studies with constructs mutated in the MMTV long terminal repeat enhancer, we have identified two main regulatory elements necessary for the mammary cell-specific response. These elements consist of binding sites for a transcription factor in the family of CTF/NFI proteins and the transcription factor mammary cell-activating factor (MAF) that recognizes the sequence G Pu Pu G C/G A A G G/T. Combinations of CTF/NFI- and MAF-binding sites or multiple copies of either one of these binding sites but not solitary binding sites mediate mammary cell-specific expression. The functional activities of these two regulatory elements are enhanced by another factor that binds to the core sequence ACAAAG. Interdigitated binding sites for CTF/NFI, MAF, and/or the ACAAAG factor are also found in the 5' upstream regions of genes encoding whey milk proteins from different species. These findings suggest that mammary cell-specific regulation is achieved by a concerted action of factors binding to multiple regulatory sites. Images PMID:1328867

  19. Investigation of the Role of the Mitogenic Neuropeptide Galanin in Mammary Gland Development and Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    mammary epithelial cells. 5 commenced in Gal’ mice, where small alveoli showed colostrum retention (Fig. 2C). Differentiation of the mammary epithelium...compared to wild type animals there were many more ducts that had not commenced lactation and which retained colostrum (Fig. 2C). Analysis of milk protein...are clear Naylor et al. Galanin regulation of mammary epithelial cells. 25 and open, while non-lactating less differentiated ducts retain colostrum

  20. Canonical Wnt Signaling as a Specific Marker of Normal and Tumorigenic Mammary Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    mammary epithelium impacts glandular development . We found ductal abnormali ties; however, the phenotype was not as severe as expected. Approximately...In previous reports we have clearly showed that cells w ith activated canonical Wnt signaling are present within the mammary epithelium starting at...Wnt1 transgenic cells. We generated a mouse line in which ~-catenin is conditionally deleted in the mammary epithelium of MMTV-Wnt1 transgenic

  1. Comparative Roles of Overexpressed and Mutated H- and K-ras in Mammary Carcinogenesis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-08-01

    initiated tumors ) using the mismatch amplification mutation assay ( MAMA ) developed by Cha et al (5). Our initial studies indicated that there was...fold more potent at inducing mammary tumors than the activated K-ras gene. Yet, the K-ras oncogene was still effective at mammary carcinoma induction...transgenic rats harboring a H-ras gene (HrHr transgenics) or K-ras gene (HrKr transgenics) controlled by H-ras gene regulatory elements. Mammary tumor

  2. Role of Fibroblast Growth Factor Binding Protein-1 in Mammary Development and Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Hens and Wysolmerski 2005). At the future site of each nipple , five disk-like placodes line up and invade into the underlying mesenchyme. Referred...mouse mammary gland forms a single ductal tree leading to each nipple . The nascent mammary gland remains quiescent until puberty where the...harvested as described in this original proposal. 12 Apoptosis at regular intervals is a normal part of mammary physiology . In murine models

  3. Investigating the Role of FIP200 in Mammary Carcinogenesis Using a Transgenic Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    the mammary gland of virgin mice however, lactating mice have severe lobulo-alveolar hypoplasia in the mammary gland. After completing the analysis... hypoplasia which renders the dams unable to lactate). In the 1B mating scheme a female mouse with FAKFlox/Flox genotype was mated to a male MMTV...Epithelial-Specific Deletion of the Focal Adhesion Kinase Gene Leads to Severe Lobulo-Alveolar Hypoplasia and Secretory Immaturity of the Murine Mammary

  4. Advanced Imaging Approaches to Characterize Stromal and Metabolic Changes in In Vivo Mammary Tumor Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    characterization and toward future intravital studies. Preliminary fluorescence lifetime images were also collected intravitally through a mammary imaging window...intend to use this characterization to understand shifts in fluorescence lifetime collected by intravital imaging using a mammary imaging window...collected intravitally through a mammary imaging window implanted in a female, PyVT positive, Col1a1 heterozygote, mouse (Figure 7). A paper has

  5. Role of the Stem Cell Niche in Hormone-Induced Tumorigenesis in Fetal Mouse Mammary Epithelium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0719 TITLE: Role of the Stem Cell Niche in Hormone-Induced Tumorigenesis in Fetal Mouse Mammary Epithelium PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Role of the Stem Cell Niche in Hormone-induced Tumorigenesis in Fetal Mouse 5b. GRANT NUMBER Mammary Epithelium...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT SEE PAGE 4 15. SUBJECT TERMS Stem Cells , Stem Cell niche, Immunohistochemistry, mammary gland, breast cancer 16

  6. [THE ROLE OF ENDOSCOPIC MAMMODUCTOSCOPY IN COMPLEX DIAGNOSIS OF INTRADUCTAL TUMORS OF MAMMARY GLAND].

    PubMed

    Aksyonov, O A

    2015-11-01

    First Ukrainian experience in endoscopic mammoductoscopy (EMDS) conduction in 112 patients for revealing of intraductal tumors of mammary gland is presented. In comparison with roentgenological, ultrasonographic and cytological diagnostical methods, EMDS for intraductal tumors of mammary gland differs by highest sensitivity (90.3%) and accuracy (80.2%), but insufficient (47.4%) specificity. To improve the surgical treatment results the authors propose their own method of marking of the mammary gland intraductal tumors under endoscopic and echographic control.

  7. Transgenic Mammary Epithelial Osteopontin (Spp1) Expression Induces Proliferation and Alveologenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Neil E.; Chen, Qian J.; Sickafoose, Laura K.; Wood, Meghan B.; Gregg, Jeffrey P.; Abrahamsson, Ninnie M.; Engelberg, Jesse A.; Walls, Judith E.

    2013-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) Spp1 is involved in differentiation of the mammary gland. We engineered mice to overexpress OPN in mammary epithelium and describe an altered mammary phenotype. Three transgenic (Tg) founder lines FVB/N Tg(MMTV-Opn)(1-3BOR) were propagated after FVB/NJ pronuclear injections. Mammary glands from Tg-OPN mice compared to littermate controls showed, at 4 weeks of age, exaggerated terminal end buds; at 8 and 12 weeks, more numerous and complex ducts with increased luminal protein; and at 16 weeks, increased lobulogenesis. Lactational Tg-OPN mammary glands showed more rapid lobulogenesis and lactational changes with slower gland involution and regression following weaning. Ex vivo lobulogenesis was noticeably increased from organoids of Tg-OPN mice. Immunohistochemistry revealed cytoplasmic OPN accumulation and increased Ki-67 positive mammary epithelial cells in Tg-OPN mammary glands. OPN appears to convey a proliferative stimulus for mammary epithelial cells and alters development and differentiation. These OPN mammary overexpressing mice provide a means to study the role of OPN in cancer progression. PMID:24069507

  8. Socs2 and elf5 mediate prolactin-induced mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jessica; Stanford, Prudence M; Sutherland, Kate; Oakes, Samantha R; Naylor, Matthew J; Robertson, Fiona G; Blazek, Katrina D; Kazlauskas, Michael; Hilton, Heidi N; Wittlin, Sergio; Alexander, Warren S; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Visvader, Jane E; Ormandy, Christopher J

    2006-05-01

    The proliferative phase of mammary alveolar morphogenesis is initiated during early pregnancy by rising levels of serum prolactin and progesterone, establishing a program of gene expression that is ultimately responsible for the development of the lobuloalveoli and the onset of lactation. To explore this largely unknown genetic program, we constructed transcript profiles derived from transplanted mammary glands formed by recombination of prolactin receptor (Prlr) knockout or wild-type mammary epithelium with wild-type mammary stroma. Comparison with profiles derived from prolactin-treated Scp2 mammary epithelial cells produced a small set of commonly prolactin-regulated genes that included the negative regulator of cytokine signaling, Socs2 (suppressor of cytokine signaling 2), and the ets transcription factor, E74-like factor 5 (Elf5). Homozygous null mutation of Socs2 rescued the failure of lactation and reduction of mammary signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 phosphorylation that characterizes Prlr heterozygous mice, demonstrating that mammary Socs2 is a key regulator of the prolactin-signaling pathway. Reexpression of Elf5 in Prlr nullizygous mammary epithelium restored lobuloalveolar development and milk production, demonstrating that Elf5 is a transcription factor capable of substituting for prolactin signaling. Thus, Socs2 and Elf5 are key members of the set of prolactin-regulated genes that mediate prolactin-driven mammary development.

  9. Pro-inflammatory cytokines: Useful markers for the diagnosis of canine mammary tumours?

    PubMed

    Andaluz, Ana; Yeste, Marc; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan E; Rigau, Teresa; García, Félix; Rivera del Álamo, Maria Montserrat

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyse the expression of 60 pro-inflammatory cytokines as possible markers of malignancy in canine mammary tumours using a human cytokine antibody array. The cytokines were grouped into two different categories: (1) cytokines in which expression indicated the presence of a mammary tumour and (2) cytokines in which expression differentiated between simple mammary adenoma, tubulopapillary carcinoma or complex carcinoma. These data suggest that specific pro-inflammatory cytokines could be useful as tools for the diagnosis of canine mammary tumours.

  10. Slugging their way to immortality: driving mammary epithelial cells into a stem cell-like state.

    PubMed

    Soady, Kelly; Smalley, Matthew J

    2012-09-10

    Delineating the molecular factors that define and maintain the mammary stem cell state is vital for understanding normal development and tumourigenesis. A recent study by Guo and colleagues identifies two master transcriptional regulators of mammary stem cells, Slug and Sox9, ectopic expression of which confers stem cell attributes on differentiated mammary epithelial cells. Slug and Sox9 expression was also shown to determine in vivo metastatic potential of human breast cancer cell lines. Understanding these factors in the context of normal lineage differentiation is an important step toward elucidating the mammary epithelial cell hierarchy and the origins of cancer stem cells.

  11. Establishment and Characterization of a Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) Mammary Epithelial Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Vijay; Dogra, Nilambra; Singh, Surender; Kumar, Sudarshan N.; Jena, Manoj K.; Malakar, Dhruba; Dang, Ajay K.; Mishra, Bishnu P.; Mukhopadhyay, Tapas K.; Kaushik, Jai K.; Mohanty, Ashok K.

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to establish the buffalo mammary epithelial cell line (BuMEC) and characterize its mammary specific functions. Methodology Buffalo mammary tissue collected from the slaughter house was processed enzymatically to obtain a heterogenous population of cells containing both epithelial and fibroblasts cells. Epithelial cells were purified by selective trypsinization and were grown in a plastic substratum. The purified mammary epithelial cells (MECs) after several passages were characterized for mammary specific functions by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR and western blot. Principal Findings The established buffalo mammary epithelial cell line (BuMEC) exhibited epithelial cell characteristics by immunostaining positively with cytokeratin 18 and negatively with vimentin. The BuMEC maintained the characteristics of its functional differentiation by expression of β-casein, κ-casein, butyrophilin and lactoferrin. BuMEC had normal growth properties and maintained diploid chromosome number (2n = 50) before and after cryopreservation. A spontaneously immortalized buffalo mammary epithelial cell line was established after 20 passages and was continuously subcultured for more than 60 passages without senescence. Conclusions We have established a buffalo mammary epithelial cell line that can be used as a model system for studying mammary gland functions. PMID:22792341

  12. Neuregulin 3 and erbb signalling networks in embryonic mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Kogata, Naoko; Zvelebil, Marketa; Howard, Beatrice A

    2013-06-01

    We review the role of Neuregulin 3 (Nrg3) and Erbb receptor signalling in embryonic mammary gland development. Neuregulins are growth factors that bind and activate its cognate Erbb receptor tyrosine kinases, which form a signalling network with established roles in breast development and breast cancer. Studies have shown that Nrg3 expression profoundly impacts early stages of embryonic mammary development. Network analysis shows how Nrg/Erbb signals could integrate with other major regulators of embryonic mammary development to elicit the morphogenetic processes and cell fate decisions that occur as the mammary lineage is established.

  13. [Estimation of the Average Glandular Dose Using the Mammary Gland Image Analysis in Mammography].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Tomoko; Teramoto, Atsushi; Asada, Yasuki; Suzuki, Shoichi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Kamiya, Satoru; Anno, Hirofumi

    2016-05-01

    Currently, the glandular dose is evaluated quantitatively on the basis of the measured data using phantom, and not in a dose based on the mammary gland structure of an individual patient. However, mammary gland structures of the patients are different from each other and mammary gland dose of an individual patient cannot be obtained by the existing methods. In this study, we present an automated estimation method of mammary gland dose by means of mammary structure which is measured automatically using mammogram. In this method, mammary gland structure is extracted by Gabor filter; mammary region is segmented by the automated thresholding. For the evaluation, mammograms of 100 patients diagnosed with category 1 were collected. Using these mammograms we compared the mammary gland ratio measured by proposed method and visual evaluation. As a result, 78% of the total cases were matched. Furthermore, the mammary gland ratio and average glandular dose among the patients with same breast thickness was matched well. These results show that the proposed method may be useful for the estimation of average glandular dose for the individual patients.

  14. Amphiregulin mediates self-renewal in an immortal mammary epithelial cell line with stem cell characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Brian W.; Boulanger, Corinne A.; Anderson, Lisa H.; Jimenez-Rojo, Lucia; Brisken, Cathrin; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2010-02-01

    Amphiregulin (AREG), a ligand for epidermal growth factor receptor, is required for mammary gland ductal morphogenesis and mediates estrogen actions in vivo, emerging as an essential growth factor during mammary gland growth and differentiation. The COMMA-D {beta}-geo (CD{beta}geo) mouse mammary cell line displays characteristics of normal mammary progenitor cells including the ability to regenerate a mammary gland when transplanted into the cleared fat pad of a juvenile mouse, nuclear label retention, and the capacity to form anchorage-independent mammospheres. We demonstrate that AREG is essential for formation of floating mammospheres by CD{beta}geo cells and that the mitogen activated protein kinase signaling pathway is involved in AREG-mediated mammosphere formation. Addition of exogenous AREG promotes mammosphere formation in cells where AREG expression is knocked down by siRNA and mammosphere formation by AREG{sup -/-} mammary epithelial cells. AREG knockdown inhibits mammosphere formation by duct-limited mammary progenitor cells but not lobule-limited mammary progenitor cells. These data demonstrate AREG mediates the function of a subset of mammary progenitor cells in vitro.

  15. Growth hormone mRNA in mammary gland tumors of dogs and cats.

    PubMed Central

    Mol, J A; van Garderen, E; Selman, P J; Wolfswinkel, J; Rijinberk, A; Rutteman, G R

    1995-01-01

    We have shown recently that in the dog progestin administration results in mammary production of immunoreactive growth hormone (GH). At present we demonstrate the expression of the gene encoding GH in the mammary gland of dogs and cats using reverse-transcriptase PCR. GH mRNA was found in the great majority of normal mammary tissues as well as benign and malignant mammary tumors of the dog and was associated with the presence of immunoreactive GH in cryostat sections. The mammary PCR product proved to be identical to that of the pituitary. The highest expression levels were found after prolonged treatment with progestins. In carcinomas GH mRNA was also found in progesterone receptor-negative tissue samples, indicating that after malignant transformation GH gene expression may become progestin independent. GH mRNA was also present in mammary tissues of cats with progestin-induced fibroadenomatous changes. It is concluded that GH gene expression occurs in normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic mammary tissue of the dog. The expression in normal tissue is stimulated by progestins and might mediate the progestin-stimulated development of canine mammary tumors. The demonstration of progestin-stimulated GH expression in mammary tissue of cats indicates that the phenomenon is more generalized among mammals. Images PMID:7738169

  16. Ocular melanoma and mammary mucinous carcinoma in an African lion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Reports of neoplasms in Panthera species are increasing, but they are still an uncommon cause of disease and death in captive wild felids. The presence of two or more primary tumor in large felids is rarely reported, and there are no documented cases of ocular melanoma and mammary mucinous carcinoma in African lions. Case presentation An ocular melanoma and a mammary mucinous carcinoma are described in an African lion (Panthera leo). The first tumour was histologically characterized by the presence of epithelioid and fusiform melanocytes, while the latter was composed of mucus-producing cells with an epithelial phenotype that contained periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) and Alcian blue staining mucins. Metastases of both tumor were identified in various organs and indirect immunohistochemistry was used to characterize them. Peribiliary cysts were observed in the liver. Conclusions This is the first description of these tumor in African lions. PMID:23009723

  17. MAMMARY GLAND ADENOCARCINOMA IN A MALE BORNEAN ORANGUTAN (PONGO PYGMAEUS).

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Nancy A; Crook, Erika K

    2017-03-01

    An adult male Bornean orangutan ( Pongo pygmaeus ) was diagnosed with invasive, poorly differentiated grade 9/9 mammary gland adenocarcinoma from a subcutaneous mass that was surgically removed during a routine preventative health examination. The tumor was tested for estrogen and progesterone receptors, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and HER2 fluorescence in situ hybridization (HER2 FISH). Whole blood was tested for breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) and breast cancer 2 (BRCA2) genes. The orangutan was treated orally with two common human breast cancer drugs; tamoxifen and anastrozole. The orangutan lived for 4.5 yr postdetection, dying from an unrelated cause. This is the first reported case of mammary gland adenocarcinoma in a male great ape.

  18. Significance of rat mammary tumors for human risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Russo, Jose

    2015-02-01

    We have previously indicated that the ideal animal tumor model should mimic the human disease. This means that the investigator should be able to ascertain the influence of host factors on the initiation of tumorigenesis, mimic the susceptibility of tumor response based on age and reproductive history, and determine the response of the tumors induced to chemotherapy. The utilization of experimental models of mammary carcinogenesis in risk assessment requires that the influence of ovarian, pituitary, and placental hormones, among others, as well as overall reproductive events are taken into consideration, since they are important modifiers of the susceptibility of the organ to neoplastic development. Several species, such as rodents, dogs, cats, and monkeys, have been evaluated for these purposes; however, none of them fulfills all the criteria specified previously. Rodents, however, are the most widely used models; therefore, this work will concentrate on discussing the rat rodent model of mammary carcinogenesis.

  19. Modeling and analysis of transport in the mammary glands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quezada, Ana; Vafai, Kambiz

    2014-08-01

    The transport of three toxins moving from the blood stream into the ducts of the mammary glands is analyzed in this work. The model predictions are compared with experimental data from the literature. The utility of the model lies in its potential to improve our understanding of toxin transport as a pre-disposing factor to breast cancer. This work is based on a multi-layer transport model to analyze the toxins present in the breast milk. The breast milk in comparison with other sampling strategies allows us to understand the mass transport of toxins once inside the bloodstream of breastfeeding women. The multi-layer model presented describes the transport of caffeine, DDT and cimetidine. The analysis performed takes into account the unique transport mechanisms for each of the toxins. Our model predicts the movement of toxins and/or drugs within the mammary glands as well as their bioaccumulation in the tissues.

  20. Serotoninergic and Circadian Systems: Driving Mammary Gland Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Trujillo, Aridany; Casey, Theresa M.

    2016-01-01

    Since lactation is one of the most metabolically demanding states in adult female mammals, beautifully complex regulatory mechanisms are in place to time lactation to begin after birth and cease when the neonate is weaned. Lactation is regulated by numerous different homeorhetic factors, all of them tightly coordinated with the demands of milk production. Emerging evidence support that among these factors are the serotonergic and circadian clock systems. Here we review the serotoninergic and circadian clock systems and their roles in the regulation of mammary gland development and lactation physiology. We conclude by presenting our hypothesis that these two systems interact to accommodate the metabolic demands of lactation and thus adaptive changes in these systems occur to maintain mammary and systemic homeostasis through the reproductive cycles of female mammals. PMID:27471474

  1. Giant venous aneurysm jeopardising internal mammary arterial graft patency.

    PubMed

    Van Caenegem, Olivier; le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoit; de Kerchove, Laurent; Coche, Emmanuel

    2012-09-01

    The authors report a 79-year old man with a history of coronary bypass surgery, presenting with acute heart failure and elevated troponin. Coronarography revealed a giant saphenous vein graft aneurysm, which was compressing the left internal mammary artery bypass graft. This was confirmed by a multislice enhanced-ECG gated cardiac CT, showing the venous aneurysm responsible for external compression of the arterial graft and its functional occlusion. Myocardial ischaemia, the mechanism leading to cardiac failure, was confirmed by hypoperfusion of the sub-endocardial area shown by the CT. The aneurysm was surgically removed without complications. The patient recovered and his cardiac function improved. This is the first recorded case of compression of the left internal mammary artery by an giant saphenous vein graft aneurysm having triggered severe myocardial ischaemia and heart failure. The authors review the incidence and complications of giant venous bypass graft aneurysms reported in the literature.

  2. Giant venous aneurysm jeopardising internal mammary arterial graft patency

    PubMed Central

    Van Caenegem, Olivier; le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoit; de Kerchove, Laurent; Coche, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    The authors report a 79-year old man with a history of coronary bypass surgery, presenting with acute heart failure and elevated troponin. Coronarography revealed a giant saphenous vein graft aneurysm, which was compressing the left internal mammary artery bypass graft. This was confirmed by a multislice enhanced-ECG gated cardiac CT, showing the venous aneurysm responsible for external compression of the arterial graft and its functional occlusion. Myocardial ischaemia, the mechanism leading to cardiac failure, was confirmed by hypoperfusion of the sub-endocardial area shown by the CT. The aneurysm was surgically removed without complications. The patient recovered and his cardiac function improved. This is the first recorded case of compression of the left internal mammary artery by an giant saphenous vein graft aneurysm having triggered severe myocardial ischaemia and heart failure. The authors review the incidence and complications of giant venous bypass graft aneurysms reported in the literature. PMID:22723090

  3. Mammary gland tumor formation in transgenic mice overexpressing stromelysin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Sympson, Carolyn J; Bissell, Mina J; Werb, Zena

    1995-06-01

    An intact basement membrane (BM) is essential for the proper function, differentiation and morphology of many epithelial cells. The disruption or loss of this BM occurs during normal development as well as in the disease state. To examine the importance of BM during mammary gland development in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that inappropriately express autoactivating isoforms of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. The mammary glands from these mice are both functionally and morphologically altered throughout development. We have now documented a dramatic incidence of breast tumors in several independent lines of these mice. These data suggest that overexpression of stromelysin-1 and disruption of the BM may be a key step in the multi-step process of breast cancer.

  4. Control of Differentiation of a Mammary Cell Line by Lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulbecco, Renato; Bologna, Mauro; Unger, Michael

    1980-03-01

    A rat mammary cell line (LA7) undergoes spontaneous differentiation into domes due to production of specific inducers by the cells. Some of these inducers may be lipids, and we show that lipids regulate this differentiation as both inducers and inhibitors. One inhibitor is the tumor promoter tetradecanoyl-13 phorbol 12-acetate. The inducers are saturated fatty acids of two groups: butyric acid and acids with chain lengths from C13 to C16, especially myristic acid (C14). Other inducers are myristoyl and palmitoyl lysolecithins, myristic acid methyl ester, and two cationic detergents with a tetradecenyl chain. We propose that the lipids with a C14-C16 alkyl chain affect differentiation by recognizing specific receptors through their alkyl chains and that the effects obtained depend on the head groups. These lipids may be physiological regulators in the mammary gland.

  5. Mammary gland tumors in irradiated and untreated guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Hoch-Ligeti, C.; Liebelt, A.G.; Congdon, C.C.; Stewart, H.L.

    1986-01-01

    This is a report of mammary gland tumors from 62 guinea pigs. The tumors arose in the terminal ductal-lobular units as either lobular acinar carcinoma or cystadenocarcinoma or as papillary carcinomas within large ducts near the mammilla. About half the number of the males had terminal ductal-lobular carcinomas and all but 2 of the papillary duct carcinomas also arose in males. Large tumors frequently exhibited squamous, chondromatous, osseous, fatty and myoepitheliomatous types of tissues. In 2 irradiated males and 1 female the tumors metastasized. Whole-body irradiation did not produce significant changes in the number or sex distribution or in the morphology of mammary gland tumors in inbred or outbred guinea pigs. All females had cystic ovaries without increase in granulosa cells, 24 (66.6%) had uterine tumors and 13 (34.2%) had adrenal gland tumors; all males had atrophic testes, 5 (16.5%) had testicular and 6 (22.2%) had adrenal gland tumors.

  6. Quantification of regenerative potential in primary human mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Linnemann, Jelena R.; Miura, Haruko; Meixner, Lisa K.; Irmler, Martin; Kloos, Uwe J.; Hirschi, Benjamin; Bartsch, Harald S.; Sass, Steffen; Beckers, Johannes; Theis, Fabian J.; Gabka, Christian; Sotlar, Karl; Scheel, Christina H.

    2015-01-01

    We present an organoid regeneration assay in which freshly isolated human mammary epithelial cells are cultured in adherent or floating collagen gels, corresponding to a rigid or compliant matrix environment. In both conditions, luminal progenitors form spheres, whereas basal cells generate branched ductal structures. In compliant but not rigid collagen gels, branching ducts form alveoli at their tips, express basal and luminal markers at correct positions, and display contractility, which is required for alveologenesis. Thereby, branched structures generated in compliant collagen gels resemble terminal ductal-lobular units (TDLUs), the functional units of the mammary gland. Using the membrane metallo-endopeptidase CD10 as a surface marker enriches for TDLU formation and reveals the presence of stromal cells within the CD49fhi/EpCAM− population. In summary, we describe a defined in vitro assay system to quantify cells with regenerative potential and systematically investigate their interaction with the physical environment at distinct steps of morphogenesis. PMID:26071498

  7. Quantification of regenerative potential in primary human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Jelena R; Miura, Haruko; Meixner, Lisa K; Irmler, Martin; Kloos, Uwe J; Hirschi, Benjamin; Bartsch, Harald S; Sass, Steffen; Beckers, Johannes; Theis, Fabian J; Gabka, Christian; Sotlar, Karl; Scheel, Christina H

    2015-09-15

    We present an organoid regeneration assay in which freshly isolated human mammary epithelial cells are cultured in adherent or floating collagen gels, corresponding to a rigid or compliant matrix environment. In both conditions, luminal progenitors form spheres, whereas basal cells generate branched ductal structures. In compliant but not rigid collagen gels, branching ducts form alveoli at their tips, express basal and luminal markers at correct positions, and display contractility, which is required for alveologenesis. Thereby, branched structures generated in compliant collagen gels resemble terminal ductal-lobular units (TDLUs), the functional units of the mammary gland. Using the membrane metallo-endopeptidase CD10 as a surface marker enriches for TDLU formation and reveals the presence of stromal cells within the CD49f(hi)/EpCAM(-) population. In summary, we describe a defined in vitro assay system to quantify cells with regenerative potential and systematically investigate their interaction with the physical environment at distinct steps of morphogenesis.

  8. Targeting the Prometastatic Microenvironment of the Involuting Mammary Gland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    breast-cancer-research.com/content/15/6/R111induces ductal morphogenesis, differentiation of nipple epithelium and suppression of hair follicles ...LacZ expression (blue stain) in the mammary rudiments (white arrows) and developing hair follicles (red arrowheads). (B) Nuclear fast red (NFR...to inhibit hair follicle induction. Development 2007, 134:1221–1230. 56. Noguera I, Obata H, Gualandris A, Cowin P, Rifkin DB: Molecular cloning of

  9. Effect of Estrogen on Mutagenesis in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    estrogen signaling through the estrogen receptor alpha (ERa) may induce a mutator phenotype by suppressing DNA repair activity in ERa positive mammary...measure DNA MMR activity in live cells. We have also developed a method to measure mutation rate as a function of estrogen/ER signaling . Our goals were to...whether 1713-estradiol signaling through ER inhibits DNA MMR activity, we developed a method that can quantitatively assess MMR efficiency in live

  10. Anti-Inflammatory Cytokine II-10 and Mammary Gland Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    We then mated IL10+/- male with IL10+/- females to generate 144 experimental female mice with +/+ or -/- genotype (72 each) from 80 litters. After...IL-10 heterozygous female with IL-10 heterozygous male ; second, to develop essential techniques for mammary gland analysis so that we can compare...Since then, we have mated IL10+/- male with IL10+/- females to generate 144 experimental female mice with +/+ or -/- genotype (72 each) from 80

  11. [Mammary analog secretory carcinoma of the parotid gland].

    PubMed

    Guérin, Maxime; Diedhiou, Abdoulaye; Nallet, Emmanuel; Duflo, Suzy; Laé, Marick; Wassef, Michel

    2014-10-01

    Mammary analog secretory carcinoma (MASC) of the parotid gland is a rare and recently described lesion. We report the case of a 46-year-old man with a tumor of the parotid gland which was carried to the diagnosis of MASC. Diagnostic was confirmed by highlighting the ETV6-NTRK3 gene translocation. However, some morphologic and immunohistochemical features are suggestive of this entity. This carcinoma should be distinguished from its main differential diagnoses: acinic cell carcinoma and low grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma.

  12. [Mammary implant selection or chest implants fabrication with computer help].

    PubMed

    Chavoin, J-P; André, A; Bozonnet, E; Teisseyre, A; Arrue, J; Moreno, B; Gangloff, D; Grolleau, J-L; Garrido, I

    2010-10-01

    Authors present their personal and original experience in the use of computer to enhance the precision in the good choice of volumes and shapes in the field of mammary reconstruction and aesthetic augmentation (800 cases). Concerning funnel chest (163 cases) and Poland syndrome (12 cases), they use computer-assisted conception and custom-made implants, much more precise than traditional plaster cast.

  13. Mammary Stem/Progenitor Cells and Cancer Susceptibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    dependent mammary cancer; and 2) Brown Norway (BN), which is highly resistant. Major findings: ACI and BN rats likely exhibit significant differences in...stimulated states in two well characterized inbred rat strains: 1) ACI, which is highly susceptible to 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced/progesterone (P...MaSC number and/or responsiveness to hormone. Technical issues and loss of commercial source of BN rats led to revision of Aims. The data generated

  14. USF-1 as an Inhibitor of Mammary Gland Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    virgin transgenic mice under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat. The transgene was evaluated in transfected...cells in culture, and then injected into fertilized FVB mouse embryos. A total of 370 embryos were injected and transferred into recipient females ...resulting in 11 pregnancies. From these a total of 84 offspring were obtained, 12 of which were positive for the transgene. Females from the F0 and F

  15. In Vivo Role of Six1 in Mammary Gland Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    overexpression is documented in a number of tumor types, including ovarian cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, Wilms ’ tumor , rhabdomyosarcomas and...Klein, U., and Tycko, B. 2002. Gene expression in Wilms ’ tumor mimics the earliest committed stage in the metanephric mesenchymal-epithelial...progression of breast cancer. Most significantly, we have determined that Six1 is sufficient to induce tumor formation in the mammary glands of mice

  16. Genetic Susceptibility to Estrogen-Induced Mammary Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    Susceptibility to Estrogen -Induced Mammary Cancers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. James D. Shull CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Nebraska Medical Center Omaha...DATES COVERED blank) November 2001 Final (01 Oct 98 - 01 Oct 01) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Genetic Susceptibility to Estrogen -Induced...Street, Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012. 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) Estrogens are important in the etiology of breast cancer. We have developed

  17. Characterization of WWOX inactivation in murine mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Abdeen, Suhaib K; Salah, Zaidoun; Khawaled, Saleh; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2013-07-01

    The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) is commonly inactivated in multiple human cancers, including breast cancer. Wwox null mice die prematurely precluding adult tumor analysis. Nevertheless, aging Wwox-heterozygous mice at C3H genetic background develop higher incidence of mammary tumors. We recently generated a Wwox conditional knockout mouse in which loxp sites flank exon 1 in the Wwox allele and showed that total ablation of WWOX in these mice resembles that of conventional targeting of Wwox. Here, we report the characterization of WWOX ablation in mouse mammary gland using MMTV-Cre transgenic line. We demonstrated that WWOX ablation leads to impaired mammary ductal growth. Moreover, targeted deletion of WWOX is associated with increased levels of fibronectin, a component of the extracellular matrix. In addition, we showed that shRNA knockdown of WWOX in MCF10A breast epithelial cells dramatically increased fibronectin and is associated with enhanced cell survival and impaired growth in three-dimensional culture Matrigel assay. Taken together our results are consistent with a critical role for WWOX in normal breast development and tumorigenesis.

  18. Cholesterol transport and regulation in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Ontsouka, Edgar C; Albrecht, Christiane

    2014-03-01

    The milk-producing alveolar epithelial cells secrete milk that remains after birth the principal source of nutrients for neonates. Milk secretion and composition are highly regulated processes via integrated actions of hormones and local factors which involve specific receptors and downstream signal transduction pathways. Overall milk composition is similar among mammalian species, although the content of individual constituents such as lipids may significantly differ from one species to another. The milk lipid fraction is essentially composed of triglycerides, which represent more than 95 % of the total lipids in human and commercialized bovine milk. Though sterols, including cholesterol, which is the major milk sterol, represent less than 0.5 % of the total milk lipid fraction, they are of key importance for several biological processes. Cholesterol is required for the formation of biological membranes especially in rapidly growing organisms, and for the synthesis of sterol-based compounds. Cholesterol found in milk originates predominantly from blood uptake and, to a certain extent, from local synthesis in the mammary tissue. The present review summarizes current knowledge on cellular mechanisms and regulatory processes determining intra- and transcellular cholesterol transport in the mammary gland. Cholesterol exchanges between the blood, the mammary alveolar cells and the milk, and the likely role of active cholesterol transporters in these processes are discussed. In this context, the hormonal regulation and signal transduction pathways promoting active cholesterol transport as well as potential regulatory crosstalks are highlighted.

  19. Characteristics and EGFP expression of porcine mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; He, Xiao-Ying

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were to establish a porcine mammary gland epithelial (PMGE) cell line, and to determine if these PMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of PMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating pig. The passage sixteen PMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in PMGE cells was tested by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was tested for PMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that PMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the cells contained different cell types. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells, and the PMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the PMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected porcine mammary gland epithelial (ET-PMGE) cell line.

  20. Tamoxifen inhibition of prolactin action in the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Biswas, R; Vonderhaar, B K

    1991-01-01

    Binding of lactogenic hormones to particulate and solubilized microsomal membranes isolated from mammary glands of lactating mice is inhibited by direct addition of 10(-10) M or greater concentrations of triphenylethylene antiestrogens [i.e. tamoxifen (TAM), 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen, and Nafoxidine] to the binding assays. Estradiol and other antiestrogens such as BPEA (-2-(4-tert-butyl-phenoxy) ethyl diethylamine hydrochloride, LY117018, and LY 156758 do not have this effect. The triphenylethylene antiestrogens bind to the membrane-associated antiestrogen binding sites (AEBS). Effectiveness of binding to the AEBS parallels the effectiveness of inhibition of the lactogen binding. The effect is selective in that binding of epidermal growth factor and insulin to these same membranes is unaffected by the antiestrogens. Binding of PRL to membranes prepared from the livers of the lactating mice is also unaffected. Both the PRL receptor and AEBS are primarily localized to the microsomal membrane fraction of cells. Maximal inhibition of PRL binding by TAM is observed in the light microsomes that contain plasma membranes. In addition to inhibition of PRL binding, TAM also prevents the PRL-induced accumulation of caseins by cultured mouse mammary explants. Thus it appears that the triphenylethylene antiestrogens, acting through the AEBS, act as antilactogens in the normal mammary gland.

  1. The effects of spaceflight on mammary metabolism in pregnant rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, K.; Maple, R.; Vyas, C.; Munaim, S.; Darling, A.; Casey, T.; Alberts, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight on mammary metabolism of 10 pregnant rats was measured on Day 20 of pregnancy and after parturition. Rats were flown on the space shuttle from Day 11 through Day 20 of pregnancy. After their return to earth, glucose oxidation to carbon dioxide increased 43% (P < 0.05), and incorporation into fatty acids increased 300% (P < 0.005) compared to controls. It is unclear whether the enhanced glucose use is due to spaceflight or a response to landing. Casein mRNA and gross histology were not altered at Day 20 of pregnancy. Six rats gave birth (on Day 22 to 23 of pregnancy) and mammary metabolic activity was measured immediately postpartum. The earlier effects of spaceflight were no longer apparent. There was also no difference in expression of beta-casein mRNA. It is clear from these studies that spaceflight does not impair the normal development of the mammary gland, its ability to use glucose, nor the ability to express mRNA for a major milk protein.

  2. Hedgehog signaling in the normal and neoplastic mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Visbal, Adriana P; Lewis, Michael T

    2010-09-01

    The hedgehog signal transduction network is a critical regulator of metazoan development. Inappropriate activation of this network is implicated in several different cancers, including breast. Genetic evidence in mice as well as molecular biological studies in human cells clearly indicate that activated signaling can lead to mammary hyperplasia and, in some cases, tumor formation. However, the exact role(s) activated hedgehog signaling plays in the development or progression of breast cancer also remain unclear. In this review, we have discussed recent data regarding the mechanism(s) by which the hedgehog network may signal in the mammary gland, as well as the data implicating activated signaling as a contributing factor to breast cancer development. Finally, we provide a brief update on the available hedgehog signaling inhibitors with respect to ongoing clinical trials, some of which will include locally advanced or metastatic breast cancers. Given the growing intensity with which the hedgehog signaling network is being studied in the normal and neoplastic mammary gland, a more complete understanding of this network should allow more effective targeting of its activities in breast cancer treatment or prevention.

  3. Primary mammary mucinous cystadenocarcinoma: cytological and histological findings.

    PubMed

    Sentani, Kazuhiro; Tashiro, Takashi; Uraoka, Naohiro; Aosaki, Yoriyuki; Yano, Satomi; Takaeko, Fumio; Yasui, Wataru

    2012-07-01

    Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (MCA), commonly encountered in the ovary or pancreas, is rare in the breast and was only recently described as a distinct variant of invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. Only 11 cases of primary mammary MCA have been reported. In this article, we report a case of primary mammary MCA with focus on cytological and histological findings. A 65-year-old female noticed right palpable breast mass. Sonography showed an irregularly shaped 2.8 × 2.4 cm lesion in the upper outer quadrant of the right breast. Fine-needle aspiration cytology was performed on the right breast nodule, and cytopathologic examination suggested an adenocarcinoma composed of tall columnar cells with mucin. A partial mastectomy of the right breast and the axillary lymph nodes dissection was performed. The gross examination revealed a well-demarcated and mucus-filled tumor. Histologically, it had complex papillae, some of which were supported by delicate fibrovascular stroma lined by simple to slightly stratified columnar neoplastic epithelial cells with intracellular mucin, coexisting with MCA in situ and ordinary intraductal carcinoma component (ICC). Immunohistochemically, ICC was HER2-negative and estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor-positive, while MCA was triple negative. MCA might be derived from a metaplasia of ordinary ICC, but its pathogenesis and biologic behavior remains unclear. Despite the invasive nature of mammary MCA, these carcinomas appear to be associated with a good prognosis. The patient has remained well and disease-free for 6 months after the operation.

  4. Automatic segmentation of histological structures in mammary gland tissue sections

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Deschamps, Thomas; Idica, Adam K.; Malladi, Ravikanth; Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos

    2004-02-17

    Real-time three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of epithelial structures in human mammary gland tissue blocks mapped with selected markers would be an extremely helpful tool for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment planning. Besides its clear clinical application, this tool could also shed a great deal of light on the molecular basis of breast cancer initiation and progression. In this paper we present a framework for real-time segmentation of epithelial structures in two-dimensional (2D) images of sections of normal and neoplastic mammary gland tissue blocks. Complete 3D rendering of the tissue can then be done by surface rendering of the structures detected in consecutive sections of the blocks. Paraffin embedded or frozen tissue blocks are first sliced, and sections are stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin. The sections are then imaged using conventional bright field microscopy and their background is corrected using a phantom image. We then use the Fast-Marching algorithm to roughly extract the contours of the different morphological structures in the images. The result is then refined with the Level-Set method which converges to an accurate (sub-pixel) solution for the segmentation problem. Finally, our system stacks together the 2D results obtained in order to reconstruct a 3D representation of the entire tissue block under study. Our method is illustrated with results from the segmentation of human and mouse mammary gland tissue samples.

  5. Estrogen receptor alpha is required for mammary development and the induction of mammary hyperplasia and epigenetic alterations in the aromatase transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Tekmal, Rajeshwar Rao; Liu, Ya-Guang; Nair, Hareesh B; Jones, Jeremy; Perla, Rao P; Lubahn, Dennis B; Korach, Kenneth S; Kirma, Nameer

    2005-05-01

    Aromatase transgenic mice exhibit hyperplastic and dysplastic changes, attesting to the importance of local estrogen in breast carcinogenesis. These mice also show increased levels of the estrogen receptor alpha and beta (ERalpha, ERbeta) suggesting that this receptor may play an important role in the initiation of estrogen-mediated mammary hyperplasia observed in these mice. To address the specific role of ERalpha in the mammary development and in the induction of estrogen-mediated hyperplasia in aromatase transgenic mice, we have generated MMTV-aromatase x ERalpha knockout cross (referred as aromatase/ERKO). Even though ERbeta is expressed in aromatase/ERKO mice, lack of ERalpha leads to impaired mammary growth in these mice. The data suggest that ERalpha plays an important role in the mammary gland development as well as in the induction of mammary hyperplasia in aromatase transgenic mice. Lack of ERalpha expression in the aromatase/ERKO mice resulted in a decrease in the expression of Cyclin D1, PCNA and TGFbeta relative to the aromatase parental strain. The studies involving aromatase/ERKO mice show that lack of ERalpha results in impaired mammary development even in the presence of continuous tissue estrogen, suggesting estrogen/ERalpha-mediated actions are critical for mammary development and carcinogenesis.

  6. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment of Salmonella Enteritidis inoculated eggshells.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Maike; Wiacek, Claudia; Koethe, Martin; Braun, Peggy G

    2017-03-20

    Contamination of eggshells with Salmonella Enteritidis remains a food safety concern. In many cases human salmonellosis within the EU can be traced back to raw or undercooked eggs and egg products. Atmospheric pressure plasma is a novel decontamination method that can reduce a wide range of pathogens. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possibility of using an effective short time cold plasma treatment to inactivate Salmonella Enteritidis on the eggshell. Therefore, artificially contaminated eggshells were treated with an atmospheric pressure plasma jet under different experimental settings with various exposure times (15-300s), distances from the plasma jet nozzle to the eggshell surface (5, 8 or 12mm), feed gas compositions (Ar, Ar with 0.2, 0.5 or 1.0% O2), gas flow rates (5 and 7slm) and different inoculations of Salmonella Enteritidis (10(1)-10(6)CFU/cm(2)). Atmospheric pressure plasma could reduce Salmonella Enteritidis on eggshells significantly. Reduction factors ranged between 0.22 and 2.27 log CFU (colony-forming units). Exposure time and, particularly at 10(4)CFU/cm(2) inoculation, feed gas had a major impact on Salmonella reduction. Precisely, longer exposure times led to higher reductions and Ar as feed gas was more effective than ArO2 mixtures.

  7. Comparative volatile profiles in soy sauce according to inoculated microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Eun; Lee, Sang Mi; Choi, Yong Ho; Hurh, Byung Serk; Kim, Young-Suk

    2013-01-01

    We compared the volatile profiles in soy sauce according to inoculation with Tetragenococcus halophilus and/or Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. Totals of 107 and 81 volatiles were respectively identified by using solid-phase microextraction and solvent extraction. The various volatile compounds identified included acids, aldehydes, esters, ketones, furans and furan derivatives, and phenols. The major volatiles in the samples treated with T. halophilus were acetic acid, formic acid, benzaldehyde, methyl acetate, ethyl 2-hydroxypropanoate, 2-hydroxy-3-methyl-2-cyclopenten-1-one, and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde, while those in the samples inoculated with Z. rouxii were mainly ethanol, acetaldehyde, ethyl propanoate, 2/3-methylbutanol, 1-butanol, 2-phenylethanol, ethyl 2-methylpropanoate, and 4-hydroxy-2-ethyl-5-methyl-3(2H)-furanone. The results indicate that T. halophilus produced significant acid compounds and could affect the Z. rouxii activity, supporting the notion that yeasts and lactic acid bacteria respectively have different metabolic pathways of alcoholic fermentation and lactic acid fermentation, and produce different dominant volatile compounds in soy sauce.

  8. Binding of transcobalamin II by human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Y; Lönnerdal, B

    2001-01-01

    The presence of nutrient binders in milk may have an important role during milk production and may influence the nutrient's bioavailability to the infant. Human milk and plasma contain at least two types of vitamin B12 binders: transcobalamin II (TCII) and haptocorrin (Hc). Vitamin B12 in milk is exclusively bound to Hc (Hc-B12). In plasma, the major vitamin B12 binding protein that is responsible for delivering absorbed vitamin B12 to most tissues and cells is TCII (TCII-B12). Currently, little is known about the route of secretion of vitamin B12 into human milk. It is possible that a receptor-mediated pathway is involved, since maternal vitamin B12 supplementation increases the amount of the vitamin secreted into human milk if the mother's vitamin B12 consumption is low, but remains unchanged if her intake is adequate. In this study, we investigated the process by which the mammary gland acquires vitamin B12 from maternal circulation, whether as a free vitamin or as a Hc-B12 or TCII-B12 complex. TCII was purified from plasma incubated with [57Co]vit B12 (B12*), while Hc was purified from whey incubated with B12*. Both proteins were separated by fast protein liquid chromatography using gel filtration and anion-exchange columns. Purity of the separated proteins was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Binding studies were carried out on a monolayer of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) at 4 degrees C using free B12* and TCII-B12* and Hc-B12* complexes. Minimal binding of free B12* and Hc-B12* to HMEC was observed; however, HMEC exhibited a high affinity for the TCII-B12* complex. This study suggests that a specific cell surface receptor for the TCII-B12 complex exists in the mammary gland. It is possible that once vitamin B12 is in the mammary gland it is transferred to Hc (which may be synthesized by the mammary gland) and then secreted into milk as a Hc-B12 complex.

  9. Human Milk Protein Production in Xenografts of Genetically Engineered Bovine Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martignani, Eugenio; Eirew, Peter; Accornero, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Background In the bovine species milk production is well known to correlate with mammary tissue mass. However, most advances in optimizing milk production relied on improvements of breeding and husbandry practices. A better understanding of the cells that generate bovine mammary tissue could facilitate important advances in milk production and have global economic impact. With this possibility in mind, we show that a mammary stem cell population can be functionally identified and isolated from the bovine mammary gland. We also demonstrate that this stem cell population may be a promising target for manipulating the composition of cow's milk using gene transfer. Methods and Findings We show that the in vitro colony-forming cell assay for detecting normal primitive bipotent and lineage-restricted human mammary clonogenic progenitors are applicable to bovine mammary cells. Similarly, the ability of normal human mammary stem cells to regenerate functional bilayered structures in collagen gels placed under the kidney capsule of immunodeficient mice is shared by a subset of bovine mammary cells that lack aldehyde dehydrogenase activity. We also find that this activity is a distinguishing feature of luminal-restricted bovine progenitors. The regenerated structures recapitulate the organization of bovine mammary tissue, and milk could be readily detected in these structures when they were assessed by immunohistochemical analysis. Transplantation of the bovine cells transduced with a lentivirus encoding human β-CASEIN led to expression of the transgene and secretion of the product by their progeny regenerated in vivo. Conclusions These findings point to a common developmental hierarchy shared by human and bovine mammary glands, providing strong evidence of common mechanisms regulating the maintenance and differentiation of mammary stem cells from both species. These results highlight the potential of novel engineering and transplant strategies for a variety of commercial

  10. Evidence for a multipotent mammary progenitor with pregnancy-specific activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The mouse mammary gland provides a powerful model system for studying processes involved in epithelial tissue development. Although markers that enrich for mammary stem cells and progenitors have been identified, our understanding of the mammary developmental hierarchy remains incomplete. Methods We used the MMTV promoter linked to the reverse tetracycline transactivator to induce H2BGFP expression in the mouse mammary gland. Mammary epithelial cells (MECs) from virgin mice were sorted by flow cytometry for expression of the mammary stem cell/progenitor markers CD24 and CD29, and H2BGFP. Sorted populations were analyzed for in vivo repopulation ability, expression of mammary lineage markers, and differential gene expression. Results The reconstituting activity of CD24+/CD29+ cells in cleared fat pad transplantation assays was not distinguished in GFP+ compared to GFP- subpopulations. However, within the CD24+/CD29lo luminal progenitor-enriched population, H2BGFP+, but not H2BGFP-, MECs formed mammary structures in transplantation assays; moreover, this activity was dramatically enhanced in pregnant recipients. These outgrowths contained luminal and myoepithelial mammary lineages and produced milk, but lacked the capacity for serial transplantation. Transcriptional microarray analysis revealed that H2BGFP+/CD24+/CD29lo MECs are distinct from H2BGFP-/CD24+/CD29lo MECs and enriched for gene expression signatures with both the stem cell (CD24+/CD29+) and luminal progenitor (CD24+/CD29lo/CD61+) compartments. Conclusions We have identified a population of MECs containing pregnancy-activated multipotent progenitors that are present in the virgin mammary gland and contribute to the expansion of the mammary gland during pregnancy. PMID:23947835

  11. ABC- and SLC-Transporters in Murine and Bovine Mammary Epithelium - Effects of Prochloraz

    PubMed Central

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Oskarsson, Agneta; Knight, Christopher H.; Tallkvist, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Some chemicals are ligands to efflux transporters which may result in high concentrations in milk. Limited knowledge is available on the influence of maternal exposure to chemicals on the expression and function of transporters in the lactating mammary gland. We determined gene expression of ABC and SLC transporters in murine mammary tissue of different gestation and lactation stages, in murine mammary cells (HC11) featuring resting and secreting phenotypes and in bovine mammary tissue and cells (BME-UV). Effects on transporter expression and function of the imidazole fungicide prochloraz, previously reported to influence BCRP in mammary cells, was investigated on transporter expression and function in the two cell lines. Transporters studied were BCRP, MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5/OATP1A2, OCTN1 and OCT1. Gene expressions of BCRP and OCT1 in murine mammary glands were increased during gestation and lactation, whereas MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5 and OCTN1 were decreased, compared to expressions in virgins. All transporters measured in mammary glands of mice were detected in bovine mammary tissue and in HC11 cells, while only MDR1 and MRP1 were detected in BME-UV cells. Prochloraz treatment induced MDR1 gene and protein expression in both differentiated HC11 and BME-UV cells and increased protein function in HC11 cells, resulting in decreased accumulation of the MDR1 substrate digoxin. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that murine (HC11) and bovine (BME-UV) mammary epithelial cells can be applied to characterize expression and function of transporters as well as effects of contaminants on the mammary transporters. An altered expression, induced by a drug or toxic chemical, on any of the transporters expressed in the mammary epithelial cells during lactation may modulate the well-balanced composition of nutrients and/or secretion of contaminants in milk with potential adverse effects on breast-fed infants and dairy consumers. PMID:27028005

  12. Development of novel murine mammary imaging windows to examine wound healing effects on leukocyte trafficking in mammary tumors with intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sobolik, Tammy; Su, Ying-Jun; Ashby, Will; Schaffer, David K.; Wells, Sam; Wikswo, John P.; Zijlstra, Andries; Richmond, Ann

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We developed mammary imaging windows (MIWs) to evaluate leukocyte infiltration and cancer cell dissemination in mouse mammary tumors imaged by confocal microscopy. Previous techniques relied on surgical resection of a skin flap to image the tumor microenvironment restricting imaging time to a few hours. Utilization of mammary imaging windows offers extension of intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment. We have characterized strengths and identified some previously undescribed potential weaknesses of MIW techniques. Through iterative enhancements of a transdermal portal we defined conditions for improved quality and extended confocal imaging time for imaging key cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:28243517

  13. Development of novel murine mammary imaging windows to examine wound healing effects on leukocyte trafficking in mammary tumors with intravital imaging.

    PubMed

    Sobolik, Tammy; Su, Ying-Jun; Ashby, Will; Schaffer, David K; Wells, Sam; Wikswo, John P; Zijlstra, Andries; Richmond, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We developed mammary imaging windows (MIWs) to evaluate leukocyte infiltration and cancer cell dissemination in mouse mammary tumors imaged by confocal microscopy. Previous techniques relied on surgical resection of a skin flap to image the tumor microenvironment restricting imaging time to a few hours. Utilization of mammary imaging windows offers extension of intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment. We have characterized strengths and identified some previously undescribed potential weaknesses of MIW techniques. Through iterative enhancements of a transdermal portal we defined conditions for improved quality and extended confocal imaging time for imaging key cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment.

  14. Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    sorting data coming from human and mouse adult mammary gland , and coming from the fetal mammary rudiment, to define gene expression profiles of...AD_____________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0106 TITLE: Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human...SUBTITLE Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making Improve

  15. Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion. We have used FAC sorting data coming from human and mouse adult mammary gland , and coming from the fetal mammary rudiment, to define gene...AD_____________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0107 TITLE: Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic

  16. The Role of Nuclear Receptor Coactivator A1B1 in Growth Factor-Mediated Mammary Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    gland development, dwarfism and abnormal reproductive function [8]. I want to determine whether the loss of AIB1 in MMTV-Neu mice alters the mammary...study display dwarfism and the retardation of mammary gland growth [9]. At the 4-month time point, I similarly observed an overall decrease in mammary

  17. s-SHIP promoter expression marks activated stem cells in developing mouse mammary tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lixia; Rohrschneider, Larry R.

    2010-01-01

    Mammary stem cells (MaSCs) play critical roles in normal development and perhaps tumorigenesis of the mammary gland. Using combined cell markers, adult MaSCs have been enriched in a basal cell population, but the exact identity of MaSCs remains unknown. We used the s-SHIP promoter to tag presumptive stem cells with GFP in the embryos of a transgenic mouse model. Here we show, in postnatal mammary gland development, that GFP+ cap cells in puberty and basal alveolar bud cells in pregnancy each exhibit self-renewal and regenerative capabilities for all mammary epithelial cells of a new functional mammary gland upon transplantation. Single GFP+ cells can regenerate the mammary epithelial network. GFP+ mammary epithelial cells are p63+, CD24mod, CD49fhigh, and CD29high; are actively proliferating; and express s-SHIP mRNA. Overall, our results identify the activated MaSC population in vivo at the forefront of rapidly developing terminal end buds (puberty) and alveolar buds (pregnancy) in the mammary gland. In addition, GFP+ basal cells are expanded in MMTV-Wnt1 breast tumors but not in ErbB2 tumors. These results enable MaSC in situ identification and isolation via a consistent single parameter using a new mouse model with applications for further analyses of normal and potential cancer stem cells. PMID:20810647

  18. Prolactin effects on the dietary regulation of mouse mammary tumor virus proviral DNA expression.

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, N; Engelman, R W; Tomita, Y; Chen, R F; Iwai, H; Good, R A; Day, N K

    1990-01-01

    Chronic energy-intake restriction inhibits mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-induced mammary tumors in C3H/Ou mice by greater than 90%. We have shown that associated with suppression of mammary tumorigenesis there is a reduction or inhibition of circulating prolactin, MMTV particles expressed, and MMTV mRNA transcription in mammary glands (and in most organs tested). To understand the concerted action of prolactin, energy-consumption level, and MMTV on inducing mammary tumors, experiments were designed to control prolactin and energy levels in order to evaluate their effects on MMTV mRNA expression. Mice on restricted diets were grafted with adenohypophyses, and mice fed ad libitum were treated with the dopaminomimetic agent octahydrobenzo [g]quinoline. Adenohypophyseal grafting significantly increased prolactin in dietary (energy)-restricted mice, and this effect was associated with an increase in MMTV mRNA expression within the mammary gland; a linear correlation between prolactin levels and MMTV mRNA expression in the mammary gland was found. Conversely, elimination of the nocturnal peak of circulating prolactin by i.p. injection of dopaminomimetic octahydrobenzo [g]quinoline to mice fed ad libitum delayed (by 8 weeks) and reduced (even as long as 25 weeks) mammary gland MMTV mRNA expression. These findings associate prolactin influences with MMTV mRNA production in mice and help explain the link between chronic energy-intake restriction and reduced MMTV gene expression. Images PMID:1975696

  19. Keratinocyte Growth Factor Causes Cystic Dilation of the Mammary Glands of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Eunhee S.; Bedoya, Adriana A.; Lee, Hyesun; Kim, Seokhyun; Housley, Regina M.; Aukerman, Sharon L.; Tarpley, John E.; Starnes, Charles; Yin, Songmei; Pierce, Glenn F.; Ulich, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is a paracrine mediator of epithelial cell proliferation that has been reported to induce marked proliferation of mammary epithelium in rats. In this study, systemic administration of KGF into naive and oophorectomized mice causes mammary gland proliferation, as evidenced histologically by the appearance of cysts lined by a single layer of epithelium and by hyperplastic epithelium. Whole mount preparations of the mammary glands reveal that the histologically noted cysts are actually ducts that are dilated along much of their length. The histology of the mammary glands of KGF-treated mice is similar to the histology of fibrocystic disease in the buman female breast. The response in mice differs significantly from the appearance of the mammary glands in KGF-treated rats in which ductal epithelial proliferation is most prominent. Estrogen and progesterone when administered in combination but not alone cause the development of numerous endbuds in the mouse mammary gland. KGF in estrogen- and progesterone-pretreated mice causes the growth of dilated ducts, hyperplastic epithelium within ducts and endbuds, and a fibrous metamorphosis of periductal adipose tissue. The mammary epithelial hyperplasia caused by KGF is rapidly reversible in both mice and rats after cessation of KGF treatment. The spectrum of KGF-, estrogen-, and progesterone-induced mammary histopathology in mice provides a model for the study of fibrocystic and hyperplastic breast disease. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:7977634

  20. Un(MaSC)ing Stem Cell Dynamics in Mammary Branching Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Erin; Wrenn, Emma D; Cheung, Kevin J

    2017-02-27

    The properties of stem cells that participate in mammary gland branching morphogenesis remain contested. Reporting in Nature, Scheele et al. (2017) establish a model for post-pubertal mammary branching morphogenesis in which position-dependent, lineage-restricted stem cells undergo cell mixing in order to contribute to long-term growth.

  1. Regulation of Mammary Gland Sensitivity to Thyroid Hormones during the Transition from Pregnancy to Lactation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thyroid hormones are galactopoietic and appear to assist in establishing the mammary gland’s metabolic priority during lactation. Expression patterns for genes that can alter tissue sensitivity to thyroid hormones and thyroid hormone activity were evaluated in the mammary gland and liver of Holstei...

  2. Repression of mammary adipogenesis by genistein limits mammosphere formation of human MCF-7 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary adipose tissue may contribute to breast cancer development and progression by altering neighboring epithelial cell behavior and phenotype through paracrine signaling. Dietary exposure to soy foods is associated with lower mammary tumor risk and reduced body weight and adiposity in humans and...

  3. Advanced Imaging Approaches to Characterize Stromal and Metabolic Changes in In Vivo Mammary Tumor Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Optical imaging , metabolism, tumor microenvironment, NADH, FAD, intravital imaging , collagen, metastasis 3.Overall Project Summary Our preliminary...Keely, KW Eliceiri. Novel Intravital Imaging Approaches to Characterize Collagen Alignment in Defined Mammary Tumor Models. Microscopy and...fixturing for intravital FLIM imaging through a rodent mammary imaging window. Stage is raised to accommodate tall 20xW objective. 14     Figure

  4. Mammary stem cells: Novel markers and novel approaches to increase lactation efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) provide for net growth, renewal and turnover of mammary epithelial cells, and are therefore potential targets for strategies to increase production efficiency. Appropriate regulation of MaSC can potentially benefit milk yield, persistency, dry period management and tissue r...

  5. Immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cells express stem cell markers and differentiate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hu, Han; Zheng, Nan; Gao, Haina; Dai, Wenting; Zhang, Yangdong; Li, Songli; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-08-01

    The bovine mammary epithelial cell is a secretory cell, and its cell number and secretory activity determine milk production. In this study, we immortalized a bovine mammary epithelial cell line by SV40 large T antigen gene using a retrovirus based on Chinese Holstein primary mammary epithelial cells (CMEC) cultured in vitro. An immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cell line surpassed the 50-passage mark and was designated the CMEC-H. The immortalized mammary epithelial cells grew in close contact with each other and exhibited the typical cobblestone morphology characteristic with obvious boundaries. The telomerase expression of CMEC-H has consistently demonstrated the presence of telomerase activity as an immortalized cell line, but the cell line never induced tumor formation in nude mice. CMEC-H expressed epithelial (cytokeratins CK7, CK8, CK18, and CK19), mesenchymal (vimentin), and stem/progenitor (CD44 and p63) cell markers. The induced expression of milk proteins, αS1 -casein, β-casein, κ-casein, and butyrophilin, indicated that CMEC-H maintained the synthesis function of the mammary epithelial cells. The established immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cell line CMEC-H is capable of self-renewal and differentiation and can serve as a valuable reagent for studying the physiological mechanism of the mammary gland.

  6. Diet Does Not Affect Putative Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells in Pre-weaned Holstein Heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Overfeeding prepubertal heifers can impair mammary epithelial growth and development, processes that depend on stem cells. In this study we evaluated effects of diet composition on putative bovine mammary epithelial stem cell populations using a 5-bromo-2-deoxyrudine (BrdU; a thymidine analog) label...

  7. CRIPTO/GRP78 Signaling Maintains Fetal and Adult Mammary Stem Cells Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Spike, Benjamin T.; Kelber, Jonathan A.; Booker, Evan; Kalathur, Madhuri; Rodewald, Rose; Lipianskaya, Julia; La, Justin; He, Marielle; Wright, Tracy; Klemke, Richard; Wahl, Geoffrey M.; Gray, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Little is known about the extracellular signaling factors that govern mammary stem cell behavior. Here, we identify CRIPTO and its cell-surface receptor GRP78 as regulators of stem cell behavior in isolated fetal and adult mammary epithelial cells. We develop a CRIPTO antagonist that promotes differentiation and reduces self-renewal of mammary stem cell-enriched populations cultured ex vivo. By contrast, CRIPTO treatment maintains the stem cell phenotype in these cultures and yields colonies with enhanced mammary gland reconstitution capacity. Surface expression of GRP78 marks CRIPTO-responsive, stem cell-enriched fetal and adult mammary epithelial cells, and deletion of GRP78 from adult mammary epithelial cells blocks their mammary gland reconstitution potential. Together, these findings identify the CRIPTO/GRP78 pathway as a developmentally conserved regulator of fetal and adult mammary stem cell behavior ex vivo, with implications for the stem-like cells found in many cancers. PMID:24749068

  8. A Spectrum of Monoclonal Antibodies Reactive with Human Mammary Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colcher, D.; Horan Hand, P.; Nuti, M.; Schlom, J.

    1981-05-01

    Splenic lymphocytes of mice, immunized with membrane-enriched fractions of metastatic human mammary carcinoma tissues, were fused with the NS-1 non-immunoglobulin-secreting murine myeloma cell line. This resulted in the generation of hybridoma cultures secreting immunoglobulins reactive in solid-phase radioimmunoassays with extracts of metastatic mammary carcinoma cells from involved livers, but not with extracts of apparently normal human liver. As a result of further screening of immunoglobulin reactivities and double cloning of cultures, 11 monoclonal antibodies were chosen that demonstrated reactivities with human mammary tumor cells and not with apparently normal human tissues. These monoclonal antibodies could be placed into at least five major groups on the basis of their differential binding to the surface of various live human mammary tumor cells in culture, to extracts of mammary tumor tissues, or to tissue sections of mammary tumor cells studied by the immunoperoxidase technique. Whereas a spectrum of reactivities to mammary tumors was observed with the 11 monoclonal antibodies, no reactivity was observed to apparently normal cells of the following human tissues: breast, lymph node, lung, skin, testis, kidney, thymus, bone marrow, spleen, uterus, thyroid, intestine, liver, bladder, tonsils, stomach, prostate, and salivary gland. Several of the antibodies also demonstrated a ``pancarcinoma'' reactivity, showing binding to selected non-breast carcinomas. None of the monoclonal antibodies showed binding to purified ferritin or carcinoembryonic antigen. Monoclonal antibodies of all five major groups, however, demonstrated binding to human metastatic mammary carcinoma cells both in axillary lymph nodes and at distal sites.

  9. First demonstration of decorin, an extracellular matrix molecule, in bovine mammary tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the mammary gland, the extracellular matrix (ECM) is secreted by and surrounds cells located in both mammary parenchyma (PAR) and stroma. Decorin is an ECM proteoglycan with cell growth regulatory effects mediated by its ability to interact with growth factors or up-regulation of cyclin-dependent...

  10. Metastatic anaplastic adenocarcinoma suspected to be of mammary origin in an intact male rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    PubMed Central

    Summa, Noémie M.; Eshar, David; Snyman, Heindrich N.; Lillie, Brandon N.

    2014-01-01

    A 7-year-old, intact male, pet dwarf rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) was presented for a ventral abdominal subcutaneous mass. Histolopathology of the resected mass was suggestive of a mammary adenocarcinoma. Six months later, the rabbit died from severe dyspnea. Necropsy showed recurrence of the original mass with hepatic and pulmonary metastasis of the anaplastic adenocarcinoma, suspected to be of mammary origin. PMID:24790235

  11. Id-1 is not expressed in the luminal epithelial cells of mammary glands

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Norihisa; Chou, Yu-Chien; Galvez, Jose J; de-Candia, Paola; Cardiff, Robert D; Benezra, Robert; Shyamala, Gopalan

    2003-01-01

    Background The family of inhibitor of differentiation/DNA binding (Id) proteins is known to regulate development in several tissues. One member of this gene family, Id-1, has been implicated in mammary development and carcinogenesis. Mammary glands contain various cell types, among which the luminal epithelial cells are primarily targeted for proliferation, differentiation and carcinogenesis. Therefore, to assess the precise significance of Id-1 in mammary biology and carcinogenesis, we examined its cellular localization in vivo using immunohistochemistry. Methods Extracts of whole mammary glands from wild type and Id-1 null mutant mice, and tissue sections from paraffin-embedded mouse mammary glands from various developmental stages and normal human breast were subjected to immunoblot and immunohistochemical analyses, respectively. In both these procedures, an anti-Id-1 rabbit polyclonal antibody was used for detection of Id-1. Results In immunoblot analyses, using whole mammary gland extracts, Id-1 was detected. In immunohistochemical analyses, however, Id-1 was not detected in the luminal epithelial cells of mammary glands during any stage of development, but it was detected in vascular endothelial cells. Conclusion Id-1 is not expressed in the luminal epithelial cells of mammary glands. PMID:12631395

  12. A Novel Technique of Preserving Internal Mammary Artery Perforators in Nipple Sparing Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Swistel, Alexander; Small, Kevin; Dent, Briar; Cohen, Oriana; Devgan, Lara

    2014-01-01

    Summary: As nipple-sparing mastectomy with implant-based reconstruction has increased, attention must be paid to the viability of the nipple-areolar complex. This article describes the use of preoperative Doppler ultrasound to identify the internal mammary artery perforators. Preserving the internal mammary artery improves vascular supply to the nipple-areolar complex. PMID:25426381

  13. Lymphatic Dissemination of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus after Penile Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhong-Min; Dutra, Joseph; Fritts, Linda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is primarily transmitted by heterosexual contact, and approximately equal numbers of men and women worldwide are infected with the virus. Understanding the biology of HIV acquisition and dissemination in men exposed to the virus by insertive penile intercourse is likely to help with the rational design of vaccines that can limit or prevent HIV transmission. To characterize the target cells and dissemination pathways involved in establishing systemic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection, we necropsied male rhesus macaques at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after penile SIV inoculation and quantified the levels of unspliced SIV RNA and spliced SIV RNA in tissue lysates and the number of SIV RNA-positive cells in tissue sections. We found that penile (glans, foreskin, coronal sulcus) T cells and, to a lesser extent, macrophages and dendritic cells are primary targets of infection and that SIV rapidly reaches the regional lymph nodes. At 7 days after inoculation, SIV had disseminated to the blood, systemic lymph nodes, and mucosal lymphoid tissues. Further, at 7 days postinoculation (p.i.), spliced SIV RNA levels were the highest in the genital lymph nodes, indicating that this is the site where the infection is initially amplified. By 14 days p.i., spliced SIV RNA levels were high in all tissues, but they were the highest in the gastrointestinal tract, indicating that the primary site of virus replication had shifted from the genital lymph nodes to the gut. The stepwise pattern of virus replication and dissemination described here suggests that vaccine-elicited immune responses in the genital lymph nodes could help prevent infection after penile SIV challenge. IMPORTANCE To be the most effective, vaccines should produce antiviral immune responses in the anatomic sites of virus replication. Thus, understanding the path taken by HIV from the mucosal surfaces, which are the site of virus exposure, to the deeper tissues where

  14. Dry Transfer Inoculation of Low-Moisture Spices Containing Antimicrobial Compounds.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Ian M; Hu, Chuxuan; Grasso-Kelley, Elizabeth M; Ye, Peiran; Anderson, Nathan M; Keller, Susanne E

    2017-02-01

    Inoculation of a food product for use in subsequent validation studies typically makes use of a high concentration cocktail of microorganisms suspended in aqueous media. However, this inoculation method may prove difficult particularly when the food product is a low-moisture food containing antimicrobial compounds, such as some dried spices. In this study, a dry transfer method for inoculation of clove powder, oregano leaves, ginger powder, and ground black pepper with a five-serovar cocktail of Salmonella was developed and compared with a traditional aqueous inoculation procedure. Spices were inoculated at three levels, 10, 8, and 6 log CFU/g, by using both an aqueous suspension of Salmonella and a dry transfer of Salmonella from previously inoculated silica beads. At the highest inoculation level, the dry transfer method resulted in a significantly higher microbial load (P < 0.05) for ground cloves and oregano, but not for ginger and ground black pepper. At the intermediate inoculation level, differences were apparent only for ginger and black pepper. Inoculation levels of 6 log CFU/g resulted in recoveries below detection limits for both methods of inoculation. Additional examination on the survival of Salmonella on silica beads after inoculation and in clove powder after dry transfer from silica beads showed linear rates of decline, with a rate of -0.011 log CFU/g/day for beads and -0.015 log CFU/g/day for clove powder. The results suggest that dry transfer of Salmonella via inoculated silica beads is a viable alternative when traditional aqueous inoculation is not feasible.

  15. Transcriptome analysis of the normal human mammary cell commitment and differentiation process.

    PubMed

    Raouf, Afshin; Zhao, Yun; To, Karen; Stingl, John; Delaney, Allen; Barbara, Mary; Iscove, Norman; Jones, Steven; McKinney, Steven; Emerman, Joanne; Aparicio, Samuel; Marra, Marco; Eaves, Connie

    2008-07-03

    Mature mammary epithelial cells are generated from undifferentiated precursors through a hierarchical process, but the molecular mechanisms involved, particularly in the human mammary gland, are poorly understood. To address this issue, we isolated highly purified subpopulations of primitive bipotent and committed luminal progenitor cells as well as mature luminal and myoepithelial cells from normal human mammary tissue and compared their transcriptomes obtained using three different methods. Elements unique to each subset of mammary cells were identified, and changes that accompany their differentiation in vivo were shown to be recapitulated in vitro. These include a stage-specific change in NOTCH pathway gene expression during the commitment of bipotent progenitors to the luminal lineage. Functional studies further showed NOTCH3 signaling to be critical for this differentiation event to occur in vitro. Taken together, these findings provide an initial foundation for future delineation of mechanisms that perturb primitive human mammary cell growth and differentiation.

  16. Impact of diethylhexyl phthalate on gene expression and development of mammary glands of pregnant mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Lan; Liu, Jing-Cai; Zhao, Yong; Lai, Fang-Nong; Yang, Fan; Ge, Wei; Dou, Cheng-Li; Shen, Wei; Zhang, Xi-Feng; Chen, Hong

    2015-10-01

    The widely used diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) is a known endocrine disruptor that causes persistent alterations in the structure and function of female reproductive system, including ovaries, uterus and oviducts. To explore the molecular mechanism of the effect of DEHP on the development of mammary glands, we investigated the cell cycle, growth, proliferation and gene expression of mammary gland cells of pregnant mice exposed to DEHP. It was demonstrated, for the first time, that the mammary gland cells of pregnant mice treated with DEHP for 0.5-3.5 days post-coitum had increased proliferation, growth rate and number of cells in the G2/S phase. The expression of cell proliferation-related genes was significantly altered after short time and low-dose DEHP treatment of mammary gland cells in vivo and in vitro. These findings showed adverse effects of DEHP on mammary gland cells in pregnant mice.

  17. Relationship between histology, development and tumorigenesis of mammary gland in female rat

    PubMed Central

    LÍŠKA, Ján; BRTKO, Július; DUBOVICKÝ, Michal; MACEJOVÁ, Dana; KISSOVÁ, Viktória; POLÁK, Štefan; UJHÁZY, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The mammary gland is a dynamic organ that undergoes structural and functional changes associated with growth, reproduction, and post-menopausal regression. The postnatal transformations of the epithelium and stromal cells of the mammary gland may contribute to its susceptibility to carcinogenesis. The increased cancer incidence in mammary glands of humans and similarly of rodents in association with their development is believed to be partly explained by proliferative activity together with lesser degree of differentiation, but it is not completely understood how the virgin gland retains its higher susceptibility to carcinogenesis. During its developmental cycle, the mammary gland displays many of the properties associated with breast cancer. An early first full-term pregnancy may have a protective effect. Rodent models are useful for investigating potential breast carcinogens. The purpose of this review is to help recognizing histological appearance of the epithelium and the stroma of the normal mammary gland in rats, and throughout its development in relation to tumorigenic potential. PMID:26424555

  18. Relationship between histology, development and tumorigenesis of mammary gland in female rat.

    PubMed

    Líška, Ján; Brtko, Július; Dubovický, Michal; Macejová, Dana; Kissová, Viktória; Polák, Štefan; Ujházy, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland is a dynamic organ that undergoes structural and functional changes associated with growth, reproduction, and post-menopausal regression. The postnatal transformations of the epithelium and stromal cells of the mammary gland may contribute to its susceptibility to carcinogenesis. The increased cancer incidence in mammary glands of humans and similarly of rodents in association with their development is believed to be partly explained by proliferative activity together with lesser degree of differentiation, but it is not completely understood how the virgin gland retains its higher susceptibility to carcinogenesis. During its developmental cycle, the mammary gland displays many of the properties associated with breast cancer. An early first full-term pregnancy may have a protective effect. Rodent models are useful for investigating potential breast carcinogens. The purpose of this review is to help recognizing histological appearance of the epithelium and the stroma of the normal mammary gland in rats, and throughout its development in relation to tumorigenic potential.

  19. Insights into the role of connexins in mammary gland morphogenesis and function.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael K G; Simek, Jamie; Laird, Dale W

    2015-06-01

    Gap junctions formed of connexin subunits link adjacent cells by direct intercellular communication that is essential for normal tissue homeostasis in the mammary gland. The mammary gland undergoes immense remodeling and requires exquisite regulation to control the proliferative, differentiating, and cell death mechanisms regulating gland development and function. The generation of novel genetically modified mice with reduced or ablated connexin function within the mammary gland has advanced our understanding of the role of gap junctions during the complex and dynamic process of mammary gland development. These studies have revealed an important stage-specific role for Cx26 (GJA1) and Cx43 (GJB2), while Cx30 (GJB6) and Cx32 (Gjb1) can be eliminated without compromising the gland. Yet, there remain gaps in our understanding of the role of mammary gland gap junctions.

  20. Expression of the gene encoding growth hormone in the human mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Mol, J.A.; Misdorp, W.; Rijnberk, A.

    1995-10-01

    Progestins cause a syndrome of growth hormone (GH) excess and enhanced mammary tumorigenesis in the dog. This has been regarded as being specific for the dog. Recently we reported that progestin-induced GH excess originates from foci of hyperplastic ductular epithelium of the mammary gland in the dog. In the present report we demonstrate by reverse-transcriptase PCR and immunohistochemistry that a main factor involved in tissue growth, i.e. GH, is also expressed in normal and neoplastic human mammary glands. The gene expressed in the human mammary gland proved to be identical to the gene encoding GH in the pituitary gland. The role of progesterone in the GH expression of the human mammary gland needs, however, to be proven. It is hypothesized that this locally produced hGH may play a pathogenetic role in breast cancer. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Interplay between progesterone and prolactin in mammary development and implications for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heather J; Ormandy, Christopher J

    2012-06-24

    Progesterone and prolactin remodel mammary morphology during pregnancy by acting on the mammary epithelial cell hierarchy. The roles of each hormone in mammary development have been well studied, but evidence of signalling cross-talk between progesterone and prolactin is still emerging. Factors such as receptor activator of NFkB ligand (RANKL) may integrate signals from both hormones to orchestrate their joint actions on the epithelial cell hierarchy. Common targets of progesterone and prolactin signalling are also likely to integrate their pro-proliferative actions in breast cancer. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the interplay between progesterone and prolactin in mammary development may reveal therapeutic targets for breast cancer. This review summarises our understanding of Pg and PRL action in mammary gland development before focusing on molecular mechanisms of signalling cross-talk and the implications for breast cancer.

  2. Mixtures of environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting chemicals affect mammary gland development in female and male rats.

    PubMed

    Mandrup, Karen Riiber; Johansson, Hanna Katarina Lilith; Boberg, Julie; Pedersen, Anne Stilling; Mortensen, Mette Sidsel; Jørgensen, Jennifer Solgaard; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hass, Ulla

    2015-07-01

    Estrogenic chemicals are able to alter mammary gland development in female rodents, but little is known on the effects of anti-androgens and mixtures of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with dissimilar modes of action. Pregnant rat dams were exposed during gestation and lactation to mixtures of environmentally relevant EDCs with estrogenic, anti-androgenic or dissimilar modes of action (TotalMix) of 100-, 200- or 450-fold high end human intake estimates. Mammary glands of prepubertal and adult female and male offspring were examined. Oestrogens increased mammary outgrowth in prepubertal females and the mRNA level of matrix metalloproteinase-3, which may be a potential biomarker for increased outgrowth. Mixtures of EDCs gave rise to ductal hyperplasia in adult males. Adult female mammary glands of the TotalMix group showed morphological changes possibly reflecting increased prolactin levels. In conclusion both estrogenic and anti-androgenic chemicals given during foetal life and lactation affected mammary glands in the offspring.

  3. Inoculation and scoring methods for rice sheath blight disease.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yulin; Liu, Guangjie; Park, Dong-Soo; Yang, Yinong

    2013-01-01

    Sheath blight disease of rice caused by the soilborne fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani has been a major disease of rice with a serious threat to stable rice production worldwide. Although various cultural practices have been used to manage the disease, it is advantageous and important to screen rice germplasm and identify resistant rice cultivars for more effective disease control. Recent advances in methods for the fungal inoculation and disease evaluation have enabled a better measurement of host resistance by minimizing confounding factors from plant architectures and environmental conditions. This chapter introduces five such methods: (1) detached leaf method; (2) micro-chamber method; (3) mist-chamber method; (4) parafilm sachet method; and (5) aluminum foil method. These methods are useful for screening and evaluating disease reactions of rice germplasm and facilitating the genetic mapping of disease resistance genes.

  4. Oxidation of methane in biotrickling filters inoculated with methanotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, Manuel; Dorado, Antonio D; Gentina, Juan C; Aroca, Germán

    2016-07-01

    The oxidation of methane (CH4) using biofilters has been proposed as an alternative to mitigate anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions with a low concentration of CH4 that cannot be used as a source of energy. However, conventional biofilters utilize organic packing materials that have a short lifespan, clogging problems, and are commonly inoculated with non-specific microorganisms leading to unpredictable CH4 elimination capacities (EC) and removal efficiencies (RE). The main objective of this work was to characterize the oxidation of CH4 in two biotrickling filters (BTFs) packed with polyethylene rings and inoculated with two methanotrophic bacteria, Methylomicrobium album and Methylocystis sp., in order to determine EC and CO2 production (pCO2) when using a specific inoculum. The repeatability of the results in both BTFs was determined when they operated at the same inlet load of CH4. A dynamic mathematical model that describes the CH4 abatement in the BTFs was developed and validated using mass transfer and kinetic parameters estimated independently. The results showed that EC and pCO2 of the BTFs are not identical but very similar for all the conditions tested. The use of specific inoculum has shown a faster startup and higher EC per unit area (0.019 gCH4 m(-2) h(-1)) in comparison to most of the previous studies at the same CH4 load rate (23.2 gCH4 m(-3) h(-1)). Global mass balance showed that the maximum reduction of CO2 equivalents was 98.5 gCO2eq m(-3) h(-1). The developed model satisfactorily described CH4 abatement in BTFs for a wide range of conditions.

  5. Identification of Rhizobium spp. in peat-based inoculants by DNA hybridization and PCR and its application in inoculant quality control.

    PubMed Central

    Tas, E; Saano, A; Leinonen, P; Lindström, K

    1995-01-01

    Procedures based on DNA hybridization and PCR were developed for quality control of Rhizobium inoculants. Inoculants for pea and goat's rue were produced by Elomestari Ltd., Juva, Finland, in sterile dry fine peat by the standard procedure used by the company. The inoculants contained Rhizobium galegae HAMBI 1174 and HAMBI 1207 and an R. leguminosarum biovar vicia strain, 16HSA, either solely or in combinations of two or three strains. DNA was isolated from 1-g samples of each peat inoculant and analyzed by nonradioactive DNA-DNA hybridization and by PCR. The hybridization probes were total DNAs from pure cultures of R. galegae HAMBI 1207 and R. leguminosarum biovar viciae 16HSA and a 264-bp strain-specific fragment from the genome of R. galegae HAMBI 1174. The total DNA probes distinguished inoculants containing R. galegae or R. leguminosarum, and the strain-specific probe distinguished inoculants containing R. galegae HAMBI 1174. The hybridization results for R. galegae were verified in a PCR experiment by amplifying an R. galegae species-specific fragment and an R. galegae HAMBI 1174 strain-specific fragment in the same reaction. When suitable probes and primers are available, the methods described here offer promising alternatives for the quality control of peat-based inoculants. PMID:7646020

  6. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and a Novel Mammary Derived Growth Inhibitor Fatty Acid Binding Protein MRG in Suppression of Mammary Tumor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    suppressing effect of n-3 fatty acid DHA on mammary tumors. MRG induces differentiation of mammary epithelial cells in vitro and its expression is...expression of MRG also increased milk protein beta-casein expression in the gland. Treatment of human breast cancer cells with w-3 PUFA DHA resulted...differentiating effect of pregnancy on breast epithelial cells and may play a major role in w-3 PUFA -mediated tumor suppression.

  7. Prognostic factors in MNU and DMBA-induced mammary tumors in female rats.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Antonieta; Lopes, Ana C; Faustino-Rocha, Ana I; Cabrita, António M S; Ferreira, Rita; Oliveira, Paula A; Colaço, Bruno

    2017-02-24

    Chemically-induced mammary tumors in rats by the carcinogens 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea- (MNU) and 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) are the most widely used models for studies related with human breast cancer. This study aimed to evaluate the immunoexpression of the prognostic factors estrogen receptor α (ERα), progesterone receptor (PR) and Ki-67, in MNU and DMBA-induced rat mammary tumors, in order to know the model that best suits to woman breast cancer. Twenty-eight MNU-induced and 16 DMBA-induced mammary tumors in virgin female Sprague-Dawley rats were analyzed. The expression of the prognostic markers ERα, PR and Ki-67 proliferation index (Ki-67 PI) was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Mitotic activity index (MAI) was also evaluated. More than one histological pattern was identified in each mammary tumor. Carcinomas constituted the lesions most frequently induced by both carcinogens: 33 MNU-induced carcinomas and 23 DMBA-induced carcinomas. All MNU and DMBA-induced mammary carcinomas were ER(+)/PR(+), with a higher expression of ERα when compared with PR. Tumors' weight, the expression of ERα, PR, Ki-67 PI and MAI were higher in MNU-induced mammary carcinomas when compared with the DMBA-induced ones. Statistically significant differences between groups were observed for ERα, PR and MAI (p<0.05). The higher KI-67 PI and MAI in MNU-induced mammary carcinomas are suggestive of a higher aggressiveness of these carcinomas when compared with the DMBA-induced ones, and consequently a worse response to the therapy and a worse prognosis. In this way, the use of the rat model of MNU-induced mammary tumors is advised in experimental protocols aiming to study more aggressive mammary tumors within the group of double-positive mammary tumors (ER(+)/PR(+)).

  8. The roles of inoculants' carbon source use in the biocontrol of potato scab disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pingping; Zhao, Xinbei; Shangguan, Nini; Chang, Dongwei; Ma, Qing

    2015-04-01

    Despite the application of multiple strains in the biocontrol of plant diseases, multistrain inoculation is still constrained by its inconsistency in the field. Nutrients, especially carbons, play an important role in the biocontrol processes. However, little work has been done on the systematic estimation of inoculants' carbon source use on biocontrol efficacies in vivo. In the present study, 7 nonpathogenic Streptomyces strains alone and in different combinations were inoculated as biocontrol agents against the potato scab disease, under field conditions and greenhouse treatments. The influence of the inoculants' carbon source use properties on biocontrol efficacies was investigated. The results showed that increasing the number of inoculated strains did not necessarily result in greater biocontrol efficacy in vivo. However, single strains with higher growth rates or multiple strains with less carbon source competition had positive effects on the biocontrol efficacies. These findings may shed light on optimizing the consistent biocontrol of plant disease with the consideration of inoculants' carbon source use properties.

  9. Growth response of Pinus densiflora seedlings inoculated with three indigenous ectomycorrhizal fungi in combination.

    PubMed

    Dalong, M; Luhe, W; Guoting, Y; Liqiang, M; Chun, L

    2011-07-01

    Pinus densiflora seedlings were inoculated with three indigenous ectomycorrhizal fungi (Cenococcum geophilum, Rhizopogon roseolus and Russula densifolia) in single-, two-, and three-species treatments. After 8 months, the colonization rates of each ectomycorrhizal species, seedling growth and the nutrition were assessed in each treatment. P. densiflora seedlings inoculated with different ECM species composition showed an increase in height and basal diameter and improved seedling root and shoot nutrition concentrations compared to control treatment. Generally, combined inoculation had a more positive influence on the seedlings than the single inoculation. The three-species inoculation presented the highest growth and basal diameter and concentration of most nutrients except potassium. In conclusion, the results provided strong evidence for benefits of combined inoculation with the indigenous ectomycorrhizal fungi on P. densiflora seedlings under controlled conditions.

  10. Growth response of maize plantlets inoculated with Enterobacter spp., as a model for alternative agriculture.

    PubMed

    Morales-García, Yolanda E; Juárez-Hernández, Dalia; Aragón-Hernández, Celia; Mascarua-Esparza, Miguel A; Bustillos-Cristales, María R; Fuentes-Ramírez, Luis E; Martinez-Contreras, Rebeca D; Munoz-Rojas, Jesus

    2011-01-01

    A maize rhizosphere isolate was phenotypically and genotypically characterized and identified as Enterobacter spp. bacterium. Germinated seeds were inoculated, the plantlets were sown in vermiculite and in soil and grown under laboratory and field conditions, respectively. The adherence, colonization and plant growth promotion capability of Enterobacter sp. UAPS03001 was evaluated in "Rojo-Criollo" maize under laboratory conditions. Twenty days after inoculation, the treated plantlets showed larger biomass than non-inoculated ones. In field grown plants, the kernel biomass was also greater in inoculated than in non-inoculated plants. The inoculation of maize sprouts with plant growth- promoting bacteria before their sowing in the field would be an alternative practice for achieving successful yield in temporal agriculture.

  11. MicroRNA expression in canine mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Boggs, R Michelle; Wright, Zachary M; Stickney, Mark J; Porter, Weston W; Murphy, Keith E

    2008-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 18-22-nt noncoding RNAs that are involved in post-transcriptional regulation of genes. Oncomirs, a subclass of miRNAs, include genes whose expression, or lack thereof, are associated with cancers. Until the last decade, the domestic dog was an underused model for the study of various human diseases that have genetic components. The dog exhibits marked genetic and physiologic similarity to the human, thereby making it an excellent model for study and treatment of various hereditary diseases. Furthermore, because the dog presents with distinct, spontaneously occurring mammary tumors, it may serve as a model for genetic analysis and treatments of humans with malignant breast tumors. Because miRNAs have been found to act as both tumor suppressors and oncogenes in several different cancers, expression patterns of ten miRNAs (miR-15a, miR-16, miR-17-5p, miR-21, miR-29b, miR-125b, miR-145, miR-155, miR-181b, let-7f) known to be associated with human breast cancers were compared to malignant canine mammary tumors (n = 6) and normal canine mammary tissue (n = 10). Resulting data revealed miR-29b and miR-21 to have a statistically significant (p < 0.05 by MANOVA analysis) upregulation in cancerous samples. The ten canine miRNAs follow the same pattern of expression as in the human, except for miR-145 which does not show a difference in expression between the normal and cancerous canine samples. In addition, when analyzed according to specific cancer phenotypes, miR-15a and miR-16 show a significant downregulation in canine ductal carcinomas while miRsR-181b, -21, -29b, and let-7f show a significant upregulation in canine tubular papillary carcinomas.

  12. Remodeling of endogenous mammary epithelium by breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R; Habte, Frezghi G; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L; Clarke, Michael F; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2012-10-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC.

  13. Chemoprevention of Rat Mammary Carcinogenesis by Apiaceae Spices

    PubMed Central

    Aqil, Farrukh; Jeyabalan, Jeyaprakash; Munagala, Radha; Ravoori, Srivani; Vadhanam, Manicka V.; Schultz, David J.; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2017-01-01

    Scientific evidence suggests that many herbs and spices have medicinal properties that alleviate symptoms or prevent disease. In this study, we examined the chemopreventive effects of the Apiaceae spices, anise, caraway, and celery seeds against 17β-estrogen (E2)-mediated mammary tumorigenesis in an ACI (August-Copenhagen Irish) rat model. Female ACI rats were given either control diet (AIN 93M) or diet supplemented with 7.5% (w/w) of anise, caraway, or celery seed powder. Two weeks later, one half of the animals in each group received subcutaneous silastic implants of E2. Diet intake and body weight were recorded weekly, and animals were euthanized after 3 and 12 weeks. E2-treatment showed significantly (2.1- and 3.4-fold) enhanced growth of pituitary gland at 3 and 12 weeks, respectively. All test spices significantly offset the pituitary growth by 12 weeks, except celery which was effective as early as three weeks. Immunohistochemical analysis for proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in mammary tissues showed significant reduction in E2-mediated mammary cell proliferation. Test spices reduced the circulating levels of both E2 and prolactin at three weeks. This protection was more pronounced at 12 weeks, with celery eliciting the highest effect. RT-PCR and western blot analysis were performed to determine the potential molecular targets of the spices. Anise and caraway diets significantly offset estrogen-mediated overexpression of both cyclin D1 and estrogen receptor α (ERα). The effect of anise was modest. Likewise, expression of CYP1B1 and CYP1A1 was inhibited by all test spices. Based on short-term molecular markers, caraway was selected over other spices based on its enhanced effect on estrogen-associated pathway. Therefore, a tumor-end point study in ACI rats was conducted with dietary caraway. Tumor palpation from 12 weeks onwards revealed tumor latency of 29 days in caraway-treated animals compared with first tumor appearance at 92 days in control

  14. Regulation of Mammary Progenitor Cells by p53 and Parity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    2003). 12. Ibarra , I., Erlich, Y., Muthuswamy, S. K., Sachidanandam, R. & Hannon, G. J. A role for microRNAs in maintenance of mouse mammary...supplemented with 1mM EDTA, 25mM HEPES, 1%FBS and 100u/ml Pen/Strep. The FACS data were collected using LSRII (Becton Dickinson, San Jose CA). A total...epithelial stem/progenitor cells. BREAST CANCER RES. 2009;11(2):R20. 28. Ibarra I, Erlich Y, Muthuswamy SK et al. A role for microRNAs in maintenance

  15. Gene Regulation by Retinoid Receptors in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    altered response to rECM, ECM sig- (919) 668-2458. E-mail: seewa001@mcAuke.edu naling pathways may utilize tumor suppressor checkpoints *Abbreviations...1998). In the tumor suppressor p53 in ECM-induced growth arrest, po- normal mammary gland, the x3/13 1 integrin is expressed at larity, and apoptosis...as a tumor mune IgG and grown in rECM. Electron micrographs of suppressor and in promoting differentiation, little is known early passage p53- HMEC-E6

  16. Molecular Analysis of Motility in Metastatic Mammary Adenocarcinoma Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    Culture MTLn3 cells were clonally derived from a lung metastasis of the 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma ( Neri et al., 1982) (kindly provided by Dr...MTLn3 cells were plated on collagen I coated MATTEK tissue culture dishes for 24 hours. Cells were plated at a density of 5000 cells/sq cm and...mM KOH; 4 mM MgC12 ; 10 mM EGTA pH 6.5 with 20 mM KOH; 5 1M phallacidin; 0.025 % saponin) was added to the culture well. After 15 seconds of extraction

  17. Non-coding RNAs in Mammary Gland Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Gurveen K; Milevskiy, Michael J G; Wilson, Wesley; Shewan, Annette M; Brown, Melissa A

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are untranslated RNA molecules that function to regulate the expression of numerous genes and associated biochemical pathways and cellular functions. NcRNAs include small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs), PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). They participate in the regulation of all developmental processes and are frequently aberrantly expressed or functionally defective in disease. This Chapter will focus on the role of ncRNAs, in particular miRNAs and lncRNAs, in mammary gland development and disease.

  18. Chemoprevention of Rat Mammary Carcinogenesis by Apiaceae Spices.

    PubMed

    Aqil, Farrukh; Jeyabalan, Jeyaprakash; Munagala, Radha; Ravoori, Srivani; Vadhanam, Manicka V; Schultz, David J; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2017-02-16

    Scientific evidence suggests that many herbs and spices have medicinal properties that alleviate symptoms or prevent disease. In this study, we examined the chemopreventive effects of the Apiaceae spices, anise, caraway, and celery seeds against 17β-estrogen (E2)-mediated mammary tumorigenesis in an ACI (August-Copenhagen Irish) rat model. Female ACI rats were given either control diet (AIN 93M) or diet supplemented with 7.5% (w/w) of anise, caraway, or celery seed powder. Two weeks later, one half of the animals in each group received subcutaneous silastic implants of E2. Diet intake and body weight were recorded weekly, and animals were euthanized after 3 and 12 weeks. E2-treatment showed significantly (2.1- and 3.4-fold) enhanced growth of pituitary gland at 3 and 12 weeks, respectively. All test spices significantly offset the pituitary growth by 12 weeks, except celery which was effective as early as three weeks. Immunohistochemical analysis for proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in mammary tissues showed significant reduction in E2-mediated mammary cell proliferation. Test spices reduced the circulating levels of both E2 and prolactin at three weeks. This protection was more pronounced at 12 weeks, with celery eliciting the highest effect. RT-PCR and western blot analysis were performed to determine the potential molecular targets of the spices. Anise and caraway diets significantly offset estrogen-mediated overexpression of both cyclin D1 and estrogen receptor α (ERα). The effect of anise was modest. Likewise, expression of CYP1B1 and CYP1A1 was inhibited by all test spices. Based on short-term molecular markers, caraway was selected over other spices based on its enhanced effect on estrogen-associated pathway. Therefore, a tumor-end point study in ACI rats was conducted with dietary caraway. Tumor palpation from 12 weeks onwards revealed tumor latency of 29 days in caraway-treated animals compared with first tumor appearance at 92 days in control

  19. Inoculated Titanium Aluminide Alloys and Their Predicted Propensity for Grain Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosslar, D.; Günther, R.

    2014-08-01

    This work centers on grain-size model calculations of titanium diboride-inoculated titanium aluminide-based alloys. The model uses the free-growth criterion of grain initiation after heterogeneous nucleation, which implies that grains initiate once their interfacial curvature reaches a maximum. The presented calculations identify quantitatively the influence of inoculation process parameters on the amount of achievable grain refinement. A benchmark test against experimental results allows a discussion of the grain size reduction efficiency of titanium-diboride inoculants.

  20. Analysis of 30 patients with acupuncture-induced primary inoculation tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangbo; Pan, Jingye; Jin, Keke; Liu, Cailong; Wang, Jing; Chen, Li; Chen, Lei; Yuan, Jiandong

    2014-01-01

    Primary inoculation tuberculosis is a skin condition that develops at the site of inoculation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in tuberculosis-free individuals. This report describes the diagnosis, treatment and >1 year follow-up of 30 patients presenting with acupuncture-induced primary inoculation tuberculosis. Our data provide a deeper insight into this rare route of infection of tuberculosis. We also review effective treatment options.

  1. Carbon decomposition by inoculating Phanerochaete chrysosporium during drum composting of agricultural waste.

    PubMed

    Varma, V Sudharsan; Ramu, Kamma; Kalamdhad, Ajay S

    2015-05-01

    The effect of Phanerochaete chrysosporium inoculation during drum composting of agricultural waste was performed at different composting stages. Three trials were carried out with (5:4:1) combination of vegetable waste, cattle manure, and sawdust along with 10 kg of dried leaves with a total mass of 100 kg in a 550 L rotary drum composter. Trial 1 was a control without inoculation of fungus, while trial 2 was inoculated during the initial day (0th day of composting), and trial 3 was inoculated after the thermophilic phase, i.e., on the 8th day of composting period. The inoculation of fungus increased the volatile solids reduction by 1.45-fold in trial 2 and 1.7-fold in trial 3 as compared to trial 1 without any fungal inoculation. Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN) was observed with 2.31, 2.62, and 2.59% in trials 1, 2, and 3, respectively, at the end of 20 days of composting period. Hence, it can be concluded that inoculation of white-rot fungus increased the decomposition rate of agricultural waste within shorter time in drum composting. However, inoculation after the thermophilic phase was found more effective than inoculation during initial days of composting for producing more stabilized and nutrient-rich compost.

  2. Pathogenesis of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 in mice after various routes of inoculation.

    PubMed Central

    Renis, H E; Eidson, E E; Mathews, J; Gray, J E

    1976-01-01

    The pathogenesis of herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 was compared after inoculation of mice by different routes. Intravaginal inoculation of HSV-1 and HSV-2 produced a local infection, with virus recovery from the vagina through 5 days. Virus was recovered from the spinal cords 4 to 5 days after inoculation but not from liver, kidney, lung, spleen, or blood. Intravenous or intraperitoneal inoculation of HSV-2 produced a focal necrotic hepatitis similar to that described previously (S. C. Mogenson, B. Teisner, and H.K. Andersen, 1974). The viral etiology of the liver lesions was confirmed by virus isolation (through 4 days) and electron microscopy. No evidence of infection of the kidney, lung, blood, or spleen was observed, although virus was isolated from spinal cord homogenates 7 days after inoculation. HSV-1 inoculation by the intraperitoneal or intravenous route resulted in virus isolation from the kidney during the 7-day harvest period, without producing overt pathological changes. Virus was isolated from spinal cord homogenates 2 to 3 days after HSV-1 inoculation but not from homogenates prepared from spleen, lung, or blood. Increases in serum transaminase activity were observed after systemic (intravenous) inoculation of HSV-2 but not after HSV-1 inoculation. Images PMID:184048

  3. Establishment of Desmoncus orthacanthos Martius (Arecaceae): effect of inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizae.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Zapata, José A; Orellana, Roger; Allen, Edith B

    2006-03-01

    Inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi has often promoted increased growth of plants but very little work has been done in the tropics to evaluate the effects of inoculation on the establishment and development of seedlings in forests. Desmoncus orthacanthos Martius is a scandent palm present both in early and late succession, and consequently can be used in restoration processes. A test was conducted to determine the effect of AM on the establishment of Desmoncus orthacanthos in tropical forest in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Thirty inoculated and 30 non-inoculated seedlings were introduced in two sites of different successional age, a mature forest and an eight-year old abandoned cornfield (acahual). Survival and growth parameters were evaluated after 12 months. Leaf area and phosphorus, but not height, were greater in inoculated than non-inoculated plants in the forest but not in the acahual. However, mycorrhizae had a clear effect on plant survival in both sites, with a threefold increase in survival of inoculated compared with non-inoculated plants bassed on an odds ratio. The results suggest that inoculation will be important to increase the establishment of this commercially important palm.

  4. Effects of inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on maize grown in multi-metal contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chang-Cong; Li, Tao; Xiao, Yan-ping; Liu, Mao-Jun; Zhang, Han-Bo; Zhao, Zhi-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Pot culture experiments were established to determine the effects of colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) (Glomus mosseae and G. sp) on maize (Zea mays L.) grown in Pb, Zn, and Cd complex contaminated soils. AMF and non-AMF inoculated maize were grown in sterilized substrates and subjected to different soil heavy metal (Pb, Zn, Cd) concentrations. The root and shoot biomasses of inoculated maize were significantly higher than those of non-inoculated maize. Pb, Zn, and Cd concentrations in roots were significantly higher than those in shoots in both the inoculated and non-inoculated maize, indicating the heavy metals mostly accumulated in the roots of maize. The translocation rates of Pb, Zn, and Cd from roots to shoots were not significantly difference between inoculated and non-inoculated maize. However, at high soil heavy metal concentrations, Pb, Zn, and Cd in the shoots and Pb in the roots of inoculated maize were significantly reduced by about 50% compared to the non-inoculated maize. These results indicated that AMF could promote maize growth and decrease the uptake of these heavy metals at higher soil concentrations, thus protecting their hosts from the toxicity of heavy metals in Pb, Zn, and Cd complex contaminated soils.

  5. Effects of milk replacer formulation on measures of mammary growth and composition in Holstein heifers.

    PubMed

    Daniels, K M; Capuco, A V; McGilliard, M L; James, R E; Akers, R M

    2009-12-01

    Overfeeding prepubertal heifers may impair mammary parenchymal growth and reduce milk production, but evidence suggests that increased intake of a high-protein milk replacer before weaning may be beneficial. This study was designed to evaluate effects of milk replacer (MR) composition on mass and composition of mammary parenchyma and fat pad, growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis gene expression, and putative mammary epithelial stem cells. Specifically, we hypothesized that positive effects of faster rates of gain during the preweaning period alter the development, persistence, or activity of populations of putative mammary epithelial stem cells, possibly through involvement of GH/IGF-I axis molecules. Twenty-four newborn heifers were fed 1 of 4 MR diets (n = 6/diet): control [20% crude protein (CP), 21% fat MR fed at 441 g of dry matter (DM)/d], high protein, low fat (28% CP, 20% fat MR fed at 951 g of DM/d), high protein, high fat (27% CP, 28% fat MR fed at 951 g of DM/d), and high protein, high fat+ (27% CP, 28% fat MR fed at 1,431 g of DM/d). Water and starter (20% CP, 1.43% fat) were offered ad libitum. Animals were killed on d 65 and mammary tissue was subjected to biochemical, molecular, and histological examination. No differences in mammary parenchymal mass or composition, with or without adjusting for empty body weight, were detected. Mass was increased and composition of the mammary fat pad was altered by nutrient intake. No diet differences in putative mammary epithelial stem cell abundance or abundance of transcripts for genes of the GH/IGF-I axis were detected. In this study, growth of the mammary epithelium, size of the mammary epithelial stem cell population, and components of the GH/IGF-I axis did not depend on diet. However, an underlying positive correlation between telomerase, a marker of mammary stem cells, and growth of the mammary parenchyma was detected. Implications of diet-induced effects on mammary fat pad and

  6. Differential roles of ERα and ERβ in normal and neoplastic development in the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rajendra G; Hawthorne, Michael; Mehta, Rajeshwari R; Torres, Karen E O; Peng, Xinjian; McCormick, David L; Kopelovich, Levy

    2014-01-01

    The present experiments were performed to determine the roles of estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ) in normal and neoplastic development in the mouse mammary gland. In wild-type mice, in vivo administration of estradiol (E) + progesterone (P) stimulated mammary ductal growth and alveolar differentiation. Mammary glands from mice in which the ERβ gene has been deleted (βERKO mice) demonstrated normal ductal growth and differentiation in response to E + P. By contrast, mammary glands from mice in which the ERα gene has been deleted (αERKO mice) demonstrated only rudimentary ductal structures that did not differentiate in response to E + P. EGF demonstrates estrogen-like activity in the mammary glands of αERKO mice: treatment of αERKO mice with EGF + P (without E) supported normal mammary gland development, induced expression of progesterone receptor (PR), and increased levels of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR30) protein. Mammary gland development in βERKO mice treated with EGF + P was comparable to that of wild-type mice receiving EGF + P; EGF had no statistically significant effects on the induction of PR or expression of GPR30 in mammary glands harvested from either wild-type mice or βERKO mice. In vitro exposure of mammary glands to 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) induced preneoplastic mammary alveolar lesions (MAL) in glands from wild-type mice and βERKO mice, but failed to induce MAL in mammary glands from αERKO mice. Microarray analysis of DMBA-treated mammary glands identified 28 functional pathways whose expression was significantly different in αERKO mice versus both βERKO and wild-type mice; key functions that were differentially expressed in αERKO mice included cell division, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. The data demonstrate distinct roles for ERα and ERβ in normal and neoplastic development in the mouse mammary gland, and suggest that EGF can mimic the ERα-mediated effects of E in this organ.

  7. Loss of vitamin D receptor signaling from the mammary epithelium or adipose tissue alters pubertal glandular development.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Abby L; Zinser, Glendon M; Waltz, Susan E

    2014-10-15

    Vitamin D₃ receptor (VDR) signaling within the mammary gland regulates various postnatal stages of glandular development, including puberty, pregnancy, involution, and tumorigenesis. Previous studies have shown that vitamin D₃ treatment induces cell-autonomous growth inhibition and differentiation of mammary epithelial cells in culture. Furthermore, mammary adipose tissue serves as a depot for vitamin D₃ storage, and both epithelial cells and adipocytes are capable of bioactivating vitamin D₃. Despite the pervasiveness of VDR in mammary tissue, individual contributions of epithelial cells and adipocytes, as well as the VDR-regulated cross-talk between these two cell types during pubertal mammary development, have yet to be investigated. To assess the cell-type specific effect of VDR signaling during pubertal mammary development, novel mouse models with mammary epithelial- or adipocyte-specific loss of VDR were generated. Interestingly, loss of VDR in either cellular compartment accelerated ductal morphogenesis with increased epithelial cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis within terminal end buds. Conversely, VDR signaling specifically in the mammary epithelium modulated hormone-induced alveolar growth, as ablation of VDR in this cell type resulted in precocious alveolar development. In examining cellular cross-talk ex vivo, we show that ligand-dependent VDR signaling in adipocytes significantly inhibits mammary epithelial cell growth in part through the vitamin D₃-dependent production of the cytokine IL-6. Collectively, these studies delineate independent roles for vitamin D₃-dependent VDR signaling in mammary adipocytes and epithelial cells in controlling pubertal mammary gland development.

  8. ApcMin, A Mutation in the Murine Apc Gene, Predisposes to Mammary Carcinomas and Focal Alveolar Hyperplasias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Amy Rapaich; Mattes, Ellen M.; Dove, William F.; Lindstrom, Mary J.; Haag, Jill D.; Gould, Michael N.

    1993-10-01

    ApcMin (Min, multiple intestinal neoplasia) is a point mutation in the murine homolog of the APC gene. Min/+ mice develop multiple intestinal adenomas, as do humans carrying germ-line mutations in APC. Female mice carrying Min are also prone to develop mammary tumors. Min/+ mammary glands are more sensitive to chemical carcinogenesis than are +/+ mammary glands. Transplantation of mammary cells from Min/+ or +/+ donors into +/+ hosts demonstrates that the propensity to develop mammary tumors is intrinsic to the Min/+ mammary cells. Long-term grafts of Min/+ mammary glands also gave rise to focal alveolar hyperplasias, indicating that the presence of the Min mutation also has a role in the development of these lesions.

  9. Distinct Luminal-Type Mammary Carcinomas Arise from Orthotopic Trp53-Null Mammary Transplantation of Juvenile versus Adult Mice

    DOE PAGES

    Nguyen, David H.; Ouyang, Haoxu; Mao, Jian-Hua; ...

    2014-12-01

    Age and physiologic status, such as menopause, are risk factors for breast cancer. Less clear is what factors influence the diversity of breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of host age on the distribution of tumor subtypes in mouse mammary chimera consisting of wild-type hosts and Trp53 nullizygous epithelium, which undergoes a high rate of neoplastic transformation. Wild-type mammary glands cleared of endogenous epithelium at 3 weeks of age were subsequently transplanted during puberty (5 weeks) or at maturation (10 weeks) with syngeneic Trp53-null mammary tissue fragments and monitored for one year. Tumors arose sooner from adultmore » hosts (AH) compared with juvenile hosts (JH). However, compared with AH tumors, JH tumors grew several times faster, were more perfused, exhibited a two-fold higher mitotic index, and were more highly positive for insulin-like growth factor receptor phosphorylation. Most tumors in each setting were estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (80% JH vs. 70% AH), but JH tumors were significantly more ER-immunoreactive (P = 0.0001) than AH tumors. A differential expression signature (JvA) of juvenile versus adult tumors revealed a luminal transcriptional program. Centroids of the human homologs of JvA genes showed that JH tumors were more like luminal A tumors and AH tumors were more like luminal B tumors. Hierarchical clustering with the JvA human ortholog gene list segregated luminal A and luminal B breast cancers across datasets. Lastly, these data support the notion that age-associated host physiology greatly influences the intrinsic subtype of breast cancer.« less

  10. Distinct Luminal-Type Mammary Carcinomas Arise from Orthotopic Trp53-Null Mammary Transplantation of Juvenile versus Adult Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, David H.; Ouyang, Haoxu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hlatky, Lynn; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Age and physiologic status, such as menopause, are risk factors for breast cancer. Less clear is what factors influence the diversity of breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of host age on the distribution of tumor subtypes in mouse mammary chimera consisting of wild-type hosts and Trp53 nullizygous epithelium, which undergoes a high rate of neoplastic transformation. Wild-type mammary glands cleared of endogenous epithelium at 3 weeks of age were subsequently transplanted during puberty (5 weeks) or at maturation (10 weeks) with syngeneic Trp53-null mammary tissue fragments and monitored for one year. Tumors arose sooner from adult hosts (AH) compared with juvenile hosts (JH). However, compared with AH tumors, JH tumors grew several times faster, were more perfused, exhibited a two-fold higher mitotic index, and were more highly positive for insulin-like growth factor receptor phosphorylation. Most tumors in each setting were estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (80% JH vs. 70% AH), but JH tumors were significantly more ER-immunoreactive (P = 0.0001) than AH tumors. A differential expression signature (JvA) of juvenile versus adult tumors revealed a luminal transcriptional program. Centroids of the human homologs of JvA genes showed that JH tumors were more like luminal A tumors and AH tumors were more like luminal B tumors. Hierarchical clustering with the JvA human ortholog gene list segregated luminal A and luminal B breast cancers across datasets. Lastly, these data support the notion that age-associated host physiology greatly influences the intrinsic subtype of breast cancer.

  11. Regeneration of Bovine Mammary Gland in Immunodeficient Mice by Transplantation of Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells Mixed with Matrigel

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Jung; Lee, Won Young; Jeong, Ha Yeon; Song, Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives With the global demand for dairy protein for consumption growing annually, there has been increasing activity in the research field of dairy protein synthesis and production. From a manipulation perspective, it is more difficult to use live cattle for laboratory studies on the production of milk as well as of dairy protein such as casein, as compared with using laboratory animals like rodents. Therefore, we aimed to develop a mouse model of bovine mammary alveolar ducts for laboratory-scale studies. We studied the formation of the bovine mammary gland ductal structure by transplanting the MAC-T bovine alveolar cell line into mice. Methods and Results MAC-T cells (1×107) were suspended in Matrigel and injected into the dorsal tissue of 8-week-old male BALB/C nude mice. Histological analysis of tissue dissected from the MAC-T cell-transplanted mice after 6 weeks showed the typical morphology of the tubuloalveolar female gland, as well as glands made up of branching ducts that were surrounded by smooth muscle with small alveoli budding off the ducts. In addition, the epithelial markers CK14 and CK18 were expressed within the duct-like structure. Prolactin was detected in the duct interior in these CK14+ and CK18+ cells but not in the non-transplanted MAC-T cells. Conclusions These results showed that duct-like tissue had been successfully formed after 6 weeks of transplantation of the CK14+ and CK18+ MAC-T cells into mice dorsal tissue. This mouse model will be a useful tool for further research on the bovine mammary gland. PMID:27788570

  12. Genetic variations of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in dogs with mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Enginler, S O; Akış, I; Toydemir, T S F; Oztabak, K; Haktanir, D; Gündüz, M C; Kırşan, I; Fırat, I

    2014-03-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common tumour type in female dogs. The formation of the mammary tumours is multifactorial but the high incidence of tumour disease in certain canine breeds suggests a strong genetic component. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the most important genes significantly associated with mammary tumours. The aim of this study was to determine the association between the variations of these two genes and canine mammary tumours. 5'-untranslated region, intron 8 and exon 9 of BRCA1 and exons 12, 24, 27 of BRCA2 were sequenced in order to detect the genetic variations. In addition to six previously identified polymorphisms, six novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected. Five of the coding SNPs were synonymous and three of them were non-synonymous. The comparison of the sequences from 25 mammary tumour bearing and 10 tumour free dogs suggested that the two SNPs in intron 8 and exon 9 of BRCA1 and two SNPs in exon 24 and exon 27 of BRCA2, which are firstly identified in this study, might be associated with mammary tumour development in dogs. Especially one SNP in exon 9 of BRCA1 and one SNP in exon 24 of BRCA2 were found to be significantly associated with canine mammary tumours.

  13. Mammary epithelial cell: Influence of extracellular matrix composition and organization during development and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kass, Laura; Erler, Janine T.; Dembo, Micah; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2009-01-01

    Stromal–epithelial interactions regulate mammary gland development and are critical for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. The extracellular matrix, which is a proteinaceous component of the stroma, regulates mammary epithelial growth, survival, migration and differentiation through a repertoire of transmembrane receptors, of which integrins are the best characterized. Integrins modulate cell fate by reciprocally transducing biochemical and biophysical cues between the cell and the extracellular matrix, facilitating processes such as embryonic branching morphogenesis and lactation in the mammary gland. During breast development and cancer progression, the extracellular matrix is dynamically altered such that its composition, turnover, processing and orientation change dramatically. These modifications influence mammary epithelial cell shape, and modulate growth factor and hormonal responses to regulate processes including branching morphogenesis and alveolar differentiation. Malignant transformation of the breast is also associated with significant matrix remodeling and a progressive stiffening of the stroma that can enhance mammary epithelial cell growth, perturb breast tissue organization, and promote cell invasion and survival. In this review, we discuss the role of stromal–epithelial interactions in normal and malignant mammary epithelial cell behavior. We specifically focus on how dynamic modulation of the biochemical and biophysical properties of the extracellular matrix elicit a dialogue with the mammary epithelium through transmembrane integrin receptors to influence tissue morphogenesis, homeostasis and malignant transformation. PMID:17719831

  14. p16 loss rescues functional decline of Brca1-deficient mammary stem cells.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alexandria; Bai, Feng; Chan, Ho Lam; Liu, Shiqin; Slingerland, Joyce M; Robbins, David J; Capobianco, Anthony J; Pei, Xin-Hai

    2017-02-22

    Recent evidence indicates that the accumulation of endogenous DNA damage can induce senescence and limit the function of adult stem cells. It remains elusive whether deficiency in DNA damage repair is associated with the functional alteration of mammary stem cells. In this article, we reported that senescence was induced in mammary epithelial cells during aging along with increased expression of p16Ink4a (p16), an inhibitor of CDK4 and CKD6. Loss of p16 abrogated the age-induced senescence in mammary epithelial cells and significantly increased mammary stem cell function. We showed that loss of Brca1, a tumor suppressor that functions in DNA damage repair, in the mammary epithelium induced senescence with induction of p16 and a decline of stem cell function, which was rescued by p16 loss. These data not only answer the question as to whether deficiency in DNA damage repair is associated with the functional decline of mammary stem cells, but also identify the role of p16 in suppressing Brca1-deficient mammary stem cell function.

  15. Nuclear repartitioning of galectin-1 by an extracellular glycan switch regulates mammary morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Ramray; Belardi, Brian; Mori, Hidetoshi; Kuo, Peiwen; Tam, Andrew; Hines, William C; Le, Quynh-Thu; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Bissell, Mina J

    2016-08-16

    Branching morphogenesis in the mammary gland is achieved by the migration of epithelial cells through a microenvironment consisting of stromal cells and extracellular matrix (ECM). Here we show that galectin-1 (Gal-1), an endogenous lectin that recognizes glycans bearing N-acetyllactosamine (LacNAc) epitopes, induces branching migration of mammary epithelia in vivo, ex vivo, and in 3D organotypic cultures. Surprisingly, Gal-1's effects on mammary patterning were independent of its glycan-binding ability and instead required localization within the nuclei of mammary epithelia. Nuclear translocation of Gal-1, in turn, was regulated by discrete cell-surface glycans restricted to the front of the mammary end buds. Specifically, α2,6-sialylation of terminal LacNAc residues in the end buds masked Gal-1 ligands, thereby liberating the protein for nuclear translocation. Within mammary epithelia, Gal-1 localized within nuclear Gemini bodies and drove epithelial invasiveness. Conversely, unsialylated LacNAc glycans, enriched in the epithelial ducts, sequestered Gal-1 in the extracellular environment, ultimately attenuating invasive potential. We also found that malignant breast cells possess higher levels of nuclear Gal-1 and α2,6-SA and lower levels of LacNAc than nonmalignant cells in culture and in vivo and that nuclear localization of Gal-1 promotes a transformed phenotype. Our findings suggest that differential glycosylation at the level of tissue microanatomy regulates the nuclear function of Gal-1 in the context of mammary gland morphogenesis and in cancer progression.

  16. Genetic variations of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in dogs with mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Enginler, S O; Akış, I; Toydemir, T S F; Oztabak, K; Haktanir, D; Gündüz, M C; Kırşan, I; Fırat, I

    2014-03-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common tumour type in female dogs. The formation of the mammary tumours is multifactorial but the high incidence of tumour disease in certain canine breeds suggests a strong genetic component. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the most important genes significantly associated with mammary tumours. The aim of this study was to determine the association between the variations of these two genes and canine mammary tumours. 5′-untranslated region, intron 8 and exon 9 of BRCA1 and exons 12, 24, 27 of BRCA2 were sequenced in order to detect the genetic variations. In addition to six previously identified polymorphisms, six novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected. Five of the coding SNPs were synonymous and three of them were non-synonymous. The comparison of the sequences from 25 mammary tumour bearing and 10 tumour free dogs suggested that the two SNPs in intron 8 and exon 9 of BRCA1 and two SNPs in exon 24 and exon 27 of BRCA2, which are firstly identified in this study, might be associated with mammary tumour development in dogs. Especially one SNP in exon 9 of BRCA1 and one SNP in exon 24 of BRCA2 were found to be significantly associated with canine mammary tumours.

  17. Histone Demethylase KDM6A Controls the Mammary Luminal Lineage through Enzyme-Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Kyung Hyun; Oh, Sumin; Kang, Keunsoo; Wang, Chaochen; Robinson, Gertraud W.; Ge, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Establishment of the mammary luminal cell lineage is controlled primarily by hormones and through specific transcription factors (TFs). Previous studies have linked histone methyltransferases to the differentiation of mammary epithelium, thus opening the possibility of biological significance of counteracting demethylases. We have now demonstrated an essential role for the H3K27me3 demethylase KDM6A in generating a balanced alveolar compartment. Deletion of Kdm6a in the mammary luminal cell lineage led to a paucity of luminal cells and an excessive expansion of basal cells, both in vivo and in vitro. The inability to form structurally normal ducts and alveoli during pregnancy resulted in lactation failure. Mutant luminal cells did not exhibit their distinctive transcription factor pattern and displayed basal characteristics. The genomic H3K27me3 landscape was unaltered in mutant tissue, and support for a demethylase-independent mechanism came from mice expressing a catalytically inactive KDM6A. Mammary tissue developed normally in these mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) experiments demonstrated KDM6A binding to putative enhancers enriched for key mammary TFs and H3K27ac. This study demonstrated for the first time that the mammary luminal lineage relies on KDM6A to ensure a transcription program leading to differentiated alveoli. Failure to fully implement this program results in structurally and functionally impaired mammary tissue. PMID:27215382

  18. New insights into fetal mammary gland morphogenesis: differential effects of natural and environmental estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Speroni, Lucia; Voutilainen, Maria; Mikkola, Marja L.; Klager, Skylar A.; Schaeberle, Cheryl M.; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M.

    2017-01-01

    An increased breast cancer risk during adulthood has been linked to estrogen exposure during fetal life. However, the impossibility of removing estrogens from the feto-maternal unit has hindered the testing of estrogen’s direct effect on mammary gland organogenesis. To overcome this limitation, we developed an ex vivo culture method of the mammary gland where the direct action of estrogens can be tested during embryonic days (E)14 to 19. Mouse mammary buds dissected at E14 and cultured for 5 days showed that estrogens directly altered fetal mammary gland development. Exposure to 0.1 pM, 10 pM, and 1 nM 17 β-estradiol (E2) resulted in monotonic inhibition of mammary buds ductal growth. In contrast, Bisphenol-A (BPA) elicited a non-monotonic response. At environmentally relevant doses (1 nM), BPA significantly increased ductal growth, as previously observed in vivo, while 1 μM BPA significantly inhibited ductal growth. Ductal branching followed the same pattern. This effect of BPA was blocked by Fulvestrant, a full estrogen antagonist, while the effect of estradiol was not. This method may be used to study the hormonal regulation of mammary gland development, and to test newly synthesized chemicals that are released into the environment without proper assessment of their hormonal action on critical targets like the mammary gland. PMID:28102330

  19. Premature mammary gland involution with repeated corticosterone injection in interleukin 10-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Woo-Sung; Bae, Ji-Hyun; Yeom, Su-Cheong

    2016-12-01

    Recently, we found that maternal stress could induce premature mammary gland involution in interleukin 10 knock out (IL-10(-/-)) mice. To elucidate correlation between stress, IL-10, and mammary gland involution, corticosterone was injected into the lactating wild type and IL-10-deficient mice and assessed mammary gland phenotype. Repetitive corticosterone injection developed premature mammary gland involution only in B6.IL-10(-/-) mice; moreover, it induced alopecia in nursing pups. Corticosterone injection induced several typical changes such as mammary gland epithelial cell apoptosis, macrophage infiltration, fat deposition in adipocyte, STAT3 phosphorylation, and upregulation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene in adrenal gland. Overall incidence of pup alopecia and mammary gland involution was relatively high in corticosterone than control B6.IL-10(-/-) group (57% vs. 20%). Our finding demonstrates that IL-10 is important for stress modulation, and B6.Il-10(-/-) with corticosterone has several advantage such as simple to establish, well-defined onset of mammary gland involution, high incidence, and inducing pup alopecia.

  20. Mammary Fat of Breast Cancer: Gene Expression Profiling and Functional Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Fu, Ziyi; Yin, Hong; Lu, Xun; Yu, Jing; Lu, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Mammary fat is the main composition of breast, and is the most probable candidate to affect tumor behavior because the fat produces hormones, growth factors and adipokines, a heterogeneous group of signaling molecules. Gene expression profiling and functional characterization of mammary fat in Chinese women has not been reported. Thus, we collected the mammary fat tissues adjacent to breast tumors from 60 subjects, among which 30 subjects had breast cancer and 30 had benign lesions. We isolated and cultured the stromal vascular cell fraction from mammary fat. The expression of genes related to adipose function (including adipogenesis and secretion) was detected at both the tissue and the cellular level. We also studied mammary fat browning. The results indicated that fat tissue close to malignant and benign lesions exhibited distinctive gene expression profiles and functional characteristics. Although the mammary fat of breast tumors atrophied, it secreted tumor growth stimulatory factors. Browning of mammary fat was observed and browning activity of fat close to malignant breast tumors was greater than that close to benign lesions. Understanding the diversity between these two fat depots may possibly help us improve our understanding of breast cancer pathogenesis and find the key to unlock new anticancer therapies. PMID:25291184

  1. Both ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone are necessary for hormonal mammary carcinogenesis in ovariectomized ACI rats.

    PubMed

    Blank, Edward W; Wong, Po-Yin; Lakshmanaswamy, Rajkumar; Guzman, Raphael; Nandi, Satyabrata

    2008-03-04

    August-Copenhagen-Irish (ACI) rats are unique in that the ovary-intact females develop high incidence of mammary cancers induced solely by hormones upon prolonged exposure to high levels of estrogen alone. Studies have also shown that such prolonged exposure to high-dose estrogen results in human-like aneuploid mammary cancers in ovary-intact ACI rats. To determine the role of progesterone in mammary carcinogenesis, six-week-old intact and ovariectomized ACI rats were continuously exposed to low- and high-dose estrogen alone, progesterone alone, low-dose estrogen plus progesterone, and ovariectomized ACI rats with high-dose estrogen plus progesterone. Also, ovariectomized ACI rats were treated with high-dose estrogen plus progesterone plus testosterone to determine the role of the androgen, testosterone, if any, in hormonal mammary carcinogenesis. The results indicate that continuous exposure to high, but not low, concentrations of estrogen alone can induce mammary carcinogenesis in intact but not in ovariectomized rats. Mammary carcinogenesis in ovariectomized ACI rats requires continuous exposure to high concentrations of estrogen and progesterone. The addition of testosterone propionate does not affect tumor incidence in such rats. These results suggest that both ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone are necessary for mammary carcinogenesis induced solely by hormones in ovariectomized ACI rats. Our results are in agreement with the Women's Health Initiative studies, where treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen (ERT) alone did not increase the risk of breast cancer, but estrogen and progesterone (HRT) did.

  2. Pathological internal mammary lymph nodes in secondary and tertiary deep inferior epigastric perforator flap breast reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Stefan O P; Rakhorst, Hinne A; Mureau, Marc A M; Moolenburgh, Sanne E; van Huizum, Martine A; van Geel, Albert N

    2005-12-01

    Use of internal mammary vessels during breast reconstruction provides information on part of the internal mammary chain lymph nodes (LNs). It was evaluated whether our current practice of screening should be changed to identify those delayed breast reconstruction patients with tumor-positive internal mammary nodes (IMNs) and whether breast reconstruction should be continued, in case suspicious IMNs were found intraoperatively. From February 2002 to December 2004, 81 patients had received 98 deep inferior epigastric perforator flaps for delayed breast reconstruction. Prospectively collected data for suspicious internal mammary LNs were evaluated. In 13 patients (16%) who had received a delayed breast reconstruction, macroscopically suspicious LNs were detected in the course of the internal mammary chain. Three patients (4%) had a pathologic diagnosis of malignancy, which was found to match their primary tumor. No relationship between positive internal mammary chain LNs and location of the primary tumor, TNM-stage, or previously administered adjuvant therapy was found. Suspicious internal mammary chain LNs found during recipient vessel dissection for breast reconstruction can have important consequences for treatment of malignant disease in individual patients. Presented data do not support changing the current perioperative approach of delayed breast reconstruction.

  3. p130Cas over-expression impairs mammary branching morphogenesis in response to estrogen and EGF.

    PubMed

    Camacho Leal, Maria del Pilar; Pincini, Alessandra; Tornillo, Giusy; Fiorito, Elisa; Bisaro, Brigitte; Di Luca, Elisa; Turco, Emilia; Defilippi, Paola; Cabodi, Sara

    2012-01-01

    p130Cas adaptor protein regulates basic processes such as cell cycle control, survival and migration. p130Cas over-expression has been related to mammary gland transformation, however the in vivo consequences of p130Cas over-expression during mammary gland morphogenesis are not known. In ex vivo mammary explants from MMTV-p130Cas transgenic mice, we show that p130Cas impairs the functional interplay between Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and Estrogen Receptor (ER) during mammary gland development. Indeed, we demonstrate that p130Cas over-expression upon the concomitant stimulation with EGF and estrogen (E2) severely impairs mammary morphogenesis giving rise to enlarged multicellular spherical structures with altered architecture and absence of the central lumen. These filled acinar structures are characterized by increased cell survival and proliferation and by a strong activation of Erk1/2 MAPKs and Akt. Interestingly, antagonizing the ER activity is sufficient to re-establish branching morphogenesis and normal Erk1/2 MAPK activity. Overall, these results indicate that high levels of p130Cas expression profoundly affect mammary morphogenesis by altering epithelial architecture, survival and unbalancing Erk1/2 MAPKs activation in response to growth factors and hormones. These results suggest that alteration of morphogenetic pathways due to p130Cas over-expression might prime mammary epithelium to tumorigenesis.

  4. Differential requirement of GRP94 and GRP78 in mammary gland development

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Genyuan; Wang, Miao; Spike, Benjamin; Gray, Peter C.; Shen, Jieli; Lee, Sung-Hyung; Chen, Si-Yi; Lee, Amy S.

    2014-01-01

    Glucose Regulated Protein (GRP) 94 and GRP78 are critical molecular chaperones and regulators of signaling. Conditional knockout mouse models have revealed tissue specific requirements for GRP94 and GRP78, including selection for allele retention in specific cell types. Here we report the consequences of mammary-targeted knockout of these GRPs. Our studies revealed that MMTV-Cre, Grp94f/f mammary glands, despite GRP94 deficiency, exhibited normal proliferation and ductal morphogenesis. Interestingly, MMTV-Cre, Grp78f/f mammary glands displayed only slightly reduced GRP78 protein levels, associating with the retention of the non-recombined Grp78 floxed alleles in isolated mammary epithelial cells and displayed phenotypes comparable to wild-type glands. In contrast, transduction of isolated Grp78f/f mammary epithelial stem/progenitor cells with adenovirus expressing GFP and Cre-recombinase was successful in GRP78 ablation, and the GFP sorted cells failed to give rise to repopulated mammary glands in de-epithelialized recipient mice. These studies imply GRP78, but not GRP94, is required for mammary gland development. PMID:24953136

  5. Progesterone facilitates chromosome instability (aneuploidy) in p53 null normal mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goepfert, T. M.; McCarthy, M.; Kittrell, F. S.; Stephens, C.; Ullrich, R. L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Medina, D.

    2000-01-01

    Mammary epithelial cells from p53 null mice have been shown recently to exhibit an increased risk for tumor development. Hormonal stimulation markedly increased tumor development in p53 null mammary cells. Here we demonstrate that mammary tumors arising in p53 null mammary cells are highly aneuploid, with greater than 70% of the tumor cells containing altered chromosome number and a mean chromosome number of 56. Normal mammary cells of p53 null genotype and aged less than 14 wk do not exhibit aneuploidy in primary cell culture. Significantly, the hormone progesterone, but not estrogen, increases the incidence of aneuploidy in morphologically normal p53 null mammary epithelial cells. Such cells exhibited 40% aneuploidy and a mean chromosome number of 54. The increase in aneuploidy measured in p53 null tumor cells or hormonally stimulated normal p53 null cells was not accompanied by centrosome amplification. These results suggest that normal levels of progesterone can facilitate chromosomal instability in the absence of the tumor suppressor gene, p53. The results support the emerging hypothesis based both on human epidemiological and animal model studies that progesterone markedly enhances mammary tumorigenesis.

  6. Aquaporin water channels in the mammary gland: from physiology to pathophysiology and neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Mobasheri, Ali; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Aquaporins are membrane proteins that play fundamental roles in water and small solute transport across epithelial and endothelial barriers. Recent studies suggest that several aquaporin proteins are present in the mammary gland. Immunohistochemical techniques have confirmed the presence of aquaporin 1 (AQP1) and AQP3 water channels in rat, mouse, bovine and human mammary glands. Studies suggest that in addition to AQP1 and AQP3 AQP4, AQP5 and AQP7 proteins are expressed in different locations in the mammary gland. Aquaporins play key roles in tumor biology and are involved in cell growth, migration and formation of ascites via increased water permeability of micro-vessels. Emerging evidence suggests that expression of these proteins is altered in mammary tumors and in breast cancer cell lines although it is not yet clear whether this is a cause or a consequence of neoplastic development. This review analyzes the expression and potential functional roles of aquaporin water channels in the mammary gland. The physiological mechanisms involved in the transport of water and small solutes across mammary endothelial and epithelial barriers are discussed in the context of milk production and lactation. This paper also reviews papers from the recent cancer literature that implicate aquaporins in mammary neoplasia.

  7. From the ranks of mammary progesterone mediators, RANKL takes the spotlight

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Valdivia, Rodrigo; Lydon, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Whether during the diestrus phase of the estrous cycle or with pregnancy onset, the mitogenic effects of progesterone are well-established in the murine mammary epithelium. Importantly, progesterone-induced mitogenicity is critical for mammary tumor promotion, providing one explanation for the increase in breast cancer-risk observed with prolonged progestin-based hormone therapy. At the cellular level, progesterone projects its mitogenic influence through an evolutionary conserved paracrine mechanism of action. In this regard, recent studies provide compelling support for receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL) as a key paracrine mediator of the progesterone mitogenic signal. Induction of RANKL is sufficient to elicit mammary ductal side-branching and alveologenesis, the very morphogenetic responses elicited by progesterone during pregnancy and at diestrus. Significantly, the proliferative and pro-survival signals triggered by RANKL are also required for progestin-promotion of mammary tumorigenesis, underscoring a dual role for RANKL in progesterone-dependent mammary morphogenesis and tumorigenesis. Recently, RANKL has been shown to be critical for progesterone-induced expansion of the mammary stem cell population (and its lineal descendents), thereby advancing our conceptual understanding not only of RANKL's involvement in normal mammary morphogenesis but also in breast cancer risk associated with sustained hormone exposure. Finally, these studies together suggest that chemotherapeutic intervention of RANKL signaling represents a feasible approach for the effective prevention and/or treatment of hormone-responsive breast cancers. PMID:21964466

  8. Targeted Overexpression of EZH2 in the Mammary Gland Disrupts Ductal Morphogenesis and Causes Epithelial Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Gonzalez, Maria E.; Toy, Katherine; Filzen, Tracey; Merajver, Sofia D.; Kleer, Celina G.

    2009-01-01

    The Polycomb group protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), which has roles during development of numerous tissues, is a critical regulator of cell type identity. Overexpression of EZH2 has been detected in invasive breast carcinoma tissue samples and is observed in human breast tissue samples of morphologically normal lobules up to 12 years before the development of breast cancer. The function of EZH2 during preneoplastic progression in the mammary gland is unknown. To investigate the role of EZH2 in the mammary gland, we targeted the expression of EZH2 to mammary epithelial cells using the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat. EZH2 overexpression resulted in aberrant terminal end bud architecture. By the age of 4 months, 100% of female mouse mammary tumor virus-EZH2 virgin mice developed intraductal epithelial hyperplasia resembling the human counterpart accompanied by premature differentiation of ductal epithelial cells and up-regulation of the luminal marker GATA-3. In addition, remodeling of the mammary gland after parturition was impaired and EZH2 overexpression caused delayed involution. Mechanistically, we found that EZH2 physically interacts with β-catenin, inducing β-catenin nuclear accumulation in mammary epithelial cells and activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The biological significance of these data to human hyperplasias is demonstrated by EZH2 up-regulation and colocalization with β-catenin in human intraductal epithelial hyperplasia, the earliest histologically identifiable precursor of breast carcinoma. PMID:19661437

  9. Efficient BLG-Cre mediated gene deletion in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Selbert, S; Bentley, D J; Melton, D W; Rannie, D; Lourenço, P; Watson, C J; Clarke, A R

    1998-09-01

    Using the phage P1-derived Cre/loxP recombination system, we have developed a strategy for efficient mammary tissue specific inactivation of floxed genes. Transgenic mice were generated which express Cre DNA-recombinase under the control of the mammary gland specific promoter of the ovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) gene. To test the specificity of Cre mediated recombination, we crossed these mice to animals harbouring a floxed DNA ligase I allele. We show that the BLG-Cre construct specifies mammary specific gene deletion, and furthermore that it is temporally regulated, predominantly occurring during lactation. We fully characterised the extent of gene deletion in one line (line 74). In this strain the virgin gland is characterised by low levels (7%) of Cre mediated deletion, whereas 70-80% of cells within the lactating mammary gland have undergone recombination. Immunohistochemistry and indirect in situ PCR were used respectively to demonstrate that both Cre protein and Cre activity were evenly distributed throughout the population of secretory epithelial cells. The level of background recombination in non-mammary tissues was found to be < or = 1.1%, irrespective of mammary gland developmental status. Crossing the transgenic BLG-Cre strain described here to mice harbouring other floxed alleles will facilitate the functional analysis of those genes during differentiation and development of the mammary gland.

  10. Mammary fat of breast cancer: gene expression profiling and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengliang; Gao, Sheng; Chen, Fei; Fu, Ziyi; Yin, Hong; Lu, Xun; Yu, Jing; Lu, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Mammary fat is the main composition of breast, and is the most probable candidate to affect tumor behavior because the fat produces hormones, growth factors and adipokines, a heterogeneous group of signaling molecules. Gene expression profiling and functional characterization of mammary fat in Chinese women has not been reported. Thus, we collected the mammary fat tissues adjacent to breast tumors from 60 subjects, among which 30 subjects had breast cancer and 30 had benign lesions. We isolated and cultured the stromal vascular cell fraction from mammary fat. The expression of genes related to adipose function (including adipogenesis and secretion) was detected at both the tissue and the cellular level. We also studied mammary fat browning. The results indicated that fat tissue close to malignant and benign lesions exhibited distinctive gene expression profiles and functional characteristics. Although the mammary fat of breast tumors atrophied, it secreted tumor growth stimulatory factors. Browning of mammary fat was observed and browning activity of fat close to malignant breast tumors was greater than that close to benign lesions. Understanding the diversity between these two fat depots may possibly help us improve our understanding of breast cancer pathogenesis and find the key to unlock new anticancer therapies.

  11. Lectin functionalized quantum dots for recognition of mammary tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Beate S.; de Farias, Patricia M. A.; de Menezes, Frederico D.; de C. Ferreira, Ricardo; Júnior, Severino A.; Figueiredo, Regina C. B. Q.; Beltrão, Eduardo I. C.

    2006-02-01

    In this study we use CdS/Cd(OH) II quantum dots functionalized with concanavalin-A (Con-A) lectin, specific to glucose/mannose residues, to investigate cell alterations regarding carbohydrate profile in human mammary tissues diagnosed as fibroadenoma (benign tumor). These particles were functionalized with glutaraldehyde and Con-A and incubated with tissue sections of normal and to Fibroadenoma, a benign type of mammary tumor. The tissue sections were deparafinized, hydrated in graded alcohol and treated with a solution of Evans Blue in order to avoid autofluorescence. The fluorescence intensity of QD-Con-A stained tissues showed different patterns, which reflect the carbohydrate expression of glucose/mannose in fibroadenoma when compared to the detection of the normal carbohydrate expression. The pattern of unspecific labeling of the tissues with glutaraldehyde functionalized CdS/Cd(OH) II quantum dots is compared to the targeting driven by the Con-A lectin. The preliminary findings reported here support the use of CdS/Cd(OH) II quantum dots as specific probes of cellular alterations and their use in diagnostics.

  12. Cellular mechano-environment regulates the mammary circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Nan; Williams, Jack; Pekovic-Vaughan, Vanja; Wang, Pengbo; Olabi, Safiah; McConnell, James; Gossan, Nicole; Hughes, Alun; Cheung, Julia; Streuli, Charles H.; Meng, Qing-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Circadian clocks drive ∼24 h rhythms in tissue physiology. They rely on transcriptional/translational feedback loops driven by interacting networks of clock complexes. However, little is known about how cell-intrinsic circadian clocks sense and respond to their microenvironment. Here, we reveal that the breast epithelial clock is regulated by the mechano-chemical stiffness of the cellular microenvironment in primary cell culture. Moreover, the mammary clock is controlled by the periductal extracellular matrix in vivo, which contributes to a dampened circadian rhythm during ageing. Mechanistically, the tension sensing cell-matrix adhesion molecule, vinculin, and the Rho/ROCK pathway, which transduces signals provided by extracellular stiffness into cells, regulate the activity of the core circadian clock complex. We also show that genetic perturbation, or age-associated disruption of self-sustained clocks, compromises the self-renewal capacity of mammary epithelia. Thus, circadian clocks are mechano-sensitive, providing a potential mechanism to explain how ageing influences their amplitude and function. PMID:28134247

  13. Breed- and age-related differences in canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Woo; Lim, Ha-Young; Shin, Jong-Il; Seung, Byung-Joon; Ju, Jung-Hyung; Sur, Jung-Hyang

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer is a type of breast cancer that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2). It is an important and clinically relevant condition as it has a poor prognosis and is difficult to treat. Basal-like triple-negative cancer is highly prevalent in both African-Americans and adolescents. We therefore examined whether such a cancer likewise occurs in specific breeds and age groups in dogs, focusing on basal-like triple-negative cancer in particular. In this study, 181 samples from dogs with malignant mammary carcinoma from the 5 most common breeds and 2 age groups in Korea were analyzed. Histological classification and molecular subtyping, including assessment of immunohistochemical findings, were carried out. Twenty-five of 28 (89.3%) triple-negative carcinomas were identified as basal-like triple-negative carcinomas. Analysis of associations of classified factors revealed that the shih tzu breed (9/25, 36.0%) and advanced-age (19/25, 76.0%) groups were characterized by higher prevalence of basal-like triple-negative tumors with diverse histological types and of a higher grade. These results suggest that breed- and age-related differences can be identified in canine mammary carcinoma and, notably, in the shih tzu breed and at older ages. Further investigation of these distinguishing characteristics of the shih tzu breed is warranted. PMID:27127342

  14. Breed- and age-related differences in canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Woo; Lim, Ha-Young; Shin, Jong-Il; Seung, Byung-Joon; Ju, Jung-Hyung; Sur, Jung-Hyang

    2016-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer is a type of breast cancer that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2). It is an important and clinically relevant condition as it has a poor prognosis and is difficult to treat. Basal-like triple-negative cancer is highly prevalent in both African-Americans and adolescents. We therefore examined whether such a cancer likewise occurs in specific breeds and age groups in dogs, focusing on basal-like triple-negative cancer in particular. In this study, 181 samples from dogs with malignant mammary carcinoma from the 5 most common breeds and 2 age groups in Korea were analyzed. Histological classification and molecular subtyping, including assessment of immunohistochemical findings, were carried out. Twenty-five of 28 (89.3%) triple-negative carcinomas were identified as basal-like triple-negative carcinomas. Analysis of associations of classified factors revealed that the shih tzu breed (9/25, 36.0%) and advanced-age (19/25, 76.0%) groups were characterized by higher prevalence of basal-like triple-negative tumors with diverse histological types and of a higher grade. These results suggest that breed- and age-related differences can be identified in canine mammary carcinoma and, notably, in the shih tzu breed and at older ages. Further investigation of these distinguishing characteristics of the shih tzu breed is warranted.

  15. Regulatory roles of Oct proteins in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xi; Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2016-06-01

    The expression of Oct-1 and -2 and their binding to the octamer motif in the mammary gland are developmentally and hormonally regulated, consistent with the expression of milk proteins. Both of these transcription factors constitutively bind to the proximal promoter of the milk protein gene β-casein and might be involved in the inhibition or activation of promoter activity via interactions with other transcription factors or cofactors at different developmental stages. In particular, the lactogenic hormone prolactin and glucocorticoids induce Oct-1 and Oct-2 binding and interaction with both the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and the glucocorticoid receptor on the β-casein promoter to activate β-casein expression. In addition, increasing evidence has shown the involvement of another Oct factor, Oct-3/4, in mammary tumorigenesis, making Oct-3/4 an emerging prognostic marker of breast cancer and a molecular target for the gene-directed therapeutic intervention, prevention and treatment of breast cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Oct Transcription Factor Family, edited by Dr. Dean Tantin.

  16. Radiogenic transformation of human mammary epithelial cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Tavakoli, A.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.

    1996-01-01

    Cancer induction by space radiations is a major concern for manned space exploration. Accurate assessment of radiation risk at low doses requires basic understanding of mechanism(s) of radiation carcinogenesis. For determining the oncogenic effects of ionizing radiation in human epithelial cells, we transformed a mammary epithelial cell line (185B5), which was immortalized by benzo(a)pyrene, with energetic heavy ions and obtained several transformed clones. These transformed cells showed growth properties on Matrigel similar to human mammary tumor cells. To better understand the mechanisms of radiogenic transformation of human cells, we systematically examined the alterations in chromosomes and cancer genes. Among 16 autosomes examined for translocations, by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, chromosomes 3, 12, 13, 15, 16, and 18 appeared to be normal in transformed cells. Chromosomes 1, 4, 6, 8, and 17 in transformed cells, however, showed patterns different from those in nontransformed cells. Southern blot analyses indicated no detectable alterations in myc, ras, Rb, or p53 genes. Further studies of chromosome 17 by using in situ hybridization with unique sequence p53 gene probe and a centromere probe showed no loss of p53 gene in transformed cells. Experimental results from cell fusion studies indicated that the transforming gene(s) is recessive. The role of genomic instability and tumor suppressor gene(s) in radiogenic transformation of human breast cells remains to be identified.

  17. Intraductal approach to breast cancer: the role of mammary ductoscopy.

    PubMed

    Deshmane, Vinay

    2010-09-01

    Mammary ductoscopy is a recent advance enabling direct visualisation and sampling of human mammary ducts using a micro endoscope. The majority of pre malignant and malignant changes in the breast arise from the epithelium lining the duct lobular unit, and access to this region by ductoscopy has the potential to revolutionise breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. The ability to sample ductal epithelium may allow identification of early malignant and pre-malignant cytological changes and assist surgical excision, facilitating diagnosis of non palpable cancer before detection on current imaging modalities. Presently, there are three main indications for ductoscopy in clinical practice viz. determining extent of resection for breast cancer, assessment of high risk individuals and in the management of patients with pathological nipple discharge. Our initial experience with ductoscopy in patients with nipple discharge undergoing surgery has been rewarding. Ductoscopy was feasible in 92% of patients. Abnormal findings on ductoscopy were associated with DCIS in 37% and DCIS with early invasive breast cancer in 21%, while normal ductoscopy correlated with a normal pathological assessment.

  18. The Deltopectoral Flap Revisited: The Internal Mammary Artery Perforator Flap.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Amir; Atiyeh, Bishara; Karami, Reem; Adelman, David M; Papazian, Nazareth J

    2016-03-01

    Pharyngo-esophageal and tracheostomal defects pose a challenge in head and neck reconstruction whenever microanastomosis is extremely difficult in hostile neck that is previously dissected and irradiated. The deltopectoral (DP) flap was initially described as a pedicled flap for such reconstruction with acceptable postoperative results. A major drawback is still that the DP flap is based on 3 perforator vessels leading to a decreased arc of rotation. The DP flap also left contour deformities in the donor site. The internal mammary artery perforator flap was described as a refinement of the deltopectoral flap. It is a pedicled fasciocutaneous flap based on a single perforator, with comparable and reliable blood supply compared with the DP flap, giving it the benefit of having a wide arc of rotation. It is both thin and pliable, with good skin color match and texture. The donor site can be closed primarily with no esthetic deformity and minimal morbidity. The procedure is relatively simple and does not require microvascular expertise. In this report, the authors describe a patient in whom bilateral internal mammary artery perforator flaps were used for subtotal pharyngo-esophageal reconstruction and neck resurfacing. The flaps healed uneventfully bilaterally with no postoperative complications.

  19. Soil inoculation with symbiotic microorganisms promotes plant growth and nutrient transporter genes expression in durum wheat

    PubMed Central

    Saia, Sergio; Rappa, Vito; Ruisi, Paolo; Abenavoli, Maria Rosa; Sunseri, Francesco; Giambalvo, Dario; Frenda, Alfonso S.; Martinelli, Federico

    2015-01-01

    In a field experiment conducted in a Mediterranean area of inner Sicily, durum wheat was inoculated with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), or with both to evaluate their effects on nutrient uptake, plant growth, and the expression of key transporter genes involved in nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) uptake. These biotic associations were studied under either low N availability (unfertilized plots) and supplying the soil with an easily mineralizable organic fertilizer. Regardless of N fertilization, at the tillering stage, inoculation with AMF alone or in combination with PGPR increased the aboveground biomass yield compared to the uninoculated control. Inoculation with PGPR enhanced the aboveground biomass yield compared to the control, but only when N fertilizer was added. At the heading stage, inoculation with all microorganisms increased the aboveground biomass and N. Inoculation with PGPR and AMF+PGPR resulted in significantly higher aboveground P compared to the control and inoculation with AMF only when organic N was applied. The role of microbe inoculation in N uptake was elucidated by the expression of nitrate transporter genes. NRT1.1, NRT2, and NAR2.2 were significantly upregulated by inoculation with AMF and AMF+PGPR in the absence of organic N. A significant down-regulation of the same genes was observed when organic N was added. The ammonium (NH4+) transporter genes AMT1.2 showed an expression pattern similar to that of the NO3- transporters. Finally, in the absence of organic N, the transcript abundance of P transporters Pht1 and PT2-1 was increased by inoculation with AMF+PGPR, and inoculation with AMF upregulated Pht2 compared to the uninoculated control. These results indicate the soil inoculation with AMF and PGPR (alone or in combination) as a valuable option for farmers to improve yield, nutrient uptake, and the sustainability of the agro-ecosystem. PMID:26483827

  20. Mammary gland neoplasia in long-term rodent studies.

    PubMed Central

    Russo, I H; Russo, J

    1996-01-01

    Breast cancer, the most frequent spontaneous malignancy diagnosed in women in the western world, is continuously increasing in incidence in industrialized nations. Although breast cancer develops in women as the result of a combination of external and endogenous factors such as exposure to ionizing radiation, diet, socioeconomic status, and endocrinologic, familial, or genetic factors, no specific etiologic agent(s) or the mechanisms responsible of the disease has been identified as yet. Thus, experimental models that exhibit the same complex interactions are needed for testing various mechanisms and for assessing the carcinogenic potential of given chemicals. Rodent mammary carcinomas represent such a model to a great extent because, in these species, mammary cancer is a multistep complex process that can be induced by either chemicals, radiation, viruses, or genetic factors. Long-term studies in rodent models have been particularly useful for dissecting the initiation, promotion, and progression steps of carcinogenesis. The susceptibility of the rodent mammary gland to develop neoplasms has made this organ a unique target for testing the carcinogenic potential of specific genotoxic chemicals and environmental agents. Mammary tumors induced by indirect- or direct-acting carcinogens such as 7, 12-dimethlbenz(a)anthracene or N-methyl-N-nitrosourea are, in general, hormone dependent adenocarcinomas whose incidence, number of tumors per animal, tumor latency, and tumor type are influenced by the age, reproductive history, and endocarinologic milieu of the host at the time of carcinogen exposure. Rodent models are informative in the absence of human data. They have provided valuable information on the dose and route of administration to be used and optimal host conditions for eliciting maximal tumorigenic response. Studies of the influence of normal gland development on the pathogenesis of chemically induced mammary carcinomas have clarified the role of differentiation

  1. Comparison of the transcriptpmes of long-tern label retaining-cells and C cells microdissected from mammary epithelium: an initial study to character potential stem/progenitor cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) account for the cell lineage of mammary epithelia and provide for mammary growth, development and tissue homeostasis. The presence of MaSC was clearly demonstrated by the generation of an entire mammary gland from a single cell implanted into epithelium-ablated mammary fat...

  2. Shh expression is required for embryonic hair follicle but not mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Michno, Kinga; Boras-Granic, Kata; Mill, Pleasantine; Hui, C C; Hamel, Paul A

    2003-12-01

    The embryonic mammary gland and hair follicle are both derived from the ventral ectoderm, and their development depends on a number of common fundamental developmental pathways. While the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is required for hair follicle morphogenesis, the role of this pathway during embryonic mammary gland development remains undetermined. We demonstrate here that, unlike the hair follicle, both Shh and Ihh are expressed in the developing embryonic mouse mammary rudiment as early as E12.5. In Shh(-/-) embryos, hair follicle development becomes arrested at an early stage, while the mammary rudiment, which continues to express Ihh, develops in a manner indistinguishable from that of wild-type littermates. The five pairs of mammary buds in Shh(-/-) female embryos exhibit normal branching morphogenesis at E16.5, forming a rudimentary ductal structure identical to wild-type embryonic mammary glands. We further demonstrate that loss of Hh signaling causes altered cyclin D1 expression in the embryonic dermal mesenchyme. Specifically, cyclin D1 is expressed at E14.5 principally in the condensed mesenchymal cells of the presumptive hair follicles and in both mesenchymal and epithelial cells of the mammary rudiments in wild-type and Shh-deficient embryos. By E18.5, robust cyclin D1 expression is maintained in mammary rudiments of both wild-type and Shh-deficient embryos. In hair follicles of wild-type embryos by E18.5, cyclin D1 expression switches to follicular epithelial cells. In contrast, strong cyclin D1 expression is observed principally in the mesenchymal cells of arrested hair follicles in Shh(-/-) embryos at E18.5. These data reveal that, despite the common embryonic origin of hair follicles and mammary glands, distinct patterns of Hh-family expression occur in these two tissues. Furthermore, these data suggest that cyclin D1 expression in the embryonic hair follicle is mediated by both Hh-independent and Hh-dependent mechanisms.

  3. Stromal matrix metalloproteinase-11 is involved in the mammary gland postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Tan, J; Buache, E; Alpy, F; Daguenet, E; Tomasetto, C-L; Ren, G-S; Rio, M-C

    2014-07-31

    MMP-11 is a bad prognosis paracrine factor in invasive breast cancers. However, its mammary physiological function remains largely unknown. In the present study we have investigated MMP-11 function during postnatal mammary gland development and function using MMP-11-deficient (MMP-11-/-) mice. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses as well as whole-mount mammary gland staining show alteration of the mammary gland in the absence of MMP-11, where ductal tree, alveolar structures and milk production are reduced. Moreover, a series of transplantation experiments allowed us to demonstrate that MMP-11 exerts an essential local paracrine function that favors mammary gland branching and epithelial cell outgrowth and invasion through adjacent connective tissues. Indeed, MMP-11-/- cleared fat pads are not permissive for wild-type epithelium development, whereas MMP-11-/- epithelium transplants grow normally when implanted in wild-type cleared fat pads. In addition, using primary mammary epithelial organoids, we show in vitro that this MMP-11 pro-branching effect is not direct, suggesting that MMP-11 acts via production/release of stroma-associated soluble factor(s). Finally, the lack of MMP-11 leads to decreased periductal collagen content, suggesting that MMP-11 has a role in collagen homeostasis. Thus, local stromal MMP-11 might also regulate mammary epithelial cell behavior mechanically by promoting extracellular matrix stiffness. Collectively, the present data indicate that MMP-11 is a paracrine factor involved during postnatal mammary gland morphogenesis, and support the concept that the stroma strongly impact epithelial cell behavior. Interestingly, stromal MMP-11 has previously been reported to favor malignant epithelial cell survival and promote cancer aggressiveness. Thus, MMP-11 has a paracrine function during mammary gland development that might be harnessed to promote tumor progression, exposing a new link between development and malignancy.

  4. From genes to milk: genomic organization and epigenetic regulation of the mammary transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Danielle G; Pollard, Katherine S; Martin, William F; Freeman Zadrowski, Courtneay; Hernandez, Joseph; Korf, Ian; German, J Bruce; Rijnkels, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Even in genomes lacking operons, a gene's position in the genome influences its potential for expression. The mechanisms by which adjacent genes are co-expressed are still not completely understood. Using lactation and the mammary gland as a model system, we explore the hypothesis that chromatin state contributes to the co-regulation of gene neighborhoods. The mammary gland represents a unique evolutionary model, due to its recent appearance, in the context of vertebrate genomes. An understanding of how the mammary gland is regulated to produce milk is also of biomedical and agricultural importance for human lactation and dairying. Here, we integrate epigenomic and transcriptomic data to develop a comprehensive regulatory model. Neighborhoods of mammary-expressed genes were determined using expression data derived from pregnant and lactating mice and a neighborhood scoring tool, G-NEST. Regions of open and closed chromatin were identified by ChIP-Seq of histone modifications H3K36me3, H3K4me2, and H3K27me3 in the mouse mammary gland and liver tissue during lactation. We found that neighborhoods of genes in regions of uniquely active chromatin in the lactating mammary gland, compared with liver tissue, were extremely rare. Rather, genes in most neighborhoods were suppressed during lactation as reflected in their expression levels and their location in regions of silenced chromatin. Chromatin silencing was largely shared between the liver and mammary gland during lactation, and what distinguished the mammary gland was mainly a small tissue-specific repertoire of isolated, expressed genes. These findings suggest that an advantage of the neighborhood organization is in the collective repression of groups of genes via a shared mechanism of chromatin repression. Genes essential to the mammary gland's uniqueness are isolated from neighbors, and likely have less tolerance for variation in expression, properties they share with genes responsible for an organism's survival.

  5. Paracrine Overexpression of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Enhances Mammary Tumorigenesis in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    de Ostrovich, Krisztina Kovács; Lambertz, Isabel; Colby, Jennifer K. L.; Tian, Jie; Rundhaug, Joyce E.; Johnston, Dennis; Conti, Claudio J.; DiGiovanni, John; Fuchs-Young, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) stimulates proliferation, regulates tissue development, protects against apoptosis, and promotes the malignant phenotype in the breast and other organs. Some epidemiological studies have linked high circulating levels of IGF-1 with an increased risk of breast cancer. To study the role of IGF-1 in mammary tumorigenesis in vivo, we used transgenic mice in which overexpression of IGF-1 is under the control of the bovine keratin 5 (BK5) promoter and is directed to either the myoepithelial or basal cells in a variety of organs, including the mammary gland. This model closely recapitulates the paracrine exposure of breast epithelium to stromal IGF-1 seen in women. Histologically, mammary glands from transgenic mice were hyperplastic and highly vascularized. Mammary glands from prepubertal transgenic mice had significantly increased ductal proliferation compared with wild-type tissues, although this difference was not maintained after puberty. Transgenic mice also had increased susceptibility to mammary carcinogenesis, and 74% of the BK5.IGF-1 mice treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (20 μg/day) developed mammary tumors compared with 29% of the wild-type mice. Interestingly, 31% of the vehicle-treated BK5.IGF-1 animals, but none of the wild-type animals, spontaneously developed mammary cancer. The mammary tumors were moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas that expressed functional, nuclear estrogen receptor at both the protein and mRNA levels. These data support the hypothesis that tissue overexpression of IGF-1 stimulates mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:18688034

  6. Estrogen decreases chemokine levels in murine mammary tissue: implications for the regulatory role of MIP-1 alpha and MCP-1/JE in mammary tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Fanti, Peter; Nazareth, Michael; Bucelli, Robert; Mineo, Michael; Gibbs, Kathleen; Kumin, Michael; Grzybek, Kevin; Hoeltke, Janice; Raiber, Lisa; Poppenberg, Kristin; Janis, Kelly; Schwach, Catherine; Aronica, Susan M

    2003-11-01

    Estrogen contributes to the development of breast cancer through mechanisms that are not completely understood. Estrogen influences the function of immune effector cells, primarily through alterations in cytokine expression. Chemokines are proinflammatory cytokines that attract various immune cells to the site of tissue injury or inflammation, and activate many cell types, including T lymphocytes and monocytes. As an initial step toward ultimately determining whether regulation of chemokine expression and/or biological activity by estrogen could potentially be a contributing factor to the development and progression of mammary tumors, we evaluated the effect of estrogen on the expression of specific chemokines in murine mammary tissue. We also evaluated whether exposure of female mice to various chemokines could alter the growth of mammary tumors in the presence of estrogen. We report here that estrogen significantly decreases levels of the chemokines MIP-1alpha and MCP-1/JE in murine mammary tissue. Co-treatment with 4-hydroxytamoxifen partially reverses the suppressive effect of estrogen on MIP-1alpha levels. Estrogen increases the growth of CCL- 51 cell-based tumors in the mammary glands of female mice. Co-treatment with the chemokine MIP-1alpha or MCP- 1/JE substantially decreases the ability of estrogen to stimulate the formation of CCL-51 cell-based tumors. Our results show that estrogen might influence the bioactivity of specific chemokines through alteration of chemokine expression in mammary tissue, and further suggest that decreases in murine chemokines evoked by estrogen exposure could contribute to the promotion of mammary tumor growth.

  7. An immunoreceptor tyrosine activation motif in the mouse mammary tumor virus envelope protein plays a role in virus-induced mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Ross, Susan R; Schmidt, John W; Katz, Elad; Cappelli, Laura; Hultine, Stacy; Gimotty, Phyllis; Monroe, John G

    2006-09-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) induces breast cancer with almost 100% efficiency in susceptible strains through insertional activation of protooncogenes, such as members of the wnt and fibroblast growth factor (fgf) families. We previously showed that expression of the MMTV envelope protein (Env) in normal immortalized mammary epithelial cells grown in three-dimensional cultures caused their morphological transformation, and that this phenotype depended on an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) present in Env and signaling through the Syk tyrosine kinase (E. Katz, M. H. Lareef, J. C. Rassa, S. M. Grande, L. B. King, J. Russo, S. R. Ross, and J. G. Monroe, J. Exp. Med. 201:431-439, 2005). Here, we examined the role of the Env protein in virus-induced mammary tumorigenesis in vivo. Similar to the effect seen in vitro, Env expression in the mammary glands of transgenic mice bearing either full-length wild-type provirus or only Env transgenes showed increased lobuloalveolar budding. Introduction of the ITAM mutation into the env of an infectious, replication-competent MMTV or into MMTV/murine leukemia virus pseudotypes had no effect on incorporation of Env into virus particles or on in vitro infectivity. Moreover, replication-competent MMTV bearing the ITAM mutation in Env infected lymphoid and mammary tissue at the same level as wild-type MMTV and was transmitted through milk. However, mammary tumor induction was greatly attenuated, and the pattern of oncogene activation was altered. Taken together, these studies indicate that the MMTV Env protein participates in mammary epithelial cell transformation in vivo and that this requires a functional ITAM in the envelope protein.

  8. Network inoculation: Heteroclinics and phase transitions in an epidemic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Rogers, Tim; Gross, Thilo

    2016-08-01

    In epidemiological modelling, dynamics on networks, and, in particular, adaptive and heterogeneous networks have recently received much interest. Here, we present a detailed analysis of a previously proposed model that combines heterogeneity in the individuals with adaptive rewiring of the network structure in response to a disease. We show that in this model, qualitative changes in the dynamics occur in two phase transitions. In a macroscopic description, one of these corresponds to a local bifurcation, whereas the other one corresponds to a non-local heteroclinic bifurcation. This model thus provides a rare example of a system where a phase transition is caused by a non-local bifurcation, while both micro- and macro-level dynamics are accessible to mathematical analysis. The bifurcation points mark the onset of a behaviour that we call network inoculation. In the respective parameter region, exposure of the system to a pathogen will lead to an outbreak that collapses but leaves the network in a configuration where the disease cannot reinvade, despite every agent returning to the susceptible class. We argue that this behaviour and the associated phase transitions can be expected to occur in a wide class of models of sufficient complexity.

  9. Preliminary attempts to biolistic inoculation of grapevine fanleaf virus.

    PubMed

    Valat, L; Mode, F; Mauro, M C; Burrus, M

    2003-03-01

    Biolistics has been studied to inoculate grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV), a Nepovirus, to its natural woody host, Vitis sp., and its herbaceous host, Chenopodium quinoa. At first, bombardment conditions for in vitro and greenhouse grown plants were set using the uidA reporter gene. The infectious feature of the cartridges was then evaluated by studying infection of C. quinoa plants. Systemic infection was obtained with either GFLV particles or RNA extracts in experimental conditions which gave also the highest transient uidA gene expression. Concerning grapevine, our results indicate that extrapolation to this plant is difficult. In only 1 out of 8 independent bombardment experiments done with GFLV and 41B, we were able to detect the virus in freshly bombarded leaves. Similarly, later after bombardment, Pol mRNAs were detected once, at days 7 and 14 only. Incubating the plants in darkness, as suggested in the literature, or using Rupestris Saint Georges, an indicator for GFLV presence, did not yield any improvement. Finely, our observations suggest that detection of GFLV in bombarded grapevine tissues by immunological or molecular techniques remains a limiting factor, probably due to an excess of inhibitory compounds released during the biolistic process.

  10. Mechanisms Underlying the Very High Susceptibility of the Immature Mammary Gland to Carcinogenic Initiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    lipopolysacchride-BP (LBP) 59 human PCA clone DJ0740D02 7p14 4 rat putative RNA binding protein gene 60 human mRNA for Pex protein 5 rat GSH S-transferase (3) 61...the comet assay to primary mammary cells, and 5) identified numerous genes that are either up or down regulated in immature mammary gland. We are...related to the increased sensitivity of radiation-induced cell killing? 6. How is the spectrum of gene expression in the immature and mature mammary glands

  11. Anti-tumor effect of bevacizumab on a xenograft model of feline mammary carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    MICHISHITA, Masaki; OHTSUKA, Aya; NAKAHIRA, Rei; TAJIMA, Tsuyoshi; NAKAGAWA, Takayuki; SASAKI, Nobuo; ARAI, Toshiro; TAKAHASHI, Kimimasa

    2015-01-01

    Feline mammary carcinomas are characterized by rapid progression and metastases. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key regulator of tumor angiogenesis, proliferation and metastasis. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a single drug therapy of bevacizumab on a xenograft model of feline mammary carcinoma expressing VEGF protein. Bevacizumab treatment suppressed tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis and enhancing apoptosis; however, it did not affect the tumor proliferation index. Thus, bevacizumab had anti-tumor effects on a xenograft model, and this may be useful for the treatment of feline mammary carcinoma. PMID:26616000

  12. Mammary cancer and epithelial stem cells: a problem or a solution?

    PubMed

    Smith, Gilbert H

    2002-01-01

    The existing paradigms for stem cells in adult tissues include the integument, the alimentary canal, the lung, the liver, skeletal muscle and bone marrow. The mammary gland, by contrast, is the 'new kid on the block'. What little is known about stem cells in the mammary gland indicates that they possess a prodigious capacity for self-renewal. More importantly, in rodents, they persist with undiminished reproductive vigor throughout the organism's lifetime without regard to age or reproductive history. Do these stem cells represent primary targets for mammary neoplasia? If so, what are the implications for prevention/therapy?

  13. ELEVATED TRANS-MAMMARY TRANSMISSION OF Toxocara canis LARVAE IN BALB/c MICE

    PubMed Central

    Telmo, Paula de Lima; de Avila, Luciana Farias da Costa; dos Santos, Cristina Araújo; de Aguiar, Patrícia de Souza; Martins, Lourdes Helena Rodrigues; Berne, Maria Elisabeth Aires; Scaini, Carlos James

    2015-01-01

    Toxocariasis is a widespread zoonosis and is considered an important worldwide public health problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of trans-mammary Toxocara canis infection in newborn BALB/c mice nursed by females experimentally infected with 1,200 eggs after delivery. After 50 days of age, the presence of larvae in different organs of the offspring was investigated. Trans-mammary infection was confirmed in 73.9% of the mice that had been nursed by infected females. These data show a high trans-mammary transmission of T. canis and confirm the significance of this transmission route in paratenic hosts. PMID:25651332

  14. Scintillation Studies of the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus with ^125I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdi, Amir; Blue, Eric; Bradley, Eric; Majewski, Stan; Mohammed, Shira; Qian, Jianguo; Saha, Margaret; Schworer, Stephen; Sutton, Jonathan; Weisenberger, Andrew; Welsh, Robert

    2007-10-01

    We have applied the techniques of scintillation imaging to studies of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). In these studies, Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) transfers the radioactive ^125I to the mammary glands of lactating mice and in particular to those mammaries with visible tumors. These studies have principally been carried out using pixellated scintillators coupled to position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). More recently, we have initiated such studies with a monolithic slab of LaBr3 scintillator coupled to an array of PSPMTs. Several techniques of mapping and measuring the development of such tumors have been employed. These will be discussed in detail and preliminary results will be reported.

  15. Pleiotropic functions of fibroblast growth factor signaling in embryonic mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Jung; Jung, Han-Sung; Lu, Pengfei

    2013-06-01

    The mammary gland is an ectodermal appendage and a defining feature of mammals. Consistent with it being a recent evolutionary novelty, many of the molecules essential for the ontogeny and morphogenesis of various vertebrate organs, including those in the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathway, are co-opted for induction, maintenance and morphogenesis of the mammary glands. Understanding the mechanism whereby FGF signaling regulates the fundamental cell behavior during normal mammary gland develop may facilitate determination of the consequences of its deregulation during breast cancer progression.

  16. Mifepristone inhibits MPA-and FGF2-induced mammary tumor growth but not FGF2-induced mammary hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Cerliani, Juan P; Giulianelli, Sebastián; Sahores, Ana; Wargon, Victoria; Gongora, Adrian; Baldi, Alberto; Molinolo, Alfredo; Lamb, Caroline E; Lanari, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated a crosstalk between fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and progestins inducing experimental breast cancer growth. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of FGF2 and of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) on the mouse mammary glands and to investigate whether the antiprogestin RU486 was able to reverse the MPA- or FGF2-induced effects on both, mammary gland and tumor growth. We demonstrate that FGF2 administered locally induced an intraductal hyperplasia that was not reverted by RU486, suggesting that FGF2-induced effects are progesterone receptor (PR)-independent. However, MPA-induced paraductal hyperplasia was reverted by RU486 and a partial agonistic effect was observed in RU486-treated glands. Using C4-HD tumors which only grow in the presence of MPA, we showed that FGF2 administered intratumorally was able to stimulate tumor growth as MPA. The histology of FGF2-treated tumors showed different degrees of gland differentiation. RU486 inhibited both, MPA or FGF2 induced tumor growth. However, only complete regression was observed in MPA-treated tumors. Our results support the hypothesis that stromal FGF2 activates PR inducing hormone independent tumor growth.

  17. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... embryo inoculation test. 113.37 Section 113.37 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.37 Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo...-serum mixture shall be inoculated into each of at least 20 fully susceptible chicken embryos. (1)...

  18. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... embryo inoculation test. 113.37 Section 113.37 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.37 Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo...-serum mixture shall be inoculated into each of at least 20 fully susceptible chicken embryos. (1)...

  19. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... embryo inoculation test. 113.37 Section 113.37 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.37 Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo...-serum mixture shall be inoculated into each of at least 20 fully susceptible chicken embryos. (1)...

  20. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... embryo inoculation test. 113.37 Section 113.37 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.37 Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo...-serum mixture shall be inoculated into each of at least 20 fully susceptible chicken embryos. (1)...

  1. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... embryo inoculation test. 113.37 Section 113.37 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.37 Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo...-serum mixture shall be inoculated into each of at least 20 fully susceptible chicken embryos. (1)...

  2. Silage inoculant effects on milk production and why that may be important to you

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silage inoculants are the most common additives used in making corn and hay crop silages. The main active ingredients in these products are lactic acid bacteria that help ensure the fermentation in the silo goes in a direction that helps preserve the crop. While inoculants have been available for ma...

  3. Silage extracts used to study the mode of action of silage inoculants in ruminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silage microbial inoculants can enhance animal performance, but the mechanisms involved in these effects are not clear. Our hypothesis was that an extractable factor from inoculated silage enhances rumen microbial activity. One alfalfa haylage (58% DM) and two corn silages (30% and 50% DM) were made...

  4. Presurgical Anxiety and Postsurgical Pain and Adjustment: Effects of a Stress Inoculation Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Judith K.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Surgery patients (N=24) were randomly assigned either to a stress inoculation intervention or to a standard hospital instructions control. The results demonstrated the utility of stress inoculation training in providing surgical patients with a self-regulation technique to reduce their experiences of anxiety and pain and to improve their…

  5. Response of Andean and Mesoamerican common bean genotypes to inoculation with rhizobium strains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In most common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production regions of Latin America, inoculants are rarely used by farmers in spite of several studies that demonstrate the importance of Rhizobium inoculation on commercial production of legume crops. This study investigated specific bean host plant-Rhizo...

  6. Rethinking the Inoculation Analogy: Effects on Subjects with Differing Preexisting Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Michelle L. M.

    2007-01-01

    Inoculation messages employed in past studies have been consistently preventative. Yet, if inoculation strategies are to be used in mass media campaigns, researchers need to know what the effects will be on all audience members--not just those known to support a message sponsor's position. A 3-phase experiment was conducted involving 558…

  7. Silage extracts used to study the mode of action of silage inoculants in ruminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa and two corn crops were ensiled with and without Lactobacillus plantarum MTD/1 silage inoculant and fermented for 4 or 60 d to assess the effect of the inoculant on in vitro rumen fermentation of the resulting silages. Water and 80% ethanol extracts of the silages with added glucose were als...

  8. Milk production response to feeding alfalfa silage inoculated with Lactobacillus plantarum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In mini-silo trials, silages treated with a Lactobacillus plantarum silage inoculant (Ecosyl, Yorkshire, UK) had increased in vitro rumen microbial biomass production compared to untreated. Our objective was to determine if alfalfa silage treated with this inoculant could produce a milk production r...

  9. Salmonella persistance within the peripheral lymph nodes of cattle following experimental inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Utilizing a transdermal method of inoculation developed in our laboratory, the duration of infection of Salmonella in the peripheral lymph nodes of steers was examined. Thirty-six Holstein steers (mean body weight of 137 kg) were inoculated with Salmonella Montevideo (day 0) on each lower leg and b...

  10. Gastric hyperplasia and parietal cell loss in Taenia taeniaeformis inoculated immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lagapa, Jose Trinipil; Konno, Kenjiro; Oku, Yuzaburo; Nonaka, Nariaki; Ito, Mamoru; Kamiya, Masao

    2002-03-01

    Immunodeficient mice were studied to determine their suitability as models in investigating the role of Taenia taeniaeformis larval products in the development of gastric hyperplasia. Recombinant active gene 2 (RAG2)-deficient and severe combined immune-deficient (SCID) mice were studied as candidate animal models. RAG2-deficient mice inoculated orally with T. taeniaeformis eggs developed gastric hyperplasia with alcian blue-periodic acid-Schiff-positive cell proliferation similar to those of rats. SCID mice inoculated with different doses and routes of T. taeniaeformis in vitro-hatched oncospheres and those orally inoculated with eggs resulted also in different degrees of gastric hyperplasia. Influence of inoculation forms of parasite, doses and routes of inoculation on initiation of hyperplastic gastropathy was suggested to be dependent on number and size of developed larvae. Both RAG2-deficient and SCID mice with hyperplastic mucosa were observed with significant loss of parietal cells. Apparent decrease in parietal cell number was observed in SCID mice at 2 weeks after intraperitoneal inoculation with oncospheres before hyperplastic lesions developed. Earliest occurrence of gastric hyperplasia in SCID mice was observed at 3 weeks after oral inoculation of in vitro-hatched oncospheres, sooner than orally inoculated rats. The results suggested that these immunodeficient mice could be used as animal models to study factors involved in T. taeniaeformis-induced gastric mucous cell hyperplasia.

  11. Enhanced phytoremediation of toxic metals by inoculating endophytic Enterobacter sp. CBSB1 expressing bifunctional glutathione synthase.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhiqi; Tan, Hongming; Zhou, Shining; Cao, Lixiang

    2014-02-28

    To engineer plant-bacteria symbionts for remediating complex sites contaminated with multiple metals, the bifunctional glutathione (GSH) synthase gene gcsgs was introduced into endophytic Enterobacter sp. CBSB1 to improve phytoremediation efficiency of host plant Brassica juncea. The GSH contents of shoots inoculated with CBSB1 is 0.4μMg(-1) fresh weight. However, the GSH concentration of shoots with engineered CBSB1-GCSGS increased to 0.7μMg(-1) fresh weight. The shoot length, fresh weight and dry weight of seedlings inoculated with CBSB1-GCSGS increased 67%, 123%, and 160%, compared with seedlings without inoculation, respectively. The Cd and Pb concentration in shoots with CBSB1-GCSGS increased 48% and 59% compared with seedlings without inoculation, respectively. The inoculation of CBSB1 and CBSB1-GCSGS could increase the Cd and Pb extraction amounts of seedlings significantly compared with those without inoculation (P<0.05), the seedlings inoculated with CBSB1-GCSGS showed the highest Cd and Pb extraction amounts. It was concluded that the gcsgs gene introduced into Enterobacter sp. CBSB1 upgraded the phytoremediation efficacy of B. juncea. So the engineered Enterobacter sp. CBSB1-GCSGS showed potentials in remediation sites contaminated with complex contaminants by inoculating into remediating plants.

  12. Effect of wetland plants and bacterial inoculation on dissipation of phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weisong; Wu, Chuan; Wang, Qiming; Su, Zhaohong; Zhou, Hui; Chung, Anna King Chuen; Hartley, William; Ge, Long

    2017-03-21

    This study attempts to evaluate the capacity of wetland plants' ability to dissipate phenanthrene (PHE) under waterlogged conditions. The results indicate that Typha latifolia and Vertiveria zizanioides may efficiently degrade PHE, and were much more effective when under combined plant cultivation with the inoculation of Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis (ATCC BAA-257). Concentrations of PHE declined from 200 mg kg(-1) to less than 52 mg kg(-1) in all treatments with plant cultivation. At the end of the experimental period, PHE was undetectable in combined plant cultivation in the presence of bacteria inoculation. Microbial biomass (carbon) C, N and P were significantly different (p<0.05) in the presence and absence of bacteria inoculation, with bacteria inoculation significantly (p<0.05) increased microbial biomass P. The presence of bacteria inoculation and different plant species significantly (p<0.05) decreased the PHE concentrations in the microcosms. The inoculation of bacteria and release of exudates from plant roots further enhanced the dissipation of PHE in sand. Concentrations of citric and malic acids were decreased up to 69% in bacteria inoculated treatments compared the absence bacteria inoculation treatments, showing large citric and malic acids serving as a food source and growth substrate for bacteria.

  13. A Stress Inoculation Program for Parents Whose Children Are Undergoing Painful Medical Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jay, Susan M.; Elliott, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    Compared program efficacy in helping parents cope with children's painful medical procedures. Parents (n=72) of pediatric leukemia patients participated in either stress inoculation program or observed child participating in cognitive behavior therapy. Found parents in stress inoculation program reported lower anxiety scores and higher positive…

  14. Experimental aerosol inoculation of Mycobacterium bovis in North American opossums (Didelphis virginiana).

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Scott D; Zwick, Laura S; Diegel, Kelly L; Berry, Dale E; Church, Steven V; Sikarskie, James G; Kaneene, John B; Reed, Willie M

    2003-04-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of North American opossums (Didelphis virginiana) to aerosol inoculation of Mycobacterium bovis at two dose levels in order to gain information on disease pathogenesis, fecal shedding of the organism, and the potential role that opossums play in the spread of this disease in nature. Six opossums received high dose (1 x 10(7) colony forming units (cfu) by aerosol inoculation, six opossums received low dose (1 x 10(3) cfu inoculation, and six opossums were sham-inoculated with sterile water and served as controls. Lungs were the most frequently infected tissues, with nine of 12 inoculated opossums positive for M. bovis on culture. Gross lesions consisted of multifocal pneumonia and enlarged lymph nodes. Microscopically, granulomatous pneumonia and granulomatous lymphadenitis associated with acid-fast bacilli were present in eight of 12 inoculated opossums. Fecal shedding of M. bovis was uncommon at both inoculation doses. While opossums were highly susceptible to aerosol inoculation of M. bovis, they did not become emaciated or develop widely disseminated lesions. From this study, opossums may transmit tuberculosis by aerosol infection to other opossums in close contact and serve as a source of infection to carnivores that feed upon them, however, transmission of the disease to large herbivores by fecal shedding or direct contact may be less likely.

  15. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Physiology and Cognitive Control of Behavior in Stress Inoculated Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Karen J.; Buckmaster, Christine L.; Lindley, Steven E.; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Lyons, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Monkeys exposed to stress inoculation protocols early in life subsequently exhibit diminished neurobiological responses to moderate psychological stressors and enhanced cognitive control of behavior during juvenile development compared to non-inoculated monkeys. The present experiments extended these findings and revealed that stress inoculated…

  16. Boosting the Potency of Resistance: Combining the Motivational Forces of Inoculation and Psychological Reactance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Claude H.; Ivanov, Bobi; Sims, Jeanetta; Compton, Josh; Harrison, Kylie J.; Parker, Kimberly A.; Parker, James L.; Averbeck, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of inoculation theory has been confirmed by decades of empirical research, yet optimizing its effectiveness remains a vibrant line of investigation. The present research turns to psychological reactance theory for a means of enhancing the core mechanisms of inoculation--threat and refutational preemption. Findings from a multisite…

  17. Rice resistance to blast caused by leaf surface moistening prior to inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effect of water droplets placed onto rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaves before inoculation with blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea (Hebert) Barr on disease severity and superoxide radical generation by the leaves was investigated. The leaves were inoculated by placement of spore suspension droplets. One da...

  18. The Effect of LAB Silage Inoculants on the Rumen Environment--Current Research Status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inoculants containing mainly lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are the most common additives used in making silage. Their function is to promote intensive production of lactic acid and rapid decrease in pH and so minimize fermentation losses. Some LAB inoculants reduce aerobic spoilage. In addition, feedin...

  19. [The effect of soil inoculation with microbial pesticide destructors on plant growth and development].

    PubMed

    Lisina, T O; Garan'kina, N G; Kruglov, Iu V

    2001-01-01

    Soil inoculation with liquid cultures of Bacillus megaterium 501 and Exophiala nigrum A-29 capable of degrading several organophosphorus pesticides accelerated growth and development of experimental plants, formation of their generative organs, and improved their productivity. This was particularly observed under stress plant growth conditions on phytotoxic peach substrates. The microorganisms inoculated can probably degrade phytotoxins present in soils, thereby favoring the plant development.

  20. Co-inoculation with Bacillus sp. CECT 450 improves nodulation in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Camacho, M; Santamaría, C; Temprano, F; Rodriguez-Navarro, D N; Daza, A

    2001-11-01

    The strain Bacillus sp. CECT 450 increased nodulation on bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) when co-inoculated with Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899. This positive effect occured under controlled conditions on perlite-vermiculite, sand, or in a mixture of soil and sand. This increase was also observed in a field assay. Nodulation kinetic studies suggested that the synergistic effect is pronounced during the latter stages of cultivation. In contrast, the same bacteria co-inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 reduced nodulation on soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.). Inoculation with Bacillus sp. CECT 450 alone had no effect on bean plants, but reduced root growth in soybean. The survival of Bacillus sp. CECT 450 on inoculated seeds was high, even when inoculated seeds were maintained for several months at room temperature.