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Sample records for inoperability input-output model

  1. Pandemic recovery analysis using the dynamic inoperability input-output model.

    PubMed

    Santos, Joost R; Orsi, Mark J; Bond, Erik J

    2009-12-01

    Economists have long conceptualized and modeled the inherent interdependent relationships among different sectors of the economy. This concept paved the way for input-output modeling, a methodology that accounts for sector interdependencies governing the magnitude and extent of ripple effects due to changes in the economic structure of a region or nation. Recent extensions to input-output modeling have enhanced the model's capabilities to account for the impact of an economic perturbation; two such examples are the inoperability input-output model((1,2)) and the dynamic inoperability input-output model (DIIM).((3)) These models introduced sector inoperability, or the inability to satisfy as-planned production levels, into input-output modeling. While these models provide insights for understanding the impacts of inoperability, there are several aspects of the current formulation that do not account for complexities associated with certain disasters, such as a pandemic. This article proposes further enhancements to the DIIM to account for economic productivity losses resulting primarily from workforce disruptions. A pandemic is a unique disaster because the majority of its direct impacts are workforce related. The article develops a modeling framework to account for workforce inoperability and recovery factors. The proposed workforce-explicit enhancements to the DIIM are demonstrated in a case study to simulate a pandemic scenario in the Commonwealth of Virginia. PMID:19961556

  2. On the local sensitivity analysis of the inoperability input-output model.

    PubMed

    Percoco, Marco

    2011-07-01

    Natural and man-made disasters are currently a source of major concern for contemporary societies. In order to understand their economic impacts, the inoperability input-output model has recently gained recognition among scholars. In a recent paper, Percoco (2006) has proposed an extension of the model to map the technologically most important sectors through so-called fields of influence. In the present note we aim to show that this importance measure also has a clear connection with local sensitivity analysis theory. PMID:21707685

  3. Systemic valuation of strategic preparedness through application of the inoperability input-output model with lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Kenneth G; Haimes, Yacov Y; Taub, Gideon

    2007-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has mandated all regions to "carefully weigh the benefit of each homeland security endeavor and only allocate resources where the benefit of reducing risk is worth the amount of additional cost" (DHS, 2006, p. 64). This mandate illuminates the need to develop methods for systemic valuation of preparedness measures that support strategic decision making. This article proposes an analysis method that naturally emerges from the structure of the inoperability input-output model (IIM) through which various regional- and sector-specific impact analyses can be cost-effectively integrated for natural and man-made disasters. The IIM is described extensively in a companion paper (Lian et al., 2007). Its reliance on data classifications structured by the U.S. Census Bureau and its extensive accounting of economic interdependencies enables us to decompose a risk analysis activity, perform independent assessments, and properly integrate the assessment for a systemic valuation of risk and risk management activity. In this article, we account for and assess some of the major impacts of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita to demonstrate this use of the IIM and illustrate hypothetical, reduced impacts resulting from various strategic preparedness decisions. Our results indicate the capability of the IIM to guide the decision-making processes involved in developing a preparedness strategy.

  4. Modeling the demand reduction input-output (I-O) inoperability due to terrorism of interconnected infrastructures.

    PubMed

    Santos, Joost R; Haimes, Yacov Y

    2004-12-01

    Interdependency analysis in the context of this article is a process of assessing and managing risks inherent in a system of interconnected entities (e.g., infrastructures or industry sectors). Invoking the principles of input-output (I-O) and decomposition analysis, the article offers a framework for describing how terrorism-induced perturbations can propagate due to interconnectedness. Data published by the Bureau of Economic Analysis Division of the U.S. Department of Commerce is utilized to present applications to serve as test beds for the proposed framework. Specifically, a case study estimating the economic impact of airline demand perturbations to national-level U.S. sectors is made possible using I-O matrices. A ranking of the affected sectors according to their vulnerability to perturbations originating from a primary sector (e.g., air transportation) can serve as important input to risk management. For example, limited resources can be prioritized for the "top-n" sectors that are perceived to suffer the greatest economic losses due to terrorism. In addition, regional decomposition via location quotients enables the analysis of local-level terrorism events. The Regional I-O Multiplier System II (RIMS II) Division of the U.S. Department of Commerce is the agency responsible for releasing the regional multipliers for various geographical resolutions (economic areas, states, and counties). A regional-level case study demonstrates a process of estimating the economic impact of transportation-related scenarios on industry sectors within Economic Area 010 (the New York metropolitan region and vicinities). PMID:15660602

  5. Space market model space industry input-output model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgin, Robert F.; Marchesini, Roberto

    1987-01-01

    The goal of the Space Market Model (SMM) is to develop an information resource for the space industry. The SMM is intended to contain information appropriate for decision making in the space industry. The objectives of the SMM are to: (1) assemble information related to the development of the space business; (2) construct an adequate description of the emerging space market; (3) disseminate the information on the space market to forecasts and planners in government agencies and private corporations; and (4) provide timely analyses and forecasts of critical elements of the space market. An Input-Output model of market activity is proposed which are capable of transforming raw data into useful information for decision makers and policy makers dealing with the space sector.

  6. Modeling uncertainties in workforce disruptions from influenza pandemics using dynamic input-output analysis.

    PubMed

    El Haimar, Amine; Santos, Joost R

    2014-03-01

    Influenza pandemic is a serious disaster that can pose significant disruptions to the workforce and associated economic sectors. This article examines the impact of influenza pandemic on workforce availability within an interdependent set of economic sectors. We introduce a simulation model based on the dynamic input-output model to capture the propagation of pandemic consequences through the National Capital Region (NCR). The analysis conducted in this article is based on the 2009 H1N1 pandemic data. Two metrics were used to assess the impacts of the influenza pandemic on the economic sectors: (i) inoperability, which measures the percentage gap between the as-planned output and the actual output of a sector, and (ii) economic loss, which quantifies the associated monetary value of the degraded output. The inoperability and economic loss metrics generate two different rankings of the critical economic sectors. Results show that most of the critical sectors in terms of inoperability are sectors that are related to hospitals and health-care providers. On the other hand, most of the sectors that are critically ranked in terms of economic loss are sectors with significant total production outputs in the NCR such as federal government agencies. Therefore, policy recommendations relating to potential mitigation and recovery strategies should take into account the balance between the inoperability and economic loss metrics. PMID:24033717

  7. Modeling uncertainties in workforce disruptions from influenza pandemics using dynamic input-output analysis.

    PubMed

    El Haimar, Amine; Santos, Joost R

    2014-03-01

    Influenza pandemic is a serious disaster that can pose significant disruptions to the workforce and associated economic sectors. This article examines the impact of influenza pandemic on workforce availability within an interdependent set of economic sectors. We introduce a simulation model based on the dynamic input-output model to capture the propagation of pandemic consequences through the National Capital Region (NCR). The analysis conducted in this article is based on the 2009 H1N1 pandemic data. Two metrics were used to assess the impacts of the influenza pandemic on the economic sectors: (i) inoperability, which measures the percentage gap between the as-planned output and the actual output of a sector, and (ii) economic loss, which quantifies the associated monetary value of the degraded output. The inoperability and economic loss metrics generate two different rankings of the critical economic sectors. Results show that most of the critical sectors in terms of inoperability are sectors that are related to hospitals and health-care providers. On the other hand, most of the sectors that are critically ranked in terms of economic loss are sectors with significant total production outputs in the NCR such as federal government agencies. Therefore, policy recommendations relating to potential mitigation and recovery strategies should take into account the balance between the inoperability and economic loss metrics.

  8. Aggregate input-output models of neuronal populations.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Shreya; Schieber, Marc H; Thakor, Nitish V; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2012-07-01

    An extraordinary amount of electrophysiological data has been collected from various brain nuclei to help us understand how neural activity in one region influences another region. In this paper, we exploit the point process modeling (PPM) framework and describe a method for constructing aggregate input-output (IO) stochastic models that predict spiking activity of a population of neurons in the "output" region as a function of the spiking activity of a population of neurons in the "input" region. We first build PPMs of each output neuron as a function of all input neurons, and then cluster the output neurons using the model parameters. Output neurons that lie within the same cluster have the same functional dependence on the input neurons. We first applied our method to simulated data, and successfully uncovered the predetermined relationship between the two regions. We then applied our method to experimental data to understand the input-output relationship between motor cortical neurons and 1) somatosensory and 2) premotor cortical neurons during a behavioral task. Our aggregate IO models highlighted interesting physiological dependences including relative effects of inhibition/excitation from input neurons and extrinsic factors on output neurons.

  9. Input-output analysis of mathematical models of ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Antonios, M.N.

    1982-01-01

    Necessary and sufficient conditions for the convergence of the solutions of linear and nonlinear time varying compartmental models described by systems of differential equations are reviewed. For continuous and discrete models, the concept of environ analysis is extended to advanced linear systems and for the first time to systems with time varying coefficient matrices A(t) and (A(t))/sup T/. Output and input environ partitioning flow and storage matrices for a two trophic level aquatic system are derived in the form of integral equations. As a step towards the important goal of controlling the eutrophication phenomenon, two phytoplankton population models in natural waters are presented. In the first model, a non-linear function general enough to include the effects of feeding saturation intraspecific consumer interference, and eutrophication phenomenon is used to present the transfer of material or energy from phytoplankton to zooplankton populations. The model using this grazing rate function is subjected to equilibrium and stability analysis to ascertain its mathematical implications. It is shown that, for a certain range of one of the parameters in this function all equilibrium points of the system become stable even with nutrient enrichment. In the second model, dynamics of both nitrogen and phosphorus cycles are combined. The influence of direct human control added to different aquatic models is studied in detail. Optimal control theory is used to obtain optimal strategies for the control of these models with several cost functions. It is found that the control program in each problem depends on the model considered and on the function to be optimized.

  10. Input-output model for MACCS nuclear accident impacts estimation¹

    SciTech Connect

    Outkin, Alexander V.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Vargas, Vanessa N

    2015-01-27

    Since the original economic model for MACCS was developed, better quality economic data (as well as the tools to gather and process it) and better computational capabilities have become available. The update of the economic impacts component of the MACCS legacy model will provide improved estimates of business disruptions through the use of Input-Output based economic impact estimation. This paper presents an updated MACCS model, bases on Input-Output methodology, in which economic impacts are calculated using the Regional Economic Accounting analysis tool (REAcct) created at Sandia National Laboratories. This new GDP-based model allows quick and consistent estimation of gross domestic product (GDP) losses due to nuclear power plant accidents. This paper outlines the steps taken to combine the REAcct Input-Output-based model with the MACCS code, describes the GDP loss calculation, and discusses the parameters and modeling assumptions necessary for the estimation of long-term effects of nuclear power plant accidents.

  11. Explicit least squares system parameter identification for exact differential input/output models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, A. E.

    1993-01-01

    The equation error for a class of systems modeled by input/output differential operator equations has the potential to be integrated exactly, given the input/output data on a finite time interval, thereby opening up the possibility of using an explicit least squares estimation technique for system parameter identification. The paper delineates the class of models for which this is possible and shows how the explicit least squares cost function can be obtained in a way that obviates dealing with unknown initial and boundary conditions. The approach is illustrated by two examples: a second order chemical kinetics model and a third order system of Lorenz equations.

  12. Methods to Register Models and Input/Output Parameters for Integrated Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Droppo, James G.; Whelan, Gene; Tryby, Michael E.; Pelton, Mitchell A.; Taira, Randal Y.; Dorow, Kevin E.

    2010-07-10

    Significant resources can be required when constructing integrated modeling systems. In a typical application, components (e.g., models and databases) created by different developers are assimilated, requiring the framework’s functionality to bridge the gap between the user’s knowledge of the components being linked. The framework, therefore, needs the capability to assimilate a wide range of model-specific input/output requirements as well as their associated assumptions and constraints. The process of assimilating such disparate components into an integrated modeling framework varies in complexity and difficulty. Several factors influence the relative ease of assimilating components, including, but not limited to, familiarity with the components being assimilated, familiarity with the framework and its tools that support the assimilation process, level of documentation associated with the components and the framework, and design structure of the components and framework. This initial effort reviews different approaches for assimilating models and their model-specific input/output requirements: 1) modifying component models to directly communicate with the framework (i.e., through an Application Programming Interface), 2) developing model-specific external wrappers such that no component model modifications are required, 3) using parsing tools to visually map pre-existing input/output files, and 4) describing and linking models as dynamic link libraries. Most of these approaches are illustrated using the widely distributed modeling system called Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems (FRAMES). The review concludes that each has its strengths and weakness, the factors that determine which approaches work best in a given application.

  13. A hybrid input-output approach to model metabolic systems: an application to intracellular thiamine kinetics.

    PubMed

    Bellazzi, R; Guglielmann, R; Ironi, L; Patrini, C

    2001-08-01

    Models of the dynamics of complex metabolic systems offer potential benefits to the deep comprehension of the system under study as well as for the performance of certain tasks. Unfortunately, dynamic modeling of a great deal of metabolic systems may be problematic due to the incompleteness of the available knowledge about the underlying mechanisms and to the lack of an adequate observational data set. In theory, a valid alternative to classical structural modeling through ordinary differential equations could be represented by input-output approaches. But, in practice, such methods, which learn the nonlinear dynamics of the system from input-output data, fail when the experimental data set is poor either in size or in quality. Such a situation is not rare in the case of metabolic systems. This paper deals with a hybrid approach which aims at overcoming the problems addressed above. More specifically, it allows us to solve the identification problems of the intracellular thiamine kinetics in the intestine tissue. The method, which is half way between the structural and input-output approach, uses the outcomes of the simulation of a qualitative structural model to build a good initialization of a fuzzy system identifier. Such an initialization allows us to efficiently cope with both the incompleteness of knowledge and the inadequacy of the available data set, and to derive an input-output model of the intracellular thiamine kinetics in the intestine tissue. The comparison of the predictions of the intracellular thiamine kinetics obtained by the application of such a model with those obtained by traditional approaches, namely compartmental models, neural networks, and fuzzy systems, highlighted a better performance of our model. As the structural assumptions are relaxed, we obtained a model slightly less informative than a purely structural one but robust enough to be used as a simulator. The paper also discusses the interpretative potential offered by such a model

  14. Minimal state space realisation of continuous-time linear time-variant input-output models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goos, J.; Pintelon, R.

    2016-04-01

    In the linear time-invariant (LTI) framework, the transformation from an input-output equation into state space representation is well understood. Several canonical forms exist that realise the same dynamic behaviour. If the coefficients become time-varying however, the LTI transformation no longer holds. We prove by induction that there exists a closed-form expression for the observability canonical state space model, using binomial coefficients.

  15. Input-Output Modeling for Urban Energy Consumption in Beijing: Dynamics and Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lixiao; Hu, Qiuhong; Zhang, Fan

    2014-01-01

    Input-output analysis has been proven to be a powerful instrument for estimating embodied (direct plus indirect) energy usage through economic sectors. Using 9 economic input-output tables of years 1987, 1990, 1992, 1995, 1997, 2000, 2002, 2005, and 2007, this paper analyzes energy flows for the entire city of Beijing and its 30 economic sectors, respectively. Results show that the embodied energy consumption of Beijing increased from 38.85 million tonnes of coal equivalent (Mtce) to 206.2 Mtce over the past twenty years of rapid urbanization; the share of indirect energy consumption in total energy consumption increased from 48% to 76%, suggesting the transition of Beijing from a production-based and manufacturing-dominated economy to a consumption-based and service-dominated economy. Real estate development has shown to be a major driving factor of the growth in indirect energy consumption. The boom and bust of construction activities have been strongly correlated with the increase and decrease of system-side indirect energy consumption. Traditional heavy industries remain the most energy-intensive sectors in the economy. However, the transportation and service sectors have contributed most to the rapid increase in overall energy consumption. The analyses in this paper demonstrate that a system-wide approach such as that based on input-output model can be a useful tool for robust energy policy making. PMID:24595199

  16. Multiregional input-output model for the evaluation of Spanish water flows.

    PubMed

    Cazcarro, Ignacio; Duarte, Rosa; Sánchez Chóliz, Julio

    2013-01-01

    We construct a multiregional input-output model for Spain, in order to evaluate the pressures on the water resources, virtual water flows, and water footprints of the regions, and the water impact of trade relationships within Spain and abroad. The study is framed with those interregional input-output models constructed to study water flows and impacts of regions in China, Australia, Mexico, or the UK. To build our database, we reconcile regional IO tables, national and regional accountancy of Spain, trade and water data. Results show an important imbalance between origin of water resources and final destination, with significant water pressures in the South, Mediterranean, and some central regions. The most populated and dynamic regions of Madrid and Barcelona are important drivers of water consumption in Spain. Main virtual water exporters are the South and Central agrarian regions: Andalusia, Castile-La Mancha, Castile-Leon, Aragon, and Extremadura, while the main virtual water importers are the industrialized regions of Madrid, Basque country, and the Mediterranean coast. The paper shows the different location of direct and indirect consumers of water in Spain and how the economic trade and consumption pattern of certain areas has significant impacts on the availability of water resources in other different and often drier regions.

  17. A Water-Withdrawal Input-Output Model of the Indian Economy.

    PubMed

    Bogra, Shelly; Bakshi, Bhavik R; Mathur, Ritu

    2016-02-01

    Managing freshwater allocation for a highly populated and growing economy like India can benefit from knowledge about the effect of economic activities. This study transforms the 2003-2004 economic input-output (IO) table of India into a water withdrawal input-output model to quantify direct and indirect flows. This unique model is based on a comprehensive database compiled from diverse public sources, and estimates direct and indirect water withdrawal of all economic sectors. It distinguishes between green (rainfall), blue (surface and ground), and scarce groundwater. Results indicate that the total direct water withdrawal is nearly 3052 billion cubic meter (BCM) and 96% of this is used in agriculture sectors with the contribution of direct green water being about 1145 BCM, excluding forestry. Apart from 727 BCM direct blue water withdrawal for agricultural, other significant users include "Electricity" with 64 BCM, "Water supply" with 44 BCM and other industrial sectors with nearly 14 BCM. "Construction", "miscellaneous food products"; "Hotels and restaurants"; "Paper, paper products, and newsprint" are other significant indirect withdrawers. The net virtual water import is found to be insignificant compared to direct water used in agriculture nationally, while scarce ground water associated with crops is largely contributed by northern states. PMID:26736016

  18. A Water-Withdrawal Input-Output Model of the Indian Economy.

    PubMed

    Bogra, Shelly; Bakshi, Bhavik R; Mathur, Ritu

    2016-02-01

    Managing freshwater allocation for a highly populated and growing economy like India can benefit from knowledge about the effect of economic activities. This study transforms the 2003-2004 economic input-output (IO) table of India into a water withdrawal input-output model to quantify direct and indirect flows. This unique model is based on a comprehensive database compiled from diverse public sources, and estimates direct and indirect water withdrawal of all economic sectors. It distinguishes between green (rainfall), blue (surface and ground), and scarce groundwater. Results indicate that the total direct water withdrawal is nearly 3052 billion cubic meter (BCM) and 96% of this is used in agriculture sectors with the contribution of direct green water being about 1145 BCM, excluding forestry. Apart from 727 BCM direct blue water withdrawal for agricultural, other significant users include "Electricity" with 64 BCM, "Water supply" with 44 BCM and other industrial sectors with nearly 14 BCM. "Construction", "miscellaneous food products"; "Hotels and restaurants"; "Paper, paper products, and newsprint" are other significant indirect withdrawers. The net virtual water import is found to be insignificant compared to direct water used in agriculture nationally, while scarce ground water associated with crops is largely contributed by northern states.

  19. Multiregional input-output model for the evaluation of Spanish water flows.

    PubMed

    Cazcarro, Ignacio; Duarte, Rosa; Sánchez Chóliz, Julio

    2013-01-01

    We construct a multiregional input-output model for Spain, in order to evaluate the pressures on the water resources, virtual water flows, and water footprints of the regions, and the water impact of trade relationships within Spain and abroad. The study is framed with those interregional input-output models constructed to study water flows and impacts of regions in China, Australia, Mexico, or the UK. To build our database, we reconcile regional IO tables, national and regional accountancy of Spain, trade and water data. Results show an important imbalance between origin of water resources and final destination, with significant water pressures in the South, Mediterranean, and some central regions. The most populated and dynamic regions of Madrid and Barcelona are important drivers of water consumption in Spain. Main virtual water exporters are the South and Central agrarian regions: Andalusia, Castile-La Mancha, Castile-Leon, Aragon, and Extremadura, while the main virtual water importers are the industrialized regions of Madrid, Basque country, and the Mediterranean coast. The paper shows the different location of direct and indirect consumers of water in Spain and how the economic trade and consumption pattern of certain areas has significant impacts on the availability of water resources in other different and often drier regions. PMID:24028336

  20. Possible effects of depolarizing GABAA conductance on the neuronal input-output relationship: a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Morita, Kenji; Tsumoto, Kunichika; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2005-06-01

    Recent in vitro experiments revealed that the GABAA reversal potential is about 10 mV higher than the resting potential in mature mammalian neocortical pyramidal cells; thus GABAergic inputs could have facilitatory, rather than inhibitory, effects on action potential generation under certain conditions. However, how the relationship between excitatory input conductances and the output firing rate is modulated by such depolarizing GABAergic inputs under in vivo circumstances has not yet been understood. We examine herewith the input-output relationship in a simple conductance-based model of cortical neurons with the depolarized GABAA reversal potential, and show that a tonic depolarizing GABAergic conductance up to a certain amount does not change the relationship between a tonic glutamatergic driving conductance and the output firing rate, whereas a higher GABAergic conductance prevents spike generation. When the tonic glutamatergic and GABAergic conductances are replaced by in vivo-like highly fluctuating inputs, on the other hand, the effect of depolarizing GABAergic inputs on the input-output relationship critically depends on the degree of coincidence between glutamatergic input events and GABAergic ones. Although a wide range of depolarizing GABAergic inputs hardly changes the firing rate of a neuron driven by noncoincident glutamatergic inputs, a certain range of these inputs considerably decreases the firing rate if a large number of driving glutamatergic inputs are coincident with them. These results raise the possibility that the depolarized GABAA reversal potential is not a paradoxical mystery, but is instead a sophisticated device for discriminative firing rate modulation.

  1. Applying Input-Output Model to Estimate Broader Economic Impact of Transportation Infrastructure Investment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anas, Ridwan; Tamin, Ofyar; Wibowo, Sony S.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the relationships between infrastructure improvement and economic growth in the surrounding region. Traditionally, microeconomic and macroeconomic analyses are the mostly used tools for analyzing the linkage between transportation sectors and economic growth but offer little clues to the mechanisms linking transport improvements and the broader economy impacts. This study will estimate the broader economic benefits of the new transportation infrastructure investment, Cipularangtollway in West Java province, Indonesia, to the region connected (Bandung district) using Input-Output model. The result show the decrease of freight transportation costs by at 17 % and the increase of 1.2 % of Bandung District's GDP after the operation of Cipularangtollway.

  2. Applying Input-Output Model to Estimate Broader Economic Impact of Transportation Infrastructure Investment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anas, Ridwan; Tamin, Ofyar; Wibowo, Sony S.

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the relationships between infrastructure improvement and economic growth in the surrounding region. Traditionally, microeconomic and macroeconomic analyses are the mostly used tools for analyzing the linkage between transportation sectors and economic growth but offer little clues to the mechanisms linking transport improvements and the broader economy impacts. This study will estimate the broader economic benefits of the new transportation infrastructure investment, Cipularangtollway in West Java province, Indonesia, to the region connected (Bandung district) using Input-Output model. The result show the decrease of freight transportation costs by at 17 % and the increase of 1.2 % of Bandung District's GDP after the operation of Cipularangtollway.

  3. Regional disaster impact analysis: comparing input-output and computable general equilibrium models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koks, Elco E.; Carrera, Lorenzo; Jonkeren, Olaf; Aerts, Jeroen C. J. H.; Husby, Trond G.; Thissen, Mark; Standardi, Gabriele; Mysiak, Jaroslav

    2016-08-01

    A variety of models have been applied to assess the economic losses of disasters, of which the most common ones are input-output (IO) and computable general equilibrium (CGE) models. In addition, an increasing number of scholars have developed hybrid approaches: one that combines both or either of them in combination with noneconomic methods. While both IO and CGE models are widely used, they are mainly compared on theoretical grounds. Few studies have compared disaster impacts of different model types in a systematic way and for the same geographical area, using similar input data. Such a comparison is valuable from both a scientific and policy perspective as the magnitude and the spatial distribution of the estimated losses are born likely to vary with the chosen modelling approach (IO, CGE, or hybrid). Hence, regional disaster impact loss estimates resulting from a range of models facilitate better decisions and policy making. Therefore, this study analyses the economic consequences for a specific case study, using three regional disaster impact models: two hybrid IO models and a CGE model. The case study concerns two flood scenarios in the Po River basin in Italy. Modelling results indicate that the difference in estimated total (national) economic losses and the regional distribution of those losses may vary by up to a factor of 7 between the three models, depending on the type of recovery path. Total economic impact, comprising all Italian regions, is negative in all models though.

  4. Neural systems with numerically matched input-output statistic: isotonic bivariate statistical modeling.

    PubMed

    Fiori, Simone

    2007-01-01

    Bivariate statistical modeling from incomplete data is a useful statistical tool that allows to discover the model underlying two data sets when the data in the two sets do not correspond in size nor in ordering. Such situation may occur when the sizes of the two data sets do not match (i.e., there are "holes" in the data) or when the data sets have been acquired independently. Also, statistical modeling is useful when the amount of available data is enough to show relevant statistical features of the phenomenon underlying the data. We propose to tackle the problem of statistical modeling via a neural (nonlinear) system that is able to match its input-output statistic to the statistic of the available data sets. A key point of the new implementation proposed here is that it is based on look-up-table (LUT) neural systems, which guarantee a computationally advantageous way of implementing neural systems. A number of numerical experiments, performed on both synthetic and real-world data sets, illustrate the features of the proposed modeling procedure.

  5. Neural Systems with Numerically Matched Input-Output Statistic: Isotonic Bivariate Statistical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Simone

    2007-01-01

    Bivariate statistical modeling from incomplete data is a useful statistical tool that allows to discover the model underlying two data sets when the data in the two sets do not correspond in size nor in ordering. Such situation may occur when the sizes of the two data sets do not match (i.e., there are “holes” in the data) or when the data sets have been acquired independently. Also, statistical modeling is useful when the amount of available data is enough to show relevant statistical features of the phenomenon underlying the data. We propose to tackle the problem of statistical modeling via a neural (nonlinear) system that is able to match its input-output statistic to the statistic of the available data sets. A key point of the new implementation proposed here is that it is based on look-up-table (LUT) neural systems, which guarantee a computationally advantageous way of implementing neural systems. A number of numerical experiments, performed on both synthetic and real-world data sets, illustrate the features of the proposed modeling procedure. PMID:18566641

  6. Validity of transfer-function representation of input-output relation in allosteric models.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, N; Naka, T

    1986-01-01

    A transfer-function representation of reaction velocity is devised to describe analytically and approximately an input-output response of allosteric enzyme around a steady state. The transfer function is derived on assuming an exponential change in reaction velocity for the indicial response to substrate influx rate. The validity of the representation with variation in the kinetic parameters and flow rates is examined for the response of Koshland-Nemethy-Filmer (KNF) and Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) dimeric models by comparing with the exact response obtained from the computer simulation, that is, by numerical integration of the rate equation. The representation has a wider valid region with a decrease in influx rate than with an increase. For the KNF model the representation is valid for negative cooperativity, but invalid for positive cooperativity. For the MWC model the validity decreases with stronger cooperativity. With the transfer functions valid for the Michaelis-Menten and allosteric reactions, we may derive the transfer-function representation for many metabolic pathways.

  7. Modeling imbalanced economic recovery following a natural disaster using input-output analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Syddall, Mark; Guan, Dabo

    2013-10-01

    Input-output analysis is frequently used in studies of large-scale weather-related (e.g., Hurricanes and flooding) disruption of a regional economy. The economy after a sudden catastrophe shows a multitude of imbalances with respect to demand and production and may take months or years to recover. However, there is no consensus about how the economy recovers. This article presents a theoretical route map for imbalanced economic recovery called dynamic inequalities. Subsequently, it is applied to a hypothetical postdisaster economic scenario of flooding in London around the year 2020 to assess the influence of future shocks to a regional economy and suggest adaptation measures. Economic projections are produced by a macro econometric model and used as baseline conditions. The results suggest that London's economy would recover over approximately 70 months by applying a proportional rationing scheme under the assumption of initial 50% labor loss (with full recovery in six months), 40% initial loss to service sectors, and 10-30% initial loss to other sectors. The results also suggest that imbalance will be the norm during the postdisaster period of economic recovery even though balance may occur temporarily. Model sensitivity analysis suggests that a proportional rationing scheme may be an effective strategy to apply during postdisaster economic reconstruction, and that policies in transportation recovery and in health care are essential for effective postdisaster economic recovery.

  8. Ecological input-output modeling for embodied resources and emissions in Chinese economy 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. M.; Chen, G. Q.; Zhou, J. B.; Jiang, M. M.; Chen, B.

    2010-07-01

    For the embodiment of natural resources and environmental emissions in Chinese economy 2005, a biophysical balance modeling is carried out based on an extension of the economic input-output table into an ecological one integrating the economy with its various environmental driving forces. Included resource flows into the primary resource sectors and environmental emission flows from the primary emission sectors belong to seven categories as energy resources in terms of fossil fuels, hydropower and nuclear energy, biomass, and other sources; freshwater resources; greenhouse gas emissions in terms of CO2, CH4, and N2O; industrial wastes in terms of waste water, waste gas, and waste solid; exergy in terms of fossil fuel resources, biological resources, mineral resources, and environmental resources; solar emergy and cosmic emergy in terms of climate resources, soil, fossil fuels, and minerals. The resulted database for embodiment intensity and sectoral embodiment of natural resources and environmental emissions is of essential implications in context of systems ecology and ecological economics in general and of global climate change in particular.

  9. Multiregional input-output model for China's farm land and water use.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shan; Shen, Geoffrey Qiping

    2015-01-01

    Land and water are the two main drivers of agricultural production. Pressure on farm land and water resources is increasing in China due to rising food demand. Domestic trade affects China's regional farm land and water use by distributing resources associated with the production of goods and services. This study constructs a multiregional input-output model to simultaneously analyze China's farm land and water uses embodied in consumption and interregional trade. Results show a great similarity for both China's farm land and water endowments. Shandong, Henan, Guangdong, and Yunnan are the most important drivers of farm land and water consumption in China, even though they have relatively few land and water resource endowments. Significant net transfers of embodied farm land and water flows are identified from the central and western areas to the eastern area via interregional trade. Heilongjiang is the largest farm land and water supplier, in contrast to Shanghai as the largest receiver. The results help policy makers to comprehensively understand embodied farm land and water flows in a complex economy network. Improving resource utilization efficiency and reshaping the embodied resource trade nexus should be addressed by considering the transfer of regional responsibilities.

  10. Multi-way metamodelling facilitates insight into the complex input-output maps of nonlinear dynamic models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Statistical approaches to describing the behaviour, including the complex relationships between input parameters and model outputs, of nonlinear dynamic models (referred to as metamodelling) are gaining more and more acceptance as a means for sensitivity analysis and to reduce computational demand. Understanding such input-output maps is necessary for efficient model construction and validation. Multi-way metamodelling provides the opportunity to retain the block-wise structure of the temporal data typically generated by dynamic models throughout the analysis. Furthermore, a cluster-based approach to regional metamodelling allows description of highly nonlinear input-output relationships, revealing additional patterns of covariation. Results By presenting the N-way Hierarchical Cluster-based Partial Least Squares Regression (N-way HC-PLSR) method, we here combine multi-way analysis with regional cluster-based metamodelling, together making a powerful methodology for extensive exploration of the input-output maps of complex dynamic models. We illustrate the potential of the N-way HC-PLSR by applying it both to predict model outputs as functions of the input parameters, and in the inverse direction (predicting input parameters from the model outputs), to analyse the behaviour of a dynamic model of the mammalian circadian clock. Our results display a more complete cartography of how variation in input parameters is reflected in the temporal behaviour of multiple model outputs than has been previously reported. Conclusions Our results indicated that the N-way HC-PLSR metamodelling provides a gain in insight into which parameters that are related to a specific model output behaviour, as well as variations in the model sensitivity to certain input parameters across the model output space. Moreover, the N-way approach allows a more transparent and detailed exploration of the temporal dimension of complex dynamic models, compared to alternative 2-way methods

  11. Methods to Register Models and Input/Output Parameters for Integrated Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant resources can be required when constructing integrated modeling systems. In a typical application, components (e.g., models and databases) created by different developers are assimilated, requiring the framework’s functionality to bridge the gap between the user’s kno...

  12. Input-Output Modeling and Control of the Departure Process of Congested Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pujet, Nicolas; Delcaire, Bertrand; Feron, Eric

    2003-01-01

    A simple queueing model of busy airport departure operations is proposed. This model is calibrated and validated using available runway configuration and traffic data. The model is then used to evaluate preliminary control schemes aimed at alleviating departure traffic congestion on the airport surface. The potential impact of these control strategies on direct operating costs, environmental costs and overall delay is quantified and discussed.

  13. Frequency dependent precompensation for dominance in a four input/output theme problem model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, R. M.; Sain, M. K.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reports on additional experience in applying the CARDIAD methodology to design of dynamical input compensation to achieve column dominance for linear multivariable models of realistic turbine engine simulations. In particular, the approach has been extended to models having four inputs and four outputs, and successful compensations have been achieved with an investment of about thirty minutes desk time.

  14. Input/output models for general aviation piston-prop aircraft fuel economy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel efficient cruise performance model for general aviation piston engine airplane was tested. The following equations were made: (1) for the standard atmosphere; (2) airframe-propeller-atmosphere cruise performance; and (3) naturally aspirated engine cruise performance. Adjustments are made to the compact cruise performance model as follows: corrected quantities, corrected performance plots, algebraic equations, maximize R with or without constraints, and appears suitable for airborne microprocessor implementation. The following hardwares are recommended: ignition timing regulator, fuel-air mass ration controller, microprocessor, sensors and displays.

  15. Supply Chain Vulnerability Analysis Using Scenario-Based Input-Output Modeling: Application to Port Operations.

    PubMed

    Thekdi, Shital A; Santos, Joost R

    2016-05-01

    Disruptive events such as natural disasters, loss or reduction of resources, work stoppages, and emergent conditions have potential to propagate economic losses across trade networks. In particular, disruptions to the operation of container port activity can be detrimental for international trade and commerce. Risk assessment should anticipate the impact of port operation disruptions with consideration of how priorities change due to uncertain scenarios and guide investments that are effective and feasible for implementation. Priorities for protective measures and continuity of operations planning must consider the economic impact of such disruptions across a variety of scenarios. This article introduces new performance metrics to characterize resiliency in interdependency modeling and also integrates scenario-based methods to measure economic sensitivity to sudden-onset disruptions. The methods will be demonstrated on a U.S. port responsible for handling $36.1 billion of cargo annually. The methods will be useful to port management, private industry supply chain planning, and transportation infrastructure management. PMID:26271771

  16. Supply Chain Vulnerability Analysis Using Scenario-Based Input-Output Modeling: Application to Port Operations.

    PubMed

    Thekdi, Shital A; Santos, Joost R

    2016-05-01

    Disruptive events such as natural disasters, loss or reduction of resources, work stoppages, and emergent conditions have potential to propagate economic losses across trade networks. In particular, disruptions to the operation of container port activity can be detrimental for international trade and commerce. Risk assessment should anticipate the impact of port operation disruptions with consideration of how priorities change due to uncertain scenarios and guide investments that are effective and feasible for implementation. Priorities for protective measures and continuity of operations planning must consider the economic impact of such disruptions across a variety of scenarios. This article introduces new performance metrics to characterize resiliency in interdependency modeling and also integrates scenario-based methods to measure economic sensitivity to sudden-onset disruptions. The methods will be demonstrated on a U.S. port responsible for handling $36.1 billion of cargo annually. The methods will be useful to port management, private industry supply chain planning, and transportation infrastructure management.

  17. Mutational analyses of HAMP helices suggest a dynamic bundle model of input-output signalling in chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Ames, Peter; Parkinson, John S

    2009-09-01

    To test the gearbox model of HAMP signalling in the Escherichia coli serine receptor, Tsr, we generated a series of amino acid replacements at each residue of the AS1 and AS2 helices. The residues most critical for Tsr function defined hydrophobic packing faces consistent with a four-helix bundle. Suppression patterns of helix lesions conformed to the predicted packing layers in the bundle. Although the properties and patterns of most AS1 and AS2 lesions were consistent with both proposed gearbox structures, some mutational features specifically indicate the functional importance of an x-da bundle over an alternative a-d bundle. These genetic data suggest that HAMP signalling could simply involve changes in the stability of its x-da bundle. We propose that Tsr HAMP controls output signals by modulating destabilizing phase clashes between the AS2 helices and the adjoining kinase control helices. Our model further proposes that chemoeffectors regulate HAMP bundle stability through a control cable connection between the transmembrane segments and AS1 helices. Attractant stimuli, which cause inward piston displacements in chemoreceptors, should reduce cable tension, thereby stabilizing the HAMP bundle. This study shows how transmembrane signalling and HAMP input-output control could occur without the helix rotations central to the gearbox model.

  18. Serial Input Output

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, Anthony; /SLAC

    2011-09-07

    Serial Input/Output (SIO) is designed to be a long term storage format of a sophistication somewhere between simple ASCII files and the techniques provided by inter alia Objectivity and Root. The former tend to be low density, information lossy (floating point numbers lose precision) and inflexible. The latter require abstract descriptions of the data with all that that implies in terms of extra complexity. The basic building blocks of SIO are streams, records and blocks. Streams provide the connections between the program and files. The user can define an arbitrary list of streams as required. A given stream must be opened for either reading or writing. SIO does not support read/write streams. If a stream is closed during the execution of a program, it can be reopened in either read or write mode to the same or a different file. Records represent a coherent grouping of data. Records consist of a collection of blocks (see next paragraph). The user can define a variety of records (headers, events, error logs, etc.) and request that any of them be written to any stream. When SIO reads a file, it first decodes the record name and if that record has been defined and unpacking has been requested for it, SIO proceeds to unpack the blocks. Blocks are user provided objects which do the real work of reading/writing the data. The user is responsible for writing the code for these blocks and for identifying these blocks to SIO at run time. To write a collection of blocks, the user must first connect them to a record. The record can then be written to a stream as described above. Note that the same block can be connected to many different records. When SIO reads a record, it scans through the blocks written and calls the corresponding block object (if it has been defined) to decode it. Undefined blocks are skipped. Each of these categories (streams, records and blocks) have some characteristics in common. Every stream, record and block has a name with the condition that each

  19. Analysis of urban metabolic processes based on input-output method: model development and a case study for Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Liu, Hong; Chen, Bin; Zheng, Hongmei; Li, Yating

    2014-06-01

    Discovering ways in which to increase the sustainability of the metabolic processes involved in urbanization has become an urgent task for urban design and management in China. As cities are analogous to living organisms, the disorders of their metabolic processes can be regarded as the cause of "urban disease". Therefore, identification of these causes through metabolic process analysis and ecological element distribution through the urban ecosystem's compartments will be helpful. By using Beijing as an example, we have compiled monetary input-output tables from 1997, 2000, 2002, 2005, and 2007 and calculated the intensities of the embodied ecological elements to compile the corresponding implied physical input-output tables. We then divided Beijing's economy into 32 compartments and analyzed the direct and indirect ecological intensities embodied in the flows of ecological elements through urban metabolic processes. Based on the combination of input-output tables and ecological network analysis, the description of multiple ecological elements transferred among Beijing's industrial compartments and their distribution has been refined. This hybrid approach can provide a more scientific basis for management of urban resource flows. In addition, the data obtained from distribution characteristics of ecological elements may provide a basic data platform for exploring the metabolic mechanism of Beijing.

  20. Ecological network analysis of an urban metabolic system based on input-output tables: model development and case study for Beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Hongmei; Fath, Brian D; Liu, Hong; Yang, Zhifeng; Liu, Gengyuan; Su, Meirong

    2014-01-15

    If cities are considered as "superorganisms", then disorders of their metabolic processes cause something analogous to an "urban disease". It is therefore helpful to identify the causes of such disorders by analyzing the inner mechanisms that control urban metabolic processes. Combining input-output analysis with ecological network analysis lets researchers study the functional relationships and hierarchy of the urban metabolic processes, thereby providing direct support for the analysis of urban disease. In this paper, using Beijing as an example, we develop a model of an urban metabolic system that accounts for the intensity of the embodied ecological elements using monetary input-output tables from 1997, 2000, 2002, 2005, and 2007, and use this data to compile the corresponding physical input-output tables. This approach described the various flows of ecological elements through urban metabolic processes and let us build an ecological network model with 32 components. Then, using two methods from ecological network analysis (flow analysis and utility analysis), we quantitatively analyzed the physical input-output relationships among urban components, determined the ecological hierarchy of the components of the metabolic system, and determined the distribution of advantage-dominated and disadvantage-dominated relationships, thereby providing scientific support to guide restructuring of the urban metabolic system in an effort to prevent or cure urban "diseases".

  1. Inventory development and input-output model of U.S. land use: relating land in production to consumption.

    PubMed

    Costello, Christine; Griffin, W Michael; Matthews, H Scott; Weber, Christopher L

    2011-06-01

    As populations and demands for land-intensive products, e.g., cattle and biofuels, increase the need to understand the relationship between land use and consumption grows. This paper develops a production-based inventory of land use (i.e., the land used to produce goods) in the U.S. With this inventory an input-output analysis is used to create a consumption-based inventory of land use. This allows for exploration of links between land used in production to the consumption of particular goods. For example, it is possible to estimate the amount of cropland embodied in processed foods or healthcare services. As would be expected, agricultural and forestry industries are the largest users of land in the production-based inventory. Similarly, we find that processed foods and forest products are the largest users of land in the consumption-based inventory. Somewhat less expectedly this work finds that the majority of manufacturing and service industries, not typically associated with land use, require substantial amounts of land to produce output due to the purchase of food and other agricultural and wood-based products in the supply chain. The quantitative land use results of this analysis could be integrated with qualitative metrics such as weighting schemes designed to reflect environmental impact or life cycle impact assessment methods.

  2. World Input-Output Network

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  3. World Input-Output Network.

    PubMed

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  4. World Input-Output Network.

    PubMed

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries.

  5. Comparing urban solid waste recycling from the viewpoint of urban metabolism based on physical input-output model: A case of Suzhou in China.

    PubMed

    Liang, Sai; Zhang, Tianzhu

    2012-01-01

    Investigating impacts of urban solid waste recycling on urban metabolism contributes to sustainable urban solid waste management and urban sustainability. Using a physical input-output model and scenario analysis, urban metabolism of Suzhou in 2015 is predicted and impacts of four categories of solid waste recycling on urban metabolism are illustrated: scrap tire recycling, food waste recycling, fly ash recycling and sludge recycling. Sludge recycling has positive effects on reducing all material flows. Thus, sludge recycling for biogas is regarded as an accepted method. Moreover, technical levels of scrap tire recycling and food waste recycling should be improved to produce positive effects on reducing more material flows. Fly ash recycling for cement production has negative effects on reducing all material flows except solid wastes. Thus, other fly ash utilization methods should be exploited. In addition, the utilization and treatment of secondary wastes from food waste recycling and sludge recycling should be concerned.

  6. Example of input-output analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The thirty sectors included in the ECASTAR energy input-output model were listed. Five of these belong to energy producing sectors, fifteen to manufacturing industries, two to residential and commercial sectors, and eight to service industries. The model is capable of tracing impacts of an action in three dimensions: dollars, BTU's of energy, and labor. Four conservation actions considered were listed and then discussed separately, dealing with the following areas: increase in fuel efficiency, reduction in fuel used by the transportation and warehousing group, manufacturing of smaller automobiles, and a communications/transportation trade-off.

  7. Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry based on physical input-output life-cycle assessment model.

    PubMed

    Liang, Sai; Zhang, Tianzhu; Xu, Yijian

    2012-03-01

    Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input-output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment.

  8. Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry based on physical input-output life-cycle assessment model

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Sai; Zhang, Tianzhu; Xu Yijian

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using crop straws and wood wastes for paper production should be promoted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bagasse and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Imports of scrap paper should be encouraged. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensitivity analysis, uncertainties and policy implications are discussed. - Abstract: Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input-output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment.

  9. Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry based on physical input-output life-cycle assessment model.

    PubMed

    Liang, Sai; Zhang, Tianzhu; Xu, Yijian

    2012-03-01

    Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input-output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment. PMID:22100716

  10. A modified NARMAX model-based self-tuner with fault tolerance for unknown nonlinear stochastic hybrid systems with an input-output direct feed-through term.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jason S-H; Hsu, Wen-Teng; Lin, Long-Guei; Guo, Shu-Mei; Tann, Joseph W

    2014-01-01

    A modified nonlinear autoregressive moving average with exogenous inputs (NARMAX) model-based state-space self-tuner with fault tolerance is proposed in this paper for the unknown nonlinear stochastic hybrid system with a direct transmission matrix from input to output. Through the off-line observer/Kalman filter identification method, one has a good initial guess of modified NARMAX model to reduce the on-line system identification process time. Then, based on the modified NARMAX-based system identification, a corresponding adaptive digital control scheme is presented for the unknown continuous-time nonlinear system, with an input-output direct transmission term, which also has measurement and system noises and inaccessible system states. Besides, an effective state space self-turner with fault tolerance scheme is presented for the unknown multivariable stochastic system. A quantitative criterion is suggested by comparing the innovation process error estimated by the Kalman filter estimation algorithm, so that a weighting matrix resetting technique by adjusting and resetting the covariance matrices of parameter estimate obtained by the Kalman filter estimation algorithm is utilized to achieve the parameter estimation for faulty system recovery. Consequently, the proposed method can effectively cope with partially abrupt and/or gradual system faults and input failures by the fault detection.

  11. Comparing urban solid waste recycling from the viewpoint of urban metabolism based on physical input-output model: A case of Suzhou in China

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Sai; Zhang Tianzhu

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impacts of solid waste recycling on Suzhou's urban metabolism in 2015 are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sludge recycling for biogas is regarded as an accepted method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technical levels of reusing scrap tires and food wastes should be improved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Other fly ash utilization methods should be exploited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Secondary wastes from reusing food wastes and sludge should be concerned. - Abstract: Investigating impacts of urban solid waste recycling on urban metabolism contributes to sustainable urban solid waste management and urban sustainability. Using a physical input-output model and scenario analysis, urban metabolism of Suzhou in 2015 is predicted and impacts of four categories of solid waste recycling on urban metabolism are illustrated: scrap tire recycling, food waste recycling, fly ash recycling and sludge recycling. Sludge recycling has positive effects on reducing all material flows. Thus, sludge recycling for biogas is regarded as an accepted method. Moreover, technical levels of scrap tire recycling and food waste recycling should be improved to produce positive effects on reducing more material flows. Fly ash recycling for cement production has negative effects on reducing all material flows except solid wastes. Thus, other fly ash utilization methods should be exploited. In addition, the utilization and treatment of secondary wastes from food waste recycling and sludge recycling should be concerned.

  12. Risk-based input-output analysis of influenza epidemic consequences on interdependent workforce sectors.

    PubMed

    Santos, Joost R; May, Larissa; Haimar, Amine El

    2013-09-01

    Outbreaks of contagious diseases underscore the ever-looming threat of new epidemics. Compared to other disasters that inflict physical damage to infrastructure systems, epidemics can have more devastating and prolonged impacts on the population. This article investigates the interdependent economic and productivity risks resulting from epidemic-induced workforce absenteeism. In particular, we develop a dynamic input-output model capable of generating sector-disaggregated economic losses based on different magnitudes of workforce disruptions. An ex post analysis of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in the national capital region (NCR) reveals the distribution of consequences across different economic sectors. Consequences are categorized into two metrics: (i) economic loss, which measures the magnitude of monetary losses incurred in each sector, and (ii) inoperability, which measures the normalized monetary losses incurred in each sector relative to the total economic output of that sector. For a simulated mild pandemic scenario in NCR, two distinct rankings are generated using the economic loss and inoperability metrics. Results indicate that the majority of the critical sectors ranked according to the economic loss metric comprise of sectors that contribute the most to the NCR's gross domestic product (e.g., federal government enterprises). In contrast, the majority of the critical sectors generated by the inoperability metric include sectors that are involved with epidemic management (e.g., hospitals). Hence, prioritizing sectors for recovery necessitates consideration of the balance between economic loss, inoperability, and other objectives. Although applied specifically to the NCR, the proposed methodology can be customized for other regions.

  13. Risk-Based Input-Output Analysis of Influenza Epidemic Consequences on Interdependent Workforce Sectors

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Joost R.; May, Larissa; Haimar, Amine El

    2013-01-01

    Outbreaks of contagious diseases underscore the ever-looming threat of new epidemics. Compared to other disasters that inflict physical damage to infrastructure systems, epidemics can have more devastating and prolonged impacts on the population. This paper investigates the interdependent economic and productivity risks resulting from epidemic-induced workforce absenteeism. In particular, we develop a dynamic input-output model capable of generating sector-disaggregated economic losses based on different magnitudes of workforce disruptions. An ex post analysis of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in the National Capital Region (NCR) reveals the distribution of consequences across different economic sectors. Consequences are categorized into two metrics: (i) economic loss, which measures the magnitude of monetary losses incurred in each sector, and (ii) inoperability, which measures the normalized monetary losses incurred in each sector relative to the total economic output of that sector. For a simulated mild pandemic scenario in NCR, two distinct rankings are generated using the economic loss and inoperability metrics. Results indicate that the majority of the critical sectors ranked according to the economic loss metric comprise of sectors that contribute the most to the NCR's gross domestic product (e.g., federal government enterprises). In contrast, the majority of the critical sectors generated by the inoperability metric include sectors that are involved with epidemic management (e.g., hospitals). Hence, prioritizing sectors for recovery necessitates consideration of the balance between economic loss, inoperability, and other objectives. Although applied specifically to the NCR region, the proposed methodology can be customized for other regions. PMID:23278756

  14. Scaling of global input-output networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Sai; Qi, Zhengling; Qu, Shen; Zhu, Ji; Chiu, Anthony S. F.; Jia, Xiaoping; Xu, Ming

    2016-06-01

    Examining scaling patterns of networks can help understand how structural features relate to the behavior of the networks. Input-output networks consist of industries as nodes and inter-industrial exchanges of products as links. Previous studies consider limited measures for node strengths and link weights, and also ignore the impact of dataset choice. We consider a comprehensive set of indicators in this study that are important in economic analysis, and also examine the impact of dataset choice, by studying input-output networks in individual countries and the entire world. Results show that Burr, Log-Logistic, Log-normal, and Weibull distributions can better describe scaling patterns of global input-output networks. We also find that dataset choice has limited impacts on the observed scaling patterns. Our findings can help examine the quality of economic statistics, estimate missing data in economic statistics, and identify key nodes and links in input-output networks to support economic policymaking.

  15. Input/output system for multiprocessors

    SciTech Connect

    Bernick, D.L.; Chan, K.K.; Chan, W.M.; Dan, Y.F.; Hoang, D.M.; Hussain, Z.; Iswandhi, G.I.; Korpi, J.E.; Sanner, M.W.; Zwangerman, J.A.

    1989-04-11

    A device controller is described, comprising: a first port-input/output controller coupled to a first input/output channel bus; and a second port-input/output controlled coupled to a second input/output channel bus; each of the first and second port-input/output controllers having: a first ownership latch means for granting shared ownership of the device controller to a first host processor to provide a first data path on a first I/O channel through the first port I/O controller between the first host processor and any peripheral, and at least a second ownership latch means operative independently of the first ownership latch means for granting shared ownership of the device controller to a second host processor independently of the first port input/output controller to provide a second data path on a second I/O channel through the second port I/O controller between the second host processor and any peripheral devices coupled to the device controller.

  16. Input-output dynamic mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annoni, Jennifer; Jovanovic, Mihailo; Nichols, Joseph; Seiler, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this work is to obtain reduced-order models for fluid flows that can be used for control design. High-fidelity computational fluid dynamic models provide accurate characterizations of complex flow dynamics but are not suitable for control design due to their prohibitive computational complexity. A variety of methods, including proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and dynamic mode decomposition (DMD), can be used to extract the dominant flow structures and obtain reduced-order models. In this presentation, we introduce an extension to DMD that can handle problems with inputs and outputs. The proposed method, termed input-output dynamic mode decomposition (IODMD), utilizes a subspace identification technique to obtain models of low-complexity. We show that, relative to standard DMD, the introduction of the external forcing in IODMD provides robustness with respect to small disturbances and noise. We use the linearized Navier-Stokes equations in a channel flow to demonstrate the utility of the proposed approach and to provide a comparison with standard techniques for obtaining reduced-order dynamical representations. NSF Career Grant No. NSFCMMI-1254129.

  17. Input/Output Subroutine Library Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, James B.

    1988-01-01

    Efficient, easy-to-use program moved easily to different computers. Purpose of NAVIO, Input/Output Subroutine Library, provides input/output package of software for FORTRAN programs that is portable, efficient, and easy to use. Implemented as hierarchy of libraries. At bottom is very small library containing only non-portable routines called "I/O Kernel." Design makes NAVIO easy to move from one computer to another, by simply changing kernel. NAVIO appropriate for software system of almost any size wherein different programs communicate through files.

  18. An electricity-focused economic input-output model: Life-cycle assessment and policy implications of future electricity generation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriott, Joe

    The electricity industry is extremely important to both our economy and our environment. We would like to be able to examine the economic, environmental and policy implications of both future electricity scenarios which include advanced generation technologies such as gasified coal, and of the products and processes which will use them, along with the interaction of this industry with the rest of the economy. This work builds upon an existing economic input-output framework, by adding detail about the electricity industry, specifically by differentiating among the various functions of the sector, and the different means of generating power. The mix of electricity consumed at any stage in the life-cycle of a product, process or industrial sector has a significant effect on the associated inventory of emissions. Fossil fuel or nuclear generators, large-scale hydroelectric, and renewable options such as geothermal, wind and solar each have a unique set of issues---both in the production of electricity at the plant and throughout the supply chain. Decision makers need better information regarding the environmental and economic impact of the electricity industry, including full supply chain details---the interaction of the electricity industry with the other 500 sectors of the economy. A systematic method for creating updated state level and sector generation mixes is developed. The results show that most sector mixes are very close to the U.S. average due to geographic dispersion of industries, but that some sectors are different, and they tend to be important raw material extraction or primary manufacturing industries. We then build a flexible framework for creating new sectors, supply chains and emission factors for the generation, transmission and distribution portions of the electricity industry. We look at scenarios of the present and future, for electricity and for particular products, and develop results which show environmental impacts split up by generation

  19. Generalized Input-Output Inequality Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yingfan Zhang Qinghong

    2006-09-15

    In this paper two types of generalized Leontief input-output inequality systems are introduced. The minimax properties for a class of functions associated with the inequalities are studied. Sufficient and necessary conditions for the inequality systems to have solutions are obtained in terms of the minimax value. Stability analysis for the solution set is provided in terms of upper semi-continuity and hemi-continuity of set-valued maps.

  20. Input-output-controlled nonlinear equation solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    To upgrade the efficiency and stability of the successive substitution (SS) and Newton-Raphson (NR) schemes, the concept of input-output-controlled solvers (IOCS) is introduced. By employing the formal properties of the constrained version of the SS and NR schemes, the IOCS algorithm can handle indefiniteness of the system Jacobian, can maintain iterate monotonicity, and provide for separate control of load incrementation and iterate excursions, as well as having other features. To illustrate the algorithmic properties, the results for several benchmark examples are presented. These define the associated numerical efficiency and stability of the IOCS.

  1. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Input output relations for multiport ring cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2007-02-01

    Quantum input-output relations for a generic n-port ring cavity are obtained by modelling the ring as a cascade of n interlinked beam splitters. Cavity response to a beam impinging on one port is studied as a function of the beam-splitter reflectivities and the internal phase shifts. Interferometric sensitivity and stability are analysed as a function of the number of ports.

  2. General theory for multiple input-output perturbations in complex molecular systems. 1. Linear QSPR electronegativity models in physical, organic, and medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Arrasate, Sonia; Gómez-SanJuan, Asier; Sotomayor, Nuria; Lete, Esther; Besada-Porto, Lina; Ruso, Juan M

    2013-01-01

    In general perturbation methods starts with a known exact solution of a problem and add "small" variation terms in order to approach to a solution for a related problem without known exact solution. Perturbation theory has been widely used in almost all areas of science. Bhor's quantum model, Heisenberg's matrix mechanincs, Feyman diagrams, and Poincare's chaos model or "butterfly effect" in complex systems are examples of perturbation theories. On the other hand, the study of Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships (QSPR) in molecular complex systems is an ideal area for the application of perturbation theory. There are several problems with exact experimental solutions (new chemical reactions, physicochemical properties, drug activity and distribution, metabolic networks, etc.) in public databases like CHEMBL. However, in all these cases, we have an even larger list of related problems without known solutions. We need to know the change in all these properties after a perturbation of initial boundary conditions. It means, when we test large sets of similar, but different, compounds and/or chemical reactions under the slightly different conditions (temperature, time, solvents, enzymes, assays, protein targets, tissues, partition systems, organisms, etc.). However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no QSPR general-purpose perturbation theory to solve this problem. In this work, firstly we review general aspects and applications of both perturbation theory and QSPR models. Secondly, we formulate a general-purpose perturbation theory for multiple-boundary QSPR problems. Last, we develop three new QSPR-Perturbation theory models. The first model classify correctly >100,000 pairs of intra-molecular carbolithiations with 75-95% of Accuracy (Ac), Sensitivity (Sn), and Specificity (Sp). The model predicts probabilities of variations in the yield and enantiomeric excess of reactions due to at least one perturbation in boundary conditions (solvent, temperature

  3. General theory for multiple input-output perturbations in complex molecular systems. 1. Linear QSPR electronegativity models in physical, organic, and medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Arrasate, Sonia; Gómez-SanJuan, Asier; Sotomayor, Nuria; Lete, Esther; Besada-Porto, Lina; Ruso, Juan M

    2013-01-01

    In general perturbation methods starts with a known exact solution of a problem and add "small" variation terms in order to approach to a solution for a related problem without known exact solution. Perturbation theory has been widely used in almost all areas of science. Bhor's quantum model, Heisenberg's matrix mechanincs, Feyman diagrams, and Poincare's chaos model or "butterfly effect" in complex systems are examples of perturbation theories. On the other hand, the study of Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships (QSPR) in molecular complex systems is an ideal area for the application of perturbation theory. There are several problems with exact experimental solutions (new chemical reactions, physicochemical properties, drug activity and distribution, metabolic networks, etc.) in public databases like CHEMBL. However, in all these cases, we have an even larger list of related problems without known solutions. We need to know the change in all these properties after a perturbation of initial boundary conditions. It means, when we test large sets of similar, but different, compounds and/or chemical reactions under the slightly different conditions (temperature, time, solvents, enzymes, assays, protein targets, tissues, partition systems, organisms, etc.). However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no QSPR general-purpose perturbation theory to solve this problem. In this work, firstly we review general aspects and applications of both perturbation theory and QSPR models. Secondly, we formulate a general-purpose perturbation theory for multiple-boundary QSPR problems. Last, we develop three new QSPR-Perturbation theory models. The first model classify correctly >100,000 pairs of intra-molecular carbolithiations with 75-95% of Accuracy (Ac), Sensitivity (Sn), and Specificity (Sp). The model predicts probabilities of variations in the yield and enantiomeric excess of reactions due to at least one perturbation in boundary conditions (solvent, temperature

  4. Development of the complex general linear model in the Fourier domain: application to fMRI multiple input-output evoked responses for single subjects.

    PubMed

    Rio, Daniel E; Rawlings, Robert R; Woltz, Lawrence A; Gilman, Jodi; Hommer, Daniel W

    2013-01-01

    A linear time-invariant model based on statistical time series analysis in the Fourier domain for single subjects is further developed and applied to functional MRI (fMRI) blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) multivariate data. This methodology was originally developed to analyze multiple stimulus input evoked response BOLD data. However, to analyze clinical data generated using a repeated measures experimental design, the model has been extended to handle multivariate time series data and demonstrated on control and alcoholic subjects taken from data previously analyzed in the temporal domain. Analysis of BOLD data is typically carried out in the time domain where the data has a high temporal correlation. These analyses generally employ parametric models of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) where prewhitening of the data is attempted using autoregressive (AR) models for the noise. However, this data can be analyzed in the Fourier domain. Here, assumptions made on the noise structure are less restrictive, and hypothesis tests can be constructed based on voxel-specific nonparametric estimates of the hemodynamic transfer function (HRF in the Fourier domain). This is especially important for experimental designs involving multiple states (either stimulus or drug induced) that may alter the form of the response function.

  5. Input-output analysis of some sector actions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Selected energy conservation actions previously discussed in depth but separately in the areas of the energy industry, the industry sector, the transportation sector, and the residential and commercial sector, were brought together and assessed as a group. Particular emphasis was devoted to identifying secondary or indirect impacts and multiple interactions. Preliminary results obtained from the ECASTAR energy input-output model suggest that the impacts of energy conservation actions can be grossly misrepresented if secondary impacts are not included in the assessment. A methodology which stresses the importance of secondary and multiple interactions permeates the underlying philosophy of this discussion.

  6. A note on scrap in the 1992 U.S. input-output tables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swisko, George M.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction A key concern of industrial ecology and life cycle analysis is the disposal and recycling of scrap. One might conclude that the U.S. input-output tables are appropriate tools for analyzing scrap flows. Duchin, for instance, has suggested using input-output analysis for industrial ecology, indicating that input-output economics can trace the stocks and flows of energy and other materials from extraction through production and consumption to recycling or disposal. Lave and others use input-output tables to design life cycle assessment models for studying product design, materials use, and recycling strategies, even with the knowledge that these tables suffer from a lack of comprehensive and detailed data that may never be resolved. Although input-output tables can offer general guidance about the interdependence of economic and environmental processes, data reporting by industry and the economic concepts underlying these tables pose problems for rigorous material flow examinations. This is especially true for analyzing the output of scrap and scrap flows in the United States and estimating the amount of scrap that can be recycled. To show how data reporting has affected the values of scrap in recent input-output tables, this paper focuses on metal scrap generated in manufacturing. The paper also briefly discusses scrap that is not included in the input-output tables and some economic concepts that limit the analysis of scrap flows.

  7. Water resources and environmental input-output analysis and its key study issues: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YANG, Z.; Xu, X.

    2013-12-01

    Used to study the material and energy flow in socioeconomic system, Input-Output Analysis(IOA) had been an effective analysis tool since its appearance. The research fields of Input-Output Analysis were increasingly expanded and studied in depth with the development of fundamental theory. In this paper, starting with introduction of theory development, the water resources input-output analysis and environmental input-output analysis had been specifically reviewed, and two key study issues mentioned as well. Input-Occupancy-Output Analysis and Grey Input-Output Analysis whose proposal and development were introduced firstly could be regard as the effective complements of traditional IOA theory. Because of the hypotheses of homogeneity, stability and proportionality, Input-Occupancy-Output Analysis and Grey Input-Output Analysis always had been restricted in practical application inevitably. In the applied study aspect, with investigation of abundant literatures, research of water resources input-output analysis and environmental input-output analysis had been comprehensively reviewed and analyzed. The regional water resources flow between different economic sectors had been systematically analyzed and stated, and several types of environmental input-output analysis models combined with other effective analysis tools concluded. In two perspectives in terms of external and inland aspect, the development of water resources and environmental input-output analysis model had been explained, and several typical study cases in recent years listed respectively. By the aid of sufficient literature analysis, the internal development tendency and study hotspot had also been summarized. In recent years, Chinese literatures reporting water resources consumption analysis and virtue water study had occupied a large share. Water resources consumption analysis had always been the emphasis of inland water resources IOA. Virtue water study had been considered as the new hotspot of

  8. Multiple actor-critic structures for continuous-time optimal control using input-output data.

    PubMed

    Song, Ruizhuo; Lewis, Frank; Wei, Qinglai; Zhang, Hua-Guang; Jiang, Zhong-Ping; Levine, Dan

    2015-04-01

    In industrial process control, there may be multiple performance objectives, depending on salient features of the input-output data. Aiming at this situation, this paper proposes multiple actor-critic structures to obtain the optimal control via input-output data for unknown nonlinear systems. The shunting inhibitory artificial neural network (SIANN) is used to classify the input-output data into one of several categories. Different performance measure functions may be defined for disparate categories. The approximate dynamic programming algorithm, which contains model module, critic network, and action network, is used to establish the optimal control in each category. A recurrent neural network (RNN) model is used to reconstruct the unknown system dynamics using input-output data. NNs are used to approximate the critic and action networks, respectively. It is proven that the model error and the closed unknown system are uniformly ultimately bounded. Simulation results demonstrate the performance of the proposed optimal control scheme for the unknown nonlinear system.

  9. Input-output identification of controlled discrete manufacturing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada-Vargas, Ana Paula; López-Mellado, Ernesto; Lesage, Jean-Jacques

    2014-03-01

    The automated construction of discrete event models from observations of external system's behaviour is addressed. This problem, often referred to as system identification, allows obtaining models of ill-known (or even unknown) systems. In this article, an identification method for discrete event systems (DESs) controlled by a programmable logic controller is presented. The method allows processing a large quantity of observed long sequences of input/output signals generated by the controller and yields an interpreted Petri net model describing the closed-loop behaviour of the automated DESs. The proposed technique allows the identification of actual complex systems because it is sufficiently efficient and well adapted to cope with both the technological characteristics of industrial controllers and data collection requirements. Based on polynomial-time algorithms, the method is implemented as an efficient software tool which constructs and draws the model automatically; an overview of this tool is given through a case study dealing with an automated manufacturing system.

  10. Input/output behavior of supercomputing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Ethan L.

    1991-01-01

    The collection and analysis of supercomputer I/O traces and their use in a collection of buffering and caching simulations are described. This serves two purposes. First, it gives a model of how individual applications running on supercomputers request file system I/O, allowing system designer to optimize I/O hardware and file system algorithms to that model. Second, the buffering simulations show what resources are needed to maximize the CPU utilization of a supercomputer given a very bursty I/O request rate. By using read-ahead and write-behind in a large solid stated disk, one or two applications were sufficient to fully utilize a Cray Y-MP CPU.

  11. Detection of decoupled input/output pairs in multivariable systems.

    PubMed

    Potts, Alain Segundo; Massaro, Leandro Cuenca; Garcia, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    A method is proposed to detect if there is no coupling between an input and an output in systems operating in open-loop, that is, without a supervisory controller. The proposed technique is applicable to multiple input multiple output (MIMO) systems, whose intent is to detect no-model input/output (IO) combinations in a transfer matrix. Traditional approaches for selecting IO pairs are usually performed after the plant model is identified. The presented approach is applied during the pre-identification stage and is based on IO cross-correlation, signal filtering and fuzzy logic analysis. A case study involving the identification of a 7×6 simulated Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) is discussed, as well as an influence analysis of detecting no-model IO pairs in the identification process and in the performance index of a Model Predictive Controller (MPC) applied to a 2×2 simulated distillation column. Finally, the method is tested with a real dataset obtained from an FCC unit of a petrol refinery.

  12. Input-output characterization of fiber composites by SH waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renneisen, John D.; Williams, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Input-output characterization of fiber composites is studied theoretically by tracing SH waves in the media. A fiberglass epoxy composite is modeled as a homogeneous transversely isotropic continuum plate. The reflection of an SH wave at a stress-free plane boundary in a semi-infinite transversely isotropic medium is considered first. It is found that an incident SH wave reflects only a similar SH wave back into the medium. It is also established that the angle of reflection of the reflected wave is equal to the angle of incidence of the incident wave. The phase velocity of the SH waves and the delay time of the SH waves in reaching the receiving transducer are computed as functions of a reflection index, defined as the number of reflections of the SH waves from the bottom face of the continuum plate. The directivity function corresponding to the shear stress associated with the SH waves in the continuum plate is also derived as a function of the reflection index. A theoretical output voltage from the receiving transducer is calculated for a tone burst (a periodic input voltage of finite duration). The output voltage is shown for tone bursts of duration 60 microseconds and center frequencies of 0.75, 1.00, and 1.25 MHz. The study enhances the quantitative and qualitative understanding of the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of fiber composites which can be modeled as transversely isotropic media.

  13. Linearisation via input-output injection of time delay systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ramírez, Eduardo; Moog, Claude H.; Califano, Claudia; Alejandro Márquez-Martínez, Luis

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the problem of linearisation of systems with constant commensurable delays by input-output injection using algebraic control tools based on the theory of non-commutative rings. Solutions for the problem of linearisation free of delays, and with delays of an observable nonlinear time-delay systems are presented based on the analysis of the input-output equation. These results are achieved by means of constructive algorithms that use the nth derivative of the output expressed in terms of the state-space variables instead of the explicit computation of the input-output representation of the system. Necessary and sufficient conditions are established in both cases by means of an invertible change of coordinates.

  14. Programming input-output operations in FORTRAN on magnetic tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorokov, V. N.

    1980-01-01

    The subprogram MTCFF was designed for carrying out input-output operations in FORTRAN on magnetic tape within the framework of the DOS ES EVM operation system. It is possible, by means of this subprogram, to perform any input-output operations of interest to the programmer such as recording and reading various control operations in the direct and reverse directions, even though for these purposes the facilities of the language FORTRAN itself are limited. The subprogram can also be used in programs written in other programming languages.

  15. Multiple input/output random vibration control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unruh, James F.

    1988-01-01

    A multi-input/output random vibration control algorithm was developed based on system identification concepts derived from random vibration spectral analysis theory. The unique features of the algorithm are: (1) the number of input excitors and the number of output control responses need not be identical; (2) the system inverse response matrix is obtained directly from the input/output spectral matrix; and (3) the system inverse response matrix is updated every control loop cycle to accommodate system amplitude nonlinearities. A laboratory demonstration case of two imputs with three outputs is presented to demonstrate the system capabilities.

  16. The realization of input-output maps using bialgebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Robert; Larson, Richard G.

    1989-01-01

    The theory of bialgebras is used to prove a state space realization theorem for input/output maps of dynamical systems. This approach allows for the consideration of the classical results of Fliess and more recent results on realizations involving families of trees. Two examples of applications of the theorum are given.

  17. Multiple actor-critic structures for continuous-time optimal control using input-output data.

    PubMed

    Song, Ruizhuo; Lewis, Frank; Wei, Qinglai; Zhang, Hua-Guang; Jiang, Zhong-Ping; Levine, Dan

    2015-04-01

    In industrial process control, there may be multiple performance objectives, depending on salient features of the input-output data. Aiming at this situation, this paper proposes multiple actor-critic structures to obtain the optimal control via input-output data for unknown nonlinear systems. The shunting inhibitory artificial neural network (SIANN) is used to classify the input-output data into one of several categories. Different performance measure functions may be defined for disparate categories. The approximate dynamic programming algorithm, which contains model module, critic network, and action network, is used to establish the optimal control in each category. A recurrent neural network (RNN) model is used to reconstruct the unknown system dynamics using input-output data. NNs are used to approximate the critic and action networks, respectively. It is proven that the model error and the closed unknown system are uniformly ultimately bounded. Simulation results demonstrate the performance of the proposed optimal control scheme for the unknown nonlinear system. PMID:25730830

  18. Advanced information processing system: Input/output network management software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagle, Gail; Alger, Linda; Kemp, Alexander

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the software requirements and specifications for the Input/Output Network Management Services for the Advanced Information Processing System. This introduction and overview section is provided to briefly outline the overall architecture and software requirements of the AIPS system before discussing the details of the design requirements and specifications of the AIPS I/O Network Management software. A brief overview of the AIPS architecture followed by a more detailed description of the network architecture.

  19. Input-output stability for accelerometer control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Morris, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that, although accelerometer control systems are not well-posed in the sense of Salamon, a well-defined input-output relation exists. It is established that the output of an accelerometer control system can be described by the convolution of the input and a distribution. This distribution is Laplace transformable, and the Laplace transform of the distribution is the transfer function of the system.

  20. Non-linear Membrane Properties in Entorhinal Cortical Stellate Cells Reduce Modulation of Input-Output Responses by Voltage Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Fernando R.; Malerba, Paola; White, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of voltage fluctuations arising from synaptic activity is a critical component in models of gain control, neuronal output gating, and spike rate coding. The degree to which individual neuronal input-output functions are modulated by voltage fluctuations, however, is not well established across different cortical areas. Additionally, the extent and mechanisms of input-output modulation through fluctuations have been explored largely in simplified models of spike generation, and with limited consideration for the role of non-linear and voltage-dependent membrane properties. To address these issues, we studied fluctuation-based modulation of input-output responses in medial entorhinal cortical (MEC) stellate cells of rats, which express strong sub-threshold non-linear membrane properties. Using in vitro recordings, dynamic clamp and modeling, we show that the modulation of input-output responses by random voltage fluctuations in stellate cells is significantly limited. In stellate cells, a voltage-dependent increase in membrane resistance at sub-threshold voltages mediated by Na+ conductance activation limits the ability of fluctuations to elicit spikes. Similarly, in exponential leaky integrate-and-fire models using a shallow voltage-dependence for the exponential term that matches stellate cell membrane properties, a low degree of fluctuation-based modulation of input-output responses can be attained. These results demonstrate that fluctuation-based modulation of input-output responses is not a universal feature of neurons and can be significantly limited by subthreshold voltage-gated conductances. PMID:25909971

  1. Non-linear Membrane Properties in Entorhinal Cortical Stellate Cells Reduce Modulation of Input-Output Responses by Voltage Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Fernando R; Malerba, Paola; White, John A

    2015-04-01

    The presence of voltage fluctuations arising from synaptic activity is a critical component in models of gain control, neuronal output gating, and spike rate coding. The degree to which individual neuronal input-output functions are modulated by voltage fluctuations, however, is not well established across different cortical areas. Additionally, the extent and mechanisms of input-output modulation through fluctuations have been explored largely in simplified models of spike generation, and with limited consideration for the role of non-linear and voltage-dependent membrane properties. To address these issues, we studied fluctuation-based modulation of input-output responses in medial entorhinal cortical (MEC) stellate cells of rats, which express strong sub-threshold non-linear membrane properties. Using in vitro recordings, dynamic clamp and modeling, we show that the modulation of input-output responses by random voltage fluctuations in stellate cells is significantly limited. In stellate cells, a voltage-dependent increase in membrane resistance at sub-threshold voltages mediated by Na+ conductance activation limits the ability of fluctuations to elicit spikes. Similarly, in exponential leaky integrate-and-fire models using a shallow voltage-dependence for the exponential term that matches stellate cell membrane properties, a low degree of fluctuation-based modulation of input-output responses can be attained. These results demonstrate that fluctuation-based modulation of input-output responses is not a universal feature of neurons and can be significantly limited by subthreshold voltage-gated conductances.

  2. Optimizing Input/Output Using Adaptive File System Policies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhyastha, Tara M.; Elford, Christopher L.; Reed, Daniel A.

    1996-01-01

    Parallel input/output characterization studies and experiments with flexible resource management algorithms indicate that adaptivity is crucial to file system performance. In this paper we propose an automatic technique for selecting and refining file system policies based on application access patterns and execution environment. An automatic classification framework allows the file system to select appropriate caching and pre-fetching policies, while performance sensors provide feedback used to tune policy parameters for specific system environments. To illustrate the potential performance improvements possible using adaptive file system policies, we present results from experiments involving classification-based and performance-based steering.

  3. Effects of synaptic synchrony on the neuronal input-output relationship.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoshen; Ascoli, Giorgio A

    2008-07-01

    The firing rate of individual neurons depends on the firing frequency of their distributed synaptic inputs, with linear and nonlinear relations subserving different computational functions. This letter explores the relationship between the degree of synchrony among excitatory synapses and the linearity of the response using detailed compartmental models of cortical pyramidal cells. Synchronous input resulted in a linear input-output relationship, while asynchronous stimulation yielded sub- and supraproportional outputs at low and high frequencies, respectively. The dependence of input-output linearity on synchrony was sigmoidal and considerably robust with respect to dendritic location, stimulus irregularity, and alteration of active and synaptic properties. Moreover, synchrony affected firing rate differently at lower and higher input frequencies. A reduced integrate-and-fire model suggested a mechanism explaining these results based on spatiotemporal integration, with fundamental implications relating synchrony to memory encoding. PMID:18254692

  4. Input-output characterization of fiber reinforced composites by P waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renneisen, John D.; Williams, James H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Input-output characterization of fiber composites is studied theoretically by tracing P waves in the media. A new path motion to aid in the tracing of P and the reflection generated SV wave paths in the continuum plate is developed. A theoretical output voltage from the receiving transducer is calculated for a tone burst. The study enhances the quantitative and qualitative understanding of the nondestructive evaluation of fiber composites which can be modeled as transversely isotropic media.

  5. Input-output description of linear systems with multiple time-scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madriz, R. S.; Sastry, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that the study of systems evolving at multiple time-scales is simplified by studying reduced-order models of these systems valid at specific time-scales. The present investigation is concerned with an extension of results on the time-scale decomposition of autonomous systems to that of input-output systems. The results are employed to study conditions under which positive realness of a transfer function is preserved under singular perturbation. Attention is given to the perturbation theory for linear operators, the multiple time-scale structure of autonomous linear systems, the input-output description of two time-scale linear systems, the positive realness of two time-scale systems, and multiple time-scale linear systems.

  6. Using Economic Input/Output Tables to Predict a Country’s Nuclear Status

    SciTech Connect

    Weimar, Mark R.; Daly, Don S.; Wood, Thomas W.

    2010-07-15

    Both nuclear power and nuclear weapons programs should have (related) economic signatures which are detectible at some scale. We evaluated this premise in a series of studies using national economic input/output (IO) data. Statistical discrimination models using economic IO tables predict with a high probability whether a country with an unknown predilection for nuclear weapons proliferation is in fact engaged in nuclear power development or nuclear weapons proliferation. We analyzed 93 IO tables, spanning the years 1993 to 2005 for 37 countries that are either members or associates of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The 2009 OECD input/output tables featured 48 industrial sectors based on International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC) Revision 3, and described the respective economies in current country-of-origin valued currency. We converted and transformed these reported values to US 2005 dollars using appropriate exchange rates and implicit price deflators, and addressed discrepancies in reported industrial sectors across tables. We then classified countries with Random Forest using either the adjusted or industry-normalized values. Random Forest, a classification tree technique, separates and categorizes countries using a very small, select subset of the 2304 individual cells in the IO table. A nation’s efforts in nuclear power, be it for electricity or nuclear weapons, are an enterprise with a large economic footprint -- an effort so large that it should discernibly perturb coarse country-level economics data such as that found in yearly input-output economic tables. The neoclassical economic input-output model describes a country’s or region’s economy in terms of the requirements of industries to produce the current level of economic output. An IO table row shows the distribution of an industry’s output to the industrial sectors while a table column shows the input required of each industrial sector by a

  7. General-Purpose Data-Formatting Input/Output System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busquets, Anthony M.; Hogge, Thomas W.

    1990-01-01

    Multiplexable input/output (I/O) system developed as interface between host computer and real-time, fixed-base simulator cockpit. Unit designed to be general-purpose interface and operated through virtually any 8- or 16-bit, transistor/transistor-logic-level, parallel-I/O port with or without handshaking. Accepts byte-coded data in form of data blocks from host computer and routes data to various system I/O modules like discrete outputs, lamp drivers, and seven-segment-display drivers. Formats and routes data from input modules back to host computer. Other modules designed to drive alphanumeric displays and communications interfaces and to serve as analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converter modules.

  8. Advanced information processing system: Input/output system services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masotto, Tom; Alger, Linda

    1989-01-01

    The functional requirements and detailed specifications for the Input/Output (I/O) Systems Services of the Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) are discussed. The introductory section is provided to outline the overall architecture and functional requirements of the AIPS system. Section 1.1 gives a brief overview of the AIPS architecture as well as a detailed description of the AIPS fault tolerant network architecture, while section 1.2 provides an introduction to the AIPS systems software. Sections 2 and 3 describe the functional requirements and design and detailed specifications of the I/O User Interface and Communications Management modules of the I/O System Services, respectively. Section 4 illustrates the use of the I/O System Services, while Section 5 concludes with a summary of results and suggestions for future work in this area.

  9. Propagation of economic shocks in input-output networks: A cross-country analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Martha G. Alatriste; Fagiolo, Giorgio

    2014-12-01

    This paper investigates how economic shocks propagate and amplify through the input-output network connecting industrial sectors in developed economies. We study alternative models of diffusion on networks and we calibrate them using input-output data on real-world inter-sectoral dependencies for several European countries before the Great Depression. We show that the impact of economic shocks strongly depends on the nature of the shock and country size. Shocks that impact on final demand without changing production and the technological relationships between sectors have on average a large but very homogeneous impact on the economy. Conversely, when shocks change also the magnitudes of input-output across-sector interdependencies (and possibly sector production), the economy is subject to predominantly large but more heterogeneous avalanche sizes. In this case, we also find that (i) the more a sector is globally central in the country network, the larger its impact; (ii) the largest European countries, such as those constituting the core of the European Union's economy, typically experience the largest avalanches, signaling their intrinsic higher vulnerability to economic shocks.

  10. Propagation of economic shocks in input-output networks: a cross-country analysis.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Martha G Alatriste; Fagiolo, Giorgio

    2014-12-01

    This paper investigates how economic shocks propagate and amplify through the input-output network connecting industrial sectors in developed economies. We study alternative models of diffusion on networks and we calibrate them using input-output data on real-world inter-sectoral dependencies for several European countries before the Great Depression. We show that the impact of economic shocks strongly depends on the nature of the shock and country size. Shocks that impact on final demand without changing production and the technological relationships between sectors have on average a large but very homogeneous impact on the economy. Conversely, when shocks change also the magnitudes of input-output across-sector interdependencies (and possibly sector production), the economy is subject to predominantly large but more heterogeneous avalanche sizes. In this case, we also find that (i) the more a sector is globally central in the country network, the larger its impact; (ii) the largest European countries, such as those constituting the core of the European Union's economy, typically experience the largest avalanches, signaling their intrinsic higher vulnerability to economic shocks. PMID:25615153

  11. Propagation of economic shocks in input-output networks: a cross-country analysis.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Martha G Alatriste; Fagiolo, Giorgio

    2014-12-01

    This paper investigates how economic shocks propagate and amplify through the input-output network connecting industrial sectors in developed economies. We study alternative models of diffusion on networks and we calibrate them using input-output data on real-world inter-sectoral dependencies for several European countries before the Great Depression. We show that the impact of economic shocks strongly depends on the nature of the shock and country size. Shocks that impact on final demand without changing production and the technological relationships between sectors have on average a large but very homogeneous impact on the economy. Conversely, when shocks change also the magnitudes of input-output across-sector interdependencies (and possibly sector production), the economy is subject to predominantly large but more heterogeneous avalanche sizes. In this case, we also find that (i) the more a sector is globally central in the country network, the larger its impact; (ii) the largest European countries, such as those constituting the core of the European Union's economy, typically experience the largest avalanches, signaling their intrinsic higher vulnerability to economic shocks.

  12. Fast metabolite identification with Input Output Kernel Regression

    PubMed Central

    Brouard, Céline; Shen, Huibin; Dührkop, Kai; d'Alché-Buc, Florence; Böcker, Sebastian; Rousu, Juho

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: An important problematic of metabolomics is to identify metabolites using tandem mass spectrometry data. Machine learning methods have been proposed recently to solve this problem by predicting molecular fingerprint vectors and matching these fingerprints against existing molecular structure databases. In this work we propose to address the metabolite identification problem using a structured output prediction approach. This type of approach is not limited to vector output space and can handle structured output space such as the molecule space. Results: We use the Input Output Kernel Regression method to learn the mapping between tandem mass spectra and molecular structures. The principle of this method is to encode the similarities in the input (spectra) space and the similarities in the output (molecule) space using two kernel functions. This method approximates the spectra-molecule mapping in two phases. The first phase corresponds to a regression problem from the input space to the feature space associated to the output kernel. The second phase is a preimage problem, consisting in mapping back the predicted output feature vectors to the molecule space. We show that our approach achieves state-of-the-art accuracy in metabolite identification. Moreover, our method has the advantage of decreasing the running times for the training step and the test step by several orders of magnitude over the preceding methods. Availability and implementation: Contact: celine.brouard@aalto.fi Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307628

  13. Fluctuation-dissipation theory of input-output interindustrial relations.

    PubMed

    Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Yasuhiro; Aoyama, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Yoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Souma, Wataru

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the fluctuation-dissipation theory is invoked to shed light on input-output interindustrial relations at a macroscopic level by its application to indices of industrial production (IIP) data for Japan. Statistical noise arising from finiteness of the time series data is carefully removed by making use of the random matrix theory in an eigenvalue analysis of the correlation matrix; as a result, two dominant eigenmodes are detected. Our previous study successfully used these two modes to demonstrate the existence of intrinsic business cycles. Here a correlation matrix constructed from the two modes describes genuine interindustrial correlations in a statistically meaningful way. Furthermore, it enables us to quantitatively discuss the relationship between shipments of final demand goods and production of intermediate goods in a linear response framework. We also investigate distinctive external stimuli for the Japanese economy exerted by the current global economic crisis. These stimuli are derived from residuals of moving-average fluctuations of the IIP remaining after subtracting the long-period components arising from inherent business cycles. The observation reveals that the fluctuation-dissipation theory is applicable to an economic system that is supposed to be far from physical equilibrium.

  14. Fluctuation-dissipation theory of input-output interindustrial relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Yasuhiro; Aoyama, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Yoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Souma, Wataru

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the fluctuation-dissipation theory is invoked to shed light on input-output interindustrial relations at a macroscopic level by its application to indices of industrial production (IIP) data for Japan. Statistical noise arising from finiteness of the time series data is carefully removed by making use of the random matrix theory in an eigenvalue analysis of the correlation matrix; as a result, two dominant eigenmodes are detected. Our previous study successfully used these two modes to demonstrate the existence of intrinsic business cycles. Here a correlation matrix constructed from the two modes describes genuine interindustrial correlations in a statistically meaningful way. Furthermore, it enables us to quantitatively discuss the relationship between shipments of final demand goods and production of intermediate goods in a linear response framework. We also investigate distinctive external stimuli for the Japanese economy exerted by the current global economic crisis. These stimuli are derived from residuals of moving-average fluctuations of the IIP remaining after subtracting the long-period components arising from inherent business cycles. The observation reveals that the fluctuation-dissipation theory is applicable to an economic system that is supposed to be far from physical equilibrium.

  15. Engineering input/output nodes in prokaryotic regulatory circuits.

    PubMed

    de Las Heras, Aitor; Carreño, Carlos A; Martínez-García, Esteban; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2010-09-01

    A large number of prokaryotic regulatory elements have been interfaced artificially with biological circuits that execute specific expression programs. Engineering such circuits involves the association of input/output components that perform discrete signal-transfer steps in an autonomous fashion while connected to the rest of the network with a defined topology. Each of these nodes includes a signal-recognition component for the detection of the relevant physicochemical or biological stimulus, a molecular device able to translate the signal-sensing event into a defined output and a genetic module capable of understanding such an output as an input for the next component of the circuit. The final outcome of the process can be recorded by means of a reporter product. This review addresses three such aspects of forward engineering of signal-responding genetic parts. We first recap natural and non-natural regulatory assets for designing gene expression in response to predetermined signals - chemical or otherwise. These include transcriptional regulators developed by in vitro evolution (or designed from scratch), and synthetic riboswitches derived from in vitro selection of aptamers. Then we examine recent progress on reporter genes, whose expression allows the quantification and parametrization of signal-responding circuits in their entirety. Finally, we critically examine recent work on other reporters that confer bacteria with gross organoleptic properties (e.g. distinct odour) and the interfacing of signal-sensing devices with determinants of community behaviour.

  16. Engineering input/output nodes in prokaryotic regulatory circuits.

    PubMed

    de Las Heras, Aitor; Carreño, Carlos A; Martínez-García, Esteban; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2010-09-01

    A large number of prokaryotic regulatory elements have been interfaced artificially with biological circuits that execute specific expression programs. Engineering such circuits involves the association of input/output components that perform discrete signal-transfer steps in an autonomous fashion while connected to the rest of the network with a defined topology. Each of these nodes includes a signal-recognition component for the detection of the relevant physicochemical or biological stimulus, a molecular device able to translate the signal-sensing event into a defined output and a genetic module capable of understanding such an output as an input for the next component of the circuit. The final outcome of the process can be recorded by means of a reporter product. This review addresses three such aspects of forward engineering of signal-responding genetic parts. We first recap natural and non-natural regulatory assets for designing gene expression in response to predetermined signals - chemical or otherwise. These include transcriptional regulators developed by in vitro evolution (or designed from scratch), and synthetic riboswitches derived from in vitro selection of aptamers. Then we examine recent progress on reporter genes, whose expression allows the quantification and parametrization of signal-responding circuits in their entirety. Finally, we critically examine recent work on other reporters that confer bacteria with gross organoleptic properties (e.g. distinct odour) and the interfacing of signal-sensing devices with determinants of community behaviour. PMID:20618867

  17. Flexible Peripheral Component Interconnect Input/Output Card

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Kirk K.; Jerry, Albert L.; Baricio, Alisha G.; Cummings, Jon K.

    2010-01-01

    The Flexible Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) Input/Output (I/O) Card is an innovative circuit board that provides functionality to interface between a variety of devices. It supports user-defined interrupts for interface synchronization, tracks system faults and failures, and includes checksum and parity evaluation of interface data. The card supports up to 16 channels of high-speed, half-duplex, low-voltage digital signaling (LVDS) serial data, and can interface combinations of serial and parallel devices. Placement of a processor within the field programmable gate array (FPGA) controls an embedded application with links to host memory over its PCI bus. The FPGA also provides protocol stacking and quick digital signal processor (DSP) functions to improve host performance. Hardware timers, counters, state machines, and other glue logic support interface communications. The Flexible PCI I/O Card provides an interface for a variety of dissimilar computer systems, featuring direct memory access functionality. The card has the following attributes: 8/16/32-bit, 33-MHz PCI r2.2 compliance, Configurable for universal 3.3V/5V interface slots, PCI interface based on PLX Technology's PCI9056 ASIC, General-use 512K 16 SDRAM memory, General-use 1M 16 Flash memory, FPGA with 3K to 56K logical cells with embedded 27K to 198K bits RAM, I/O interface: 32-channel LVDS differential transceivers configured in eight, 4-bit banks; signaling rates to 200 MHz per channel, Common SCSI-3, 68-pin interface connector.

  18. Acousto-ultrasonic input-output characterization of unidirectional fiber composite plate by SH waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, James H., Jr.; Liao, Peter

    1987-01-01

    A unidirectional fiberglass epoxy composite plate specimen is modelled as a homogeneous transversely isotropic continuum plate medium. Acousto-ultrasonic non-contact input-output characterization by tracing SH waves in the continuum is studied theoretically with a transmitting and receiving transducer located on the same face of the plate. It is found that the directional dependence of the phase velocity of the SH waves travelling in the transversely isotropic medium has a significant effect on the delay time as opposed to the phase velocity of the SH wave travelling in an isotropic medium.

  19. The Role of Agriculture in the Economic Development of West Virginia: An Input-Output Analysis. Miscellaneous Publication No. 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Souza, Gerard E.; And Others

    This study deals with the structural interrelationships among agricultural sub-sectors, and between the agricultural and non-agricultural sectors of the West Virginia economy. The study is intended to offer information on which to base sound economic development decisions. An input-output economic model is used in order to focus on the interaction…

  20. High Performance Input/Output Systems for High Performance Computing and Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Geoffrey C.; Ou, Chao-Wei

    1997-01-01

    The approach of this task was to apply leading parallel computing research to a number of existing techniques for assimilation, and extract parameters indicating where and how input/output limits computational performance. The following was used for detailed knowledge of the application problems: 1. Developing a parallel input/output system specifically for this application 2. Extracting the important input/output characteristics of data assimilation problems; and 3. Building these characteristics s parameters into our runtime library (Fortran D/High Performance Fortran) for parallel input/output support.

  1. Input-output characterization of an ultrasonic testing system by digital signal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karaguelle, H.; Lee, S. S.; Williams, J., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The input/output characteristics of an ultrasonic testing system used for stress wave factor measurements were studied. The fundamentals of digital signal processing are summarized. The inputs and outputs are digitized and processed in a microcomputer using digital signal processing techniques. The entire ultrasonic test system, including transducers and all electronic components, is modeled as a discrete-time linear shift-invariant system. Then the impulse response and frequency response of the continuous time ultrasonic test system are estimated by interpolating the defining points in the unit sample response and frequency response of the discrete time system. It is found that the ultrasonic test system behaves as a linear phase bandpass filter. Good results were obtained for rectangular pulse inputs of various amplitudes and durations and for tone burst inputs whose center frequencies are within the passband of the test system and for single cycle inputs of various amplitudes. The input/output limits on the linearity of the system are determined.

  2. Input-output relation and energy efficiency in the neuron with different spike threshold dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Tsang, Kai-Ming; Wei, Xi-Le; Deng, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Neuron encodes and transmits information through generating sequences of output spikes, which is a high energy-consuming process. The spike is initiated when membrane depolarization reaches a threshold voltage. In many neurons, threshold is dynamic and depends on the rate of membrane depolarization (dV/dt) preceding a spike. Identifying the metabolic energy involved in neural coding and their relationship to threshold dynamic is critical to understanding neuronal function and evolution. Here, we use a modified Morris-Lecar model to investigate neuronal input-output property and energy efficiency associated with different spike threshold dynamics. We find that the neurons with dynamic threshold sensitive to dV/dt generate discontinuous frequency-current curve and type II phase response curve (PRC) through Hopf bifurcation, and weak noise could prohibit spiking when bifurcation just occurs. The threshold that is insensitive to dV/dt, instead, results in a continuous frequency-current curve, a type I PRC and a saddle-node on invariant circle bifurcation, and simultaneously weak noise cannot inhibit spiking. It is also shown that the bifurcation, frequency-current curve and PRC type associated with different threshold dynamics arise from the distinct subthreshold interactions of membrane currents. Further, we observe that the energy consumption of the neuron is related to its firing characteristics. The depolarization of spike threshold improves neuronal energy efficiency by reducing the overlap of Na+ and K+ currents during an action potential. The high energy efficiency is achieved at more depolarized spike threshold and high stimulus current. These results provide a fundamental biophysical connection that links spike threshold dynamics, input-output relation, energetics and spike initiation, which could contribute to uncover neural encoding mechanism. PMID:26074810

  3. Input-output relation and energy efficiency in the neuron with different spike threshold dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Tsang, Kai-Ming; Wei, Xi-Le; Deng, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Neuron encodes and transmits information through generating sequences of output spikes, which is a high energy-consuming process. The spike is initiated when membrane depolarization reaches a threshold voltage. In many neurons, threshold is dynamic and depends on the rate of membrane depolarization (dV/dt) preceding a spike. Identifying the metabolic energy involved in neural coding and their relationship to threshold dynamic is critical to understanding neuronal function and evolution. Here, we use a modified Morris-Lecar model to investigate neuronal input-output property and energy efficiency associated with different spike threshold dynamics. We find that the neurons with dynamic threshold sensitive to dV/dt generate discontinuous frequency-current curve and type II phase response curve (PRC) through Hopf bifurcation, and weak noise could prohibit spiking when bifurcation just occurs. The threshold that is insensitive to dV/dt, instead, results in a continuous frequency-current curve, a type I PRC and a saddle-node on invariant circle bifurcation, and simultaneously weak noise cannot inhibit spiking. It is also shown that the bifurcation, frequency-current curve and PRC type associated with different threshold dynamics arise from the distinct subthreshold interactions of membrane currents. Further, we observe that the energy consumption of the neuron is related to its firing characteristics. The depolarization of spike threshold improves neuronal energy efficiency by reducing the overlap of Na(+) and K(+) currents during an action potential. The high energy efficiency is achieved at more depolarized spike threshold and high stimulus current. These results provide a fundamental biophysical connection that links spike threshold dynamics, input-output relation, energetics and spike initiation, which could contribute to uncover neural encoding mechanism.

  4. Understanding virtual water flows: A multiregion input-output case study of Victoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenzen, Manfred

    2009-09-01

    This article explains and interprets virtual water flows from the well-established perspective of input-output analysis. Using a case study of the Australian state of Victoria, it demonstrates that input-output analysis can enumerate virtual water flows without systematic and unknown truncation errors, an issue which has been largely absent from the virtual water literature. Whereas a simplified flow analysis from a producer perspective would portray Victoria as a net virtual water importer, enumerating the water embodiments across the full supply chain using input-output analysis shows Victoria as a significant net virtual water exporter. This study has succeeded in informing government policy in Australia, which is an encouraging sign that input-output analysis will be able to contribute much value to other national and international applications.

  5. Distributed input/output processing in data-driven multiprocessors

    SciTech Connect

    Evripidou, P.; Gaudiot, J.L.

    1992-12-31

    Data-flow principles of execution provide an elegant way to ensure at runtime that instructions can be executed asynchronously in a parallel environment. However, while the conventional von Neumann model of interpretation has a very rigid ordering of instructions, it is the very asynchronous character of the dataflow model of execution that introduces conflicts when ``state`` tasks (such as I/O operations) must share common data objects. In order to execute I/O operations safely and in parallel, an algorithm to detect and classify cases of potential conflicts (hazards) has been developed; it is described in this paper. It is based upon localizing the effect of I/O operations by splitting the data-flow graph into two subgraphs: (a) the computation subgraph, and (b) the I/O subgraph. The scheme presented in this paper thus enables the creation and interaction of both subgraphs, which in turn yields a deterministic execution. Furthermore, the proposed scheme enables the distributed execution of I/O operations as permitted by data dependencies.

  6. Nonlinear control via approximate input-output linearization - The ball and beam example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, John; Sastry, Shankar; Kokotovic, Petar

    1992-01-01

    A study is made of approximate input-output linearization of nonlinear systems which fail to have a well defined relative degree. For such systems, a method is provided for constructing approximate systems that are input-output linearizable. The analysis presented in this note is motivated through its application to a common undergraduate control laboratory experiment, the ball and beam system, where it is shown to be more effective for trajectory tracking than the standard Jacobian linearization.

  7. High Performance Input/Output for Parallel Computer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligon, W. B.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of our project is to study the I/O characteristics of parallel applications used in Earth Science data processing systems such as Regional Data Centers (RDCs) or EOSDIS. Our approach is to study the runtime behavior of typical programs and the effect of key parameters of the I/O subsystem both under simulation and with direct experimentation on parallel systems. Our three year activity has focused on two items: developing a test bed that facilitates experimentation with parallel I/O, and studying representative programs from the Earth science data processing application domain. The Parallel Virtual File System (PVFS) has been developed for use on a number of platforms including the Tiger Parallel Architecture Workbench (TPAW) simulator, The Intel Paragon, a cluster of DEC Alpha workstations, and the Beowulf system (at CESDIS). PVFS provides considerable flexibility in configuring I/O in a UNIX- like environment. Access to key performance parameters facilitates experimentation. We have studied several key applications fiom levels 1,2 and 3 of the typical RDC processing scenario including instrument calibration and navigation, image classification, and numerical modeling codes. We have also considered large-scale scientific database codes used to organize image data.

  8. Input-output relations in biological systems: measurement, information and the Hill equation.

    PubMed

    Frank, Steven A

    2013-01-01

    Biological systems produce outputs in response to variable inputs. Input-output relations tend to follow a few regular patterns. For example, many chemical processes follow the S-shaped Hill equation relation between input concentrations and output concentrations. That Hill equation pattern contradicts the fundamental Michaelis-Menten theory of enzyme kinetics. I use the discrepancy between the expected Michaelis-Menten process of enzyme kinetics and the widely observed Hill equation pattern of biological systems to explore the general properties of biological input-output relations. I start with the various processes that could explain the discrepancy between basic chemistry and biological pattern. I then expand the analysis to consider broader aspects that shape biological input-output relations. Key aspects include the input-output processing by component subsystems and how those components combine to determine the system's overall input-output relations. That aggregate structure often imposes strong regularity on underlying disorder. Aggregation imposes order by dissipating information as it flows through the components of a system. The dissipation of information may be evaluated by the analysis of measurement and precision, explaining why certain common scaling patterns arise so frequently in input-output relations. I discuss how aggregation, measurement and scale provide a framework for understanding the relations between pattern and process. The regularity imposed by those broader structural aspects sets the contours of variation in biology. Thus, biological design will also tend to follow those contours. Natural selection may act primarily to modulate system properties within those broad constraints.

  9. Variance estimation of modal parameters from output-only and input/output subspace-based system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellinger, Philippe; Döhler, Michael; Mevel, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    An important step in the operational modal analysis of a structure is to infer on its dynamic behavior through its modal parameters. They can be estimated by various modal identification algorithms that fit a theoretical model to measured data. When output-only data is available, i.e. measured responses of the structure, frequencies, damping ratios and mode shapes can be identified assuming that ambient sources like wind or traffic excite the system sufficiently. When also input data is available, i.e. signals used to excite the structure, input/output identification algorithms are used. The use of input information usually provides better modal estimates in a desired frequency range. While the identification of the modal mass is not considered in this paper, we focus on the estimation of the frequencies, damping ratios and mode shapes, relevant for example for modal analysis during in-flight monitoring of aircrafts. When identifying the modal parameters from noisy measurement data, the information on their uncertainty is most relevant. In this paper, new variance computation schemes for modal parameters are developed for four subspace algorithms, including output-only and input/output methods, as well as data-driven and covariance-driven methods. For the input/output methods, the known inputs are considered as realizations of a stochastic process. Based on Monte Carlo validations, the quality of identification, accuracy of variance estimations and sensor noise robustness are discussed. Finally these algorithms are applied on real measured data obtained during vibrations tests of an aircraft.

  10. Accounting for the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen in input-output life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Bakshi, Bhavik R

    2013-08-20

    Nitrogen is indispensable for sustaining human activities through its role in the production of food, animal feed, and synthetic chemicals. This has encouraged significant anthropogenic mobilization of reactive nitrogen and its emissions into the environment resulting in severe disruption of the nitrogen cycle. This paper incorporates the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen into the 2002 input-output model of the U.S. economy. Due to the complexity of this cycle, this work proposes a unique classification of nitrogen flows to facilitate understanding of the interaction between economic activities and various flows in the nitrogen cycle. The classification scheme distinguishes between the mobilization of inert nitrogen into its reactive form, use of nitrogen in various products, and nitrogen losses to the environment. The resulting inventory and model of the US economy can help quantify the direct and indirect impacts or dependence of economic sectors on the nitrogen cycle. This paper emphasizes the need for methods to manage the N cycle that focus not just on N losses, which has been the norm until now, but also include other N flows for a more comprehensive view and balanced decisions. Insight into the N profile of various sectors of the 2002 U.S. economy is presented, and the inventory can also be used for LCA or Hybrid LCA of various products. The resulting model is incorporated in the approach of Ecologically-Based LCA and available online.

  11. Input-output mapping reconstruction of spike trains at dorsal horn evoked by manual acupuncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xile; Shi, Dingtian; Yu, Haitao; Deng, Bin; Lu, Meili; Han, Chunxiao; Wang, Jiang

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a generalized linear model (GLM) is used to reconstruct mapping from acupuncture stimulation to spike trains driven by action potential data. The electrical signals are recorded in spinal dorsal horn after manual acupuncture (MA) manipulations with different frequencies being taken at the “Zusanli” point of experiment rats. Maximum-likelihood method is adopted to estimate the parameters of GLM and the quantified value of assumed model input. Through validating the accuracy of firings generated from the established GLM, it is found that the input-output mapping of spike trains evoked by acupuncture can be successfully reconstructed for different frequencies. Furthermore, via comparing the performance of several GLMs based on distinct inputs, it suggests that input with the form of half-sine with noise can well describe the generator potential induced by acupuncture mechanical action. Particularly, the comparison of reproducing the experiment spikes for five selected inputs is in accordance with the phenomenon found in Hudgkin-Huxley (H-H) model simulation, which indicates the mapping from half-sine with noise input to experiment spikes meets the real encoding scheme to some extent. These studies provide us a new insight into coding processes and information transfer of acupuncture.

  12. The neuronal response at extended timescales: a linearized spiking input-output relation.

    PubMed

    Soudry, Daniel; Meir, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Many biological systems are modulated by unknown slow processes. This can severely hinder analysis - especially in excitable neurons, which are highly non-linear and stochastic systems. We show the analysis simplifies considerably if the input matches the sparse "spiky" nature of the output. In this case, a linearized spiking Input-Output (I/O) relation can be derived semi-analytically, relating input spike trains to output spikes based on known biophysical properties. Using this I/O relation we obtain closed-form expressions for all second order statistics (input - internal state - output correlations and spectra), construct optimal linear estimators for the neuronal response and internal state and perform parameter identification. These results are guaranteed to hold, for a general stochastic biophysical neuron model, with only a few assumptions (mainly, timescale separation). We numerically test the resulting expressions for various models, and show that they hold well, even in cases where our assumptions fail to hold. In a companion paper we demonstrate how this approach enables us to fit a biophysical neuron model so it reproduces experimentally observed temporal firing statistics on days-long experiments.

  13. Characterizing the Input-Output Function of the Olfactory-Limbic Pathway in the Guinea Pig.

    PubMed

    Breschi, Gian Luca; Ciliberto, Carlo; Nieus, Thierry; Rosasco, Lorenzo; Taverna, Stefano; Chiappalone, Michela; Pasquale, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays the neuroscientific community is taking more and more advantage of the continuous interaction between engineers and computational neuroscientists in order to develop neuroprostheses aimed at replacing damaged brain areas with artificial devices. To this end, a technological effort is required to develop neural network models which can be fed with the recorded electrophysiological patterns to yield the correct brain stimulation to recover the desired functions. In this paper we present a machine learning approach to derive the input-output function of the olfactory-limbic pathway in the in vitro whole brain of guinea pig, less complex and more controllable than an in vivo system. We first experimentally characterized the neuronal pathway by delivering different sets of electrical stimuli from the lateral olfactory tract (LOT) and by recording the corresponding responses in the lateral entorhinal cortex (l-ERC). As a second step, we used information theory to evaluate how much information output features carry about the input. Finally we used the acquired data to learn the LOT-l-ERC "I/O function," by means of the kernel regularized least squares method, able to predict l-ERC responses on the basis of LOT stimulation features. Our modeling approach can be further exploited for brain prostheses applications.

  14. Relation of distortion-product otoacoustic emission input-output functions to loudness.

    PubMed

    Rasetshwane, Daniel M; Neely, Stephen T; Kopun, Judy G; Gorga, Michael P

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study is to further explore the relationship between distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) measurements and categorical loudness scaling (CLS) measurements using multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis. Recently, Thorson et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 131, 1282-1295 (2012)] obtained predictions of CLS loudness ratings from DPOAE input/output (I/O) functions using MLR analysis. The present study extends that work by (1) considering two different (and potentially improved) MLR models, one for predicting loudness rating at specified input level and the other for predicting the input level for each loudness category and (2) validating the new models' predictions using an independent set of data. Strong correlations were obtained between predicted and measured data during the validation process with overall root-mean-square errors in the range 10.43-16.78 dB for the prediction of CLS input level, supporting the view that DPOAE I/O measurements can predict CLS loudness ratings and input levels, and thus may be useful for fitting hearing aids.

  15. Effects of Age of English Exposure, Current Input/Output, and grade on bilingual language performance.

    PubMed

    Bedore, Lisa M; Peña, Elizabeth D; Griffin, Zenzi M; Hixon, J Gregory

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluates the effects of Age of Exposure to English (AoEE) and Current Input/Output on language performance in a cross-sectional sample of Spanish-English bilingual children. First- (N = 586) and third-graders (N = 298) who spanned a wide range of bilingual language experience participated. Parents and teachers provided information about English and Spanish language use. Short tests of semantic and morphosyntactic development in Spanish and English were used to quantify children's knowledge of each language. There were significant interactions between AoEE and Current Input/Output for children at third grade in English and in both grades for Spanish. In English, the relationship between AoEE and language scores were linear for first- and third-graders. In Spanish a nonlinear relationship was observed. We discuss how much of the variance was accounted for by AoEE and Current Input/Output.

  16. Acousto-ultrasonic input-output characterization of unidirectional fiber composite plate by SV waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Peter; Williams, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A unidirectional fiberglass epoxy compostie specimen is modelled as a homogeneous transversely isotropic continuum plate medium. Acousto-ultrasonic noncontact input-output characterization is studied theoretically with a transmitting and a receiving transducer located on the same face of the plate. The single reflection problem for an incident SV wave at a plane boundary in transversely isotropic medium is analyzed. An obliquely incident SV wave results in a reflected SV wave and a reflected P wave for an angle of incidence of the incident SV wave less than the critical angle. Otherwise, there exists only an SV wave in the medium as the reflected P wave degenerates into a surface wave travelling parallel to the plane boundary. The amplitude ratio of the reflected SV wave is -1 when the angle of incidence is greater than or = the critical angle. The directional dependence of the phase velocity of the SV wave propagating in the transversely isotropic medium has a significant effect on the delay time, as opposed to the directional independence of the phase velocity of a shear wave propagating in an isotropic medium. The displacements associated with the SV wave in the plate and which may be detected by the noncontact receiving transducer are approximated by an asymptotic solution for an infinite transversely isotropic medium subjected to a harmonic point load.

  17. Input-output characterization of an ultrasonic testing system by digital signal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.; Karagulle, H.

    1986-01-01

    Ultrasonic test system input-output characteristics were investigated by directly coupling the transmitting and receiving transducers face to face without a test specimen. Some of the fundamentals of digital signal processing were summarized. Input and output signals were digitized by using a digital oscilloscope, and the digitized data were processed in a microcomputer by using digital signal-processing techniques. The continuous-time test system was modeled as a discrete-time, linear, shift-invariant system. In estimating the unit-sample response and frequency response of the discrete-time system, it was necessary to use digital filtering to remove low-amplitude noise, which interfered with deconvolution calculations. A digital bandpass filter constructed with the assistance of a Blackman window and a rectangular time window were used. Approximations of the impulse response and the frequency response of the continuous-time test system were obtained by linearly interpolating the defining points of the unit-sample response and the frequency response of the discrete-time system. The test system behaved as a linear-phase bandpass filter in the frequency range 0.6 to 2.3 MHz. These frequencies were selected in accordance with the criterion that they were 6 dB below the maximum peak of the amplitude of the frequency response. The output of the system to various inputs was predicted and the results were compared with the corresponding measurements on the system.

  18. Input-output relations in biological systems: measurement, information and the Hill equation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Biological systems produce outputs in response to variable inputs. Input-output relations tend to follow a few regular patterns. For example, many chemical processes follow the S-shaped Hill equation relation between input concentrations and output concentrations. That Hill equation pattern contradicts the fundamental Michaelis-Menten theory of enzyme kinetics. I use the discrepancy between the expected Michaelis-Menten process of enzyme kinetics and the widely observed Hill equation pattern of biological systems to explore the general properties of biological input-output relations. I start with the various processes that could explain the discrepancy between basic chemistry and biological pattern. I then expand the analysis to consider broader aspects that shape biological input-output relations. Key aspects include the input-output processing by component subsystems and how those components combine to determine the system’s overall input-output relations. That aggregate structure often imposes strong regularity on underlying disorder. Aggregation imposes order by dissipating information as it flows through the components of a system. The dissipation of information may be evaluated by the analysis of measurement and precision, explaining why certain common scaling patterns arise so frequently in input-output relations. I discuss how aggregation, measurement and scale provide a framework for understanding the relations between pattern and process. The regularity imposed by those broader structural aspects sets the contours of variation in biology. Thus, biological design will also tend to follow those contours. Natural selection may act primarily to modulate system properties within those broad constraints. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eugene Koonin, Georg Luebeck and Sergei Maslov. PMID:24308849

  19. PC-based input/output controllers from a VME perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.O.

    1999-04-01

    The Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) has been widely adopted in the accelerator community. Although EPICS is available on many platforms, the majority of sites have deployed VME- or VXI-based input output controllers running the vxWorks real time operating system. Recently, a hybrid approach using vxWorks on both PC and traditional platforms is being implemented at LANL. To illustrate these developments the author compares his recent experience deploying PC-based EPICS input output controllers with experience deploying similar systems based on traditional EPICS platforms.

  20. Statistics & Input-Output Measures for School Libraries in Colorado, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Library, Denver.

    This document presents statistics and input-output measures for K-12 school libraries in Colorado for 2002. Data are presented by type and size of school, i.e., high schools (six categories ranging from 2,000 and over to under 300), junior high/middle schools (five categories ranging from 1,000-1,999 to under 300), elementary schools (four…

  1. Optimal Tracking Control of Unknown Discrete-Time Linear Systems Using Input-Output Measured Data.

    PubMed

    Kiumarsi, Bahare; Lewis, Frank L; Naghibi-Sistani, Mohammad-Bagher; Karimpour, Ali

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an output-feedback solution to the infinite-horizon linear quadratic tracking (LQT) problem for unknown discrete-time systems is proposed. An augmented system composed of the system dynamics and the reference trajectory dynamics is constructed. The state of the augmented system is constructed from a limited number of measurements of the past input, output, and reference trajectory in the history of the augmented system. A novel Bellman equation is developed that evaluates the value function related to a fixed policy by using only the input, output, and reference trajectory data from the augmented system. By using approximate dynamic programming, a class of reinforcement learning methods, the LQT problem is solved online without requiring knowledge of the augmented system dynamics only by measuring the input, output, and reference trajectory from the augmented system. We develop both policy iteration (PI) and value iteration (VI) algorithms that converge to an optimal controller that require only measuring the input, output, and reference trajectory data. The convergence of the proposed PI and VI algorithms is shown. A simulation example is used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  2. Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Assessment of Water Reuse Strategies in Residential Buildings

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper evaluates the environmental sustainability and economic feasibility of four water reuse designs through economic input-output life cycle assessments (EIO-LCA) and benefit/cost analyses. The water reuse designs include: 1. Simple Greywater Reuse System for Landscape Ir...

  3. Effects of Age of English Exposure, Current Input/Output, and Grade on Bilingual Language Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedore, Lisa M.; Pena, Elizabeth D.; Griffin, Zenzi M.; Hixon, J. Gregory

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the effects of Age of Exposure to English (AoEE) and Current Input/Output on language performance in a cross-sectional sample of Spanish-English bilingual children. First- (N = 586) and third-graders (N = 298) who spanned a wide range of bilingual language experience participated. Parents and teachers provided information…

  4. The effects of input-output configuration in syllabic compression on speech perception.

    PubMed

    Maré, M J; Dreschler, W A; Verschuure, H

    1992-06-01

    Speech perception was tested through a broad-band syllabic compressor with four different static input-output configurations. All other parameters of the compressor were held constant. The compressor was implemented digitally and incorporated a delay to reduce overshoot. We studied four different input-output configurations, including a linear reference condition. Normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects participated in the experiments testing perception of meaningful sentences as well as nonsense CVCs in carrier phrases. The speech materials were presented in quiet and in noise. The results from the CVCs were analyzed quantitatively in terms of scores and qualitatively in terms of phoneme confusions. Differences in speech perception due to the different input-output configurations were small. The input-output configuration with the highest amplification of low amplitude sounds yielded the best results. Detailed analysis of the results included a correlational analysis with a number of auditory functions characterizing the ears tested. The pure-tone audiogram provided parameters of auditory sensitivity: average audiometric loss and audiometric slope. Psychophysical tests provided parameters of temporal resolution and frequency selectivity: the temporal resolution factor, temporal gap detection, and auditory filter shape. The correlational analysis showed that the subjects with better temporal acuity obtained better results.

  5. Indirect techniques for adaptive input-output linearization of non-linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teel, Andrew; Kadiyala, Raja; Kokotovic, Peter; Sastry, Shankar

    1991-01-01

    A technique of indirect adaptive control based on certainty equivalence for input output linearization of nonlinear systems is proven convergent. It does not suffer from the overparameterization drawbacks of the direct adaptive control techniques on the same plant. This paper also contains a semiindirect adaptive controller which has several attractive features of both the direct and indirect schemes.

  6. Functional identification of the input-output transforms of mammalian motoneurones.

    PubMed

    Binder, M D; Poliakov, A V; Powers, R K

    1999-01-01

    transform could be predicted from the mean firing rate and the linear impulse response, yielding a relatively simple, general description of the motoneurone's input-output function.

  7. Rapid and long-lasting plasticity of input-output mapping.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kenji; Hoffman, Donna S; Strick, Peter L

    2006-11-01

    Skilled use of tools requires us to learn an "input-output map" for the device, i.e., how our movements relate to the actions of the device. We used the paradigm of visuo-motor rotation to examine two questions about the plasticity of input-output maps: 1) does extensive practice on one mapping make it difficult to modify and/or to form a new input-output map and 2) once a map has been modified or a new map has been formed, does this map survive a gap in performance? Humans and monkeys made wrist movements to control the position of a cursor on a computer monitor. Humans practiced the task for approximately 1.5 h; monkeys practiced for 3-9 yr. After this practice, we gradually altered the direction of cursor movement relative to wrist movement while subjects moved either to a single target or to four targets. Subjects were unaware of the change in cursor-movement relationship. Despite their prior practice on the task, the humans and the monkeys quickly adjusted their motor output to compensate for the visuo-motor rotation. Monkeys retained the modified input-output map during a 2-wk gap in motor performance. Humans retained the altered map during a gap of >1 yr. Our results show that sensorimotor performance remains flexible despite considerable practice on a specific task, and even relatively short-term exposure to a new input-output mapping leads to a long-lasting change in motor performance.

  8. Compiling and using input-output frameworks through collaborative virtual laboratories.

    PubMed

    Lenzen, Manfred; Geschke, Arne; Wiedmann, Thomas; Lane, Joe; Anderson, Neal; Baynes, Timothy; Boland, John; Daniels, Peter; Dey, Christopher; Fry, Jacob; Hadjikakou, Michalis; Kenway, Steven; Malik, Arunima; Moran, Daniel; Murray, Joy; Nettleton, Stuart; Poruschi, Lavinia; Reynolds, Christian; Rowley, Hazel; Ugon, Julien; Webb, Dean; West, James

    2014-07-01

    Compiling, deploying and utilising large-scale databases that integrate environmental and economic data have traditionally been labour- and cost-intensive processes, hindered by the large amount of disparate and misaligned data that must be collected and harmonised. The Australian Industrial Ecology Virtual Laboratory (IELab) is a novel, collaborative approach to compiling large-scale environmentally extended multi-region input-output (MRIO) models. The utility of the IELab product is greatly enhanced by avoiding the need to lock in an MRIO structure at the time the MRIO system is developed. The IELab advances the idea of the "mother-daughter" construction principle, whereby a regionally and sectorally very detailed "mother" table is set up, from which "daughter" tables are derived to suit specific research questions. By introducing a third tier - the "root classification" - IELab users are able to define their own mother-MRIO configuration, at no additional cost in terms of data handling. Customised mother-MRIOs can then be built, which maximise disaggregation in aspects that are useful to a family of research questions. The second innovation in the IELab system is to provide a highly automated collaborative research platform in a cloud-computing environment, greatly expediting workflows and making these computational benefits accessible to all users. Combining these two aspects realises many benefits. The collaborative nature of the IELab development project allows significant savings in resources. Timely deployment is possible by coupling automation procedures with the comprehensive input from multiple teams. User-defined MRIO tables, coupled with high performance computing, mean that MRIO analysis will be useful and accessible for a great many more research applications than would otherwise be possible. By ensuring that a common set of analytical tools such as for hybrid life-cycle assessment is adopted, the IELab will facilitate the harmonisation of fragmented

  9. Demand-driven water withdrawals by Chinese industry: a multi-regional input-output analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Chen, Z. M.; Zeng, L.; Qiao, H.; Chen, B.

    2016-03-01

    With ever increasing water demands and the continuous intensification of water scarcity arising from China's industrialization, the country is struggling to harmonize its industrial development and water supply. This paper presents a systems analysis of water withdrawals by Chinese industry and investigates demand-driven industrial water uses embodied in final demand and interregional trade based on a multi-regional input-output model. In 2007, the Electric Power, Steam, and Hot Water Production and Supply sector ranks first in direct industrial water withdrawal (DWW), and Construction has the largest embodied industrial water use (EWU). Investment, consumption, and exports contribute to 34.6%, 33.3%, and 30.6% of the national total EWU, respectively. Specifically, 58.0%, 51.1%, 48.6%, 43.3%, and 37.5% of the regional EWUs respectively in Guangdong, Shanghai, Zhejiang, Jiangsu, and Fujian are attributed to international exports. The total interregional import/export of embodied water is equivalent to about 40% of the national total DWW, of which 55.5% is associated with the DWWs of Electric Power, Steam, and Hot Water Production and Supply. Jiangsu is the biggest interregional exporter and deficit receiver of embodied water, in contrast to Guangdong as the biggest interregional importer and surplus receiver. Without implementing effective water-saving measures and adjusting industrial structures, the regional imbalance between water availability and water demand tends to intensify considering the water impact of domestic trade of industrial products. Steps taken to improve water use efficiency in production, and to enhance embodied water saving in consumption are both of great significance for supporting China's water policies.

  10. Compiling and using input-output frameworks through collaborative virtual laboratories.

    PubMed

    Lenzen, Manfred; Geschke, Arne; Wiedmann, Thomas; Lane, Joe; Anderson, Neal; Baynes, Timothy; Boland, John; Daniels, Peter; Dey, Christopher; Fry, Jacob; Hadjikakou, Michalis; Kenway, Steven; Malik, Arunima; Moran, Daniel; Murray, Joy; Nettleton, Stuart; Poruschi, Lavinia; Reynolds, Christian; Rowley, Hazel; Ugon, Julien; Webb, Dean; West, James

    2014-07-01

    Compiling, deploying and utilising large-scale databases that integrate environmental and economic data have traditionally been labour- and cost-intensive processes, hindered by the large amount of disparate and misaligned data that must be collected and harmonised. The Australian Industrial Ecology Virtual Laboratory (IELab) is a novel, collaborative approach to compiling large-scale environmentally extended multi-region input-output (MRIO) models. The utility of the IELab product is greatly enhanced by avoiding the need to lock in an MRIO structure at the time the MRIO system is developed. The IELab advances the idea of the "mother-daughter" construction principle, whereby a regionally and sectorally very detailed "mother" table is set up, from which "daughter" tables are derived to suit specific research questions. By introducing a third tier - the "root classification" - IELab users are able to define their own mother-MRIO configuration, at no additional cost in terms of data handling. Customised mother-MRIOs can then be built, which maximise disaggregation in aspects that are useful to a family of research questions. The second innovation in the IELab system is to provide a highly automated collaborative research platform in a cloud-computing environment, greatly expediting workflows and making these computational benefits accessible to all users. Combining these two aspects realises many benefits. The collaborative nature of the IELab development project allows significant savings in resources. Timely deployment is possible by coupling automation procedures with the comprehensive input from multiple teams. User-defined MRIO tables, coupled with high performance computing, mean that MRIO analysis will be useful and accessible for a great many more research applications than would otherwise be possible. By ensuring that a common set of analytical tools such as for hybrid life-cycle assessment is adopted, the IELab will facilitate the harmonisation of fragmented

  11. Identification of the battery state-of-health parameter from input-output pairs of time series data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Chattopadhyay, Pritthi; Ray, Asok; Rahn, Christopher D.

    2015-07-01

    As a paradigm of dynamic data-driven application systems (DDDAS), this paper addresses real-time identification of the State of Health (SOH) parameter over the life span of a battery that is subjected to approximately repeated cycles of discharging/recharging current. In the proposed method, finite-length data of interest are selected via wavelet-based segmentation from the time series of synchronized input-output (i.e., current-voltage) pairs in the respective two-dimensional space. Then, symbol strings are generated by partitioning the selected segments of the input-output time series to construct a special class of probabilistic finite state automata (PFSA), called D-Markov machines. Pertinent features of the statistics of battery dynamics are extracted as the state emission matrices of these PFSA. This real-time method of SOH parameter identification relies on the divergence between extracted features. The underlying concept has been validated on (approximately periodic) experimental data, generated from a commercial-scale lead-acid battery. It is demonstrated by real-time analysis of the acquired current-voltage data on in-situ computational platforms that the proposed method is capable of distinguishing battery current-voltage dynamics at different aging stages, as an alternative to computation-intensive and electrochemistry-dependent analysis via physics-based modeling.

  12. Simultaneous material flow analysis of nickel, chromium, and molybdenum used in alloy steel by means of input-output analysis.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Ohno, Hajime; Kondo, Yasushi; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Takeda, Osamu; Miki, Takahiro; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2013-05-01

    Steel is not elemental iron but rather a group of iron-based alloys containing many elements, especially chromium, nickel, and molybdenum. Steel recycling is expected to promote efficient resource use. However, open-loop recycling of steel could result in quality loss of nickel and molybdenum and/or material loss of chromium. Knowledge about alloying element substance flow is needed to avoid such losses. Material flow analyses (MFAs) indicate the importance of steel recycling to recovery of alloying elements. Flows of nickel, chromium, and molybdenum are interconnected, but MFAs have paid little attention to the interconnected flow of materials/substances in supply chains. This study combined a waste input-output material flow model and physical unit input-output analysis to perform a simultaneous MFA for nickel, chromium, and molybdenum in the Japanese economy in 2000. Results indicated the importance of recovery of these elements in recycling policies for end-of-life (EoL) vehicles and constructions. Improvement in EoL sorting technologies and implementation of designs for recycling/disassembly at the manufacturing phase are needed. Possible solutions include development of sorting processes for steel scrap and introduction of easier methods for identifying the composition of secondary resources. Recovery of steel scrap with a high alloy content will reduce primary inputs of alloying elements and contribute to more efficient resource use.

  13. Simultaneous material flow analysis of nickel, chromium, and molybdenum used in alloy steel by means of input-output analysis.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Ohno, Hajime; Kondo, Yasushi; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Takeda, Osamu; Miki, Takahiro; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2013-05-01

    Steel is not elemental iron but rather a group of iron-based alloys containing many elements, especially chromium, nickel, and molybdenum. Steel recycling is expected to promote efficient resource use. However, open-loop recycling of steel could result in quality loss of nickel and molybdenum and/or material loss of chromium. Knowledge about alloying element substance flow is needed to avoid such losses. Material flow analyses (MFAs) indicate the importance of steel recycling to recovery of alloying elements. Flows of nickel, chromium, and molybdenum are interconnected, but MFAs have paid little attention to the interconnected flow of materials/substances in supply chains. This study combined a waste input-output material flow model and physical unit input-output analysis to perform a simultaneous MFA for nickel, chromium, and molybdenum in the Japanese economy in 2000. Results indicated the importance of recovery of these elements in recycling policies for end-of-life (EoL) vehicles and constructions. Improvement in EoL sorting technologies and implementation of designs for recycling/disassembly at the manufacturing phase are needed. Possible solutions include development of sorting processes for steel scrap and introduction of easier methods for identifying the composition of secondary resources. Recovery of steel scrap with a high alloy content will reduce primary inputs of alloying elements and contribute to more efficient resource use. PMID:23528100

  14. Seeing Wave-Particle Superposition with Cavity Input-Output Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Rui

    2016-10-01

    We present an experimental protocol to implement quantum delay-choice experiment in the context of cavity input-output process. In our protocol, the single-atom is employed as ancillary qubit to test the wave-particle feature of a single photon. With the cavity input-output process, we show that the controlled phase shift gate between single-atom and single-photon can be naturally used to generate the controlled Hadamard gate, which thus allows us to construct the quantum circuit for realizing the quantum delay-choice experiment. We also demonstrate the photonic wavelike and particlelike states can be simultaneously observed in our platform. Our protocol may open a new prospect using cavity quantum electrodynamics system to study some counterintuitive fundamental phenomenons in quantum mechanics.

  15. Seeing Wave-Particle Superposition with Cavity Input-Output Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Rui

    2016-06-01

    We present an experimental protocol to implement quantum delay-choice experiment in the context of cavity input-output process. In our protocol, the single-atom is employed as ancillary qubit to test the wave-particle feature of a single photon. With the cavity input-output process, we show that the controlled phase shift gate between single-atom and single-photon can be naturally used to generate the controlled Hadamard gate, which thus allows us to construct the quantum circuit for realizing the quantum delay-choice experiment. We also demonstrate the photonic wavelike and particlelike states can be simultaneously observed in our platform. Our protocol may open a new prospect using cavity quantum electrodynamics system to study some counterintuitive fundamental phenomenons in quantum mechanics.

  16. Input-output finite-time stabilisation of nonlinear stochastic system with missing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jun; Niu, Yugang; Jia, Tinggang

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the problem of the input-output finite-time stabilisation for a class of nonlinear stochastic system with state-dependent noise. The phenomenon of the missing measurements may occur when state signals are transmitted via communication networks. An estimating method is proposed to compensate the lost state information. And then, a compensator-based controller is designed to ensure the input-output finite-time stochastic stability (IO-FTSS) of the closed-loop system. Some parameters-dependent sufficient conditions are derived and the corresponding solving approach is given. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the developed IO-FTSS scheme.

  17. Nonlinear control via approximate input-output linearization - The ball and beam example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, John; Sastry, Shankar; Kokotovic, Petar

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for the approximate input-output linearization of nonlinear systems, particularly those for which relative degree is not well defined. It is shown that there is a great deal of freedom in the selection of an approximation and that, by designing a tracking controller based on the approximating system, tracking of reasonable trajectories can be achieved with small error. The approximating system is itself a nonlinear system, with the difference that it is input-output linearizable by state feedback. Some properties of the accuracy of the approximation are demonstrated and, in the context of the ball and beam example, it is shown to be far superior to the Jacobian approximation. The results are focused on finding regular SISO systems which are close to systems which are not regular and controlling these approximate regular systems.

  18. Input/Output of ab-initio nuclear structure calculations for improved performance and portability

    SciTech Connect

    Laghave, Nikhil

    2010-01-01

    Many modern scientific applications rely on highly computation intensive calculations. However, most applications do not concentrate as much on the role that input/output operations can play for improved performance and portability. Parallelizing input/output operations of large files can significantly improve the performance of parallel applications where sequential I/O is a bottleneck. A proper choice of I/O library also offers a scope for making input/output operations portable across different architectures. Thus, use of parallel I/O libraries for organizing I/O of large data files offers great scope in improving performance and portability of applications. In particular, sequential I/O has been identified as a bottleneck for the highly scalable MFDn (Many Fermion Dynamics for nuclear structure) code performing ab-initio nuclear structure calculations. We develop interfaces and parallel I/O procedures to use a well-known parallel I/O library in MFDn. As a result, we gain efficient I/O of large datasets along with their portability and ease of use in the down-stream processing. Even situations where the amount of data to be written is not huge, proper use of input/output operations can boost the performance of scientific applications. Application checkpointing offers enormous performance improvement and flexibility by doing a negligible amount of I/O to disk. Checkpointing saves and resumes application state in such a manner that in most cases the application is unaware that there has been an interruption to its execution. This helps in saving large amount of work that has been previously done and continue application execution. This small amount of I/O provides substantial time saving by offering restart/resume capability to applications. The need for checkpointing in optimization code NEWUOA has been identified and checkpoint/restart capability has been implemented in NEWUOA by using simple file I/O.

  19. Low-carbon building assessment and multi-scale input-output analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G. Q.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z. M.; Zhang, Bo; Shao, L.; Guo, S.; Zhou, S. Y.; Jiang, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Presented as a low-carbon building evaluation framework in this paper are detailed carbon emission account procedures for the life cycle of buildings in terms of nine stages as building construction, fitment, outdoor facility construction, transportation, operation, waste treatment, property management, demolition, and disposal for buildings, supported by integrated carbon intensity databases based on multi-scale input-output analysis, essential for low-carbon planning, procurement and supply chain design, and logistics management.

  20. Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog Input/Output Module Ambient Temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. McKay

    2011-02-01

    Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog input/output Module Ambient Temperature Testing A series of three ambient temperature tests were conducted for the Water Power Calculator development using the INL Calibration Laboratory’s Tenney Environmental Chamber. The ambient temperature test results demonstrate that the Moore Industries Temperature Input Modules, Analog Input Module and Analog Output Module, ambient temperature response meet or exceed the manufactures specifications

  1. Input-output finite-time stabilization of linear systems with finite-time boundedness.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yang; Yao, Yu; Wang, Shicheng; Ma, Kemao; Liu, Kai; Guo, Jian

    2014-07-01

    The paper presents linear system Input-Output Finite-Time Stabilization (IO-FTS) method under Finite-Time Boundedness (FTB) constraint. A state feedback controller is designed, via Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMIs), to guarantee the system both IO-FTS and FTB. The proposed methods are applied to the guidance design of a class of terminal guidance systems to suppress disturbances with IO-FTS method and FTB constraints simultaneously satisfied. The simulation results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  2. Greenhouse gas footprinting for small businesses--the use of input-output data.

    PubMed

    Berners-Lee, M; Howard, D C; Moss, J; Kaivanto, K; Scott, W A

    2011-02-01

    To mitigate anthropogenic climate change greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) must be reduced; their major source is man's use of energy. A key way to manage emissions is for the energy consumer to understand their impact and the consequences of changing their activities. This paper addresses the challenge of delivering relevant, practical and reliable greenhouse gas 'footprint' information for small and medium sized businesses. The tool we describe is capable of ascribing parts of the total footprint to specific actions to which the business can relate and is sensitive enough to reflect the consequences of change. It provides a comprehensive description of all emissions for each business and sets them in the context of local, national and global statistics. It includes the GHG costs of all goods and services irrespective of their origin and without double accounting. We describe the development and use of the tool, which draws upon both national input-output data and process-based life cycle analysis techniques; a hybrid model. The use of national data sets the output in context and makes the results consistent with national and global targets, while the life cycle techniques provide a means of reflecting the dynamics of actions. The model is described in some detail along with a rationale and a short discussion of validity. As the tool is designed for small commercial users, we have taken care to combine rigour with practicality; parameterising from readily available client data whilst being clear about uncertainties. As an additional incentive, we also report on the potential costs or savings of switching activities. For users to benefit from the tool, they need to understand the output and know how much confidence they should place in the results. We not only describe an application of non-parametric statistics to generate confidence intervals, but also offer users the option of and guidance on adjusting figures to examine the sensitivity of the model to its

  3. The impacts of final demand changes on total output of Indonesian ICT sectors: An analysis using input-output approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhdi, Ubaidillah

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the impacts of final demand changes on total output of Indonesian Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sectors. This study employs Input-Output (IO) analysis as a tool of analysis. More specifically, demand-pull IO quantity model is applied in order to achieve the objective. "Whole sector change" and "pure change" conditions are considered in this study. The results of calculation show that, in both conditions, the biggest positive impact to the total output of the sectors is given by the change of households consumption while the change of import has a negative impact. One of the recommendations suggested from this study is to construct import restriction policy for ICT products.

  4. The dynamics of the total output of the Japanese fisheries sector: An analysis using input-output approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhdi, Ubaidillah

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the dynamics of the total output of the fisheries industry when the changes of the final demand occur. This study focuses on the case of Japan. This study employs a demand-pull Input-Output (IO) quantity model, one of the calculation instruments in the IO analysis, as an analysis tool. Two conditions are included in calculations and analysis parts, namely (1) “whole sector change”, and (2) “pure change”. An initial period in this study is 2005. The results show that, in both conditions, the analyzed sector has similar patterns, namely this industry obtains the positive impacts from scenarios 1, 3, and 4 while the negative impact is received from scenario 2. The results also expose that, in both conditions, the biggest positive impact for the discussed sector is given by scenario 4, the modification of the consumption expenditures of the private.

  5. An input-output based robust stabilization criterion for neural-network control of nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Fernández de Cañete, J; Barreiro, A; García-Cerezo, A; García-Moral, I

    2001-01-01

    A stabilization method based on the input-output conicity criterion is presented. Conventional learning algorithms are applied to adjust the controller dynamics, and robust stability of the closed-loop system is guaranteed by modifying the training patterns which yield unstable behavior. The methodology developed expands the class of nonlinear systems to be controlled using neural control schemes, so that the stabilization of a broad class of neural-network-based control systems, even with unknown dynamics, is assured. Straightforwardness in the application of this method is evident in contrast to the Lyapunov function approach. PMID:18249978

  6. Improvement of spatial light modulator optical input/output performance using microlens arrays.

    PubMed

    Chase, H; Handschy, M A; O'Callaghan, M J; Supon, F W

    1995-06-15

    Advanced spatial light modulators both detect incident light and modulate reflected light. Each pixel may contain multiple photodetectors, a modulator, control circuitry, and signal-processing circuitry. Because each detector and modulator occupies only a fraction of the area of a pixel the optical efficiency of these devices suffers. We have experimented with improving optical input/output performance by integrating a microlens array with a ferroelectric liquid-crystal VLSI spatial light modulator. We have studied the microlens VLSI spacing accuracy that must be achieved to yield minimum distortion of ref lected wave fronts and the best optical efficiency for Fourier-transform applications.

  7. Analysis of resonant optical gyroscopes with two input/output waveguides.

    PubMed

    Hah, Dooyoung; Zhang, Dan

    2010-08-16

    Rotation sensitivity of optical gyroscopes with ring resonators and two input/output waveguides in a coplanar add-drop filter configuration is studied. First, the gyroscope with a single resonator is analyzed, which is shown to have slightly higher sensitivity than the one with one waveguide. Next, the sensor with two identical resonators coupled through waveguides is investigated, which turns out to have half the sensitivity of the one with a single resonator when compared for the same footprints. The last point is valid when the resonators have the same coupling coefficients to the waveguides in the sensor with two resonators.

  8. Simulation of TunneLadder Traveling-Wave Tube Input/Output Coupler Characteristics Using MAFIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Qureshi, A. Haq

    1996-01-01

    RF input/output coupler characteristics for the TunneLadder traveling-wave tube have been calculated using the three-dimensional computer code, MAFIA and compared to experimental data with good agreement. Theory behind coupling of the TunneLadder interaction circuit to input and output waveguides is presented and VSWR data is calculated for variations on principal coupler dimensions to provide insight into manufacturing tolerances necessary for acceptable performance. Accuracy of results using MAFIA demonstrates how experimental hardware testing of three-dimensional coupler designs can be reduced.

  9. Functional identification of the input-output transforms of motoneurones in the rat and cat.

    PubMed

    Poliakov, A V; Powers, R K; Binder, M D

    1997-10-15

    associated PSTH. This linear model provided good matches to the PSTHs associated with a wide range of current transients. However, for the largest amplitude current transients, a significant improvement in the PSTH match was often achieved by expanding the model to include the convolution of the second-order Wiener kernel with the input. 4. The overall transformation of current inputs into firing rate could be approximated by a second-order Wiener model, i.e. a cascade of a dynamic, linear filter followed by a static non-linearity. At a given mean firing rate, the non-linear component of the response of the motoneurone could be described by the square of the linear component multiplied by a constant coefficient. The amplitude of the response of the linear component increased with the average firing rate, whereas the value of the multiplicative coefficient in the non-linear component decreased. As a result, the overall transform could be predicted from the mean firing rate and the linear impulse response, yielding a relatively simple, general description of the motoneurone input-output function.

  10. Input-output relations in the entorhinal-hippocampal-entorhinal loop: entorhinal cortex and dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Bartesaghi, R; Gessi, T; Migliore, M

    1995-01-01

    The pattern of impulse transfer along the entorhinal-hippocampal-entorhinal loop has been analyzed in the guinea pig by field potential analysis. The loop was driven by impulse volleys conducted by presubicular commissural fibers, directly stimulated in the dorsal psalterium, which monosynaptically activated perforant path neurons in the medial entorhinal cortex. Perforant path volleys activated in sequence the dentate gyrus, field CA3, field CA1, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex. Input-output curves were reconstructed from responses simultaneously recorded from different stations along the loop. The entorhinal response to the presubicular volley was found to increase gradually with respect to its input. The population excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) of the dentate gyrus granule cells had a similar behavior. By contrast, the input-output relation between the granule cell population spike and population EPSP was described by a very sleep sigmoid curve. The population spike of CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons as well as the response evoked in the entorhinal cortex by the hippocampal output had slightly higher threshold than the granule cell population spike and, like the latter, abruptly reached maximum amplitude. These findings show that the entorhinal-hippocampal-entorhinal loop transforms a linear input in a non-linear, almost all-or-none output and that the dentate gyrus is the critical site where the transformation occurs. Beyond the dentate gyrus, the loop appears very permeant to impulse traffic.

  11. Use of four mirrors to rotate linear polarization but preserve input-output collinearity. II.

    PubMed

    Galvez, E J; Koch, P M

    1997-12-01

    We report on the design, construction, and testing of a four-mirror reflective polarization rotator, proposed by Smith and Koch [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 13, 2102 (1996)], that rotates by an angle phi the input linear polarization while preserving the input-output beam collinearity. We correct errors in the previous work that led to an incorrect design for a phi = pi/2 rotator. This type of pure rotator is simple and inexpensive, and it is a direct application of the concept of the nonadiabatic geometric phase to polarization rotation. We also present measurements of the polarization rotation for the case of three metallic mirrors with antiparallel input and output beams, a test of geometric phase in polarization optics not done before.

  12. Generation of Atomic Cluster States through the Cavity Input-Output Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hai-Woong

    2005-10-01

    We propose a scheme to implement a two-qubit controlled-phase gate for single atomic qubits, which works in principle with nearly ideal success probability and fidelity. Our scheme is based on the cavity input-output process and the single-photon polarization measurement. We show that, even with the practical imperfections such as atomic spontaneous emission, weak atom-cavity coupling, violation of the Lamb-Dicke condition, cavity photon loss, and detection inefficiency, the proposed gate is feasible for generation of a cluster state in that it meets the scalability criterion and it operates in a conclusive manner. We demonstrate a simple and efficient process to generate a cluster state with our high probabilistic entangling gate.

  13. Scalable preparation of multiple-particle entangled states via the cavity input-output process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiu-Min; Xue, Peng; Chen, Mei-Ying; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Li, Xing-Hua

    2006-11-01

    We propose schemes for generating multiple-atom entangled states and a multiple-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state, respectively, based on the input-output relation of the cavity. The numerical simulations show that produced multiple-particle entangled states have high fidelity even if the atoms are not localized in the Lamb-Dicke regime. Some practical quantum noises, such as atomic spontaneous emission and output coupling inefficiency, only decrease the success probability but exert no influence on the fidelity of prepared multiple-particle entangled states. The successful probabilities of our protocols approach unity in the ideal case. In addition, no need for individually addressing keeps the schemes easy to implement from the experimental point of view.

  14. A convenient and accurate parallel Input/Output USB device for E-Prime.

    PubMed

    Canto, Rosario; Bufalari, Ilaria; D'Ausilio, Alessandro

    2011-03-01

    Psychological and neurophysiological experiments require the accurate control of timing and synchrony for Input/Output signals. For instance, a typical Event-Related Potential (ERP) study requires an extremely accurate synchronization of stimulus delivery with recordings. This is typically done via computer software such as E-Prime, and fast communications are typically assured by the Parallel Port (PP). However, the PP is an old and disappearing technology that, for example, is no longer available on portable computers. Here we propose a convenient USB device enabling parallel I/O capabilities. We tested this device against the PP on both a desktop and a laptop machine in different stress tests. Our data demonstrate the accuracy of our system, which suggests that it may be a good substitute for the PP with E-Prime.

  15. Energy input-output analysis of herbaceous energy and short-rotation woody crop systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.G.

    1996-11-01

    Energy input-output analyses, expressed in terms of energy-profit ratios, were derived for the production of a biocrude fuel oil from switchgrass and silver maple. Each energy analysis was concerned with determining the amount of direct and embodied energy associated with crop production, transport, processing, and conversion. Direct energy inputs include energy derived from gasoline, diesel, natural gas, and/or LP-gas. Embodied energy inputs are the amount of energy allocated to the machinery, chemicals, and equipment needed to perform the various operations associated with producing, transporting, processing, and converting bioenergy crops to a useful energy source. Energy-profit ratios varied from 1.96 to 2.48 for switchgrass and were 1.46 to 1.97 when short-rotation woody crops were the feedstock.

  16. Computer program for single input-output, single-loop feedback systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Additional work is reported on a completely automatic computer program for the design of single input/output, single loop feedback systems with parameter uncertainly, to satisfy time domain bounds on the system response to step commands and disturbances. The inputs to the program are basically the specified time-domain response bounds, the form of the constrained plant transfer function and the ranges of the uncertain parameters of the plant. The program output consists of the transfer functions of the two free compensation networks, in the form of the coefficients of the numerator and denominator polynomials, and the data on the prescribed bounds and the extremes actually obtained for the system response to commands and disturbances.

  17. Molecularly Defined Circuitry Reveals Input-Output Segregation in Deep Layers of the Medial Entorhinal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Sürmeli, Gülşen; Marcu, Daniel Cosmin; McClure, Christina; Garden, Derek L F; Pastoll, Hugh; Nolan, Matthew F

    2015-12-01

    Deep layers of the medial entorhinal cortex are considered to relay signals from the hippocampus to other brain structures, but pathways for routing of signals to and from the deep layers are not well established. Delineating these pathways is important for a circuit level understanding of spatial cognition and memory. We find that neurons in layers 5a and 5b have distinct molecular identities, defined by the transcription factors Etv1 and Ctip2, and divergent targets, with extensive intratelencephalic projections originating in layer 5a, but not 5b. This segregation of outputs is mirrored by the organization of glutamatergic input from stellate cells in layer 2 and from the hippocampus, with both preferentially targeting layer 5b over 5a. Our results suggest a molecular and anatomical organization of input-output computations in deep layers of the MEC, reveal precise translaminar microcircuitry, and identify molecularly defined pathways for spatial signals to influence computation in deep layers.

  18. The relation between input-output transformation and gastrointestinal nematode infections on dairy farms.

    PubMed

    van der Voort, M; Van Meensel, J; Lauwers, L; Van Huylenbroeck, G; Charlier, J

    2016-02-01

    Efficiency analysis is used for assessing links between technical efficiency (TE) of livestock farms and animal diseases. However, previous studies often do not make the link with the allocation of inputs and mainly present average effects that ignore the often huge differences among farms. In this paper, we studied the relationship between exposure to gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections, the TE and the input allocation on dairy farms. Although the traditional cost allocative efficiency (CAE) indicator adequately measures how a given input allocation differs from the cost-minimising input allocation, they do not represent the unique input allocation of farms. Similar CAE scores may be obtained for farms with different input allocations. Therefore, we propose an adjusted allocative efficiency index (AAEI) to measure the unique input allocation of farms. Combining this AAEI with the TE score allows determining the unique input-output position of each farm. The method is illustrated by estimating efficiency scores using data envelopment analysis (DEA) on a sample of 152 dairy farms in Flanders for which both accountancy and parasitic monitoring data were available. Three groups of farms with a different input-output position can be distinguished based on cluster analysis: (1) technically inefficient farms, with a relatively low use of concentrates per 100 l milk and a high exposure to infection, (2) farms with an intermediate TE, relatively high use of concentrates per 100 l milk and a low exposure to infection, (3) farms with the highest TE, relatively low roughage use per 100 l milk and a relatively high exposure to infection. Correlation analysis indicates for each group how the level of exposure to GI nematodes is associated or not with improved economic performance. The results suggest that improving both the economic performance and exposure to infection seems only of interest for highly TE farms. The findings indicate that current farm recommendations

  19. Viral-genetic tracing of the input-output organization of a central noradrenaline circuit.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Lindsay A; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Gao, Xiaojing J; Beier, Kevin T; Weissbourd, Brandon; DeLoach, Katherine E; Ren, Jing; Ibanes, Sandy; Malenka, Robert C; Kremer, Eric J; Luo, Liqun

    2015-08-01

    Deciphering how neural circuits are anatomically organized with regard to input and output is instrumental in understanding how the brain processes information. For example, locus coeruleus noradrenaline (also known as norepinephrine) (LC-NE) neurons receive input from and send output to broad regions of the brain and spinal cord, and regulate diverse functions including arousal, attention, mood and sensory gating. However, it is unclear how LC-NE neurons divide up their brain-wide projection patterns and whether different LC-NE neurons receive differential input. Here we developed a set of viral-genetic tools to quantitatively analyse the input-output relationship of neural circuits, and applied these tools to dissect the LC-NE circuit in mice. Rabies-virus-based input mapping indicated that LC-NE neurons receive convergent synaptic input from many regions previously identified as sending axons to the locus coeruleus, as well as from newly identified presynaptic partners, including cerebellar Purkinje cells. The 'tracing the relationship between input and output' method (or TRIO method) enables trans-synaptic input tracing from specific subsets of neurons based on their projection and cell type. We found that LC-NE neurons projecting to diverse output regions receive mostly similar input. Projection-based viral labelling revealed that LC-NE neurons projecting to one output region also project to all brain regions we examined. Thus, the LC-NE circuit overall integrates information from, and broadcasts to, many brain regions, consistent with its primary role in regulating brain states. At the same time, we uncovered several levels of specificity in certain LC-NE sub-circuits. These tools for mapping output architecture and input-output relationship are applicable to other neuronal circuits and organisms. More broadly, our viral-genetic approaches provide an efficient intersectional means to target neuronal populations based on cell type and projection pattern. PMID

  20. Multi-regional input-output analysis for China's regional CH4 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Li, Jiashuo; Peng, Beihua

    2014-03-01

    China is the largest CH4 emitter in the world. Given the importance of CH4 in greenhouse gas emission inventories, the characteristics of China's CH4 emissions at different scales deserve to be fully understood. Presented in this paper is an interprovincial input-output embodiment analysis of China's regional CH4 emissions in 2007, based on the most recently available multi-regional input-output table, and relevant CH4 emissions data. The results show that the eastern, central and western areas contribute to 48.2%, 28.6%, and 23.3% of the national total embodied emissions, respectively. Guangdong has the highest level of embodied CH4 emissions among all of the 30 regions. The Agriculture sector produces the most embodied CH4 emissions in final demand, followed by the Construction, Food Production and Tobacco Processing, and Other Service Activities sectors. Significant net transfers of embodied CH4 emission flows are identified from the central and western areas to the eastern area via interregional trade. Shanxi is the largest interregional exporter of embodied CH4 emissions. In contrast, Guangdong is the largest interregional importer. Energy activities, agricultural activities, and waste management comprise 65.6%, 30.7%, and 3.7% of the total embodied CH4 emissions in interregional trade, respectively. By using consumption-based accounting principles, the emission magnitudes, per capita emissions, and emission intensities of most eastern regions increase remarkably, while those of some central and western regions decrease largely. To achieve regional CH4 emission mitigation, comprehensive mitigation measures should be designed under consideration of regional transfer of emission responsibility.

  1. The relation between input-output transformation and gastrointestinal nematode infections on dairy farms.

    PubMed

    van der Voort, M; Van Meensel, J; Lauwers, L; Van Huylenbroeck, G; Charlier, J

    2016-02-01

    Efficiency analysis is used for assessing links between technical efficiency (TE) of livestock farms and animal diseases. However, previous studies often do not make the link with the allocation of inputs and mainly present average effects that ignore the often huge differences among farms. In this paper, we studied the relationship between exposure to gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections, the TE and the input allocation on dairy farms. Although the traditional cost allocative efficiency (CAE) indicator adequately measures how a given input allocation differs from the cost-minimising input allocation, they do not represent the unique input allocation of farms. Similar CAE scores may be obtained for farms with different input allocations. Therefore, we propose an adjusted allocative efficiency index (AAEI) to measure the unique input allocation of farms. Combining this AAEI with the TE score allows determining the unique input-output position of each farm. The method is illustrated by estimating efficiency scores using data envelopment analysis (DEA) on a sample of 152 dairy farms in Flanders for which both accountancy and parasitic monitoring data were available. Three groups of farms with a different input-output position can be distinguished based on cluster analysis: (1) technically inefficient farms, with a relatively low use of concentrates per 100 l milk and a high exposure to infection, (2) farms with an intermediate TE, relatively high use of concentrates per 100 l milk and a low exposure to infection, (3) farms with the highest TE, relatively low roughage use per 100 l milk and a relatively high exposure to infection. Correlation analysis indicates for each group how the level of exposure to GI nematodes is associated or not with improved economic performance. The results suggest that improving both the economic performance and exposure to infection seems only of interest for highly TE farms. The findings indicate that current farm recommendations

  2. The input-output transformation of the hippocampal granule cells: from grid cells to place fields.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Licurgo; Idiart, Marco; Lisman, John E

    2009-06-10

    Grid cells in the rat medial entorhinal cortex fire (periodically) over the entire environment. These cells provide input to hippocampal granule cells whose output is characterized by one or more small place fields. We sought to understand how this input-output transformation occurs. Available information allows simulation of this process with no freely adjustable parameters. We first examined the spatial distribution of excitation in granule cells produced by the convergence of excitatory inputs from randomly chosen grid cells. Because the resulting summation depends on the number of inputs, it is necessary to use a realistic number (approximately 1200) and to take into consideration their 20-fold variation in strength. The resulting excitation maps have only modest peaks and valleys. To analyze how this excitation interacts with inhibition, we used an E%-max (percentage of maximal suprathreshold excitation) winner-take-all rule that describes how gamma-frequency inhibition affects firing. We found that simulated granule cells have firing maps that have one or more place fields whose size and number approximates those observed experimentally. A substantial fraction of granule cells have no place fields, as observed experimentally. Because the input firing rates and synaptic properties are known, the excitatory charge into granule cells could be calculated (2-3 pC) and was found to be only somewhat larger than required to fire granule cells (1 pC). We conclude that the input-output transformation of dentate granule does not depend strongly on synaptic modification; place field formation can be understood in terms of simple summation of randomly chosen excitatory inputs, in conjunction with a winner-take-all network mechanism.

  3. Viral-genetic tracing of the input-output organization of a central noradrenaline circuit.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Lindsay A; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Gao, Xiaojing J; Beier, Kevin T; Weissbourd, Brandon; DeLoach, Katherine E; Ren, Jing; Ibanes, Sandy; Malenka, Robert C; Kremer, Eric J; Luo, Liqun

    2015-08-01

    Deciphering how neural circuits are anatomically organized with regard to input and output is instrumental in understanding how the brain processes information. For example, locus coeruleus noradrenaline (also known as norepinephrine) (LC-NE) neurons receive input from and send output to broad regions of the brain and spinal cord, and regulate diverse functions including arousal, attention, mood and sensory gating. However, it is unclear how LC-NE neurons divide up their brain-wide projection patterns and whether different LC-NE neurons receive differential input. Here we developed a set of viral-genetic tools to quantitatively analyse the input-output relationship of neural circuits, and applied these tools to dissect the LC-NE circuit in mice. Rabies-virus-based input mapping indicated that LC-NE neurons receive convergent synaptic input from many regions previously identified as sending axons to the locus coeruleus, as well as from newly identified presynaptic partners, including cerebellar Purkinje cells. The 'tracing the relationship between input and output' method (or TRIO method) enables trans-synaptic input tracing from specific subsets of neurons based on their projection and cell type. We found that LC-NE neurons projecting to diverse output regions receive mostly similar input. Projection-based viral labelling revealed that LC-NE neurons projecting to one output region also project to all brain regions we examined. Thus, the LC-NE circuit overall integrates information from, and broadcasts to, many brain regions, consistent with its primary role in regulating brain states. At the same time, we uncovered several levels of specificity in certain LC-NE sub-circuits. These tools for mapping output architecture and input-output relationship are applicable to other neuronal circuits and organisms. More broadly, our viral-genetic approaches provide an efficient intersectional means to target neuronal populations based on cell type and projection pattern.

  4. Inhibitory properties underlying non-monotonic input-output relationship in low-frequency spherical bushy neurons of the gerbil.

    PubMed

    Kuenzel, Thomas; Nerlich, Jana; Wagner, Hermann; Rübsamen, Rudolf; Milenkovic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Spherical bushy cells (SBCs) of the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN) receive input from large excitatory auditory nerve (AN) terminals, the endbulbs of Held, and mixed glycinergic/GABAergic inhibitory inputs. The latter have sufficient potency to block action potential firing in vivo and in slice recordings. However, it is not clear how well the data from slice recordings match the inhibition in the intact brain and how it contributes to complex phenomena such as non-monotonic rate-level functions (RLF). Therefore, we determined the input-output relationship of a model SBC with simulated endbulb inputs and a dynamic inhibitory conductance constrained by recordings in brain slice preparations of hearing gerbils. Event arrival times from in vivo single-unit recordings in gerbils, where 70% of SBC showed non-monotonic RLF, were used as input for the model. Model output RLFs systematically changed from monotonic to non-monotonic shape with increasing strength of tonic inhibition. A limited range of inhibitory synaptic properties consistent with the slice data generated a good match between the model and recorded RLF. Moreover, tonic inhibition elevated the action potentials (AP) threshold and improved the temporal precision of output functions in a SBC model with phase-dependent input conductance. We conclude that activity-dependent, summating inhibition contributes to high temporal precision of SBC spiking by filtering out weak and poorly timed EPSP. Moreover, inhibitory parameters determined in slice recordings provide a good estimate of inhibitory mechanisms apparently active in vivo.

  5. Inhibitory properties underlying non-monotonic input-output relationship in low-frequency spherical bushy neurons of the gerbil

    PubMed Central

    Kuenzel, Thomas; Nerlich, Jana; Wagner, Hermann; Rübsamen, Rudolf; Milenkovic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Spherical bushy cells (SBCs) of the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN) receive input from large excitatory auditory nerve (AN) terminals, the endbulbs of Held, and mixed glycinergic/GABAergic inhibitory inputs. The latter have sufficient potency to block action potential firing in vivo and in slice recordings. However, it is not clear how well the data from slice recordings match the inhibition in the intact brain and how it contributes to complex phenomena such as non-monotonic rate-level functions (RLF). Therefore, we determined the input-output relationship of a model SBC with simulated endbulb inputs and a dynamic inhibitory conductance constrained by recordings in brain slice preparations of hearing gerbils. Event arrival times from in vivo single-unit recordings in gerbils, where 70% of SBC showed non-monotonic RLF, were used as input for the model. Model output RLFs systematically changed from monotonic to non-monotonic shape with increasing strength of tonic inhibition. A limited range of inhibitory synaptic properties consistent with the slice data generated a good match between the model and recorded RLF. Moreover, tonic inhibition elevated the action potentials (AP) threshold and improved the temporal precision of output functions in a SBC model with phase-dependent input conductance. We conclude that activity-dependent, summating inhibition contributes to high temporal precision of SBC spiking by filtering out weak and poorly timed EPSP. Moreover, inhibitory parameters determined in slice recordings provide a good estimate of inhibitory mechanisms apparently active in vivo. PMID:25873864

  6. Adaptation in the input-output relation of the synapse made by the barnacle's photoreceptor.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, J H; Moore, J W; Stuart, A E

    1985-01-01

    A study was made of synaptic transmission between the four median photoreceptors of the giant barnacle (Balanus nubilus) and their post-synaptic cells (I-cells). Simultaneous intracellular recordings were made from the presynaptic terminal region of a photoreceptor and from the soma of an I-cell. The photoreceptor's membrane potential provided feed-back to bath electrodes that passed current into the receptors' axons, permitting the voltage to be controlled at the point of arborization of their presynaptic terminals. Simultaneous recordings from a second photoreceptor showed that its voltage tracked the first. Step depolarizations of the receptors from their dark resting potential (about -60 mV) caused hyperpolarizations of the I-cell that reached a peak, then decayed to a plateau value. The amplitude of the I-cell's response grew with presynaptic depolarizations, saturating at presynaptic values 10-20 mV depolarized from dark rest. Step hyperpolarizations of the receptors from dark rest evoked depolarizations of the I-cell consisting of an initial peak, which varied greatly in amplitude and wave form from preparation to preparation, followed by a plateau. The presence of this post-synaptic response indicates that transmitter is released continuously from the receptors at their dark resting potential. An input-output relation of the synapse was obtained by presenting step depolarizations from a holding potential of -80 mV, where steady-state transmitter release is shut off. The relation is sigmoidal; in the exponentially rising phase of the curve, a 5-11 mV presynaptic change produces a 10-fold change in post-synaptic response. When the presynaptic holding potential was set at values ranging from -80 to -40 mV, the relation between the I-cell's response and the absolute potential to which the receptor was stepped shifted along the presynaptic voltage axis. The slopes of the input-output relations were roughly parallel or increased as the photoreceptors were held

  7. Alternative industrial carbon emissions benchmark based on input-output analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mengyao; Ji, Xi

    2016-05-01

    Some problems exist in the current carbon emissions benchmark setting systems. The primary consideration for industrial carbon emissions standards highly relate to direct carbon emissions (power-related emissions) and only a portion of indirect emissions are considered in the current carbon emissions accounting processes. This practice is insufficient and may cause double counting to some extent due to mixed emission sources. To better integrate and quantify direct and indirect carbon emissions, an embodied industrial carbon emissions benchmark setting method is proposed to guide the establishment of carbon emissions benchmarks based on input-output analysis. This method attempts to link direct carbon emissions with inter-industrial economic exchanges and systematically quantifies carbon emissions embodied in total product delivery chains. The purpose of this study is to design a practical new set of embodied intensity-based benchmarks for both direct and indirect carbon emissions. Beijing, at the first level of carbon emissions trading pilot schemes in China, plays a significant role in the establishment of these schemes and is chosen as an example in this study. The newly proposed method tends to relate emissions directly to each responsibility in a practical way through the measurement of complex production and supply chains and reduce carbon emissions from their original sources. This method is expected to be developed under uncertain internal and external contexts and is further expected to be generalized to guide the establishment of industrial benchmarks for carbon emissions trading schemes in China and other countries.

  8. Energy-Dominated Local Carbon Emissions in Beijing 2007: Inventory and Input-Output Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shan; Liu, J. B.; Shao, Ling; Li, J. S.; An, Y. R.

    2012-01-01

    For greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by Beijing economy 2007, a concrete emission inventory covering carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) is presented and associated with an input-output analysis to reveal the local GHG embodiment in final demand and trade without regard to imported emissions. The total direct GHG emissions amount to 1.06E + 08 t CO2-eq, of which energy-related CO2 emissions comprise 90.49%, non-energy-related CO2 emissions 6.35%, CH4 emissions 2.33%, and N2O emissions 0.83%, respectively. In terms of energy-related CO2 emissions, the largest source is coal with a percentage of 53.08%, followed by coke with 10.75% and kerosene with 8.44%. Sector 26 (Construction Industry) holds the top local emissions embodied in final demand of 1.86E + 07 t CO2-eq due to its considerable capital, followed by energy-intensive Sectors 27 (Transport and Storage) and 14 (Smelting and Pressing of Ferrous and Nonferrous Metals). The GHG emissions embodied in Beijing's exports are 4.90E + 07 t CO2-eq, accounting for 46.01% of the total emissions embodied in final demand. The sound scientific database totally based on local emissions is an important basis to make effective environment and energy policies for local decision makers. PMID:23193385

  9. Input-output oriented computation algorithms for the control of large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minto, K. D.

    1989-01-01

    An overview is given of work in progress aimed at developing computational algorithms addressing two important aspects in the control of large flexible space structures; namely, the selection and placement of sensors and actuators, and the resulting multivariable control law design problem. The issue of sensor/actuator set selection is particularly crucial to obtaining a satisfactory control design, as clearly a poor choice will inherently limit the degree to which good control can be achieved. With regard to control law design, the researchers are driven by concerns stemming from the practical issues associated with eventual implementation of multivariable control laws, such as reliability, limit protection, multimode operation, sampling rate selection, processor throughput, etc. Naturally, the burden imposed by dealing with these aspects of the problem can be reduced by ensuring that the complexity of the compensator is minimized. Our approach to these problems is based on extensions to input/output oriented techniques that have proven useful in the design of multivariable control systems for aircraft engines. In particular, researchers are exploring the use of relative gain analysis and the condition number as a means of quantifying the process of sensor/actuator selection and placement for shape control of a large space platform.

  10. Circuit Architecture of VTA Dopamine Neurons Revealed by Systematic Input-Output Mapping.

    PubMed

    Beier, Kevin T; Steinberg, Elizabeth E; DeLoach, Katherine E; Xie, Stanley; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Schwarz, Lindsay; Gao, Xiaojing J; Kremer, Eric J; Malenka, Robert C; Luo, Liqun

    2015-07-30

    Dopamine (DA) neurons in the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA) integrate complex inputs to encode multiple signals that influence motivated behaviors via diverse projections. Here, we combine axon-initiated viral transduction with rabies-mediated trans-synaptic tracing and Cre-based cell-type-specific targeting to systematically map input-output relationships of VTA-DA neurons. We found that VTA-DA (and VTA-GABA) neurons receive excitatory, inhibitory, and modulatory input from diverse sources. VTA-DA neurons projecting to different forebrain regions exhibit specific biases in their input selection. VTA-DA neurons projecting to lateral and medial nucleus accumbens innervate largely non-overlapping striatal targets, with the latter also sending extensive extra-striatal axon collaterals. Using electrophysiology and behavior, we validated new circuits identified in our tracing studies, including a previously unappreciated top-down reinforcing circuit from anterior cortex to lateral nucleus accumbens via VTA-DA neurons. This study highlights the utility of our viral-genetic tracing strategies to elucidate the complex neural substrates that underlie motivated behaviors.

  11. Input/output functions of different-latency components of transient-evoked and stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Sisto, Renata; Sanjust, Filippo; Moleti, Arturo

    2013-04-01

    The input/output functions of the different-latency components of human transient-evoked and stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions are analyzed, with the goal of relating them to the underlying nonlinear dynamical properties of the basilar membrane response. Several cochlear models predict a cubic nonlinearity that would yield a correspondent compressive response. The otoacoustic response comes from different generation mechanisms, each characterized by a particular relation between local basilar membrane displacement and otoacoustic level. For the same mechanism (e.g., reflection from cochlear roughness), different generation places would imply differently compressive regimes of the local basilar membrane dynamics. Therefore, this kind of study requires disentangling these contributions, using suitable data acquisition and time-frequency analysis techniques. Fortunately, different generation mechanisms/places also imply different phase-gradient delays, knowledge of which can be used to perform this task. In this study, the different-latency otoacoustic components systematically show differently compressive response, consistent with two simple hypotheses: (1) all emissions come from the reflection mechanism and (2) the basilar membrane response is strongly compressive in the resonance region and closer to linear in more basal regions. It is not clear if such a compressive behavior also extends to arbitrarily low stimulus levels.

  12. Demand-driven energy requirement of world economy 2007: A multi-region input-output network simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhan-Ming; Chen, G. Q.

    2013-07-01

    This study presents a network simulation of the global embodied energy flows in 2007 based on a multi-region input-output model. The world economy is portrayed as a 6384-node network and the energy interactions between any two nodes are calculated and analyzed. According to the results, about 70% of the world's direct energy input is invested in resource, heavy manufacture, and transportation sectors which provide only 30% of the embodied energy to satisfy final demand. By contrast, non-transportation services sectors contribute to 24% of the world's demand-driven energy requirement with only 6% of the direct energy input. Commodity trade is shown to be an important alternative to fuel trade in redistributing energy, as international commodity flows embody 1.74E + 20 J of energy in magnitude up to 89% of the traded fuels. China is the largest embodied energy exporter with a net export of 3.26E + 19 J, in contrast to the United States as the largest importer with a net import of 2.50E + 19 J. The recent economic fluctuations following the financial crisis accelerate the relative expansions of energy requirement by developing countries, as a consequence China will take over the place of the United States as the world's top demand-driven energy consumer in 2022 and India will become the third largest in 2015.

  13. Carbon emissions and resources use by Chinese economy 2007: A 135-sector inventory and input-output embodiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G. Q.; Chen, Z. M.

    2010-11-01

    A 135-sector inventory and embodiment analysis for carbon emissions and resources use by Chinese economy 2007 is presented in this paper by an ecological input-output modeling based on the physical entry scheme. Included emissions and resources belong to six categories as: (1) greenhouse gas (GHG) in terms of CO 2, CH 4, and N 2O; (2) energy in terms of coal, crude oil, natural gas, hydropower, nuclear power, and firewood; (3) water in terms of freshwater; (4) exergy in terms of coal, crude oil, natural gas, grain, bean, tuber, cotton, peanut, rapeseed, sesame, jute, sugarcane, sugar beet, tobacco, silkworm feed, tea, fruits, vegetables, wood, bamboo, pulp, meat, egg, milk, wool, aquatic products, iron ore, copper ore, bauxite, lead ore, zinc ore, pyrite, phosphorite, gypsum, cement, nuclear fuel, and hydropower; (5) and (6) solar and cosmic emergies in terms of sunlight, wind power, deep earth heat, chemical power of rain, geopotential power of rain, chemical power of stream, geopotential power of stream, wave power, geothermal power, tide power, topsoil loss, coal, crude oil, natural gas, ferrous metal ore, non-ferrous metal ore, non-metal ore, cement, and nuclear fuel. Accounted based on the embodied intensities are carbon emissions and resources use embodied in the final use as rural consumption, urban consumption, government consumption, gross fixed capital formation, change in inventories, and export, as well as in the international trade balance. The resulted database is basic to environmental account of carbon emissions and resources use at various levels.

  14. Syringe Injectable Electronics: Precise Targeted Delivery with Quantitative Input/Output Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Guosong; Fu, Tian-Ming; Zhou, Tao; Schuhmann, Thomas G; Huang, Jinlin; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-10-14

    Syringe-injectable mesh electronics with tissue-like mechanical properties and open macroporous structures is an emerging powerful paradigm for mapping and modulating brain activity. Indeed, the ultraflexible macroporous structure has exhibited unprecedented minimal/noninvasiveness and the promotion of attractive interactions with neurons in chronic studies. These same structural features also pose new challenges and opportunities for precise targeted delivery in specific brain regions and quantitative input/output (I/O) connectivity needed for reliable electrical measurements. Here, we describe new results that address in a flexible manner both of these points. First, we have developed a controlled injection approach that maintains the extended mesh structure during the "blind" injection process, while also achieving targeted delivery with ca. 20 μm spatial precision. Optical and microcomputed tomography results from injections into tissue-like hydrogel, ex vivo brain tissue, and in vivo brains validate our basic approach and demonstrate its generality. Second, we present a general strategy to achieve up to 100% multichannel I/O connectivity using an automated conductive ink printing methodology to connect the mesh electronics and a flexible flat cable, which serves as the standard "plug-in" interface to measurement electronics. Studies of resistance versus printed line width were used to identify optimal conditions, and moreover, frequency-dependent noise measurements show that the flexible printing process yields values comparable to commercial flip-chip bonding technology. Our results address two key challenges faced by syringe-injectable electronics and thereby pave the way for facile in vivo applications of injectable mesh electronics as a general and powerful tool for long-term mapping and modulation of brain activity in fundamental neuroscience through therapeutic biomedical studies.

  15. Input/output characteristics of a matrix ion-chamber electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Yin, F F; Schell, M C; Rubin, P

    1994-09-01

    The input/output characteristics of a matrix liquid ion-chamber electronic portal imaging device (EPID) are investigated to elucidate the imaging properties of EPIDs. The radiation input to the detector, represented by dose rate, and the pixel value output from the device are related by a characteristic curve. Various incident radiation intensities are obtained by changing the source-to-detector distance (SDD). For each incident radiation intensity, an electronic portal image is obtained using a field size of 5 x 5 cm2. The output pixel value of the EPID is represented by the average pixel value of a region of interest of 9 x 9 pixels centered at a selected point. The effects of various accelerator settings, such as the repetition-rate setting and photon energy, gantry angle, field size, SDD, and acquisition mode of the EPID on characteristic curves are investigated at the central axis. The off-axis response of the detector is also examined. The derivative of the pixel value with respect to the input dose rate is used to analyze the detector contrast. Results indicate that the output pixel value is not a linear function of the incident radiation intensity. The detector contrast is comparable between photon energies of 10 and 6 MV and increases at low dose rates. The response of the imaging device varies substantially with acquisition mode, but is less sensitive to the SDD used for calibration. Characteristic curves are consistent for different gantry angles at the central axis and with the off-axis locations when the gantry angle is used for imaging and calibration, but vary with off-axis locations when the gantry angle is not at the calibration direction. Characteristic curves are also found to vary with different field sizes, but are similar in shape.

  16. Improved GRACE regional mass balance estimates of the Greenland ice sheet cross-validated with the input-output method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zheng; Schrama, Ernst J. O.; van der Wal, Wouter; van den Broeke, Michiel; Enderlin, Ellyn M.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we use satellite gravimetry data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) to estimate regional mass change of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) and neighboring glaciated regions using a least squares inversion approach. We also consider results from the input-output method (IOM). The IOM quantifies the difference between the mass input and output of the GrIS by studying the surface mass balance (SMB) and the ice discharge (D). We use the Regional Atmospheric Climate Model version 2.3 (RACMO2.3) to model the SMB and derive the ice discharge from 12 years of high-precision ice velocity and thickness surveys. We use a simulation model to quantify and correct for GRACE approximation errors in mass change between different subregions of the GrIS, and investigate the reliability of pre-1990s ice discharge estimates, which are based on the modeled runoff. We find that the difference between the IOM and our improved GRACE mass change estimates is reduced in terms of the long-term mass change when using a reference discharge derived from runoff estimates in several subareas. In most regions our GRACE and IOM solutions are consistent with other studies, but differences remain in the northwestern GrIS. We validate the GRACE mass balance in that region by considering several different GIA models and mass change estimates derived from data obtained by the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). We conclude that the approximated mass balance between GRACE and IOM is consistent in most GrIS regions. The difference in the northwest is likely due to underestimated uncertainties in the IOM solutions.

  17. Analyzing the impacts of final demand changes on total output using input-output approach: The case of Japanese ICT sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhdi, Ubaidillah

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the impacts of final demand changes on total output of Japanese Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) sectors in future time. This study employs one of analysis tool in Input-Output (IO) analysis, demand-pull IO quantity model, in achieving the purpose. There are three final demand changes used in this study, namely (1) export, (2) import, and (3) outside households consumption changes. This study focuses on "pure change" condition, the condition that final demand changes only appear in analyzed sectors. The results show that export and outside households consumption modifications give positive impact while opposite impact could be seen in import change.

  18. Computer-Mediated Input, Output and Feedback in the Development of L2 Word Recognition from Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Joshua; Cheng, Junyu; O'Toole, John Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the impact of computer-mediated input, output and feedback on the development of second language (L2) word recognition from speech (WRS). A quasi-experimental pre-test/treatment/post-test research design was used involving three intact tertiary level English as a Second Language (ESL) classes. Classes were either assigned to…

  19. Input-output formalism for few-photon transport in one-dimensional nanophotonic waveguides coupled to a qubit

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Shanhui; Kocabas, Suekrue Ekin; Shen, Jung-Tsung

    2010-12-15

    We extend the input-output formalism of quantum optics to analyze few-photon transport in waveguides with an embedded qubit. We provide explicit analytical derivations for one- and two-photon scattering matrix elements based on operator equations in the Heisenberg picture.

  20. INPUT-OUTPUT BUDGETS OF INORGANIC NITROGEN FOR 24 FOREST WATERSHEDS IN THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Input-output budgets for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) are summarized for 24 small watersheds at 15 locations in the northeasternUnited States. The study watersheds are completely forested, free of recent physical disturbances, and span a geographical region bounded by West ...

  1. Linear system identification - The application of Lion's identification scheme to a third order system with noisy input-output measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, C. M., Jr.; Monopoli, R. V.

    1974-01-01

    A linear system identification technique developed by Lion is adapted for use on a third-order system with six unknown parameters and noisy input-output measurements. A digital computer is employed so that rapid identification takes place with only two state variable filters. Bias in the parameter estimates is partially eliminated by a signal-to-noise ratio testing procedure.

  2. Ranking Hearing Aid Input-Output Functions for Understanding Low-, Conversational-, and High-Level Speech in Multitalker Babble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, King; Killion, Mead C.; Christensen, Laurel A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the rankings of 6 input-output functions for understanding low-level, conversational, and high-level speech in multitalker babble without manipulating volume control for listeners with normal hearing, flat sensorineural hearing loss, and mildly sloping sensorineural hearing loss. Method: Peak clipping, compression limiting,…

  3. Radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Namer, M.; Lalanne, C.M.; Boublil, J.L.; Hery, M.; Chauvel, P.; Verschoore, J.; Aubanel, J.M.; Bruneton, J.N.

    1980-08-01

    Evaluation of loco-regional results obtained by radiotherapy for 31 patients with inoperable epidermoid lung cancer revealed objective remission (over 50%) in only 25% of patients. These results emphasize the limited effectiveness of radiotherapy in such cases and point out the need for increased research in radiotherapy techniques if survival rates are to be improved.

  4. Utilizing Physical Input-Output Model to Inform Nitrogen related Ecosystem Services

    EPA Science Inventory

    Here we describe the development of nitrogen PIOTs for the midwestern US state of Illinois with large inputs of nitrogen from agriculture and industry. The PIOTs are used to analyze the relationship between regional economic activities and ecosystem services in order to identify...

  5. Estimates of embodied global energy and air-emission intensities of Japanese products for building a Japanese input-output life cycle assessment database with a global system boundary.

    PubMed

    Nansai, Keisuke; Kondo, Yasushi; Kagawa, Shigemi; Suh, Sangwon; Nakajima, Kenichi; Inaba, Rokuta; Tohno, Susumu

    2012-08-21

    To build a life cycle assessment (LCA) database of Japanese products embracing their global supply chains in a manner requiring lower time and labor burdens, this study estimates the intensity of embodied global environmental burden for commodities produced in Japan. The intensity of embodied global environmental burden is a measure of the environmental burden generated globally by unit production of the commodity and can be used as life cycle inventory data in LCA. The calculation employs an input-output LCA method with a global link input-output model that defines a global system boundary grounded in a simplified multiregional input-output framework. As results, the intensities of embodied global environmental burden for 406 Japanese commodities are determined in terms of energy consumption, greenhouse-gas emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, perfluorocarbons, hydrofluorocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, and their summation), and air-pollutant emissions (nitrogen oxide and sulfur oxide). The uncertainties in the intensities of embodied global environmental burden attributable to the simplified structure of the global link input-output model are quantified using Monte Carlo simulation. In addition, by analyzing the structure of the embodied global greenhouse-gas intensities we characterize Japanese commodities in the context of LCA embracing global supply chains. PMID:22881452

  6. Estimates of embodied global energy and air-emission intensities of Japanese products for building a Japanese input-output life cycle assessment database with a global system boundary.

    PubMed

    Nansai, Keisuke; Kondo, Yasushi; Kagawa, Shigemi; Suh, Sangwon; Nakajima, Kenichi; Inaba, Rokuta; Tohno, Susumu

    2012-08-21

    To build a life cycle assessment (LCA) database of Japanese products embracing their global supply chains in a manner requiring lower time and labor burdens, this study estimates the intensity of embodied global environmental burden for commodities produced in Japan. The intensity of embodied global environmental burden is a measure of the environmental burden generated globally by unit production of the commodity and can be used as life cycle inventory data in LCA. The calculation employs an input-output LCA method with a global link input-output model that defines a global system boundary grounded in a simplified multiregional input-output framework. As results, the intensities of embodied global environmental burden for 406 Japanese commodities are determined in terms of energy consumption, greenhouse-gas emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, perfluorocarbons, hydrofluorocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, and their summation), and air-pollutant emissions (nitrogen oxide and sulfur oxide). The uncertainties in the intensities of embodied global environmental burden attributable to the simplified structure of the global link input-output model are quantified using Monte Carlo simulation. In addition, by analyzing the structure of the embodied global greenhouse-gas intensities we characterize Japanese commodities in the context of LCA embracing global supply chains.

  7. Influence of active dendritic currents on input-output processing in spinal motoneurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, R H; Kuo, J J; Jiang, M C; Heckman, C J

    2003-01-01

    The extensive dendritic tree of the adult spinal motoneuron generates a powerful persistent inward current (PIC). We investigated how this dendritic PIC influenced conversion of synaptic input to rhythmic firing. A linearly increasing, predominantly excitatory synaptic input was generated in triceps ankle extensor motoneurons by slow stretch (duration: 2-10 s) of the Achilles tendon in the decerebrate cat preparation. The firing pattern evoked by stretch was measured by injecting a steady current to depolarize the cell to threshold for firing. The effective synaptic current (I(N), the net synaptic current reaching the soma of the cell) evoked by stretch was measured during voltage clamp. Hyperpolarized holding potentials were used to minimize the activation of the dendritic PIC and thus estimate stretch-evoked I(N) for a passive dendritic tree (I(N,PASS)). Depolarized holding potentials that approximated the average membrane potential during rhythmic firing allowed strong activation of the dendritic PIC and thus resulted in marked enhancement of the total stretch-evoked I(N) (I(N,TOT)). The net effect of the dendritic PIC on the generation of rhythmic firing was assessed by plotting stretch-evoked firing (strong PIC activation) versus stretch-evoked I(N,PASS) (minimal PIC activation). The gain of this input-output function for the neuron (I-O(N)) was found to be ~2.7 times as high as for the standard injected frequency current (F-I) function in low-input conductance neurons. However, about halfway through the stretch, firing rate tended to become constant, resulting in a sharp saturation in I-O(N) that was not present in F-I. In addition, the gain of I-O(N) decreased sharply with increasing input conductance, resulting in much lower stretch-evoked firing rates in high-input conductance cells. All three of these phenomena (high initial gain, saturation, and differences in low- and high-input conductance cells) were also readily apparent in the differences between

  8. US-CERT Control System Center Input/Output (I/O) Conceputal Design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-02-01

    This document was prepared for the US-CERT Control Systems Center of the National Cyber Security Division (NCSD) of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DHS has been tasked under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to coordinate the overall national effort to enhance the protection of the national critical infrastructure. Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-7 directs the federal departments to identify and prioritize critical infrastructure and protect it from terrorist attack. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security was prepared by the NCSD to address the control system security component addressed in the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace and the National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security identified five high-level strategic goals for improving cyber security of control systems; the I/O upgrade described in this document supports these goals. The vulnerability assessment Test Bed, located in the Information Operations Research Center (IORC) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), consists of a cyber test facility integrated with multiple test beds that simulate the nation's critical infrastructure. The fundamental mission of the Test Bed is to provide industry owner/operators, system vendors, and multi-agency partners of the INL National Security Division a platform for vulnerability assessments of control systems. The Input/Output (I/O) upgrade to the Test Bed (see Work Package 3.1 of the FY-05 Annual Work Plan) will provide for the expansion of assessment capabilities within the IORC facility. It will also provide capabilities to connect test beds within the Test Range and other Laboratory resources. This will allow real time I/O data input and communication channels for full replications of control systems (Process Control Systems [PCS], Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Systems [SCADA], and components

  9. Atomic entanglement purification and concentration using coherent state input-output process in low-Q cavity QED regime.

    PubMed

    Cao, Cong; Wang, Chuan; He, Ling-Yan; Zhang, Ru

    2013-02-25

    We investigate an atomic entanglement purification protocol based on the coherent state input-output process by working in low-Q cavity in the atom-cavity intermediate coupling region. The information of entangled states are encoded in three-level configured single atoms confined in separated one-side optical micro-cavities. Using the coherent state input-output process, we design a two-qubit parity check module (PCM), which allows the quantum nondemolition measurement for the atomic qubits, and show its use for remote parities to distill a high-fidelity atomic entangled ensemble from an initial mixed state ensemble nonlocally. The proposed scheme can further be used for unknown atomic states entanglement concentration. Also by exploiting the PCM, we describe a modified scheme for atomic entanglement concentration by introducing ancillary single atoms. As the coherent state input-output process is robust and scalable in realistic applications, and the detection in the PCM is based on the intensity of outgoing coherent state, the present protocols may be widely used in large-scaled and solid-based quantum repeater and quantum information processing.

  10. Management of Inoperable Malignant Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kiess, Ana P; Quon, Harry

    2016-01-01

    For patients with inoperable salivary gland malignancy, radiation therapy has significant limitations but has been the mainstay of treatment. With standard photon radiation (X-rays), the 10-year loco-regional control (LRC) and overall survival rates are only ∼25%. Neutron radiation has potential biological advantages over photon radiation because it causes increased DNA damage, and studies of patients with inoperable salivary gland malignancy have shown improved 6-year LRC and overall survival of ∼60%. However, neutron radiation may also increase the risk of late toxicities, especially central nervous system toxicities after treatment of tumors involving the base of the skull. Proton radiation has potential physical advantages due to minimal exit dose through normal tissues, and a recent study has demonstrated 90% 5-year LRC after combined proton/photon radiation for adenoid cystic carcinoma involving the base of the skull. Stereotactic radiosurgery has also been used in combination with neutrons or standard photons as a technique to boost the skull base. The use of concurrent chemotherapy as a radiosensitizer has been considered based on extrapolation of data on squamous cell carcinomas, but further data are needed on inoperable salivary gland malignancies. Newer targeted therapies are also under investigation, and clinical trial enrollment is encouraged. PMID:27093559

  11. Mercury Inputs, Outputs, Cycling, and Ambient Concentrations under the Forest Canopy in the Adirondacks of New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, H.; Holsen, T.

    2009-12-01

    This study investigated mercury inputs, outputs, cycling, and the interactions between deposition, emissions and atmospheric conditions in the Huntington Forest of the Adirondacks, New York. Continuous speciated mercury concentrations of gaseous elemental Hg (GEM), reactive gaseous Hg (RGM), and particulate Bound Hg (PBM) were made from June 2006 to May 2007. The average concentrations of GEM, RGM, and PBM were 1.4 ± 0.4 ng m-3, 1.8 ± 2.2 pg m-3, and 3.2 ± 3.7 pg m-3, respectively. A hybrid receptor modeling technique (potential source contribution function (PSCF)) was used with the speciated Hg concentrations to identify possible Hg sources. Major Hg sources that have a potential to contribute high Hg concentrations observed in the Adirondacks were found to be Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, Texas, Indiana, and Missouri. The volume-weighted mean (VWM) total Hg concentration in throughfall (Dec. 2004 to Dec. 2006) (6.6 ng L-1) was higher than in precipitation (4.9 ng L-1), while the total cumulative Hg flux in throughfall (12.0 µg m-2) was similar to precipitation (11.6 µg m-2). The emission flux of GEM from the forest floor measured using a polycarbonate dynamic flux chamber (DFC) was highest in spring, and summer, and lowest in winter. The yearly estimated Hg inputs into the forest canopy include throughfall (6.5 g m-2 year-1), litterfall (18.3 g m-2 year-1), and dry deposition during leaf-off periods (0.4g m-2 year-1). The yearly estimated Hg outputs from the forest canopy include emission from the forest floor (7.0g m-2 year-1), soil water (0.6 g m-2 year-1), and Hg loss via evaporation or overland flow during snow melt (1.0 g m-2 year-1). Litterfall represented the most significant input of Hg to this forest ecosystem. Based on this mass balance, 16.6 g m-2 of Hg is accumulating in the forest floor every year.

  12. Estimation of the contribution of exports to the provincial economy: an analysis based on China's multi-regional input-output tables.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sanmang; Li, Shantong; Lei, Yalin

    2016-01-01

    This paper developed an estimation model for the contribution of exports to a country's regional economy based on the Chenery-Moses model and conducted an empirical analysis using China's multi-regional input-output tables for 1997, 2002, and 2007. The results indicated that China's national exports make significantly different contributions to the provincial economy in various regions, with the greatest contribution being observed in the eastern region and the smallest in the central region. The provinces are also subjected to significantly different export spillover effects. The boosting effect for the eastern provinces is primarily generated from local exports, whereas the western provinces primarily benefit from the export spillover effect from the eastern provinces. The eastern provinces, such as Guangdong, Zhejiang, Jiangsu, and Shanghai, are the primary sources of export spillover effects, and Guangdong is the largest source of export spillover effects for almost all of the provinces in China. PMID:27006865

  13. Estimation of the contribution of exports to the provincial economy: an analysis based on China's multi-regional input-output tables.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sanmang; Li, Shantong; Lei, Yalin

    2016-01-01

    This paper developed an estimation model for the contribution of exports to a country's regional economy based on the Chenery-Moses model and conducted an empirical analysis using China's multi-regional input-output tables for 1997, 2002, and 2007. The results indicated that China's national exports make significantly different contributions to the provincial economy in various regions, with the greatest contribution being observed in the eastern region and the smallest in the central region. The provinces are also subjected to significantly different export spillover effects. The boosting effect for the eastern provinces is primarily generated from local exports, whereas the western provinces primarily benefit from the export spillover effect from the eastern provinces. The eastern provinces, such as Guangdong, Zhejiang, Jiangsu, and Shanghai, are the primary sources of export spillover effects, and Guangdong is the largest source of export spillover effects for almost all of the provinces in China.

  14. An application of input-output analysis in analyzing the impacts of final demands changes on the total outputs of Japanese energy sectors: A further study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhdi, Ubaidillah

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to continue the previous study which discussed the impacts of final demands changes on the total outputs of Japanese energy sectors. More specifically, this study aims to conduct a deeper analysis regarding these impacts. This study employs a demand-pull Input- Output (IO) quantity model, one of the calculation instruments in IO analysis, as a tool of analysis. This study focuses on two sectors, namely (1) petroleum refinery products, and (2) non-ferrous metals. Two conditions are considered in the analysis part, namely (1) “whole sector change”, and (2) “pure change”. The results show that in both conditions, both discussed sectors have similar patterns. The results also explain that, in both conditions, the biggest positive impact for the sector of petroleum refinery products is given by scenario 4, the modification of consumption expenditures of private.

  15. Experimental physics and industrial control system (EPICS) input/output controller (IOC) application developer`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Kraimer, M.R.

    1994-05-01

    This document describes the core software that resides in an Input/Output Controller (IOC), one of the major components of EPICS. The plan of the book is: EPICS overview, IOC test facilities, general purpose features, database locking - scanning - and processing, static database access, runtime database access, database scanning, record and device support, device support library, IOC database configuration, IOC initialization, and database structures. Other than the first chapter this document describes only core IOC software. Thus it does not describe other EPICS tools such as the sequencer. It also does not describe Channel Access, a major IOC component.

  16. An input-output approach to analyze the ways to increase total output of energy sectors: The case of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhdi, Ubaidillah

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the ways to increase total output of Japanese energy sectors in future time. In this study, Input-Output (IO) analysis is employed as a tool of analysis. This study focuses on petroleum refinery products and non-ferrous metals as analyzed sectors. The results show that positive impact observed in export and outside households consumption modifications while opposite impact is given by modification of import. The recommendations suggested based on these results are Japanese government should make breakthroughs so analyzed sector's export activities can increase and they have to careful in conducting import activities related to these sectors.

  17. Compilation and application of Japanese inventories for energy consumption and air pollutant emissions using input-output tables.

    PubMed

    Nansai, Keisuke; Moriguchi, Yuichi; Tohno, Susumu

    2003-05-01

    Preparing emission inventories is essential to the assessment and management of our environment. In this study, Japanese air pollutant emissions, energy consumption, and CO2 emissions categorized by approximately 400 sectors (as classified by Japanese input-output tables in 1995) were estimated, and the contributions of each sector to the total amounts were analyzed. The air pollutants examined were nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur oxides (SOx), and suspended particulate matter (SPM). Consumptions of about 20 fossil fuels and five other fuels were estimated according to sector. Air pollutant emission factors for stationary sources were calculated from the results of a survey on air pollution prevention in Japan. Pollutant emissions from mobile sources were estimated taking into consideration vehicle types, traveling speeds, and distances. This work also counted energy supply and emissions from seven nonfossil fuel sources, including nonthermal electric power, and CO2 emissions from limestone (for example, during cement production). The total energy consumption in 1995 was concluded to be 18.3 EJ, and the annual total emissions of CO2, NOx, SOx, and SPM were, respectively, 343 Mt-C, 3.51 Mt, 1.87 Mt, and 0.32 Mt. An input-output analysis of the emission inventories was used to calculate the amounts of energy consumption and emissions induced in each sector by the economic final demand. PMID:12775078

  18. An input-output table based analysis on the virtual water by sectors with the five northwest provinces in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chenchen; Zhan, Jinyan

    Virtual water refers to the volumes of water required to produce a commodity or service. It reflects human's actual consumption of water resources and therefore has certain significance in water resources management. Over the years, the concept of virtual water has caught the attentions of water manager and decision maker. In order to utilize this concept, the accounting and estimation of virtual water is the foundation that lies in this issue. Till now, the accounting methods mainly include the method provided by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), water footprint and input-output analysis method. In this paper, we chose Northwest China, which is a typical arid region that is facing with rapid economic development, as the study area and built an Input-Output (IO) analysis method to estimate virtual water among different industry sectors in the northwest China. The accounting and estimation results could be used to give suggestions to increase water use efficiency and promote virtual water trade in the study area. Comparison of the proposed method with other prevailing method was also analyzed. The introduced method could be utilized for accounting and estimation of virtual water by sectors, with its superiority in characterizing industrial water consumption and the accounting results could lend certain credence to the water resource management and industrial transformation for the future economic development of northwest China.

  19. Optimal fixed-finite-dimensional compensator for Burgers' equation with unbounded input/output operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, John A.; Marrekchi, Hamadi

    1993-01-01

    The problem of using reduced order dynamic compensators to control a class of nonlinear parabolic distributed parameter systems was considered. Concentration was on a system with unbounded input and output operators governed by Burgers' equation. A linearized model was used to compute low-order-finite-dimensional control laws by minimizing certain energy functionals. Then these laws were applied to the nonlinear model. Standard approaches to this problem employ model/controller reduction techniques in conjunction with linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) theory. The approach used is based on the finite dimensional Bernstein/Hyland optimal projection theory which yields a fixed-finite-order controller.

  20. Economic interrelationships and impacts of the aviation/aerospace industry in the state of Florida using input-output analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whealan George, Kelly

    The study provided a detailed description of the interrelatedness of the aviation and aerospace industry with principal industries in Florida and Volusia County (VC) using Input-Output (IO) analysis. Additionally, this research provided an economic impact analysis of the creation of a university research park in Daytona Beach (DB). The economic impact measures included not only direct economic output and industry employment descriptions but also described the multiplier effects in the form of indirect and induced impacts using data for 2012. This research concluded the average labor income of the aviation and aerospace industry was higher than average labor income in Florida and VC. A substantive difference between the Florida and VC average labor income for the aviation and aerospace industry existed because VC's aerospace sector was only concentrated in the search, detection, and navigation instruments manufacturing sector. VC's transport by air sector was one-fifth the size of Florida's. Differences in the aviation and aerospace industry composition between Florida and VC are important because the economic impacts from a shock to the entire aviation and aerospace industry will be distributed differently. Since the aviation and aerospace average labor income is higher than the average labor income in Florida and VC, it would be a positive move for Florida's economy to attract and grow the aviation and aerospace industry. It would be highly unlikely that the entirety of newly created jobs would be resourced from the local population. Nonetheless, growing the aviation and aerospace industry jobs would have a positive influence on the region's economy and tax revenues. It would be a desirable course of action to spur the growth of this sector, as its direct effect would culminate with additional jobs in Florida that would bring higher wage jobs to the state. The interdependencies of the aviation and aerospace industry in Florida and VC with other industries had a

  1. A controls engineering approach for analyzing airplane input-output characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbuckle, P. Douglas

    1991-01-01

    An engineering approach for analyzing airplane control and output characteristics is presented. State-space matrix equations describing the linear perturbation dynamics are transformed from physical coordinates into scaled coordinates. The scaling is accomplished by applying various transformations to the system to employ prior engineering knowledge of the airplane physics. Two different analysis techniques are then explained. Modal analysis techniques calculate the influence of each system input on each fundamental mode of motion and the distribution of each mode among the system outputs. The optimal steady state response technique computes the blending of steady state control inputs that optimize the steady state response of selected system outputs. Analysis of an example airplane model is presented to demonstrate the described engineering approach.

  2. An Exact Algorithm using Edges and Routes Pegging Test for the Input-Output Scheduling Problem in Automated Warehouses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Yoshitsune; Numata, Kazumiti

    In this paper we propose and evaluate some idea to improve an existing exact algorithm for Input-Output Scheduling Problem (IOSP) in automated warehouses. The existing algorithm is based on LP relaxation of IOSP, which is solved by the column generation method allowing relaxed columns (routes). Our idea is, expecting to enhance LP solution, to impliment the column generation using only exact routes, and to reduce consequently increasing calculation cost by dropping (pegging) unusable edges. The pegging test is done in the preprocessing phase by solving Lagrangian relaxation of IOSP formulated in node cover decision variables. The results of computational experiments show that the proposed algorithm can solve slightly large sized instances in less execution time than existing one.

  3. Changes in soil organic carbon storage under grassland as evidenced by changes in sulphur input-output budgets.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J S; Deng, Y; Smith, R V

    2001-01-01

    Information about temporal changes in soil organic carbon (C) pools may be obtained indirectly from changes in input-output budgets of organically combined nutrients such as sulphur (S). Sulphur budgets were therefore evaluated for Northern Ireland (NI) for the period 1940-1990, inclusive. These budgets indicated that the land or soil had acted first as a sink but then as a source for S, and that reserves of soil S built up between 1940 and 1965 were totally depleted by the mid-1980s. Pooled data from six long-term soil-monitoring sites on undisturbed grassland suggested that negative S budgets from the late-1970s onwards had been due to the net mineralization of soil organic matter and thus were indicative of net losses of organic C from surface soil horizons. There was some evidence that the decline in rainfall and fertiliser S inputs from the mid-1960s may have precipitated the breakdown of soil organic matter.

  4. Automated pure-tone threshold estimations from extrapolated distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) input/output functions.

    PubMed

    Schmuziger, Nicolas; Patscheke, Jochen; Probst, Rudolf

    2006-04-01

    A promising approach to the prediction of pure-tone thresholds through the estimation of DPOAE thresholds by input/output functions was recently published by Boege and Janssen [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111, 1810-1818 (2002)]. On the basis of their results, a device that enables automated measurements of these thresholds was recently developed. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the reliability of this instrument for the objective assessment of hearing loss in 101 ears with either normal hearing or with cochlear hearing loss of up to 50 dB HL. The median difference between pure-tone hearing and DPOAE thresholds was approximately 2 dB. For individual subjects, however, DPOAE thresholds differed from pure-tone thresholds by up to 40 dB. We find, therefore, that the clinical benefits of this method are probably limited.

  5. Potential characterization of free-space-wave drop demultiplexer using cavity-resonator-integrated grating input/output coupler.

    PubMed

    Kintaka, Kenji; Shimizu, Katsuya; Kita, Yuki; Kawanami, Satoshi; Inoue, Junichi; Ura, Shogo; Nishii, Junji

    2010-11-22

    A prototype free-space-wave drop demultiplexer consisting of a cavity-resonator-integrated grating input/output coupler (CRIGIC) and a different-guided-mode-coupling distributed Bragg reflector (DGM-DBR) was designed for constructing a high-density wavelength-division-multiplexing intra-board chip-to-chip optical interconnection. The CRIGIC consists of one grating coupler and two DBRs, and can vertically couple a guided wave and a free-space wave with high efficiency. A two-channel drop demultiplexer operating at around 850-nm wavelength with 5-nm channel spacing in wavelength was fabricated in a thin-film SiO2-based waveguide. The device performance was predicted theoretically, characterized experimentally, and discussed.

  6. Cavity-resonator-integrated grating input/output coupler for high-efficiency vertical coupling with a small aperture.

    PubMed

    Kintaka, Kenji; Kita, Yuki; Shimizu, Katsuya; Matsuoka, Hitoshi; Ura, Shogo; Nishii, Junji

    2010-06-15

    A cavity-resonator-integrated grating input/output coupler (CRIGIC) is designed to operate at about 850 nm wavelength for high-efficiency vertical coupling of a guided wave and a free-space wave with a small aperture. The CRIGIC consists of a grating coupler and a waveguide cavity resonator constructed by two distributed Bragg reflectors. A coupling efficiency of 96% with a 3 dB bandwidth of 1.2 nm is predicted by a theoretical calculation. An output coupling efficiency of about 60% is experimentally demonstrated on a 20 microm aperture device, fabricated in a thin-film SiO(2)-based waveguide on a substrate with an Au reflection layer, for what we believe to be the first time.

  7. Coupled-Cluster Theory Employing Approximate Integrals: An Approach to Avoid the Input/Output and Storage Bottlenecks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rendell, Alistair P.; Lee, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    By representing orbital products in an expansion basis, certain classes of two-electron integrals are approximated for use in CCSD(T) calculations (singles and doubles coupled-cluster plus a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations). This leads to a very large reduction in disk storage and input/output requirements, with usually only a modest increase in computational effort. The new procedure will allow very large CCSD(T) calculations to be undertaken, limited only by available processor time. Using the molecular basis as the expansion basis, explicit numerical comparisons of equilibrium geometries, harmonic frequencies, and energy differences indicate that the error due to the use of approximate integrals is less than the error associated with truncation of the molecular basis set.

  8. Ultrasonic input-output for transmitting and receiving longitudinal transducers coupled to same face of isotropic elastic plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Karagulle, H.; Lee, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    The quantitative understanding of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation parameters such as the stress wave factor were studied. Ultrasonic input/output characteristics for an isotropic elastic plate with transmitting and receiving longitudinal transducers coupled to the same face were analyzed. The asymptotic normal stress is calculated for an isotropic elastic half space subjected to a uniform harmonic normal stress applied to a circular region at the surface. The radiated stress waves are traced within the plate by considering wave reflections at the top and bottom faces. The output voltage amplitude of the receiving transducer is estimated by considering only longitudinal waves. Agreement is found between the output voltage wave packet amplitudes and times of arrival due to multiple reflections of the longitudinal waves.

  9. Modulation of the input-output function by GABAA receptor-mediated currents in rat oculomotor nucleus motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Torres-Torrelo, Julio; Torres, Blas; Carrascal, Livia

    2014-11-15

    The neuronal input-output function depends on recruitment threshold and gain of the firing frequency-current (f-I) relationship. These two parameters are positively correlated in ocular motoneurons (MNs) recorded in alert preparation and inhibitory inputs could contribute to this correlation. Phasic inhibition mediated by γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) occurs when a high concentration of GABA at the synaptic cleft activates postsynaptic GABAA receptors, allowing neuronal information transfer. In some neuronal populations, low concentrations of GABA activate non-synaptic GABAA receptors and generate a tonic inhibition, which modulates cell excitability. This study determined how ambient GABA concentrations modulate the input-output relationship of rat oculomotor nucleus MNs. Superfusion of brain slices with GABA (100 μm) produced a GABAA receptor-mediated current that reduced the input resistance, increased the recruitment threshold and shifted the f-I relationship rightward without any change in gain. These modifications did not depend on MN size. In absence of exogenous GABA, gabazine (20 μm; antagonist of GABAA receptors) abolished spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents and revealed a tonic current in MNs. Gabazine increased input resistance and decreased recruitment threshold mainly in larger MNs. The f-I relationship shifted to the left, without any change in gain. Gabazine effects were chiefly due to MN tonic inhibition because tonic current amplitude was five-fold greater than phasic. This study demonstrates a tonic inhibition in ocular MNs that modulates cell excitability depending on cell size. We suggest that GABAA tonic inhibition acting concurrently with glutamate receptors activation could reproduce the positive covariation between threshold and gain reported in alert preparation.

  10. Estimating raw material equivalents on a macro-level: comparison of multi-regional input-output analysis and hybrid LCI-IO.

    PubMed

    Schoer, Karl; Wood, Richard; Arto, Iñaki; Weinzettel, Jan

    2013-12-17

    The mass of material consumed by a population has become a useful proxy for measuring environmental pressure. The "raw material equivalents" (RME) metric of material consumption addresses the issue of including the full supply chain (including imports) when calculating national or product level material impacts. The RME calculation suffers from data availability, however, as quantitative data on production practices along the full supply chain (in different regions) is required. Hence, the RME is currently being estimated by three main approaches: (1) assuming domestic technology in foreign economies, (2) utilizing region-specific life-cycle inventories (in a hybrid framework), and (3) utilizing multi-regional input-output (MRIO) analysis to explicitly cover all regions of the supply chain. While the first approach has been shown to give inaccurate results, this paper focuses on the benefits and costs of the latter two approaches. We analyze results from two key (MRIO and hybrid) projects modeling raw material equivalents, adjusting the models in a stepwise manner in order to quantify the effects of individual conceptual elements. We attempt to isolate the MRIO gap, which denotes the quantitative impact of calculating the RME of imports by an MRIO approach instead of the hybrid model, focusing on the RME of EU external trade imports. While, the models give quantitatively similar results, differences become more pronounced when tracking more detailed material flows. We assess the advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches and look forward to ways to further harmonize data and approaches. PMID:24255968

  11. Estimating raw material equivalents on a macro-level: comparison of multi-regional input-output analysis and hybrid LCI-IO.

    PubMed

    Schoer, Karl; Wood, Richard; Arto, Iñaki; Weinzettel, Jan

    2013-12-17

    The mass of material consumed by a population has become a useful proxy for measuring environmental pressure. The "raw material equivalents" (RME) metric of material consumption addresses the issue of including the full supply chain (including imports) when calculating national or product level material impacts. The RME calculation suffers from data availability, however, as quantitative data on production practices along the full supply chain (in different regions) is required. Hence, the RME is currently being estimated by three main approaches: (1) assuming domestic technology in foreign economies, (2) utilizing region-specific life-cycle inventories (in a hybrid framework), and (3) utilizing multi-regional input-output (MRIO) analysis to explicitly cover all regions of the supply chain. While the first approach has been shown to give inaccurate results, this paper focuses on the benefits and costs of the latter two approaches. We analyze results from two key (MRIO and hybrid) projects modeling raw material equivalents, adjusting the models in a stepwise manner in order to quantify the effects of individual conceptual elements. We attempt to isolate the MRIO gap, which denotes the quantitative impact of calculating the RME of imports by an MRIO approach instead of the hybrid model, focusing on the RME of EU external trade imports. While, the models give quantitatively similar results, differences become more pronounced when tracking more detailed material flows. We assess the advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches and look forward to ways to further harmonize data and approaches.

  12. Uncertainty of solute flux estimation in ungauged small streams: potential implications for input-output nutrient mass balances at stream reach scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butturini, A.

    2005-12-01

    Input-output mass balances within stream reaches provide in situ estimates of stream nutrient retention/release under a wide spectrum of hydrological conditions. Providing good estimates of the mass balances for nutrients depends on precise hydrological monitoring and good chemical characterisation of stream water at the input and output ends of the stream reach. There is a need to optimise the hydrological monitoring and the frequencies of water sampling to yield precise annual mass balances, so as to avoid undue cost - high resolution monitoring and subsequent chemical analysis can be labour intensive and costly. In this paper, simulation exercises were performed using a data set created to represent the instantaneous discharge and solute dynamics at the input and output ends of a model stream reach during a one year period. At the output end, stream discharge and water chemistry were monitored continuously, while the input end was assumed to be ungauged; water sampling frequency was changed arbitrarily. Instantaneous discharge at the ungauged sampling point was estimated with an empirical power model linking the discharge to the catchment area (Hooper, 1986). The model thus substitutes for the additional gauge station. Simulations showed that 10 days was the longest chemical sampling interval which could provide reach annual mass balances of acceptable precision. Presently, the relationship between discharge and catchment area is usually assumed to be linear but simulations indicate that small departures from the linearity of this relationship could cause dramatic changes in the mass balance estimations.

  13. Breeding for resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes - the potential in low-input/output small ruminant production systems.

    PubMed

    Zvinorova, P I; Halimani, T E; Muchadeyi, F C; Matika, O; Riggio, V; Dzama, K

    2016-07-30

    The control of gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) is mainly based on the use of drugs, grazing management, use of copper oxide wire particles and bioactive forages. Resistance to anthelmintic drugs in small ruminants is documented worldwide. Host genetic resistance to parasites, has been increasingly used as a complementary control strategy, along with the conventional intervention methods mentioned above. Genetic diversity in resistance to GIN has been well studied in experimental and commercial flocks in temperate climates and more developed economies. However, there are very few report outputs from the more extensive low-input/output smallholder systems in developing and emerging countries. Furthermore, results on quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with nematode resistance from various studies have not always been consistent, mainly due to the different nematodes studied, different host breeds, ages, climates, natural infections versus artificial challenges, infection level at sampling periods, among others. The increasing use of genetic markers (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms, SNPs) in GWAS or the use of whole genome sequence data and a plethora of analytic methods offer the potential to identify loci or regions associated nematode resistance. Genomic selection as a genome-wide level method overcomes the need to identify candidate genes. Benefits in genomic selection are now being realised in dairy cattle and sheep under commercial settings in the more advanced countries. However, despite the commercial benefits of using these tools, there are practical problems associated with incorporating the use of marker-assisted selection or genomic selection in low-input/output smallholder farming systems breeding schemes. Unlike anthelmintic resistance, there is no empirical evidence suggesting that nematodes will evolve rapidly in response to resistant hosts. The strategy of nematode control has evolved to a more practical manipulation of host-parasite equilibrium

  14. Breeding for resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes - the potential in low-input/output small ruminant production systems.

    PubMed

    Zvinorova, P I; Halimani, T E; Muchadeyi, F C; Matika, O; Riggio, V; Dzama, K

    2016-07-30

    The control of gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) is mainly based on the use of drugs, grazing management, use of copper oxide wire particles and bioactive forages. Resistance to anthelmintic drugs in small ruminants is documented worldwide. Host genetic resistance to parasites, has been increasingly used as a complementary control strategy, along with the conventional intervention methods mentioned above. Genetic diversity in resistance to GIN has been well studied in experimental and commercial flocks in temperate climates and more developed economies. However, there are very few report outputs from the more extensive low-input/output smallholder systems in developing and emerging countries. Furthermore, results on quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with nematode resistance from various studies have not always been consistent, mainly due to the different nematodes studied, different host breeds, ages, climates, natural infections versus artificial challenges, infection level at sampling periods, among others. The increasing use of genetic markers (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms, SNPs) in GWAS or the use of whole genome sequence data and a plethora of analytic methods offer the potential to identify loci or regions associated nematode resistance. Genomic selection as a genome-wide level method overcomes the need to identify candidate genes. Benefits in genomic selection are now being realised in dairy cattle and sheep under commercial settings in the more advanced countries. However, despite the commercial benefits of using these tools, there are practical problems associated with incorporating the use of marker-assisted selection or genomic selection in low-input/output smallholder farming systems breeding schemes. Unlike anthelmintic resistance, there is no empirical evidence suggesting that nematodes will evolve rapidly in response to resistant hosts. The strategy of nematode control has evolved to a more practical manipulation of host-parasite equilibrium

  15. Design and microwave test of an ultrawideband input/output structure for sheet beam travelling wave tubes.

    PubMed

    Shu, Guoxiang; Wang, Jianxun; Liu, Guo; Yang, Liya; Luo, Yong; Wang, Shafei

    2015-06-01

    Broadband operation is of great importance for the applications of travelling wave tubes such as high-data communication and wideband radar. An input/output (I/O) structure operating with broadband property plays a significant role to achieve these applications. In this paper, a Y-type branch waveguide (YTBW) coupler and its improvements are proposed and utilized to construct an extremely wideband I/O structure to ensure the broadband operation for sheet beam travelling wave tubes (SB-TWTs). Cascaded reflection resonators are utilized to improve the isolation characteristic and transmission efficiency. Furthermore, to minimize the reflectivity of the port connected with the RF circuit, wave-absorbing material (WAM) is loaded in the resonator. Simulation results for the YTBW loaded with WAM predict an excellent performance with a 50.2% relative bandwidth for port reflectivity under -15 dB, transmission up to -1.5 dB, and meanwhile isolation under -20 dB. In addition, the coupler has a relatively compact configuration and the beam tunnel can be widened, which is beneficial for the propagation of the electrons. A Q-band YTBW loaded with two reflection resonators is fabricated and microwave tested. Vector network analyzer (VNA) measured results have an excellent agreement with our simulation, which verify our theoretical analysis and simulation calculation. PMID:26133854

  16. Greenhouse Gas Emission Intensities Based on Economic Input-Output Tables and Case Studies of Product LCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Oguchi, Masahiro; Amemiya, Kumiko; Kagami, Hideyo; Haruki, Kazuhito

    In this paper, emission intensity tables of greenhouse gas (especially HFC, PFC and SF6) are presented and LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) case studies using those tables are discussed. The emission intensity tables of greenhouse gas are derived from Economic Input-Output Tables (I/O tables) and several statistical data. The emission intensities derived from the total amount transferred between sections in I/O tables become larger than the intensities derived from the actual amount of gases transferred between sections. In order to calculate the intensities of these gases, certain sections of the I/O tables should be decomposed. The I/O tables are modified, adding these sections, which correspond to ″HFC″, ″PFC″, ″HCFC″ and ″SF6″ manufacturing industries. The emission intensities become large in not only ″HFC″, ″PFC″, ″HCFC″, ″SF6″ subsections, but also ″Semiconductor devices and integrated circuits″, ″Liquid crystal devices″ and ″Relay switches and switchboards″ sections. LCA case studies are conducted on a laptop PC and an air conditioner. The greenhouse gas emission at each stage of the life cycle is increased by about 20% for a laptop PC and by about 1% for an air conditioner with the CO2 equivalent compared with the result calculated by the emission intensity tables of CO2 and N2O.

  17. Simultaneous recording of stimulus-frequency and distortion-product otoacoustic emission input-output functions in human ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schairer, Kim S.; Keefe, Douglas H.

    2005-02-01

    Stimulus frequency otoacoustic emission (SFOAE) input-output (I/O) functions were elicited in normal-hearing adults using unequal-frequency primaries in equal-level and fixed-suppressor level (Ls) conditions. Responses were repeatable and similar across a range of primary frequency ratios in the fixed-Ls condition. In comparison to equal-frequency primary conditions [Schairer, Fitzpatrick, and Keefe, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 944-966 (2003)], the unequal-frequency, fixed-Ls condition appears to be more useful for characterizing SFOAE response growth and relating it to basilar-membrane response growth, and for testing the ability to predict audiometric thresholds. Simultaneously recorded distortion-product OAE (DPOAE) I/O functions had higher thresholds than SFOAE I/O functions, and they identified the onset of the nonlinear-distortion mechanism in SFOAEs. DPOAE threshold often corresponded to nonmonotonicities in SFOAE I/O functions. This suggests that the level-dependent nonmonotonicities and associated phase shifts in SFOAE I/O functions were due to varying degrees of cancellation of two sources of SFOAE, such as coherent reflection and distortion mechanisms. Level-dependent noise was observed on-band (at the frequencies of the stimuli) but not off-band, or in the DPOAEs. The variability was observed in ears with normal hearing and ears with cochlear implants. In general, these results indicate the source of the variability is biological, possibly from within the middle ear. .

  18. Local-scale systems input-output analysis of embodied water for the Beijing economy in 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mengyao; Guo, Shan; Chen, Hui; Ji, Xi; Li, Jiashuo

    2014-09-01

    Using the most detailed and recent statistics available for Beijing, a local-scale embodiment analysis on water use was conducted, employing a systems input-output analysis that integrates economic systems with natural resources data. Systems analysis for water research at the local scale is a crucial part of a systems oriented water accounting framework. To our knowledge, however, related works have not been thoroughly conducted. In this paper, a set of embodied water intensity inventory data is presented, which is applicable to both intermediate input and final demand. Also, detailed analyses of Beijing's embodied water use accounting are presented. The embodied water intensity of the Water Production and Supply Industry Sector turns out to be the highest among the 42 sectors. For water embodied in final demand, the total amount is 3.48 km3, of which the water embodied in urban household consumption makes up nearly a half proportion. As a net virtual water importer, Beijing's water embodied in commodity trade totals 5.84×108 m3. As a result, in addition to improvements in technology and water use efficiency, adjustments in industrial structure and trade policies are also of significant importance to water conservation efforts.

  19. Analysis of a beach as a time-invariant linear input/output system of marine litter.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Tomoya; Hinata, Hirofumi; Kato, Shigeru

    2013-12-15

    The exponential decay of the amount of new litter on Wadahama Beach, Nii-jima Island, Japan revealed by 20-month mark-recapture experiments demonstrates a linear response of the beach to the input of target items. Here we show the amplitude and phase characteristics of the beach as a time-invariant linear input/output system and discuss the hydrodynamic and geomorphological factors that would determine the characteristics with the aid of a diffusion equation. The characteristics are fully determined by the residence time of the items (τ(r)=209 days) and can be described as functions of the ratio of τ(r) to the period of input variability. The decay is reproduced well by the analytical solution of the equation with a constant diffusion coefficient (D), whose order was estimated by τ(r) and the backshore width. Generally, D would depend on hydrodynamical statistics and beach geomorphology as well as the dimensions and density of the items. PMID:24143956

  20. Analysis of a beach as a time-invariant linear input/output system of marine litter.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Tomoya; Hinata, Hirofumi; Kato, Shigeru

    2013-12-15

    The exponential decay of the amount of new litter on Wadahama Beach, Nii-jima Island, Japan revealed by 20-month mark-recapture experiments demonstrates a linear response of the beach to the input of target items. Here we show the amplitude and phase characteristics of the beach as a time-invariant linear input/output system and discuss the hydrodynamic and geomorphological factors that would determine the characteristics with the aid of a diffusion equation. The characteristics are fully determined by the residence time of the items (τ(r)=209 days) and can be described as functions of the ratio of τ(r) to the period of input variability. The decay is reproduced well by the analytical solution of the equation with a constant diffusion coefficient (D), whose order was estimated by τ(r) and the backshore width. Generally, D would depend on hydrodynamical statistics and beach geomorphology as well as the dimensions and density of the items.

  1. Design and microwave test of an ultrawideband input/output structure for sheet beam travelling wave tubes.

    PubMed

    Shu, Guoxiang; Wang, Jianxun; Liu, Guo; Yang, Liya; Luo, Yong; Wang, Shafei

    2015-06-01

    Broadband operation is of great importance for the applications of travelling wave tubes such as high-data communication and wideband radar. An input/output (I/O) structure operating with broadband property plays a significant role to achieve these applications. In this paper, a Y-type branch waveguide (YTBW) coupler and its improvements are proposed and utilized to construct an extremely wideband I/O structure to ensure the broadband operation for sheet beam travelling wave tubes (SB-TWTs). Cascaded reflection resonators are utilized to improve the isolation characteristic and transmission efficiency. Furthermore, to minimize the reflectivity of the port connected with the RF circuit, wave-absorbing material (WAM) is loaded in the resonator. Simulation results for the YTBW loaded with WAM predict an excellent performance with a 50.2% relative bandwidth for port reflectivity under -15 dB, transmission up to -1.5 dB, and meanwhile isolation under -20 dB. In addition, the coupler has a relatively compact configuration and the beam tunnel can be widened, which is beneficial for the propagation of the electrons. A Q-band YTBW loaded with two reflection resonators is fabricated and microwave tested. Vector network analyzer (VNA) measured results have an excellent agreement with our simulation, which verify our theoretical analysis and simulation calculation.

  2. Simultaneous recording of stimulus-frequency and distortion-product otoacoustic emission input-output functions in human ears.

    PubMed

    Schairer, Kim S; Keefe, Douglas H

    2005-02-01

    Stimulus frequency otoacoustic emission (SFOAE) input-output (I/O) functions were elicited in normal-hearing adults using unequal-frequency primaries in equal-level and fixed-suppressor level (Ls) conditions. Responses were repeatable and similar across a range of primary frequency ratios in the fixed-Ls condition. In comparison to equal-frequency primary conditions [Schairer, Fitzpatrick, and Keefe, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 944-966 (2003)], the unequal-frequency, fixed-Ls condition appears to be more useful for characterizing SFOAE response growth and relating it to basilar-membrane response growth, and for testing the ability to predict audiometric thresholds. Simultaneously recorded distortion-product OAE (DPOAE) I/O functions had higher thresholds than SFOAE I/O functions, and they identified the onset of the nonlinear-distortion mechanism in SFOAEs. DPOAE threshold often corresponded to nonmonotonicities in SFOAE I/O functions. This suggests that the level-dependent nonmonotonicities and associated phase shifts in SFOAE I/O functions were due to varying degrees of cancellation of two sources of SFOAE, such as coherent reflection and distortion mechanisms. Level-dependent noise was observed on-band (at the frequencies of the stimuli) but not off-band, or in the DPOAEs. The variability was observed in ears with normal hearing and ears with cochlear implants. In general, these results indicate the source of the variability is biological, possibly from within the middle ear.

  3. Similarity in loudness and distortion product otoacoustic emission input/output functions: implications for an objective hearing aid adjustment.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jörg; Janssen, Thomas

    2004-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) to loudness with regard to the potentiality of DPOAEs to determine characteristic quantities of the cochlear-impaired ear and to derive objective hearing aid parameters. Recently, Neely et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 1499-1507 (2003)] compared DPOAE input/output functions to the Fletcher and Munson [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 5, 82-108 (1933)] loudness function finding a close resemblance in the slope characteristics of both measures. The present study extended their work by performing both loudness and DPOAE measurements in the same subject sample, and by developing a method for the estimation of gain needed to compensate for loss of cochlear sensitivity and compression. DPOAEs and loudness exhibited similar behavior when plotted on a logarithmic scale and slope increased with increasing hearing loss, confirming the findings of Neely et al. To compensate for undesired nonpathological impacts on the magnitude of DPOAE level, normalization of DPOAE data was implemented. A close resemblance between gain functions based on loudness and normalized DPOAE data was achieved. These findings suggest that DPOAEs are able to quantify the loss of cochlear sensitivity and compression and thus might provide parameters for a noncooperative hearing aid adjustment.

  4. Design and microwave test of an ultrawideband input/output structure for sheet beam travelling wave tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Guoxiang; Wang, Jianxun; Liu, Guo; Yang, Liya; Luo, Yong; Wang, Shafei

    2015-06-15

    Broadband operation is of great importance for the applications of travelling wave tubes such as high-data communication and wideband radar. An input/output (I/O) structure operating with broadband property plays a significant role to achieve these applications. In this paper, a Y-type branch waveguide (YTBW) coupler and its improvements are proposed and utilized to construct an extremely wideband I/O structure to ensure the broadband operation for sheet beam travelling wave tubes (SB-TWTs). Cascaded reflection resonators are utilized to improve the isolation characteristic and transmission efficiency. Furthermore, to minimize the reflectivity of the port connected with the RF circuit, wave-absorbing material (WAM) is loaded in the resonator. Simulation results for the YTBW loaded with WAM predict an excellent performance with a 50.2% relative bandwidth for port reflectivity under −15 dB, transmission up to −1.5 dB, and meanwhile isolation under −20 dB. In addition, the coupler has a relatively compact configuration and the beam tunnel can be widened, which is beneficial for the propagation of the electrons. A Q-band YTBW loaded with two reflection resonators is fabricated and microwave tested. Vector network analyzer (VNA) measured results have an excellent agreement with our simulation, which verify our theoretical analysis and simulation calculation.

  5. Effects of hyperdynamic fields on input-output relationships and long-term potentiation in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Guinan, M J; Horowitz, J M; Fuller, C A

    1998-10-01

    The effects of a 2G force environment on synaptic plasticity were examined in the rat hippocampus. Field potentials from neurons in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer were evoked by stimulation of the afferent Schaffer collateral/commissural fibers in an in vitro slice preparation. Input-output (I-O) relationships of the circuit were determined before and after tetanizing stimuli given to induce long term potentiation (LTP), a form of neural plasticity. I-O curves from animals exposed to 2G via centrifugation for either 2 or 14 days were not different from those obtained in control (1G) animals. Similarly, induction of LTP was equivalent in all groups, showing increases in maximum amplitude, slope and midpoint response of the fitted Boltzmann functions compared to un-tetanized controls. Comparison of slices from dorsal and ventral hippocampus showed the location of the slice had no effect of LTP expression. We conclude that, in contrast to other reports of functional changes in the central nervous system under altered force environments, cellular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, which may underlie learning and memory, are preserved in the hippocampus. PMID:11541900

  6. A comprehensive estimation of the economic effects of meteorological services based on the input-output method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianhua; Wei, Guo; Yang, Lingjuan; Guo, Ji; Lu, Huaguo; Chen, Yunfeng; Sun, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Concentrating on consuming coefficient, partition coefficient, and Leontief inverse matrix, relevant concepts and algorithms are developed for estimating the impact of meteorological services including the associated (indirect, complete) economic effect. Subsequently, quantitative estimations are particularly obtained for the meteorological services in Jiangxi province by utilizing the input-output method. It is found that the economic effects are noticeably rescued by the preventive strategies developed from both the meteorological information and internal relevance (interdependency) in the industrial economic system. Another finding is that the ratio range of input in the complete economic effect on meteorological services is about 1 : 108.27-1 : 183.06, remarkably different from a previous estimation based on the Delphi method (1 : 30-1 : 51). Particularly, economic effects of meteorological services are higher for nontraditional users of manufacturing, wholesale and retail trades, services sector, tourism and culture, and art and lower for traditional users of agriculture, forestry, livestock, fishery, and construction industries. PMID:24578666

  7. Quality- and dilution losses in the recycling of ferrous materials from end-of-life passenger cars: input-output analysis under explicit consideration of scrap quality.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shinichiro; Kondo, Yasushi; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Nakajima, Kenichi; Tasaki, Tomohiro; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2012-09-01

    Metals can in theory be infinitely recycled in a closed-loop without any degradation in quality. In reality, however, open-loop recycling is more typical for metal scrap recovered from end-of-life (EoL) products because mixing of different metal species results in scrap quality that no longer matches the originals. Further losses occur when meeting the quality requirement of the target product requires dilution of the secondary material by adding high purity materials. Standard LCA usually does not address these losses. This paper presents a novel approach to quantifying quality- and dilution losses, by means of hybrid input-output analysis. We focus on the losses associated with the recycling of ferrous materials from end-of-life vehicle (ELV) due to the mixing of copper, a typical contaminant in steel recycling. Given the quality of scrap in terms of copper density, the model determines the ratio by which scrap needs to be diluted in an electric arc furnace (EAF), and the amount of demand for EAF steel including those quantities needed for dilution. Application to a high-resolution Japanese IO table supplemented with data on ferrous materials including different grades of scrap indicates that a nationwide avoidance of these losses could result in a significant reduction of CO(2) emissions.

  8. Quality- and dilution losses in the recycling of ferrous materials from end-of-life passenger cars: input-output analysis under explicit consideration of scrap quality.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shinichiro; Kondo, Yasushi; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Nakajima, Kenichi; Tasaki, Tomohiro; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2012-09-01

    Metals can in theory be infinitely recycled in a closed-loop without any degradation in quality. In reality, however, open-loop recycling is more typical for metal scrap recovered from end-of-life (EoL) products because mixing of different metal species results in scrap quality that no longer matches the originals. Further losses occur when meeting the quality requirement of the target product requires dilution of the secondary material by adding high purity materials. Standard LCA usually does not address these losses. This paper presents a novel approach to quantifying quality- and dilution losses, by means of hybrid input-output analysis. We focus on the losses associated with the recycling of ferrous materials from end-of-life vehicle (ELV) due to the mixing of copper, a typical contaminant in steel recycling. Given the quality of scrap in terms of copper density, the model determines the ratio by which scrap needs to be diluted in an electric arc furnace (EAF), and the amount of demand for EAF steel including those quantities needed for dilution. Application to a high-resolution Japanese IO table supplemented with data on ferrous materials including different grades of scrap indicates that a nationwide avoidance of these losses could result in a significant reduction of CO(2) emissions. PMID:22876977

  9. A longitudinal study of distortion product otoacoustic emission ipsilateral suppression and input/output characteristics in human neonates.

    PubMed

    Abdala, Carolina

    2003-12-01

    Past work has shown that distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) (2f1-f2) ipsilateral suppression and input/output (I/O) characteristics are not adult-like in prematurely born neonates [Abdala, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 110, 1465-1476 (2001)]. These age differences are most pronounced at f2 = 6000 Hz and have been interpreted to indicate a subtle immaturity in human cochlear function prior to term birth. It is still not clear, however, whether term-born neonates are completely adult-like in cochlear function. To study this question, DPOAE suppression and I/O functions for f2 = 6000 Hz were measured in a group of prematurely born neonates at weekly intervals over a period of 7-8-weeks, a group of normal-hearing adults, and during a one-time test session in a group of term-born neonates. Results show that there was no significant change in suppression tuning, suppression growth, and various I/O characteristics across test session for premature neonates, but there was an age-group effect; even once prematurely born neonates reached the equivalence of term-like status (38-40-weeks postconceptional weeks), they continued to show narrower suppression tuning than adults, shallower suppression growth for low-frequency side suppressor tones, and an elevated amplitude saturation plateau on the I/O function. Term-born neonates showed DPOAE results that were comparable to those measured from premature neonates and unlike adult findings. These results suggest that a subtle immaturity in cochlear function persists into the postnatal period. PMID:14714805

  10. A longitudinal study of distortion product otoacoustic emission ipsilateral suppression and input/output characteristics in human neonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdala, Carolina

    2003-12-01

    Past work has shown that distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) (2f1-f2) ipsilateral suppression and input/output (I/O) characteristics are not adult-like in prematurely born neonates [Abdala, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 110, 1465-1476 (2001)]. These age differences are most pronounced at f2=6000 Hz and have been interpreted to indicate a subtle immaturity in human cochlear function prior to term birth. It is still not clear, however, whether term-born neonates are completely adult-like in cochlear function. To study this question, DPOAE suppression and I/O functions for f2=6000 Hz were measured in a group of prematurely born neonates at weekly intervals over a period of 7-8-weeks, a group of normal-hearing adults, and during a one-time test session in a group of term-born neonates. Results show that there was no significant change in suppression tuning, suppression growth, and various I/O characteristics across test session for premature neonates, but there was an age-group effect; even once prematurely born neonates reached the equivalence of term-like status (38-40-weeks postconceptional weeks), they continued to show narrower suppression tuning than adults, shallower suppression growth for low-frequency side suppressor tones, and an elevated amplitude saturation plateau on the I/O function. Term-born neonates showed DPOAE results that were comparable to those measured from premature neonates and unlike adult findings. These results suggest that a subtle immaturity in cochlear function persists into the postnatal period.

  11. A longitudinal study of distortion product otoacoustic emission ipsilateral suppression and input/output characteristics in human neonates.

    PubMed

    Abdala, Carolina

    2003-12-01

    Past work has shown that distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) (2f1-f2) ipsilateral suppression and input/output (I/O) characteristics are not adult-like in prematurely born neonates [Abdala, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 110, 1465-1476 (2001)]. These age differences are most pronounced at f2 = 6000 Hz and have been interpreted to indicate a subtle immaturity in human cochlear function prior to term birth. It is still not clear, however, whether term-born neonates are completely adult-like in cochlear function. To study this question, DPOAE suppression and I/O functions for f2 = 6000 Hz were measured in a group of prematurely born neonates at weekly intervals over a period of 7-8-weeks, a group of normal-hearing adults, and during a one-time test session in a group of term-born neonates. Results show that there was no significant change in suppression tuning, suppression growth, and various I/O characteristics across test session for premature neonates, but there was an age-group effect; even once prematurely born neonates reached the equivalence of term-like status (38-40-weeks postconceptional weeks), they continued to show narrower suppression tuning than adults, shallower suppression growth for low-frequency side suppressor tones, and an elevated amplitude saturation plateau on the I/O function. Term-born neonates showed DPOAE results that were comparable to those measured from premature neonates and unlike adult findings. These results suggest that a subtle immaturity in cochlear function persists into the postnatal period.

  12. Further efforts to predict pure-tone thresholds from distortion product otoacoustic emission input/output functions.

    PubMed

    Gorga, Michael P; Neely, Stephen T; Dorn, Patricia A; Hoover, Brenda M

    2003-06-01

    Recently, Boege and Janssen [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111, 1810-1818 (2002)] fit linear equations to distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) input/output (UO) functions after the DPOAE level (in dB SPL) was converted into pressure (in microPa). Significant correlations were observed between these DPOAE thresholds and audiometric thresholds. The present study extends their work by (1) evaluating the effect of frequency, (2) determining the behavioral thresholds in those conditions that did not meet inclusion criteria, and (3) including a wider range of stimulus levels. DPOAE I/O functions were measured in as many as 278 ears of subjects with normal and impaired hearing. Nine f2 frequencies (500 to 8000 Hz in 1/2-octave steps) were used, L2 ranged from 10 to 85 dB SPL (5-dB steps), and L1 was set according to the equation L1 = 0.4L2 + 39 dB [Kummer et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 103, 3431-3444 (1998)] for L2 levels up to 65 dB SPL, beyond which L1 = L2. For the same conditions as those used by Boege and Janssen, we observed a frequency effect such that correlations were higher for mid-frequency threshold comparisons. In addition, a larger proportion of conditions not meeting inclusion criteria at mid and high frequencies had hearing losses exceeding 30 dB HL, compared to lower frequencies. These results suggest that DPOAE I/O functions can be used to predict audiometric thresholds with greater accuracy at mid and high frequencies, but only when certain inclusion criteria are met. When the SNR inclusion criterion is not met, the expected amount of hearing loss increases. Increasing the range of input levels from 20-65 dB SPL to 10-85 dB SPL increased the number of functions meeting inclusion criteria and increased the overall correlation between DPOAE and behavioral thresholds.

  13. 14 CFR 135.179 - Inoperable instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inoperable instruments and equipment. 135... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.179 Inoperable instruments and equipment. (a) No person may take off an aircraft with inoperable instruments or equipment installed unless the following conditions are met: (1)...

  14. 14 CFR 121.628 - Inoperable instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inoperable instruments and equipment. 121... § 121.628 Inoperable instruments and equipment. (a) No person may take off an airplane with inoperable instruments or equipment installed unless the following conditions are met: (1) An approved Minimum...

  15. Input-output method to fault detection for discrete-time fuzzy networked systems with time-varying delay and multiple packet losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenquan; Feng, Jian; Jiang, Yulian

    2016-05-01

    The fault detection (FD) problem for discrete-time fuzzy networked systems with time-varying delay and multiple packet losses is investigated in this paper. The communication links between the plant and the FD filter (FDF) are assumed to be imperfect, and the missing probability is governed by an individual random variable satisfying a certain probabilistic distribution over the interval [0 1]. The discrete-time delayed fuzzy networked system is first transformed into the form of interconnect ion of two subsystems by applying an input-output method and a two-term approximation approach, which are employed to approximate the time-varying delay. Our attention is focused on the design of fuzzy FDF (FFDF) such that, for all data missing conditions, the overall FD dynamics are input-output stable in mean square and preserves a guaranteed performance. Sufficient conditions are first established via H∞ performance analysis for the existence of the desired FFDF; meanwhile, the corresponding solvability conditions for the desired FFDF gains are characterised in terms of the feasibility of a convex optimisation problem. Moreover, we show that the obtained criteria based on the input-output approach can also be established by applying the direct Lyapunov method to the original time-delay systems. Finally, simulation examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  16. 14 CFR 125.201 - Inoperable instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inoperable instruments and equipment. 125... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 125.201 Inoperable instruments and equipment. (a) No person may take off...

  17. ePPR: a new strategy for the characterization of sensory cells from input/output data.

    PubMed

    Rapela, Joaquín; Felsen, Gidon; Touryan, Jon; Mendel, Jerry M; Grzywacz, Norberto M

    2010-01-01

    A central goal of systems neuroscience is to characterize the transformation of sensory input to spiking output in single neurons. This problem is complicated by the large dimensionality of the inputs. To cope with this problem, previous methods have estimated simplified versions of a generic linear-nonlinear (LN) model and required, in most cases, stimuli with constrained statistics. Here we develop the extended Projection Pursuit Regression (ePPR) algorithm that allows the estimation of all of the parameters, in space and time, of a generic LN model using arbitrary stimuli. We first prove that ePPR models can uniformly approximate, to an arbitrary degree of precision, any continuous function. To test this generality empirically, we use ePPR to recover the parameters of models of cortical cells that cannot be represented exactly with an ePPR model. Next we evaluate ePPR with physiological data from primary visual cortex, and show that it can characterize both simple and complex cells, from their responses to both natural and random stimuli. For both simulated and physiological data, we show that ePPR compares favorably to spike-triggered and information-theoretic techniques. To the best of our knowledge, this article contains the first demonstration of a method that allows the estimation of an LN model of visual cells, containing multiple spatio-temporal filters, from their responses to natural stimuli. PMID:20735338

  18. ePPR: a new strategy for the characterization of sensory cells from input/output data.

    PubMed

    Rapela, Joaquín; Felsen, Gidon; Touryan, Jon; Mendel, Jerry M; Grzywacz, Norberto M

    2010-01-01

    A central goal of systems neuroscience is to characterize the transformation of sensory input to spiking output in single neurons. This problem is complicated by the large dimensionality of the inputs. To cope with this problem, previous methods have estimated simplified versions of a generic linear-nonlinear (LN) model and required, in most cases, stimuli with constrained statistics. Here we develop the extended Projection Pursuit Regression (ePPR) algorithm that allows the estimation of all of the parameters, in space and time, of a generic LN model using arbitrary stimuli. We first prove that ePPR models can uniformly approximate, to an arbitrary degree of precision, any continuous function. To test this generality empirically, we use ePPR to recover the parameters of models of cortical cells that cannot be represented exactly with an ePPR model. Next we evaluate ePPR with physiological data from primary visual cortex, and show that it can characterize both simple and complex cells, from their responses to both natural and random stimuli. For both simulated and physiological data, we show that ePPR compares favorably to spike-triggered and information-theoretic techniques. To the best of our knowledge, this article contains the first demonstration of a method that allows the estimation of an LN model of visual cells, containing multiple spatio-temporal filters, from their responses to natural stimuli.

  19. Water flows in the Spanish economy: agri-food sectors, trade and households diets in an input-output framework.

    PubMed

    Cazcarro, Ignacio; Duarte, Rosa; Sánchez-Chóliz, Julio

    2012-06-19

    Seeking to advance our knowledge of water flows and footprints and the factors underlying them, we apply, on the basis of an extended 2004 Social Accounting Matrix for Spain, an open Leontief model in which households and foreign trade are the exogenous accounts. The model shows the water embodied in products bought by consumers (which we identify with the Water Footprint) and in trade (identified with virtual water trade). Activities with relevant water inflows and outflows such as the agrarian sector, textiles, and the agri-food industry are examined in detail using breakdowns of the relevant accounts. The data reflect only physical consumption, differentiating between green and blue water. The results reveal that Spain is a net importer of water. Flows are then related to key trading partners to show the large quantities involved. The focus on embodied (or virtual) water by activity is helpful to distinguish indirect from direct consumption as embodied water can be more than 300 times direct consumption in some food industry activities. Finally, a sensitivity analysis applied to changes in diets shows the possibility of reducing water uses by modifying households' behavior to encourage healthier eating.

  20. Design of a high voltage input - output ratio dc-dc converter dedicated to small power fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthoux, O.; Cathelin, J.

    2010-12-01

    Consuming chemical energy, fuel cells produce simultaneously heat, water and useful electrical power [J.M. Andújar, F. Segura, Renew. Sust. Energy Rev. 13, 2309 (2009)], [J. Larminie, A. Dicks, Fuel Cell Systems Explained, 2nd edn. (John Wiley & Sons, 2003)]. As a matter of fact, the voltage generated by a fuel cell strongly depends on both the load power demand and the operating conditions. Besides, as a result of many design aspects, fuel cells are low voltage and high current electric generators. On the contrary, electric loads are commonly designed for small voltage swing and a high V/I ratio in order to minimize Joule losses. Therefore, electric loads supplied by fuel cells are typically fed by means of an intermediate power voltage regulator. The specifications of such a power converter are to be able to step up the input voltage with a high ratio (a ratio of 10 is a classic situation) and also to work with an excellent efficiency (in order to minimize its size, its weight and its losses) [A. Shahin, B. Huang, J.P. Martin, S. Pierfederici, B. Davat, Energy Conv. Manag. 51, 56 (2010)]. This paper deals with the design of this essential ancillary device. It intends to bring out the best structure for fulfilling this function. Several dc-dc converters with large voltage step-up ratios are introduced. A topology based on a coupled inductor or tapped inductor is closely studied. A detailed modelling is performed with the purpose of providing designing rules. This model is validated with both simulation and implementation. The experimental prototype is based on the following specifications: the fuel cell output voltage ranges from a 50 V open-voltage to a 25 V rated voltage while the load requires a constant 250 V voltage. The studied coupled inductor converter is compared with a classic boost converter commonly used in this voltage elevating application. Even though the voltage regulator faces severe FC specifications, the measured efficiency reaches 96% at the

  1. Implementation of real-time input/output interfaces at the AMRDEC Advanced Simulation Center's hardware-in-the-loop facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Joe; Beck, David; Richard, Henri

    2005-05-01

    Hardware in the Loop (HWIL) simulations are often spread over a large area with many hardware and software components. Open and closed loop tests necessitate a flexible test environment of allocating and ordering these components. These components may be connected in a star, a ring configuration, and/or any combinations of these two configurations, with shared memory wrappers connecting some of the software components. A Resource Allocation Program (RAP) is proposed along with a device table to allocate, organize, and document the communication protocol between the software and hardware components. Communication between software components is done through a single set of input output routines using information so that software objects may be changed with hardware objects or placed on different computers with minimal code changes.

  2. GD-aided IOL (input-output linearisation) controller for handling affine-form nonlinear system with loose condition on relative degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunong; Chen, Dechao; Jin, Long; Zhang, Yinyan; Yin, Yonghua

    2016-04-01

    Input-output linearisation (IOL) may encounter a singularity problem when applied to the tracking control of affine-form nonlinear system (AFNS), which may not have a well-defined relative degree. The singularity problem has occurred in the area of control for decades. In this paper, we incorporate the gradient dynamics (GD) into IOL, which leads to the GD-aided IOL method to solve the singularity problem, with the proposition of the loose condition on relative degree. Moreover, detailed theoretical analyses on tracking-error bound and convergence performance of the corresponding GD-aided IOL controller are presented. Simulations and comparisons substantiate that the proposed GD-aided IOL method is capable of completing the tracking-control task and conquering the singularity encountered in the AFNS.

  3. Applying the input-output method to account for water footprint and virtual water trade in the Haihe River basin in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu; Yang, Hong; Yang, Zhifeng; Chen, Bin; Qin, Yan

    2010-12-01

    The virtual water strategy which advocates importing water intensive products and exporting products with low water intensity is gradually accepted as one of the options for solving water crisis in severely water scarce regions. However, if we count the virtual water embodied in imported products as the water saved for a region, we might overestimate the saving by including the virtual water that is later re-exported in association with the proceeded products made from the originally imported products. This problem can be avoided by accounting for the saved water through calculating water footprint (WF) in domestic final consumptive products. In this paper, an input-output analysis (IOA) based on the water footprint accounting framework is built to account for WF and virtual water trade of final consumptive products in the water stressed Haihe River basin in China for the year 1997, 2000, and 2002. The input-output transaction tables of the three years are constructed. The results show WF of 46.57, 44.52, and 42.71 billion m(3) for the three years, respectively. These volumes are higher than the water used directly in the corresponding years in the basin. A WF intensity (WFI) indicator is then used to assess if the economic activities in the basin are consistent with the virtual water strategy. The temporal change of the WFI is also decomposed by the index number analysis method. The results showed that the basin was silently importing virtual water through the trade of raw and processed food commodities under the background of the whole economic circulation.

  4. Changes in input-output relations in the corticospinal pathway to the lower limb muscles during robot-assisted passive stepping.

    PubMed

    Kamibayashi, Kiyotaka; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Makoto; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2011-01-01

    We investigated input (stimulus)-output (response) relations of the corticospinal pathway in the lower limb muscles during passive stepping using a robotic driven gait orthosis. Nine healthy adult subjects passively stepped with 40% body weight unloading (ground stepping) and 100% body weight unloading in the air (air stepping). During passive stepping, the motor evoked potentials (MEPs) of the lower limb muscles elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were recorded at late-stance, early-, and late-swing phases of 2 stepping conditions. The input-output relation at each phase of the stepping conditions was obtained by increasing stimulus intensity in 5% increments from 40% to 70% of maximal stimulator output. The slopes of input-output relations were steeper at the early-swing phase in the rectus femoris muscle and at the late-stance and late-swing phases in the biceps femoris muscle in both stepping conditions. There were no significant differences in the MEP responses of the rectus femoris and biceps femoris muscles at each phase between the 2 conditions. Low muscle activity was seen at the late-stance phase of ground stepping in the soleus muscle and the MEP amplitude at this phase became larger. The slopes in the tibialis anterior muscle were steep at the early- and late-swing phases of ground stepping. There was a significant difference in the MEPs of the tibialis anterior muscle between the late-swing phases in ground and air stepping. The present study indicates that corticospinal excitability to the lower limb muscles is modulated by sensory inputs elicited by passive stepping.

  5. Morphology, input-output relations and synaptic connectivity of Cajal-Retzius cells in layer 1 of the developing neocortex of CXCR4-EGFP mice.

    PubMed

    Anstötz, Max; Cosgrove, Kathleen E; Hack, Iris; Mugnaini, Enrico; Maccaferri, Gianmaria; Lübke, Joachim H R

    2014-11-01

    Layer 1 (L1) neurons, in particular Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells are among the earliest generated neurons in the neocortex. However, their role and that of L1 GABAergic interneurons in the establishment of an early cortical microcircuit are still poorly understood. Thus, the morphology of whole-cell recorded and biocytin-filled CR cells was investigated in postnatal day (P) 7-11 old CXCR4-EGFP mice where CR cells can be easily identified by their fluorescent appearance. Confocal-, light- and subsequent electron microscopy was performed to investigate their developmental regulation, morphology, synaptic input-output relationships and electrophysiological properties. CR cells reached their peak in occurrence between P4 to P7 and from thereon declined to almost complete disappearance at P14 by undergoing selective cell death through apoptosis. CR cells formed a dense and long-range horizontal network in layer 1 with a remarkable high density of synaptic boutons along their axons. They received dense GABAergic and non-GABAergic synaptic input and in turn provided synaptic output preferentially with spines or shafts of terminal tuft dendrites of pyramidal neurons. Interestingly, no dye-coupling between CR cells with other cortical neurons was observed as reported for other species, however, biocytin-labeling of individual CR cells leads to co-staining of L1 end foot astrocytes. Electrophysiologically, CR cells are characterized by a high input resistance and a characteristic firing pattern. Increasing depolarizing currents lead to action potential of decreasing amplitude and increasing half width, often terminated by a depolarization block. The presence of membrane excitability, the high density of CR cells in layer 1, their long-range horizontal axonal projection together with a high density of synaptic boutons and their synaptic input-output relationship suggest that they are an integral part of an early cortical network important not only in layer 1 but also for the

  6. Input/output error analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, E. T.

    1977-01-01

    Program aids in equipment assessment. Independent assembly-language utility program is designed to operate under level 27 or 31 of EXEC 8 Operating System. It scans user-selected portions of system log file, whether located on tape or mass storage, and searches for and processes 1/0 error (type 6) entries.

  7. Input/output interface module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozyazici, E. M.

    1980-01-01

    Module detects level changes in any of its 16 inputs, transfers changes to its outputs, and generates interrupts when changes are detected. Up to four changes-in-state per line are stored for later retrieval by controlling computer. Using standard TTL logic, module fits 19-inch rack-mounted console.

  8. Balanced input-output assignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, W.; Hadaegh, F. Y.

    1989-01-01

    Actuator/sensor locations and balanced representations of linear systems are considered for a given set of controllability and observability grammians. The case of equally controlled and observed states is given special attention. The assignability of grammians is examined, and the conditions for their existence are presented, along with several algorithms for their determination. Although an arbitrary positive semidefinite matrix is not always assignable, the identity grammian is shown to be always assignable. The results are extended to the case of flexible structures.

  9. Nonlinear input-output systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. R.; Luksic, Mladen; Su, Renjeng

    1987-01-01

    Necessary and sufficient conditions that the nonlinear system dot-x = f(x) + ug(x) and y = h(x) be locally feedback equivalent to the controllable linear system dot-xi = A xi + bv and y = C xi having linear output are found. Only the single input and single output case is considered, however, the results generalize to multi-input and multi-output systems.

  10. The effects of low- and high-frequency repetitive TMS on the input/output properties of the human corticospinal pathway.

    PubMed

    Houdayer, E; Degardin, A; Cassim, F; Bocquillon, P; Derambure, P; Devanne, H

    2008-05-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the effects of various parameters (notably the frequency and intensity) of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied over the primary motor (M1) and premotor (PMC) cortices on the excitability of the first dorsalis interosseus (FDI) corticospinal pathway. To this end, we applied a comprehensive input-output analysis after fitting the experimental results to a sigmoidal function. Twenty-six healthy subjects participated in the experiments. Repetitive TMS was applied either over M1 or PMC at 1 Hz (LF) for 30 min (1,800 pulses) or at 20 Hz (HF) for 20 min (1,600 pulses). In the HF condition, the TMS intensity was set to 90% (HF(90)) of the FDI's resting motor threshold (RMT). In the LF condition, the TMS intensity was set to either 90% (LF(90)) or 115% (LF(115)) of the RMT. The FDI input/output (I/O) curve was measured on both sides of the body before rTMS (the Pre session) and then during two Post sessions. For each subject, the I/O curves (i.e., the integral of the FDI motor-evoked potential (MEP) vs. stimulus intensity) were fitted using a Boltzmann sigmoidal function. The graph's maximum slope, S (50) and plateau value were then compared between Pre and Post sessions. LF(115) over M1 increased the slope of the FDI I/O curve but did not change the S (50) and plateau value. This also suggested an increase in the RMT. HF(90) led to a more complex effect, with an increase in the slope and a decrease in the S (50) and plateau value. We did not see a cross effect on the homologous FDI corticospinal pathway, and only PMC LF(90) had an effect on ipsilateral corticospinal excitability. Our results suggest that rTMS may exert a more complex influence on cortical network excitability than is usually reported (i.e. simple inhibitory or facilitatory effects). Analysis of the fitted stimulus response curve indicates a dichotomous influence of both low- and high-frequency rTMS on M1 cortical excitability; this may

  11. Validity of quasi-steady-state and transfer-function representations for input-output relation in a Michaelis-Menten reaction.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, N

    1986-08-01

    In relation to the input-output characteristics of enzymatic reactions in the cellular metabolism and biochemical reactors, the validity of the quasi-steady-state and transfer-function representations of reaction velocity has been examined for a basic Michaelis-Menten reaction employing computer simulation, that is, numerical integration of the rate equation. The well-known S-v relationship (relationship between substrate concentration and reaction velocity)derived on the quasi-steady-state assumption is found to be in general a good approximation to the actual velocity throughout the temporal progress of the reaction. The validity of the approximation depends on a ratio of the Michaelis constant to the total enzyme concentration in the reaction system rather than on the individual rate constants. A transfer-function representation is derived on assuming an exponential change in the reaction velocity for the indicial response to the substrate influx rate. The representation has a wider valid region with a decrease in influx rate than with an increase in the influx rate. The validity is most dependent on a ratio of total enzyme concentration to the steady-state concentration of the substrate. The analysis of the linear sensitivity of the reaction velocity to rate constants reveals that the characteristics of these valid representations in systems analysis change according to the phase of the reaction.

  12. Development of a pulse programmer for magnetic resonance imaging using a personal computer and a high-speed digital input-output board.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Seitaro; Kose, Katsumi; Haishi, Tomoyuki

    2012-05-01

    We have developed a pulse programmer for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a personal computer and a commercially available high-speed digital input-output board. The software for the pulse programmer was developed using C∕C++ and .NET Framework 2.0 running under the Windows 7 operating system. The pulse programmer was connected to a digital MRI transceiver using a 32-bit parallel interface, and 128-bit data (16 bits × 8 words) for the pulse sequence and the digitally detected MRI signal were transferred bi-directionally every 1 μs. The performance of the pulse programmer was evaluated using a 1.0 T permanent magnet MRI system. The acquired MR images demonstrated the usefulness of the pulse programmer. Although our pulse programmer was developed for a specially designed digital MRI transceiver, our approach can be used for any MRI system if the interface for the transceiver is properly designed. Therefore, we have concluded that our approach is promising for MRI pulse programmers. PMID:22667620

  13. Utilizing a shallow trench isolation parasitic transistor to characterize the total ionizing dose effect of partially-depleted silicon-on-insulator input/output n-MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chao; Hu, Zhi-Yuan; Ning, Bing-Xu; Huang, Hui-Xiang; Fan, Shuang; Zhang, Zheng-Xuan; Bi, Da-Wei; En, Yun-Fei

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the effects of 60Co γ-ray irradiation on the 130 nm partially-depleted silicon-on-isolator (PDSOI) input/output (I/O) n-MOSFETs. A shallow trench isolation (STI) parasitic transistor is responsible for the observed hump in the back-gate transfer characteristic curve. The STI parasitic transistor, in which the trench oxide acts as the gate oxide, is sensitive to the radiation, and it introduces a new way to characterize the total ionizing dose (TID) responses in the STI oxide. A radiation enhanced drain induced barrier lower (DIBL) effect is observed in the STI parasitic transistor. It is manifested as the drain bias dependence of the radiation-induced off-state leakage and the increase of the DIBL parameter in the STI parasitic transistor after irradiation. Increasing the doping concentration in the whole body region or just near the STI sidewall can increase the threshold voltage of the STI parasitic transistor, and further reduce the radiation-induced off-state leakage. Moreover, we find that the radiation-induced trapped charge in the buried oxide leads to an obvious front-gate threshold voltage shift through the coupling effect. The high doping concentration in the body can effectively suppress the radiation-induced coupling effect.

  14. NMDA currents modulate the synaptic input-output functions of neurons in the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus in Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Porres, Christian P; Meyer, Elisabeth M M; Grothe, Benedikt; Felmy, Felix

    2011-03-23

    Neurons in the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (DNLL) receive excitatory and inhibitory inputs from the superior olivary complex (SOC) and convey GABAergic inhibition to the contralateral DNLL and the inferior colliculi. Unlike the fast glycinergic inhibition in the SOC, this GABAergic inhibition outlasts auditory stimulation by tens of milliseconds. Two mechanisms have been postulated to explain this persistent inhibition. One, an "integration-based" mechanism, suggests that postsynaptic excitatory integration in DNLL neurons generates prolonged activity, and the other favors the synaptic time course of the DNLL output itself. The feasibility of the integration-based mechanism was tested in vitro in DNLL neurons of Mongolian gerbils by quantifying the cellular excitability and synaptic input-output functions (IO-Fs). All neurons were sustained firing and generated a near monotonic IO-F on current injections. From synaptic stimulations, we estimate that activation of approximately five fibers, each on average liberating ∼18 vesicles, is sufficient to trigger a single postsynaptic action potential. A strong single pulse of afferent fiber stimulation triggered multiple postsynaptic action potentials. The steepness of the synaptic IO-F was dependent on the synaptic NMDA component. The synaptic NMDA receptor current defines the slope of the synaptic IO-F by enhancing the temporal and spatial EPSP summation. Blocking this NMDA-dependent amplification during postsynaptic integration of train stimulations resulted into a ∼20% reduction of the decay time course of the GABAergic inhibition. Thus, our data show that the NMDA-dependent amplification of the postsynaptic activity contributes to the GABAergic persistent inhibition generated by DNLL neurons.

  15. Inventory of CO2 emissions driven by energy consumption in Hubei Province: a time-series energy input-output analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiashuo; Luo, Ran; Yang, Qing; Yang, Haiping

    2016-03-01

    Based on an input-output analysis, this paper compiles inventories of fuel-related CO2 emissions of Hubei economy in the years of 2002, 2005, and 2007. Results show that calculated total direct CO2 emissions rose from 114,462.69 kt (2002) to 196,650.31 kt (2005), reaching 210,419.93 kt in 2007, with an average 22.50% rate of increase. Raw coal was the dominant source of the direct emissions throughout the three years. The sector of Electric Power, Heat Production, and Supply was the main direct emissions contributor, with the largest intensities observed from 2002 (1192.97 g/CNY) to 2007 (1739.15 g/ CNY). From the industrial perspective, the secondary industry, which is characterized as manufacture of finished products, was still the pillar of the Hubei economy during this period concerned, contributing more than 80% of the total direct emissions. As a net exporter of embodied CO2 emissions in 2002 and 2007, Hubei reported net-exported emissions of 4109.00 kt and 17,871.77 kt respectively; however, Hubei was once a net importer of CO2 emissions in 2005 (2511.93 kt). The CO2 emissions embodied in export and fixed capital formation had the two leading fractions of emissions embodied in the final use. The corresponding countermeasures, such as promoting renewable and clean energy and properly reducing the exports of low value added and carbon-intensive products are suggestions for reducing CO2 emissions in Hubei.

  16. Transarterial Chemoembolization (TACE) for Inoperable Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Herber, S. Otto, G.; Schneider, J.; Manzl, N.; Kummer, I.; Kanzler, S.; Schuchmann, A.; Thies, J.; Dueber, C.; Pitton, M.

    2007-11-15

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the safety and efficacy of chemoembolization (TACE) as palliative treatment for patients with unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) and to compare the results with those in the literature. Fifteen patients with histology-proven CCA (5 men, 10 women) had received palliative treatment with TACE over a 6-year period. The treatment protocol comprised repeated TACE at a minimum of 8-week intervals. TACE was performed with a mixture of 10 ml Lipiodol and 10 mg mitomycin C injected into the tumor-supplying vessels. Follow-up investigations after 8-10 weeks comprised contrast-enhanced multislice spiral CT and laboratory control. Statistical evaluation included survival analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method. During the investigation period 58 TACEs (3.9 {+-} 3.8; 1-15) were performed in 15 patients. Mean tumor size was 10.8 {+-} 4.6 cm (range, 2.0-18.0 cm). Unifocal tumor disease was diagnosed in eight patients, and multifocal disease in seven. Mean survival was 21.1 months (95% CI, 9.4-32.5 months). At the end of the investigation period 3 patients are still alive, and 12 patients have died. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rate was 51.3%, 27.5%, and 27.5% respectively. According to RECIST criteria interim best response to therapy was stable disease in 9 of 15 patients, a partial response in 1 of 15 patients, and tumor progression in 4 of 15 patients. No deaths and no acute liver failure occurred under TACE therapy. Major complications were observed in two patients, comprising anaphylactic shock owing to contrast medium administration in one and gastric ulceration due to lipiodol displacement in the second patient. These results demonstrate that TACE is a safe procedure with a moderate number of complications for patients suffering from inoperable CCA. According to recently published data on i.v. chemotherapy we suggest that TACE might be able to prolong survival in selected patients who would succumb under

  17. Two-source interference as the major reason for auditory-threshold estimation error based on DPOAE input-output functions in normal-hearing subjects.

    PubMed

    Dalhoff, Ernst; Turcanu, Diana; Vetešník, Aleš; Gummer, Anthony W

    2013-02-01

    Fine structure in the frequency response of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) can severely limit the usefulness of DPOAEs in estimating auditory thresholds. Here, fine structure is removed by extracting the primary-source DPOAE component using the onset-decomposition technique (Vetešník et al., 2009) and auditory threshold estimates are compared to those obtained from DPOAEs in response to conventional, continuous two-tone stimulation. Auditory thresholds are predicted using the estimated distortion product thresholds (EDPTs), obtained from linear regression of input-output (I/O) functions of DPOAE pressure amplitude versus second-tone stimulus level (Boege and Janssen, 2002). The accuracy of the auditory-threshold predictions is derived by comparison with measured auditory thresholds. The parameters of the two primary stimulus tones of frequency f(1) and f(2) and levels of L(1) and L(2) are chosen as: f(2)/f(1) = 1.2 with 1.5 ≤ f(2) ≤ 2.5 kHz, and L(1) = 0.4L(2) + 39 dB SPL, with 25 ≤ L(2) ≤ 65 dB SPL. Data are from 12 normal-hearing subjects with profound DPOAE fine structure. 255 DPOAE I/O functions were measured for each of the two DPOAE paradigms. An EDPT value was accepted as reliable if: 1) the squared correlation coefficient, r(2) ≥ 0.8, 2) the regression slope, s(I/O) ≥ 0.2 μPa/dB, and 3) the standard deviation of the EDPT, σ(EDPT) ≤ 10 dB. The proportion of rejected I/O functions was 8% for onset-decomposition DPOAEs, and 25% for continuous-tone DPOAEs. Removal of data points from the saturation region of the DPOAE I/O function by an automated algorithm reduced the rejection rate, to zero for onset-decomposition DPOAEs, but to only 13% for continuous-tone DPOAEs. In the absence of saturated DPOAE responses, auditory thresholds were predicted with standard deviation of only 4 dB for onset-decomposition DPOAEs, but 12 dB for continuous-tone DPOAEs. In summary, by extracting the primary

  18. 14 CFR 91.1115 - Inoperable instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... requiring recertification. (3) The approved Minimum Equipment List must: (i) Be prepared in accordance with... inoperable instruments and equipment and the information required by (a)(3)(ii) of this section must be... directive to be in operable condition unless the airworthiness directive provides otherwise. (3)...

  19. 14 CFR 91.1115 - Inoperable instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1115 Inoperable instruments and equipment. (a) No person may... are met: (1) An approved Minimum Equipment List exists for that aircraft. (2) The program manager has been issued management specifications authorizing operations in accordance with an approved...

  20. Autonomous Structural Health MONITORING—PART II: Vibration-Based In-Operation Damage Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parloo, E.; Verboven, P.; Guillaume, P.; van Overmeire, M.

    2002-07-01

    Monitoring structural health of civil and industrial structures, based on in-operation modal testing, has become an important issue. Recently, a sensitivity-based damage assessment technique was presented and successfully tested on both civil and more academic structures. As shown in literature, these sensitivities can be experimentally calculated (without the use of a finite element model) on a basis of the estimated natural frequencies and mass-normalised mode shapes of the test structure in its reference condition. Since a driving point measurement is required for an easy scaling (e.g. mass-normalisation) of the mode shapes, the applicability of the method was restricted to forced-vibration tests only. In this contribution, the applicability of the sensitivity-based method is extended to the domain of operational modal analysis (output-only measurements). In a first step, a new method is used for the correct re-scaling of operational mode shape estimates that neither requires forced vibration testing nor finite element modelling. Secondly, two innovative sensitivity-based in-operation damage assessment schemes are introduced. Both methods were experimentally tested on an academic frame structure as well as a slat track of an Airbus A320 commercial aeroplane.

  1. The management of inoperable gastrointestinal obstruction in terminal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ventafridda, V; Ripamonti, C; Caraceni, A; Spoldi, E; Messina, L; De Conno, F

    1990-08-31

    The aim of the study was to assess vomit and pain control in terminal cancer patients with inoperable gastrointestinal obstruction, using a pharmacologic symptomatic treatment which prevents recourse to nasogastric tube placement and intravenous hydration, in hospital and home care settings. Twenty-two symptomatic patients, who were judged as inoperable, were treated with a pharmacologic association of morphine hydrochloride and scopolamine butylbromide as analgesics and haloperidol as an antiemetic. The drugs were administered by continuous subcutaneous infusion via a syringe driver or intravenously only when a central venous catheter had been inserted previously. Daily recordings included assessment of pain, number of vomiting episodes, dry mouth, drowsiness, and thirst sensation. Data were examined before starting the treatment (T0), 2 days after (T2) and 2 days before death (T-2). They showed that there was a significant decrease in the pain score (p less than 0.001) on T2 and a further decrease on T-2 (p less than 0.05). Vomiting was controlled in all patients, with the exception of three patients with upper abdomen obstruction who required nasogastric tube placement. Dry mouth showed an upward trend throughout the observation period (p less than 0.05) but was successfully treated by administering liquids by mouth or ice-cubes to suck. Drowsiness too presented an upward trend from T0 to T-2 (p less than 0.001). Only one patient out of 16 who reported to be thirsty required intravenous hydration. We believe that in terminal cancer patients, vomit and pain resulting from inoperable intestinal obstruction, with the exception of obstruction of the upper abdomen, can be controlled through administration of analgesic and antiemetic drugs, in the hospital and at home, without recourse to nasogastric tube placement or intravenous hydration. PMID:1697993

  2. Two-scale evaluation of remediation technologies for a contaminated site by applying economic input-output life cycle assessment: risk-cost, risk-energy consumption and risk-CO2 emission.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yasushi; Katayama, Arata

    2011-09-15

    A two-scale evaluation concept of remediation technologies for a contaminated site was expanded by introducing life cycle costing (LCC) and economic input-output life cycle assessment (EIO-LCA). The expanded evaluation index, the rescue number for soil (RN(SOIL)) with LCC and EIO-LCA, comprises two scales, such as risk-cost, risk-energy consumption or risk-CO(2) emission of a remediation. The effectiveness of RN(SOIL) with LCC and EIO-LCA was examined in a typical contamination and remediation scenario in which dieldrin contaminated an agricultural field. Remediation was simulated using four technologies: disposal, high temperature thermal desorption, biopile and landfarming. Energy consumption and CO(2) emission were determined from a life cycle inventory analysis using monetary-based intensity based on an input-output table. The values of RN(SOIL) based on risk-cost, risk-energy consumption and risk-CO(2) emission were calculated, and then rankings of the candidates were compiled according to RN(SOIL) values. A comparison between three rankings showed the different ranking orders. The existence of differences in ranking order indicates that the scales would not have reciprocal compatibility for two-scale evaluation and that each scale should be used independently. The RN(SOIL) with LCA will be helpful in selecting a technology, provided an appropriate scale is determined.

  3. [Fabrication of improved multi-slit equipment to obtain the input-output characteristics of computed radiography systems: correction of the heel effect, and application to high tube-voltage experiments].

    PubMed

    Maehata, Itsumi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Takegami, Kazuki; Ujita, Syohei; Kimoto, Natsumi; Konishi, Yuki; Fukuda, Ikuma

    2014-09-01

    Multi-slit equipment is a new experimental apparatus that can measure the input-output characteristics of a CR (computed radiography) system with limited influence of the fading effect. Kimoto et al. recently proposed a new type of multi-slit apparatus in which the multi-slit setup, the insertion region of the phosphor plate, and plate shielding are integrated to create a single handy-type item (an all-in-one type multi-slit apparatus). However, some problems remained unsolved. The aims of this study were to devise a setup for application to high tube voltage conditions, and to improve the all-in-one type multi-slit equipment so as to correct the heel effect. We examined the capabilities of our improved multi-slit equipment using diagnostic X-ray apparatus and found that it can obtain input-output characteristics with 5% accuracy for tube voltages of 40-140 kV and SID (source to image receptor distances) of 50-200 cm.

  4. Atomic resolution tomography reconstruction of tilt series based on a GPU accelerated hybrid input-output algorithm using polar Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiangwen; Gao, Wenpei; Zuo, Jian-Min; Yuan, Jiabin

    2015-02-01

    Advances in diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have greatly improved the prospect of three-dimensional (3D) structure reconstruction from two-dimensional (2D) images or diffraction patterns recorded in a tilt series at atomic resolution. Here, we report a new graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated iterative transformation algorithm (ITA) based on polar fast Fourier transform for reconstructing 3D structure from 2D diffraction patterns. The algorithm also applies to image tilt series by calculating diffraction patterns from the recorded images using the projection-slice theorem. A gold icosahedral nanoparticle of 309 atoms is used as the model to test the feasibility, performance and robustness of the developed algorithm using simulations. Atomic resolution in 3D is achieved for the 309 atoms Au nanoparticle using 75 diffraction patterns covering 150° rotation. The capability demonstrated here provides an opportunity to uncover the 3D structure of small objects of nanometers in size by electron diffraction.

  5. Effects of Reservoir Filling on Sediment and Nutrient Removal in the Lower Susquehanna River Reservoir: An Input-Output Analysis Based on Long-Term Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, W. P.; Zhang, Q.; Hirsch, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Reduction of suspended sediment (SS), total phosphorus (TP), and total nitrogen is an important focus for Chesapeake Bay watershed management. Susquehanna River, the bay's largest tributary, has drawn attention because SS load from behind Conowingo Dam (near the river fall-line) has risen dramatically recently. To better understand these changes, we evaluated decadal-scale (1986-2013) history of concentrations and fluxes using data from sites above and below the reservoir. First, observed concentration-discharge relationships show declined SS and TP concentrations at the reservoir inlet under most discharges in recent years, but such changes have not been propagated to emerge at the outlet, implying recently diminished reservoir trapping. Second, best estimates of loadings show declined net depositions of SS and TP in recent decades, which occurred under a range of discharges, with the 75th~99.5th percentile of Conowingo discharge dominating such changes and carrying most sediment/nutrient loadings. Finally, stationary models that better accommodate effects of riverflow variability also show diminished reservoir trapping of SS and TP, which occurred under a range of flows including those well below the literature-documented scour threshold. These findings have significant implications in regard to our understanding and management of this major reservoir and illustrate the value of long-term monitoring programs.

  6. Endoscopic Management of Tumor Bleeding from Inoperable Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Il

    2015-01-01

    Tumor bleeding is not a rare complication in patients with inoperable gastric cancer. Endoscopy has important roles in the diagnosis and primary treatment of tumor bleeding, similar to its roles in other non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases. Although limited studies have been performed, endoscopic therapy has been highly successful in achieving initial hemostasis. One or a combination of endoscopic therapy modalities, such as injection therapy, mechanical therapy, or ablative therapy, can be used for hemostasis in patients with endoscopic stigmata of recent hemorrhage. However, rebleeding after successful hemostasis with endoscopic therapy frequently occurs. Endoscopic therapy may be a treatment option for successfully controlling this rebleeding. Transarterial embolization or palliative surgery should be considered when endoscopic therapy fails. For primary and secondary prevention of tumor bleeding, proton pump inhibitors can be prescribed, although their effectiveness to prevent bleeding remains to be investigated. PMID:25844339

  7. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) in advanced inoperable bronchial carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghissi, Keyvan; Dixon, Kate; Stringer, Mark R.; Brown, Stanley B.

    1996-12-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of PDT to: Palliate symptoms, control disease and extend survival in patients with advanced inoperable cancer. Subject and Method: 55 Males and 23 females aged between 45-81 years (mean 66 years) with inoperable and advanced lung cancer with > 5O. obstructive lesions of the main, lobar or segmental bronchi. Patients had pre-treatment routine clinical radiological, functional and endoscopic assessment with proven histological diagnosis. Protocol of PDT was; Intravenous injection of 2 mg/Kg bodyweight Polyhaematoporphyrin (equivalent to Photofrin) or Photofrin followed 24-72 hours later by illumination of tumour using 630 nm light (Oxford Laser) delivered via an optical fibre with end diffuser. Treatments were carried out under general anaesthesia as a day case procedure. Patients were rebronchoscoped for debridement/retreatment 4-7 days later. Results: There was no treatment related mortality. Two patients developed mild photosensitivity reaction. All patients showed symptomatic improvement with good initial functional and radiological amelioration. Every patient responded to treatment. Seven patients had complete response and negative histology for 3-12 months. After the first treatment average Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) and Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1) improvement was 0.5 litres and 0.4 litres respectively. Twenty five percent of patients (nr 19) survived more than 2 years, 10'. (nr=8) between 1-2 years and the remaining 51 patients less than a year. Conclusion: PDT should be considered as a therapeutic modality for all stages of lung cancer and is an excellent treatment modality for palliation in advanced bronchial malignancies.

  8. Input-output, expandable-parity network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckevitt, J. F., III

    1974-01-01

    Large-scale integrated circuit generates and checks parity of four eight-bit registers. In addition, circuit will indicate by output signal whether parity error exists. Circuit can also generate or check parity of words up to 32 bits. This is done by making appropriate internal wiring connections on the large-scale integrated chip.

  9. UNSIO: Universal Nbody Snapshot Input Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, J. C.

    2014-05-01

    Access to nbody simulation is not easy and needs to be defined for every format. Unsio gives to astrophysicists a very simple and generic way to access their nbody simulation data from high level programming languages like C, C++, Fortran and Python.

  10. Vidicon storage tube electrical input/output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipoma, P.

    1972-01-01

    Electrical data storage tube is assembled from standard vidicon tube using conventional amplification and control circuits. Vidicon storage tube is simple, inexpensive and has an erase and preparation time of less than 5 microseconds.

  11. Endoscopic drainage in patients with inoperable hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ye Jin

    2013-01-01

    Hilar cholangiocarcinoma has an extremely poor prognosis and is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Palliative management plays an important role in the treatment of patients with inoperable hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Surgical, percutaneous, and endoscopic biliary drainage are three modalities available to resolve obstructive jaundice. Plastic stents were widely used in the past; however, self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) have become popular recently due to their long patency and reduced risk of side branch obstruction, and SEMS are now the accepted treatment of choice for hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Bilateral drainage provides more normal and physiological biliary flow through the biliary ductal system than that of unilateral drainage. Unilateral drainage was preferred until recently because of its technical simplicity. But, with advancements in technology, bilateral drainage now achieves a high success rate and is the preferred treatment modality in many centers. However, the choice of unilateral or bilateral drainage is still controversial, and more studies are needed. This review focuses on the endoscopic method and discusses stent materials and types of procedures for patients with a hilar cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:23345990

  12. Palliative Radiation Therapy for Symptomatic Control of Inoperable Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaev, Anatoly; Benda, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is traditionally considered to be resistant to conventional low dose radiation therapy (RT). The emergence of image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) made it possible to deliver much higher doses of radiation. Recent clinical trials of SBRT for RCC showed improvement in local control rates and acceptable toxicity. Here we report a case of inoperable symptomatic RCC that was managed with SBRT. Strikingly, the presenting symptoms of gross hematuria and severe anemia were completely resolved following a course of SBRT. Thus, our case report highlights the potential benefit of this technique for patients with inoperable RCC. PMID:26793580

  13. Palliative Radiation Therapy for Symptomatic Control of Inoperable Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Anatoly; Benda, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is traditionally considered to be resistant to conventional low dose radiation therapy (RT). The emergence of image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) made it possible to deliver much higher doses of radiation. Recent clinical trials of SBRT for RCC showed improvement in local control rates and acceptable toxicity. Here we report a case of inoperable symptomatic RCC that was managed with SBRT. Strikingly, the presenting symptoms of gross hematuria and severe anemia were completely resolved following a course of SBRT. Thus, our case report highlights the potential benefit of this technique for patients with inoperable RCC. PMID:26793580

  14. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Radiofrequency Ablation for Medically Inoperable, Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The standard management of medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) conventionally has been fractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). The relatively poor local control rate and inconvenience associated with this therapy have prompted the development of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), a technique that delivers very high doses of irradiation typically over 3 to 5 sessions. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has also been investigated as a less costly, single-day therapy that thermally ablates small, peripheral tumors. The cost-effectiveness of these three techniques has never been compared. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to describe health states of 65-year-old men with medically inoperable NSCLC after treatment with 3D-CRT, SBRT, and RFA. Given their frail state, patients were assumed to receive supportive care after recurrence. Utility values, recurrence risks, and costs were adapted from the literature. Sensitivity analyses were performed to model uncertainty in these parameters. Results: The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SBRT over 3D-CRT was $6,000/quality-adjusted life-year, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SBRT over RFA was $14,100/quality-adjusted life-year. One-way sensitivity analysis showed that the results were robust across a range of tumor sizes, patient utility values, and costs. This result was confirmed with probabilistic sensitivity analyses that varied local control rates and utilities. Conclusion: In comparison to 3D-CRT and RFA, SBRT was the most cost-effective treatment for medically inoperable NSCLC over a wide range of treatment and disease assumptions. On the basis of efficacy and cost, SBRT should be the primary treatment approach for this disease.

  15. Chemoembolization alone vs combined chemoembolization and hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy in inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Song; Zhang, Peng-Jun; Guo, Jian-Hai; Chen, Hui; Xu, Hai-Feng; Liu, Peng; Yang, Ren-Jie; Zhu, Xu

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the efficacy and safety of chemoembolization alone or chemoembolization combined with hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC), including oxaliplatin (OXA), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and folinic acid (CF), in inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) without distant metastasis. METHODS: Eighty-four inoperable HCC patients were enrolled. Thirty-nine patients underwent chemoembolization alone, and the other 45 patients underwent chemoembolization + HAIC (OXA/5-FU/CF) treatment non-randomly. The progression free survival (PFS), objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR) and adverse reactions were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: A significant difference in the ORR was observed between the chemoembolization alone and chemoembolization + HAIC groups. There was no statistically significant difference in DCR between the two groups. The median PFS (mPFS) showed a significant difference between the two groups. For patients with BCLC stage A/B disease, with or without vessel invasion, the chemoembolization + HAIC group showed better mPFS when compared to chemoembolization alone, but no significant difference was found in patients with BCLC stage C disease. The parameter of pain (grade III-IV) in the chemoembolization + HAIC group was increased statistically. CONCLUSION: Chemoembolization combined with HAIC with OXA/5-FU/CF may be safe and more effective than chemoembolization alone for inoperable HCC patients without distant metastasis. PMID:26420971

  16. Electrochemotherapy guided by intraoperative fluorescence imaging for the treatment of inoperable peritoneal micro-metastases.

    PubMed

    Josserand, V; Kéramidas, M; Lavaud, J; Righini, C; Vollaire, J; Bellard, E; Rols, M P; Teissié, J; Coll, J L; Golzio, M

    2016-07-10

    Surgery is often the first therapeutic indication in cancer. Patient survival essentially depends on the completeness of tumor resection. This is a major challenge, particularly in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC), where tumors are widely disseminated in the large peritoneal cavity. These small tumors can be difficult to visualize and are often positioned in delicate locations, further increasing the risk of producing serious tissue/organ damage during their ablation. We propose an innovative therapeutic approach based on intraoperative fluorescence (IF) guided electrochemotherapy (ECT) for the treatment of peritoneal micro-metastases. ECT combines the effects of tissue electro-permeabilization (EP) with the administration of an antimitotic agent (bleomycin) that has poor permeability across intact membranes. IF significantly improves the detection of small tumor lesions. ECT is clinically validated for the treatment of cutaneous tumors in animals and humans, but this is the first time that it has been used along with IF imaging for the targeted treatment of peritoneal metastases in a preclinical model. We set up a murine model of PC that develops secondarily to the resection of a distant primary tumor. Tumor growth and metastasis were finely monitored by non-invasive multimodal imaging (bioluminescence and 3D fluorescence/microCT). Once metastases were detected, mice were randomized into three groups: the ECT group (bleomycin injected intravenously followed by EP) and 2 control groups (bleomycin alone and EP alone). Twenty four hours after the intravenous injection of the tumor targeting agent Angiostamp™700, mice in all groups underwent an abdominal surgery for metastases exploration assisted by fluorescence imaging with the Fluobeam®700 portative device. EP was applied to every nodule detected by IF, except in the bleomycin control group. After surgery, the metastatic invasion was tracked by bioluminescence imaging. In mice treated with bleomycin

  17. Survival and Quality of Life After Stereotactic or 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy for Inoperable Early-Stage Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, Joachim; Postmus, Douwe; Ubbels, Jan F.; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate survival and local recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) administered for early-stage primary lung cancer and to investigate longitudinal changes of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) parameters after either treatment. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts of inoperable patients with T1-2N0M0 primary lung tumors were analyzed. Patients received 70 Gy in 35 fractions with 3D-CRT or 60 Gy in three to eight fractions with SABR. Global quality of life (GQOL), physical functioning (PF), and patient-rated dyspnea were assessed using the respective dimensions of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Questionnaire-C30 and LC13. HRQOL was analyzed using multivariate linear mixed-effects modeling, survival and local control (LC) using the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox proportional hazards analysis, and Fine and Gray multivariate competing risk analysis as appropriate. Results: Overall survival (OS) was better after SABR compared with 3D-CRT with a HR of 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-4.8; p < 0.01). 3D-CRT conferred a subhazard ratio for LC of 5.0 (95% CI: 1.7-14.7; p < 0.01) compared with SABR. GQOL and PF were stable after SABR (p = 0.21 and p = 0.62, respectively). Dyspnea increased after SABR by 3.2 out of 100 points (95% CI: 1.0-5.3; p < 0.01), which is clinically insignificant. At 1 year, PF decreased by an excess of 8.7 out of 100 points (95% CI: 2.8-14.7; p < 0.01) after 3D-CRT compared with SABR. Conclusion: In this nonrandomized comparison of two prospective cohorts of medically inoperable patients with Stage I lung cancer, OS and LC were better after SABR. GQOL, PF, and patient-rated dyspnea were stable after SABR, whereas PF decreased after 3D-CRT approaching clinical significance already at 1 year.

  18. Survival after Radiofrequency Ablation in 122 Patients with Inoperable Colorectal Lung Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Gillams, Alice; Khan, Zahid; Osborn, Peter; Lees, William

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To analyze the factors associated with favorable survival in patients with inoperable colorectal lung metastases treated with percutaneous image-guided radiofrequency ablation. Methods. Between 2002 and 2011, a total of 398 metastases were ablated in 122 patients (87 male, median age 68 years, range 29-90 years) at 256 procedures. Percutaneous CT-guided cool-tip radiofrequency ablation was performed under sedation/general anesthesia. Maximum tumor size, number of tumors ablated, number of procedures, concurrent/prior liver ablation, previous liver or lung resection, systemic chemotherapy, disease-free interval from primary resection to lung metastasis, and survival from first ablation were recorded prospectively. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed, and factors were compared by log rank test. Results. The initial number of metastases ablated was 2.3 (range 1-8); the total number was 3.3 (range 1-15). The maximum tumor diameter was 1.7 (range 0.5-4) cm, and the number of procedures was 2 (range 1-10). The major complication rate was 3.9 %. Overall median and 3-year survival rate were 41 months and 57 %. Survival was better in patients with smaller tumors-a median of 51 months, with 3-year survival of 64 % for tumors 2 cm or smaller versus 31 months and 44 % for tumors 2.1-4 cm (p = 0.08). The number of metastases ablated and whether the tumors were unilateral or bilateral did not affect survival. The presence of treated liver metastases, systemic chemotherapy, or prior lung resection did not affect survival. Conclusion. Three-year survival of 57 % in patients with inoperable colorectal lung metastases is better than would be expected with chemotherapy alone. Patients with inoperable but small-volume colorectal lung metastases should be referred for ablation.

  19. Spinal cord stimulation for patients with inoperable chronic critical leg ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-pei; Fu, Wei-min; Gu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Because of the prevalence of diabetes, the treatment of diabetic foot is still challenging. Even an exactly proved effective and practical method can’t be listed except vascular surgery which is not a long-term way for it. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a very promising option in the treatment algorithm of inoperable chronic critical leg ischemia (CLI). DATA SOURCES: We searched Pubmed database with key words or terms such as “spinal cord stimulation”, “ischemic pain” and “limb ischemia” appeared in the last five years. RESULTS: The mechanism of SCS is unclear. Two theories have emerged to interpret the benefits of SCS. Pain relief from SCS can be confirmed by a majority of the studies, while limb salvage and other more ambitious improvements have not come to an agreement. The complications of SCS are not fatal, but most of them are lead migration, lead connection failure, and local infection. CONCLUSIONS: SCS is a safe, promising treatment for patients with inoperable CLI. It is effective in pain reduction compared with traditional medical treatment. PMID:25215020

  20. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I non‐small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Jian‐Yang; Wang, Jing‐Bo; Liang, Jun; Hui, Zhou‐Guang; Wang, Xiao‐Zhen; Zhou, Zong‐Mei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background To investigate the clinical outcomes and toxicity of hypofractionated radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I non‐small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Patients treated with radiotherapy at a dose of 4–6 Gy per fraction using fixed‐field intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric‐modulated arc therapy (VMAT) at our hospital from June 2005 to December 2013 were analyzed. The total prescription doses ranged from 50–78 Gy with 4–6 Gy per fraction. The median follow‐up period was 24 months. Results A total of 65 patients with stage I NSCLC were analyzed, including 43 primary NSCLC patients and 22 patients with recurrent or second primary NSCLC. An objective response (complete or partial response) was achieved at six months in 84.6% of patients. The three‐year local control rate was 90.8%. Kaplan–Meier estimates of local failure‐free, progression‐free, overall, and cancer‐specific survival rates at three years were 90.3%, 64.3%, 68.9%, and 88.8%, respectively. The rate of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis was 16.9%, and no grade 4–5 toxicity was observed. Conclusion Favorable local control and outcome was achieved with hypofractionated radiotherapy in patients with inoperable stage I NSCLC with acceptable toxicity. The most common schedule of 6 Gy × 12 fractions may be a promising regimen, and a prospective study is in process. PMID:27148414

  1. Chemotherapy plus percutaneous radiofrequency ablation in patients with inoperable colorectal liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, Joseph; Cast, James; Garadi, Krishna K; Belechri, Maria; Breen, David J; Monson, John RT; Maraveyas, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To access the efficacy of chemotherapy plus radiofrequency ablation (RFA) as one line of treatment in inoperable colorectal liver metastases. METHODS: Eligible patients were included in three Phase II studies. In the first study percutaneous RFA was used first followed by 6 cycles of 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan combination (FOLFIRI) (adjunctive chemotherapy trial). In the other two, chemotherapy (FOLFIRI or 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin combination) up to 12 cycles was used first with percutaneous RFA offered to responding patients (primary chemotherapy trials). RESULTS: Thirteen patients were included in the adjunctive chemotherapy trial and 17 in the other two. At inclusion they had 1-4 liver metastases (up to 6.5 cm in size). Two patients died during chemotherapy. All patients in the adjunctive chemotherapy trial and 44% in the primary chemotherapy studies had their metastases ablated. Median PFS and overall survival in the adjunctive study were 13 and 24 mo respectively while in the primary chemotherapy studies they were 10 and 21 mo respectively. Eighty one percent of the patients had tumour relapse in at least one previously ablated lesion. CONCLUSION: Chemotherapy plus RFA in patients with low volume inoperable colorectal liver metastases seems safe and relatively effective. The high local recurrence rate is of concern. PMID:21528091

  2. Econometric models for biohydrogen development.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duu-Hwa; Lee, Duu-Jong; Veziroglu, Ayfer

    2011-09-01

    Biohydrogen is considered as an attractive clean energy source due to its high energy content and environmental-friendly conversion. Analyzing various economic scenarios can help decision makers to optimize development strategies for the biohydrogen sector. This study surveys econometric models of biohydrogen development, including input-out models, life-cycle assessment approach, computable general equilibrium models, linear programming models and impact pathway approach. Fundamentals of each model were briefly reviewed to highlight their advantages and disadvantages. The input-output model and the simplified economic input-output life-cycle assessment model proved most suitable for economic analysis of biohydrogen energy development. A sample analysis using input-output model for forecasting biohydrogen development in the United States is given.

  3. Investigation of abnormal negative threshold voltage shift under positive bias stress in input/output n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors with TiN/HfO{sub 2} structure using fast I-V measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Szu-Han; Chen, Ching-En; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen; Chang, Ting-Chang Lu, Ying-Hsin; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Liu, Kuan-Ju; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung; Lu, Ching-Sen

    2014-03-17

    This letter investigates abnormal negative threshold voltage shifts under positive bias stress in input/output (I/O) TiN/HfO{sub 2} n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors using fast I-V measurement. This phenomenon is attributed to a reversible charge/discharge effect in pre-existing bulk traps. Moreover, in standard performance devices, threshold-voltage (V{sub t}) shifts positively during fast I-V double sweep measurement. However, in I/O devices, V{sub t} shifts negatively since electrons escape from bulk traps to metal gate rather than channel electrons injecting to bulk traps. Consequently, decreasing pre-existing bulk traps in I/O devices, which can be achieved by adopting Hf{sub x}Zr{sub 1−x}O{sub 2} as gate oxide, can reduce the charge/discharge effect.

  4. A framework for linking cybersecurity metrics to the modeling of macroeconomic interdependencies.

    PubMed

    Santos, Joost R; Haimes, Yacov Y; Lian, Chenyang

    2007-10-01

    Hierarchical decision making is a multidimensional process involving management of multiple objectives (with associated metrics and tradeoffs in terms of costs, benefits, and risks), which span various levels of a large-scale system. The nation is a hierarchical system as it consists multiple classes of decisionmakers and stakeholders ranging from national policymakers to operators of specific critical infrastructure subsystems. Critical infrastructures (e.g., transportation, telecommunications, power, banking, etc.) are highly complex and interconnected. These interconnections take the form of flows of information, shared security, and physical flows of commodities, among others. In recent years, economic and infrastructure sectors have become increasingly dependent on networked information systems for efficient operations and timely delivery of products and services. In order to ensure the stability, sustainability, and operability of our critical economic and infrastructure sectors, it is imperative to understand their inherent physical and economic linkages, in addition to their cyber interdependencies. An interdependency model based on a transformation of the Leontief input-output (I-O) model can be used for modeling: (1) the steady-state economic effects triggered by a consumption shift in a given sector (or set of sectors); and (2) the resulting ripple effects to other sectors. The inoperability metric is calculated for each sector; this is achieved by converting the economic impact (typically in monetary units) into a percentage value relative to the size of the sector. Disruptive events such as terrorist attacks, natural disasters, and large-scale accidents have historically shown cascading effects on both consumption and production. Hence, a dynamic model extension is necessary to demonstrate the interplay between combined demand and supply effects. The result is a foundational framework for modeling cybersecurity scenarios for the oil and gas sector. A

  5. A framework for linking cybersecurity metrics to the modeling of macroeconomic interdependencies.

    PubMed

    Santos, Joost R; Haimes, Yacov Y; Lian, Chenyang

    2007-10-01

    Hierarchical decision making is a multidimensional process involving management of multiple objectives (with associated metrics and tradeoffs in terms of costs, benefits, and risks), which span various levels of a large-scale system. The nation is a hierarchical system as it consists multiple classes of decisionmakers and stakeholders ranging from national policymakers to operators of specific critical infrastructure subsystems. Critical infrastructures (e.g., transportation, telecommunications, power, banking, etc.) are highly complex and interconnected. These interconnections take the form of flows of information, shared security, and physical flows of commodities, among others. In recent years, economic and infrastructure sectors have become increasingly dependent on networked information systems for efficient operations and timely delivery of products and services. In order to ensure the stability, sustainability, and operability of our critical economic and infrastructure sectors, it is imperative to understand their inherent physical and economic linkages, in addition to their cyber interdependencies. An interdependency model based on a transformation of the Leontief input-output (I-O) model can be used for modeling: (1) the steady-state economic effects triggered by a consumption shift in a given sector (or set of sectors); and (2) the resulting ripple effects to other sectors. The inoperability metric is calculated for each sector; this is achieved by converting the economic impact (typically in monetary units) into a percentage value relative to the size of the sector. Disruptive events such as terrorist attacks, natural disasters, and large-scale accidents have historically shown cascading effects on both consumption and production. Hence, a dynamic model extension is necessary to demonstrate the interplay between combined demand and supply effects. The result is a foundational framework for modeling cybersecurity scenarios for the oil and gas sector. A

  6. [Four cases of double bypass surgery involving choledochojejunostomy and gastrojejunostomy for inoperable peripancreatic head cancer].

    PubMed

    Tsujie, Masanori; Isono, Sayuri; Sato, Katsuaki; Kawai, Kenji; Ikeda, Mitsunori; Hara, Johji; Kitani, Kotaro; Nakayama, Tsuyoshi; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Yukawa, Masao; Watatani, Masahiro; Inoue, Masatoshi

    2013-11-01

    Peripancreatic head cancer often causes obstructive jaundice and duodenal obstruction, which reduces the quality of life and hinders the administration of anti-cancer drugs. Here, we report 4 cases of double bypass surgery( biliary and gastric) for the treatment of inoperable peripancreatic head cancer. The patients' ages ranged from 64 to 72 years. Two patients had pancreatic head cancer and 2 had ampullary cancer. No postoperative morbidity was observed and all 4 patients resumed oral intake within 5 days after surgery and began receiving chemotherapy within 1 month after surgery. There was immediate relief of biliary obstruction in all 3 patients with obstructive jaundice. None of the patients experienced recurrence of obstructive jaundice requiring biliary drainage. Two patients who died of cancer were able to consume food orally just before they died. Although bypass surgery is more invasive than endoscopic stenting, it may be safe and useful not only for palliation, but also for induction or continuation of chemotherapy.

  7. Risk Factors for Pericardial Effusion in Inoperable Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated With Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Xiong; Liu, H. Helen Tucker, Susan L.; Wang Shulian; Mohan, Radhe; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and dosimetric factors influencing the risk of pericardial effusion (PCE) in patients with inoperable esophageal cancer treated with definitive concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Data for 101 patients with inoperable esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and RT from 2000 to 2003 at our institution were analyzed. The PCE was confirmed from follow-up chest computed tomography scans and radiologic reports, with freedom from PCE computed from the end of RT. Log-rank tests were used to identify clinical and dosimetric factors influencing freedom from PCE. Dosimetric factors were calculated from the dose-volume histogram for the whole heart and pericardium. Results: The crude rate of PCE was 27.7% (28 of 101). Median time to onset of PCE was 5.3 months (range, 1.0-16.7 months) after RT. None of the clinical factors investigated was found to significantly influence the risk of PCE. In univariate analysis, a wide range of dose-volume histogram parameters of the pericardium and heart were associated with risk of PCE, including mean dose to the pericardium, volume of pericardium receiving a dose greater than 3 Gy (V3) to greater than 50 Gy (V50), and heart volume treated to greater than 32-38 Gy. Multivariate analysis selected V30 as the only parameter significantly associated with risk of PCE. Conclusions: High-dose radiation to the pericardium may strongly increase the risk of PCE. Such a risk may be reduced by minimizing the dose-volume of the irradiated pericardium and heart.

  8. Recombinant alpha 2 interferon is superior to doxorubicin for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma: a prospective randomised trial.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, C. L.; Wu, P. C.; Lok, A. S.; Lin, H. J.; Ngan, H.; Lau, J. Y.; Chung, H. T.; Ng, M. M.; Yeoh, E. K.; Arnold, M.

    1989-01-01

    In a prospective trial of 75 Chinese patients with histologically proven inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 25 patients were randomised to receive doxorubicin 60-75 mg m-2 intravenously once every 3 weeks, 25 to receive recombinant alpha 2 interferon (rIFN) (Roferon) 9-18 x 10(6) IU m-2 intramuscularly (i.m.) daily and 25 to receive rIFN 25-50 x 10(6) IU m-2 i.m. three times weekly. Patients were switched to the other drug if: (a) there was progressive disease after 12 weeks, (b) unacceptable toxicity developed and (c) they had received a total of 500 mg m-2 of doxorubicin. Six patients had switching over of therapy, three on doxorubicin and three on rIFN. In the remaining 69 patients on single drug therapy, the median survival rate of patients on doxorubicin and rIFN was 4.8 and 8.3 weeks respectively (P = ns.). rIFN induced tumour regression of 25-50% in 12% of patients and of over 50% in 10% of patients. When compared with doxorubicin, rIFN was associated with more tumour regression (P = 0.00199) and less progressive tumours (P = 0.00017). It caused less prolonged and less severe marrow suppression (P = 0.01217), and had significantly less fatal complications than doxorubicin (P = 0.01383). Doxorubicin caused fatal complications due to cardiotoxicity and neutropenia in 25% of patients. rIFN was associated with fatal complications due to dementia and renal failure in 3.8% of patients. In the treatment of inoperable HCC, rIFN is superior to doxorubicin in causing more tumour regression, less serious marrow suppression and less fatal complications. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2557881

  9. EPICS Input Output Controller (IOC) Record Reference Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.B.; Kraimer, M.R.

    1994-12-01

    This manual describes all supported EPICS record types. The first chapter gives introduction and describes the field summary table. The second chapter describes the fields in database common, i.e. the fields that are present in every record type. The third chapter describes the input and output field that are common to many record types and have the same usage wherever they are used. Following the third chapter is a separate chapter for each record type containing a description of all the fields for that record type except those in database common.

  10. Voice input/output capabilities at Perception Technology Corporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferber, Leon A.

    1977-01-01

    Condensed resumes of key company personnel at the Perception Technology Corporation are presented. The staff possesses recognition, speech synthesis, speaker authentication, and language identification. Hardware and software engineers' capabilities are included.

  11. The Desired Sensation Level Multistage Input/Output Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Scollie, Susan; Seewald, Richard; Cornelisse, Leonard; Moodie, Sheila; Bagatto, Marlene; Laurnagaray, Diana; Beaulac, Steve; Pumford, John

    2005-01-01

    The Desired Sensation Level (DSL) Method was revised to support hearing instrument fitting for infants, young children, and adults who use modern hearing instrument technologies, including multichannel compression, expansion, and multimemory capability. The aims of this revision are to maintain aspects of the previous versions of the DSL Method that have been supported by research, while extending the method to account for adult-child differences in preference and listening requirements. The goals of this version (5.0) include avoiding loudness discomfort, selecting a frequency response that meets audibility requirements, choosing compression characteristics that appropriately match technology to the user's needs, and accommodating the overall prescription to meet individual needs for use in various listening environments. This review summarizes the status of research on the use of the DSL Method with pediatric and adult populations and presents a series of revisions that have been made during the generation of DSL v5.0. This article concludes with case examples that illustrate key differences between the DSL v4.1 and DSL v5.0 prescriptions. PMID:16424945

  12. Input/output properties of the lateral vestibular nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R.; Bush, G.; Ehsanian, R.

    2004-01-01

    This article is a review of work in three species, squirrel monkey, cat, and rat studying the inputs and outputs from the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Different electrophysiological shock paradigms were used to determine the synaptic inputs derived from thick to thin diameter vestibular nerve afferents. Angular and linear mechanical stimulations were used to activate and study the combined and individual contribution of inner ear organs and neck afferents. The spatio-temporal properties of LVN neurons in the decerebrated rat were studied in response to dynamic acceleration inputs using sinusoidal linear translation in the horizontal head plane. Outputs were evaluated using antidromic identification techniques and identified LVN neurons were intracellularly injected with biocytin and their morphology studied.

  13. Input, Output, and Negotiation of Meaning in Spanish Conversation Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rondon-Pari, Graziela

    2014-01-01

    This research study is based on the analysis of speech in three Spanish conversation classes. Research questions are: What is the ratio of English and Spanish spoken in class? Is classroom speech more predominant in students or the instructor? And, are teachers' beliefs in regards to the use of English and Spanish consistent with their…

  14. INPUT-OUTPUT RELATIONSHIPS AMONG SELECTED INTELLECTUAL INVESTMENTS IN AGRICULTURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CVANCARA, JOSEPH GEORGE

    DATA WERE COLLECTED ON TWO GROUPS OF FARM UNITS IN 20 MINNESOTA COMMUNITIES TO DETERMINE PRODUCTION UNIT RESPONSE TO EDUCATIONAL INVESTMENT, AND STUDY CUMULATIVE OR DIMINISHING EFFECTS ON CASH INCOME INCREASES CAUSED BY FARM MANAGEMENT INSTRUCTION OVER 3 YEARS. GROUPS WERE PAIRED ON THE BASIS OF 1962 RECORDS ACCORDING TO SIZE MEASURED IN WORK…

  15. The Input-Output Relationship in First Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, Heike

    2006-01-01

    This study provides an account of the distributional information and the production rates in a particularly rich corpus of German child and adult language. Three structural domains are analysed: the parts-of-speech distribution for a coded corpus of circa one million words as well as the internal constituency of 300,000 noun phrases and almost…

  16. The application of PLC distributed input/output technology offshore

    SciTech Connect

    Glendening, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    The Programmable Logic Controller is becoming a familiar part of the Process Controls on Offshore Facilities. The current evolution of this expanding technology is Distributed I/O Blocks, and this paper is concerned with the benefits and applications this new technology brings to the Offshore Industry. The advent of the Programmable Logic Controller to the Gulf of Mexico brought greater process control flexibility to Offshore facilities. The offshore control philosophy went from independent pneumatic control of each skid unit to PLC distributed control with field panels that contained the local controls for several skid units and interfaced with control room based PLC visual display stations. The Distributed I/O Block concept allows offshore control systems to eliminate the large field interface panel, along with the associated wiring and hardware cost. This is accomplished by installing Distributed 1/0 Blocks inside the individual skid control panels and then communicating back to the control room based PLC via redundant communication cables. The control wiring between each skid control panel and the control room is now reduced to one power cable and redundant communication cables.

  17. Hardware efficient monitoring of input/output signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, Kevin R. (Inventor); Hall, Brendan (Inventor); Paulitsch, Michael (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A communication device comprises first and second circuits to implement a plurality of ports via which the communicative device is operable to communicate over a plurality of communication channels. For each of the plurality of ports, the communication device comprises: command hardware that includes a first transmitter to transmit data over a respective one of the plurality of channels and a first receiver to receive data from the respective one of the plurality of channels; and monitor hardware that includes a second receiver coupled to the first transmitter and a third receiver coupled to the respective one of the plurality of channels. The first circuit comprises the command hardware for a first subset of the plurality of ports. The second circuit comprises the monitor hardware for the first subset of the plurality of ports and the command hardware for a second subset of the plurality of ports.

  18. Application-Controlled Parallel Asynchronous Input/Output Utility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clune, Thomas; Zhou, Shujia

    2010-01-01

    A software utility tool has been designed to alleviate file system I/O performance bottlenecks to which many high-end computing (HEC) applications fall prey because of the relatively large volume of data generated for a given amount of computational work. In an effort to reduce computing resource waste, and to improve sustained performance of these HEC applications, a lightweight software utility has been designed to circumvent bandwidth limitations of typical HEC file systems by exploiting the faster inter-processor bandwidth to move output data from compute nodes to designated I/O nodes as quickly as possible, thereby minimizing the I/O wait time. This utility has successfully demonstrated a significant performance improvement within a major NASA weather application.

  19. Visual display panel functions as computer input/output device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilborn, E. H.

    1970-01-01

    Display panel permits information entry and erasure using a probe, and has an inherent storage capability for use on time-shared systems. Data input need not be online. Other advantages include direct display of input and output, simplicity, and low fabrication cost.

  20. Input/output system identification - Learning from repeated experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Horta, Lucas G.; Longman, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    The paper describes three approaches and possible variations for the determination of the Markov parameters for forced response data using general inputs. It is shown that, when the parameters in the solution procedure are bootstrapped, the results can be obtained very efficiently, but the errors propagate throughout all parameters. By arranging the data in a different form and using singular value decomposition, the resulting identified parameters are more accurate, in the least number of successive experiments, at the expense of a large matrix singular value decomposition. When a recursive procedure is employed, the calculations can be performed very efficiently, but the number of repetitions of the experiments is much greater for a given accuracy than for any of the previous approaches. An alternative formulation is proposed to combine the advantages of each of the approaches.

  1. Study of the NASTRAN input/output systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. K.; Schoellmann, W. F.

    1977-01-01

    The basic characteristics of the NASTRAN level 16 I/O subsystem are presented with particular reference to blocking/deblocking aspects, I/O methods used on the IBM, CDC, and UNIVAC machines, definition of basic NASTRAN I/O control tables, and portability of parts of the I/O subsystem to other programs outside the NASTRAN environment are included. An explanation of the IBM primary, secondary, and tertiary files defined by the data definition (DD) cards in the NASTRAN JCL procedure. The explanation is intended to enlighten users as to the purpose of these DD cards, how they relate to one another, and why there are no similar type definition cards required on the CDC and UNIVAC versions. Enhancements designed to increase overall efficiency and decrease core requirements are also recommended.

  2. Percutaneous Image-guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Tumors in Inoperable Patients - Immediate Complications and Overall Safety

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Anubha; Sahay, Nishant; Kapoor, Ashok; Kapoor, Jyoti; Chatterjee, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Percutaneous destruction of cancer cells using a radiofrequency energy source has become an accepted part of the modern armamentarium for managing malignancies. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a relatively novel procedure for treating recurrent and metastatic tumors. It is used for debulking tumors and as adjuvant therapy for palliative care apart from its role as a pain management tool. Its use in the third world countries is limited by various factors such as cost and expertise. In the remotest parts of India, where economic development has been slow, abject poverty with poor health care facilities advanced malignancies present a challenge to health care providers. We undertook this study to assess the safety of the percutaneous RFA tumor ablation as a therapeutic or palliative measure in patients where surgery was not possible. We observed that RFA may be an effective, alternative therapeutic modality for some inoperable tumors where other therapeutic modalities cannot be considered. Context: Palliative and therapeutic image-guided RFAs of tumors may be the only treatment option in patients who are inoperable for a variety of reasons. To assess the safety and complications of RFA in such a patient population is important before embarking upon any interventions given their physically, mentally, and socially compromised status in a country such as India. Aims: To assess the safety of percutaneous image-guided radiofrequency tumor ablation and to note the various immediate and early complications of the intervention. Settings and Design: This was a prospective, observational study conducted in Tata Main Hospital, Jamshedpur, Jharkhand, India. Subjects and Methods: After approval by the Hospital Approval Committee all patients who consented for percutaneous RFA of their tumor admitted in the hospital were included after taking fully informed consent from patient/close relative keeping the following criteria in view. Inclusion Criteria: Patients who

  3. DRI Model of the U.S. Economy -- Model Documentation:

    EIA Publications

    1993-01-01

    Provides documentation on Data Resources, Inc., DRI Model of the U.S. Economy and the DRI Personal Computer Input/Output Model. It also describes the theoretical basis, structure and functions of both DRI models; and contains brief descriptions of the models and their equations.

  4. A new prognostic score based on the systemic inflammatory response in patients with inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lizhen; Li, Xiaofen; Shen, Yanwei; Cao, Ying; Fang, Xuefeng; Chen, Jiaqi; Yuan, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pretreatment systemic inflammatory response has been confirmed to have prognostic value in patients with inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Increasing studies show that the modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS), a prognostic score based on C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin, is a prognostic factor in these patients. This study was aimed at recognizing possible prognostic factors and new prognostic scores of inoperable NSCLC based on pretreatment systemic inflammatory response. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinicopathological data of 105 patients with inoperable NSCLC who received first-line chemotherapy as initial treatment. Univariate and multivariate analyses of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for prognostic factors and scores were performed. Results The serum CRP, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), cancer antigen 125 (CA125), and pathological type were independent pretreatment prognostic factors for PFS and OS. A new score was assembled by CRP, LDH, and CA125. In multivariate analysis, when the mGPS and the new score were covariates, only the new score retained independent prognostic value for both PFS (P<0.001; hazard ratio =2.12; 95% confidence interval: 1.60–2.82) and OS (P<0.001; hazard ratio =1.82; 95% confidence interval: 1.33–2.48). Conclusion The new score based on pretreatment serum level of CRP, LDH, and CA125, indicates the prognosis of both PFS and OS in patients with inoperable NSCLC who were treated with first-line systemic chemotherapy, and it was found to be more effective than mGPS. PMID:27540301

  5. Percutaneous microwave ablation of stage I medically inoperable non-small cell lung cancer: clinical evaluation of 47 cases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xia; Ye, Xin; Zheng, Aimin; Huang, Guanghui; Ni, Xiang; Wang, Jiao; Han, Xiaoying; Li, Wenhong; Wei, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively evaluate safety and effectiveness of CT-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) in 47 patients with medically inoperable stage I peripheral non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods From February 2008 to October 2012, 47 patients with stage I medically inoperable NSCLC were treated in 47 MWA sessions. The clinical outcomes were evaluated. Complications after MWA were also summarized. Results At a median follow-up period of 30 months, the median time to the first recurrence was 45.5 months. The local control rates at 1, 3, 5 years after MWA were 96%, 64% and 48%, respectively. The median cancer-specific and median overall survivals were 47.4 months and 33.8 months. The overall survival rates at 1, 2, 3 and 5 years after MWA were 89%, 63%, 43%, and 16 %, respectively. Tumors ≤3.5 cm were associated with better survival than were tumors >3.5 cm. The complications after MWA included pneumothorax (63.8%), hemoptysis (31.9%), pleural effusion (34%), pulmonary infection (14.9%), and bronchopleural fistula (2.1%). Conclusions MWA is safe and effective for the treatment of medically inoperable stage I peripheral NSCLC. PMID:24965604

  6. Characteristics of Inoperable Patients with Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis —In the Era of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Seki, Tatsuya; Sakakibara, Mamoru; Shingu, Yasushige; Katoh, Hiroki; Wakasa, Satoru; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a therapeutic option for severe aortic valvular stenosis (AS). To determine the indication for TAVR, it is mandatory to clarify the characteristics of the patients who were judged as inoperable for conventional aortic valve replacement (cAVR). Methods: Of 185 patients newly diagnosed as severe AS from March 2010 to April 2011, we studied the characteristics of 61 (33%) patients (mean age, 86 ± 8 years) who were judged as inoperable. Results: Younger patients (<85 years old, n = 22) had more major comorbidities and lower left ventricular ejection fraction than older patients (≥85 years old, n = 39). Mean estimated mortality for cAVR by Japan score was 7.0% ± 7.4%. Japan score did not correlate to age and was calculated relatively low in the older age group (6.2% ± 7.0%) than the younger age group (8.3% ± 8.1%). Conclusion: One thirds of severe AS patients were judged as inoperable. In advanced age patients, age itself and other factors, which are not included in the conventional scoring systems, might have contributed to the decision making not to perform cAVR by cardiologists. Further study is necessary to define risk factors except for age. PMID:25078548

  7. Active but inoperable thrombin is accumulated in a plasma protein layer surrounding Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Naudin, Clément; Hurley, Sinead M; Malmström, Erik; Plug, Tom; Shannon, Oonagh; Meijers, Joost C M; Mörgelin, Matthias; Björck, Lars; Herwald, Heiko

    2015-10-01

    Activation of thrombin is a critical determinant in many physiological and pathological processes including haemostasis and inflammation. Under physiological conditions many of these functions are involved in wound healing or eradication of an invading pathogen. However, when activated systemically, thrombin can contribute to severe and life-threatening conditions by causing complications such as multiple multi-organ failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. In the present study we investigated how the activity of thrombin is modulated when it is bound to the surface of Streptococcus pyogenes. Our data show that S. pyogenes bacteria become covered with a proteinaceous layer when incubated with human plasma, and that thrombin is a constituent of this layer. Though the coagulation factor is found attached to the bacteria with a functional active site, thrombin has lost its capacity to interact with its natural substrates and inhibitors. Thus, the interaction of bacteria with human plasma renders thrombin completely inoperable at the streptococcal surface. This could represent a host defense mechanism to avoid systemic activation of coagulation which could be otherwise induced when bacteria enter the circulation and cause systemic infection.

  8. Clock time and embodied time experienced by patients with inoperable lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lövgren, Malin; Hamberg, Katarina; Tishelman, Carol

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we explore how patients with inoperable lung cancer (LC) discuss their experiences of time, based on content analysis of open interviews with 35 patients 1 year after diagnosis, using Davies' distinction between "clock time" and "embodied time" as sensitizing concepts. Two interrelated themes were derived: (1) aspects related to the healthcare system, with 3 subthemes: waiting times in the healthcare system, limited time for patient-professional contact, and limited time for coordination of services, and (2) existential aspects, with subthemes: the future with LC and managing an uncertain and finite life with LC. Time could be experienced as problematic for these patients, when limited or lacking or through long periods of waiting, especially when these periods occurred without adequate preparation or information. This contributed to exacerbation of these patients' existing sense of uncertainty, their perception of care as impersonal and insecure, and their need to remain alert and act on their own behalf. Awareness of the seriousness of their disease and the prospect of a limited lifetime was described as increasing uncertainty about dying and fear of certain death. People also described efforts to constructively deal with their situation by reprioritizing their remaining time, having increased appreciation of some aspects of daily life, and living consciously in the present. This analysis suggests a collision between clock time, which steers the healthcare system, and embodied time, as experienced by individuals. Greater attention to psychosocial needs is suggested as one means of positively affecting patients' experiences of time and uncertainty. PMID:19926976

  9. [F-18] FDG-PET/CT parameters as predictors of outcome in inoperable NSCLC patients

    PubMed Central

    Nappi, Antonio; Gallicchio, Rosj; Simeon, Vittorio; Nardelli, Anna; Pelagalli, Alessandra; Zupa, Angela; Vita, Giulia; Venetucci, Angela; Di Cosola, Michele; Barbato, Francesco; Storto, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the prognostic significance of standardized uptake value (SUVmax), metabolic tumour volume (MTV), and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) in [F-18] FDG PET/CT findings in patients with inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods. One hundred and three patients (mean age, 65.6 ± 16 years) underwent [F-18] FDG PET/CT before the chemotherapy. The SUVmax value, the MTV (cm3; 42% threshold) and the TLG (g) were registered. The patients were followed up to 18 months thereafter (range 12–55 months). Failure to respond without progression, progression and/or disease-related death constituted surrogate end-points. The optimal SUVmax, MTV and TLG cut-off to predict the patients’ outcome were estimated. PET/CT results were then related to disease outcome (progression free survival; PFS). Results The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis for SUVmax showed a significant shorter PFS in patients presenting with lower values as compared to those with higher (p < 0.05, log-rank test). MTV and TLG were not suitable for predicting PFS apart from the subset of patients with mediastinal nodal involvement. Conclusions Despite the availability of new tools for the quantitative assessment of disease activity on PET/CT, the SUVmax rather than MTV and TLG remains the only predictor for PFS in NSCLC patients. MTV holds a value only when concomitant nodal involvement occurs. PMID:26834517

  10. Prognostic factors of inoperable localized lung cancer treated by high dose radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schaake-Koning, C.S.; Schuster-Uitterhoeve, L.; Hart, G.; Gonzalez, D.G.

    1983-07-01

    A retrospective study was made of the results of high dose radiotherapy (greater than or equal to 50 Gy) given to 171 patients with inoperable, intrathoracic non small cell lung cancer from January 1971-April 1973. Local control was dependent on the total tumor dose: after one year local control was 63% for patients treated with >65 Gy, the two year local control was 35%. If treated with <65 Gy the one year local control was less than or equal to 40%. Tumor doses correlated with the size of the booster field. If the size of the booster field was <100 cm/sup 2/, the one year local control was 72%; the two year local control was 44%. Local control was also influenced by the performance status, by the localization of the primary tumor in the left upper lobe and in the periphery of the lung. Local control for tumors in the left upper lobe and in the periphery of the lung was about 70% after one year, and about 40% after two years. The one and two years survival results were correlated with the factors influencing local control. The dose factor, the localization factors and the performance influenced local control independently. Tumors localized in the left upper lobe did metastasize less than tumors in the lower lobe, or in a combination of the two. This was not true for the right upper lobe. No correlation between the TNM system, pathology and the prognosis was found.

  11. WE-G-BRD-01: Diffusion Weighted MRI for Response Assessment of Inoperable Lung Tumors for Patients Undergoing SBRT Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, N; Wengler, K; Yorke, E; Hunt, M; Deasy, J; Rimner, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate early changes in tumor Apparent Diffusion Coefficients derived from diffusion weighted (DW)-MRI of lung cancer patients undergoing SBRT, as a possible early predictor of treatment response. Methods: DW-MRI scans were performed in this prospective phase I IRB-approved study of inoperable lung tumors at various time-points during the course of SBRT treatments. Axial DW scan using multi b-values ranging from 0–1000 s/mm{sup 2} were acquired in treatment position on a 3T Philips MR scanner during simulation, one hour after the first fraction (8 Gy), after a total of 5 fractions (40 Gy) and 4 weeks after SBRT delivery. A monoexponential model based on a least square fit from all b values was performed on a pixel-by-pixel basis and ADC was calculated. GTVs drawn on 4DCT for planning were mapped on the T2w MRI (acquired at exhale) after deformable registration. These volumes were then mapped on DWI scan for ADC calculation after rigid registration between the anatomical scan and diffusion scan. T2w scan on followup time points were deformably registered to the pretreatment T2 scan. Results: The first two patients in this study were analyzed. Median ADC values were 1.48, 1.48, 1.62 and 1.83 (10{sup −3}×) mm{sup 2}/s at pretreatment, after 8 Gy, after 40 Gy and 4 weeks posttreatment for the first patient and 1.57, 1.53, 1.66 and 1.72 (10{sup −3}×) mm{sup 2}/s for the second patient. ADC increased more significantly after 4 weeks of treatment rather than immediately post treatment, implying that late ADC value may be a better predictor of tumor response for SBRT treatment. The fraction of tumor pixels at high ADC values increased at 4 weeks post treatment. Conclusion: The observed increase in ADC values before the end of radiotherapy may be a surrogate for tumor response, but further patient accrual will be necessary to determine its value.

  12. Governance: A Community College Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carhart, John I.; Collins, Charles C.

    The purpose of this report is to describe the development of the input/output governance model at Los Medanos College and to explore the governance issues pertinent to all community colleges. Considerations in creating the model included the issue of authority and responsibility in terms of legal sources, the authority and accountability…

  13. High-Dose-Rate Rotte 'Y' Applicator Brachytherapy for Definitive Treatment of Medically Inoperable Endometrial Cancer: 10-Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, Devin; Beriwal, Sushil Heron, Dwight E.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Edwards, Robert P.; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Zorn, Kristin K.; Krivak, Thomas C.

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the intermediate clinical outcomes of medically inoperable patients with endometrial cancer treated with definitive Rotte 'Y' applicator high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) over a 10-year period. Methods and Materials: Forty-nine inoperable patients were treated with HDRB from 1997 to 2007. Forty three (84%) were markedly obese (body mass index >35 kg/m{sup 2}). Thirty-one patients (63.3%) underwent two-dimensional treatment planning, whereas 18 patients (36.7%) underwent three-dimensional treatment planning. Thirty five of the patients (71.4%) were first treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). For patients receiving EBRT in addition to HDRB, the median Y-applicator dose was 20 Gy in 5 fractions; for patients receiving HDRB alone it was 35 Gy in 5 fractions. All patients received two Y-applicator treatments per day. Results: Median follow-up time for all patients was 33 months. Acute HDRB toxicities were limited to Grade 1 and 2 occurring in 5 patients. One patient had a myocardial infarction. Four patients had late Grade 2 or 3 toxicity. Three patients had local recurrence (median time to recurrence, 16 months). The 3- and 5-year actuarial cause-specific survival rates were 93% and 87%, respectively; the overall survival rate was 83% and 42%, respectively, at 3 and 5 years. Conclusions: Twice-daily HDRB using a Y-applicator is a well-tolerated and efficacious regimen for the definitive treatment of medically inoperable patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. The recent incorporation of three-dimensional treatment planning has the potential to further decrease treatment morbidities.

  14. [A case of S-1/CDDP chemotherapy for inoperable advanced gastric cancer which led to gastrectomy with histological complete response].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kenji; Tanizaki, Keiko; Aoki, Taro; Takachi, Kou; Nishioka, Kiyonori; Matsumoto, Takashi; Komori, Takamichi; Chono, Teruhiro; Kato, Aya; Hyuga, Satoshi; Watanabe, Risa; Uemura, Yoshio

    2011-11-01

    As the treatment for inoperable advanced gastric cancer, S-1/CDDP combination therapy (SP chemotherapy) has become a standard treatment. In our hospital, a second course of chemotherapy was performed on an outpatient basis in order to improve a traditional QOL. In this case, it showed remarkable effects in 15 months after starting chemotherapy. Then gastrectomy was performed. Histological findings of the resected specimens confirmed pCR in all tumors. We report on progress of this case and explain about the ingenuity of SP chemotherapy.

  15. Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Inoperable Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sura, Sonal; Gupta, Vishal; Yorke, Ellen; Jackson, Andrew; Amols, Howard; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an advanced treatment delivery technique that can improve the therapeutic dose ratio. Its use in the treatment of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been well studied. This report reviews our experience with IMRT for patients with inoperable NSCLC. Methods and Materials We performed a retrospective review of fifty-five patients with stage I–IIIB inoperable NSCLC treated with IMRT at our institution between 2001–2005. The study endpoints were toxicity, local control, and overall survival. Results With a median follow-up of 26 months, the 2-year local control and overall survival rates for stage I/II patients were 50% and 55% respectively. For the stage III patients, 2-year local control and overall survival rates were 58% and 58% respectively with median survival time of 25 months. Six patients (11%) experienced grade 3 acute pulmonary toxicity. There were no acute treatment-related deaths. Two patients (4%) had grade 3 or worse late treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Conclusions IMRT treatment resulted in promising outcomes for inoperable NSCLC patients. PMID:18343515

  16. A Retrospective Comparison of Taxane and Fluorouracil-based Chemoradiotherapy in Patients with Inoperable Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaojiang; Han, Shuiyun; Gu, Feiying; Lin, Gang; Wang, Zhun; Wang, Yuezhen; Xu, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare taxane-based with fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy in terms of toxicity profiles, efficacy and survival in patients with inoperable esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed retrospectively 179 consecutive patients who were unresectable or medically unfit for surgery between March 2009 and November 2014. Eight-three patients were included in the taxane group and 96 cases were in the fluorouracil group. Results: The overall response rate (ORR) in the taxane group was higher than fluorouracil group, but was not significantly different (71.6% vs. 63.5%, respectively, P=0.255). In total, 53.0% (44/83) of the patients in the taxane group had progressive disease versus 54.2% (52/96) in the fluorouracil group (not significantly different (P=0.758)). There was no significant difference in overall response rate, progression free survival and overall survival, as well as treatment-related death. In terms of non-hematological toxicity, patients in the taxane group experienced a lower incidence of ≥ grade 3 esophageal perforation or fistula (4.8% vs. 13.5%, P=0.047) and pneumonia (4.8% vs. 9.7%, P=0.242). Regarding hematological toxicity, thrombocytopenia in the taxane group was significantly lower (4.8% vs. 13.5%, P=0.047), but there was a trend towards a higher rate of ≥ grade 3 leukopenia (34.9% vs.26.0%, P=0.196). Conclusions: Chemoradiation with taxane-based regimens is well tolerated, with potentially promising efficacy, and could become a good alternative treatment in a first line setting for patients with inoperable esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27326249

  17. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Medically Inoperable Early-Stage Lung Cancer: Excellent Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Stephans, Kevin; Reddy, Chandana; Gajdos, Stephen; Kolar, Matthew; Clouser, Edward; Djemil, Toufik

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To validate the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beams for medically inoperable Stage I lung cancer. Methods and Materials: From February 2004 to November 2006, a total of 26 patients with 28 lesions received SBRT using a Novalis/BrainLAB system. Immobilization involved a Bodyfix vacuum cushion. A weighted abdominal belt limited respiratory excursion. Computed tomographic simulation images were acquired at rest, full inhalation, and full exhalation and were merged to generate an internal gross tumor volume (ITV). Dose was prescribed to cover the planning target volume (PTV), defined as PTV = ITV + 3-5 mm set-up margin. Heterogeneity corrections were used. Delivery of 50 Gy in five sequential fractions typically used seven nonopposing, noncoplanar beams. Image-guided target verification was provided by BrainLAB-ExacTrac. Results: Among the 26 patients, the mean age was 74 years (range, 49-88 years). Of the patients, 50% were male and 50% female. The median Karnofsky performance status was 70 (range, 40-100). The median follow-up was 30.9 months (range, 10.4-51.4 months). Tissue diagnosis was contraindicated in seven patients (26.9%). There were 22 T1 (78.6%) and six T2 (21.4%) tumors. The median conformality index was 1.38 (range, 1.12-1.8). The median heterogeneity index was 1.08 (range, 1.04-1.2). One patient (3.6%) developed acute Grade 3 dyspnea and one patient developed late Grade 2 chest wall pain. Actuarial local control and overall survival at 3 years were 94.4% and 52%, respectively. Conclusions: Use of IMRT-based delivery of SBRT using restriction of tumor motion in medically inoperable lung cancer demonstrates excellent local control and favorable survival.

  18. High Radiation Dose May Reduce the Negative Effect of Large Gross Tumor Volume in Patients With Medically Inoperable Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Lujun; West, Brady T.; Hayman, James A.; Lyons, Susan; Cease, Kemp; Kong, F.-M. . E-mail: Fengkong@med.umich.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the effect of radiation dose varies with gross tumor volume (GTV) in patients with stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Included in the study were 114 consecutive patients with medically inoperable stage I/II NSCLC treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy between 1992 and 2004. The median biologic equivalent dose (BED) was 79.2 Gy (range, 58.2-124.5 Gy). The median GTV was 51.8 cm{sup 3} (range, 2.1-727.8 cm{sup 3}). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Kaplan-Meier estimation and Cox regression models were used for survival analyses. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that there was a significant interaction between radiation dose and GTV (p < 0.001). In patients with BED {<=}79.2 Gy (n = 68), the OS medians for patients with GTV >51.8 cm{sup 3} and {<=}51.8 cm{sup 3} were 18.2 and 23.9 months, respectively (p 0.015). If BED was >79.2 Gy (n = 46), no significant difference was found between GTV groups (p = 0.681). For patients with GTV >51.8 cm{sup 3} (n = 45), the OS medians in those with BED >79.2 Gy and {<=}79.2 Gy were 30.4 and 18.2 months, respectively (p < 0.001). If GTV was {<=}51.8 cm{sup 3} (n = 45), the difference was no longer significant (p = 0.577). Conclusion: High-dose radiation is more important for patients with larger tumors and may be effective in reducing the adverse outcome associated with large GTV. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  19. ZIMOD: A Simple Computer Model of the Zimbabwean Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Jon; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a rationale for the construction and use of a simple consistency model of the Zimbabwean economy that incorporates an input-output matrix. The model is designed to investigate alternative industrial strategies and their consequences for the balance of payments, consumption, and overall gross domestic product growth for a…

  20. Proton Beam Therapy for Patients With Medically Inoperable Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer at the University of Tsukuba

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Sugahara, Shinji; Tokita, Mari; Satoh, Hiroaki; Tsuboi, Koji; Ishikawa, Shigemi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in a retrospective review the role of proton beam therapy for patients with medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: From November 2001 to July 2008, 55 medically inoperable patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated with proton beam therapy. A total of 58 (T1/T2, 30/28) tumors were treated. The median age of study participants was 77 years (range, 52-86 years). A total dose of 66 GyE in 10 fractions was given to peripherally located tumors and 72.6 GyE in 22 fractions to centrally located tumors. Results: The rates (95% confidence interval) of overall and progression-free survival of all patients and of local control of all tumors at 2 years were 97.8% (93.6-102.0%), 88.7% (77.9-99.5%), and 97.0% (91.1-102.8%), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in progression-free rate between T1 and T2 tumors (p = 0.87). Two patients (3.6%) had deterioration in pulmonary function, and 2 patients (3.6%) had Grade 3 pneumonitis. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy was effective and well tolerated in medically inoperable patients with Stage I NSCLC.

  1. Analyzing Company Economics Using the Leontief Open Production Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laumakis, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    This article details the application of an economic theory to the fiscal operation of a small engineering consulting firm. Nobel Prize-winning economist Wassily Leontief developed his general input-output economic theory in the mid-twentieth century to describe the flow of goods and services in the U.S. economy. We use one mathematical model that…

  2. Treatment of inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma with intrahepatic arterial yttrium-90 microspheres: a phase I and II study.

    PubMed

    Lau, W Y; Leung, W T; Ho, S; Leung, N W; Chan, M; Lin, J; Metreweli, C; Johnson, P; Li, A K

    1994-11-01

    Eighteen patients with inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were treated with intrahepatic arterial yttrium-90 microspheres. All these patients showed a lung shunting below 15% and a tumour-to-normal ratio higher than 2 as determined by diagnostic technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin (Tc-MAA) gamma scintigraphy. The treatment was given through an arterial port placed during laparotomy. The radiation doses to the liver and tumour were determined intraoperatively with a beta probe and liquid scintillation counting of multiple liver biopsies. The treatment was well tolerated without major complications. In all patients the tumour marker fell to a level which ranged from 41% to 0.2% of the pretreatment level. Tumour regression was found to be dose related. Progressive or static disease occurred in a higher proportion of patients whose tumours received < 120 Gy (P = 0.005). Survival was better in those whose tumours received > 120 Gy (median survival = 55.9 weeks) than those whose tumours received lower doses (median survival = 26.2 weeks). This difference is statistically significant with P = 0.005. We conclude that yttrium-90 microsphere therapy is safe and that tumour response is dose related. A tumour dose of > 120 Gy is recommended.

  3. Combination chemo-radiotherapy for residual, recurrent or inoperable carcinoma of the rectum: E. C. O. G. study (EST 3276)

    SciTech Connect

    Danjoux, C.E.; Gelber, R.D.; Catton, G.E.; Klaassen, D.J.

    1985-04-01

    Thirty evaluated patients were randomized to either continuous radiation +5-FU (16 patients), or split-course radiation +5-FU (14 patients) for the treatment of residual, recurrent, or inoperable carcinoma of the rectum or recto-sigmoid. Twenty-one of these patients received maintenance MeCCNU +5-FU chemotherapy following radiation. Twenty-four of the patients have died; the estimated median survival is 17 months in each of the treatment arms. The rate of severe, acute reactions during the radiation treatment period was higher for the continuous-course than for the split-course regimen. The rate of severe late treatment reactions and severe chemotherapy toxicity were similar for the two treatment programs. Late treatment reactions, primarily bowel complications, were seen from 3 to 23 months after radiation in 3 patients treated with continuous course and 4 patients treated with split course. Ten of 21 patients (48%) who received maintenance chemotherapy had severe or worse toxicity. Toxicity was seen for 6 of 12 continuous-course, and 4 of 9 split-course patients. Twenty-seven patients have had disease progression, and the median length of disease control is 11 months.

  4. Palliative radiotherapy for inoperable carcinoma of the lung: final report of a RTOG multi-institutional trial

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.R.; Francis, M.E.; Perez-Tamayo, R.; Marks, R.D.; Rao, D.V.

    1985-04-01

    Between June 1973 and February 1979, 409 patients with inoperable advanced non-oat cell carcinoma of the lung were randomized on RTOG protocol 73-02. Three treatment arms were evaluated: 40 Gy split course, 30 Gy continuous course, and 40 Gy continuous course. Patients were also randomized to receive cytoxan or no further therapy following irradiation. Three hundred sixteen patients were evaluable. Palliation of symptoms was achieved in 60% with 1/4 of the patients becoming symptom-free. Complete regression of local and regional tumor was produced in 15% and partial regression in 26%. There is no significant difference between the treatment arms in these objective response rates. Median survival times were approximately 6 months. No significant benefit was demonstrated by the adjuvant use of Cytoxan. Although the number of complete responses produced was relatively small, patients achieving a complete response had a significantly longer median survival than the remaining patients, i.e., 14.5 months versus 6 months. Significant toxicity occurred in fewer than 6% of patients. Radiation pneumonitis counted for the majority of these adverse reactions. Toxicity occurred somewhat more often in the group treated with 40 Gy split course therapy. Implications for further studies are discussed.

  5. Description of the FORTRAN implementation of the spring small grains planting date distribution model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artley, J. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The Hodges-Artley spring small grains planting date distribution model was coded in FORTRAN. The PLDRVR program, which implements the model, is described and a copy of the code is provided. The purpose, calling procedure, local variables, and input/output devices for each subroutine are explained to supplement the user's guide.

  6. Are the most distressing concerns of patients with inoperable lung cancer adequately assessed? A mixed-methods analysis.

    PubMed

    Tishelman, Carol; Lövgren, Malin; Broberger, Eva; Hamberg, Katarina; Sprangers, Mirjam A G

    2010-04-10

    PURPOSE Standardized questionnaires for patient-reported outcomes are generally composed of specified predetermined items, although other areas may also cause patients distress. We therefore studied reports of what was most distressing for 343 patients with inoperable lung cancer (LC) at six time points during the first year postdiagnosis and how these concerns were assessed by three quality-of-life and symptom questionnaires. PATIENTS AND METHODS Qualitative analysis of patients' responses to the question "What do you find most distressing at present?" generated 20 categories, with 17 under the dimensions of "bodily distress," "life situation with LC," and "iatrogenic distress." Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were conducted. RESULTS The majority of statements reported as most distressing related to somatic and psychosocial problems, with 26% of patients reporting an overarching form of distress instead of specific problems at some time point. Twenty-seven percent reported some facet of their contact with the health care system as causing them most distress. While 55% to 59% of concerns reported as most distressing were clearly assessed by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment for Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 and Lung Cancer Module instruments, the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, and the modified Distress Screening Tool, iatrogenic distress is not specifically targeted by any of the three instruments examined. CONCLUSION Using this approach, several distressing issues were found to be commonly reported by this patient group but were not assessed by standardized questionnaires. This highlights the need to carefully consider choice of instrument in relation to study objectives and characteristics of the sample investigated and to consider complementary means of assessment in clinical practice.

  7. Alterations in inflammatory biomarkers and energy intake in cancer cachexia: a prospective study in patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bye, Asta; Wesseltoft-Rao, Nima; Iversen, Per Ole; Skjegstad, Grete; Holven, Kirsten B; Ulven, Stine; Hjermstad, Marianne J

    2016-06-01

    Chronic systemic inflammatory response is proposed as an underlying mechanism for development of cancer cachexia. We conducted a prospective study to examine changes in inflammatory biomarkers during the disease course and the relationship between inflammatory biomarkers and cachexia in patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer. Twenty patients, median (range) age 67.5 (35-79) years, 5 females, were followed for median 5.5 (1-12) months. Cachexia was diagnosed according to the 2011 consensus-based classification system (weight loss >5 % past six months, BMI < 20 kg/m(2) and weight loss >2 %, or sarcopenia) and the modified Glasgow Prognostic score (mGPS) that combines CRP and albumin levels. Inflammatory biomarkers were measured by enzyme immunoassays. The patients had increased levels of most inflammatory biomarkers, albeit not all statistically significant, both at study entry and close to death, indicating ongoing inflammation. According to the consensus-based classification system, eleven (55 %) patients were classified as cachectic upon inclusion. They did not differ from non-cachectic patients with regard to inflammatory biomarkers or energy intake. According to the mGPS, seven (35 %) were defined as cachectic and had a higher IL-6 (p < 0.001) than the non-cachectic patients. They also had a slightly, but insignificantly longer survival than non-cachectic patients (p = 0.08). The mGPS should be considered as an additional framework for identification of cancer cachexia. PMID:27119533

  8. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for the treatment of medically inoperable primary renal cell carcinoma: Current evidence and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Swaminath, Anand; Chu, William

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is steadily rising due to an aging population and more frequent imaging of the abdomen for other medical conditions. While surgery remains the standard of care treatment for localized disease, many patients are unfit due to their advanced age and medical comorbidities. In these patients, an active surveillance strategy or ablative therapies, including radiofrequency/microwave ablation or cryotherapy, can be offered. Such options have limitations particularly with fast growing, or larger tumors. A promising ablative therapy option to consider is stereo-tactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). SBRT refers to high dose, focally ablative radiation delivered in a short time (3–5 fractions), and is safe and effective in many other cancer sites, including lung, liver and spine. SBRT offers potential advantages in the primary kidney cancer setting due to its ablative dosing (overcoming the notion of “radio-resistance”), short treatment duration (important in an elderly population), low toxicity profile (enabling SBRT to treat larger RCCs than other ablative modalities), and non-invasiveness. To date, there is limited long-term prospective data on the outcomes of SBRT in primary RCC. However, early evidence is intriguing with respect to excellent local control and low toxicity; however, most studies vary in terms of technique and radiation dosing used. Well-designed prospective cohort studies with clearly defined and standardized techniques, dosing, follow-up, and integration of quality of life outcomes will be essential to further establish the role of SBRT in management of inoperable, localized RCC. PMID:26316914

  9. Intensity-Modulated and Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Patients with Locally Advanced Inoperable Pancreatic Cancer after Preradiation Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, M.; Ganeshan, R.; Graf, R.; Pelzer, U.; Stieler, J. M.; Striefler, J. K.; Bahra, M.; Wust, P.; Riess, H.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy (RT) in patients with pancreatic cancer is still a controversial subject and its benefit in inoperable stages of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), even after induction chemotherapy, remains unclear. Modern radiation techniques such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may improve effectiveness and reduce radiotherapy-related toxicities. Methods. Patients with LAPC who underwent radiotherapy after chemotherapy between 09/2004 and 05/2013 were retrospectively analyzed with regard to preradiation chemotherapy (PRCT), modalities of radiotherapy, and toxicities. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated by Kaplan-Meier curves. Results. 15 (68%) women and 7 men (median age 64 years; range 40–77) were identified. Median duration of PRCT was 11.1 months (range 4.3–33.0). Six patients (27%) underwent conventional RT and 16 patients (73%) advanced IMRT and IGRT; median dosage was 50.4 (range 9–54) Gray. No grade III or IV toxicities occurred. Median PFS (estimated from the beginning of RT) was 5.8 months, 2.6 months in the conventional RT group (conv-RT), and 7.1 months in the IMRT/IGRT group (P = 0.029); median OS was 11.0 months, 4.2 months (conv-RT), and 14.0 months (IMRT/IGRT); P = 0.141. Median RT-specific PFS for patients with prolonged PRCT > 9 months was 8.5 months compared to 5.6 months for PRCT < 9 months (P = 0.293). This effect was translated into a significantly better median RT-specific overall survival of patients in the PRCT > 9 months group, with 19.0 months compared to 8.5 months in the PRCT  <  9 months group (P = 0.049). Conclusions. IGRT and IMRT after PRCT are feasible and effective options for patients with LAPC after prolonged preradiation chemotherapy. PMID:25401140

  10. The Development of a Cost-Efficiency Model to Assist in Special Education Program Decision-Making and Financing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Daniel P.; Sommers, Paul A.

    Summarized are activities of the Wausau District Public Schools (Wisconsin) toward developing a model for cost efficiency analysis in special education. The model links input-output analysis and task analysis features. Introductory information includes varying impressions of cost efficiency concerns and the current status of project development.…

  11. Information-System Structure by Communication-Technology Concepts: A Cybernetic Model Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisig, Gerhard H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the "Evidence-of-Existence" information system in which the structure is developed, with application of cybernetic concepts, as an isomorphic model in analogy to the system structure of communication technology. Three criteria of structuring are postulated: (1) source-channel-sink, with input-output characteristics, (2) filter-type…

  12. Toxicity and Patterns of Failure of Adaptive/Ablative Proton Therapy for Early-Stage, Medically Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joe Y.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Wen, Hong Y.; De Gracia, Beth; Bluett, Jaques B.; McAleer, Mary F.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Cox, James D.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze the toxicity and patterns of failure of proton therapy given in ablative doses for medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with medically inoperable T1N0M0 (central location) or T2-3N0M0 (any location) NSCLC were treated with proton therapy at 87.5 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) at 2.5 Gy /fraction in this Phase I/II study. All patients underwent treatment simulation with four-dimensional CT; internal gross tumor volumes were delineated on maximal intensity projection images and modified by visual verification of the target volume in 10 breathing phases. The internal gross tumor volumes with maximal intensity projection density was used to design compensators and apertures to account for tumor motion. Therapy consisted of passively scattered protons. All patients underwent repeat four-dimensional CT simulations during treatment to assess the need for adaptive replanning. Results: At a median follow-up time of 16.3 months (range, 4.8-36.3 months), no patient had experienced Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. The most common adverse effect was dermatitis (Grade 2, 67%; Grade 3, 17%), followed by Grade 2 fatigue (44%), Grade 2 pneumonitis (11%), Grade 2 esophagitis (6%), and Grade 2 chest wall pain (6%). Rates of local control were 88.9%, regional lymph node failure 11.1%, and distant metastasis 27.8%. Twelve patients (67%) were still alive at the last follow-up; five had died of metastatic disease and one of preexisting cardiac disease. Conclusions: Proton therapy to ablative doses is well tolerated and produces promising local control rates for medically inoperable early-stage NSCLC.

  13. Induction Chemotherapy and Continuous Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy (CHART) for Patients With Locally Advanced Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The MRC INCH Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Hatton, Matthew; Nankivell, Matthew; Lyn, Ethan; Falk, Stephen; Pugh, Cheryl; Navani, Neal; Stephens, Richard; Parmar, Mahesh

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Recent clinical trials and meta-analyses have shown that both CHART (continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy) and induction chemotherapy offer a survival advantage over conventional radical radiotherapy for patients with inoperable non-small cell-lung cancer (NSCLC). This multicenter randomized controlled trial (INCH) was set up to assess the value of giving induction chemotherapy before CHART. Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically confirmed, inoperable, Stage I-III NSCLC were randomized to induction chemotherapy (ICT) (three cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by CHART) or CHART alone. Results: Forty-six patients were randomized (23 in each treatment arm) from 9 UK centers. As a result of poor accrual, the trial was closed in December 2007. Twenty-eight patients were male, 28 had squamous cell histology, 34 were Stage IIIA or IIIB, and all baseline characteristics were well balanced between the two treatment arms. Seventeen (74%) of the 23 ICT patients completed the three cycles of chemotherapy. All 42 (22 CHART + 20 ICT) patients who received CHART completed the prescribed treatment. Median survival was 17 months in the CHART arm and 25 months in the ICT arm (hazard ratio of 0.60 [95% CI 0.31-1.16], p = 0.127). Grade 3 or 4 adverse events (mainly fatigue, dysphagia, breathlessness, and anorexia) were reported for 13 (57%) CHART and 13 (65%) ICT patients. Conclusions: This small randomized trial indicates that ICT followed by CHART is feasible and well tolerated. Despite closing early because of poor accrual, and so failing to show clear evidence of a survival benefit for the additional chemotherapy, the results suggest that CHART, and ICT before CHART, remain important options for the treatment of inoperable NSCLC and deserve further study.

  14. Reirradiation With Cetuximab in Locoregional Recurrent and Inoperable Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Feasibility and First Efficacy Results

    SciTech Connect

    Balermpas, Panagiotis; Keller, Christian; Hambek, Markus; Wagenblast, Jens; Seitz, Oliver; Roedel, Claus; Weiss, Christian

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report our experience with a prospective protocol of external beam reirradiation (Re-RT) combined with cetuximab for patients with inoperable, recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and Methods: Between August 2008 and June 2010, 18 patients with inoperable recurrence of SCCHN after adjuvant or definitive radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous or sequential cisplatin-based chemotherapy for primary SCCHN were enrolled. Acute and late toxicity from the experimental regimen were recorded every week during RT and every 3 months thereafter. Efficacy was assessed with repeated imaging using response evaluation criteria in solid tumors and clinical examinations 8-12 weeks after completion of the treatment and every 3 months thereafter. Results: Median follow-up time for all patients was 9.4 (range: 3.85-31.7) months and for patients alive 30.4 (range: 15.7-31.7) months. Acute toxicity was generally mild or moderate. Five patients developed a grade 3 acneiform rash related to cetuximab. Late toxicity occurred as grade 3 trismus in five and as grade 3 abacterial salivary gland inflammation in one patient, respectively. Overall response rate was 47%. Median overall and progression-free survival for all patients was 8.38 months and 7.33 months, respectively. The overall survival rate was 44% at 1 year, with a 1 year local control rate of 33%. Conclusion: Notwithstanding the limitations of our preliminary data Re-RT combined with cetuximab for recurrent and inoperable SCCHN is feasible and the integration of newer targeted agents seems to be less toxic compared to conventional chemotherapy with encouraging response rates at least for a subset of patients.

  15. Aero-elastic Parameter Estimation of a 2.5 MW Wind Turbine Through Dynamic Analysis of In-Operation Vibration Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbek, Muammer; Rixen, Daniel J.

    Aero-elastic parameters of a 2.5 MW—80 m diameter—wind turbine were extracted by using the in-operation vibration data recorded for various wind speeds and operating conditions. The data acquired by 8 strain gauges (2 sensors on each blade and 2 sensors on the tower) installed on the turbine was analyzed by using OMA (Operational Modal Analysis) methods while several turbine parameters (eigenfrequencies and damping ratios) were extracted. The obtained system parameters were then qualitatively compared with the results presented in a study from literature, which includes both aeroelastic simulations and in-field measurements performed on a similar size and capacity wind turbine.

  16. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Medically Inoperable Lung Cancer: Prospective, Single-Center Study of 108 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Taremi, Mojgan; Hope, Andrew; Dahele, Max; Pearson, Shannon; Fung, Sharon; Purdie, Thomas; Brade, Anthony; Cho, John; Sun, Alexander; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Bezjak, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To present the results of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for medically inoperable patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and contrast outcomes in patients with and without a pathologic diagnosis. Methods and Materials: Between December 2004 and October 2008, 108 patients (114 tumors) underwent treatment according to the prospective research ethics board-approved SBRT protocols at our cancer center. Of the 108 patients, 88 (81.5%) had undergone pretreatment whole-body [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A pathologic diagnosis was unavailable for 33 (28.9%) of the 114 lesions. The SBRT schedules included 48 Gy in 4 fractions or 54-60 Gy in 3 fractions for peripheral lesions and 50-60 Gy in 8-10 fractions for central lesions. Toxicity and radiologic response were assessed at the 3-6-month follow-up visits using conventional criteria. Results: The mean tumor diameter was 2.4-cm (range, 0.9-5.7). The median follow-up was 19.1 months (range, 1-55.7). The estimated local control rate at 1 and 4 years was 92% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86-97%) and 89% (95% CI, 81-96%). The cause-specific survival rate at 1 and 4 years was 92% (95% CI, 87-98%) and 77% (95% CI, 64-89%), respectively. No statistically significant difference was found in the local, regional, and distant control between patients with and without pathologically confirmed NSCLC. The most common acute toxicity was Grade 1 or 2 fatigue (53 of 108 patients). No toxicities of Grade 4 or greater were identified. Conclusions: Lung SBRT for early-stage NSCLC resulted in excellent local control and cause-specific survival with minimal toxicity. The disease-specific outcomes were comparable for patients with and without a pathologic diagnosis. SBRT can be considered an option for selected patients with proven or presumed early-stage NSCLC.

  17. Image Guided Hypofractionated 3-Dimensional Radiation Therapy in Patients With Inoperable Advanced Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Osti, Mattia Falchetto; Agolli, Linda; Valeriani, Maurizio; Falco, Teresa; Bracci, Stefano; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (HypoRT) can potentially improve local control with a higher biological effect and shorter overall treatment time. Response, local control, toxicity rates, and survival rates were evaluated in patients affected by inoperable advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received HypoRT. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled; 27% had stage IIIA, 50% had stage IIIB, and 23% had stage IV disease. All patients underwent HypoRT with a prescribed total dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions of 3 Gy each. Radiation treatment was delivered using an image guided radiation therapy technique to verify correct position. Toxicities were graded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity score. Survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up was 13 months (range, 4-56 months). All patients completed radiation therapy and received the total dose of 60 Gy to the primary tumor and positive lymph nodes. The overall response rate after radiation therapy was 83% (3 patients with complete response and 22 patients with partial response). The 2-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 38.1% and 36%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence/persistence occurred in 11 (37%) patients. Distant metastasis occurred in 17 (57%) patients. Acute toxicities occurred consisting of grade 1 to 2 hematological toxicity in 5 patients (17%) and grade 3 in 1 patient; grade 1 to 2 esophagitis in 12 patients (40%) and grade 3 in 1 patient; and grade 1 to 2 pneumonitis in 6 patients (20%) and grade 3 in 2 patients (7%). Thirty-three percent of patients developed grade 1 to 2 late toxicities. Only 3 patients developed grade 3 late adverse effects: esophagitis in 1 patient and pneumonitis in 2 patients. Conclusions: Hypofractionated curative radiation therapy is a feasible and well-tolerated treatment for patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Randomized

  18. Commercial versus PARTNER study experience with the transfemoral Edwards SAPIEN valve for inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Pendyala, Lakshmana K; Minha, Sa'ar; Barbash, Israel M; Torguson, Rebecca; Magalhaes, Marco A; Okubagzi, Petros; Loh, Joshua P; Chen, Fang; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron

    2014-01-15

    In patients with aortic stenosis who cannot have surgery, transcatheter aortic valve replacement using the Edwards SAPIEN valve has been shown to improve survival rate and is approved for commercial use in the United States. This study aims to assess the clinical profile, procedural characteristics, and in-hospital complications in patients treated with a commercial SAPIEN valve outside the clinical trial context. We retrospectively analyzed 69 consecutive patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement with a commercial SAPIEN valve compared with 55 Placement of AoRTic traNscathetER valves (PARTNER) trial patients from cohort B enrolled in the same institution by the same Heart Team. Compared with the commercial group, patients in the PARTNER cohort B had higher mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score (10 ± 5 vs 9 ± 4, p = 0.04) and a lower rate of peripheral arterial disease (19% vs 44%, p = 0.004). Most patients in the commercial group had the procedure under conscious sedation (83% vs 66%, p = 0.03). Planned surgical cut down for vascular access was rare in the commercial group (1.4% vs 46%, p <0.001). The overall rates of major vascular complications, life-threatening or major bleeding, and blood transfusions were lower in commercial group (7.2% vs 27%, p = 0.003; 2.9% vs 16%, p = 0.01; and 28% vs 60%, p <0.001, respectively). In-hospital all-cause mortality (5.8% vs 9.1%, p = 0.51) and stroke rates (7.2% vs 14.5%, p = 0.19) were not statistically different between groups. The median length of hospitalization (p <0.001) and postprocedural length of stay (p = 0.01) was shorter in the commercial group. In conclusion, transfemoral commercial use of the Edwards SAPIEN valve for inoperable patients shows similar in-hospital mortality and stroke rates compared with PARTNER cohort B. The refinements in the procedure such as more conscious sedation, experience of the operators, and careful vascular planning in the commercial group led to lesser

  19. Misonidazole combined with radiotherapy in the treatment of inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. A double-blind randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Panduro, J.; Kjaer, M.; Wolff-Jensen, J.; Hansen, H.H.

    1983-07-01

    Sixty-seven patients with inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of the lung were randomized to receive split-course irradiation therapy, 40 Gy in 10 fractions over 5 weeks plus either placebo or misonidazole 1.200 mg/m2 orally on each treatment day. The target area was the primary tumor, both hilar regions, mediastinum, and both supraclavicular regions. Thirty-three patients received misonidazole, while 34 patients received placebo. Mean observation time for the study was 27 months (range, 17-36+ months. 31% of the patients in the misonidazole group obtained a complete response (CR) or a partial response (PR) as compared to 29% in the placebo group. No difference was demonstrated in the relapse pattern comparing the two groups. The death intensity was significantly higher (P . 0.03) in the misonidazole than in the placebo group, with the median survival being 4.2 and 6.7 months, respectively. Eight patients in the misonidazole group (31%) developed sensoric neuropathy while one patient in the placebo group developed irradiation myelopathy of the Brown-Sequard type. The group of patients who later developed neuropathy had significantly higher plasma misonidazole concentrations on treatment days than the group of patients who did not. It is concluded that the combination of misonidazole and irradiation therapy for inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of the lung has no effect on response rate and relapse pattern, but a significant unexplained adverse effect on survival.

  20. Activity of pemetrexed-based regimen as first-line chemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer with asymptomatic inoperable brain metastasis: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weiyou; Røe, Oluf Dimitri; Wu, Chen; Li, Wei; Guo, Renhua; Gu, Yanhong; Liu, Yiqian; Shu, Yongqian; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2015-08-01

    This retrospective study was conducted to assess the efficacy of combination of pemetrexed and cisplatin/carboplatin as first-line treatment in inoperable and asymptomatic brain metastasis (BM) from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 30 patients with adenocarcinoma were included. Nine patients had solitary, and 21 patients had multiple BM. At evaluation after two cycles, the complete response (CR) rate, partial response (PR) rate, and stable disease (SD) for brain lesions was 0, 33.3, and 46.7%, respectively. The overall CR, PR, and SD were 0, 23.3, and 46.7%, respectively. The median time to tumour progression of BM (TTP-BM) was 6.0 months (95% CI 4.068-7.932). The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 5.0 months (95% CI 4.197-5.803) and 11.0 months (95% CI 7.398-14.602), respectively. Pemetrexed has comparable activity on brain lesions as on extracranial tumours in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients with inoperable and asymptomatic BM.

  1. Advantages of CyberKnife for inoperable stage I peripheral non-small-cell lung cancer compared to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    TONG, AN-NA; YAN, PENG; YUAN, GUANG-HUI; LV, XIAO-YAN; GONG, HAI; ZHAO, HUI; WANG, YAN-MING

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the clinical curative effect and acute radiation lung reactions between CyberKnife (CK) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) treatment for inoperable stage I peripheral non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We retrospectively analyzed 68 patients with inoperable stage I peripheral NSCLC between 2012 and 2013 in our institution. The CK patients were treated with 42–60 Gy in three fractions, while the 3DCRT patients were treated with a total of 60 Gy, at 2 Gy per fraction. The patients were followed up and the clinical outcome was evaluated according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours. We assessed the presence of acute radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary function status by thoracic scan and pulmonary function tests following CK and 3DCRT treatment. The binary univariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that treatment method and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) prior to treatment (pre-FEV1/FVC) were the main factors affecting the risk of radiation pneumonitis. The analysis of these factors through multivariate logistic regression method demonstrated that treatment method for grade 1 and 2 [odds ratio (OR)= 7.866 and 11.334, respectively) and pre-FEV1/FVC for grade 1, 2 and 3 (OR = 5.062, 11.498 and 15.042, respectively) were significant factors affecting the risk of radiation pneumonitis (P<0.05). The 68 patients were divided into two subgroups using the threshold of pre-FEV1/FVC selected by the receiver operating characteristic curve. There were significant differences between the 3DCRT and CK treatment in both the pre-FEV1/FVC <68% and ≥68% subgroups for radiation pneumonitis (P=0.023 and 0.002, respectively). There was no statistically significant change in FVC, FEV1 and carbon monoxide diffusion capacity (DCLO) in the CK group, whereas there was a decrease in DCLO in the 3DCRT group. The complete remission rate was 40 vs. 34.2% at 1 year in the CK and

  2. Energy intensity of computer manufacturing: hybrid assessment combining process and economic input-output methods.

    PubMed

    Williams, Eric

    2004-11-15

    The total energy and fossil fuels used in producing a desktop computer with 17-in. CRT monitor are estimated at 6400 megajoules (MJ) and 260 kg, respectively. This indicates that computer manufacturing is energy intensive: the ratio of fossil fuel use to product weight is 11, an order of magnitude larger than the factor of 1-2 for many other manufactured goods. This high energy intensity of manufacturing, combined with rapid turnover in computers, results in an annual life cycle energy burden that is surprisingly high: about 2600 MJ per year, 1.3 times that of a refrigerator. In contrast with many home appliances, life cycle energy use of a computer is dominated by production (81%) as opposed to operation (19%). Extension of usable lifespan (e.g. by reselling or upgrading) is thus a promising approach to mitigating energy impacts as well as other environmental burdens associated with manufacturing and disposal.

  3. Oral History in All 50 States; Two Major Openings, Input/Output, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. Oral History Research Office.

    Statistics show the vigorous growth of oral history programs in the United States since 1965. Recent events at the Oral History Research Office, Columbia University, include the opening of two new memoirs (Francis Perkins and Henry A. Wallace); a successful oral history course; and projects in progress in business, English literature,…

  4. Input, Output, Throughput and Kaput. Position Paper on Technology. Response Prepared by Teresa Strozik.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowen, Walter; Wakefield, Rowan A.

    A review of the history of libraries from the viewpoint of a speaker in the year 2080 describes the opposing trends of a shift of human values toward individuality and diversity, while technology was becoming more uniform. Man-computer relationships steadily replaced people-to-people relationships. While the cost of contact services rose,…

  5. Message Passage Interface Input/Output (MPI-IO Test) Version 1.0

    2005-04-08

    Although there a host of existing file system and I/O test programs available, most were not designed with parallel I/O in mind and are not useful at the scale of our clusters. Los Alamos National Lab's MPI-IO test was written with I/O and scale in mind. The MPI-IO test is built on top of MPI's I/O calls and is used to gather timing information for reading from and writing to file(s) using a variety ofmore » I/O profiles; N processes writing to N files, N processes writing to one file, N processes sending data to m processes writing to m files, or n processes sending data to m processes to one file. A data aggregation capability is available and the user can pass down MPI-IO, ROMIO and some file system specific MPI hints. By default, the MPI-IO Test will write and specific pattern to a file, close the file, open the file for read, read the data, check for data integrity and close the file. Timing information is reported for file open, close, read and write data rates, and effective bandwidths. The MPI-IO Test can be used for performance benchmarking and, in some cases, to diagnost problems with file systems or I/O networks.« less

  6. Transportation network with fluctuating input/output designed by the bio-inspired Physarum algorithm.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shin; Takamatsu, Atsuko

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose designing transportation network topology and traffic distribution under fluctuating conditions using a bio-inspired algorithm. The algorithm is inspired by the adaptive behavior observed in an amoeba-like organism, plasmodial slime mold, more formally known as plasmodium of Physarum plycephalum. This organism forms a transportation network to distribute its protoplasm, the fluidic contents of its cell, throughout its large cell body. In this process, the diameter of the transportation tubes adapts to the flux of the protoplasm. The Physarum algorithm, which mimics this adaptive behavior, has been widely applied to complex problems, such as maze solving and designing the topology of railroad grids, under static conditions. However, in most situations, environmental conditions fluctuate; for example, in power grids, the consumption of electric power shows daily, weekly, and annual periodicity depending on the lifestyles or the business needs of the individual consumers. This paper studies the design of network topology and traffic distribution with oscillatory input and output traffic flows. The network topology proposed by the Physarum algorithm is controlled by a parameter of the adaptation process of the tubes. We observe various rich topologies such as complete mesh, partial mesh, Y-shaped, and V-shaped networks depending on this adaptation parameter and evaluate them on the basis of three performance functions: loss, cost, and vulnerability. Our results indicate that consideration of the oscillatory conditions and the phase-lags in the multiple outputs of the network is important: The building and/or maintenance cost of the network can be reduced by introducing the oscillating condition, and when the phase-lag among the outputs is large, the transportation loss can also be reduced. We use stability analysis to reveal how the system exhibits various topologies depending on the parameter. PMID:24586616

  7. Global fishmeal and fish-oil supply: inputs, outputs and markets.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, C J; Jackson, A J

    2013-10-01

    Recent data on fishmeal and fish-oil supply are presented identifying key producer countries and raw material sources and distinguishing between whole fish and by-products. The conversion of these raw materials into marine ingredients is discussed and global volumes presented. This is followed by a summary of the main countries using these marine ingredients over recent years. Uses of fishmeal and fish-oil by market segment are then presented. From this, a global mass balance of inputs and outputs is derived which allows the calculation of the input-to-output ratios (fish in:fish out; FIFO) for the main aquaculture production types to be made. Current areas of focus by the industry include the need to demonstrate sustainable practice, more strategic use of marine ingredients, greater use of fishery and land-animal by-products as well as vegetable substitutes, and novel sources of essential omega-3 fats, notably the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids. Implications are drawn for future supply prospects of fishmeal and fish-oil and their future role in aquaculture, agriculture and human health.

  8. A control problem for Burgers' equation with bounded input/output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, John A.; Kang, Sungkwon

    1990-01-01

    A stabilization problem for Burgers' equation is considered. Using linearization, various controllers are constructed which minimize certain weighted energy functionals. These controllers produce the desired degree of stability for the closed-loop nonlinear system. A numerical scheme for computing the feedback gain functional is developed and several numerical experiments are performed to show the theoretical results.

  9. Global network of embodied water flow by systems input-output simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhanming; Chen, Guoqian; Xia, Xiaohua; Xu, Shiyun

    2012-09-01

    The global water resources network is simulated in the present work for the latest target year with statistical data available and with the most detailed data disaggregation. A top-down approach of systems inputoutput simulation is employed to track the embodied water flows associated with economic flows for the globalized economy in 2004. The numerical simulation provides a database of embodied water intensities for all economic commodities from 4928 producers, based on which the differences between direct and indirect water using efficiencies at the global scale are discussed. The direct and embodied water uses are analyzed at continental level. Besides, the commodity demand in terms of monetary expenditure and the water demand in terms of embodied water use are compared for the world as well as for three major water using regions, i.e., India, China, and the United States. Results show that food product contributes to a significant fraction for water demand, despite the value varies significantly with respect to the economic status of region.

  10. Central Cross-Talk in Task Switching : Evidence from Manipulating Input-Output Modality Compatibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephan, Denise Nadine; Koch, Iring

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments examined the role of compatibility of input and output (I-O) modality mappings in task switching. We define I-O modality compatibility in terms of similarity of stimulus modality and modality of response-related sensory consequences. Experiment 1 included switching between 2 compatible tasks (auditory-vocal vs. visual-manual) and…

  11. New Radiation Input/Output Systems for Millimeter-Wave Gyrotron Traveling-Wave Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, G. G.; Bogdashov, A. A.; Gachev, I. G.; Mishakin, S. V.; Samsonov, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    We consider in detail the method allowing one to input and output the microwave radiation produced by an elecrovacuum amplifier through the same barrier window, which was proposed earlier, in the context of its application in a traveling-wave tube based on a waveguide with a helically corrugated surface. Special attention is given to the splitter of differently polarized radiation, and the results of studying this splitter at wavelengths of about 6 and 1 mm theoretically and experimentally are presented.

  12. Integrating Ecological and Water Footprint Accounting in a Multi-Regional Input-Output Framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon, ecological, and water footprints (CF, EF, and WF) are accounting tools that can be used to understand the connection between consumption activities and environmental pressures on the Earth?s atmosphere, bioproductive areas, and freshwater resources. These indicators have ...

  13. Watershed versus in-lake alkalinity generation: A comparison of rates using input-output studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, P.W.; Hooper, R.P.; Eshleman, K.N.; Church, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    As a means of assessing the relative contributions of watershed (terrestrial) and in-lake processes to overall lake/watershed alkalinity budgets, alkalinity production rates for watersheds and low-alkalinity lakes were compiled from the literature and compared. Analysis of data indicates that for low-alkalinity systems, areal alkalinity production rates for watersheds and lakes are approximately equal. The relationship suggests that watershed area to lake area ratio can be used as a convenient estimator of the relative importance of watershed and in-lake sources of alkalinity for drainage lake systems. For precipitation-dominated seepage lakes and other systems where hydrology limits soil-water contact, hydrologic flow paths and residence times can be of overriding importance in determining alkalinity sources. For regions dominated by drainage lakes with high watershed area to lake area ratios (such as the Northeastern U.S.), however, alkalinity budgets are dominated by watershed processes. Omission of in-lake alkalinity consideration for most lakes in such regions would have little impact on computed alkalinity budgets or on predicted response to changes in acidic-deposition loadings.

  14. Polymer waveguide end facet roughness and optical input/output coupling loss for OPCB applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghsiahi, Hadi; Wang, Kai; Pitwon, Richard; Selviah, David R.

    2014-03-01

    Electro-optical printed circuit board technology (EOCB) based on integrated planar polymer optical waveguides has been the subject of research and development for many years to provide a cost viable, fully integrated system embedded optical interconnect solution, however a number of constraints of this technology have yet to be overcome. Optical coupling loss at the input and output of the waveguides is one of the major issues and waveguide end facet roughness is one of the main sources of the coupling loss which is investigated in this paper. The results of a comprehensive investigation of the end facet roughness of multimode polymer waveguides, fabricated on FR4 printed circuit boards, PCBs, and its effect of optical loss are presented theoretically and experimentally. The waveguide end facet roughness was measured using an atomic force microscope, AFM, when the waveguides were cut using a milling router with various numbers of cutting edges called flutes. The optimized cutting parameters are derived and the optical coupling loss, between the laser source and the waveguide, due to the different roughness magnitudes is measured by experiment for the first time. To improve the surface quality and decrease the waveguide optical loss, a new fabrication technique for reducing the end facet roughness after cutting is proposed and demonstrated. The insertion loss was reduced by 2.60 dB +/- 1.3 dB which is more than that achieved by other conventional methods such as index matching fluid.

  15. Reflectivity of micromachined {111}-oriented silicon mirrors for optical input/output couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Daniel J.; Garter, Maichael J.; Ahn, Chong H.; Koh, Seungug; Cook, Anthony L.

    1996-09-01

    In this work, bulk-micromachined {111}-oriented silicon mirrors at 54.7 degree(s) have been fabricated in 20 wt% KOH solution at various temperatures and characterized with single mode fibers (10/125 and 5/125). In fabricating the mirrors, the etch rate of the (100) silicon surface was widely changed from 5.3 micrometers /hr to 73 micrometers /hr as the processing temperatures were varied from 40 degree(s)C to 80 degree(s)C. In spite of the tremendous variation of etch rate, the measured reflectivities of the mirrors showed fairly stable values of 63.7 - 58% at 1330 nm and 55.4 - 57.7% at 1550 nm respectively. This paper describes the silicon mirror processing conditions, measured reflectivities, reflected beam profiles, and a prototype integrated optical I/O coupler with the realized mirrors. The results obtained from this work show that optical I/O couplers with 54.7 degree(s) mirrors on conventional (100)-oriented silicon wafers are feasible, envisaging a synchronized optical clock distribution system as well as a distributed remote optical sensing system with low manufacturing cost.

  16. Optical reflectivity of micromachined {111}-oriented silicon mirrors for optical input - output couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Daniel J.; Garter, Michael J.; Ahn, Chong H.; Koh, Seungug; Cook, Anthony L.

    1997-12-01

    In this work, bulk-micromachined 0960-1317/7/4/001/img7-oriented silicon mirrors at 0960-1317/7/4/001/img8 have been fabricated in 20 wt% KOH solution at various temperatures and characterized with single-mode fibers (10/125 and 5/125). In fabricating the mirrors, the etch rate of the (100) silicon surface was widely varied from 5.3 to 0960-1317/7/4/001/img9 as the processing temperatures were varied from 40 to 0960-1317/7/4/001/img10C. In spite of the tremendous variation of etch rate, the measured reflectivities of the mirrors showed fairly stable values of 63.7 - 58% at 1330 nm and 55.4 - 57.7% at 1550 nm. This paper describes the silicon mirror processing conditions, measured reflectivities, reflected beam profiles, and a prototype integrated optical I - O coupler with the realized mirrors. The results obtained from this work show that optical I - O couplers with 0960-1317/7/4/001/img8 mirrors on conventional (100)-oriented silicon wafers are feasible, enabling us to envisage a synchronized optical clock distribution system as well as a distributed remote optical sensing system with low manufacturing cost.

  17. Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) Linear Systems Extreme Inputs/Outputs

    DOE PAGES

    Smallwood, David O.

    2007-01-01

    A linear structure is excited at multiple points with a stationary normal random process. The response of the structure is measured at multiple outputs. If the autospectral densities of the inputs are specified, the phase relationships between the inputs are derived that will minimize or maximize the trace of the autospectral density matrix of the outputs. If the autospectral densities of the outputs are specified, the phase relationships between the outputs that will minimize or maximize the trace of the input autospectral density matrix are derived. It is shown that other phase relationships and ordinary coherence less than one willmore » result in a trace intermediate between these extremes. Least favorable response and some classes of critical response are special cases of the development. It is shown that the derivation for stationary random waveforms can also be applied to nonstationary random, transients, and deterministic waveforms.« less

  18. Extreme inputs/outputs for multiple input multiple output linear systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, David Ora

    2005-09-01

    A linear structure is excited at multiple points with a stationary normal random process. The response of the structure is measured at multiple outputs. If the auto spectral densities of the inputs are specified, the phase relationships between the inputs are derived that will minimize or maximize the trace of the auto spectral density matrix of the outputs. If the autospectral densities of the outputs are specified, the phase relationships between the outputs that will minimize or maximize the trace of the input auto spectral density matrix are derived. It is shown that other phase relationships and ordinary coherence less than one will result in a trace intermediate between these extremes. Least favorable response and some classes of critical response are special cases of the development. It is shown that the derivation for stationary random waveforms can also be applied to nonstationary random, transients, and deterministic waveforms.

  19. Input/output pulse operation of ZnO nanowire threshold integrators.

    PubMed

    White, Richard; Colli, Alan; Li, Hongwei; Kivioja, Jani

    2011-01-14

    Integrating more functionality into individual nano-components is a key step to exploit alternative architectures for energy-efficient computation, such as, for instance, neuromorphic computing. Here, we show how to configure ZnO nanowire field-effect transistors as light pulse integrators with programmable threshold. We demonstrate that these single-component devices can be operated as both synchronous and asynchronous neuron-like structures, where the firing threshold and the form of the output signal, either step-like or spiked, can be controlled by using several operational parameters, including the environment in which the device operates. A detailed study showing how environmental variables, such as relative humidity, ambient light and temperature, affect device operation is presented.

  20. Message Passage Interface Input/Output (MPI-IO Test) Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, James

    2005-04-08

    Although there a host of existing file system and I/O test programs available, most were not designed with parallel I/O in mind and are not useful at the scale of our clusters. Los Alamos National Lab's MPI-IO test was written with I/O and scale in mind. The MPI-IO test is built on top of MPI's I/O calls and is used to gather timing information for reading from and writing to file(s) using a variety of I/O profiles; N processes writing to N files, N processes writing to one file, N processes sending data to m processes writing to m files, or n processes sending data to m processes to one file. A data aggregation capability is available and the user can pass down MPI-IO, ROMIO and some file system specific MPI hints. By default, the MPI-IO Test will write and specific pattern to a file, close the file, open the file for read, read the data, check for data integrity and close the file. Timing information is reported for file open, close, read and write data rates, and effective bandwidths. The MPI-IO Test can be used for performance benchmarking and, in some cases, to diagnost problems with file systems or I/O networks.

  1. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: INPUT/OUTPUT DATA FOR SEVERAL TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This treatability study is a pilot-scale evaluation of a thin-film evaporator (TFE) for volatile organics (VO) removal from oily sludges such as refinery sludges. TFEs were studied to evaluate their use to remove and recover VO from these sludges prior to land treatment. This w...

  2. Dialog system for automatic data input/output and processing with two BESM-6 computers

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Y.N.; Gorlov, Y.P.; Makarychev, S.V.; Monakov, A.A.; Shcherbakov, S.A.

    1985-09-01

    This paper presents a system for conducting experiments with fully automatic processing of data from multichannel recorders in the dialog mode. The system acquires data at a rate of 2.5 . 10/sup 3/ readings/sec, processes in real time, and outputs digital and graphical material in a multitasking environment.

  3. Computational Mechanics of Input-Output Processes: Structured Transformations and the ɛ -Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Nix; Crutchfield, James P.

    2015-10-01

    Computational mechanics quantifies structure in a stochastic process via its causal states, leading to the process's minimal, optimal predictor—the ɛ {{-}}machine. We extend computational mechanics to communication channels coupling two processes, obtaining an analogous optimal model—the ɛ {{-}}transducer—of the stochastic mapping between them. Here, we lay the foundation of a structural analysis of communication channels, treating joint processes and processes with input. The result is a principled structural analysis of mechanisms that support information flow between processes. It is the first in a series on the structural information theory of memoryful channels, channel composition, and allied conditional information measures.

  4. seqphase: a web tool for interconverting phase input/output files and fasta sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Flot, J-F

    2010-01-01

    The program phase is widely used for Bayesian inference of haplotypes from diploid genotypes; however, manually creating phase input files from sequence alignments is an error-prone and time-consuming process, especially when dealing with numerous variable sites and/or individuals. Here, a web tool called seqphase is presented that generates phase input files from fasta sequence alignments and converts phase output files back into fasta. During the production of the phase input file, several consistency checks are performed on the dataset and suitable command line options to be used for the actual phase data analysis are suggested. seqphase was written in perl and is freely accessible over the Internet at the address http://www.mnhn.fr/jfflot/seqphase.

  5. Design of nonlinear resistive networks with prescribed input-output behavior.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peikari, B.

    1973-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of designing nonlinear multiport resistive networks for prescribed driving point and transfer characteristics. It is shown that, if the topology of the desired network is given, then the i-v characteristics of the nonlinear elements can be obtained iteratively. This is achieved by implementation of a newly developed steepest descent criterion.

  6. Advanced crew station concepts, displays, and input/output technology for civil aircraft of the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, J. J.; Robertson, J. B.; Batson, V. M.

    1979-01-01

    Current efforts on a new Cockpit Avionics Research program are described. The major thrusts of the program presented include: a comparative analysis of advanced display media and development of promising selected media, development of flight display generation techniques, and identification and development of promising I/O technology. In addition, the advanced integrated display concepts described include a 'tunnel in the sky' display and a traffic situation display with associated keyboard. Finally, the Cockpit Avionics Research program is summarized, future research plans are presented, and the need for an expanded program is discussed.

  7. Logarithmic and power law input-output relations in sensory systems with fold-change detection.

    PubMed

    Adler, Miri; Mayo, Avi; Alon, Uri

    2014-08-01

    Two central biophysical laws describe sensory responses to input signals. One is a logarithmic relationship between input and output, and the other is a power law relationship. These laws are sometimes called the Weber-Fechner law and the Stevens power law, respectively. The two laws are found in a wide variety of human sensory systems including hearing, vision, taste, and weight perception; they also occur in the responses of cells to stimuli. However the mechanistic origin of these laws is not fully understood. To address this, we consider a class of biological circuits exhibiting a property called fold-change detection (FCD). In these circuits the response dynamics depend only on the relative change in input signal and not its absolute level, a property which applies to many physiological and cellular sensory systems. We show analytically that by changing a single parameter in the FCD circuits, both logarithmic and power-law relationships emerge; these laws are modified versions of the Weber-Fechner and Stevens laws. The parameter that determines which law is found is the steepness (effective Hill coefficient) of the effect of the internal variable on the output. This finding applies to major circuit architectures found in biological systems, including the incoherent feed-forward loop and nonlinear integral feedback loops. Therefore, if one measures the response to different fold changes in input signal and observes a logarithmic or power law, the present theory can be used to rule out certain FCD mechanisms, and to predict their cooperativity parameter. We demonstrate this approach using data from eukaryotic chemotaxis signaling.

  8. Acousto-ultrasonic input-output characterization of unidirectional fiber composite plate by P waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Peter; Williams, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The single reflection problem for an incident P wave at a stress free plane boundary in a semi-infinite transversely isotropic medium whose isotropic plane is parallel to the plane boundary is analyzed. It is found that an obliquely incident P wave results in a reflected P wave and a reflected SV wave. The delay time for propagation between the transmitting and the receiving transducers is computed as if the P waves were propagating in an infinite half space. The displacements associated with the P waves in the plate and which may be detected by a noncontact NDE receiving transducer are approximated by an asymptotic solution for an infinite transversely isotropic medium subjected to a harmonic point load.

  9. On the input-output properties of linear time-invariant systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desoer, C. A.; Lam, F. L.

    1972-01-01

    Recently improved sufficient conditions for the Lp stability of multiple-input multiple-output linear time-invariant feedback systems are given. The continuous-time case is done in detail; the discrete-time case is outlined. Unstable open-loop systems with singular residue matrices are allowed.

  10. The computational structural mechanics testbed architecture. Volume 5: The Input-Output Manager DMGASP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, Carlos A.

    1989-01-01

    This is the fifth of a set of five volumes which describe the software architecture for the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed. Derived from NICE, an integrated software system developed at Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, the architecture is composed of the command language (CLAMP), the command language interpreter (CLIP), and the data manager (GAL). Volumes 1, 2, and 3 (NASA CR's 178384, 178385, and 178386, respectively) describe CLAMP and CLIP and the CLIP-processor interface. Volumes 4 and 5 (NASA CR's 178387 and 178388, respectively) describe GAL and its low-level I/O. CLAMP, an acronym for Command Language for Applied Mechanics Processors, is designed to control the flow of execution of processors written for NICE. Volume 5 describes the low-level data management component of the NICE software. It is intended only for advanced programmers involved in maintenance of the software.

  11. On reachability of dynamic systems. [input/output invariance despite on-off subsystem participation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siljak, D. D.

    1977-01-01

    A large-scale dynamic system is considered as composed of a number of interconnected subsystems. Input and output reachability of the system is defined as a structural counterpart to controllability and observability. When the system is subject to structural perturbations due to on-off participation of the subsystems, conditions are provided for reachability to be connective, that is, to be invariant under the perturbations. The concept of input and output reachability leads naturally to formulations of input and output decentralized systems. It is shown that such systems are connectively reachable, which is an important structural property of 'large' and 'small' decentralized systems alike. Finally, a procedure is outlined to transform a centralized system into an input or output decentralized system with distinct inputs or outputs assigned to each subsystem separately.

  12. Expanded all-optical programmable logic array based on multi-input/output canonical logic units.

    PubMed

    Lei, Lei; Dong, Jianji; Zou, Bingrong; Wu, Zhao; Dong, Wenchan; Zhang, Xinliang

    2014-04-21

    We present an expanded all-optical programmable logic array (O-PLA) using multi-input and multi-output canonical logic units (CLUs) generation. Based on four-wave mixing (FWM) in highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF), two-input and three-input CLUs are simultaneously achieved in five different channels with an operation speed of 40 Gb/s. Clear temporal waveforms and wide open eye diagrams are successfully observed. The effectiveness of the scheme is validated by extinction ratio and optical signal-to-noise ratio measurements. The computing capacity, defined as the total amount of logic functions achieved by the O-PLA, is discussed in detail. For a three-input O-PLA, the computing capacity of the expanded CLUs-PLA is more than two times as large as that of the standard CLUs-PLA, and this multiple will increase to more than three and a half as the idlers are individually independent.

  13. Oral everolimus treatment in a preterm infant with multifocal inoperable cardiac rhabdomyoma associated with tuberous sclerosis complex and a structural heart defect.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Ibrahim; Ethier, Guillaume; Goyer, Isabelle; Major, Philippe; Dahdah, Nagib

    2014-11-26

    Rhabdomyoma (RHM) is a benign cardiac tumour usually associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Most RHMs are asymptomatic and regress spontaneously during the first years of life. Haemodynamically significant RHMs are classically treated with surgical excision. We present a case of a premature infant, born to a mother having TSC, with a prenatal diagnosis of pulmonary valve atresia and a large ventricular septal defect. Multiple cardiac RHMs were also present, including a large tumour affecting the right ventricular filling. Owing to the prematurity and low birth weight, the infant was inoperable. In this report, we describe our approach to pharmacologically reduce the RHM size using oral everolimus in preparation for a two-ventricle surgical repair of the structural cardiac defect. We also specifically describe the dose of everolimus that was used in this case to achieve therapeutic serum levels, which was seven times lower than the conventional dose applicable for older infants.

  14. Usefulness of Photodynamic Diagnosis and Therapy using Talaporfin Sodium for an Advanced-aged Patient with Inoperable Gastric Cancer (a secondary publication)

    PubMed Central

    Oinuma, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: In Japan the rise in the average life expectancy has caused an increase in the proportion of the population who are classed as geriatric. Accordingly, the number of elderly people being treated for cancer is increasing concomitantly. However, with the increase in age, the numbers of prior complications also increase. This is especially so in the advanced-aged patients, defined in Japan as those over the age of 85. Such complications may be too high risk for radical surgery and a less invasive treatment is warranted. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive treatment approved by the Japanese National Health Insurance for the treatment of early stage superficial type esophageal and gastric cancers, early stage uterine cervical cancers and dysplasia, and early and advanced lung cancer. We report herein on the efficacy of palliative PDT using talaporfin sodium (Laserphyrin®) for a case of inoperable gastric cancer. Material and methods: The patient was an 87-year-old-man, a diabetic with histories of diabetic nephropathy, cerebral infarction and myocardial infarction. This patient was first diagnosed as having gastric cancer in 2007 but surgery and chemotherapy were contraindicated due to his poor physical status and poor renal function, respectively, owing to the anticipated side effects. The patient was referred to our institution after hearing of PDT in 2009. He was treated with 1 course of porfimer sodium PDT and 3 courses of talaporfin sodium PDT with photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) during the period from September, 2009 to June, 2011. Results: The massive gastric cancer located in the cardia was successfully treated with 4 PDT sessions without any serious complications; therefore the patient was able to orally ingest food until his death due to natural causes other than the cancer, in October, 2011. Conclusion: Talaporfin sodium PDT is safe and effective treatment for advanced-aged patients suffering from inoperable gastric cancer. PMID

  15. Incidental Prophylactic Nodal Irradiation and Patterns of Nodal Relapse in Inoperable Early Stage NSCLC Patients Treated With SBRT: A Case-Matched Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, Louis; Hope, Andrew J.; Maganti, Manjula; Brade, Anthony; Bezjak, Andrea; Saibishkumar, Elantholi P.; Giuliani, Meredith; Sun, Alexander; Cho, B. C. John

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Reported rates of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) nodal failure following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are lower than those reported in the surgical series when matched for stage. We hypothesized that this effect was due to incidental prophylactic nodal irradiation. Methods and Materials: A prospectively collected group of medically inoperable early stage NSCLC patients from 2004 to 2010 was used to identify cases with nodal relapses. Controls were matched to cases, 2:1, controlling for tumor volume (ie, same or greater) and tumor location (ie, same lobe). Reference (normalized to equivalent dose for 2-Gy fractions [EQD2]) point doses at the ipsilateral hilum and carina, demographic data, and clinical outcomes were extracted from the medical records. Univariate conditional logistical regression analyses were performed with variables of interest. Results: Cases and controls were well matched except for size. The controls, as expected, had larger gross tumor volumes (P=.02). The mean ipsilateral hilar doses were 9.6 Gy and 22.4 Gy for cases and controls, respectively (P=.014). The mean carinal doses were 7.0 Gy and 9.2 Gy, respectively (P=.13). Mediastinal nodal relapses, with and without ipsilateral hilar relapse, were associated with mean ipsilateral hilar doses of 3.6 Gy and 19.8 Gy, respectively (P=.01). The conditional density plot appears to demonstrate an inverse dose-effect relationship between ipsilateral hilar normalized total dose and risk of ipsilateral hilar relapse. Conclusions: Incidental hilar dose greater than 20 Gy is significantly associated with fewer ipsilateral hilar relapses in inoperable early stage NSCLC patients treated with SBRT.

  16. 30 Gy or 34 Gy? Comparing 2 Single-Fraction SBRT Dose Schedules for Stage I Medically Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Videtic, Gregory M.M. Stephans, Kevin L.; Woody, Neil M.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Zhuang, Tingliang; Magnelli, Anthony; Djemil, Toufik

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To review outcomes of 2 single-fraction lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) schedules used for medically inoperable early stage lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients in our institution have been treated on and off protocols using single-fraction SBRT (30 Gy and 34 Gy, respectively). All patients had node-negative lung cancer measuring ≤5 cm and lying ≥2 cm beyond the trachea-bronchial tree and were treated on a Novalis/BrainLAB system with the ExactTrac positioning system for daily image guidance. Results: For the interval from 2009 to 2012, 80 patients with 82 lesions were treated with single-fraction lung SBRT. Fifty-five patients (69%) and 25 patients (31%) received 30 Gy and 34 Gy, respectively. In a comparison of 30 Gy and 34 Gy cohorts, patient and tumor characteristics were balanced and median follow-up in months was 18.7 and 17.8, respectively. The average heterogeneity-corrected mean doses to the target were 33.75 Gy and 37.94 Gy for the 30-Gy and 34-Gy prescriptions, respectively. Comparing 30-Gy and 34-Gy cohorts, 92.7% and 84.0% of patients, respectively, experienced no toxicity (P was not significant), and had neither grade 3 nor higher toxicities. For the 30-Gy and 34-Gy patients, rates of 1-year local failure, overall survival, and lung cancer-specific mortality were 2.0% versus 13.8%, 75.0% versus 64.0%, and 2. 1% versus 16.0%, respectively (P values for differences were not significant). Conclusions: This is the largest single-fraction lung SBRT series yet reported. and it confirms the safety, efficacy, and minimal toxicity of this schedule for inoperable early stage lung cancer.

  17. Optimisation on the least squares identification of dynamical systems with application to hemodynamic modelling.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yi; Zheng, Ying; Harris, Sam; Coca, Daniel; Johnston, David; Mayhew, John; Billings, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic modelling using the traditional least squares method with noisy input/output data can yield biased and sometimes unstable model predictions. This is largely because the cost function employed by the traditional least squares method is based on the one-step-ahead prediction errors. In this paper, the model-predicted-output errors are used in estimating the model parameters. As the cost function is highly nonlinear in terms of the model parameters, the particle swarm optimisation method is used to search for the optimal parameters. We will show that compared with model predictions using the traditional least squares method, the model-predicted-output approach is more robust at dealing with noisy input/output data. The algorithm is applied to identify the dynamic relationship between changes in cerebral blood flow and volume due to evoked changes in neural activity and is shown to produce better predictions than that using the least squares method.

  18. The Impact of Tumor Size on Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Medically Inoperable Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Allibhai, Zishan; Taremi, Mojgan; Bezjak, Andrea; Brade, Anthony; Hope, Andrew J.; Sun, Alexander; Cho, B.C. John

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) offers excellent control rates. Most published series deal mainly with small (usually <4 cm), peripheral, solitary tumors. Larger tumors are associated with poorer outcomes (ie, lower control rates, higher toxicity) when treated with conventional RT. It is unclear whether SBRT is sufficiently potent to control these larger tumors. We therefore evaluated and examined the influence of tumor size on treatment outcomes after SBRT. Methods and Materials: Between October 2004 and October 2010, 185 medically inoperable patients with early (T1-T2N0M0) NSCLC were treated on a prospective research ethics board-approved single-institution protocol. Prescription doses were risk-adapted based on tumor size and location. Follow-up included prospective assessment of toxicity (as per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) and serial computed tomography scans. Patterns of failure, toxicity, and survival outcomes were calculated using Kaplan-Meier method, and the significance of tumor size (diameter, volume) with respect to patient, treatment, and tumor factors was tested. Results: Median follow-up was 15.2 months. Tumor size was not associated with local failure but was associated with regional failure (P=.011) and distant failure (P=.021). Poorer overall survival (P=.001), disease-free survival (P=.001), and cause-specific survival (P=.005) were also significantly associated with tumor size (with tumor volume more significant than diameter). Gross tumor volume and planning target volume were significantly associated with grade 2 or worse radiation pneumonitis. However, overall rates of grade ≥3 pneumonitis were low and not significantly affected by tumor or target size. Conclusions: Currently employed stereotactic body radiation therapy dose regimens can provide safe effective local therapy even for larger solitary NSCLC tumors (up to 5.7 cm

  19. Dynamic model of in-lake alkalinity generation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, L.A.; Brezonik, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    In-lake alkalinity generation (IAG) is important in regulation of alkalinity in lakes with long residence times, particularly seepage lakes. An IAG model based on input/output modeling concepts is presented that describes budgets for each ion involved in alkalinity regulation by a single differential equation that includes inputs, outputs, and a first-order sink term. These equations are linked to an alkalinity balance equation that includes inputs, outputs, IAG (by sulfate and nitrate reduction), and internal alkalinity consumption (by ammonium assimilation). Calibration using published lake budgets shows that rate constants are generally similar among soft water lakes (k/sub SO/sub 4// approx. 0.5 m/yr; k/sub NO/sub 3// approx. = 1.3 yr/sup -1/; k/sub NH/sub 4// approx. 1.5 yr/sup -1/). Sensitivity analysis shows that predicted alkalinity is sensitive to water residence time, but less sensitive to modest changes in rate constants. The model reflects the homeostatic nature of internal alkalinity generation, in which internal alkalinity production increases with increasing acid input and decreases with decreasing acid inputs of HNO/sub 3/ or H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/.

  20. Simultaneous transfemoral transcatheter mitral and tricuspid valve edge-to-edge repair (using MitraClip system) completed by atrial septal defect occlusion in a surgically inoperable patient. First-in-human report.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Marek; Franz, Norbert; Ritter, Frank; Hofmann, Steffen; Stabel-Mahassine, Chourok; Warnecke, Henning; Thale, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Transcatheter transfemoral mitral valve repair using the MitraClip system (Abbott Vascular, USA) is used in high-risk or inoperable patients with severe mitral regurgitation. We report the first-in-human simultaneous transfemoral clipping of the mitral and tricuspid valve completed by occlusion of an atrial septal defect (ASD). The procedure was performed in an 84-year-old patient in October 2015. After effective reduction of mitral and tricuspid regurgitations using the MitraClip system a PFO Occluder (St. Jude Medical, USA) was implanted. Transfemoral simultaneous mitral and tricuspid valve repair using the MitraClip system with ASD occlusion seems to be an effective therapy for high-risk or inoperable patients. PMID:26855642

  1. Simultaneous transfemoral transcatheter mitral and tricuspid valve edge-to-edge repair (using MitraClip system) completed by atrial septal defect occlusion in a surgically inoperable patient. First-in-human report

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Norbert; Ritter, Frank; Hofmann, Steffen; Stabel-Mahassine, Chourok; Warnecke, Henning; Thale, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter transfemoral mitral valve repair using the MitraClip system (Abbott Vascular, USA) is used in high-risk or inoperable patients with severe mitral regurgitation. We report the first-in-human simultaneous transfemoral clipping of the mitral and tricuspid valve completed by occlusion of an atrial septal defect (ASD). The procedure was performed in an 84-year-old patient in October 2015. After effective reduction of mitral and tricuspid regurgitations using the MitraClip system a PFO Occluder (St. Jude Medical, USA) was implanted. Transfemoral simultaneous mitral and tricuspid valve repair using the MitraClip system with ASD occlusion seems to be an effective therapy for high-risk or inoperable patients. PMID:26855642

  2. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.; Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

    2013-06-01

    The Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed by NREL and MRG & Associates, is a spreadsheet based input-output tool. JEDI is meant to be a user friendly and transparent tool to estimate potential economic impacts supported by the development and operation of offshore wind projects. This guide describes how to use the model as well as technical information such as methodology, limitations, and data sources.

  3. A novel approach to the modelling and control of flexible robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Xuru; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1988-01-01

    A general dynamic model of a two-link Euler-Bernoulli beam flexible robot arm is presented in the form of partial-differential-integral equations. Observations are made on important properties of the dynamic model. The resulting infinite-dimensional system is then input-output decoupled and partially linearized by a diffeomorphic state transformation and nonlinear state feedback. The local stability issue is addressed for a one-link flexible robot arm.

  4. Theoretic aspects of the identification of the parameters in the optimal control model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanwijk, R. A.; Kok, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    The identification of the parameters of the optimal control model from input-output data of the human operator is considered. Accepting the basic structure of the model as a cascade of a full-order observer and a feedback law, and suppressing the inherent optimality of the human controller, the parameters to be identified are the feedback matrix, the observer gain matrix, and the intensity matrices of the observation noise and the motor noise. The identification of the parameters is a statistical problem, because the system and output are corrupted by noise, and therefore the solution must be based on the statistics (probability density function) of the input and output data of the human operator. However, based on the statistics of the input-output data of the human operator, no distinction can be made between the observation and the motor noise, which shows that the model suffers from overparameterization.

  5. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bree, Ingrid de; van Hinsberg, Mariëlle G E; van Veelen, Lieneke R

    2012-01-01

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose ≥60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control. PMID:22459649

  6. Model validation - A connection between robust control and identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Roy S.; Doyle, John C.

    1992-01-01

    The gap between the models used in control synthesis and those obtained from identification experiments is considered by investigating the connection between uncertain models and data. The model validation problem addressed is: given experimental data and a model with both additive noise and norm-bounded perturbations, is it possible that the model could produce the observed input-output data? This problem is studied for the standard H-infinity/mu framework models. A necessary condition for such a model to describe an experimental datum is obtained. For a large class of models in the robust control framework, this condition is computable as the solution of a quadratic optimization problem.

  7. Structural identifiability analyses of candidate models for in vitro Pitavastatin hepatic uptake.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Thomas R B; Chappell, Michael J; Yates, James W T; Evans, Neil D

    2014-05-01

    In this paper a review of the application of four different techniques (a version of the similarity transformation approach for autonomous uncontrolled systems, a non-differential input/output observable normal form approach, the characteristic set differential algebra and a recent algebraic input/output relationship approach) to determine the structural identifiability of certain in vitro nonlinear pharmacokinetic models is provided. The Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide (OATP) substrate, Pitavastatin, is used as a probe on freshly isolated animal and human hepatocytes. Candidate pharmacokinetic non-linear compartmental models have been derived to characterise the uptake process of Pitavastatin. As a prerequisite to parameter estimation, structural identifiability analyses are performed to establish that all unknown parameters can be identified from the experimental observations available. PMID:23870173

  8. Main control computer security model of closed network systems protection against cyber attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymen, Bilal

    2014-06-01

    The model that brings the data input/output under control in closed network systems, that maintains the system securely, and that controls the flow of information through the Main Control Computer which also brings the network traffic under control against cyber-attacks. The network, which can be controlled single-handedly thanks to the system designed to enable the network users to make data entry into the system or to extract data from the system securely, intends to minimize the security gaps. Moreover, data input/output record can be kept by means of the user account assigned for each user, and it is also possible to carry out retroactive tracking, if requested. Because the measures that need to be taken for each computer on the network regarding cyber security, do require high cost; it has been intended to provide a cost-effective working environment with this model, only if the Main Control Computer has the updated hardware.

  9. Structural identifiability analyses of candidate models for in vitro Pitavastatin hepatic uptake.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Thomas R B; Chappell, Michael J; Yates, James W T; Evans, Neil D

    2014-05-01

    In this paper a review of the application of four different techniques (a version of the similarity transformation approach for autonomous uncontrolled systems, a non-differential input/output observable normal form approach, the characteristic set differential algebra and a recent algebraic input/output relationship approach) to determine the structural identifiability of certain in vitro nonlinear pharmacokinetic models is provided. The Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide (OATP) substrate, Pitavastatin, is used as a probe on freshly isolated animal and human hepatocytes. Candidate pharmacokinetic non-linear compartmental models have been derived to characterise the uptake process of Pitavastatin. As a prerequisite to parameter estimation, structural identifiability analyses are performed to establish that all unknown parameters can be identified from the experimental observations available.

  10. SCI Identification (SCIDNT) program user's guide. [maximum likelihood method for linear rotorcraft models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The computer program Linear SCIDNT which evaluates rotorcraft stability and control coefficients from flight or wind tunnel test data is described. It implements the maximum likelihood method to maximize the likelihood function of the parameters based on measured input/output time histories. Linear SCIDNT may be applied to systems modeled by linear constant-coefficient differential equations. This restriction in scope allows the application of several analytical results which simplify the computation and improve its efficiency over the general nonlinear case.

  11. Long-Term Clinical Outcome of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: The MD Anderson Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Zhiqin; Yang Kunyu; Komaki, Ritsuko; Wei Xiong; Tucker, Susan L.; Zhuang Yan; Martel, Mary K.; Vedam, Sastray; Balter, Peter; Zhu Guangying; Gomez, Daniel; Lu, Charles; Mohan, Radhe; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In 2007, we published our initial experience in treating inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The current report is an update of that experience with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: Patients in this retrospective review were 165 patients who began definitive radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy, for newly diagnosed, pathologically confirmed NSCLC to a dose of {>=}60 Gy from 2005 to 2006. Early and late toxicities assessed included treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP), pulmonary fibrosis, esophagitis, and esophageal stricture, scored mainly according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Other variables monitored were radiation-associated dermatitis and changes in body weight and Karnofsky performance status. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compute survival and freedom from radiation-related acute and late toxicities as a function of time. Results: Most patients (89%) had Stage III to IV disease. The median radiation dose was 66 Gy given in 33 fractions (range, 60-76 Gy, 1.8-2.3 Gy per fraction). Median overall survival time was 1.8 years; the 2-year and 3-year overall survival rates were 46% and 30%. Rates of Grade {>=}3 maximum TRP (TRP{sub max}) were 11% at 6 months and 14% at 12 months. At 18 months, 86% of patients had developed Grade {>=}1 maximum pulmonary fibrosis (pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}) and 7% Grade {>=}2 pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}. The median times to maximum esophagitis (esophagitis{sub max}) were 3 weeks (range, 1-13 weeks) for Grade 2 and 6 weeks (range, 3-13 weeks) for Grade 3. A higher percentage of patients who experienced Grade 3 esophagitis{sub max} later developed Grade 2 to 3 esophageal stricture. Conclusions: In our experience, using IMRT to treat NSCLC leads to low rates of pulmonary and esophageal toxicity, and favorable clinical outcomes in terms of survival.

  12. The VEGFR2, COX-2 and MMP-2 polymorphisms are associated with clinical outcome of patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Butkiewicz, Dorota; Krześniak, Małgorzata; Drosik, Anna; Giglok, Monika; Gdowicz-Kłosok, Agnieszka; Kosarewicz, Agata; Rusin, Marek; Masłyk, Barbara; Gawkowska-Suwińska, Marzena; Suwiński, Rafał

    2015-11-15

    Certain common inherited variations in genes involved in tumor angiogenesis, progression and metastasis may contribute to cancer therapy outcome and prognosis by altering the gene expression and protein activity. In this report, we examined the effect of functional polymorphisms in MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, VEGF, VEGFR2, FGFR4 and COX-2 genes on overall (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) of 350 Caucasian patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The results of multivariate analysis indicated that VEGFR2 -906C and COX-2 -1195G alleles were strongly associated with poor OS and PFS (p = 0.002 and 0.015, respectively, for OS; p = 0.009 and 0.015, respectively, for PFS), while MMP-2 -1306 T allele carriers had significantly reduced PFS (p = 0.010). Moreover, an increased risk of death and progression was significantly associated with the number of adverse alleles for VEGFR2/COX-2 (p = 0.0005 for OS and 0.0006 for PFS in >1 adverse allele carriers) and VEGFR2/COX-2/MMP-2 combinations (p = 0.0003 for OS and 0.0001 for PFS in patients with >2 adverse alleles). Finally, VEGFR2 TC/CC, COX-2 AG/GG and MMP-2 CT/TT genotypes as well as "at risk" allele combinations were identified as independent predictors of unfavorable OS and PFS in the group. In conclusion, the data suggest that selected VEGFR2, COX-2 and MMP-2 polymorphisms may be potential prognostic markers in unresectable NSCLC treated with radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, although further validation studies are warranted to confirm our observations.

  13. Does immunohistochemistry affect response to therapy and survival of inoperable non-small cell lung carcinoma patients? A survey of 145 stage III-IV consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Giuseppe; Haspinger, Eva Regina; Bimbatti, Manuela; Leone, Giorgia; Paolini, Biagio; Fabbri, Alessandra; Tamborini, Elena; Perrone, Federica; Testi, Adele; Garassino, Marina; Maisonneuve, Patrick; de Braud, Filippo; Pilotti, Silvana; Pastorino, Ugo

    2014-04-01

    Whether non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) unveiled by immunohistochemistry (IHC) has the same clinical outcome as those typed by morphology is still matter of debate. A total of 145 stage III-IV, consecutive inoperable NSCLC patients treated by chemotherapy (133 cases) or EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (12 cases) and including 100 biopsies, 11 surgical specimens, and 34 cytological samples had originally accounted for 120 adenocarcinomas (ADs), 19 squamous cell carcinomas (SQCs), and 6 adenosquamous carcinomas (ADSQCs) by integrating morphology and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF1)/p40 IHC. Thirty-two NSCLC-not otherwise specified (NSCLC-NOS) cases were identified by morphology revision of the original diagnoses, which showed solid growth pattern (P < .001), 22 ADs, 5 SQCs, and 5 ADSQCs by IHC profiling (P < .001), and 10 gene-altered tumors (3 EGFR, 5 KRAS, and 2 ALK). While no significant relationships were observed between response to therapy and original, morphology or IHC diagnoses, driver mutations and tumor differentiation by TTF1 expression, AD run better progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) than other tumor types by morphology (P = .010 and P = .047) and IHC (P = .033 and P = .046), respectively. Furthermore, patients with NSCLC-NOS confirmed as AD by IHC tended to have poorer OS (P = .179) and PFS (P = .193) similar to that of ADSQC and SQC (P = .702 and P = .540, respectively). A category of less differentiated AD with poorer prognosis on therapy could be identified by IHC, while there were no differences for SQC or ADSQC. The terminology of "NSCLC-NOS, favor by IHC" is appropriate to alert clinicians toward more aggressive tumors. PMID:24326823

  14. Induction chemotherapy with carboplatin-paclitaxel followed by standard radiotherapy with concurrent daily low-dose cisplatin plus weekly paclitaxel for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ardizzoni, Andrea; Scolaro, Tindaro; Mereu, Carlo; Cafferata, Mara Argenide; Tixi, Lucia; Bacigalupo, Almalina; Tiseo, Marcello; Monetti, Francesco; Rosso, Riccardo

    2005-02-01

    Both induction chemotherapy and concurrent platinating agents have been shown to improve results of thoracic irradiation in the treatment of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This phase II study investigated activity and feasibility of a novel chemoradiation regimen, including platinum and paclitaxel, both as induction chemotherapy and concurrently with thoracic radiotherapy. Previously untreated patients with histologically/cytologically proven unresectable stage I-III NSCLC were eligible. Induction chemotherapy consisted of 2 courses of 200 mg/m2 paclitaxel and carboplatin at AUC of 6 mg/mL/min every 3 weeks. From day 43, continuous thoracic irradiation (60 Gy in 30 fractions radiotherapy for 6 weeks) was given concurrently with daily cisplatin at a dose of 5 mg/m2 intravenously and weekly paclitaxel at a dose of 45 mg/m2 for 6 weeks. Fifteen patients were accrued in the first stage of the trial. According to the previous statistical considerations, accrual at the second stage of the study was halted as a result of the achievement an insufficient number of successes. Major toxicity of combined chemoradiation was grade III-IV esophagitis requiring hospitalization for artificial nutrition, which occurred in 58% of patients. Other toxicities included grade II-IV fatigue in 75% of patients and grade I-IV neuromuscular toxicity in 67%. Only 7 patients completed the treatment program as scheduled. Eight patients (53.3%; 95% confidence interval, 26.5-78.7%) had a major response (5 partial response, 3 complete response), 2 patients had disease progression, and 1 was stable at the end of treatment. Four patients died early. With a median follow up of 38 months, the median survival was 12 months. A combined chemoradiation program, including platinum and paclitaxel, appears difficult to deliver at full dose as a result of toxicity, mainly esophagitis. More active and less toxic combined modality treatments need to be developed for inoperable NSCLC.

  15. User's manual for a parameter identification technique. [with options for model simulation for fixed input forcing functions and identification from wind tunnel and flight measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanning, G.

    1975-01-01

    A digital computer program written in FORTRAN is presented that implements the system identification theory for deterministic systems using input-output measurements. The user supplies programs simulating the mathematical model of the physical plant whose parameters are to be identified. The user may choose any one of three options. The first option allows for a complete model simulation for fixed input forcing functions. The second option identifies up to 36 parameters of the model from wind tunnel or flight measurements. The third option performs a sensitivity analysis for up to 36 parameters. The use of each option is illustrated with an example using input-output measurements for a helicopter rotor tested in a wind tunnel.

  16. Nearly data-based optimal control for linear discrete model-free systems with delays via reinforcement learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jilie; Zhang, Huaguang; Wang, Binrui; Cai, Tiaoyang

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a nearly data-based optimal control scheme is proposed for linear discrete model-free systems with delays. The nearly optimal control can be obtained using only measured input/output data from systems, by reinforcement learning technology, which combines Q-learning with value iterative algorithm. First, we construct a state estimator by using the measured input/output data. Second, the quadratic functional is used to approximate the value function at each point in the state space, and the data-based control is designed by Q-learning method using the obtained state estimator. Then, the paper states the method, that is, how to solve the optimal inner kernel matrix ? in the least-square sense, by value iteration algorithm. Finally, the numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  17. Long-term results of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the primary treatment of medically inoperable stage I-II endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Niazi, Tamim M.; Souhami, Luis . E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca; Portelance, Lorraine; Bahoric, Boris; Gilbert, Lucy; Stanimir, Gerald

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: Total-abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAHBSO) is the gold-standard therapy for patients with endometrial carcinoma. However, patients with high operative risks are usually treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone. The goal of this study was to update our experience of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB), with or without external-beam irradiation (EBRT), for such patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1984 and 2003, 38 patients with Stage I and Stage II adenocarcinoma of the endometrium considered high operative risk received RT as the primary treatment. The median age was 74.1 years. Before 1996, the local extent of the disease was assessed by an examination under anesthesia (EUA) and by EUA and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) thereafter. Eight patients (21%) were treated with combined HDRB and EBRT, and 30 patients (79%) were treated with with HDRB alone. The median HDRB dose was 23.9 Gy, typically delivered in 3 fractions in a weekly schedule. The median EBRT dose was 42 Gy. Results: At a median follow-up of 57.5 months for patients at risk, 11 patients (29%) have failed: 6 patients (16%) locally, 4 patients (10.5%) distantly, and 1 patient (3%) locally and distantly. Local failure was established by biopsy, and 4 patients were salvaged by TAHBSO. Higher stage and higher grade were both associated with increased failure rate. The 15-year disease-specific survival (DSS) was 78% for all stages, 90% for Stage I, and 42% for Stage II (p < 0.0001). The 15-year DSS was 91% for Grade I and 67% for Grade II and III combined (p = 0.0254). Patients with Stage I disease established by MRI (11 patients) and who received a total HDRB dose of 30 Gy had a DSS rate of 100% at 10 years. Four patients experienced late toxicities: 1 Grade II and 3 Grade III or IV. Conclusion: Medically inoperable Stage I endometrial carcinoma may be safely and effectively treated with HDRB as the primary therapy. In selected Stage I patients, our results are

  18. Toxicity Profile and Pharmacokinetic Study of A Phase I Low-Dose Schedule-Dependent Radiosensitizing Paclitaxel Chemoradiation Regimen for Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yuhchyau Pandya, Kishan J.; Feins, Richard; Johnstone, David W.; Watson, Thomas; Smudzin, Therese; Keng, Peter C.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: We report the toxicity profile and pharmacokinetic data of a schedule-dependent chemoradiation regimen using pulsed low-dose paclitaxel for radiosensitization in a Phase I study for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Paclitaxel at escalating doses of 15 mg/m{sup 2}, 20 mg/m{sup 2}, and 25 mg/m{sup 2} were infused on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday with daily chest radiation in cohorts of 6 patients. Daily radiation was delayed for maximal G2/M arrest and apoptotic effect, an observation from preclinical investigations. Plasma paclitaxel concentration was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: Dose-limiting toxicities included 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 pneumonitis and 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 esophagitis. There was no Grade 4 or 5 pneumonitis or esophagitis. There was also no Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia or neuropathy. For Dose Levels I (15 mg/m{sup 2}), II (20 mg/m{sup 2}), and III (25 mg/m{sup 2}), the mean peak plasma level was 0.23 {+-} 0.06 {mu}mol/l, 0.32 {+-} 0.05 {mu}mol/l, and 0.52 {+-} 0.14 {mu}mol/l, respectively; AUC was 0.44 {+-} 0.09 {mu}mol/l, 0.61 {+-} 0.1 {mu}mol/l, and 0.96 {+-} 0.23 {mu}mol/l, respectively; and duration of drug concentration >0.05 {mu}mol/l (t > 0.05 {mu}mol/l) was 1.6 {+-} 0.3 h, 1.9 {+-} 0.2 h, and 3.0 {+-} 0.9 h, respectively. Conclusion: Pulsed low-dose paclitaxel chemoradiation is associated with low toxicity. Pharmacokinetic data showed that plasma paclitaxel concentration >0.05 {mu}mol/l for a minimum of 1.6 h was sufficient for effective radiosensitization.

  19. Reirradiation alternating with docetaxel and cisplatin in inoperable recurrence of head-and-neck cancer: A prospective phase I/II trial

    SciTech Connect

    Hehr, Thomas; Classen, Johannes; Belka, Claus; Welz, Stefan; Schaefer, Juergen; Koitschev, Assen; Bamberg, Michael; Budach, Wilfried . E-mail: wilfried.budach@med.uni-tuebingen.de

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Inoperable locoregional recurrences of head-and-neck cancer in a previously irradiated volume represent a therapeutic dilemma. Chemotherapy alone has no curative potential, whereas reirradiation and concurrent chemoradiation can salvage a small fraction of patients. Mucosal toxicity of concurrent chemoradiation requires substantial dose reduction of chemotherapy. Alternating chemoradiation offers the chance to give both full-dose chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The latter may provide a particular advantage for recurrent, potentially radiation resistant tumors. The feasibility and efficacy of a full-dose docetaxel containing alternating chemoradiation schedule was tested. Patients and Methods: Twenty-seven patients (Karnofsky performance status score {>=}70%) with histologically proven recurrent squamous cell cancer that occurred {>=} 6 months in a previously irradiated area ({>=} 60 Gy) were considered unresectable and unsuitable for brachytherapy. Alternating chemoradiation consisted of 3 cycles of docetaxel 60 mg/m{sup 2} d1 and cisplatin 15 mg/m{sup 2} d2-5, q d22, and involved field radiotherapy 2.0 Gy every day d8-12, d15-19, d29-33, and d36-40 (40.0 Gy total dose). Dose reduction of docetaxel to 50 mg/m{sup 2} was necessary, because of hematologic toxicity in the first 12 patients. Results: Alternating chemoreirradiation was applied as planned in 12 of 27 patients, with reirradiation completed per protocol in 81%. Overall, patients received 83% of the intended dose of docetaxel and 73% of cisplatin. Third-degree common toxicity criteria mucositis occurred in 15%, leukopenia of {>=} third degree by common toxicity criteria in 37%, and 3 early deaths were observed. Median time to follow-up, time to local progression, median survival, and 3-year survival rates were 42 months, 10 months, 10 months, and 18%, respectively. Conclusions: Alternating chemoreirradiation in recurrences of head-and-neck cancer resulted in 80% overall response with acceptable

  20. Modeling of materials supply, demand and prices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The societal, economic, and policy tradeoffs associated with materials processing and utilization, are discussed. The materials system provides the materials engineer with the system analysis required for formulate sound materials processing, utilization, and resource development policies and strategies. Materials system simulation and modeling research program including assessments of materials substitution dynamics, public policy implications, and materials process economics was expanded. This effort includes several collaborative programs with materials engineers, economists, and policy analysts. The technical and socioeconomic issues of materials recycling, input-output analysis, and technological change and productivity are examined. The major thrust areas in materials systems research are outlined.

  1. Identifiability Results for Several Classes of Linear Compartment Models.

    PubMed

    Meshkat, Nicolette; Sullivant, Seth; Eisenberg, Marisa

    2015-08-01

    Identifiability concerns finding which unknown parameters of a model can be estimated, uniquely or otherwise, from given input-output data. If some subset of the parameters of a model cannot be determined given input-output data, then we say the model is unidentifiable. In this work, we study linear compartment models, which are a class of biological models commonly used in pharmacokinetics, physiology, and ecology. In past work, we used commutative algebra and graph theory to identify a class of linear compartment models that we call identifiable cycle models, which are unidentifiable but have the simplest possible identifiable functions (so-called monomial cycles). Here we show how to modify identifiable cycle models by adding inputs, adding outputs, or removing leaks, in such a way that we obtain an identifiable model. We also prove a constructive result on how to combine identifiable models, each corresponding to strongly connected graphs, into a larger identifiable model. We apply these theoretical results to several real-world biological models from physiology, cell biology, and ecology. PMID:26337290

  2. A probabilistic model for the fault tolerance of multilayer perceptrons.

    PubMed

    Merchawi, N S; Kumara, S T; Das, C R

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical approach to determine the probability of misclassification of the multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural model, subject to weight errors. The type of applications considered are classification/recognition tasks involving binary input-output mappings. The analytical models are validated via simulation of a small illustrative example. The theoretical results, in agreement with simulation results, show that, for the example considered, Gaussian weight errors of standard deviation up to 22% of the weight value can be tolerated. The theoretical method developed here adds predictability to the fault tolerance capability of neural nets and shows that this capability is heavily dependent on the problem data.

  3. Regulated dc-to-dc converter for voltage step-up or step-down with input-output isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, S. Y.; Wilson, T. G. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A closed loop regulated dc-to-dc converter employing an unregulated two winding inductive energy storage converter is provided by using a magnetically coupled multivibrator acting as duty cycle generator to drive the converter. The multivibrator is comprised of two transistor switches and a saturable transformer. The output of the converter is compared with a reference in a comparator which transmits a binary zero until the output exceeds the reference. When the output exceeds the reference, the binary output of the comparator drives transistor switches to turn the multivibrator off. The multivibrator is unbalanced so that a predetermined transistor will always turn on first when the binary feedback signal becomes zero.

  4. Beyond input-output computings: error-driven emergence with parallel non-distributed slime mold computer.

    PubMed

    Aono, Masashi; Gunji, Yukio-Pegio

    2003-10-01

    The emergence derived from errors is the key importance for both novel computing and novel usage of the computer. In this paper, we propose an implementable experimental plan for the biological computing so as to elicit the emergent property of complex systems. An individual plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum acts in the slime mold computer. Modifying the Elementary Cellular Automaton as it entails the global synchronization problem upon the parallel computing provides the NP-complete problem solved by the slime mold computer. The possibility to solve the problem by giving neither all possible results nor explicit prescription of solution-seeking is discussed. In slime mold computing, the distributivity in the local computing logic can change dynamically, and its parallel non-distributed computing cannot be reduced into the spatial addition of multiple serial computings. The computing system based on exhaustive absence of the super-system may produce, something more than filling the vacancy.

  5. A Framework for Lab Work Management in Mass Courses. Application to Low Level Input/Output without Hardware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Santiago; Zamorano, Juan; Rosales, Francisco; Dopico, Antonio Garcia; Pedraza, Jose Luis

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a complete lab work management framework designed and developed in the authors' department to help teachers to manage the small projects that students are expected to complete as lab assignments during their graduate-level computer engineering studies. The paper focuses on an application example of the framework to a specific…

  6. A low power and low distortion rail-to-rail input/output amplifier using constant current technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liu; Yiqiang, Zhao; Shilin, Zhang; Hongliang, Zhao

    2011-04-01

    A rail-to-rail amplifier with constant transconductance, intended for audio processing, is presented. The constant transconductance is obtained by a constant current technique based on the input differential pairs operating in the weak inversion region. MOSFETs working in the weak inversion region have the advantages of low power and low distortion. The proposed rail-to-rail amplifier, fabricated in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS process, occupies a core die area of 75 × 183 μm2. Measured results show that the maximum power consumption is 85.37 μW with a supply voltage of 3.3 V and the total harmonic distortion level is 1.2% at 2 kHz.

  7. Fault detection for T-S fuzzy time-delay systems: delta operator and input-output methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyi; Gao, Yabin; Wu, Ligang; Lam, H K

    2015-02-01

    This paper focuses on the problem of fault detection for Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems with time-varying delays via delta operator approach. By designing a filter to generate a residual signal, the fault detection problem addressed in this paper can be converted into a filtering problem. The time-varying delay is approximated by the two-term approximation method. Fuzzy augmented fault detection system is constructed in δ -domain, and a threshold function is given. By applying the scaled small gain theorem and choosing a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional in δ -domain, a sufficient condition of asymptotic stability with a prescribed H∞ disturbance attenuation level is derived for the proposed fault detection system. Then, a solvability condition for the designed fault detection filter is established, with which the desired filter can be obtained by solving a convex optimization problem. Finally, an example is given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. The role of docking interactions in mediating signaling input, output, and discrimination in the yeast MAPK network.

    PubMed

    Reményi, Attila; Good, Matthew C; Bhattacharyya, Roby P; Lim, Wendell A

    2005-12-22

    Cells use a network of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) to coordinate responses to diverse extracellular signals. Here, we examine the role of docking interactions in determining connectivity of the yeast MAPKs Fus3 and Kss1. These closely related kinases are activated by the common upstream MAPK kinase Ste7 yet generate distinct output responses, mating and filamentous growth, respectively. We find that docking interactions are necessary for communication with the kinases and that they can encode subtle differences in pathway-specific input and output. The cell cycle arrest mediator Far1, a mating-specific substrate, has a docking motif that selectively binds Fus3. In contrast, the shared partner Ste7 has a promiscuous motif that binds both Fus3 and Kss1. Structural analysis reveals that Fus3 interacts with specific and promiscuous peptides in conformationally distinct modes. Induced fit recognition may allow docking peptides to achieve discrimination by exploiting subtle differences in kinase flexibility. PMID:16364919

  9. NITROGEN AND SULFUR INPUT-OUTPUT BUDGETS IN THE EXPERIMENTAL AND REFERENCE WATERSHEDS, BEAR BROOK WATERSHED IN MAINE. (R825762)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  10. Linear functional observers with guaranteed ɛ-convergence for discrete time-delay systems with input/output disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, M. C.; Trinh, H.; Nam, P. T.

    2016-10-01

    The problem of designing linear functional observers for discrete time-delay systems with unknown-but-bounded disturbances in both the plant and the output is considered for the first time in this paper. A novel approach to design a minimum-order observer is proposed to guarantee that the observer error is ε-convergent, which means that the estimate converges robustly within an ε-bound of the true state. Conditions for the existence of this observer are first derived. Then, by utilising an extended Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and the free-weighting matrix technique, a sufficient condition for ε-convergence of the observer error system is given. This condition is presented in terms of linear matrix inequalities with two parameters needed to be tuned, so that it can be efficiently solved by incorporating a two-dimensional search method into convex optimisation algorithms to obtain the smallest possible value for ε. Three numerical examples, including the well-known single-link flexible joint robotic system, are given to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our results.

  11. Portable file management system in FORTRAN. II. The input/output routine for free-format text.

    PubMed

    Okada, M; Okada, M

    1986-04-01

    A software tool for inputing and outputing patient data (1/O routine) has been developed. Since this I/O routine is programmed exclusively in FORTRAN77, it will make a powerful tool for constructing a portable database system. Basically the routine manipulates an ASCII-coded text string that consists of lines demarcated by the CR code (13) and is terminated by the null code (0). The editing commands are preceded by one of the following ASCII characters: @, !, ], [, *, and _, and all the strings with an initial character other than these are interpreted as data to be inserted into the text. Since the routine uses two FORTRAN tools already reported, i.e. the subroutines to manipulate key files and the subroutines to manage variable length records, character strings can be stored without any restrictions in format or in size, and can be retrieved either sequentially or in an indexed manner.

  12. Input-Output Features of Anatomically Identified CA3 Neurons during Hippocampal Sharp Wave/Ripple Oscillation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Karlócai, Mária R.; Németh, Beáta; Ulbert, István; Monyer, Hannah; Szabó, Gábor; Erdélyi, Ferenc; Freund, Tamás F.; Gulyás, Attila I.

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal sharp waves and the associated ripple oscillations (SWRs) are implicated in memory processes. These network events emerge intrinsically in the CA3 network. To understand cellular interactions that generate SWRs, we detected first spiking activity followed by recording of synaptic currents in distinct types of anatomically identified CA3 neurons during SWRs that occurred spontaneously in mouse hippocampal slices. We observed that the vast majority of interneurons fired during SWRs, whereas only a small portion of pyramidal cells was found to spike. There were substantial differences in the firing behavior among interneuron groups; parvalbumin-expressing basket cells were one of the most active GABAergic cells during SWRs, whereas ivy cells were silent. Analysis of the synaptic currents during SWRs uncovered that the dominant synaptic input to the pyramidal cell was inhibitory, whereas spiking interneurons received larger synaptic excitation than inhibition. The discharge of all interneurons was primarily determined by the magnitude and the timing of synaptic excitation. Strikingly, we observed that the temporal structure of synaptic excitation and inhibition during SWRs significantly differed between parvalbumin-containing basket cells, axoaxonic cells, and type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1)-expressing basket cells, which might explain their distinct recruitment to these synchronous events. Our data support the hypothesis that the active current sources restricted to the stratum pyramidale during SWRs originate from the synaptic output of parvalbumin-expressing basket cells. Thus, in addition to gamma oscillation, these GABAergic cells play a central role in SWR generation. PMID:23843535

  13. Input-output budget of nitrogen and the effect of experimentally changed deposition in the forest ecosystems in central Japan.

    PubMed

    Shindo, J; Fumoto, T; Oura, N; Toda, H; Kawashima, H

    2001-11-01

    To evaluate the current nitrogen (N) status in Japanese forests, field measurements of rainfall, throughfall, litter layer percolation, and soil solution percolation were conducted in a red pine stand (Kannondai) and a deciduous stand (Yasato) located in central Japan. N input via throughfall was 31 and 14 kg ha(-1) year(-1) and output below rooting zone was 9.6 and 5.5 kg ha1 year(-1) in Kannondai and in Yasato, respectively. Two thirds of input N were retained in plant-soil systems. Manipulation of N input was carried out. Ionic constituents were removed from throughfall with ion exchange resin at removal sites and ammonium nitrate containing twice the N of the throughfall was applied at N addition sites periodically. SO4(2-) output below 20-cm soil layer changed depending on the input, while NO3- output was regulated mainly by the internal cycle and effect of manipulation was undetected. These Japanese stands were generally considered to have a larger capacity to assimilate N than NITREX sites in Europe. However, N output fluxes had large spatial variability and some sites in Kannondai showed high N leaching below rooting zone almost balanced with the input via throughfall.

  14. T-type calcium channels promote predictive homeostasis of input-output relations in thalamocortical neurons of lateral geniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Hong, Su Z; Kim, Haram R; Fiorillo, Christopher D

    2014-01-01

    A general theory views the function of all neurons as prediction, and one component of this theory is that of "predictive homeostasis" or "prediction error." It is well established that sensory systems adapt so that neuronal output maintains sensitivity to sensory input, in accord with information theory. Predictive homeostasis applies the same principle at the cellular level, where the challenge is to maintain membrane excitability at the optimal homeostatic level so that spike generation is maximally sensitive to small gradations in synaptic drive. Negative feedback is a hallmark of homeostatic mechanisms, as exemplified by depolarization-activated potassium channels. In contrast, T-type calcium channels exhibit positive feedback that appears at odds with the theory. In thalamocortical neurons of lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), T-type channels are capable of causing bursts of spikes with an all-or-none character in response to excitation from a hyperpolarized potential. This "burst mode" would partially uncouple visual input from spike output and reduce the information spikes convey about gradations in visual input. However, past observations of T-type-driven bursts may have resulted from unnaturally high membrane excitability. Here we have mimicked within rat brain slices the patterns of synaptic conductance that occur naturally during vision. In support of the theory of predictive homeostasis, we found that T-type channels restored excitability toward its homeostatic level during periods of hyperpolarization. Thus, activation of T-type channels allowed two retinal input spikes to cause one output spike on average, and we observed almost no instances in which output count exceeded input count (a "burst"). T-type calcium channels therefore help to maintain a single optimal mode of transmission rather than creating a second mode. More fundamentally our results support the general theory, which seeks to predict the properties of a neuron's ion channels and synapses given knowledge of natural patterns of synaptic input.

  15. Regulated dc-to-dc converter for voltage step-up or step-down with input-output isolation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, S. Y. M.; Wilson, T. G.; Dakermandji, G.; Lee, F. C. Y.

    1971-01-01

    A dc-to-dc regulated-converter circuit employing duty-cycle control with variable on and variable off time has been presented. A unique feature of this converter is the method by which the bistable-comparator output controls the duty cycle of the power switching transistor through the action of the encoder. The utilization of minor-loop flux excursions of a saturable-core transformer in the encoder makes it feasible to extend the converter switching frequency considerably higher than would normally be possible. With this converter circuit, high and very-high frequency converter operations were explored.

  16. The determination of third order linear models from a seventh order nonlinear jet engine model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalonde, Rick J.; Hartley, Tom T.; De Abreu-Garcia, J. Alex

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented that demonstrate how good reduced-order models can be obtained directly by recursive parameter identification using input/output (I/O) data of high-order nonlinear systems. Three different methods of obtaining a third-order linear model from a seventh-order nonlinear turbojet engine model are compared. The first method is to obtain a linear model from the original model and then reduce the linear model by standard reduction techniques such as residualization and balancing. The second method is to identify directly a third-order linear model by recursive least-squares parameter estimation using I/O data of the original model. The third method is to obtain a reduced-order model from the original model and then linearize the reduced model. Frequency responses are used as the performance measure to evaluate the reduced models. The reduced-order models along with their Bode plots are presented for comparison purposes.

  17. A one-dimensional heat transfer model for parallel-plate thermoacoustic heat exchangers.

    PubMed

    de Jong, J A; Wijnant, Y H; de Boer, A

    2014-03-01

    A one-dimensional (1D) laminar oscillating flow heat transfer model is derived and applied to parallel-plate thermoacoustic heat exchangers. The model can be used to estimate the heat transfer from the solid wall to the acoustic medium, which is required for the heat input/output of thermoacoustic systems. The model is implementable in existing (quasi-)1D thermoacoustic codes, such as DeltaEC. Examples of generated results show good agreement with literature results. The model allows for arbitrary wave phasing; however, it is shown that the wave phasing does not significantly influence the heat transfer.

  18. SMP: A solid modeling program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, D. P.; Jones, K. H.; Vonofenheim, W. H.; Gates, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A prototype solid modeling program, SMP, developed by CSC for Langley Research Center (LaRC) is documented in this paper. The SMP software is employed by the System and Experiments Branch (SEB) of the Space Systems Division (SSD) for preliminary space station design, but is intended as a general purpose tool. The SMP document provides details concerning: the basic geometric modeling primitives and associated operators, the data representation scheme utilized to structure the geometric model, the available commands for both editing and displaying the solid model, the interactive user interface and the input/output interfaces to external software, and the utility of the package in the LaRC computing environment. The document is sufficiently detailed to serve both as a user's guide and reference manual.

  19. Fitting neuron models to spike trains.

    PubMed

    Rossant, Cyrille; Goodman, Dan F M; Fontaine, Bertrand; Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Magnusson, Anna K; Brette, Romain

    2011-01-01

    Computational modeling is increasingly used to understand the function of neural circuits in systems neuroscience. These studies require models of individual neurons with realistic input-output properties. Recently, it was found that spiking models can accurately predict the precisely timed spike trains produced by cortical neurons in response to somatically injected currents, if properly fitted. This requires fitting techniques that are efficient and flexible enough to easily test different candidate models. We present a generic solution, based on the Brian simulator (a neural network simulator in Python), which allows the user to define and fit arbitrary neuron models to electrophysiological recordings. It relies on vectorization and parallel computing techniques to achieve efficiency. We demonstrate its use on neural recordings in the barrel cortex and in the auditory brainstem, and confirm that simple adaptive spiking models can accurately predict the response of cortical neurons. Finally, we show how a complex multicompartmental model can be reduced to a simple effective spiking model. PMID:21415925

  20. Modeling and Calibration of Automatic Guided Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Kenji; Tanaka, Kosuke; Shin, Seiichi; Kumagai, Kenji; Yoneda, Hisato

    This paper presents a modeling of an automatic guided vehicle (AGV) to achieve a model-based control. The modeling includes 3 kinds of choices; a choice of input-output data pair from 14 candidate pairs, a choice of system identification technique form 5 candidate techniques, a choice of discrete to continuous transform method from 2 candidate methods. In order to obtain reliable plant models of AGV, an approach for calibration between a statistical model and a physical model is also here. In our approach, the models are combined according to the weight of AGV. As a result, our calibration problem is recast as a nonlinear optimization problem that can be solved by quasi-Newton's method.

  1. Volterra representation enables modeling of complex synaptic nonlinear dynamics in large-scale simulations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Eric Y.; Bouteiller, Jean-Marie C.; Song, Dong; Baudry, Michel; Berger, Theodore W.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical synapses are comprised of a wide collection of intricate signaling pathways involving complex dynamics. These mechanisms are often reduced to simple spikes or exponential representations in order to enable computer simulations at higher spatial levels of complexity. However, these representations cannot capture important nonlinear dynamics found in synaptic transmission. Here, we propose an input-output (IO) synapse model capable of generating complex nonlinear dynamics while maintaining low computational complexity. This IO synapse model is an extension of a detailed mechanistic glutamatergic synapse model capable of capturing the input-output relationships of the mechanistic model using the Volterra functional power series. We demonstrate that the IO synapse model is able to successfully track the nonlinear dynamics of the synapse up to the third order with high accuracy. We also evaluate the accuracy of the IO synapse model at different input frequencies and compared its performance with that of kinetic models in compartmental neuron models. Our results demonstrate that the IO synapse model is capable of efficiently replicating complex nonlinear dynamics that were represented in the original mechanistic model and provide a method to replicate complex and diverse synaptic transmission within neuron network simulations. PMID:26441622

  2. HI-CHART: A Phase I/II Study on the Feasibility of High-Dose Continuous Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy in Patients With Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ruysscher, Dirk de Wanders, Rinus; Haren, Erik van; Hochstenbag, Monique; Geraedts, Wiel; Pitz, Cordula; Simons, Jean; Boersma, Liesbeth; Verschueren, Tom; Minken, Andre; Bentzen, Soren M.; Lambin, Philippe

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of high-dose continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in patients with inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: In a prospective, Phase I/II study, according to the risk for radiation pneumonitis, three risk groups were defined: V{sub 20} <25%, V{sub 20} 25-37%, and V{sub 20} >37%. The dose was administered in three steps from 61.2 Gy/34 fractions/23 days to 64.8 Gy/36 fractions/24 days to 68.40 Gy/38 fractions/25 days (1.8 Gy b.i.d. with 8-h interval), using a three-dimensional conformal technique. Only the mediastinal lymph node areas that were positive on the pretreatment {sup 18}F-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography scan were included in the target volume. The primary endpoint was toxicity. Results: A total of 48 Stage I-IIIB patients were included. In all risk groups, 68.40 Gy/38 fractions/25 days could be administered. Maximal toxicity according to the risk groups was as follows: V{sub 20} <25% (n = 35): 1 Grade 4 (G4) lung and 1 G3 reversible esophageal toxicity; V{sub 20} 35-37% (n = 12): 1 G5 lung and 1 G3 reversible esophageal toxicity. For the whole group, local tumor recurrence occurred in 25% (95% confidence interval 14%-40%) of the patients, with 1 of 48 (2.1%; upper one-sided 95% confidence limit 9.5%) having an isolated nodal recurrence. The median actuarial overall survival was 20 months, with a 2-year survival rate of 36%. Conclusions: High-dose continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy up to a dose of 68.40 Gy/38 fractions/25 days (a biologic equivalent of approximately 80 Gy when delivered in conventional fractionation) in patients with inoperable NSCLC and a V{sub 20} up to 37% is feasible.

  3. Model Structures and Algorithms for Identification of Aerodynamic Models for Flight Dynamics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasanth, Ravi K.; Klein, Vladislav; Murphy, Patrick C.; Mehra, Raman K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes model structures and parameter estimation algorithms suitable for the identification of unsteady aerodynamic models from input-output data. The model structures presented are state space models and include linear time-invariant (LTI) models and linear parameter-varying (LPV) models. They cover a wide range of local and parameter dependent identification problems arising in unsteady aerodynamics and nonlinear flight dynamics. We present a residue algorithm for estimating model parameters from data. The algorithm can incorporate apriori information and is described in detail. The algorithms are evaluated on the F-16XL wind-tunnel test data from NAS Langley Research Center. Results of numerical evaluation are presented. The paper concludes with a discussion major issues and directions for future work.

  4. State energy modeling. Volume 1: An analysis of state energy modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melcher, A. G.

    1981-05-01

    An inventory and analysis of state energy models were made. The inventory identified 69 models developed or used at the state government level. Most of these deal with energy demand and area mix as regards the sectors modeled and the fuel types included. Nearly all of these are econometric or econometric engineering end use models. Fewer models deal with energy supply, and several address both supply and demand. The most common types of models are econometric, engineering and use, linear programming, and input-output. Purposes of models include: forecasting; policy analysis; impact analysis; and scenario analysis. Uses include short term emergency management, long term strategic assessment, and specific applications in decisions on facility siting, utility capacity expansion and rate increases proposed legislation, and analysis of federal policy.

  5. Experimental development based on mapping rule between requirements analysis model and web framework specific design model.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Hirotaka; Ogata, Shinpei; Matsuura, Saeko

    2013-12-01

    Model Driven Development is a promising approach to develop high quality software systems. We have proposed a method of model-driven requirements analysis using Unified Modeling Language (UML). The main feature of our method is to automatically generate a Web user interface prototype from UML requirements analysis model so that we can confirm validity of input/output data for each page and page transition on the system by directly operating the prototype. We proposes a mapping rule in which design information independent of each web application framework implementation is defined based on the requirements analysis model, so as to improve the traceability to the final product from the valid requirements analysis model. This paper discusses the result of applying our method to the development of a Group Work Support System that is currently running in our department.

  6. Multidrug chemotherapy (vincristine-bleomycin-methotrexate) followed by radiotherapy in inoperable carcinomas of the head and neck: preliminary report of a pilot study of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Marcial, V.A.; Velez-Garcia, E.; Figueroa-Valles, N.R.; Cintron, J.; Vallecillo, L.A.

    1980-06-01

    This is a preliminary report on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) pilot study 77-08, of a combination of chemotherapy with vincristine-bleomycin-methotrexate, followed by radiotherapy, for inoperable carcinomas of the head and neck. The main objectives of the study were to determine toxicity and tumor control. Patients who were included had untreated carcinomas, with no distant metastases, and with adequate pulmonary, renal, and liver function. Forty patients were registered for the study. Chemotherapy started with vincristine--1.5 mgs/m/sup 2/ (maximum of 2 mgs) by I.V. injection, followed by bleomycin drip for 48 hours (15 units/day), and then methotrexate (200 mgs/m/sup 2/ divided in equal doses 6 hours apart) with folinic acid rescue. Eleven patients received one course of the stated chemotherapy; 28 were given two courses with one week rest period between them. Radical curative radiotherapy was started usually two weeks after chemotherapy. A surgical procedure was considered if the patient was found operable after receiving a dose of 5000 rad with continuous therapy or at 3000 rad with split-course therapy. The level of toxicity that resulted from this combined therapy was considered acceptable. The percentage of complete response of the primary tumor was 6% with chemotherapy; this increased to 46% after irradiation, and to 65% when surgery was added.

  7. Verification and validation of the comprehensive operational support evaluation model for space. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, L.A.

    1991-12-01

    This study details the verification and validation (V and V) of the Comprehensive Operational Support Evaluation Model for Space (COSEMS). COSEMS is an Ada-based simulation which models spacecraft constellation support concepts such as support from the ground and on-orbit support. While the model is intended for use in analyzing Strategic Defense System concepts, it can easily evaluate non-military satellite constellations. The VV was confined to a subset of the over 200 subprograms which comprise COSEMS. This subset covered random number generation, reliability, orbital mechanics, and mission planning functions. The study used traces and comparison to other models to perform the VV. An input/output analysis was also performed to ascertain the ease of use of COSEMS and the utility of its output. The analysis showed that the areas under investigation performed according to the model and that the model approximated real-world behavior except for orbital motion. The part of the model governing orbital perturbations due to the non-spherical earth omitted rotation of the line-of-apsides. The analysis also revealed that the Ada code and the input/output format are highly machine dependent, which restricts the program from coming into widespread use and limits the usefulness of the output.

  8. Critique of the IIASA energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, D.

    1981-07-01

    Energy models developed by the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) are reviewed in response to a paper published by Basile on the interrelationship of the models MEDEE-2, MESSAGE, and IMPACT (referred to as MMI). Although the three link static accounting, linear programming, and input-output matrices, no theory has been developed about what the combination means. Since their meaning is unclear, the author notes that the model results do not prove that either the hard or the soft path is correct. Outside access to MMI data is essential to allow independent researchers the opportunity to reproduce IIASA results. If the different projections for the hard and soft paths can be resolved, the IIASA models will provide a more-useful foundation for future analyses. 8 references. (DCK)

  9. Modelling, analyses and design of switching converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuk, S. M.; Middlebrook, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    A state-space averaging method for modelling switching dc-to-dc converters for both continuous and discontinuous conduction mode is developed. In each case the starting point is the unified state-space representation, and the end result is a complete linear circuit model, for each conduction mode, which correctly represents all essential features, namely, the input, output, and transfer properties (static dc as well as dynamic ac small-signal). While the method is generally applicable to any switching converter, it is extensively illustrated for the three common power stages (buck, boost, and buck-boost). The results for these converters are then easily tabulated owing to the fixed equivalent circuit topology of their canonical circuit model. The insights that emerge from the general state-space modelling approach lead to the design of new converter topologies through the study of generic properties of the cascade connection of basic buck and boost converters.

  10. Computing the modal mass from the state space model in combined experimental-operational modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cara, Javier

    2016-05-01

    Modal parameters comprise natural frequencies, damping ratios, modal vectors and modal masses. In a theoretic framework, these parameters are the basis for the solution of vibration problems using the theory of modal superposition. In practice, they can be computed from input-output vibration data: the usual procedure is to estimate a mathematical model from the data and then to compute the modal parameters from the estimated model. The most popular models for input-output data are based on the frequency response function, but in recent years the state space model in the time domain has become popular among researchers and practitioners of modal analysis with experimental data. In this work, the equations to compute the modal parameters from the state space model when input and output data are available (like in combined experimental-operational modal analysis) are derived in detail using invariants of the state space model: the equations needed to compute natural frequencies, damping ratios and modal vectors are well known in the operational modal analysis framework, but the equation needed to compute the modal masses has not generated much interest in technical literature. These equations are applied to both a numerical simulation and an experimental study in the last part of the work.

  11. TEAMS Model Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tijidjian, Raffi P.

    2010-01-01

    The TEAMS model analyzer is a supporting tool developed to work with models created with TEAMS (Testability, Engineering, and Maintenance System), which was developed by QSI. In an effort to reduce the time spent in the manual process that each TEAMS modeler must perform in the preparation of reporting for model reviews, a new tool has been developed as an aid to models developed in TEAMS. The software allows for the viewing, reporting, and checking of TEAMS models that are checked into the TEAMS model database. The software allows the user to selectively model in a hierarchical tree outline view that displays the components, failure modes, and ports. The reporting features allow the user to quickly gather statistics about the model, and generate an input/output report pertaining to all of the components. Rules can be automatically validated against the model, with a report generated containing resulting inconsistencies. In addition to reducing manual effort, this software also provides an automated process framework for the Verification and Validation (V&V) effort that will follow development of these models. The aid of such an automated tool would have a significant impact on the V&V process.

  12. Modeling and identification of parallel and feedback nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hai-Wen

    1994-10-01

    Structural classification and parameter estimation (SCPE) methods have been used for studying single-input single. output (SISO) parallel and feedback nonlinear system models from input-output (I-O) measurements. The uniqueness of the I-O mappings of different models and parameter uniqueness of the I-O mapping of a given structural model are evaluated. The former aids in defining the conditions under which different model structures may be differentiated from one another. The latter defines the conditions under which a given model parameter can be uniquely estimated from I-O measurements. SCPE methods presented in this paper can be further developed to study more complicated multi-input multi-output (MIMO) block-structured models which will provide useful techniques for modeling and identifying highly complex nonlinear systems.

  13. [Modeling of carbon dioxide measurement and optimization on building ceramic industry].

    PubMed

    Peng, Jun-Xi; Zhao, Yu-Bo; Jiao, Li-Hua; Zeng, Lu; Zheng, Wei-Min

    2012-02-01

    Input-output model and low carbon programming model on building ceramic industry were established. Carbon dioxide emissions of key steps and carbon footprint of products were calculated and predicted using the input-output model. While products planning was optimized using the low carbon programming model. The results showed that CO2 emission in the enterprise reached 182 543.9 t a year and CO2 emission per unit product was 10% more than advanced level in the world. 80% of the total CO2 was emitted during the processes of firing and drying. As a result, we should focus on these two steps in order to reduce carbon dioxide emission of building ceramic industry. Carbon footprint of blank tile, polished tile, and glazed tile were 150.2 t, 168.0 t, 159.6 t respectively. Optimized by the low carbon model, The ceramic enterprise could reduce carbon dioxide emission by 5.4% while not sacrificing any profit, and also could obtain profit 5.6% higher than before while unrise the carbon dioxide emission.

  14. A Policy Model for Secure Information Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adetoye, Adedayo O.; Badii, Atta

    When a computer program requires legitimate access to confidential data, the question arises whether such a program may illegally reveal sensitive information. This paper proposes a policy model to specify what information flow is permitted in a computational system. The security definition, which is based on a general notion of information lattices, allows various representations of information to be used in the enforcement of secure information flow in deterministic or nondeterministic systems. A flexible semantics-based analysis technique is presented, which uses the input-output relational model induced by an attacker’s observational power, to compute the information released by the computational system. An illustrative attacker model demonstrates the use of the technique to develop a termination-sensitive analysis. The technique allows the development of various information flow analyses, parametrised by the attacker’s observational power, which can be used to enforce what declassification policies.

  15. Dynamic causal modelling of brain-behaviour relationships.

    PubMed

    Rigoux, L; Daunizeau, J

    2015-08-15

    In this work, we expose a mathematical treatment of brain-behaviour relationships, which we coin behavioural Dynamic Causal Modelling or bDCM. This approach aims at decomposing the brain's transformation of stimuli into behavioural outcomes, in terms of the relative contribution of brain regions and their connections. In brief, bDCM places the brain at the interplay between stimulus and behaviour: behavioural outcomes arise from coordinated activity in (hidden) neural networks, whose dynamics are driven by experimental inputs. Estimating neural parameters that control network connectivity and plasticity effectively performs a neurobiologically-constrained approximation to the brain's input-outcome transform. In other words, neuroimaging data essentially serves to enforce the realism of bDCM's decomposition of input-output relationships. In addition, post-hoc artificial lesions analyses allow us to predict induced behavioural deficits and quantify the importance of network features for funnelling input-output relationships. This is important, because this enables one to bridge the gap with neuropsychological studies of brain-damaged patients. We demonstrate the face validity of the approach using Monte-Carlo simulations, and its predictive validity using empirical fMRI/behavioural data from an inhibitory control task. Lastly, we discuss promising applications of this work, including the assessment of functional degeneracy (in the healthy brain) and the prediction of functional recovery after lesions (in neurological patients).

  16. Modelling and prediction of complex non-linear processes by using Pareto multi-objective genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, A.; Khaleghi, E.; Gholaminezhad, I.; Nariman-zadeh, N.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a new multi-objective genetic programming (GP) with a diversity preserving mechanism and a real number alteration operator is presented and successfully used for Pareto optimal modelling of some complex non-linear systems using some input-output data. In this study, two different input-output data-sets of a non-linear mathematical model and of an explosive cutting process are considered separately in three-objective optimisation processes. The pertinent conflicting objective functions that have been considered for such Pareto optimisations are namely, training error (TE), prediction error (PE), and the length of tree (complexity of the network) (TL) of the GP models. Such three-objective optimisation implementations leads to some non-dominated choices of GP-type models for both cases representing the trade-offs among those objective functions. Therefore, optimal Pareto fronts of such GP models exhibit the trade-off among the corresponding conflicting objectives and, thus, provide different non-dominated optimal choices of GP-type models. Moreover, the results show that no significant optimality in TE and PE may occur when the TL of the corresponding GP model exceeds some values.

  17. Modelling of Non-Linear Distortion in Vacuum Triodes Using Trans-Characteristics Inverse and Newton's Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadić, Martin

    2013-06-01

    The increased interest in vacuum tube audio amplifiers led to an increased interest in mathematical modelling of such kind of amplifiers. The main purpose of this paper is to develop a novel global numerical approach in calculation of the harmonic distortion (HD) and intermodulation distortion (IM) of vacuum-triode audio amplifiers, suitable for applications using brute-force of modern computers. Since the 3/2 power law gives only the transcharacteristic inverse of a vacuum triode amplifier, unknown plate currents are determined in this paper iteratively using Newton's method. Using the resulting input/output pairs, harmonic distortions and intermodulations are calculated using discrete Fourier transform and three different analytical methods.

  18. Characteristic operator functions for quantum input-plant-output models and coherent control

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, John E.

    2015-01-15

    We introduce the characteristic operator as the generalization of the usual concept of a transfer function of linear input-plant-output systems to arbitrary quantum nonlinear Markovian input-output models. This is intended as a tool in the characterization of quantum feedback control systems that fits in with the general theory of networks. The definition exploits the linearity of noise differentials in both the plant Heisenberg equations of motion and the differential form of the input-output relations. Mathematically, the characteristic operator is a matrix of dimension equal to the number of outputs times the number of inputs (which must coincide), but with entries that are operators of the plant system. In this sense, the characteristic operator retains details of the effective plant dynamical structure and is an essentially quantum object. We illustrate the relevance to model reduction and simplification definition by showing that the convergence of the characteristic operator in adiabatic elimination limit models requires the same conditions and assumptions appearing in the work on limit quantum stochastic differential theorems of Bouten and Silberfarb [Commun. Math. Phys. 283, 491-505 (2008)]. This approach also shows in a natural way that the limit coefficients of the quantum stochastic differential equations in adiabatic elimination problems arise algebraically as Schur complements and amounts to a model reduction where the fast degrees of freedom are decoupled from the slow ones and eliminated.

  19. Characteristic operator functions for quantum input-plant-output models and coherent control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, John E.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the characteristic operator as the generalization of the usual concept of a transfer function of linear input-plant-output systems to arbitrary quantum nonlinear Markovian input-output models. This is intended as a tool in the characterization of quantum feedback control systems that fits in with the general theory of networks. The definition exploits the linearity of noise differentials in both the plant Heisenberg equations of motion and the differential form of the input-output relations. Mathematically, the characteristic operator is a matrix of dimension equal to the number of outputs times the number of inputs (which must coincide), but with entries that are operators of the plant system. In this sense, the characteristic operator retains details of the effective plant dynamical structure and is an essentially quantum object. We illustrate the relevance to model reduction and simplification definition by showing that the convergence of the characteristic operator in adiabatic elimination limit models requires the same conditions and assumptions appearing in the work on limit quantum stochastic differential theorems of Bouten and Silberfarb [Commun. Math. Phys. 283, 491-505 (2008)]. This approach also shows in a natural way that the limit coefficients of the quantum stochastic differential equations in adiabatic elimination problems arise algebraically as Schur complements and amounts to a model reduction where the fast degrees of freedom are decoupled from the slow ones and eliminated.

  20. Modeling Regular Replacement for String Constraint Solving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Xiang; Li, Chung-Chih

    2010-01-01

    Bugs in user input sanitation of software systems often lead to vulnerabilities. Among them many are caused by improper use of regular replacement. This paper presents a precise modeling of various semantics of regular substitution, such as the declarative, finite, greedy, and reluctant, using finite state transducers (FST). By projecting an FST to its input/output tapes, we are able to solve atomic string constraints, which can be applied to both the forward and backward image computation in model checking and symbolic execution of text processing programs. We report several interesting discoveries, e.g., certain fragments of the general problem can be handled using less expressive deterministic FST. A compact representation of FST is implemented in SUSHI, a string constraint solver. It is applied to detecting vulnerabilities in web applications

  1. Cascade process modeling with mechanism-based hierarchical neural networks.

    PubMed

    Cong, Qiumei; Yu, Wen; Chai, Tianyou

    2010-02-01

    Cascade process, such as wastewater treatment plant, includes many nonlinear sub-systems and many variables. When the number of sub-systems is big, the input-output relation in the first block and the last block cannot represent the whole process. In this paper we use two techniques to overcome the above problem. Firstly we propose a new neural model: hierarchical neural networks to identify the cascade process; then we use serial structural mechanism model based on the physical equations to connect with neural model. A stable learning algorithm and theoretical analysis are given. Finally, this method is used to model a wastewater treatment plant. Real operational data of wastewater treatment plant is applied to illustrate the modeling approach.

  2. Lithium-ion battery cell-level control using constrained model predictive control and equivalent circuit models

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, MA; Trimboli, MS

    2015-07-01

    This paper introduces a novel application of model predictive control (MPC) to cell-level charging of a lithium-ion battery utilizing an equivalent circuit model of battery dynamics. The approach employs a modified form of the MPC algorithm that caters for direct feed-though signals in order to model near-instantaneous battery ohmic resistance. The implementation utilizes a 2nd-order equivalent circuit discrete-time state-space model based on actual cell parameters; the control methodology is used to compute a fast charging profile that respects input, output, and state constraints. Results show that MPC is well-suited to the dynamics of the battery control problem and further suggest significant performance improvements might be achieved by extending the result to electrochemical models. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Model for Axon Guidance: Sensing, Transduction and Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aletti, Giacomo; Causin, Paola; Naldi, Giovanni

    2008-07-01

    Axon guidance by graded diffusible ligands plays a crucial role in the developing nervous system. In this paper, we extend the mathematical description of the growth cone transduction cascade of [1] by adding a model of the gradient sensing process related to the theory of [2]. The resulting model is composed by a series of subsystems characterized by suitable input/output relations. The study of the transmission of the noise-to-signal ratio allows to predict the variability of the gradient assay as a function of experimental parameters as the ligand concentration, both in the single and in the multiple ligand tests. For this latter condition, we address the biologically relevant case of silencing in commissural axons. We also consider a phenomenological model which reproduces the results of the experiments of [3]. This simple model allows to test hypotheses on receptor functions and regulation in time.

  4. Baseline Cardiopulmonary Function as an Independent Prognostic Factor for Survival of Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer After Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Single-Center Analysis of 161 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Semrau, Sabine; Klautke, Gunther; Fietkau, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Little is known about the effects of cardiopulmonary function on the prognosis of concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients with inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of the effects of tumor- and patient-related factors and parameters of cardiopulmonary function and heart morphology on the feasibility, toxicity, and prognosis was performed. Results: Cardiopulmonary function had no effect on the toxicity or feasibility of treatment; effects on survival were observed in the univariate analysis. Median survival varied as follows: cardiac function: 13.0 {+-} 1.6 months for left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) > 50% vs. 10.0 {+-} 1.9 months for LVEF {<=} 50% (p = 0.003); pulmonary function: 16.0 {+-} 0.6 months for no lung function deficits (vital capacity [VC]{>=} 60%, forced expiratory volume in 1 s {>=} 80%, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) {>=}60%) vs. 14.0 {+-} 1.5 months for one or two function deficits vs. 8.0 {+-} 1.5 months for three lung function deficits (p = 0.001); T stage: 19.0 {+-} 3.1 months for rcT0/cT1/cT2 vs. 12.0 {+-} 0.8 months for cT3/cT4 (p = 0.039); and age: 11.0 {+-} 1.5 months for <60 years vs. 18.0 {+-} 2.5 months for 60-69 years vs. 12.0 {+-} 1.2 months for {>=}70 years (p = 0.008). Prognostic factors identified in the multivariate analysis were LVEF {<=}50% (p = 0.043; hazard ratio [HR], 1.74), reduced pulmonary function (p = 0.001; HR, 1.71 or 5.05) and T stage (p = 0.026; HR: 1.71). Conclusions: In addition to T-stage, cardiac and pulmonary function variables affected the survival of non-small-cell lung cancer patients after chemoradiotherapy.

  5. Modeling the Role of Inventories and Heterogeneity in the Assessment of the Economic Costs of Natural Disasters.

    PubMed

    Hallegatte, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of the cost of potential disasters, including indirect economic consequences, are an important input in the design of risk management strategies. The adaptive regional input-output (ARIO) inventory model is a tool to assess indirect disaster losses and to analyze their drivers. It is based on an input-output structure, but it also (i) explicitly represents production bottlenecks and input scarcity and (ii) introduces inventories as an additional flexibility in the production system. This modeling strategy distinguishes between (i) essential supplies that cannot be stocked (e.g., electricity, water) and whose scarcity can paralyze all economic activity; (ii) essential supplies that can be stocked at least temporarily (e.g., steel, chemicals), whose scarcity creates problems only over the medium term; and (iii) supplies that are not essential in the production process, whose scarcity is problematic only over the long run and are therefore easy to replace with imports. The model is applied to the landfall of Hurricane Katrina in Louisiana and identifies two periods in the disaster aftermath: (1) the first year, during which production bottlenecks are responsible for large output losses; (2) the rest of the reconstruction period, during which bottlenecks are inexistent and output losses lower. This analysis also suggests important research questions and policy options to mitigate disaster-related output losses. PMID:23834029

  6. Local identifiability and sensitivity analysis of neuromuscular blockade and depth of hypnosis models.

    PubMed

    Silva, M M; Lemos, J M; Coito, A; Costa, B A; Wigren, T; Mendonça, T

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the local identifiability and sensitivity properties of two classes of Wiener models for the neuromuscular blockade and depth of hypnosis, when drug dose profiles like the ones commonly administered in the clinical practice are used as model inputs. The local parameter identifiability was assessed based on the singular value decomposition of the normalized sensitivity matrix. For the given input signal excitation, the results show an over-parameterization of the standard pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models. The same identifiability assessment was performed on recently proposed minimally parameterized parsimonious models for both the neuromuscular blockade and the depth of hypnosis. The results show that the majority of the model parameters are identifiable from the available input-output data. This indicates that any identification strategy based on the minimally parameterized parsimonious Wiener models for the neuromuscular blockade and for the depth of hypnosis is likely to be more successful than if standard models are used.

  7. Linear models for river flow routing on large catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, G. C.; Nash, J. E.

    1988-11-01

    Following a brief review of the place of linear input-output models in applied hydrology, the algebraic analysis of multiple input single output linear systems is presented and applied in the context of flood routing on the Changjiang (Yangtze River) in China. Two different stretches of the river and one tributary catchment are chosen and the outflows are forecast in terms of observed flows at the upper ends of the river reaches and rainfall on the intervening catchment. It is shown that very high accuracy indeed can be obtained with multiple input linear models whether applied to the total flows and rainfall or to the departures in these quantities from their seasonal expectations. The paper concludes with some analysis of the residual errors which could provide the basis of an updating procedure if the linear models were used for forecasting purposes.

  8. Workflow Modelling and Analysis Based on the Construction of Task Models

    PubMed Central

    Cravo, Glória

    2015-01-01

    We describe the structure of a workflow as a graph whose vertices represent tasks and the arcs are associated to workflow transitions in this paper. To each task an input/output logic operator is associated. Furthermore, we associate a Boolean term to each transition present in the workflow. We still identify the structure of workflows and describe their dynamism through the construction of new task models. This construction is very simple and intuitive since it is based on the analysis of all tasks present on the workflow that allows us to describe the dynamism of the workflow very easily. So, our approach has the advantage of being very intuitive, which is an important highlight of our work. We also introduce the concept of logical termination of workflows and provide conditions under which this property is valid. Finally, we provide a counter-example which shows that a conjecture presented in a previous article is false. PMID:25705713

  9. Workflow modelling and analysis based on the construction of task models.

    PubMed

    Cravo, Glória

    2015-01-01

    We describe the structure of a workflow as a graph whose vertices represent tasks and the arcs are associated to workflow transitions in this paper. To each task an input/output logic operator is associated. Furthermore, we associate a Boolean term to each transition present in the workflow. We still identify the structure of workflows and describe their dynamism through the construction of new task models. This construction is very simple and intuitive since it is based on the analysis of all tasks present on the workflow that allows us to describe the dynamism of the workflow very easily. So, our approach has the advantage of being very intuitive, which is an important highlight of our work. We also introduce the concept of logical termination of workflows and provide conditions under which this property is valid. Finally, we provide a counter-example which shows that a conjecture presented in a previous article is false. PMID:25705713

  10. Solar Sail Models and Test Measurements Correspondence for Validation Requirements Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Anthony; Adams, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Solar sails are being developed as a mission-enabling technology in support of future NASA science missions. Current efforts have advanced solar sail technology sufficient to justify a flight validation program. A primary objective of this activity is to test and validate solar sail models that are currently under development so that they may be used with confidence in future science mission development (e.g., scalable to larger sails). Both system and model validation requirements must be defined early in the program to guide design cycles and to ensure that relevant and sufficient test data will be obtained to conduct model validation to the level required. A process of model identification, model input/output documentation, model sensitivity analyses, and test measurement correspondence is required so that decisions can be made to satisfy validation requirements within program constraints.

  11. Dynamic Fuzzy Model Development for a Drum-type Boiler-turbine Plant Through GK Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habbi, Ahcène; Zelmat, Mimoun

    2008-10-01

    This paper discusses a TS fuzzy model identification method for an industrial drum-type boiler plant using the GK fuzzy clustering approach. The fuzzy model is constructed from a set of input-output data that covers a wide operating range of the physical plant. The reference data is generated using a complex first-principle-based mathematical model that describes the key dynamical properties of the boiler-turbine dynamics. The proposed fuzzy model is derived by means of fuzzy clustering method with particular attention on structure flexibility and model interpretability issues. This may provide a basement of a new way to design model based control and diagnosis mechanisms for the complex nonlinear plant.

  12. Modeling of light-matter interactions with neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Selle, Reimer; Vogt, Gerhard; Brixner, Tobias; Gerber, Gustav; Metzler, Richard; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2007-08-15

    We show that a neural network (NN) can be used for automated generation of computer models of light-matter interaction. Nonlinear input-output maps are created for phase-shaped femtosecond laser pulses in the exemplary cases of second-harmonic generation and molecular fluorescence yield. Simulations and experiments demonstrate that the NN has the capability of generalizing and extrapolating beyond initial training data, by predicting the response of the investigated systems for arbitrary laser pulse shapes. Applications are envisioned in the area of quantum control, specifically for the interpolation and extrapolation of control maps and possibly as a tool for investigating control mechanisms. In a wider scope, neural networks might generally provide effective computer models for light-matter interactions for cases where ab initio calculations are intractable.

  13. SIMWEST - A simulation model for wind energy storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edsinger, R. W.; Warren, A. W.; Gordon, L. H.; Chang, G. C.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive and efficient computer program for the modeling of wind energy systems with storage. The level of detail of SIMWEST (SImulation Model for Wind Energy STorage) is consistent with evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems with energy storage options. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and control components. The first program is a precompiler which allows the library components to be put together in building block form. The second program performs the technoeconomic system analysis with the required input/output, and the integration of system dynamics. An example of the application of the SIMWEST program to a current 100 kW wind energy storage system is given.

  14. Volterra network modeling of the nonlinear finite-impulse reponse of the radiation belt flux

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Vassiliadis, D.

    2011-01-04

    We show how a general class of spatio-temporal nonlinear impulse-response forecast networks (Volterra networks) can be constructed from a taxonomy of nonlinear autoregressive integrated moving average with exogenous inputs (NAR-MAX) input-output equations, and used to model the evolution of energetic particle f uxes in the Van Allen radiation belts. We present initial results for the nonlinear response of the radiation belts to conditions a month earlier. The essential features of spatio-temporal observations are recovered with the model echoing the results of state space models and linear f nite impulse-response models whereby the strongest coupling peak occurs in the preceding 1-2 days. It appears that such networks hold promise for the development of accurate and fully data-driven space weather modelling, monitoring and forecast tools.

  15. Volterra network modeling of the nonlinear finite-impulse reponse of the radiation belt flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Vassiliadis, D.

    2011-01-01

    We show how a general class of spatio-temporal nonlinear impulse-response forecast networks (Volterra networks) can be constructed from a taxonomy of nonlinear autoregressive integrated moving average with exogenous inputs (NAR-MAX) input-output equations, and used to model the evolution of energetic particle f uxes in the Van Allen radiation belts. We present initial results for the nonlinear response of the radiation belts to conditions a month earlier. The essential features of spatio-temporal observations are recovered with the model echoing the results of state space models and linear f nite impulse-response models whereby the strongest coupling peak occurs in the preceding 1-2 days. It appears that such networks hold promise for the development of accurate and fully data-driven space weather modelling, monitoring and forecast tools.

  16. Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models

    SciTech Connect

    Billman, L.; Keyser, D.

    2013-08-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), use input-output methodology to estimate gross (not net) jobs and economic impacts of building and operating selected types of renewable electricity generation and fuel plants. This analysis provides the DOE with an assessment of the value, impact, and validity of the JEDI suite of models. While the models produce estimates of jobs, earnings, and economic output, this analysis focuses only on jobs estimates. This validation report includes an introduction to JEDI models, an analysis of the value and impact of the JEDI models, and an analysis of the validity of job estimates generated by JEDI model through comparison to other modeled estimates and comparison to empirical, observed jobs data as reported or estimated for a commercial project, a state, or a region.

  17. How has dematerialization contributed to reducing oil price pressure?: a qualitative input-output analysis for the Japanese economy during 1990-2000.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Shigemi; Oshita, Yuko; Nansai, Keisuke; Suh, Sangwon

    2009-01-15

    The evolution of crude oil use structure and its impacts on commodity prices are examined for Japanese economy between 1990 and 2000. We found that the out-degree of the production network, indicating the extent of the pressure on prices of downstream industries in response to higher crude oil prices, decreased in several sectors between 1990 and 2000. The results by sector showed that the decrease was greatest in the chemical product- and iron and steel manufacturing sectors, which both indirectly use crude oil. The decrease in out-degree is considered to have been caused by improved efficiency in the production of oil-related products and increase in energy savings by the manufacturing facilities in these sectors. In addition, many of the sectors having a high out-degree engage in intermediate product production. Conversely, the in-degree, which represents the extent of being pressured by other sectors with increased crude oil prices, also decreased during the period between 1990 and 2000. From the result of the in-degree, this study found that dematerialization and weight reduction of final products such as "cellular phones" and "personal computers" had a marked effect on decreasing in-degree. More importantly, for the top-ranked sectors with the high out-degree and in-degree, such as "aliphatic intermediates", "chemical fertilizers", "plastic products", "hot rolled steel", "yarn and fabric dyeing and finishing", the results suggest that the pressure due to rising crude oil prices can be more effectively eased by implementing measures targeted at upstream products and sectors, while current policy measures to alleviate oil-price induced inflation are mainly targeted at downstream products such as gasoline.

  18. Anatomically heterogeneous populations of CB1 cannabinoid receptor-expressing interneurons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus show homogeneous input-output characteristics.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Gergely G; Papp, Orsolya I; Máté, Zoltán; Szabó, Gábor; Hájos, Norbert

    2014-12-01

    A subpopulation of GABAergic cells in cortical structures expresses CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1 ) on their axon terminals. To understand the function of these interneurons in information processing, it is necessary to uncover how they are embedded into neuronal circuits. Therefore, the proportion of GABAergic terminals expressing CB1 and the morphological and electrophysiological properties of CB1 -immunoreactive interneurons should be revealed. We investigated the ratio and the origin of CB1 -expressing inhibitory boutons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Using immunocytochemical techniques, we estimated that ∼40% of GABAergic axon terminals in different layers of CA3 also expressed CB1 . To identify the inhibitory cell types expressing CB1 in this region, we recorded and intracellularly labeled interneurons in hippocampal slices. CB1 -expressing interneurons showed distinct axonal arborization, and were classified as basket cells, mossy-fiber-associated cells, dendritic-layer-innervating cells or perforant-path-associated cells. In each morphological category, a substantial variability in axonal projection was observed. In contrast to the diverse morphology, the active and passive membrane properties were found to be rather similar. Using paired recordings, we found that pyramidal cells displayed large and fast unitary postsynaptic currents in response to activating basket and mossy-fiber-associated cells, while they showed slower and smaller synaptic events in pairs originating from interneurons that innervate the dendritic layer, which may be due to dendritic filtering. In addition, CB1 activation significantly reduced the amplitude of the postsynaptic currents in each cell pair tested. Our data suggest that CB1 -expressing interneurons with different axonal projections have comparable physiological characteristics, contributing to a similar proportion of GABAergic inputs along the somato-dendritic axis of CA3 pyramidal cells.

  19. Influence of Current Input-Output and Age of First Exposure on Phonological Acquisition in Early Bilingual Spanish-English-Speaking Kindergarteners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz-Felter, Roxanna; Cooperson, Solaman J.; Bedore, Lisa M.; Peña, Elizabeth D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although some investigations of phonological development have found that segmental accuracy is comparable in monolingual children and their bilingual peers, there is evidence that language use affects segmental accuracy in both languages. Aims: To investigate the influence of age of first exposure to English and the amount of current…

  20. The role of input-output analysis of energy and ecologic systems. In the early development of ecological economics--a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    A summary is provided of the early history of research on the flow of nonrenewable energy resources through the economy and of the flow of renewable energy resources through a natural ecosystem. The techniques are similar, and many specific applications are provided. A combined economic and ecological technique is also defined. The early history and people of the International Society Ecological Economic are cited.

  1. The role of input-output analysis of energy and ecologic systems. In the early development of ecological economics--a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    A summary is provided of the early history of research on the flow of nonrenewable energy resources through the economy and of the flow of renewable energy resources through a natural ecosystem. The techniques are similar, and many specific applications are provided. A combined economic and ecological technique is also defined. The early history and people of the International Society Ecological Economic are cited. PMID:20146760

  2. Submillisecond precision of the input-output transformation function mediated by fast sodium dendritic spikes in basal dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ariav, Gal; Polsky, Alon; Schiller, Jackie

    2003-08-27

    The ability of cortical neurons to perform temporally accurate computations has been shown to be important for encoding of information in the cortex; however, cortical neurons are expected to be imprecise temporal encoders because of the stochastic nature of synaptic transmission and ion channel gating, dendritic filtering, and background synaptic noise. Here we show for the first time that fast local spikes in basal dendrites can serve to improve the temporal precision of neuronal output. Integration of coactivated, spatially distributed synaptic inputs produces temporally imprecise output action potentials within a time window of several milliseconds. In contrast, integration of closely spaced basal inputs initiates local dendritic spikes that amplify and sharpen the summed somatic potential. In turn, these fast basal spikes allow precise timing of output action potentials with submillisecond temporal jitter over a wide range of activation intensities and background synaptic noise. Our findings indicate that fast spikes initiated in individual basal dendrites can serve as precise "timers" of output action potentials in various network activity states and thus may contribute to temporal coding in the cortex.

  3. Modulation of postsynaptic activities of thalamic lateral geniculate neurons by spontaneous changes in number of retinal inputs in chronic cats. 1. Input-output relations.

    PubMed

    Fourment, A; Hirsch, J C; Marc, M E; Guidet, C

    1984-06-01

    The experiments were designed to explore the role of retinal inputs compared with that of the behavioral state in the modulation of the output of thalamic lateral geniculate neurons during sleep and wakefulness in cats with intact visual pathways. We made the following assumptions: the retinal dark discharge, while showing spontaneous pauses in activity, does not vary with the behavioral state; the optic tract inputs postsynaptically elicit subthreshold activities called S-potentials which in turn generate spikes, the degree of transformation being dependent on the level of alertness. On the basis of these assumptions, it could be expected that changes in retinal input frequency would modify the rate of the S-potentials. Therefore the effect of spontaneous decreases in frequency of S-potentials on the spike rate and pattern was examined in juxta- and intracellular recordings from chronically implanted cats during natural sleep and wakefulness. During quiet wakefulness and light slow-wave sleep, lateral geniculate relay neurons normally displayed numerous S-potentials associated with a moderate firing rate. Many neurons occasionally showed transient reductions in frequency of the S-potentials and an oversimplification of the discharges which combined a decreased rate with a prevalent rhythmical burst pattern. Antidromic responsiveness remained unchanged. The oscillatory periods recurred two to six times without any alteration in the control state level. They were not observed throughout wakefulness and paradoxical sleep, during which neuronal activity combined a high spike rate with a low S-potential rate. The modifications were confirmed by computation of the mean rates and of the inter-event intervals. The transfer ratio (spikes/S-potentials + spikes) significantly increased both during the oscillatory periods poor in S-potentials of quiet wakefulness and during active wakefulness. But the correlation between the transfer ratio and the spike frequency, which was high throughout the control behavioral states, faded during the periods poor in S-potentials. Thus the transient falls in the frequency of S-potentials which occurred spontaneously during quiet wakefulness caused burst discharges in lateral geniculate relay neurons, which resembled a sleep deepening, but also paralleled the effect of experimental deafferentation. The data indicate that the iterative spikes grouped in well spaced bursts which persisted during decreases in subthreshold postsynaptic activities result in an enhanced signal-to-noise ratio.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  4. Input-Output Approach to Control for Fuzzy Markov Jump Systems With Time-Varying Delays and Uncertain Packet Dropout Rate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixian; Ning, Zepeng; Shi, Peng

    2015-11-01

    This paper is concerned with H∞ control problem for a class of discrete-time Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy Markov jump systems with time-varying delays under unreliable communication links. It is assumed that the data transmission between the plant and the controller are subject to randomly occurred packet dropouts satisfying Bernoulli distribution and the dropout rate is uncertain. Based on a fuzzy-basis-dependent and mode-dependent Lyapunov function, the existence conditions of the desired H∞ state-feedback controllers are derived by employing the scaled small gain theorem such that the closed-loop system is stochastically stable and achieves a guaranteed H∞ performance. The gains of the controllers are constructed by solving a set of linear matrix inequalities. Finally, a practical example of robot arm is provided to illustrate the performance of the proposed approach.

  5. Modeling of BWR core meltdown accidents - for application in the MELRPI. MOD2 computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, B R; Kim, S H; Taleyarkhan, R P; Podowski, M Z; Lahey, Jr, R T

    1985-04-01

    This report summarizes improvements and modifications made in the MELRPI computer code. A major difference between this new, updated version of the code, called MELRPI.MOD2, and the one reported previously, concerns the inclusion of a model for the BWR emergency core cooling systems (ECCS). This model and its computer implementation, the ECCRPI subroutine, account for various emergency injection modes, for both intact and rubblized geometries. Other changes to MELRPI deal with an improved model for canister wall oxidation, rubble bed modeling, and numerical integration of system equations. A complete documentation of the entire MELRPI.MOD2 code is also given, including an input guide, list of subroutines, sample input/output and program listing.

  6. Robust quasi-LPV control based on neural state-space models.

    PubMed

    Bendtsen, J D; Trangbaek, K

    2002-01-01

    We derive a synthesis result for robust linear parameter varying (LPV) output feedback controllers for nonlinear systems modeled by neural state-space models. This result is achieved by writing the neural state-space model on a linear fractional transformation (LFT) form in a nonconservative way, separating the system description into a linear part and a nonlinear part. Linear parameter-varying control synthesis methods are then applied to design a nonlinear control law for this system. Since the model is assumed to have been identified from input-output measurement data only, it must be expected that there is some uncertainty on the identified nonlinearities. The control law is therefore made robust to noise perturbations. After formulating the controller synthesis as a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) with added constraints, some implementation issues are addressed and a simulation example is presented.

  7. Neural Network and Regression Soft Model Extended for PAX-300 Aircraft Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    2002-01-01

    In fiscal year 2001, the neural network and regression capabilities of NASA Glenn Research Center's COMETBOARDS design optimization testbed were extended to generate approximate models for the PAX-300 aircraft engine. The analytical model of the engine is defined through nine variables: the fan efficiency factor, the low pressure of the compressor, the high pressure of the compressor, the high pressure of the turbine, the low pressure of the turbine, the operating pressure, and three critical temperatures (T(sub 4), T(sub vane), and T(sub metal)). Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) calculations of the specific fuel consumption (TSFC), as a function of the variables can become time consuming, and numerical instabilities can occur during these design calculations. "Soft" models can alleviate both deficiencies. These approximate models are generated from a set of high-fidelity input-output pairs obtained from the NPSS code and a design of the experiment strategy. A neural network and a regression model with 45 weight factors were trained for the input/output pairs. Then, the trained models were validated through a comparison with the original NPSS code. Comparisons of TSFC versus the operating pressure and of TSFC versus the three temperatures (T(sub 4), T(sub vane), and T(sub metal)) are depicted in the figures. The overall performance was satisfactory for both the regression and the neural network model. The regression model required fewer calculations than the neural network model, and it produced marginally superior results. Training the approximate methods is time consuming. Once trained, the approximate methods generated the solution with only a trivial computational effort, reducing the solution time from hours to less than a minute.

  8. Human operator identification model and related computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, K. M.; Mohr, J. N.

    1978-01-01

    Four computer programs which provide computational assistance in the analysis of man/machine systems are reported. The programs are: (1) Modified Transfer Function Program (TF); (2) Time Varying Response Program (TVSR); (3) Optimal Simulation Program (TVOPT); and (4) Linear Identification Program (SCIDNT). The TV program converts the time domain state variable system representative to frequency domain transfer function system representation. The TVSR program computes time histories of the input/output responses of the human operator model. The TVOPT program is an optimal simulation program and is similar to TVSR in that it produces time histories of system states associated with an operator in the loop system. The differences between the two programs are presented. The SCIDNT program is an open loop identification code which operates on the simulated data from TVOPT (or TVSR) or real operator data from motion simulators.

  9. Dynamic output feedback stabilization for nonlinear systems based on standard neural network models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meiqin

    2006-08-01

    A neural-model-based control design for some nonlinear systems is addressed. The design approach is to approximate the nonlinear systems with neural networks of which the activation functions satisfy the sector conditions. A novel neural network model termed standard neural network model (SNNM) is advanced for describing this class of approximating neural networks. Full-order dynamic output feedback control laws are then designed for the SNNMs with inputs and outputs to stabilize the closed-loop systems. The control design equations are shown to be a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) which can be easily solved by various convex optimization algorithms to determine the control signals. It is shown that most neural-network-based nonlinear systems can be transformed into input-output SNNMs to be stabilization synthesized in a unified way. Finally, some application examples are presented to illustrate the control design procedures.

  10. Water recovery and management test support modeling for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamadinejad, Habib; Bacskay, Allen S.

    1990-01-01

    The water-recovery and management (WRM) subsystem proposed for the Space Station Freedom program is outlined, and its computerized modeling and simulation based on a Computer Aided System Engineering and Analysis (CASE/A) program are discussed. A WRM test model consisting of a pretreated urine processing (TIMES), hygiene water processing (RO), RO brine processing using TIMES, and hygiene water storage is presented. Attention is drawn to such end-user equipment characteristics as the shower, dishwasher, clotheswasher, urine-collection facility, and handwash. The transient behavior of pretreated-urine, RO waste-hygiene, and RO brine tanks is assessed, as well as the total input/output to or from the system. The model is considered to be beneficial for pretest analytical predictions as a program cost-saving feature.

  11. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 3.34): Programmer's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; James, Bonnie F.; Johnson, Dale L.

    1996-01-01

    This is a programmer's guide for the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 3.34). Included are a brief history and review of the model since its origin in 1988 and a technical discussion of recent additions and modifications. Examples of how to run both the interactive and batch (subroutine) forms are presented. Instructions are provided on how to customize output of the model for various parameters of the Mars atmosphere. Detailed descriptions are given of the main driver programs, subroutines, and associated computational methods. Lists and descriptions include input, output, and local variables in the programs. These descriptions give a summary of program steps and 'map' of calling relationships among the subroutines. Definitions are provided for the variables passed between subroutines through common lists. Explanations are provided for all diagnostic and progress messages generated during execution of the program. A brief outline of future plans for Mars-GRAM is also presented.

  12. A novel integrated fiber-optic interferometer model and its application in micro-displacement measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chi; Xu, Long-long; Zhu, Jun; Yuan, Zhi-wen; Yu, Ying-jie; Asundi, Anand K.

    2016-11-01

    We conducted an investigation in a novel integrated fiber-optic interferometer model based on ultra-small self-focusing optical fiber probe and the method of its application in micro-displacement measurement. Firstly, we proposed the structure model of integrated fiber-optic interferometer and established its input-output mathematical model applied in micro-displacement measurement. Secondly, we established the hardware system of the integrated fiber-optic interferometer. Finally, we analyzed the fitting result of experimental data of micro-displacement measurement and some error factors and defined the linear working range. The experimental results indicate that, under the given experimental conditions, the linear measurement range, linearity and sensitivity of the integrated fiber-optic interferometer were 10 μm, 1.36% and 8.8 mv/μm respectively.

  13. Accelerating advances in continental domain hydrologic modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archfield, Stacey A.; Clark, Martyn; Arheimer, Berit; Hay, Lauren E.; McMillan, Hilary; Kiang, Julie E.; Seibert, Jan; Hakala, Kirsti; Bock, Andrew R.; Wagener, Thorsten; Farmer, William H.; Andreassian, Vazken; Attinger, Sabine; Viglione, Alberto; Knight, Rodney; Markstrom, Steven; Over, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    In the past, hydrologic modeling of surface water resources has mainly focused on simulating the hydrologic cycle at local to regional catchment modeling domains. There now exists a level of maturity among the catchment, global water security, and land surface modeling communities such that these communities are converging toward continental domain hydrologic models. This commentary, written from a catchment hydrology community perspective, provides a review of progress in each community toward this achievement, identifies common challenges the communities face, and details immediate and specific areas in which these communities can mutually benefit one another from the convergence of their research perspectives. Those include: (1) creating new incentives and infrastructure to report and share model inputs, outputs, and parameters in data services and open access, machine-independent formats for model replication or reanalysis; (2) ensuring that hydrologic models have: sufficient complexity to represent the dominant physical processes and adequate representation of anthropogenic impacts on the terrestrial water cycle, a process-based approach to model parameter estimation, and appropriate parameterizations to represent large-scale fluxes and scaling behavior; (3) maintaining a balance between model complexity and data availability as well as uncertainties; and (4) quantifying and communicating significant advancements toward these modeling goals.

  14. Accelerating advances in continental domain hydrologic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archfield, Stacey A.; Clark, Martyn; Arheimer, Berit; Hay, Lauren E.; McMillan, Hilary; Kiang, Julie E.; Seibert, Jan; Hakala, Kirsti; Bock, Andrew; Wagener, Thorsten; Farmer, William H.; Andréassian, Vazken; Attinger, Sabine; Viglione, Alberto; Knight, Rodney; Markstrom, Steven; Over, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    In the past, hydrologic modeling of surface water resources has mainly focused on simulating the hydrologic cycle at local to regional catchment modeling domains. There now exists a level of maturity among the catchment, global water security, and land surface modeling communities such that these communities are converging toward continental domain hydrologic models. This commentary, written from a catchment hydrology community perspective, provides a review of progress in each community toward this achievement, identifies common challenges the communities face, and details immediate and specific areas in which these communities can mutually benefit one another from the convergence of their research perspectives. Those include: (1) creating new incentives and infrastructure to report and share model inputs, outputs, and parameters in data services and open access, machine-independent formats for model replication or reanalysis; (2) ensuring that hydrologic models have: sufficient complexity to represent the dominant physical processes and adequate representation of anthropogenic impacts on the terrestrial water cycle, a process-based approach to model parameter estimation, and appropriate parameterizations to represent large-scale fluxes and scaling behavior; (3) maintaining a balance between model complexity and data availability as well as uncertainties; and (4) quantifying and communicating significant advancements toward these modeling goals.

  15. Reprint of: Active subspaces for sensitivity analysis and dimension reduction of an integrated hydrologic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferson, Jennifer L.; Gilbert, James M.; Constantine, Paul G.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2016-05-01

    Integrated hydrologic models coupled to land surface models require several input parameters to characterize the land surface and to estimate energy fluxes. Uncertainty of input parameter values is inherent in any model and the sensitivity of output to these uncertain parameters becomes an important consideration. To better understand these connections in the context of hydrologic models, we use the ParFlow-Common Land Model (PF-CLM) to estimate energy fluxes given variations in 19 vegetation and land surface parameters over a 144-hour period of time. Latent, sensible and ground heat fluxes from bare soil and grass vegetation were estimated using single column and tilted-v domains. Energy flux outputs, along with the corresponding input parameters, from each of the four scenario simulations were evaluated using active subspaces. The active subspace method considers parameter sensitivity by quantifying a weight for each parameter. The method also evaluates the potential for dimension reduction by identifying the input-output relationship through the active variable - a linear combination of input parameters. The aerodynamic roughness length was the most important parameter for bare soil energy fluxes. Multiple parameters were important for energy fluxes from vegetated surfaces and depended on the type of energy flux. Relationships between land surface inputs and output fluxes varied between latent, sensible and ground heat, but were consistent between domain setup (i.e., with or without lateral flow) and vegetation type. A quadratic polynomial was used to describe the input-output relationship for these energy fluxes. The reduced-dimension model of land surface dynamics can be compared to observations or used to solve the inverse problem. Considering this work as a proof-of-concept, the active subspace method can be applied and extended to a range of domain setups, land cover types and time periods to obtain a reduced-form representation of any output of interest

  16. Transfer functions for protein signal transduction: application to a model of striatal neural plasticity.

    PubMed

    Scheler, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel formulation for biochemical reaction networks in the context of protein signal transduction. The model consists of input-output transfer functions, which are derived from differential equations, using stable equilibria. We select a set of "source" species, which are interpreted as input signals. Signals are transmitted to all other species in the system (the "target" species) with a specific delay and with a specific transmission strength. The delay is computed as the maximal reaction time until a stable equilibrium for the target species is reached, in the context of all other reactions in the system. The transmission strength is the concentration change of the target species. The computed input-output transfer functions can be stored in a matrix, fitted with parameters, and even recalled to build dynamical models on the basis of state changes. By separating the temporal and the magnitudinal domain we can greatly simplify the computational model, circumventing typical problems of complex dynamical systems. The transfer function transformation of biochemical reaction systems can be applied to mass-action kinetic models of signal transduction. The paper shows that this approach yields significant novel insights while remaining a fully testable and executable dynamical model for signal transduction. In particular we can deconstruct the complex system into local transfer functions between individual species. As an example, we examine modularity and signal integration using a published model of striatal neural plasticity. The modularizations that emerge correspond to a known biological distinction between calcium-dependent and cAMP-dependent pathways. Remarkably, we found that overall interconnectedness depends on the magnitude of inputs, with higher connectivity at low input concentrations and significant modularization at moderate to high input concentrations. This general result, which directly follows from the properties of individual transfer

  17. Aeroservoelastic Uncertainty Model Identification from Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.

    2001-01-01

    Uncertainty modeling is a critical element in the estimation of robust stability margins for stability boundary prediction and robust flight control system development. There has been a serious deficiency to date in aeroservoelastic data analysis with attention to uncertainty modeling. Uncertainty can be estimated from flight data using both parametric and nonparametric identification techniques. The model validation problem addressed in this paper is to identify aeroservoelastic models with associated uncertainty structures from a limited amount of controlled excitation inputs over an extensive flight envelope. The challenge to this problem is to update analytical models from flight data estimates while also deriving non-conservative uncertainty descriptions consistent with the flight data. Multisine control surface command inputs and control system feedbacks are used as signals in a wavelet-based modal parameter estimation procedure for model updates. Transfer function estimates are incorporated in a robust minimax estimation scheme to get input-output parameters and error bounds consistent with the data and model structure. Uncertainty estimates derived from the data in this manner provide an appropriate and relevant representation for model development and robust stability analysis. This model-plus-uncertainty identification procedure is applied to aeroservoelastic flight data from the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center F-18 Systems Research Aircraft.

  18. A plant-growth stress model: Conceptual model and development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.W. )

    1989-12-01

    This report begins with a literature review of existing models for crops and forest trees. The models were analyzed for their assumptions, formulations, inputs, outputs, calibrations and verifications. The formulations of crop models (e.g. corn, sugar beet, soybean, and red radish) included detailed hypotheses of carbon uptake, light attenuation through leaves, photosynthesis, chemical synthesis of organics, material transport between plant parts and production of havestable dry matter. Most crop models performed simulations with a time step of 15 minutes to an hour for a total period of 100 to 150 days. Tree models were developed, mostly without verification, for forest management practices, ecological studies of species succession, and assessment of air pollution effects. None are physiologically based models that can simulate mechanistically tree responses to interacting natural and anthropogenic stresses. A new generation tree model was formulated. The model incorporated subroutines from an existing model (ILWAS) to calculate daily soil temperature, soil moisture, cations (including aluminum species) and anion concentrations in the soil solution at the root zone. It also includes a new plant module to simulate daily physiological and growth responses of trees, subjected to the dynamic impacts of air pollution, aluminum toxicity, nutrient deficiency, and drought. Model coefficient will be calibrated with data from exposure experiments where environmental conditions are controlled. The model can then be extended to the field where environmental conditions change dynamically. 90 refs., 11 figs.

  19. Towards Model Diagnosis in Hydrologic Models: Evaluation of the abcd Water Balance Model Using the HCDN Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Baquero, G. F.; Gupta, H. V.

    2006-12-01

    Increasing model complexity demands the development of new methods able to mine larger amounts of information from model results and available data. Measures commonly used to compare models with data typically lack diagnostic "power". This work therefore explores the design of more powerful strategies to identify the causes of discrepancy between models and hydrologic phenomena, as well as to increase the knowledge about the input-output relationship of the system. In this context, we evaluate how the abcd monthly water balance model, used to infer soil moisture conditions or groundwater recharge, performs in 764 watersheds of the conterminous United States. Work done under these guidelines required the integration of the Hydro-Climatic Data Network dataset with spatial information to summarize the results and relate the performance with the model assumptions and specific conditions of the basins. The diagnostic process is implemented by the definition of appropriate hydrologic signatures to measure the capability of watersheds to transform environmental inputs and propose equivalent modeling structures. Knowledge acquired during this process is used to test modifications of the model in hydrologic regions where the performance is poor.

  20. Modeling and Analysis of The Pressure Die Casting Using Response Surface Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Kittur, Jayant K.; Herwadkar, T. V.; Parappagoudar, M. B.

    2010-10-26

    Pressure die casting is successfully used in the manufacture of Aluminum alloys components for automobile and many other industries. Die casting is a process involving many process parameters having complex relationship with the quality of the cast product. Though various process parameters have influence on the quality of die cast component, major influence is seen by the die casting machine parameters and their proper settings. In the present work, non-linear regression models have been developed for making predictions and analyzing the effect of die casting machine parameters on the performance characteristics of die casting process. Design of Experiments (DOE) with Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has been used to analyze the effect of effect of input parameters and their interaction on the response and further used to develop nonlinear input-output relationships. Die casting machine parameters, namely, fast shot velocity, slow shot to fast shot change over point, intensification pressure and holding time have been considered as the input variables. The quality characteristics of the cast product were determined by porosity, hardness and surface rough roughness (output/responses). Design of experiments has been used to plan the experiments and analyze the impact of variables on the quality of casting. On the other-hand Response Surface Methodology (Central Composite Design) is utilized to develop non-linear input-output relationships (regression models). The developed regression models have been tested for their statistical adequacy through ANOVA test. The practical usefulness of these models has been tested with some test cases. These models can be used to make the predictions about different quality characteristics, for the known set of die casting machine parameters, without conducting the experiments.

  1. Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Model to Predict High-Order Modulation Intersymbol Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Andro, Monty; Williams, W. D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Demands for increased data rates in satellite communications necessitate higher order modulation schemes, larger system bandwidth, and minimum distortion of the modulated signal as it is passed through the traveling wave tube amplifier (TWTA). One type of distortion that the TWTA contributes to is intersymbol interference (ISI), and this becomes particularly disruptive with wide-band, complex modulation schemes. It is suspected that in addition to the dispersion of the TWT, frequency dependent reflections due to mismatches within the TWT are a significant contributor to ISI. To experimentally investigate the effect of these mismatches within the physical TWT on ISI would be prohibitively expensive, as it would require manufacturing numerous amplifiers in addition to the acquisition of the required digital hardware. In an attempt to develop a more accurate model to correlate IS1 with the TWTA and the operational signal, a fully three-dimensional (3D), time-dependent, TWT interaction model has been developed using the electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code MAFIA (solution of Maxwell's equations by the Finite-Integration-Algorithm). The model includes a user defined slow-wave circuit with a spatially tapered region of loss to implement a sever, and spatially varied geometry (such as helical pitch) to implement a phase velocity taper. The model also includes user defined input/output coupling and an electron beam contained by solenoidal, electrostatic, or periodic permanent magnet (PPM) focusing allowing standard or novel TWTs to be investigated. This model comprehensively takes into account the effects of frequency dependent nonlinear distortions (MAM and AMPM); gain ripple due to frequency dependent reflections at the input/output coupling, severs, and mismatches from dynamic pitch variations; drive induced oscillations; harmonic generation; intermodulation products; and backward waves.

  2. Systems modeling: The first step in a process for solving the health care cost problem

    SciTech Connect

    Gover, J.

    1994-06-01

    The core problem with the US health care system is -- it already costs to much and the rate of its cost growth is cause for further alarm. To deal with these, regulators must introduce incentives for health care providers to reduce costs and introduce incentives that make consumers of health care services concerned about the costs of the services they demand. Achievement of these regulatory goals will create opportunities for the introduction of innovations, including revolutionary new technology, that can lead to major reductions in costs. Modeling of health care system inputs, outputs, transactions, and the relationships between these parameters will expedite the development of an effective regulatory process. This model must include all of those major factors that affect the demand for health care and it must facilitate benchmarking health care subsystems against the most efficient international practices.

  3. Robust stabilization control based on guardian maps theory for a longitudinal model of hypersonic vehicle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanbin; Liu, Mengying; Sun, Peihua

    2014-01-01

    A typical model of hypersonic vehicle has the complicated dynamics such as the unstable states, the nonminimum phases, and the strong coupling input-output relations. As a result, designing a robust stabilization controller is essential to implement the anticipated tasks. This paper presents a robust stabilization controller based on the guardian maps theory for hypersonic vehicle. First, the guardian maps theories are provided to explain the constraint relations between the open subsets of complex plane and the eigenvalues of the state matrix of closed-loop control system. Then, a general control structure in relation to the guardian maps theories is proposed to achieve the respected design demands. Furthermore, the robust stabilization control law depending on the given general control structure is designed for the longitudinal model of hypersonic vehicle. Finally, a simulation example is provided to verify the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  4. Simulating Cortical Feedback Modulation as Changes in Excitation and Inhibition in a Cortical Circuit Model.

    PubMed

    Zagha, Edward; Murray, John D; McCormick, David A

    2016-01-01

    Cortical feedback pathways are hypothesized to distribute context-dependent signals during flexible behavior. Recent experimental work has attempted to understand the mechanisms by which cortical feedback inputs modulate their target regions. Within the mouse whisker sensorimotor system, cortical feedback stimulation modulates spontaneous activity and sensory responsiveness, leading to enhanced sensory representations. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying these effects are currently unknown. In this study we use a simplified neural circuit model, which includes two recurrent excitatory populations and global inhibition, to simulate cortical modulation. First, we demonstrate how changes in the strengths of excitation and inhibition alter the input-output processing responses of our model. Second, we compare these responses with experimental findings from cortical feedback stimulation. Our analyses predict that enhanced inhibition underlies the changes in spontaneous and sensory evoked activity observed experimentally. More generally, these analyses provide a framework for relating cellular and synaptic properties to emergent circuit function and dynamic modulation. PMID:27595137

  5. Life cycle assessment modelling of waste-to-energy incineration in Spain and Portugal.

    PubMed

    Margallo, M; Aldaco, R; Irabien, A; Carrillo, V; Fischer, M; Bala, A; Fullana, P

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, waste management systems have been evaluated using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. A main shortcoming of prior studies was the focus on a mixture of waste with different characteristics. The estimation of emissions and consumptions associated with each waste fraction in these studies presented allocation problems. Waste-to-energy (WTE) incineration is a clear example in which municipal solid waste (MSW), comprising many types of materials, is processed to produce several outputs. This paper investigates an approach to better understand incineration processes in Spain and Portugal by applying a multi-input/output allocation model. The application of this model enabled predictions of WTE inputs and outputs, including the consumption of ancillary materials and combustibles, air emissions, solid wastes, and the energy produced during the combustion of each waste fraction.

  6. Simulating Cortical Feedback Modulation as Changes in Excitation and Inhibition in a Cortical Circuit Model.

    PubMed

    Zagha, Edward; Murray, John D; McCormick, David A

    2016-01-01

    Cortical feedback pathways are hypothesized to distribute context-dependent signals during flexible behavior. Recent experimental work has attempted to understand the mechanisms by which cortical feedback inputs modulate their target regions. Within the mouse whisker sensorimotor system, cortical feedback stimulation modulates spontaneous activity and sensory responsiveness, leading to enhanced sensory representations. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying these effects are currently unknown. In this study we use a simplified neural circuit model, which includes two recurrent excitatory populations and global inhibition, to simulate cortical modulation. First, we demonstrate how changes in the strengths of excitation and inhibition alter the input-output processing responses of our model. Second, we compare these responses with experimental findings from cortical feedback stimulation. Our analyses predict that enhanced inhibition underlies the changes in spontaneous and sensory evoked activity observed experimentally. More generally, these analyses provide a framework for relating cellular and synaptic properties to emergent circuit function and dynamic modulation.

  7. Springback Control of Sheet Metal Forming Based on High Dimension Model Representation and Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Tang; Hu, Wang; Yong, Cai; Lichen, Mao; Guangyao, Li

    2011-08-01

    Springback is related to multi-factors in the process of metal forming. In order to construct an accurate metamodel between technical parameters and springback, a general set of quantitative model assessment and analysis tool, termed high dimension model representations (HDMR), is applied to building metamodel. Genetic algorithm is also integrated for optimization based on metamodel. Compared with widely used metamodeling techniques, the most remarkable advantage of this method is its capacity to dramatically reduce sampling effort for learning the input-output behavior from exponential growth to polynomial level. In this work, the blank holding forces (BHFs) and corresponding key time are design variables. The final springback is well controlled by the HDMR-based metamodeling technique.

  8. Robust Stabilization Control Based on Guardian Maps Theory for a Longitudinal Model of Hypersonic Vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengying; Sun, Peihua

    2014-01-01

    A typical model of hypersonic vehicle has the complicated dynamics such as the unstable states, the nonminimum phases, and the strong coupling input-output relations. As a result, designing a robust stabilization controller is essential to implement the anticipated tasks. This paper presents a robust stabilization controller based on the guardian maps theory for hypersonic vehicle. First, the guardian maps theories are provided to explain the constraint relations between the open subsets of complex plane and the eigenvalues of the state matrix of closed-loop control system. Then, a general control structure in relation to the guardian maps theories is proposed to achieve the respected design demands. Furthermore, the robust stabilization control law depending on the given general control structure is designed for the longitudinal model of hypersonic vehicle. Finally, a simulation example is provided to verify the effectiveness of the proposed methods. PMID:24795535

  9. A Neural-FEM tool for the 2-D magnetic hysteresis modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardelli, E.; Faba, A.; Laudani, A.; Lozito, G. M.; Riganti Fulginei, F.; Salvini, A.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work is to present a new tool for the analysis of magnetic field problems considering 2-D magnetic hysteresis. In particular, this tool makes use of the Finite Element Method to solve the magnetic field problem in real device, and fruitfully exploits a neural network (NN) for the modeling of 2-D magnetic hysteresis of materials. The NS has as input the magnetic inductions components B at the k-th simulation step and returns as output the corresponding values of the magnetic field H corresponding to the input pattern. It is trained by vector measurements performed on the magnetic material to be modeled. This input/output scheme is directly implemented in a FEM code employing the magnetic potential vector A formulation. Validations through measurements on a real device have been performed.

  10. Modeling of complex-valued wiener systems using B-spline neural network.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xia; Chen, Sheng

    2011-05-01

    In this brief, a new complex-valued B-spline neural network is introduced in order to model the complex-valued Wiener system using observational input/output data. The complex-valued nonlinear static function in the Wiener system is represented using the tensor product from two univariate B-spline neural networks, using the real and imaginary parts of the system input. Following the use of a simple least squares parameter initialization scheme, the Gauss-Newton algorithm is applied for the parameter estimation, which incorporates the De Boor algorithm, including both the B-spline curve and the first-order derivatives recursion. Numerical examples, including a nonlinear high-power amplifier model in communication systems, are used to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approaches. PMID:21550875

  11. A high-fidelity harmonic drive model.

    SciTech Connect

    Preissner, C.; Royston, T. J.; Shu, D.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a new model of the harmonic drive transmission is presented. The purpose of this work is to better understand the transmission hysteresis behavior while constructing a new type of comprehensive harmonic drive model. The four dominant aspects of harmonic drive behavior - nonlinear viscous friction, nonlinear stiffness, hysteresis, and kinematic error - are all included in the model. The harmonic drive is taken to be a black box, and a dynamometer is used to observe the input/output relations of the transmission. This phenomenological approach does not require any specific knowledge of the internal kinematics. In a novel application, the Maxwell resistive-capacitor hysteresis model is applied to the harmonic drive. In this model, sets of linear stiffness elements in series with Coulomb friction elements are arranged in parallel to capture the hysteresis behavior of the transmission. The causal hysteresis model is combined with nonlinear viscous friction and spectral kinematic error models to accurately represent the harmonic drive behavior. Empirical measurements are presented to quantify all four aspects of the transmission behavior. These measurements motivate the formulation of the complete model. Simulation results are then compared to additional measurements of the harmonic drive performance.

  12. State dependent model predictive control for orbital rendezvous using pulse-width pulse-frequency modulated thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Zhu, Zheng H.; Meguid, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation based trajectory planning for orbital rendezvous and proximity maneuvering near a non-cooperative spacecraft in an elliptical orbit. The problem is formulated by converting the continuous control input, output from the state dependent model predictive control, into a sequence of pulses of constant magnitude by controlling firing frequency and duration of constant-magnitude thrusters. The state dependent model predictive control is derived by minimizing the control error of states and control roughness of control input for a safe, smooth and fuel efficient approaching trajectory. The resulting nonlinear programming problem is converted into a series of quadratic programming problem and solved by numerical iteration using the receding horizon strategy. The numerical results show that the proposed state dependent model predictive control with the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation is able to effectively generate optimized trajectories using equivalent control pulses for the proximity maneuvering with less energy consumption.

  13. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

  14. Modeling neuron-glia interactions: from parametric model to neuromorphic hardware.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Viviane S; Allam, Sushmita L; Ambert, N; Bouteiller, J-M C; Choma, J; Berger, T W

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental evidence suggests that glial cells are more than just supporting cells to neurons - they play an active role in signal transmission in the brain. We herein propose to investigate the importance of these mechanisms and model neuron-glia interactions at synapses using three approaches: A parametric model that takes into account the underlying mechanisms of the physiological system, a non-parametric model that extracts its input-output properties, and an ultra-low power, fast processing, neuromorphic hardware model. We use the EONS (Elementary Objects of the Nervous System) platform, a highly elaborate synaptic modeling platform to investigate the influence of astrocytic glutamate transporters on postsynaptic responses in the detailed micro-environment of a tri-partite synapse. The simulation results obtained using EONS are then used to build a non-parametric model that captures the essential features of glutamate dynamics. The structure of the non-parametric model we use is specifically designed for efficient hardware implementation using ultra-low power subthreshold CMOS building blocks. The utilization of the approach described allows us to build large-scale models of neuron/glial interaction and consequently provide useful insights on glial modulation during normal and pathological neural function. PMID:22255113

  15. Model documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-24

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is a component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. This report documents the archived version of NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts used in support of the Annual Energy Outlook 1994, DOE/EIA-0383(94). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. It is intended to fulfill the legal obligation of the EIA to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, Section 57.b.2). This report represents Volume 1 of a two-volume set. (Volume 2 will report on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.) Subsequent chapters of this report provide: (1) an overview of the NGTDM (Chapter 2); (2) a description of the interface between the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and the NGTDM (Chapter 3); (3) an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM (Chapter 4); (4) the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module (Chapter 5); (5) the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module (Chapter 6); (6) the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module (Chapter 7); (7) the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module (Chapter 8); and (8) a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs (Chapter 9).

  16. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Agbodjan Prince, Just; Kohl, Franz; Sauter, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment's shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object. PMID:27608021

  17. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Agbodjan Prince, Just; Kohl, Franz; Sauter, Thilo

    2016-09-06

    This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment's shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object.

  18. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Agbodjan Prince, Just; Kohl, Franz; Sauter, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment’s shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object. PMID:27608021

  19. Beam-commissioning study of high-intensity accelerators using virtual accelerator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, H.; Shigaki, K.; Irie, Y.; Noda, F.; Hotchi, H.; Saha, P. K.; Shobuda, Y.; Sako, H.; Furukawa, K.; Machida, S.

    2009-04-01

    In order to control large-scale accelerators efficiently, a control system with a virtual accelerator model was constructed. The virtual accelerator (VA) is an on-line beam simulator provided with a beam monitor scheme. The VA is based upon the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) and is configured under the EPICS input/output controller (IOC) in parallel with a real accelerator (RA). Thus, the machine operator can access the parameters of the RA through the channel access client and then feed them to the VA, and vice versa. Such a control scheme facilitates developments of the commissioning tools, feasibility study of the proposed accelerator parameters and examination of the measured accelerator data. This paper describes the beam commissioning results and activities by using the VA at the J-PARC 3-GeV rapid-cycling synchrotron (RCS).

  20. Modified Levenberg-Marquardt Method for RÖSSLER Chaotic System Fuzzy Modeling Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Hui; Wu, Qing-Xian; Jiang, Chang-Sheng; Xue, Ya-Li; Fang, Wei

    Generally, fuzzy approximation models require some human knowledge and experience. Operator's experience is involved in the mathematics of fuzzy theory as a collection of heuristic rules. The main goal of this paper is to present a new method for identifying unknown nonlinear dynamics such as Rössler system without any human knowledge. Instead of heuristic rules, the presented method uses the input-output data pairs to identify the Rössler chaotic system. The training algorithm is a modified Levenberg-Marquardt (L-M) method, which can adjust the parameters of each linear polynomial and fuzzy membership functions on line, and do not rely on experts' experience excessively. Finally, it is applied to training Rössler chaotic system fuzzy identification. Comparing this method with the standard L-M method, the convergence speed is accelerated. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.