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Sample records for inoperability input-output model

  1. Modeling the demand reduction input-output (I-O) inoperability due to terrorism of interconnected infrastructures.

    PubMed

    Santos, Joost R; Haimes, Yacov Y

    2004-12-01

    Interdependency analysis in the context of this article is a process of assessing and managing risks inherent in a system of interconnected entities (e.g., infrastructures or industry sectors). Invoking the principles of input-output (I-O) and decomposition analysis, the article offers a framework for describing how terrorism-induced perturbations can propagate due to interconnectedness. Data published by the Bureau of Economic Analysis Division of the U.S. Department of Commerce is utilized to present applications to serve as test beds for the proposed framework. Specifically, a case study estimating the economic impact of airline demand perturbations to national-level U.S. sectors is made possible using I-O matrices. A ranking of the affected sectors according to their vulnerability to perturbations originating from a primary sector (e.g., air transportation) can serve as important input to risk management. For example, limited resources can be prioritized for the "top-n" sectors that are perceived to suffer the greatest economic losses due to terrorism. In addition, regional decomposition via location quotients enables the analysis of local-level terrorism events. The Regional I-O Multiplier System II (RIMS II) Division of the U.S. Department of Commerce is the agency responsible for releasing the regional multipliers for various geographical resolutions (economic areas, states, and counties). A regional-level case study demonstrates a process of estimating the economic impact of transportation-related scenarios on industry sectors within Economic Area 010 (the New York metropolitan region and vicinities).

  2. Space market model space industry input-output model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgin, Robert F.; Marchesini, Roberto

    1987-01-01

    The goal of the Space Market Model (SMM) is to develop an information resource for the space industry. The SMM is intended to contain information appropriate for decision making in the space industry. The objectives of the SMM are to: (1) assemble information related to the development of the space business; (2) construct an adequate description of the emerging space market; (3) disseminate the information on the space market to forecasts and planners in government agencies and private corporations; and (4) provide timely analyses and forecasts of critical elements of the space market. An Input-Output model of market activity is proposed which are capable of transforming raw data into useful information for decision makers and policy makers dealing with the space sector.

  3. Input-output analysis of mathematical models of ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Antonios, M.N.

    1982-01-01

    Necessary and sufficient conditions for the convergence of the solutions of linear and nonlinear time varying compartmental models described by systems of differential equations are reviewed. For continuous and discrete models, the concept of environ analysis is extended to advanced linear systems and for the first time to systems with time varying coefficient matrices A(t) and (A(t))/sup T/. Output and input environ partitioning flow and storage matrices for a two trophic level aquatic system are derived in the form of integral equations. As a step towards the important goal of controlling the eutrophication phenomenon, two phytoplankton population models in natural waters are presented. In the first model, a non-linear function general enough to include the effects of feeding saturation intraspecific consumer interference, and eutrophication phenomenon is used to present the transfer of material or energy from phytoplankton to zooplankton populations. The model using this grazing rate function is subjected to equilibrium and stability analysis to ascertain its mathematical implications. It is shown that, for a certain range of one of the parameters in this function all equilibrium points of the system become stable even with nutrient enrichment. In the second model, dynamics of both nitrogen and phosphorus cycles are combined. The influence of direct human control added to different aquatic models is studied in detail. Optimal control theory is used to obtain optimal strategies for the control of these models with several cost functions. It is found that the control program in each problem depends on the model considered and on the function to be optimized.

  4. Input-output model for MACCS nuclear accident impacts estimation¹

    SciTech Connect

    Outkin, Alexander V.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Vargas, Vanessa N

    2015-01-27

    Since the original economic model for MACCS was developed, better quality economic data (as well as the tools to gather and process it) and better computational capabilities have become available. The update of the economic impacts component of the MACCS legacy model will provide improved estimates of business disruptions through the use of Input-Output based economic impact estimation. This paper presents an updated MACCS model, bases on Input-Output methodology, in which economic impacts are calculated using the Regional Economic Accounting analysis tool (REAcct) created at Sandia National Laboratories. This new GDP-based model allows quick and consistent estimation of gross domestic product (GDP) losses due to nuclear power plant accidents. This paper outlines the steps taken to combine the REAcct Input-Output-based model with the MACCS code, describes the GDP loss calculation, and discusses the parameters and modeling assumptions necessary for the estimation of long-term effects of nuclear power plant accidents.

  5. Explicit least squares system parameter identification for exact differential input/output models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, A. E.

    1993-01-01

    The equation error for a class of systems modeled by input/output differential operator equations has the potential to be integrated exactly, given the input/output data on a finite time interval, thereby opening up the possibility of using an explicit least squares estimation technique for system parameter identification. The paper delineates the class of models for which this is possible and shows how the explicit least squares cost function can be obtained in a way that obviates dealing with unknown initial and boundary conditions. The approach is illustrated by two examples: a second order chemical kinetics model and a third order system of Lorenz equations.

  6. Methods to Register Models and Input/Output Parameters for Integrated Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Droppo, James G.; Whelan, Gene; Tryby, Michael E.; Pelton, Mitchell A.; Taira, Randal Y.; Dorow, Kevin E.

    2010-07-10

    Significant resources can be required when constructing integrated modeling systems. In a typical application, components (e.g., models and databases) created by different developers are assimilated, requiring the framework’s functionality to bridge the gap between the user’s knowledge of the components being linked. The framework, therefore, needs the capability to assimilate a wide range of model-specific input/output requirements as well as their associated assumptions and constraints. The process of assimilating such disparate components into an integrated modeling framework varies in complexity and difficulty. Several factors influence the relative ease of assimilating components, including, but not limited to, familiarity with the components being assimilated, familiarity with the framework and its tools that support the assimilation process, level of documentation associated with the components and the framework, and design structure of the components and framework. This initial effort reviews different approaches for assimilating models and their model-specific input/output requirements: 1) modifying component models to directly communicate with the framework (i.e., through an Application Programming Interface), 2) developing model-specific external wrappers such that no component model modifications are required, 3) using parsing tools to visually map pre-existing input/output files, and 4) describing and linking models as dynamic link libraries. Most of these approaches are illustrated using the widely distributed modeling system called Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems (FRAMES). The review concludes that each has its strengths and weakness, the factors that determine which approaches work best in a given application.

  7. Approximation of Quantum Stochastic Differential Equations for Input-Output Model Reduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-25

    Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals: " Algorithms and software for quantum engineering," H. Mabuchi and R. Balu, Review Management Board...Approximation of Quantum Stochastic Differential Equations for Input-Output Model Reduction We have completed a short program of theoretical research...on dimensional reduction and approximation of models based on quantum stochastic differential equations. Our primary results lie in the area of

  8. Input-Output Modeling for Urban Energy Consumption in Beijing: Dynamics and Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lixiao; Hu, Qiuhong; Zhang, Fan

    2014-01-01

    Input-output analysis has been proven to be a powerful instrument for estimating embodied (direct plus indirect) energy usage through economic sectors. Using 9 economic input-output tables of years 1987, 1990, 1992, 1995, 1997, 2000, 2002, 2005, and 2007, this paper analyzes energy flows for the entire city of Beijing and its 30 economic sectors, respectively. Results show that the embodied energy consumption of Beijing increased from 38.85 million tonnes of coal equivalent (Mtce) to 206.2 Mtce over the past twenty years of rapid urbanization; the share of indirect energy consumption in total energy consumption increased from 48% to 76%, suggesting the transition of Beijing from a production-based and manufacturing-dominated economy to a consumption-based and service-dominated economy. Real estate development has shown to be a major driving factor of the growth in indirect energy consumption. The boom and bust of construction activities have been strongly correlated with the increase and decrease of system-side indirect energy consumption. Traditional heavy industries remain the most energy-intensive sectors in the economy. However, the transportation and service sectors have contributed most to the rapid increase in overall energy consumption. The analyses in this paper demonstrate that a system-wide approach such as that based on input-output model can be a useful tool for robust energy policy making. PMID:24595199

  9. Alternative to Ritt's pseudodivision for finding the input-output equations of multi-output models.

    PubMed

    Meshkat, Nicolette; Anderson, Chris; DiStefano, Joseph J

    2012-09-01

    Differential algebra approaches to structural identifiability analysis of a dynamic system model in many instances heavily depend upon Ritt's pseudodivision at an early step in analysis. The pseudodivision algorithm is used to find the characteristic set, of which a subset, the input-output equations, is used for identifiability analysis. A simpler algorithm is proposed for this step, using Gröbner Bases, along with a proof of the method that includes a reduced upper bound on derivative requirements. Efficacy of the new algorithm is illustrated with several biosystem model examples.

  10. Linear spectral mixture analysis with the Open Leontief Input-Output Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lijiang, Zhu

    2014-03-01

    Commonly, it requires two constraints imposed on the linear spectral mixture analysis (LSMA). One constraint is the abundance of sum-to-one, which requires the abundance fractions of materials presented in an image pixel to be one and is easy to deal with. The other constraint is that any abundance fractions are always nonnegative and difficult to solve with analytical solution. Most of approaches that provide the solution for the latter problem of LSMA use an optimization or maximization procedure. The results of solution resort to optimization strategies. The Leontief input-output model, of which parameters are very similar to LSMA, is represented by a linear system of equations and the system has a unique nonnegative solution. In this paper, we considered how to determine the parameters of LSMA model, and based on the open Leontief input-output model, we presented a fully constrained linear spectral (FCLS) mixture analysis method for estimating material abundance in spectral mixture pixel. The new FCLS method can not only make the abundance fractions of materials be nonnegative, but also keep them less than one, that always obtained by normalizing procedure in other methods. We also examine a number of approaches, previous FCLS and non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) spectral un-mixing, closely related. A series of computer simulations are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method in material quantification.

  11. A Water-Withdrawal Input-Output Model of the Indian Economy.

    PubMed

    Bogra, Shelly; Bakshi, Bhavik R; Mathur, Ritu

    2016-02-02

    Managing freshwater allocation for a highly populated and growing economy like India can benefit from knowledge about the effect of economic activities. This study transforms the 2003-2004 economic input-output (IO) table of India into a water withdrawal input-output model to quantify direct and indirect flows. This unique model is based on a comprehensive database compiled from diverse public sources, and estimates direct and indirect water withdrawal of all economic sectors. It distinguishes between green (rainfall), blue (surface and ground), and scarce groundwater. Results indicate that the total direct water withdrawal is nearly 3052 billion cubic meter (BCM) and 96% of this is used in agriculture sectors with the contribution of direct green water being about 1145 BCM, excluding forestry. Apart from 727 BCM direct blue water withdrawal for agricultural, other significant users include "Electricity" with 64 BCM, "Water supply" with 44 BCM and other industrial sectors with nearly 14 BCM. "Construction", "miscellaneous food products"; "Hotels and restaurants"; "Paper, paper products, and newsprint" are other significant indirect withdrawers. The net virtual water import is found to be insignificant compared to direct water used in agriculture nationally, while scarce ground water associated with crops is largely contributed by northern states.

  12. Wind Farm Flow Modeling using an Input-Output Reduced-Order Model

    SciTech Connect

    Annoni, Jennifer; Gebraad, Pieter; Seiler, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Wind turbines in a wind farm operate individually to maximize their own power regardless of the impact of aerodynamic interactions on neighboring turbines. There is the potential to increase power and reduce overall structural loads by properly coordinating turbines. To perform control design and analysis, a model needs to be of low computational cost, but retains the necessary dynamics seen in high-fidelity models. The objective of this work is to obtain a reduced-order model that represents the full-order flow computed using a high-fidelity model. A variety of methods, including proper orthogonal decomposition and dynamic mode decomposition, can be used to extract the dominant flow structures and obtain a reduced-order model. In this paper, we combine proper orthogonal decomposition with a system identification technique to produce an input-output reduced-order model. This technique is used to construct a reduced-order model of the flow within a two-turbine array computed using a large-eddy simulation.

  13. Application of a Linear Input/Output Model to Tankless Water Heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher T.; Schoenbauer, B.

    2011-12-31

    In this study, the applicability of a linear input/output model to gas-fired, tankless water heaters has been evaluated. This simple model assumes that the relationship between input and output, averaged over both active draw and idle periods, is linear. This approach is being applied to boilers in other studies and offers the potential to make a small number of simple measurements to obtain the model parameters. These parameters can then be used to predict performance under complex load patterns. Both condensing and non-condensing water heaters have been tested under a very wide range of load conditions. It is shown that this approach can be used to reproduce performance metrics, such as the energy factor, and can be used to evaluate the impacts of alternative draw patterns and conditions.

  14. Applying Input-Output Model to Estimate Broader Economic Impact of Transportation Infrastructure Investment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anas, Ridwan; Tamin, Ofyar; Wibowo, Sony S.

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the relationships between infrastructure improvement and economic growth in the surrounding region. Traditionally, microeconomic and macroeconomic analyses are the mostly used tools for analyzing the linkage between transportation sectors and economic growth but offer little clues to the mechanisms linking transport improvements and the broader economy impacts. This study will estimate the broader economic benefits of the new transportation infrastructure investment, Cipularangtollway in West Java province, Indonesia, to the region connected (Bandung district) using Input-Output model. The result show the decrease of freight transportation costs by at 17 % and the increase of 1.2 % of Bandung District's GDP after the operation of Cipularangtollway.

  15. Transport coefficient computation based on input/output reduced order models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Joshua L.

    The guiding purpose of this thesis is to address the optimal material design problem when the material description is a molecular dynamics model. The end goal is to obtain a simplified and fast model that captures the property of interest such that it can be used in controller design and optimization. The approach is to examine model reduction analysis and methods to capture a specific property of interest, in this case viscosity, or more generally complex modulus or complex viscosity. This property and other transport coefficients are defined by a input/output relationship and this motivates model reduction techniques that are tailored to preserve input/output behavior. In particular Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) based methods are investigated. First simulation methods are identified that are amenable to systems theory analysis. For viscosity, these models are of the Gosling and Lees-Edwards type. They are high order nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) that employ Periodic Boundary Conditions. Properties can be calculated from the state trajectories of these ODEs. In this research local linear approximations are rigorously derived and special attention is given to potentials that are evaluated with Periodic Boundary Conditions (PBC). For the Gosling description LTI models are developed from state trajectories but are found to have limited success in capturing the system property, even though it is shown that full order LTI models can be well approximated by reduced order LTI models. For the Lees-Edwards SLLOD type model nonlinear ODEs will be approximated by a Linear Time Varying (LTV) model about some nominal trajectory and both balanced truncation and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) will be used to assess the plausibility of reduced order models to this system description. An immediate application of the derived LTV models is Quasilinearization or Waveform Relaxation. Quasilinearization is a Newton's method applied to the ODE operator

  16. Regional disaster impact analysis: comparing Input-Output and Computable General Equilibrium models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koks, E. E.; Carrera, L.; Jonkeren, O.; Aerts, J. C. J. H.; Husby, T. G.; Thissen, M.; Standardi, G.; Mysiak, J.

    2015-11-01

    A large variety of models has been developed to assess the economic losses of disasters, of which the most common ones are Input-Output (IO) and Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) models. In addition, an increasing numbers of scholars has developed hybrid approaches; one that combines both or either of them in combination with non-economic methods. While both IO and CGE models are widely used, they are mainly compared on theoretical grounds. Few studies have compared disaster impacts of different model types in a systematic way and for the same geographical area, using similar input data. Such a comparison is valuable from both a scientific and policy perspective as the magnitude and the spatial distribution of the estimated losses are likely to vary with the chosen modelling approach (IO, CGE, or hybrid). Hence, regional disaster impact loss estimates resulting from a range of models facilitates better decisions and policy making. Therefore, in this study we analyze one specific case study, using three regional models: two hybrid IO models and a regionally calibrated version of a global CGE model. The case study concerns two flood scenarios in the Po-river basin in Italy. Modelling results indicate that the difference in estimated total (national) economic losses and the regional distribution of those losses may vary by up to a factor of seven between the three models, depending on the type of recovery path. Total economic impact, comprising all Italian regions, is negative in all models though.

  17. Regional disaster impact analysis: comparing input-output and computable general equilibrium models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koks, Elco E.; Carrera, Lorenzo; Jonkeren, Olaf; Aerts, Jeroen C. J. H.; Husby, Trond G.; Thissen, Mark; Standardi, Gabriele; Mysiak, Jaroslav

    2016-08-01

    A variety of models have been applied to assess the economic losses of disasters, of which the most common ones are input-output (IO) and computable general equilibrium (CGE) models. In addition, an increasing number of scholars have developed hybrid approaches: one that combines both or either of them in combination with noneconomic methods. While both IO and CGE models are widely used, they are mainly compared on theoretical grounds. Few studies have compared disaster impacts of different model types in a systematic way and for the same geographical area, using similar input data. Such a comparison is valuable from both a scientific and policy perspective as the magnitude and the spatial distribution of the estimated losses are born likely to vary with the chosen modelling approach (IO, CGE, or hybrid). Hence, regional disaster impact loss estimates resulting from a range of models facilitate better decisions and policy making. Therefore, this study analyses the economic consequences for a specific case study, using three regional disaster impact models: two hybrid IO models and a CGE model. The case study concerns two flood scenarios in the Po River basin in Italy. Modelling results indicate that the difference in estimated total (national) economic losses and the regional distribution of those losses may vary by up to a factor of 7 between the three models, depending on the type of recovery path. Total economic impact, comprising all Italian regions, is negative in all models though.

  18. A mixed-unit input-output model for environmental life-cycle assessment and material flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Troy; Hendrickson, Chris; Higgins, Cortney; Matthews, H Scott; Suh, Sangwon

    2007-02-01

    Materials flow analysis models have traditionally been used to track the production, use, and consumption of materials. Economic input-output modeling has been used for environmental systems analysis, with a primary benefit being the capability to estimate direct and indirect economic and environmental impacts across the entire supply chain of production in an economy. We combine these two types of models to create a mixed-unit input-output model that is able to bettertrack economic transactions and material flows throughout the economy associated with changes in production. A 13 by 13 economic input-output direct requirements matrix developed by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis is augmented with material flow data derived from those published by the U.S. Geological Survey in the formulation of illustrative mixed-unit input-output models for lead and cadmium. The resulting model provides the capabilities of both material flow and input-output models, with detailed material tracking through entire supply chains in response to any monetary or material demand. Examples of these models are provided along with a discussion of uncertainty and extensions to these models.

  19. Neural Systems with Numerically Matched Input-Output Statistic: Isotonic Bivariate Statistical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Simone

    2007-01-01

    Bivariate statistical modeling from incomplete data is a useful statistical tool that allows to discover the model underlying two data sets when the data in the two sets do not correspond in size nor in ordering. Such situation may occur when the sizes of the two data sets do not match (i.e., there are “holes” in the data) or when the data sets have been acquired independently. Also, statistical modeling is useful when the amount of available data is enough to show relevant statistical features of the phenomenon underlying the data. We propose to tackle the problem of statistical modeling via a neural (nonlinear) system that is able to match its input-output statistic to the statistic of the available data sets. A key point of the new implementation proposed here is that it is based on look-up-table (LUT) neural systems, which guarantee a computationally advantageous way of implementing neural systems. A number of numerical experiments, performed on both synthetic and real-world data sets, illustrate the features of the proposed modeling procedure. PMID:18566641

  20. Ecological input-output modeling for embodied resources and emissions in Chinese economy 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. M.; Chen, G. Q.; Zhou, J. B.; Jiang, M. M.; Chen, B.

    2010-07-01

    For the embodiment of natural resources and environmental emissions in Chinese economy 2005, a biophysical balance modeling is carried out based on an extension of the economic input-output table into an ecological one integrating the economy with its various environmental driving forces. Included resource flows into the primary resource sectors and environmental emission flows from the primary emission sectors belong to seven categories as energy resources in terms of fossil fuels, hydropower and nuclear energy, biomass, and other sources; freshwater resources; greenhouse gas emissions in terms of CO2, CH4, and N2O; industrial wastes in terms of waste water, waste gas, and waste solid; exergy in terms of fossil fuel resources, biological resources, mineral resources, and environmental resources; solar emergy and cosmic emergy in terms of climate resources, soil, fossil fuels, and minerals. The resulted database for embodiment intensity and sectoral embodiment of natural resources and environmental emissions is of essential implications in context of systems ecology and ecological economics in general and of global climate change in particular.

  1. Technical note: Simultaneous fully dynamic characterization of multiple input-output relationships in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, Ben; MacMartin, Douglas G.; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong

    2017-02-01

    We introduce system identification techniques to climate science wherein multiple dynamic input-output relationships can be simultaneously characterized in a single simulation. This method, involving multiple small perturbations (in space and time) of an input field while monitoring output fields to quantify responses, allows for identification of different timescales of climate response to forcing without substantially pushing the climate far away from a steady state. We use this technique to determine the steady-state responses of low cloud fraction and latent heat flux to heating perturbations over 22 regions spanning Earth's oceans. We show that the response characteristics are similar to those of step-change simulations, but in this new method the responses for 22 regions can be characterized simultaneously. Furthermore, we can estimate the timescale over which the steady-state response emerges. The proposed methodology could be useful for a wide variety of purposes in climate science, including characterization of teleconnections and uncertainty quantification to identify the effects of climate model tuning parameters.

  2. Finding identifiable parameter combinations in nonlinear ODE models and the rational reparameterization of their input-output equations.

    PubMed

    Meshkat, Nicolette; Anderson, Chris; Distefano, Joseph J

    2011-09-01

    When examining the structural identifiability properties of dynamic system models, some parameters can take on an infinite number of values and yet yield identical input-output data. These parameters and the model are then said to be unidentifiable. Finding identifiable combinations of parameters with which to reparameterize the model provides a means for quantitatively analyzing the model and computing solutions in terms of the combinations. In this paper, we revisit and explore the properties of an algorithm for finding identifiable parameter combinations using Gröbner Bases and prove useful theoretical properties of these parameter combinations. We prove a set of M algebraically independent identifiable parameter combinations can be found using this algorithm and that there exists a unique rational reparameterization of the input-output equations over these parameter combinations. We also demonstrate application of the procedure to a nonlinear biomodel.

  3. Embodied water analysis for Hebei Province, China by input-output modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siyuan; Han, Mengyao; Wu, Xudong; Wu, Xiaofang; Li, Zhi; Xia, Xiaohua; Ji, Xi

    2016-12-01

    With the accelerating coordinated development of the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region, regional economic integration is recognized as a national strategy. As water scarcity places Hebei Province in a dilemma, it is of critical importance for Hebei Province to balance water resources as well as make full use of its unique advantages in the transition to sustainable development. To our knowledge, related embodied water accounting analysis has been conducted for Beijing and Tianjin, while similar works with the focus on Hebei are not found. In this paper, using the most complete and recent statistics available for Hebei Province, the embodied water use in Hebei Province is analyzed in detail. Based on input-output analysis, it presents a complete set of systems accounting framework for water resources. In addition, a database of embodied water intensity is proposed which is applicable to both intermediate inputs and final demand. The result suggests that the total amount of embodied water in final demand is 10.62 billion m3, of which the water embodied in urban household consumption accounts for more than half. As a net embodied water importer, the water embodied in the commodity trade in Hebei Province is 17.20 billion m3. The outcome of this work implies that it is particularly urgent to adjust industrial structure and trade policies for water conservation, to upgrade technology and to improve water utilization. As a result, to relieve water shortages in Hebei Province, it is of crucial importance to regulate the balance of water use within the province, thus balancing water distribution in the various industrial sectors.

  4. Methods to Register Models and Input/Output Parameters for Integrated Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant resources can be required when constructing integrated modeling systems. In a typical application, components (e.g., models and databases) created by different developers are assimilated, requiring the framework’s functionality to bridge the gap between the user’s kno...

  5. Input-Output Modeling and Control of the Departure Process of Congested Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pujet, Nicolas; Delcaire, Bertrand; Feron, Eric

    2003-01-01

    A simple queueing model of busy airport departure operations is proposed. This model is calibrated and validated using available runway configuration and traffic data. The model is then used to evaluate preliminary control schemes aimed at alleviating departure traffic congestion on the airport surface. The potential impact of these control strategies on direct operating costs, environmental costs and overall delay is quantified and discussed.

  6. Frequency dependent precompensation for dominance in a four input/output theme problem model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, R. M.; Sain, M. K.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reports on additional experience in applying the CARDIAD methodology to design of dynamical input compensation to achieve column dominance for linear multivariable models of realistic turbine engine simulations. In particular, the approach has been extended to models having four inputs and four outputs, and successful compensations have been achieved with an investment of about thirty minutes desk time.

  7. Input/output models for general aviation piston-prop aircraft fuel economy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel efficient cruise performance model for general aviation piston engine airplane was tested. The following equations were made: (1) for the standard atmosphere; (2) airframe-propeller-atmosphere cruise performance; and (3) naturally aspirated engine cruise performance. Adjustments are made to the compact cruise performance model as follows: corrected quantities, corrected performance plots, algebraic equations, maximize R with or without constraints, and appears suitable for airborne microprocessor implementation. The following hardwares are recommended: ignition timing regulator, fuel-air mass ration controller, microprocessor, sensors and displays.

  8. Supply Chain Vulnerability Analysis Using Scenario-Based Input-Output Modeling: Application to Port Operations.

    PubMed

    Thekdi, Shital A; Santos, Joost R

    2016-05-01

    Disruptive events such as natural disasters, loss or reduction of resources, work stoppages, and emergent conditions have potential to propagate economic losses across trade networks. In particular, disruptions to the operation of container port activity can be detrimental for international trade and commerce. Risk assessment should anticipate the impact of port operation disruptions with consideration of how priorities change due to uncertain scenarios and guide investments that are effective and feasible for implementation. Priorities for protective measures and continuity of operations planning must consider the economic impact of such disruptions across a variety of scenarios. This article introduces new performance metrics to characterize resiliency in interdependency modeling and also integrates scenario-based methods to measure economic sensitivity to sudden-onset disruptions. The methods will be demonstrated on a U.S. port responsible for handling $36.1 billion of cargo annually. The methods will be useful to port management, private industry supply chain planning, and transportation infrastructure management.

  9. A stock-flow consistent input-output model with applications to energy price shocks, interest rates, and heat emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Matthew; Hartley, Brian; Richters, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    By synthesizing stock-flow consistent models, input-output models, and aspects of ecological macroeconomics, a method is developed to simultaneously model monetary flows through the financial system, flows of produced goods and services through the real economy, and flows of physical materials through the natural environment. This paper highlights the linkages between the physical environment and the economic system by emphasizing the role of the energy industry. A conceptual model is developed in general form with an arbitrary number of sectors, while emphasizing connections with the agent-based, econophysics, and complexity economics literature. First, we use the model to challenge claims that 0% interest rates are a necessary condition for a stationary economy and conduct a stability analysis within the parameter space of interest rates and consumption parameters of an economy in stock-flow equilibrium. Second, we analyze the role of energy price shocks in contributing to recessions, incorporating several propagation and amplification mechanisms. Third, implied heat emissions from energy conversion and the effect of anthropogenic heat flux on climate change are considered in light of a minimal single-layer atmosphere climate model, although the model is only implicitly, not explicitly, linked to the economic model.

  10. An adaptive regional input-output model and its application to the assessment of the economic cost of Katrina.

    PubMed

    Hallegatte, Stéphane

    2008-06-01

    This article proposes a new modeling framework to investigate the consequences of natural disasters and the following reconstruction phase. Based on input-output tables, its originalities are (1) the taking into account of sector production capacities and of both forward and backward propagations within the economic system; and (2) the introduction of adaptive behaviors. The model is used to simulate the response of the economy of Louisiana to the landfall of Katrina. The model is found consistent with available data, and provides two important insights. First, economic processes exacerbate direct losses, and total costs are estimated at $149 billion, for direct losses equal to $107 billion. When exploring the impacts of other possible disasters, it is found that total losses due to a disaster affecting Louisiana increase nonlinearly with respect to direct losses when the latter exceed $50 billion. When direct losses exceed $200 billion, for instance, total losses are twice as large as direct losses. For risk management, therefore, direct losses are insufficient measures of disaster consequences. Second, positive and negative backward propagation mechanisms are essential for the assessment of disaster consequences, and the taking into account of production capacities is necessary to avoid overestimating the positive effects of reconstruction. A systematic sensitivity analysis shows that, among all parameters, the overproduction capacity in the construction sector and the adaptation characteristic time are the most important.

  11. Serial Input Output

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, Anthony; /SLAC

    2011-09-07

    Serial Input/Output (SIO) is designed to be a long term storage format of a sophistication somewhere between simple ASCII files and the techniques provided by inter alia Objectivity and Root. The former tend to be low density, information lossy (floating point numbers lose precision) and inflexible. The latter require abstract descriptions of the data with all that that implies in terms of extra complexity. The basic building blocks of SIO are streams, records and blocks. Streams provide the connections between the program and files. The user can define an arbitrary list of streams as required. A given stream must be opened for either reading or writing. SIO does not support read/write streams. If a stream is closed during the execution of a program, it can be reopened in either read or write mode to the same or a different file. Records represent a coherent grouping of data. Records consist of a collection of blocks (see next paragraph). The user can define a variety of records (headers, events, error logs, etc.) and request that any of them be written to any stream. When SIO reads a file, it first decodes the record name and if that record has been defined and unpacking has been requested for it, SIO proceeds to unpack the blocks. Blocks are user provided objects which do the real work of reading/writing the data. The user is responsible for writing the code for these blocks and for identifying these blocks to SIO at run time. To write a collection of blocks, the user must first connect them to a record. The record can then be written to a stream as described above. Note that the same block can be connected to many different records. When SIO reads a record, it scans through the blocks written and calls the corresponding block object (if it has been defined) to decode it. Undefined blocks are skipped. Each of these categories (streams, records and blocks) have some characteristics in common. Every stream, record and block has a name with the condition that each

  12. The stability of input structures in a supply-driven input-output model: A regional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, T.

    1994-06-01

    Disruptions in the supply of strategic resources or other crucial factor inputs often present significant problems for planners and policymakers. The problem may be particularly significant at the regional level where higher levels of product specialization mean supply restrictions are more likely to affect leading regional industries. To maintain economic stability in the event of a supply restriction, regional planners may therefore need to evaluate the importance of market versus non-market systems for allocating the remaining supply of the disrupted resource to the region`s leading consuming industries. This paper reports on research that has attempted to show that large short term changes on the supply side do not lead to substantial changes in input coefficients and do not therefore mean the abandonment of the concept of the production function as has been suggested (Oosterhaven, 1988). The supply-driven model was tested for six sectors of the economy of Washington State and found to yield new input coefficients whose values were in most cases close approximations of their original values, even with substantial changes in supply. Average coefficient changes from a 50% output reduction in these six sectors were in the vast majority of cases (297 from a total of 315) less than +2.0% of their original values, excluding coefficient changes for the restricted input. Given these small changes, the most important issue for the validity of the supply-driven input-output model may therefore be the empirical question of the extent to which these coefficient changes are acceptable as being within the limits of approximation.

  13. Analysis of urban metabolic processes based on input-output method: model development and a case study for Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Liu, Hong; Chen, Bin; Zheng, Hongmei; Li, Yating

    2014-06-01

    Discovering ways in which to increase the sustainability of the metabolic processes involved in urbanization has become an urgent task for urban design and management in China. As cities are analogous to living organisms, the disorders of their metabolic processes can be regarded as the cause of "urban disease". Therefore, identification of these causes through metabolic process analysis and ecological element distribution through the urban ecosystem's compartments will be helpful. By using Beijing as an example, we have compiled monetary input-output tables from 1997, 2000, 2002, 2005, and 2007 and calculated the intensities of the embodied ecological elements to compile the corresponding implied physical input-output tables. We then divided Beijing's economy into 32 compartments and analyzed the direct and indirect ecological intensities embodied in the flows of ecological elements through urban metabolic processes. Based on the combination of input-output tables and ecological network analysis, the description of multiple ecological elements transferred among Beijing's industrial compartments and their distribution has been refined. This hybrid approach can provide a more scientific basis for management of urban resource flows. In addition, the data obtained from distribution characteristics of ecological elements may provide a basic data platform for exploring the metabolic mechanism of Beijing.

  14. Ecological network analysis of an urban metabolic system based on input-output tables: model development and case study for Beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Hongmei; Fath, Brian D; Liu, Hong; Yang, Zhifeng; Liu, Gengyuan; Su, Meirong

    2014-01-15

    If cities are considered as "superorganisms", then disorders of their metabolic processes cause something analogous to an "urban disease". It is therefore helpful to identify the causes of such disorders by analyzing the inner mechanisms that control urban metabolic processes. Combining input-output analysis with ecological network analysis lets researchers study the functional relationships and hierarchy of the urban metabolic processes, thereby providing direct support for the analysis of urban disease. In this paper, using Beijing as an example, we develop a model of an urban metabolic system that accounts for the intensity of the embodied ecological elements using monetary input-output tables from 1997, 2000, 2002, 2005, and 2007, and use this data to compile the corresponding physical input-output tables. This approach described the various flows of ecological elements through urban metabolic processes and let us build an ecological network model with 32 components. Then, using two methods from ecological network analysis (flow analysis and utility analysis), we quantitatively analyzed the physical input-output relationships among urban components, determined the ecological hierarchy of the components of the metabolic system, and determined the distribution of advantage-dominated and disadvantage-dominated relationships, thereby providing scientific support to guide restructuring of the urban metabolic system in an effort to prevent or cure urban "diseases".

  15. World Input-Output Network

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  16. Comparing urban solid waste recycling from the viewpoint of urban metabolism based on physical input-output model: A case of Suzhou in China.

    PubMed

    Liang, Sai; Zhang, Tianzhu

    2012-01-01

    Investigating impacts of urban solid waste recycling on urban metabolism contributes to sustainable urban solid waste management and urban sustainability. Using a physical input-output model and scenario analysis, urban metabolism of Suzhou in 2015 is predicted and impacts of four categories of solid waste recycling on urban metabolism are illustrated: scrap tire recycling, food waste recycling, fly ash recycling and sludge recycling. Sludge recycling has positive effects on reducing all material flows. Thus, sludge recycling for biogas is regarded as an accepted method. Moreover, technical levels of scrap tire recycling and food waste recycling should be improved to produce positive effects on reducing more material flows. Fly ash recycling for cement production has negative effects on reducing all material flows except solid wastes. Thus, other fly ash utilization methods should be exploited. In addition, the utilization and treatment of secondary wastes from food waste recycling and sludge recycling should be concerned.

  17. Estimating the Fully Burdened Cost of Fuel Using an Input-Output Model - A Micro-Level Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    tool for energy calculations. Albino , Izzo, and Kuhtz (2002) attempted to create IO models that can be used to examine both a local and global supply...geographic area. Each process can be defined as a system that produces output flows in consequence of input flows” ( Albino et al., 2002, p. 119). They...chain level as well as at local level a common policy for the management of resources and wastes” ( Albino et al., 2002, p. 130). Albino

  18. A modified NARMAX model-based self-tuner with fault tolerance for unknown nonlinear stochastic hybrid systems with an input-output direct feed-through term.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jason S-H; Hsu, Wen-Teng; Lin, Long-Guei; Guo, Shu-Mei; Tann, Joseph W

    2014-01-01

    A modified nonlinear autoregressive moving average with exogenous inputs (NARMAX) model-based state-space self-tuner with fault tolerance is proposed in this paper for the unknown nonlinear stochastic hybrid system with a direct transmission matrix from input to output. Through the off-line observer/Kalman filter identification method, one has a good initial guess of modified NARMAX model to reduce the on-line system identification process time. Then, based on the modified NARMAX-based system identification, a corresponding adaptive digital control scheme is presented for the unknown continuous-time nonlinear system, with an input-output direct transmission term, which also has measurement and system noises and inaccessible system states. Besides, an effective state space self-turner with fault tolerance scheme is presented for the unknown multivariable stochastic system. A quantitative criterion is suggested by comparing the innovation process error estimated by the Kalman filter estimation algorithm, so that a weighting matrix resetting technique by adjusting and resetting the covariance matrices of parameter estimate obtained by the Kalman filter estimation algorithm is utilized to achieve the parameter estimation for faulty system recovery. Consequently, the proposed method can effectively cope with partially abrupt and/or gradual system faults and input failures by the fault detection.

  19. Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry based on physical input-output life-cycle assessment model

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Sai; Zhang, Tianzhu; Xu Yijian

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using crop straws and wood wastes for paper production should be promoted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bagasse and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Imports of scrap paper should be encouraged. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensitivity analysis, uncertainties and policy implications are discussed. - Abstract: Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input-output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment.

  20. Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry based on physical input-output life-cycle assessment model.

    PubMed

    Liang, Sai; Zhang, Tianzhu; Xu, Yijian

    2012-03-01

    Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input-output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment.

  1. Comparing urban solid waste recycling from the viewpoint of urban metabolism based on physical input-output model: A case of Suzhou in China

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Sai; Zhang Tianzhu

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impacts of solid waste recycling on Suzhou's urban metabolism in 2015 are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sludge recycling for biogas is regarded as an accepted method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technical levels of reusing scrap tires and food wastes should be improved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Other fly ash utilization methods should be exploited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Secondary wastes from reusing food wastes and sludge should be concerned. - Abstract: Investigating impacts of urban solid waste recycling on urban metabolism contributes to sustainable urban solid waste management and urban sustainability. Using a physical input-output model and scenario analysis, urban metabolism of Suzhou in 2015 is predicted and impacts of four categories of solid waste recycling on urban metabolism are illustrated: scrap tire recycling, food waste recycling, fly ash recycling and sludge recycling. Sludge recycling has positive effects on reducing all material flows. Thus, sludge recycling for biogas is regarded as an accepted method. Moreover, technical levels of scrap tire recycling and food waste recycling should be improved to produce positive effects on reducing more material flows. Fly ash recycling for cement production has negative effects on reducing all material flows except solid wastes. Thus, other fly ash utilization methods should be exploited. In addition, the utilization and treatment of secondary wastes from food waste recycling and sludge recycling should be concerned.

  2. Interprovincial transfer of embodied energy between the Jing-Jin-Ji area and other provinces in China: A quantification using interprovincial input-output model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiming; Wu, Sanmang; Lei, Yalin; Li, Shantong

    2017-04-15

    Commodity trade between regions implies a large amount of energy transfer. As an important economic growth pole of China, the Jing-Jin-Ji area (Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei) is also one of the areas with the largest energy consumption in China. Moreover, the primary energy consumer goods in this area are fossil fuels, such as coal. This has led to serious air pollution in the area. Therefore, the reduction of energy consumption under the premise of maintaining sustained economic growth is an important task of the Jing-Jin-Ji area. In this study, an interprovincial input-output model was applied to quantitatively estimate the embodied energy transfer between Jing-Jin-Ji area and other provinces in China. The results indicated that the Metal and nonmetal mineral processing industry and the Electrical, gas and water industry in the Jing-Jin-Ji area exported a large amount of embodied energy to the Yangtze River Delta and the Pearl River Delta. However, the embodied energy export of the Jing-Jin-Ji area mainly exported by Hebei province. Beijing and Tianjin even have some net import of embodied energy. The embodied energy transfer between Tianjin, Hebei and other provinces was mainly driven by investment, while the main media of embodied energy transfer between Beijing and other provinces was consumption. Therefore, we suggest that the Jing-Jin-Ji area should further increase the degree of dependence on other provinces' energy-intensive products and reduce the export of energy-intensive products. In addition, there should be difference in the energy and industrial policies among Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei, and the problems of high energy consumption and high proportion of heavy industry in Hebei should be first resolved.

  3. Risk-Based Input-Output Analysis of Influenza Epidemic Consequences on Interdependent Workforce Sectors

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Joost R.; May, Larissa; Haimar, Amine El

    2013-01-01

    Outbreaks of contagious diseases underscore the ever-looming threat of new epidemics. Compared to other disasters that inflict physical damage to infrastructure systems, epidemics can have more devastating and prolonged impacts on the population. This paper investigates the interdependent economic and productivity risks resulting from epidemic-induced workforce absenteeism. In particular, we develop a dynamic input-output model capable of generating sector-disaggregated economic losses based on different magnitudes of workforce disruptions. An ex post analysis of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in the National Capital Region (NCR) reveals the distribution of consequences across different economic sectors. Consequences are categorized into two metrics: (i) economic loss, which measures the magnitude of monetary losses incurred in each sector, and (ii) inoperability, which measures the normalized monetary losses incurred in each sector relative to the total economic output of that sector. For a simulated mild pandemic scenario in NCR, two distinct rankings are generated using the economic loss and inoperability metrics. Results indicate that the majority of the critical sectors ranked according to the economic loss metric comprise of sectors that contribute the most to the NCR's gross domestic product (e.g., federal government enterprises). In contrast, the majority of the critical sectors generated by the inoperability metric include sectors that are involved with epidemic management (e.g., hospitals). Hence, prioritizing sectors for recovery necessitates consideration of the balance between economic loss, inoperability, and other objectives. Although applied specifically to the NCR region, the proposed methodology can be customized for other regions. PMID:23278756

  4. Generalized Input-Output Inequality Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yingfan Zhang Qinghong

    2006-09-15

    In this paper two types of generalized Leontief input-output inequality systems are introduced. The minimax properties for a class of functions associated with the inequalities are studied. Sufficient and necessary conditions for the inequality systems to have solutions are obtained in terms of the minimax value. Stability analysis for the solution set is provided in terms of upper semi-continuity and hemi-continuity of set-valued maps.

  5. An electricity-focused economic input-output model: Life-cycle assessment and policy implications of future electricity generation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriott, Joe

    The electricity industry is extremely important to both our economy and our environment. We would like to be able to examine the economic, environmental and policy implications of both future electricity scenarios which include advanced generation technologies such as gasified coal, and of the products and processes which will use them, along with the interaction of this industry with the rest of the economy. This work builds upon an existing economic input-output framework, by adding detail about the electricity industry, specifically by differentiating among the various functions of the sector, and the different means of generating power. The mix of electricity consumed at any stage in the life-cycle of a product, process or industrial sector has a significant effect on the associated inventory of emissions. Fossil fuel or nuclear generators, large-scale hydroelectric, and renewable options such as geothermal, wind and solar each have a unique set of issues---both in the production of electricity at the plant and throughout the supply chain. Decision makers need better information regarding the environmental and economic impact of the electricity industry, including full supply chain details---the interaction of the electricity industry with the other 500 sectors of the economy. A systematic method for creating updated state level and sector generation mixes is developed. The results show that most sector mixes are very close to the U.S. average due to geographic dispersion of industries, but that some sectors are different, and they tend to be important raw material extraction or primary manufacturing industries. We then build a flexible framework for creating new sectors, supply chains and emission factors for the generation, transmission and distribution portions of the electricity industry. We look at scenarios of the present and future, for electricity and for particular products, and develop results which show environmental impacts split up by generation

  6. Reconstruction of Linear and Non-Linear Continuous-Time System Models from Input/output Data Using the Kernel Invariance Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BILLINGS, S. A.; LI, L. M.

    2000-06-01

    A new kernel invariance algorithm (KIA) is introduced to determine both the significant model terms and estimate the unknown parameters in non-linear continuous-time differential equation models of unknown systems

  7. General theory for multiple input-output perturbations in complex molecular systems. 1. Linear QSPR electronegativity models in physical, organic, and medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Arrasate, Sonia; Gómez-SanJuan, Asier; Sotomayor, Nuria; Lete, Esther; Besada-Porto, Lina; Ruso, Juan M

    2013-01-01

    In general perturbation methods starts with a known exact solution of a problem and add "small" variation terms in order to approach to a solution for a related problem without known exact solution. Perturbation theory has been widely used in almost all areas of science. Bhor's quantum model, Heisenberg's matrix mechanincs, Feyman diagrams, and Poincare's chaos model or "butterfly effect" in complex systems are examples of perturbation theories. On the other hand, the study of Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships (QSPR) in molecular complex systems is an ideal area for the application of perturbation theory. There are several problems with exact experimental solutions (new chemical reactions, physicochemical properties, drug activity and distribution, metabolic networks, etc.) in public databases like CHEMBL. However, in all these cases, we have an even larger list of related problems without known solutions. We need to know the change in all these properties after a perturbation of initial boundary conditions. It means, when we test large sets of similar, but different, compounds and/or chemical reactions under the slightly different conditions (temperature, time, solvents, enzymes, assays, protein targets, tissues, partition systems, organisms, etc.). However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no QSPR general-purpose perturbation theory to solve this problem. In this work, firstly we review general aspects and applications of both perturbation theory and QSPR models. Secondly, we formulate a general-purpose perturbation theory for multiple-boundary QSPR problems. Last, we develop three new QSPR-Perturbation theory models. The first model classify correctly >100,000 pairs of intra-molecular carbolithiations with 75-95% of Accuracy (Ac), Sensitivity (Sn), and Specificity (Sp). The model predicts probabilities of variations in the yield and enantiomeric excess of reactions due to at least one perturbation in boundary conditions (solvent, temperature

  8. Development of the complex general linear model in the Fourier domain: application to fMRI multiple input-output evoked responses for single subjects.

    PubMed

    Rio, Daniel E; Rawlings, Robert R; Woltz, Lawrence A; Gilman, Jodi; Hommer, Daniel W

    2013-01-01

    A linear time-invariant model based on statistical time series analysis in the Fourier domain for single subjects is further developed and applied to functional MRI (fMRI) blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) multivariate data. This methodology was originally developed to analyze multiple stimulus input evoked response BOLD data. However, to analyze clinical data generated using a repeated measures experimental design, the model has been extended to handle multivariate time series data and demonstrated on control and alcoholic subjects taken from data previously analyzed in the temporal domain. Analysis of BOLD data is typically carried out in the time domain where the data has a high temporal correlation. These analyses generally employ parametric models of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) where prewhitening of the data is attempted using autoregressive (AR) models for the noise. However, this data can be analyzed in the Fourier domain. Here, assumptions made on the noise structure are less restrictive, and hypothesis tests can be constructed based on voxel-specific nonparametric estimates of the hemodynamic transfer function (HRF in the Fourier domain). This is especially important for experimental designs involving multiple states (either stimulus or drug induced) that may alter the form of the response function.

  9. Correlation entropy of synaptic input-output dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleppe, Ingo C.; Robinson, Hugh P. C.

    2006-10-01

    The responses of synapses in the neocortex show highly stochastic and nonlinear behavior. The microscopic dynamics underlying this behavior, and its computational consequences during natural patterns of synaptic input, are not explained by conventional macroscopic models of deterministic ensemble mean dynamics. Here, we introduce the correlation entropy of the synaptic input-output map as a measure of synaptic reliability which explicitly includes the microscopic dynamics. Applying this to experimental data, we find that cortical synapses show a low-dimensional chaos driven by the natural input pattern.

  10. A note on scrap in the 1992 U.S. input-output tables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swisko, George M.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction A key concern of industrial ecology and life cycle analysis is the disposal and recycling of scrap. One might conclude that the U.S. input-output tables are appropriate tools for analyzing scrap flows. Duchin, for instance, has suggested using input-output analysis for industrial ecology, indicating that input-output economics can trace the stocks and flows of energy and other materials from extraction through production and consumption to recycling or disposal. Lave and others use input-output tables to design life cycle assessment models for studying product design, materials use, and recycling strategies, even with the knowledge that these tables suffer from a lack of comprehensive and detailed data that may never be resolved. Although input-output tables can offer general guidance about the interdependence of economic and environmental processes, data reporting by industry and the economic concepts underlying these tables pose problems for rigorous material flow examinations. This is especially true for analyzing the output of scrap and scrap flows in the United States and estimating the amount of scrap that can be recycled. To show how data reporting has affected the values of scrap in recent input-output tables, this paper focuses on metal scrap generated in manufacturing. The paper also briefly discusses scrap that is not included in the input-output tables and some economic concepts that limit the analysis of scrap flows.

  11. Water resources and environmental input-output analysis and its key study issues: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YANG, Z.; Xu, X.

    2013-12-01

    Used to study the material and energy flow in socioeconomic system, Input-Output Analysis(IOA) had been an effective analysis tool since its appearance. The research fields of Input-Output Analysis were increasingly expanded and studied in depth with the development of fundamental theory. In this paper, starting with introduction of theory development, the water resources input-output analysis and environmental input-output analysis had been specifically reviewed, and two key study issues mentioned as well. Input-Occupancy-Output Analysis and Grey Input-Output Analysis whose proposal and development were introduced firstly could be regard as the effective complements of traditional IOA theory. Because of the hypotheses of homogeneity, stability and proportionality, Input-Occupancy-Output Analysis and Grey Input-Output Analysis always had been restricted in practical application inevitably. In the applied study aspect, with investigation of abundant literatures, research of water resources input-output analysis and environmental input-output analysis had been comprehensively reviewed and analyzed. The regional water resources flow between different economic sectors had been systematically analyzed and stated, and several types of environmental input-output analysis models combined with other effective analysis tools concluded. In two perspectives in terms of external and inland aspect, the development of water resources and environmental input-output analysis model had been explained, and several typical study cases in recent years listed respectively. By the aid of sufficient literature analysis, the internal development tendency and study hotspot had also been summarized. In recent years, Chinese literatures reporting water resources consumption analysis and virtue water study had occupied a large share. Water resources consumption analysis had always been the emphasis of inland water resources IOA. Virtue water study had been considered as the new hotspot of

  12. Input-output identification of controlled discrete manufacturing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada-Vargas, Ana Paula; López-Mellado, Ernesto; Lesage, Jean-Jacques

    2014-03-01

    The automated construction of discrete event models from observations of external system's behaviour is addressed. This problem, often referred to as system identification, allows obtaining models of ill-known (or even unknown) systems. In this article, an identification method for discrete event systems (DESs) controlled by a programmable logic controller is presented. The method allows processing a large quantity of observed long sequences of input/output signals generated by the controller and yields an interpreted Petri net model describing the closed-loop behaviour of the automated DESs. The proposed technique allows the identification of actual complex systems because it is sufficiently efficient and well adapted to cope with both the technological characteristics of industrial controllers and data collection requirements. Based on polynomial-time algorithms, the method is implemented as an efficient software tool which constructs and draws the model automatically; an overview of this tool is given through a case study dealing with an automated manufacturing system.

  13. Differential effects of excitatory and inhibitory plasticity on synaptically-driven neuronal Input-Output functions

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Tiago P.; Buonomano, Dean V.

    2009-01-01

    Ultimately, whether or not a neuron produces a spike determines its contribution to local computations. In response to brief stimuli the probability a neuron will fire can be described by its input-output function, which depends on the net balance and timing of excitatory and inhibitory currents. While excitatory and inhibitory synapses are plastic, most studies examine plasticity of subthreshold events. Thus, the effects of concerted regulation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic strength on neuronal input-output functions are not well understood. Here, theoretical analyses reveal that excitatory synaptic strength controls the threshold of the neuronal input-output function, while inhibitory plasticity alters the threshold and gain. Experimentally, changes in the balance of excitation and inhibition in CA1 pyramidal neurons also altered their input-output function as predicted by the model. These results support the existence of two functional modes of plasticity that can be used to optimize information processing: threshold and gain plasticity. PMID:19285473

  14. Input/output behavior of supercomputing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Ethan L.

    1991-01-01

    The collection and analysis of supercomputer I/O traces and their use in a collection of buffering and caching simulations are described. This serves two purposes. First, it gives a model of how individual applications running on supercomputers request file system I/O, allowing system designer to optimize I/O hardware and file system algorithms to that model. Second, the buffering simulations show what resources are needed to maximize the CPU utilization of a supercomputer given a very bursty I/O request rate. By using read-ahead and write-behind in a large solid stated disk, one or two applications were sufficient to fully utilize a Cray Y-MP CPU.

  15. DNA Memory and Input/Output

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    P1 Cre recombinase - + >Coliphage Lox/Cre recombinase site - + Coliphage T7 RNA polymerase analog + >Coliphage T7 RNA polymerase initiation...kilobase pairs long and contain 151 genes. b. Mathematical models of diffusion-constrained polymerase chain reactions provides the basis of high...replicators (i.e. polymerase - ribosome-based). The major challenge is integration with silicon computing. The motivations are bio-monitoring of spatially

  16. The UK waste input-output table: Linking waste generation to the UK economy.

    PubMed

    Salemdeeb, Ramy; Al-Tabbaa, Abir; Reynolds, Christian

    2016-10-01

    In order to achieve a circular economy, there must be a greater understanding of the links between economic activity and waste generation. This study introduces the first version of the UK waste input-output table that could be used to quantify both direct and indirect waste arisings across the supply chain. The proposed waste input-output table features 21 industrial sectors and 34 waste types and is for the 2010 time-period. Using the waste input-output table, the study results quantitatively confirm that sectors with a long supply chain (i.e. manufacturing and services sectors) have higher indirect waste generation rates compared with industrial primary sectors (e.g. mining and quarrying) and sectors with a shorter supply chain (e.g. construction). Results also reveal that the construction, mining and quarrying sectors have the highest waste generation rates, 742 and 694 tonne per £1m of final demand, respectively. Owing to the aggregated format of the first version of the waste input-output, the model does not address the relationship between waste generation and recycling activities. Therefore, an updated version of the waste input-output table is expected be developed considering this issue. Consequently, the expanded model would lead to a better understanding of waste and resource flows in the supply chain.

  17. Linearisation via input-output injection of time delay systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ramírez, Eduardo; Moog, Claude H.; Califano, Claudia; Alejandro Márquez-Martínez, Luis

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the problem of linearisation of systems with constant commensurable delays by input-output injection using algebraic control tools based on the theory of non-commutative rings. Solutions for the problem of linearisation free of delays, and with delays of an observable nonlinear time-delay systems are presented based on the analysis of the input-output equation. These results are achieved by means of constructive algorithms that use the nth derivative of the output expressed in terms of the state-space variables instead of the explicit computation of the input-output representation of the system. Necessary and sufficient conditions are established in both cases by means of an invertible change of coordinates.

  18. Multiple input/output random vibration control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unruh, James F.

    1988-01-01

    A multi-input/output random vibration control algorithm was developed based on system identification concepts derived from random vibration spectral analysis theory. The unique features of the algorithm are: (1) the number of input excitors and the number of output control responses need not be identical; (2) the system inverse response matrix is obtained directly from the input/output spectral matrix; and (3) the system inverse response matrix is updated every control loop cycle to accommodate system amplitude nonlinearities. A laboratory demonstration case of two imputs with three outputs is presented to demonstrate the system capabilities.

  19. Programming input-output operations in FORTRAN on magnetic tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorokov, V. N.

    1980-01-01

    The subprogram MTCFF was designed for carrying out input-output operations in FORTRAN on magnetic tape within the framework of the DOS ES EVM operation system. It is possible, by means of this subprogram, to perform any input-output operations of interest to the programmer such as recording and reading various control operations in the direct and reverse directions, even though for these purposes the facilities of the language FORTRAN itself are limited. The subprogram can also be used in programs written in other programming languages.

  20. The realization of input-output maps using bialgebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Robert; Larson, Richard G.

    1989-01-01

    The theory of bialgebras is used to prove a state space realization theorem for input/output maps of dynamical systems. This approach allows for the consideration of the classical results of Fliess and more recent results on realizations involving families of trees. Two examples of applications of the theorum are given.

  1. Advanced information processing system: Input/output network management software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagle, Gail; Alger, Linda; Kemp, Alexander

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the software requirements and specifications for the Input/Output Network Management Services for the Advanced Information Processing System. This introduction and overview section is provided to briefly outline the overall architecture and software requirements of the AIPS system before discussing the details of the design requirements and specifications of the AIPS I/O Network Management software. A brief overview of the AIPS architecture followed by a more detailed description of the network architecture.

  2. Understanding sideline jet noise using input-output analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeun, Jinah; Nichols, Joseph W.; Jovanovic, Mihailo R.

    2016-11-01

    We apply input-output analysis to high-speed turbulent jets to obtain the far-field acoustic response at different radiation angles. We consider both axisymmetric and higher azimuthal modes over a range of different frequencies to investigate the resulting noise spectra. At each frequency, singular value decomposition of the resolvent operator distinguishes between the optimal mode and several sub-optimal input-output modes by the magnitude of corresponding singular value. While both types of modes resemble wavepackets, the optimal mode associated with the largest singular value is superdirective in the peak noise radiation angle. Sub-optimal modes, in contrast, appear increasingly omnidirectional, rotating progressively to the sideline direction. Our analysis also recovers a broadening of the far-field acoustic spectra as the radiation angle increases. We show that a significant amount of the entire acoustic field can be captured by a superposition of a small number of coherent input-output modes. The LES data was produced as part of a Cascade Technologies STTR project sponsored by NAVAIR, under the supervision of Dr. John T. Spyropoulos. The LES calculations were performed at the ERDC supercomputer center.

  3. Optimizing Input/Output Using Adaptive File System Policies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhyastha, Tara M.; Elford, Christopher L.; Reed, Daniel A.

    1996-01-01

    Parallel input/output characterization studies and experiments with flexible resource management algorithms indicate that adaptivity is crucial to file system performance. In this paper we propose an automatic technique for selecting and refining file system policies based on application access patterns and execution environment. An automatic classification framework allows the file system to select appropriate caching and pre-fetching policies, while performance sensors provide feedback used to tune policy parameters for specific system environments. To illustrate the potential performance improvements possible using adaptive file system policies, we present results from experiments involving classification-based and performance-based steering.

  4. Stability Test for Multivariable NCbT Using Input/Output Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yubai, Kazuhiro; Terada, Shinya; Hirai, Junji

    In model-free controller syntheses, we have no idea whether the designed controller stabilizes the resulting closed-loop system before its implementation. From the view point of safety of the experimental equipment, we should develop the stability test for model-free controller synthesis using the acquired input/output data. Karimi et al. introduced the sufficient stability condition for the closed-loop system and proposed the stability test for NCbT (Noniterative Correlation-based Tuning) for SISO systems. However, since the positions of the plant and the controller have to be swapped in NCbT, its applicability is restricted to SISO systems. This paper proposes to extend the stability test for NCbT to MIMO systems. The basic idea is to use the special reference r[i](t) and to acquire input/output data as many times as the number of plant inputs. The small-gain theorem introduces the sufficient stability condition for the closed-loop system in terms of the H∞ norm of the specific transfer function matrix, which is estimated from the acquired input/output data by the spectral analysis method. The effectiveness of the proposed stability test is confirmed by the numerical experiment for LV100 gas turbine engine model and the experiment for tension-and-speed control apparatus.

  5. Advanced information processing system: Input/output system services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masotto, Tom; Alger, Linda

    1989-01-01

    The functional requirements and detailed specifications for the Input/Output (I/O) Systems Services of the Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) are discussed. The introductory section is provided to outline the overall architecture and functional requirements of the AIPS system. Section 1.1 gives a brief overview of the AIPS architecture as well as a detailed description of the AIPS fault tolerant network architecture, while section 1.2 provides an introduction to the AIPS systems software. Sections 2 and 3 describe the functional requirements and design and detailed specifications of the I/O User Interface and Communications Management modules of the I/O System Services, respectively. Section 4 illustrates the use of the I/O System Services, while Section 5 concludes with a summary of results and suggestions for future work in this area.

  6. Input-output Gaussian channels: theory and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufarelli, Tommaso; Retzker, Alex; Plenio, Martin B.; Serafini, Alessio

    2012-09-01

    Setting off from the classic input-output formalism, we develop a theoretical framework to characterize the Gaussian quantum channels relating the initial correlations of an open bosonic system to those of properly identified output modes. We then proceed to apply our formalism to the case of quantum harmonic oscillators, such as the motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions or nanomechanical oscillators, interacting with travelling electromagnetic modes through cavity fields and subject to external white noise. We thus determine the degree of squeezing that can be transferred from an intra-cavity oscillator to light and show that the intra-cavity squeezing can be transformed into distributed optical entanglement if one can access both output fields of a two-sided cavity.

  7. Fast metabolite identification with Input Output Kernel Regression

    PubMed Central

    Brouard, Céline; Shen, Huibin; Dührkop, Kai; d'Alché-Buc, Florence; Böcker, Sebastian; Rousu, Juho

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: An important problematic of metabolomics is to identify metabolites using tandem mass spectrometry data. Machine learning methods have been proposed recently to solve this problem by predicting molecular fingerprint vectors and matching these fingerprints against existing molecular structure databases. In this work we propose to address the metabolite identification problem using a structured output prediction approach. This type of approach is not limited to vector output space and can handle structured output space such as the molecule space. Results: We use the Input Output Kernel Regression method to learn the mapping between tandem mass spectra and molecular structures. The principle of this method is to encode the similarities in the input (spectra) space and the similarities in the output (molecule) space using two kernel functions. This method approximates the spectra-molecule mapping in two phases. The first phase corresponds to a regression problem from the input space to the feature space associated to the output kernel. The second phase is a preimage problem, consisting in mapping back the predicted output feature vectors to the molecule space. We show that our approach achieves state-of-the-art accuracy in metabolite identification. Moreover, our method has the advantage of decreasing the running times for the training step and the test step by several orders of magnitude over the preceding methods. Availability and implementation: Contact: celine.brouard@aalto.fi Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307628

  8. Fluctuation-dissipation theory of input-output interindustrial relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Yasuhiro; Aoyama, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Yoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Souma, Wataru

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the fluctuation-dissipation theory is invoked to shed light on input-output interindustrial relations at a macroscopic level by its application to indices of industrial production (IIP) data for Japan. Statistical noise arising from finiteness of the time series data is carefully removed by making use of the random matrix theory in an eigenvalue analysis of the correlation matrix; as a result, two dominant eigenmodes are detected. Our previous study successfully used these two modes to demonstrate the existence of intrinsic business cycles. Here a correlation matrix constructed from the two modes describes genuine interindustrial correlations in a statistically meaningful way. Furthermore, it enables us to quantitatively discuss the relationship between shipments of final demand goods and production of intermediate goods in a linear response framework. We also investigate distinctive external stimuli for the Japanese economy exerted by the current global economic crisis. These stimuli are derived from residuals of moving-average fluctuations of the IIP remaining after subtracting the long-period components arising from inherent business cycles. The observation reveals that the fluctuation-dissipation theory is applicable to an economic system that is supposed to be far from physical equilibrium.

  9. Flexible Peripheral Component Interconnect Input/Output Card

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Kirk K.; Jerry, Albert L.; Baricio, Alisha G.; Cummings, Jon K.

    2010-01-01

    The Flexible Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) Input/Output (I/O) Card is an innovative circuit board that provides functionality to interface between a variety of devices. It supports user-defined interrupts for interface synchronization, tracks system faults and failures, and includes checksum and parity evaluation of interface data. The card supports up to 16 channels of high-speed, half-duplex, low-voltage digital signaling (LVDS) serial data, and can interface combinations of serial and parallel devices. Placement of a processor within the field programmable gate array (FPGA) controls an embedded application with links to host memory over its PCI bus. The FPGA also provides protocol stacking and quick digital signal processor (DSP) functions to improve host performance. Hardware timers, counters, state machines, and other glue logic support interface communications. The Flexible PCI I/O Card provides an interface for a variety of dissimilar computer systems, featuring direct memory access functionality. The card has the following attributes: 8/16/32-bit, 33-MHz PCI r2.2 compliance, Configurable for universal 3.3V/5V interface slots, PCI interface based on PLX Technology's PCI9056 ASIC, General-use 512K 16 SDRAM memory, General-use 1M 16 Flash memory, FPGA with 3K to 56K logical cells with embedded 27K to 198K bits RAM, I/O interface: 32-channel LVDS differential transceivers configured in eight, 4-bit banks; signaling rates to 200 MHz per channel, Common SCSI-3, 68-pin interface connector.

  10. The Role of Agriculture in the Economic Development of West Virginia: An Input-Output Analysis. Miscellaneous Publication No. 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Souza, Gerard E.; And Others

    This study deals with the structural interrelationships among agricultural sub-sectors, and between the agricultural and non-agricultural sectors of the West Virginia economy. The study is intended to offer information on which to base sound economic development decisions. An input-output economic model is used in order to focus on the interaction…

  11. High Performance Input/Output Systems for High Performance Computing and Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Geoffrey C.; Ou, Chao-Wei

    1997-01-01

    The approach of this task was to apply leading parallel computing research to a number of existing techniques for assimilation, and extract parameters indicating where and how input/output limits computational performance. The following was used for detailed knowledge of the application problems: 1. Developing a parallel input/output system specifically for this application 2. Extracting the important input/output characteristics of data assimilation problems; and 3. Building these characteristics s parameters into our runtime library (Fortran D/High Performance Fortran) for parallel input/output support.

  12. Input-output characterization of an ultrasonic testing system by digital signal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karaguelle, H.; Lee, S. S.; Williams, J., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The input/output characteristics of an ultrasonic testing system used for stress wave factor measurements were studied. The fundamentals of digital signal processing are summarized. The inputs and outputs are digitized and processed in a microcomputer using digital signal processing techniques. The entire ultrasonic test system, including transducers and all electronic components, is modeled as a discrete-time linear shift-invariant system. Then the impulse response and frequency response of the continuous time ultrasonic test system are estimated by interpolating the defining points in the unit sample response and frequency response of the discrete time system. It is found that the ultrasonic test system behaves as a linear phase bandpass filter. Good results were obtained for rectangular pulse inputs of various amplitudes and durations and for tone burst inputs whose center frequencies are within the passband of the test system and for single cycle inputs of various amplitudes. The input/output limits on the linearity of the system are determined.

  13. Input/Output operations for hybrid data-flow/control-flow systems

    SciTech Connect

    Evripidou, P.; Gaudiot, J.L.

    1991-12-31

    Hybrid data-flow/control-flow system combine the advantages of the data-flow model: functionality and tolerance to communication and memory latencies with the efficient instruction scheduling of the control-flow model. The absence of global state in such hybrid multiprocessors and multiprocessors in general renders the implementation of state tasks such as Input/Output operations very difficult to implement. A distributed file-pointer scheme for incorporations I/O operations onto the data-flow model has been developed. A dependency detection algorithm detects and classify cases of potential access conflicts. A conflict resolution data-flow graph is then created which at execution time safely distributes file-pointers to the I/O actors. This scheme has also been implemented on a hybrid a data-flow control-flow multiprocessor: the Decoupled Data-Driven Multiprocessor with Variable Resolution Actors.

  14. Laboratory accreditation: quality in management and analysis and the input-output control.

    PubMed

    Bunyaratvej, A

    1999-01-01

    An attempt to overcome the uncertainties and errors of all processes in clinical laboratory has been done in systematic ways. To reach the stage of laboratory accreditation, quality and standard criteria in the laboratory must be developed. Two aspects of quality are considered as management and analysis. Input-output control is proposed to handle the process from the beginning of laboratory design until post analytical phase or the control at the outcome. The model of ten Ms including model, material, machine, man, mind, money, method, mechanism, measurement and menace and one O or outcome, is elaborated to cover pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical phases. Laboratory accreditation is then an integral part of hospital accreditation with total quality management.

  15. Cascade-able spin torque logic gates with input-output isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2015-06-01

    Spin torque majority gate (STMG) is one of the promising options for beyond-complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor non-volatile logic circuits for normally-off computing. Modeling of prior schemes demonstrated logic completeness using majority operation and nonlinear transfer characteristics. However significant problems arose with cascade-ability and input output isolation manifesting as domain walls (DWs) stopping, reflecting off ends of wires or propagating back to the inputs. We introduce a new scheme to enable cascade-ability and isolation based on (a) in-plane DW automotion in interconnects, (b) exchange coupling of magnetization between two FM layers, and (c) ‘round-about’ topology for the majority gate. We performed micro-magnetic simulations that demonstrate switching operation of this STMG scheme. These circuits were verified to enable isolation of inputs from output signals and to be cascade-able without limitations.

  16. Input-output relation and energy efficiency in the neuron with different spike threshold dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Tsang, Kai-Ming; Wei, Xi-Le; Deng, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Neuron encodes and transmits information through generating sequences of output spikes, which is a high energy-consuming process. The spike is initiated when membrane depolarization reaches a threshold voltage. In many neurons, threshold is dynamic and depends on the rate of membrane depolarization (dV/dt) preceding a spike. Identifying the metabolic energy involved in neural coding and their relationship to threshold dynamic is critical to understanding neuronal function and evolution. Here, we use a modified Morris-Lecar model to investigate neuronal input-output property and energy efficiency associated with different spike threshold dynamics. We find that the neurons with dynamic threshold sensitive to dV/dt generate discontinuous frequency-current curve and type II phase response curve (PRC) through Hopf bifurcation, and weak noise could prohibit spiking when bifurcation just occurs. The threshold that is insensitive to dV/dt, instead, results in a continuous frequency-current curve, a type I PRC and a saddle-node on invariant circle bifurcation, and simultaneously weak noise cannot inhibit spiking. It is also shown that the bifurcation, frequency-current curve and PRC type associated with different threshold dynamics arise from the distinct subthreshold interactions of membrane currents. Further, we observe that the energy consumption of the neuron is related to its firing characteristics. The depolarization of spike threshold improves neuronal energy efficiency by reducing the overlap of Na(+) and K(+) currents during an action potential. The high energy efficiency is achieved at more depolarized spike threshold and high stimulus current. These results provide a fundamental biophysical connection that links spike threshold dynamics, input-output relation, energetics and spike initiation, which could contribute to uncover neural encoding mechanism.

  17. Image annotation by input-output structural grouping sparsity.

    PubMed

    Han, Yahong; Wu, Fei; Tian, Qi; Zhuang, Yueting

    2012-06-01

    Automatic image annotation (AIA) is very important to image retrieval and image understanding. Two key issues in AIA are explored in detail in this paper, i.e., structured visual feature selection and the implementation of hierarchical correlated structures among multiple tags to boost the performance of image annotation. This paper simultaneously introduces an input and output structural grouping sparsity into a regularized regression model for image annotation. For input high-dimensional heterogeneous features such as color, texture, and shape, different kinds (groups) of features have different intrinsic discriminative power for the recognition of certain concepts. The proposed structured feature selection by structural grouping sparsity can be used not only to select group-of-features but also to conduct within-group selection. Hierarchical correlations among output labels are well represented by a tree structure, and therefore, the proposed tree-structured grouping sparsity can be used to boost the performance of multitag image annotation. In order to efficiently solve the proposed regression model, we relax the solving process as a framework of the bilayer regression model for multilabel boosting by the selection of heterogeneous features with structural grouping sparsity (Bi-MtBGS). The first-layer regression is to select the discriminative features for each label. The aim of the second-layer regression is to refine the feature selection model learned from the first layer, which can be taken as a multilabel boosting process. Extensive experiments on public benchmark image data sets and real-world image data sets demonstrate that the proposed approach has better performance of multitag image annotation and leads to a quite interpretable model for image understanding.

  18. Understanding virtual water flows: A multiregion input-output case study of Victoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenzen, Manfred

    2009-09-01

    This article explains and interprets virtual water flows from the well-established perspective of input-output analysis. Using a case study of the Australian state of Victoria, it demonstrates that input-output analysis can enumerate virtual water flows without systematic and unknown truncation errors, an issue which has been largely absent from the virtual water literature. Whereas a simplified flow analysis from a producer perspective would portray Victoria as a net virtual water importer, enumerating the water embodiments across the full supply chain using input-output analysis shows Victoria as a significant net virtual water exporter. This study has succeeded in informing government policy in Australia, which is an encouraging sign that input-output analysis will be able to contribute much value to other national and international applications.

  19. High Performance Input/Output for Parallel Computer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligon, W. B.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of our project is to study the I/O characteristics of parallel applications used in Earth Science data processing systems such as Regional Data Centers (RDCs) or EOSDIS. Our approach is to study the runtime behavior of typical programs and the effect of key parameters of the I/O subsystem both under simulation and with direct experimentation on parallel systems. Our three year activity has focused on two items: developing a test bed that facilitates experimentation with parallel I/O, and studying representative programs from the Earth science data processing application domain. The Parallel Virtual File System (PVFS) has been developed for use on a number of platforms including the Tiger Parallel Architecture Workbench (TPAW) simulator, The Intel Paragon, a cluster of DEC Alpha workstations, and the Beowulf system (at CESDIS). PVFS provides considerable flexibility in configuring I/O in a UNIX- like environment. Access to key performance parameters facilitates experimentation. We have studied several key applications fiom levels 1,2 and 3 of the typical RDC processing scenario including instrument calibration and navigation, image classification, and numerical modeling codes. We have also considered large-scale scientific database codes used to organize image data.

  20. Variance estimation of modal parameters from output-only and input/output subspace-based system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellinger, Philippe; Döhler, Michael; Mevel, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    An important step in the operational modal analysis of a structure is to infer on its dynamic behavior through its modal parameters. They can be estimated by various modal identification algorithms that fit a theoretical model to measured data. When output-only data is available, i.e. measured responses of the structure, frequencies, damping ratios and mode shapes can be identified assuming that ambient sources like wind or traffic excite the system sufficiently. When also input data is available, i.e. signals used to excite the structure, input/output identification algorithms are used. The use of input information usually provides better modal estimates in a desired frequency range. While the identification of the modal mass is not considered in this paper, we focus on the estimation of the frequencies, damping ratios and mode shapes, relevant for example for modal analysis during in-flight monitoring of aircrafts. When identifying the modal parameters from noisy measurement data, the information on their uncertainty is most relevant. In this paper, new variance computation schemes for modal parameters are developed for four subspace algorithms, including output-only and input/output methods, as well as data-driven and covariance-driven methods. For the input/output methods, the known inputs are considered as realizations of a stochastic process. Based on Monte Carlo validations, the quality of identification, accuracy of variance estimations and sensor noise robustness are discussed. Finally these algorithms are applied on real measured data obtained during vibrations tests of an aircraft.

  1. Input-output mapping reconstruction of spike trains at dorsal horn evoked by manual acupuncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xile; Shi, Dingtian; Yu, Haitao; Deng, Bin; Lu, Meili; Han, Chunxiao; Wang, Jiang

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a generalized linear model (GLM) is used to reconstruct mapping from acupuncture stimulation to spike trains driven by action potential data. The electrical signals are recorded in spinal dorsal horn after manual acupuncture (MA) manipulations with different frequencies being taken at the “Zusanli” point of experiment rats. Maximum-likelihood method is adopted to estimate the parameters of GLM and the quantified value of assumed model input. Through validating the accuracy of firings generated from the established GLM, it is found that the input-output mapping of spike trains evoked by acupuncture can be successfully reconstructed for different frequencies. Furthermore, via comparing the performance of several GLMs based on distinct inputs, it suggests that input with the form of half-sine with noise can well describe the generator potential induced by acupuncture mechanical action. Particularly, the comparison of reproducing the experiment spikes for five selected inputs is in accordance with the phenomenon found in Hudgkin-Huxley (H-H) model simulation, which indicates the mapping from half-sine with noise input to experiment spikes meets the real encoding scheme to some extent. These studies provide us a new insight into coding processes and information transfer of acupuncture.

  2. Accounting for the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen in input-output life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Bakshi, Bhavik R

    2013-08-20

    Nitrogen is indispensable for sustaining human activities through its role in the production of food, animal feed, and synthetic chemicals. This has encouraged significant anthropogenic mobilization of reactive nitrogen and its emissions into the environment resulting in severe disruption of the nitrogen cycle. This paper incorporates the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen into the 2002 input-output model of the U.S. economy. Due to the complexity of this cycle, this work proposes a unique classification of nitrogen flows to facilitate understanding of the interaction between economic activities and various flows in the nitrogen cycle. The classification scheme distinguishes between the mobilization of inert nitrogen into its reactive form, use of nitrogen in various products, and nitrogen losses to the environment. The resulting inventory and model of the US economy can help quantify the direct and indirect impacts or dependence of economic sectors on the nitrogen cycle. This paper emphasizes the need for methods to manage the N cycle that focus not just on N losses, which has been the norm until now, but also include other N flows for a more comprehensive view and balanced decisions. Insight into the N profile of various sectors of the 2002 U.S. economy is presented, and the inventory can also be used for LCA or Hybrid LCA of various products. The resulting model is incorporated in the approach of Ecologically-Based LCA and available online.

  3. Input-output relationship in social communications characterized by spike train analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Takaaki; Takaguchi, Taro; Kobayashi, Ryota; Lambiotte, Renaud

    2016-10-01

    We study the dynamical properties of human communication through different channels, i.e., short messages, phone calls, and emails, adopting techniques from neuronal spike train analysis in order to characterize the temporal fluctuations of successive interevent times. We first measure the so-called local variation (LV) of incoming and outgoing event sequences of users and find that these in- and out-LV values are positively correlated for short messages and uncorrelated for phone calls and emails. Second, we analyze the response-time distribution after receiving a message to focus on the input-output relationship in each of these channels. We find that the time scales and amplitudes of response differ between the three channels. To understand the effects of the response-time distribution on the correlations between the LV values, we develop a point process model whose activity rate is modulated by incoming and outgoing events. Numerical simulations of the model indicate that a quick response to incoming events and a refractory effect after outgoing events are key factors to reproduce the positive LV correlations.

  4. Characterizing the Input-Output Function of the Olfactory-Limbic Pathway in the Guinea Pig.

    PubMed

    Breschi, Gian Luca; Ciliberto, Carlo; Nieus, Thierry; Rosasco, Lorenzo; Taverna, Stefano; Chiappalone, Michela; Pasquale, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays the neuroscientific community is taking more and more advantage of the continuous interaction between engineers and computational neuroscientists in order to develop neuroprostheses aimed at replacing damaged brain areas with artificial devices. To this end, a technological effort is required to develop neural network models which can be fed with the recorded electrophysiological patterns to yield the correct brain stimulation to recover the desired functions. In this paper we present a machine learning approach to derive the input-output function of the olfactory-limbic pathway in the in vitro whole brain of guinea pig, less complex and more controllable than an in vivo system. We first experimentally characterized the neuronal pathway by delivering different sets of electrical stimuli from the lateral olfactory tract (LOT) and by recording the corresponding responses in the lateral entorhinal cortex (l-ERC). As a second step, we used information theory to evaluate how much information output features carry about the input. Finally we used the acquired data to learn the LOT-l-ERC "I/O function," by means of the kernel regularized least squares method, able to predict l-ERC responses on the basis of LOT stimulation features. Our modeling approach can be further exploited for brain prostheses applications.

  5. Input-output characterization of an ultrasonic testing system by digital signal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.; Karagulle, H.

    1986-01-01

    Ultrasonic test system input-output characteristics were investigated by directly coupling the transmitting and receiving transducers face to face without a test specimen. Some of the fundamentals of digital signal processing were summarized. Input and output signals were digitized by using a digital oscilloscope, and the digitized data were processed in a microcomputer by using digital signal-processing techniques. The continuous-time test system was modeled as a discrete-time, linear, shift-invariant system. In estimating the unit-sample response and frequency response of the discrete-time system, it was necessary to use digital filtering to remove low-amplitude noise, which interfered with deconvolution calculations. A digital bandpass filter constructed with the assistance of a Blackman window and a rectangular time window were used. Approximations of the impulse response and the frequency response of the continuous-time test system were obtained by linearly interpolating the defining points of the unit-sample response and the frequency response of the discrete-time system. The test system behaved as a linear-phase bandpass filter in the frequency range 0.6 to 2.3 MHz. These frequencies were selected in accordance with the criterion that they were 6 dB below the maximum peak of the amplitude of the frequency response. The output of the system to various inputs was predicted and the results were compared with the corresponding measurements on the system.

  6. Cavity quantum electro-optics. II. Input-output relations between traveling optical and microwave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Mankei

    2011-10-01

    In a previous paper [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.81.063837 81, 063837 (2010)], I proposed a quantum model of the cavity electro-optic modulator, which can coherently couple an optical cavity mode to a microwave resonator mode and enable quantum operations on the two modes, including laser cooling of the microwave resonator, electro-optic entanglement, and backaction-evading optical measurement of a microwave quadrature. In this sequel, I focus on the quantum input-output relations between traveling optical and microwave fields coupled to the cavity electro-optic modulator. With red-sideband optical pumping, the relations are shown to resemble those of a beam splitter for the traveling fields, so that in the ideal case of zero parasitic loss and critical coupling, microwave photons can be coherently up converted to “flying” optical photons with unit efficiency, and vice versa. With blue-sideband pumping, the modulator acts as a nondegenerate parametric amplifier, which can generate two-mode squeezing and hybrid entangled photon pairs at optical and microwave frequencies. These fundamental operations provide a potential bridge between circuit quantum electrodynamics and quantum optics.

  7. Cavity quantum electro-optics. II. Input-output relations between traveling optical and microwave fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Mankei

    2011-10-15

    In a previous paper [Phys. Rev. A 81, 063837 (2010)], I proposed a quantum model of the cavity electro-optic modulator, which can coherently couple an optical cavity mode to a microwave resonator mode and enable quantum operations on the two modes, including laser cooling of the microwave resonator, electro-optic entanglement, and backaction-evading optical measurement of a microwave quadrature. In this sequel, I focus on the quantum input-output relations between traveling optical and microwave fields coupled to the cavity electro-optic modulator. With red-sideband optical pumping, the relations are shown to resemble those of a beam splitter for the traveling fields, so that in the ideal case of zero parasitic loss and critical coupling, microwave photons can be coherently up converted to ''flying'' optical photons with unit efficiency, and vice versa. With blue-sideband pumping, the modulator acts as a nondegenerate parametric amplifier, which can generate two-mode squeezing and hybrid entangled photon pairs at optical and microwave frequencies. These fundamental operations provide a potential bridge between circuit quantum electrodynamics and quantum optics.

  8. Input-output relations in biological systems: measurement, information and the Hill equation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Biological systems produce outputs in response to variable inputs. Input-output relations tend to follow a few regular patterns. For example, many chemical processes follow the S-shaped Hill equation relation between input concentrations and output concentrations. That Hill equation pattern contradicts the fundamental Michaelis-Menten theory of enzyme kinetics. I use the discrepancy between the expected Michaelis-Menten process of enzyme kinetics and the widely observed Hill equation pattern of biological systems to explore the general properties of biological input-output relations. I start with the various processes that could explain the discrepancy between basic chemistry and biological pattern. I then expand the analysis to consider broader aspects that shape biological input-output relations. Key aspects include the input-output processing by component subsystems and how those components combine to determine the system’s overall input-output relations. That aggregate structure often imposes strong regularity on underlying disorder. Aggregation imposes order by dissipating information as it flows through the components of a system. The dissipation of information may be evaluated by the analysis of measurement and precision, explaining why certain common scaling patterns arise so frequently in input-output relations. I discuss how aggregation, measurement and scale provide a framework for understanding the relations between pattern and process. The regularity imposed by those broader structural aspects sets the contours of variation in biology. Thus, biological design will also tend to follow those contours. Natural selection may act primarily to modulate system properties within those broad constraints. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eugene Koonin, Georg Luebeck and Sergei Maslov. PMID:24308849

  9. Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Assessment of Water Reuse Strategies in Residential Buildings

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper evaluates the environmental sustainability and economic feasibility of four water reuse designs through economic input-output life cycle assessments (EIO-LCA) and benefit/cost analyses. The water reuse designs include: 1. Simple Greywater Reuse System for Landscape Ir...

  10. Optimal Tracking Control of Unknown Discrete-Time Linear Systems Using Input-Output Measured Data.

    PubMed

    Kiumarsi, Bahare; Lewis, Frank L; Naghibi-Sistani, Mohammad-Bagher; Karimpour, Ali

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an output-feedback solution to the infinite-horizon linear quadratic tracking (LQT) problem for unknown discrete-time systems is proposed. An augmented system composed of the system dynamics and the reference trajectory dynamics is constructed. The state of the augmented system is constructed from a limited number of measurements of the past input, output, and reference trajectory in the history of the augmented system. A novel Bellman equation is developed that evaluates the value function related to a fixed policy by using only the input, output, and reference trajectory data from the augmented system. By using approximate dynamic programming, a class of reinforcement learning methods, the LQT problem is solved online without requiring knowledge of the augmented system dynamics only by measuring the input, output, and reference trajectory from the augmented system. We develop both policy iteration (PI) and value iteration (VI) algorithms that converge to an optimal controller that require only measuring the input, output, and reference trajectory data. The convergence of the proposed PI and VI algorithms is shown. A simulation example is used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  11. Effects of Age of English Exposure, Current Input/Output, and Grade on Bilingual Language Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedore, Lisa M.; Pena, Elizabeth D.; Griffin, Zenzi M.; Hixon, J. Gregory

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the effects of Age of Exposure to English (AoEE) and Current Input/Output on language performance in a cross-sectional sample of Spanish-English bilingual children. First- (N = 586) and third-graders (N = 298) who spanned a wide range of bilingual language experience participated. Parents and teachers provided information…

  12. Demand-driven water withdrawals by Chinese industry: a multi-regional input-output analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Chen, Z. M.; Zeng, L.; Qiao, H.; Chen, B.

    2016-03-01

    With ever increasing water demands and the continuous intensification of water scarcity arising from China's industrialization, the country is struggling to harmonize its industrial development and water supply. This paper presents a systems analysis of water withdrawals by Chinese industry and investigates demand-driven industrial water uses embodied in final demand and interregional trade based on a multi-regional input-output model. In 2007, the Electric Power, Steam, and Hot Water Production and Supply sector ranks first in direct industrial water withdrawal (DWW), and Construction has the largest embodied industrial water use (EWU). Investment, consumption, and exports contribute to 34.6%, 33.3%, and 30.6% of the national total EWU, respectively. Specifically, 58.0%, 51.1%, 48.6%, 43.3%, and 37.5% of the regional EWUs respectively in Guangdong, Shanghai, Zhejiang, Jiangsu, and Fujian are attributed to international exports. The total interregional import/export of embodied water is equivalent to about 40% of the national total DWW, of which 55.5% is associated with the DWWs of Electric Power, Steam, and Hot Water Production and Supply. Jiangsu is the biggest interregional exporter and deficit receiver of embodied water, in contrast to Guangdong as the biggest interregional importer and surplus receiver. Without implementing effective water-saving measures and adjusting industrial structures, the regional imbalance between water availability and water demand tends to intensify considering the water impact of domestic trade of industrial products. Steps taken to improve water use efficiency in production, and to enhance embodied water saving in consumption are both of great significance for supporting China's water policies.

  13. Global industrial impact coefficient based on random walk process and inter-country input-output table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Lizhi; Dong, Xianlei; Guan, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Input-output table is very comprehensive and detailed in describing the national economic system with lots of economic relationships, which contains supply and demand information among industrial sectors. The complex network, a theory and method for measuring the structure of complex system, can describe the structural characteristics of the internal structure of the research object by measuring the structural indicators of the social and economic system, revealing the complex relationship between the inner hierarchy and the external economic function. This paper builds up GIVCN-WIOT models based on World Input-Output Database in order to depict the topological structure of Global Value Chain (GVC), and assumes the competitive advantage of nations is equal to the overall performance of its domestic sectors' impact on the GVC. Under the perspective of econophysics, Global Industrial Impact Coefficient (GIIC) is proposed to measure the national competitiveness in gaining information superiority and intermediate interests. Analysis of GIVCN-WIOT models yields several insights including the following: (1) sectors with higher Random Walk Centrality contribute more to transmitting value streams within the global economic system; (2) Half-Value Ratio can be used to measure robustness of open-economy macroeconomics in the process of globalization; (3) the positive correlation between GIIC and GDP indicates that one country's global industrial impact could reveal its international competitive advantage.

  14. Application of a physical input-output table to evaluate the development and sustainability of continental water resources in Spain.

    PubMed

    Gascó, Gabriel; Hermosilla, Daphne; Gascó, Antonio; Naredo, José Manuel

    2005-07-01

    Continental waters are complex resources in terms of a measurable physical quantity, and measuring them requires a good knowledge of total water availability. In this research, an accounting physical input-output table (PIOT) was applied to evaluate total water resources and gross annual availabilities at each stage of the natural-artificial water cycle. These stages are considered subsystems of a continental water resource system describing water transfers for an average year within 13 administrative basins of Spain. Water transfers between various subsystems are characterized by internal flows decreasing the water resource availabilities. The PIOT analysis establishes these internal flows, and the origins and final uses of the total resources for each subsystem. The input-output balance registered an unsustainable negative net accumulation in eight water basins. The PIOT analysis also allowed the calculation of significant indicators such as water resource developments (RDI) and their sustainable use (SUI). RDI and SUI demonstrate that groundwater is a critical resource affecting the environment (e.g., wetlands in the upper Guadiana) and the water supply (e.g., irrigation in the Segura basin). The results of this model suggest that above-/below-ground hydrological links are important when decisions have to be made in order to provide a satisfactory supply of water in Spain. The model integrates the different water basins under territorial criteria, and therefore it may be useful for the Spanish National Hydrological Plan.

  15. Simultaneous material flow analysis of nickel, chromium, and molybdenum used in alloy steel by means of input-output analysis.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Ohno, Hajime; Kondo, Yasushi; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Takeda, Osamu; Miki, Takahiro; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2013-05-07

    Steel is not elemental iron but rather a group of iron-based alloys containing many elements, especially chromium, nickel, and molybdenum. Steel recycling is expected to promote efficient resource use. However, open-loop recycling of steel could result in quality loss of nickel and molybdenum and/or material loss of chromium. Knowledge about alloying element substance flow is needed to avoid such losses. Material flow analyses (MFAs) indicate the importance of steel recycling to recovery of alloying elements. Flows of nickel, chromium, and molybdenum are interconnected, but MFAs have paid little attention to the interconnected flow of materials/substances in supply chains. This study combined a waste input-output material flow model and physical unit input-output analysis to perform a simultaneous MFA for nickel, chromium, and molybdenum in the Japanese economy in 2000. Results indicated the importance of recovery of these elements in recycling policies for end-of-life (EoL) vehicles and constructions. Improvement in EoL sorting technologies and implementation of designs for recycling/disassembly at the manufacturing phase are needed. Possible solutions include development of sorting processes for steel scrap and introduction of easier methods for identifying the composition of secondary resources. Recovery of steel scrap with a high alloy content will reduce primary inputs of alloying elements and contribute to more efficient resource use.

  16. Input-output finite-time stabilisation of nonlinear stochastic system with missing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jun; Niu, Yugang; Jia, Tinggang

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the problem of the input-output finite-time stabilisation for a class of nonlinear stochastic system with state-dependent noise. The phenomenon of the missing measurements may occur when state signals are transmitted via communication networks. An estimating method is proposed to compensate the lost state information. And then, a compensator-based controller is designed to ensure the input-output finite-time stochastic stability (IO-FTSS) of the closed-loop system. Some parameters-dependent sufficient conditions are derived and the corresponding solving approach is given. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the developed IO-FTSS scheme.

  17. Intrinsic Information Processing and Energy Dissipation in Stochastic Input-Output Dynamical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-09

    intelligent” control can convert information to energy. However, these approaches have yet to account for the diverse kinds of information that complex...Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 input-output processes, controlled thermodynamics systems, nonlinear...be subject to any oenalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE

  18. Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog Input/Output Module Ambient Temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. McKay

    2011-02-01

    Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog input/output Module Ambient Temperature Testing A series of three ambient temperature tests were conducted for the Water Power Calculator development using the INL Calibration Laboratory’s Tenney Environmental Chamber. The ambient temperature test results demonstrate that the Moore Industries Temperature Input Modules, Analog Input Module and Analog Output Module, ambient temperature response meet or exceed the manufactures specifications

  19. Low-carbon building assessment and multi-scale input-output analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G. Q.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z. M.; Zhang, Bo; Shao, L.; Guo, S.; Zhou, S. Y.; Jiang, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Presented as a low-carbon building evaluation framework in this paper are detailed carbon emission account procedures for the life cycle of buildings in terms of nine stages as building construction, fitment, outdoor facility construction, transportation, operation, waste treatment, property management, demolition, and disposal for buildings, supported by integrated carbon intensity databases based on multi-scale input-output analysis, essential for low-carbon planning, procurement and supply chain design, and logistics management.

  20. Greenhouse gas footprinting for small businesses--the use of input-output data.

    PubMed

    Berners-Lee, M; Howard, D C; Moss, J; Kaivanto, K; Scott, W A

    2011-02-01

    To mitigate anthropogenic climate change greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) must be reduced; their major source is man's use of energy. A key way to manage emissions is for the energy consumer to understand their impact and the consequences of changing their activities. This paper addresses the challenge of delivering relevant, practical and reliable greenhouse gas 'footprint' information for small and medium sized businesses. The tool we describe is capable of ascribing parts of the total footprint to specific actions to which the business can relate and is sensitive enough to reflect the consequences of change. It provides a comprehensive description of all emissions for each business and sets them in the context of local, national and global statistics. It includes the GHG costs of all goods and services irrespective of their origin and without double accounting. We describe the development and use of the tool, which draws upon both national input-output data and process-based life cycle analysis techniques; a hybrid model. The use of national data sets the output in context and makes the results consistent with national and global targets, while the life cycle techniques provide a means of reflecting the dynamics of actions. The model is described in some detail along with a rationale and a short discussion of validity. As the tool is designed for small commercial users, we have taken care to combine rigour with practicality; parameterising from readily available client data whilst being clear about uncertainties. As an additional incentive, we also report on the potential costs or savings of switching activities. For users to benefit from the tool, they need to understand the output and know how much confidence they should place in the results. We not only describe an application of non-parametric statistics to generate confidence intervals, but also offer users the option of and guidance on adjusting figures to examine the sensitivity of the model to its

  1. Properties of input-output Hammerstein-bilinear structure with application to an industrial air handling unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkowski, T.; Zajic, I.; Burnham, K. J.; Koszalka, L.

    2014-12-01

    When developing mathematical models, especially for control, the practical interest lies in relatively simple extensions of linear structures that offer improved modelling capabilities. In this paper a discrete-time input-output Hammerstein-bilinear structure is introduced and its properties are discussed in detail. It consists of a cascade connection of a static nonlinearity followed by a dynamic bilinear system. By combining advantages of constituent subsystems the Hammerstein-bilinear structure allows for both an input dependant dynamic behaviour (particular property of bilinear systems) and an increased flexibility of the steady-state characteristic (particular property of Hammerstein models) to be obtained simultaneously. Modelling capabilities of such structure are evaluated on an air-handling unit that is a part of an industrial heating, ventilation and air-conditioning system.

  2. Combining ptychographical algorithms with the Hybrid Input-Output (HIO) algorithm.

    PubMed

    Konijnenberg, A P; Coene, W M J; Pereira, S F; Urbach, H P

    2016-12-01

    In this article we combine the well-known Ptychographical Iterative Engine (PIE) with the Hybrid Input-Output (HIO) algorithm. The important insight is that the HIO feedback function should be kept strictly separate from the reconstructed object, which is done by introducing a separate feedback function per probe position. We have also combined HIO with floating PIE (fPIE) and extended PIE (ePIE). Simulations indicate that the combined algorithm performs significantly better in many situations. Although we have limited our research to a combination with HIO, the same insight can be used to combine ptychographical algorithms with any phase retrieval algorithm that uses a feedback function.

  3. Simulation of TunneLadder Traveling-Wave Tube Input/Output Coupler Characteristics Using MAFIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Qureshi, A. Haq

    1996-01-01

    RF input/output coupler characteristics for the TunneLadder traveling-wave tube have been calculated using the three-dimensional computer code, MAFIA and compared to experimental data with good agreement. Theory behind coupling of the TunneLadder interaction circuit to input and output waveguides is presented and VSWR data is calculated for variations on principal coupler dimensions to provide insight into manufacturing tolerances necessary for acceptable performance. Accuracy of results using MAFIA demonstrates how experimental hardware testing of three-dimensional coupler designs can be reduced.

  4. Assessing contributory risk using economic input-output life-cycle analysis.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ian; Shelly, Michael; Jonmaire, Paul; Lee, Richard V; Harbison, Raymond D

    2005-04-01

    The contribution of consumer purchases of non-essential products to environmental pollution is characterized. Purchase decisions by consumers induce a complex sequence of economy-wide production interactions that influence the production and consumption of chemicals and subsequent exposure and possible public health risks. An economic input-output life-cycle analysis (EIO-LCA) was used to link resource consumption and production by manufacturers to corresponding environmental impacts. Using the US Department of Commerce's input-output tables together with the US Environmental Protection Agency's Toxics Release Inventory and AIRData databases, the economy-wide air discharges resulting from purchases of household appliances, motor homes, and games and toys were quantified. The economic and environmental impacts generated from a hypothetical 10,000 US dollar purchase for selected consumer items were estimated. The analysis shows how purchases of seemingly benign consumer products increase the output of air pollutants along the supply chain and contribute to the potential risks associated with environmental chemical exposures to both consumers and non-consumers alike.

  5. Mitigating the effect of noise in the hybrid input-output method of phase retrieval.

    PubMed

    Trahan, Russell; Hyland, David

    2013-05-01

    Here a modification to the hybrid input-output (HIO) method of phase retrieval is presented which aides in mitigating the negative effects of low signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Various type of interferometers measure diffraction patterns which are used to determine the Fourier transform modulus of an objective. Interferometry often suffers from very low SNRs making phase retrieval difficult because of the sensitivity of most phase retrieval algorithms to local minima. Here we analyze the effect of noise on the HIO method. The result is used as a rationale for the proposed modification to the HIO method. The algorithm presented here introduces a filtering scheme which removes much of the Fourier modulus noise. Examples are shown and the results are compared to the HIO method with and without the proposed modification. Comparisons are also made to other methods of filtering the Fourier modulus noise.

  6. Vertex centralities in input-output networks reveal the structure of modern economies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blöchl, Florian; Theis, Fabian J.; Vega-Redondo, Fernando; Fisher, Eric O.'N.

    2011-04-01

    Input-output tables describe the flows of goods and services between the sectors of an economy. These tables can be interpreted as weighted directed networks. At the usual level of aggregation, they contain nodes with strong self-loops and are almost completely connected. We derive two measures of node centrality that are well suited for such networks. Both are based on random walks and have interpretations as the propagation of supply shocks through the economy. Random walk centrality reveals the vertices most immediately affected by a shock. Counting betweenness identifies the nodes where a shock lingers longest. The two measures differ in how they treat self-loops. We apply both to data from a wide set of countries and uncover salient characteristics of the structures of these national economies. We further validate our indices by clustering according to sectors’ centralities. This analysis reveals geographical proximity and similar developmental status.

  7. Molecularly Defined Circuitry Reveals Input-Output Segregation in Deep Layers of the Medial Entorhinal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Sürmeli, Gülşen; Marcu, Daniel Cosmin; McClure, Christina; Garden, Derek L F; Pastoll, Hugh; Nolan, Matthew F

    2015-12-02

    Deep layers of the medial entorhinal cortex are considered to relay signals from the hippocampus to other brain structures, but pathways for routing of signals to and from the deep layers are not well established. Delineating these pathways is important for a circuit level understanding of spatial cognition and memory. We find that neurons in layers 5a and 5b have distinct molecular identities, defined by the transcription factors Etv1 and Ctip2, and divergent targets, with extensive intratelencephalic projections originating in layer 5a, but not 5b. This segregation of outputs is mirrored by the organization of glutamatergic input from stellate cells in layer 2 and from the hippocampus, with both preferentially targeting layer 5b over 5a. Our results suggest a molecular and anatomical organization of input-output computations in deep layers of the MEC, reveal precise translaminar microcircuitry, and identify molecularly defined pathways for spatial signals to influence computation in deep layers.

  8. A convenient and accurate parallel Input/Output USB device for E-Prime.

    PubMed

    Canto, Rosario; Bufalari, Ilaria; D'Ausilio, Alessandro

    2011-03-01

    Psychological and neurophysiological experiments require the accurate control of timing and synchrony for Input/Output signals. For instance, a typical Event-Related Potential (ERP) study requires an extremely accurate synchronization of stimulus delivery with recordings. This is typically done via computer software such as E-Prime, and fast communications are typically assured by the Parallel Port (PP). However, the PP is an old and disappearing technology that, for example, is no longer available on portable computers. Here we propose a convenient USB device enabling parallel I/O capabilities. We tested this device against the PP on both a desktop and a laptop machine in different stress tests. Our data demonstrate the accuracy of our system, which suggests that it may be a good substitute for the PP with E-Prime.

  9. Computer program for single input-output, single-loop feedback systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Additional work is reported on a completely automatic computer program for the design of single input/output, single loop feedback systems with parameter uncertainly, to satisfy time domain bounds on the system response to step commands and disturbances. The inputs to the program are basically the specified time-domain response bounds, the form of the constrained plant transfer function and the ranges of the uncertain parameters of the plant. The program output consists of the transfer functions of the two free compensation networks, in the form of the coefficients of the numerator and denominator polynomials, and the data on the prescribed bounds and the extremes actually obtained for the system response to commands and disturbances.

  10. State Space Consistency and Differentiability Conditions for a Class of Causal Dynamical Input-Output Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    U) be an input-output system. F is a causal mapping and (Y; F; U) is a causal system if and only if for all t and for all u; v 2 U such that ku vkt ...in u, then the Frechet derivative of the map S : Ut ! de�ned by S(t) = t at ut exists. Proof: Calculate u+vt (w0;1) ut (w0;1) = [LtF ((u+ v...for all u 2 U , the state trajectory t! ut is di¤erentiable. Proof: First calculate : ut+h(v0;1) ut (v0;1) = [Lt+hF (ut+h+! Rt+hv0;1) LtF (ut

  11. Distributed input/output subsystem for traffic signal control. Final report, December 1993-May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, D.; Schwem, C.

    1995-07-01

    The `distributed input/output sybsystem` is an electrical interface between a traffic device controller, its sensors (typically loop detectors), and its actuators (typically signal lamps), Spread-spectrum signals from the controller are carried over a pair of 110VAC wires that supply power to the devices. Control modules at the actuators decode these signals and implement only the commands that are addressed to their devices. The process also works in reverse for sensors, using the same hardware elements. This interface greatly reduces the quantity of wiring installed at traffic signals and can be easily expanded to accommodate additional sensors and actuators. This can substantially reduce labor and material costs. This project demonstrated distributed control modules for several ITS applications: traffic signal lamps, ramp meters, loop detectors and variable message signs.

  12. ProMC: Input-output data format for HEP applications using varint encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekanov, S. V.; May, E.; Strand, K.; Van Gemmeren, P.

    2014-10-01

    A new data format for Monte Carlo (MC) events, or any structural data, including experimental data, is discussed. The format is designed to store data in a compact binary form using variable-size integer encoding as implemented in the Google's Protocol Buffers package. This approach is implemented in the PROMC library which produces smaller file sizes for MC records compared to the existing input-output libraries used in high-energy physics (HEP). Other important features of the proposed format are a separation of abstract data layouts from concrete programming implementations, self-description and random access. Data stored in PROMC files can be written, read and manipulated in a number of programming languages, such C++, JAVA, FORTRAN and PYTHON.

  13. Multi-regional input-output analysis for China's regional CH4 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Li, Jiashuo; Peng, Beihua

    2014-03-01

    China is the largest CH4 emitter in the world. Given the importance of CH4 in greenhouse gas emission inventories, the characteristics of China's CH4 emissions at different scales deserve to be fully understood. Presented in this paper is an interprovincial input-output embodiment analysis of China's regional CH4 emissions in 2007, based on the most recently available multi-regional input-output table, and relevant CH4 emissions data. The results show that the eastern, central and western areas contribute to 48.2%, 28.6%, and 23.3% of the national total embodied emissions, respectively. Guangdong has the highest level of embodied CH4 emissions among all of the 30 regions. The Agriculture sector produces the most embodied CH4 emissions in final demand, followed by the Construction, Food Production and Tobacco Processing, and Other Service Activities sectors. Significant net transfers of embodied CH4 emission flows are identified from the central and western areas to the eastern area via interregional trade. Shanxi is the largest interregional exporter of embodied CH4 emissions. In contrast, Guangdong is the largest interregional importer. Energy activities, agricultural activities, and waste management comprise 65.6%, 30.7%, and 3.7% of the total embodied CH4 emissions in interregional trade, respectively. By using consumption-based accounting principles, the emission magnitudes, per capita emissions, and emission intensities of most eastern regions increase remarkably, while those of some central and western regions decrease largely. To achieve regional CH4 emission mitigation, comprehensive mitigation measures should be designed under consideration of regional transfer of emission responsibility.

  14. The relation between input-output transformation and gastrointestinal nematode infections on dairy farms.

    PubMed

    van der Voort, M; Van Meensel, J; Lauwers, L; Van Huylenbroeck, G; Charlier, J

    2016-02-01

    Efficiency analysis is used for assessing links between technical efficiency (TE) of livestock farms and animal diseases. However, previous studies often do not make the link with the allocation of inputs and mainly present average effects that ignore the often huge differences among farms. In this paper, we studied the relationship between exposure to gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections, the TE and the input allocation on dairy farms. Although the traditional cost allocative efficiency (CAE) indicator adequately measures how a given input allocation differs from the cost-minimising input allocation, they do not represent the unique input allocation of farms. Similar CAE scores may be obtained for farms with different input allocations. Therefore, we propose an adjusted allocative efficiency index (AAEI) to measure the unique input allocation of farms. Combining this AAEI with the TE score allows determining the unique input-output position of each farm. The method is illustrated by estimating efficiency scores using data envelopment analysis (DEA) on a sample of 152 dairy farms in Flanders for which both accountancy and parasitic monitoring data were available. Three groups of farms with a different input-output position can be distinguished based on cluster analysis: (1) technically inefficient farms, with a relatively low use of concentrates per 100 l milk and a high exposure to infection, (2) farms with an intermediate TE, relatively high use of concentrates per 100 l milk and a low exposure to infection, (3) farms with the highest TE, relatively low roughage use per 100 l milk and a relatively high exposure to infection. Correlation analysis indicates for each group how the level of exposure to GI nematodes is associated or not with improved economic performance. The results suggest that improving both the economic performance and exposure to infection seems only of interest for highly TE farms. The findings indicate that current farm recommendations

  15. A Direct Design from Input/Output Data of Fault-Tolerant Control System Based on GIMC Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuishi, Tsubasa; Yubai, Kazuhiro; Hirai, Junji

    This paper deals with a design method of fault-tolerant control system based on Generalized Internal Model Control (GIMC) structure consisting of a standard outer loop feedback controller and an extra inner loop controller. The distinguished feature of GIMC structure is that the controller design for performance and robustness may be done separately. The outer loop controller is designed for nominal performance using some controller synthesis to meet (nominal) control specification, while the inner loop controller is designed to make a trade-off between robustness and performance. This feature is suitable for fault-tolerant control. The outer loop controller is designed for fault-free case, and the inner loop controller for faulty case. In the conventional methods, the inner loop controller is designed to maximize the robust stability margin without information on fault. Therefore, the performance in the faulty case tends to become conservative. In this paper, the inner loop controller is directly designed from experimental data collected from the faulty system. Since the collected data contains information on the fault, conservativeness in the conventional methods is decreased. The inner loop controller is designed by Virtual Reference Feedback Tuning (VRFT). VRFT is a direct design method from input-output data without identifying any models. Since complexity of the controller can be specified by the designer, no complexity reduction has to be required, which becomes advantageous upon implementation. The effectiveness of the proposed design method is confirmed by an experiment.

  16. Alternative industrial carbon emissions benchmark based on input-output analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mengyao; Ji, Xi

    2016-12-01

    Some problems exist in the current carbon emissions benchmark setting systems. The primary consideration for industrial carbon emissions standards highly relate to direct carbon emissions (power-related emissions) and only a portion of indirect emissions are considered in the current carbon emissions accounting processes. This practice is insufficient and may cause double counting to some extent due to mixed emission sources. To better integrate and quantify direct and indirect carbon emissions, an embodied industrial carbon emissions benchmark setting method is proposed to guide the establishment of carbon emissions benchmarks based on input-output analysis. This method attempts to link direct carbon emissions with inter-industrial economic exchanges and systematically quantifies carbon emissions embodied in total product delivery chains. The purpose of this study is to design a practical new set of embodied intensity-based benchmarks for both direct and indirect carbon emissions. Beijing, at the first level of carbon emissions trading pilot schemes in China, plays a significant role in the establishment of these schemes and is chosen as an example in this study. The newly proposed method tends to relate emissions directly to each responsibility in a practical way through the measurement of complex production and supply chains and reduce carbon emissions from their original sources. This method is expected to be developed under uncertain internal and external contexts and is further expected to be generalized to guide the establishment of industrial benchmarks for carbon emissions trading schemes in China and other countries.

  17. Investigating time-efficiency of forward masking paradigms for estimating basilar membrane input-output characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Fereczkowski, Michal; Jepsen, Morten L.; Dau, Torsten; MacDonald, Ewen N.

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that pure-tone audiometry does not sufficiently describe individual hearing loss (HL) and that additional measures beyond pure-tone sensitivity might improve the diagnostics of hearing deficits. Specifically, forward masking experiments to estimate basilar-membrane (BM) input-output (I/O) function have been proposed. However, such measures are very time consuming. The present study investigated possible modifications of the temporal masking curve (TMC) paradigm to improve time and measurement efficiency. In experiment 1, estimates of knee point (KP) and compression ratio (CR) of individual BM I/Os were derived without considering the corresponding individual “off-frequency” TMC. While accurate estimation of KPs was possible, it is difficult to ensure that the tested dynamic range is sufficient. Therefore, in experiment 2, a TMC-based paradigm, referred to as the “gap method”, was tested. In contrast to the standard TMC paradigm, the maker level was kept fixed and the “gap threshold” was obtained, such that the masker just masks a low-level (12 dB sensation level) signal. It is argued that this modification allows for better control of the tested stimulus level range, which appears to be the main drawback of the conventional TMC method. The results from the present study were consistent with the literature when estimating KP levels, but showed some limitations regarding the estimation of the CR values. Perspectives and limitations of both approaches are discussed. PMID:28355275

  18. Multi-input/output alarming system for patients with inattention caused by higher cortical function disorder

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To apply advanced methods of communication, sensing, and instrumentation technologies to make a system that can help patients suffering from hemispatial neglect caused by higher cortical function disorder. Method By using several sensors and actuators, the objective was to construct a tailor-made system for each patient. The input part of the system consists of sensors, an interface and transmitters. The output part consists of a receiver, logical arithmetic, an output interface and actuators. The information from the input part is sent to the output part in a wireless manner allowing the mobility of the input and output parts. Results The system and its functionality were realized. Voice alarming and neck muscle stimuli were applied to two patients. We could verify the applicability of the system to remind the patients to put on their wheelchair’s brake and raise its footrest before attempting to stand for transferring to their beds. Conclusion The designed and constructed multi-input/output system can be used effectively to alarm the patients. PMID:24119204

  19. Energy-Dominated Local Carbon Emissions in Beijing 2007: Inventory and Input-Output Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shan; Liu, J. B.; Shao, Ling; Li, J. S.; An, Y. R.

    2012-01-01

    For greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by Beijing economy 2007, a concrete emission inventory covering carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) is presented and associated with an input-output analysis to reveal the local GHG embodiment in final demand and trade without regard to imported emissions. The total direct GHG emissions amount to 1.06E + 08 t CO2-eq, of which energy-related CO2 emissions comprise 90.49%, non-energy-related CO2 emissions 6.35%, CH4 emissions 2.33%, and N2O emissions 0.83%, respectively. In terms of energy-related CO2 emissions, the largest source is coal with a percentage of 53.08%, followed by coke with 10.75% and kerosene with 8.44%. Sector 26 (Construction Industry) holds the top local emissions embodied in final demand of 1.86E + 07 t CO2-eq due to its considerable capital, followed by energy-intensive Sectors 27 (Transport and Storage) and 14 (Smelting and Pressing of Ferrous and Nonferrous Metals). The GHG emissions embodied in Beijing's exports are 4.90E + 07 t CO2-eq, accounting for 46.01% of the total emissions embodied in final demand. The sound scientific database totally based on local emissions is an important basis to make effective environment and energy policies for local decision makers. PMID:23193385

  20. Input-output theory for waveguide QED with an ensemble of inhomogeneous atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalumière, Kevin; Sanders, Barry C.; van Loo, A. F.; Fedorov, A.; Wallraff, A.; Blais, A.

    2013-10-01

    We study the collective effects that emerge in waveguide quantum electrodynamics where several (artificial) atoms are coupled to a one-dimensional superconducting transmission line. Since single microwave photons can travel without loss for a long distance along the line, real and virtual photons emitted by one atom can be reabsorbed or scattered by a second atom. Depending on the distance between the atoms, this collective effect can lead to super- and subradiance or to a coherent exchange-type interaction between the atoms. Changing the artificial atoms transition frequencies, something which can be easily done with superconducting qubits (two levels artificial atoms), is equivalent to changing the atom-atom separation and thereby opens the possibility to study the characteristics of these collective effects. To study this waveguide quantum electrodynamics system, we extend previous work and present an effective master equation valid for an ensemble of inhomogeneous atoms driven by a coherent state. Using input-output theory, we compute analytically and numerically the elastic and inelastic scattering and show how these quantities reveal information about collective effects. These theoretical results are compatible with recent experimental results using transmon qubits coupled to a superconducting one-dimensional transmission line [van Loo (unpublished)].

  1. Alternative industrial carbon emissions benchmark based on input-output analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mengyao; Ji, Xi

    2016-05-01

    Some problems exist in the current carbon emissions benchmark setting systems. The primary consideration for industrial carbon emissions standards highly relate to direct carbon emissions (power-related emissions) and only a portion of indirect emissions are considered in the current carbon emissions accounting processes. This practice is insufficient and may cause double counting to some extent due to mixed emission sources. To better integrate and quantify direct and indirect carbon emissions, an embodied industrial carbon emissions benchmark setting method is proposed to guide the establishment of carbon emissions benchmarks based on input-output analysis. This method attempts to link direct carbon emissions with inter-industrial economic exchanges and systematically quantifies carbon emissions embodied in total product delivery chains. The purpose of this study is to design a practical new set of embodied intensity-based benchmarks for both direct and indirect carbon emissions. Beijing, at the first level of carbon emissions trading pilot schemes in China, plays a significant role in the establishment of these schemes and is chosen as an example in this study. The newly proposed method tends to relate emissions directly to each responsibility in a practical way through the measurement of complex production and supply chains and reduce carbon emissions from their original sources. This method is expected to be developed under uncertain internal and external contexts and is further expected to be generalized to guide the establishment of industrial benchmarks for carbon emissions trading schemes in China and other countries.

  2. Energy-dominated local carbon emissions in Beijing 2007: inventory and input-output analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shan; Liu, J B; Shao, Ling; Li, J S; An, Y R

    2012-01-01

    For greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by Beijing economy 2007, a concrete emission inventory covering carbon dioxide (CO(2)), methane (CH(4)), and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) is presented and associated with an input-output analysis to reveal the local GHG embodiment in final demand and trade without regard to imported emissions. The total direct GHG emissions amount to 1.06E + 08 t CO(2)-eq, of which energy-related CO(2) emissions comprise 90.49%, non-energy-related CO(2) emissions 6.35%, CH(4) emissions 2.33%, and N(2)O emissions 0.83%, respectively. In terms of energy-related CO(2) emissions, the largest source is coal with a percentage of 53.08%, followed by coke with 10.75% and kerosene with 8.44%. Sector 26 (Construction Industry) holds the top local emissions embodied in final demand of 1.86E + 07 t CO(2)-eq due to its considerable capital, followed by energy-intensive Sectors 27 (Transport and Storage) and 14 (Smelting and Pressing of Ferrous and Nonferrous Metals). The GHG emissions embodied in Beijing's exports are 4.90E + 07 t CO(2)-eq, accounting for 46.01% of the total emissions embodied in final demand. The sound scientific database totally based on local emissions is an important basis to make effective environment and energy policies for local decision makers.

  3. An input-output procedure for calculating economy-wide economic impacts in supply chains using homeland security consequence analysis tools.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Braeton J.; Vugrin, Eric D.; Loose, Verne W.; Warren, Drake E.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

    2010-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed several models to analyze potential consequences of homeland security incidents. Two of these models (the National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center Agent-Based Laboratory for Economics, N-ABLE{trademark}, and Loki) simulate detailed facility- and product-level consequences of simulated disruptions to supply chains. Disruptions in supply chains are likely to reduce production of some commodities, which may reduce economic activity across many other types of supply chains throughout the national economy. The detailed nature of Sandia's models means that simulations are limited to specific supply chains in which detailed facility-level data has been collected, but policymakers are often concerned with the national-level economic impacts of supply-chain disruptions. A preliminary input-output methodology has been developed to estimate national-level economic impacts based upon the results of supply-chain-level simulations. This methodology overcomes two primary challenges. First, the methodology must be relatively simple to integrate successfully with existing models; it must be easily understood, easily applied to the supply-chain models without user intervention, and run quickly. The second challenge is more fundamental: the methodology must account for both upstream and downstream impacts that result from supply-chain disruptions. Input-output modeling typically estimates only upstream impacts, but shortages resulting from disruptions in many supply chains (for example, energy, communications, and chemicals) are likely to have large downstream impacts. In overcoming these challenges, the input-output methodology makes strong assumptions about technology and substitution. This paper concludes by applying the methodology to chemical supply chains.

  4. Carbon emissions and resources use by Chinese economy 2007: A 135-sector inventory and input-output embodiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G. Q.; Chen, Z. M.

    2010-11-01

    A 135-sector inventory and embodiment analysis for carbon emissions and resources use by Chinese economy 2007 is presented in this paper by an ecological input-output modeling based on the physical entry scheme. Included emissions and resources belong to six categories as: (1) greenhouse gas (GHG) in terms of CO 2, CH 4, and N 2O; (2) energy in terms of coal, crude oil, natural gas, hydropower, nuclear power, and firewood; (3) water in terms of freshwater; (4) exergy in terms of coal, crude oil, natural gas, grain, bean, tuber, cotton, peanut, rapeseed, sesame, jute, sugarcane, sugar beet, tobacco, silkworm feed, tea, fruits, vegetables, wood, bamboo, pulp, meat, egg, milk, wool, aquatic products, iron ore, copper ore, bauxite, lead ore, zinc ore, pyrite, phosphorite, gypsum, cement, nuclear fuel, and hydropower; (5) and (6) solar and cosmic emergies in terms of sunlight, wind power, deep earth heat, chemical power of rain, geopotential power of rain, chemical power of stream, geopotential power of stream, wave power, geothermal power, tide power, topsoil loss, coal, crude oil, natural gas, ferrous metal ore, non-ferrous metal ore, non-metal ore, cement, and nuclear fuel. Accounted based on the embodied intensities are carbon emissions and resources use embodied in the final use as rural consumption, urban consumption, government consumption, gross fixed capital formation, change in inventories, and export, as well as in the international trade balance. The resulted database is basic to environmental account of carbon emissions and resources use at various levels.

  5. Demand-driven energy requirement of world economy 2007: A multi-region input-output network simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhan-Ming; Chen, G. Q.

    2013-07-01

    This study presents a network simulation of the global embodied energy flows in 2007 based on a multi-region input-output model. The world economy is portrayed as a 6384-node network and the energy interactions between any two nodes are calculated and analyzed. According to the results, about 70% of the world's direct energy input is invested in resource, heavy manufacture, and transportation sectors which provide only 30% of the embodied energy to satisfy final demand. By contrast, non-transportation services sectors contribute to 24% of the world's demand-driven energy requirement with only 6% of the direct energy input. Commodity trade is shown to be an important alternative to fuel trade in redistributing energy, as international commodity flows embody 1.74E + 20 J of energy in magnitude up to 89% of the traded fuels. China is the largest embodied energy exporter with a net export of 3.26E + 19 J, in contrast to the United States as the largest importer with a net import of 2.50E + 19 J. The recent economic fluctuations following the financial crisis accelerate the relative expansions of energy requirement by developing countries, as a consequence China will take over the place of the United States as the world's top demand-driven energy consumer in 2022 and India will become the third largest in 2015.

  6. COSTEAM expansion and improvements: design of a coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed submodel, an oil-fired submodel and input/output improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Reierson, James D.; Rosenberg, Joseph I.; Murphy, Mary B.; Lethi, Minh- Triet

    1980-10-01

    COSTEAM is an interactive computer model designed to estimate the cost of industrial steam produced by various steam plant technologies. At the end of Phase I development, the COSTEAM model included only one submodel to calculate the capital and operating costs of a conventional coal-fired boiler plant with environmental control systems. This report describes the results of Phase II development. Two new submodels are added which calculate costs for steam produced by coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed boilers and by oil-fired boilers. COSTEAM input/output capabilities are also improved.

  7. Carbon sequestration in forest soils - Results from input-output balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumme, Dr

    2009-04-01

    Input-output balances of 53 forest ecosystems were used to calculate the N-induced C-sequestration in forest soils. Input and output measurements were conducted in spruce, pine, beech and oak forests over an 8-years period. N-input ranged from 7-37 kg N ha-1 yr-1 and N-output from 0-27 kg ha-1 yr-1. N-retention in soils was estimated by subtracting N-leaching and N-increments in plants from total deposition assuming similar values for gaseous N-losses and N-fixation (Brumme & Khanna 2008). Soil N-changes ranged from -24 kg to 21 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Negative balances are explained by humus degradation in the mineral soil (n=9), positive values by N-accumulation in the forest floor (n=44). C-sequestration was calculated by corresponding C/N values in the forest floor and the top mineral soil (0-5 cm depth). C-losses from the mineral soil were lower than 290 kg ha-1 yr-1 and C-gain lower than 590 kg ha-1 yr-1. Since the C-losses from the mineral soil did not originate from N-deposition only positive values were used to calculate the N-induced C-sequestration in the forest floor. C-sequestration ranged from 1 kg to 590 ha-1 yr-1. The highest sink was observed for spruce forests (250 ha-1 yr-1, n=14), fallowed by pine (170 ha-1 yr-1, n=11), beech (137 ha-1 yr-1, n=13), and oak (94 ha-1 yr-1, n=6). The overall mean value for C-sequestration is 176 ha-1 yr-1 (sd 140 kg ha-1 yr-1). Brumme R, Khanna PK (2008) Ecological and site historical aspects of N dynamics and current N status in temperate forests. Global Change Biology 14, 125-141

  8. A network-centric input-output feedback linearization-based control strategy for unmanned systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouyoucef, K.; Khorasani, K.

    2005-05-01

    Large scale unmanned networks consisting of a number of heterogeneous nodes that may be configured in ad-hoc fashions and incorporating complicated architectures result in challenging problems for design of appropriate control and resource allocation optimization techniques. The problem is further compounded by the fact that designing appropriate network control methodologies subject to bandwidth, latencies and computational resources for these network-centric systems are highly non-trivial. In this paper, we only investigate one of a number of critical issues that are of interest in this domain, namely the problem of congestion control of a network that consists of three nodes that can be configured into different architectures. This study shows that depending on the interconnections between the network nodes the dynamics of the resulting closed-loop system can change considerably so that the unmanned system could become even unstable and unmanageable. Therefore, a robust control strategy is required to be able to cope with any configuration changes and to be able to address the resource allocation problem subject to the propagation delays and latencies. For sake of comparative evaluation, we first implement a standard PID control scheme which is shown to lack sufficient capability for achieving the desired performance requirements. Subsequently, a nonlinear control scheme is proposed to resolve the limitation of sensitivity of the closed-loop system to propagation delays. The proposed strategy is based on a well-known input-output feedback linearization approach that is shown to achieve an appreciable improvement in the performance of the closed-loop unmanned network and which is also less sensitive to the network propagation delays.

  9. Improved GRACE regional mass balance estimates of the Greenland ice sheet cross-validated with the input-output method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zheng; Schrama, Ernst J. O.; van der Wal, Wouter; van den Broeke, Michiel; Enderlin, Ellyn M.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we use satellite gravimetry data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) to estimate regional mass change of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) and neighboring glaciated regions using a least squares inversion approach. We also consider results from the input-output method (IOM). The IOM quantifies the difference between the mass input and output of the GrIS by studying the surface mass balance (SMB) and the ice discharge (D). We use the Regional Atmospheric Climate Model version 2.3 (RACMO2.3) to model the SMB and derive the ice discharge from 12 years of high-precision ice velocity and thickness surveys. We use a simulation model to quantify and correct for GRACE approximation errors in mass change between different subregions of the GrIS, and investigate the reliability of pre-1990s ice discharge estimates, which are based on the modeled runoff. We find that the difference between the IOM and our improved GRACE mass change estimates is reduced in terms of the long-term mass change when using a reference discharge derived from runoff estimates in several subareas. In most regions our GRACE and IOM solutions are consistent with other studies, but differences remain in the northwestern GrIS. We validate the GRACE mass balance in that region by considering several different GIA models and mass change estimates derived from data obtained by the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). We conclude that the approximated mass balance between GRACE and IOM is consistent in most GrIS regions. The difference in the northwest is likely due to underestimated uncertainties in the IOM solutions.

  10. The Comparative Effects of Comprehensible Input, Output and Corrective Feedback on the Receptive Acquisition of L2 Vocabulary Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowbakht, Mohammad; Shahnazari, Mohammadtaghi

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the comparative effects of comprehensible input, output and corrective feedback on the receptive acquisition of L2 vocabulary items were investigated. Two groups of beginning EFL learners participated in the study. The control group received comprehensible input only, while the experimental group received input and was…

  11. Application of optimization technique to noncrystalline x-ray diffraction microscopy: Guided hybrid input-output method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Chun; Miao, Jianwei; Wang, C. W.; Lee, T. K.

    2007-08-01

    We have developed an algorithm that combines the concept of optimization with the conventional hybrid input-output (HIO) algorithm for phase retrieval of oversampled diffraction intensities. In particular, the optimization algorithm of guiding searching direction to locate the global minimum has been implemented. Compared with HIO, this guided HIO algorithm retrieves the lost phase information from diffraction intensities with much better accuracy.

  12. Ranking Hearing Aid Input-Output Functions for Understanding Low-, Conversational-, and High-Level Speech in Multitalker Babble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, King; Killion, Mead C.; Christensen, Laurel A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the rankings of 6 input-output functions for understanding low-level, conversational, and high-level speech in multitalker babble without manipulating volume control for listeners with normal hearing, flat sensorineural hearing loss, and mildly sloping sensorineural hearing loss. Method: Peak clipping, compression limiting,…

  13. Linear system identification - The application of Lion's identification scheme to a third order system with noisy input-output measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, C. M., Jr.; Monopoli, R. V.

    1974-01-01

    A linear system identification technique developed by Lion is adapted for use on a third-order system with six unknown parameters and noisy input-output measurements. A digital computer is employed so that rapid identification takes place with only two state variable filters. Bias in the parameter estimates is partially eliminated by a signal-to-noise ratio testing procedure.

  14. INPUT-OUTPUT BUDGETS OF INORGANIC NITROGEN FOR 24 FOREST WATERSHEDS IN THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Input-output budgets for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) are summarized for 24 small watersheds at 15 locations in the northeasternUnited States. The study watersheds are completely forested, free of recent physical disturbances, and span a geographical region bounded by West ...

  15. Estimates of embodied global energy and air-emission intensities of Japanese products for building a Japanese input-output life cycle assessment database with a global system boundary.

    PubMed

    Nansai, Keisuke; Kondo, Yasushi; Kagawa, Shigemi; Suh, Sangwon; Nakajima, Kenichi; Inaba, Rokuta; Tohno, Susumu

    2012-08-21

    To build a life cycle assessment (LCA) database of Japanese products embracing their global supply chains in a manner requiring lower time and labor burdens, this study estimates the intensity of embodied global environmental burden for commodities produced in Japan. The intensity of embodied global environmental burden is a measure of the environmental burden generated globally by unit production of the commodity and can be used as life cycle inventory data in LCA. The calculation employs an input-output LCA method with a global link input-output model that defines a global system boundary grounded in a simplified multiregional input-output framework. As results, the intensities of embodied global environmental burden for 406 Japanese commodities are determined in terms of energy consumption, greenhouse-gas emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, perfluorocarbons, hydrofluorocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, and their summation), and air-pollutant emissions (nitrogen oxide and sulfur oxide). The uncertainties in the intensities of embodied global environmental burden attributable to the simplified structure of the global link input-output model are quantified using Monte Carlo simulation. In addition, by analyzing the structure of the embodied global greenhouse-gas intensities we characterize Japanese commodities in the context of LCA embracing global supply chains.

  16. A Variable Input-Output Model for Inflation, Growth, and Energy for the Korean Economy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    source of energy to the coal mining industry . Its input elasticity is 0.0496, followed by the petroleum oroduc-s, 0.0102. Crude petroleum is the largest...ationary i mpacts when a wage hike is " intrcduced. The largest Irfla-ionary moact comes to k coal mining industry . A one percent 1vicrease -n wages in the...coal mining industry rs sults in a 0.9654 percent -ncrease in price levels. The inflationary impact of a one og9rcent wage hike is 0.CC5891 fcr

  17. The Canadian Defence Input-Output Model DIO Version 4.41

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    5910 Cocoa beans 702 5920 Coffee , not roasted 703 5930 Tropical fruit 704 5940 Unallocated imports and exports 705 5950 Sales of other government...other syrups 124 1080 Prepared cake and other mixes 125 1090 Dehydrated soup mixes and bases 126 1100 Roasted coffee 127 1110 Tea 128 1120 Potato...equipment, including safety 420 3690 Batteries 421 3700 Insulated wire and cable, excluding aluminium 422 3710 Aluminium wire and cable 423 3729 Wiring

  18. Utilizing Physical Input-Output Model to Inform Nitrogen related Ecosystem Services

    EPA Science Inventory

    Here we describe the development of nitrogen PIOTs for the midwestern US state of Illinois with large inputs of nitrogen from agriculture and industry. The PIOTs are used to analyze the relationship between regional economic activities and ecosystem services in order to identify...

  19. US-CERT Control System Center Input/Output (I/O) Conceputal Design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-02-01

    This document was prepared for the US-CERT Control Systems Center of the National Cyber Security Division (NCSD) of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DHS has been tasked under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to coordinate the overall national effort to enhance the protection of the national critical infrastructure. Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-7 directs the federal departments to identify and prioritize critical infrastructure and protect it from terrorist attack. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security was prepared by the NCSD to address the control system security component addressed in the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace and the National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security identified five high-level strategic goals for improving cyber security of control systems; the I/O upgrade described in this document supports these goals. The vulnerability assessment Test Bed, located in the Information Operations Research Center (IORC) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), consists of a cyber test facility integrated with multiple test beds that simulate the nation's critical infrastructure. The fundamental mission of the Test Bed is to provide industry owner/operators, system vendors, and multi-agency partners of the INL National Security Division a platform for vulnerability assessments of control systems. The Input/Output (I/O) upgrade to the Test Bed (see Work Package 3.1 of the FY-05 Annual Work Plan) will provide for the expansion of assessment capabilities within the IORC facility. It will also provide capabilities to connect test beds within the Test Range and other Laboratory resources. This will allow real time I/O data input and communication channels for full replications of control systems (Process Control Systems [PCS], Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Systems [SCADA], and components

  20. Atomic entanglement purification and concentration using coherent state input-output process in low-Q cavity QED regime.

    PubMed

    Cao, Cong; Wang, Chuan; He, Ling-Yan; Zhang, Ru

    2013-02-25

    We investigate an atomic entanglement purification protocol based on the coherent state input-output process by working in low-Q cavity in the atom-cavity intermediate coupling region. The information of entangled states are encoded in three-level configured single atoms confined in separated one-side optical micro-cavities. Using the coherent state input-output process, we design a two-qubit parity check module (PCM), which allows the quantum nondemolition measurement for the atomic qubits, and show its use for remote parities to distill a high-fidelity atomic entangled ensemble from an initial mixed state ensemble nonlocally. The proposed scheme can further be used for unknown atomic states entanglement concentration. Also by exploiting the PCM, we describe a modified scheme for atomic entanglement concentration by introducing ancillary single atoms. As the coherent state input-output process is robust and scalable in realistic applications, and the detection in the PCM is based on the intensity of outgoing coherent state, the present protocols may be widely used in large-scaled and solid-based quantum repeater and quantum information processing.

  1. Mercury Inputs, Outputs, Cycling, and Ambient Concentrations under the Forest Canopy in the Adirondacks of New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, H.; Holsen, T.

    2009-12-01

    This study investigated mercury inputs, outputs, cycling, and the interactions between deposition, emissions and atmospheric conditions in the Huntington Forest of the Adirondacks, New York. Continuous speciated mercury concentrations of gaseous elemental Hg (GEM), reactive gaseous Hg (RGM), and particulate Bound Hg (PBM) were made from June 2006 to May 2007. The average concentrations of GEM, RGM, and PBM were 1.4 ± 0.4 ng m-3, 1.8 ± 2.2 pg m-3, and 3.2 ± 3.7 pg m-3, respectively. A hybrid receptor modeling technique (potential source contribution function (PSCF)) was used with the speciated Hg concentrations to identify possible Hg sources. Major Hg sources that have a potential to contribute high Hg concentrations observed in the Adirondacks were found to be Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, Texas, Indiana, and Missouri. The volume-weighted mean (VWM) total Hg concentration in throughfall (Dec. 2004 to Dec. 2006) (6.6 ng L-1) was higher than in precipitation (4.9 ng L-1), while the total cumulative Hg flux in throughfall (12.0 µg m-2) was similar to precipitation (11.6 µg m-2). The emission flux of GEM from the forest floor measured using a polycarbonate dynamic flux chamber (DFC) was highest in spring, and summer, and lowest in winter. The yearly estimated Hg inputs into the forest canopy include throughfall (6.5 g m-2 year-1), litterfall (18.3 g m-2 year-1), and dry deposition during leaf-off periods (0.4g m-2 year-1). The yearly estimated Hg outputs from the forest canopy include emission from the forest floor (7.0g m-2 year-1), soil water (0.6 g m-2 year-1), and Hg loss via evaporation or overland flow during snow melt (1.0 g m-2 year-1). Litterfall represented the most significant input of Hg to this forest ecosystem. Based on this mass balance, 16.6 g m-2 of Hg is accumulating in the forest floor every year.

  2. Estimation of the contribution of exports to the provincial economy: an analysis based on China's multi-regional input-output tables.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sanmang; Li, Shantong; Lei, Yalin

    2016-01-01

    This paper developed an estimation model for the contribution of exports to a country's regional economy based on the Chenery-Moses model and conducted an empirical analysis using China's multi-regional input-output tables for 1997, 2002, and 2007. The results indicated that China's national exports make significantly different contributions to the provincial economy in various regions, with the greatest contribution being observed in the eastern region and the smallest in the central region. The provinces are also subjected to significantly different export spillover effects. The boosting effect for the eastern provinces is primarily generated from local exports, whereas the western provinces primarily benefit from the export spillover effect from the eastern provinces. The eastern provinces, such as Guangdong, Zhejiang, Jiangsu, and Shanghai, are the primary sources of export spillover effects, and Guangdong is the largest source of export spillover effects for almost all of the provinces in China.

  3. An input-output approach to analyze the ways to increase total output of energy sectors: The case of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhdi, Ubaidillah

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the ways to increase total output of Japanese energy sectors in future time. In this study, Input-Output (IO) analysis is employed as a tool of analysis. This study focuses on petroleum refinery products and non-ferrous metals as analyzed sectors. The results show that positive impact observed in export and outside households consumption modifications while opposite impact is given by modification of import. The recommendations suggested based on these results are Japanese government should make breakthroughs so analyzed sector's export activities can increase and they have to careful in conducting import activities related to these sectors.

  4. An application of input-output analysis in analyzing the impacts of final demands changes on the total outputs of Japanese energy sectors: A further study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhdi, Ubaidillah

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to continue the previous study which discussed the impacts of final demands changes on the total outputs of Japanese energy sectors. More specifically, this study aims to conduct a deeper analysis regarding these impacts. This study employs a demand-pull Input- Output (IO) quantity model, one of the calculation instruments in IO analysis, as a tool of analysis. This study focuses on two sectors, namely (1) petroleum refinery products, and (2) non-ferrous metals. Two conditions are considered in the analysis part, namely (1) “whole sector change”, and (2) “pure change”. The results show that in both conditions, both discussed sectors have similar patterns. The results also explain that, in both conditions, the biggest positive impact for the sector of petroleum refinery products is given by scenario 4, the modification of consumption expenditures of private.

  5. An input-output table based analysis on the virtual water by sectors with the five northwest provinces in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chenchen; Zhan, Jinyan

    Virtual water refers to the volumes of water required to produce a commodity or service. It reflects human's actual consumption of water resources and therefore has certain significance in water resources management. Over the years, the concept of virtual water has caught the attentions of water manager and decision maker. In order to utilize this concept, the accounting and estimation of virtual water is the foundation that lies in this issue. Till now, the accounting methods mainly include the method provided by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), water footprint and input-output analysis method. In this paper, we chose Northwest China, which is a typical arid region that is facing with rapid economic development, as the study area and built an Input-Output (IO) analysis method to estimate virtual water among different industry sectors in the northwest China. The accounting and estimation results could be used to give suggestions to increase water use efficiency and promote virtual water trade in the study area. Comparison of the proposed method with other prevailing method was also analyzed. The introduced method could be utilized for accounting and estimation of virtual water by sectors, with its superiority in characterizing industrial water consumption and the accounting results could lend certain credence to the water resource management and industrial transformation for the future economic development of northwest China.

  6. Compilation and application of Japanese inventories for energy consumption and air pollutant emissions using input-output tables.

    PubMed

    Nansai, Keisuke; Moriguchi, Yuichi; Tohno, Susumu

    2003-05-01

    Preparing emission inventories is essential to the assessment and management of our environment. In this study, Japanese air pollutant emissions, energy consumption, and CO2 emissions categorized by approximately 400 sectors (as classified by Japanese input-output tables in 1995) were estimated, and the contributions of each sector to the total amounts were analyzed. The air pollutants examined were nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur oxides (SOx), and suspended particulate matter (SPM). Consumptions of about 20 fossil fuels and five other fuels were estimated according to sector. Air pollutant emission factors for stationary sources were calculated from the results of a survey on air pollution prevention in Japan. Pollutant emissions from mobile sources were estimated taking into consideration vehicle types, traveling speeds, and distances. This work also counted energy supply and emissions from seven nonfossil fuel sources, including nonthermal electric power, and CO2 emissions from limestone (for example, during cement production). The total energy consumption in 1995 was concluded to be 18.3 EJ, and the annual total emissions of CO2, NOx, SOx, and SPM were, respectively, 343 Mt-C, 3.51 Mt, 1.87 Mt, and 0.32 Mt. An input-output analysis of the emission inventories was used to calculate the amounts of energy consumption and emissions induced in each sector by the economic final demand.

  7. Optimal fixed-finite-dimensional compensator for Burgers' equation with unbounded input/output operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, John A.; Marrekchi, Hamadi

    1993-01-01

    The problem of using reduced order dynamic compensators to control a class of nonlinear parabolic distributed parameter systems was considered. Concentration was on a system with unbounded input and output operators governed by Burgers' equation. A linearized model was used to compute low-order-finite-dimensional control laws by minimizing certain energy functionals. Then these laws were applied to the nonlinear model. Standard approaches to this problem employ model/controller reduction techniques in conjunction with linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) theory. The approach used is based on the finite dimensional Bernstein/Hyland optimal projection theory which yields a fixed-finite-order controller.

  8. Input-Output Stability Analysis with Magnetic Hysteresis Non-Linearity - A Class of Multipliers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-08

    Circuit Theory, Vol. CT-17. that the same properties hold for yl(t). i.e.. p. 564. Nov. 1970. YI(t)ELa, is continuous, and go to zero as t--. [12] Desoer ...inductor (trans- former), but from circuit analysis point of view. zero as t . the input and output of the model replaced for N U as shown in Fig. (2...output [I. I],"Lumped- Circuit Models for Non-linearcof Industors Exhibiting Hysteresis Loop.’therefore, eEL., and el(t)- 0 as t- . imply IEEE Trans. on

  9. Economic interrelationships and impacts of the aviation/aerospace industry in the state of Florida using input-output analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whealan George, Kelly

    The study provided a detailed description of the interrelatedness of the aviation and aerospace industry with principal industries in Florida and Volusia County (VC) using Input-Output (IO) analysis. Additionally, this research provided an economic impact analysis of the creation of a university research park in Daytona Beach (DB). The economic impact measures included not only direct economic output and industry employment descriptions but also described the multiplier effects in the form of indirect and induced impacts using data for 2012. This research concluded the average labor income of the aviation and aerospace industry was higher than average labor income in Florida and VC. A substantive difference between the Florida and VC average labor income for the aviation and aerospace industry existed because VC's aerospace sector was only concentrated in the search, detection, and navigation instruments manufacturing sector. VC's transport by air sector was one-fifth the size of Florida's. Differences in the aviation and aerospace industry composition between Florida and VC are important because the economic impacts from a shock to the entire aviation and aerospace industry will be distributed differently. Since the aviation and aerospace average labor income is higher than the average labor income in Florida and VC, it would be a positive move for Florida's economy to attract and grow the aviation and aerospace industry. It would be highly unlikely that the entirety of newly created jobs would be resourced from the local population. Nonetheless, growing the aviation and aerospace industry jobs would have a positive influence on the region's economy and tax revenues. It would be a desirable course of action to spur the growth of this sector, as its direct effect would culminate with additional jobs in Florida that would bring higher wage jobs to the state. The interdependencies of the aviation and aerospace industry in Florida and VC with other industries had a

  10. Response of Cryolite-Based Bath to a Shift in Heat Input/output Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingjing; Taylor, Mark; Dorreen, Mark

    2017-04-01

    A technology for low amperage potline operation is now recognized as a competitive advantage for the aluminum smelting industry in order to align smelter operations with the power and aluminum price markets. This study investigates the cryolite-based bath response to heat balance shifts when the heat extraction from the bath is adjusted to different levels in a laboratory analogue. In the analogue experiments, the heat balance shift is driven by a graphite `cold finger' heat exchanger, which can control the heat extraction from the analogue, and a corresponding change in heat input from the furnace which maintains the control temperature of the lab "cell." This paper reports the first experimental results from shifting the steady state of the lab cell heat balance, and investigates the effects on the frozen ledge and bath superheat. The lab cell energy balances are compared with energy balances in a published industrial cell model.

  11. Response of Cryolite-Based Bath to a Shift in Heat Input/output Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingjing; Taylor, Mark; Dorreen, Mark

    2016-12-01

    A technology for low amperage potline operation is now recognized as a competitive advantage for the aluminum smelting industry in order to align smelter operations with the power and aluminum price markets. This study investigates the cryolite-based bath response to heat balance shifts when the heat extraction from the bath is adjusted to different levels in a laboratory analogue. In the analogue experiments, the heat balance shift is driven by a graphite `cold finger' heat exchanger, which can control the heat extraction from the analogue, and a corresponding change in heat input from the furnace which maintains the control temperature of the lab "cell." This paper reports the first experimental results from shifting the steady state of the lab cell heat balance, and investigates the effects on the frozen ledge and bath superheat. The lab cell energy balances are compared with energy balances in a published industrial cell model.

  12. A controls engineering approach for analyzing airplane input-output characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbuckle, P. Douglas

    1991-01-01

    An engineering approach for analyzing airplane control and output characteristics is presented. State-space matrix equations describing the linear perturbation dynamics are transformed from physical coordinates into scaled coordinates. The scaling is accomplished by applying various transformations to the system to employ prior engineering knowledge of the airplane physics. Two different analysis techniques are then explained. Modal analysis techniques calculate the influence of each system input on each fundamental mode of motion and the distribution of each mode among the system outputs. The optimal steady state response technique computes the blending of steady state control inputs that optimize the steady state response of selected system outputs. Analysis of an example airplane model is presented to demonstrate the described engineering approach.

  13. Nonlinear SVM-DTC for induction motor drive using input-output feedback linearization and high order sliding mode control.

    PubMed

    Ammar, Abdelkarim; Bourek, Amor; Benakcha, Abdelhamid

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a nonlinear Direct Torque Control (DTC) strategy with Space Vector Modulation (SVM) for an induction motor. A nonlinear input-output feedback linearization (IOFL) is implemented to achieve a decoupled torque and flux control and the SVM is employed to reduce high torque and flux ripples. Furthermore, the control scheme performance is improved by inserting a super twisting speed controller in the outer loop and a load torque observer to enhance the speed regulation. The combining of dual nonlinear strategies ensures a good dynamic and robustness against parameters variation and disturbance. The system stability has been analyzed using Lyapunov stability theory. The effectiveness of the control algorithm is investigated by simulation and experimental validation using Matlab/Simulink software with real-time interface based on dSpace 1104.

  14. Modified technique for differential mode delay map measurement by scanning of input/output ends of tested multimode fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdine, Anton V.; Burdin, Vladimir A.; Pashin, Stanislav S.; Praporshchikov, Denis E.; Sevruk, Nikita L.

    2016-03-01

    We present modified technique for differential mode delay map measurement. Here according to well-known methods a fast laser pulse is also launched into a tested multimode fiber (MMF) via single mode fiber (SMF), which scans core of MMF under precision offset positions. However unlike known technique formalized in ratified standards, proposed modification differs by addition scanning of the output end of tested MMF by short tail of SMF. Therefore for each radial offset position at the input/output MMF ends, the shape of pulse response of launched optical signal is recorded, that provides to get more informative differential mode delay map. This work presents some results of experimental approbation of proposed modified technique for differential mode delay map measurement.

  15. Estimating raw material equivalents on a macro-level: comparison of multi-regional input-output analysis and hybrid LCI-IO.

    PubMed

    Schoer, Karl; Wood, Richard; Arto, Iñaki; Weinzettel, Jan

    2013-12-17

    The mass of material consumed by a population has become a useful proxy for measuring environmental pressure. The "raw material equivalents" (RME) metric of material consumption addresses the issue of including the full supply chain (including imports) when calculating national or product level material impacts. The RME calculation suffers from data availability, however, as quantitative data on production practices along the full supply chain (in different regions) is required. Hence, the RME is currently being estimated by three main approaches: (1) assuming domestic technology in foreign economies, (2) utilizing region-specific life-cycle inventories (in a hybrid framework), and (3) utilizing multi-regional input-output (MRIO) analysis to explicitly cover all regions of the supply chain. While the first approach has been shown to give inaccurate results, this paper focuses on the benefits and costs of the latter two approaches. We analyze results from two key (MRIO and hybrid) projects modeling raw material equivalents, adjusting the models in a stepwise manner in order to quantify the effects of individual conceptual elements. We attempt to isolate the MRIO gap, which denotes the quantitative impact of calculating the RME of imports by an MRIO approach instead of the hybrid model, focusing on the RME of EU external trade imports. While, the models give quantitatively similar results, differences become more pronounced when tracking more detailed material flows. We assess the advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches and look forward to ways to further harmonize data and approaches.

  16. Breeding for resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes - the potential in low-input/output small ruminant production systems.

    PubMed

    Zvinorova, P I; Halimani, T E; Muchadeyi, F C; Matika, O; Riggio, V; Dzama, K

    2016-07-30

    The control of gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) is mainly based on the use of drugs, grazing management, use of copper oxide wire particles and bioactive forages. Resistance to anthelmintic drugs in small ruminants is documented worldwide. Host genetic resistance to parasites, has been increasingly used as a complementary control strategy, along with the conventional intervention methods mentioned above. Genetic diversity in resistance to GIN has been well studied in experimental and commercial flocks in temperate climates and more developed economies. However, there are very few report outputs from the more extensive low-input/output smallholder systems in developing and emerging countries. Furthermore, results on quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with nematode resistance from various studies have not always been consistent, mainly due to the different nematodes studied, different host breeds, ages, climates, natural infections versus artificial challenges, infection level at sampling periods, among others. The increasing use of genetic markers (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms, SNPs) in GWAS or the use of whole genome sequence data and a plethora of analytic methods offer the potential to identify loci or regions associated nematode resistance. Genomic selection as a genome-wide level method overcomes the need to identify candidate genes. Benefits in genomic selection are now being realised in dairy cattle and sheep under commercial settings in the more advanced countries. However, despite the commercial benefits of using these tools, there are practical problems associated with incorporating the use of marker-assisted selection or genomic selection in low-input/output smallholder farming systems breeding schemes. Unlike anthelmintic resistance, there is no empirical evidence suggesting that nematodes will evolve rapidly in response to resistant hosts. The strategy of nematode control has evolved to a more practical manipulation of host-parasite equilibrium

  17. Design and microwave test of an ultrawideband input/output structure for sheet beam travelling wave tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Guoxiang; Wang, Jianxun; Liu, Guo; Yang, Liya; Luo, Yong; Wang, Shafei

    2015-06-01

    Broadband operation is of great importance for the applications of travelling wave tubes such as high-data communication and wideband radar. An input/output (I/O) structure operating with broadband property plays a significant role to achieve these applications. In this paper, a Y-type branch waveguide (YTBW) coupler and its improvements are proposed and utilized to construct an extremely wideband I/O structure to ensure the broadband operation for sheet beam travelling wave tubes (SB-TWTs). Cascaded reflection resonators are utilized to improve the isolation characteristic and transmission efficiency. Furthermore, to minimize the reflectivity of the port connected with the RF circuit, wave-absorbing material (WAM) is loaded in the resonator. Simulation results for the YTBW loaded with WAM predict an excellent performance with a 50.2% relative bandwidth for port reflectivity under -15 dB, transmission up to -1.5 dB, and meanwhile isolation under -20 dB. In addition, the coupler has a relatively compact configuration and the beam tunnel can be widened, which is beneficial for the propagation of the electrons. A Q-band YTBW loaded with two reflection resonators is fabricated and microwave tested. Vector network analyzer (VNA) measured results have an excellent agreement with our simulation, which verify our theoretical analysis and simulation calculation.

  18. Mirror-based surface optical input/output technology with precise and arbitrary coupling angle for silicon photonic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriki, Akihiro; Amano, Takeru; Mori, Masahiko; Sakakibara, Yoichi

    2017-04-01

    Mirror-based surface optical coupling is an attractive technology for the optical input/output of Si photonics. For the practical use of the mirror-based surface optical coupling, we evaluated its coupling angle controllability. Different angular mirrors were integrated into 3 × 3-µm-square single-mode silicon oxynitride optical waveguides on Si substrates. Near- and far-field patterns of optical beams output from the mirrors were measured to evaluate the beam characteristics and coupling angles. We successfully controlled the coupling angle over a wide range of more than 20° without beam characteristic variation, and perfect vertical output, which is difficult to achieve using grating couplers, was successfully demonstrated. The coupling angle error was less than ±1°, which was sufficiently small to ignore additional coupling loss. The wavelength dependence of the coupling angle was also evaluated and found to be less than ±0.5° over wide wavelength ranges of 1.26–1.36 and 1.52–1.62 µm.

  19. Design and microwave test of an ultrawideband input/output structure for sheet beam travelling wave tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Guoxiang; Wang, Jianxun; Liu, Guo; Yang, Liya; Luo, Yong; Wang, Shafei

    2015-06-15

    Broadband operation is of great importance for the applications of travelling wave tubes such as high-data communication and wideband radar. An input/output (I/O) structure operating with broadband property plays a significant role to achieve these applications. In this paper, a Y-type branch waveguide (YTBW) coupler and its improvements are proposed and utilized to construct an extremely wideband I/O structure to ensure the broadband operation for sheet beam travelling wave tubes (SB-TWTs). Cascaded reflection resonators are utilized to improve the isolation characteristic and transmission efficiency. Furthermore, to minimize the reflectivity of the port connected with the RF circuit, wave-absorbing material (WAM) is loaded in the resonator. Simulation results for the YTBW loaded with WAM predict an excellent performance with a 50.2% relative bandwidth for port reflectivity under −15 dB, transmission up to −1.5 dB, and meanwhile isolation under −20 dB. In addition, the coupler has a relatively compact configuration and the beam tunnel can be widened, which is beneficial for the propagation of the electrons. A Q-band YTBW loaded with two reflection resonators is fabricated and microwave tested. Vector network analyzer (VNA) measured results have an excellent agreement with our simulation, which verify our theoretical analysis and simulation calculation.

  20. Design and microwave test of an ultrawideband input/output structure for sheet beam travelling wave tubes.

    PubMed

    Shu, Guoxiang; Wang, Jianxun; Liu, Guo; Yang, Liya; Luo, Yong; Wang, Shafei

    2015-06-01

    Broadband operation is of great importance for the applications of travelling wave tubes such as high-data communication and wideband radar. An input/output (I/O) structure operating with broadband property plays a significant role to achieve these applications. In this paper, a Y-type branch waveguide (YTBW) coupler and its improvements are proposed and utilized to construct an extremely wideband I/O structure to ensure the broadband operation for sheet beam travelling wave tubes (SB-TWTs). Cascaded reflection resonators are utilized to improve the isolation characteristic and transmission efficiency. Furthermore, to minimize the reflectivity of the port connected with the RF circuit, wave-absorbing material (WAM) is loaded in the resonator. Simulation results for the YTBW loaded with WAM predict an excellent performance with a 50.2% relative bandwidth for port reflectivity under -15 dB, transmission up to -1.5 dB, and meanwhile isolation under -20 dB. In addition, the coupler has a relatively compact configuration and the beam tunnel can be widened, which is beneficial for the propagation of the electrons. A Q-band YTBW loaded with two reflection resonators is fabricated and microwave tested. Vector network analyzer (VNA) measured results have an excellent agreement with our simulation, which verify our theoretical analysis and simulation calculation.

  1. Do Women with Inoperable Breast Cancer Have a Psychological Profile?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbar, Ora; Florian, Victor

    1991-01-01

    Compared psychological variables of 30 patients with inoperable breast cancer to matched group of 30 operable breast cancer patients. Found that women with inoperable breast cancer had higher scores in denial, exhaustion, hopelessness, worthlessness, depression, somatization, hostility, and psychoticism. Profile of inoperable cancer patients did…

  2. 14 CFR 91.1115 - Inoperable instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inoperable instruments and equipment. 91... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1115 Inoperable instruments and equipment. (a) No person may take off an aircraft with inoperable instruments or equipment installed unless the following...

  3. Quality- and dilution losses in the recycling of ferrous materials from end-of-life passenger cars: input-output analysis under explicit consideration of scrap quality.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shinichiro; Kondo, Yasushi; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Nakajima, Kenichi; Tasaki, Tomohiro; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2012-09-04

    Metals can in theory be infinitely recycled in a closed-loop without any degradation in quality. In reality, however, open-loop recycling is more typical for metal scrap recovered from end-of-life (EoL) products because mixing of different metal species results in scrap quality that no longer matches the originals. Further losses occur when meeting the quality requirement of the target product requires dilution of the secondary material by adding high purity materials. Standard LCA usually does not address these losses. This paper presents a novel approach to quantifying quality- and dilution losses, by means of hybrid input-output analysis. We focus on the losses associated with the recycling of ferrous materials from end-of-life vehicle (ELV) due to the mixing of copper, a typical contaminant in steel recycling. Given the quality of scrap in terms of copper density, the model determines the ratio by which scrap needs to be diluted in an electric arc furnace (EAF), and the amount of demand for EAF steel including those quantities needed for dilution. Application to a high-resolution Japanese IO table supplemented with data on ferrous materials including different grades of scrap indicates that a nationwide avoidance of these losses could result in a significant reduction of CO(2) emissions.

  4. [Spatial temporal differentiation of product-based and consumption-based CO2 emissions and balance in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region: an economic input- output analysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Chen, Cao-cao; Pan, Tao; Liu, Chun-lan; Chen, Long; Sun, Li

    2014-09-01

    Distinguishing product-based and consumption-based CO2 emissions in the open economic region is the basis for differentiating the emission responsibility, which is attracting increasing attention of decision-makers'attention. The spatial and temporal characteristics of product-based and consumption-based CO2 emissions, as well as carbon balance, in 1997, 2002 and 2007 of JING- JIN-JI region were analyzed by the Economic Input-Output-Life Cycle Assessment model. The results revealed that both the product- based and consumption-based CO2 emissions in the region have been increased by about 4% annually. The percentage of CO2 emissions embodied in trade was 30% -83% , to which the domestic trading added the most. The territorial and consumption-based CO2 emissions in Hebei province were the predominant emission in JING-JIN-JI region, and the increasing speed and emission intensity were stronger than those of Beijing and Tianjin. JING-JIN-JI region was a net inflow region of CO2 emissions, and parts of the emission responsibility were transferred. Beijing and Tianjin were the net importers of CO2 emissions, and Hebei was a net outflow area of CO2 emissions. The key CO2 emission departments in the region were concentrated, and the similarity was great. The inter-regional mechanisms could be set up for joint prevention and control work. - Production and distribution of electricity, gas and water and smelting and pressing of metals had the highest reliability on CO2 emissions, and took on the responsibility of other departments. The EIO-LCA model could be used to analyze the product-based and consumption-based CO2 emissions, which is helpful for the delicate management of regional CO2 emissions reduction and policies making, and stimulating the reduction cooperation at regional scale.

  5. Estimating the Fully Burdened Cost of Supply in a Self-Sustaining Supply Chain Using an Input-Output Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    communication system , firms around the world have more capability to trade globally. Also, improvements and success in the practice of SCM have...delivery system were analyzed by comparing the results of each scenario. The results of this analysis show that small convoys in supply chains are more...five different scenarios, the effects of changes in the size of convoy and delivery system were analyzed by comparing the results of each scenario

  6. Input-Output Analysis as a Tool in Assessing the Impacts of Climatic Variations on Regional Economies: with Prototype Applications to the Oklahoma Economy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooter, William S.

    Input-output analysis techniques are developed to relate climate impacts affecting specific economic sectors to overall economic impacts in a regional economy. The types of applied problems covered include: (1) Estimates of impacts from "natural" (or historical) climatic variability on the agricultural crop sector and residential consumption; (2) Estimates of likely impacts from an operational weather modification program; (3) Estimates of likely impacts from the implementation of climate-conscious irrigation scheduling strategies; (4) Estimates of likely impacts resulting from climate-conscious residential retrofitting; (5) The feasibility of instituting a statewide water transfer program, including consideration of the impact of scenarios involving climate -conscious irrigation scheduling; (6) A general consideration of using input-output techniques as an "optimal" decision -making tool for regional planners faced with coping with climate-related water shortages. The potentials of input -output analysis for dealing with such problem contexts are explored. Provisional estimates are made of the magnitude of the dollar impacts on the Oklahoma economy. Suggestions are made as how much information can be used to tailor programmatic expenditures to match expected economic gains. Finally, suggestions are made as to promising avenues for future study.

  7. Input-output method to fault detection for discrete-time fuzzy networked systems with time-varying delay and multiple packet losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenquan; Feng, Jian; Jiang, Yulian

    2016-05-01

    The fault detection (FD) problem for discrete-time fuzzy networked systems with time-varying delay and multiple packet losses is investigated in this paper. The communication links between the plant and the FD filter (FDF) are assumed to be imperfect, and the missing probability is governed by an individual random variable satisfying a certain probabilistic distribution over the interval [0 1]. The discrete-time delayed fuzzy networked system is first transformed into the form of interconnect ion of two subsystems by applying an input-output method and a two-term approximation approach, which are employed to approximate the time-varying delay. Our attention is focused on the design of fuzzy FDF (FFDF) such that, for all data missing conditions, the overall FD dynamics are input-output stable in mean square and preserves a guaranteed performance. Sufficient conditions are first established via H∞ performance analysis for the existence of the desired FFDF; meanwhile, the corresponding solvability conditions for the desired FFDF gains are characterised in terms of the feasibility of a convex optimisation problem. Moreover, we show that the obtained criteria based on the input-output approach can also be established by applying the direct Lyapunov method to the original time-delay systems. Finally, simulation examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  8. Application of cycling index and input-output environs for interpretation of nutrient flows in mixed rice-beef production systems in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Yusuke; Oishi, Kazato; Kumagai, Hajime; Hirooka, Hiroyuki

    2009-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to apply two methods developed in ecology, the cycling index and input-output environs, to interpret nutrient flows in mixed rice-beef production systems. The cycling index (CI) was a quantitative measure of nutrient cycling. It was defined as the proportion of cycled nutrients to the total amount of nutrient flows. On the other hand, the input-output environs provide a quantitative distribution on a particular input or output. In this study, these methods were applied to the nutrient flows in the mixed rice-beef production systems in Japan. The results of CI provided information on the effects of nutrient cycling on the efficient conversion of nutrient imports to nutrient export. The results of input-output environs indicated that the indices represent indirect effects provided by the interaction between rice and beef production. In conclusion, these methods indicated new findings on nutrient utilization in the systems. The results of this study implied the further applicability of these two methods to the study of nutrient flows in mixed crop-animal production systems.

  9. Measuring the environmental sustainability performance of global supply chains: A multi-regional input-output analysis for carbon, sulphur oxide and water footprints.

    PubMed

    Acquaye, Adolf; Feng, Kuishuang; Oppon, Eunice; Salhi, Said; Ibn-Mohammed, Taofeeq; Genovese, Andrea; Hubacek, Klaus

    2017-02-01

    Measuring the performance of environmentally sustainable supply chains instead of chain constitute has become a challenge despite the convergence of the underlining principles of sustainable supply chain management. This challenge is exacerbated by the fact that supply chains are inherently dynamic and complex and also because multiple measures can be used to characterize performances. By identifying some of the critical issues in the literature regarding performance measurements, this paper contributes to the existing body of literature by adopting an environmental performance measurement approach for economic sectors. It uses economic sectors and evaluates them on a sectoral level in specific countries as well as part of the Global Value Chain based on the established multi-regional input-output (MRIO) modeling framework. The MRIO model has been used to calculate direct and indirect (that is supply chain or upstream) environmental effects such as CO2, SO2, biodiversity, water consumption and pollution to name just a few of the applications. In this paper we use MRIO analysis to calculate emissions and resource consumption intensities and footprints, direct and indirect impacts, and net emission flows between countries. These are exemplified by using carbon emissions, sulphur oxide emissions and water use in two highly polluting industries; Electricity production and Chemical industry in 33 countries, including the EU-27, Brazil, India and China, the USA, Canada and Japan from 1995 to 2009. Some of the highlights include: On average, direct carbon emissions in the electricity sector across all 27 member states of the EU was estimated to be 1368 million tons and indirect carbon emissions to be 470.7 million tons per year representing 25.6% of the EU-27 total carbon emissions related to this sector. It was also observed that from 2004, sulphur oxide emissions intensities in electricity production in India and China have remained relatively constant at about 62.8 g

  10. Water flows in the Spanish economy: agri-food sectors, trade and households diets in an input-output framework.

    PubMed

    Cazcarro, Ignacio; Duarte, Rosa; Sánchez-Chóliz, Julio

    2012-06-19

    Seeking to advance our knowledge of water flows and footprints and the factors underlying them, we apply, on the basis of an extended 2004 Social Accounting Matrix for Spain, an open Leontief model in which households and foreign trade are the exogenous accounts. The model shows the water embodied in products bought by consumers (which we identify with the Water Footprint) and in trade (identified with virtual water trade). Activities with relevant water inflows and outflows such as the agrarian sector, textiles, and the agri-food industry are examined in detail using breakdowns of the relevant accounts. The data reflect only physical consumption, differentiating between green and blue water. The results reveal that Spain is a net importer of water. Flows are then related to key trading partners to show the large quantities involved. The focus on embodied (or virtual) water by activity is helpful to distinguish indirect from direct consumption as embodied water can be more than 300 times direct consumption in some food industry activities. Finally, a sensitivity analysis applied to changes in diets shows the possibility of reducing water uses by modifying households' behavior to encourage healthier eating.

  11. Design of a high voltage input - output ratio dc-dc converter dedicated to small power fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthoux, O.; Cathelin, J.

    2010-12-01

    Consuming chemical energy, fuel cells produce simultaneously heat, water and useful electrical power [J.M. Andújar, F. Segura, Renew. Sust. Energy Rev. 13, 2309 (2009)], [J. Larminie, A. Dicks, Fuel Cell Systems Explained, 2nd edn. (John Wiley & Sons, 2003)]. As a matter of fact, the voltage generated by a fuel cell strongly depends on both the load power demand and the operating conditions. Besides, as a result of many design aspects, fuel cells are low voltage and high current electric generators. On the contrary, electric loads are commonly designed for small voltage swing and a high V/I ratio in order to minimize Joule losses. Therefore, electric loads supplied by fuel cells are typically fed by means of an intermediate power voltage regulator. The specifications of such a power converter are to be able to step up the input voltage with a high ratio (a ratio of 10 is a classic situation) and also to work with an excellent efficiency (in order to minimize its size, its weight and its losses) [A. Shahin, B. Huang, J.P. Martin, S. Pierfederici, B. Davat, Energy Conv. Manag. 51, 56 (2010)]. This paper deals with the design of this essential ancillary device. It intends to bring out the best structure for fulfilling this function. Several dc-dc converters with large voltage step-up ratios are introduced. A topology based on a coupled inductor or tapped inductor is closely studied. A detailed modelling is performed with the purpose of providing designing rules. This model is validated with both simulation and implementation. The experimental prototype is based on the following specifications: the fuel cell output voltage ranges from a 50 V open-voltage to a 25 V rated voltage while the load requires a constant 250 V voltage. The studied coupled inductor converter is compared with a classic boost converter commonly used in this voltage elevating application. Even though the voltage regulator faces severe FC specifications, the measured efficiency reaches 96% at the

  12. Probing the input-output behavior of biochemical and genetic systems system identification methods from control theory.

    PubMed

    Ang, Jordan; Ingalls, Brian; McMillen, David

    2011-01-01

    A key aspect of the behavior of any system is the timescale on which it operates: when inputs change, do responses take milliseconds, seconds, minutes, hours, days, months? Does the system respond preferentially to inputs at certain timescales? These questions are well addressed by the methods of frequency response analysis. In this review, we introduce these methods and outline a procedure for applying this analysis directly to experimental data. This procedure, known as system identification, is a well-established tool in engineering systems and control theory and allows the construction of a predictive dynamic model of a biological system in the absence of any mechanistic details. When studying biochemical and genetic systems, the required experiments are not standard laboratory practice, but with advances in both our ability to measure system outputs (e.g., using fluorescent reporters) and our ability to generate precise inputs (with microfluidic chambers capable of changing cells' environments rapidly and under fine control), these frequency response methods are now experimentally practical for a wide range of biological systems, as evidenced by a number of successful recent applications of these techniques. We use a yeast G-protein signaling cascade as a running example, illustrating both theoretical concepts and practical considerations while keeping mathematical details to a minimum. The review aims to provide the reader with the tools required to design frequency response experiments for their own biological system and the background required to analyze and interpret the resulting data.

  13. Comparative performance of decoupled input-output linearizing controller and linear interpolation PID controller: enhancing biomass and ethanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Persad, A; Chopda, V R; Rathore, A S; Gomes, J

    2013-02-01

    A decoupled input-output linearizing controller (DIOLC) was designed as an alternative advanced control strategy for controlling bioprocesses. Simulation studies of its implementation were carried out to control ethanol and biomass production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its performance was compared to that of a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller with parameters tuned according to a linear schedule. The overall performance of the DIOLC was better in the test experiments requiring the controllers to respond accurately to simultaneous changes in the trajectories of the substrate and dissolved oxygen concentration. It also exhibited better performance in perturbation experiments of the most significant parameters q (S,max), q (O2,max), and k ( s ), determined through a statistical design of experiments involving 730 simulations. DIOLC exhibited a superior ability of constraining the process when implemented in extreme metabolic regimes of high oxygen demand for maximizing biomass concentration and low oxygen demand for maximizing ethanol concentration.

  14. GD-aided IOL (input-output linearisation) controller for handling affine-form nonlinear system with loose condition on relative degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunong; Chen, Dechao; Jin, Long; Zhang, Yinyan; Yin, Yonghua

    2016-04-01

    Input-output linearisation (IOL) may encounter a singularity problem when applied to the tracking control of affine-form nonlinear system (AFNS), which may not have a well-defined relative degree. The singularity problem has occurred in the area of control for decades. In this paper, we incorporate the gradient dynamics (GD) into IOL, which leads to the GD-aided IOL method to solve the singularity problem, with the proposition of the loose condition on relative degree. Moreover, detailed theoretical analyses on tracking-error bound and convergence performance of the corresponding GD-aided IOL controller are presented. Simulations and comparisons substantiate that the proposed GD-aided IOL method is capable of completing the tracking-control task and conquering the singularity encountered in the AFNS.

  15. Morphology, input-output relations and synaptic connectivity of Cajal-Retzius cells in layer 1 of the developing neocortex of CXCR4-EGFP mice.

    PubMed

    Anstötz, Max; Cosgrove, Kathleen E; Hack, Iris; Mugnaini, Enrico; Maccaferri, Gianmaria; Lübke, Joachim H R

    2014-11-01

    Layer 1 (L1) neurons, in particular Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells are among the earliest generated neurons in the neocortex. However, their role and that of L1 GABAergic interneurons in the establishment of an early cortical microcircuit are still poorly understood. Thus, the morphology of whole-cell recorded and biocytin-filled CR cells was investigated in postnatal day (P) 7-11 old CXCR4-EGFP mice where CR cells can be easily identified by their fluorescent appearance. Confocal-, light- and subsequent electron microscopy was performed to investigate their developmental regulation, morphology, synaptic input-output relationships and electrophysiological properties. CR cells reached their peak in occurrence between P4 to P7 and from thereon declined to almost complete disappearance at P14 by undergoing selective cell death through apoptosis. CR cells formed a dense and long-range horizontal network in layer 1 with a remarkable high density of synaptic boutons along their axons. They received dense GABAergic and non-GABAergic synaptic input and in turn provided synaptic output preferentially with spines or shafts of terminal tuft dendrites of pyramidal neurons. Interestingly, no dye-coupling between CR cells with other cortical neurons was observed as reported for other species, however, biocytin-labeling of individual CR cells leads to co-staining of L1 end foot astrocytes. Electrophysiologically, CR cells are characterized by a high input resistance and a characteristic firing pattern. Increasing depolarizing currents lead to action potential of decreasing amplitude and increasing half width, often terminated by a depolarization block. The presence of membrane excitability, the high density of CR cells in layer 1, their long-range horizontal axonal projection together with a high density of synaptic boutons and their synaptic input-output relationship suggest that they are an integral part of an early cortical network important not only in layer 1 but also for the

  16. Applying the input-output method to account for water footprint and virtual water trade in the Haihe River basin in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu; Yang, Hong; Yang, Zhifeng; Chen, Bin; Qin, Yan

    2010-12-01

    The virtual water strategy which advocates importing water intensive products and exporting products with low water intensity is gradually accepted as one of the options for solving water crisis in severely water scarce regions. However, if we count the virtual water embodied in imported products as the water saved for a region, we might overestimate the saving by including the virtual water that is later re-exported in association with the proceeded products made from the originally imported products. This problem can be avoided by accounting for the saved water through calculating water footprint (WF) in domestic final consumptive products. In this paper, an input-output analysis (IOA) based on the water footprint accounting framework is built to account for WF and virtual water trade of final consumptive products in the water stressed Haihe River basin in China for the year 1997, 2000, and 2002. The input-output transaction tables of the three years are constructed. The results show WF of 46.57, 44.52, and 42.71 billion m(3) for the three years, respectively. These volumes are higher than the water used directly in the corresponding years in the basin. A WF intensity (WFI) indicator is then used to assess if the economic activities in the basin are consistent with the virtual water strategy. The temporal change of the WFI is also decomposed by the index number analysis method. The results showed that the basin was silently importing virtual water through the trade of raw and processed food commodities under the background of the whole economic circulation.

  17. Transarterial Chemoembolization (TACE) for Inoperable Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Herber, S. Otto, G.; Schneider, J.; Manzl, N.; Kummer, I.; Kanzler, S.; Schuchmann, A.; Thies, J.; Dueber, C.; Pitton, M.

    2007-11-15

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the safety and efficacy of chemoembolization (TACE) as palliative treatment for patients with unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) and to compare the results with those in the literature. Fifteen patients with histology-proven CCA (5 men, 10 women) had received palliative treatment with TACE over a 6-year period. The treatment protocol comprised repeated TACE at a minimum of 8-week intervals. TACE was performed with a mixture of 10 ml Lipiodol and 10 mg mitomycin C injected into the tumor-supplying vessels. Follow-up investigations after 8-10 weeks comprised contrast-enhanced multislice spiral CT and laboratory control. Statistical evaluation included survival analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method. During the investigation period 58 TACEs (3.9 {+-} 3.8; 1-15) were performed in 15 patients. Mean tumor size was 10.8 {+-} 4.6 cm (range, 2.0-18.0 cm). Unifocal tumor disease was diagnosed in eight patients, and multifocal disease in seven. Mean survival was 21.1 months (95% CI, 9.4-32.5 months). At the end of the investigation period 3 patients are still alive, and 12 patients have died. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rate was 51.3%, 27.5%, and 27.5% respectively. According to RECIST criteria interim best response to therapy was stable disease in 9 of 15 patients, a partial response in 1 of 15 patients, and tumor progression in 4 of 15 patients. No deaths and no acute liver failure occurred under TACE therapy. Major complications were observed in two patients, comprising anaphylactic shock owing to contrast medium administration in one and gastric ulceration due to lipiodol displacement in the second patient. These results demonstrate that TACE is a safe procedure with a moderate number of complications for patients suffering from inoperable CCA. According to recently published data on i.v. chemotherapy we suggest that TACE might be able to prolong survival in selected patients who would succumb under

  18. Utilizing a shallow trench isolation parasitic transistor to characterize the total ionizing dose effect of partially-depleted silicon-on-insulator input/output n-MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chao; Hu, Zhi-Yuan; Ning, Bing-Xu; Huang, Hui-Xiang; Fan, Shuang; Zhang, Zheng-Xuan; Bi, Da-Wei; En, Yun-Fei

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the effects of 60Co γ-ray irradiation on the 130 nm partially-depleted silicon-on-isolator (PDSOI) input/output (I/O) n-MOSFETs. A shallow trench isolation (STI) parasitic transistor is responsible for the observed hump in the back-gate transfer characteristic curve. The STI parasitic transistor, in which the trench oxide acts as the gate oxide, is sensitive to the radiation, and it introduces a new way to characterize the total ionizing dose (TID) responses in the STI oxide. A radiation enhanced drain induced barrier lower (DIBL) effect is observed in the STI parasitic transistor. It is manifested as the drain bias dependence of the radiation-induced off-state leakage and the increase of the DIBL parameter in the STI parasitic transistor after irradiation. Increasing the doping concentration in the whole body region or just near the STI sidewall can increase the threshold voltage of the STI parasitic transistor, and further reduce the radiation-induced off-state leakage. Moreover, we find that the radiation-induced trapped charge in the buried oxide leads to an obvious front-gate threshold voltage shift through the coupling effect. The high doping concentration in the body can effectively suppress the radiation-induced coupling effect.

  19. Reconstruction of an object from its Fourier modulus: development of the combination algorithm composed of the hybrid input-output algorithm and its converging part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takajo, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Tohru; Itoh, Katsuhiko; Fujisaki, Toshiro

    2002-10-01

    The hybrid input-output algorithm (HIO) used for phase retrieval is in many cases combined with the error-reduction algorithm (ER) to attempt to stabilize the HIO. However, in our previous paper [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 16, 2163 (1999)], it was demonstrated that this combination makes it more likely that the resultant algorithm will fall into a periodic state before reaching a solution because the values of the input object outside the support, which is imposed as the object-domain constraint, are set to be zero in the intervals in which the ER is implemented. This paper deals with this problem inherent in the combination algorithm. The converging part of the HIO (CPHIO), which is an algorithm we previously developed [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 15, 2849 (1998)], can be thought of as an extension of the ER for the case in which the input object can have nonzero values outside the support. Keeping this in mind, the algorithm is then constructed by combining the HIO with the CPHIO instead of with the ER. The computer simulation results that demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm are given.

  20. Reconstruction of an object from its Fourier modulus: development of the combination algorithm composed of the hybrid input-output algorithm and its converging part.

    PubMed

    Takajo, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Tohru; Itoh, Katsuhiko; Fujisaki, Toshiro

    2002-10-10

    The hybrid input-output algorithm (HIO) used for phase retrieval is in many cases combined with the error-reduction algorithm (ER) to attempt to stabilize the HIO. However, in our previous paper [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 16, 2163 (1999)], it was demonstrated that this combination makes it more likely that the resultant algorithm will fall into a periodic state before reaching a solution because the values of the input object outside the support, which is imposed as the object-domain constraint, are set to be zero in the intervals in which the ER is implemented. This paper deals with this problem inherent in the combination algorithm. The converging part of the HIO (CPHIO), which is an algorithm we previously developed [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 15, 2849 (1998)], can be thought of as an extension of the ER for the case in which the input object can have nonzero values outside the support. Keeping this in mind, the algorithm is then constructed by combining the HIO with the CPHIO instead of with the ER. The computer simulation results that demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm are given.

  1. Development of a pulse programmer for magnetic resonance imaging using a personal computer and a high-speed digital input-output board.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Seitaro; Kose, Katsumi; Haishi, Tomoyuki

    2012-05-01

    We have developed a pulse programmer for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a personal computer and a commercially available high-speed digital input-output board. The software for the pulse programmer was developed using C∕C++ and .NET Framework 2.0 running under the Windows 7 operating system. The pulse programmer was connected to a digital MRI transceiver using a 32-bit parallel interface, and 128-bit data (16 bits × 8 words) for the pulse sequence and the digitally detected MRI signal were transferred bi-directionally every 1 μs. The performance of the pulse programmer was evaluated using a 1.0 T permanent magnet MRI system. The acquired MR images demonstrated the usefulness of the pulse programmer. Although our pulse programmer was developed for a specially designed digital MRI transceiver, our approach can be used for any MRI system if the interface for the transceiver is properly designed. Therefore, we have concluded that our approach is promising for MRI pulse programmers.

  2. Distributed fault diagnosis for process and sensor faults in a class of interconnected input-output nonlinear discrete-time systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keliris, Christodoulos; Polycarpou, Marios M.; Parisini, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a distributed fault diagnosis scheme able to deal with process and sensor faults in an integrated way for a class of interconnected input-output nonlinear uncertain discrete-time systems. A robust distributed fault detection scheme is designed, where each interconnected subsystem is monitored by its respective fault detection agent, and according to the decisions of these agents, further information regarding the type of the fault can be deduced. As it is shown, a process fault occurring in one subsystem can only be detected by its corresponding detection agent whereas a sensor fault in a subsystem can be detected by either its corresponding detection agent or the detection agent of another subsystem that is affected by the subsystem where the sensor fault occurred. This discriminating factor is exploited for the derivation of a high-level isolation scheme. Moreover, process and sensor fault detectability conditions characterising quantitatively the class of detectable faults are derived. Finally, a simulation example is used to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed distributed fault detection scheme.

  3. Development of a pulse programmer for magnetic resonance imaging using a personal computer and a high-speed digital input-output board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Seitaro; Kose, Katsumi; Haishi, Tomoyuki

    2012-05-01

    We have developed a pulse programmer for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a personal computer and a commercially available high-speed digital input-output board. The software for the pulse programmer was developed using C/C++ and .NET Framework 2.0 running under the Windows 7 operating system. The pulse programmer was connected to a digital MRI transceiver using a 32-bit parallel interface, and 128-bit data (16 bits × 8 words) for the pulse sequence and the digitally detected MRI signal were transferred bi-directionally every 1 μs. The performance of the pulse programmer was evaluated using a 1.0 T permanent magnet MRI system. The acquired MR images demonstrated the usefulness of the pulse programmer. Although our pulse programmer was developed for a specially designed digital MRI transceiver, our approach can be used for any MRI system if the interface for the transceiver is properly designed. Therefore, we have concluded that our approach is promising for MRI pulse programmers.

  4. Inventory of CO2 emissions driven by energy consumption in Hubei Province: a time-series energy input-output analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiashuo; Luo, Ran; Yang, Qing; Yang, Haiping

    2016-03-01

    Based on an input-output analysis, this paper compiles inventories of fuel-related CO2 emissions of Hubei economy in the years of 2002, 2005, and 2007. Results show that calculated total direct CO2 emissions rose from 114,462.69 kt (2002) to 196,650.31 kt (2005), reaching 210,419.93 kt in 2007, with an average 22.50% rate of increase. Raw coal was the dominant source of the direct emissions throughout the three years. The sector of Electric Power, Heat Production, and Supply was the main direct emissions contributor, with the largest intensities observed from 2002 (1192.97 g/CNY) to 2007 (1739.15 g/ CNY). From the industrial perspective, the secondary industry, which is characterized as manufacture of finished products, was still the pillar of the Hubei economy during this period concerned, contributing more than 80% of the total direct emissions. As a net exporter of embodied CO2 emissions in 2002 and 2007, Hubei reported net-exported emissions of 4109.00 kt and 17,871.77 kt respectively; however, Hubei was once a net importer of CO2 emissions in 2005 (2511.93 kt). The CO2 emissions embodied in export and fixed capital formation had the two leading fractions of emissions embodied in the final use. The corresponding countermeasures, such as promoting renewable and clean energy and properly reducing the exports of low value added and carbon-intensive products are suggestions for reducing CO2 emissions in Hubei.

  5. NMDA currents modulate the synaptic input-output functions of neurons in the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus in Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Porres, Christian P; Meyer, Elisabeth M M; Grothe, Benedikt; Felmy, Felix

    2011-03-23

    Neurons in the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (DNLL) receive excitatory and inhibitory inputs from the superior olivary complex (SOC) and convey GABAergic inhibition to the contralateral DNLL and the inferior colliculi. Unlike the fast glycinergic inhibition in the SOC, this GABAergic inhibition outlasts auditory stimulation by tens of milliseconds. Two mechanisms have been postulated to explain this persistent inhibition. One, an "integration-based" mechanism, suggests that postsynaptic excitatory integration in DNLL neurons generates prolonged activity, and the other favors the synaptic time course of the DNLL output itself. The feasibility of the integration-based mechanism was tested in vitro in DNLL neurons of Mongolian gerbils by quantifying the cellular excitability and synaptic input-output functions (IO-Fs). All neurons were sustained firing and generated a near monotonic IO-F on current injections. From synaptic stimulations, we estimate that activation of approximately five fibers, each on average liberating ∼18 vesicles, is sufficient to trigger a single postsynaptic action potential. A strong single pulse of afferent fiber stimulation triggered multiple postsynaptic action potentials. The steepness of the synaptic IO-F was dependent on the synaptic NMDA component. The synaptic NMDA receptor current defines the slope of the synaptic IO-F by enhancing the temporal and spatial EPSP summation. Blocking this NMDA-dependent amplification during postsynaptic integration of train stimulations resulted into a ∼20% reduction of the decay time course of the GABAergic inhibition. Thus, our data show that the NMDA-dependent amplification of the postsynaptic activity contributes to the GABAergic persistent inhibition generated by DNLL neurons.

  6. Inventory of CO2 emissions driven by energy consumption in Hubei Province: a time-series energy input-output analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiashuo; Luo, Ran; Yang, Qing; Yang, Haiping

    2016-12-01

    Based on an input-output analysis, this paper compiles inventories of fuel-related CO2 emissions of Hubei economy in the years of 2002, 2005, and 2007. Results show that calculated total direct CO2 emissions rose from 114,462.69 kt (2002) to 196,650.31 kt (2005), reaching 210,419.93 kt in 2007, with an average 22.50% rate of increase. Raw coal was the dominant source of the direct emissions throughout the three years. The sector of Electric Power, Heat Production, and Supply was the main direct emissions contributor, with the largest intensities observed from 2002 (1192.97 g/CNY) to 2007 (1739.15 g/ CNY). From the industrial perspective, the secondary industry, which is characterized as manufacture of finished products, was still the pillar of the Hubei economy during this period concerned, contributing more than 80% of the total direct emissions. As a net exporter of embodied CO2 emissions in 2002 and 2007, Hubei reported net-exported emissions of 4109.00 kt and 17,871.77 kt respectively; however, Hubei was once a net importer of CO2 emissions in 2005 (2511.93 kt). The CO2 emissions embodied in export and fixed capital formation had the two leading fractions of emissions embodied in the final use. The corresponding countermeasures, such as promoting renewable and clean energy and properly reducing the exports of low value added and carbon-intensive products are suggestions for reducing CO2 emissions in Hubei.

  7. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) in advanced inoperable bronchial carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghissi, Keyvan; Dixon, Kate; Stringer, Mark R.; Brown, Stanley B.

    1996-12-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of PDT to: Palliate symptoms, control disease and extend survival in patients with advanced inoperable cancer. Subject and Method: 55 Males and 23 females aged between 45-81 years (mean 66 years) with inoperable and advanced lung cancer with > 5O. obstructive lesions of the main, lobar or segmental bronchi. Patients had pre-treatment routine clinical radiological, functional and endoscopic assessment with proven histological diagnosis. Protocol of PDT was; Intravenous injection of 2 mg/Kg bodyweight Polyhaematoporphyrin (equivalent to Photofrin) or Photofrin followed 24-72 hours later by illumination of tumour using 630 nm light (Oxford Laser) delivered via an optical fibre with end diffuser. Treatments were carried out under general anaesthesia as a day case procedure. Patients were rebronchoscoped for debridement/retreatment 4-7 days later. Results: There was no treatment related mortality. Two patients developed mild photosensitivity reaction. All patients showed symptomatic improvement with good initial functional and radiological amelioration. Every patient responded to treatment. Seven patients had complete response and negative histology for 3-12 months. After the first treatment average Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) and Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1) improvement was 0.5 litres and 0.4 litres respectively. Twenty five percent of patients (nr 19) survived more than 2 years, 10'. (nr=8) between 1-2 years and the remaining 51 patients less than a year. Conclusion: PDT should be considered as a therapeutic modality for all stages of lung cancer and is an excellent treatment modality for palliation in advanced bronchial malignancies.

  8. Atomic resolution tomography reconstruction of tilt series based on a GPU accelerated hybrid input-output algorithm using polar Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiangwen; Gao, Wenpei; Zuo, Jian-Min; Yuan, Jiabin

    2015-02-01

    Advances in diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have greatly improved the prospect of three-dimensional (3D) structure reconstruction from two-dimensional (2D) images or diffraction patterns recorded in a tilt series at atomic resolution. Here, we report a new graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated iterative transformation algorithm (ITA) based on polar fast Fourier transform for reconstructing 3D structure from 2D diffraction patterns. The algorithm also applies to image tilt series by calculating diffraction patterns from the recorded images using the projection-slice theorem. A gold icosahedral nanoparticle of 309 atoms is used as the model to test the feasibility, performance and robustness of the developed algorithm using simulations. Atomic resolution in 3D is achieved for the 309 atoms Au nanoparticle using 75 diffraction patterns covering 150° rotation. The capability demonstrated here provides an opportunity to uncover the 3D structure of small objects of nanometers in size by electron diffraction.

  9. Effects of Reservoir Filling on Sediment and Nutrient Removal in the Lower Susquehanna River Reservoir: An Input-Output Analysis Based on Long-Term Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, W. P.; Zhang, Q.; Hirsch, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Reduction of suspended sediment (SS), total phosphorus (TP), and total nitrogen is an important focus for Chesapeake Bay watershed management. Susquehanna River, the bay's largest tributary, has drawn attention because SS load from behind Conowingo Dam (near the river fall-line) has risen dramatically recently. To better understand these changes, we evaluated decadal-scale (1986-2013) history of concentrations and fluxes using data from sites above and below the reservoir. First, observed concentration-discharge relationships show declined SS and TP concentrations at the reservoir inlet under most discharges in recent years, but such changes have not been propagated to emerge at the outlet, implying recently diminished reservoir trapping. Second, best estimates of loadings show declined net depositions of SS and TP in recent decades, which occurred under a range of discharges, with the 75th~99.5th percentile of Conowingo discharge dominating such changes and carrying most sediment/nutrient loadings. Finally, stationary models that better accommodate effects of riverflow variability also show diminished reservoir trapping of SS and TP, which occurred under a range of flows including those well below the literature-documented scour threshold. These findings have significant implications in regard to our understanding and management of this major reservoir and illustrate the value of long-term monitoring programs.

  10. High serotonin levels during brain development alter the structural input-output connectivity of neural networks in the rat somatosensory layer IV

    PubMed Central

    Miceli, Stéphanie; Negwer, Moritz; van Eijs, Fenneke; Kalkhoven, Carla; van Lierop, Ilja; Homberg, Judith; Schubert, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Homeostatic regulation of serotonin (5-HT) concentration is critical for “normal” topographical organization and development of thalamocortical (TC) afferent circuits. Down-regulation of the serotonin transporter (SERT) and the consequent impaired reuptake of 5-HT at the synapse, results in a reduced terminal branching of developing TC afferents within the primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Despite the presence of multiple genetic models, the effect of high extracellular 5-HT levels on the structure and function of developing intracortical neural networks is far from being understood. Here, using juvenile SERT knockout (SERT−/−) rats we investigated, in vitro, the effect of increased 5-HT levels on the structural organization of (i) the TC projections of the ventroposteromedial thalamic nucleus toward S1, (ii) the general barrel-field pattern, and (iii) the electrophysiological and morphological properties of the excitatory cell population in layer IV of S1 [spiny stellate (SpSt) and pyramidal cells]. Our results confirmed previous findings that high levels of 5-HT during development lead to a reduction of the topographical precision of TCA projections toward the barrel cortex. Also, the barrel pattern was altered but not abolished in SERT−/− rats. In layer IV, both excitatory SpSt and pyramidal cells showed a significantly reduced intracolumnar organization of their axonal projections. In addition, the layer IV SpSt cells gave rise to a prominent projection toward the infragranular layer Vb. Our findings point to a structural and functional reorganization of TCAs, as well as early stage intracortical microcircuitry, following the disruption of 5-HT reuptake during critical developmental periods. The increased projection pattern of the layer IV neurons suggests that the intracortical network changes are not limited to the main entry layer IV but may also affect the subsequent stages of the canonical circuits of the barrel cortex. PMID:23761736

  11. Robust Multiple-Input-Output Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Calderbank, "Fast Decoding of the Golden Code by Diophantine Approximation", in Proc. IEEE ITW, Lake Tahoe , CA. USA, 2-6 Sept 2007. 12. S. Sirianunpiboon...wireless system can cause the quality of the transmission to change. This effect is referred to as fading. Fad- ing is caused by the transmitted signal...antennas to provide good quality and large capacity to a wide range of applications requiring high data rates. In short, MIMO techniques allow higher data

  12. Input-output, expandable-parity network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckevitt, J. F., III

    1974-01-01

    Large-scale integrated circuit generates and checks parity of four eight-bit registers. In addition, circuit will indicate by output signal whether parity error exists. Circuit can also generate or check parity of words up to 32 bits. This is done by making appropriate internal wiring connections on the large-scale integrated chip.

  13. Boundary Condition Error for Parametric Updating of In-Operation SYSTEMS—APPLICATION to Piping Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FRIKHA, S.; GAUDIN, M.; COFFIGNAL, G.

    2001-03-01

    There is an increasing interest in experimental analysis of in-operation structures where a part of the boundary conditions is poorly known. This concerns particularly the case of coupled systems where some complex physical phenomena make the behaviour of both the system and its connectivity dependent on the functioning conditions. In this context, this paper presents a new frequency approach for parametric structural updating in the vibration and acoustic fields. This methodology is developed here in the case of piping systems. It follows the boundary conditions identification method previously developed by the authors. A boundary conditions error is presented and its efficiency to translate structural parameters error is shown. Thus, the proposed approach allows performing the identification of some unknown boundary conditions and, simultaneously, updating the model of the tested structure. The pertinence of a frequency choice criteria based on the smallest singular value of the solved system during the identification of the boundary conditions is shown. It specifically allows avoiding the bands of critical frequencies. The developed updating technique is tested with two actual cases: a laboratory test case and an industrial example.

  14. Palliative Radiation Therapy for Symptomatic Control of Inoperable Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Anatoly; Benda, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is traditionally considered to be resistant to conventional low dose radiation therapy (RT). The emergence of image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) made it possible to deliver much higher doses of radiation. Recent clinical trials of SBRT for RCC showed improvement in local control rates and acceptable toxicity. Here we report a case of inoperable symptomatic RCC that was managed with SBRT. Strikingly, the presenting symptoms of gross hematuria and severe anemia were completely resolved following a course of SBRT. Thus, our case report highlights the potential benefit of this technique for patients with inoperable RCC.

  15. Palliative Radiation Therapy for Symptomatic Control of Inoperable Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaev, Anatoly; Benda, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is traditionally considered to be resistant to conventional low dose radiation therapy (RT). The emergence of image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) made it possible to deliver much higher doses of radiation. Recent clinical trials of SBRT for RCC showed improvement in local control rates and acceptable toxicity. Here we report a case of inoperable symptomatic RCC that was managed with SBRT. Strikingly, the presenting symptoms of gross hematuria and severe anemia were completely resolved following a course of SBRT. Thus, our case report highlights the potential benefit of this technique for patients with inoperable RCC. PMID:26793580

  16. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Bleasdale, C.; Jones, B.

    1995-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer is a major cause of mortality and significant morbidity in the UK. The majority of patients are inoperable and the optimum management of these patients requires a multidisciplinary approach involving the cooperation of respiratory physicians, thoracic surgeons and clinical oncologists (radiotherapists). Treatment techniques are constantly being refined and new approaches developed. Images Figure 2 PMID:7567729

  17. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Creates Surgery Opportunities For Inoperable Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minghao; Hou, Lingmi; Chen, Maoshan; Zhou, Yan; Liang, Yueyang; Wang, Shushu; Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), the systematic chemotherapy given to patients with locally advanced and inoperable breast caner, has been proven to be of great clinical values. Many scientific reports confirmed NAC could effectively eliminate sub-clinical disseminated lesions of tumor, and improve long-term and disease-free survival rate of patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC); however, up to now, LABC is still a serious clinical issue given improved screening and early diagnosis. This study, with main focus on inoperable LABC, investigated the values of NAC in converting inoperable LABC into operable status and assessed the prognosis. Sixty-one patients with inoperable LABC were initially treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy; their local conditions were improved to operable status. Radical surgery was exerted on 49 patients. Original chemotherapy was performed after surgery, followed by local radiotherapy. And endocrine therapy was optional according to the hormone receptor status. The quality of life for most patients with skin diabrosis was obviously improved because their local conditions were under control. For all recruited cases, the survival duration and life quality were significantly improved in patients who finished both NAC and surgery compared to those who did not. Further more, this study demonstrates improved prognostic consequences. PMID:28327615

  18. Guideline for radiotherapy with curative intent in patients with early-stage medically inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Falkson, C.B.; Vella, E.T.; Yu, E.; El-Mallah, M.; Mackenzie, R.; Ellis, P.M.; Ung, Y.C.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives For this guideline, we investigated the effectiveness of radiotherapy with curative intent in medically inoperable patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc). Methods The guideline was developed by Cancer Care Ontario’s Program in Evidence-Based Care and by the Lung Cancer Disease Site Group through a systematic review of mainly retrospective studies, expert consensus, and formal internal and external reviews. Recommendations ■ Stereotactic body radiation therapy (sbrt) with curative intent is an option that should be considered for patients with early-stage, node-negative, medically inoperable nsclc. Qualifying Statements■ Because of the high dose per fraction, the planning process and treatment delivery for sbrt require the use of advanced technology to maintain an appropriate level of safety. Consistent patient positioning and 4-dimensional analysis of tumour and critical structure motion during simulation and treatment delivery are essential.■ Preliminary results for proton-beam therapy have been promising, but the technique requires further clinical study.■ Recommended fractionation schemes for sbrt should result in a biologically effective dose of 100 or greater by the linear quadric model, choosing an α/β value of 10 [bed10(LQ) ≥ 100]. Qualifying Statements■ Because of the increased risk of treatment-related adverse events associated with centrally located tumours, consideration of tumour size and proximity to critical central structures is required when determining the dose and fractionation.■ Examples of dose–fractionation schemes used in the included studies have been provided.■ Based on the current evidence and the opinion of the authors, radiation doses at bed10(LQ) greater than 146 might significantly increase toxicity and should be avoided.■ Determination of the radiation bed by the linear quadratic model has limitations for the extreme hypofractionated schemes used in sbrt. PMID:28270731

  19. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Radiofrequency Ablation for Medically Inoperable, Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The standard management of medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) conventionally has been fractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). The relatively poor local control rate and inconvenience associated with this therapy have prompted the development of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), a technique that delivers very high doses of irradiation typically over 3 to 5 sessions. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has also been investigated as a less costly, single-day therapy that thermally ablates small, peripheral tumors. The cost-effectiveness of these three techniques has never been compared. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to describe health states of 65-year-old men with medically inoperable NSCLC after treatment with 3D-CRT, SBRT, and RFA. Given their frail state, patients were assumed to receive supportive care after recurrence. Utility values, recurrence risks, and costs were adapted from the literature. Sensitivity analyses were performed to model uncertainty in these parameters. Results: The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SBRT over 3D-CRT was $6,000/quality-adjusted life-year, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SBRT over RFA was $14,100/quality-adjusted life-year. One-way sensitivity analysis showed that the results were robust across a range of tumor sizes, patient utility values, and costs. This result was confirmed with probabilistic sensitivity analyses that varied local control rates and utilities. Conclusion: In comparison to 3D-CRT and RFA, SBRT was the most cost-effective treatment for medically inoperable NSCLC over a wide range of treatment and disease assumptions. On the basis of efficacy and cost, SBRT should be the primary treatment approach for this disease.

  20. Apparatus for rendering at least a portion of a device inoperable and related methods

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, Michael A.; Steffler, Eric D.; Hartenstein, Steven D.; Wallace, Ronald S.

    2016-11-08

    Apparatus for rendering at least a portion of a device inoperable may include a containment structure having a first compartment that is configured to receive a device therein and a movable member configured to receive a cartridge having reactant material therein. The movable member is configured to be inserted into the first compartment of the containment structure and to ignite the reactant material within the cartridge. Methods of rendering at least a portion of a device inoperable may include disposing the device into the first compartment of the containment structure, inserting the movable member into the first compartment of the containment structure, igniting the reactant material in the cartridge, and expelling molten metal onto the device.

  1. Argon plasma coagulation compared with stent placement in the palliative treatment of inoperable oesophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sigounas, Dimitrios E; Krystallis, Christoforos; Couper, Graeme; Paterson-Brown, Simon; Tatsioni, Athina

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) are the main palliative modality used in inoperable oesophageal cancer. Other palliative modalities, including argon plasma coagulation (APC), have also been used. Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the relative efficacy of SEMS and APC regarding the survival of patients with inoperable oesophageal cancer, not receiving chemo/radiotherapy. Methods Single centre, retrospective analysis of all patients (n = 228) with inoperable oesophageal cancer between January 2000 and July 2014, not receiving chemo-radiotherapy, treated with SEMS (n = 160) or APC (n = 68) as primary palliation modalities. Cox regression analysis was performed to identify individual factors affecting survival and Kaplan–Meier curves were created for patients treated with APC and SEMS for stage III and IV disease. Survival intervals were compared by the log-rank test. Results Type of treatment was the only statistically significant factor affecting survival, after disease stage stratification (hazard ratio (HR): 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.13–1.65 of SEMS over APC, p: 0.002). Median survival for patients treated with APC and SEMS was 257 (interquartile range (IQR): 414, 124) and 151 (IQR: 241, 61) days respectively in stage III disease. It was 135 (IQR: 238, 43) and 70 (IQR: 148, 32) days respectively in stage IV disease. Both differences were statistically significant (p = 0.02 and 0.05 respectively). Conclusions APC is a promising palliation modality in inoperable oesophageal cancer, when patients are not candidates for chemo-radiotherapy. A randomized controlled trial will be needed to confirm those results.

  2. Chemoembolization alone vs combined chemoembolization and hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy in inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Song; Zhang, Peng-Jun; Guo, Jian-Hai; Chen, Hui; Xu, Hai-Feng; Liu, Peng; Yang, Ren-Jie; Zhu, Xu

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the efficacy and safety of chemoembolization alone or chemoembolization combined with hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC), including oxaliplatin (OXA), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and folinic acid (CF), in inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) without distant metastasis. METHODS: Eighty-four inoperable HCC patients were enrolled. Thirty-nine patients underwent chemoembolization alone, and the other 45 patients underwent chemoembolization + HAIC (OXA/5-FU/CF) treatment non-randomly. The progression free survival (PFS), objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR) and adverse reactions were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: A significant difference in the ORR was observed between the chemoembolization alone and chemoembolization + HAIC groups. There was no statistically significant difference in DCR between the two groups. The median PFS (mPFS) showed a significant difference between the two groups. For patients with BCLC stage A/B disease, with or without vessel invasion, the chemoembolization + HAIC group showed better mPFS when compared to chemoembolization alone, but no significant difference was found in patients with BCLC stage C disease. The parameter of pain (grade III-IV) in the chemoembolization + HAIC group was increased statistically. CONCLUSION: Chemoembolization combined with HAIC with OXA/5-FU/CF may be safe and more effective than chemoembolization alone for inoperable HCC patients without distant metastasis. PMID:26420971

  3. Survival and Quality of Life After Stereotactic or 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy for Inoperable Early-Stage Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, Joachim; Postmus, Douwe; Ubbels, Jan F.; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate survival and local recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) administered for early-stage primary lung cancer and to investigate longitudinal changes of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) parameters after either treatment. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts of inoperable patients with T1-2N0M0 primary lung tumors were analyzed. Patients received 70 Gy in 35 fractions with 3D-CRT or 60 Gy in three to eight fractions with SABR. Global quality of life (GQOL), physical functioning (PF), and patient-rated dyspnea were assessed using the respective dimensions of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Questionnaire-C30 and LC13. HRQOL was analyzed using multivariate linear mixed-effects modeling, survival and local control (LC) using the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox proportional hazards analysis, and Fine and Gray multivariate competing risk analysis as appropriate. Results: Overall survival (OS) was better after SABR compared with 3D-CRT with a HR of 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-4.8; p < 0.01). 3D-CRT conferred a subhazard ratio for LC of 5.0 (95% CI: 1.7-14.7; p < 0.01) compared with SABR. GQOL and PF were stable after SABR (p = 0.21 and p = 0.62, respectively). Dyspnea increased after SABR by 3.2 out of 100 points (95% CI: 1.0-5.3; p < 0.01), which is clinically insignificant. At 1 year, PF decreased by an excess of 8.7 out of 100 points (95% CI: 2.8-14.7; p < 0.01) after 3D-CRT compared with SABR. Conclusion: In this nonrandomized comparison of two prospective cohorts of medically inoperable patients with Stage I lung cancer, OS and LC were better after SABR. GQOL, PF, and patient-rated dyspnea were stable after SABR, whereas PF decreased after 3D-CRT approaching clinical significance already at 1 year.

  4. Survival after Radiofrequency Ablation in 122 Patients with Inoperable Colorectal Lung Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Gillams, Alice; Khan, Zahid; Osborn, Peter; Lees, William

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To analyze the factors associated with favorable survival in patients with inoperable colorectal lung metastases treated with percutaneous image-guided radiofrequency ablation. Methods. Between 2002 and 2011, a total of 398 metastases were ablated in 122 patients (87 male, median age 68 years, range 29-90 years) at 256 procedures. Percutaneous CT-guided cool-tip radiofrequency ablation was performed under sedation/general anesthesia. Maximum tumor size, number of tumors ablated, number of procedures, concurrent/prior liver ablation, previous liver or lung resection, systemic chemotherapy, disease-free interval from primary resection to lung metastasis, and survival from first ablation were recorded prospectively. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed, and factors were compared by log rank test. Results. The initial number of metastases ablated was 2.3 (range 1-8); the total number was 3.3 (range 1-15). The maximum tumor diameter was 1.7 (range 0.5-4) cm, and the number of procedures was 2 (range 1-10). The major complication rate was 3.9 %. Overall median and 3-year survival rate were 41 months and 57 %. Survival was better in patients with smaller tumors-a median of 51 months, with 3-year survival of 64 % for tumors 2 cm or smaller versus 31 months and 44 % for tumors 2.1-4 cm (p = 0.08). The number of metastases ablated and whether the tumors were unilateral or bilateral did not affect survival. The presence of treated liver metastases, systemic chemotherapy, or prior lung resection did not affect survival. Conclusion. Three-year survival of 57 % in patients with inoperable colorectal lung metastases is better than would be expected with chemotherapy alone. Patients with inoperable but small-volume colorectal lung metastases should be referred for ablation.

  5. Image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy in inoperable endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Petsuksiri, J; Chansilpa, Y; Hoskin, P J

    2014-01-01

    Inoperable endometrial cancer may be treated with curative aim using radical radiotherapy alone. The radiation techniques are external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) alone, EBRT plus brachytherapy and brachytherapy alone. Recently, high-dose-rate brachytherapy has been used instead of low-dose-rate brachytherapy. Image-guided brachytherapy enables sufficient coverage of tumour and reduction of dose to the organs at risk, thus increasing the therapeutic ratio of treatment. Local control rates with three-dimensional brachytherapy appear better than with conventional techniques (about 90–100% and 70–90%, respectively). PMID:24807067

  6. Analysis to support power operation with inoperable MSSVs at Seabrook Station

    SciTech Connect

    Ladieu, A.E.; Bergeron, P.A.

    1996-11-01

    Seabrook Station Technical Specification 3.7.1.1 specifies the maximum Power Range Neutron Flux--High reactor trip setpoints with 1, 2, or 3 inoperable Main Steam Safety Valves (MSSVs). The basis for these setpoints is to ensure that the Secondary Side pressure will be limited to within 110% (1,320 psia) of its design pressure of 1,200 psia during the most severe anticipated system operational transient as required by the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The maximum required reliving capacity is associated with a postulated turbine trip coincident with an assumed loss of condenser heat sink. In 1994, Westinghouse notified its customers via a Nuclear Safety Advisory Letter that the trip setpoints supplied in the Technical Specifications (T.S.) may not comply with the basis. In response to the Westinghouse notification, Yankee Atomic Electric Company (Yankee), in cooperation with Seabrook Station engineering/licensing staff, applied safety analysis methodology to support revised Power Range Neutron Flux. High reactor trip setpoints for operation of Seabrook Station with inoperable MSSVs. The methodology was also used to demonstrate that previous power operation complied with the basis to T.S. 3.7.1.1 and to support revised MSSV setpoints. The revised setpoints allow optimal use of MSSVs to mitigate postulated overpressure transients. The methodology is demonstrated in this paper using the optimized MSSV setpoints.

  7. A meta-analysis and systematic review: Success of endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary stenting in patients with inoperable malignant biliary strictures and a failed ERCP

    PubMed Central

    Moole, Harsha; Bechtold, Matthew L.; Forcione, David; Puli, Srinivas R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: In patients with inoperable malignant biliary strictures, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) guided biliary stenting fails in 5% to 10% patients due to difficult anatomy/inability to cannulate the papilla. Recently, endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) has been described. Primary outcomes were to evaluate the biliary drainage success rates with EUS and compare it to percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). Secondary outcomes were to evaluate overall procedure related complications. Methods: Study selection criteria: Studies evaluating the efficacy of EUS-BD and comparing EUS-BD versus PTBD in inoperable malignant biliary stricture patients with a failed ERCP were included in this analysis. Data collection and extraction: Articles were searched in Medline, PubMed, and Ovid journals. Two authors independently searched and extracted data. The study design was written in accordance to PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement. Subgroup analyses of prospective studies and EUS-BD versus PTBD were performed. Statistical method: Pooled proportions were calculated using fixed and random effects model. I2 statistic was used to assess heterogeneity among studies. Results: Initial search identified 846 reference articles, of which 124 were selected and reviewed. Sixteen studies (N = 528) that met the inclusion criteria were included in this analysis. In the pooled patient population, the percentage of patients that had a successful biliary drainage with EUS was 90.91% (95% CI = 88.10–93.38). The proportion of patients that had overall procedure related complications with EUS-PD was 16.46% (95% CI = 13.20–20.01). The pooled odds ratio for successful biliary drainage in EUS-PD versus PTBD group was 3.06 (95% CI = 1.11–8.43). The risk difference for overall procedure related complications in EUS-PD versus PTBD group was −0.21 (95% CI = −0

  8. [Single-dose palliative radiotherapy in inoperable non-small-cell lung carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Scolaro, T; Bacigalupo, A; Giudici, S; Guenzi, M; Vitale, V

    1995-12-01

    The treatment of choice for advanced inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is radiation therapy. Palliative radiotherapy schedules vary considerably in different centers, but a 30-Gy dose given in ten fractions over two weeks is a typical standard schedule. Our study was aimed at investigating whether a shorter course of only one 10-Gy fraction allows good palliation in the treatment of inoperable NSCLC patients whose main symptoms are related to an intrathoracic lesion. Patients of both sexes and any age, untreated with radiotherapy, with inoperable and histologically or cytologically proved NSCLC were examined. Seventeen patients, too advanced for radical "curative" radiotherapy and whose main symptoms were related to primary intrathoracic lesions, entered the study even though they had metastases. On admission, 76% (13/17) of patients had cough 76% (13/17) dyspnea, 70.7% (12/17) chest pain and 23.6% (4/17) hemoptysis. They received a single dose of 10 Gy, delivered with an 18-Mv linear accelerator via anteroposteriorly opposing portals without spinal cord shielding. Treatment volume usually included the macroscopically detected lesion identified with a CT simulator. Palliation of symptoms was achieved in high rates of patients: 46% for cough, 69% for dyspnea, 83% for pain and 75% for hemoptysis. These results were obtained within one month of treatment. Unfortunately, palliation of symptoms did not last long, decreasing to 42% within two months of the end of treatment and to 32% at three months. Four patients were retreated, one patient three months and three patients two months after the end of radiotherapy. Ten Gy to the target volume were administered as retreatment with spinal cord shielding. Side-effects were mild: nausea in 3 patients (17%), vomiting in one patient (5%) and grade-II dysphagia in two patients were observed and classified according to WHO criteria. Pain increased 24 hours after radiotherapy in five patients. We can conclude that

  9. Clinical potential of boron neutron capture therapy for locally recurrent inoperable previously irradiated head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Diana; Quah, Daniel S C; Leech, Michelle; Marignol, Laure

    2015-12-01

    This review compares the safety and efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of previously irradiated, inoperable locoregional recurrent HNC patients and compares BNCT against the standard treatment of platinum-based chemotherapy. Our analysis of published clinical trials highlights efficacy of BNCT associated with mild side effects. However, the use of BNCT should be explored in stratified randomised trials.

  10. Effects of a spleen peptide preparation as supportive therapy in inoperable head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Borghardt, J; Rosien, B; Görtelmeyer, R; Lindemann, S; Hartleb, M; Klingmüller, M

    2000-02-01

    Patients with inoperable head and neck cancer were treated with a spleen peptide preparation (Polyerga) in a phase III randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind study during chemotherapy (cisplatin/carboplatin, 5-fluorouracil) to investigate further the efficacy of this peptide preparation as supportive treatment under chemotherapy. Immunological changes as well as quality of life aspects were examined. Forty patients were included in this study. The peptide preparation had a significant stabilizing effect on the peripheral blood lymphocyte status during chemotherapy cycles (Student t-test, p = 0.05) and tended to stabilize the shift of granulocyte count (Student t-test, p = 0.18). In addition, the group receiving the verum showed a remarkable stabilization of body weight (Mann-Whitney U-test, p = 0.17) during chemotherapy treatment and the generally observed increase of fatigue-inertia during the chemotherapy cycles was significantly reduced (Student t-test, p = 0.01).

  11. Serum Bilirubin and 6-min Walk Distance as Prognostic Predictors for Inoperable Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Juan-Ni; Zhai, Zhen-Guo; Yang, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Yan; Gu, Song; Kuang, Tu-Guang; Xie, Wan-Mu; Miao, Ran; Wang, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a severe clinical syndrome characterized by right cardiac failure and possibly subsequent liver dysfunction. However, whether serum markers of liver dysfunction can predict prognosis in inoperable CTEPH patients has not been determined. Our study aimed to evaluate the potential role of liver function markers (such as serum levels of transaminase, bilirubin, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase [GGT]) combined with 6-min walk test in the prediction of prognosis in patients with inoperable CTEPH. Methods: From June 2005 to May 2013, 77 consecutive patients with inoperable CTEPH without confounding co-morbidities were recruited for this prospective cohort study. Baseline clinical characteristics and 6-min walk distance (6MWD) results were collected. Serum biomarkers of liver function, including levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, GGT, uric acid, and serum bilirubin, were also determined at enrollment. All-cause mortality was recorded during the follow-up period. Results: During the follow-up, 22 patients (29%) died. Cox regression analyses demonstrated that increased serum concentration of total bilirubin (hazard ratio [HR] = 7.755, P < 0.001), elevated N-terminal of the prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (HR = 1.001, P = 0.001), decreased 6MWD (HR = 0.990, P < 0.001), increased central venous pressure (HR = 1.074, P = 0.040), and higher pulmonary vascular resistance (HR = 1.001, P = 0.018) were associated with an increased risk of mortality. Serum concentrations of total bilirubin (HR = 4.755, P = 0.007) and 6MWD (HR = 0.994, P = 0.017) were independent prognostic predictors for CTEPH patients. Patients with hyperbilirubinemia (≥23.7 μmol/L) had markedly worse survival than those with normobilirubinemia. Conclusion: Elevated serum bilirubin and decreased 6MWD are potential predictors for poor prognosis in inoperable CTEPH. PMID:26612283

  12. A framework for linking cybersecurity metrics to the modeling of macroeconomic interdependencies.

    PubMed

    Santos, Joost R; Haimes, Yacov Y; Lian, Chenyang

    2007-10-01

    Hierarchical decision making is a multidimensional process involving management of multiple objectives (with associated metrics and tradeoffs in terms of costs, benefits, and risks), which span various levels of a large-scale system. The nation is a hierarchical system as it consists multiple classes of decisionmakers and stakeholders ranging from national policymakers to operators of specific critical infrastructure subsystems. Critical infrastructures (e.g., transportation, telecommunications, power, banking, etc.) are highly complex and interconnected. These interconnections take the form of flows of information, shared security, and physical flows of commodities, among others. In recent years, economic and infrastructure sectors have become increasingly dependent on networked information systems for efficient operations and timely delivery of products and services. In order to ensure the stability, sustainability, and operability of our critical economic and infrastructure sectors, it is imperative to understand their inherent physical and economic linkages, in addition to their cyber interdependencies. An interdependency model based on a transformation of the Leontief input-output (I-O) model can be used for modeling: (1) the steady-state economic effects triggered by a consumption shift in a given sector (or set of sectors); and (2) the resulting ripple effects to other sectors. The inoperability metric is calculated for each sector; this is achieved by converting the economic impact (typically in monetary units) into a percentage value relative to the size of the sector. Disruptive events such as terrorist attacks, natural disasters, and large-scale accidents have historically shown cascading effects on both consumption and production. Hence, a dynamic model extension is necessary to demonstrate the interplay between combined demand and supply effects. The result is a foundational framework for modeling cybersecurity scenarios for the oil and gas sector. A

  13. Econometric models for biohydrogen development.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duu-Hwa; Lee, Duu-Jong; Veziroglu, Ayfer

    2011-09-01

    Biohydrogen is considered as an attractive clean energy source due to its high energy content and environmental-friendly conversion. Analyzing various economic scenarios can help decision makers to optimize development strategies for the biohydrogen sector. This study surveys econometric models of biohydrogen development, including input-out models, life-cycle assessment approach, computable general equilibrium models, linear programming models and impact pathway approach. Fundamentals of each model were briefly reviewed to highlight their advantages and disadvantages. The input-output model and the simplified economic input-output life-cycle assessment model proved most suitable for economic analysis of biohydrogen energy development. A sample analysis using input-output model for forecasting biohydrogen development in the United States is given.

  14. Voice input/output capabilities at Perception Technology Corporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferber, Leon A.

    1977-01-01

    Condensed resumes of key company personnel at the Perception Technology Corporation are presented. The staff possesses recognition, speech synthesis, speaker authentication, and language identification. Hardware and software engineers' capabilities are included.

  15. Indexing Consistency: The Input/Output Function of Thesauri.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Phyllis; Biever, Erik J.

    1991-01-01

    Describes a study that was conducted to determine how well subject authority lists, or thesauri, control indexing vocabulary. Indexer consistency using the Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaux (CAB) thesaurus was tested by comparing indexing done by CAB and by National Agricultural Library (NAL) indexers. (six references) (LRW)

  16. Fully Burdened Cost of Fuel Using Input-Output Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    her by my side. I love you, Elisa, and I am forever grateful God brought us together. The second person that I must thank is my beautiful son , Johnny...visit the ducks and fish so Daddy could finish his thesis. Next, I would like to thank Professors Eva Regnier and Dan Nussbaum. Through their endless...like to thank my parents for their neverending love, support, and prayer. I am very fortunate and grateful to be your son . xvi THIS PAGE

  17. Input, Output, and Negotiation of Meaning in Spanish Conversation Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rondon-Pari, Graziela

    2014-01-01

    This research study is based on the analysis of speech in three Spanish conversation classes. Research questions are: What is the ratio of English and Spanish spoken in class? Is classroom speech more predominant in students or the instructor? And, are teachers' beliefs in regards to the use of English and Spanish consistent with their classroom…

  18. Hardware efficient monitoring of input/output signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, Kevin R. (Inventor); Hall, Brendan (Inventor); Paulitsch, Michael (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A communication device comprises first and second circuits to implement a plurality of ports via which the communicative device is operable to communicate over a plurality of communication channels. For each of the plurality of ports, the communication device comprises: command hardware that includes a first transmitter to transmit data over a respective one of the plurality of channels and a first receiver to receive data from the respective one of the plurality of channels; and monitor hardware that includes a second receiver coupled to the first transmitter and a third receiver coupled to the respective one of the plurality of channels. The first circuit comprises the command hardware for a first subset of the plurality of ports. The second circuit comprises the monitor hardware for the first subset of the plurality of ports and the command hardware for a second subset of the plurality of ports.

  19. Using voice input/output in the processing of plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, P.F.; Fullerton, R.

    1989-01-01

    A new method for weighing samples of plutonium dioxide is described. An efficient, reliable method of weighing samples and batches is important because a sample and batch may need to be weighed and treated a number of times before they are sufficiently pure for use. Accurate weighing and recording of all plutonium dioxide coming into or leaving the laboratory is also needed to satisfy accountability requirements. In the past, the necessary data were recorded by hand -- a time-consuming, error-prone procedure. This method was further complicated because plutonium cannot be handled safely outside a glovebox, and two operators were needed to record the data: one to weigh the plutonium dioxide and the other to record the weight. When vocal input to a computer is used, two operators are not needed to record data. An operator still handles the material in a glovebox, and measurement is still done within a glovebox, but with automated equipment, thus reducing the risk of radiation exposure and eliminating the need for two operators. This method allows the operator to determine from the glovebox monitor if the weights recorded are reasonable. If not, he can interrupt the procedure and reweigh the material. With computer recording of data, the chance for error is greatly reduced. All data are transmitted directly from the balance to the computer, where the result is displayed on monitors and recorded on a disk. 3 figs.

  20. Input/output properties of the lateral vestibular nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R.; Bush, G.; Ehsanian, R.

    2004-01-01

    This article is a review of work in three species, squirrel monkey, cat, and rat studying the inputs and outputs from the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Different electrophysiological shock paradigms were used to determine the synaptic inputs derived from thick to thin diameter vestibular nerve afferents. Angular and linear mechanical stimulations were used to activate and study the combined and individual contribution of inner ear organs and neck afferents. The spatio-temporal properties of LVN neurons in the decerebrated rat were studied in response to dynamic acceleration inputs using sinusoidal linear translation in the horizontal head plane. Outputs were evaluated using antidromic identification techniques and identified LVN neurons were intracellularly injected with biocytin and their morphology studied.

  1. INPUT-OUTPUT RELATIONSHIPS AMONG SELECTED INTELLECTUAL INVESTMENTS IN AGRICULTURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CVANCARA, JOSEPH GEORGE

    DATA WERE COLLECTED ON TWO GROUPS OF FARM UNITS IN 20 MINNESOTA COMMUNITIES TO DETERMINE PRODUCTION UNIT RESPONSE TO EDUCATIONAL INVESTMENT, AND STUDY CUMULATIVE OR DIMINISHING EFFECTS ON CASH INCOME INCREASES CAUSED BY FARM MANAGEMENT INSTRUCTION OVER 3 YEARS. GROUPS WERE PAIRED ON THE BASIS OF 1962 RECORDS ACCORDING TO SIZE MEASURED IN WORK…

  2. Development of Speech Input/Output Interfaces for Tactical Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    pilot’s eyes out of the cockpit and hands on the flight controls at a critical time . In summa- ry, just because a task can be performed by speech 1 /0...providing time and money are avail- able. The near term speech 1 /0 design is conceived as transcending the foregoing retrofit problems by innovative oesign...will be made in one of three ways as follows: 1 . Not recognized - at which time a speech output which says "say again," will be initiated. 2. Recognized

  3. The application of PLC distributed input/output technology offshore

    SciTech Connect

    Glendening, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    The Programmable Logic Controller is becoming a familiar part of the Process Controls on Offshore Facilities. The current evolution of this expanding technology is Distributed I/O Blocks, and this paper is concerned with the benefits and applications this new technology brings to the Offshore Industry. The advent of the Programmable Logic Controller to the Gulf of Mexico brought greater process control flexibility to Offshore facilities. The offshore control philosophy went from independent pneumatic control of each skid unit to PLC distributed control with field panels that contained the local controls for several skid units and interfaced with control room based PLC visual display stations. The Distributed I/O Block concept allows offshore control systems to eliminate the large field interface panel, along with the associated wiring and hardware cost. This is accomplished by installing Distributed 1/0 Blocks inside the individual skid control panels and then communicating back to the control room based PLC via redundant communication cables. The control wiring between each skid control panel and the control room is now reduced to one power cable and redundant communication cables.

  4. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy as Primary Treatment for Elderly Patients with Medically Inoperable Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vargo, John A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Clump, David A.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: With a growing elderly population, elderly patients with head and neck cancers represent an increasing challenge with limited prospective data to guide management. The complex interplay between advanced age, associated co-morbidities, and conventional local therapies, such as surgery and external beam radiotherapy ± chemotherapy, can significantly impact elderly patients’ quality of life (QoL). Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a well-established curative strategy for medical-inoperable early-stage lung cancers even in elderly populations; however, there is limited data examining SBRT as primary therapy in head and neck cancer. Material/methods: Twelve patients with medically inoperable head and neck cancer treated with SBRT ± cetuximab from 2002 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. SBRT consisted of primarily 44 Gy in five fractions delivered on alternating days over 1–2 weeks. Concurrent cetuximab was administered at a dose of 400 mg/m2 on day −7 followed by 250 mg/m2 on day 0 and +7 in n = 3 (25%). Patient-reported quality of life (PRQoL) was prospectively recorded using the previously validated University of Washington quality of life revised (UW-QoL-R). Results: Median clinical follow-up was 6 months (range: 0.5–29 months). The 1-year actuarial local progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, progression-free survival, and overall survival for definitively treated patients were 69, 100, 69, and 64%, respectively. One patient (8%) experienced acute grade 3 dysphagia and one patient (8%) experienced late grade 3 mucositis; there were no grade 4–5 toxicities. Prospective collection of PRQoL as assessed by UW-QoL-R was preserved across domains. Conclusion: Stereotactic body radiotherapy shows encouraging survival and relatively low toxicity in elderly patients with unresectable head and neck cancer, which may provide an aggressive potentially curative local therapy while maintaining QoL. PMID

  5. SALTO: a randomized, multicenter study assessing octreotide LAR in inoperable bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Laval, Guillemette; Rousselot, Hubert; Toussaint-Martel, Sophie; Mayer, Françoise; Terrebonne, Eric; François, Eric; Brixi, Hédia; Nguyen, Thierry; Bourdeix, Isabelle; Bisot-Locard, Ségolène; Zelek, Laurent

    2012-02-01

    This phase II, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, non-comparative study assessed the efficacy and safety of immediate-release octreotide and octreotide LAR, in combination with corticosteroids and standard medical care, on the symptoms of inoperable malignant bowel obstruction (MBO) due to peritoneal carcinomatosis. The primary efficacy endpoint was "success" at day 14 defined as a composite endpoint including the absence of a nasogastric tube, and vomiting less than twice per day and no use of anticholinergic agents. Patients in the octreotide arm received octreotide LAR 30 mg intramuscular (im) on days 1, 29 and 57, as well as daily immediate-release octreotide 600 μg per day plus methylprednisolone on days 1 to 6. Placebo-treated patients received methylprednisolone and matched placebo instead of octreotide. Difficulties associated with enrolling patients at palliative-care stage meant only 64 patients (instead of the planned 102 patients) were randomized, 32 to octreotide and 32 to placebo. Despite randomization, more patients in the octreotide arm (46.4%) than in the placebo arm (21.9%) had a baseline Karnofsky score less than 50. An intention-to-treat analysis showed that in the octreotide and placebo arms, 12 (38%) and nine (28%), respectively, patients were successfully treated at day 14, which increased to 9/15 (60%) and 7/25 (28%), respectively, among patients with a baseline Karnofsky score greater or equal to 50. Octreotide-treated patients reported three drug-related adverse events (AEs), and no drug-related serious AEs or deaths. Octreotide LAR may have a key role in treating patients with a MBO due to peritoneal carcinomatosis, particularly in those with moderately severe disease.

  6. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation: Long-term survival analysis of 71 patients with inoperable malignant hepatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Niessen, C.; Thumann, S.; Beyer, L.; Pregler, B.; Kramer, J.; Lang, S.; Teufel, A.; Jung, E. M.; Stroszczynski, C.; Wiggermann, P.

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this retrospective analysis was to evaluate the survival times after percutaneous irreversible electroporation (IRE) in inoperable liver tumors not amenable to thermal ablation. 71 patients (14 females, 57 males, median age 63.5 ± 10.8 years) with 103 liver tumors were treated in 83 interventions using IRE (NanoKnife® system). The median tumor short-axis diameter was 1.9 cm (minimum 0.4 cm, maximum 4.5 cm). 35 patients had primary liver tumors and 36 patients had liver metastases. The Kaplan-Meier method was employed to calculate the survival rates, and the different groups were compared using multivariate log-rank and Wilcoxon tests. The overall median survival time was 26.3 months; the median survival of patients with primary land secondary liver cancer did not significantly differ (26.8 vs. 19.9 months; p = 0.41). Patients with a tumor diameter >3 cm (p < 0.001) or more than 2 lesions (p < 0.005) died significantly earlier than patients with smaller or fewer tumors. Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and Child-Pugh class B or C cirrhosis died significantly earlier than patients with Child-Pugh class A (p < 0.05). Patients with very early stage HCC survived significantly longer than patients with early stage HCC with a median survival of 22.3 vs. 13.7 months (p < 0.05). PMID:28266600

  7. DRI Model of the U.S. Economy -- Model Documentation:

    EIA Publications

    1993-01-01

    Provides documentation on Data Resources, Inc., DRI Model of the U.S. Economy and the DRI Personal Computer Input/Output Model. It also describes the theoretical basis, structure and functions of both DRI models; and contains brief descriptions of the models and their equations.

  8. Exercise Training Improves Exercise Capacity and Quality of Life in Patients with Inoperable or Residual Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Herb, Jochen; Ehlken, Nicola; Fischer, Christine; Reichenberger, Frank; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Seyfarth, Hans-Juergen; Mayer, Eckhard

    2012-01-01

    Background Aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effects of exercise training in patients with inoperable or residual chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). Methods Thirty-five consecutive patients with invasively confirmed inoperable or residual CTEPH (16 women;19 men; mean age 61±15 years, mean pulmonary artery pressure, 63±20 mmHg; primary inoperable n = 33, persisting pulmonary hypertension after pulmonary endarterectomy n = 2) on stable disease-targeted medication received exercise training in-hospital for 3 weeks and continued at home for 15 weeks. Medication remained unchanged during the study period. Efficacy parameters have been evaluated at baseline, after 3 and 15 weeks by blinded-observers. Survival rate has been evaluated in a follow-up period of median 36.4 months (interquartile range 26.6–46.6 months). Results All patients tolerated exercise training without severe adverse events. Patients significantly improved the mean distance walked in 6 minutes compared to baseline by 61±54 meters after 3 weeks (p<0.001) and by 71±70 meters after 15 weeks (p = 0.001), as well as scores of quality-of-life questionnaire, peak oxygen consumption and maximal workload. NT-proBNP improved significantly after 3 weeks of exercise training (p = 0.046). The 1-year survival rate was 97%, 2-year survival rate was 94% and the 3-year-survival 86% respectively. Conclusion Training as add-on to medical therapy may be effective in patients with CTEPH to improve work capacity, quality of life and further prognostic relevant parameters and possibly improves the 1-, 2- and 3-year survival rate. Further multicentric randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm these promising results. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01398345 PMID:22848542

  9. Receiving a diagnosis of inoperable lung cancer: patients' perspectives of how it affects their life situation and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Berterö, Carina; Vanhanen, Maria; Appelin, Gunilla

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer is a disease with many biomedical and psychological symptoms. The diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer induces adverse effects. Having an inoperable lung cancer there are few possibilities of being cured. Management of patients with inoperable disease is directed at relieving local or systemic symptoms. The purpose of this study is to describe how it affects the patients' life situation and quality of life. Data was collected by qualitative interviews where the patient's lived experiences were articulated. Twenty-three Swedish patients diagnosed and starting palliative treatment for inoperable lung cancer were interviewed. The interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data were interpreted trough interpretive phenomenology. Six themes were identified that were important for the informants' experience of their life situation and quality of life. The themes were: Experience of uncertainty; including time of waiting and thoughts, experience of hope; about a prolonged life, network as support; being treated as the person they are thoughts of death; is there time to conclude their lives?, feelings of shame and guilt; they have caused the disease by themselves and next of kin reactions; sadness, guilt, worries and anger. These six themes gave a structure presenting the essence: Living as usual. Maintaining independency and integrity were important, as well as maintaining status, being treated as the person they always had been and that they experience that they had a meaning to fulfill in life. They were living as usual. The findings of this study point out the importance of improving the care of people afflicted with lung cancer, as well as promoting support for the next of kin, since they are significantly important for these patients' experiences of quality of life. This knowledge and understanding will be useful for development of interventions and guidelines for treatment.

  10. Radiofrequency Ablation of Stage IA NSCLC in Medically Inoperable Patients: Results from the ACOSOG Z4033 (Alliance) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dupuy, Damian E.; Fernando, Hiran C.; Hillman, Shauna; Ng, Thomas; Tan, Angelina D.; Sharma, Amita; Rilling, William S.; Hong, Kelvin; Putnam, Joe B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluates the two-year overall survival (OS), adverse event rate, local control rate and impact on pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in medically inoperable patients with stage IA NSCLC undergoing CT-guided RFA in a prospective multi-center trial. Methods 54 patients M:F=25:29, median age/range= 76/60–89 were enrolled from 16 US centers 51 patients were eligible (biopsy proven stage IA NSCLC and deemed medically inoperable by board certified thoracic surgeon) for evaluation. PFTs were obtained within 60 days of RFA, 3 and 24 months after RFA. Adverse events were recorded and categorized. Patients were followed by CT and FDG PET. Local control rate and recurrence patterns were analyzed. RESULTS The OS rate was 86.3% at one year and 69.8% at two years. Local tumor recurrence free rate was 68.9% at one year and 59.8% at two years and was worse for tumors >2 cm. In the 19 patients with local recurrence, 11 had retreatment with RFA, nine had radiation and three had chemotherapy. There were 21 grade 3, two grade 4 and one grade 5 AEs in 12 patients within the first 90 days after RFA. None of the grade 4 and 5 AEs were attributed to the RFA. There was no significant change in the FEV1 or DLCO after RFA. Tumor size less than 2.0 cm and performance status of 0–1 were associated with a statistically significant improved survival of 83% and 78% respectively, at two years. CONCLUSIONS RFA is a single minimally invasive procedure, that is well tolerated in medically inoperable patients, does not adversely affect PFTs and gives two year OS that is comparable to that reported following SBRT in similar patients. PMID:26096694

  11. CT-guided 125I seed implantation for inoperable retroperitoneal sarcoma: A technique for delivery of local tumor brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Biao; Guo, Wen-Hao; Lan, Ting; Yuan, Fang; Liu, Guan-Jian; Zan, Rui-Yu; You, Xin; Tan, Qiao-Yue; Liao, Zheng-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Radical surgery is currently the first treatment of choice for retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma (RSTS). However, the prognosis of RSTS remains poor due to ineffective local control and a high incidence of metastasis after surgical resection. Brachytherapy has been shown to safely provide local radiotherapy for numerous types of cancer when used alone or in combination with surgical resection, but has not been well characterized in the management of RSTS. The aim of this study was to evaluate CT-guided 125I seed implantation for local control and pain relief in the treatment of inoperable RSTS. A total of 23 patients with RSTS were treated with 125I implantation. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Other endpoints were evaluated via computed tomography scan or phone call/e-mail records. The occurrence of complications was assessed preoperatively (baseline) and during postoperatively follow-up or until patient succumbed. All patients were successfully treated with 125I implantation. A mean number of 70.87 radioactive seeds were applied in each patient. During the follow-up, two patients were unaccounted for, local recurrence occurred in three patients, five succumbed and complications were observed in sixteen. The patient's VAS score changed from 7.4 preoperatively to 7.6, 2.3, 2.0, 1.2, 1.5, 1.4 and 2.5 at 24 h, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after the procedure, respectively. Good local control and significant pain relief after 125I seed implantation was observed in patients with inoperable RSTS. Thus, the present results suggest that this method could be an effective treatment option for patients with inoperable RSTS. PMID:28101168

  12. High-Dose-Rate Rotte 'Y' Applicator Brachytherapy for Definitive Treatment of Medically Inoperable Endometrial Cancer: 10-Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, Devin; Beriwal, Sushil Heron, Dwight E.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Edwards, Robert P.; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Zorn, Kristin K.; Krivak, Thomas C.

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the intermediate clinical outcomes of medically inoperable patients with endometrial cancer treated with definitive Rotte 'Y' applicator high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) over a 10-year period. Methods and Materials: Forty-nine inoperable patients were treated with HDRB from 1997 to 2007. Forty three (84%) were markedly obese (body mass index >35 kg/m{sup 2}). Thirty-one patients (63.3%) underwent two-dimensional treatment planning, whereas 18 patients (36.7%) underwent three-dimensional treatment planning. Thirty five of the patients (71.4%) were first treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). For patients receiving EBRT in addition to HDRB, the median Y-applicator dose was 20 Gy in 5 fractions; for patients receiving HDRB alone it was 35 Gy in 5 fractions. All patients received two Y-applicator treatments per day. Results: Median follow-up time for all patients was 33 months. Acute HDRB toxicities were limited to Grade 1 and 2 occurring in 5 patients. One patient had a myocardial infarction. Four patients had late Grade 2 or 3 toxicity. Three patients had local recurrence (median time to recurrence, 16 months). The 3- and 5-year actuarial cause-specific survival rates were 93% and 87%, respectively; the overall survival rate was 83% and 42%, respectively, at 3 and 5 years. Conclusions: Twice-daily HDRB using a Y-applicator is a well-tolerated and efficacious regimen for the definitive treatment of medically inoperable patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. The recent incorporation of three-dimensional treatment planning has the potential to further decrease treatment morbidities.

  13. A novel approach to inoperable or recurrent rectal cancer by chemoembolization. A new arrow in our quiver?

    PubMed Central

    Bini, Roberto; Comelli, Simone; Leli, Renzo; Vaudano, Giacomo Paolo; Savio, Daniele; Viora, Tiziana; Addeo, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Assess the feasibility, safety and efficacy of TACE with irinotecan loaded micro particles (debiri) for the treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer patients. Results We assessed the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS). The tool is designed to assess nine common symptoms in cancer patients: pain, tiredness, nausea, depression, anxiety, drowsiness, appetite, wellbeing and shortness of breath. The ESAS score was 7 in 10/12 (83%) patients before treatment and 6 in 2/12 (16.5%) patients. After treatment in 6/12 (50%) patients the score dropped to 3; 3/12 (33%) reported 4, 1/12 (8%) reported 2. All patients experienced local control disease with a degree of citoreduction; in 4 cases (33%) we observed outstanding responses with a dramatic reduction in the tumors size which led us to surgical radical resections. Materials and methods We run a prospective mono-institutional study where we recruited, 12 non- consecutive patients with histology confirmation of rectal cancer, inoperable and not treatable due to severe comorbidities, or pelvic recurrence/progression after curative treatment, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and/or surgery. Their performance status (PS) ECOG was 2-3. Twelve patients (10 male and 2 female) with a median age 71 (range 56-89) were recruited in the study. Conclusions The study has met the primary endpoint and showed encouraging activity. Debiri could be a possible option for locally advanced/inoperable or recurred rectal cancer patients. Further trials are warranted to validate this methodic in early stages. PMID:27303924

  14. Network Interdependency Modeling for Risk Assessment on Built Infrastructure Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    inoperability model (IIM) in the analysis of built infrastructure systems . Previous applications of the IIM characterized infrastructure at the national...infrastructure systems and facilities. .............. 86 Figure 15. Analysis results using a common centrality measure. .................................... 90

  15. Palliative stenting for relief of dysphagia in patients with inoperable esophageal cancer: impact on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Madhusudhan, Chinthakandhi; Saluja, Sundeep S; Pal, Sujoy; Ahuja, Vineet; Saran, Pratap; Dash, Nihar R; Sahni, Peush; Chattopadhyay, Tushar K

    2009-01-01

    The aim of palliation in patients with inoperable esophageal cancer is to relieve dysphagia with minimal morbidity and mortality, and thus improve quality of life (QOL). The use of a self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) is a well-established modality for palliation of dysphagia in such patients. We assessed the QOL after palliative stenting in patients with inoperable esophageal cancer. Thirty-three patients with dysphagia due to inoperable esophageal cancer underwent SEMS insertion between October 2004 and December 2006. All patients had grade III/IV dysphagia and locally advanced unresectable cancer (n = 13), distant metastasis (n = 14), or comorbid conditions/poor general health status precluding a major surgical procedure (n = 6). Patients with grade I/II dysphagia and those with carcinoma of the cervical esophagus were excluded. The QOL was assessed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 (version 3) and EORTC QLQ-Esophagus (OES) 18 questionnaire (a QOL scale specifically designed for esophageal diseases) before and at 1, 4, and 8 weeks after placement of the stent. The mean age of the patients was 56 (range 34-78) years, and 22 were men. A covered SEMS was used in all patients. The most common site of malignancy was the lower third of the esophagus (n = 18, 55%). In 23 (77%) patients, the stent crossed the gastroesophageal junction. Seven patients required a reintervention for stent block (n = 5) and stent migration (n = 2). Dysphagia improved significantly immediately after stenting, and this improvement persisted until 8 weeks (16.5 vs. 90.6; P < 0.01). The global health status (5.8 vs. 71.7; P < 0.01) and all functional scores improved significantly after stenting from baseline until 8 weeks. Except pain (14.1 vs. 17.7; P = 0.67), there was significant improvement in deglutition (22.7 vs. 2.0; P < 0.01), eating (48 vs. 12.6; P < 0.01), and other symptom scales (19.7 vs. 12.1; P = 0.04) following stenting. The

  16. [Response in a case of inoperable bile duct cancer treated by combined chemotherapy of S-1 and gemcitabine].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Nobuhiro; Ayata, Sakura; Maruyama, Yuzuru; Tsukada, Yoshihisa

    2010-08-01

    A 60-year-old male patient was diagnosed as bile duct cancer with left neck and abdominal para-aortic lymph node metastasis. He was treated by combined chemotherapy of S-1 and gemcitabine(GEM). S-1 (120 mg/day) was administered 14 days followed by 14 days rest as one course. GEM (1,000 mg/m2) was administered at 8 and 15 days after the start of S-1. Combined therapy could be continued, though S-1 and GEM were reduced for neutropemia. After 5 courses of treatment, CT and MRCP revealed a partial response. S-1/GEM combined therapy was effective for inoperable biliary tract carcinoma.

  17. A concurrent ultra-fractionated radiation therapy and temozolomide treatment: A promising therapy for newly diagnosed, inoperable glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Beauchesne, P; Quillien, V; Faure, G; Bernier, V; Noel, G; Quetin, P; Gorlia, T; Carnin, C; Pedeux, R

    2016-03-15

    We report on a phase II clinical trial to determine the effect of a concurrent ultra-fractionated radiotherapy and temozolomide treatment in inoperable glioblastoma patients. A phase II study opened; patients over 18 years of age who were able to give informed consent and had histologically proven, newly diagnosed inoperable diagnosed and supratentorial glioblastoma were eligible. Three doses of 0.75 Gy spaced apart by at least 4 hr were delivered daily, 5 days a week for six consecutive weeks for a total of 67.5 Gy. Chemotherapy was administered during the same period, which consisted of temozolomide given at a dose of 75 mg/m(2) for 7 days a week. After a 4-week break, chemotherapy was resumed for up to six cycles of adjuvant temozolomide treatment, given every 28 days, according to the standard 5-day regimen. Tolerance and toxicity were the primary endpoints; survival and progression-free survival were the secondary endpoints. In total, 40 patients were enrolled in this study, 29 men and 11 women. The median age was 58 years, and the median Karnofsky performance status was 80. The concomitant ultra-fractionated radiotherapy and temozolomide treatment was well tolerated. Complete responses were seen in four patients, and partial responses were reported in seven patients. The median survival from the initial diagnosis was 16 months. Several long-term survivors were noted. Concurrent ultra-fractionated radiation therapy and temozolomide treatment are well accepted by the patients. The results showed encouraging survival rates for these unfavorable patients.

  18. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Medically Inoperable Early-Stage Lung Cancer: Excellent Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Stephans, Kevin; Reddy, Chandana; Gajdos, Stephen; Kolar, Matthew; Clouser, Edward; Djemil, Toufik

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To validate the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beams for medically inoperable Stage I lung cancer. Methods and Materials: From February 2004 to November 2006, a total of 26 patients with 28 lesions received SBRT using a Novalis/BrainLAB system. Immobilization involved a Bodyfix vacuum cushion. A weighted abdominal belt limited respiratory excursion. Computed tomographic simulation images were acquired at rest, full inhalation, and full exhalation and were merged to generate an internal gross tumor volume (ITV). Dose was prescribed to cover the planning target volume (PTV), defined as PTV = ITV + 3-5 mm set-up margin. Heterogeneity corrections were used. Delivery of 50 Gy in five sequential fractions typically used seven nonopposing, noncoplanar beams. Image-guided target verification was provided by BrainLAB-ExacTrac. Results: Among the 26 patients, the mean age was 74 years (range, 49-88 years). Of the patients, 50% were male and 50% female. The median Karnofsky performance status was 70 (range, 40-100). The median follow-up was 30.9 months (range, 10.4-51.4 months). Tissue diagnosis was contraindicated in seven patients (26.9%). There were 22 T1 (78.6%) and six T2 (21.4%) tumors. The median conformality index was 1.38 (range, 1.12-1.8). The median heterogeneity index was 1.08 (range, 1.04-1.2). One patient (3.6%) developed acute Grade 3 dyspnea and one patient developed late Grade 2 chest wall pain. Actuarial local control and overall survival at 3 years were 94.4% and 52%, respectively. Conclusions: Use of IMRT-based delivery of SBRT using restriction of tumor motion in medically inoperable lung cancer demonstrates excellent local control and favorable survival.

  19. Robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy for elderly medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Sana D; Horne, Zachary D; Hong, Robert L; Baig, Nimrah; Gagnon, Gregory J; McRae, Don; Duhamel, David; Nasr, Nadim M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is being increasingly applied in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) because of its high local efficacy. This study aims to examine survival outcomes in elderly patients with inoperable stage I NSCLC treated with SBRT. Methods A total of 31 patients with single lesions treated with fractionated SBRT from 2008 to 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. A median prescribed dose of 48 Gy was delivered to the prescription isodose line, over a median of four treatments. The median biologically effective dose (BED) was 105.6 (range 37.50–180), and the median age was 73 (65–90 years). No patient received concurrent chemotherapy. Results With a median follow up of 13 months (range, 4–40 months), the actuarial median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 32 months, and 19 months, respectively. The actuarial median local control (LC) time was not reached. The survival outcomes at median follow up of 13 months were 80%, 68%, and 70% for LC, PFS, and OS, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed a BED of >100 Gy was associated with improved LC rates (P = 0.02), while squamous cell histology predicted for worse LC outcome at median follow up time of 13 months (P = 0.04). Increased tumor volume was a worse prognostic indicator of both LC and OS outcomes (P < 0.05). Finally, female gender was a better prognostic factor for OS than male gender (P = 0.006). There were no prognostic indicators of PFS that reached statistical significance. No acute or subacute high-grade toxicities were documented. Conclusion SBRT is a safe, feasible, and effective treatment option for elderly patients with inoperable early stage NSCLC. BED, histology, and tumor size are predictors of local control, while tumor size and gender predict OS. PMID:28210133

  20. High Radiation Dose May Reduce the Negative Effect of Large Gross Tumor Volume in Patients With Medically Inoperable Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Lujun; West, Brady T.; Hayman, James A.; Lyons, Susan; Cease, Kemp; Kong, F.-M. . E-mail: Fengkong@med.umich.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the effect of radiation dose varies with gross tumor volume (GTV) in patients with stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Included in the study were 114 consecutive patients with medically inoperable stage I/II NSCLC treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy between 1992 and 2004. The median biologic equivalent dose (BED) was 79.2 Gy (range, 58.2-124.5 Gy). The median GTV was 51.8 cm{sup 3} (range, 2.1-727.8 cm{sup 3}). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Kaplan-Meier estimation and Cox regression models were used for survival analyses. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that there was a significant interaction between radiation dose and GTV (p < 0.001). In patients with BED {<=}79.2 Gy (n = 68), the OS medians for patients with GTV >51.8 cm{sup 3} and {<=}51.8 cm{sup 3} were 18.2 and 23.9 months, respectively (p 0.015). If BED was >79.2 Gy (n = 46), no significant difference was found between GTV groups (p = 0.681). For patients with GTV >51.8 cm{sup 3} (n = 45), the OS medians in those with BED >79.2 Gy and {<=}79.2 Gy were 30.4 and 18.2 months, respectively (p < 0.001). If GTV was {<=}51.8 cm{sup 3} (n = 45), the difference was no longer significant (p = 0.577). Conclusion: High-dose radiation is more important for patients with larger tumors and may be effective in reducing the adverse outcome associated with large GTV. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  1. High level modelling and design of asynchronous interface logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, A. V.; Koelmans, A. M.; Lavagno, L.

    1993-11-01

    The authors propose a new methodology to design asynchronous circuits that is divided in two stages: abstract synthesis and logic synthesis. The first state is carried out by refining an abstract model, based on logic predicates describing the correct input-output behavior of the circuit, into a labelled Petri net and then into a formalization of timing diagrams (the Signal Transition Graph). This refinement involves hierarchical decomposition of the initial implementation until its size can be handled by automated logic synthesis tools, as well as replacing symbolic events occurring on the input-output ports of the labelled Petri net with up and down transitions occurring on the input-output wires of a circuit implementation.

  2. Catalog of Wargaming and Military Simulation Models.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    production by industries; sub-titutions of raw materials, energy, inteniiediate goods, and finished products; investment, employment; 235 technology ...Interindustry, Equilibrium, Dynamic, Simulatior, Substitution, Technology , Model, and Economic 238 TITLE: Direct Fire Simulation (BRONZE SCEPTRE I Version...input-output techniques which allow no changes in relative prices and technology and no substitution of inputs or outputs. From that standpoint, it

  3. Proton Beam Therapy for Patients With Medically Inoperable Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer at the University of Tsukuba

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Sugahara, Shinji; Tokita, Mari; Satoh, Hiroaki; Tsuboi, Koji; Ishikawa, Shigemi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in a retrospective review the role of proton beam therapy for patients with medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: From November 2001 to July 2008, 55 medically inoperable patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated with proton beam therapy. A total of 58 (T1/T2, 30/28) tumors were treated. The median age of study participants was 77 years (range, 52-86 years). A total dose of 66 GyE in 10 fractions was given to peripherally located tumors and 72.6 GyE in 22 fractions to centrally located tumors. Results: The rates (95% confidence interval) of overall and progression-free survival of all patients and of local control of all tumors at 2 years were 97.8% (93.6-102.0%), 88.7% (77.9-99.5%), and 97.0% (91.1-102.8%), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in progression-free rate between T1 and T2 tumors (p = 0.87). Two patients (3.6%) had deterioration in pulmonary function, and 2 patients (3.6%) had Grade 3 pneumonitis. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy was effective and well tolerated in medically inoperable patients with Stage I NSCLC.

  4. Alterations in inflammatory biomarkers and energy intake in cancer cachexia: a prospective study in patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bye, Asta; Wesseltoft-Rao, Nima; Iversen, Per Ole; Skjegstad, Grete; Holven, Kirsten B; Ulven, Stine; Hjermstad, Marianne J

    2016-06-01

    Chronic systemic inflammatory response is proposed as an underlying mechanism for development of cancer cachexia. We conducted a prospective study to examine changes in inflammatory biomarkers during the disease course and the relationship between inflammatory biomarkers and cachexia in patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer. Twenty patients, median (range) age 67.5 (35-79) years, 5 females, were followed for median 5.5 (1-12) months. Cachexia was diagnosed according to the 2011 consensus-based classification system (weight loss >5 % past six months, BMI < 20 kg/m(2) and weight loss >2 %, or sarcopenia) and the modified Glasgow Prognostic score (mGPS) that combines CRP and albumin levels. Inflammatory biomarkers were measured by enzyme immunoassays. The patients had increased levels of most inflammatory biomarkers, albeit not all statistically significant, both at study entry and close to death, indicating ongoing inflammation. According to the consensus-based classification system, eleven (55 %) patients were classified as cachectic upon inclusion. They did not differ from non-cachectic patients with regard to inflammatory biomarkers or energy intake. According to the mGPS, seven (35 %) were defined as cachectic and had a higher IL-6 (p < 0.001) than the non-cachectic patients. They also had a slightly, but insignificantly longer survival than non-cachectic patients (p = 0.08). The mGPS should be considered as an additional framework for identification of cancer cachexia.

  5. ZIMOD: A Simple Computer Model of the Zimbabwean Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Jon; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a rationale for the construction and use of a simple consistency model of the Zimbabwean economy that incorporates an input-output matrix. The model is designed to investigate alternative industrial strategies and their consequences for the balance of payments, consumption, and overall gross domestic product growth for a…

  6. Inter-application displacement of brachytherapy dose received by the bladder and rectum of the patients with inoperable cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marosevic, Goran; Ljuca, Dzenita; Osmic, Hasan; Fazlic, Semir; Arsovski, Oliver; Mileusnic, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to examine on the CT basis the inter-application displacement of the positions D0.1cc, D1cc and D2cc of the brachytherapy dose applied to the bladder and rectum of the patients with inoperable cervical cancer. Patients and methods This prospective study included 30 patients with cervical cancer who were treated by concomitant chemo-radiotherapy. HDR intracavitary brachytherapy was made by the applicators type Fletcher tandem and ovoids. For each brachytherapy application the position D0.1cc was determined of the bladder and rectum that receive a brachytherapty dose. Then, based on the X, Y, and Z axis displacement, inter-application mean X, Y, and Z axis displacements were calculated as well as their displacement vectors (R). It has been analyzed whether there is statistically significant difference in inter-application displacement of the position of the brachytherapy dose D0.1cc, D1cc and D2cc of the bladder and rectum. The ANOVA test and post-hoc analysis by Tukey method were used for testing statistical importance of differences among the groups analyzed. The difference among the groups analyzed was considered significant if p < 0.05. Results There are significant inter-application displacements of the position of the brachytherapy dose D0,1cc, D1cc and D2cc of the bladder and rectum. Conclusions When we calculate the cumulative brachytherapy dose by summing up D0,1cc, D1cc and D2cc of the organs at risk for all the applications, we must bear in mind their inter-application displacement, and the fact that it is less likely that the worst scenario would indeed happen. PMID:24991211

  7. Intensity-Modulated and Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Patients with Locally Advanced Inoperable Pancreatic Cancer after Preradiation Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, M.; Ganeshan, R.; Graf, R.; Pelzer, U.; Stieler, J. M.; Striefler, J. K.; Bahra, M.; Wust, P.; Riess, H.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy (RT) in patients with pancreatic cancer is still a controversial subject and its benefit in inoperable stages of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), even after induction chemotherapy, remains unclear. Modern radiation techniques such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may improve effectiveness and reduce radiotherapy-related toxicities. Methods. Patients with LAPC who underwent radiotherapy after chemotherapy between 09/2004 and 05/2013 were retrospectively analyzed with regard to preradiation chemotherapy (PRCT), modalities of radiotherapy, and toxicities. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated by Kaplan-Meier curves. Results. 15 (68%) women and 7 men (median age 64 years; range 40–77) were identified. Median duration of PRCT was 11.1 months (range 4.3–33.0). Six patients (27%) underwent conventional RT and 16 patients (73%) advanced IMRT and IGRT; median dosage was 50.4 (range 9–54) Gray. No grade III or IV toxicities occurred. Median PFS (estimated from the beginning of RT) was 5.8 months, 2.6 months in the conventional RT group (conv-RT), and 7.1 months in the IMRT/IGRT group (P = 0.029); median OS was 11.0 months, 4.2 months (conv-RT), and 14.0 months (IMRT/IGRT); P = 0.141. Median RT-specific PFS for patients with prolonged PRCT > 9 months was 8.5 months compared to 5.6 months for PRCT < 9 months (P = 0.293). This effect was translated into a significantly better median RT-specific overall survival of patients in the PRCT > 9 months group, with 19.0 months compared to 8.5 months in the PRCT  <  9 months group (P = 0.049). Conclusions. IGRT and IMRT after PRCT are feasible and effective options for patients with LAPC after prolonged preradiation chemotherapy. PMID:25401140

  8. [Effect of long-term therapy with oral Beraprost on survival of patients with arterial and inoperable thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Kurzyna, Marcin; Florczyk, Michał; Fijałkowska, Anna; Kuca, Paweł; Szewczyk, Grzegorz; Burakowski, Janusz; Kober, Jarosław; Sikora, Jarosław; Wawrzyńska, Liliana; Szturmowicz, Monika; Tomkowskil, Witold; Torbicki, Adam

    2004-04-01

    Beraprost sodium (BPS)--an orally active prostacyclin analogue--improves haemodynamic parameters and quality of life in group of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Effect of long-term therapy with BPS is not well defined. This study assesses influence of long-term therapy with BPS on the survival of patients with precapillary pulmonary hypertension. Studied group consisted of 25 patients with precapillary PH (18 F, 7M, aged 34 +/- 13,9 years). Sixteen patients were diagnosed with primary PH, 3 pts had PH associated with connective tissue disease, 5 pts developed PH in course of congenital systemic to pulmonary shunt, and 1 patient suffered from inoperable chronic thromboembolic PH. At time of diagnosis 15 pts presented exercise impairment of WHO class II and 10 pts were in functional class III. All studied subjects had complete hemodynamic assessment of right heart and obtained values were used for estimation of hypothetic survival using prognostic equation proposed by D'Alonzo et al. On follow-up period patients received BPS in the highest tolerated dose (80-480 mg daily). During a follow-up period (mean: 22 months) 7 patients died. Cumulative survival rate BPS group was significantly higher in BPS group comparing to hypothetical survival at 6 months (96% (95% CI: 88-104%) vs 73% (95% CI: 67-78%), p = 0.02) and 12 months (94% (95% CI: 84-104%) vs 65% (58-71%), p = 0.01), respectively. At 18 and 24 months differences between BPS virtual and hypothetical survival were not statistically significant. There was no correlation between survival and maximal achieved dose of BPS. These results suggest, that BPS improves prognosis of patients with precapillary PH during 12 months after initiation of therapy. Later effect of BPS seems to decrease, requiring changing or intensification of therapy.

  9. Effects of selenomethionine on acute toxicities from concurrent chemoradiation for inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mix, Michael; Ramnath, Nithya; Gomez, Jorge; de Groot, Charles; Rajan, Saju; Dibaj, Shiva; Tan, Wei; Rustum, Youcef; Jameson, Michael B; Singh, Anurag K

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively determine the safety and tolerability of oral L-selenomethionine (SLM) with concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) for Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and estimate if the incidence and/or severity of adverse events could be reduced by its use. METHODS: Sixteen patients with stage III NSCLC were accrued to this single arm, phase II study. CCRT consisted of radiation given at 2 Gy per fraction for 30-33 fractions, 5 d per week with concurrent weekly IV paclitaxel 50 mg/m2 followed by carboplatin dosed at an area under the time-concentration curve of 2. SLM was dosed in a loading phase at 4800 μg twice daily for one week prior to CCRT followed by once daily dosing during treatment. RESULTS: No selenium-related toxicity was observed. Analysis revealed grade 3 or higher esophagitis in 3 of 16 patients (19%), pneumonitis in 0, leukopenia in 2 (12.5%), and anemia in 1 (6%); the latter two were significantly reduced when compared to the protocol-stated expected rate of 35% (P = 0.045 for leukopenia, and P < 0.01 for anemia). Median overall survival was 14.9 mo and median failure-free survival was 9 mo (95%CI: 3.3-21.5). CONCLUSION: There may be some protective benefit of selenium in the setting of CCRT for inoperable NSCLC. The data suggests decreased rates of myelosuppression when compared to similarly-treated historical and contemporary controls. Further evaluation of selenium in this setting may be warranted. PMID:26468452

  10. Reirradiation With Cetuximab in Locoregional Recurrent and Inoperable Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Feasibility and First Efficacy Results

    SciTech Connect

    Balermpas, Panagiotis; Keller, Christian; Hambek, Markus; Wagenblast, Jens; Seitz, Oliver; Roedel, Claus; Weiss, Christian

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report our experience with a prospective protocol of external beam reirradiation (Re-RT) combined with cetuximab for patients with inoperable, recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and Methods: Between August 2008 and June 2010, 18 patients with inoperable recurrence of SCCHN after adjuvant or definitive radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous or sequential cisplatin-based chemotherapy for primary SCCHN were enrolled. Acute and late toxicity from the experimental regimen were recorded every week during RT and every 3 months thereafter. Efficacy was assessed with repeated imaging using response evaluation criteria in solid tumors and clinical examinations 8-12 weeks after completion of the treatment and every 3 months thereafter. Results: Median follow-up time for all patients was 9.4 (range: 3.85-31.7) months and for patients alive 30.4 (range: 15.7-31.7) months. Acute toxicity was generally mild or moderate. Five patients developed a grade 3 acneiform rash related to cetuximab. Late toxicity occurred as grade 3 trismus in five and as grade 3 abacterial salivary gland inflammation in one patient, respectively. Overall response rate was 47%. Median overall and progression-free survival for all patients was 8.38 months and 7.33 months, respectively. The overall survival rate was 44% at 1 year, with a 1 year local control rate of 33%. Conclusion: Notwithstanding the limitations of our preliminary data Re-RT combined with cetuximab for recurrent and inoperable SCCHN is feasible and the integration of newer targeted agents seems to be less toxic compared to conventional chemotherapy with encouraging response rates at least for a subset of patients.

  11. Induction Chemotherapy and Continuous Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy (CHART) for Patients With Locally Advanced Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The MRC INCH Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Hatton, Matthew; Nankivell, Matthew; Lyn, Ethan; Falk, Stephen; Pugh, Cheryl; Navani, Neal; Stephens, Richard; Parmar, Mahesh

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Recent clinical trials and meta-analyses have shown that both CHART (continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy) and induction chemotherapy offer a survival advantage over conventional radical radiotherapy for patients with inoperable non-small cell-lung cancer (NSCLC). This multicenter randomized controlled trial (INCH) was set up to assess the value of giving induction chemotherapy before CHART. Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically confirmed, inoperable, Stage I-III NSCLC were randomized to induction chemotherapy (ICT) (three cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by CHART) or CHART alone. Results: Forty-six patients were randomized (23 in each treatment arm) from 9 UK centers. As a result of poor accrual, the trial was closed in December 2007. Twenty-eight patients were male, 28 had squamous cell histology, 34 were Stage IIIA or IIIB, and all baseline characteristics were well balanced between the two treatment arms. Seventeen (74%) of the 23 ICT patients completed the three cycles of chemotherapy. All 42 (22 CHART + 20 ICT) patients who received CHART completed the prescribed treatment. Median survival was 17 months in the CHART arm and 25 months in the ICT arm (hazard ratio of 0.60 [95% CI 0.31-1.16], p = 0.127). Grade 3 or 4 adverse events (mainly fatigue, dysphagia, breathlessness, and anorexia) were reported for 13 (57%) CHART and 13 (65%) ICT patients. Conclusions: This small randomized trial indicates that ICT followed by CHART is feasible and well tolerated. Despite closing early because of poor accrual, and so failing to show clear evidence of a survival benefit for the additional chemotherapy, the results suggest that CHART, and ICT before CHART, remain important options for the treatment of inoperable NSCLC and deserve further study.

  12. Toxicity and Patterns of Failure of Adaptive/Ablative Proton Therapy for Early-Stage, Medically Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joe Y.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Wen, Hong Y.; De Gracia, Beth; Bluett, Jaques B.; McAleer, Mary F.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Cox, James D.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze the toxicity and patterns of failure of proton therapy given in ablative doses for medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with medically inoperable T1N0M0 (central location) or T2-3N0M0 (any location) NSCLC were treated with proton therapy at 87.5 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) at 2.5 Gy /fraction in this Phase I/II study. All patients underwent treatment simulation with four-dimensional CT; internal gross tumor volumes were delineated on maximal intensity projection images and modified by visual verification of the target volume in 10 breathing phases. The internal gross tumor volumes with maximal intensity projection density was used to design compensators and apertures to account for tumor motion. Therapy consisted of passively scattered protons. All patients underwent repeat four-dimensional CT simulations during treatment to assess the need for adaptive replanning. Results: At a median follow-up time of 16.3 months (range, 4.8-36.3 months), no patient had experienced Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. The most common adverse effect was dermatitis (Grade 2, 67%; Grade 3, 17%), followed by Grade 2 fatigue (44%), Grade 2 pneumonitis (11%), Grade 2 esophagitis (6%), and Grade 2 chest wall pain (6%). Rates of local control were 88.9%, regional lymph node failure 11.1%, and distant metastasis 27.8%. Twelve patients (67%) were still alive at the last follow-up; five had died of metastatic disease and one of preexisting cardiac disease. Conclusions: Proton therapy to ablative doses is well tolerated and produces promising local control rates for medically inoperable early-stage NSCLC.

  13. Dosimetric feasibility of stereotactic body radiation therapy as an alternative to brachytherapy for definitive treatment of medically inoperable early stage endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to evaluate the dosimetric feasibility of definitive stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the treatment of medically inoperable early stage endometrial cancer. Methods CT simulation scans from 10 medically inoperable early stage endometrial cancer patients previously treated with high dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy were used to generate Helical Tomotherapy (HT) plans using the IMRT mode with clinical target volumes (CTVs) that included the uterus plus cervix. A prescription dose of 34 Gy in 4 fractions was used. The SBRT dosimetry was compared to the 10 prior intracavitary brachytherapy plans normalized to a standard dose. Organs at risk (OARs) evaluated were the bladder, rectum, sigmoid, femoral heads, and other bowel, including both large and small bowel. The simulation CT and daily image guidance for 4 patients treated with this technique were evaluated to assess for interfraction variation in the uterine position and effects on dosimetry. Results Compared to intracavitary brachytherapy, HT SBRT produced significantly greater overall target coverage to the uterus, boost CTV, and PTV, with exception of the V150% of the uterus. HT SBRT significantly increased dose to the rectum, bowel, and femoral heads compared to intracavitary brachytherapy, though not outside of dose tolerance limits. Review of daily image guidance for patients treated with this technique demonstrated good reproducibility with a mean overlap index of 0.87 (range, 0.74 – 0.99). Conclusions Definitive SBRT for medically inoperable early stage endometrial cancer appears to be a feasible treatment option. Future studies are warranted to evaluate long-term clinical outcomes with this technique, compared to HDR intracavitary brachytherapy. PMID:25059785

  14. State-Space Modeling, System Identification and Control of a 4th Order Rotational Mechanical System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    state-space form. Identification of the state-space parameters was accomplished using the parameter estimation function in Matlab’s System ... Identification Toolbox utilizing experimental input/output data. The identified model was then constructed in Simulink and the accuracy of the identified model

  15. A Model for the Assessment of Community College Employee Workload Impact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyman, Frank J.

    1995-01-01

    Uses input-output analysis to develop a model that assesses the effect of changes in final-demand work on employees at a South Carolina community college. Model uses matrices and the Leontief inverse function to monitor employee workload impact and analyze simulated scenarios. (YKH)

  16. Description of the FORTRAN implementation of the spring small grains planting date distribution model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artley, J. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The Hodges-Artley spring small grains planting date distribution model was coded in FORTRAN. The PLDRVR program, which implements the model, is described and a copy of the code is provided. The purpose, calling procedure, local variables, and input/output devices for each subroutine are explained to supplement the user's guide.

  17. Endoscopic radiofrequency ablation combined with fully covered self-expandable metal stent for inoperable periampullary carcinoma in a liver transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Qing; Wang, Guijie; Zhang, Yamin; Jin, Yan; Cui, Zilin; Sun, Xiaoye; Shen, Zhongyang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Postliver transplant periampullary carcinoma is an extremely uncommon disease. Patient concerns: Cutaneous jaundice in a patient who had received a liver transplant 4 years earlier. Diagnosis: Periampullary carcinoma. Interventions: Radiofrequency ablation plus fully covered self-expanding metal stents (FCSEMS). Outcomes: The treatment of malignant neoplasm of the ampulla of Vater is the patient by radiofrequency ablation plus FCSEMS placement was successful. No complications occurred. Lessons: This is the first reported case of a liver transplant patient with inoperable periampullary carcinoma successfully treated by radiofrequency ablation plus FCSEMS placement. Our experience will be useful to other surgeons in managing similar patients in the future. PMID:28151854

  18. Aero-elastic Parameter Estimation of a 2.5 MW Wind Turbine Through Dynamic Analysis of In-Operation Vibration Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbek, Muammer; Rixen, Daniel J.

    Aero-elastic parameters of a 2.5 MW—80 m diameter—wind turbine were extracted by using the in-operation vibration data recorded for various wind speeds and operating conditions. The data acquired by 8 strain gauges (2 sensors on each blade and 2 sensors on the tower) installed on the turbine was analyzed by using OMA (Operational Modal Analysis) methods while several turbine parameters (eigenfrequencies and damping ratios) were extracted. The obtained system parameters were then qualitatively compared with the results presented in a study from literature, which includes both aeroelastic simulations and in-field measurements performed on a similar size and capacity wind turbine.

  19. Forward Operating Base Sharana: Poor Planning and Construction Resulted in $5.4 Million Spent for Inoperable Incinerators and Continued Use of Open-Air Burn Pits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Forward Operating Base Sharana: Poor Planning and Construction Resulted in $5.4 Million Spent for Inoperable Incinerators and Continued Use of Open-Air...Burn Pits SIGAR 14-13-IP/Forward Operating Base Sharana Incinerators SIGAR DECEMBER 2 0 1 3 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704... Incinerators and Continued Use of Open-Air Burn Pits 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  20. [Combination of trastuzumab, aromatase inhibitor and anti-cancer drugs obtained a good prognosis for an inoperable stage III B breast cancer patient with giant skin ulceration].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Noriyoshi; Konishi, Juichiro

    2012-04-01

    A 68-year-old woman who had an inoperable, ER-positive, PgR-positive and HER2-positive advanced breast cancer with giant skin ulceration has been treated with the combination of trastuzumab, aromatase inhibitor and anti-cancer drugs. She was thus well-controll for over 9 years. Trastuzumab was administered more than 400 times, but no cardiac toxicity has been observed. The synergistic efficacy of the combination of trastuzumab and anti-cancer drugs was already proven, but it has recently been reported that concurrent treatment of trastuzumab and endocrine therapy improves the prognoses of triple positive breast cancer patients.

  1. Image Guided Hypofractionated 3-Dimensional Radiation Therapy in Patients With Inoperable Advanced Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Osti, Mattia Falchetto; Agolli, Linda; Valeriani, Maurizio; Falco, Teresa; Bracci, Stefano; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (HypoRT) can potentially improve local control with a higher biological effect and shorter overall treatment time. Response, local control, toxicity rates, and survival rates were evaluated in patients affected by inoperable advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received HypoRT. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled; 27% had stage IIIA, 50% had stage IIIB, and 23% had stage IV disease. All patients underwent HypoRT with a prescribed total dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions of 3 Gy each. Radiation treatment was delivered using an image guided radiation therapy technique to verify correct position. Toxicities were graded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity score. Survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up was 13 months (range, 4-56 months). All patients completed radiation therapy and received the total dose of 60 Gy to the primary tumor and positive lymph nodes. The overall response rate after radiation therapy was 83% (3 patients with complete response and 22 patients with partial response). The 2-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 38.1% and 36%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence/persistence occurred in 11 (37%) patients. Distant metastasis occurred in 17 (57%) patients. Acute toxicities occurred consisting of grade 1 to 2 hematological toxicity in 5 patients (17%) and grade 3 in 1 patient; grade 1 to 2 esophagitis in 12 patients (40%) and grade 3 in 1 patient; and grade 1 to 2 pneumonitis in 6 patients (20%) and grade 3 in 2 patients (7%). Thirty-three percent of patients developed grade 1 to 2 late toxicities. Only 3 patients developed grade 3 late adverse effects: esophagitis in 1 patient and pneumonitis in 2 patients. Conclusions: Hypofractionated curative radiation therapy is a feasible and well-tolerated treatment for patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Randomized

  2. Treatment of inoperable coronary disease and refractory angina: spinal stimulators, epidurals, gene therapy, transmyocardial laser, and counterpulsation.

    PubMed

    Svorkdal, Nelson

    2004-03-01

    Intractable angina from refractory coronary disease is a severe form of myocardial ischemia for which revascularization provides no prognostic benefit. Inoperable coronary disease is also accompanied by a "vicious cycle" of myocardial dystrophy from a chronic alteration of the cardiac sympathetic tone and sensitization of damaged cardiac tissues. Several adjunctive treatments have demonstrated efficacy when revascularization is either unsuccessful or contraindicated. Spinal cord stimulation modifies the neurologic input and output of the heart by delivering a very low dose of electrical current to the dorsal columns of the high thoracic spinal cord. Neural fibers then release CGRP and other endogenous peptides to the coronary circulation reducing myocardial oxygen demand and enhancing vasodilation of collaterals to improve the myocardial blood flow of the most diseased regions of the heart. Randomized study has shown the survival data at five years is comparable to bypass for high-risk patients. Transmyocardial laser revascularization creates small channels into ischemic myocardium in an effort to enhance flow though studies have shown no improvement in prognosis over medical therapy alone. Enhanced external counterpulsation uses noninvasive pneumatic compression of the legs to improve diastolic filling of the coronary vessels and promote development of collateral flow. The compressor regimen requires thirty-five hours of therapy over a seven-week treatment period. Therapeutic angiogenesis requires injection of cytokines to promote neovascularization and improve myocardial perfusion into the regions affected by chronic ischemia. Phase 3 trials are pending. High thoracic epidural blockade produces a rapid and potent sympatholysis, coronary vasodilation and reduced myocardial oxygen demand in refractory coronary disease. This technique can be used as an adjunct to bypass surgery or medical therapy in chronic or acute unstable angina. Epidurals are easy to perform and

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Medically Inoperable Lung Cancer: Prospective, Single-Center Study of 108 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Taremi, Mojgan; Hope, Andrew; Dahele, Max; Pearson, Shannon; Fung, Sharon; Purdie, Thomas; Brade, Anthony; Cho, John; Sun, Alexander; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Bezjak, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To present the results of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for medically inoperable patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and contrast outcomes in patients with and without a pathologic diagnosis. Methods and Materials: Between December 2004 and October 2008, 108 patients (114 tumors) underwent treatment according to the prospective research ethics board-approved SBRT protocols at our cancer center. Of the 108 patients, 88 (81.5%) had undergone pretreatment whole-body [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A pathologic diagnosis was unavailable for 33 (28.9%) of the 114 lesions. The SBRT schedules included 48 Gy in 4 fractions or 54-60 Gy in 3 fractions for peripheral lesions and 50-60 Gy in 8-10 fractions for central lesions. Toxicity and radiologic response were assessed at the 3-6-month follow-up visits using conventional criteria. Results: The mean tumor diameter was 2.4-cm (range, 0.9-5.7). The median follow-up was 19.1 months (range, 1-55.7). The estimated local control rate at 1 and 4 years was 92% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86-97%) and 89% (95% CI, 81-96%). The cause-specific survival rate at 1 and 4 years was 92% (95% CI, 87-98%) and 77% (95% CI, 64-89%), respectively. No statistically significant difference was found in the local, regional, and distant control between patients with and without pathologically confirmed NSCLC. The most common acute toxicity was Grade 1 or 2 fatigue (53 of 108 patients). No toxicities of Grade 4 or greater were identified. Conclusions: Lung SBRT for early-stage NSCLC resulted in excellent local control and cause-specific survival with minimal toxicity. The disease-specific outcomes were comparable for patients with and without a pathologic diagnosis. SBRT can be considered an option for selected patients with proven or presumed early-stage NSCLC.

  4. Using Propensity Score Matching to Model Retention of Developmental Math Students in Community Colleges in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frye, Bobbie Jean

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, modeling student retention has been done by deriving student success predictors and measuring the likelihood of success based on several background factors such as age, race, gender, and other pre-college variables, also known as the input-output model. Increasingly, however, researchers have used mediating factors of the student…

  5. The Development of a Cost-Efficiency Model to Assist in Special Education Program Decision-Making and Financing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Daniel P.; Sommers, Paul A.

    Summarized are activities of the Wausau District Public Schools (Wisconsin) toward developing a model for cost efficiency analysis in special education. The model links input-output analysis and task analysis features. Introductory information includes varying impressions of cost efficiency concerns and the current status of project development.…

  6. Misonidazole combined with radiotherapy in the treatment of inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. A double-blind randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Panduro, J.; Kjaer, M.; Wolff-Jensen, J.; Hansen, H.H.

    1983-07-01

    Sixty-seven patients with inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of the lung were randomized to receive split-course irradiation therapy, 40 Gy in 10 fractions over 5 weeks plus either placebo or misonidazole 1.200 mg/m2 orally on each treatment day. The target area was the primary tumor, both hilar regions, mediastinum, and both supraclavicular regions. Thirty-three patients received misonidazole, while 34 patients received placebo. Mean observation time for the study was 27 months (range, 17-36+ months. 31% of the patients in the misonidazole group obtained a complete response (CR) or a partial response (PR) as compared to 29% in the placebo group. No difference was demonstrated in the relapse pattern comparing the two groups. The death intensity was significantly higher (P . 0.03) in the misonidazole than in the placebo group, with the median survival being 4.2 and 6.7 months, respectively. Eight patients in the misonidazole group (31%) developed sensoric neuropathy while one patient in the placebo group developed irradiation myelopathy of the Brown-Sequard type. The group of patients who later developed neuropathy had significantly higher plasma misonidazole concentrations on treatment days than the group of patients who did not. It is concluded that the combination of misonidazole and irradiation therapy for inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of the lung has no effect on response rate and relapse pattern, but a significant unexplained adverse effect on survival.

  7. Information-System Structure by Communication-Technology Concepts: A Cybernetic Model Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisig, Gerhard H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the "Evidence-of-Existence" information system in which the structure is developed, with application of cybernetic concepts, as an isomorphic model in analogy to the system structure of communication technology. Three criteria of structuring are postulated: (1) source-channel-sink, with input-output characteristics, (2) filter-type…

  8. Measuring Resources in Education: A Comparison of Accounting and the Resource Cost Model Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jay G.

    2000-01-01

    The need for programmatic cost information, data compatibility, and understanding input/output relationships are sparking efforts to improve standards for organizing and reporting educational-resource data. Unlike accountants, economists measure resources in real terms and organize information around service delivery, using a resource-cost model.…

  9. Oral everolimus treatment in a preterm infant with multifocal inoperable cardiac rhabdomyoma associated with tuberous sclerosis complex and a structural heart defect.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Ibrahim; Ethier, Guillaume; Goyer, Isabelle; Major, Philippe; Dahdah, Nagib

    2014-11-26

    Rhabdomyoma (RHM) is a benign cardiac tumour usually associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Most RHMs are asymptomatic and regress spontaneously during the first years of life. Haemodynamically significant RHMs are classically treated with surgical excision. We present a case of a premature infant, born to a mother having TSC, with a prenatal diagnosis of pulmonary valve atresia and a large ventricular septal defect. Multiple cardiac RHMs were also present, including a large tumour affecting the right ventricular filling. Owing to the prematurity and low birth weight, the infant was inoperable. In this report, we describe our approach to pharmacologically reduce the RHM size using oral everolimus in preparation for a two-ventricle surgical repair of the structural cardiac defect. We also specifically describe the dose of everolimus that was used in this case to achieve therapeutic serum levels, which was seven times lower than the conventional dose applicable for older infants.

  10. Regional Economic Development Impact Model: Phase I Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    A multiregional variable input-output (MRVIO) model is introduced to investigate the impact of a change in transportation costs on regional development and trade flows. The MRVIO model is a theoretically well-founded, practically useful, and policy sensitive model. The regional technical coefficients and the trade coefficients are endogenous variables to the MRVIO model. These coefficients are sensitive to the transportation costs as...transportation cost stimulates the regional development . However, its sensitivity differs among industries. (Author)

  11. Usefulness of Photodynamic Diagnosis and Therapy using Talaporfin Sodium for an Advanced-aged Patient with Inoperable Gastric Cancer (a secondary publication)

    PubMed Central

    Oinuma, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: In Japan the rise in the average life expectancy has caused an increase in the proportion of the population who are classed as geriatric. Accordingly, the number of elderly people being treated for cancer is increasing concomitantly. However, with the increase in age, the numbers of prior complications also increase. This is especially so in the advanced-aged patients, defined in Japan as those over the age of 85. Such complications may be too high risk for radical surgery and a less invasive treatment is warranted. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive treatment approved by the Japanese National Health Insurance for the treatment of early stage superficial type esophageal and gastric cancers, early stage uterine cervical cancers and dysplasia, and early and advanced lung cancer. We report herein on the efficacy of palliative PDT using talaporfin sodium (Laserphyrin®) for a case of inoperable gastric cancer. Material and methods: The patient was an 87-year-old-man, a diabetic with histories of diabetic nephropathy, cerebral infarction and myocardial infarction. This patient was first diagnosed as having gastric cancer in 2007 but surgery and chemotherapy were contraindicated due to his poor physical status and poor renal function, respectively, owing to the anticipated side effects. The patient was referred to our institution after hearing of PDT in 2009. He was treated with 1 course of porfimer sodium PDT and 3 courses of talaporfin sodium PDT with photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) during the period from September, 2009 to June, 2011. Results: The massive gastric cancer located in the cardia was successfully treated with 4 PDT sessions without any serious complications; therefore the patient was able to orally ingest food until his death due to natural causes other than the cancer, in October, 2011. Conclusion: Talaporfin sodium PDT is safe and effective treatment for advanced-aged patients suffering from inoperable gastric cancer. PMID

  12. 30 Gy or 34 Gy? Comparing 2 Single-Fraction SBRT Dose Schedules for Stage I Medically Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Videtic, Gregory M.M. Stephans, Kevin L.; Woody, Neil M.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Zhuang, Tingliang; Magnelli, Anthony; Djemil, Toufik

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To review outcomes of 2 single-fraction lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) schedules used for medically inoperable early stage lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients in our institution have been treated on and off protocols using single-fraction SBRT (30 Gy and 34 Gy, respectively). All patients had node-negative lung cancer measuring ≤5 cm and lying ≥2 cm beyond the trachea-bronchial tree and were treated on a Novalis/BrainLAB system with the ExactTrac positioning system for daily image guidance. Results: For the interval from 2009 to 2012, 80 patients with 82 lesions were treated with single-fraction lung SBRT. Fifty-five patients (69%) and 25 patients (31%) received 30 Gy and 34 Gy, respectively. In a comparison of 30 Gy and 34 Gy cohorts, patient and tumor characteristics were balanced and median follow-up in months was 18.7 and 17.8, respectively. The average heterogeneity-corrected mean doses to the target were 33.75 Gy and 37.94 Gy for the 30-Gy and 34-Gy prescriptions, respectively. Comparing 30-Gy and 34-Gy cohorts, 92.7% and 84.0% of patients, respectively, experienced no toxicity (P was not significant), and had neither grade 3 nor higher toxicities. For the 30-Gy and 34-Gy patients, rates of 1-year local failure, overall survival, and lung cancer-specific mortality were 2.0% versus 13.8%, 75.0% versus 64.0%, and 2. 1% versus 16.0%, respectively (P values for differences were not significant). Conclusions: This is the largest single-fraction lung SBRT series yet reported. and it confirms the safety, efficacy, and minimal toxicity of this schedule for inoperable early stage lung cancer.

  13. The computational structural mechanics testbed architecture. Volume 5: The Input-Output Manager DMGASP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, Carlos A.

    1989-01-01

    This is the fifth of a set of five volumes which describe the software architecture for the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed. Derived from NICE, an integrated software system developed at Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, the architecture is composed of the command language (CLAMP), the command language interpreter (CLIP), and the data manager (GAL). Volumes 1, 2, and 3 (NASA CR's 178384, 178385, and 178386, respectively) describe CLAMP and CLIP and the CLIP-processor interface. Volumes 4 and 5 (NASA CR's 178387 and 178388, respectively) describe GAL and its low-level I/O. CLAMP, an acronym for Command Language for Applied Mechanics Processors, is designed to control the flow of execution of processors written for NICE. Volume 5 describes the low-level data management component of the NICE software. It is intended only for advanced programmers involved in maintenance of the software.

  14. Central Cross-Talk in Task Switching : Evidence from Manipulating Input-Output Modality Compatibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephan, Denise Nadine; Koch, Iring

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments examined the role of compatibility of input and output (I-O) modality mappings in task switching. We define I-O modality compatibility in terms of similarity of stimulus modality and modality of response-related sensory consequences. Experiment 1 included switching between 2 compatible tasks (auditory-vocal vs. visual-manual) and…

  15. Electrical properties of an input--output cable for Josephson applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.J.

    1982-11-01

    The electrical properties of an 80 signal line microstrip cable for transmitting signals between room-temperature electronics and cryogenic electronics were calculated and verified. The impedance, propagation velocity, skin effect losses, dielectric losses, forward wave cross talk, and backward wave cross talk were investigated for a copper and polyimide microstrip cable. An effective method of reducing forward wave cross talk was discovered. The microstrip cable has a high signal line density, 19.7 lines/cm, and a high bandwidth, dc-1 GHz.

  16. New Radiation Input/Output Systems for Millimeter-Wave Gyrotron Traveling-Wave Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, G. G.; Bogdashov, A. A.; Gachev, I. G.; Mishakin, S. V.; Samsonov, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    We consider in detail the method allowing one to input and output the microwave radiation produced by an elecrovacuum amplifier through the same barrier window, which was proposed earlier, in the context of its application in a traveling-wave tube based on a waveguide with a helically corrugated surface. Special attention is given to the splitter of differently polarized radiation, and the results of studying this splitter at wavelengths of about 6 and 1 mm theoretically and experimentally are presented.

  17. On the input-output properties of linear time-invariant systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desoer, C. A.; Lam, F. L.

    1972-01-01

    Recently improved sufficient conditions for the Lp stability of multiple-input multiple-output linear time-invariant feedback systems are given. The continuous-time case is done in detail; the discrete-time case is outlined. Unstable open-loop systems with singular residue matrices are allowed.

  18. A control problem for Burgers' equation with bounded input/output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, John A.; Kang, Sungkwon

    1990-01-01

    A stabilization problem for Burgers' equation is considered. Using linearization, various controllers are constructed which minimize certain weighted energy functionals. These controllers produce the desired degree of stability for the closed-loop nonlinear system. A numerical scheme for computing the feedback gain functional is developed and several numerical experiments are performed to show the theoretical results.

  19. Energy intensity of computer manufacturing: hybrid assessment combining process and economic input-output methods.

    PubMed

    Williams, Eric

    2004-11-15

    The total energy and fossil fuels used in producing a desktop computer with 17-in. CRT monitor are estimated at 6400 megajoules (MJ) and 260 kg, respectively. This indicates that computer manufacturing is energy intensive: the ratio of fossil fuel use to product weight is 11, an order of magnitude larger than the factor of 1-2 for many other manufactured goods. This high energy intensity of manufacturing, combined with rapid turnover in computers, results in an annual life cycle energy burden that is surprisingly high: about 2600 MJ per year, 1.3 times that of a refrigerator. In contrast with many home appliances, life cycle energy use of a computer is dominated by production (81%) as opposed to operation (19%). Extension of usable lifespan (e.g. by reselling or upgrading) is thus a promising approach to mitigating energy impacts as well as other environmental burdens associated with manufacturing and disposal.

  20. Logarithmic and Power Law Input-Output Relations in Sensory Systems with Fold-Change Detection

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Miri; Mayo, Avi; Alon, Uri

    2014-01-01

    Two central biophysical laws describe sensory responses to input signals. One is a logarithmic relationship between input and output, and the other is a power law relationship. These laws are sometimes called the Weber-Fechner law and the Stevens power law, respectively. The two laws are found in a wide variety of human sensory systems including hearing, vision, taste, and weight perception; they also occur in the responses of cells to stimuli. However the mechanistic origin of these laws is not fully understood. To address this, we consider a class of biological circuits exhibiting a property called fold-change detection (FCD). In these circuits the response dynamics depend only on the relative change in input signal and not its absolute level, a property which applies to many physiological and cellular sensory systems. We show analytically that by changing a single parameter in the FCD circuits, both logarithmic and power-law relationships emerge; these laws are modified versions of the Weber-Fechner and Stevens laws. The parameter that determines which law is found is the steepness (effective Hill coefficient) of the effect of the internal variable on the output. This finding applies to major circuit architectures found in biological systems, including the incoherent feed-forward loop and nonlinear integral feedback loops. Therefore, if one measures the response to different fold changes in input signal and observes a logarithmic or power law, the present theory can be used to rule out certain FCD mechanisms, and to predict their cooperativity parameter. We demonstrate this approach using data from eukaryotic chemotaxis signaling. PMID:25121598

  1. Transportation Network with Fluctuating Input/Output Designed by the Bio-Inspired Physarum Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shin; Takamatsu, Atsuko

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose designing transportation network topology and traffic distribution under fluctuating conditions using a bio-inspired algorithm. The algorithm is inspired by the adaptive behavior observed in an amoeba-like organism, plasmodial slime mold, more formally known as plasmodium of Physarum plycephalum. This organism forms a transportation network to distribute its protoplasm, the fluidic contents of its cell, throughout its large cell body. In this process, the diameter of the transportation tubes adapts to the flux of the protoplasm. The Physarum algorithm, which mimics this adaptive behavior, has been widely applied to complex problems, such as maze solving and designing the topology of railroad grids, under static conditions. However, in most situations, environmental conditions fluctuate; for example, in power grids, the consumption of electric power shows daily, weekly, and annual periodicity depending on the lifestyles or the business needs of the individual consumers. This paper studies the design of network topology and traffic distribution with oscillatory input and output traffic flows. The network topology proposed by the Physarum algorithm is controlled by a parameter of the adaptation process of the tubes. We observe various rich topologies such as complete mesh, partial mesh, Y-shaped, and V-shaped networks depending on this adaptation parameter and evaluate them on the basis of three performance functions: loss, cost, and vulnerability. Our results indicate that consideration of the oscillatory conditions and the phase-lags in the multiple outputs of the network is important: The building and/or maintenance cost of the network can be reduced by introducing the oscillating condition, and when the phase-lag among the outputs is large, the transportation loss can also be reduced. We use stability analysis to reveal how the system exhibits various topologies depending on the parameter. PMID:24586616

  2. F/A-18E/F Nacelle Simulator Input/Output Boundary Condition Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    aft diamond vent was measured with a pitot rake. The airflow in the other outlets was measured with a calibrated vane anemometer and stopwatch. Air...dimensional flow to the vane anemometer. 7. ASME Pitot -Static Tube: o.d. .327 in. The calibration data for the instrumentation is presented in appendix B...of the diamond; the velocity out the starboard side was measured with the vane anemometer to be ~20% of that out the port side. The pitot rake

  3. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: INPUT/OUTPUT DATA FOR SEVERAL TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This treatability study is a pilot-scale evaluation of a thin-film evaporator (TFE) for volatile organics (VO) removal from oily sludges such as refinery sludges. TFEs were studied to evaluate their use to remove and recover VO from these sludges prior to land treatment. This w...

  4. Integrating Ecological and Water Footprint Accounting in a Multi-Regional Input-Output Framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon, ecological, and water footprints (CF, EF, and WF) are accounting tools that can be used to understand the connection between consumption activities and environmental pressures on the Earth?s atmosphere, bioproductive areas, and freshwater resources. These indicators have ...

  5. Structure and Input-Output Properties in Networks of Nonlinear Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-20

    Networks of Nonlinear Systems FA9550-11-1-0244 Murat Arcak University of California Berkeley Sponsored Projects Office Berkeley , CA. 94704-5940 DAF Air...and Computer Sciences University of California, Berkeley AFOSR Dynamical Systems and Control Department Dynamics and Control Program FA9550-11-1-0244

  6. Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) Linear Systems Extreme Inputs/Outputs

    DOE PAGES

    Smallwood, David O.

    2007-01-01

    A linear structure is excited at multiple points with a stationary normal random process. The response of the structure is measured at multiple outputs. If the autospectral densities of the inputs are specified, the phase relationships between the inputs are derived that will minimize or maximize the trace of the autospectral density matrix of the outputs. If the autospectral densities of the outputs are specified, the phase relationships between the outputs that will minimize or maximize the trace of the input autospectral density matrix are derived. It is shown that other phase relationships and ordinary coherence less than one willmore » result in a trace intermediate between these extremes. Least favorable response and some classes of critical response are special cases of the development. It is shown that the derivation for stationary random waveforms can also be applied to nonstationary random, transients, and deterministic waveforms.« less

  7. Extreme inputs/outputs for multiple input multiple output linear systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, David Ora

    2005-09-01

    A linear structure is excited at multiple points with a stationary normal random process. The response of the structure is measured at multiple outputs. If the auto spectral densities of the inputs are specified, the phase relationships between the inputs are derived that will minimize or maximize the trace of the auto spectral density matrix of the outputs. If the autospectral densities of the outputs are specified, the phase relationships between the outputs that will minimize or maximize the trace of the input auto spectral density matrix are derived. It is shown that other phase relationships and ordinary coherence less than one will result in a trace intermediate between these extremes. Least favorable response and some classes of critical response are special cases of the development. It is shown that the derivation for stationary random waveforms can also be applied to nonstationary random, transients, and deterministic waveforms.

  8. Transportation network with fluctuating input/output designed by the bio-inspired Physarum algorithm.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shin; Takamatsu, Atsuko

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose designing transportation network topology and traffic distribution under fluctuating conditions using a bio-inspired algorithm. The algorithm is inspired by the adaptive behavior observed in an amoeba-like organism, plasmodial slime mold, more formally known as plasmodium of Physarum plycephalum. This organism forms a transportation network to distribute its protoplasm, the fluidic contents of its cell, throughout its large cell body. In this process, the diameter of the transportation tubes adapts to the flux of the protoplasm. The Physarum algorithm, which mimics this adaptive behavior, has been widely applied to complex problems, such as maze solving and designing the topology of railroad grids, under static conditions. However, in most situations, environmental conditions fluctuate; for example, in power grids, the consumption of electric power shows daily, weekly, and annual periodicity depending on the lifestyles or the business needs of the individual consumers. This paper studies the design of network topology and traffic distribution with oscillatory input and output traffic flows. The network topology proposed by the Physarum algorithm is controlled by a parameter of the adaptation process of the tubes. We observe various rich topologies such as complete mesh, partial mesh, Y-shaped, and V-shaped networks depending on this adaptation parameter and evaluate them on the basis of three performance functions: loss, cost, and vulnerability. Our results indicate that consideration of the oscillatory conditions and the phase-lags in the multiple outputs of the network is important: The building and/or maintenance cost of the network can be reduced by introducing the oscillating condition, and when the phase-lag among the outputs is large, the transportation loss can also be reduced. We use stability analysis to reveal how the system exhibits various topologies depending on the parameter.

  9. An Analysis of the Space Sector’s Surge Capacity. An Input-Output Approach.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-13

    Silverware & Plated Ware 64.0400 Misc. Sporting Goods 64.0501 Pens & Mechanical Pencils 64.0502 Lead Pencils & Art Goods 64.0503 Marking Devices 64.0504...Mechanical Pencils 64.0502 Lead Pencils & Art Goods 64.0503 Marking Devices 64.0504 Carbon Paper & Inked Ribbons 64.0800 Brooms & Brushes 64.1200...1987; . 5> Nicholson. Walter. M.-croeconomi _ Thecrv, N.w :’-, ryden Press, 1985 5" N::koas , 3eerge 7 Ready S._rie .,.w •echni qes . efense Manaeren-i

  10. Global network of embodied water flow by systems input-output simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhanming; Chen, Guoqian; Xia, Xiaohua; Xu, Shiyun

    2012-09-01

    The global water resources network is simulated in the present work for the latest target year with statistical data available and with the most detailed data disaggregation. A top-down approach of systems inputoutput simulation is employed to track the embodied water flows associated with economic flows for the globalized economy in 2004. The numerical simulation provides a database of embodied water intensities for all economic commodities from 4928 producers, based on which the differences between direct and indirect water using efficiencies at the global scale are discussed. The direct and embodied water uses are analyzed at continental level. Besides, the commodity demand in terms of monetary expenditure and the water demand in terms of embodied water use are compared for the world as well as for three major water using regions, i.e., India, China, and the United States. Results show that food product contributes to a significant fraction for water demand, despite the value varies significantly with respect to the economic status of region.

  11. MATCH-TO-SUCCESSIVE-SAMPLE-DEVICE SYSTEM WITH PAPER TAPE INPUT/OUTPUT UNIT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    the input data, the MSSD system also records each response and indicates whether or not the response was correct. Positive and negative ... reinforcement are administered at the conclusion of each problem, depending on the reinforcement modes programmed by the experimenter. (Author)

  12. Oral History in All 50 States; Two Major Openings, Input/Output, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. Oral History Research Office.

    Statistics show the vigorous growth of oral history programs in the United States since 1965. Recent events at the Oral History Research Office, Columbia University, include the opening of two new memoirs (Francis Perkins and Henry A. Wallace); a successful oral history course; and projects in progress in business, English literature,…

  13. Global fishmeal and fish-oil supply: inputs, outputs and markets.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, C J; Jackson, A J

    2013-10-01

    Recent data on fishmeal and fish-oil supply are presented identifying key producer countries and raw material sources and distinguishing between whole fish and by-products. The conversion of these raw materials into marine ingredients is discussed and global volumes presented. This is followed by a summary of the main countries using these marine ingredients over recent years. Uses of fishmeal and fish-oil by market segment are then presented. From this, a global mass balance of inputs and outputs is derived which allows the calculation of the input-to-output ratios (fish in:fish out; FIFO) for the main aquaculture production types to be made. Current areas of focus by the industry include the need to demonstrate sustainable practice, more strategic use of marine ingredients, greater use of fishery and land-animal by-products as well as vegetable substitutes, and novel sources of essential omega-3 fats, notably the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids. Implications are drawn for future supply prospects of fishmeal and fish-oil and their future role in aquaculture, agriculture and human health.

  14. Characteristic monitoring of groundwater-salt transportation and input-output in inland arid irrigation area.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cundong; Zhang, Hongyang; Han, Liwei; Zhai, Luxin

    2014-11-01

    The rules of microscopic water-salt transportation can be revealed and the impact on the macroscopic water and soil resources can be further predicted by selecting a typical study area and carrying out continuous monitoring. In this paper, Jingtaichuan Electrical Lifting Irrigation District in Gansu Province (hereinafter called as JingDian irrigation district (JID)) located at the inland desert region of northwest China was selected as study area. Based on the groundwater-salt transportation data of representative groundwater monitoring wells in different hydrogeological units, the groundwater-salt evolution and transportation tendency in both closed and unclosed hydrogeological units were analyzed and the quantity relative ratio relationship of regional water-salt input-excretion was calculated. The results showed that the salt brought in by artificial irrigation accounts for the highest proportion of about 63.99% and the salt carried off by the discharge of irrigation water accounts for 66.42%, namely, the water-salt evolution and transportation were mainly controlled by artificial irrigation. As the general features of regional water-salt transportation, groundwater salinity and soil salt content variation were mainly decided by the transportation of soil soluble salt which showed an obvious symbiosis gathering regularity, but the differentiation with insoluble salt components was significant in the transportation process. Besides, groundwater salinity of the unclosed hydrogeological unit presented a periodically fluctuating trend, while the groundwater salinity and soil salt content in water and salt accumulation zone of the closed hydrogeological unit showed an increasing tendency, which formed the main occurrence area of soil secondary salinization.

  15. The Global versus Local Hamiltonian Description of Quantum Input-Output Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, John

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to derive the global Hamiltonian form for a quantum system and bath, or more generally a quantum network with multiple quantum input field connections, based on the local descriptions. We give a new simple argument which shows that the global Hamiltonian for a single Markov component arises as the singular perturbation of the free translation operator. We show that the Fermi analogue takes an equivalent form provided the parity of the coefficients is correctly specified. This allows us to immediately extend the theory of quantum feedback networks to Fermi systems.

  16. FLIS Procedures Manual. Document Identifier Code Input/Output Formats (Fixed Length). Volume 8.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    4100.39-M DEFENSE LOGISTICS SERVICES CENTER Volume 8 74 WASHINGTON AVE N BATTLE CREEK MI 49017-3084 DLSC- VPH 1 April 1997 FOREWORD This is one of the...volume 1, chapter 1.6, or administrative comments and inquiries may be directed to DLSC- VPH . Service/Agency distribution is handled through...changes to DLSC- VPH . Content changes appearing on these pages are entered in bold-faced italic type. Comments or questions may be directed to DLSC- VPH . This

  17. Error Models of the Analog to Digital Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaeli, Linus; Šaliga, Ján

    2014-04-01

    Error models of the Analog to Digital Converters describe metrological properties of the signal conversion from analog to digital domain in a concise form using few dominant error parameters. Knowledge of the error models allows the end user to provide fast testing in the crucial points of the full input signal range and to use identified error models for post correction in the digital domain. The imperfections of the internal ADC structure determine the error characteristics represented by the nonlinearities as a function of the output code. Progress in the microelectronics and missing information about circuital details together with the lack of knowledge about interfering effects caused by ADC installation prefers another modeling approach based on the input-output behavioral characterization by the input-output error box. Internal links in the ADC structure cause that the input-output error function could be described in a concise form by suitable function. Modeled functional parameters allow determining the integral error parameters of ADC. Paper is a survey of error models starting from the structural models for the most common architectures and their linkage with the behavioral models represented by the simple look up table or the functional description of nonlinear errors for the output codes.

  18. An Independent Verification and Validation of the Future Theater Level Model Conceptual Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    the Battle Area FLOT Forward Line of Troops FTLM Future Theater Level Model GUI Graphical User Interface I/ O Input/Output IV&V Independent...areas have been grouped together and the four areas concerned with input and output (I/ O ) have been grouped together. The Analytic Structure area...LOGISTICS • i .i .-.• .j 3.0 4.G j I/ O GROUP OPERATIONAL GROUP (.• (.* 1." 1.’ t

  19. Compartmental and Data-Based Modeling of Cerebral Hemodynamics: Linear Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Henley, B.C.; Shin, D.C.; Zhang, R.; Marmarelis, V.Z.

    2015-01-01

    Compartmental and data-based modeling of cerebral hemodynamics are alternative approaches that utilize distinct model forms and have been employed in the quantitative study of cerebral hemodynamics. This paper examines the relation between a compartmental equivalent-circuit and a data-based input-output model of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (DCA) and CO2-vasomotor reactivity (DVR). The compartmental model is constructed as an equivalent-circuit utilizing putative first principles and previously proposed hypothesis-based models. The linear input-output dynamics of this compartmental model are compared with data-based estimates of the DCA-DVR process. This comparative study indicates that there are some qualitative similarities between the two-input compartmental model and experimental results. PMID:26900535

  20. SU-E-T-625: Potential for Reduced Radiation Induced Toxicity for the Treatment of Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using RapidArc Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Pokhrel, D; Sood, S; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Saleh, H; Wang, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using RapidArc (RA) treatment planning to reduce irradiation volume of normal lung and other organs at risk (OARs) in the treatment of inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods: A retrospective treatment planning and delivery study was performed to compare target coverage and the volumes of the normal lung, spinal cord, heart and esophagus on 4D-CT scan above their dose tolerances delivered by RA vs. IMRT for ten inoperable NSCLC patients (Stage I-IIIB). RA plans consisted of either one-full or two-partial co-planar arcs used to treat 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) with 6MV beam to a prescription of 66Gy in 33 fractions. IMRT plans were generated using 5–7 co-planar fields with 6MV beam. PTV coverage, dose-volume histograms, homogeneity/conformity indices (CI), total number of monitor units(MUs), beam-on time and delivery accuracy were compared between the two treatment plans. Results: Similar target coverage was obtained between the two techniques. RA (CI=1.02) provided more conformal plans without loss of homogeneity compared to IMRT plans (CI=1.12). Compared to IMRT, RA achieved a significant median dose reduction in V10 (3%), V20 (8%), and mean lung dose (3%) on average, respectively. On average, V5 was comparable between the two treatment plans. RA reduced mean esophagus (6%), mean heart (18%), and maximum spinal cord dose (7%), on average, respectively. Total number of MUs and beam-on time were each reduced almost by a factor of 2 when compared to IMRT-patient comfort, reduced intra-fraction-motion and leakage dose. The average IMRT and RA QA pass rate was about 98% for both types of plans for 3%/3mm criterion. Conclusion: Compared to IMRT plans, RA provided not only comparable target coverage, but also improved conformity, treatment time, and significant reduction in irradiation of OARs. This may potentially allow for target dose escalation without increase in normal tissue toxicity.

  1. The Impact of Tumor Size on Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Medically Inoperable Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Allibhai, Zishan; Taremi, Mojgan; Bezjak, Andrea; Brade, Anthony; Hope, Andrew J.; Sun, Alexander; Cho, B.C. John

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) offers excellent control rates. Most published series deal mainly with small (usually <4 cm), peripheral, solitary tumors. Larger tumors are associated with poorer outcomes (ie, lower control rates, higher toxicity) when treated with conventional RT. It is unclear whether SBRT is sufficiently potent to control these larger tumors. We therefore evaluated and examined the influence of tumor size on treatment outcomes after SBRT. Methods and Materials: Between October 2004 and October 2010, 185 medically inoperable patients with early (T1-T2N0M0) NSCLC were treated on a prospective research ethics board-approved single-institution protocol. Prescription doses were risk-adapted based on tumor size and location. Follow-up included prospective assessment of toxicity (as per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) and serial computed tomography scans. Patterns of failure, toxicity, and survival outcomes were calculated using Kaplan-Meier method, and the significance of tumor size (diameter, volume) with respect to patient, treatment, and tumor factors was tested. Results: Median follow-up was 15.2 months. Tumor size was not associated with local failure but was associated with regional failure (P=.011) and distant failure (P=.021). Poorer overall survival (P=.001), disease-free survival (P=.001), and cause-specific survival (P=.005) were also significantly associated with tumor size (with tumor volume more significant than diameter). Gross tumor volume and planning target volume were significantly associated with grade 2 or worse radiation pneumonitis. However, overall rates of grade ≥3 pneumonitis were low and not significantly affected by tumor or target size. Conclusions: Currently employed stereotactic body radiation therapy dose regimens can provide safe effective local therapy even for larger solitary NSCLC tumors (up to 5.7 cm

  2. On looking into the Black Box: Prospects and Limits in the Search for Mental Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    to identify input-output relationships [Rouse, 1977; van Bussel, 1980; van Heusden , 1980]. All four of the above studies resulted in hypothesized...8217 abilities to "capture" mental models are constrained by humans’ lack of abilities to verbalize their models. Van Heusden [1980. found that subjects...Independent studies by Rouse [1977], van Bussel [1980], and van Heusden [19801 have concluded, via empirical modeling methods, that humans’ models

  3. Improved AWG Fourier optics model.

    PubMed

    Molina-Fernández, I; Wangüemert-Pérez, J

    2004-10-04

    In this paper we present an improved Fourier Optics model to calculate the transmission characteristics between any arbitrary pair of input/output ports (IOPs) of an Arrayed Waveguide Grating (AWG). In this model the input and output sections of the AWG are modeled using the same approximations, thus removing some reciprocity-related inconsistencies present in previously existing models. The expressions which summarize the model are compact and easily interpretable. Simple quasi-analytical expressions are also derived under the Gaussian approximation of the mode field profiles.

  4. A novel approach to the modelling and control of flexible robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Xuru; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1988-01-01

    A general dynamic model of a two-link Euler-Bernoulli beam flexible robot arm is presented in the form of partial-differential-integral equations. Observations are made on important properties of the dynamic model. The resulting infinite-dimensional system is then input-output decoupled and partially linearized by a diffeomorphic state transformation and nonlinear state feedback. The local stability issue is addressed for a one-link flexible robot arm.

  5. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.; Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

    2013-06-01

    The Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed by NREL and MRG & Associates, is a spreadsheet based input-output tool. JEDI is meant to be a user friendly and transparent tool to estimate potential economic impacts supported by the development and operation of offshore wind projects. This guide describes how to use the model as well as technical information such as methodology, limitations, and data sources.

  6. The VEGFR2, COX-2 and MMP-2 polymorphisms are associated with clinical outcome of patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Butkiewicz, Dorota; Krześniak, Małgorzata; Drosik, Anna; Giglok, Monika; Gdowicz-Kłosok, Agnieszka; Kosarewicz, Agata; Rusin, Marek; Masłyk, Barbara; Gawkowska-Suwińska, Marzena; Suwiński, Rafał

    2015-11-15

    Certain common inherited variations in genes involved in tumor angiogenesis, progression and metastasis may contribute to cancer therapy outcome and prognosis by altering the gene expression and protein activity. In this report, we examined the effect of functional polymorphisms in MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, VEGF, VEGFR2, FGFR4 and COX-2 genes on overall (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) of 350 Caucasian patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The results of multivariate analysis indicated that VEGFR2 -906C and COX-2 -1195G alleles were strongly associated with poor OS and PFS (p = 0.002 and 0.015, respectively, for OS; p = 0.009 and 0.015, respectively, for PFS), while MMP-2 -1306 T allele carriers had significantly reduced PFS (p = 0.010). Moreover, an increased risk of death and progression was significantly associated with the number of adverse alleles for VEGFR2/COX-2 (p = 0.0005 for OS and 0.0006 for PFS in >1 adverse allele carriers) and VEGFR2/COX-2/MMP-2 combinations (p = 0.0003 for OS and 0.0001 for PFS in patients with >2 adverse alleles). Finally, VEGFR2 TC/CC, COX-2 AG/GG and MMP-2 CT/TT genotypes as well as "at risk" allele combinations were identified as independent predictors of unfavorable OS and PFS in the group. In conclusion, the data suggest that selected VEGFR2, COX-2 and MMP-2 polymorphisms may be potential prognostic markers in unresectable NSCLC treated with radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, although further validation studies are warranted to confirm our observations.

  7. Long-Term Clinical Outcome of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: The MD Anderson Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Zhiqin; Yang Kunyu; Komaki, Ritsuko; Wei Xiong; Tucker, Susan L.; Zhuang Yan; Martel, Mary K.; Vedam, Sastray; Balter, Peter; Zhu Guangying; Gomez, Daniel; Lu, Charles; Mohan, Radhe; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In 2007, we published our initial experience in treating inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The current report is an update of that experience with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: Patients in this retrospective review were 165 patients who began definitive radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy, for newly diagnosed, pathologically confirmed NSCLC to a dose of {>=}60 Gy from 2005 to 2006. Early and late toxicities assessed included treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP), pulmonary fibrosis, esophagitis, and esophageal stricture, scored mainly according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Other variables monitored were radiation-associated dermatitis and changes in body weight and Karnofsky performance status. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compute survival and freedom from radiation-related acute and late toxicities as a function of time. Results: Most patients (89%) had Stage III to IV disease. The median radiation dose was 66 Gy given in 33 fractions (range, 60-76 Gy, 1.8-2.3 Gy per fraction). Median overall survival time was 1.8 years; the 2-year and 3-year overall survival rates were 46% and 30%. Rates of Grade {>=}3 maximum TRP (TRP{sub max}) were 11% at 6 months and 14% at 12 months. At 18 months, 86% of patients had developed Grade {>=}1 maximum pulmonary fibrosis (pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}) and 7% Grade {>=}2 pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}. The median times to maximum esophagitis (esophagitis{sub max}) were 3 weeks (range, 1-13 weeks) for Grade 2 and 6 weeks (range, 3-13 weeks) for Grade 3. A higher percentage of patients who experienced Grade 3 esophagitis{sub max} later developed Grade 2 to 3 esophageal stricture. Conclusions: In our experience, using IMRT to treat NSCLC leads to low rates of pulmonary and esophageal toxicity, and favorable clinical outcomes in terms of survival.

  8. Main control computer security model of closed network systems protection against cyber attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymen, Bilal

    2014-06-01

    The model that brings the data input/output under control in closed network systems, that maintains the system securely, and that controls the flow of information through the Main Control Computer which also brings the network traffic under control against cyber-attacks. The network, which can be controlled single-handedly thanks to the system designed to enable the network users to make data entry into the system or to extract data from the system securely, intends to minimize the security gaps. Moreover, data input/output record can be kept by means of the user account assigned for each user, and it is also possible to carry out retroactive tracking, if requested. Because the measures that need to be taken for each computer on the network regarding cyber security, do require high cost; it has been intended to provide a cost-effective working environment with this model, only if the Main Control Computer has the updated hardware.

  9. Structural identifiability analyses of candidate models for in vitro Pitavastatin hepatic uptake.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Thomas R B; Chappell, Michael J; Yates, James W T; Evans, Neil D

    2014-05-01

    In this paper a review of the application of four different techniques (a version of the similarity transformation approach for autonomous uncontrolled systems, a non-differential input/output observable normal form approach, the characteristic set differential algebra and a recent algebraic input/output relationship approach) to determine the structural identifiability of certain in vitro nonlinear pharmacokinetic models is provided. The Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide (OATP) substrate, Pitavastatin, is used as a probe on freshly isolated animal and human hepatocytes. Candidate pharmacokinetic non-linear compartmental models have been derived to characterise the uptake process of Pitavastatin. As a prerequisite to parameter estimation, structural identifiability analyses are performed to establish that all unknown parameters can be identified from the experimental observations available.

  10. Color Reproduction System Based on Color Appearance Model and Gamut Mapping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    and Gamut Mapping DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report: TITLE: Input/Output...report: ADP011333 thru ADP011362 UNCLASSIFIED Color reproduction system based on color appearance model and gamut mapping Fang-Hsuan Cheng, Chih-Yuan...perception is usually different. Basically, the influence factors are device calibration and characterization, viewing condition, device gamut and human

  11. The Battlefield Environment Division Modeling Framework (BMF). Part 2. Serial and Parallel Output Enhancements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The treatment of input/output ( IO ) is critically important in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for scalable...use of object-oriented program (OOP) design. Here we extend BMF to include IO functionality for serial and distributed compute configurations. The...Atmospheric Boundary Layer Environment (ABLE) model has been built using BMF, and ABLE now uses the IO enhancements to BMF to enable serial and

  12. SCI Identification (SCIDNT) program user's guide. [maximum likelihood method for linear rotorcraft models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The computer program Linear SCIDNT which evaluates rotorcraft stability and control coefficients from flight or wind tunnel test data is described. It implements the maximum likelihood method to maximize the likelihood function of the parameters based on measured input/output time histories. Linear SCIDNT may be applied to systems modeled by linear constant-coefficient differential equations. This restriction in scope allows the application of several analytical results which simplify the computation and improve its efficiency over the general nonlinear case.

  13. Toxicity Profile and Pharmacokinetic Study of A Phase I Low-Dose Schedule-Dependent Radiosensitizing Paclitaxel Chemoradiation Regimen for Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yuhchyau Pandya, Kishan J.; Feins, Richard; Johnstone, David W.; Watson, Thomas; Smudzin, Therese; Keng, Peter C.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: We report the toxicity profile and pharmacokinetic data of a schedule-dependent chemoradiation regimen using pulsed low-dose paclitaxel for radiosensitization in a Phase I study for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Paclitaxel at escalating doses of 15 mg/m{sup 2}, 20 mg/m{sup 2}, and 25 mg/m{sup 2} were infused on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday with daily chest radiation in cohorts of 6 patients. Daily radiation was delayed for maximal G2/M arrest and apoptotic effect, an observation from preclinical investigations. Plasma paclitaxel concentration was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: Dose-limiting toxicities included 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 pneumonitis and 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 esophagitis. There was no Grade 4 or 5 pneumonitis or esophagitis. There was also no Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia or neuropathy. For Dose Levels I (15 mg/m{sup 2}), II (20 mg/m{sup 2}), and III (25 mg/m{sup 2}), the mean peak plasma level was 0.23 {+-} 0.06 {mu}mol/l, 0.32 {+-} 0.05 {mu}mol/l, and 0.52 {+-} 0.14 {mu}mol/l, respectively; AUC was 0.44 {+-} 0.09 {mu}mol/l, 0.61 {+-} 0.1 {mu}mol/l, and 0.96 {+-} 0.23 {mu}mol/l, respectively; and duration of drug concentration >0.05 {mu}mol/l (t > 0.05 {mu}mol/l) was 1.6 {+-} 0.3 h, 1.9 {+-} 0.2 h, and 3.0 {+-} 0.9 h, respectively. Conclusion: Pulsed low-dose paclitaxel chemoradiation is associated with low toxicity. Pharmacokinetic data showed that plasma paclitaxel concentration >0.05 {mu}mol/l for a minimum of 1.6 h was sufficient for effective radiosensitization.

  14. Long-term results of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the primary treatment of medically inoperable stage I-II endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Niazi, Tamim M.; Souhami, Luis . E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca; Portelance, Lorraine; Bahoric, Boris; Gilbert, Lucy; Stanimir, Gerald

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: Total-abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAHBSO) is the gold-standard therapy for patients with endometrial carcinoma. However, patients with high operative risks are usually treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone. The goal of this study was to update our experience of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB), with or without external-beam irradiation (EBRT), for such patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1984 and 2003, 38 patients with Stage I and Stage II adenocarcinoma of the endometrium considered high operative risk received RT as the primary treatment. The median age was 74.1 years. Before 1996, the local extent of the disease was assessed by an examination under anesthesia (EUA) and by EUA and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) thereafter. Eight patients (21%) were treated with combined HDRB and EBRT, and 30 patients (79%) were treated with with HDRB alone. The median HDRB dose was 23.9 Gy, typically delivered in 3 fractions in a weekly schedule. The median EBRT dose was 42 Gy. Results: At a median follow-up of 57.5 months for patients at risk, 11 patients (29%) have failed: 6 patients (16%) locally, 4 patients (10.5%) distantly, and 1 patient (3%) locally and distantly. Local failure was established by biopsy, and 4 patients were salvaged by TAHBSO. Higher stage and higher grade were both associated with increased failure rate. The 15-year disease-specific survival (DSS) was 78% for all stages, 90% for Stage I, and 42% for Stage II (p < 0.0001). The 15-year DSS was 91% for Grade I and 67% for Grade II and III combined (p = 0.0254). Patients with Stage I disease established by MRI (11 patients) and who received a total HDRB dose of 30 Gy had a DSS rate of 100% at 10 years. Four patients experienced late toxicities: 1 Grade II and 3 Grade III or IV. Conclusion: Medically inoperable Stage I endometrial carcinoma may be safely and effectively treated with HDRB as the primary therapy. In selected Stage I patients, our results are

  15. Model reduction of flexible manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Xu, Yangsheng; Chen, C. S.

    1992-06-01

    Flexible manipulators can be characterized by a dynamic model with a large number of vibration modes, and the use of the model in the model-based control schemes requires reduction of model order. Balanced truncation is an effective method for model reduction of asymptotically stable systems by transforming the states to a coordinate system in which the controllability and observability Gramians are equal and diagonal, and eliminating the states which contribute weakly to the input-output map. An elastic flexible manipulator, however, is a marginally stable system and thus the balanced truncation method can not be directly applied. Herein, a method is presented of reducing the order of a marginally stable system based on the fact that translation transformations in the frequency domain preserve input-output properties of the system. The successful application is addressed of the method to model reduction of flexible manipulators with infinite-dimensional for finite-dimensional model. The method is also applicable for any other marginally stable model, such as elastic space trusswork and multi-dimensional space vehicle structure.

  16. Parallel processor engine model program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, P.

    1984-01-01

    The Parallel Processor Engine Model Program is a generalized engineering tool intended to aid in the design of parallel processing real-time simulations of turbofan engines. It is written in the FORTRAN programming language and executes as a subset of the SOAPP simulation system. Input/output and execution control are provided by SOAPP; however, the analysis, emulation and simulation functions are completely self-contained. A framework in which a wide variety of parallel processing architectures could be evaluated and tools with which the parallel implementation of a real-time simulation technique could be assessed are provided.

  17. User's manual for a parameter identification technique. [with options for model simulation for fixed input forcing functions and identification from wind tunnel and flight measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanning, G.

    1975-01-01

    A digital computer program written in FORTRAN is presented that implements the system identification theory for deterministic systems using input-output measurements. The user supplies programs simulating the mathematical model of the physical plant whose parameters are to be identified. The user may choose any one of three options. The first option allows for a complete model simulation for fixed input forcing functions. The second option identifies up to 36 parameters of the model from wind tunnel or flight measurements. The third option performs a sensitivity analysis for up to 36 parameters. The use of each option is illustrated with an example using input-output measurements for a helicopter rotor tested in a wind tunnel.

  18. The IDA/BPT Crisis Relocation Planning Model: Description, Documentation and User’s Guide to the Computer Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-22

    CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Federal Emergency Management Agency December 22, 1982 Office of Research 13. NUMBER OF PAGES...18 2.0 User’s Guide to the Computer Program ..................... 20 2.1 Master Control Sequence ............................. 22 2.2 Input/Output... control during an evacuation. Users of the IDA/BPT model may choose among three options for controlling traffic during an evacuation. Normal Traffic

  19. Associative memory model with spontaneous neural activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurikawa, Tomoki; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2012-05-01

    We propose a novel associative memory model wherein the neural activity without an input (i.e., spontaneous activity) is modified by an input to generate a target response that is memorized for recall upon the same input. Suitable design of synaptic connections enables the model to memorize input/output (I/O) mappings equaling 70% of the total number of neurons, where the evoked activity distinguishes a target pattern from others. Spontaneous neural activity without an input shows chaotic dynamics but keeps some similarity with evoked activities, as reported in recent experimental studies.

  20. Nearly data-based optimal control for linear discrete model-free systems with delays via reinforcement learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jilie; Zhang, Huaguang; Wang, Binrui; Cai, Tiaoyang

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a nearly data-based optimal control scheme is proposed for linear discrete model-free systems with delays. The nearly optimal control can be obtained using only measured input/output data from systems, by reinforcement learning technology, which combines Q-learning with value iterative algorithm. First, we construct a state estimator by using the measured input/output data. Second, the quadratic functional is used to approximate the value function at each point in the state space, and the data-based control is designed by Q-learning method using the obtained state estimator. Then, the paper states the method, that is, how to solve the optimal inner kernel matrix ? in the least-square sense, by value iteration algorithm. Finally, the numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  1. Equicontrollability and its application to model-following and decoupling.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, R. T.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of 'model following,' a term used to describe a class of problems characterized by having two dynamic systems, generically known as the 'plant' and the 'model,' it being required to find a controller to attach to the plant so as to make the resultant compensated system behave, in an input/output sense, in the same way as the model. The approach presented to the problem takes a structural point of view. The result is a complex but informative definition which solves the problem as posed. The application of both the algorithm and its basis, equicontrollability, to the decoupling problem is considered.

  2. Modeling of materials supply, demand and prices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The societal, economic, and policy tradeoffs associated with materials processing and utilization, are discussed. The materials system provides the materials engineer with the system analysis required for formulate sound materials processing, utilization, and resource development policies and strategies. Materials system simulation and modeling research program including assessments of materials substitution dynamics, public policy implications, and materials process economics was expanded. This effort includes several collaborative programs with materials engineers, economists, and policy analysts. The technical and socioeconomic issues of materials recycling, input-output analysis, and technological change and productivity are examined. The major thrust areas in materials systems research are outlined.

  3. Identifiability Results for Several Classes of Linear Compartment Models.

    PubMed

    Meshkat, Nicolette; Sullivant, Seth; Eisenberg, Marisa

    2015-08-01

    Identifiability concerns finding which unknown parameters of a model can be estimated, uniquely or otherwise, from given input-output data. If some subset of the parameters of a model cannot be determined given input-output data, then we say the model is unidentifiable. In this work, we study linear compartment models, which are a class of biological models commonly used in pharmacokinetics, physiology, and ecology. In past work, we used commutative algebra and graph theory to identify a class of linear compartment models that we call identifiable cycle models, which are unidentifiable but have the simplest possible identifiable functions (so-called monomial cycles). Here we show how to modify identifiable cycle models by adding inputs, adding outputs, or removing leaks, in such a way that we obtain an identifiable model. We also prove a constructive result on how to combine identifiable models, each corresponding to strongly connected graphs, into a larger identifiable model. We apply these theoretical results to several real-world biological models from physiology, cell biology, and ecology.

  4. Beyond input-output computings: error-driven emergence with parallel non-distributed slime mold computer.

    PubMed

    Aono, Masashi; Gunji, Yukio-Pegio

    2003-10-01

    The emergence derived from errors is the key importance for both novel computing and novel usage of the computer. In this paper, we propose an implementable experimental plan for the biological computing so as to elicit the emergent property of complex systems. An individual plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum acts in the slime mold computer. Modifying the Elementary Cellular Automaton as it entails the global synchronization problem upon the parallel computing provides the NP-complete problem solved by the slime mold computer. The possibility to solve the problem by giving neither all possible results nor explicit prescription of solution-seeking is discussed. In slime mold computing, the distributivity in the local computing logic can change dynamically, and its parallel non-distributed computing cannot be reduced into the spatial addition of multiple serial computings. The computing system based on exhaustive absence of the super-system may produce, something more than filling the vacancy.

  5. A Framework for Lab Work Management in Mass Courses. Application to Low Level Input/Output without Hardware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Santiago; Zamorano, Juan; Rosales, Francisco; Dopico, Antonio Garcia; Pedraza, Jose Luis

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a complete lab work management framework designed and developed in the authors' department to help teachers to manage the small projects that students are expected to complete as lab assignments during their graduate-level computer engineering studies. The paper focuses on an application example of the framework to a specific…

  6. Regulated dc-to-dc converter for voltage step-up or step-down with input-output isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, S. Y.; Wilson, T. G. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A closed loop regulated dc-to-dc converter employing an unregulated two winding inductive energy storage converter is provided by using a magnetically coupled multivibrator acting as duty cycle generator to drive the converter. The multivibrator is comprised of two transistor switches and a saturable transformer. The output of the converter is compared with a reference in a comparator which transmits a binary zero until the output exceeds the reference. When the output exceeds the reference, the binary output of the comparator drives transistor switches to turn the multivibrator off. The multivibrator is unbalanced so that a predetermined transistor will always turn on first when the binary feedback signal becomes zero.

  7. Federal Logistics Information System (FLIS) Procedures Manual. Volume 8. Document Identifier Code Input/Output Formats (Fixed Length)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    COLLABORATION CODE 0002X B Fl 41-42 2533 AUTHORIZED ITEM IDENTIFICATION DATA COLLABORATION CODE 0002X B Fl 43-44 2533 AUTHORIZED ITEM IDENTIFICATION DATA ... COLLABORATION CODE 0002X B Fl 45-46 2533 AUTHORIZED ITEM IDENTIFICATION DATA COLLABORATION CODE 0002X B F1 47-48 2533 AUTHORIZED ITEM IDENTIFICATION... DATA COLLABORATION CODE 0002X B F1 49-50 2533 AUTHORIZED ITEM IDENTIFICATION DATA COLLABORATION CODE 0002X B Fl 51-52 0 3 DIC LMD DoD 4100.39-M Volume

  8. T-type calcium channels promote predictive homeostasis of input-output relations in thalamocortical neurons of lateral geniculate nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Su Z.; Kim, Haram R.; Fiorillo, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    A general theory views the function of all neurons as prediction, and one component of this theory is that of “predictive homeostasis” or “prediction error.” It is well established that sensory systems adapt so that neuronal output maintains sensitivity to sensory input, in accord with information theory. Predictive homeostasis applies the same principle at the cellular level, where the challenge is to maintain membrane excitability at the optimal homeostatic level so that spike generation is maximally sensitive to small gradations in synaptic drive. Negative feedback is a hallmark of homeostatic mechanisms, as exemplified by depolarization-activated potassium channels. In contrast, T-type calcium channels exhibit positive feedback that appears at odds with the theory. In thalamocortical neurons of lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), T-type channels are capable of causing bursts of spikes with an all-or-none character in response to excitation from a hyperpolarized potential. This “burst mode” would partially uncouple visual input from spike output and reduce the information spikes convey about gradations in visual input. However, past observations of T-type-driven bursts may have resulted from unnaturally high membrane excitability. Here we have mimicked within rat brain slices the patterns of synaptic conductance that occur naturally during vision. In support of the theory of predictive homeostasis, we found that T-type channels restored excitability toward its homeostatic level during periods of hyperpolarization. Thus, activation of T-type channels allowed two retinal input spikes to cause one output spike on average, and we observed almost no instances in which output count exceeded input count (a “burst”). T-type calcium channels therefore help to maintain a single optimal mode of transmission rather than creating a second mode. More fundamentally our results support the general theory, which seeks to predict the properties of a neuron's ion channels and synapses given knowledge of natural patterns of synaptic input. PMID:25221503

  9. Linear functional observers with guaranteed ɛ-convergence for discrete time-delay systems with input/output disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, M. C.; Trinh, H.; Nam, P. T.

    2016-10-01

    The problem of designing linear functional observers for discrete time-delay systems with unknown-but-bounded disturbances in both the plant and the output is considered for the first time in this paper. A novel approach to design a minimum-order observer is proposed to guarantee that the observer error is ε-convergent, which means that the estimate converges robustly within an ε-bound of the true state. Conditions for the existence of this observer are first derived. Then, by utilising an extended Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and the free-weighting matrix technique, a sufficient condition for ε-convergence of the observer error system is given. This condition is presented in terms of linear matrix inequalities with two parameters needed to be tuned, so that it can be efficiently solved by incorporating a two-dimensional search method into convex optimisation algorithms to obtain the smallest possible value for ε. Three numerical examples, including the well-known single-link flexible joint robotic system, are given to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our results.

  10. A Quantitative Analysis of the Soviet Economy. Volume 1. Expansion of the 1972 Soviet Input-Output Tables

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-15

    the production quadrant of the tables include: a. Military production b. Housing c. Non-productive transportation and commun icati ons d. Government ...was reduced to 81. With the addition of military production, housing , non-productive transportation and communication, and government and military ...not "productive" industries. The additions to the production quadrant include: a. Military production b. Housing c. "Non-productive" transportation and

  11. Federal Logistics Information Systems. FLIS Procedures Manual. Document Identifier Code Input/Output Formats (Variable Length). Volume 9.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    49017-3084 CH I CHANGE NO. 1 DoD 4100.39-M DoD 4100.39-M Volume 9 V DLSC- VPH 1 July 1997 _-’ FEDERAL LOGISTICS INFORMATION SYSTEM (FLIS) PROCEDURES...47 3053 UNIT OF ISSUE CONVERSION FACTOR 0005N H 02 QS 8472 FORMER UNIT OF ISSUE 0002A H 89 0211 OCCURS COUNTER/li/ 0001N H GV 2862 PHRASE CODE...16 0707 MANAGEMENT CONTROL DATA, COAST GUARD 0007X H 16 0443 EXPANSION FIELD 1 0001X H 47 3053 UNIT OF ISSUE CONVERSION FACTOR 0005N H 02 0S 8472

  12. Input-output features of anatomically identified CA3 neurons during hippocampal sharp wave/ripple oscillation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hájos, Norbert; Karlócai, Mária R; Németh, Beáta; Ulbert, István; Monyer, Hannah; Szabó, Gábor; Erdélyi, Ferenc; Freund, Tamás F; Gulyás, Attila I

    2013-07-10

    Hippocampal sharp waves and the associated ripple oscillations (SWRs) are implicated in memory processes. These network events emerge intrinsically in the CA3 network. To understand cellular interactions that generate SWRs, we detected first spiking activity followed by recording of synaptic currents in distinct types of anatomically identified CA3 neurons during SWRs that occurred spontaneously in mouse hippocampal slices. We observed that the vast majority of interneurons fired during SWRs, whereas only a small portion of pyramidal cells was found to spike. There were substantial differences in the firing behavior among interneuron groups; parvalbumin-expressing basket cells were one of the most active GABAergic cells during SWRs, whereas ivy cells were silent. Analysis of the synaptic currents during SWRs uncovered that the dominant synaptic input to the pyramidal cell was inhibitory, whereas spiking interneurons received larger synaptic excitation than inhibition. The discharge of all interneurons was primarily determined by the magnitude and the timing of synaptic excitation. Strikingly, we observed that the temporal structure of synaptic excitation and inhibition during SWRs significantly differed between parvalbumin-containing basket cells, axoaxonic cells, and type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1)-expressing basket cells, which might explain their distinct recruitment to these synchronous events. Our data support the hypothesis that the active current sources restricted to the stratum pyramidale during SWRs originate from the synaptic output of parvalbumin-expressing basket cells. Thus, in addition to gamma oscillation, these GABAergic cells play a central role in SWR generation.

  13. An Investigation of the Application of Voice Input/Output Technology in the COINS Network Control Center,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    Bell’s later wcrx cn the telephone. As described by Flanagan [Ref. 17: pp. 2Z6-207], The lips, tongue, palate, teeth, pharynx, and velum were...the overall effectiveness of the Network Controller function. Our conclusions in this area were rather tentative . We shcwed, for example, that use of

  14. Bond graph modeling, simulation, and reflex control of the Mars planetary automatic vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amara, Maher; Friconneau, Jean Pierre; Micaelli, Alain

    1993-01-01

    The bond graph modeling, simulation, and reflex control study of the Planetary Automatic Vehicle are considered. A simulator derived from a complete bond graph model of the vehicle is presented. This model includes both knowledge and representation models of the mechanical structure, the floor contact, and the Mars site. The MACSYMEN (French acronym for aided design method of multi-energetic systems) is used and applied to study the input-output power transfers. The reflex control is then considered. Controller architecture and locomotion specificity are described. A numerical stage highlights some interesting results of the robot and the controller capabilities.

  15. A one-dimensional heat transfer model for parallel-plate thermoacoustic heat exchangers.

    PubMed

    de Jong, J A; Wijnant, Y H; de Boer, A

    2014-03-01

    A one-dimensional (1D) laminar oscillating flow heat transfer model is derived and applied to parallel-plate thermoacoustic heat exchangers. The model can be used to estimate the heat transfer from the solid wall to the acoustic medium, which is required for the heat input/output of thermoacoustic systems. The model is implementable in existing (quasi-)1D thermoacoustic codes, such as DeltaEC. Examples of generated results show good agreement with literature results. The model allows for arbitrary wave phasing; however, it is shown that the wave phasing does not significantly influence the heat transfer.

  16. A general unified approach to modelling switching dc-to-dc converters in discontinuous conduction mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuk, S.; Middlebrook, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A method for modelling switching converters in the discontinuous conduction mode is developed, whose starting point is the unified state-space representation, and whose end result is a complete linear circuit model which correctly represents all essential features, namely, the input, output, and transfer properties (static dc as well as dynamic ac small signal). While the method is generally applicable to any switching converter operating in the discontinuous conduction mode, it is extensively illustrated for the three common power stages (buck, boost, and buck-boost). The results for these converters are then easily tabulated owing to the fixed equivalent circuit topology of their canonical circuit model.

  17. SMP: A solid modeling program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, D. P.; Jones, K. H.; Vonofenheim, W. H.; Gates, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A prototype solid modeling program, SMP, developed by CSC for Langley Research Center (LaRC) is documented in this paper. The SMP software is employed by the System and Experiments Branch (SEB) of the Space Systems Division (SSD) for preliminary space station design, but is intended as a general purpose tool. The SMP document provides details concerning: the basic geometric modeling primitives and associated operators, the data representation scheme utilized to structure the geometric model, the available commands for both editing and displaying the solid model, the interactive user interface and the input/output interfaces to external software, and the utility of the package in the LaRC computing environment. The document is sufficiently detailed to serve both as a user's guide and reference manual.

  18. Learning models of intelligent agents

    SciTech Connect

    Carmel, D.; Markovitch, S.

    1996-12-31

    Agents that operate in a multi-agent system need an efficient strategy to handle their encounters with other agents involved. Searching for an optimal interactive strategy is a hard problem because it depends mostly on the behavior of the others. In this work, interaction among agents is represented as a repeated two-player game, where the agents` objective is to look for a strategy that maximizes their expected sum of rewards in the game. We assume that agents` strategies can be modeled as finite automata. A model-based approach is presented as a possible method for learning an effective interactive strategy. First, we describe how an agent should find an optimal strategy against a given model. Second, we present an unsupervised algorithm that infers a model of the opponent`s automaton from its input/output behavior. A set of experiments that show the potential merit of the algorithm is reported as well.

  19. Adaptive control using neural networks and approximate models.

    PubMed

    Narendra, K S; Mukhopadhyay, S

    1997-01-01

    The NARMA model is an exact representation of the input-output behavior of finite-dimensional nonlinear discrete-time dynamical systems in a neighborhood of the equilibrium state. However, it is not convenient for purposes of adaptive control using neural networks due to its nonlinear dependence on the control input. Hence, quite often, approximate methods are used for realizing the neural controllers to overcome computational complexity. In this paper, we introduce two classes of models which are approximations to the NARMA model, and which are linear in the control input. The latter fact substantially simplifies both the theoretical analysis as well as the practical implementation of the controller. Extensive simulation studies have shown that the neural controllers designed using the proposed approximate models perform very well, and in many cases even better than an approximate controller designed using the exact NARMA model. In view of their mathematical tractability as well as their success in simulation studies, a case is made in this paper that such approximate input-output models warrant a detailed study in their own right.

  20. Minimal Models of Multidimensional Computations

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Jeffrey D.; Sincich, Lawrence C.; Sharpee, Tatyana O.

    2011-01-01

    The multidimensional computations performed by many biological systems are often characterized with limited information about the correlations between inputs and outputs. Given this limitation, our approach is to construct the maximum noise entropy response function of the system, leading to a closed-form and minimally biased model consistent with a given set of constraints on the input/output moments; the result is equivalent to conditional random field models from machine learning. For systems with binary outputs, such as neurons encoding sensory stimuli, the maximum noise entropy models are logistic functions whose arguments depend on the constraints. A constraint on the average output turns the binary maximum noise entropy models into minimum mutual information models, allowing for the calculation of the information content of the constraints and an information theoretic characterization of the system's computations. We use this approach to analyze the nonlinear input/output functions in macaque retina and thalamus; although these systems have been previously shown to be responsive to two input dimensions, the functional form of the response function in this reduced space had not been unambiguously identified. A second order model based on the logistic function is found to be both necessary and sufficient to accurately describe the neural responses to naturalistic stimuli, accounting for an average of 93% of the mutual information with a small number of parameters. Thus, despite the fact that the stimulus is highly non-Gaussian, the vast majority of the information in the neural responses is related to first and second order correlations. Our results suggest a principled and unbiased way to model multidimensional computations and determine the statistics of the inputs that are being encoded in the outputs. PMID:21455284

  1. A complete procedure for leak detection and diagnosis in a complex heat exchanger using data-driven fuzzy models.

    PubMed

    Habbi, Hacene; Kinnaert, Michel; Zelmat, Mimoun

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, an efficient fuzzy model-based leak detection algorithm is designed for a pilot heat exchanger. A dynamic fuzzy model of the physical plant is first derived from input-output measurements using a fuzzy clustering technique. This model is run in parallel to the process for symptom generation. The leak detection mechanism has been tested and validated on the real co-current heat exchanger, and has proven to be efficient in detecting leaks of different magnitudes in the water circulation pipe.

  2. Volterra representation enables modeling of complex synaptic nonlinear dynamics in large-scale simulations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Eric Y.; Bouteiller, Jean-Marie C.; Song, Dong; Baudry, Michel; Berger, Theodore W.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical synapses are comprised of a wide collection of intricate signaling pathways involving complex dynamics. These mechanisms are often reduced to simple spikes or exponential representations in order to enable computer simulations at higher spatial levels of complexity. However, these representations cannot capture important nonlinear dynamics found in synaptic transmission. Here, we propose an input-output (IO) synapse model capable of generating complex nonlinear dynamics while maintaining low computational complexity. This IO synapse model is an extension of a detailed mechanistic glutamatergic synapse model capable of capturing the input-output relationships of the mechanistic model using the Volterra functional power series. We demonstrate that the IO synapse model is able to successfully track the nonlinear dynamics of the synapse up to the third order with high accuracy. We also evaluate the accuracy of the IO synapse model at different input frequencies and compared its performance with that of kinetic models in compartmental neuron models. Our results demonstrate that the IO synapse model is capable of efficiently replicating complex nonlinear dynamics that were represented in the original mechanistic model and provide a method to replicate complex and diverse synaptic transmission within neuron network simulations. PMID:26441622

  3. Model Structures and Algorithms for Identification of Aerodynamic Models for Flight Dynamics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasanth, Ravi K.; Klein, Vladislav; Murphy, Patrick C.; Mehra, Raman K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes model structures and parameter estimation algorithms suitable for the identification of unsteady aerodynamic models from input-output data. The model structures presented are state space models and include linear time-invariant (LTI) models and linear parameter-varying (LPV) models. They cover a wide range of local and parameter dependent identification problems arising in unsteady aerodynamics and nonlinear flight dynamics. We present a residue algorithm for estimating model parameters from data. The algorithm can incorporate apriori information and is described in detail. The algorithms are evaluated on the F-16XL wind-tunnel test data from NAS Langley Research Center. Results of numerical evaluation are presented. The paper concludes with a discussion major issues and directions for future work.

  4. Experimental development based on mapping rule between requirements analysis model and web framework specific design model.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Hirotaka; Ogata, Shinpei; Matsuura, Saeko

    2013-12-01

    Model Driven Development is a promising approach to develop high quality software systems. We have proposed a method of model-driven requirements analysis using Unified Modeling Language (UML). The main feature of our method is to automatically generate a Web user interface prototype from UML requirements analysis model so that we can confirm validity of input/output data for each page and page transition on the system by directly operating the prototype. We proposes a mapping rule in which design information independent of each web application framework implementation is defined based on the requirements analysis model, so as to improve the traceability to the final product from the valid requirements analysis model. This paper discusses the result of applying our method to the development of a Group Work Support System that is currently running in our department.

  5. An integrated model for continuous quality improvement and productivity improvement in health services organizations.

    PubMed

    Rakich, J S; Darr, K; Longest, B B

    1993-01-01

    The health services paradigm with respect to quality has shifted to that of conformance to requirements (the absence of defects) and fitness for use (meeting customer expectations and needs). This article presents an integrated model of continuous quality improvement (CQI) (often referred to as total quality management) and productivity improvement for health services organizations. It incorporates input-output theory and focuses on the CQI challenge--"How can we be certain that we do the right things right the first time, every time?" The twin pillars of CQI are presented. Achievement of both will result in productivity improvement and enhancement of the health services organization's competitive position.

  6. Modelling of the cellular automata space deformation within the RCAFE framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitko, Mateusz; Madej, Łukasz

    2016-10-01

    Development of the innovative approach to micro scale cellular automata (CA) space deformation during dynamic recrystallization process (DRX) is the main goal of the present paper. Major assumptions of the developed CA DRX model as well as novel space deformation algorithm, which is based on the random cellular automata concept and FE method, are described. Algorithms and methods to transfer input/output data between FE and CA are presented in detail. Visualization tool to analyze progress of deformation in the irregular CA space is also highlighted. Finally, initial results in the form of deformed and recrystallized microstructures are presented and discussed.

  7. The IIASA set of energy models: Its design and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, P. S.; Agnew, M.; Holzl, A.; Kononov, Y.; Papin, A.; Rogner, H. H.; Schrattenholzer, L.

    1980-12-01

    The models studied include an accounting framework type energy demand model, a dynamic linear programming energy supply and conversion system model, an input-output model, a macroeconomic model, and an oil trade gaming model. They are incorporated in an integrated set for long-term, global analyses. This set makes use of a highly iterative process for energy scenario projections and analyses. Each model is quite simple and straightforward in structure; a great deal of human judgement is necessary in applying the set. The models are applied to study two alternative energy scenarios for a coming fifty year period. Examples are presented revealing the wealth of information that can be obtained from multimodel techniques. Details are given for several models (equations employed, assumptions made, data used).

  8. Modelling, analyses and design of switching converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuk, S. M.; Middlebrook, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    A state-space averaging method for modelling switching dc-to-dc converters for both continuous and discontinuous conduction mode is developed. In each case the starting point is the unified state-space representation, and the end result is a complete linear circuit model, for each conduction mode, which correctly represents all essential features, namely, the input, output, and transfer properties (static dc as well as dynamic ac small-signal). While the method is generally applicable to any switching converter, it is extensively illustrated for the three common power stages (buck, boost, and buck-boost). The results for these converters are then easily tabulated owing to the fixed equivalent circuit topology of their canonical circuit model. The insights that emerge from the general state-space modelling approach lead to the design of new converter topologies through the study of generic properties of the cascade connection of basic buck and boost converters.

  9. Differential control of active and silent phases in relaxation models of neuronal rhythms.

    PubMed

    Tabak, Joël; O'Donovan, Michael J; Rinzel, John

    2006-12-01

    Rhythmic bursting activity, found in many biological systems, serves a variety of important functions. Such activity is composed of episodes, or bursts (the active phase, AP) that are separated by quiescent periods (the silent phase, SP). Here, we use mean field, firing rate models of excitatory neural network activity to study how AP and SP durations depend on two critical network parameters that control network connectivity and cellular excitability. In these models, the AP and SP correspond to the network's underlying bistability on a fast time scale due to rapid recurrent excitatory connectivity. Activity switches between the AP and SP because of two types of slow negative feedback: synaptic depression-which has a divisive effect on the network input/output function, or cellular adaptation-a subtractive effect on the input/output function. We show that if a model incorporates the divisive process (regardless of the presence of the subtractive process), then increasing cellular excitability will speed up the activity, mostly by decreasing the silent phase. Reciprocally, if the subtractive process is present, increasing the excitatory connectivity will slow down the activity, mostly by lengthening the active phase. We also show that the model incorporating both slow processes is less sensitive to parameter variations than the models with only one process. Finally, we note that these network models are formally analogous to a type of cellular pacemaker and thus similar results apply to these cellular pacemakers.

  10. [Evolvement of ecological footprint model representing ecological carrying capacity].

    PubMed

    Cao, Shu-yan; Xie, Gao-di

    2007-06-01

    Ecological footprint (EF) is an important index of ecological carrying capacity. The original EF model is excellent in simplicity, aggregation, comparability, and lifelikeness in presenting results, but short in predictability, configuration, and applicability. To overcome these shortcomings, many researches were conducted to modify and promote the EF model, and developed it from static with single time scale to diversified ones, which included: 1) time series EF model, 2) input-output analysis based EF model, 3) integrated assessment incorporated EF model, 4) land disturbance degree based EF model, and 5) life cycle analysis based EF model, or component EF model. The function of EF as a measurement of ecological carrying capacity was significantly improved, but its accuracy and integrality still need to be advanced.

  11. [Modeling of carbon dioxide measurement and optimization on building ceramic industry].

    PubMed

    Peng, Jun-Xi; Zhao, Yu-Bo; Jiao, Li-Hua; Zeng, Lu; Zheng, Wei-Min

    2012-02-01

    Input-output model and low carbon programming model on building ceramic industry were established. Carbon dioxide emissions of key steps and carbon footprint of products were calculated and predicted using the input-output model. While products planning was optimized using the low carbon programming model. The results showed that CO2 emission in the enterprise reached 182 543.9 t a year and CO2 emission per unit product was 10% more than advanced level in the world. 80% of the total CO2 was emitted during the processes of firing and drying. As a result, we should focus on these two steps in order to reduce carbon dioxide emission of building ceramic industry. Carbon footprint of blank tile, polished tile, and glazed tile were 150.2 t, 168.0 t, 159.6 t respectively. Optimized by the low carbon model, The ceramic enterprise could reduce carbon dioxide emission by 5.4% while not sacrificing any profit, and also could obtain profit 5.6% higher than before while unrise the carbon dioxide emission.

  12. An Application of the Interregional I/O Model for the Study of the Impact of the McClellan-kerr Arkansas River Multiple Purpose Project.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-01

    Harvard University to the assessment of the impacts of constructing the McClellan-Kerr project. The model will also be used to asses the economic and spatial impacts of recreation and navigation among other project outputs. The gross direct and indirect construction impact of the project was estimated by the Interregional Input-Output Model to the $6.4 billion in output and $2.1 billion in household income in 1963 dollars. Of this amount, apparently 35.8 percent of the output and 52 percent of the income are estimated to be shared by the project region. This assessment is

  13. In-operation field-of-view retrieval (IFR) for satellite and ground-based DOAS-type instruments applying coincident high-resolution imager data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihler, Holger; Lübcke, Peter; Lang, Rüdiger; Beirle, Steffen; de Graaf, Martin; Hörmann, Christoph; Lampel, Johannes; Penning de Vries, Marloes; Remmers, Julia; Trollope, Ed; Wang, Yang; Wagner, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Knowledge of the field of view (FOV) of a remote sensing instrument is particularly important when interpreting their data and merging them with other spatially referenced data. Especially for instruments in space, information on the actual FOV, which may change during operation, may be difficult to obtain. Also, the FOV of ground-based devices may change during transportation to the field site, where appropriate equipment for the FOV determination may be unavailable. This paper presents an independent, simple and robust method to retrieve the FOV of an instrument during operation, i.e. the two-dimensional sensitivity distribution, sampled on a discrete grid. The method relies on correlated measurements featuring a significantly higher spatial resolution, e.g. by an imaging instrument accompanying a spectrometer. The method was applied to two satellite instruments, GOME-2 and OMI, and a ground-based differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument integrated in an SO2 camera. For GOME-2, quadrangular FOVs could be retrieved, which almost perfectly match the provided FOV edges after applying a correction for spatial aliasing inherent to GOME-type instruments. More complex sensitivity distributions were found at certain scanner angles, which are probably caused by degradation of the moving parts within the instrument. For OMI, which does not feature any moving parts, retrieved sensitivity distributions were much smoother compared to GOME-2. A 2-D super-Gaussian with six parameters was found to be an appropriate model to describe the retrieved OMI FOV. The comparison with operationally provided FOV dimensions revealed small differences, which could be mostly explained by the limitations of our IFR implementation. For the ground-based DOAS instrument, the FOV retrieved using SO2-camera data was slightly smaller than the flat-disc distribution, which is assumed by the state-of-the-art correlation technique. Differences between both methods may be

  14. TEAMS Model Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tijidjian, Raffi P.

    2010-01-01

    The TEAMS model analyzer is a supporting tool developed to work with models created with TEAMS (Testability, Engineering, and Maintenance System), which was developed by QSI. In an effort to reduce the time spent in the manual process that each TEAMS modeler must perform in the preparation of reporting for model reviews, a new tool has been developed as an aid to models developed in TEAMS. The software allows for the viewing, reporting, and checking of TEAMS models that are checked into the TEAMS model database. The software allows the user to selectively model in a hierarchical tree outline view that displays the components, failure modes, and ports. The reporting features allow the user to quickly gather statistics about the model, and generate an input/output report pertaining to all of the components. Rules can be automatically validated against the model, with a report generated containing resulting inconsistencies. In addition to reducing manual effort, this software also provides an automated process framework for the Verification and Validation (V&V) effort that will follow development of these models. The aid of such an automated tool would have a significant impact on the V&V process.

  15. Turbine modeling technique to generate off-design performance data for both single and multistage axial-flow turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Converse, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    This technique is applicable to larger axial flow turbines which may or may not incorporate variable geometry in the first stage stator. A user specified option will also permit the calculation of design point cooling flow levels and the corresponding change in turbine efficiency. The modeling technique was incorporated into a time sharing computer program in order to facilitate its use. Because this report contains a description of the input output data, values of typical inputs, and example cases, it is suitable as a user's manual.

  16. Modelling and prediction of complex non-linear processes by using Pareto multi-objective genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, A.; Khaleghi, E.; Gholaminezhad, I.; Nariman-zadeh, N.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a new multi-objective genetic programming (GP) with a diversity preserving mechanism and a real number alteration operator is presented and successfully used for Pareto optimal modelling of some complex non-linear systems using some input-output data. In this study, two different input-output data-sets of a non-linear mathematical model and of an explosive cutting process are considered separately in three-objective optimisation processes. The pertinent conflicting objective functions that have been considered for such Pareto optimisations are namely, training error (TE), prediction error (PE), and the length of tree (complexity of the network) (TL) of the GP models. Such three-objective optimisation implementations leads to some non-dominated choices of GP-type models for both cases representing the trade-offs among those objective functions. Therefore, optimal Pareto fronts of such GP models exhibit the trade-off among the corresponding conflicting objectives and, thus, provide different non-dominated optimal choices of GP-type models. Moreover, the results show that no significant optimality in TE and PE may occur when the TL of the corresponding GP model exceeds some values.

  17. Randomized trial of palliative two-fraction versus more intensive 13-fraction radiotherapy for patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer and good performance status. Medical Research Council Lung Cancer Working Party.

    PubMed

    Macbeth, F R; Bolger, J J; Hopwood, P; Bleehen, N M; Cartmell, J; Girling, D J; Machin, D; Stephens, R J; Bailey, A J

    1996-01-01

    In patients with non-metastatic but inoperable non-small cell lung cancer that is locally too extensive for radical radiotherapy (RT), but who have good performance status, it is important to determine whether thoracic RT should be the minimum that is required to palliate thoracic symptoms or whether treatment should be more intensive, with the aim of prolonging survival. A total of 509 such patients from 11 centres in the UK between November 1989 and October 1992 were admitted to a trial comparing palliative versus more intensive RT with respect to survival and quality of life. They were allocated at random to receive thoracic RT with either 17 Gy in two fractions (F2) 1 week apart (255 patients) or 39 Gy in 13 fractions (F13) 5 days per week (254 patients). Survival was better in the F13 group, the median survival periods being 7 months in the F2 group compared with 9 months in the F13 group, and the survival rates 31% and 36% at one year and 9% and 12% at 2 years, respectively (hazard ratio = 0.82; 95% CI0.69-0.99). There was a suggestion of a trend towards greater benefit in fitter patients. Metastases appeared earlier in the F2 group. As recorded by patients using the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist, the commonest symptoms on admission were cough, shortness of breath, tiredness, lack of energy, worrying and chest pain. These were more rapidly palliated by the F2 regimen. Psychological distress was generally lower in the F13 group. Three patients (two F13, one F2) exhibited evidence of myelopathy. As recorded by patients using a diary card, 76% of the F2 compared with 81% of the F13 patients had dysphagia associated with their RT. This was transient, lasting for a median of 6.5 days in the F2 group compared with 14 days in the F13 group. In conclusion, the F2 regimen had a more rapid palliative effect. In the F13 group, although treatment-related dysphagia was worse, survival was longer.

  18. Baseline Cardiopulmonary Function as an Independent Prognostic Factor for Survival of Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer After Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Single-Center Analysis of 161 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Semrau, Sabine; Klautke, Gunther; Fietkau, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Little is known about the effects of cardiopulmonary function on the prognosis of concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients with inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of the effects of tumor- and patient-related factors and parameters of cardiopulmonary function and heart morphology on the feasibility, toxicity, and prognosis was performed. Results: Cardiopulmonary function had no effect on the toxicity or feasibility of treatment; effects on survival were observed in the univariate analysis. Median survival varied as follows: cardiac function: 13.0 {+-} 1.6 months for left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) > 50% vs. 10.0 {+-} 1.9 months for LVEF {<=} 50% (p = 0.003); pulmonary function: 16.0 {+-} 0.6 months for no lung function deficits (vital capacity [VC]{>=} 60%, forced expiratory volume in 1 s {>=} 80%, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) {>=}60%) vs. 14.0 {+-} 1.5 months for one or two function deficits vs. 8.0 {+-} 1.5 months for three lung function deficits (p = 0.001); T stage: 19.0 {+-} 3.1 months for rcT0/cT1/cT2 vs. 12.0 {+-} 0.8 months for cT3/cT4 (p = 0.039); and age: 11.0 {+-} 1.5 months for <60 years vs. 18.0 {+-} 2.5 months for 60-69 years vs. 12.0 {+-} 1.2 months for {>=}70 years (p = 0.008). Prognostic factors identified in the multivariate analysis were LVEF {<=}50% (p = 0.043; hazard ratio [HR], 1.74), reduced pulmonary function (p = 0.001; HR, 1.71 or 5.05) and T stage (p = 0.026; HR: 1.71). Conclusions: In addition to T-stage, cardiac and pulmonary function variables affected the survival of non-small-cell lung cancer patients after chemoradiotherapy.

  19. Modeling Regular Replacement for String Constraint Solving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Xiang; Li, Chung-Chih

    2010-01-01

    Bugs in user input sanitation of software systems often lead to vulnerabilities. Among them many are caused by improper use of regular replacement. This paper presents a precise modeling of various semantics of regular substitution, such as the declarative, finite, greedy, and reluctant, using finite state transducers (FST). By projecting an FST to its input/output tapes, we are able to solve atomic string constraints, which can be applied to both the forward and backward image computation in model checking and symbolic execution of text processing programs. We report several interesting discoveries, e.g., certain fragments of the general problem can be handled using less expressive deterministic FST. A compact representation of FST is implemented in SUSHI, a string constraint solver. It is applied to detecting vulnerabilities in web applications

  20. Lithium-ion battery cell-level control using constrained model predictive control and equivalent circuit models

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, MA; Trimboli, MS

    2015-07-01

    This paper introduces a novel application of model predictive control (MPC) to cell-level charging of a lithium-ion battery utilizing an equivalent circuit model of battery dynamics. The approach employs a modified form of the MPC algorithm that caters for direct feed-though signals in order to model near-instantaneous battery ohmic resistance. The implementation utilizes a 2nd-order equivalent circuit discrete-time state-space model based on actual cell parameters; the control methodology is used to compute a fast charging profile that respects input, output, and state constraints. Results show that MPC is well-suited to the dynamics of the battery control problem and further suggest significant performance improvements might be achieved by extending the result to electrochemical models. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Integrated model of G189A and Aspen-plus for the transient modeling of extravehicular activity atmospheric control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodney, Matthew; Conger, Bruce C.

    1990-01-01

    A computerized modeling tool, under development for the transient modeling of an extravehicular activity atmospheric control subsystem is described. This subsystem includes the astronaut, temperature control, moisture control, CO2 removal, and oxygen make-up components. Trade studies evaluating competing components and subsystems to guide the selection and development of hardware for lunar and Martian missions will use this modeling tool. The integrated modeling tool uses the Advanced System for Process Engineering (ASPEN) to accomplish pseudosteady-state simulations, and the general environmental thermal control and life support program (G189A) to manage overall control of the run and transient input output, as well as transient modeling computations and database functions. Flow charts and flow diagrams are included.

  2. Model-based fault diagnosis in continuous dynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Lo, C H; Wong, Y K; Rad, A B

    2004-07-01

    Traditional fault detection and isolation methods are based on quantitative models which are sometimes difficult and costly to obtain. In this paper, qualitative bond graph (QBG) reasoning is adopted as the modeling scheme to generate a set of qualitative equations. The QBG method provides a unified approach for modeling engineering systems, in particular, mechatronic systems. An input-output qualitative equation derived from QBG formalism performs continuous system monitoring. Fault diagnosis is activated when a discrepancy is observed between measured abnormal behavior and predicted system behavior. Genetic algorithms (GA's) are then used to search for possible faulty components among a system of qualitative equations. In order to demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm, we have tested it on a laboratory scale servo-tank liquid process rig. Results of the proposed model-based fault detection and diagnosis algorithm for the process rig are presented and discussed.

  3. Online parameter estimation for surgical needle steering model.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kai Guo; Podder, Tarun; Xiao, Di; Yu, Yan; Liu, Tien-I; Ling, Keck Voon; Ng, Wan Sing

    2006-01-01

    Estimation of the system parameters, given noisy input/output data, is a major field in control and signal processing. Many different estimation methods have been proposed in recent years. Among various methods, Extended Kalman Filtering (EKF) is very useful for estimating the parameters of a nonlinear and time-varying system. Moreover, it can remove the effects of noises to achieve significantly improved results. Our task here is to estimate the coefficients in a spring-beam-damper needle steering model. This kind of spring-damper model has been adopted by many researchers in studying the tissue deformation. One difficulty in using such model is to estimate the spring and damper coefficients. Here, we proposed an online parameter estimator using EKF to solve this problem. The detailed design is presented in this paper. Computer simulations and physical experiments have revealed that the simulator can estimate the parameters accurately with fast convergent speed and improve the model efficacy.

  4. The cerebellum as an adaptive filter: a general model?

    PubMed

    Dean, Paul; Porrill, John

    2010-01-01

    Many functional models of the cerebellar microcircuit are based on the adaptive-filter model first proposed by Fujita. The adaptive filter has powerful signal processing capacities that are suitable for both sensory and motor tasks, and uses a simple and intuitively plausible decorrelation learning rule that offers and account of the evolution of the inferior olive. Moreover, in those cases where the input-output transformations of cerebellar microzones have been sufficiently characterised, they appear to conform to those predicted by the adaptive-filter model. However, these cases are few in number, and comparing the model with the internal operations of the microcircuit itself has not proved straightforward. Whereas some microcircuit features appear compatible with adaptive-filter function, others such as simple granular-layer processing or Purkinje cell bistability, do not. How far these seeming incompatibilities indicate additional computational roles for the cerebellar microcircuit remains to be determined.

  5. Local identifiability and sensitivity analysis of neuromuscular blockade and depth of hypnosis models.

    PubMed

    Silva, M M; Lemos, J M; Coito, A; Costa, B A; Wigren, T; Mendonça, T

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the local identifiability and sensitivity properties of two classes of Wiener models for the neuromuscular blockade and depth of hypnosis, when drug dose profiles like the ones commonly administered in the clinical practice are used as model inputs. The local parameter identifiability was assessed based on the singular value decomposition of the normalized sensitivity matrix. For the given input signal excitation, the results show an over-parameterization of the standard pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models. The same identifiability assessment was performed on recently proposed minimally parameterized parsimonious models for both the neuromuscular blockade and the depth of hypnosis. The results show that the majority of the model parameters are identifiable from the available input-output data. This indicates that any identification strategy based on the minimally parameterized parsimonious Wiener models for the neuromuscular blockade and for the depth of hypnosis is likely to be more successful than if standard models are used.

  6. Linear and Nonlinear Electrical Models of Neurons for Hopfield Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, Farah; Iqbal, Shaukat; Hussain, Muhammad Waqar

    2016-11-01

    A novel electrical model of neuron is proposed in this presentation. The suggested neural network model has linear/nonlinear input-output characteristics. This new deterministic model has joint biological properties in excellent agreement with the earlier deterministic neuron model of Hopfield and Tank and to the stochastic neuron model of McCulloch and Pitts. It is an accurate portrayal of differential equation presented by Hopfield and Tank to mimic neurons. Operational amplifiers, resistances, capacitor, and diodes are used to design this system. The presented biological model of neurons remains to be advantageous for simulations. Impulse response is studied and conferred to certify the stability and strength of this innovative model. A simple illustration is mapped to demonstrate the exactness of the intended system. Precisely mapped illustration exhibits 100 % accurate results.

  7. Reduced order modeling and active flow control of an inlet duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xiaoqing

    Many aerodynamic applications require the modeling of compressible flows in or around a body, e.g., the design of aircraft, inlet or exhaust duct, wind turbines, or tall buildings. Traditional methods use wind tunnel experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of the flows. Although they provide a great deal of insight into the essential characteristics of the flow field, they are not suitable for control analysis and design due to the high physical/computational cost. Many model reduction methods have been studied to reduce the complexity of the flow model. There are two main approaches: linearization based input/output modeling and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) based model reduction. The former captures mostly the local behavior near a steady state, which is suitable to model laminar flow dynamics. The latter obtains a reduced order model by projecting the governing equation onto an "optimal" subspace and is able to model complex nonlinear flow phenomena. In this research we investigate various model reduction approaches and compare them in flow modeling and control design. We propose an integrated model-based control methodology and apply it to the reduced order modeling and active flow control of compressible flows within a very aggressive (length to exit diameter ratio, L/D, of 1.5) inlet duct and its upstream contraction section. The approach systematically applies reduced order modeling, estimator design, sensor placement and control design to improve the aerodynamic performance. The main contribution of this work is the development of a hybrid model reduction approach that attempts to combine the best features of input/output model identification and POD method. We first identify a linear input/output model by using a subspace algorithm. We next project the difference between CFD response and the identified model response onto a set of POD basis. This trajectory is fit to a nonlinear

  8. An Open-Source Toolbox for Surrogate Modeling of Joint Contact Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Eskinazi, Ilan

    2016-01-01

    Goal Incorporation of elastic joint contact models into simulations of human movement could facilitate studying the interactions between muscles, ligaments, and bones. Unfortunately, elastic joint contact models are often too expensive computationally to be used within iterative simulation frameworks. This limitation can be overcome by using fast and accurate surrogate contact models that fit or interpolate input-output data sampled from existing elastic contact models. However, construction of surrogate contact models remains an arduous task. The aim of this paper is to introduce an open-source program called Surrogate Contact Modeling Toolbox (SCMT) that facilitates surrogate contact model creation, evaluation, and use. Methods SCMT interacts with the third party software FEBio to perform elastic contact analyses of finite element models and uses Matlab to train neural networks that fit the input-output contact data. SCMT features sample point generation for multiple domains, automated sampling, sample point filtering, and surrogate model training and testing. Results An overview of the software is presented along with two example applications. The first example demonstrates creation of surrogate contact models of artificial tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints and evaluates their computational speed and accuracy, while the second demonstrates the use of surrogate contact models in a forward dynamic simulation of an open-chain leg extension-flexion motion. Conclusion SCMT facilitates the creation of computationally fast and accurate surrogate contact models. Additionally, it serves as a bridge between FEBio and OpenSim musculoskeletal modeling software. Significance Researchers may now create and deploy surrogate models of elastic joint contact with minimal effort. PMID:26186761

  9. Workflow Modelling and Analysis Based on the Construction of Task Models

    PubMed Central

    Cravo, Glória

    2015-01-01

    We describe the structure of a workflow as a graph whose vertices represent tasks and the arcs are associated to workflow transitions in this paper. To each task an input/output logic operator is associated. Furthermore, we associate a Boolean term to each transition present in the workflow. We still identify the structure of workflows and describe their dynamism through the construction of new task models. This construction is very simple and intuitive since it is based on the analysis of all tasks present on the workflow that allows us to describe the dynamism of the workflow very easily. So, our approach has the advantage of being very intuitive, which is an important highlight of our work. We also introduce the concept of logical termination of workflows and provide conditions under which this property is valid. Finally, we provide a counter-example which shows that a conjecture presented in a previous article is false. PMID:25705713

  10. Solar Sail Models and Test Measurements Correspondence for Validation Requirements Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Anthony; Adams, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Solar sails are being developed as a mission-enabling technology in support of future NASA science missions. Current efforts have advanced solar sail technology sufficient to justify a flight validation program. A primary objective of this activity is to test and validate solar sail models that are currently under development so that they may be used with confidence in future science mission development (e.g., scalable to larger sails). Both system and model validation requirements must be defined early in the program to guide design cycles and to ensure that relevant and sufficient test data will be obtained to conduct model validation to the level required. A process of model identification, model input/output documentation, model sensitivity analyses, and test measurement correspondence is required so that decisions can be made to satisfy validation requirements within program constraints.

  11. SIMWEST - A simulation model for wind energy storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edsinger, R. W.; Warren, A. W.; Gordon, L. H.; Chang, G. C.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive and efficient computer program for the modeling of wind energy systems with storage. The level of detail of SIMWEST (SImulation Model for Wind Energy STorage) is consistent with evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems with energy storage options. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and control components. The first program is a precompiler which allows the library components to be put together in building block form. The second program performs the technoeconomic system analysis with the required input/output, and the integration of system dynamics. An example of the application of the SIMWEST program to a current 100 kW wind energy storage system is given.

  12. Directory of Energy Information Administration models, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-04

    This directory revises and updates the Directory of Energy Information Administration Models, DOE/EIA-0293(89), Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy, May 1989. The major changes are the inclusion of the Building Energy End-Use Model (BEEM-PC), Residential Energy End-Use Model (REEM-PC), the Refinery Yield Model Spreadsheet System (RYMSS-PC), and the Capital Stock Model (CAPSTOCK-PC). Also, the following models have been inactivated: Energy Disaggregated Input-Output Model (EDIO), Household Model of Energy (HOME3-PC), Commercial Sector Energy Model (CSEM-PC), Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Supply Model (OCSM), and the Stock Module of the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (STOCK). This directory contains descriptions about each basic and auxiliary model, including the title, acronym, purpose, and type, followed by more detailed information on characteristics, uses, and requirements. For developing models, limited information is provided. Sources for additional information are identified. Included in this directory are 38 EIA models active as of March 1, 1990, as well as the PC-AEO Forecasting Model Overview and the three Subsystems for the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) Model. Models that run on personal computers are identified by PC'' as part of the acronym.

  13. A Simulation-Based Black-Box Microcontroller Model for EME Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villavicencio, Yamarita; Musolino, Francesco; Fiori, Franco

    This paper describes a black-box model of mixed analog-digital VLSI circuits for the prediction of microcontroller electromagnetic emissions without disclosure of manufacturer data. The model is based on small-signal simulations performed at the analog and digital building-block level, considering also layout and technology parameters, and modeling the parasitic substrate coupling paths and the interconnects. The developed model allows system designers to predict the impact of microcontroller operation on the system-level EMEs by carrying out low-time consuming simulations in the early design phases of their products thus minimizing unnecessary costs and scheduling delays. In this paper, the black-box model of an 8-bit microcontroller is described and it is employed to predict the conducted emission delivered through the input-output ports.

  14. Using model order tests to determine sensory inputs in a motion study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repperger, D. W.; Junker, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    In the study of motion effects on tracking performance, a problem of interest is the determination of what sensory inputs a human uses in controlling his tracking task. In the approach presented here a simple canonical model (FID or a proportional, integral, derivative structure) is used to model the human's input-output time series. A study of significant changes in reduction of the output error loss functional is conducted as different permutations of parameters are considered. Since this canonical model includes parameters which are related to inputs to the human (such as the error signal, its derivatives and integration), the study of model order is equivalent to the study of which sensory inputs are being used by the tracker. The parameters are obtained which have the greatest effect on reducing the loss function significantly. In this manner the identification procedure converts the problem of testing for model order into the problem of determining sensory inputs.

  15. Volterra network modeling of the nonlinear finite-impulse reponse of the radiation belt flux

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Vassiliadis, D.

    2011-01-04

    We show how a general class of spatio-temporal nonlinear impulse-response forecast networks (Volterra networks) can be constructed from a taxonomy of nonlinear autoregressive integrated moving average with exogenous inputs (NAR-MAX) input-output equations, and used to model the evolution of energetic particle f uxes in the Van Allen radiation belts. We present initial results for the nonlinear response of the radiation belts to conditions a month earlier. The essential features of spatio-temporal observations are recovered with the model echoing the results of state space models and linear f nite impulse-response models whereby the strongest coupling peak occurs in the preceding 1-2 days. It appears that such networks hold promise for the development of accurate and fully data-driven space weather modelling, monitoring and forecast tools.

  16. Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models

    SciTech Connect

    Billman, L.; Keyser, D.

    2013-08-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), use input-output methodology to estimate gross (not net) jobs and economic impacts of building and operating selected types of renewable electricity generation and fuel plants. This analysis provides the DOE with an assessment of the value, impact, and validity of the JEDI suite of models. While the models produce estimates of jobs, earnings, and economic output, this analysis focuses only on jobs estimates. This validation report includes an introduction to JEDI models, an analysis of the value and impact of the JEDI models, and an analysis of the validity of job estimates generated by JEDI model through comparison to other modeled estimates and comparison to empirical, observed jobs data as reported or estimated for a commercial project, a state, or a region.

  17. Efficient Computational Model of Hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Joel

    2005-01-01

    A recently developed mathematical model of the output (displacement) versus the input (applied voltage) of a piezoelectric transducer accounts for hysteresis. For the sake of computational speed, the model is kept simple by neglecting the dynamic behavior of the transducer. Hence, the model applies to static and quasistatic displacements only. A piezoelectric transducer of the type to which the model applies is used as an actuator in a computer-based control system to effect fine position adjustments. Because the response time of the rest of such a system is usually much greater than that of a piezoelectric transducer, the model remains an acceptably close approximation for the purpose of control computations, even though the dynamics are neglected. The model (see Figure 1) represents an electrically parallel, mechanically series combination of backlash elements, each having a unique deadband width and output gain. The zeroth element in the parallel combination has zero deadband width and, hence, represents a linear component of the input/output relationship. The other elements, which have nonzero deadband widths, are used to model the nonlinear components of the hysteresis loop. The deadband widths and output gains of the elements are computed from experimental displacement-versus-voltage data. The hysteresis curve calculated by use of this model is piecewise linear beyond deadband limits.

  18. Anatomically heterogeneous populations of CB1 cannabinoid receptor-expressing interneurons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus show homogeneous input-output characteristics.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Gergely G; Papp, Orsolya I; Máté, Zoltán; Szabó, Gábor; Hájos, Norbert

    2014-12-01

    A subpopulation of GABAergic cells in cortical structures expresses CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1 ) on their axon terminals. To understand the function of these interneurons in information processing, it is necessary to uncover how they are embedded into neuronal circuits. Therefore, the proportion of GABAergic terminals expressing CB1 and the morphological and electrophysiological properties of CB1 -immunoreactive interneurons should be revealed. We investigated the ratio and the origin of CB1 -expressing inhibitory boutons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Using immunocytochemical techniques, we estimated that ∼40% of GABAergic axon terminals in different layers of CA3 also expressed CB1 . To identify the inhibitory cell types expressing CB1 in this region, we recorded and intracellularly labeled interneurons in hippocampal slices. CB1 -expressing interneurons showed distinct axonal arborization, and were classified as basket cells, mossy-fiber-associated cells, dendritic-layer-innervating cells or perforant-path-associated cells. In each morphological category, a substantial variability in axonal projection was observed. In contrast to the diverse morphology, the active and passive membrane properties were found to be rather similar. Using paired recordings, we found that pyramidal cells displayed large and fast unitary postsynaptic currents in response to activating basket and mossy-fiber-associated cells, while they showed slower and smaller synaptic events in pairs originating from interneurons that innervate the dendritic layer, which may be due to dendritic filtering. In addition, CB1 activation significantly reduced the amplitude of the postsynaptic currents in each cell pair tested. Our data suggest that CB1 -expressing interneurons with different axonal projections have comparable physiological characteristics, contributing to a similar proportion of GABAergic inputs along the somato-dendritic axis of CA3 pyramidal cells.

  19. The Theory and Feasibility of Implementing an Economic Input/Output Analysis of the Department of Defense to Support Acquisition Decision Analysis and Cost Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-30

    Army Contracting Command, U.S. Army Materiel Command • Program Manager, Airborne, Maritime and Fixed Station Joint Tactical Radio System ^Åèìáëáíáçå...and governments in Iraq and Afghanistan. Additionally, Mr. Patterson supported the Deputy Secretary in the areas of military commissions for detainees...postdoctoral positions in Econometrics and Operations Research and in National Security Studies at Washington State University and Harvard

  20. Theory and Feasibility of Implementing Economic Input/Output Analysis of the Department of Defense to Support Acquisition Decision Analysis and Cost Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-28

    Professor of Decision Science, Defense Resources Management Institute. She received a PhD in Industrial Engineering and an MS in Operations Research from...the Georgia Institute of Technology , and a BS in Environmental Engineering Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology . Dr. Regnier...characterizing uncertainty for decision-makers, with a focus on applications with sources of uncertainty in the natural environment. Eva Regnier, PhD

  1. Prime Contract Awards Alphabetically by Contractor, by State or Country, and Place, Fiscal Year 1987. Part 9. Hawthorne Srvc. & Medical U SC-Input Output Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    t( m2C 400C10-400N-4N-4NN--OOOCOOO- -- 02- ON-lOON I.,� 0_0 m P-40 ClI3D-. :)-D- D00 J 0 0 l C 0 N l ( ( ( 0 0 Cl 4L10’J N-4LN N P40N 4 N0...0 4- 4I 0 4 04 4 - 1 4 00C 0-4 C4 I ~~0 0 CQ2N020M20200M020NŖ-40 I a* 04c - 4M DL .41 - 4N4 -4 vv - wwr-4 -c0 - Ulm I M2C I 0񓀠 -40 00 In

  2. How has dematerialization contributed to reducing oil price pressure?: a qualitative input-output analysis for the Japanese economy during 1990-2000.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Shigemi; Oshita, Yuko; Nansai, Keisuke; Suh, Sangwon

    2009-01-15

    The evolution of crude oil use structure and its impacts on commodity prices are examined for Japanese economy between 1990 and 2000. We found that the out-degree of the production network, indicating the extent of the pressure on prices of downstream industries in response to higher crude oil prices, decreased in several sectors between 1990 and 2000. The results by sector showed that the decrease was greatest in the chemical product- and iron and steel manufacturing sectors, which both indirectly use crude oil. The decrease in out-degree is considered to have been caused by improved efficiency in the production of oil-related products and increase in energy savings by the manufacturing facilities in these sectors. In addition, many of the sectors having a high out-degree engage in intermediate product production. Conversely, the in-degree, which represents the extent of being pressured by other sectors with increased crude oil prices, also decreased during the period between 1990 and 2000. From the result of the in-degree, this study found that dematerialization and weight reduction of final products such as "cellular phones" and "personal computers" had a marked effect on decreasing in-degree. More importantly, for the top-ranked sectors with the high out-degree and in-degree, such as "aliphatic intermediates", "chemical fertilizers", "plastic products", "hot rolled steel", "yarn and fabric dyeing and finishing", the results suggest that the pressure due to rising crude oil prices can be more effectively eased by implementing measures targeted at upstream products and sectors, while current policy measures to alleviate oil-price induced inflation are mainly targeted at downstream products such as gasoline.

  3. Influence of Current Input-Output and Age of First Exposure on Phonological Acquisition in Early Bilingual Spanish-English-Speaking Kindergarteners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz-Felter, Roxanna; Cooperson, Solaman J.; Bedore, Lisa M.; Peña, Elizabeth D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although some investigations of phonological development have found that segmental accuracy is comparable in monolingual children and their bilingual peers, there is evidence that language use affects segmental accuracy in both languages. Aims: To investigate the influence of age of first exposure to English and the amount of current…

  4. The role of input-output analysis of energy and ecologic systems. In the early development of ecological economics--a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    A summary is provided of the early history of research on the flow of nonrenewable energy resources through the economy and of the flow of renewable energy resources through a natural ecosystem. The techniques are similar, and many specific applications are provided. A combined economic and ecological technique is also defined. The early history and people of the International Society Ecological Economic are cited.

  5. Documenting Models for Interoperability and Reusability ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Many modeling frameworks compartmentalize science via individual models that link sets of small components to create larger modeling workflows. Developing integrated watershed models increasingly requires coupling multidisciplinary, independent models, as well as collaboration between scientific communities, since component-based modeling can integrate models from different disciplines. Integrated Environmental Modeling (IEM) systems focus on transferring information between components by capturing a conceptual site model; establishing local metadata standards for input/output of models and databases; managing data flow between models and throughout the system; facilitating quality control of data exchanges (e.g., checking units, unit conversions, transfers between software languages); warning and error handling; and coordinating sensitivity/uncertainty analyses. Although many computational software systems facilitate communication between, and execution of, components, there are no common approaches, protocols, or standards for turn-key linkages between software systems and models, especially if modifying components is not the intent. Using a standard ontology, this paper reviews how models can be described for discovery, understanding, evaluation, access, and implementation to facilitate interoperability and reusability. In the proceedings of the International Environmental Modelling and Software Society (iEMSs), 8th International Congress on Environmental Mod

  6. Modeling of BWR core meltdown accidents - for application in the MELRPI. MOD2 computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, B R; Kim, S H; Taleyarkhan, R P; Podowski, M Z; Lahey, Jr, R T

    1985-04-01

    This report summarizes improvements and modifications made in the MELRPI computer code. A major difference between this new, updated version of the code, called MELRPI.MOD2, and the one reported previously, concerns the inclusion of a model for the BWR emergency core cooling systems (ECCS). This model and its computer implementation, the ECCRPI subroutine, account for various emergency injection modes, for both intact and rubblized geometries. Other changes to MELRPI deal with an improved model for canister wall oxidation, rubble bed modeling, and numerical integration of system equations. A complete documentation of the entire MELRPI.MOD2 code is also given, including an input guide, list of subroutines, sample input/output and program listing.

  7. Human operator identification model and related computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, K. M.; Mohr, J. N.

    1978-01-01

    Four computer programs which provide computational assistance in the analysis of man/machine systems are reported. The programs are: (1) Modified Transfer Function Program (TF); (2) Time Varying Response Program (TVSR); (3) Optimal Simulation Program (TVOPT); and (4) Linear Identification Program (SCIDNT). The TV program converts the time domain state variable system representative to frequency domain transfer function system representation. The TVSR program computes time histories of the input/output responses of the human operator model. The TVOPT program is an optimal simulation program and is similar to TVSR in that it produces time histories of system states associated with an operator in the loop system. The differences between the two programs are presented. The SCIDNT program is an open loop identification code which operates on the simulated data from TVOPT (or TVSR) or real operator data from motion simulators.

  8. A novel integrated fiber-optic interferometer model and its application in micro-displacement measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chi; Xu, Long-long; Zhu, Jun; Yuan, Zhi-wen; Yu, Ying-jie; Asundi, Anand K.

    2016-11-01

    We conducted an investigation in a novel integrated fiber-optic interferometer model based on ultra-small self-focusing optical fiber probe and the method of its application in micro-displacement measurement. Firstly, we proposed the structure model of integrated fiber-optic interferometer and established its input-output mathematical model applied in micro-displacement measurement. Secondly, we established the hardware system of the integrated fiber-optic interferometer. Finally, we analyzed the fitting result of experimental data of micro-displacement measurement and some error factors and defined the linear working range. The experimental results indicate that, under the given experimental conditions, the linear measurement range, linearity and sensitivity of the integrated fiber-optic interferometer were 10 μm, 1.36% and 8.8 mv/μm respectively.

  9. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 3.34): Programmer's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; James, Bonnie F.; Johnson, Dale L.

    1996-01-01

    This is a programmer's guide for the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 3.34). Included are a brief history and review of the model since its origin in 1988 and a technical discussion of recent additions and modifications. Examples of how to run both the interactive and batch (subroutine) forms are presented. Instructions are provided on how to customize output of the model for various parameters of the Mars atmosphere. Detailed descriptions are given of the main driver programs, subroutines, and associated computational methods. Lists and descriptions include input, output, and local variables in the programs. These descriptions give a summary of program steps and 'map' of calling relationships among the subroutines. Definitions are provided for the variables passed between subroutines through common lists. Explanations are provided for all diagnostic and progress messages generated during execution of the program. A brief outline of future plans for Mars-GRAM is also presented.

  10. Water recovery and management test support modeling for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamadinejad, Habib; Bacskay, Allen S.

    1990-01-01

    The water-recovery and management (WRM) subsystem proposed for the Space Station Freedom program is outlined, and its computerized modeling and simulation based on a Computer Aided System Engineering and Analysis (CASE/A) program are discussed. A WRM test model consisting of a pretreated urine processing (TIMES), hygiene water processing (RO), RO brine processing using TIMES, and hygiene water storage is presented. Attention is drawn to such end-user equipment characteristics as the shower, dishwasher, clotheswasher, urine-collection facility, and handwash. The transient behavior of pretreated-urine, RO waste-hygiene, and RO brine tanks is assessed, as well as the total input/output to or from the system. The model is considered to be beneficial for pretest analytical predictions as a program cost-saving feature.

  11. Cavity-QED models of switches for attojoule-scale nanophotonic logic

    SciTech Connect

    Mabuchi, Hideo

    2009-10-15

    Quantum optical input-output models are described for a class of optical switches based on cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) with a single multilevel atom (or comparable bound system of charges) coupled simultaneously to several resonant field modes. A recent limit theorem for quantum stochastic differential equations is used to show that such models converge to a simple scattering matrix in a type of strong-coupling limit that seems natural for nanophotonic systems. Numerical integration is used to show that the behavior of the prelimit model approximates that of the simple scattering matrix in a realistic regime for the physical parameters and that it is possible in the proposed cavity-QED configuration for low-power optical signals to switch higher-power signals at attojoule energy scales.

  12. SimSphere model sensitivity analysis towards establishing its use for deriving key parameters characterising land surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulos, G. P.; Griffiths, H. M.; Carlson, T. N.; Ioannou-Katidis, P.; Holt, T.

    2014-09-01

    Being able to accurately estimate parameters characterising land surface interactions is currently a key scientific priority due to their central role in the Earth's global energy and water cycle. To this end, some approaches have been based on utilising the synergies between land surface models and Earth observation (EO) data to retrieve relevant parameters. One such model is SimSphere, the use of which is currently expanding, either as a stand-alone application or synergistically with EO data. The present study aimed at exploring the effect of changing the atmospheric sounding profile on the sensitivity of key variables predicted by this model assuming different probability distribution functions (PDFs) for its inputs/outputs. To satisfy this objective and to ensure consistency and comparability to analogous studies conducted previously on the model, a sophisticated, cutting-edge sensitivity analysis (SA) method adopting Bayesian theory was implemented on SimSphere. Our results did not show dramatic changes in the nature or ranking of influential model inputs in comparison to previous studies. Model outputs examined using SA were sensitive to a small number of the inputs; a significant amount of first-order interactions between the inputs was also found, suggesting strong model coherence. Results showed that the assumption of different PDFs for the model inputs/outputs did not have an important bearing on mapping the most responsive model inputs and interactions, but only the absolute SA measures. This study extends our understanding of SimSphere's structure and further establishes its coherence and correspondence to that of a natural system's behaviour. Consequently, the present work represents a significant step forward in the global efforts on SimSphere verification, especially those focusing on the development of global operational products from the model synergy with EO data.

  13. Accelerating advances in continental domain hydrologic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archfield, Stacey A.; Clark, Martyn; Arheimer, Berit; Hay, Lauren E.; McMillan, Hilary; Kiang, Julie E.; Seibert, Jan; Hakala, Kirsti; Bock, Andrew; Wagener, Thorsten; Farmer, William H.; Andréassian, Vazken; Attinger, Sabine; Viglione, Alberto; Knight, Rodney; Markstrom, Steven; Over, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    In the past, hydrologic modeling of surface water resources has mainly focused on simulating the hydrologic cycle at local to regional catchment modeling domains. There now exists a level of maturity among the catchment, global water security, and land surface modeling communities such that these communities are converging toward continental domain hydrologic models. This commentary, written from a catchment hydrology community perspective, provides a review of progress in each community toward this achievement, identifies common challenges the communities face, and details immediate and specific areas in which these communities can mutually benefit one another from the convergence of their research perspectives. Those include: (1) creating new incentives and infrastructure to report and share model inputs, outputs, and parameters in data services and open access, machine-independent formats for model replication or reanalysis; (2) ensuring that hydrologic models have: sufficient complexity to represent the dominant physical processes and adequate representation of anthropogenic impacts on the terrestrial water cycle, a process-based approach to model parameter estimation, and appropriate parameterizations to represent large-scale fluxes and scaling behavior; (3) maintaining a balance between model complexity and data availability as well as uncertainties; and (4) quantifying and communicating significant advancements toward these modeling goals.

  14. Accelerating advances in continental domain hydrologic modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archfield, Stacey A.; Clark, Martyn; Arheimer, Berit; Hay, Lauren E.; McMillan, Hilary; Kiang, Julie E.; Seibert, Jan; Hakala, Kirsti; Bock, Andrew R.; Wagener, Thorsten; Farmer, William H.; Andreassian, Vazken; Attinger, Sabine; Viglione, Alberto; Knight, Rodney; Markstrom, Steven; Over, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    In the past, hydrologic modeling of surface water resources has mainly focused on simulating the hydrologic cycle at local to regional catchment modeling domains. There now exists a level of maturity among the catchment, global water security, and land surface modeling communities such that these communities are converging toward continental domain hydrologic models. This commentary, written from a catchment hydrology community perspective, provides a review of progress in each community toward this achievement, identifies common challenges the communities face, and details immediate and specific areas in which these communities can mutually benefit one another from the convergence of their research perspectives. Those include: (1) creating new incentives and infrastructure to report and share model inputs, outputs, and parameters in data services and open access, machine-independent formats for model replication or reanalysis; (2) ensuring that hydrologic models have: sufficient complexity to represent the dominant physical processes and adequate representation of anthropogenic impacts on the terrestrial water cycle, a process-based approach to model parameter estimation, and appropriate parameterizations to represent large-scale fluxes and scaling behavior; (3) maintaining a balance between model complexity and data availability as well as uncertainties; and (4) quantifying and communicating significant advancements toward these modeling goals.

  15. Modeling and control of tubular solid-oxide fuel cell systems: II. Nonlinear model reduction and model predictive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanandaji, Borhan M.; Vincent, Tyrone L.; Colclasure, Andrew M.; Kee, Robert J.

    This paper describes a systematic method for developing model-based controllers for solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems. To enhance the system efficiency and to avoid possible damages, the system must be controlled within specific operating conditions, while satisfying a load requirement. Model predictive control (MPC) is a natural choice for control implementation. However, to implement MPC, a low-order model is needed that captures the dominant dynamic behavior over the operating range. A linear parameter varying (LPV) model structure is developed and applied to obtain a control-oriented dynamic model of the SOFC stack. This approach effectively reduces a detailed physical model to a form that is compatible with MPC. The LPV structure includes nonlinear scheduling functions that blend the dynamics of locally linear models to represent nonlinear dynamic behavior over large operating ranges. Alternative scheduling variables are evaluated, with cell current being shown to be an appropriate choice. Using the reduced-order model, an MPC controller is designed that can respond to the load requirement over a wide range of operation changes while maintaining input-output variables within specified constraints. To validate the approach, the LPV-based MPC controller is applied to the high-order physical model.

  16. Aeroservoelastic Uncertainty Model Identification from Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.

    2001-01-01

    Uncertainty modeling is a critical element in the estimation of robust stability margins for stability boundary prediction and robust flight control system development. There has been a serious deficiency to date in aeroservoelastic data analysis with attention to uncertainty modeling. Uncertainty can be estimated from flight data using both parametric and nonparametric identification techniques. The model validation problem addressed in this paper is to identify aeroservoelastic models with associated uncertainty structures from a limited amount of controlled excitation inputs over an extensive flight envelope. The challenge to this problem is to update analytical models from flight data estimates while also deriving non-conservative uncertainty descriptions consistent with the flight data. Multisine control surface command inputs and control system feedbacks are used as signals in a wavelet-based modal parameter estimation procedure for model updates. Transfer function estimates are incorporated in a robust minimax estimation scheme to get input-output parameters and error bounds consistent with the data and model structure. Uncertainty estimates derived from the data in this manner provide an appropriate and relevant representation for model development and robust stability analysis. This model-plus-uncertainty identification procedure is applied to aeroservoelastic flight data from the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center F-18 Systems Research Aircraft.

  17. Parameter Identifiability of Fundamental Pharmacodynamic Models

    PubMed Central

    Janzén, David L. I.; Bergenholm, Linnéa; Jirstrand, Mats; Parkinson, Joanna; Yates, James; Evans, Neil D.; Chappell, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Issues of parameter identifiability of routinely used pharmacodynamics models are considered in this paper. The structural identifiability of 16 commonly applied pharmacodynamic model structures was analyzed analytically, using the input-output approach. Both fixed-effects versions (non-population, no between-subject variability) and mixed-effects versions (population, including between-subject variability) of each model structure were analyzed. All models were found to be structurally globally identifiable under conditions of fixing either one of two particular parameters. Furthermore, an example was constructed to illustrate the importance of sufficient data quality and show that structural identifiability is a prerequisite, but not a guarantee, for successful parameter estimation and practical parameter identifiability. This analysis was performed by generating artificial data of varying quality to a structurally identifiable model with known true parameter values, followed by re-estimation of the parameter values. In addition, to show the benefit of including structural identifiability as part of model development, a case study was performed applying an unidentifiable model to real experimental data. This case study shows how performing such an analysis prior to parameter estimation can improve the parameter estimation process and model performance. Finally, an unidentifiable model was fitted to simulated data using multiple initial parameter values, resulting in highly different estimated uncertainties. This example shows that although the standard errors of the parameter estimates often indicate a structural identifiability issue, reasonably “good” standard errors may sometimes mask unidentifiability issues. PMID:27994553

  18. Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Model to Predict High-Order Modulation Intersymbol Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Andro, Monty; Williams, W. D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Demands for increased data rates in satellite communications necessitate higher order modulation schemes, larger system bandwidth, and minimum distortion of the modulated signal as it is passed through the traveling wave tube amplifier (TWTA). One type of distortion that the TWTA contributes to is intersymbol interference (ISI), and this becomes particularly disruptive with wide-band, complex modulation schemes. It is suspected that in addition to the dispersion of the TWT, frequency dependent reflections due to mismatches within the TWT are a significant contributor to ISI. To experimentally investigate the effect of these mismatches within the physical TWT on ISI would be prohibitively expensive, as it would require manufacturing numerous amplifiers in addition to the acquisition of the required digital hardware. In an attempt to develop a more accurate model to correlate IS1 with the TWTA and the operational signal, a fully three-dimensional (3D), time-dependent, TWT interaction model has been developed using the electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code MAFIA (solution of Maxwell's equations by the Finite-Integration-Algorithm). The model includes a user defined slow-wave circuit with a spatially tapered region of loss to implement a sever, and spatially varied geometry (such as helical pitch) to implement a phase velocity taper. The model also includes user defined input/output coupling and an electron beam contained by solenoidal, electrostatic, or periodic permanent magnet (PPM) focusing allowing standard or novel TWTs to be investigated. This model comprehensively takes into account the effects of frequency dependent nonlinear distortions (MAM and AMPM); gain ripple due to frequency dependent reflections at the input/output coupling, severs, and mismatches from dynamic pitch variations; drive induced oscillations; harmonic generation; intermodulation products; and backward waves.

  19. Modeling and Analysis of The Pressure Die Casting Using Response Surface Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittur, Jayant K.; Herwadkar, T. V.; Parappagoudar, M. B.

    2010-10-01

    Pressure die casting is successfully used in the manufacture of Aluminum alloys components for automobile and many other industries. Die casting is a process involving many process parameters having complex relationship with the quality of the cast product. Though various process parameters have influence on the quality of die cast component, major influence is seen by the die casting machine parameters and their proper settings. In the present work, non-linear regression models have been developed for making predictions and analyzing the effect of die casting machine parameters on the performance characteristics of die casting process. Design of Experiments (DOE) with Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has been used to analyze the effect of effect of input parameters and their interaction on the response and further used to develop nonlinear input-output relationships. Die casting machine parameters, namely, fast shot velocity, slow shot to fast shot change over point, intensification pressure and holding time have been considered as the input variables. The quality characteristics of the cast product were determined by porosity, hardness and surface rough roughness (output/responses). Design of experiments has been used to plan the experiments and analyze the impact of variables on the quality of casting. On the other-hand Response Surface Methodology (Central Composite Design) is utilized to develop non-linear input-output relationships (regression models). The developed regression models have been tested for their statistical adequacy through ANOVA test. The practical usefulness of these models has been tested with some test cases. These models can be used to make the predictions about different quality characteristics, for the known set of die casting machine parameters, without conducting the experiments.

  20. Modeling and Analysis of The Pressure Die Casting Using Response Surface Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Kittur, Jayant K.; Herwadkar, T. V.; Parappagoudar, M. B.

    2010-10-26

    Pressure die casting is successfully used in the manufacture of Aluminum alloys components for automobile and many other industries. Die casting is a process involving many process parameters having complex relationship with the quality of the cast product. Though various process parameters have influence on the quality of die cast component, major influence is seen by the die casting machine parameters and their proper settings. In the present work, non-linear regression models have been developed for making predictions and analyzing the effect of die casting machine parameters on the performance characteristics of die casting process. Design of Experiments (DOE) with Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has been used to analyze the effect of effect of input parameters and their interaction on the response and further used to develop nonlinear input-output relationships. Die casting machine parameters, namely, fast shot velocity, slow shot to fast shot change over point, intensification pressure and holding time have been considered as the input variables. The quality characteristics of the cast product were determined by porosity, hardness and surface rough roughness (output/responses). Design of experiments has been used to plan the experiments and analyze the impact of variables on the quality of casting. On the other-hand Response Surface Methodology (Central Composite Design) is utilized to develop non-linear input-output relationships (regression models). The developed regression models have been tested for their statistical adequacy through ANOVA test. The practical usefulness of these models has been tested with some test cases. These models can be used to make the predictions about different quality characteristics, for the known set of die casting machine parameters, without conducting the experiments.

  1. A plant-growth stress model: Conceptual model and development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.W. )

    1989-12-01

    This report begins with a literature review of existing models for crops and forest trees. The models were analyzed for their assumptions, formulations, inputs, outputs, calibrations and verifications. The formulations of crop models (e.g. corn, sugar beet, soybean, and red radish) included detailed hypotheses of carbon uptake, light attenuation through leaves, photosynthesis, chemical synthesis of organics, material transport between plant parts and production of havestable dry matter. Most crop models performed simulations with a time step of 15 minutes to an hour for a total period of 100 to 150 days. Tree models were developed, mostly without verification, for forest management practices, ecological studies of species succession, and assessment of air pollution effects. None are physiologically based models that can simulate mechanistically tree responses to interacting natural and anthropogenic stresses. A new generation tree model was formulated. The model incorporated subroutines from an existing model (ILWAS) to calculate daily soil temperature, soil moisture, cations (including aluminum species) and anion concentrations in the soil solution at the root zone. It also includes a new plant module to simulate daily physiological and growth responses of trees, subjected to the dynamic impacts of air pollution, aluminum toxicity, nutrient deficiency, and drought. Model coefficient will be calibrated with data from exposure experiments where environmental conditions are controlled. The model can then be extended to the field where environmental conditions change dynamically. 90 refs., 11 figs.

  2. Life cycle assessment modelling of waste-to-energy incineration in Spain and Portugal.

    PubMed

    Margallo, M; Aldaco, R; Irabien, A; Carrillo, V; Fischer, M; Bala, A; Fullana, P

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, waste management systems have been evaluated using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. A main shortcoming of prior studies was the focus on a mixture of waste with different characteristics. The estimation of emissions and consumptions associated with each waste fraction in these studies presented allocation problems. Waste-to-energy (WTE) incineration is a clear example in which municipal solid waste (MSW), comprising many types of materials, is processed to produce several outputs. This paper investigates an approach to better understand incineration processes in Spain and Portugal by applying a multi-input/output allocation model. The application of this model enabled predictions of WTE inputs and outputs, including the consumption of ancillary materials and combustibles, air emissions, solid wastes, and the energy produced during the combustion of each waste fraction.

  3. A Neural-FEM tool for the 2-D magnetic hysteresis modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardelli, E.; Faba, A.; Laudani, A.; Lozito, G. M.; Riganti Fulginei, F.; Salvini, A.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work is to present a new tool for the analysis of magnetic field problems considering 2-D magnetic hysteresis. In particular, this tool makes use of the Finite Element Method to solve the magnetic field problem in real device, and fruitfully exploits a neural network (NN) for the modeling of 2-D magnetic hysteresis of materials. The NS has as input the magnetic inductions components B at the k-th simulation step and returns as output the corresponding values of the magnetic field H corresponding to the input pattern. It is trained by vector measurements performed on the magnetic material to be modeled. This input/output scheme is directly implemented in a FEM code employing the magnetic potential vector A formulation. Validations through measurements on a real device have been performed.

  4. Robust stabilization control based on guardian maps theory for a longitudinal model of hypersonic vehicle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanbin; Liu, Mengying; Sun, Peihua

    2014-01-01

    A typical model of hypersonic vehicle has the complicated dynamics such as the unstable states, the nonminimum phases, and the strong coupling input-output relations. As a result, designing a robust stabilization controller is essential to implement the anticipated tasks. This paper presents a robust stabilization controller based on the guardian maps theory for hypersonic vehicle. First, the guardian maps theories are provided to explain the constraint relations between the open subsets of complex plane and the eigenvalues of the state matrix of closed-loop control system. Then, a general control structure in relation to the guardian maps theories is proposed to achieve the respected design demands. Furthermore, the robust stabilization control law depending on the given general control structure is designed for the longitudinal model of hypersonic vehicle. Finally, a simulation example is provided to verify the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  5. LAI inversion from optical reflectance using a neural network trained with a multiple scattering model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James A.

    1992-01-01

    The inversion of the leaf area index (LAI) canopy parameter from optical spectral reflectance measurements is obtained using a backpropagation artificial neural network trained using input-output pairs generated by a multiple scattering reflectance model. The problem of LAI estimation over sparse canopies (LAI < 1.0) with varying soil reflectance backgrounds is particularly difficult. Standard multiple regression methods applied to canopies within a single homogeneous soil type yield good results but perform unacceptably when applied across soil boundaries, resulting in absolute percentage errors of >1000 percent for low LAI. Minimization methods applied to merit functions constructed from differences between measured reflectances and predicted reflectances using multiple-scattering models are unacceptably sensitive to a good initial guess for the desired parameter. In contrast, the neural network reported generally yields absolute percentage errors of <30 percent when weighting coefficients trained on one soil type were applied to predicted canopy reflectance at a different soil background.

  6. Robust Stabilization Control Based on Guardian Maps Theory for a Longitudinal Model of Hypersonic Vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengying; Sun, Peihua

    2014-01-01

    A typical model of hypersonic vehicle has the complicated dynamics such as the unstable states, the nonminimum phases, and the strong coupling input-output relations. As a result, designing a robust stabilization controller is essential to implement the anticipated tasks. This paper presents a robust stabilization controller based on the guardian maps theory for hypersonic vehicle. First, the guardian maps theories are provided to explain the constraint relations between the open subsets of complex plane and the eigenvalues of the state matrix of closed-loop control system. Then, a general control structure in relation to the guardian maps theories is proposed to achieve the respected design demands. Furthermore, the robust stabilization control law depending on the given general control structure is designed for the longitudinal model of hypersonic vehicle. Finally, a simulation example is provided to verify the effectiveness of the proposed methods. PMID:24795535

  7. Identification of complex systems based on neural and Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy model.

    PubMed

    Kukolj, Dragan; Levi, Emil

    2004-02-01

    The paper describes a neuro-fuzzy identification approach, which uses numerical data as a starting point. The proposed method generates a Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy model, characterized with transparency, high accuracy and a small number of rules. The process of self-organizing of the identification model consists of three phases: clustering of the input-output space using a self-organized neural network; determination of the parameters of the consequent part of a rule from over-determined batch least-squares formulation of the problem, using singular value decomposition algorithm; and on-line adaptation of these parameters using recursive least-squares method. The verification of the proposed identification approach is provided using four different problems: two benchmark identification problems, speed estimation for a dc motor drive, and estimation of the temperature in a tunnel furnace for clay baking.

  8. State dependent model predictive control for orbital rendezvous using pulse-width pulse-frequency modulated thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Zhu, Zheng H.; Meguid, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation based trajectory planning for orbital rendezvous and proximity maneuvering near a non-cooperative spacecraft in an elliptical orbit. The problem is formulated by converting the continuous control input, output from the state dependent model predictive control, into a sequence of pulses of constant magnitude by controlling firing frequency and duration of constant-magnitude thrusters. The state dependent model predictive control is derived by minimizing the control error of states and control roughness of control input for a safe, smooth and fuel efficient approaching trajectory. The resulting nonlinear programming problem is converted into a series of quadratic programming problem and solved by numerical iteration using the receding horizon strategy. The numerical results show that the proposed state dependent model predictive control with the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation is able to effectively generate optimized trajectories using equivalent control pulses for the proximity maneuvering with less energy consumption.

  9. Strategic preparedness for recovery from catastrophic risks to communities and infrastructure systems of systems.

    PubMed

    Haimes, Yacov Y

    2012-11-01

    Natural and human-induced disasters affect organizations in myriad ways because of the inherent interconnectedness and interdependencies among human, cyber, and physical infrastructures, but more importantly, because organizations depend on the effectiveness of people and on the leadership they provide to the organizations they serve and represent. These human-organizational-cyber-physical infrastructure entities are termed systems of systems. Given the multiple perspectives that characterize them, they cannot be modeled effectively with a single model. The focus of this article is: (i) the centrality of the states of a system in modeling; (ii) the efficacious role of shared states in modeling systems of systems, in identification, and in the meta-modeling of systems of systems; and (iii) the contributions of the above to strategic preparedness, response to, and recovery from catastrophic risk to such systems. Strategic preparedness connotes a decision-making process and its associated actions. These must be: implemented in advance of a natural or human-induced disaster, aimed at reducing consequences (e.g., recovery time, community suffering, and cost), and/or controlling their likelihood to a level considered acceptable (through the decisionmakers' implicit and explicit acceptance of various risks and tradeoffs). The inoperability input-output model (IIM), which is grounded on Leontief's input/output model, has enabled the modeling of interdependent subsystems. Two separate modeling structures are introduced. These are: phantom system models (PSM), where shared states constitute the essence of modeling coupled systems; and the IIM, where interdependencies among sectors of the economy are manifested by the Leontief matrix of technological coefficients. This article demonstrates the potential contributions of these two models to each other, and thus to more informative modeling of systems of systems schema. The contributions of shared states to this modeling and to

  10. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

  11. Modelling of the control of heart rate by breathing using a kernel method.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A K; Fakhouri, S Y; Harness, J B; Mearns, A J

    1986-03-07

    The process of the breathing (input) to the heart rate (output) of man is considered for system identification by the input-output relationship, using a mathematical model expressed as integral equations. The integral equation is considered and fixed so that the identification method reduces to the determination of the values within the integral, called kernels, resulting in an integral equation whose input-output behaviour is nearly identical to that of the system. This paper uses an algorithm of kernel identification of the Volterra series which greatly reduces the computational burden and eliminates the restriction of using white Gaussian input as a test signal. A second-order model is the most appropriate for a good estimate of the system dynamics. The model contains the linear part (first-order kernel) and quadratic part (second-order kernel) in parallel, and so allows for the possibility of separation between the linear and non-linear elements of the process. The response of the linear term exhibits the oscillatory input and underdamped nature of the system. The application of breathing as input to the system produces an oscillatory term which may be attributed to the nature of sinus node of the heart being sensitive to the modulating signal the breathing wave. The negative-on diagonal seems to cause the dynamic asymmetry of the total response of the system which opposes the oscillatory nature of the first kernel related to the restraining force present in the respiratory heart rate system. The presence of the positive-off diagonal of the second-order kernel of respiratory control of heart rate is an indication of an escape-like phenomenon in the system.

  12. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Agbodjan Prince, Just; Kohl, Franz; Sauter, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment’s shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object. PMID:27608021

  13. Modified Levenberg-Marquardt Method for RÖSSLER Chaotic System Fuzzy Modeling Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Hui; Wu, Qing-Xian; Jiang, Chang-Sheng; Xue, Ya-Li; Fang, Wei

    Generally, fuzzy approximation models require some human knowledge and experience. Operator's experience is involved in the mathematics of fuzzy theory as a collection of heuristic rules. The main goal of this paper is to present a new method for identifying unknown nonlinear dynamics such as Rössler system without any human knowledge. Instead of heuristic rules, the presented method uses the input-output data pairs to identify the Rössler chaotic system. The training algorithm is a modified Levenberg-Marquardt (L-M) method, which can adjust the parameters of each linear polynomial and fuzzy membership functions on line, and do not rely on experts' experience excessively. Finally, it is applied to training Rössler chaotic system fuzzy identification. Comparing this method with the standard L-M method, the convergence speed is accelerated. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Agbodjan Prince, Just; Kohl, Franz; Sauter, Thilo

    2016-09-06

    This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment's shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object.

  15. Model documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-24

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is a component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. This report documents the archived version of NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts used in support of the Annual Energy Outlook 1994, DOE/EIA-0383(94). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. It is intended to fulfill the legal obligation of the EIA to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, Section 57.b.2). This report represents Volume 1 of a two-volume set. (Volume 2 will report on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.) Subsequent chapters of this report provide: (1) an overview of the NGTDM (Chapter 2); (2) a description of the interface between the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and the NGTDM (Chapter 3); (3) an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM (Chapter 4); (4) the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module (Chapter 5); (5) the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module (Chapter 6); (6) the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module (Chapter 7); (7) the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module (Chapter 8); and (8) a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs (Chapter 9).

  16. From spiking neuron models to linear-nonlinear models.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Srdjan; Brunel, Nicolas

    2011-01-20

    Neurons transform time-varying inputs into action potentials emitted stochastically at a time dependent rate. The mapping from current input to output firing rate is often represented with the help of phenomenological models such as the linear-nonlinear (LN) cascade, in which the output firing rate is estimated by applying to the input successively a linear temporal filter and a static non-linear transformation. These simplified models leave out the biophysical details of action potential generation. It is not a priori clear to which extent the input-output mapping of biophysically more realistic, spiking neuron models can be reduced to a simple linear-nonlinear cascade. Here we investigate this question for the leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF), exponential integrate-and-fire (EIF) and conductance-based Wang-Buzsáki models in presence of background synaptic activity. We exploit available analytic results for these models to determine the corresponding linear filter and static non-linearity in a parameter-free form. We show that the obtained functions are identical to the linear filter and static non-linearity determined using standard reverse correlation analysis. We then quantitatively compare the output of the corresponding linear-nonlinear cascade with numerical simulations of spiking neurons, systematically varying the parameters of input signal and background noise. We find that the LN cascade provides accurate estimates of the firing rates of spiking neurons in most of parameter space. For the EIF and Wang-Buzsáki models, we show that the LN cascade can be reduced to a firing rate model, the timescale of which we determine analytically. Finally we introduce an adaptive timescale rate model in which the timescale of the linear filter depends on the instantaneous firing rate. This model leads to highly accurate estimates of instantaneous firing rates.

  17. Modelling the relationship between peripheral blood pressure and blood volume pulses using linear and neural network system identification techniques.

    PubMed

    Allen, J; Murray, A

    1999-08-01

    The relationships between peripheral blood pressure and blood volume pulse waveforms can provide valuable physiological data about the peripheral vascular system, and are the subject of this study. Blood pressure and volume pulse waveforms were collected from 12 normal male subjects using non-invasive optical techniques, finger arterial blood pressure (BP, Finapres: Datex-Ohmeda) and photoelectric plethysmography (PPG) respectively, and captured to computer for three equal (1 min) measurement phases: baseline, hand raising and hand elevated. This simple physiological challenge was designed to induce a significant drop in peripheral blood pressure. A simple first order lag transfer function was chosen to study the relationship between blood pressure (system input) and blood volume pulse waveforms (system output), with parameters describing the dynamics (time constant, tau) and input-output gain (K). Tau and K were estimated for each subject using two different system identification techniques: a recursive parameter estimation algorithm which calculated tau and K from a linear auto-regressive with exogenous variable (ARX) model, and an artificial neural network which was trained to learn the non-linear process input-output relationships and then derive a linearized ARX model of the system. The identification techniques allowed the relationship between the blood pressure and blood volume pulses to be described simply, with the neural network technique providing a better model fit overall (p < 0.05, Wilcoxon). The median falls in tau following the hand raise challenge were 26% and 31% for the linear and neural network based techniques respectively (both p < 0.05, Wilcoxon). This preliminary study has shown that the time constant and gain parameters obtained using these techniques can provide physiological data for the clinical assessment of the peripheral circulation.

  18. Calibration of hydrological models using flow-duration curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerberg, I. K.; Guerrero, J.-L.; Younger, P. M.; Beven, K. J.; Seibert, J.; Halldin, S.; Freer, J. E.; Xu, C.-Y.

    2010-12-01

    The degree of belief we have in predictions from hydrologic models depends on how well they can reproduce observations. Calibrations with traditional performance measures such as the Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency are challenged by problems including: (1) uncertain discharge data, (2) variable importance of the performance with flow magnitudes, (3) influence of unknown input/output errors and (4) inability to evaluate model performance when observation time periods for discharge and model input data do not overlap. A new calibration method using flow-duration curves (FDCs) was developed which addresses these problems. The method focuses on reproducing the observed discharge frequency distribution rather than the exact hydrograph. It consists of applying limits of acceptability for selected evaluation points (EPs) of the observed uncertain FDC in the extended GLUE approach. Two ways of selecting the EPs were tested - based on equal intervals of discharge and of volume of water. The method was tested and compared to a calibration using the traditional model efficiency for the daily four-parameter WASMOD model in the Paso La Ceiba catchment in Honduras and for Dynamic TOPMODEL evaluated at an hourly time scale for the Brue catchment in Great Britain. The volume method of selecting EPs gave the best results in both catchments with better calibrated slow flow, recession and evaporation than the other criteria. Observed and simulated time series of uncertain discharges agreed better for this method both in calibration and prediction in both catchments without resulting in overpredicted simulated uncertainty. An advantage with the method is that the rejection criterion is based on an estimation of the uncertainty in discharge data and that the EPs of the FDC can be chosen to reflect the aims of the modelling application e.g. using more/less EPs at high/low flows. While the new method is less sensitive to epistemic input/output errors than the normal use of limits of

  19. Calibration of hydrological models using flow-duration curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerberg, I. K.; Guerrero, J.-L.; Younger, P. M.; Beven, K. J.; Seibert, J.; Halldin, S.; Freer, J. E.; Xu, C.-Y.

    2011-07-01

    The degree of belief we have in predictions from hydrologic models will normally depend on how well they can reproduce observations. Calibrations with traditional performance measures, such as the Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency, are challenged by problems including: (1) uncertain discharge data, (2) variable sensitivity of different performance measures to different flow magnitudes, (3) influence of unknown input/output errors and (4) inability to evaluate model performance when observation time periods for discharge and model input data do not overlap. This paper explores a calibration method using flow-duration curves (FDCs) to address these problems. The method focuses on reproducing the observed discharge frequency distribution rather than the exact hydrograph. It consists of applying limits of acceptability for selected evaluation points (EPs) on the observed uncertain FDC in the extended GLUE approach. Two ways of selecting the EPs were tested - based on equal intervals of discharge and of volume of water. The method was tested and compared to a calibration using the traditional model efficiency for the daily four-parameter WASMOD model in the Paso La Ceiba catchment in Honduras and for Dynamic TOPMODEL evaluated at an hourly time scale for the Brue catchment in Great Britain. The volume method of selecting EPs gave the best results in both catchments with better calibrated slow flow, recession and evaporation than the other criteria. Observed and simulated time series of uncertain discharges agreed better for this method both in calibration and prediction in both catchments. An advantage with the method is that the rejection criterion is based on an estimation of the uncertainty in discharge data and that the EPs of the FDC can be chosen to reflect the aims of the modelling application, e.g. using more/less EPs at high/low flows. While the method appears less sensitive to epistemic input/output errors than previous use of limits of acceptability applied

  20. Prediction of magnetic substorms using a state space model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unnikrishnan, K.

    2012-02-01

    Nonlinear dynamical models of the magnetosphere derived from observational time series data using phase space reconstruction techniques have yielded new advances in the understanding of its dynamics. Considering the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction to be a natural input-output system its dynamical features can be reconstructed on the storm time scale by using the method of time delay embedding. Here, fourteen magnetic storm intervals belonging to low/moderate and high solar activity periods are considered and a suitable state space model has designed by performing training and validation tests, for which dawn to dusk electric field (VBz) is chosen as the input, and the AL time series as the output. The percentage of the output variations that is reproduced by the model is termed as fit_model and a higher number of fit_model means a better model. The number of components m used in the state space model is varied from 1-9 and the best prediction is obtained when m=4. The fit_model values of time series used for validation are 67.96, 67.2, 72.44, and 70.89, with m=4. In the present study most of the storms considered are having Dstmax in between -100 and -300 nT, and they can be predicted well with this procedure. To reveal the prediction capability of the proposed state space model the 30 steps ahead outputs for the storm events are generated, which reasonably reproduce the observed values.

  1. User's guide for SAMMY: a computer model for multilevel r-matrix fits to neutron data using Bayes' equations

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N. M.; Perey, F. G.

    1980-11-01

    A method is described for determining the parameters of a model from experimental data based upon the utilization of Bayes' theorem. This method has several advantages over the least-squares method as it is commonly used; one important advantage is that the assumptions under which the parameter values have been determined are more clearly evident than in many results based upon least squares. Bayes' method has been used to develop a computer code which can be utilized to analyze neutron cross-section data by means of the R-matrix theory. The required formulae from the R-matrix theory are presented, and the computer implementation of both Bayes' equations and R-matrix theory is described. Details about the computer code and compelte input/output information are given.

  2. DCPT v1.0 - New particle tracker for modeling transport in dual-continuum - User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Lehua; Liu, Hui Hai; Cushey, Mark; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur

    2001-04-01

    DCPT (Dual-Continuum Particle Tracker) V1.0 is a new software for simulating solute transport in the subsurface. It is based on the random-walk method for modeling transport processes such as advection, dispersion/diffusion, linear sorption, radioactive decay, and fracture-matrix mass exchange (in fractured porous media). The user shall provide flow-field and other parameters in the form of input files. In Comparison to several analytical and numerical solutions for a number of test cases, DCPT shows excellent performance in both accuracy and efficiency. This report serves as a user's manual of DCPT V1.0. It includes theoretical basis, numerical methods, software structure, input/output description, and examples.

  3. Update and assessment of geothermal economic models, geothermal fluid flow and heat distribution models, and geothermal data bases

    SciTech Connect

    Kenkeremath, D.

    1985-05-01

    Numerical simulation models and data bases that were developed for DOE as part of a number of geothermal programs have been assessed with respect to their overall stage of development and usefulness. This report combines three separate studies that focus attention upon: (1) economic models related to geothermal energy; (2) physical geothermal system models pertaining to thermal energy and the fluid medium; and (3) geothermal energy data bases. Computerized numerical models pertaining to the economics of extracting and utilizing geothermal energy have been summarized and catalogued with respect to their availability, utility and function. The 19 models that are discussed in detail were developed for use by geothermal operators, public utilities, and lending institutions who require a means to estimate the value of a given resource, total project costs, and the sensitivity of these values to specific variables. A number of the models are capable of economically assessing engineering aspects of geothermal projects. Computerized simulations of heat distribution and fluid flow have been assessed and are presented for ten models. Five of the models are identified as wellbore simulators and five are described as reservoir simulators. Each model is described in terms of its operational characteristics, input, output, and other pertinent attributes. Geothermal energy data bases are reviewed with respect to their current usefulness and availability. Summaries of eight data bases are provided in catalogue format, and an overall comparison of the elements of each data base is included.

  4. Uncertainty Quantification in Climate Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, K.; Safta, C.; Berry, R.; Debusschere, B.; Najm, H.

    2011-12-01

    We address challenges that sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification methods face when dealing with complex computational models. In particular, climate models are computationally expensive and typically depend on a large number of input parameters. We consider the Community Land Model (CLM), which consists of a nested computational grid hierarchy designed to represent the spatial heterogeneity of the land surface. Each computational cell can be composed of multiple land types, and each land type can incorporate one or more sub-models describing the spatial and depth variability. Even for simulations at a regional scale, the computational cost of a single run is quite high and the number of parameters that control the model behavior is very large. Therefore, the parameter sensitivity analysis and uncertainty propagation face significant difficulties for climate models. This work employs several algorithmic avenues to address some of the challenges encountered by classical uncertainty quantification methodologies when dealing with expensive computational models, specifically focusing on the CLM as a primary application. First of all, since the available climate model predictions are extremely sparse due to the high computational cost of model runs, we adopt a Bayesian framework that effectively incorporates this lack-of-knowledge as a source of uncertainty, and produces robust predictions with quantified uncertainty even if the model runs are extremely sparse. In particular, we infer Polynomial Chaos spectral expansions that effectively encode the uncertain input-output relationship and allow efficient propagation of all sources of input uncertainties to outputs of interest. Secondly, the predictability analysis of climate models strongly suffers from the curse of dimensionality, i.e. the large number of input parameters. While single-parameter perturbation studies can be efficiently performed in a parallel fashion, the multivariate uncertainty analysis

  5. Geoacoustic model inversion using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Jeremy; Chapman, N. Ross; Antoniou, Andreas

    2000-12-01

    An inversion technique using artificial neural networks (ANNs) is described for estimating geoacoustic model parameters of the ocean bottom and information about the sound source from acoustic field data. The method is applied to transmission loss data from the TRIAL SABLE experiment that was carried out in shallow water off Nova Scotia. The inversion is designed to incorporate the a priori information available for the site in order to improve the estimation accuracy. The inversion scheme involves training feedforward ANNs to estimate the geoacoustic and geometric parameters using simulated input/output training pairs generated with a forward acoustic propagation model. The inputs to the ANNs are the spectral components of the transmission loss at each sensor of a vertical hydrophone array for the two lowest frequencies that were transmitted in the experiment, 35 and 55 Hz. The output is the set of environmental model parameters, both geometric and geoacoustic, corresponding to the received field. In order to decrease the training time, a separate network was trained for each parameter. The errors for the parallel estimation are 10% lower than for those obtained using a single network to estimate all the parameters simultaneously, and the training time is decreased by a factor of six. When the experimental data are presented to the ANNs the geometric parameters, such as source range and depth, are estimated with a high accuracy. Geoacoustic parameters, such as the compressional speed in the sediment and the sediment thickness, are found with a moderate accuracy.

  6. Modeling and Identification of a Large Gap Magnetic Suspension System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, David E. (Editor); Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Hsiao, Min-Hung; Huang, Jen-Kuang

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the results of modeling and system identification efforts on the NASA Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF). The LAMSTF consists of a cylindrical permanent magnet which is levitated above a planar array of five electromagnets mounted in a circular configuration. The analytical model is first developed and open-loop characteristics are described. The system is shown to be highly unstable and requires feedback control in order to apply system identification. Limitations on modeling accuracy due to the effect of eddy-currents on the system are discussed. An algorithm is derived to identify a state-space model for the system from input/output data acquired during closed-loop operation. The algorithm is tested on both the baseline system and a perturbed system which has an increased presence of eddy currents. It is found that for the baseline system the analytic model adequately captures the dynamics, although the identified model improves the simulation accuracy. For the system perturbed by additional unmodeled eddy-currents the analytic model is no longer adequate and a higher-order model, determined through system identification, is required to accurately predict the system's time response.

  7. A Formal Approach to Empirical Dynamic Model Optimization and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G; Morelli, Eugene A.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    A framework was developed for the optimization and validation of empirical dynamic models subject to an arbitrary set of validation criteria. The validation requirements imposed upon the model, which may involve several sets of input-output data and arbitrary specifications in time and frequency domains, are used to determine if model predictions are within admissible error limits. The parameters of the empirical model are estimated by finding the parameter realization for which the smallest of the margins of requirement compliance is as large as possible. The uncertainty in the value of this estimate is characterized by studying the set of model parameters yielding predictions that comply with all the requirements. Strategies are presented for bounding this set, studying its dependence on admissible prediction error set by the analyst, and evaluating the sensitivity of the model predictions to parameter variations. This information is instrumental in characterizing uncertainty models used for evaluating the dynamic model at operating conditions differing from those used for its identification and validation. A practical example based on the short period dynamics of the F-16 is used for illustration.

  8. Algorithms for Digital Micro-Wave Receivers and Optimal System Identification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-28

    estimation, Frequency estimation, Digital receiver design, Improved AR and ARMA modeling, Electronic Warfare (EW) signal detection, Optimal system identification from input/output and frequency domain data.

  9. Toward diagnostic model calibration and evaluation: Approximate Bayesian computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrugt, Jasper A.; Sadegh, Mojtaba

    2013-07-01

    The ever increasing pace of computational power, along with continued advances in measurement technologies and improvements in process understanding has stimulated the development of increasingly complex hydrologic models that simulate soil moisture flow, groundwater recharge, surface runoff, root water uptake, and river discharge at different spatial and temporal scales. Reconciling these high-order system models with perpetually larger volumes of field data is becoming more and more difficult, particularly because classical likelihood-based fitting methods lack the power to detect and pinpoint deficiencies in the model structure. Gupta et al. (2008) has recently proposed steps (amongst others) toward the development of a more robust and powerful method of model evaluation. Their diagnostic approach uses signature behaviors and patterns observed in the input-output data to illuminate to what degree a representation of the real world has been adequately achieved and how the model should be improved for the purpose of learning and scientific discovery. In this paper, we introduce approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) as a vehicle for diagnostic model evaluation. This statistical methodology relaxes the need for an explicit likelihood function in favor of one or multiple different summary statistics rooted in hydrologic theory that together have a clearer and more compelling diagnostic power than some average measure of the size of the error residuals. Two illustrative case studies are used to demonstrate that ABC is relatively easy to implement, and readily employs signature based indices to analyze and pinpoint which part of the model is malfunctioning and in need of further improvement.

  10. Documentation of the DRI Model of the US economy, December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-28

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) uses models of the US economy developed by Data Resources, Inc. (DRI) for conducting policy analyses, preparing forecasts for the Annual Energy Outlook, the Short-Term Energy Outlook, and related analyses in conjunction with EIA`s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and its other energy market models. Both the DRI Model of the US Economy and the DRI Personal Computer Input-Output Model (PC-IO){sup 2} were developed and are maintained by DRI as proprietary models. This report provides documentation, as required by EIA standards for the use of proprietary models; describes the theoretical basis, structure and functions of both DRI models; and contains brief descriptions of the models and their equations. Appendix A describes how the two large-scale models documented here are used to support the macroeconomic and interindustry modeling associated with the National Energy Modeling System. Appendix B is an article by Stephen McNees of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston on ``How Large are Economic Forecast Errors.`` This article assesses the forecast accuracy of a number of economic forecasting models (groups) and is attached as an independent assessment of the forecast accuracy of the DRI Model of the US Economy.

  11. Comparison of a Neural Network and a Conceptual Model for Rainfall-Runoff Modelling with Monthly Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chochlidakis, Chronis; Daliakopoulos, Ioannis; Tsanis, Ioannis

    2014-05-01

    Rainfall-runoff (RR) models contain parameters that can seldom be directly measured or estimated by expert judgment, but are rather inferred by calibration against a historical record of input-output datasets. Here, a comparison is made between a conceptual model and an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) for efficient modeling of complex hydrological processes. The monthly rainfall, streamflow, and evapotranspiration data from 15 catchments in Crete, Greece are used to compare the proposed methodologies. Genetic Algorithms (GA) are applied for the stochastic calibration of the parameters in the Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) model yielding R2 values between 0.65 and 0.90. A Feedforward NN (FNN) is trained using a time delay approach, optimized through trial and error for each catchment, yielding R2 values between 0.70 and 0.91. The results obtained show that the ANN models can be superior to the conventional conceptual models due to their ability to handle the non-linearity and dynamic nature of the natural physical processes in a more efficient manner. On the other hand, SAC-SMA depicts high flows with greater accuracy and results suggest that conceptual models can be more robust in extrapolating beyond historical record limits.

  12. Failure Analysis of Nonvolatile Residue (NVR) Analyzer Model SP-1000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) subcontractor Wiltech contacted the NASA Electrical Lab (NE-L) and requested a failure analysis of a Solvent Purity Meter; model SP-IOOO produced by the VerTis Instrument Company. The meter, used to measure the contaminate in a solvent to determine the relative contamination on spacecraft flight hardware and ground servicing equipment, had been inoperable and in storage for an unknown amount of time. NE-L was asked to troubleshoot the unit and make a determination on what may be required to make the unit operational. Through the use of general troubleshooting processes and the review of a unit in service at the time of analysis, the unit was found to be repairable but would need the replacement of multiple components.

  13. The cerebro-cerebellum: Could it be loci of forward models?

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takahiro; Tomatsu, Saeka; Izawa, Jun; Kakei, Shinji

    2016-03-01

    It is widely accepted that the cerebellum acquires and maintain internal models for motor control. An internal model simulates mapping between a set of causes and effects. There are two candidates of cerebellar internal models, forward models and inverse models. A forward model transforms a motor command into a prediction of the sensory consequences of a movement. In contrast, an inverse model inverts the information flow of the forward model. Despite the clearly different formulations of the two internal models, it is still controversial whether the cerebro-cerebellum, the phylogenetically newer part of the cerebellum, provides inverse models or forward models for voluntary limb movements or other higher brain functions. In this article, we review physiological and morphological evidence that suggests the existence in the cerebro-cerebellum of a forward model for limb movement. We will also discuss how the characteristic input-output organization of the cerebro-cerebellum may contribute to forward models for non-motor higher brain functions.

  14. Development of a visualization tool for integrated surface water-groundwater modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yong; Zheng, Yi; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2016-01-01

    Physically-based, fully integrated surface water (SW)-groundwater (GW) models have been increasingly used in water resources research and management. The integrated modeling involves a large amount of scientific data. The use of three-dimensional (3D) visualization software to integrate all the scientific data into a comprehensive system can facilitate the interpretation and validation of modeling results. Nevertheless, at present few software tools can efficiently perform data visualization for integrated SW-GW modeling. In this study, a visualization tool named IHM3D was designed and developed specifically for integrated SW-GW modeling. In IHM3D, spatially distributed model inputs/outputs and geo-referenced data sets are visualized in a virtual globe-based 3D environment. End users can conveniently explore and validate modeling results within the 3D environment. A GSLFOW (an integrated SW-GW model developed by USGS) modeling case in the Heihe River Basin (Northwest China) was used to demonstrate the applicability of IHM3D at a large basin scale. The visualization of the modeling results significantly improved the understanding of the complex hydrologic cycle in this water-limited area, and provided insights into the regional water resources management. This study shows that visualization tools like IHM3D can promote data and model sharing in the water resources research community, and make it more practical to perform complex hydrological modeling in real-world water resources management.

  15. Hydrological Modeling Reproducibility Through Data Management and Adaptors for Model Interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Because of a lack of centralized planning and no widely-adopted standards among hydrological modeling research groups, research communities, and the data management teams meant to support research, there is chaos when it comes to data formats, spatio-temporal resolutions, ontologies, and data availability. All this makes true scientific reproducibility and collaborative integrated modeling impossible without some glue to piece it all together. Our Virtual Watershed Integrated Modeling System provides the tools and modeling framework hydrologists need to accelerate and fortify new scientific investigations by tracking provenance and providing adaptors for integrated, collaborative hydrologic modeling and data management. Under global warming trends where water resources are under increasing stress, reproducible hydrological modeling will be increasingly important to improve transparency and understanding of the scientific facts revealed through modeling. The Virtual Watershed Data Engine is capable of ingesting a wide variety of heterogeneous model inputs, outputs, model configurations, and metadata. We will demonstrate one example, starting from real-time raw weather station data packaged with station metadata. Our integrated modeling system will then create gridded input data via geostatistical methods along with error and uncertainty estimates. These gridded data are then used as input to hydrological models, all of which are available as web services wherever feasible. Models may be integrated in a data-centric way where the outputs too are tracked and used as inputs to "downstream" models. This work is part of an ongoing collaborative Tri-state (New Mexico, Nevada, Idaho) NSF EPSCoR Project, WC-WAVE, comprised of researchers from multiple universities in each of the three states. The tools produced and presented here have been developed collaboratively alongside watershed scientists to address specific modeling problems with an eye on the bigger picture of

  16. gpuPOM: a GPU-based Princeton Ocean Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Huang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Fu, H.; Oey, L.-Y.; Xu, F.; Yang, G.

    2014-11-01

    Rapid advances in the performance of the graphics processing unit (GPU) have made the GPU a compelling solution for a series of scientific applications. However, most existing GPU acceleration works for climate models are doing partial code porting for certain hot spots, and can only achieve limited speedup for the entire model. In this work, we take the mpiPOM (a parallel version of the Princeton Ocean Model) as our starting point, design and implement a GPU-based Princeton Ocean Model. By carefully considering the architectural features of the state-of-the-art GPU devices, we rewrite the full mpiPOM model from the original Fortran version into a new Compute Unified Device Architecture C (CUDA-C) version. We take several accelerating methods to further improve the performance of gpuPOM, including optimizing memory access in a single GPU, overlapping communication and boundary operations among multiple GPUs, and overlapping input/output (I/O) between the hybrid Central Processing Unit (CPU) and the GPU. Our experimental results indicate that the performance of the gpuPOM on a workstation containing 4 GPUs is comparable to a powerful cluster with 408 CPU cores and it reduces the energy consumption by 6.8 times.

  17. Random Predictor Models for Rigorous Uncertainty Quantification: Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    This and a companion paper propose techniques for constructing parametric mathematical models describing key features of the distribution of an output variable given input-output data. By contrast to standard models, which yield a single output value at each value of the input, Random Predictors Models (RPMs) yield a random variable at each value of the input. Optimization-based strategies for calculating RPMs having a polynomial dependency on the input and a linear dependency on the parameters are proposed. These formulations yield RPMs having various levels of fidelity in which the mean and the variance of the model's parameters, thus of the predicted output, are prescribed. As such they encompass all RPMs conforming to these prescriptions. The RPMs are optimal in the sense that they yield the tightest predictions for which all (or, depending on the formulation, most) of the observations are less than a fixed number of standard deviations from the mean prediction. When the data satisfies mild stochastic assumptions, and the optimization problem(s) used to calculate the RPM is convex (or, when its solution coincides with the solution to an auxiliary convex problem), the model's reliability, which is the probability that a future observation would be within the predicted ranges, can be bounded tightly and rigorously.

  18. Random Predictor Models for Rigorous Uncertainty Quantification: Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    This and a companion paper propose techniques for constructing parametric mathematical models describing key features of the distribution of an output variable given input-output data. By contrast to standard models, which yield a single output value at each value of the input, Random Predictors Models (RPMs) yield a random variable at each value of the input. Optimization-based strategies for calculating RPMs having a polynomial dependency on the input and a linear dependency on the parameters are proposed. These formulations yield RPMs having various levels of fidelity in which the mean, the variance, and the range of the model's parameter, thus of the output, are prescribed. As such they encompass all RPMs conforming to these prescriptions. The RPMs are optimal in the sense that they yield the tightest predictions for which all (or, depending on the formulation, most) of the observations are less than a fixed number of standard deviations from the mean prediction. When the data satisfies mild stochastic assumptions, and the optimization problem(s) used to calculate the RPM is convex (or, when its solution coincides with the solution to an auxiliary convex problem), the model's reliability, which is the probability that a future observation would be within the predicted ranges, is bounded rigorously.

  19. Operational Models of Infrastructure Resilience

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    following a catastrophic event.” Reed et al.(67) present resilience scoring met- rics and build on the work of Haimes(58) in using input-output...ties among countermeasures. Military Operations Research, 2002; 7:5–23. 31. Garrick B, Hall J, McDonald JC, OToole T, Probst PS, Parker E, Rosenthal R

  20. MIG version 0.0 model interface guidelines: Rules to accelerate installation of numerical models into any compliant parent code

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, R.M.; Wong, M.K.

    1996-08-01

    A set of model interface guidelines, called MIG, is presented as a means by which any compliant numerical material model can be rapidly installed into any parent code without having to modify the model subroutines. Here, {open_quotes}model{close_quotes} usually means a material model such as one that computes stress as a function of strain, though the term may be extended to any numerical operation. {open_quotes}Parent code{close_quotes} means a hydrocode, finite element code, etc. which uses the model and enforces, say, the fundamental laws of motion and thermodynamics. MIG requires the model developer (who creates the model package) to specify model needs in a standardized but flexible way. MIG includes a dictionary of technical terms that allows developers and parent code architects to share a common vocabulary when specifying field variables. For portability, database management is the responsibility of the parent code. Input/output occurs via structured calling arguments. As much model information as possible (such as the lists of required inputs, as well as lists of precharacterized material data and special needs) is supplied by the model developer in an ASCII text file. Every MIG-compliant model also has three required subroutines to check data, to request extra field variables, and to perform model physics. To date, the MIG scheme has proven flexible in beta installations of a simple yield model, plus a more complicated viscodamage yield model, three electromechanical models, and a complicated anisotropic microcrack constitutive model. The MIG yield model has been successfully installed using identical subroutines in three vectorized parent codes and one parallel C++ code, all predicting comparable results. By maintaining one model for many codes, MIG facilitates code-to-code comparisons and reduces duplication of effort, thereby reducing the cost of installing and sharing models in diverse new codes.

  1. Comparative analysis of system identification techniques for nonlinear modeling of the neuron-microelectrode junction.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saad Ahmad; Thakore, Vaibhav; Behal, Aman; Bölöni, Ladislau; Hickman, James J

    2013-03-01

    Applications of non-invasive neuroelectronic interfacing in the fields of whole-cell biosensing, biological computation and neural prosthetic devices depend critically on an efficient decoding and processing of information retrieved from a neuron-electrode junction. This necessitates development of mathematical models of the neuron-electrode interface that realistically represent the extracellular signals recorded at the neuroelectronic junction without being computationally expensive. Extracellular signals recorded using planar microelectrode or field effect transistor arrays have, until now, primarily been represented using linear equivalent circuit models that fail to reproduce the correct amplitude and shape of the signals recorded at the neuron-microelectrode interface. In this paper, to explore viable alternatives for a computationally inexpensive and efficient modeling of the neuron-electrode junction, input-output data from the neuron-electrode junction is modeled using a parametric Wiener model and a Nonlinear Auto-Regressive network with eXogenous input trained using a dynamic Neural Network model (NARX-NN model). Results corresponding to a validation dataset from these models are then employed to compare and contrast the computational complexity and efficiency of the aforementioned modeling techniques with the Lee-Schetzen technique of cross-correlation for estimating a nonlinear dynamic model of the neuroelectronic junction.

  2. Comparative analysis of system identification techniques for nonlinear modeling of the neuron-microelectrode junction

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saad Ahmad; Thakore, Vaibhav; Behal, Aman; Bölöni, Ladislau; Hickman, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Applications of non-invasive neuroelectronic interfacing in the fields of whole-cell biosensing, biological computation and neural prosthetic devices depend critically on an efficient decoding and processing of information retrieved from a neuron-electrode junction. This necessitates development of mathematical models of the neuron-electrode interface that realistically represent the extracellular signals recorded at the neuroelectronic junction without being computationally expensive. Extracellular signals recorded using planar microelectrode or field effect transistor arrays have, until now, primarily been represented using linear equivalent circuit models that fail to reproduce the correct amplitude and shape of the signals recorded at the neuron-microelectrode interface. In this paper, to explore viable alternatives for a computationally inexpensive and efficient modeling of the neuron-electrode junction, input-output data from the neuron-electrode junction is modeled using a parametric Wiener model and a Nonlinear Auto-Regressive network with eXogenous input trained using a dynamic Neural Network model (NARX-NN model). Results corresponding to a validation dataset from these models are then employed to compare and contrast the computational complexity and efficiency of the aforementioned modeling techniques with the Lee-Schetzen technique of cross-correlation for estimating a nonlinear dynamic model of the neuroelectronic junction.

  3. Percutaneous ablation therapies of inoperable pancreatic cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Lucchina, Natalie; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Marco, De Chiara; Bracchi, Elena; Cocozza, Eugenio; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Floridi, Chiara; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2015-01-01

    Initial studies about ablation therapies of the pancreas were associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which limited widespread adoption. Development of techniques with high quality imaging used as guidance improve outcomes reducing complications. Moreover, only few experiences of percutaneous pancreatic ablations are reported. They are performed by very skilled operators in highly specialized centers. This review presents the current status of percutaneous local ablative therapies in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26424487

  4. Endoscopic palliation for inoperable malignant dysphagia: long term follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Maunoury, V; Brunetaud, J M; Cochelard, D; Boniface, B; Cortot, A; Paris, J C

    1992-01-01

    This prospective non-randomised trial of 128 selected patients with unresectable oesophageal or gastrooesophageal junction cancers aims to evaluate the initial relief of malignant obstruction by means of bipolar electrocoagulation for both circumferential and submucosal strictures of Nd:YAG laser for the other patients. A limited dilatation was performed initially if a small calibre endoscope was unable to pass through the stricture. Prompt and significant relief of dysphagia without complications was achieved in 83% of patients. Improved patients were retreated monthly during the follow up period. Radiotherapy was recommended when possible. Symptomatic relief of obstruction lasted 4.2 months on average and 76% of patients remained palliated until death. Monthly retreatment using the most appropriate endoscopic procedure for the tumour configuration and radiotherapy after endoscopic relief of obstruction seems to give the best palliation for patients with unresectable cancers of the oesophagus or gastrooesophageal junction. PMID:1283144

  5. [Radiation therapy of patients with inoperable cancer of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Ankudinov, V A; Morozov, A I; Barkanov, A I; Zverev, M P; Karleshenko, N I

    1976-01-01

    Radiotherapy was employed in 60 patients, symptomatic treatment--in 10 patients with pancreatic cancer, 9 of them had the disease in stage III. Radiotherapy, using betatron 25 Mev, was conducted by a longitudinal method, distant gammatherapy--through a wolfram and the radiation source focused grid. Single focal dosage was 150--200 rad, total--5000--8000 rad. The treatment proved to be uneffective in 31.7 per cent of patients.

  6. The Computational Properties of a Simplified Cortical Column Model

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ramakrishnan; Koch, Christof; Mihalas, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex has a repetitious, laminar structure and performs functions integral to higher cognitive processes, including sensory perception, memory, and coordinated motor output. What computations does this circuitry subserve that link these unique structural elements to their function? Potjans and Diesmann (2014) parameterized a four-layer, two cell type (i.e. excitatory and inhibitory) model of a cortical column with homogeneous populations and cell type dependent connection probabilities. We implement a version of their model using a displacement integro-partial differential equation (DiPDE) population density model. This approach, exact in the limit of large homogeneous populations, provides a fast numerical method to solve equations describing the full probability density distribution of neuronal membrane potentials. It lends itself to quickly analyzing the mean response properties of population-scale firing rate dynamics. We use this strategy to examine the input-output relationship of the Potjans and Diesmann cortical column model to understand its computational properties. When inputs are constrained to jointly and equally target excitatory and inhibitory neurons, we find a large linear regime where the effect of a multi-layer input signal can be reduced to a linear combination of component signals. One of these, a simple subtractive operation, can act as an error signal passed between hierarchical processing stages. PMID:27617444

  7. Control-oriented reduced order modeling of dipteran flapping flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruque, Imraan

    Flying insects achieve flight stabilization and control in a manner that requires only small, specialized neural structures to perform the essential components of sensing and feedback, achieving unparalleled levels of robust aerobatic flight on limited computational resources. An engineering mechanism to replicate these control strategies could provide a dramatic increase in the mobility of small scale aerial robotics, but a formal investigation has not yet yielded tools that both quantitatively and intuitively explain flapping wing flight as an "input-output" relationship. This work uses experimental and simulated measurements of insect flight to create reduced order flight dynamics models. The framework presented here creates models that are relevant for the study of control properties. The work begins with automated measurement of insect wing motions in free flight, which are then used to calculate flight forces via an empirically-derived aerodynamics model. When paired with rigid body dynamics and experimentally measured state feedback, both the bare airframe and closed loop systems may be analyzed using frequency domain system identification. Flight dynamics models describing maneuvering about hover and cruise conditions are presented for example fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) and blowflies (Calliphorids). The results show that biologically measured feedback paths are appropriate for flight stabilization and sexual dimorphism is only a minor factor in flight dynamics. A method of ranking kinematic control inputs to maximize maneuverability is also presented, showing that the volume of reachable configurations in state space can be dramatically increased due to appropriate choice of kinematic inputs.

  8. Development of Aeroservoelastic Analytical Models and Gust Load Alleviation Control Laws of a SensorCraft Wind-Tunnel Model Using Measured Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Shimko, Anthony; Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Eure, Kenneth W.; Scott, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    Aeroservoelastic (ASE) analytical models of a SensorCraft wind-tunnel model are generated using measured data. The data was acquired during the ASE wind-tunnel test of the HiLDA (High Lift-to-Drag Active) Wing model, tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) in late 2004. Two time-domain system identification techniques are applied to the development of the ASE analytical models: impulse response (IR) method and the Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) method. Using measured control surface inputs (frequency sweeps) and associated sensor responses, the IR method is used to extract corresponding input/output impulse response pairs. These impulse responses are then transformed into state-space models for use in ASE analyses. Similarly, the GPC method transforms measured random control surface inputs and associated sensor responses into an AutoRegressive with eXogenous input (ARX) model. The ARX model is then used to develop the gust load alleviation (GLA) control law. For the IR method, comparison of measured with simulated responses are presented to investigate the accuracy of the ASE analytical models developed. For the GPC method, comparison of simulated open-loop and closed-loop (GLA) time histories are presented.

  9. Development of Aeroservoelastic Analytical Models and Gust Load Alleviation Control Laws of a SensorCraft Wind-Tunnel Model Using Measured Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Vartio, Eric; Shimko, Anthony; Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Eure, Kenneth W.; Scott,Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    Aeroservoelastic (ASE) analytical models of a SensorCraft wind-tunnel model are generated using measured data. The data was acquired during the ASE wind-tunnel test of the HiLDA (High Lift-to-Drag Active) Wing model, tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) in late 2004. Two time-domain system identification techniques are applied to the development of the ASE analytical models: impulse response (IR) method and the Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) method. Using measured control surface inputs (frequency sweeps) and associated sensor responses, the IR method is used to extract corresponding input/output impulse response pairs. These impulse responses are then transformed into state-space models for use in ASE analyses. Similarly, the GPC method transforms measured random control surface inputs and associated sensor responses into an AutoRegressive with eXogenous input (ARX) model. The ARX model is then used to develop the gust load alleviation (GLA) control law. For the IR method, comparison of measured with simulated responses are presented to investigate the accuracy of the ASE analytical models developed. For the GPC method, comparison of simulated open-loop and closed-loop (GLA) time histories are presented.

  10. An improved state-parameter analysis of ecosystem models using data assimilation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, M.; Liu, S.; Tieszen, L.L.; Hollinger, D.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Much of the effort spent in developing data assimilation methods for carbon dynamics analysis has focused on estimating optimal values for either model parameters or state variables. The main weakness of estimating parameter values alone (i.e., without considering state variables) is that all errors from input, output, and model structure are attributed to model parameter uncertainties. On the other hand, the accuracy of estimating state variables may be lowered if the temporal evolution of parameter values is not incorporated. This research develops a smoothed ensemble Kalman filter (SEnKF) by combining ensemble Kalman filter with kernel smoothing technique. SEnKF has following characteristics: (1) to estimate simultaneously the model states and parameters through concatenating unknown parameters and state variables into a joint state vector; (2) to mitigate dramatic, sudden changes of parameter values in parameter sampling and parameter evolution process, and control narrowing of parameter variance which results in filter divergence through adjusting smoothing factor in kernel smoothing algorithm; (3) to assimilate recursively data into the model and thus detect possible time variation of parameters; and (4) to address properly various sources of uncertainties stemming from input, output and parameter uncertainties. The SEnKF is tested by assimilating observed fluxes of carbon dioxide and environmental driving factor data from an AmeriFlux forest station located near Howland, Maine, USA, into a partition eddy flux model. Our analysis demonstrates that model parameters, such as light use efficiency, respiration coefficients, minimum and optimum temperatures for photosynthetic activity, and others, are highly constrained by eddy flux data at daily-to-seasonal time scales. The SEnKF stabilizes parameter values quickly regardless of the initial values of the parameters. Potential ecosystem light use efficiency demonstrates a strong seasonality. Results show that the

  11. Evaluating performances of simplified physically based landslide susceptibility models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capparelli, Giovanna; Formetta, Giuseppe; Versace, Pasquale

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall induced shallow landslides cause significant damages involving loss of life and properties. Prediction of shallow landslides susceptible locations is a complex task that involves many disciplines: hydrology, geotechnical science, geomorphology, and statistics. Usually to accomplish this task two main approaches are used: statistical or physically based model. This paper presents a package of GIS based models for landslide susceptibility analysis. It was integrated in the NewAge-JGrass hydrological model using the Object Modeling System (OMS) modeling framework. The package includes three simplified physically based models for landslides susceptibility analysis (M1, M2, and M3) and a component for models verifications. It computes eight goodness of fit indices (GOF) by comparing pixel-by-pixel model results and measurements data. Moreover, the package integration in NewAge-JGrass allows the use of other components such as geographic information system tools to manage inputs-output processes, and automatic calibration algorithms to estimate model parameters. The system offers the possibility to investigate and fairly compare the quality and the robustness of models and models parameters, according a procedure that includes: i) model parameters estimation by optimizing each of the GOF index separately, ii) models evaluation in the ROC plane by using each of the optimal parameter set, and iii) GOF robustness evaluation by assessing their sensitivity to the input parameter variation. This procedure was repeated for all three models. The system was applied for a case study in Calabria (Italy) along the Salerno-Reggio Calabria highway, between Cosenza and Altilia municipality. The analysis provided that among all the optimized indices and all the three models, Average Index (AI) optimization coupled with model M3 is the best modeling solution for our test case. This research was funded by PON Project No. 01_01503 "Integrated Systems for Hydrogeological Risk

  12. One-Dimensional Transport with Equilibrium Chemistry (OTEQ) - A Reactive Transport Model for Streams and Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    OTEQ is a mathematical simulation model used to characterize the fate and transport of waterborne solutes in streams and rivers. The model is formed by coupling a solute transport model with a chemical equilibrium submodel. The solute transport model is based on OTIS, a model that considers the physical processes of advection, dispersion, lateral inflow, and transient storage. The equilibrium submodel is based on MINTEQ, a model that considers the speciation and complexation of aqueous species, acid-base reactions, precipitation/dissolution, and sorption. Within OTEQ, reactions in the water column may result in the formation of solid phases (precipitates and sorbed species) that are subject to downstream transport and settling processes. Solid phases on the streambed may also interact with the water column through dissolution and sorption/desorption reactions. Consideration of both mobile (waterborne) and immobile (streambed) solid phases requires a unique set of governing differential equations and solution techniques that are developed herein. The partial differential equations describing physical transport and the algebraic equations describing chemical equilibria are coupled using the sequential iteration approach. The model's ability to simulate pH, precipitation/dissolution, and pH-dependent sorption provides a means of evaluating the complex interactions between instream chemistry and hydrologic transport at the field scale. This report details the development and application of OTEQ. Sections of the report describe model theory, input/output specifications, model applications, and installation instructions. OTEQ may be obtained over the Internet at http://water.usgs.gov/software/OTEQ.

  13. Stochastic filtering for damage identification through nonlinear structural finite element model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astroza, Rodrigo; Ebrahimian, Hamed; Conte, Joel P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a novel framework that combines advanced mechanics-based nonlinear (hysteretic) finite element (FE) models and stochastic filtering techniques to estimate unknown time-invariant parameters of nonlinear inelastic material models used in the FE model. Using input-output data recorded during earthquake events, the proposed framework updates the nonlinear FE model of the structure. The updated FE model can be directly used for damage identification and further used for damage prognosis. To update the unknown time-invariant parameters of the FE model, two alternative stochastic filtering methods are used: the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and the unscented Kalman filter (UKF). A three-dimensional, 5-story, 2-by-1 bay reinforced concrete (RC) frame is used to verify the proposed framework. The RC frame is modeled using fiber-section displacement-based beam-column elements with distributed plasticity and is subjected to the ground motion recorded at the Sylmar station during the 1994 Northridge earthquake. The results indicate that the proposed framework accurately estimate the unknown material parameters of the nonlinear FE model. The UKF outperforms the EKF when the relative root-mean-square error of the recorded responses are compared. In addition, the results suggest that the convergence of the estimate of modeling parameters is smoother and faster when the UKF is utilized.

  14. Comprehensive, Population-Based Sensitivity Analysis of a Two-Mass Vocal Fold Model

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Daniel; Zañartu, Matías; Cook, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Previous vocal fold modeling studies have generally focused on generating detailed data regarding a narrow subset of possible model configurations. These studies can be interpreted to be the investigation of a single subject under one or more vocal conditions. In this study, a broad population-based sensitivity analysis is employed to examine the behavior of a virtual population of subjects and to identify trends between virtual individuals as opposed to investigating a single subject or model instance. Four different sensitivity analysis techniques were used in accomplishing this task. Influential relationships between model input parameters and model outputs were identified, and an exploration of the model’s parameter space was conducted. Results indicate that the behavior of the selected two-mass model is largely dominated by complex interactions, and that few input-output pairs have a consistent effect on the model. Results from the analysis can be used to increase the efficiency of optimization routines of reduced-order models used to investigate voice abnormalities. Results also demonstrate the types of challenges and difficulties to be expected when applying sensitivity analyses to more complex vocal fold models. Such challenges are discussed and recommendations are made for future studies. PMID:26845452

  15. Comparative Analysis of Soft Computing Models in Prediction of Bending Rigidity of Cotton Woven Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guruprasad, R.; Behera, B. K.

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative prediction of fabric mechanical properties is an essential requirement for design engineering of textile and apparel products. In this work, the possibility of prediction of bending rigidity of cotton woven fabrics has been explored with the application of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and two hybrid methodologies, namely Neuro-genetic modeling and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) modeling. For this purpose, a set of cotton woven grey fabrics was desized, scoured and relaxed. The fabrics were then conditioned and tested for bending properties. With the database thus created, a neural network model was first developed using back propagation as the learning algorithm. The second model was developed by applying a hybrid learning strategy, in which genetic algorithm was first used as a learning algorithm to optimize the number of neurons and connection weights of the neural network. The Genetic algorithm optimized network structure was further allowed to learn using back propagation algorithm. In the third model, an ANFIS modeling approach was attempted to map the input-output data. The prediction performances of the models were compared and a sensitivity analysis was reported. The results show that the prediction by neuro-genetic and ANFIS models were better in comparison with that of back propagation neural network model.

  16. Spatio-Temporal Modelling of Dust Transport over Surface Mining Areas and Neighbouring Residential Zones.

    PubMed

    Matejicek, Lubos; Janour, Zbynek; Benes, Ludek; Bodnar, Tomas; Gulikova, Eva

    2008-06-06

    Projects focusing on spatio-temporal modelling of the living environment need to manage a wide range of terrain measurements, existing spatial data, time series, results of spatial analysis and inputs/outputs from numerical simulations. Thus, GISs are often used to manage data from remote sensors, to provide advanced spatial analysis and to integrate numerical models. In order to demonstrate the integration of spatial data, time series and methods in the framework of the GIS, we present a case study focused on the modelling of dust transport over a surface coal mining area, exploring spatial data from 3D laser scanners, GPS measurements, aerial images, time series of meteorological observations, inputs/outputs form numerical models and existing geographic resources. To achieve this, digital terrain models, layers including GPS thematic mapping, and scenes with simulation of wind flows are created to visualize and interpret coal dust transport over the mine area and a neighbouring residential zone. A temporary coal storage and sorting site, located near the residential zone, is one of the dominant sources of emissions. Using numerical simulations, the possible effects of wind flows are observed over the surface, modified by natural objects and man-made obstacles. The coal dust drifts with the wind in the direction of the residential zone and is partially deposited in this area. The simultaneous display of the digital map layers together with the location of the dominant emission source, wind flows and protected areas enables a risk assessment of the dust deposition in the area of interest to be performed. In order to obtain a more accurate simulation of wind flows over the temporary storage and sorting site, 3D laser scanning and GPS thematic mapping are used to create a more detailed digital terrain model. Thus, visualization of wind flows over the area of interest combined with 3D map layers enables the exploration of the processes of coal dust deposition at a

  17. ImSET 3.1: Impact of Sector Energy Technologies Model Description and User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Michael J.; Livingston, Olga V.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schultz, Robert W.

    2009-05-22

    This 3.1 version of the Impact of Sector Energy Technologies (ImSET) model represents the next generation of the previously-built ImSET model (ImSET 2.0) that was developed in 2005 to estimate the macroeconomic impacts of energy-efficient technology in buildings. In particular, a special-purpose version of the Benchmark National Input-Output (I-O) model was designed specifically to estimate the national employment and income effects of the deployment of Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)–developed energy-saving technologies. In comparison with the previous versions of the model, this version features the use of the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis 2002 national input-output table and the central processing code has been moved from the FORTRAN legacy operating environment to a modern C++ code. ImSET is also easier to use than extant macroeconomic simulation models and incorporates information developed by each of the EERE offices as part of the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act. While it does not include the ability to model certain dynamic features of markets for labor and other factors of production featured in the more complex models, for most purposes these excluded features are not critical. The analysis is credible as long as the assumption is made that relative prices in the economy would not be substantially affected by energy efficiency investments. In most cases, the expected scale of these investments is small enough that neither labor markets nor production cost relationships should seriously affect national prices as the investments are made. The exact timing of impacts on gross product, employment, and national wage income from energy efficiency investments is not well-enough understood that much special insight can be gained from the additional dynamic sophistication of a macroeconomic simulation model. Thus, we believe that this version of ImSET is a cost-effective solution to estimating the economic

  18. Application of Interval Predictor Models to Space Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy,Daniel P.; Norman, Ryan B.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops techniques for predicting the uncertainty range of an output variable given input-output data. These models are called Interval Predictor Models (IPM) because they yield an interval valued function of the input. This paper develops IPMs having a radial basis structure. This structure enables the formal description of (i) the uncertainty in the models parameters, (ii) the predicted output interval, and (iii) the probability that a future observation would fall in such an interval. In contrast to other metamodeling techniques, this probabilistic certi cate of correctness does not require making any assumptions on the structure of the mechanism from which data are drawn. Optimization-based strategies for calculating IPMs having minimal spread while containing all the data are developed. Constraints for bounding the minimum interval spread over the continuum of inputs, regulating the IPMs variation/oscillation, and centering its spread about a target point, are used to prevent data over tting. Furthermore, we develop an approach for using expert opinion during extrapolation. This metamodeling technique is illustrated using a radiation shielding application for space exploration. In this application, we use IPMs to describe the error incurred in predicting the ux of particles resulting from the interaction between a high-energy incident beam and a target.

  19. Model sensitivity analysis of ozone production based on DISCOVER-AQ field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollonige, D. E.; Thompson, A. M.; Chen, S.; Martins, D. K.; Halliday, H.; Brune, W. H.; Knepp, T. N.

    2012-12-01

    Sensitivity analysis can be used to study the effects of model and measurement uncertainties on the output of a model. This analysis tests the effect of uncertainty on the prediction of urban ozone production and its limitation by NOx and VOCs under real atmospheric conditions. A Monte Carlo approach is employed using a zero-dimensional box model with base cases of differing initial conditions forced by a daily cycle of chemical measurements from the Edgewood, MD site during NASA's Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) field campaign conducted in July 2011. Model results stem from four different chemical mechanisms including the Regional Atmospheric Chemical Mechanism (RACM). The Random Sampling - High Dimensional Model Representation (RS-HDMR) method, developed to explore the input-output relationship of complex models with large numbers of inputs, is executed to quantify the impact of input measurements, kinetic rate coefficients, and product yields on ozone production. Comparisons are also made between observed and modeled ozone formation rates based on the differing chemical mechanisms used in the box model.

  20. Time series modeling of soil moisture dynamics on a steep mountainous hillside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sanghyun

    2016-05-01

    The response of soil moisture to rainfall events along hillslope transects is an important hydrologic process and a critical component of interactions between soil vegetation and the atmosphere. In this context, the research described in this article addresses the spatial distribution of soil moisture as a function of topography. In order to characterize the temporal variation in soil moisture on a steep mountainous hillside, a transfer function, including a model for noise, was introduced. Soil moisture time series with similar rainfall amounts, but different wetness gradients were measured in the spring and fall. Water flux near the soil moisture sensors was modeled and mathematical expressions were developed to provide a basis for input-output modeling of rainfall and soil moisture using hydrological processes such as infiltration, exfiltration and downslope lateral flow. The characteristics of soil moisture response can be expressed in terms of model structure. A seasonal comparison of models reveals differences in soil moisture response to rainfall, possibly associated with eco-hydrological process and evapotranspiration. Modeling results along the hillslope indicate that the spatial structure of the soil moisture response patterns mainly appears in deeper layers. Similarities between topographic attributes and stochastic model structures are spatially organized. The impact of temporal and spatial discretization scales on parameter expression is addressed in the context of modeling results that link rainfall events and soil moisture.

  1. Fault Diagnosis in Discrete-Event Systems with Incomplete Models: Learnability and Diagnosability.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Raymond H; Yonge-Mallo, David L

    2015-07-01

    Most model-based approaches to fault diagnosis of discrete-event systems require a complete and accurate model of the system to be diagnosed. However, the discrete-event model may have arisen from abstraction and simplification of a continuous time system, or through model building from input-output data. As such, it may not capture the dynamic behavior of the system completely. In a previous paper, we addressed the problem of diagnosing faults given an incomplete model of the discrete-event system. We presented the learning diagnoser which not only diagnoses faults, but also attempts to learn missing model information through parsimonious hypothesis generation. In this paper, we study the properties of learnability and diagnosability. Learnability deals with the issue of whether the missing model information can be learned, while diagnosability corresponds to the ability to detect and isolate a fault after it has occurred. We provide conditions under which the learning diagnoser can learn missing model information. We define the notions of weak and strong diagnosability and also give conditions under which they hold.

  2. Analytical modeling of operating characteristics of premixing-prevaporizing fuel-air mixing passages. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, O. L.; Chiappetta, L. M.; Edwards, D. E.; Mcvey, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    A user's manual describing the operation of three computer codes (ADD code, PTRAK code, and VAPDIF code) is presented. The general features of the computer codes, the input/output formats, run streams, and sample input cases are described.

  3. Surrogate modeling of deformable joint contact using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Eskinazi, Ilan; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2015-09-01

    Deformable joint contact models can be used to estimate loading conditions for cartilage-cartilage, implant-implant, human-orthotic, and foot-ground interactions. However, contact evaluations are often so expensive computationally that they can be prohibitive for simulations or optimizations requiring thousands or even millions of contact evaluations. To overcome this limitation, we developed a novel surrogate contact modeling method based on artificial neural networks (ANNs). The method uses special sampling techniques to gather input-output data points from an original (slow) contact model in multiple domains of input space, where each domain represents a different physical situation likely to be encountered. For each contact force and torque output by the original contact model, a multi-layer feed-forward ANN is defined, trained, and incorporated into a surrogate contact model. As an evaluation problem, we created an ANN-based surrogate contact model of an artificial tibiofemoral joint using over 75,000 evaluations of a fine-grid elastic foundation (EF) contact model. The surrogate contact model computed contact forces and torques about 1000 times faster than a less accurate coarse grid EF contact model. Furthermore, the surrogate contact model was seven times more accurate than the coarse grid EF contact model within the input domain of a walking motion. For larger input domains, the surrogate contact model showed the expected trend of increasing error with increasing domain size. In addition, the surrogate contact model was able to identify out-of-contact situations with high accuracy. Computational contact models created using our proposed ANN approach may remove an important computational bottleneck from musculoskeletal simulations or optimizations incorporating deformable joint contact models.

  4. Evaluating performances of simplified physically based models for landslide susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formetta, G.; Capparelli, G.; Versace, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rainfall induced shallow landslides cause loss of life and significant damages involving private and public properties, transportation system, etc. Prediction of shallow landslides susceptible locations is a complex task that involves many disciplines: hydrology, geotechnical science, geomorphology, and statistics. Usually to accomplish this task two main approaches are used: statistical or physically based model. Reliable models' applications involve: automatic parameters calibration, objective quantification of the quality of susceptibility maps, model sensitivity analysis. This paper presents a methodology to systemically and objectively calibrate, verify and compare different models and different models performances indicators in order to individuate and eventually select the models whose behaviors are more reliable for a certain case study. The procedure was implemented in package of models for landslide susceptibility analysis and integrated in the NewAge-JGrass hydrological model. The package includes three simplified physically based models for landslides susceptibility analysis (M1, M2, and M3) and a component for models verifications. It computes eight goodness of fit indices by comparing pixel-by-pixel model results and measurements data. Moreover, the package integration in NewAge-JGrass allows the use of other components such as geographic information system tools to manage inputs-output processes, and automatic calibration algorithms to estimate model parameters. The system was applied for a case study in Calabria (Italy) along the Salerno-Reggio Calabria highway, between Cosenza and Altilia municipality. The analysis provided that among all the optimized indices and all the three models, the optimization of the index distance to perfect classification in the receiver operating characteristic plane (D2PC) coupled with model M3 is the best modeling solution for our test case.

  5. Surrogate Modeling of Deformable Joint Contact using Artificial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Eskinazi, Ilan; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Deformable joint contact models can be used to estimate loading conditions for cartilage-cartilage, implant-implant, human-orthotic, and foot-ground interactions. However, contact evaluations are often so expensive computationally that they can be prohibitive for simulations or optimizations requiring thousands or even millions of contact evaluations. To overcome this limitation, we developed a novel surrogate contact modeling method based on artificial neural networks (ANNs). The method uses special sampling techniques to gather input-output data points from an original (slow) contact model in multiple domains of input space, where each domain represents a different physical situation likely to be encountered. For each contact force and torque output by the original contact model, a multi-layer feed-forward ANN is defined, trained, and incorporated into a surrogate contact model. As an evaluation problem, we created an ANN-based surrogate contact model of an artificial tibiofemoral joint using over 75,000 evaluations of a fine-grid elastic foundation (EF) contact model. The surrogate contact model computed contact forces and torques about 1000 times faster than a less accurate coarse grid EF contact model. Furthermore, the surrogate contact model was seven times more accurate than the coarse grid EF contact model within the input domain of a walking motion. For larger input domains, the surrogate contact model showed the expected trend of increasing error with increasing domain size. In addition, the surrogate contact model was able to identify out-of-contact situations with high accuracy. Computational contact models created using our proposed ANN approach may remove an important computational bottleneck from musculoskeletal simulations or optimizations incorporating deformable joint contact models. PMID:26220591

  6. Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy models in the framework of orthonormal basis functions.

    PubMed

    Machado, Jeremias B; Campello, Ricardo J G B; Amaral, Wagner Caradori

    2013-06-01

    An approach to obtain Takagi-Sugeno (TS) fuzzy models of nonlinear dynamic systems using the framework of orthonormal basis functions (OBFs) is presented in this paper. This approach is based on an architecture in which local linear models with ladder-structured generalized OBFs (GOBFs) constitute the fuzzy rule consequents and the outputs of the corresponding GOBF filters are input variables for the rule antecedents. The resulting GOBF-TS model is characterized by having only real-valued parameters that do not depend on any user specification about particular types of functions to be used in the orthonormal basis. The fuzzy rules of the model are initially obtained by means of a well-known technique based on fuzzy clustering and least squares. Those rules are then simplified, and the model parameters (GOBF poles, GOBF expansion coefficients, and fuzzy membership functions) are subsequently adjusted by using a nonlinear optimization algorithm. The exact gradients of an error functional with respect to the parameters to be optimized are computed analytically. Those gradients provide exact search directions for the optimization process, which relies solely on input-output data measured from the system to be modeled. An example is presented to illustrate the performance of this approach in the modeling of a complex nonlinear dynamic system.

  7. Modelling of agricultural combination driver behaviour from the aspect of safety of movement.

    PubMed

    Szczepaniak, Jan; Tanaś, Wojciech; Pawłowski, Tadeusz; Kromulski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Statistics show that the travel of agricultural machinery to a work area and their movement during labour is the source of many serious accidents. The most dangerous in consequences prove to be those that occur during transport and associated with maneuvering tractors and machinery (about 30% of all fatal accidents). It can be assumed that at least some of these accidents were caused indirectly by the specific design features of agricultural machines which adversely affect the driveability. The single- and multi-loop structures of the driver-vehicle system models are formulated to study the contributions of various preview and prediction strategies to the path tracking and dynamic performance of the articulated vehicle. In the presented study the compensatory model of driver utilizes the lateral acceleration of the tractor, roll angle of trailer sprung mass and the articulation rate as the internal motion feedback variables. The control model of steering of an agricultural set has been implemented in the Matlab/Simulink environment. The model has been constructed with the use of stochastic methods and operational transmittances describing the various components of the system. The model operational transmittances has been estimated using Box-Jenkins and continuous-time process models from input-output data. The model has been tested using experimental data from road investigation of the agricultural set.

  8. Hybrid model building methodology using unsupervised fuzzy clustering and supervised neural networks.

    PubMed

    Ronen, M; Shabtai, Y; Guterman, H

    2002-02-15

    This paper suggests a model building methodology for dealing with new processes. The methodology, called Hybrid Fuzzy Neural Networks (HFNN), combines unsupervised fuzzy clustering and supervised neural networks in order to create simple and flexible models. Fuzzy clustering was used to define relevant domains on the input space. Then, sets of multilayer perceptrons (MLP) were trained (one for each domain) to map input-output relations, creating, in the process, a set of specified sub-models. The estimated output of the model was obtained by fusing the different sub-model outputs weighted by their predicted possibilities. On-line reinforcement learning enabled improvement of the model. The determination of the optimal number of clusters is fundamental to the success of the HFNN approach. The effectiveness of several validity measures was compared to the generalization capability of the model and information criteria. The validity measures were tested with fermentation simulations and real fermentations of a yeast-like fungus, Aureobasidium pullulans. The results outline the criteria limitations. The learning capability of the HFNN was tested with the fermentation data. The results underline the advantages of HFNN over a single neural network.

  9. System modelling for LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Aguiló, Marc; Grynagier, Adrien; Rais, Boutheina

    LISA Pathfinder is the technology demonstrator for LISA, a space-borne gravitational waves observatory. The goal of the mission is to characterise the dynamics of the LISA Technology Package (LTP) to prove that on-board experimental conditions are compatible with the de-tection of gravitational waves. The LTP is a drag-free dynamics experiment which includes a control loop with sensors (interferometric and capacitive), actuators (capacitive actuators and thrusters), controlled disturbances (magnetic coils, heaters) and which is subject to various endogenous or exogenous noise sources such as infrared pressure or solar wind. The LTP experiment features new hardware which was never flown in space. The mission has a tight operation timeline as it is constrained to about 100 days. It is therefore vital to have efficient and precise means of investigation and diagnostics to be used during the on-orbit operations. These will be conducted using the LTP Data Analysis toolbox (LTPDA) which allows for simulation, parameter identification and various analyses (covariance analysis, state estimation) given an experimental model. The LTPDA toolbox therefore contains a series of models which are state-space representations of each component in the LTP. The State-Space Models (SSM) are objects of a state-space class within the LTPDA toolbox especially designed to address all the requirements of this tool. The user has access to a set of linear models which represent every satellite subsystem; the models are available in different forms representing 1D, 2D and 3D systems, each with settable symbolic and numeric parameters. To limit the possible errors, the models can be automatically linked to produce composite systems and closed-loops of the LTP. Finally, for the sake of completeness, accuracy and maintainability of the tool, the models contain all the physical information they mimic (i.e. variable units, description of parameters, description of inputs/outputs, etc). Models

  10. Superconducting cavity control based on system model identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, Tomasz

    2007-08-01

    A digital control system for the superconducting cavities for a linear accelerator is presented. The low level radio frequency system for the FLASH project in DESY is introduced. A field programmable gate array-based controller managed by MATLAB was developed to investigate the novel firmware implementation. An algebraic complex domain model is proposed for the system analysis. The calibration procedure of a signal path is considered for multi-channel control. For a given model structure, the input-output relation of the real plant with unknown parameters is applied. The over-determined matrix equation is created covering a long enough measurement range with the solution according to the least squares method. A base function approximation by a cubic B-spline set is applied to estimate the time-varying cavity detuning during the pulse. Control tables, feed-forward and set point, are determined for the required cavity performance, according to the recognized process. The feedback loop is tuned by fitting complex gain of the corrector unit according to the determined gain table. An adaptive control algorithm is applied for feed-forward and feedback modes. Experimental results including field measurement are presented for a cavity representative operation.

  11. Models for regionalizing economic data and their applications within the scope of forensic disaster analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Hanns-Maximilian; Wiens, rer. pol. Marcus, , Dr.; Schultmann, rer. pol. Frank, Prof. _., Dr.

    2015-04-01

    The impact of natural hazards on the economic system can be observed in many different regions all over the world. Once the local economic structure is hit by an event direct costs instantly occur. However, the disturbance on a local level (e.g. parts of city or industries along a river bank) might also cause monetary damages in other, indirectly affected sectors. If the impact of an event is strong, these damages are likely to cascade and spread even on an international scale (e.g. the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull and its impact on the automotive sector in Europe). In order to determine these special impacts, one has to gain insights into the directly hit economic structure before being able to calculate these side effects. Especially, regarding the development of a model used for near real-time forensic disaster analyses any simulation needs to be based on data that is rapidly available or easily to be computed. Therefore, we investigated commonly used or recently discussed methodologies for regionalizing economic data. Surprisingly, even for German federal states there is no official input-output data available that can be used, although it might provide detailed figures concerning economic interrelations between different industry sectors. In the case of highly developed countries, such as Germany, we focus on models for regionalizing nationwide input-output table which is usually available at the national statistical offices. However, when it comes to developing countries (e.g. South-East Asia) the data quality and availability is usually much poorer. In this case, other sources need to be found for the proper assessment of regional economic performance. We developed an indicator-based model that can fill this gap because of its flexibility regarding the level of aggregation and the composability of different input parameters. Our poster presentation brings up a literature review and a summary on potential models that seem to be useful for this specific task

  12. Using transfer functions to quantify El Niño Southern Oscillation dynamics in data and models.

    PubMed

    MacMartin, Douglas G; Tziperman, Eli

    2014-09-08

    Transfer function tools commonly used in engineering control analysis can be used to better understand the dynamics of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), compare data with models and identify systematic model errors. The transfer function describes the frequency-dependent input-output relationship between any pair of causally related variables, and can be estimated from time series. This can be used first to assess whether the underlying relationship is or is not frequency dependent, and if so, to diagnose the underlying differential equations that relate the variables, and hence describe the dynamics of individual subsystem processes relevant to ENSO. Estimating process parameters allows the identification of compensating model errors that may lead to a seemingly realistic simulation in spite of incorrect model physics. This tool is applied here to the TAO array ocean data, the GFDL-CM2.1 and CCSM4 general circulation models, and to the Cane-Zebiak ENSO model. The delayed oscillator description is used to motivate a few relevant processes involved in the dynamics, although any other ENSO mechanism could be used instead. We identify several differences in the processes between the models and data that may be useful for model improvement. The transfer function methodology is also useful in understanding the dynamics and evaluating models of other climate processes.

  13. Applications of Artificial Neural Networks in Structural Engineering with Emphasis on Continuum Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.; Liu, Youhua

    1998-01-01

    The use of continuum models for the analysis of discrete built-up complex aerospace structures is an attractive idea especially at the conceptual and preliminary design stages. But the diversity of available continuum models and hard-to-use qualities of these models have prevented them from finding wide applications. In this regard, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN or NN) may have a great potential as these networks are universal approximators that can realize any continuous mapping, and can provide general mechanisms for building models from data whose input-output relationship can be highly nonlinear. The ultimate aim of the present work is to be able to build high fidelity continuum models for complex aerospace structures using the ANN. As a first step, the concepts and features of ANN are familiarized through the MATLAB NN Toolbox by simulating some representative mapping examples, including some problems in structural engineering. Then some further aspects and lessons learned about the NN training are discussed, including the performances of Feed-Forward and Radial Basis Function NN when dealing with noise-polluted data and the technique of cross-validation. Finally, as an example of using NN in continuum models, a lattice structure with repeating cells is represented by a continuum beam whose properties are provided by neural networks.

  14. Exploring temporal and functional synchronization in integrating models: A sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belete, Getachew F.; Voinov, Alexey

    2016-05-01

    When integrating independently built models, we may encounter components that describe the same processes or groups of processes using different assumptions and formalizations. The time stepping in component models can also be very different depending upon the temporal resolution chosen. Even if this time stepping is handled outside of the components (as assumed by good practice of component building) the use of inappropriate temporal synchronization can produce either major run-time redundancy or loss of model accuracy. While components may need to be run asynchronously, finding the right times for them to communicate and exchange information becomes a challenge. We are illustrating this by experimenting with a couple of simple component models connected by means of Web services to explore how the timing of their input-output data exchange affects the performance of the overall integrated model. We have also considered how to best communicate information between components that use a different formalism for the same processes. Currently there are no generic recommendations for component synchronization but including sensitivity analysis for temporal and functional synchronization should be recommended as an essential part of integrated modeling.

  15. A neuron-astrocyte transistor-like model for neuromorphic dressed neurons.

    PubMed

    Valenza, G; Pioggia, G; Armato, A; Ferro, M; Scilingo, E P; De Rossi, D

    2011-09-01

    Experimental evidences on the role of the synaptic glia as an active partner together with the bold synapse in neuronal signaling and dynamics of neural tissue strongly suggest to investigate on a more realistic neuron-glia model for better understanding human brain processing. Among the glial cells, the astrocytes play a crucial role in the tripartite synapsis, i.e. the dressed neuron. A well-known two-way astrocyte-neuron interaction can be found in the literature, completely revising the purely supportive role for the glia. The aim of this study is to provide a computationally efficient model for neuron-glia interaction. The neuron-glia interactions were simulated by implementing the Li-Rinzel model for an astrocyte and the Izhikevich model for a neuron. Assuming the dressed neuron dynamics similar to the nonlinear input-output characteristics of a bipolar junction transistor, we derived our computationally efficient model. This model may represent the fundamental computational unit for the development of real-time artificial neuron-glia networks opening new perspectives in pattern recognition systems and in brain neurophysiology.

  16. Model reduction of cavity nonlinear optics for photonic logic: a quasi-principal components approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhan; Nurdin, Hendra I.

    2016-11-01

    Kerr nonlinear cavities displaying optical thresholding have been proposed for the realization of ultra-low power photonic logic gates. In the ultra-low photon number regime, corresponding to energy levels in the attojoule scale, quantum input-output models become important to study the effect of unavoidable quantum fluctuations on the performance of such logic gates. However, being a quantum anharmonic oscillator, a Kerr-cavity has an infinite dimensional Hilbert space spanned by the Fock states of the oscillator. This poses a challenge to simulate and analyze photonic logic gates and circuits composed of multiple Kerr nonlinearities. For simulation, the Hilbert of the oscillator is typically truncated to the span of only a finite number of Fock states. This paper develops a quasi-principal components approach to identify important subspaces of a Kerr-cavity Hilbert space and exploits it to construct an approximate reduced model of the Kerr-cavity on a smaller Hilbert space. Using this approach, we find a reduced dimension model with a Hilbert space dimension of 15 that can closely match the magnitudes of the mean transmitted and reflected output fields of a conventional truncated Fock state model of dimension 75, when driven by an input coherent field that switches between two levels. For the same input, the reduced model also closely matches the magnitudes of the mean output fields of Kerr-cavity-based AND and NOT gates and a NAND latch obtained from simulation of the full 75 dimension model.

  17. Accurate Time-Dependent Traveling-Wave Tube Model Developed for Computational Bit-Error-Rate Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    2001-01-01

    The phenomenal growth of the satellite communications industry has created a large demand for traveling-wave tubes (TWT's) operating with unprecedented specifications requiring the design and production of many novel devices in record time. To achieve this, the TWT industry heavily relies on computational modeling. However, the TWT industry's computational modeling capabilities need to be improved because there are often discrepancies between measured TWT data and that predicted by conventional two-dimensional helical TWT interaction codes. This limits the analysis and design of novel devices or TWT's with parameters differing from what is conventionally manufactured. In addition, the inaccuracy of current computational tools limits achievable TWT performance because optimized designs require highly accurate models. To address these concerns, a fully three-dimensional, time-dependent, helical TWT interaction model was developed using the electromagnetic particle-in-cell code MAFIA (Solution of MAxwell's equations by the Finite-Integration-Algorithm). The model includes a short section of helical slow-wave circuit with excitation fed by radiofrequency input/output couplers, and an electron beam contained by periodic permanent magnet focusing. A cutaway view of several turns of the three-dimensional helical slow-wave circuit with input/output couplers is shown. This has been shown to be more accurate than conventionally used two-dimensional models. The growth of the communications industry has also imposed a demand for increased data rates for the transmission of large volumes of data. To achieve increased data rates, complex modulation and multiple access techniques are employed requiring minimum distortion of the signal as it is passed through the TWT. Thus, intersymbol interference (ISI) becomes a major consideration, as well as suspected causes such as reflections within the TWT. To experimentally investigate effects of the physical TWT on ISI would be

  18. Landslide hazard assessment along a mountain highway in the Indian Himalayan Region (IHR) using remote sensing and computational models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Akhouri P.; Kumar, Santosh

    2013-10-01

    Landslide hazard assessments using computational models, such as artificial neural network (ANN) and frequency ratio (FR), were carried out covering one of the important mountain highways in the Central Himalaya of Indian Himalayan Region (IHR). Landslide influencing factors were either calculated or extracted from spatial databases including recent remote sensing data of LANDSAT TM, CARTOSAT digital elevation model (DEM) and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite for rainfall data. ANN was implemented using the multi-layered feed forward architecture with different input, output and hidden layers. This model based on back propagation algorithm derived weights for all possible parameters of landslides and causative factors considered. The training sites for landslide prone and non-prone areas were identified and verified through details gathered from remote sensing and other sources. Frequency Ratio (FR) models are based on observed relationships between the distribution of landslides and each landslide related factor. FR model implementation proved useful for assessing the spatial relationships between landslide locations and factors contributing to its occurrence. Above computational models generated respective susceptibility maps of landslide hazard for the study area. This further allowed the simulation of landslide hazard maps on a medium scale using GIS platform and remote sensing data. Upon validation and accuracy checks, it was observed that both models produced good results with FR having some edge over ANN based mapping. Such statistical and functional models led to better understanding of relationships between the landslides and preparatory factors as well as ensuring lesser levels of subjectivity compared to qualitative approaches.

  19. Model transparency and validation: a report of the ISPOR-SMDM Modeling Good Research Practices Task Force--7.

    PubMed

    Eddy, David M; Hollingworth, William; Caro, J Jaime; Tsevat, Joel; McDonald, Kathryn M; Wong, John B

    2012-01-01

    Trust and confidence are critical to the success of health care models. There are two main methods for achieving this: transparency (people can see how the model is built) and validation (how well the model reproduces reality). This report describes recommendations for achieving transparency and validation developed by a taskforce appointed by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research and the Society for Medical Decision Making. Recommendations were developed iteratively by the authors. A nontechnical description--including model type, intended applications, funding sources, structure, intended uses, inputs, outputs, other components that determine function, and their relationships, data sources, validation methods, results, and limitations--should be made available to anyone. Technical documentation, written in sufficient detail to enable a reader with necessary expertise to evaluate the model and potentially reproduce it, should be made available openly or under agreements that protect intellectual property, at the discretion of the modelers. Validation involves face validity (wherein experts evaluate model structure, data sources, assumptions, and results), verification or internal validity (check accuracy of coding), cross validity (comparison of results with other models analyzing the same problem), external validity (comparing model results with real-world results), and predictive validity (comparing model results with prospectively observed events). The last two are the strongest form of validation. Each section of this article contains a number of recommendations that were iterated among the authors, as well as among the wider modeling taskforce, jointly set up by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research and the Society for Medical Decision Making.

  20. Application of stochastic parameter optimization to the Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrugt, Jasper A.; Gupta, Hoshin V.; Dekker, Stefan C.; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Wagener, Thorsten; Bouten, Willem

    2006-06-01

    Hydrological models generally contain parameters that cannot be measured directly, but can only be meaningfully inferred by calibration against a historical record of input-output data. While considerable progress has been made in the development and application of automatic procedures for model calibration, such methods have received criticism for their lack of rigor in treating uncertainty in the parameter estimates. In this paper, we apply the recently developed Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis algorithm (SCEM-UA) to stochastic calibration of the parameters in the Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting model (SAC-SMA) model using historical data from the Leaf River in Mississippi. The SCEM-UA algorithm is a Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler that provides an estimate of the most likely parameter set and underlying posterior distribution within a single optimization run. In particular, we explore the relationship between the length and variability of the streamflow data and the Bayesian uncertainty associated with the SAC-SMA model parameters and compare SCEM-UA derived parameter values with those obtained using deterministic SCE-UA calibrations. Most significantly, for the Leaf River catchments under study our results demonstrate that most of the 13 SAC-SMA parameters are well identified by calibration to daily streamflow data suggesting that this data contains more information than has previously been reported in the literature.

  1. Nonlinear modeling and predictive functional control of Hammerstein system with application to the turntable servo system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Qunjing; Li, Guoli

    2016-05-01

    This article deals with the identification of nonlinear model and Nonlinear Predictive Functional Controller (NPFC) design based on the Hammerstein structure for the turntable servo system. As a mechanism with multi-mass rotational system, nonlinearities significantly influence the system operation, especially when the turntable is in the states of zero-crossing distortion or rapid acceleration/deceleration, etc. The field data from identification experiments are processed by Comprehensive Learning Particle Swarm Optimization (CLPSO). As a result, Hammerstein model can be derived to describe the input-output relationship globally, considering all the linear and nonlinear factors of the turntable system. Cross validation results demonstrate good correspondence between the real equipment and the identified model. In the second part of this manuscript, a nonlinear control strategy based on the genetic algorithm and predictive control is developed. The global nonlinear predictive controller is carried out by two steps: (i) build the linear predictive functional controller with state space equations for the linear subsystem of Hammerstein model, and (ii) optimize the global control variable by minimizing the cost function through genetic algorithm. On the basis of distinguish model for turntable and the effectiveness of NPFC, the good performance of tracking ability is achieved in the simulation results.

  2. Digital image watermarking: its formal model, fundamental properties and possible attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyeem, Hussain; Boles, Wageeh; Boyd, Colin

    2014-12-01

    While formal definitions and security proofs are well established in some fields like cryptography and steganography, they are not as evident in digital watermarking research. A systematic development of watermarking schemes is desirable, but at present, their development is usually informal, ad hoc, and omits the complete realization of application scenarios. This practice not only hinders the choice and use of a suitable scheme for a watermarking application, but also leads to debate about the state-of-the-art for different watermarking applications. With a view to the systematic development of watermarking schemes, we present a formal generic model for digital image watermarking. Considering possible inputs, outputs, and component functions, the initial construction of a basic watermarking model is developed further to incorporate the use of keys. On the basis of our proposed model, fundamental watermarking properties are defined and their importance exemplified for different image applications. We also define a set of possible attacks using our model showing different winning scenarios depending on the adversary capabilities. It is envisaged that with a proper consideration of watermarking properties and adversary actions in different image applications, use of the proposed model would allow a unified treatment of all practically meaningful variants of watermarking schemes.

  3. User Guide for the International Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model

    SciTech Connect

    Keyser, David; Flores-Espino, Francisco; Uriarte, Caroline; Cox, Sadie

    2016-09-01

    The International Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (I-JEDI) model is a freely available economic model that estimates gross economic impacts from wind, solar, and geothermal energy projects for several different countries. Building on the original JEDI model, which was developed for the United States, I-JEDI was developed under the USAID Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) program to support countries in assessing economic impacts of LEDS actions in the energy sector. I-JEDI estimates economic impacts by characterizing the construction and operation of energy projects in terms of expenditures and the portion of these expenditures made within the country of analysis. These data are then used in a country-specific input-output (I-O) model to estimate employment, earnings, gross domestic product (GDP), and gross output impacts. Total economic impacts are presented as well as impacts by industry. This user guide presents general information about how to use I-JEDI and interpret results as well as detailed information about methodology and model limitations.

  4. Identification of continuous-time models for nonlinear dynamic systems from discrete data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuzhu; Guo, Ling Zhong; Billings, Stephen A.; Wei, Hua-Liang

    2016-09-01

    A new iOFR-MF (iterative orthogonal forward regression--modulating function) algorithm is proposed to identify continuous-time models from noisy data by combining the MF method and the iOFR algorithm. In the new method, a set of candidate terms, which describe different dynamic relationships among the system states or between the input and output, are first constructed. These terms are then modulated using the MF method to generate the data matrix. The iOFR algorithm is next applied to build the relationships between these modulated terms, which include detecting the model structure and estimating the associated parameters. The relationships between the original variables are finally recovered from the model of the modulated terms. Both nonlinear state-space models and a class of higher order nonlinear input-output models are considered. The new direct method is compared with the traditional finite difference method and results show that the new method performs much better than the finite difference method. The new method works well even when the measurements are severely corrupted by noise. The selection of appropriate MFs is also discussed.

  5. Agricultural Employment and Economic Growth in the Lower Rio Grande Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritsch, Conrad F.

    Using the basic input-output model developed by the Texas Input-Output Project for a 19 county South Texas Region, income transfer effects from the extension of unemployment insurance to the agricultural sector were derived. Total income transferred would have ranged from $1.5 million to $2.3 million depending upon coverage provisions. About…

  6. Model transparency and validation: a report of the ISPOR-SMDM Modeling Good Research Practices Task Force-7.

    PubMed

    Eddy, David M; Hollingworth, William; Caro, J Jaime; Tsevat, Joel; McDonald, Kathryn M; Wong, John B

    2012-01-01

    Trust and confidence are critical to the success of health care models. There are two main methods for achieving this: transparency (people can see how the model is built) and validation (how well it reproduces reality). This report describes recommendations for achieving transparency and validation, developed by a task force appointed by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) and the Society for Medical Decision Making (SMDM). Recommendations were developed iteratively by the authors. A nontechnical description should be made available to anyone-including model type and intended applications; funding sources; structure; inputs, outputs, other components that determine function, and their relationships; data sources; validation methods and results; and limitations. Technical documentation, written in sufficient detail to enable a reader with necessary expertise to evaluate the model and potentially reproduce it, should be made available openly or under agreements that protect intellectual property, at the discretion of the modelers. Validation involves face validity (wherein experts evaluate model structure, data sources, assumptions, and results), verification or internal validity (check accuracy of coding), cross validity (comparison of results with other models analyzing same problem), external validity (comparing model results to real-world results), and predictive validity (comparing model results with prospectively observed events). The last two are the strongest form of validation. Each section of this paper contains a number of recommendations that were iterated among the authors, as well as the wider modeling task force jointly set up by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research and the Society for Medical Decision Making.

  7. Stiffness modeling of compliant parallel mechanisms and applications in the performance analysis of a decoupled parallel compliant stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yao; Li, Tie-Min; Wang, Li-Ping

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates the stiffness modeling of compliant parallel mechanism (CPM) based on the matrix method. First, the general compliance matrix of a serial flexure chain is derived. The stiffness modeling of CPMs is next discussed in detail, considering the relative positions of the applied load and the selected displacement output point. The derived stiffness models have simple and explicit forms, and the input, output, and coupling stiffness matrices of the CPM can easily be obtained. The proposed analytical model is applied to the stiffness modeling and performance analysis of an XY parallel compliant stage with input and output decoupling characteristics. Then, the key geometrical parameters of the stage are optimized to obtain the minimum input decoupling degree. Finally, a prototype of the compliant stage is developed and its input axial stiffness, coupling characteristics, positioning resolution, and circular contouring performance are tested. The results demonstrate the excellent performance of the compliant stage and verify the effectiveness of the proposed theoretical model. The general stiffness models provided in this paper will be helpful for performance analysis, especially in determining coupling characteristics, and the structure optimization of the CPM.

  8. Porcolation: An Invasion Percolation Model for Mercury Porosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Bendegúz Dezső; Kalmár-Nagy, Tamás

    Mercury porosimetry is utilized primarily in the oil industry to determine the pore size distribution of rock samples. During the process, mercury is forced into the sample with gradually increasing pressure and the volume of the injected mercury is measured vs. the applied pressure (the saturation curve). In practice, the saturation curve is assumed to be directly related the cumulative pore size distribution. However, this distribution does not coincide with the real one because of the “nonaccessibility” of pores at a given pressure. This motivates our goal to determine a more accurate cumulative pore size distribution. To achieve this, we treat the propagation of mercury as a percolation process (dubbed “porcolation” after PORosimetry perCOLATION). Porcolation is an external pressure-driven access-limited invasion percolation model where resistance values are assigned to sites/vertices. As pressure increases, the invading mercury occupies sites with smaller resistance values along paths that are connected to the “boundaries” of the network. Simulations are carried out on regular lattices, as well as on random graphs with prescribed degree distributions (representing the pore network of rock samples). An assumed pore size distribution is considered as an input/parameter of the simulations resulting in an output saturation curve. We determine the input-output mapping (homeomorphism) and utilize its inverse to correct the discrepancies between the assumed and actual pore size distributions. The results show nice agreement between experimental saturation curves and those obtained from our homeomorphism method.

  9. Optimal SCR Control Using Data-Driven Models

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Sun, Yannan; Lian, Jianming; Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Parker, Gordon

    2013-04-16

    We present an optimal control solution for the urea injection for a heavy-duty diesel (HDD) selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The approach taken here is useful beyond SCR and could be applied to any system where a control strategy is desired and input-output data is available. For example, the strategy could also be used for the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) system. In this paper, we identify and validate a one-step ahead Kalman state-space estimator for downstream NOx using the bench reactor data of an SCR core sample. The test data was acquired using a 2010 Cummins 6.7L ISB production engine with a 2010 Cummins production aftertreatment system. We used a surrogate HDD federal test procedure (FTP), developed at Michigan Technological University (MTU), which simulates the representative transients of the standard FTP cycle, but has less engine speed/load points. The identified state-space model is then used to develop a tunable cost function that simultaneously minimizes NOx emissions and urea usage. The cost function is quadratic and univariate, thus the minimum can be computed analytically. We show the performance of the closed-loop controller in using a reduced-order discrete SCR simulator developed at MTU. Our experiments with the surrogate HDD-FTP data show that the strategy developed in this paper can be used to identify performance bounds for urea dose controllers.

  10. Distributed and Lumped Parameter Models for the Characterization of High Throughput Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Iannetti, Laura; D'Urso, Giovanna; Conoscenti, Gioacchino; Cutrì, Elena; Tuan, Rocky S; Raimondi, Manuela T; Gottardi, Riccardo; Zunino, Paolo

    Next generation bioreactors are being developed to generate multiple human cell-based tissue analogs within the same fluidic system, to better recapitulate the complexity and interconnection of human physiology [1, 2]. The effective development of these devices requires a solid understanding of their interconnected fluidics, to predict the transport of nutrients and waste through the constructs and improve the design accordingly. In this work, we focus on a specific model of bioreactor, with multiple input/outputs, aimed at generating osteochondral constructs, i.e., a biphasic construct in which one side is cartilaginous in nature, while the other is osseous. We next develop a general computational approach to model the microfluidics of a multi-chamber, interconnected system that may be applied to human-on-chip devices. This objective requires overcoming several challenges at the level of computational modeling. The main one consists of addressing the multi-physics nature of the problem that combines free flow in channels with hindered flow in porous media. Fluid dynamics is also coupled with advection-diffusion-reaction equations that model the transport of biomolecules throughout the system and their interaction with living tissues and C constructs. Ultimately, we aim at providing a predictive approach useful for the general organ-on-chip community. To this end, we have developed a lumped parameter approach that allows us to analyze the behavior of multi-unit bioreactor systems with modest computational effort, provided that the behavior of a single unit can be fully characterized.

  11. Application of frequency domain ARX models and extreme value statistics to damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasel, Timothy R.; Sohn, Hoon; Farrar, Charles R.

    2003-08-01

    In this study, the applicability of an auto-regressive model with exogenous inputs (ARX) in the frequency domain to structural health monitoring (SHM) is explored. Damage sensitive features that explicitly consider the nonlinear system input/output relationships produced by damage are extracted from the ARX model. Furthermore, because of the non-Gaussian nature of the extracted features, Extreme Value Statistics (EVS) is employed to develop a robust damage classifier. EVS is useful in this case because the data of interest are in the tails (extremes) of the damage sensitive feature distribution. The suitability of the ARX model, combined with EVS, to nonlinear damage detection is demonstrated using vibration data obtained from a laboratory experiment of a three-story building model. It is found that the current method, while able to discern when damage is present in the structure, is unable to localize the damage to a particular joint. An impedance-based method using piezoelectric (PZT) material as both an actuator and a sensor is then proposed as a possible solution to the problem of damage localization.

  12. Reconstruction of neuronal input through modeling single-neuron dynamics and computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Qing; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao; Deng, Bin; Chan, Wai-lok

    2016-06-01

    Mathematical models provide a mathematical description of neuron activity, which can better understand and quantify neural computations and corresponding biophysical mechanisms evoked by stimulus. In this paper, based on the output spike train evoked by the acupuncture mechanical stimulus, we present two different levels of models to describe the input-output system to achieve the reconstruction of neuronal input. The reconstruction process is divided into two steps: First, considering the neuronal spiking event as a Gamma stochastic process. The scale parameter and the shape parameter of Gamma process are, respectively, defined as two spiking characteristics, which are estimated by a state-space method. Then, leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) model is used to mimic the response system and the estimated spiking characteristics are transformed into two temporal input parameters of LIF model, through two conversion formulas. We test this reconstruction method by three different groups of simulation data. All three groups of estimates reconstruct input parameters with fairly high accuracy. We then use this reconstruction method to estimate the non-measurable acupuncture input parameters. Results show that under three different frequencies of acupuncture stimulus conditions, estimated input parameters have an obvious difference. The higher the frequency of the acupuncture stimulus is, the higher the accuracy of reconstruction is.

  13. A proposal for a UPC memory consistency model, v1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Yelick, Katherine; Bonachea, Dan; Wallace, Charles

    2004-05-05

    The memory consistency model in a language defines the order in which the results of write operations maybe observed through read operations. The behavior of a UPC program may depend on the timing of accesses to shared variables, so a program defines a set of possible executions, rather than a single execution. The memory consistency model constrains the set of possible executions for a given program; the user may then rely on properties that are true of all of those executions. The memory consistency model is defined in terms of the read and write operations issued by each thread in naive translation of the code, i.e., without any code transformations by the compiler, with each thread issuing operations as defined by the abstract machine defined in ISO C 5.1.2.3. A UPC compiler or run time system may perform various code transformations to improve performance, so long as they are not visible to the programmer - i.e., provided the set of externally-visible behaviors (the input/output dynamics and volatile behavior defined in ISO C 5.1.2.3) from any execution of the transformed program are identical to those of the original program executing on the abstract machine and adhering to the consistency model defined in this document.

  14. Distributed and Lumped Parameter Models for the Characterization of High Throughput Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Conoscenti, Gioacchino; Cutrì, Elena; Tuan, Rocky S.; Raimondi, Manuela T.; Gottardi, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Next generation bioreactors are being developed to generate multiple human cell-based tissue analogs within the same fluidic system, to better recapitulate the complexity and interconnection of human physiology [1, 2]. The effective development of these devices requires a solid understanding of their interconnected fluidics, to predict the transport of nutrients and waste through the constructs and improve the design accordingly. In this work, we focus on a specific model of bioreactor, with multiple input/outputs, aimed at generating osteochondral constructs, i.e., a biphasic construct in which one side is cartilaginous in nature, while the other is osseous. We next develop a general computational approach to model the microfluidics of a multi-chamber, interconnected system that may be applied to human-on-chip devices. This objective requires overcoming several challenges at the level of computational modeling. The main one consists of addressing the multi-physics nature of the problem that combines free flow in channels with hindered flow in porous media. Fluid dynamics is also coupled with advection-diffusion-reaction equations that model the transport of biomolecules throughout the system and their interaction with living tissues and C constructs. Ultimately, we aim at providing a predictive approach useful for the general organ-on-chip community. To this end, we have developed a lumped parameter approach that allows us to analyze the behavior of multi-unit bioreactor systems with modest computational effort, provided that the behavior of a single unit can be fully characterized. PMID:27669413

  15. Reduced-Order Modeling for Flutter/LCO Using Recurrent Artificial Neural Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Weigang; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2012-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the efficacy of a recurrent artificial neural network to provide a high fidelity time-dependent nonlinear reduced-order model (ROM) for flutter/limit-cycle oscillation (LCO) modeling. An artificial neural network is a relatively straightforward nonlinear method for modeling an input-output relationship from a set of known data, for which we use the radial basis function (RBF) with its parameters determined through a training process. The resulting RBF neural network, however, is only static and is not yet adequate for an application to problems of dynamic nature. The recurrent neural network method [1] is applied to construct a reduced order model resulting from a series of high-fidelity time-dependent data of aero-elastic simulations. Once the RBF neural network ROM is constructed properly, an accurate approximate solution can be obtained at a fraction of the cost of a full-order computation. The method derived during the study has been validated for predicting nonlinear aerodynamic forces in transonic flow and is capable of accurate flutter/LCO simulations. The obtained results indicate that the present recurrent RBF neural network is accurate and efficient for nonlinear aero-elastic system analysis

  16. Brain mechanisms for predictive control by switching internal models: implications for higher-order cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Imamizu, Hiroshi; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2009-07-01

    Humans can guide their actions toward the realization of their intentions. Flexible, rapid and precise realization of intentions and goals relies on the brain learning to control its actions on external objects and to predict the consequences of this control. Neural mechanisms that mimic the input-output properties of our own body and other objects can be used to support prediction and control, and such mechanisms are called internal models. We first summarize functional neuroimaging, behavioral and computational studies of the brain mechanisms related to acquisition, modular organization, and the predictive switching of internal models mainly for tool use. These mechanisms support predictive control and flexible switching of intentional actions. We then review recent studies demonstrating that internal models are crucial for the execution of not only immediate actions but also higher-order cognitive functions, including optimization of behaviors toward long-term goals, social interactions based on prediction of others' actions and mental states, and language processing. These studies suggest that a concept of internal models can consistently explain the neural mechanisms and computational principles needed for fundamental sensorimotor functions as well as higher-order cognitive functions.

  17. A synaptic input portal for a mapped clock oscillator model of neuronal electrical rhythmic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zariffa, José; Ebden, Mark; Bardakjian, Berj L.

    2004-09-01

    Neuronal electrical oscillations play a central role in a variety of situations, such as epilepsy and learning. The mapped clock oscillator (MCO) model is a general model of transmembrane voltage oscillations in excitable cells. In order to be able to investigate the behaviour of neuronal oscillator populations, we present a neuronal version of the model. The neuronal MCO includes an extra input portal, the synaptic portal, which can reflect the biological relationships in a chemical synapse between the frequency of the presynaptic action potentials and the postsynaptic resting level, which in turn affects the frequency of the postsynaptic potentials. We propose that the synaptic input-output relationship must include a power function in order to be able to reproduce physiological behaviour such as resting level saturation. One linear and two power functions (Butterworth and sigmoidal) are investigated, using the case of an inhibitory synapse. The linear relation was not able to produce physiologically plausible behaviour, whereas both the power function examples were appropriate. The resulting neuronal MCO model can be tailored to a variety of neuronal cell types, and can be used to investigate complex population behaviour, such as the influence of network topology and stochastic resonance.

  18. Propagation of action potentials along complex axonal trees. Model and implementation.

    PubMed Central

    Manor, Y; Gonczarowski, J; Segev, I

    1991-01-01

    Axonal trees are typically morphologically and physiologically complicated structures. Because of this complexity, axonal trees show a large repertoire of behavior: from transmission lines with delay, to frequency filtering devices in both temporal and spatial domains. Detailed theoretical exploration of the electrical behavior of realistically complex axonal trees is notably lacking, mainly because of the absence of a simple modeling tool. AXONTREE is an attempt to provide such a simulator. It is written in C for the SUN workstation and implements both a detailed compartmental modeling of Hodgkin and Huxley-like kinetics, and a more abstract, event-driven, modeling approach. The computing module of AXONTREE is introduced together with its input/output features. These features allow graphical construction of arbitrary trees directly on the computer screen, and superimposition of the results on the simulated structure. Several numerical improvements that increase the computational efficiency by a factor of 5-10 are presented; most notable is a novel method of dynamic lumping of the modeled tree into simpler representations ("equivalent cables"). AXONTREE's performance is examined using a reconstructed terminal of an axon from a Y cell in cat visual cortex. It is demonstrated that realistically complicated axonal trees can be handled efficiently. The application of AXONTREE for the study of propagation delays along axonal trees is presented in the companion paper (Manor et al., 1991). Images FIGURE 4 PMID:1777566

  19. Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) Level 2 Version 5: Structures and Facilities for Model Definitions.

    PubMed

    Hucka, Michael; Bergmann, Frank T; Dräger, Andreas; Hoops, Stefan; Keating, Sarah M; Le Novère, Nicolas; Myers, Chris J; Olivier, Brett G; Sahle, Sven; Schaff, James C; Smith, Lucian P; Waltemath, Dagmar; Wilkinson, Darren J

    2015-09-04

    Computational models can help researchers to interpret data, understand biological function, and make quantitative predictions. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) is a file format for representing computational models in a declarative form that can be exchanged between different software systems. SBML is oriented towards describing biological processes of the sort common in research on a number of topics, including metabolic pathways, cell signaling pathways, and many others. By supporting SBML as an input/output format, different tools can all operate on an identical representation of a model, removing opportunities for translation errors and assuring a common starting point for analyses and simulations. This document provides the specification for Version 5 of SBML Level 2. The specification defines the data structures prescribed by SBML as well as their encoding in XML, the eXtensible Markup Language. This specification also defines validation rules that determine the validity of an SBML document, and provides many examples of models in SBML form. Other materials and software are available from the SBML project web site, http://sbml.org.

  20. Modeling the impact of potential wetlands on phosphorus retention in a Swedish catchment.

    PubMed

    Tonderski, Karin S; Arheimer, Berit; Pers, Charlotta B

    2005-11-01

    In southern Sweden, wetlands are constructed to remove nitrogen (N) in agricultural catchments. The possible effects of such wetlands on riverine phosphorus (P) were also estimated using input-output data from three well-monitored wetlands. This was done to formulate a simple model for removal of P that is dependent on inflow characteristics. Next, the N- and P-reducing effects of wetlands were modeled on a catchment scale (1900 km2) using the HBV-NP model and various assumptions about the wetland area and location. All three wetlands functioned as sinks for total P (tot-P) and for total suspended solids (TSS) with a removal of 10% to 31% and 28% to 50%, respectively. Mean P-removal rates of 17-49 kg ha(-1) yr(-1) were well simulated with the model. Catchment scale simulations indicated that wetlands were more efficient (in percentage of load) as traps for P than for N and that this may motivate the construction of wetlands for P removal far upstream from the catchment outlet.