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Sample records for inorganic arsenic based

  1. Arsenic, inorganic

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Arsenic , inorganic ; CASRN 7440 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  2. PATHWAY OF INORGANIC ARSENIC METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A remarkable aspect of the metabolism of inorganic arsenic in humans is its conversion to methylated metabolites. These metabolites account for most of the arsenic found in urine after exposure to inorganic arsenic. At least some of the adverse health effects attributed to inor...

  3. Roxarsone, Inorganic Arsenic, and Other Arsenic Species in Chicken: A U.S.-Based Market Basket Sample

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Patrick A.; Raber, Georg; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Navas-Acien, Ana; Love, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Inorganic arsenic (iAs) causes cancer and possibly other adverse health outcomes. Arsenic-based drugs are permitted in poultry production; however, the contribution of chicken consumption to iAs intake is unknown. Objectives: We sought to characterize the arsenic species profile in chicken meat and estimate bladder and lung cancer risk associated with consuming chicken produced with arsenic-based drugs. Methods: Conventional, antibiotic-free, and organic chicken samples were collected from grocery stores in 10 U.S. metropolitan areas from December 2010 through June 2011. We tested 116 raw and 142 cooked chicken samples for total arsenic, and we determined arsenic species in 65 raw and 78 cooked samples that contained total arsenic at ≥ 10 µg/kg dry weight. Results: The geometric mean (GM) of total arsenic in cooked chicken meat samples was 3.0 µg/kg (95% CI: 2.5, 3.6). Among the 78 cooked samples that were speciated, iAs concentrations were higher in conventional samples (GM = 1.8 µg/kg; 95% CI: 1.4, 2.3) than in antibiotic-free (GM = 0.7 µg/kg; 95% CI: 0.5, 1.0) or organic (GM = 0.6 µg/kg; 95% CI: 0.5, 0.8) samples. Roxarsone was detected in 20 of 40 conventional samples, 1 of 13 antibiotic-free samples, and none of the 25 organic samples. iAs concentrations in roxarsone-positive samples (GM = 2.3 µg/kg; 95% CI: 1.7, 3.1) were significantly higher than those in roxarsone-negative samples (GM = 0.8 µg/kg; 95% CI: 0.7, 1.0). Cooking increased iAs and decreased roxarsone concentrations. We estimated that consumers of conventional chicken would ingest an additional 0.11 µg/day iAs (in an 82-g serving) compared with consumers of organic chicken. Assuming lifetime exposure and a proposed cancer slope factor of 25.7 per milligram per kilogram of body weight per day, this increase in arsenic exposure could result in 3.7 additional lifetime bladder and lung cancer cases per 100,000 exposed persons. Conclusions: Conventional chicken meat had higher i

  4. RESEARCH TOWARD THE DEVELOPMENT OF A BIOLOGICALLY BASED DOSE RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR INORGANIC ARSENIC CARCINOGENICITY: A PROGRESS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer risk assessments for inorganic arsenic have been based on human epidemiological data, assuming a linear dose-response below the range of observation of tumors. Part of the reason for the continued use of the linear approach in arsenic risk assessments is the lack of an ad...

  5. The intake of inorganic arsenic from long grain rice and rice-based baby food in Finland - low safety margin warrants follow up.

    PubMed

    Rintala, Eeva-Maria; Ekholm, Päivi; Koivisto, Pertti; Peltonen, Kimmo; Venäläinen, Eija-Riitta

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated total and inorganic arsenic levels in long grain rice and rice based baby foods on Finnish market. Inorganic arsenic was analysed with an HPLC-ICP-MS system. The total arsenic concentration was determined with an ICP-MS method. In this study, the inorganic arsenic levels in long grain rice varied from 0.09 to 0.28mg/kg (n=8) and the total arsenic levels from 0.11 to 0.65mg/kg. There was a good correlation between the total and inorganic arsenic levels in long grain rice at a confidence level of 95%. The total arsenic levels of rice-based baby foods were in the range 0.02 - 0.29mg/kg (n=10), however, the level of inorganic arsenic could only be quantitated in four samples, on average they were 0.11mg/kg. Our estimation of inorganic arsenic intake from long grain rice and rice-based baby food in Finland indicate that in every age group the intake is close to the lowest BMDL0.1 value 0.3μg/kg bw/day set by EFSA. According to our data, the intake of inorganic arsenic should be more extensively evaluated.

  6. Inorganic arsenic in rice-based products for infants and young children.

    PubMed

    Signes-Pastor, Antonio J; Carey, Manus; Meharg, Andrew A

    2016-01-15

    Inorganic arsenic (Asi) is a chronic, non-threshold carcinogen. Rice and rice-based products can be the major source of Asi for many subpopulations. Baby rice, rice cereals and rice crackers are widely used to feed infants and young children. The Asi concentration in rice-based products may pose a health risk for infants and young children. Asi concentration was determined in rice-based products produced in the European Union and risk assessment associated with the consumption of these products by infants and young children, and compared to an identical US FDA survey. There are currently no European Union or United States of America regulations applicable to Asi in food. However, this study suggests that the samples evaluated may introduce significant concentration of Asi into infants' and young children's diets. Thus, there is an urgent need for regulatory limits on Asi in food, especially for baby rice-based products.

  7. Inorganic and total arsenic contents in rice-based foods for children with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Munera-Picazo, Sandra; Ramírez-Gandolfo, Amanda; Burló, Francisco; Carbonell-Barrachina, Angel Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease that affects the villi of the small intestine causing abdominal pain, gas, diarrhea, or bad absorption due to gluten intolerance. The only treatment for this disease consists of a lifelong gluten free diet; this is, celiac people cannot consume products containing gluten, such as wheat, barley, and rye, but they can use rice and corn. Thus, rice flour is mainly used for the manufacturing of the basic products of this population. Unfortunately, rice can contain high contents of total (t-As) and inorganic (i-As) arsenic. The current study demonstrated that products for celiac children with a high percentage of rice contained high concentrations of arsenic (256 and 128 μg kg⁻¹). The daily intake of i-As ranged from 0.61 to 0.78 μg kg⁻¹ body weight (bw) in children up to 5 y of age; these values were below the maximum value established by the EFSA Panel (8.0 μg kg⁻¹ bw per day), but it should be considered typical of populations with a high exposure to this pollutant. Finally, legislation is needed to improve the labeling of these special rice-based foods for celiac children; label should include information about percentage, geographical origin, and cultivar of the used rice.

  8. Nitarsone, Inorganic Arsenic, and Other Arsenic Species in Turkey Meat: Exposure and Risk Assessment Based on a 2014 U.S. Market Basket Sample

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, Keeve E.; Love, David C.; Baron, Patrick A.; Nigra, Anne E.; Murko, Manuela; Raber, Georg; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Use of nitarsone, an arsenic-based poultry drug, may result in dietary exposures to inorganic arsenic (iAs) and other arsenic species. Nitarsone was withdrawn from the U.S. market in 2015, but its use in other countries may continue. Objectives: We characterized the impact of nitarsone use on arsenic species in turkey meat and arsenic exposures among turkey consumers, and we estimated cancer risk increases from consuming turkey treated with nitarsone before its 2015 U.S. withdrawal. Methods: Turkey from three cities was analyzed for total arsenic, iAs, methylarsonate (MA), dimethylarsinate, and nitarsone, which were compared across label type and month of purchase. Turkey consumption was estimated from NHANES data to estimate daily arsenic exposures for adults and children 4–30 months of age and cancer risks among adult consumers. Results: Turkey meat from conventional producers not prohibiting nitarsone use showed increased mean levels of iAs (0.64 μg/kg) and MA (5.27 μg/kg) compared with antibiotic-free and organic meat (0.39 μg/kg and 1.54 μg/kg, respectively) and meat from conventional producers prohibiting nitarsone use (0.33 μg/kg and 0.28 μg/kg, respectively). Samples with measurable nitarsone had the highest mean iAs and MA (0.92 μg/kg and 10.96 μg/kg, respectively). Nitarsone was higher in October samples than in March samples, possibly resulting from increased summer use. Based on mean iAs concentrations in samples from conventional producers with no known policy versus policies prohibiting nitarsone, estimated lifetime daily consumption by an 80-kg adult, and a recently proposed cancer slope factor, we estimated that use of nitarsone by all turkey producers would result in 3.1 additional cases of bladder or lung cancer per 1,000,000 consumers. Conclusions: Nitarsone use can expose turkey consumers to iAs and MA. The results of our study support the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s removal of nitarsone from the U.S. market and

  9. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are...

  10. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  11. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are...

  13. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are...

  16. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are...

  17. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  18. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  19. Inorganic Arsenic and Human Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Benbrahim-Tallaa, Lamia; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective We critically evaluated the etiologic role of inorganic arsenic in human prostate cancer. Data sources We assessed data from relevant epidemiologic studies concerning environmental inorganic arsenic exposure. Whole animal studies were evaluated as were in vitro model systems of inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis in the prostate. Data synthesis Multiple studies in humans reveal an association between environmental inorganic arsenic exposure and prostate cancer mortality or incidence. Many of these human studies provide clear evidence of a dose–response relationship. Relevant whole animal models showing a relationship between inorganic arsenic and prostate cancer are not available. However, cellular model systems indicate arsenic can induce malignant transformation of human prostate epithelial cells in vitro. Arsenic also appears to impact prostate cancer cell progression by precipitating events leading to androgen independence in vitro. Conclusion Available evidence in human populations and human cells in vitro indicates that the prostate is a target for inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis. A role for this common environmental contaminant in human prostate cancer initiation and/or progression would be very important. PMID:18288312

  20. In vitro Assays of Inorganic Arsenic Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Drobna, Zuzana; Styblo, Miroslav; Thomas, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is extensively metabolized to produce mono-, di-, and trimethylated products. The formation of these metabolites produces a variety of intermediates that differ from inorganic arsenic in terms of patterns of distribution and retention and in toxic effects. In order to elucidate the pathway for arsenic methylation, it was necessary to develop a reliable in vitro assay system in which the formation of methylated metabolites could be monitored. Here, in vitro assay system that uses the postmicrosomal supernate from rat liver is used as the source of the enzymatic activity that catalyzes methylation reactions. This system can be used to study the requirements for methylation reactions (e.g., identifying the donor of methyl groups) and for screening of compounds as potential activators or inhibitors of arsenic methylation. PMID:20440380

  1. IRIS Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic (Cancer) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On February 19, 2010, the draft IRIS Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic (Cancer) external review draft document and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for public review and comment. The draft document and the charge to external peer reviewers were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and White House Offices before public release. In the new IRIS process, introduced by the EPA Administrator, all written comments on IRIS assessments submitted by other federal agencies and White House Offices will be made publicly available. Accordingly, interagency comments and the interagency science consultation draft of the Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic and the charge to external peer reviewers are posted on this site. This draft IRIS health assessment addresses only cancer human health effects that may result from chronic exposure to this chemical. An assessment of noncancer health effects of inorganic arsenic will be released for external peer review and public comment at a later date.

  2. 29 CFR 1910.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... would occur if the employee were not using a respirator. (iii) The employer shall collect full shift... exposures to inorganic arsenic, without regard to the use of respirators, are in excess of the permissible... respirators. All persons entering a regulated area shall be supplied with a respirator, selected in...

  3. 29 CFR 1910.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... would occur if the employee were not using a respirator. (iii) The employer shall collect full shift... exposures to inorganic arsenic, without regard to the use of respirators, are in excess of the permissible... respirators. All persons entering a regulated area shall be supplied with a respirator, selected in...

  4. Total and inorganic arsenic in Iranian rice.

    PubMed

    Cano-Lamadrid, Marina; Munera-Picazo, Sandra; Burló, Francisco; Hojjati, Mohammad; Carbonell-Barrachina, Ángel A

    2015-05-01

    It is well known that arsenic (As) exposure, particularly to inorganic species (i-As), has adverse effects on humans. Nowadays, the European Union (EU) has still not regulated the maximum residue limit of As in commercial samples of rice and rice-based products, although it is actively working on the topic. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) is collecting data on total arsenic (t-As) and i-As from different rice-producing regions not only from EU countries but also from other parts of the world to finally set up this maximum threshold. As Iran is a rice-producing country, the aim of this work was to evaluate the contents of t-As and i-As in 15 samples of Iranian white, nonorganic, and aromatic rice collected from the most important rice-producing regions of the country. The means of t-As and i-As were 120 and 82 μg/kg, respectively. The experimental i-As mean in Iranian rice was below the Chinese standard for the i-As in rice, 150 μg/kg, and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) limit, 200 μg/kg. Therefore, Iranian rice seems to have reasonable low i-As content and it is safe to be marketed in any market, including China and the EU.

  5. Inorganic arsenic: A non-genotoxic carcinogen.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Samuel M; Chowdhury, Aparajita; Arnold, Lora L

    2016-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic induces a variety of toxicities including cancer. The mode of action for cancer and non-cancer effects involves the metabolic generation of trivalent arsenicals and their reaction with sulfhydryl groups within critical proteins in various cell types which leads to the biological response. In epithelial cells, the response is cell death with consequent regenerative proliferation. If this continues for a long period of time, it can result in an increased risk of cancer. Arsenicals do not react with DNA. There is evidence for indirect genotoxicity in various in vitro and in vivo systems, but these involve exposures at cytotoxic concentrations and are not the basis for cancer development. The resulting markers of genotoxicity could readily be due to the cytotoxicity rather than an effect on the DNA itself. Evidence for genotoxicity in humans has involved detection of chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges in lymphocytes and micronucleus formation in lymphocytes, buccal mucosal cells, and exfoliated urothelial cells in the urine. Numerous difficulties have been identified in the interpretation of such results, including inadequate assessment of exposure to arsenic, measurement of micronuclei, and potential confounding factors such as tobacco exposure, folate deficiency, and others. Overall, the data strongly supports a non-linear dose response for the effects of inorganic arsenic. In various in vitro and in vivo models and in human epidemiology studies there appears to be a threshold for biological responses, including cancer.

  6. DOES DISSOLVED INORGANIC CARBON PLAY A ROLE IN ARSENIC MOBILIZATION?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent experimental results provide evidence that dissolved inorganic carbon plays a direct role in mobilizing arsenic in anoxic aquatic environments. This hypothesis is partially supported by observed correlations between elevated levels of arsenic and alkalinity in a ground wa...

  7. Methylation of Inorganic Arsenic by Murine Fetal Tissue Explants

    PubMed Central

    Broka, Derrick; Ditzel, Eric; Quach, Stephanie; Camenisch, Todd D.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is generally believed that the developing fetus is principally exposed to inorganic arsenic and the methylated metabolites from the maternal metabolism of arsenic, little is known about whether the developing embryo can autonomously metabolize arsenic. This study investigates inorganic arsenic methylation by murine embryonic organ cultures of the heart, lung, and liver. mRNA for AS3mt, the gene responsible for methylation of arsenic, was detected in all of embryonic tissue types studied. In addition, methylated arsenic metabolites were generated by all three tissue types. The fetal liver explants yielded the most methylated arsenic metabolites (~7% of total arsenic/ 48 hr incubation) while the heart, and lung preparations produced slightly greater than 2% methylated metabolites. With all tissues the methylation proceeded mostly to the dimethylated arsenic species. This has profound implications for understanding arsenic-induced fetal toxicity, particularly if the methylated metabolites are produced autonomously by embryonic tissues. PMID:26446802

  8. Inorganic species of arsenic in soil solution determined by microcartridges and ferrihydrite-based diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT).

    PubMed

    Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo; Six, Laetitia; Williams, Paul N; Smolders, Erik

    2013-01-30

    The bioavailability of soil arsenic (As) is determined by its speciation in soil solution, i.e., arsenite [As(III)] or arsenate [As(V)]. Soil bioavailability studies require suitable methods to cope with small volumes of soil solution that can be speciated directly after sampling, and thereby minimise any As speciation change during sample collection. In this study, we tested a self-made microcartridge to separate both As species and compared it to a commercially available cartridge. In addition, the diffusive gradient in thin films technique (DGT), in combination with the microcartridges, was applied to synthetic solutions and to a soil spiked with As. This combination was used to improve the assessment of available inorganic As species with ferrihydrite(FH)-DGT, in order to validate the technique for environmental analysis, mainly in soils. The self-made microcartridge was effective in separating As(III) from As(V) in solution with detection by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) in volumes of only 3 ml. The DGT study also showed that the FH-based binding gels are effective for As(III) and As(V) assessment, in solutions with As and P concentrations and ionic strength commonly found in soils. The FH-DGT was tested on flooded and unflooded As spiked soils and recoveries of As(III) and As(V) were 85-104% of the total dissolved As. This study shows that the DGT with FH-based binding gel is robust for assessing inorganic species of As in soils.

  9. Inorganic arsenic contents in rice-based infant foods from Spain, UK, China and USA.

    PubMed

    Carbonell-Barrachina, Angel A; Wu, Xiangchun; Ramírez-Gandolfo, Amanda; Norton, Gareth J; Burló, Francisco; Deacon, Claire; Meharg, Andrew A

    2012-04-01

    Spanish gluten-free rice, cereals with gluten, and pureed baby foods were analysed for total (t-As) and inorganic As (i-As) using ICP-MS and HPLC-ICP-MS, respectively. Besides, pure infant rice from China, USA, UK and Spain were also analysed. The i-As contents were significantly higher in gluten-free rice than in cereals mixtures with gluten, placing infants with celiac disease at high risk. All rice-based products displayed a high i-As content, with values being above 60% of the t-As content and the remainder being dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). Approximately 77% of the pure infant rice samples showed contents below 150 μg kg(-1) (Chinese limit). When daily intake of i-As by infants (4-12 months) was estimated and expressed on a bodyweight basis (μg d(-1) kg(-1)), it was higher in all infants aged 8-12 months than drinking water maximum exposures predicted for adults (assuming 1 L consumption per day for a 10 μg L(-1) standard).

  10. New diffusive gradients in a thin film technique for measuring inorganic arsenic and selenium(IV) using a titanium dioxide based adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Bennett, William W; Teasdale, Peter R; Panther, Jared G; Welsh, David T; Jolley, Dianne F

    2010-09-01

    A new diffusive gradients in a thin film (DGT) technique, using a titanium dioxide based adsorbent (Metsorb), has been developed and evaluated for the determination of dissolved inorganic arsenic and selenium. As(III), As(V), and Se(IV) were found to be quantitatively accumulated by the adsorbent (uptake efficiencies of 96.5-100%) and eluted in 1 M NaOH (elution efficiencies of 81.2%, 75.2%, and 88.7%). Se(VI) was not quantitatively accumulated by the adsorbent (<20%). Laboratory DGT validation experiments gave linear mass uptake over time (R(2) >or= 0.998) for As(III), As(V), and Se(IV). Consistent uptake occurred over pH (3.5-8.5) and ionic strength (0.0001-0.75 mol L(-1) NaNO(3)) ranges typical of natural waters, including seawater. Field deployments of DGT probes with various diffusive layer thicknesses confirmed the use of the technique in situ, allowing calculation of the diffusive boundary layers and an accurate measurement of inorganic arsenic. Reproducibility of the technique in field deployments was good (relative standard deviation <8%). Limits of detection (4 day deployments) were 0.01 microg L(-1) for inorganic arsenic and 0.05 microg L(-1) for Se(IV). The results of this study confirmed that DGT with Metsorb was a reliable and robust method for the measurement of inorganic arsenic and the selective measurement of Se(IV) within useful limits of accuracy.

  11. Considerations when using longitudinal cohort studies to assess dietary exposure to inorganic arsenic and chronic health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Scrafford, Carolyn G; Barraj, Leila M; Tsuji, Joyce S

    2016-07-01

    Dietary arsenic exposure and chronic health outcomes are of interest, due in part to increased awareness and data available on inorganic arsenic levels in some foods. Recent concerns regarding levels of inorganic arsenic, the primary form of arsenic of human health concern, in foods are based on extrapolation from adverse health effects observed at high levels of inorganic arsenic exposure; the potential for the occurrence of these health effects from lower levels of dietary inorganic arsenic exposure has not been established. In this review, longitudinal cohort studies are evaluated for their utility in estimating dietary inorganic arsenic exposure and quantifying statistically reliable associations with health outcomes. The primary limiting factor in longitudinal studies is incomplete data on inorganic arsenic levels in foods combined with the aggregation of consumption of foods with varying arsenic levels into a single category, resulting in exposure misclassification. Longitudinal cohort studies could provide some evidence to evaluate associations of dietary patterns related to inorganic arsenic exposure with risk of arsenic-related diseases. However, currently available data from longitudinal cohort studies limit causal analyses regarding the association between inorganic arsenic exposure and health outcomes. Any conclusions should therefore be viewed with knowledge of the analytical and methodological limitations.

  12. ARSENIC (+3 OXIDATION STATE) METHYLTRANSFERASE AND THE INORGANIC ARSENIC METHYLATION PHENOTYPE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inorganic arsenic is enzymatically methylated; hence, its ingestion results in exposure to the parent compound and various methylated arsenicals. Both experimental and epidemiological evidence suggest that some of the adverse health effects associated with chronic exposure to in...

  13. IRIS Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic (Cancer) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Science Advisory Board (SAB) conducted a review of the scientific basis supporting the human health cancer hazard and dose-response assessment of inorganic arsenic that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. EPA revised the assessment and is now returning the assessment to the SAB and releasing the document to the public for a focused review of EPA's responses to the SAB recommendations. This draft IRIS health assessment addresses only cancer human health effects that may result from chronic exposure to this chemical.

  14. Inorganic and Total Arsenic Contents in Rice and Rice-Based Foods Consumed by a Potential Risk Subpopulation: Sportspeople.

    PubMed

    Cano-Lamadrid, M; Munera-Picazo, S; Burgos-Hernández, A; Burló, F; Carbonell-Barrachina, Ángel A

    2016-04-01

    One of the main routes of exposure to inorganic arsenic (i-As) in humans is food, especially rice and rice-based products. There are certain groups of consumers that could be highly exposed to i-As. Maximum levels of i-As have been issued for infants and young children by the European Union, but perhaps other groups are also at risk. Sportspeople could be one of those groups, due to their specific nutritional requirements, especially its high consumption of cereals, such as rice. Because of the well-known relationship between rice and i-As, the intake of i-As by sportspeople deserved especial attention and was estimated in Spain. This study demonstrated that rice-based products reached a maximum i-As content of 178 μg/kg, with a mean for all studied products of 56 μg/kg; the maximum contents were found in rice cakes (149 μg/kg) and brown rice (111 μg/kg). The estimated daily intake of i-As were 0.16 and 0.18 μg/kg bw (body weight)/d, in sportsmen and sportswomen, respectively. These values were below the BMDL01 , 0.3 to 8.0 μg/kg bw/d; thus, it can be concluded that the sportspeople group is not at a significant risk regarding the intake of i-As. However, further studies are needed to evaluate their whole diet and not only rice-based products. Finally, it is important to claim that companies producing rice products include as much information as possible about the rice used in their products, including rice percentage and geographical origin.

  15. Accuracy of a method based on atomic absorption spectrometry to determine inorganic arsenic in food: Outcome of the collaborative trial IMEP-41.

    PubMed

    Fiamegkos, I; Cordeiro, F; Robouch, P; Vélez, D; Devesa, V; Raber, G; Sloth, J J; Rasmussen, R R; Llorente-Mirandes, T; Lopez-Sanchez, J F; Rubio, R; Cubadda, F; D'Amato, M; Feldmann, J; Raab, A; Emteborg, H; de la Calle, M B

    2016-12-15

    A collaborative trial was conducted to determine the performance characteristics of an analytical method for the quantification of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in food. The method is based on (i) solubilisation of the protein matrix with concentrated hydrochloric acid to denature proteins and allow the release of all arsenic species into solution, and (ii) subsequent extraction of the inorganic arsenic present in the acid medium using chloroform followed by back-extraction to acidic medium. The final detection and quantification is done by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-HG-AAS). The seven test items used in this exercise were reference materials covering a broad range of matrices: mussels, cabbage, seaweed (hijiki), fish protein, rice, wheat, mushrooms, with concentrations ranging from 0.074 to 7.55mgkg(-1). The relative standard deviation for repeatability (RSDr) ranged from 4.1 to 10.3%, while the relative standard deviation for reproducibility (RSDR) ranged from 6.1 to 22.8%.

  16. Use of arsenic-73 in research supports USEPA's regulatory decisions on inorganic arsenic in drinking water*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inorganic arsenic is a natural contaminant of drinking water in the United States and throughout the world. Long term exposure to inorganic arsenic in drinking water at elevated levels (>100 ug/L) is associated with development of cancer in several organs, cardiovascular disease,...

  17. Total and inorganic arsenic in fish samples from Norwegian waters.

    PubMed

    Julshamn, Kaare; Nilsen, Bente M; Frantzen, Sylvia; Valdersnes, Stig; Maage, Amund; Nedreaas, Kjell; Sloth, Jens J

    2012-01-01

    The contents of total arsenic and inorganic arsenic were determined in fillet samples of Northeast Artic cod, herring, mackerel, Greenland halibut, tusk, saithe and Atlantic halibut. In total, 923 individual fish samples were analysed. The fish were mostly caught in the open sea off the coast of Norway, from 40 positions. The determination of total arsenic was carried out by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry following microwave-assisted wet digestion. The determination of inorganic arsenic was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography-ICP-MS following microwave-assisted dissolution of the samples. The concentrations found for total arsenic varied greatly between fish species, and ranged from 0.3 to 110 mg kg(-1) wet weight. For inorganic arsenic, the concentrations found were very low (<0.006 mg kg(-1)) in all cases. The obtained results question the assumptions made by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) on the inorganic arsenic level in fish used in the recent EFSA opinion on arsenic in food.

  18. Determination of total arsenic, inorganic and organic arsenic species in wine.

    PubMed

    Herce-Pagliai, C; Moreno, I; González, G; Repetto, M; Cameán, A M

    2002-06-01

    Forty-five wine samples from the south of Spain of different alcoholic strength were analysed for total arsenic and its inorganic [As(III), As(V)] and organic (monomethylarsonic acid [MMAA], dimethylarsinic acid [DMAA]) species. The As levels of the wine samples ranged from 2.1 to 14.6 microg l(-1). The possible effect of the alcoholic fermentation process on the levels of the total arsenic and arsenical species was studied. The average total arsenic levels for the different samples were very similar, without significant differences between all types of wines. In table wines and sherry, the percentages of total inorganic arsenic were 18.6 and 15.6%, with DMAA or MMAA being the predominant species, respectively. In most samples, DMAA was the most abundant species, but the total inorganic aresenic fraction was considerable, representing 25.4% of the total concentration of the element. The estimated daily intakes of total arsenic and total inorganic arsenic for average Spanish consumers were 0.78 and 0.15 microg/person day(-1), respectively. The results suggest that the consumption of these types of wines makes no significant contribution to the total and inorganic arsenic intake for normal drinkers. However, wine consumption contributes a higher arsenic intake than through consumption of beers and sherry brandies.

  19. 40 CFR 61.184 - Ambient air monitoring for inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... arsenic. 61.184 Section 61.184 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.184 Ambient air monitoring for inorganic arsenic. (a) The owner or operator of each source to...

  20. 40 CFR 61.184 - Ambient air monitoring for inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... arsenic. 61.184 Section 61.184 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.184 Ambient air monitoring for inorganic arsenic. (a) The owner or operator of each source to...

  1. 40 CFR 61.184 - Ambient air monitoring for inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... arsenic. 61.184 Section 61.184 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.184 Ambient air monitoring for inorganic arsenic. (a) The owner or operator of each source to...

  2. 40 CFR 61.184 - Ambient air monitoring for inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... arsenic. 61.184 Section 61.184 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.184 Ambient air monitoring for inorganic arsenic. (a) The owner or operator of each source to...

  3. 40 CFR 61.184 - Ambient air monitoring for inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... arsenic. 61.184 Section 61.184 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.184 Ambient air monitoring for inorganic arsenic. (a) The owner or operator of each source to...

  4. Total arsenic in selected food samples from Argentina: Estimation of their contribution to inorganic arsenic dietary intake.

    PubMed

    Sigrist, Mirna; Hilbe, Nandi; Brusa, Lucila; Campagnoli, Darío; Beldoménico, Horacio

    2016-11-01

    An optimized flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectroscopy (FI-HGAAS) method was used to determine total arsenic in selected food samples (beef, chicken, fish, milk, cheese, egg, rice, rice-based products, wheat flour, corn flour, oats, breakfast cereals, legumes and potatoes) and to estimate their contributions to inorganic arsenic dietary intake. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) values obtained were 6μgkg(-)(1) and 18μgkg(-)(1), respectively. The mean recovery range obtained for all food at a fortification level of 200μgkg(-)(1) was 85-110%. Accuracy was evaluated using dogfish liver certified reference material (DOLT-3 NRC) for trace metals. The highest total arsenic concentrations (in μgkg(-)(1)) were found in fish (152-439), rice (87-316) and rice-based products (52-201). The contribution to inorganic arsenic (i-As) intake was calculated from the mean i-As content of each food (calculated by applying conversion factors to total arsenic data) and the mean consumption per day. The primary contributors to inorganic arsenic intake were wheat flour, including its proportion in wheat flour-based products (breads, pasta and cookies), followed by rice; both foods account for close to 53% and 17% of the intake, respectively. The i-As dietary intake, estimated as 10.7μgday(-)(1), was significantly lower than that from drinking water in vast regions of Argentina.

  5. METHYLATED ASIII COMPOUNDS AS POTENTIAL PROXIMATE/ULTIMATE GENOTOXIC METABOLITES OF INORGANIC ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    METHYLATED Asm COMPOUNDS AS POTENTIAL PROXIMATE/ULTIMATE GENOTOXIC METABOLITES OF INORGANIC ARSENIC.

    The methylation of inorganic arsenic has typically been viewed as a detoxification process. Genotoxicity tests have generally shown that arsenite has greater mutagenic p...

  6. Inorganic arsenic exposure and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Coronado-González, José Antonio; Del Razo, Luz María; García-Vargas, Gonzalo; Sanmiguel-Salazar, Francisca; Escobedo-de la Peña, Jorge

    2007-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic exposure in drinking water has been recently related to diabetes mellitus. To evaluate this relationship the authors conducted in 2003, a case-control study in an arseniasis-endemic region from Coahuila, a northern state of Mexico with a high incidence of diabetes. The present analysis includes 200 cases and 200 controls. Cases were obtained from a previous cross-sectional study conducted in that region. Diagnosis of diabetes was established following the American Diabetes Association criteria, with two fasting glucose values > or = 126 mg/100 ml (> or = 7.0 mmol/l) or a history of diabetes treated with insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents. The next subject studied, subsequent to the identification of a case in the cross-sectional study was taken as control. Inorganic arsenic exposure was measured through total arsenic concentrations in urine, measured by hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Subjects with intermediate total arsenic concentration in urine (63.5-104 microg/g creatinine) had two-fold higher risk of having diabetes (odds ratio=2.16; 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 3.79), but the risk was almost three times greater in subjects with higher concentrations of total arsenic in urine (odds ratio=2.84; 95% confidence interval: 1.64, 4.92). This data provides additional evidence that inorganic arsenic exposure may be diabetogenic.

  7. Inorganic arsenic exposure and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Coronado-Gonzalez, Jose Antonio; Razo, Luz Maria del; Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo; Sanmiguel-Salazar, Francisca; Escobedo-de la Pena, Jorge . E-mail: jorgeep@servidor.unam.mx

    2007-07-15

    Inorganic arsenic exposure in drinking water has been recently related to diabetes mellitus. To evaluate this relationship the authors conducted in 2003, a case-control study in an arseniasis-endemic region from Coahuila, a northern state of Mexico with a high incidence of diabetes. The present analysis includes 200 cases and 200 controls. Cases were obtained from a previous cross-sectional study conducted in that region. Diagnosis of diabetes was established following the American Diabetes Association criteria, with two fasting glucose values {>=}126 mg/100 ml ({>=}7.0 mmol/l) or a history of diabetes treated with insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents. The next subject studied, subsequent to the identification of a case in the cross-sectional study was taken as control. Inorganic arsenic exposure was measured through total arsenic concentrations in urine, measured by hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Subjects with intermediate total arsenic concentration in urine (63.5-104 {mu}g/g creatinine) had two-fold higher risk of having diabetes (odds ratio=2.16; 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 3.79), but the risk was almost three times greater in subjects with higher concentrations of total arsenic in urine (odds ratio=2.84; 95% confidence interval: 1.64, 4.92). This data provides additional evidence that inorganic arsenic exposure may be diabetogenic.

  8. Evaluation of urinary speciated arsenic in NHANES: Issues in interpretation in the context of potential inorganic arsenic exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urinary dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) are among the commonly used biomarkers for inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure, but may also arise from seafood consumption and organoarsenical pesticide applications. We examined speciated urinary arsenic data from...

  9. Biosensors for Inorganic and Organic Arsenicals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed and is strongly associated with human health problems, including cancer, cardiovascular and neurological diseases. To date, a number of biosensors for the detection of arsenic involving the coupling of biological engineering and electrochemical techniques has been developed. The properties of whole-cell bacterial or cell-free biosensors are summarized in the present review with emphasis on their sensitivity and selectivity. Their limitations and future challenges are highlighted. PMID:25587436

  10. IRIS Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic (Preliminary Assessment Materials)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In April 2014, EPA released the draft literature searches and associated search strategies, evidence tables, and exposure response arrays for inorganic arsenic (iAs) to obtain input from stakeholders and the public prior to developing the draft IRIS assessment. Specifically, EPA ...

  11. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ingested Inorganic Arsenic (2005 ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD), Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP), and Office of Water (OW) requested the SAB to provide advice to the Agency on several issues about the mode of carcinogenic action of various arsenic species and the implications of these issues for EPA's assessment of the cancer hazard and risks of organic and inorganic arsenic. The panel will review an OPP Science Issue Paper (with an attachment prepared by ORD) and a revised hazard and dose response assessment/characterization for inclusion in the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) prepared by OW. Inorganic arsenic is used for hardening copper and lead alloys. It also is used in glass manufacturing as a decolorizing and refining agent, as a component of electrical devices, in the semiconductor industry, and as a catalyst in the production of ethylene oxide.

  12. Inorganic arsenic in Chinese food and its cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Sun, Guo-Xin; Williams, Paul N; Nunes, Luis; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2011-10-01

    Even moderate arsenic exposure may lead to health problems, and thus quantifying inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure from food for different population groups in China is essential. By analyzing the data from the China National Nutrition and Health Survey (CNNHS) and collecting reported values of iAs in major food groups, we developed a framework of calculating average iAs daily intake for different regions of China. Based on this framework, cancer risks from iAs in food was deterministically and probabilistically quantified. The article presents estimates for health risk due to the ingestion of food products contaminated with arsenic. Both per individual and for total population estimates were obtained. For the total population, daily iAs intake is around 42 μg day(-1), and rice is the largest contributor of total iAs intake accounting for about 60%. Incremental lifetime cancer risk from food iAs intake is 106 per 100,000 for adult individuals and the median population cancer risk is 177 per 100,000 varying between regions. Population in the Southern region has a higher cancer risk than that in the Northern region and the total population. Sensitive analysis indicated that cancer slope factor, ingestion rates of rice, aquatic products and iAs concentration in rice were the most relevant variables in the model, as indicated by their higher contribution to variance of the incremental lifetime cancer risk. We conclude that rice may be the largest contributor of iAs through food route for the Chinese people. The population from the South has greater cancer risk than that from the North and the whole population.

  13. Relation of dietary inorganic arsenic exposure and urinary inorganic arsenic metabolites excretion in Japanese subjects.

    PubMed

    Oguri, Tomoko; Yoshinaga, Jun; Suzuki, Yayoi; Tao, Hiroaki; Nakazato, Tetsuya

    2017-03-08

    Inorganic arsenic (InAs) is a ubiquitous metalloid that has been shown to exert multiple adverse health outcomes. Urinary InAs and its metabolite concentration has been used as a biomarker of arsenic (As) exposure in some epidemiological studies, however, quantitative relationship between daily InAs exposure and urinary InAs metabolites concentration has not been well characterized. We collected a set of 24-h duplicated diet and spot urine sample of the next morning of diet sampling from 20 male and 19 female subjects in Japan from August 2011 to October 2012. Concentrations of As species in duplicated diet and urine samples were determined by using liquid chromatography-ICP mass spectrometry with a hydride generation system. Sum of the concentrations of urinary InAs and methylarsonic acid (MMA) was used as a measure of InAs exposure. Daily dietary InAs exposure was estimated to be 0.087 µg kg(-1) day(-1) (Geometric mean, GM), and GM of urinary InAs+MMA concentrations was 3.5 ng mL(-1). Analysis of covariance did not find gender-difference in regression coefficients as significant (P > 0.05). Regression equation Log 10 [urinary InAs+MMA concentration] = 0.570× Log 10 [dietary InAs exposure level per body weight] + 1.15 was obtained for whole data set. This equation would be valuable in converting urinary InAs concentration to daily InAs exposure, which will be important information in risk assessment.

  14. SPE speciation of inorganic arsenic in rice followed by hydride-generation atomic fluorescence spectrometric quantification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to high toxicity, inorganic arsenics (iAs) are the focus of monitoring effort worldwide. In this work, extraction was performed by microwave-assisted digestion in HCl-H2O2, during which AsIII was oxidized to AsV. AsV was separated from organoarsenic species using silica-based SAX cartridge and r...

  15. IRIS Toxicological Review for Inorganic Arsenic (Scoping and Problem Formulation Materials)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In November 2012, EPA released scoping and problem formulation materials for the IRIS assessment of inorganic arsenic for public comment and discussion. The scoping information was based on input from EPA's program and regional offices and was provided for informational purposes....

  16. Fractionation of inorganic arsenic by adjusting hydrogen ion concentration.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Andrea; Gonzalez, Mario Henrique; Queiroz, Helena Müller; Cadore, Solange

    2016-12-15

    The inorganic fraction of arsenic species, iAs=∑[As(III)+As(V)] present in fish samples can be quantified in the presence of other arsenic species also found in fishes, such as: monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and arsenobetaine (AsB). The toxic arsenic fraction was selected taking into account the dissociation constants of these arsenic species in different hydrogen ions concentration leading to the arsine formation from iAs compounds detected as As(III) by HG AAS. For thus, a microwave assisted extraction was carried out using HCl 1molL(-1) in order to maintain the integrity of the arsenic species in this mild extraction media. Recovery experiments were done for iAs fraction, in the presence of other arsenic species. The recovery values obtained for iAs fraction added were quantitative about 87-107% (for N=3, RSD⩽3%). The limit of detection (LOD), and the limit of quantification (LOQ), were 5μgkg(-1) and 16μgkg(-1) respectively.

  17. High levels of inorganic arsenic in rice in areas where arsenic-contaminated water is used for irrigation and cooking.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Azizur; Hasegawa, H

    2011-10-15

    Rice is the staple food for the people of arsenic endemic South (S) and South-East (SE) Asian countries. In this region, arsenic contaminated groundwater has been used not only for drinking and cooking purposes but also for rice cultivation during dry season. Irrigation of arsenic-contaminated groundwater for rice cultivation has resulted high deposition of arsenic in topsoil and uptake in rice grain posing a serious threat to the sustainable agriculture in this region. In addition, cooking rice with arsenic-contaminated water also increases arsenic burden in cooked rice. Inorganic arsenic is the main species of S and SE Asian rice (80 to 91% of the total arsenic), and the concentration of this toxic species is increased in cooked rice from inorganic arsenic-rich cooking water. The people of Bangladesh and West Bengal (India), the arsenic hot spots in the world, eat an average of 450g rice a day. Therefore, in addition to drinking water, dietary intake of arsenic from rice is supposed to be another potential source of exposure, and to be a new disaster for the population of S and SE Asian countries. Arsenic speciation in raw and cooked rice, its bioavailability and the possible health hazard of inorganic arsenic in rice for the population of S and SE Asia have been discussed in this review.

  18. Total and Inorganic Arsenic Contents in Some Edible Zingiberaceous Rhizomes in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Ubonnuch, Chomkamon; Ruangwises, Suthep; Gritsanapan, Wandee; Ruangwises, Nongluck

    2013-01-01

    The arsenic accumulation in rhizomes of Zingiberaceous plants was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry interfaced with hydride generation system (HG-AAS). The raw herbal materials, rhizomes, were collected from different regions of Thailand between December 2011 and January 2012. Six well-known Zingiberaceous plants, 16 samples from each and a total of 96 samples, were analyzed Alpinia galanga (Khaa), Boesenbergia rotunda (Kra-chaai), Curcuma longa (Khamin-chan), Curcuma zedoaria (Khamin-oi), Zingiber cassumunar (Plai) and Zingiber officinale (Ginger). Concentrations of total arsenic based on dry weight were 92.4 ± 9.2, 103.5 ± 20.8, 61.7 ± 12.5, 89.8 ± 17.5, 106.7 ± 19.5 and 69.3 ± 11.8 ng/g, respectively and inorganic arsenic were 48.8 ± 7.0, 66.3 ± 12.7, 25.5 ± 5.0, 38.7 ± 4.7, 71.2 ± 11.6, and 38.5 ± 5.5 ng/g, respectively. Among these, Plai and Kra-chaai exhibited the highest levels of total arsenic and inorganic arsenic accumulation that remind consumers to be aware of excess consuming of these rhizomes. On the contrary, the lowest value found in Khamin-chan indicating natural dietary supplements and herbal medicines comprising Kamin-chan are safe from arsenic poison. All investigated amounts of total and inorganic arsenic were much lower than limits recommended by Thai Food and Drug Administration. PMID:23690845

  19. Arsenic speciation in rice and risk assessment of inorganic arsenic in Taiwan population.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Lee, Ching-Chang; Huang, Winn-Jung; Huang, Han-Ting; Wu, Yi-Chen; Hsu, Ya-Chen; Kao, Yi-Ting

    2016-03-01

    This study assessed the total arsenic content and arsenic speciation in rice to determine the health risks associated with rice consumption in various age-gender subgroups in Taiwan. The average total arsenic levels in white rice and brown rice were 116.6 ± 39.2 and 215.5 ± 63.5 ng/g weight (n = 51 and 13), respectively. The cumulative cancer risk among males was 10.4/100,000. The highest fraction of inorganic/total arsenic content in white rice ranged from 76.9 to 88.2 % and from 81.0 to 96.5 % in brown rice. The current study found different arsenic speciation of rice in southern Taiwan, where the famous blackfoot disease has been reported compared with arsenic speciation from other Taiwan areas. Therefore, rice and other grains should be further monitored in southern Taiwan to evaluate whether arsenic contamination is well controlled in this area.

  20. Total and inorganic arsenic in dietary supplement supplies in northern Mexico.

    PubMed

    García-Rico, Leticia; Tejeda-Valenzuela, Lourdes

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of total and inorganic arsenic in dietary supplements composed of herbal plants and seaweed, and to determine the potential toxicological risk. Total arsenic was determined by dry ashing and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, and inorganic arsenic was determined by acid digestion, solvent extraction, and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Total and inorganic arsenic in the supplements ranged from 0.07 to 8.31 mg kg(-1) dry weight and from 0.14 to 0.28 mg kg(-1) dry weight, respectively. Daily intake of total arsenic ranged from 0.05 to 12.46 μg day(-1). Inorganic arsenic intake ranged from 0.21 to 0.83 μg day(-1), values that are below the Benchmark Dose Lower Confidence Limit recommended by the Word Health Organization. Therefore, there appears to be a low risk of adverse effects resulting from excess inorganic arsenic intake from these supplements. This is the first study conducted in Mexico that investigates total and inorganic arsenic in dietary supplements. Although the results do not suggest toxicological risk, it is nonetheless important considering the toxicity of inorganic arsenic and the increasing number consumer preferences for dietary supplements. Moreover, it is important to improve and ensure the safety of dietary supplements containing inorganic arsenic.

  1. Association between Lifetime Exposure to Inorganic Arsenic in Drinking Water and Coronary Heart Disease in Colorado Residents

    PubMed Central

    Byers, Tim; Hokanson, John E.; Meliker, Jaymie R.; Zerbe, Gary O.; Marshall, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic diseases, including coronary heart disease (CHD), have been associated with ingestion of drinking water with high levels of inorganic arsenic (> 1,000 μg/L). However, associations have been inconclusive in populations with lower levels (< 100 μg/L) of inorganic arsenic exposure. Objectives: We conducted a case-cohort study based on individual estimates of lifetime arsenic exposure to examine the relationship between chronic low-level arsenic exposure and risk of CHD. Methods: This study included 555 participants with 96 CHD events diagnosed between 1984 and 1998 for which individual lifetime arsenic exposure estimates were determined using data from structured interviews and secondary data sources to determine lifetime residence, which was linked to a geospatial model of arsenic concentrations in drinking water. These lifetime arsenic exposure estimates were correlated with historically collected urinary arsenic concentrations. A Cox proportional-hazards model with time-dependent CHD risk factors was used to assess the association between time-weighted average (TWA) lifetime exposure to low-level inorganic arsenic in drinking water and incident CHD. Results: We estimated a positive association between low-level inorganic arsenic exposure and CHD risk [hazard ratio (HR): = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.09, 1.78] per 15 μg/L while adjusting for age, sex, first-degree family history of CHD, and serum low-density lipoprotein levels. The risk of CHD increased monotonically with increasing TWAs for inorganic arsenic exposure in water relative to < 20 μg/L (HR = 1.2, 95% CI: 0.6, 2.2 for 20–30 μg/L; HR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.2, 4.0 for 30–45 μg/L; and HR = 3, 95% CI: 1.1, 9.1 for 45–88 μg/L). Conclusions: Lifetime exposure to low-level inorganic arsenic in drinking water was associated with increased risk for CHD in this population. Citation: James KA, Byers T, Hokanson JE, Meliker JR, Zerbe GO, Marshall JA. 2015. Association between lifetime exposure to

  2. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  3. Metabolism of inorganic arsenic in children with chronic high arsenic exposure in northern Argentina.

    PubMed Central

    Concha, G; Nermell, B; Vahter, M V

    1998-01-01

    This study concerns the metabolism of inorganic arsenic (As) in children in three villages in northern Argentina: San Antonio de los Cobres and Taco Pozo, each with about 200 microg As/l in the drinking water, and Rosario de Lerma, with 0.65 microg As/l. Findings show that the concentrations of As in the blood and urine of the children in the two As-rich villages were on average 9 and 380 microg/l, respectively, the highest ever recorded for children. The concentrations were about 10 and 30 times higher for blood and urine, respectively, than in Rosario de Lerma. Total As in urine was only slightly higher than the sum of metabolites of inorganic As (U-Asmet), i.e., inorganic As, methylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA); this shows that inorganic As was the main form of As ingested. In contrast to previous studies on urinary metabolites of inorganic As in various population groups, the children and women in the present study excreted very little MMA. Thus, there seems to be a polymorphism for the enzymes (methyltransferases) involved in the methylation of As. Interestingly, the children had a significantly higher percentage of inorganic As in urine than the women, about 50% versus 32%. Also, the percentage of inorganic As in the children is considerably higher than in previous studies on children (about 13% in the two studies available) and adults (about 15-25%) in other population groups. This may indicate that children are more sensitive to As-induced toxicity than adults, as the methylated metabolites bind less to tissue constituents than inorganic As. In the children, the percentage inorganic arsenic in urine decreased, and the percentage of DMA increased with increasing U-Asmet, indicating an induction of As methylation with increasing exposure. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9618352

  4. Inorganic arsenic and trace elements in Ghanaian grain staples.

    PubMed

    Adomako, Eureka E; Williams, Paul N; Deacon, Claire; Meharg, Andrew A

    2011-10-01

    A total of 549 samples of rice, maize, wheat, sorghum and millet were obtained from markets in Ghana, the EU, US and Asia. Analysis of the samples, originating from 21 countries in 5 continents, helped to establish global mean trace element concentrations in grains; thus placing the Ghanaian data within a global context. Ghanaian rice was generally low in potentially toxic elements, but high in essential nutrient elements. Arsenic concentrations in rice from US (0.22 mg/kg) and Thailand (0.15 mg/kg) were higher than in Ghanaian rice (0.11 mg/kg). Percentage inorganic arsenic content of the latter (83%) was, however, higher than for US (42%) and Thai rice (67%). Total arsenic concentration in Ghanaian maize, sorghum and millet samples (0.01 mg/kg) was an order of magnitude lower than in Ghanaian rice, indicating that a shift from rice-centric to multigrain diets could help reduce health risks posed by dietary exposure to inorganic As.

  5. A Study on Extraction Method of Inorganic Arsenic Species in Abandoned Mine Soils of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, M.; Yoon, H.; Suh, J.

    2006-12-01

    It is important to determine the concentration of many toxic elements in environmental samples. However, the total concentration provides no information concerning the fate of the elements. Environmental fate, behavior, bioavailability, and toxicity of metals often vary dramatically with the chemical forms (species) in which metals exist. For example, inorganic arsenite [As (III)] and arsenate [As (V)] are toxic while methylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and dimethylarseinic acid [DMA(V)] are less toxic. Thus, the assessments of environmental impact and human health risk solely based on the measurements of total element concentration become no longer reliable. It is important to identify and quantify individual chemical species of the element. A method to separate two inorganic arsenic species As(III) and As(V) by SPE HG-ICP-AES has been developed, based on extraction with a mixture of 1 mol phosphoric acid and 0.1 mol ascorbic acid. Hydride generation method by ICP-AES improved effectively the detection limit of the arsenic. Extraction instruments used in this study were the microwave system (Milestone 1200 Mega) and the ultrasound extraction method (Sonic Dismembrator 500, Fisher scientific). The separation of arsenic species was achieved on the anion exchange cartridge (Accell Plus QMA, Waters) with ammonium dihydrogen phosphate as mobile phase. SPE HG--ICP-AES coupled technique was applied to analyzed extracts of contaminated soil and SRM 2710. Analysis is performed as soon as possible (approximately within 1hour) after extraction. SPE HG--ICP-AES analysis showed the majority of solid phase arsenic to be arsenate (AsV), with AsIII accounting for <3% of extracted total inorganic arsenic. SRM 2710 (Montana soil) is not detected the AsIII. Both arsenite (AsIII) and arsenate (AsV) is increasing, according as size decreases (<64μm, 64-200μm, 2mm- 200μm). The extraction efficiency of contaminated soil samples, relative to the total arsenic concentration, varied from 15 to

  6. The predominance of inorganic arsenic species in plants from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, I.; Wang, L.; Ollson, C.A.; Cullen, W.R.; Reimer, K.J.

    2000-01-01

    Elevated levels of arsenic in Yellowknife, NWT, Canada, from historic and recent gold mine operations, are of increasing concern to Yellowknife residents. The study of arsenic in Yellowknife plants is a part of ongoing bioavailability and food chain research. A variety of plants from Yellowknife were analyzed for total arsenic and water soluble arsenic species. The plants included vascular plants and bryophytes (mosses). Total amounts of arsenic were greatest in mosses and varied greatly within specimens of the same plant species from different locations. Mostly inorganic arsenic species were extracted from plants using methanol/water (1:1). This result is very important from a toxicological point of view, since inorganic species are relatively toxic arsenic species. Small amounts of methylated arsenic species, as well as arsenosugars, were present in some plants. On average, greater than 50% of arsenic in these plants was not extracted; the chemical and toxicological characteristics of this fraction remain a topic for further study.

  7. Response surface methodology based on central composite design as a chemometric tool for optimization of dispersive-solidification liquid-liquid microextraction for speciation of inorganic arsenic in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Asadollahzadeh, Mehdi; Tavakoli, Hamed; Torab-Mostaedi, Meisam; Hosseini, Ghaffar; Hemmati, Alireza

    2014-06-01

    Dispersive-solidification liquid-liquid microextraction (DSLLME) coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed for preconcentration and determination of inorganic arsenic (III, V) in water samples. At pH=1, As(III) formed complex with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) and extracted into the fine droplets of 1-dodecanol (extraction solvent) which were dispersed with ethanol (disperser solvent) into the water sample solution. After extraction, the organic phase was separated by centrifugation, and was solidified by transferring into an ice bath. The solidified solvent was transferred to a conical vial and melted quickly at room temperature. As(III) was determined in the melted organic phase while As(V) remained in the aqueous layer. Total inorganic As was determined after the reduction of the pentavalent forms of arsenic with sodium thiosulphate and potassium iodide. As(V) was calculated by difference between the concentration of total inorganic As and As(III). The variable of interest in the DSLLME method, such as the volume of extraction solvent and disperser solvent, pH, concentration of APDC (chelating agent), extraction time and salt effect, was optimized with the aid of chemometric approaches. First, in screening experiments, fractional factorial design (FFD) was used for selecting the variables which significantly affected the extraction procedure. Afterwards, the significant variables were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) based on central composite design (CCD). In the optimum conditions, the proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of inorganic arsenic in different environmental water samples and certified reference material (NIST RSM 1643e).

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A HUMAN PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR INORGANIC ARSENIC AND ITS MONO- AND DI-METHYLATED METABOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to estimate levels of arsenic and its metabolites in human tissues and urine after oral exposure to either arsenate (AsV) or arsnite (AsIII). The model consists of interconnected individual ...

  9. Nitric acid-based partial-digestion method for selective determination of inorganic arsenic in hijiki and application to soaked hijiki.

    PubMed

    Hamano-Nagaoka, Megumi; Hanaoka, Ken'ichi; Usui, Masakatsu; Nishimura, Tsutomu; Maitani, Tamio

    2008-04-01

    Because there is a great difference between the toxicity of inorganic arsenic (As) and organic As in food, the JECFA has set a PTWI value for inorganic As (iAs) rather than for total As. The difference in As toxicity makes it necessary to extract iAs completely from food samples for toxicological analysis, but complete extraction of As from most foods including seaweed has not been achieved to date. We developed a partial-digestion method that uses nitric acid as a solvent in order to extract almost all arsenicals from the solid matrix of hijiki (Hizikia fusiforme, a brown alga) samples. In this method, organic As species were not converted into iAs. HPLC/ICP-MS was then used to determine the concentration of iAs. Total As was measured by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry. The adopted conditions for 0.1 g of ground fine powder sample were: 2 mL of 0.3 mol/L nitric acid; heating, 80 degrees C for 1 hr. Intra-laboratory validation of the method showed good precision and accuracy. The repeatability and intermediate precision for iAs were 1.5% and 1.5%, respectively. The LOD and LOQ for iAs were 0.14 and 0.46 mg/kg dry weight, respectively. Recovery studies performed by spiking 0.5 mg/kg dry weight as the LOQ level and by spiking 3 mg/kg dry weight as the iAs concentration of an un-spiked hijiki sample showed good accuracy. The method was applied to hijiki samples after a water soaking process and a water soaking and simmering process. The results suggested that the As concentration in hijiki after both processes was lower than that before the treatments and that the water soaking and simmering process reduced the iAs concentration much more effectively than the water soaking process.

  10. Multiple inorganic toxic substances contaminating the groundwater of Myingyan Township, Myanmar: arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, and uranium.

    PubMed

    Bacquart, Thomas; Frisbie, Seth; Mitchell, Erika; Grigg, Laurie; Cole, Christopher; Small, Colleen; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2015-06-01

    In South Asia, the technological and societal shift from drinking surface water to groundwater has resulted in a great reduction of acute diseases due to water borne pathogens. However, arsenic and other naturally occurring inorganic toxic substances present in groundwater in the region have been linked to a variety of chronic diseases, including cancers, heart disease, and neurological problems. Due to the highly specific symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning, arsenic was the first inorganic toxic substance to be noticed at unsafe levels in the groundwater of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh. Subsequently, other inorganic toxic substances, including manganese, uranium, and fluoride have been found at unsafe levels in groundwater in South Asia. While numerous drinking water wells throughout Myanmar have been tested for arsenic, relatively little is known about the concentrations of other inorganic toxic substances in Myanmar groundwater. In this study, we analyzed samples from 18 drinking water wells (12 in Myingyan City and 6 in nearby Tha Pyay Thar Village) and 2 locations in the Ayeyarwaddy River for arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, selenium, thallium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. Concentrations of arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, or uranium exceeded health-based reference values in most wells. In addition, any given well usually contained more than one toxic substance at unsafe concentrations. While water testing and well sharing could reduce health risks, none of the wells sampled provide water that is entirely safe with respect to inorganic toxic substances. It is imperative that users of these wells, and users of other wells that have not been tested for multiple inorganic toxic substances throughout the region, be informed of the need for drinking water testing and the health consequences of drinking water contaminated with inorganic toxic

  11. Remediation of Organic and Inorganic Arsenic Contaminated Groundwater using a Nonocrystalline TiO2 Based Adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Meng, X; Calvache, E; Jiang, G

    2009-01-01

    A nanocrystalline TiO2-based adsorbent was evaluated for the simultaneous removal of As(V), As(III), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in contaminated groundwater. Batch experimental results show that As adsorption followed pseudo-second order rate kinetics. The competitive adsorption was described with the charge distribution multi-site surface complexation model (CD-MUSIC). The groundwater containing an average of 329 ?g L-1 As(III), 246 ?g L-1 As(V), 151 ?g L-1 MMA, and 202 ?g L-1 DMA was continuously passed through a TiO2 filter at an empty bed contact time of 6 min for 4 months. Approximately 11 000, 14 000, and 9900 bed volumes of water had been treated before the As(III), As(V), and MMA concentration in the effluent increased to 10 ?g L-1. However, very little DMA was removed. The EXAFS results demonstrate the existence of a bidentate binuclear As(V) surface complex on spent adsorbent, indicating the oxidation of adsorbed As(III). A nanocrystalline TiO2-based adsorbent could be used for the simultaneous removal of As(V), As(III), MMA, and DMA in contaminated groundwater.

  12. Remediation of organic and inorganic arsenic contaminated groundwater using a nanocrystalline TiO2-based adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Jing, Chuanyong; Meng, Xiaoguang; Calvache, Edwin; Jiang, Guibin

    2009-01-01

    A nanocrystalline TiO2-based adsorbent was evaluated for the simultaneous removal of As(V), As(III), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in contaminated groundwater. Batch experimental results show that As adsorption followed pseudo-second order rate kinetics. The competitive adsorption was described with the charge distribution multi-site surface complexation model (CD-MUSIC). The groundwater containing an average of 329 microg L(-1) As(III), 246 microg L(-1) As(V), 151 microg L(-1) MMA, and 202 microg L(-1) DMA was continuously passed through a TiO2 filter at an empty bed contact time of 6 min for 4 months. Approximately 11,000, 14,000, and 9900 bed volumes of water had been treated before the As(III), As(V), and MMA concentration in the effluent increased to 10 microg L(-1). However, very little DMA was removed. The EXAFS results demonstrate the existence of a bidentate binuclear As(V) surface complex on spent adsorbent, indicating the oxidation of adsorbed As(III).

  13. Speciation of inorganic arsenic and selenium in leachates from landfills in relation to water quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Yusof, A M; Salleh, S; Wood, A K

    1999-01-01

    Speciation of arsenic and selenium was carried out on water samples taken from rivers used as water intake points in the vicinity of landfill areas used for land-based waste disposal system. Leachates from these landfill areas may contaminate the river water through underground seepage or overflowing, especially after a heavy downpour. Preconcentration of the chemical species was done using a mixture of ammonium pyrrolidinethiocarbamate-chloroform (APDTC-CHCl3). Because only the reduced forms of both arsenic and selenium species could be extracted by the preconcentrating mixture, suitable reducing agents such as 25% sodium thiosulfate for As(III) and 6M HCl for Se(IV) were used throughout the studies. Care was taken to exclude the interfering elements such as the alkali and alkali earth metals from the inorganic arsenic and selenium species by introducing 12% EDTA solution as the masking agent. The extracted mixture was irradiated in a thermal neutron flux of 4 x 10(12)/cm/s from a TRIGA Mk.II reactor at the Malaysia Institute of Nuclear Technology Research (MINT). Gamma rays of 559 keV and 297 keV from 76As and 75Se, respectively, were used in the quantitative determination of the inorganic species. Mixed standards of As(III) and Se(IV) used in the percentage efficiency procedure were prepared from salts of Analar grade. The water quality evaluation was viewed from the ratio of the inorganic species present.

  14. Geographical variation in total and inorganic arsenic content of polished (white) rice.

    PubMed

    Meharg, Andrew A; Williams, Paul N; Adomako, Eureka; Lawgali, Youssef Y; Deacon, Claire; Villada, Antia; Cambell, Robert C J; Sun, Guoxin; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Feldmann, Joerg; Raab, Andrea; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Islam, Rafiqul; Hossain, Shahid; Yanai, Junta

    2009-03-01

    An extensive data set of total arsenic analysis for 901 polished (white) grain samples, originating from 10 countries from 4 continents, was compiled. The samples represented the baseline (i.e., notspecifically collected from arsenic contaminated areas), and all were for market sale in major conurbations. Median total arsenic contents of rice varied 7-fold, with Egypt (0.04 mg/kg) and India (0.07 mg/kg) having the lowest arsenic content while the U.S. (0.25 mg/kg) and France (0.28 mg/kg) had the highest content. Global distribution of total arsenic in rice was modeled by weighting each country's arsenic distribution by that country's contribution to global production. A subset of 63 samples from Bangladesh, China, India, Italy, and the U.S. was analyzed for arsenic species. The relationship between inorganic arsenic contentversus total arsenic contentsignificantly differed among countries, with Bangladesh and India having the steepest slope in linear regression, and the U.S. having the shallowest slope. Using country-specific rice consumption data, daily intake of inorganic arsenic was estimated and the associated internal cancer risk was calculated using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cancer slope. Median excess internal cancer risks posed by inorganic arsenic ranged 30-fold for the 5 countries examined, being 0.7 per 10,000 for Italians to 22 per 10,000 for Bangladeshis, when a 60 kg person was considered.

  15. Detection of Inorganic Arsenic in Rice Using a Field Test Kit: A Screening Method.

    PubMed

    Bralatei, Edi; Lacan, Severine; Krupp, Eva M; Feldmann, Jörg

    2015-11-17

    Rice is a staple food eaten by more than 50% of the world's population and is a daily dietary constituent in most South East Asian countries where 70% of the rice export comes from and where there is a high level of arsenic contamination in groundwater used for irrigation. Research shows that rice can take up and store inorganic arsenic during cultivation, and rice is considered to be one of the major routes of exposure to inorganic arsenic, a class I carcinogen for humans. Here, we report the use of a screening method based on the Gutzeit methodology to detect inorganic arsenic (iAs) in rice within 1 h. After optimization, 30 rice commodities from the United Kingdom market were tested with the field method and were compared to the reference method (high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, HPLC-ICP-MS). In all but three rice samples, iAs compound can be determined. The results show no bias for iAs using the field method. Results obtained show quantification limits of about 50 μg kg(-1), a good reproducibility for a field method of ±12%, and only a few false positives and negatives (<10%) could only be recorded at the 2015 European Commission (EC) guideline for baby rice of 100 μg kg(-1), while none were recorded at the maximum level suggested by the World Health Organization (WHO) and implemented by the EC for polished and white rice of 200 μg kg(-1). The method is reliable, fast, and inexpensive; hence, it is suggested to be used as a screening method in the field for preselection of rice which violates legislative guidelines.

  16. Urinary arsenic profiles reveal exposures to inorganic arsenic from private drinking water supplies in Cornwall, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, D. R. S.; Watts, M. J.; Hamilton, E. M.; Ander, E. L.; Close, R. M.; Exley, K. S.; Crabbe, H.; Leonardi, G. S.; Fletcher, T.; Polya, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    Private water supplies (PWS) in Cornwall, South West England exceeded the current WHO guidance value and UK prescribed concentration or value (PCV) for arsenic of 10 μg/L in 5% of properties surveyed (n = 497). In this follow-up study, the first of its kind in the UK, volunteers (n = 207) from 127 households who used their PWS for drinking, provided urine and drinking water samples for total As determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and urinary As speciation by high performance liquid chromatography ICP-MS (HPLC-ICP-MS). Arsenic concentrations exceeding 10 μg/L were found in the PWS of 10% of the volunteers. Unadjusted total urinary As concentrations were poorly correlated (Spearman’s ρ = 0.36 (P < 0.001)) with PWS As largely due to the use of spot urine samples and the dominance of arsenobetaine (AB) from seafood sources. However, the osmolality adjusted sum, U-AsIMM, of urinary inorganic As species, arsenite (AsIII) and arsenate (AsV), and their metabolites, methylarsonate (MA) and dimethylarsinate (DMA), was found to strongly correlate (Spearman’s ρ: 0.62 (P < 0.001)) with PWS As, indicating private water supplies as the dominant source of inorganic As exposure in the study population of PWS users.

  17. Urinary arsenic profiles reveal exposures to inorganic arsenic from private drinking water supplies in Cornwall, UK

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, D. R. S.; Watts, M. J.; Hamilton, E. M.; Ander, E. L.; Close, R. M.; Exley, K. S.; Crabbe, H.; Leonardi, G. S.; Fletcher, T.; Polya, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    Private water supplies (PWS) in Cornwall, South West England exceeded the current WHO guidance value and UK prescribed concentration or value (PCV) for arsenic of 10 μg/L in 5% of properties surveyed (n = 497). In this follow-up study, the first of its kind in the UK, volunteers (n = 207) from 127 households who used their PWS for drinking, provided urine and drinking water samples for total As determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and urinary As speciation by high performance liquid chromatography ICP-MS (HPLC-ICP-MS). Arsenic concentrations exceeding 10 μg/L were found in the PWS of 10% of the volunteers. Unadjusted total urinary As concentrations were poorly correlated (Spearman’s ρ = 0.36 (P < 0.001)) with PWS As largely due to the use of spot urine samples and the dominance of arsenobetaine (AB) from seafood sources. However, the osmolality adjusted sum, U-AsIMM, of urinary inorganic As species, arsenite (AsIII) and arsenate (AsV), and their metabolites, methylarsonate (MA) and dimethylarsinate (DMA), was found to strongly correlate (Spearman’s ρ: 0.62 (P < 0.001)) with PWS As, indicating private water supplies as the dominant source of inorganic As exposure in the study population of PWS users. PMID:27156998

  18. A biological indicator of inorganic arsenic exposure using the sum of urinary inorganic arsenic and monomethylarsonic acid concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Akihisa; Kurosawa, Hidetoshi; Endo, Yoko; Yamanaka, Kenzo; Fujitani, Noboru; Endo, Ginji

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The sum of urinary inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) concentrations is used for the biological monitoring of occupational iAs exposure. Although DMA is a major metabolite of iAs, it is an inadequate index because high DMA levels are present in urine after seafood consumption. We estimated the urinary iAs+MMA concentration corresponding to iAs exposure. Methods: We used data from two arsenic speciation analyses of urine samples from 330 Bangladeshi with oral iAs exposure and 172 Japanese workers without occupational iAs exposure using high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results: iAs, MMA, and DMA, but not arsenobetaine (AsBe), were detected in the urine of the Bangladeshi subjects. The correlation between iAs+MMA+DMA and iAs+MMA was obtained as log (iAs+MMA) = 1.038 log (iAs+MMA+DMA) -0.658. Using the regression formula, the iAs+MMA value was calculated as 2.15 and 7.5 μg As/l, corresponding to 3 and 10 μg As/m3 of exposures, respectively. In the urine of the Japanese workers, arsenic was mostly excreted as AsBe. We used the 95th percentile of iAs+MMA (12.6 μg As/l) as the background value. The sum of the calculated and background values can be used as a biological indicator of iAs exposure. Conclusion: We propose 14.8 and 20.1 μg As/l of urinary iAs+MMA as the biological indicators of 3 and 10 μg As/m3 iAs exposure, respectively. PMID:27010090

  19. RE: Request for Correction - SAB Workgroup Review of Draft IRIS Assessment for Inorganic Arsenic

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Request from Lynn Bergeson for the correction of information in the draft EPA document Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic: In Support of the Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS).

  20. Notification of SAB Workgroup Public Meeting for the Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Organic Arsenical Products Task Force (OAPTF), a group of registrants of pesticide products that contain monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA), to request that the Science Advisory Board (SAB) reschedule the public meeting of a workgroup to conduct a review of the draft document entitled Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic

  1. RE: Notification of SAB Workgroup Public Meeting for the Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Request from the Organic Arsenical Products Task Force for the Science Advisory Board to reschedule the public meeting of a workgroup to conduct a review of the draft document Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic: In Support of the Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS).

  2. ORGANIC AND INORGANIC ARSENICALS SENSITIZE HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS TO HYDROGEN PEROXIDE-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lungs are a target organ for arsenic carcinogenesis, however, its mechanism of action remains unclear. Furthermore, it has been suggested that inorganic arsenic (iAs) can potentiate DNA damage induced by other agents. Once inside the human body iAs generally undergoes two ...

  3. METABOLISM AS A DETERMINING FACTOR IN ACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY OF INORGANIC ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The metabolism of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in humans involves reduction of As(V)-species to trivalency and oxidative methylation of As(III)-species. In this pathway, iAs is converted to methylarsenic (MAs) and dimethyl arsenic (DMAs) metabolites that contain As(III) or As(V). Rec...

  4. 76 FR 65217 - Inorganic Arsenic Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Inorganic Arsenic Standard; Extension of the Office of Management...) approval of the information collection requirements specified in the Inorganic Arsenic Standard (29 CFR... obtaining information (29 U.S.C. 657). The information collection requirements in the Inorganic...

  5. Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to inorganic arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Apostoli, P.; Bartoli, D.; Alessio, L.; Buchet, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to assess reliable biological indicators for monitoring the occupational exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs), taking into account the possible confounding role of arsenicals present in food and of the element present in drinking water. METHODS: 51 Glass workers exposed to As trioxide were monitored by measuring dust in the breathing zone, with personal air samplers. Urine samples at the end of work shift were analysed for biological monitoring. A control group of 39 subjects not exposed to As, and eight volunteers who drank water containing about 45 micrograms/l iAs for a week were also considered. Plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for the analysis of total As in air and urine samples, whereas the urinary As species (trivalent, As3; pentavalent, As5; monomethyl arsonic acid, MMA; dimethyl arsinic acid, DMA; arsenobetaine, AsB) were measured by liquid chromatography coupled with plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) RESULTS: Environmental concentrations of As in air varied widely (mean 84 micrograms/m3, SD 61, median 40) and also the sum of urinary iAs MMA and DMA, varied among the groups of exposed subjects (mean 106 micrograms/l, SD 84, median 65). AsB was the most excreted species (34% of total As) followed by DMA (28%), MMA (26%), and As3 + As5 (12%). In the volunteers who drank As in the water the excretion of MMA and DMA increased (from a median of 0.5 to 5 micrograms/day for MMA and from 4 to 13 micrograms/day for DMA). The best correlations between As in air and its urinary species were found for total iAs and As3 + As5. CONCLUSIONS: To avoid the effect of As from sources other than occupation on urinary species of the element, in particular on DMA, it is proposed that urinary As3 + As5 may an indicator for monitoring the exposure to iAs. For concentrations of 10 micrograms/m3 the current environmental limit for iAs, the limit for urinary As3 + As5 was calculated to be around 5 micrograms/l, even if the wide

  6. Inorganic arsenic in seafood: does the extraction method matter?

    PubMed

    Pétursdóttir, Ásta H; Gunnlaugsdóttir, Helga; Krupp, Eva M; Feldmann, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    Nine different extraction methods were evaluated for three seafood samples to test whether the concentration of inorganic arsenic (iAs) determined in seafood is dependent on the extraction method. Certified reference materials (CRM) DOLT-4 (Dogfish Liver) and TORT-2 (Lobster Hepatopancreas), and a commercial herring fish meal were evaluated. All experimental work described here was carried out by the same operator using the same instrumentation, thus eliminating possible differences in results caused by laboratory related factors. Low concentrations of iAs were found in CRM DOLT-4 (0.012±0.003mgkg(-1)) and the herring fish meal sample (0.007±0.002mgkg(-1)) for all extraction methods. When comparing the concentration of iAs in CRM TORT-2 found in this study and in the literature dilute acids, HNO3 and HCl, showed the highest extracted iAs wheras dilute NaOH (in 50% ethanol) showed significantly lower extracted iAs. However, most other extraction solvents were not statistically different from one another.

  7. A rapid monitoring method for inorganic arsenic in rice flour using reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Narukawa, Tomohiro; Chiba, Koichi; Sinaviwat, Savarin; Feldmann, Jörg

    2017-01-06

    A new rapid monitoring method by means of high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) following the heat-assisted extraction was developed for measurement of total inorganic arsenic species in rice flour. As(III) and As(V) eluted at the same retention time and completely separated from organoarsenic species by an isocratic elution program on a reversed phase column. Therefore, neither ambiguous oxidation of arsenite to arsenate nor the integration of two peaks were necessary to determine directly the target analyte inorganic arsenic. Rapid injection allowed measuring 3 replicates within 6min and this combined with a quantitative extraction of all arsenic species from rice flour by a 15min HNO3-H2O2 extraction makes this the fastest laboratory based method for inorganic arsenic in rice flour.

  8. Evaluation of potential effects of soil available phosphorus on soil arsenic availability and paddy rice inorganic arsenic content.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Hou, Qingye; Yang, Zhongfang; Zhong, Cong; Zheng, Guodong; Yang, Zhiqiang; Li, Jie

    2014-05-01

    The transfer of arsenic from paddy field to rice is a major exposure route of the highly toxic element to humans. The aim of our study is to explore the effects of soil available phosphorus on As uptake by rice, and identify the effects of soil properties on arsenic transfer from soil to rice under actual field conditions. 56 pairs of topsoil and rice samples were collected. The relevant parameters in soil and the inorganic arsenic in rice grains were analyzed, and then all the results were treated by statistical methods. Results show that the main factors influencing the uptake by rice grain include soil pH and available phosphorus. The eventual impact of phosphorus is identified as the suppression of As uptake by rice grains. The competition for transporters from soil to roots between arsenic and phosphorus in rhizosphere soil has been a dominant feature.

  9. Inorganic arsenic: a need and an opportunity to improve risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Chappell, W R; Beck, B D; Brown, K G; Chaney, R; Cothern, R; Cothern, C R; Irgolic, K J; North, D W; Thornton, I; Tsongas, T A

    1997-10-01

    This paper presents views on the current status of (inorganic) arsenic risk assessment in the United States and recommends research needed to set standards for drinking water. The opinions are those of the Arsenic Task Force of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health, which has met periodically since 1991 to study issues related to arsenic risk assessment and has held workshops and international conferences on arsenic. The topic of this paper is made timely by current scientific interest in exposure to and adverse health effects of arsenic in the United States and passage of the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendment of 1996, which has provisions for a research program on arsenic and a schedule mandating the EPA to revise the maximum contaminant level of arsenic in drinking water by the year 2001. Our central premise and recommendations are straightforward: the risk of adverse health effects associated with arsenic in drinking water is unknown for low arsenic concentrations found in the United States, such as at the current interim maximum contaminant level of 50 microg/l and below. Arsenic-related research should be directed at answering that question. New epidemiological studies are needed to provide data for reliable dose-response assessments of arsenic and for skin cancer, bladder cancer, or other endpoints to be used by the EPA for regulation. Further toxicological research, along with the observational data from epidemiology, is needed to determine if the dose-response relationship at low levels is more consistent with the current assumption of low-dose linearity or the existence of a practical threshold. Other recommendations include adding foodborne arsenic to the calculation of total arsenic intake, calculation of total arsenic intake, and encouraging cooperative research within the United States and between the United States and affected countries.

  10. Inorganic arsenic: a need and an opportunity to improve risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, W R; Beck, B D; Brown, K G; Chaney, R; Cothern, R; Cothern, C R; Irgolic, K J; North, D W; Thornton, I; Tsongas, T A

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents views on the current status of (inorganic) arsenic risk assessment in the United States and recommends research needed to set standards for drinking water. The opinions are those of the Arsenic Task Force of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health, which has met periodically since 1991 to study issues related to arsenic risk assessment and has held workshops and international conferences on arsenic.The topic of this paper is made timely by current scientific interest in exposure to and adverse health effects of arsenic in the United States and passage of the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendment of 1996, which has provisions for a research program on arsenic and a schedule mandating the EPA to revise the maximum contaminant level of arsenic in drinking water by the year 2001. Our central premise and recommendations are straightforward: the risk of adverse health effects associated with arsenic in drinking water is unknown for low arsenic concentrations found in the United States, such as at the current interim maximum contaminant level of 50 microg/l and below. Arsenic-related research should be directed at answering that question. New epidemiological studies are needed to provide data for reliable dose-response assessments of arsenic and for skin cancer, bladder cancer, or other endpoints to be used by the EPA for regulation. Further toxicological research, along with the observational data from epidemiology, is needed to determine if the dose-response relationship at low levels is more consistent with the current assumption of low-dose linearity or the existence of a practical threshold. Other recommendations include adding foodborne arsenic to the calculation of total arsenic intake, calculation of total arsenic intake, and encouraging cooperative research within the United States and between the United States and affected countries. Images p1060-a Figure 1. PMID:9349827

  11. Urinary Trivalent Methylated Arsenic Species in a Population Chronically Exposed to Inorganic Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Olga L.; Borja-Aburto, Victor H.; Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo G.; Cruz-Gonzalez, Martha B.; Garcia-Montalvo, Eliud A.; Calderon-Aranda, Emma S.; Del Razo, Luz M.

    2005-01-01

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) has been associated with increased risk of various forms of cancer and of noncancerous diseases. Metabolic conversions of iAs that yield highly toxic and genotoxic methylarsonite (MAsIII) and dimethylarsinite (DMAsIII) may play a significant role in determining the extent and character of toxic and cancer-promoting effects of iAs exposure. In this study we examined the relationship between urinary profiles of MAsIII and DMAsIII and skin lesion markers of iAs toxicity in individuals exposed to iAs in drinking water. The study subjects were recruited among the residents of an endemic region of central Mexico. Drinking-water reservoirs in this region are heavily contaminated with iAs. Previous studies carried out in the local populations have found an increased incidence of pathologies, primarily skin lesions, that are characteristic of arseniasis. The goal of this study was to investigate the urinary profiles for the trivalent and pentavalent As metabolites in both high- and low-iAs–exposed subjects. Notably, methylated trivalent arsenicals were detected in 98% of analyzed urine samples. On average, the major metabolite, DMAsIII, represented 49% of total urinary As, followed by DMAsV (23.7%), iAsV (8.6%), iAsIII (8.5%), MAsIII (7.4%), and MAsV (2.8%). More important, the average MAsIII concentration was significantly higher in the urine of exposed individuals with skin lesions compared with those who drank iAs-contaminated water but had no skin lesions. These data suggest that urinary levels of MAsIII, the most toxic species among identified metabolites of iAs, may serve as an indicator to identify individuals with increased susceptibility to toxic and cancer-promoting effects of arseniasis. PMID:15743710

  12. Urinary trivalent methylated arsenic species in a population chronically exposed to inorganic arsenic.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Olga L; Borja-Aburto, Victor H; Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo G; Cruz-Gonzalez, Martha B; Garcia-Montalvo, Eliud A; Calderon-Aranda, Emma S; Del Razo, Luz M

    2005-03-01

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) has been associated with increased risk of various forms of cancer and of noncancerous diseases. Metabolic conversions of iAs that yield highly toxic and genotoxic methylarsonite (MAsIII) and dimethylarsinite (DMAsIII) may play a significant role in determining the extent and character of toxic and cancer-promoting effects of iAs exposure. In this study we examined the relationship between urinary profiles of MAsIII and DMAsIII and skin lesion markers of iAs toxicity in individuals exposed to iAs in drinking water. The study subjects were recruited among the residents of an endemic region of central Mexico. Drinking-water reservoirs in this region are heavily contaminated with iAs. Previous studies carried out in the local populations have found an increased incidence of pathologies, primarily skin lesions, that are characteristic of arseniasis. The goal of this study was to investigate the urinary profiles for the trivalent and pentavalent As metabolites in both high- and low-iAs-exposed subjects. Notably, methylated trivalent arsenicals were detected in 98% of analyzed urine samples. On average, the major metabolite, DMAsIII, represented 49% of total urinary As, followed by DMAsV (23.7%), iAsV (8.6%), iAsIII (8.5%), MAsIII (7.4%), and MAsV (2.8%). More important, the average MAsIII concentration was significantly higher in the urine of exposed individuals with skin lesions compared with those who drank iAs-contaminated water but had no skin lesions. These data suggest that urinary levels of MAsIII, the most toxic species among identified metabolites of iAs, may serve as an indicator to identify individuals with increased susceptibility to toxic and cancer-promoting effects of arseniasis.

  13. Distribution and speciation of arsenic by transplacental and early life exposure to inorganic arsenic in offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Xi, Shuhua; Jin, Yaping; Lv, Xiuqiang; Sun, Guifan

    2010-04-01

    The amount of arsenic compounds was determined in the liver and brain of pups and in breast milk in the pup's stomach in relation to the route of exposure: transplacental, breast milk, or drinking water. Forty-eight pregnant rats were randomly divided into four groups, each group was given free access to drinking water that contained 0, 10, 50, and 100 mg/L NaAsO(2) from gestation day 6 (GD 6) until postnatal day 42 (PND 42). Once pups were weaned, they started to drink the same arsenic-containing water as the dams. Contents of inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), and trimethylarsenic acid (TMA) in livers and brains of the pups on PND 0, 15, 28, and 42 and breast milk taken from the pup's stomach on PND 0 and 15 were detected using the hydride generation atomic absorption spectroscopy method. Concentrations of iAs, MMA, and DMA in the breast milk, the brain, and the liver of the pups increased with the concentration of arsenic in drinking water on PND 0, 15, 28, and 42. Compared to the liver or brain, breast milk had the lowest arsenic concentrations. There was a significant decrease in the levels of arsenic species on PND 15 compared to PND 0, 28, or 42. It was confirmed that arsenic species can pass through the placental barrier from dams to offspring and across the blood-brain barrier in the pups, and breast milk from dams exposed to arsenic in drinking water contains less arsenic than the liver and brain of pups.

  14. Rapid Reduction in Breast Cancer Mortality With Inorganic Arsenic in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Allan H.; Marshall, Guillermo; Yuan, Yan; Steinmaus, Craig; Liaw, Jane; Smith, Martyn T.; Wood, Lily; Heirich, Marissa; Fritzemeier, Rebecca M.; Pegram, Mark D.; Ferreccio, Catterina

    2014-01-01

    Background Arsenic trioxide is effective in treating promyelocytic leukemia, and laboratory studies demonstrate that arsenic trioxide causes apoptosis of human breast cancer cells. Region II in northern Chile experienced very high concentrations of inorganic arsenic in drinking water, especially in the main city Antofagasta from 1958 until an arsenic removal plant was installed in 1970. Methods We investigated breast cancer mortality from 1950 to 2010 among women in Region II compared to Region V, which had low arsenic water concentrations. We conducted studies on human breast cancer cell lines and compared arsenic exposure in Antofagasta with concentrations inducing apoptosis in laboratory studies. Findings Before 1958, breast cancer mortality rates were similar, but in 1958–1970 the rates in Region II were half those in Region V (rate ratio RR = 0.51, 95% CI 0.40–0.66; p < 0.0001). Women under the age of 60 experienced a 70% reduction in breast cancer mortality during 1965–1970 (RR = 0.30, 0.17–0.54; p < 0.0001). Breast cancer cell culture studies showed apoptosis at arsenic concentrations close to those estimated to have occurred in people in Region II. Interpretation We found biologically plausible major reductions in breast cancer mortality during high exposure to inorganic arsenic in drinking water which could not be attributed to bias or confounding. We recommend clinical trial assessment of inorganic arsenic in the treatment of advanced breast cancer. PMID:25580451

  15. Hybrid flow system for automatic dynamic fractionation and speciation of inorganic arsenic in environmental solids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanlin; Miró, Manuel; Kolev, Spas D

    2015-03-03

    An integrated flow analysis system and protocol are proposed for the first time for automatic dynamic flow-through fractionation of inorganic arsenic (arsenite and arsenate) in environmental solids in combination with its real-time speciation. Four extractants (i.e., (1) 0.05 M ammonium sulfate, (2) 0.05 M ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, (3) 0.2 M ammonium oxalate, and (4) a mixture of 0.2 M ammonium oxalate and 0.1 M ascorbic acid at 96 °C) are applied sequentially to the sample to measure bioaccessible inorganic arsenic associated with (1) nonspecifically sorbed phases, (2) specifically sorbed phases, (3) amorphous plus poorly crystalline hydrous oxides of iron and aluminum, and (4) well-crystallized hydrous oxides of Fe and Al, respectively. The kinetic extraction profiles of arsenite and total inorganic arsenic are obtained for each extractant by automatic collection of a given number of its aliquots (subfractions) exposed to the solid sample. Arsenite and total inorganic arsenic in each subfraction are converted to arsine sequentially by hydride generation at pH 4.50 and in 1.14 M hydrochloric acid, respectively. Arsine is absorbed into a potassium permanganate solution, the discoloration of which is related to the concentration of the corresponding arsenic species. The proposed method is successfully validated by analyzing a soil reference material (NIST 2710a) and a sediment sample.

  16. Changes in Serum Adiponectin in Mice Chronically Exposed to Inorganic Arsenic in Drinking Water.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuanbo; Li, Ying; Liu, Junqiu; Ji, Xiaohong; Zhao, Lijun; Wei, Yudan

    2017-02-11

    Cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus are prominent features of glucose and lipid metabolism disorders. Adiponectin is a key adipokine that is largely involved in glucose and lipid metabolism processes. A growing body of evidence suggests that chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic is associated with cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. We hypothesized that arsenic exposure may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus by affecting the level of adiponectin. In this study, we examined serum adiponectin levels, as well as serum levels of metabolic measures (including fasting blood glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol) in C57BL/6 mice exposed to inorganic arsenic in drinking water (5 and 50 ppm NaAsO2) for 18 weeks. Body mass and adiposity were monitored throughout the study. We found no significant changes in serum insulin and glucose levels in mice treated with arsenic for 18 weeks. However, arsenic exposure decreased serum levels of adiponectin, triglyceride, and HDL-cholesterol. Further, an inverse relationship was observed between urinary concentrations of total arsenic and serum levels of adiponectin. This study suggests that arsenic exposure could disturb the metabolism of lipids and increase the risk of cardiovascular disease by reducing the level of adiponectin.

  17. Paraoxonase 1 activity in subchronic low-level inorganic arsenic exposure through drinking water.

    PubMed

    Afolabi, Olusegun K; Wusu, Adedoja D; Ogunrinola, Olufunmilayo O; Abam, Esther O; Babayemi, David O; Dosumu, Oluwatosin A; Onunkwor, Okechukwu B; Balogun, Elizabeth A; Odukoya, Olusegun O; Ademuyiwa, Oladipo

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiological evidences indicate close association between inorganic arsenic exposure via drinking water and cardiovascular diseases. While the exact mechanism of this arsenic-mediated increase in cardiovascular risk factors remains enigmatic, epidemiological studies indicate a role for paraoxonase 1 (PON1) in cardiovascular diseases. To investigate the association between inorganic arsenic exposure and cardiovascular diseases, rats were exposed to sodium arsenite (trivalent; 50, 100, and 150 ppm As) and sodium arsenate (pentavalent; 100, 150, and 200 ppm As) in their drinking water for 12 weeks. PON1 activity towards paraoxon (PONase) and phenylacetate (AREase) in plasma, lipoproteins, hepatic, and brain microsomal fractions were determined. Inhibition of PONase and AREase in plasma and HDL characterized the effects of the two arsenicals. While the trivalent arsenite inhibited PONase by 33% (plasma) and 46% (HDL), respectively, the pentavalent arsenate inhibited the enzyme by 41 and 34%, respectively. AREase activity was inhibited by 52 and 48% by arsenite, whereas the inhibition amounted to 72 and 67%, respectively by arsenate. The pattern of inhibition in plasma and HDL indicates that arsenite induced a dose-dependent inhibition of PONase whereas arsenate induced a dose-dependent inhibition of AREase. In the VLDL + LDL, arsenate inhibited PONase and AREase while arsenite inhibited PONase. In the hepatic and brain microsomal fractions, only the PONase enzyme was inhibited by the two arsenicals. The inhibition was more pronounced in the hepatic microsomes where a 70% inhibition was observed at the highest dose of pentavalent arsenic. Microsomal cholesterol was increased by the two arsenicals resulting in increased cholesterol/phospholipid ratios. Our findings indicate that decreased PON1 activity observed in arsenic exposure may be an incipient biochemical event in the cardiovascular effects of arsenic. Modulation of PON1 activity by arsenic may also be

  18. Total and inorganic arsenic in the fauna of the Guadalquivir estuary: environmental and human health implications.

    PubMed

    Suñer, M A; Devesa, V; Muñoz, O; López, F; Montoro, R; Arias, A M; Blasco, J

    1999-12-06

    To evaluate the impact on fauna of the release of toxic waste from the tailings dam operated by the Boliden Apirsa S.L company at Aznalcóllar, Seville (Spain) a study was carried out of total and inorganic arsenic contents in 164 samples from six different estuary species, including molluscs, crustaceans and fish, collected at six sampling stations distributed along the estuary and mouth of the River Guadalquivir. The contents found, expressed in micrograms per gram wet weight, were as follows. Total arsenic: Crassostrea angulata--giant cupped oyster (2.44 +/- 0.45); Scrobicularia plana--peppery furrow (2.50 +/- 0.73); Palaemon longirostris--delta prawn (1.33 +/- 0.54); Uca tangeri--AfroEuropean fiddler crab (1.76 +/- 0.08); Melicertus kerathurus--shrimp (3.60 +/- 1.92); and Liza ramada--mullet (0.65 +/- 0.38). Inorganic arsenic: C. angulata (0.09 +/- 0.02); S. plana (0.38 +/- 0.23); P. longirostris (0.04 +/- 0.01); U. tangeri (0.22 +/- 0.03); M. kerathurus (0.03 +/- 0.01); and L. ramada (0.03 +/- 0.03). The levels of total As are comparable to those obtained by other authors. With respect to inorganic arsenic, only S. plana and U. tangeri present high levels of inorganic arsenic. This may be due to the fact that these organisms live in estuary sediments, reservoirs of inorganic arsenic, and ingest particles of sediments during feeding. Because of the lack of information for this area concerning previous levels of total and inorganic arsenic in the species analysed, it was not possible to establish the impact on the fauna of the River Guadalquivir estuary of the toxic spill resulting from the failure of the mine tailings dam at Aznalcóllar. With respect to the implications to human health as a result of consumption of species from the Guadalquivir estuary, only with the species Scrobicularia plana, as a high consumption of this mollusc might, in some cases, exceed the maximum tolerable intake for inorganic arsenic indicated by the FAO/WHO. Consumption of the

  19. A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression Analysis of Lung Cancer Risk and Inorganic Arsenic in Drinking Water.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Steven H; Ferdosi, Hamid; Dissen, Elisabeth K; Li, Ji; Ahn, Jaeil

    2015-12-07

    High levels (> 200 µg/L) of inorganic arsenic in drinking water are known to be a cause of human lung cancer, but the evidence at lower levels is uncertain. We have sought the epidemiological studies that have examined the dose-response relationship between arsenic levels in drinking water and the risk of lung cancer over a range that includes both high and low levels of arsenic. Regression analysis, based on six studies identified from an electronic search, examined the relationship between the log of the relative risk and the log of the arsenic exposure over a range of 1-1000 µg/L. The best-fitting continuous meta-regression model was sought and found to be a no-constant linear-quadratic analysis where both the risk and the exposure had been logarithmically transformed. This yielded both a statistically significant positive coefficient for the quadratic term and a statistically significant negative coefficient for the linear term. Sub-analyses by study design yielded results that were similar for both ecological studies and non-ecological studies. Statistically significant X-intercepts consistently found no increased level of risk at approximately 100-150 µg/L arsenic.

  20. A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression Analysis of Lung Cancer Risk and Inorganic Arsenic in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, Steven H.; Ferdosi, Hamid; Dissen, Elisabeth K.; Li, Ji; Ahn, Jaeil

    2015-01-01

    High levels (> 200 µg/L) of inorganic arsenic in drinking water are known to be a cause of human lung cancer, but the evidence at lower levels is uncertain. We have sought the epidemiological studies that have examined the dose-response relationship between arsenic levels in drinking water and the risk of lung cancer over a range that includes both high and low levels of arsenic. Regression analysis, based on six studies identified from an electronic search, examined the relationship between the log of the relative risk and the log of the arsenic exposure over a range of 1–1000 µg/L. The best-fitting continuous meta-regression model was sought and found to be a no-constant linear-quadratic analysis where both the risk and the exposure had been logarithmically transformed. This yielded both a statistically significant positive coefficient for the quadratic term and a statistically significant negative coefficient for the linear term. Sub-analyses by study design yielded results that were similar for both ecological studies and non-ecological studies. Statistically significant X-intercepts consistently found no increased level of risk at approximately 100–150 µg/L arsenic. PMID:26690190

  1. IRIS Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic (Cancer) (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On February 19, 2010, the draft IRIS Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic (Cancer) external review draft document and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for public review and comment. The draft document and the charge to external peer reviewers were reviewed...

  2. SPECIATION AND PRESERVATION OF INORGANIC ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER SUPPLIES WITH IC-ICP-MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The speciation of inorganic arsenic in drinking water supplies is an essential part of devising an appropriate treatment process. Arsenate, because of its anion characteristics at drinking water pHs, is effectively removed by anion exchange treatment while arsenite remains in the...

  3. IRIS Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic (Cancer) (2010 External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Science Advisory Board (SAB) conducted a review of the scientific basis supporting the human health cancer hazard and dose-response assessment of inorganic arsenic that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. EPA revised the assessment and is...

  4. DIFFERENTIAL ACTIVATION OF AP-1 IN HUMAN BLADDER EPITHELIAL CELLS BY INORGANIC AND METHYLATED ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differential Activation of AP-1 in Human Bladder Epithelial Cells by Inorganic and Methylated Arsenicals

    Zuzana Drobna, Ilona Jaspers, David J. Thomas, and Miroslav Styblo

    ABSTRACT

    Epidemiological studies have linked chronic ingestion of drinking water contai...

  5. APPARENT SEXUAL DIFFERENCES IN METABOLISM OF INORGANIC ARSENIC IN HUMAN HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    APPARENT SEXUAL DIFFERENCES IN METABOLISM OF INORGANIC ARSENIC IN HUMAN HEPATOCYTES. M Styblo1, G A Hamilton1, E L LeCluyse1 and D J Thomas2. 1University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    The liver is considered a m...

  6. Chronic arsenic exposure increases TGFalpha concentration in bladder urothelial cells of Mexican populations environmentally exposed to inorganic arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela, Olga L.; Germolec, Dori R.; Borja-Aburto, Victor H.; Contreras-Ruiz, Jose; Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo G.; Razo, Luz M. del

    2007-08-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a well-established carcinogen and human exposure has been associated with a variety of cancers including those of skin, lung, and bladder. High expression of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-{alpha}) has associated with local relapses in early stages of urinary bladder cancer. iAs exposures are at least in part determined by the rate of formation and composition of iAs metabolites (MAs{sup III}, MAs{sup V}, DMAs{sup III}, DMAs{sup V}). This study examines the relationship between TGF-{alpha} concentration in exfoliated bladder urothelial cells (BUC) separated from urine and urinary arsenic species in 72 resident women (18-51 years old) from areas exposed to different concentrations of iAs in drinking water (2-378 ppb) in central Mexico. Urinary arsenic species, including trivalent methylated metabolites were measured by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry method. The concentration of TGF-{alpha} in BUC was measured using an ELISA assay. Results show a statistically significant positive correlation between TGF-{alpha} concentration in BUC and each of the six arsenic species present in urine. The multivariate linear regression analyses show that the increment of TGF-{alpha} levels in BUC was importantly associated with the presence of arsenic species after adjusting by age, and presence of urinary infection. People from areas with high arsenic exposure had a significantly higher TGF-{alpha} concentration in BUC than people from areas of low arsenic exposure (128.8 vs. 64.4 pg/mg protein; p < 0.05). Notably, exfoliated cells isolated from individuals with skin lesions contained significantly greater amount of TGF-{alpha} than cells from individuals without skin lesions: 157.7 vs. 64.9 pg/mg protein (p = 0.003). These results suggest that TGF-{alpha} in exfoliated BUC may serve as a susceptibility marker of adverse health effects on epithelial tissue in arsenic-endemic areas.

  7. Geographical variation in inorganic arsenic in paddy field samples and commercial rice from the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Signes-Pastor, Antonio J; Carey, Manus; Carbonell-Barrachina, Angel A; Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo; Green, Andy J; Meharg, Andrew A

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated total arsenic and arsenic speciation in rice using ion chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (IC-ICP-MS), covering the main rice-growing regions of the Iberian Peninsula in Europe. The main arsenic species found were inorganic and dimethylarsinic acid. Samples surveyed were soil, shoots and field-collected rice grain. From this information soil to plant arsenic transfer was investigated plus the distribution of arsenic in rice across the geographical regions of Spain and Portugal. Commercial polished rice was also obtained from each region and tested for arsenic speciation, showing a positive correlation with field-obtained rice grain. Commercial polished rice had the lowest i-As content in Andalucia, Murcia and Valencia while Extremadura had the highest concentrations. About 26% of commercial rice samples exceeded the permissible concentration for infant food production as governed by the European Commission. Some cadmium data is also presented, available with ICP-MS analyses, and show low concentration in rice samples.

  8. SHRNA-MEDIATED SILENCING OF AS3MT EXPRESSION MODULATES THE CAPACITY OF HEPG2 CELLS TO METHYLATE INORGANIC ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several methyltransferases have been linked to the oxidative methylation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in mammalian cells. However, the relative contributions of these enzymes to the overall capacity of cells to methylate iAs have not been characterized. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state)...

  9. Inorganic arsenic speciation by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry using thoria nanoparticles-carbon paste electrodes.

    PubMed

    Pereira, F J; Vázquez, M D; Debán, L; Aller, A J

    2016-05-15

    Two novel thoria (ThO2) nanoparticles-carbon paste electrodes were used to evaluate an anodic stripping voltammetric method for the direct determination of arsenite and total inorganic arsenic (arsenite plus arsenate) in water samples. The effect of Ag((I)), Cu((II)), Hg((II)), Sb((III)) and Se((IV)) ions on the electrochemical response of arsenic was assayed. The developed electroanalytical method offers a rapid procedure with improved analytical characteristics including good repeatability (3.4%) at low As((III)) concentrations, high selectivity, lower detection limit (0.1 μg L(-1)) and high sensitivity (0.54 μA μg(-1) L). The analytical capability of the optimized method was demonstrated by the determination of arsenic in certified reference materials (trace elements in natural water, trace elements in water and coal fly ash).

  10. Inorganic arsenic exposure affects pain behavior and inflammatory response in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre-Banuelos, Patricia; Escudero-Lourdes, Claudia; Sanchez-Pena, Luz Carmen; Del Razo, Luz Maria; Perez-Urizar, Jose

    2008-06-15

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) contamination of drinking water is a worldwide problem associated with an increased risk for the development of various types of cancer and noncancerous damage. In vitro studies have suggested that iAs can modulate the activity of macrophages producing an over-expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and resulting in an increase in prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) concentrations in endothelial cells. These effects may lead to an in vivo enhancement of inflammatory and pain responses. Our aim was to determine the effect of a single dose of arsenic or subchronic exposure to arsenic on pain behavior and tissue inflammation in rats. Rats were given a single dose of sodium arsenite (0.1, 1 and 10 mg/kg i.p.) or submitted to subchronic exposure to arsenic added to the drinking water for 4 weeks (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppm). Inflammatory pain was assessed by using the formalin and tail-flick tests, while inflammation was evaluated with the carrageenan model. Arsenite did not induce pain or significant inflammation by itself. In contrast, arsenite in both single dose administration and subchronic exposure increased not only the inflammatory process and the underlying hyperalgesic pain, but also induced a decrease in the pain threshold. Alterations in pain processing were dependent on the arsenic dose and the length of exposure, and the underlying mechanism involved an increased release of local PGE{sub 2}. These results suggest that inorganic arsenic exposure enhances pain perception and exacerbates the pathological state of inflammatory diseases.

  11. RE: Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic: In Support of the Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System -- Comments Submitted for Review by the SAB Workgroup

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Submission of comments by the Organic Arsenical Products Task Force on the draft document Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic: In Support of the Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS).

  12. Optimization of a GFAAS method for determination of total inorganic arsenic in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Michon, Jérôme; Deluchat, Véronique; Al Shukry, Raad; Dagot, Christophe; Bollinger, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-15

    The new 10mugl(-1) arsenic standard in drinking water has been a spur to the search for reliable routine analytical methods with a limit of detection at the mugl(-1) level. These methods also need to be easy to handle due to the routine analyses that are required in drinking water monitoring. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) meets these requirements, but the limit of detection is generally too high except for methods using a pre-concentration or separation step. The use of a high-intensity boosted discharge hollow-cathode lamp decreases the baseline noise level and therefore allows a lower limit of detection. The temperature program, chemical matrix modifier and thermal stabilizer additives were optimized for total inorganic arsenic determination with GFAAS, without preliminary treatment. The optimal furnace program was validated with a proprietary software. The limit of detection was 0.26mugAsl(-1) for a sample volume of 16mul corresponding to 4.2pgAs. This attractive technique is rapid as 20 samples can be analysed per hour. This method was validated with arsenic reference solutions. Its applicability was verified with artificial and natural groundwaters. Recoveries from 91 to 105% with relative standard deviation <5% can be easily achieved. The effect of interfering anions and cations commonly found in groundwater was studied. Only phosphates and silicates (respectively at 4 and 20mgl(-1)) lead to significant interferences in the determination of total inorganic arsenic at 4mugl(-1).

  13. Preserving the distribution of inorganic arsenic species in groundwater and acid mine drainage samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bednar, A.J.; Garbarino, J.R.; Ranville, J.F.; Wildeman, T.R.

    2002-01-01

    The distribution of inorganic arsenic species must be preserved in the field to eliminate changes caused by metal oxyhydroxide precipitation, photochemical oxidation, and redox reactions. Arsenic species sorb to iron and manganese oxyhydroxide precipitates, and arsenite can be oxidized to arsenate by photolytically produced free radicals in many sample matrices. Several preservatives were evaluated to minimize metal oxyhydroxide precipitation, such as inorganic acids and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). EDTA was found to work best for all sample matrices tested. Storing samples in opaque polyethylene bottles eliminated the effects of photochemical reactions. The preservation technique was tested on 71 groundwater and six acid mine drainage samples. Concentrations in groundwater samples reached 720 ??g-As/L for arsenite and 1080 ??g-As/L for arsenate, and acid mine drainage samples reached 13 000 ??g-As/L for arsenite and 3700 ??g-As/L for arsenate. The arsenic species distribution in the samples ranged from 0 to 90% arsenite. The stability of the preservation technique was established by comparing laboratory arsenic speciation results for samples preserved in the field to results for subsamples speciated onsite. Statistical analyses indicated that the difference between arsenite and arsenate concentrations for samples preserved with EDTA in opaque bottles and field speciation results were analytically insignificant. The percentage change in arsenite:arsenate ratios for a preserved acid mine drainage sample and groundwater sample during a 3-month period was -5 and +3%, respectively.

  14. Dietary exposure of the Italian population to inorganic arsenic: The 2012-2014 Total Diet Study.

    PubMed

    Cubadda, Francesco; D'Amato, Marilena; Aureli, Federica; Raggi, Andrea; Mantovani, Alberto

    2016-12-01

    Dietary exposure of the Italian population to inorganic arsenic has been assessed in the national Total Diet Study (TDS) carried out in 2012-2014. Within the TDS, food samples (>3000) were collected to be representative of the whole diet of the population, prepared as consumed, and pooled into 51 food groups, thus modelling the Italian diet. Inorganic arsenic was determined by HPLC-ICP-MS after chemical extraction and quantified in all samples. Occurrence data were combined with national individual consumption data to estimate mean and high level dietary exposure of the general population and of population subgroups according to age and gender, both at the national level and for each of the four main geographical areas of Italy. The intakes assessed are in the lower range of iAs exposure estimates in other European countries carried out without the support of the TDS approach. However, taking the lower limit of the BMDL01 range established by the EFSA as reference point, the margins of exposure are <2 for the mean intake in infants and toddlers and <1 for the 95th percentile intakes in all younger age groups. Our results indicate the goal to check and further reduce the dietary exposure to inorganic arsenic.

  15. [Distribution, seasonal variation and influence factors of dissolved inorganic arsenic in the Sanggou Bay].

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Ren, Jing-Ling; Liu, Su-Mei; Jiang, Zeng-Jie; Du, Jin-Zhou; Fang, Jian-Guang

    2014-07-01

    The biogeochemical behavior of arsenic in the aquatic environment has already captured the attentions of scientists due to its complex forms and toxicity. Four cruises were carried out in April, August, October 2011 and January 2012 in the Sanggou Bay. The concentrations of total dissolved inorganic arsenic (TDIAs, TDIAs = [ As(5+] + [As(3+)]) and arsenite (As(3+)) were measured by Hydride Generation-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry (HG-AFS). The concentrations of TDIAs ranged from 3.4-12.4 nmol x L(-1) in April, 8.9-16.9 nmol x L(-1) in August, 14.7-21.3 nmol x L(-1) in October and 13.8-21.9 nmol x L(-1) in January. The concentrations of arsenite ranged from 0.3-2.1 nmol x L(-1), 0.4-3.8 nmol x L(-1), 1.8-4.0 nmol x L(-1) and 0.3-2.9 nmol x L(-1) during four cruises, respectively. The concentrations of TDIAs in spring and summer were lower than those in autumn and winter, and high values of TDIAs appeared in the bay-mouth and the coastal estuary. The concentrations of arsenite in spring and winter were lower than those in summer and autumn. The maximum As(3+)/TDIAs ratios appeared in summer. The mean value of TDIAs in the Sanggou Bay was (13.9 +/- 4.7) nmol x L(-1), which was lower than the national primary drinking in water Standards from USEPA and met the first grade water quality based on the environmental quality standards for surface water of China. It indicates that there is no obvious anthropogenic pollution. The concentrations of TDIAs in the Sanggou Bay were lower than those in the Ailian Bay and the Lidao Bay in spring and summer due to the different hydrological environments and terrestrial inputs. Riverine input, incursion of Yellow Sea and biological activities were the three main factors impacting the distribution of TDIAs in the Sanggou Bay, and the influence of aquaculture activities was particularly significant. The enrichment of arsenic by aquaculture may lead to potential ecological crisis and food safety problems, and need to be paid more

  16. Significance of exposure assessment to analysis of cancer risk from inorganic arsenic in drinking water in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.G.; Chen, C.J.

    1995-08-01

    The primary source of evidence that inorganic arsenic in drinking water is associated with increased mortality from cancer at internal sites (bladder, liver, lung, and other organs) is a large ecologic study conducted in regions of Southwest Taiwan endemic to Blackfoot disease. The dose-response patterns for lung, liver, and bladder cancers display a nonlinear dose-response relationship with arsenic exposure. The data do not appear suitable, however, for the more refined task of dose-response assessment, particularly for inference of risk at the low arsenic concentrations found in some U.S. water supplies. The problem lies in variable arsenic concentrations between the wells within a village, largely due to a mix of shallow wells and deep artesian wells, and in having only one well test for 24 (40%) of the 60 villages. The current analysis identifies 14 villages where the exposure appears most questionable, based on criteria described in the test. The exposure values were then changed for seven of the villages, from the median well test being used as a default to some other point in the village`s range of well tests that would contribute to smoothing the appearance of a dose-response curve. The remaining seven villages, six of which had only one well test, were deleted as outliers. The resultant dose-response patterns showed no evidence of excess risk below arsenic concentrations of 0.1 mg/l. Of course, that outcome is dependent on manipulation of the data, as described. Inclusion of the seven deleted villages would make estimates of risk much higher at low doses. In those seven villages the cancer mortality rates are significantly high for their exposure levels, suggesting that their exposure values may be too low or that other etiological factors need to be taken into account. 10 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Significance of exposure assessment to analysis of cancer risk from inorganic arsenic in drinking water in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Brown, K G; Chen, C J

    1995-08-01

    The primary source of evidence that inorganic arsenic in drinking water is associated with increased mortality from cancer at internal sites (bladder, liver, lung, and other organs) is a large ecologic study conducted in regions of Southwest Taiwan endemic to Blackfoot disease. The dose-response patterns for lung, liver, and bladder cancers display a nonlinear dose-response relationship with arsenic exposure. The data do not appear suitable, however, for the more refined task of dose-response assessment, particularly for inference of risk at the low arsenic concentrations found in some U.S. water supplies. The problem lies in variable arsenic concentrations between the wells within a village, largely due to a mix of shallow wells and deep artesian wells, and in having only one well test for 24 (40%) of the 60 villages. The current analysis identifies 14 villages where the exposure appears most questionable, based on criteria described in the text. The exposure values were then changed for seven of the villages, from the median well test being used as a default to some other point in the village's range of well tests that would contribute to smoothing the appearance of a dose-response curve. The remaining seven villages, six of which had only one well test, were deleted as outliers. The resultant dose-response patterns showed no evidence of excess risk below arsenic concentrations of 0.1 mg/l. Of course, that outcome is dependent on manipulation of the data, as described. Inclusion of the seven deleted villages would make estimates of risk much higher at low doses. In those seven villages, the cancer mortality rates are significantly high for their exposure levels, suggesting that their exposure values may be too low or that other etiological factors need to be taken into account.

  18. Contribution of inorganic arsenic sources to population exposure risk on a regional scale.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wei-Chun; Chen, Jein-Wen; Liao, Chung-Min

    2016-07-01

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) in the human population is associated with various internal cancers and other adverse outcomes. The purpose of this study was to estimate a population-scale exposure risk attributable to iAs consumptions by linking a stochastic physiological-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model and biomonitoring data of iAs in urine. The urinary As concentrations were obtained from a total of 1,043 subjects living in an industrial area of Taiwan. The results showed that the study subjects had an iAs exposure risk of 27 % (the daily iAs intake for 27 % study subjects exceeded the WHO-recommended value, 2.1 μg iAs day(-1) kg(-1) body weight). Moreover, drinking water and cooked rice contributed to the iAs exposure risk by 10 and 41 %, respectively. The predicted risks in the current study were 4.82, 27.21, 34.69, and 64.17 %, respectively, among the mid-range of Mexico, Taiwan (this study), Korea, and Bangladesh reported in the literature. In conclusion, we developed a population-scale-based risk model that covered the broad range of iAS exposure by integrating stochastic PBPK modeling and reverse dosimetry to generate probabilistic distribution of As intake corresponding to urinary As measured from the cohort study. The model can also be updated as new urinary As information becomes available.

  19. Inorganic arsenic in drinking water accelerates N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine-induced bladder tissue damage in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Paul-Yann; Lin, Yung-Lun; Huang, Chin-Chin; Chen, Sin-Syu; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2012-02-15

    Epidemiological studies have revealed that exposure to an arsenic-contaminated environment correlates with the incidence of bladder cancer. Bladder cancer is highly recurrent after intravesical therapy, and most of the deaths from this disease are due to invasive metastasis. In our present study, the role of inorganic arsenic in bladder carcinogenesis is characterized in a mouse model. This work provides the first evidence that inorganic arsenic in drinking water promotes N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN)-induced bladder tissue damage, including the urothelium and submucosal layer. This damage to the bladder epithelium induced by BBN includes thickening of the submucosal layer, the loss of the glycosaminoglycan layer and an increase in both the deoxyguanosine oxidation and cytosine methylation levels in the DNA. Further, when 10 ppm inorganic arsenic is combined with BBN, the number of bladder submucosal capillaries is increased. In addition, inorganic arsenic also increases the deoxyguanosine oxidation level, alters the cytosine methylation state, decreases the activities of glutathione reductase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, decreases the protein expression of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO-1) and increases the protein expression of specific protein 1 (Sp1) in bladder tissues. In summary, our data reveal that inorganic arsenic in drinking water promotes the BBN-induced pre-neoplastic damage of bladder tissue in mice, and that the 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, 5-methylcytosine, NQO-1 protein and Sp1 protein levels may be pre-neoplastic markers of bladder tumors. -- Highlights: ► The role of inorganic arsenic in bladder carcinogenesis is characterized in mice. ► We examine the changes in the histology and biochemistry of bladder tissues. ► Inorganic arsenic enhances BBN-induced DNA oxidation while decreases BBN-induced DNA methylation in the mouse bladder. ► Inorganic arsenic alters the activities of the anti-oxidant enzymes in

  20. Binational arsenic exposure survey: methodology and estimated arsenic intake from drinking water and urinary arsenic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Roberge, Jason; O'Rourke, Mary Kay; Meza-Montenegro, Maria Mercedes; Gutiérrez-Millán, Luis Enrique; Burgess, Jefferey L; Harris, Robin B

    2012-04-01

    The Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey (BAsES) was designed to evaluate probable arsenic exposures in selected areas of southern Arizona and northern Mexico, two regions with known elevated levels of arsenic in groundwater reserves. This paper describes the methodology of BAsES and the relationship between estimated arsenic intake from beverages and arsenic output in urine. Households from eight communities were selected for their varying groundwater arsenic concentrations in Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico. Adults responded to questionnaires and provided dietary information. A first morning urine void and water from all household drinking sources were collected. Associations between urinary arsenic concentration (total, organic, inorganic) and estimated level of arsenic consumed from water and other beverages were evaluated through crude associations and by random effects models. Median estimated total arsenic intake from beverages among participants from Arizona communities ranged from 1.7 to 14.1 µg/day compared to 0.6 to 3.4 µg/day among those from Mexico communities. In contrast, median urinary inorganic arsenic concentrations were greatest among participants from Hermosillo, Mexico (6.2 µg/L) whereas a high of 2.0 µg/L was found among participants from Ajo, Arizona. Estimated arsenic intake from drinking water was associated with urinary total arsenic concentration (p < 0.001), urinary inorganic arsenic concentration (p < 0.001), and urinary sum of species (p < 0.001). Urinary arsenic concentrations increased between 7% and 12% for each one percent increase in arsenic consumed from drinking water. Variability in arsenic intake from beverages and urinary arsenic output yielded counter intuitive results. Estimated intake of arsenic from all beverages was greatest among Arizonans yet participants in Mexico had higher urinary total and inorganic arsenic concentrations. Other contributors to urinary arsenic concentrations should be evaluated.

  1. Total and Inorganic Arsenic in Mid-Atlantic Marine Fish and Shellfish and Implications for Fish Advisories

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Richard; Crecelius, Eric A.

    2006-02-06

    Up to 33.3 metric tons of arsenic trioxide were spilled off the Middle Atlantic coast of the United States in January of 1992 during a shipping accident. Historical fish tissue data for samples collected in the Delaware Inland Bays before and after the spill reveal a prominent spike in total arsenic in summer flounder following the spill and a gradual decline ever since. In 2002, a small study was conducted to determine whether summer flounder migrating into the Delaware Inland Bays from the Continental Shelf in the spring contain higher body burdens of arsenic than summer flounder migrating out of the Inland Bays in the fall. Total arsenic was significantly higher in the incoming fish. Considering that summer flounder overwinter at the spill site, that arsenic trioxide is a dense powder of limited solubility that would tend to incorporate into the sediments, and that summer flounder are demersal fish, we conclude that summer flounder accumulate arsenic offshore and that the likely source of their extra body burden is the spilled arsenic. Speciation of arsenic in the summer flounder, as well as in Atlantic croaker, striped bass, and hard clam reveal low concentrations (0.5 ? 20 ug/kg ww) of toxic inorganic arsenic. DMA was more than an order of magnitude greater in hard clam meats than in the other species tested, a finding attributed to arsenic uptake by phytoplankton and subsequent dietary uptake by the clam. Risk assessment using the inorganic arsenic concentrations was used to conclude that a fish advisory is not warranted.

  2. Low dose chronic treatment of human keratinocytes with inorganic arsenic causes hyperproliferation and altered protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.L.; Su, L.; Snow, E.T. |

    1997-10-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenate [As(V)] or arsenite [As(III)] causes hyperproliferation of normal and SV40-transformed human epidermal keratinocytes. Line 327 SV40-infected human keratinocytes were grown in the presence of either As(III) or As(V) (0.01 to 10 {mu}M) in complete medium for seven days prior to harvesting and counting. Both As(III) and As(V) were cytotoxic at micromolar concentrations, however submicromolar arsenic caused a significant increase in cell growth. Cell numbers in cultures exposed to As(V) were increased more than 186% relative to controls, and an even larger stimulation in cell growth was observed after treatment with 50 nM As(III). Normal non-SV40 T-antigen. Preliminary cell cycle analysis using unselected, log-phase cultures of arsenic-treated keratinocytes shows an increased proportion of cells in S- and G2/M-phase. Isoelectric focusing of phosphotyrosine-containing proteins from cells labeled with {sup 32}P-inorganic phosphate showed that the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes grown in low concentrations of arsenic is accompanied by altered tyrosine-specific protein phosphorylation. A number of phosphorylated proteins were observed in As-treated cells that were not observed in the controls; and minor bands at IEPs of 3.0, 4.2, 7.2, 7.5 and 8.2. These results, together with the lack of direct enzyme inhibition by arsenic shown by Su et al., this volume, suggest that arsenic-induced skin lesions and carcinogenesis may be the result of altered cell cycle control rather than DNA damage or reduced DNA repair.

  3. Soil Incorporation of Silica-Rich Rice Husk Decreases Inorganic Arsenic in Rice Grain.

    PubMed

    Seyfferth, Angelia L; Morris, Andrew H; Gill, Rattandeep; Kearns, Kelli A; Mann, Jessica N; Paukett, Michelle; Leskanic, Corey

    2016-05-18

    Arsenic decreases rice yield, and inorganic grain As threatens human health; thus, strategies to decrease rice As are critically needed. Increased plant-available silica (Si) can decrease rice As, yet the source of Si matters. Rice husk, an underutilized and Si-rich byproduct of rice production that contains less labile C and an order of magnitude less As than rice straw, may be an economically viable Si resource to decrease rice As, yet the impact of rice husk incorporation on As in the rice-soil nexus has not been reported. This proof-of-concept study shows that rice husk incorporation to soil (1% w/w) decreases inorganic grain As by 25-50% without negatively affecting grain Cd, yield, or dissolved CH4 levels. Rice husk is a critical yet perhaps overlooked resource to improve soil quality through enhanced nutrient availability and attenuate human health risks through consumption of As-laden grain.

  4. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Person, Rachel J.; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Makia, Ngome L.; Bell, Matthew W.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Tokar, Erik J.

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure transforms a human peripheral lung epithelia cell line. • Cells acquire characteristics in common with human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • These transformed cells provide a

  5. Voltammetric methods for determination and speciation of inorganic arsenic in the environment--a review.

    PubMed

    Mays, Douglas E; Hussam, Abul

    2009-07-30

    The measurement of inorganic arsenic in the environment has received considerable attention over the past 40+ years due to its toxicity and prevalence in drinking water. This paper provides an overview of voltammetric techniques used since 2001. More than fifty papers from refereed analytical chemistry journals on the speciation and measurement of inorganic arsenic (As(III) and As(V)) in practical and environmental samples are included. The present review shows that stripping voltammetry is a sensitive and inexpensive technique. The new approaches include development of novel measurement protocols through media variation, development and use of new boron doped diamond electrodes modified with metals, nano Au-modified electrodes on carbon or carbon nano-tubes, novel rotating disc and vibrating electrodes to enhance mass transfer, and modified Hg(l) and thin film Bi on carbon for cathodic stripping voltammetry are discussed. Although, majority of the papers were of exploratory in nature, the trend towards developing a commercial standalone instrument for field use is still in progress.

  6. Biotransformation of inorganic arsenic in a marine herbivorous fish Siganus fuscescens after dietborne exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Lizhao; Zhou, Yanyan; Wu, Yun; Zhang, Li

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic (As) is well known to be biodiminished along marine food chains. The marine herbivorous fish at a lower trophic level are expected to accumulate more As. However, little is known about how marine herbivorous fish biotransform the potential high As bioaccumulation. Therefore, the present study quantified the biotransformation of two inorganic As species (As(III) and As(V)) in a marine herbivorous fish Siganus fuscescens following dietborne exposure. The fish were fed on As contaminated artificial diets at nominal concentrations of 400 and 1500 μg As(III) or As(V) g(-1) (dry weight) for 21 d and 42 d. After exposure, As concentrations in intestine, liver, and muscle tissues of rabbitfish increased significantly and were proportional to the inorganic As exposure concentrations. The present study demonstrated that both inorganic As(III) and As(V) in the dietborne phases were able to be biotransformed to the less toxic arsenobetaine (AsB) (63.3-91.3% in liver; 79.0%-95.2% in muscle). The processes of As biotransformation in rabbitfish could include oxidation of As(III) to As(V), reduction of As(V) to As(III), methylation to monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), and subsequent conversion to AsB. These results also demonstrated that AsB synthesis processes were diverse facing different inorganic As species in different tissues. In summary, the present study elucidated that marine herbivorous fish had high ability to biotransform inorganic As to the organic forms (mainly AsB), resulting in high As bioaccumulation. Therefore, marine herbivorous fish could detoxify inorganic As in the natural environment.

  7. Inorganic Arsenic Induces NRF2-Regulated Antioxidant Defenses in Both Cerebral Cortex and Hippocampus in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Duan, Xiaoxu; Li, Jinlong; Zhao, Shuo; Li, Wei; Zhao, Lu; Li, Wei; Nie, Huifang; Sun, Guifang; Li, Bing

    2016-08-01

    Inorganic arsenic is reported to induce the reactive oxygen species-mediated oxidative stress, which is supposed to be one of the main mechanisms of arsenic-related neurological diseases. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), a master regulator of antioxidant defense systems, up-regulates the expression of target genes to fight against oxidative damages caused by harmful substances, including metals. In the present study, mice were used as a model to investigate the oxidative stress levels and the expressions of NRF2-regulated antioxidant substances in both cerebral cortex and hippocampus with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg NaAsO2 exposure intra-gastrically. Our results showed that acute NaAsO2 treatment resulted in decreased total anti-oxidative capacity (T-AOC) and increased maleic dialdehyde production in the nervous system. We also detected rapidly elevation of NRF2 protein levels by enhancement of Nrf2 transcription, especially at 20 mg/kg NaAsO2 exposure group. In the meantime, mRNA and protein levels of Nrf2 encoding antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H: quinine oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were consistently elevated time- and dose-dependently both in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Taken together, the presence study demonstrated the activation of NRF2 pathway, an early antioxidant defensive response, in both cerebral cortex and hippocampus upon inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure in vivo. A better knowledge on the roles of NRF2 pathway in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis would be helpful for the strategies on improvement of neurotoxicity related to this metalloid.

  8. Urinary arsenic metabolism in a Western Chinese population exposed to high-dose inorganic arsenic in drinking water: influence of ethnicity and genetic polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Fu, Songbo; Wu, Jie; Li, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yan; Gao, Yanhui; Yao, Feifei; Qiu, Chuanying; Song, Li; Wu, Yu; Liao, Yongjian; Sun, Dianjun

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the differences in urinary arsenic metabolism patterns of individuals exposed to a high concentration of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in drinking water, an epidemiological investigation was conducted with 155 individuals living in a village where the arsenic concentration in the drinking water was 969μg/L. Blood and urine samples were collected from 66 individuals including 51 cases with skin lesions and 15 controls without skin lesions. The results showed that monomethylated arsenic (MMA), the percentage of MMA (%MMA) and the ratio of MMA to iAs (MMA/iAs) were significantly increased in patients with skin lesions as compared to controls, while dimethylated arsenic (DMA), the percentage of DMA (%DMA) and the ratio of DMA to MMA (DMA/MMA) were significantly reduced. The percent DMA of individuals with the Ala/Asp genotype of glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) was significantly lower than those with Ala/Ala. The percent MMA of individuals with the A2B/A2B genotype of arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) was significantly lower than those with AB/A2B. The iAs and total arsenic (tAs) content in the urine of a Tibetan population were significantly higher than that of Han and Hui ethnicities, whereas MMA/iAs was significantly lower than that of Han and Hui ethnicities. Our results showed that when exposed to the same arsenic environment, different individuals exhibited different urinary arsenic metabolism patterns. Gender and ethnicity affect these differences and above polymorphisms may be effectors too.

  9. Optimization of microwave-assisted extraction for six inorganic and organic arsenic species in chicken tissues using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenfeng; Hu, Yuanan; Cheng, Hefa

    2015-09-01

    Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the parameters for microwave-assisted extraction of six major inorganic and organic arsenic species (As(III), As(V), dimethyl arsenic acid, monomethyl arsenic acid, p-arsanilic acid, and roxarsone) from chicken tissues, followed by detection using a high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry detection method, which allows the simultaneous analysis of both inorganic and organic arsenic species in the extract in a single run. Effects of extraction medium, solution pH, liquid-to-solid ratio, and the temperature and time of microwave-assisted extraction on the extraction of the targeted arsenic species were studied. The optimum microwave-assisted extraction conditions were: 100 mg of chicken tissue, extracted by 5 mL of 22% v/v methanol, 90 mmol/L (NH4 )2 HPO4 , and 0.07% v/v trifluoroacetic acid (with pH adjusted to 10.0 by ammonium hydroxide solution), ramping for 10 min to 71°C, and holding for 11 min. The method has good extraction performance for total arsenic in the spiked and nonspiked chicken tissues (104.0 ± 13.8% and 91.6 ± 7.8%, respectively), except for the ones with arsenic contents close to the quantitation limits. Limits of quantitation (S/N = 10) for As(III), As(V), dimethyl arsenic acid, monomethyl arsenic acid, p-arsanilic acid, and roxarsone in chicken tissues using this method were 0.012, 0.058, 0.039, 0.061, 0.102, and 0.240 mg/kg (dry weight), respectively.

  10. Inorganic arsenic and respiratory health, from early life exposure to sex-specific effects: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Tiffany R; Perzanowski, Matthew; Graziano, Joseph H

    2016-05-01

    This systematic review synthesizes the diverse body of epidemiologic research accrued on inorganic arsenic exposure and respiratory health effects. Twenty-nine articles were identified that examined the relationship between inorganic arsenic exposure and respiratory outcomes (i.e. lung function, symptoms, acute respiratory infections, chronic non-malignant lung diseases, and non-malignant lung disease mortality). There was strong evidence of a general association between arsenic and non-malignant respiratory illness, including consistent evidence on lung function impairment, acute respiratory tract infections, respiratory symptoms, and non-malignant lung disease mortality. Overall, early life exposure (i.e. in utero and/or early-childhood) had a marked effect throughout the lifespan. This review also identified some research gaps, including limited evidence at lower levels of exposure (water arsenic <100μg/L), mixed evidence of sex differences, and some uncertainty on arsenic and any single non-malignant respiratory disease or pathological process. Common limitations, including potential publication bias; non-comparability of outcome measures across included articles; incomplete exposure histories; and limited confounder control attenuated the cumulative strength of the evidence as it relates to US populations. This systematic review provides a comprehensive assessment of the epidemiologic evidence and should be used to guide future research on arsenic's detrimental effects on respiratory health.

  11. Biotransformation and detoxification of inorganic arsenic in Bombay oyster Saccostrea cucullata.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Guo, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Yanyan; Liu, Huaxue; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) exists as the toxic inorganic forms in marine water and sediment, while marine oysters usually accumulate high As contents mostly as the less toxic organic forms. It has not yet been clear that how As is biotransformed in marine oysters. This study therefore investigated the biotransformation and detoxification of two inorganic As forms (As(III) and As(V)) in Bombay oyster Saccostrea cucullata after waterborne exposures for 30 days. Seven treatments of dissolved As exposure (clean seawater, 1, 5, 20 mg/L As(III), and 1, 5, 20 mg/L As(V)) were performed. Body As concentration increased significantly after all As exposure treatments except 1mg/L As(V). Total As, As(III), and As(V) concentration were positive correlated with glutathione-S-transferases (GST) activities, suggesting GST might play an important role in the As biotransformation and detoxification process. Organic As species were predominant in control and the low As exposed oysters, whereas a large fraction of As was remained as the inorganic forms in the high As exposed oysters, suggesting As could be biotransformed efficiently in the oysters in clean or light contaminated environment. The results of As speciation demonstrated the As biotransformation in the oysters included As(V) reduction, methylation to monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), and subsequent conversion to arsenobetaine (AsB). More As was distributed in the subcellular metallothionein-like proteins fraction (MTLP) functioning sequestration and detoxification in the inorganic As exposed oysters, suggesting it was also a strategy for oysters against As stress. In summary, this study elucidated that marine oysters had high ability to accumulate, biotransform, and detoxify inorganic As.

  12. Systematic review of differential inorganic arsenic exposure in minority, low-income, and indigenous populations in the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is carcinogenic in humans and also associated with cardiovascular, respiratory, and skin diseases. Natural and anthropogenic sources contribute to low concentrations of iAs in water, food, soil, and air. Minority and low income populations are often at hig...

  13. 75 FR 7477 - Draft Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic: In Support of the Summary Information on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of... Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)'' (EPA/635/R-10/001). The draft document was prepared by the... Inorganic Arsenic: In Support of the Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System...

  14. Inorganic arsenic in starchy roots, tubers, and plantain and assessment of cancer risk of sub-Saharan African populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starchy roots, tubers, and plantain (RTP) are the staple food in sub-Saharan Africa, and also important energy sources in Asia, Europe, and America. In this work, inorganic arsenic (iAs) in these crops was quantified by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) after solid phase e...

  15. TISSUE DISTRIBUTION OF INORGANIC ARSENIC (AS) AND ITS METHYLATED METABOLITES IN MICE FOLLOWING ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF ARSENATE (ASV)

    EPA Science Inventory

    TISSUE DISTRIBUTION OF INORGANIC ARSENIC (iAs) AND ITS METHYLATED METABOLITES IN MICE FOLLOWING ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF ARSENATE (AsV). E M Kenyon1, L M Del Razo2, and M F Hughes1. 1NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA; 2CINVESTAV-IPN, Mexico City, Mexico.

    The relationship o...

  16. Speciation of inorganic arsenic species and total inorganic arsenic in rice using microwave-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi-Jouibari, Toraj; Fattahi, Nazir

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) via rice consumption is of increasing concern. In the present study, microwave-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction (MADLLME) and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) were developed for the speciation of iAs in rice samples. After microwave-assisted digestion, the As(III) ion reacted with diethyldithiophosphoric acid (DDTP) to form an As-DDTP complex and was extracted at the same time. Some parameters affecting digestion, complex formation, and extraction were studied and optimised. Under the optimised conditions, a detection limit of 0.2 µg kg(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9901 were obtained with a calibration curve in the range of 0.5-200 µg kg(-1). Total iAs was determined after reduction of As(V) to As(III) with sodium thiosulfate and potassium iodide, and As(V) was calculated by difference. The proposed extraction procedure was successfully applied for the determination of iAs ions in certified reference materials (NIST CRM 1568a and NMIJ CRM 7503a) and 10 rice samples produced in Iran and other Asian countries.

  17. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi reduced the ratios of inorganic/organic arsenic in rice grains.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Chen, X W; Wong, M H

    2016-02-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) - Rhizophagus intraradices was inoculated to rice to investigate its effects on arsenic (As) uptake, grain As speciation, and rhizospheric As concentration of six rice cultivars grown in As-amended soil (60 mg As kg(-1) soil). The AMF inoculation induced either positive, neutral or negative responses in rice grown in As contaminated soil, suggesting that functional diversity may exist in AMF symbiosis when As is taken up and transferred. The ratios of inorganic/organic As concentrations in rice grains of all cultivars were significantly reduced by AMF, that involved the transformation of inorganic As into less toxic organic form dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in rice. AMF decreased significantly total As and inorganic As concentrations in rice grains of Handao 3. Positive correlations (R(2) = 0.30-0.56, P < 0.05) between As in the rhizospheric soil solution and As in rice grain at different periods were observed. This inferred that the As survey of soil solution can be an effective measure for evaluating As in grains.

  18. Is it possible to agree on a value for inorganic arsenic in food? The outcome of IMEP-112.

    PubMed

    de la Calle, M B; Baer, I; Robouch, P; Cordeiro, F; Emteborg, H; Baxter, M J; Brereton, N; Raber, G; Velez, D; Devesa, V; Rubio, R; Llorente-Mirandes, T; Raab, A; Feldmann, J; Sloth, J J; Rasmussen, R R; D'Amato, M; Cubadda, F

    2012-11-01

    Two of the core tasks of the European Union Reference Laboratory for Heavy Metals in Feed and Food (EU-RL-HM) are to provide advice to the Directorate General for Health and Consumers (DG SANCO) on scientific matters and to organise proficiency tests among appointed National Reference Laboratories. This article presents the results of the 12th proficiency test organised by the EU-RL-HM (IMEP-112) that focused on the determination of total and inorganic arsenic in wheat, vegetable food and algae. The test items used in this exercise were: wheat sampled in a field with a high concentration of arsenic in the soil, spinach (SRM 1570a from NIST) and an algae candidate reference material. Participation in this exercise was open to laboratories from all around the world to be able to judge the state of the art of the determination of total and, more in particular, inorganic arsenic in several food commodities. Seventy-four laboratories from 31 countries registered to the exercise; 30 of them were European National Reference Laboratories. The assigned values for IMEP-112 were provided by a group of seven laboratories expert in the field of arsenic speciation analysis in food. Laboratory results were rated with z and ζ scores (zeta scores) in accordance with ISO 13528. Around 85 % of the participants performed satisfactorily for inorganic arsenic in vegetable food and 60 % did for inorganic arsenic in wheat, but only 20 % of the laboratories taking part in the exercise were able to report satisfactory results in the algae test material.

  19. DIETARY ARSENIC EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT USING ENZYMATIC BASED EXTRACTION CONDITIONS AND DETECTION OF URINARY THIO-ARSENICALS AS METABOLITES OF EXPOSURE - MCEARD2

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inorganic arsenic is classified as a carcinogen and has been linked to lung and bladder cancer as well as other non-cancerous health effects. Because of these health effects the U.S. EPA has set a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) at 10ppb based on a linear extrapolation of risk an...

  20. Arsenic speciation, distribution, and bioaccessibility in shrews and their food.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, Maeve M; Koch, Iris; Reimer, Kenneth J

    2012-04-01

    Shrews (Sorex cinereus) collected at a historic mine in Nova Scotia, Canada, had approximately twice the arsenic body burden and 100 times greater daily intake of arsenic compared with shrews from a nearby uncontaminated background site. Shrews store arsenic as inorganic and simple methylated arsenicals. Much of the arsenic associated with their primary food source, i.e., small invertebrates, may be soil adsorbed to their exoskeletons. A physiologically based extraction test estimated that 47 ± 2% of invertebrate arsenic is bioaccessible in the shrew gastrointestinal tract. Overall, shrews appear to be efficient at processing and excreting inorganic arsenic.

  1. Arsenic

    MedlinePlus

    ... and minerals. Arsenic compounds are used to preserve wood, as pesticides, and in some industries. Arsenic can ... Breathing sawdust or burning smoke from arsenic-treated wood Living in an area with high levels of ...

  2. In vitro study of transporters involved in intestinal absorption of inorganic arsenic.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Marta; Barrios, Julio A; Vélez, Dinoraz; Devesa, Vicenta

    2012-02-20

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) [As(III)+As(V)] is a drinking water contaminant, and human exposure to these arsenic species has been linked with a wide range of health effects. The main path of exposure is the oral route, and the intestinal epithelium is the first physiological barrier that iAs must cross in order to be absorbed. However, there is a lack of information about intestinal iAs absorption. The aim of this study was to evaluate the participation of certain transporters [glucose transporters (GLUT and SGLT), organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs), aquaporins (AQPs), and phosphate transporters (NaPi and PiT)] in intestinal absorption of As(V) and As(III), using the Caco-2 cell line as a model of the intestinal epithelium. For this purpose, the effects of chemical inhibition and gene silencing of the transporters of interest on iAs uptake were evaluated, and also the differential expression of these transporters after treatment with iAs. The results show that chemical inhibition using rifamycin SV (OATP inhibitor), phloridzin (SGLT inhibitor), phloretin (GLUT and AQP inhibitor), and copper sulfate (AQP inhibitor) leads to a significant reduction in the apparent permeability and cellular retention of As(III). RT-qPCR indicates up-regulation of GLUT2, GLUT5, OATPB, AQP3, and AQP10 after exposure to As(III), while exposure to As(V) increases the expression of sodium-dependent phosphate transporters, especially NaPiIIb. Gene silencing of OATPB, AQP10, and GLUT5 for As(III) and NaPiIIb for As(V) significantly reduces uptake of the inorganic forms. These results indicate that these transporters may be involved in intestinal absorption of iAs.

  3. Survey of inorganic arsenic in marine animals and marine certified reference materials by anion exchange high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sloth, Jens J; Larsen, Erik H; Julshamn, Kåre

    2005-07-27

    A method for the determination of inorganic arsenic in seafood samples using high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. The principle of the method relied on microwave-assisted alkaline dissolution of the sample, which at the same time oxidized arsenite [As(III)] to arsenate [As(V)], whereby inorganic arsenic could be determined as the single species As(V). Anion exchange chromatography using isocratic elution with aqueous ammonium carbonate as the mobile phase was used for the separation of As(V) from other coextracted organoarsenic compounds, including arsenobetaine. The stability of organoarsenic compounds during the sample pretreatment was investigated, and no degradation/conversion to inorganic arsenic was detected. The method was employed for the determination of inorganic arsenic in a variety of seafood samples including fish, crustaceans, bivalves, and marine mammals as well as a range of marine certified reference materials, and the results were compared to values published in the literature. For fish and marine mammals, the results were in most cases below the limit of detection. For other sample types, inorganic arsenic concentrations up to 0.060 mg kg(-)(1) were found. In all samples, the inorganic arsenic content constituted less than 1% of the total arsenic content.

  4. Toxicological properties of the thiolated inorganic arsenic and arsenosugar metabolite thio-dimethylarsinic acid in human bladder cells.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Franziska; Leffers, Larissa; Weber, Till; Berndt, Svenia; Mangerich, Aswin; Beneke, Sascha; Bürkle, Alexander; Schwerdtle, Tanja

    2014-04-01

    Thio-dimethylarsinic acid (thio-DMA(V)) has recently been identified as human metabolite after exposure toward both the human carcinogen inorganic arsenic and arsenosugars, which are the major arsenical constituents of marine algae. This study aims to get further insight in the toxic modes of action of thio-DMA(V) in cultured human urothelial cells. Among others effects of thio-DMA(V) on eight cell death related endpoints, cell cycle distribution, genotoxicity, cellular bioavailability as well as for the first time its impact on DNA damage induced poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation were investigated and compared to effects induced by arsenite. The data indicate that thio-DMA(V) exerts its cellular toxicity in a similar or even lower concentration range, however most likely via different mechanisms, than arsenite. Most interestingly, thio-DMA(V) decreased damage-induced cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation by 35,000-fold lower concentrations than arsenite. The inhibition of this essential DNA-damage induced and DNA-repair related signaling reaction might contribute to inorganic arsenic induced toxicity, at least in the bladder. Therefore, and also because thio-DMA(V) is to date by far the most toxic human metabolite identified after arsenosugar intake, thio-DMA(V) should contemporary be fully (also in vivo) toxicologically characterized, to assess risks to human health related to inorganic arsenic but especially arsenosugar dietary intake.

  5. Blood Pressure, Left Ventricular Geometry, and Systolic Function in Children Exposed to Inorganic Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Osorio-Yáñez, Citlalli; Ayllon-Vergara, Julio C.; Arreola-Mendoza, Laura; Aguilar-Madrid, Guadalupe; Hernández-Castellanos, Erika; Sánchez-Peña, Luz C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a ubiquitous element present in the groundwater worldwide. Cardiovascular effects related to iAs exposure have been studied extensively in adult populations. Few epidemiological studies have been focused on iAs exposure–related cardiovascular disease in children. Objective: In this study we investigated the association between iAs exposure, blood pressure (BP), and functional and anatomical echocardiographic parameters in children. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 161 children between 3 and 8 years was conducted in Central Mexico. The total concentration of arsenic (As) species in urine (U-tAs) was determined by hydride generation–cryotrapping–atomic absorption spectrometry and lifetime iAs exposure was estimated by multiplying As concentrations measured in drinking water by the duration of water consumption in years (LAsE). BP was measured by standard protocols, and M-mode echocardiographic parameters were determined by ultrasonography. Results: U-tAs concentration and LAsE were significantly associated with diastolic (DBP) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in multivariable linear regression models: DBP and SBP were 0.013 (95% CI: 0.002, 0.024) and 0.021 (95% CI: 0.004, 0.037) mmHg higher in association with each 1-ng/mL increase in U-tAs (p < 0.025), respectively. Left ventricular mass (LVM) was significantly associated with LAsE [5.5 g higher (95% CI: 0.65, 10.26) in children with LAsE > 620 compared with < 382 μg/L-year; p = 0.03] in an adjusted multivariable model. The systolic function parameters left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) and shortening fraction were 3.67% (95% CI: –7.14, –0.20) and 3.41% (95% CI: –6.44, –0.37) lower, respectively, in children with U-tAs > 70 ng/mL compared with < 35 ng/mL. Conclusion: Early-life exposure to iAs was significantly associated with higher BP and LVM and with lower EF in our study population of Mexican children. Citation: Osorio-Yáñez C, Ayllon-Vergara JC

  6. Inorganic arsenic represses interleukin-17A expression in human activated Th17 lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Morzadec, Claudie; Macoch, Mélinda; Robineau, Marc; Sparfel, Lydie; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2012-08-01

    Trivalent inorganic arsenic [As(III)] is an efficient anticancer agent used to treat patients suffering from acute promyelocytic leukemia. Recently, experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that this metalloid can also cure lymphoproliferative and/or pro-inflammatory syndromes in different murine models of chronic immune-mediated diseases. T helper (Th) 1 and Th17 lymphocytes play a central role in development of these diseases, in mice and humans, especially by secreting the potent pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ and IL-17A, respectively. As(III) impairs basic functions of human T cells but its ability to modulate secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by differentiated Th lymphocytes is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that As(III), used at concentrations clinically achievable in plasma of patients, has no effect on the secretion of interferon-γ from Th1 cells but almost totally blocks the expression and the release of IL-17A from human Th17 lymphocytes co-stimulated for five days with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies, in the presence of differentiating cytokines. In addition, As(III) specifically reduces mRNA levels of the retinoic-related orphan receptor (ROR)C gene which encodes RORγt, a key transcription factor controlling optimal IL-17 expression in fully differentiated Th17 cells. The metalloid also blocks initial expression of IL-17 gene induced by the co-stimulation, probably in part by impairing activation of the JNK/c-Jun pathway. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that As(III) represses expression of the major pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17A produced by human Th17 lymphocytes, thus strengthening the idea that As(III) may be useful to treat inflammatory immune-mediated diseases in humans. -- Highlights: ► Arsenic inhibits secretion of IL-17A from human naïve and memory Th17 lymphocytes. ► Arsenic represses early expression of IL-17A gene in human activated T lymphocytes. ► Arsenic interferes with activation of

  7. RE:RE: Comments on the Draft US EPA Document Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic: In Support of the Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS).

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Letter from the Organic Arsenical Products Task Force expressing concern about aspects of the Science Advisory Board Workgroup's review of a draft document Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic: In Support of the Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) and decision not to grant more time to prepare for meeting.

  8. Comments on the Draft U.S. EPA Document Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic: In Support of the Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Organic Arsenical Products Task Force (OAPTF) hereby submits the appended list of materials from the scientific literature on inorganic arsenic for inclusion in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) docket maintained in support of the Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Report (Report)

  9. Comments on the Draft Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic: In Support of the Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Comments from the members of the SAB Arsenic Review Panel on the draft Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic in Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) document that will be review by a Work Group of the Chartered SAB.

  10. Determination of inorganic arsenic species in natural waters--benefits of separation and preconcentration on ion exchange and hybrid resins.

    PubMed

    Ben Issa, Nureddin; Rajaković-Ognjanović, Vladana N; Jovanović, Branislava M; Rajaković, Ljubinka V

    2010-07-19

    A simple method for the separation and determination of inorganic arsenic (iAs) species in natural and drinking water was developed. Procedures for sample preparation, separation of As(III) and As(V) species and preconcentration of the total iAs on fixed bed columns were defined. Two resins, a strong base anion exchange (SBAE) resin and a hybrid (HY) resin were utilized. The inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry method was applied as the analytical method for the determination of the arsenic concentration in water. The governing factors for the ion exchange/sorption of arsenic on resins in a batch and a fixed bed flow system were analyzed and compared. Acidity of the water, which plays an important role in the control of the ionic or molecular forms of arsenic species, was beneficial for the separation; by adjusting the pH values to less than 8.00, the SBAE resin separated As(V) from As(III) in water by retaining As(V) and allowing As(III) to pass through. The sorption activity of the hydrated iron oxide particles integrated into the HY resin was beneficial for bonding of all iAs species over a wide range of pH values from 5.00 to 11.00. The resin capacities were calculated according to the breakthrough points in a fixed bed flow system. At pH 7.50, the SBAE resin bound more than 370 microg g(-1) of As(V) while the HY resin bound more than 4150 microg g(-1) of As(III) and more than 3500 microg g(-1) of As(V). The high capacities and selectivity of the resins were considered as advantageous for the development and application of two procedures, one for the separation and determination of As(III) (with SBAE) and the other for the preconcentration and determination of the total arsenic (with HY resin). Methods were established through basic analytical procedures (with external standards, certified reference materials and the standard addition method) and by the parallel analysis of some samples using the atomic absorption spectrometry-hydride generation

  11. Urinary arsenic metabolism in a Western Chinese population exposed to high-dose inorganic arsenic in drinking water: Influence of ethnicity and genetic polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Songbo; Wu, Jie; Li, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yan; Gao, Yanhui; Yao, Feifei; Qiu, Chuanying; Song, Li; Wu, Yu; Liao, Yongjian; Sun, Dianjun

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the differences in urinary arsenic metabolism patterns of individuals exposed to a high concentration of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in drinking water, an epidemiological investigation was conducted with 155 individuals living in a village where the arsenic concentration in the drinking water was 969 μg/L. Blood and urine samples were collected from 66 individuals including 51 cases with skin lesions and 15 controls without skin lesions. The results showed that monomethylated arsenic (MMA), the percentage of MMA (%MMA) and the ratio of MMA to iAs (MMA/iAs) were significantly increased in patients with skin lesions as compared to controls, while dimethylated arsenic (DMA), the percentage of DMA (%DMA) and the ratio of DMA to MMA (DMA/MMA) were significantly reduced. The percent DMA of individuals with the Ala/Asp genotype of glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) was significantly lower than those with Ala/Ala. The percent MMA of individuals with the A2B/A2B genotype of arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) was significantly lower than those with AB/A2B. The iAs and total arsenic (tAs) content in the urine of a Tibetan population were significantly higher than that of Han and Hui ethnicities, whereas MMA/iAs was significantly lower than that of Han and Hui ethnicities. Our results showed that when exposed to the same arsenic environment, different individuals exhibited different urinary arsenic metabolism patterns. Gender and ethnicity affect these differences and above polymorphisms may be effectors too. - Highlights: • We first survey a village with high iAs content in the drinking water (969 μg/L). • 90 villagers suffered typical skin lesions with a morbidity rate of 58%. • Cases exhibited higher %MMA and MMA/iAs, and lower %DMA and DMA/MMA than controls. • Gender and ethnicity affect the differences of iAs methylation metabolism levels. • GSTO1 and AS3MT gene polymorphisms may be factors too.

  12. Inorganic Arsenic and Basal Cell Carcinoma in Areas of Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia: A Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Giovanni; Vahter, Marie; Clemens, Felicity; Goessler, Walter; Gurzau, Eugen; Hemminki, Kari; Hough, Rupert; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Kumar, Rajiv; Rudnai, Peter; Surdu, Simona

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a potent carcinogen, but there is a lack of information about cancer risk for concentrations < 100 μg/L in drinking water. Objectives: We aimed to quantify skin cancer relative risks in relation to iAs exposure < 100 μg/L and the modifying effects of iAs metabolism. Methods: The Arsenic Health Risk Assessment and Molecular Epidemiology (ASHRAM) study, a case–control study, was conducted in areas of Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia with reported presence of iAs in groundwater. Consecutively diagnosed cases of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin were histologically confirmed; controls were general surgery, orthopedic, and trauma patients who were frequency matched to cases by age, sex, and area of residence. Exposure indices were constructed based on information on iAs intake over the lifetime of participants. iAs metabolism status was classified based on urinary concentrations of methylarsonic acid (MA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). Associations were estimated by multivariable logistic regression. Results: A total of 529 cases with BCC and 540 controls were recruited for the study. BCC was positively associated with three indices of iAs exposure: peak daily iAs dose rate, cumulative iAs dose, and lifetime average water iAs concentration. The adjusted odds ratio per 10-μg/L increase in average lifetime water iAs concentration was 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 1.08, 1.28). The estimated effect of iAs on cancer was stronger in participants with urinary markers indicating incomplete metabolism of iAs: higher percentage of MA in urine or a lower percentage of DMA. Conclusion: We found a positive association between BCC and exposure to iAs through drinking water with concentrations < 100 μg/L. PMID:22436128

  13. Inorganic arsenic causes cell apoptosis in mouse cerebrum through an oxidative stress-regulated signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yen, Cheng Chien; Ho, Tsung Jung; Wu, Chin Ching; Chang, Chun Fang; Su, Chin Chuan; Chen, Ya Wen; Jinn, Tzyy Rong; Lu, Tien Hui; Cheng, Po Wen; Su, Yi Chang; Liu, Shing Hwa; Huang, Chun Fa

    2011-06-01

    Arsenic pollution is a major public health problem worldwide. Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is usually more harmful than organic ones. iAs pollution increases the risk of human diseases such as peripheral vascular disease and cancer. However, the toxicological effects of iAs in the brain are mostly unclear. Here, we investigated the toxic effects and possible mechanisms of iAs in the cerebrum of mice after exposure to iAs (0.5 and 5 ppm (mg/l) As(2)O(3), via the drinking water), which was the possible human exposed dose via the ingestion in iAs-contaminated areas, for 6 consecutive weeks. iAs dose-dependently caused an increase of LPO production in the plasma and cerebral cortex. iAs also decreased the reduced glutathione levels and the expressions of NQO1 and GPx mRNA in the cerebral cortex. These impairments in the cerebral cortex caused by iAs exposure were significantly correlated with the accumulation of As. Moreover, iAs induced the production of apoptotic cells and activation of caspase-3, up-regulation of Bax and Bak, and down-regulation of Mcl-1 in the cerebral cortex. Exposure to iAs also triggered the expression of ER stress-related genes, including GRP78, GRP94, and CHOP. Meanwhile, an increase of p38 activation and dephosphorylation of ERK1/2 were shown in the cerebral cortex as a result of iAs-exposed mice. These iAs-induced damages and apoptosis-related signals could be significantly reversed by NAC. Taken together, these results suggest that iAs-induced oxidative stress causes cellular apoptosis in the cerebrum, signaling of p38 and ERK1/2, and ER stress may be involved in iAs-induced cerebral toxicity.

  14. Toenails as a biomarker of inorganic arsenic intake from drinking water and foods.

    PubMed

    Slotnick, Melissa J; Meliker, Jaymie R; AvRuskin, Gillian A; Ghosh, Debashis; Nriagu, Jerome O

    2007-01-15

    Toenails were used recently in epidemiological and environmental health studies as a means of assessing exposure to arsenic from drinking water. While positive correlations between toenail and drinking-water arsenic concentrations were reported in the literature, a significant percentage of the variation in toenail arsenic concentration remains unexplained by drinking-water concentration alone. Here, the influence of water consumption at home and work, food intake, and drinking-water concentration on toenail arsenic concentration was investigated using data from a case-control study being conducted in 11 counties of Michigan. The results from 440 controls are presented. Log-transformed drinking-water arsenic concentration at home was a significant predictor (p < .05) of toenail arsenic concentration (R2 = .32). When arsenic intake from consumption of tap water and beverages made from tap water (microg/L arsenic x L/d = microg/d) was used as a predictor variable, the correlation was markedly increased for individuals with >1 microg/L arsenic (R2 = .48). Increased intake of seafood and intake of arsenic from water at work were independently and significantly associated with increased toenail arsenic concentration. However, when added to intake at home, work drinking-water exposure and food intake had little influence on the overall correlation. These results suggest that arsenic exposure from drinking-water consumption is an important determinant of toenail arsenic concentration, and therefore should be considered when validating and applying toenails as a biomarker of arsenic exposure.

  15. High resolution profile of inorganic aqueous geochemistry and key redox zones in an arsenic bearing aquifer in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Richards, Laura A; Magnone, Daniel; Sovann, Chansopheaktra; Kong, Chivuth; Uhlemann, Sebastian; Kuras, Oliver; van Dongen, Bart E; Ballentine, Christopher J; Polya, David A

    2017-07-15

    Arsenic contamination of groundwaters in South and Southeast Asia is a major threat to public health. In order to better understand the geochemical controls on the mobility of arsenic in a heavily arsenic-affected aquifer in northern Kandal Province, Cambodia, key changes in inorganic aqueous geochemistry have been monitored at high vertical and lateral resolution along dominant groundwater flow paths along two distinct transects. The two transects are characterized by differing geochemical, hydrological and lithological conditions. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater are highly heterogenous, and are broadly positively associated with iron and negatively associated with sulfate and dissolved oxygen. The observed correlations are generally consistent with arsenic mobilization by reductive-dissolution of iron (hydr)oxides. Key redox zones, as identified using groupings of the PHREEQC model equilibrium electron activity of major redox couples (notably ammonium/nitrite; ammonium/nitrate; nitrite/nitrate; dissolved oxygen/water) have been identified and vary with depth, site and season. Mineral saturation is also characterized. Seasonal changes in groundwater chemistry were observed in areas which were (i) sandy and of high permeability; (ii) in close proximity to rivers; and/or (iii) in close proximity to ponds. Such changes are attributed to monsoonal-driven surface-groundwater interactions and are consistent with the separate provenance of recharge sources as identified using stable isotope mixing models.

  16. Simultaneously removal of inorganic arsenic species from stored rainwater in arsenic endemic area by leaves of Tecomella undulata: a multivariate study.

    PubMed

    Brahman, Kapil Dev; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Abro, Muhammad Ishaque; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Ali, Jamshed; Khan, Sumaira

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, an indigenous biosorbent (leaves of Tecomella undulata) was used for the simultaneous removal of inorganic arsenic species (As(III) and As(V)) from the stored rainwater in Tharparkar, Pakistan. The Plackett-Burman experimental design was used as a multivariate strategy for the evaluation of the effects of six factors/variables on the biosorption of inorganic arsenic species, simultaneously. Central composite design (CCD) was used to found the optimum values of significant factors for the removal of As(III) and As(V). Initial concentrations of both inorganic As species, pH, biosorbent dose, and contact time were selected as independent factors in CCD, while the adsorption capacity (q e) was considered as a response function. The separation of inorganic As species in water samples before and after biosorption was carried out by cloud point and solid-phase extraction methods. Theoretical values of pH, concentration of analytes, biosorbent dose, and contact time were calculated by quadratic equation for 100 % biosorption of both inorganic As species in aqueous media. Experimental data were modeled by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Thermodynamic and kinetic study indicated that the biosorption of As(III) and As(V) was followed by pseudo second order. It was concluded that the indigenous biosorbent material efficiently and simultaneously removed both As species in the range of 70.8 to 98.5 % of total contents in studied ground water samples. Graphical abstract Optimizing the significant varable by central 2(3) + star orthogonal composite design.

  17. Total and inorganic arsenic in foods of the first Hong Kong total diet study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Stephen Wai-cheung; Lam, Chi-ho; Chan, Benny Tsz-pun

    2014-04-01

    Arsenic (As) is a metalloid that occurs in different inorganic and organic forms, which are found in the environment from both natural occurrence and anthropogenic activity. The inorganic forms of As (iAs) are more toxic as compared with the organic As, but so far most of the occurrence data in food collected in the framework of official food control are still reported as total As without differentiating the various As species. In this paper, total As and iAs contents of 600 total diet study (TDS) samples, subdivided into 15 different food groups, were quantified by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP/MS) and hydride generation (HG) ICP/MS respectively. The method detection limits for both total As and iAs were 3 μg As kg(-1). As the samples were prepared for TDS, food items were purchased directly from the market or prepared as for normal consumption, i.e. table ready, in the manner most representative of and consistent with cultural habits in Hong Kong as far as practicable. The highest total As and iAs content were found in 'fish, seafood and their products' and 'vegetables and their products' respectively. Besides, this paper also presents the ratios of iAs and total As content in different ready-to-eat food items. The highest ratio of iAs to total As was found in 'vegetables and their products'. It is likely that iAs in vegetables maintained its status even after cooking.

  18. GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN MOUSE BLADDER TISSUE IN RESPONSE TO INORGANIC ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic human exposures to high arsenic concentrations are associated with lung, skin, and bladder cancer. Considerable controversy exists concerning arsenic mode of action and low dose extrapolation. This investigation was designed to identify dose-response changes in gene expre...

  19. A luminescent-water soluble inorganic co-crystal for a selective pico-molar range arsenic(III) sensor in water medium.

    PubMed

    Dey, Biswajit; Saha, Rajat; Mukherjee, Priyanka

    2013-08-14

    The water solution of an intriguing luminescent 'Inorganic Co-crystal' of Cu(II) monomeric and dimeric units shows extremely selective sensing ability towards inorganic arsenic(III) in water medium in the pico-molar concentration range even in the presence of other cations.

  20. ARSENIC (+3 OXIDATION STATE) METHYLTRANSFERASE AND THE METHYLATION OF ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolic conversion of inorganic arsenic into methylated products is a multistep process that yields mono, di, and trimethylated arsenicals. In recent years, it has become apparent that formation of methylated metabolites of inorganic arsenic is not necessarily a detoxification...

  1. Inorganic arsenic can be potent granulotoxin in mammalian neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Masumeh; Mehrzad, Jalil; Afshari, Reza; Saleh-Moghaddam, Massoud; Mahmudy Gharaie, Mohamad Hosein

    2016-09-01

    An important outcome arising out of occupational/environmental exposure to arsenic (As) is immunotoxicity. To determine the impact of inorganic As on innate immune cells, effects of a low dose of NaAsO2 (i.e. 20 ng As/ml) on select parameters associated with human and bovine neutrophils (PMN) were evaluated in vitro. PMN isolated from the blood of healthy individuals and cows (n = 8/treatment) were pre-incubated with NaAsO2 for 12 h before effects on PMN phagocytosis, transcription of TLR2, TLR4 and CD64 in human PMN - as well as on phagocytosis-dependent/-independent cell chemiluminescence (CL), phagocytosis and killing of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, PMN H2O2 production and necrosis and TLR4 transcription in bovine PMN - were assessed. Relative to control (no As) PMN, treatment with As significantly decreased phagocytic capacity and CD64 mRNA, but increased TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA, in human PMN. In bovine PMN, while As also led to increased TLR4 mRNA abundance, it resulted in decreases in phagocytosis-dependent and -independent CL, PMN H2O2 production, PMN phagocytosis and killing of both E. coli and S. aureus by PMN. Considering the broad roles of PMN in immunology, the results of these studies increase our understanding of functional consequences of As exposure in inducing immunotoxicity and increasing susceptibility to (infectious) diseases in mammals.

  2. Concentrations of Inorganic Arsenic in Milled Rice from China and Associated Dietary Exposure Assessment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yatao; Wang, Min; Mao, Xuefei; Qian, Yongzhong; Chen, Tianjin; Zhang, Ying

    2015-12-23

    Total arsenic (As) and inorganic As (Asi) in milled rice (n = 1653) collected from China were studied to evaluate the contamination level, distribution, and health risks. The mean concentrations of the total As and Asi were 116.5 and 90.9 μg/kg, respectively. There were significant differences (P < 0.01) between the 11 provinces, and 1.1% of samples exceeded the maximum contaminant level established by Chinese legislation. According to the exposure assessment method of probabilistic simulation, all values of the target hazard quotients (THQs) for chronic noncarcinogenic risks (skin lesions as the point of departure) were below 1, suggesting that the Chinese population will not encounter a significant noncarcinogenic risk. However, the mean values of margin of exposure (MOE) for lung cancer risks ranging from 3.86 to 8.54 were under 100 for all age groups and genders of the Chinese population; moreover, MOE values for some major rice-producing and -consuming countries, such as Japan, Thailand, Bangladesh, and the United States, were all also below 100. More attention should be paid to carcinogenic risks from rice Asi intake, and some control measures to reduce rice Asi intake should be taken.

  3. Coping with arsenic-based pesticides on Dine (Navajo) textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jae R.

    Arsenic-based pesticide residues have been detected on Arizona State Museum's (ASM) Dine (Navajo) textile collection using a handheld portable X-ray (pXRF) spectrometer. The removal of this toxic pesticide from historic textiles in museums collections is necessary to reduce potential health risks to Native American communities, museum professionals, and visitors. The research objective was divided into three interconnected stages: (1) empirically calibrate the pXRF instrument for arsenic contaminated cotton and wool textiles; (2) engineer an aqueous washing treatment exploring the effects of time, temperature, agitation, and pH conditions to efficiently remove arsenic from wool textiles while minimizing damage to the structure and properties of the textile; (3) demonstrate the devised aqueous washing treatment method on three historic Navajo textiles known to have arsenic-based pesticide residues. The preliminary results removed 96% of arsenic from a high arsenic concentration (~1000 ppm) textile opposed to minimal change for low arsenic concentration textiles (<100 ppm).

  4. The metabolism of inorganic arsenic oxides, gallium arsenide, and arsine: a toxicochemical review.

    PubMed

    Carter, Dean E; Aposhian, H Vasken; Gandolfi, A Jay

    2003-12-15

    The aim of this review is to compare the metabolism, chemistry, and biological effects to determine if either of the industrial arsenicals (arsine and gallium arsenide) act like the environmental arsenic oxides (arsenite and arsenate). The metabolism of the arsenic oxides has been extensively investigated in the past 4 years and the differences between the arsenic metabolites in the oxidation states +III versus +V and with one or two methyl groups added have shown increased importance. The arsenic oxide metabolism has been compared with arsine (oxidation state -III) and arsenide (oxidation state between 0 to -III). The different metabolites appear to have different strengths of reaction for binding arsenic (III) to thiol groups, their oxidation-reduction reactions and their forming an arsenic-carbon bond. It is unclear if the differences in parameters such as the presence or absence of methyl metabolites, the rates of AsV reduction compared to the rates of AsIII oxidation, or the competition of phosphate and arsenate for cellular uptake are large enough to change biological effects. The arsine rate of decomposition, products of metabolism, target organ of toxic action, and protein binding appeared to support an oxidized arsenic metabolite. This arsine metabolite was very different from anything made by the arsenic oxides. The gallium arsenide had a lower solubility than any other arsenic compound and it had a disproportionate intensity of lung damage to suggest that the GaAs had a site of contact interaction and that oxidation reactions were important in its toxicity. The urinary metabolites after GaAs exposure were the same as excreted by arsenic oxides but the chemical compounds responsible for the toxic effects of GaAs are different from the arsenic oxides. The review concludes that there is insufficient evidence to equate the different arsenic compounds. There are several differences in the toxicity of the arsenic compounds that will require substantial

  5. Exposure to Inorganic Arsenic Is Associated with Increased Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Longer Telomere Length in Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Ameer, Syeda S.; Xu, YiYi; Engström, Karin; Li, Huiqi; Tallving, Pia; Nermell, Barbro; Boemo, Analia; Parada, Luis A.; Peñaloza, Lidia G.; Concha, Gabriela; Harari, Florencia; Vahter, Marie; Broberg, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) through drinking water causes cancer. Alterations in mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn) and telomere length in blood have been associated with cancer risk. We elucidated if arsenic exposure alters mtDNAcn and telomere length in individuals with different arsenic metabolizing capacity. Methods: We studied two groups in the Salta province, Argentina, one in the Puna area of the Andes (N = 264, 89% females) and one in Chaco (N = 169, 75% females). We assessed arsenic exposure as the sum of arsenic metabolites [iAs, methylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA)] in urine (U-As) using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with hydride generation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Efficiency of arsenic metabolism was expressed as percentage of urinary metabolites. MtDNAcn and telomere length were determined in blood by real-time PCR. Results: Median U-As was 196 (5–95 percentile: 21–537) μg/L in Andes and 80 (5–95 percentile: 15–1637) μg/L in Chaco. The latter study group had less-efficient metabolism, with higher %iAs and %MMA in urine compared with the Andean group. U-As was significantly associated with increased mtDNAcn (log2 transformed to improve linearity) in Chaco (β = 0.027 per 100 μg/L, p = 0.0085; adjusted for age and sex), but not in Andes (β = 0.025, p = 0.24). U-As was also associated with longer telomere length in Chaco (β = 0.016, p = 0.0066) and Andes (β = 0.0075, p = 0.029). In both populations, individuals with above median %iAs showed significantly higher mtDNAcn and telomere length compared with individuals with below median %iAs. Conclusions: Arsenic was associated with increased mtDNAcn and telomere length, particularly in individuals with less-efficient arsenic metabolism, a group who may have increased risk for arsenic-related cancer. PMID:27597942

  6. Dose-Response Relationship between Inorganic Arsenic Exposure and Lung Cancer among Arseniasis Residents with Low Methylation Capacity.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kuang-Hung; Tsui, Ke-Hung; Hsu, Ling-I; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2016-12-22

    Background Exposure to inorganic arsenic (InAs) has been documented as a risk factor for lung cancer. This study examined the association between InAs exposure, its metabolism, and lung cancer occurrence. Methods We followed 1300 residents from an arseniasis area in Taiwan, determined urinary InAs metabolites, and identified 39 lung cancer cases. Cox proportional hazard model was performed. Results The results demonstrated that participants with either the primary methylation index (monomethylarsonic acid [MMA]/InAs) or the secondary methylation index (dimethylarsinic acid[DMA]/MMA) lower than their respective median values were at a higher risk of lung cancer (hazard ratios from 3.41 to 4.66) than those with high methylation capacity. The incidence density of lung cancer increased from 79.9/100000 (year-1) to 467.4/100000 (year-1) for residents with low methylation capacity and from 0 to 158.5/100000 (year-1) for residents with high methylation capacity when the arsenic exposure dose increased from 2-10 ppb to ≥200 ppb, respectively. The analyses revealed a dose-response relationship between lung cancer occurrence and increasing arsenic concentrations in drinking water as well as cumulative arsenic exposure (monotonic trend test; P < .05 and P < .05, respectively) among the residents with low methylation capacity. The relationship between arsenic exposure and lung cancer among high methylaters was not statistically significant. Conclusions Hypomethylation responses to InAs exposure may dose-dependently increase lung cancer occurrence. Impact The high-risk characteristics observed among those exposed should be considered in future preventive medicine and research on arsenic carcinogenesis.

  7. THE CELLUAR METABOLISM OF ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the methylation of arsenic produces intermediates and terminal products that exceed inorganic arsenic in potency as enzyme inhibitors, cytotoxins, and genotoxins, the methylation of arsenic is properly regarded as an activation process. The methylation of arsenic is an e...

  8. Dynamics of organic and inorganic arsenic in the solution phase of an acidic fen in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.-H.; Matzner, E.

    2006-04-01

    Wetland soils play a key role for the transformation of heavy metals in forested watersheds, influencing their mobility, and ecotoxicity. Our goal was to investigate the mechanisms of release from solid to solution phase, the mobility, and the transformation of arsenic species in a fen soil. In methanol-water extracts, monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid, trimethylarsine oxide, arsenobetaine, and two unknown organic arsenic species were found with concentrations up to 14 ng As g -1 at the surface horizon. Arsenate is the dominant species at the 0-30 cm depth, whereas arsenite predominated at the 30-70 cm depth. Only up to 2.2% of total arsenic in fen was extractable with methanol-water. In porewaters, depth gradient spatial variation of arsenic species, pH, redox potentials, and the other chemical parameters along the profile was observed in June together with high proportion of organic arsenic species (up to 1.2 μg As L -1, 70% of total arsenic). Tetramethylarsonium ion and an unknown organic arsenic species were additionally detected in porewaters at deeper horizons. In comparison, the arsenic speciation in porewaters in April was homogeneous with depth and no organic arsenic species were found. Thus, the occurrence of microbial methylation of arsenic in fen was demonstrated for the first time. The 10 times elevated total arsenic concentrations in porewaters in June compared to April were accompanied by elevated concentrations of total iron, lower concentrations of sulfate and the presence of ammonium and phosphate. The low proportion of methanol-water extractable total arsenic suggests a generally low mobility of arsenic in fen soils. The release of arsenic from solid to solution phases in fen is dominantly controlled by dissolution of iron oxides, redox transformation, and methylation of arsenic, driven by microbial activity in the growing season. As a result, increased concentrations of total arsenic and potentially toxic arsenic species in fen

  9. Remediation of inorganic arsenic in groundwater for safe water supply: a critical assessment of technological solutions.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Priyanka; Bhowmick, Subhamoy; Chatterjee, Debashis; Figoli, Alberto; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic contaminations of groundwater in several parts of the world are the results of natural and/or anthropogenic sources, and have a large impact on human health. Millions of people from different countries rely on groundwater containing As for drinking purposes. This paper reviews removal technologies (oxidation, coagulation flocculation, adsorption, ion exchange and membrane processes) with attention for the drawbacks and limitations of these applied technologies. The technologies suggested and applied for treatment of As rich water have various problems, including the need for further treatment of As containing secondary waste generated from these water treatment processes. More efficient technologies, with a lower tendency to generate waste include the removal of As by membrane distillation or forward osmosis, instead of using pressure driven membrane processes and subsequently reducing soluble As to commercially valuable metallic As are surveyed. An integrated approach of two or more techniques is suggested to be more beneficial than a single process. Advanced technologies such as membrane distillation, forward osmosis as well as some hybrid integrated techniques and their potentials are also discussed in this review. Membrane processes combined with other process (especially iron based technologies) are thought to be most sustainable for the removal of arsenic and further research allowing scale up of these technologies is suggested.

  10. Biologically based modeling of multimedia, multipathway, multiroute population exposures to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, Panos G; Wang, Sheng-Wei; Yang, Yu-Ching; Xue, Jianping; Zartarian, Valerie G; McCurdy, Thomas; Ozkaynak, Halûk

    2008-09-01

    This article presents an integrated, biologically based, source-to-dose assessment framework for modeling multimedia/multipathway/multiroute exposures to arsenic. Case studies demonstrating this framework are presented for three US counties (Hunderton County, NJ; Pima County, AZ; and Franklin County, OH), representing substantially different conditions of exposure. The approach taken utilizes the Modeling ENvironment for TOtal Risk studies (MENTOR) in an implementation that incorporates and extends the approach pioneered by Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS), in conjunction with a number of available databases, including NATA, NHEXAS, CSFII, and CHAD, and extends modeling techniques that have been developed in recent years. Model results indicate that, in most cases, the food intake pathway is the dominant contributor to total exposure and dose to arsenic. Model predictions are evaluated qualitatively by comparing distributions of predicted total arsenic amounts in urine with those derived using biomarker measurements from the NHEXAS--Region V study: the population distributions of urinary total arsenic levels calculated through MENTOR and from the NHEXAS measurements are in general qualitative agreement. Observed differences are due to various factors, such as interindividual variation in arsenic metabolism in humans, that are not fully accounted for in the current model implementation but can be incorporated in the future, in the open framework of MENTOR. The present study demonstrates that integrated source-to-dose modeling for arsenic can not only provide estimates of the relative contributions of multipathway exposure routes to the total exposure estimates, but can also estimate internal target tissue doses for speciated organic and inorganic arsenic, which can eventually be used to improve evaluation of health risks associated with exposures to arsenic from multiple sources, routes, and pathways.

  11. Biologically based modeling of multimedia, multipathway, multiroute population exposures to arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulos, Panos G.; Wang, Sheng-Wei; Yang, Yu-Ching; Xue, Jianping; Zartarian, Valerie G.; Mccurdy, Thomas; Özkaynak, Halûk

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an integrated, biologically based, source-to-dose assessment framework for modeling multimedia/multipathway/multiroute exposures to arsenic. Case studies demonstrating this framework are presented for three US counties (Hunderton County, NJ; Pima County, AZ; and Franklin County, OH), representing substantially different conditions of exposure. The approach taken utilizes the Modeling ENvironment for TOtal Risk studies (MENTOR) in an implementation that incorporates and extends the approach pioneered by Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS), in conjunction with a number of available databases, including NATA, NHEXAS, CSFII, and CHAD, and extends modeling techniques that have been developed in recent years. Model results indicate that, in most cases, the food intake pathway is the dominant contributor to total exposure and dose to arsenic. Model predictions are evaluated qualitatively by comparing distributions of predicted total arsenic amounts in urine with those derived using biomarker measurements from the NHEXAS — Region V study: the population distributions of urinary total arsenic levels calculated through MENTOR and from the NHEXAS measurements are in general qualitative agreement. Observed differences are due to various factors, such as interindividual variation in arsenic metabolism in humans, that are not fully accounted for in the current model implementation but can be incorporated in the future, in the open framework of MENTOR. The present study demonstrates that integrated source-to-dose modeling for arsenic can not only provide estimates of the relative contributions of multipathway exposure routes to the total exposure estimates, but can also estimate internal target tissue doses for speciated organic and inorganic arsenic, which can eventually be used to improve evaluation of health risks associated with exposures to arsenic from multiple sources, routes, and pathways. PMID:18073786

  12. Rethinking Rice Preparation for Highly Efficient Removal of Inorganic Arsenic Using Percolating Cooking Water

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Manus; Jiujin, Xiao; Gomes Farias, Júlia; Meharg, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    A novel way of cooking rice to maximize the removal of the carcinogen inorganic arsenic (Asi) is presented here. In conventional rice cooking water and grain are in continuous contact, and it is known that the larger the water:rice cooking ratio, the more Asi removed by cooking, suggesting that the Asi in the grain is mobile in water. Experiments were designed where rice is cooked in a continual stream of percolating near boiling water, either low in Asi, or Asi free. This has the advantage of not only exposing grain to large volumes of cooking water, but also physically removes any Asi leached from the grain into the water receiving vessel. The relationship between cooking water volume and Asi removal in conventional rice cooking was demonstrated for the rice types under study. At a water-to-rice cooking ratio of 12:1, 57±5% of Asi could be removed, average of 6 wholegrain and 6 polished rice samples. Two types of percolating technology were tested, one where the cooking water was recycled through condensing boiling water steam and passing the freshly distilled hot water through the grain in a laboratory setting, and one where tap water was used to cook the rice held in an off-the-shelf coffee percolator in a domestic setting. Both approaches proved highly effective in removing Asi from the cooking rice, with up to 85% of Asi removed from individual rice types. For the recycled water experiment 59±8% and 69±10% of Asi was removed, on average, compared to uncooked rice for polished (n=27) and wholegrain (n=13) rice, respectively. For coffee percolation there was no difference between wholegrain and polished rice, and the effectiveness of Asi removal was 49±7% across 6 wholegrain and 6 polished rice samples. The manuscript explores the potential applications and further optimization of this percolating cooking water, high Asi removal, discovery. PMID:26200355

  13. Rethinking Rice Preparation for Highly Efficient Removal of Inorganic Arsenic Using Percolating Cooking Water.

    PubMed

    Carey, Manus; Jiujin, Xiao; Gomes Farias, Júlia; Meharg, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    A novel way of cooking rice to maximize the removal of the carcinogen inorganic arsenic (Asi) is presented here. In conventional rice cooking water and grain are in continuous contact, and it is known that the larger the water:rice cooking ratio, the more Asi removed by cooking, suggesting that the Asi in the grain is mobile in water. Experiments were designed where rice is cooked in a continual stream of percolating near boiling water, either low in Asi, or Asi free. This has the advantage of not only exposing grain to large volumes of cooking water, but also physically removes any Asi leached from the grain into the water receiving vessel. The relationship between cooking water volume and Asi removal in conventional rice cooking was demonstrated for the rice types under study. At a water-to-rice cooking ratio of 12:1, 57±5% of Asi could be removed, average of 6 wholegrain and 6 polished rice samples. Two types of percolating technology were tested, one where the cooking water was recycled through condensing boiling water steam and passing the freshly distilled hot water through the grain in a laboratory setting, and one where tap water was used to cook the rice held in an off-the-shelf coffee percolator in a domestic setting. Both approaches proved highly effective in removing Asi from the cooking rice, with up to 85% of Asi removed from individual rice types. For the recycled water experiment 59±8% and 69±10% of Asi was removed, on average, compared to uncooked rice for polished (n=27) and wholegrain (n=13) rice, respectively. For coffee percolation there was no difference between wholegrain and polished rice, and the effectiveness of Asi removal was 49±7% across 6 wholegrain and 6 polished rice samples. The manuscript explores the potential applications and further optimization of this percolating cooking water, high Asi removal, discovery.

  14. Fact Sheet on Arsenic

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring element that is found in combination with either inorganic or organic substances to form many different compounds. Inorganic arsenic compounds are found in soils, sediments, and groundwater.

  15. Arsenic

    MedlinePlus

    ... basis for regulation and standard setting worldwide. The current recommended limit of arsenic in drinking-water is 10 μg/litre, although this guideline value is designated as provisional because of measurement difficulties and the practical difficulties in removing arsenic ...

  16. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the methylation of arsenicals in the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biotransformation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) involves methylation by an arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT), yielding methyl arsenic (MA), dimethyl arsenic (DMA), and trimethylarsenic (TMA). To identify molecular mechanisms that coordinate arsenic biotra...

  17. Metallothionein blocks oxidative DNA damage induced by acute inorganic arsenic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Wei Waalkes, Michael P.

    2015-02-01

    We studied how protein metallothionein (MT) impacts arsenic-induced oxidative DNA damage (ODD) using cells that poorly express MT (MT-I/II double knockout embryonic cells; called MT-null cells) and wild-type (WT) MT competent cells. Arsenic (as NaAsO{sub 2}) was less cytolethal over 24 h in WT cells (LC{sub 50} = 11.0 ± 1.3 μM; mean ± SEM) than in MT-null cells (LC{sub 50} = 5.6 ± 1.2 μM). ODD was measured by the immuno-spin trapping method. Arsenic (1 or 5 μM; 24 h) induced much less ODD in WT cells (121% and 141% of control, respectively) than in MT-null cells (202% and 260%). In WT cells arsenic caused concentration-dependent increases in MT expression (transcript and protein), and in the metal-responsive transcription factor-1 (MTF-1), which is required to induce the MT gene. In contrast, basal MT levels were not detectable in MT-null cells and unaltered by arsenic exposure. Transfection of MT-I gene into the MT-null cells markedly reduced arsenic-induced ODD levels. The transport genes, Abcc1 and Abcc2 were increased by arsenic in WT cells but either showed no or very limited increases in MT-null cells. Arsenic caused increases in oxidant stress defense genes HO-1 and GSTα2 in both WT and MT-null cells, but to much higher levels in WT cells. WT cells appear more adept at activating metal transport systems and oxidant response genes, although the role of MT in these responses is unclear. Overall, MT protects against arsenic-induced ODD in MT competent cells by potential sequestration of scavenging oxidant radicals and/or arsenic. - Highlights: • Metallothionein blocks arsenic toxicity. • Metallothionein reduces arsenic-induced DNA damage. • Metallothionein may bind arsenic or radicals produced by arsenic.

  18. Chronic Arsenic Poisoning Probably Caused by Arsenic-Based Pesticides: Findings from an Investigation Study of a Household

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongfang; Ye, Feng; Wang, Anwei; Wang, Da; Yang, Boyi; Zheng, Quanmei; Sun, Guifan; Gao, Xinghua

    2016-01-01

    In addition to naturally occurring arsenic, man-made arsenic-based compounds are other sources of arsenic exposure. In 2013, our group identified 12 suspected arsenicosis patients in a household (32 living members). Of them, eight members were diagnosed with skin cancer. Interestingly, all of these patients had lived in the household prior to 1989. An investigation revealed that approximately 2 tons of arsenic-based pesticides had been previously placed near a well that had supplied drinking water to the family from 1973 to 1989. The current arsenic level in the well water was 620 μg/L. No other high arsenic wells were found near the family’s residence. Based on these findings, it is possible to infer that the skin lesions exhibited by these family members were caused by long-term exposure to well water contaminated with arsenic-based pesticides. Additionally, biochemical analysis showed that the individuals exposed to arsenic had higher levels of aspartate aminotransferase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase than those who were not exposed. These findings might indicate the presence of liver dysfunction in the arsenic-exposed individuals. This report elucidates the effects of arsenical compounds on the occurrence of high levels of arsenic in the environment and emphasizes the severe human health impact of arsenic exposure. PMID:26784217

  19. Chronic Arsenic Poisoning Probably Caused by Arsenic-Based Pesticides: Findings from an Investigation Study of a Household.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfang; Ye, Feng; Wang, Anwei; Wang, Da; Yang, Boyi; Zheng, Quanmei; Sun, Guifan; Gao, Xinghua

    2016-01-16

    In addition to naturally occurring arsenic, man-made arsenic-based compounds are other sources of arsenic exposure. In 2013, our group identified 12 suspected arsenicosis patients in a household (32 living members). Of them, eight members were diagnosed with skin cancer. Interestingly, all of these patients had lived in the household prior to 1989. An investigation revealed that approximately 2 tons of arsenic-based pesticides had been previously placed near a well that had supplied drinking water to the family from 1973 to 1989. The current arsenic level in the well water was 620 μg/L. No other high arsenic wells were found near the family's residence. Based on these findings, it is possible to infer that the skin lesions exhibited by these family members were caused by long-term exposure to well water contaminated with arsenic-based pesticides. Additionally, biochemical analysis showed that the individuals exposed to arsenic had higher levels of aspartate aminotransferase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase than those who were not exposed. These findings might indicate the presence of liver dysfunction in the arsenic-exposed individuals. This report elucidates the effects of arsenical compounds on the occurrence of high levels of arsenic in the environment and emphasizes the severe human health impact of arsenic exposure.

  20. Size-fractionation of groundwater arsenic in alluvial aquifers of West Bengal, India: the role of organic and inorganic colloids.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Santanu; Nath, Bibhash; Sarkar, Simita; Chatterjee, Debashis; Roman-Ross, Gabriela; Hidalgo, Manuela

    2014-01-15

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and Fe mineral phases are known to influence the mobility of arsenic (As) in groundwater. Arsenic can be associated with colloidal particles containing organic matter and Fe. Currently, no data is available on the dissolved phase/colloidal association of As in groundwater of alluvial aquifers in West Bengal, India. This study investigated the fractional distribution of As (and other metals/metalloids) among the particulate, colloidal and dissolved phases in groundwater to decipher controlling behavior of organic and inorganic colloids on As mobility. The result shows that 83-94% of As remained in the 'truly dissolved' phases (i.e., <0.05 μm size). Strong positive correlation between Fe and As (r(2) between 0.65 and 0.94) is mainly observed in the larger (i.e., >0.05 μm size) colloidal particles, which indicates the close association of As with larger Fe-rich inorganic colloids. In smaller (i.e., <0.05 μm size) colloidal particles strong positive correlation is observed between As and DOC (r(2)=0.85), which highlights the close association of As with smaller organic colloids. As(III) is mainly associated with larger inorganic colloids, whereas, As(V) is associated with smaller organic/organometallic colloids. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirm the association of As with DOC and Fe mineral phases suggesting the formation of dissolved organo-Fe complexes and colloidal organo-Fe oxide phases. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy further confirms the formation of As-Fe-NOM organometallic colloids, however, a detailed study of these types of colloids in natural waters is necessary to underpin their controlling behavior.

  1. Arsenic and diabetes: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun Fa; Chen, Ya Wen; Yang, Ching Yao; Tsai, Keh Sung; Yang, Rong Sen; Liu, Shing Hwa

    2011-09-01

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring toxic metalloid of global concern. Many studies have indicated a dose-response relationship between accumulative arsenic exposure and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in arseniasis-endemic areas in Taiwan and Bangladesh, where arsenic exposure occurs through drinking water. Epidemiological researches have suggested that the characteristics of arsenic-induced DM observed in arseniasis-endemic areas in Taiwan and Mexico are similar to those of non-insulin-dependent DM (Type 2 DM). These studies analyzed the association between high and chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic in drinking water and the development of DM, but the effect of exposure to low to moderate levels of inorganic arsenic on the risk of DM is unclear. Navas-Acien et al. recently proposed that a positive association existed between total urine arsenic and the prevalence of Type 2 DM in people exposed to low to moderate levels of arsenic. However, the diabetogenic role played by arsenic is still debated upon. An increase in the prevalence of DM has been observed among residents of highly arsenic-contaminated areas, whereas the findings from community-based and occupational studies in low-arsenic-exposure areas have been inconsistent. Recently, a population-based cross-sectional study showed that the current findings did not support an association between arsenic exposure from drinking water at levels less than 300 μg/L and a significantly increased risk of DM. Moreover, although the precise mechanisms for the arsenic-induced diabetogenic effect are still largely undefined, recent in vitro experimental studies indicated that inorganic arsenic or its metabolites impair insulin-dependent glucose uptake or glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Nevertheless, the dose, the form of arsenic used, and the experimental duration in the in vivo studies varied greatly, leading to conflicting results and ambiguous interpretation of these data with respect to human exposure

  2. Meeting Materials for the 4th NRC Meeting on the Guidance for and the Review of EPA's Toxicological Assessment of Inorganic Arsenic

    EPA Science Inventory

    On December 2-3, 2015, the National Research Council (NRC) hosted the 4th meeting of the committee formed to peer review the draft IRIS assessment of inorganic arsenic. EPA presented background and overview materials during the public session on December 2nd. This information co...

  3. Femtomolar level sensing of inorganic arsenic(III) in water and in living-systems using a non-toxic fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Dey, Biswajit; Mukherjee, Priyanka; Mondal, Ranjan Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Asoke Prasun; Hauli, Ipsit; Mukhopadhyay, Subhra Kanti; Fleck, Michel

    2014-12-14

    A highly selective femtomolar level sensing of inorganic arsenic(III) as arsenious acid has been accomplished in water medium and in living-systems (on pollen grains of Tecoma stans; Candida albicans cells (IMTECH No. 3018) and Peperomia pellucida stem section) using a non-toxic fluorescent probe of a Cu(II)-complex.

  4. FINGERPRINTING INORGANIC ARSENIC AND ORGANOARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT AND PROCESS VOTERS USING A LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPH COUPLED WITH AN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER AS A DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, Richard H.; Brinckman, Frederick E.; Jewett, Kenneth L.

    1981-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic and organoarsenic compounds were speciated in seven oil shale retort and process waters, including samples from simulated, true and modified in situ processes, using a high performance liquid chromatograph automatically coupled to a graphite furnace atomic absorption detector. The molecular forms of arsenic at ppm levels (({micro}g/mL) in these waters are identified for the first time, and shown to include arsenate, methylarsonic acid and phenylarsonic acid. An arsenic-specific fingerprint chromatogram of each retort or process water studied has significant impliestions regarding those arsenical species found and those marginally detected, such as dimethylarsinic acid and the suspected carcinogen arsenite. The method demonstrated suggests future means for quantifying environmental impacts of bioactive organometal species involved in oil shale retorting technology.

  5. Biogeochemistry of organic and inorganic arsenic species in a forested catchment in Germany.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jen-How; Matzner, Egbert

    2007-03-01

    Little is known about the fate and behavior of diffuse inputs of arsenic (As) species in forested catchments which often are the sources of drinking water. The objective of this study was to investigate the mobility and transformation of different As species in forest ecosystems to assess the environmental risk related to the diffuse pollution of As. We determined concentrations and fluxes in precipitation, litterfall, soil solutions (Oa horizon and 20- and 90-cm depth), and runoff of organic and inorganic As species and Astotal in a forest ecosystem in NE-Bavaria, Germany. The concentrations of Astotal were mostly <1 microg As L(-1) in aqueous samples and were highest in forestfloor percolates (7.6 microg As L(-1)). In litterfall, the concentrations of As species never exceeded 0.1 microg As g(-1). Arsenate and arsenite were the prevalent As species in all samples. Organic As species, comprising monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid, trimethylarsine oxide, arsenobetaine, and three unidentified organic As species, were mostly found in throughfall reaching up to 45% of Astotal. The total deposition of Astotal (calculated as throughfall + litterfall) was 5.6 g As ha(-1) yr(-1) with 16% contribution of litterfall. The annual Astotal fluxes were 30 g As ha(-1) yr(-1) for forest floor percolates, 8.0 g As ha(-1) yr(-1) at 20-cm soil depth, and 1.4 g As ha(-1) yr(-1) at 90-cm soil depth. The annual runoff of Astotal from the catchment amounted to 3.8 g As ha(-1) yr(-1). The annual fluxes of total organic As species was highest in total deposition (1.1 g As ha(-1) yr(-1)) and decreased largely with depth in the soil profile. The annual runoff of total organic As species was only 0.08 g As ha(-1) yr(-1). Significant correlations in soil solutions and runoff were found between Astotal and dissolved organic C and Fe. Correlations between Astotal concentrations in runoff and water fluxes were seasonally dependent and with a steeper slope in the growing season than in

  6. Effects on operant learning and brain acetylcholine esterase activity in rats following chronic inorganic arsenic intake.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, T N; Desiraju, T

    1994-05-01

    1. Very young and adult Wistar rats were given As5+, 5 mg arsenic kg-1 body weight day-1 (sodium arsenate). 2. Operant learning was tested in a Skinner box at the end of exposure and, in the case of developing animals, also after a recovery period. 3. Acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity was estimated in discrete brain regions of these animals. 4. The animals exposed to arsenic took longer to acquire the learned behaviour and to extinguish the operant. AChE activity was inhibited in some regions of the brain.

  7. Inorganic arsenic trioxide induces gap junction loss in association with the downregulation of connexin43 and E-cadherin in rat hepatic "stem-like" cells.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Pi-Jung; Jao, Jo-Chi; Tsai, Jin-Lian; Chang, Wen-Tsan; Jeng, Kuo-Shyang; Kuo, Kung-Kai

    2014-02-01

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic trioxide causes tumors of the skin, urinary bladder, lung, and liver. Several cancer initiators and promoters have been shown to alter cell-cell signaling by interference with gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or modulation of cell adhesion molecules, such as connexin43 (Cx43), E-cadherin, and β-catenin. The aim of this study was to determine whether the disruption of cell-cell interactions occurs in liver epithelial cells after exposure to arsenic trioxide. WB-F344 cells were treated with arsenic trioxide (6.25-50 μM) for up to 8 hours, and gap junction function was analyzed using the scrape-load/dye transfer assay. In addition, the changes in mRNA and protein levels of Cx43, E-cadherin, and β-catenin were determined. A significant dose- and time-dependent decrease in GJIC was observed when WB-F344 cells were exposed to arsenic trioxide (p < 0.05). Consistent with the inhibition of GJIC, cells' exposure to arsenic trioxide resulted in dose- and time-dependent decreases in Cx43 and E-cadherin mRNA expression and protein levels. However, arsenic trioxide did not alter the mRNA or protein levels of β-catenin. In an immunofluorescence study, nuclei were heavily stained with anti-β-catenin antibody, indicating significant nuclear translocation. In this study, we also demonstrated that arsenic trioxide-induced GJIC loss was a reversible process. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that disruption of cell-cell communication may contribute to the tumor-promoting effect of inorganic arsenic trioxide.

  8. On-line speciation analysis of inorganic arsenic in complex environmental aqueous samples by pervaporation sequential injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Boonjob, Warunya; Miró, Manuel; Kolev, Spas D

    2013-12-15

    A proof of concept of a novel pervaporation sequential injection (PSI) analysis method for automatic non-chromatographic speciation analysis of inorganic arsenic in complex aqueous samples is presented. The method is based on hydride generation of arsine followed by its on-line pervaporation-based membrane separation and CCD spectrophotometric detection. The concentrations of arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)) are determined sequentially in a single sample zone. The leading section of the sample zone merges with a citric acid/citrate buffer solution (pH 4.5) for the selective reduction of As(III) to arsine while the trailing section of the sample zone merges with hydrochloric acid solution to allow the reduction of both As(III) and As(V) to arsine at pH lower than 1. Virtually identical analytical sensitivity is obtained for both As(III) and As(V) at this high acidity. The flow analyzer also accommodates in-line pH detector for monitoring of the acidity throughout the sample zone prior to hydride generation. Under optimal conditions the proposed PSI method is characterized by a limit of detection, linear calibration range and repeatability for As(III) of 22 μg L(-1) (3sblank level criterion), 50-1000 μg L(-1) and 3.0% at the 500 μg L(-1) level and for As(V) of 51 μg L(-1), 100-2000 μg L(-1) and 2.6% at the 500 μg L(-1) level, respectively. The method was validated with mixed As(III)/As(V) standard aqueous solutions and successfully applied to the determination of As(III) and As(V) in river water samples with elevated content of dissolved organic carbon and suspended particulate matter with no prior sample pretreatment. Excellent relative recoveries ranging from 98% to 104% were obtained for both As(III) and As(V).

  9. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ingested Inorganic Arsenic (2005 Sab External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD), Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP), and Office of Water (OW) requested the SAB to provide advice to the Agency on several issues about the mode of carcinogenic action of various arsenic species and the implications of these issues f...

  10. Arsenic: bioaccessibility from seaweed and rice, dietary exposure calculations and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Esther F A; Janssen, Paul J C M; de Wit-Bos, Lianne

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a metalloid that occurs in food and the environment in different chemical forms. Inorganic arsenic is classified as a class I carcinogen. The inorganic arsenic intake from food and drinking water varies depending on the geographic arsenic background. Non-dietary exposure to arsenic is likely to be of minor importance for the general population within the European Union. In Europe, arsenic in drinking water is on average low, but food products (e.g. rice and seaweed) are imported from all over the world including from regions with naturally high arsenic levels. Therefore, specific populations living in Europe could also have a high exposure to inorganic arsenic due to their consumption pattern. Current risk assessment is based on exposure via drinking water. For a good estimation of the risks of arsenic in food, it is important to investigate if the bioavailability of inorganic arsenic from food is different from drinking water. The present study further explores the issue of European dietary exposure to inorganic arsenic via rice and seaweed and its associated health risks. The bioavailability of inorganic arsenic was measured in in vitro digestion experiments. The data indicate that the bioavailability of inorganic arsenic is similar for rice and seaweed compared with drinking water. The calculated dietary intake for specific European Union populations varied between 0.44 and 4.51 µg kg⁻¹ bw day⁻¹. The margins of exposure between the inorganic intake levels and the BMDL0.5 values as derived by JECFA are low. Decreasing the intake of inorganic arsenic via Hijiki seaweed could be achieved by setting legal limits similar to those set for rice by the Codex Alimentarius Commission in July 2014.

  11. Use of mode of action data to inform a dose-response assessment for bladder cancer following exposure to inorganic arsenic.

    PubMed

    Gentry, P R; Yager, J W; Clewell, R A; Clewell, H J

    2014-10-01

    In the recent National Research Council report on conducting a dose-response assessment for inorganic arsenic, the committee remarked that mode of action data should be used, to the extent possible, to extrapolate below the observed range for epidemiological studies to inform the shape of the dose-response curve. Recent in vitro mode of action studies focused on understanding the development of bladder cancer following exposure to inorganic arsenic provide data to inform the dose-response curve. These in vitro data, combined with results of bladder cancer epidemiology studies, inform the dose-response curve in the low-dose region, and include values for both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variability. Integration of these data provides evidence of a range of concentrations of arsenic for which no effect on the bladder would be expected. Specifically, integration of these results suggest that arsenic exposures in the range of 7-43 ppb in drinking water are exceedingly unlikely to elicit changes leading to key events in the development of cancer or noncancer effects in bladder tissue. These findings are consistent with the lack of evidence for bladder cancer following chronic ingestion of arsenic water concentrations <100 ppb in epidemiological studies.

  12. Arsenic speciation in marine fish and shellfish from American Samoa.

    PubMed

    Peshut, Peter J; Morrison, R John; Brooks, Barbara A

    2008-03-01

    We speciated arsenic compounds in marine fish and shellfish from two islands of the United States Territory of American Samoa in the South Pacific, and found that inorganic arsenic occurred as a minor fraction. The proportion of inorganic arsenic was generally far below the levels of prevailing assumptions typically used in human health risk assessments when only total arsenic is analysed. Fish and shellfish were collected from Tutuila and Ofu between May 2001 and March 2002 (n=383 individual specimens, with 117 composites); sites were selected based on habitat type and were representative of those frequented by local fishers. These islands have moderately developed reef fish fisheries among artisanal fishers, are far removed from any industrial or mining sources of arsenic, and presented an opportunity to study arsenic variations in marine biota from un-impacted environments. Target species were from various trophic levels and are among those frequently harvested for human consumption. We found evidence that arsenic concentrated in some marine species, but did not tend to follow classic trophic patterns for biomagnification or bioaccumulation. For the majority of samples, inorganic arsenic was less than 0.5% of total arsenic, with only a few samples in the range of 1-5%, the latter being mollusks which are recognized to have unusually high arsenic levels in general. This work supports the importance of speciation analysis for arsenic, because of the ubiquitous occurrence of arsenic in the environment, and its variable toxicity depending on chemical form.

  13. Toxicity of arsenic species to three freshwater organisms and biotransformation of inorganic arsenic by freshwater phytoplankton (Chlorella sp. CE-35).

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Azizur; Hogan, Ben; Duncan, Elliott; Doyle, Christopher; Krassoi, Rick; Rahman, Mohammad Mahmudur; Naidu, Ravi; Lim, Richard P; Maher, William; Hassler, Christel

    2014-08-01

    In the environment, arsenic (As) exists in a number of chemical species, and arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)) dominate in freshwater systems. Toxicity of As species to aquatic organisms is complicated by their interaction with chemicals in water such as phosphate that can influence the bioavailability and uptake of As(V). In the present study, the toxicities of As(III), As(V) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) to three freshwater organisms representing three phylogenetic groups: a phytoplankton (Chlorella sp. strain CE-35), a floating macrophyte (Lemna disperma) and a cladoceran grazer (Ceriodaphnia cf. dubia), were determined using acute and growth inhibition bioassays (EC₅₀) at a range of total phosphate (TP) concentrations in OECD medium. The EC₅₀ values of As(III), As(V) and DMA were 27 ± 10, 1.15 ± 0.04 and 19 ± 3 mg L(-1) for Chlorella sp. CE-35; 0.57 ± 0.16, 2.3 ± 0.2 and 56 ± 15 mg L(-1) for L. disperma, and 1.58 ± 0.05, 1.72 ± 0.01 and 5.9 ± 0.1 mg L(-1) for C. cf. dubia, respectively. The results showed that As(III) was more toxic than As(V) to L. disperma; however, As(V) was more toxic than As(III) to Chlorella sp. CE-35. The toxicities of As(III) and As(V) to C. cf. dubia were statistically similar (p>0.05). DMA was less toxic than iAs species to L. disperma and C. cf. dubia, but more toxic than As(III) to Chlorella sp. CE-35. The toxicity of As(V) to Chlorella sp. CE-35 and L. disperma decreased with increasing TP concentrations in the growth medium. Phosphate concentrations did not influence the toxicity of As(III) to either organism. Chlorella sp. CE-35 showed the ability to reduce As(V) to As(III), indicating a substantial influence of phytoplankton on As biogeochemistry in freshwater aquatic systems.

  14. Tissue distribution and urinary excretion of inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites in C57BL6 mice following subchronic exposure to arsenate in drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, E.M. Hughes, M.F.; Adair, B.M.; Highfill, J.H.; Crecelius, E.A.; Clewell, H.J.; Yager, J.W.

    2008-11-01

    The relationship of exposure and tissue concentration of parent chemical and metabolites over prolonged exposure is a critical issue for chronic toxicities mediated by metabolite(s) rather than parent chemical alone. This is an issue for As{sup V} because its trivalent metabolites have unique toxicities and relatively greater potency compared to their pentavalent counterparts for many endpoints. In this study, dose-dependency in tissue distribution and urinary excretion for inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites was assessed in female C57Bl/6 mice exposed to 0, 0.5, 2, 10 or 50 ppm arsenic (as arsenate, As{sup V}) in their drinking water for 12 weeks. No adverse effects were observed and body weight gain did not differ significantly among groups. Urinary excretion of arsenite monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}), dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}), and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) increased linearly with dose, whereas As{sup V} and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA{sup V}) excretion was non-linear with respect to dose. Total tissue arsenic accumulation was greatest in kidney > lung > urinary bladder >>> skin > blood > liver. Monomethyl arsenic (MMA, i.e. MMA{sup III} + MMA{sup V}) was the predominant metabolite in kidney, whereas dimethylarsenic (DMA, i.e., DMA{sup III} + DMA{sup V}) was the predominant metabolite in lung. Urinary bladder tissue had roughly equivalent levels of inorganic arsenic and dimethylarsenic, as did skin. These data indicate that pharmacokinetic models for arsenic metabolism and disposition need to include mechanisms for organ-specific accumulation of some arsenicals and that urinary metabolite profiles are not necessarily reflective of target tissue dosimetry.

  15. Determination of total cadmium, lead, arsenic, mercury and inorganic arsenic in mushrooms: outcome of IMEP-116 and IMEP-39

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, F.; Llorente-Mirandes, T.; López-Sánchez, J.F.; Rubio, R.; Sánchez Agullo, A.; Raber, G.; Scharf, H.; Vélez, D.; Devesa, V.; Fiamegos, Y.; Emteborg, H.; Seghers, J.; Robouch, P.; de la Calle, M.B.

    2015-01-01

    The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) of the Joint Research Centre (JRC), a Directorate General of the European Commission, operates the International Measurement Evaluation Program (IMEP). IMEP organises inter-laboratory comparisons in support of European Union policies. This paper presents the results of two proficiency tests (PTs): IMEP-116 and IMEP-39, organised for the determination of total Cd, Pb, As, Hg and inorganic As (iAs) in mushrooms. Participation in IMEP-116 was restricted to National Reference Laboratories (NRLs) officially appointed by national authorities in European Union member states. IMEP-39 was open to all other laboratories wishing to participate. Thirty-seven participants from 25 countries reported results in IMEP-116, and 62 laboratories from 36 countries reported for the IMEP-39 study. Both PTs were organised in support to Regulation (EC) No. 1881/2006, which sets the maximum levels for certain contaminants in food. The test item used in both PTs was a blend of mushrooms of the variety shiitake (Lentinula edodes). Five laboratories, with demonstrated measurement capability in the field, provided results to establish the assigned values (X ref). The standard uncertainties associated to the assigned values (u ref) were calculated by combining the uncertainty of the characterisation (u char) with a contribution for homogeneity (u bb) and for stability (u st), whilst u char was calculated following ISO 13528. Laboratory results were rated with z- and zeta (ζ)-scores in accordance with ISO 13528. The standard deviation for proficiency assessment, σ p, ranged from 10% to 20% depending on the analyte. The percentage of satisfactory z-scores ranged from 81% (iAs) to 97% (total Cd) in IMEP-116 and from 64% (iAs) to 84% (total Hg) in IMEP-39. PMID:25365736

  16. Arsenic in rice: a cause for concern.

    PubMed

    Hojsak, Iva; Braegger, Christian; Bronsky, Jiri; Campoy, Cristina; Colomb, Virginie; Decsi, Tamas; Domellöf, Magnus; Fewtrell, Mary; Mis, Nataša Fidler; Mihatsch, Walter; Molgaard, Christian; van Goudoever, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic intake is likely to affect long-term health. High concentrations are found in some rice-based foods and drinks widely used in infants and young children. In order to reduce exposure, we recommend avoidance of rice drinks for infants and young children. For all of the rice products, strict regulation should be enforced regarding arsenic content. Moreover, infants and young children should consume a balanced diet including a variety of grains as carbohydrate sources. Although rice protein-based infant formulas are an option for infants with cows' milk protein allergy, the inorganic arsenic content should be declared and the potential risks should be considered when using these products.

  17. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the methylation of arsenicals in the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotransformation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) involves methylation catalyzed by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt), yielding mono- , di- , and trimethylated arsenicals. To investigate the evolution of molecular mechanisms that mediate arsenic biotransformation,...

  18. Simultaneous speciation of inorganic arsenic, selenium and tellurium in environmental water samples by dispersive liquid liquid microextraction combined with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-09-01

    A new method based on dispersive liquid liquid microextraction (DLLME) combined with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) was developed for the simultaneous speciation of inorganic arsenic (As), selenium (Se) and tellurium (Te) with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) as both chelating reagent and chemical modifier. As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV) were transformed into DDTC-chelates at pH 7 and extracted into the fine droplets formed by injecting the binary solution of bromobenzene (extraction solvent) and methanol (dispersive solvent) into the sample solution. After phase separation by centrifugation, As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV) preconcentrated in the organic phase were determined by ETV-ICP-MS. Total inorganic As, Se and Te were obtained by reducing As(V), Se(VI) and Te(VI) to As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV) with L-cysteine, which were then subjected to the same DLLME-ETV-ICP-MS process. The concentration of As(V), Se(VI), Te(VI) were calculated by subtracting the concentration of As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV) from the total inorganic As, Se and Te, respectively. The main factors affecting the microextraction efficiency and the vaporization behavior of target species were investigated in detail. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detection were 2.5, 8.6 and 0.56 ng L(-1) for As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV), respectively, with the relative standard deviations (n=7) of 8.5-9.7%. The developed method was applied to the speciation of inorganic As, Se and Te in Certified Reference Materials of GSBZ50004-88, GBW(E)080395 and GBW(E)080548 environmental waters, and the determined values are in good agreement with the certified values. The method was also successfully applied to the simultaneous speciation of inorganic As, Se and Te in different environmental water samples with the recoveries in the range of 86.3-107% for the spiked samples.

  19. Sex differences in the reduction of arsenic methylation capacity as a function of urinary total and inorganic arsenic in Mexican children.

    PubMed

    Torres-Sánchez, Luisa; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth; Rosado, Jorge L; Rodriguez, Valentina M; Vera-Aguilar, Eunice; Kordas, Katarzyna; García-Vargas, Gonzalo G; Cebrian, Mariano E

    2016-11-01

    Chronic arsenic (As) exposure decreases adult and children's ability to methylate inorganic As (iAs); however, few studies have examined children's sex differences. We measured urinary concentrations of iAs, monomethylarsonic (MMA), and dimethylarsinic (DMA) acids, and calculated the primary (PMI: MMA/iAs) and secondary (SMI: DMA/MMA) methylation capacity indexes in 591 children 6-8 years in Torreón, Mexico. We determined iAs, MMA, and DMA by hydride generation cryotrapping AAS. Lineal regression models estimated associations between methylation capacity and total As (TAs) or iAs. Interactions with sex were tested at p<0.10. Boys had significantly higher TAs levels, (58.4µg/L) than girls (46.2µg/L). We observed negative associations between TAs and PMI (β=-0.039; p<0.18) and SMI (β=-0.08; p=0.002) with significant sex differences; PMI reduction was significant in boys (β=-0.09; p=0.02) but not in girls (β=0.021; p=0.63), p for interaction=0.06. In contrast, SMI reduction was significantly more pronounced in girls. Furthermore, negative associations PMI (β=-0.19; p<0.001) and SMI (β=-0.35; p<0.001) were a function of urinary iAs levels, independently of TAs; however, the reduction in PMI was more pronounced in boys (β=-0.24; p<0.001; girls β=-0.15; p<0.001), p for interaction=0.04. A significant negative association was observed between SMI and iAs levels without significant sex differences. TAs and iAs associations with metabolite percentages were in good agreement with those observed with methylation indexes. Our results suggest that iAs plays an important role in reducing As methylation ability and that significant sex differences are present in As metabolism. These differences merit further investigation to confirm our findings and their potential implications for arsenic toxicity in children.

  20. ELUCIDATING THE PATHWAY FOR ARSENIC METHYLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enzymatically-catalyzed methylation of arsenic is part of a metabolic pathway that converts inorganic arsenic into methylated products. Hence, in humans chronically exposed to inorganic arsenic, methyl and dimethyl arsenic account for most of the arsenic that is excreted in the ...

  1. Transplacental exposure to inorganic arsenic at a hepatocarcinogenic dose induces fetal gene expression changes in mice indicative of aberrant estrogen signaling and disrupted steroid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jie . E-mail: Liu6@niehs.nih.gov; Xie Yaxiong; Cooper, Ryan; Ducharme, Danica M.K.; Tennant, Raymond; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2007-05-01

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic in utero in C3H mice produces hepatocellular carcinoma in male offspring when they reach adulthood. To help define the molecular events associated with the fetal onset of arsenic hepatocarcinogenesis, pregnant C3H mice were given drinking water containing 0 (control) or 85 ppm arsenic from day 8 to 18 of gestation. At the end of the arsenic exposure period, male fetal livers were removed and RNA isolated for microarray analysis using 22K oligo chips. Arsenic exposure in utero produced significant (p < 0.001) alterations in expression of 187 genes, with approximately 25% of aberrantly expressed genes related to either estrogen signaling or steroid metabolism. Real-time RT-PCR on selected genes confirmed these changes. Various genes controlled by estrogen, including X-inactive-specific transcript, anterior gradient-2, trefoil factor-1, CRP-ductin, ghrelin, and small proline-rich protein-2A, were dramatically over-expressed. Estrogen-regulated genes including cytokeratin 1-19 and Cyp2a4 were over-expressed, although Cyp3a25 was suppressed. Several genes involved with steroid metabolism also showed remarkable expression changes, including increased expression of 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-7 (HSD17{beta}7; involved in estradiol production) and decreased expression of HSD17{beta}5 (involved in testosterone production). The expression of key genes important in methionine metabolism, such as methionine adenosyltransferase-1a, betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase and thioether S-methyltransferase, were suppressed. Thus, exposure of mouse fetus to inorganic arsenic during a critical period in development significantly alters the expression of various genes encoding estrogen signaling and steroid or methionine metabolism. These alterations could disrupt genetic programming at the very early life stage, which could impact tumor formation much later in adulthood.

  2. Transplacental exposure to inorganic arsenic at a hepatocarcinogenic dose induces fetal gene expression changes in mice indicative of aberrant estrogen signaling and disrupted steroid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Xie, Yaxiong; Cooper, Ryan; Ducharme, Danica M K; Tennant, Raymond; Diwan, Bhalchandra A; Waalkes, Michael P

    2007-05-01

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic in utero in C3H mice produces hepatocellular carcinoma in male offspring when they reach adulthood. To help define the molecular events associated with the fetal onset of arsenic hepatocarcinogenesis, pregnant C3H mice were given drinking water containing 0 (control) or 85 ppm arsenic from day 8 to 18 of gestation. At the end of the arsenic exposure period, male fetal livers were removed and RNA isolated for microarray analysis using 22K oligo chips. Arsenic exposure in utero produced significant (p<0.001) alterations in expression of 187 genes, with approximately 25% of aberrantly expressed genes related to either estrogen signaling or steroid metabolism. Real-time RT-PCR on selected genes confirmed these changes. Various genes controlled by estrogen, including X-inactive-specific transcript, anterior gradient-2, trefoil factor-1, CRP-ductin, ghrelin, and small proline-rich protein-2A, were dramatically over-expressed. Estrogen-regulated genes including cytokeratin 1-19 and Cyp2a4 were over-expressed, although Cyp3a25 was suppressed. Several genes involved with steroid metabolism also showed remarkable expression changes, including increased expression of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-7 (HSD17beta7; involved in estradiol production) and decreased expression of HSD17beta5 (involved in testosterone production). The expression of key genes important in methionine metabolism, such as methionine adenosyltransferase-1a, betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase and thioether S-methyltransferase, were suppressed. Thus, exposure of mouse fetus to inorganic arsenic during a critical period in development significantly alters the expression of various genes encoding estrogen signaling and steroid or methionine metabolism. These alterations could disrupt genetic programming at the very early life stage, which could impact tumor formation much later in adulthood.

  3. Arsenic Speciation in Plankton Organisms from Contaminated Lakes: Transformations at the Base of the Freshwater Food Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Caumette, Guilhem; Koch, Iris; Estrada, Esteban; Reimer, Ken J.

    2012-02-06

    The two complementary techniques high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis were used to assess arsenic speciation in freshwater phytoplankton and zooplankton collected from arsenic-contaminated lakes in Yellowknife (Northwest Territories, Canada). Arsenic concentrations in lake water ranged from 7 {micro}g L{sup -1} in a noncontaminated lake to 250 {micro}g L{sup -1} in mine-contaminated lakes, which resulted in arsenic concentrations ranging from 7 to 340 mg kg{sup -1} d.w. in zooplankton organisms (Cyclops sp.) and from 154 to 894 mg kg{sup -1} d.w. in phytoplankton. The main arsenic compounds identified by HPLC-ICP-MS in all plankton were inorganic arsenic (from 38% to 98% of total arsenic). No other arsenic compounds were found in phytoplankton, but zooplankton organisms showed the presence of organoarsenic compounds, the most common being the sulfate arsenosugar, up to 47% of total arsenic, with traces of phosphate sugar, glycerol sugar, methylarsonate (MMA), and dimethylarsinate (DMA). In the uncontaminated Grace Lake, zooplankton also contained arsenobetaine (AB). XANES characterization of arsenic in the whole plankton samples showed AsV-O as the only arsenic compound in phytoplankton, and AsIII-S and AsV-O compounds as the two major inorganic arsenic species in zooplankton. The proportion of organoarsenicals and inorganic arsenic in zooplankton depends upon the arsenic concentration in lakes and shows the impact of arsenic contamination: zooplankton from uncontaminated lake has higher proportions of organoarsenic compounds and contains arsenobetaine, while zooplankton from contaminated area contains mostly inorganic arsenic.

  4. How can biologically-based modeling of arsenic kinetics and dynamics inform the risk assessment process? - A workshop review.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Elaina M; Klimecki, Walter T; El-Masri, Hisham; Conolly, Rory B; Clewell, Harvey J; Beck, Barbara D

    2008-11-01

    Quantitative biologically-based models describing key events in the continuum from arsenic exposure to the development of adverse health effects provide a framework to integrate information obtained across diverse research areas. For example, genetic polymorphisms in arsenic metabolizing enzymes can lead to differences in target tissue dosimetry for key metabolites causative in toxic and carcinogenic response. This type of variation can be quantitatively incorporated into pharmacokinetic (PK) models and used together with population-based modeling approaches to evaluate the impact of genetic variation in methylation capacity on dose of key metabolites to target tissue. The PK model is an essential bridge to the pharmacodynamic (PD) models. A particular benefit of PD modeling for arsenic is that alternative models can be constructed for multiple proposed modes of action for arsenicals. Genomics data will prove useful for identifying the key pathways involved in particular responses and aid in determining other types of data needed for quantitative modeling. These models, when linked with PK models, can be used to better understand and explain dose- and time-response behaviors. This in turn assists in prioritizing modes of action with respect to their risk assessment relevance and future research. This type of integrated modeling approach can form the basis for a highly informative mode-of-action directed risk assessment for inorganic arsenic (iAs). This paper will address both practical and theoretical aspects of integrating PK and PD data in a modeling framework, including practical barriers to its application.

  5. Simultaneous speciation analysis of inorganic arsenic, chromium and selenium in environmental waters by 3-(2-aminoethylamino) propyltrimethoxysilane modified multi-wall carbon nanotubes packed microcolumn solid phase extraction and ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hanyong; Zhang, Nan; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Speciation analysis of inorganic arsenic, chromium and selenium in environmental waters is of great significance for the monitoring of environmental pollution. In this work, 3-(2-aminoethylamino) propyltrimethoxysilane (AAPTS) functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized and employed as the adsorbent for simultaneous speciation analysis of inorganic arsenic, chromium and selenium in environmental waters by microcolumn solid-phase extraction (SPE)-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). It was found that As(V), Cr(VI) and Se(VI) could be selectively adsorbed on the microcolumn packed with AAPTS-MWCNTs adsorbent at pH around 2.2, while As(III), Cr(III) and Se(IV) could not be retained at this pH and passed through the microcolumn directly. Total inorganic arsenic, chromium and selenium was determined after the oxidation of As(III), Cr(III) and Se(IV) to As(V), Cr(VI) and Se(VI) with 10.0 μmol L(-1) KMnO4. The assay of As(III), Cr(III) and Se(IV) was based on subtracting As(V), Cr(VI) and Se(VI) from the total As, Cr and Se, respectively. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits of 15, 38 and 16 ng L(-1) with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 7.4, 2.4 and 6.2% (c=1 µg L(-1), n=7) were obtained for As(V), Cr(VI) and Se(VI), respectively. The developed method was validated by analyzing four Certified Reference Materials, rainwater, Yangtze River and East Lake waters.

  6. Evaluation of coexposure to inorganic arsenic and titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the marine shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Lucas; Müller, Larissa; Gelesky, Marcos A; Wasielesky, Wilson; Fattorini, Daniele; Regoli, Francesco; Monserrat, José Marìa; Ventura-Lima, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    The acute toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) that occur concomitantly in the aquatic environment with other contaminants such as arsenic (As) is little known in crustaceans. The objective of the present study is to evaluate whether coexposure to nTiO2 can influence the accumulation, metabolism, and oxidative stress parameters induced by arsenic exposure in the gills and hepatopancreas of the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. Organisms were exposed by dissolving chemicals in seawater (salinity = 30) at nominal concentrations of 10 μg/L nTiO2 or As(III), dosed alone and in combination. Results showed that there was not a significant accumulation of As in either tissue type, but the coexposure altered the pattern of the metabolism. In the hepatopancreas, no changes were observed in the biochemical response, while in the gills, an increase in the glutamate-cysteine-ligase (GCL) activity was observed upon exposure to As or nTiO2 alone, an increase in the reduced glutathione (GSH) levels was observed upon exposure to As alone, and an increase in the total antioxidant capacity was observed upon exposure to nTiO2 or nTiO2 + As. However, these modulations were not sufficient enough to prevent the lipid damage induced by nTiO2 exposure. Our results suggest that coexposure to nTiO2 and As does not alter the toxicity of this metalloid in the gills and hepatopancreas of L. vannamei but does alter its metabolism, favoring its accumulation of organic As species considered moderately toxic.

  7. Ultrathin inorganic molecular nanowire based on polyoxometalates

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenxin; Murayama, Toru; Sadakane, Masahiro; Ariga, Hiroko; Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Asakura, Kiyotaka; Ueda, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    The development of metal oxide-based molecular wires is important for fundamental research and potential practical applications. However, examples of these materials are rare. Here we report an all-inorganic transition metal oxide molecular wire prepared by disassembly of larger crystals. The wires are comprised of molybdenum(VI) with either tellurium(IV) or selenium(IV): {(NH4)2[XMo6O21]}n (X=tellurium(IV) or selenium(IV)). The ultrathin molecular nanowires with widths of 1.2 nm grow to micrometre-scale crystals and are characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis, Rietveld analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, thermal analysis and elemental analysis. The crystals can be disassembled into individual molecular wires through cation exchange and subsequent ultrasound treatment, as visualized by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The ultrathin molecular wire-based material exhibits high activity as an acid catalyst, and the band gap of the molecular wire-based crystal is tunable by heat treatment. PMID:26139011

  8. Molecular modifications induced by inorganic arsenic in Vicia faba investigated by FTIR, FTNIR spectroscopy and genotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Boccia, P; Meconi, C; Mecozzi, M; Sturchio, E

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) through drinking water is a major public health concern affecting most countries. Epidemiologic studies showed a significant association between consumption of iAs through drinking water and different types of cancer. However, the exact mechanisms underlying As-induced cancer and other diseases are not yet well understood. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of exposure iAs (20 or 30 mg/L) on Vicia faba seedlings in terms of phytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and spectroscopy by investigation of molecular modifications using infrared (FTIR) and near infrared (FTNIR) spectroscopy. Further, the mitigation effects of a precursor of glutathione (GSH), N-acetylcysteine (NAC), were also assessed. Spectroscopic and genotoxicity analysis demonstrated that specific molecular changes were directly correlated with iAs exposure. Comet assay in Vicia faba showed significant effects at concentrations of 20 and 30 mg/L, depending on the structural changes involving nucleic acids as identified by FTIR and FTNIR spectroscopy. Results of phytotoxicity and micronuclei tests were significant only at higher iAs concentrations (30 mg/L), where an antioxidant effect of NAC was noted. The two spectroscopic techniques demonstrated molecular modifications predominantly associated with chemical interactions of iAs with biomolecules such as nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins in Vicia faba. Our findings suggest that further studies are required to better understand the mechanisms underlying toxicity produced by different As chemical forms in vegetal and agricultural species.

  9. Cloud point extraction for trace inorganic arsenic speciation analysis in water samples by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shan; Wang, Mei; Zhong, Yizhou; Zhang, Zehua; Yang, Bingyi

    2015-09-01

    A new cloud point extraction technique was established and used for the determination of trace inorganic arsenic species in water samples combined with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HGAFS). As(III) and As(V) were complexed with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate and molybdate, respectively. The complexes were quantitatively extracted with the non-ionic surfactant (Triton X-114) by centrifugation. After addition of antifoam, the surfactant-rich phase containing As(III) was diluted with 5% HCl for HGAFS determination. For As(V) determination, 50% HCl was added to the surfactant-rich phase, and the mixture was placed in an ultrasonic bath at 70 °C for 30 min. As(V) was reduced to As(III) with thiourea-ascorbic acid solution, followed by HGAFS. Under the optimum conditions, limits of detection of 0.009 and 0.012 μg/L were obtained for As(III) and As(V), respectively. Concentration factors of 9.3 and 7.9, respectively, were obtained for a 50 mL sample. The precisions were 2.1% for As(III) and 2.3% for As(V). The proposed method was successfully used for the determination of trace As(III) and As(V) in water samples, with satisfactory recoveries.

  10. Inorganic arsenic speciation at river basin scales: the Tinto and Odiel rivers in the Iberian Pyrite Belt, SW Spain.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, A M; Nieto, J M; Casiot, C; Elbaz-Poulichet, F; Egal, M

    2009-04-01

    The Tinto and Odiel rivers are heavily affected by acid mine drainage from mining areas in the Iberian Pyrite Belt. In this work we have conducted a study along these rivers where surface water samples have been collected. Field measurements, total dissolved metals and Fe and inorganic As speciation analysis were performed. The average total concentration of As in the Tinto river (1975 microg L(-1)) is larger than in the Odiel river (441 microg L(-1)); however, the mean concentration of As(III) is almost four times higher in the Odiel. In wet seasons the mean pH levels of both rivers (2.4 and 3.2 for the Tinto and Odiel, respectively) increase slightly and the amount of dissolved total arsenic tend to decrease, while the As(III)/(V) ratio strongly increase. Besides, the concentration of the reduced As species increase along the water course. As a result, As(III)/(V) ratio can be up to 100 times higher in the lower part of the basins. An estimation of the As(III) load transported by both rivers into the Atlantic Ocean has been performed, resulting in about 60 kg yr(-1) and 2.7t yr(-1) by the Tinto and Odiel rivers, respectively.

  11. Inorganic Arsenic Determination in Food: A Review of Analytical Proposals and Quality Assessment Over the Last Six Years.

    PubMed

    Llorente-Mirandes, Toni; Rubio, Roser; López-Sánchez, José Fermín

    2017-01-01

    Here we review recent developments in analytical proposals for the assessment of inorganic arsenic (iAs) content in food products. Interest in the determination of iAs in products for human consumption such as food commodities, wine, and seaweed among others is fueled by the wide recognition of its toxic effects on humans, even at low concentrations. Currently, the need for robust and reliable analytical methods is recognized by various international safety and health agencies, and by organizations in charge of establishing acceptable tolerance levels of iAs in food. This review summarizes the state of the art of analytical methods while highlighting tools for the assessment of quality assessment of the results, such as the production and evaluation of certified reference materials (CRMs) and the availability of specific proficiency testing (PT) programmes. Because the number of studies dedicated to the subject of this review has increased considerably over recent years, the sources consulted and cited here are limited to those from 2010 to the end of 2015.

  12. Inorganic arsenic speciation in natural mineral drinking waters by flow-through anodic stripping chronopotentiometry.

    PubMed

    Jedryczko, Dominika; Pohl, Pawel; Welna, Maja

    2016-04-01

    A simple and inexpensive method for chemical speciation of inorganic As in natural mineral drinking waters by using anodic stripping chronopotentiometry (ASCP) in an electrochemical flow-through cell with an Au wire as the working electrode was described in the present work. The presented method is an attractive alternative to laborious and time-consuming procedures requiring pre-separation of various forms of As before their detection by other flow-through and non flow-through stripping methods. The limits of detection were found to be 0.42 µg L(-1) for As(III) and 0.55 µg L(-1) for As(V), obtained at the deposition potentials of -350 mV and -1600 mV, respectively. The accuracy of the method was assessed by the spiking-and-recovery experiments for particular water samples and the recoveries found, being in range from 99% to 105% for As(III) and from 104% to 106% for As(V), respectively, were quantitative. The proposed method was successfully applied to speciation analysis of inorganic As in water samples with a high content of Cu.

  13. Substantial contribution of biomethylation to aquifer arsenic cycling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maguffin, Scott C.; Kirk, Matthew F.; Daigle, Ashley R.; Hinkle, Stephen R.; Jin, Qusheng

    2015-01-01

    Microbes play a prominent role in transforming arsenic to and from immobile forms in aquifers1. Much of this cycling involves inorganic forms of arsenic2, but microbes can also generate organic forms through methylation3, although this process is often considered insignificant in aquifers4, 5, 6, 7. Here we identify the presence of dimethylarsinate and other methylated arsenic species in an aquifer hosted in volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks. We find that dimethylarsinate is widespread in the aquifer and its concentration correlates strongly with arsenite concentration. We use laboratory incubation experiments and an aquifer injection test to show that aquifer microbes can produce dimethylarsinate at rates of about 0.1% of total dissolved arsenic per day, comparable to rates of dimethylarsinate production in surface environments. Based on these results, we estimate that globally, biomethylation in aquifers has the potential to transform 100 tons of inorganic arsenic to methylated arsenic species per year, compared with the 420–1,250 tons of inorganic arsenic that undergoes biomethylation in soils8. We therefore conclude that biomethylation could contribute significantly to aquifer arsenic cycling. Because biomethylation yields arsine and methylarsines, which are more volatile and prone to diffusion than other arsenic species, we further suggest that biomethylation may serve as a link between surface and subsurface arsenic cycling.

  14. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling considering methylated trivalent arsenicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    PBPK modeling provides a quantitative biologically-based framework to integrate diverse types of information for application to risk analysis. For example, genetic polymorphisms in arsenic metabolizing enzymes (AS3MT) can lead to differences in target tissue dosimetry for key tri...

  15. Advancing Dose-Response Assessment Methods for Environmental Regulatory Impact Analysis: A Bayesian Belief Network Approach Applied to Inorganic Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Zabinski, Joseph W.; Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela; Fry, Rebecca C.; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald

    2016-01-01

    Dose-response functions used in regulatory risk assessment are based on studies of whole organisms and fail to incorporate genetic and metabolomic data. Bayesian belief networks (BBNs) could provide a powerful framework for incorporating such data, but no prior research has examined this possibility. To address this gap, we develop a BBN-based model predicting birthweight at gestational age from arsenic exposure via drinking water and maternal metabolic indicators using a cohort of 200 pregnant women from an arsenic-endemic region of Mexico. We compare BBN predictions to those of prevailing slope-factor and reference-dose approaches. The BBN outperforms prevailing approaches in balancing false-positive and false-negative rates. Whereas the slope-factor approach had 2% sensitivity and 99% specificity and the reference-dose approach had 100% sensitivity and 0% specificity, the BBN's sensitivity and specificity were 71% and 30%, respectively. BBNs offer a promising opportunity to advance health risk assessment by incorporating modern genetic and metabolomic data. PMID:27747248

  16. Torsional Resonators Based on Inorganic Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Divon, Yiftach; Levi, Roi; Garel, Jonathan; Golberg, Dmitri; Tenne, Reshef; Ya'akobovitz, Assaf; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2017-01-11

    We study for the first time the resonant torsional behaviors of inorganic nanotubes, specifically tungsten disulfide (WS2) and boron nitride (BN) nanotubes, and compare them to that of carbon nanotubes. We have found WS2 nanotubes to have the highest quality factor (Q) and torsional resonance frequency, followed by BN nanotubes and carbon nanotubes. Dynamic and static torsional spring constants of the various nanotubes were found to be different, especially in the case of WS2, possibly due to a velocity-dependent intershell friction. These results indicate that inorganic nanotubes are promising building blocks for high-Q nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

  17. Development of a simple, sensitive and inexpensive ion-pairing cloud point extraction approach for the determination of trace inorganic arsenic species in spring water, beverage and rice samples by UV-Vis spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Gürkan, Ramazan; Kır, Ufuk; Altunay, Nail

    2015-08-01

    The determination of inorganic arsenic species in water, beverages and foods become crucial in recent years, because arsenic species are considered carcinogenic and found at high concentrations in the samples. This communication describes a new cloud-point extraction (CPE) method for the determination of low quantity of arsenic species in the samples, purchased from the local market by UV-Visible Spectrophotometer (UV-Vis). The method is based on selective ternary complex of As(V) with acridine orange (AOH(+)) being a versatile fluorescence cationic dye in presence of tartaric acid and polyethylene glycol tert-octylphenyl ether (Triton X-114) at pH 5.0. Under the optimized conditions, a preconcentration factor of 65 and detection limit (3S blank/m) of 1.14 μg L(-1) was obtained from the calibration curve constructed in the range of 4-450 μg L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9932 for As(V). The method is validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (CRMs).

  18. Mouse arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase genotype affects metabolism and tissue dosimetry of arsenicals after arsenite administration in drinking water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) catalyzes methylation of inorganic arsenic producing a number of methylated arsenic metabolites. Although methylation has been commonly considered a pathway for detoxification of arsenic, some highly reactive methylated ars...

  19. The impact of a rice based diet on urinary arsenic.

    PubMed

    Cascio, Claudia; Raab, Andrea; Jenkins, Richard O; Feldmann, Joerg; Meharg, Andrew A; Haris, Parvez I

    2011-02-01

    Rice is elevated in arsenic (As) compared to other staple grains. The Bangladeshi community living in the United Kingdom (UK) has a ca. 30-fold higher consumption of rice than white Caucasians. In order to assess the impact of this difference in rice consumption, urinary arsenicals of 49 volunteers in the UK (Bangladeshi n = 37; white Caucasians n = 12) were monitored along with dietary habits. Total urinary arsenic (As(t)) and speciation analysis for dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), monomethylarsonic acid (MA) and inorganic arsenic (iAs) was conducted. Although no significant difference was found for As(t) (median: Bangladeshis 28.4 µg L(-1)) and white Caucasians (20.6 µg L(-1)), the sum of medians of DMA, MA and iAs for the Bangladeshi group was found to be over 3-fold higher (17.9 µg L(-1)) than for the Caucasians (3.50 µg L(-1)). Urinary DMA was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in the UK Bangladeshis (median: 16.9 µg DMA L(-1)) than in the white Caucasians (3.16 µg DMA L(-1)) as well as iAs (p < 0.001) with a median of 0.630 µg iAs L(-1) for Bangladeshi and 0.250 µg iAs L(-1) for Caucasians. Cationic compounds were significantly lower in the Bangladeshis (2.93 µg L(-1)) than in Caucasians (14.9 µg L(-1)). The higher DMA and iAs levels in the Bangladeshis are mainly the result of higher rice consumption: arsenic is speciated in rice as both iAs and DMA, and iAs can be metabolized, through MA, to DMA by humans. This study shows that a higher dietary intake of DMA alters the DMA/MA ratio in urine. Consequently, DMA/MA ratio as an indication of methylation capacity in populations consuming large quantities of rice should be applied with caution since variation in the quantity and type of rice eaten may alter this ratio.

  20. Human Arsenic Poisoning Issues in Central-East Indian Locations: Biomarkers and Biochemical Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Piyush Kant; Yadav, Sushma; Pandey, Madhurima

    2007-01-01

    The study reports the use of three biomarkers i.e. total arsenic in hair and nails, total arsenic in blood, and total arsenic in urine to identify or quantify arsenic exposure and concomitant health effects. The main source of arsenic was inorganic exposure through drinking water. The arsenic levels and the health effects were analyzed closely in a family having maximum symptoms of arsenic. Based on the result of this study it is reported that there exist a correlation between the clinically observable symptoms, the blood and urine arsenic level, and the arsenic intake through drinking water. An intensive study on the urinary arsenic levels was carried out in which the urine levels of arsenic and the urine sufficiency tests were performed. A composite picture of body burden of arsenic has been obtained by carrying out a complete biochemical analysis of a maximum affected family. This confirms pronounced chronic exposure of the arsenic to these people. A combined correlation study on the arsenic levels measured in whole blood, urine, hair, nails and age present a remarkable outcome. Accordingly, the arsenic levels in blood are negatively correlated with the urine arsenic levels, which indicate either the inadequacy of the renal system in cleaning the blood arsenic or a continuous recirculation of the accumulated arsenic. This is an important conclusion about arsenical metabolism in humans. The study also raises the issues of the prospects of complete elimination of the accumulated arsenic and the reversibility of the health effects. Based on the work in Kourikasa village we report that there are very remote chances of complete purging of arsenic and thus reversibility of the health effects owing to various factors. The paper also discusses the various issues concerning the chronic arsenic poisoning management in the affected locations. PMID:17431310

  1. Arsenic removal using natural biomaterial-based sorbents.

    PubMed

    Ansone, Linda; Klavins, Maris; Viksna, Arturs

    2013-10-01

    Arsenic contamination of water is a major problem worldwide. A possible solution can be approached through developing new sorbents based on cost-effective and environmentally friendly natural biomaterials. We have developed new sorbents based on biomaterial impregnation with iron oxyhydroxide. In this study, raw peat material, iron-modified peat, iron-modified biomass (shingles, straw, sands, cane and moss) as well as iron humate were used for the removal of arsenate from contaminated water. The highest sorption capacity was observed in iron-modified peat, and kinetic studies indicated that the amount of arsenic sorbed on this material exceeds 90 % in 5 h. Arsenate sorption on iron-modified peat is characterised by the pseudo-second-order mechanism. The results of arsenic sorption in the presence of competing substances indicated that sulphate, nitrate, chloride and tartrate anions have practically no influence on As(V) sorption onto Fe-modified peat, whereas the presence of phosphate ions and humic acid significantly lowers the arsenic removal efficiency.

  2. Differential DNA methylation profile of key genes in malignant prostate epithelial cells transformed by inorganic arsenic or cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Pelch, Katherine E.; Tokar, Erik J.; Merrick, B. Alex; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2015-08-01

    Previous work shows altered methylation patterns in inorganic arsenic (iAs)- or cadmium (Cd)-transformed epithelial cells. Here, the methylation status near the transcriptional start site was assessed in the normal human prostate epithelial cell line (RWPE-1) that was malignantly transformed by 10 μM Cd for 11 weeks (CTPE) or 5 μM iAs for 29 weeks (CAsE-PE), at which time cells showed multiple markers of acquired cancer phenotype. Next generation sequencing of the transcriptome of CAsE-PE cells identified multiple dysregulated genes. Of the most highly dysregulated genes, five genes that can be relevant to the carcinogenic process (S100P, HYAL1, NTM, NES, ALDH1A1) were chosen for an in-depth analysis of the DNA methylation profile. DNA was isolated, bisulfite converted, and combined bisulfite restriction analysis was used to identify differentially methylated CpG sites, which was confirmed with bisulfite sequencing. Four of the five genes showed differential methylation in transformants relative to control cells that was inversely related to altered gene expression. Increased expression of HYAL1 (> 25-fold) and S100P (> 40-fold) in transformants was correlated with hypomethylation near the transcriptional start site. Decreased expression of NES (> 15-fold) and NTM (> 1000-fold) in transformants was correlated with hypermethylation near the transcriptional start site. ALDH1A1 expression was differentially expressed in transformed cells but was not differentially methylated relative to control. In conclusion, altered gene expression observed in Cd and iAs transformed cells may result from altered DNA methylation status. - Highlights: • Cd and iAs are known human carcinogens, yet neither appears directly mutagenic. • Prior data suggest epigenetic modification plays a role in Cd or iAs induced cancer. • Altered methylation of four misregulated genes was found in Cd or iAs transformants. • The resulting altered gene expression may be relevant to cellular

  3. Neurological effects of inorganic arsenic exposure: altered cysteine/glutamate transport, NMDA expression and spatial memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Chávez, Lucio A.; Rendón-López, Christian R. R.; Zepeda, Angélica; Silva-Adaya, Daniela; Del Razo, Luz M.; Gonsebatt, María E.

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is an important natural pollutant. Millions of individuals worldwide drink water with high levels of iAs. Chronic exposure to iAs has been associated with lower IQ and learning disabilities as well as memory impairment. iAs is methylated in tissues such as the brain generating mono and dimethylated species. iAs methylation requires cellular glutathione (GSH), which is the main antioxidant in the central nervous system (CNS). In humans, As species cross the placenta and are found in cord blood. A CD1 mouse model was used to investigate effects of gestational iAs exposure which can lead to oxidative damage, disrupted cysteine/glutamate transport and its putative impact in learning and memory. On postnatal days (PNDs) 1, 15 and 90, the expression of membrane transporters related to GSH synthesis and glutamate transport and toxicity, such as xCT, EAAC1, GLAST and GLT1, as well as LAT1, were analyzed. Also, the expression of the glutamate receptor N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDAR) subunits NR2A and B as well as the presence of As species in cortex and hippocampus were investigated. On PND 90, an object location task was performed to associate exposure with memory impairment. Gestational exposure to iAs affected the expression of cysteine/glutamate transporters in cortex and hippocampus and induced a negative modulation of NMDAR NR2B subunit in the hippocampus. Behavioral tasks showed significant spatial memory impairment in males while the effect was marginal in females. PMID:25709567

  4. Differential DNA methylation profile of key genes in malignant prostate epithelial cells transformed by inorganic arsenic or cadmium.

    PubMed

    Pelch, Katherine E; Tokar, Erik J; Merrick, B Alex; Waalkes, Michael P

    2015-08-01

    Previous work shows altered methylation patterns in inorganic arsenic (iAs)- or cadmium (Cd)-transformed epithelial cells. Here, the methylation status near the transcriptional start site was assessed in the normal human prostate epithelial cell line (RWPE-1) that was malignantly transformed by 10μM Cd for 11weeks (CTPE) or 5μM iAs for 29weeks (CAsE-PE), at which time cells showed multiple markers of acquired cancer phenotype. Next generation sequencing of the transcriptome of CAsE-PE cells identified multiple dysregulated genes. Of the most highly dysregulated genes, five genes that can be relevant to the carcinogenic process (S100P, HYAL1, NTM, NES, ALDH1A1) were chosen for an in-depth analysis of the DNA methylation profile. DNA was isolated, bisulfite converted, and combined bisulfite restriction analysis was used to identify differentially methylated CpG sites, which was confirmed with bisulfite sequencing. Four of the five genes showed differential methylation in transformants relative to control cells that was inversely related to altered gene expression. Increased expression of HYAL1 (>25-fold) and S100P (>40-fold) in transformants was correlated with hypomethylation near the transcriptional start site. Decreased expression of NES (>15-fold) and NTM (>1000-fold) in transformants was correlated with hypermethylation near the transcriptional start site. ALDH1A1 expression was differentially expressed in transformed cells but was not differentially methylated relative to control. In conclusion, altered gene expression observed in Cd and iAs transformed cells may result from altered DNA methylation status.

  5. Impact of carbon nanotubes on the toxicity of inorganic arsenic [AS(III) and AS(V)] to Daphnia magna: The role of certain arsenic species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinghao; Qu, Ruijuan; Allam, Ahmed A; Ajarem, Jamaan; Wei, Zhongbo; Wang, Zuoyao

    2016-07-01

    As a type of emerging nanomaterial, hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (OH-MWCNTs) may interact with other pollutants in the aquatic environments and further influence their toxicity, transport, and fate. Thus, evaluation of toxicity to arsenic in the presence of CNTs needs to receive much more attention. The present study was conducted to explore the underlying mechanisms of OH-MWCNT-induced arsenic (As[III] and As[V]) toxicity changes in the aquatic organism Daphnia magna at different pH levels. The most toxic species for As(III) and As(V) to D. magna were found to be H2 AsO3 (-) and H2 AsO4 (-) . It appeared that the pH values were of greatest importance when the biological toxicity of As(III) and As(V) was compared. Furthermore, the effects of OH-MWCNTs on arsenic toxicity to D. magna indicated that the presence of OH-MWCNTs could enhance the toxicity of arsenic. The interactions of arsenic with OH-MWCNTs were further investigated by conducting adsorption experiments. The adsorption capacity of As(V) by OH-MWCNTs was found to be higher than that of As(III). To conclude, adsorption of certain arsenic species onto OH-MWCNTs is crucial for a reliable interpretation of enhanced toxicity. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1852-1859. © 2016 SETAC.

  6. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Long-Circulating Inorganic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaowen; Wang, Haolu; Grice, Jeffrey E; Li, Li; Liu, Xin; Xu, Zhi Ping; Roberts, Michael S

    2016-02-10

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed for accurately characterizing and predicting the in vivo fate of long-circulating inorganic nanoparticles (NPs). This model is built based on direct visualization of NP disposition details at the organ and cellular level. It was validated with multiple data sets, indicating robust inter-route and interspecies predictive capability. We suggest that the biodistribution of long-circulating inorganic NPs is determined by the uptake and release of NPs by phagocytic cells in target organs.

  7. Arsenic Exposure and Cancer Mortality in a US-based Prospective Cohort: the Strong Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    García-Esquinas, Esther; Pollán, Marina; Umans, Jason G.; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; Guallar, Eliseo; Howard, Barbara; Farley, John; Yeh, Jeunliang; Best, Lyle G.; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Background Inorganic arsenic, a carcinogen at high exposure levels, is a major global health problem. Prospective studies on carcinogenic effects at low-moderate arsenic levels are lacking. Methods We evaluated the association between baseline arsenic exposure and cancer mortality in 3,932 American Indians 45–74 years from Arizona, Oklahoma and North/South Dakota who participated in the Strong Heart Study in 1989–1991 and were followed through 2008. We estimated inorganic arsenic exposure as the sum of inorganic and methylated species in urine. Cancer deaths (386 overall, 78 lung, 34 liver, 18 prostate, 26 kidney, 24 esophagus/stomach, 25 pancreas, 32 colon/rectal, 26 breast, 40 lymphatic/hematopoietic) were assessed by mortality surveillance reviews. We hypothesized an association with lung, liver, prostate and kidney cancer. Results Median (interquartile range) urine concentration for inorganic plus methylated arsenic species was 9.7 (5.8–15.6) μg/g creatinine. The adjusted hazard ratios (95% CI) comparing the 80th versus 20th percentiles of arsenic were 1.14 (0.92–1.41) for overall cancer, 1.56 (1.02–2.39) for lung cancer, 1.34 (0.66, 2.72) for liver cancer, 3.30 (1.28–8.48) for prostate cancer, and 0.44 (0.14, 1.14) for kidney cancer. The corresponding hazard ratios were 2.46 (1.09–5.58) for pancreatic cancer, and 0.46 (0.22–0.96) for lymphatic and hematopoietic cancers. Arsenic was not associated with cancers of the esophagus and stomach, colon and rectum, and breast. Conclusions Low to moderate exposure to inorganic arsenic was prospectively associated with increased mortality for cancers of the lung, prostate and pancreas. Impact These findings support the role of low-moderate arsenic exposure in lung, prostate and pancreas cancer development and can inform arsenic risk assessment. PMID:23800676

  8. Bioaccessibility and degradation of naturally occurring arsenic species from food in the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Capilla, Teresa; Beshai, Mona; Maher, William; Kelly, Tamsin; Foster, Simon

    2016-12-01

    Humans are exposed to organic arsenic species through their diet and therefore, are susceptible to arsenic toxicity. Investigating the transformations occurring in the gastrointestinal tract will influence which arsenic species to focus on when studying metabolism in cells. Using a physiologically based extraction test, the bioaccessibility of arsenic species was determined after the simulated gastrointestinal digestion of rice, seaweed and fish. Pure standards of the major arsenic species present in these foodstuffs (arsenic glutathione complexes, arsenosugars and short chain fatty acids) were also evaluated to assess the effect of the food matrix on bioaccessibility and transformation. Approximately 80% of arsenic is released from these foodstuffs, potentially becoming available. Hydrolysis and demethylation of arsenic glutathione complexes and arsenosugars standards was observed, but no transformations occurred to arsenosugars present in seaweed. Demethylation of MA and DMA from rice occurs increasing the amount of inorganic arsenic species available for metabolism.

  9. Bioaccumulation of arsenic by freshwater algae and the application to the removal of inorganic arsenic from an aqueous phase. Part II. By Chlorella vulgaris isolated from arsenic-polluted environment

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, S.; Nakashima, S.; Takeshita, T.; Higashi, S.

    1985-01-01

    Green algae, Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck var. vulgaris, isolated from an arsenic-polluted environment, was examined for the effects of arsenic levels, arsenic valence, temperature illumination intensity, phosphate levels, metabolism inhibitors, heat treatment on the growth, and arsenic bioaccumulation. The following conclusions were reached from the experimental results: (a) The growth of the cell increased with an increase of arsenic(V) levels of the medium up to 1000 ppm, and the cell survived even at 10,000 ppm; (b) The arsenic bioaccumulation increased with an increase of the arsenic level. The maximum accumulation of arsenic was about 50,000 ..mu..g As/g dry cell; (c) The growth decreased with an increase of the arsenic(III) level and the cell was cytolyzed at levels higher than 40 ppm; (d) No arsenic(V) was bioaccumulated by a cell which had been pretreated with dinitrophenol (respiratory inhibitor) or with heat. Little effect of NaN/sub 3/ (photosynthesis inhibitor) on the bioaccumulation was observed. 8 references, 2 figures, 6 tables.

  10. Arsenic speciation in rice-based food for adults with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Munera-Picazo, Sandra; Burló, Francisco; Carbonell-Barrachina, Ángel Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) may affect up to 1% of the Western population. It is a disease whose diagnosis has been made mainly in childhood, but now the profile has changed, with one out of five newly diagnosed individuals being over 65 years old. The only treatment for this population is a gluten-free diet. Therefore, the objective of this study was to analyse the occurrence of arsenic (As) in gluten-free products, basically those rice-based, intended for celiac adult consumers. The current study demonstrated that these rice-based products contained important contents of total arsenic (t-As) (up to 120 μg kg(-1)) and inorganic arsenic (i-As) (up to 85.8 μg kg(-1)). It was estimated that the contents of t-As and i-As in rice used as the main ingredient of these foods were as high as 235 and 198 μg kg(-1), respectively. The estimated daily intake of i-As was 0.46 and 0.45 μg kg(-1) bw in women and men of 58 and 75 kg of body weight (bw), respectively. These values indicate that a health risk to these consumers cannot be excluded. Finally, legislation is needed to delimit the safety intake by health agencies and to improve the labelling of these special rice-based foods for celiac adult consumers. The label should include information about percentage, geographical origin and cultivar of the rice used; besides and if companies want to clearly prove the safety of their products, the exact content of i-As should also be included.

  11. Evaluation of gene expression changes in human primary lung epithelial cells following 24-hr exposures to inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites and to arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    Efremenko, Alina Y; Seagrave, JeanClare; Clewell, Harvey J; Van Landingham, Cynthia; Gentry, P Robinan; Yager, Janice W

    2015-06-01

    The concentration response for altered gene expression in primary lung epithelial cells was determined following two treatments with arsenicals: (1) a mixture of trivalent arsenic compounds representative of urinary arsenic concentrations in exposed human populations, and (2) arsenite (As2 O3 ) a common form of inhaled arsenic dust that is frequently used in both in vivo and in vitro experimental exposures. Biochemical assays did not detect any evidence of cytotoxicity at the concentrations used, apart from a concentration-related increase in cellular heme oxygenase that was also indicated by the genomic analysis. Cell signal pathway enrichment analysis indicated similar responses to both treatments, with concentration-related responses in pathways related to cell adhesion, cytoskeleton remodeling, development (morphogenesis), cell cycle control, and to a lesser extent inflammatory responses. These cellular responses to arsenic were consistent with those observed in a previous study with primary uroepithelial cells. Benchmark dose analysis also demonstrated similar potency of the two treatments as well as comparable sensitivity of the two cell types. A number of genes showing similar concentration-dependent expression across individuals in both bladder and lung cells were identified, including heme oxygenase 1, thioredoxin reductase, DNA damage binding protein 2, and thrombomodulin. The data on human primary lung cells from this study, together with the data from human primary uroepithelial cells, support a conclusion that biological responses to arsenic by human cells under study conditions are unlikely to occur at concentrations below 0.1 µM. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 56:477-490, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Stretchable, curvilinear electronics based on inorganic materials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Xiao, Jianliang; Song, Jizhou; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2010-05-18

    All commercial forms of electronic/optoelectronic technologies use planar, rigid substrates. Device possibilities that exploit bio-inspired designs or require intimate integration with the human body demand curvilinear shapes and/or elastic responses to large strain deformations. This article reviews progress in research designed to accomplish these outcomes with established, high-performance inorganic electronic materials and modest modifications to conventional, planar processing techniques. We outline the most well developed strategies and illustrate their use in demonstrator devices that exploit unique combinations of shape, mechanical properties and electronic performance. We conclude with an outlook on the challenges and opportunities for this emerging area of materials science and engineering.

  13. *Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the methylation of arsenicals in the invertebrate chordate ciona intestinalis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotransformation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) involves methylation catalyzed by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) , yielding mono-, di-, and trimethylated arsenicals. A comparative genomic approach focused on Ciona intestinaJis, an invertebrate chordate, was u...

  14. Arsenic concentrations in Baltic Sea sediments close to chemical munitions dumpsites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bełdowski, Jacek; Szubska, Marta; Emelyanov, Emelyan; Garnaga, Galina; Drzewińska, Anna; Bełdowska, Magdalena; Vanninen, Paula; Östin, Anders; Fabisiak, Jacek

    2016-06-01

    In addition to natural sources and land-originated pollution, the Baltic Sea has another anthropogenic source of arsenic in bottom sediments-arsenic-based Chemical Warfare Agents (CWA). To examine the potential usage of arsenic contents results for monitoring the leakage from chemical weapons, sediment samples were collected from officially reported and potential chemical weapon dumpsites located in the Baltic Sea, and total and inorganic arsenic concentrations were analyzed. Results showed an elevated arsenic content in dumpsite areas compared to reference areas. Correlations of arsenic with other metals and organic matter were studied to elucidate any unusual behavior of arsenic in the dumpsites. In the area of the Bornholm Deep, such behavior was observed for inorganic arsenic. It appears that in close vicinity of dumped munitions, the inorganic arsenic concentration of sediments is not correlated with either organic matter content or authigenic minerals formation, as is commonly observed elsewhere. Investigations on CWA concentrations, performed within the CHEMSEA (Chemical Munition Search and Assesment) project, allowed us to compare the results of arsenic concentrations with the occurrence of arsenic-containing CWA.

  15. Arsenic Toxicity to Juvenile Fish: Effects of Exposure Route, Arsenic Speciation, and Fish Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic toxicity to juvenile rainbow trout and fathead minnows was evaluated in 28-day tests using both dietborne and waterborne exposures, both inorganic and organic arsenic species, and both a live diet and an arsenic-spiked pellet diet. Effects of inorganic arsenic on rainbow...

  16. Comparison of sand-based water filters for point-of-use arsenic removal in China.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kate; Li, Zhenyu; Chen, Bohan; Liang, Honggang; Zhang, Xinyi; Xu, Ruifei; Li, Zhilin; Dai, Huanfang; Wei, Caijie; Liu, Shuming

    2017-02-01

    Contamination of groundwater wells by arsenic is a major problem in China. This study compared arsenic removal efficiency of five sand-based point-of-use filters with the aim of selecting the most effective filter for use in a village in Shanxi province, where the main groundwater source had arsenic concentration >200 μg/L. A biosand filter, two arsenic biosand filters, a SONO-style filter and a version of the biosand filter with nails embedded in the sand were tested. The biosand filter with embedded nails was the most consistent and effective under the study conditions, likely due to increased contact time between water and nails and sustained corrosion. Effluent arsenic was below China's standard of 50 μg/L for more than six months after construction. The removal rate averaged 92% and was never below 86%. In comparison, arsenic removal for the nail-free biosand filter was never higher than 53% and declined with time. The arsenic biosand filter, in which nails sit in a diffuser basin above the sand, performed better but effluent arsenic almost always exceeded the standard. This highlights the positive impact on arsenic removal of embedding nails within the top layer of biosand filter sand and the promise of this low-cost filtration method for rural areas affected by arsenic contamination.

  17. Progress on lanthanide-based organic-inorganic hybrid phosphors.

    PubMed

    Carlos, Luís D; Ferreira, Rute A S; de Zea Bermudez, Verónica; Julián-López, Beatriz; Escribano, Purificación

    2011-02-01

    Research on organic-inorganic hybrid materials containing trivalent lanthanide ions (Ln(3+)) is a very active field that has rapidly shifted in the last couple of years to the development of eco-friendly, versatile and multifunctional systems, stimulated by the challenging requirements of technological applications spanning domains as diverse as optics, environment, energy, and biomedicine. This tutorial review offers a general overview of the myriad of advanced Ln(3+)-based organic-inorganic hybrid materials recently synthesised, which may be viewed as a major innovation in areas of phosphors, lighting, integrated optics and optical telecommunications, solar cells, and biomedicine.

  18. Hijacking microglial glutathione by inorganic arsenic impels bystander death of immature neurons through extracellular cystine/glutamate imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vikas; Gera, Ruchi; Kushwaha, Rajesh; Sharma, Anuj Kumar; Patnaik, Satyakam; Ghosh, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic-induced altered microglial activity leads to neuronal death, but the causative mechanism remains unclear. The present study showed, arsenic-exposed (10 μM) microglial (N9) culture supernatant induced bystander death of neuro-2a (N2a), which was further validated with primary microglia and immature neuronal cultures. Results indicated that arsenic-induced GSH synthesis by N9 unfavorably modified the extracellular milieu for N2a by lowering cystine and increasing glutamate concentration. Similar result was observed in N9-N2a co-culture. Co-exposure of arsenic and 250 μM glutamate, less than the level (265 μM) detected in arsenic-exposed N9 culture supernatant, compromised N2a viability which was rescued by cystine supplementation. Therefore, microglia executes bystander N2a death by competitive inhibition of system Xc- (xCT) through extracellular cystine/glutamate imbalance. We confirmed the role of xCT in mediating bystander N2a death by siRNA inhibition studies. Ex-vivo primary microglia culture supernatant from gestationally exposed mice measured to contain lower cystine and higher glutamate compared to control and N-acetyl cysteine co-treated group. Immunofluorescence staining of brain cryosections from treated group showed more dead immature neurons with no such effect on microglia. Collectively, we showed, in presence of arsenic microglia alters cystine/glutamate balance through xCT in extracellular milieu leading to bystander death of immature neurons. PMID:27477106

  19. Association between arsenic exposure and plasma cholinesterase activity: a population based study in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Arsenic is a potent pollutant that has caused an environmental catastrophe in certain parts of the world including Bangladesh where millions of people are presently at risk due to drinking water contaminated by arsenic. Chronic arsenic exposure has been scientifically shown as a cause for liver damage, cancers, neurological disorders and several other ailments. The relationship between plasma cholinesterase (PChE) activity and arsenic exposure has not yet been clearly documented. However, decreased PChE activity has been found in patients suffering liver dysfunction, heart attack, cancer metastasis and neurotoxicity. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the PChE activity in individuals exposed to arsenic via drinking water in Bangladesh. Methods A total of 141 Bangladeshi residents living in arsenic endemic areas with the mean arsenic exposure of 14.10 ± 3.27 years were selected as study subjects and split into tertile groups based on three water arsenic concentrations: low (< 129 μg/L), medium (130-264 μg/L) and high (> 265 μg/L). Study subjects were further sub-divided into two groups (≤50 μg/L and > 50 μg/L) based on the recommended upper limit of water arsenic concentration (50 μg/L) in Bangladesh. Blood samples were collected from the study subjects by venipuncture and arsenic concentrations in drinking water, hair and nail samples were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). PChE activity was assayed by spectrophotometer. Results Arsenic concentrations in hair and nails were positively correlated with the arsenic levels in drinking water. Significant decreases in PChE activity were observed with increasing concentrations of arsenic in water, hair and nails. The average levels of PChE activity in low, medium and high arsenic exposure groups were also significantly different between each group. Lower levels of PChE activity were also observed in the > 50 μg/L group compared to the ≤50 μg/L group. Moreover

  20. Recent Advances on Inorganic Nanoparticle-Based Cancer Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fenglin; Li, Chengyao; Cheng, Jing; Yuan, Zhiqin

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles have been widely investigated as therapeutic agents for cancer treatments in biomedical fields due to their unique physical/chemical properties, versatile synthetic strategies, easy surface functionalization and excellent biocompatibility. This review focuses on the discussion of several types of inorganic nanoparticle-based cancer therapeutic agents, including gold nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, upconversion nanoparticles and mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Several cancer therapy techniques are briefly introduced at the beginning. Emphasis is placed on how these inorganic nanoparticles can provide enhanced therapeutic efficacy in cancer treatment through site-specific accumulation, targeted drug delivery and stimulated drug release, with elaborations on several examples to highlight the respective strategies adopted. Finally, a brief summary and future challenges are included. PMID:27898016

  1. Population Based Exposure Assessment of Bioaccessible Arsenic in Carrots

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two predominant arsenic exposure routes are food and water. Estimating the risk from dietary exposures is complicated, owing to the chemical form dependent toxicity of arsenic and the diversity of arsenicals present in dietary matrices. Two aspects of assessing dietary expo...

  2. Effects of compost amended lead-arsenate contaminated soils on total and inorganic arsenic concentration in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.), a staple crop for over fifty percent of the world’s population, is also a source of dietary arsenic because of its efficiency at accumulating As. Pesticides containing As were once widely used in agriculture, and some soils in which these pesticides were used are now being u...

  3. Protective effect of edible marine algae, Laminaria japonica and Porphyra haitanensis, on subchronic toxicity in rats induced by inorganic arsenic.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanhua; Wang, Lianzhu; Yao, Lin; Liu, Zhantao; Gao, Hua

    2013-09-01

    Arsenic, a potent environmental toxic agent, causes various hazardous effects on human health. This study was performed to evaluate the protective effects of edible marine algae, Laminaria japonica and Porphyra haitanensis, on subchronic stress of rats induced by arsenic trioxide (As2O3). The co-treatment of marine algae could slightly increase the growth rates of body weights compared to the As2O3-treated group. The marine algae application restored liver and renal function by preventing the increment in the activities of alanine transaminase and alkaline phosphatase, and the levels of total protein, blood urea nitrogen, and creatinine. The increase in the contents of total cholesterol, triglyceride, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and decrease in the contents of high density lipoprotein cholesterol were observed in algae co-treated groups which indicated that marine algae could reverse the abnormal lipid metabolisms induced by arsenic. Moreover, these algae could protect the rats from lipid peroxidation by restoring the depletion of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities and sulfhydryl group contents, and lowering the enhanced malondialdehyde contents. Therefore, evidences indicate that L. japonica and P. haitanensis can serve as an effective regimen for treating arsenic poisoning.

  4. Arsenic speciation analysis in mono-varietal wines by on-line ionic liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Leticia B; Martinis, Estefanía M; Olsina, Roberto A; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G

    2013-05-01

    A highly efficient separation and pre-concentration method for arsenic species determination, based on ionic liquid (IL) dispersive microextraction technique implemented in a flow analysis system, is proposed. Highly selective separation of arsenite species [As(III)] was achieved by chelation with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) followed by dispersion with 40 mg of 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C(8)mim][PF(6)]) IL. Analyte extraction, retention and separation of IL phase were achieved with a packed microcolumn and As(III) was determined in eluent solution by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Concentration of As(V) was deduced by the difference between total inorganic arsenic and As(III). Thus, determination of total arsenic was performed by previous degradation of organo-arsenic species, followed by a reduction. Under optimal conditions, As(III) extraction efficiency was 100% and a sensitivity enhancement factor of 46 was obtained with only 4.0 ml of sample The method was successfully applied for arsenic speciation studies in mono-varietal wines.

  5. Reduction of inorganic compounds with molecular hydrogen by Micrococcus lactilyticus. I. Stoichiometry with compounds of arsenic, selenium, tellurium, transition and other elements.

    PubMed

    WOOLFOLK, C A; WHITELEY, H R

    1962-10-01

    Woolfolk, C. A. (University of Washington, Seattle) and H. R. Whiteley. Reduction of inorganic compounds with molecular hydrogen by Micrococcus lactilyticus. I. Stoichiometry with compounds of arsenic, selenium, tellurium, transition and other elements. J. Bacteriol. 84:647-658. 1962.-Extracts of Micrococcus lactilyticus (Veillonella alcalescens) oxidize molecular hydrogen at the expense of certain compounds of arsenic, bismuth, selenium, tellurium, lead, thallium, vanadium, manganese, iron, copper, molybdenum, tungsten, osmium, ruthenium, gold, silver, and uranium, as well as molecular oxygen. Chemical and manometric data indicate that the following reductions are essentially quantitative: arsenate to arsenite, pentavalent and trivalent bismuth to the free element, selenite via elemental selenium to selenide, tellurate and tellurite to tellurium, lead dioxide and manganese dioxide to the divalent state, ferric to ferrous iron, osmium tetroxide to osmate ion, osmium dioxide and trivalent osmium to the metal, uranyl uranium to the tetravalent state, vanadate to the level of vanadyl, and polymolybdate ions to molybdenum blues with an average valence for molybdenum of +5. The results of a study of certain other hydrogenase-containing bacteria with respect to their ability to carry out some of the same reactions are also presented.

  6. How Can Biologically-Based Modeling of Arsenic Kinetics and Dynamics Inform the Risk Assessment Process? -- ETD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative biologically-based models describing key events in the continuum from arsenic exposure to the development of adverse health effects provide a framework to integrate information obtained across diverse research areas. For example, genetic polymorphisms in arsenic me...

  7. Role of Metabolism in Arsenic-Induced Toxicity: Identification and Quantification of Arsenic Metabolites in Tissues and Excreta

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is a known toxicant and carcinogen. Methylation of inorganic arsenic was once thought to be a detoxification mechanism because of the rapid excretion and relatively lower toxicity of the pentavalent organic arsenical metabolites. Advances in analytical chemistry have al...

  8. Arsenic Metabolism and Distribution in Developing Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    A growing body of evidence suggests that exposure to inorganic arsenic during early life has long term adverse effects. The extent of exposure to inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites in utero is determined not only by the rates of formation and transfer of arsenicals...

  9. A Pathway-based Analysis of Urinary Arsenic Metabolites and Skin Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kile, Molly L.; Hoffman, Elaine; Rodrigues, Ema G.; Breton, Carrie V.; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Mahiuddin, Golam; Hsueh, Yu-Mei; Christiani, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is metabolized to monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). Limited evidence suggests that the ability to fully metabolize arsenic into DMA influences susceptibility to disease. To determine whether percentage of MMA was predictive of disease, the authors used data from a case-control study conducted in Bangladesh (2001–2003). Persons who were diagnosed with keratosis, melanosis, Bowen's disease, or squamous cell carcinoma were matched on age, sex, and village to persons without these conditions. This analysis was restricted to persons who had no missing data on covariates (859 cases, 868 controls). A path analysis was used to evaluate simultaneously the association between the percentage of all urinary arsenic metabolites and the odds of skin lesions using PROC CALIS in SAS, version 9.1 (SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, North Carolina) and Mplus, version 6.1 (Muthén & Muthén, Los Angeles, California). The odds of skin lesions were significantly associated with log10 percentage of MMA (adjusted odds ratio (ORadj) = 1.56, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.15, 2.12) but not log10 percentage of inorganic arsenic (ORadj = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.75, 1.50) or log10 percentage of DMA (ORadj = 1.07, 95% CI: 0.33, 3.46). This novel analysis confirmed that persons who excrete a higher proportion of MMA have a greater risk of skin lesions after data are adequately controlled for urinary arsenic metabolites, current arsenic exposure, and other risk factors. PMID:21378128

  10. PROPOSED CARCINOGENIC MECHANISMS FOR ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    PROPOSED CARCINOGENIC MECHANISMS FOR ARSENIC.

    Arsenic is a human carcinogen in skin, lung, liver, urinary bladder and kidney. In contrast,
    there is no accepted experimental animal model of inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis.
    Proposed mechanisms/modes of action for a...

  11. Impaired arsenic metabolism in children during weaning

    SciTech Connect

    Faengstroem, Britta; Hamadani, Jena; Nermell, Barbro; Grander, Margaretha; Palm, Brita; Vahter, Marie

    2009-09-01

    Background: Methylation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) via one-carbon metabolism is a susceptibility factor for a range of arsenic-related health effects, but there is no data on the importance of arsenic metabolism for effects on child development. Aim: To elucidate the development of arsenic metabolism in early childhood. Methods: We measured iAs, methylarsonic acid (MA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), the metabolites of iAs, in spot urine samples of 2400 children at 18 months of age. The children were born to women participating in a population-based longitudinal study of arsenic effects on pregnancy outcomes and child development, carried out in Matlab, a rural area in Bangladesh with a wide range of arsenic concentrations in drinking water. Arsenic metabolism was evaluated in relation to age, sex, anthropometry, socio-economic status and arsenic exposure. Results: Arsenic concentrations in child urine (median 34 {mu}g/L, range 2.4-940 {mu}g/L), adjusted to average specific gravity of 1.009 g/mL, were considerably higher than that measured at 3 months of age, but lower than that in maternal urine. Child urine contained on average 12% iAs, 9.4% MA and 78% DMA, which implies a marked change in metabolite pattern since infancy. In particular, there was a marked increase in urinary %MA, which has been associated with increased risk of health effects. Conclusion: The arsenic metabolite pattern in urine of children at 18 months of age in rural Bangladesh indicates a marked decrease in arsenic methylation efficiency during weaning.

  12. Arsenic mobilization and immobilization in paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappler, A.; Hohmann, C.; Zhu, Y. G.; Morin, G.

    2010-05-01

    Arsenic is oftentimes of geogenic origin and in many cases bound to iron(III) minerals. Iron(III)-reducing bacteria can harvest energy by coupling the oxidation of organic or inorganic electron donors to the reduction of Fe(III). This process leads either to dissolution of Fe(III)-containing minerals and thus to a release of the arsenic into the environment or to secondary Fe-mineral formation and immobilisation of arsenic. Additionally, aerobic and anaerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria have the potential to co-precipitate or sorb arsenic during iron(II) oxidation at neutral pH that is usually followed by iron(III) mineral precipitation. We are currently investigating arsenic immobilization by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria and arsenic co-precipitation and immobilization by anaerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria in batch, microcosm and rice pot experiments. Co-precipitation batch experiments with pure cultures of nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are used to quantify the amount of arsenic that can be immobilized during microbial iron mineral precipitation, to identify the minerals formed and to analyze the arsenic binding environment in the precipitates. Microcosm and rice pot experiments are set-up with arsenic-contaminated rice paddy soil. The microorganisms (either the native microbial population or the soil amended with the nitrate-dependent iron(II)-oxidizing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1) are stimulated either with iron(II), nitrate, or oxygen. Dissolved and solid-phase arsenic and iron are quantified. Iron and arsenic speciation and redox state in batch and microcosm experiments are determined by LC-ICP-MS and synchrotron-based methods (EXAFS, XANES).

  13. Bio-Based Approaches to Inorganic Material Synthesis (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    involves the fungus and plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum acting on amorphous silica in rice husks to transform it into crystalline silica...structures generally are formed at ambient conditions and near neutral pH. Well studied examples include the silaffin family of proteins from diatoms...Inorganic Nanomaterials Based on the findings from nature, many groups have studied the use of naturally occurring proteins, domains of those

  14. Flexible Photodetectors Based on 1D Inorganic Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Flexible photodetectors with excellent flexibility, high mechanical stability and good detectivity, have attracted great research interest in recent years. 1D inorganic nanostructures provide a number of opportunities and capabilities for use in flexible photodetectors as they have unique geometry, good transparency, outstanding mechanical flexibility, and excellent electronic/optoelectronic properties. This article offers a comprehensive review of several types of flexible photodetectors based on 1D nanostructures from the past ten years, including flexible ultraviolet, visible, and infrared photodetectors. High‐performance organic‐inorganic hybrid photodetectors, as well as devices with 1D nanowire (NW) arrays, are also reviewed. Finally, new concepts of flexible photodetectors including piezophototronic, stretchable and self‐powered photodetectors are examined to showcase the future research in this exciting field. PMID:27774404

  15. TISSUE DISTRIBUTION AND URINARY EXCRETION OF INORGANIC ARSENIC AND ITS METHYLATED METABOLITES IN MICE FOLLOWING ACUTE ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF ARSENATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT The relationship of exposure dose and tissue concentration of parent chemical and metabolites is a critical issue in cases where toxicity may be mediated by a metabolite or parent chemical and metabolite acting together. This has emerged as an issue for inorganic ars...

  16. Evaluating of arsenic(V) removal from water by weak-base anion exchange adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Awual, M Rabiul; Hossain, M Amran; Shenashen, M A; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Shinichi; Jyo, Akinori

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater has been called the largest mass poisoning calamity in human history and creates severe health problems. The effective adsorbents are imperative in response to the widespread removal of toxic arsenic exposure through drinking water. Evaluation of arsenic(V) removal from water by weak-base anion exchange adsorbents was studied in this paper, aiming at the determination of the effects of pH, competing anions, and feed flow rates to improvement on remediation. Two types of weak-base adsorbents were used to evaluate arsenic(V) removal efficiency both in batch and column approaches. Anion selectivity was determined by both adsorbents in batch method as equilibrium As(V) adsorption capacities. Column studies were performed in fixed-bed experiments using both adsorbent packed columns, and kinetic performance was dependent on the feed flow rate and competing anions. The weak-base adsorbents clarified that these are selective to arsenic(V) over competition of chloride, nitrate, and sulfate anions. The solution pH played an important role in arsenic(V) removal, and a higher pH can cause lower adsorption capacities. A low concentration level of arsenic(V) was also removed by these adsorbents even at a high flow rate of 250-350 h(-1). Adsorbed arsenic(V) was quantitatively eluted with 1 M HCl acid and regenerated into hydrochloride form simultaneously for the next adsorption operation after rinsing with water. The weak-base anion exchange adsorbents are to be an effective means to remove arsenic(V) from drinking water. The fast adsorption rate and the excellent adsorption capacity in the neutral pH range will render this removal technique attractive in practical use in chemical industry.

  17. Contribution of arsenic species in unicellular algae to the cycling of arsenic in marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Elliott G; Maher, William A; Foster, Simon D

    2015-01-06

    This review investigates the arsenic species produced by and found in marine unicellular algae to determine if unicellular algae contribute to the formation of arsenobetaine (AB) in higher marine organisms. A wide variety of arsenic species have been found in marine unicellular algae including inorganic species (mainly arsenate--As(V)), methylated species (mainly dimethylarsenate (DMA)), arsenoribosides (glycerol, phosphate, and sulfate) and metabolites (dimethylarsenoethanol (DMAE)). Subtle differences in arsenic species distributions exist between chlorophyte and heterokontophyte species with As(V) commonly found in water-soluble cell fractions of chlorophyte species, while DMA is more common in heterokontophyte species. Additionally, different arsenoriboside species are found in each phyla with glycerol and phosphate arsenoribosides produced by chlorophytes, whereas glycerol, phosphate, and sulfate arsenoribosides are produced by heterokontophytes, which is similar to existing data for marine macro-algae. Although arsenoribosides are the major arsenic species in many marine unicellular algal species, AB has not been detected in unicellular algae which supports the hypothesis that AB is formed in marine animals via the ingestion and further metabolism of arsenoribosides. The observation of significant DMAE concentrations in some unicellular algal cultures suggests that unicellular algae-based detritus contains arsenic species that can be further metabolized to form AB in higher marine organisms. Future research establishing how environmental variability influences the production of arsenic species by marine unicellular algae and what effect this has on arsenic cycling within marine food webs is essential to clarify the role of these organisms in marine arsenic cycling.

  18. Inorganic phosphate-triggered release of anti-cancer arsenic trioxide from a self-delivery system: an in vitro and in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fei-Yan; Yi, Jing-Wei; Gu, Zhe-Jia; Tang, Bin-Bing; Li, Jian-Qi; Li, Li; Kulkarni, Padmakar; Liu, Li; Mason, Ralph P.; Tang, Qun

    2016-03-01

    On-demand drug delivery is becoming feasible via the design of either exogenous or endogenous stimulus-responsive drug delivery systems. Herein we report the development of gadolinium arsenite nanoparticles as a self-delivery platform to store, deliver and release arsenic trioxide (ATO, Trisenox), a clinical anti-cancer drug. Specifically, unloading of the small molecule drug is triggered by an endogenous stimulus: inorganic phosphate (Pi) in the blood, fluid, and soft or hard tissue. Kinetics in vitro demonstrated that ATO is released with high ON/OFF specificity and no leakage was observed in the silent state. The nanoparticles induced tumor cell apoptosis, and reduced cancer cell migration and invasion. Plasma pharmacokinetics verified extended retention time, but no obvious disturbance of phosphate balance. Therapeutic efficacy on a liver cancer xenograft mouse model was dramatically potentiated with reduced toxicity compared to the free drug. These results suggest a new drug delivery strategy which might be applied for ATO therapy on solid tumors.On-demand drug delivery is becoming feasible via the design of either exogenous or endogenous stimulus-responsive drug delivery systems. Herein we report the development of gadolinium arsenite nanoparticles as a self-delivery platform to store, deliver and release arsenic trioxide (ATO, Trisenox), a clinical anti-cancer drug. Specifically, unloading of the small molecule drug is triggered by an endogenous stimulus: inorganic phosphate (Pi) in the blood, fluid, and soft or hard tissue. Kinetics in vitro demonstrated that ATO is released with high ON/OFF specificity and no leakage was observed in the silent state. The nanoparticles induced tumor cell apoptosis, and reduced cancer cell migration and invasion. Plasma pharmacokinetics verified extended retention time, but no obvious disturbance of phosphate balance. Therapeutic efficacy on a liver cancer xenograft mouse model was dramatically potentiated with reduced

  19. Cluster-based inorganic-organic hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Ulrich

    2011-02-01

    Clusters as building blocks have been used for two types of inorganic-organic hybrid materials. The first are hybrid polymers, with polymer-like properties and structures, where the cluster units crosslink the polymer chains. They are prepared by co-polymerization of organic monomers with functional ligands attached to the clusters. The second type is crystalline metal-organic framework structures which are obtained by coordination chemistry approaches, i.e. by coordinating multifunctional organic ligands to cluster units. This tutorial review shows that both types of cluster-based materials are limiting cases with many options for varying both the cluster units as well as the connecting organic entities.

  20. Groundwater arsenic in Chimaltenango, Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Lotter, Jason T; Lacey, Steven E; Lopez, Ramon; Socoy Set, Genaro; Khodadoust, Amid P; Erdal, Serap

    2014-09-01

    In the Municipality of Chimaltenango, Guatemala, we sampled groundwater for total inorganic arsenic. In total, 42 samples were collected from 27 (43.5%) of the 62 wells in the municipality, with sites chosen to achieve spatial representation throughout the municipality. Samples were collected from household faucets used for drinking water, and sent to the USA for analysis. The only site found to have a concentration above the 10 μg/L World Health Organization provisional guideline for arsenic in drinking water was Cerro Alto, where the average concentration was 47.5 μg/L. A health risk assessment based on the arsenic levels found in Cerro Alto showed an increase in noncarcinogenic and carcinogenic risks for residents as a result of consuming groundwater as their primary drinking water source. Using data from the US Geological Survey and our global positioning system data of the sample locations, we found Cerro Alto to be the only site sampled within the tertiary volcanic rock layer, a known source of naturally occurring arsenic. Recommendations were made to reduce the levels of arsenic found in the community's drinking water so that the health risks can be managed.

  1. Genome-wide DNA methylation reprogramming in response to inorganic arsenic links inhibition of CTCF binding, DNMT expression and cellular transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, Matthew; Eckstein, Meredith; Eleazer, Rebekah; Smith, Caroline; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne N.

    2017-02-01

    Chronic low dose inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure leads to changes in gene expression and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation. During this transformation, cells adopt a fibroblast-like phenotype accompanied by profound gene expression changes. While many mechanisms have been implicated in this transformation, studies that focus on the role of epigenetic alterations in this process are just emerging. DNA methylation controls gene expression in physiologic and pathologic states. Several studies show alterations in DNA methylation patterns in iAs-mediated pathogenesis, but these studies focused on single genes. We present a comprehensive genome-wide DNA methylation analysis using methyl-sequencing to measure changes between normal and iAs-transformed cells. Additionally, these differential methylation changes correlated positively with changes in gene expression and alternative splicing. Interestingly, most of these differentially methylated genes function in cell adhesion and communication pathways. To gain insight into how genomic DNA methylation patterns are regulated during iAs-mediated carcinogenesis, we show that iAs probably targets CTCF binding at the promoter of DNA methyltransferases, regulating their expression. These findings reveal how CTCF binding regulates DNA methyltransferase to reprogram the methylome in response to an environmental toxin.

  2. Accumulation and transformation of inorganic and organic arsenic in rice and role of thiol-complexation to restrict their translocation to shoot

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Seema; Mattusch, Jürgen; Wennrich, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Environmental contamination of arsenic (As) and its accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) is of serious human health concern. In planta speciation of As is an important tool to understand As metabolism in plants. In the present study, we investigated root to shoot As translocation and speciation in rice exposed to inorganic and methylated As. Arsenate (AsV) and methylarsonate (MAV) were efficiently reduced to arsenite (AsIII) and MAIII, respectively in rice root and shoot but no trivalent form of dimethylarsinate (DMAV) was detected. Further, up to 48 and 83% of root As in AsV and MAV exposed plants, respectively were complexed with various thiols showing up to 20 and 16 As species, respectively. Several mixed As- and MA-complexes with hydroxymethyl-phytochelatin, DesGly-phytochelatin, hydroxymethyl-GSH and cysteine were identified in rice. Despite high complexation in roots, more As was translocated to shoots in MAV exposed plants than AsV, with shoot/root As transfer factor being in order DMAV > MAV > AsV. Moreover, in shoots 78% MAIII and 71% AsIII were present as weakly bound species which is alarming, as MAIII has been found to be more cytotoxic than AsIII for human and it could also be an important factor inducing straighthead (spikelet sterility disorder) in rice. PMID:28094280

  3. Speciation of inorganic arsenic in drinking water by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry after in situ preconcentration with miniature solid-phase extraction disks.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Kenta; Inui, Tetsuo; Koike, Yuya; Aizawa, Mamoru; Nakamura, Toshihiro

    2015-03-01

    A rapid and simple method using wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry after in situ solid-phase extraction (SPE) was developed for the speciation and evaluation of the concentration of inorganic arsenic (As) in drinking water. The method involves the simultaneous collection of As(III) and As(V) using 13 mm ϕ SPE miniature disks. The removal of Pb(2+) from the sample water was first conducted to avoid the overlapping PbLα and AsKα spectra on the XRF spectrum. To this end, a 50 mL aqueous sample (pH 5-9) was passed through an iminodiacetate chelating disk. The filtrate was adjusted to pH 2-3 with HCl, and then ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate solution was added. The solution was passed through a hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene filter placed on a Zr and Ca loaded cation-exchange disk at a flow rate of 12.5 mL min(-1) to separate As(III)-pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate complex and As(V). Each SPE disk was affixed to an acrylic plate using adhesive cellophane tape, and then examined by WDXRF spectrometry. The detection limits of As(III) and As(V) were 0.8 and 0.6 μg L(-1), respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to screening for As speciation and concentration evaluation in spring water and well water.

  4. Genome-wide DNA methylation reprogramming in response to inorganic arsenic links inhibition of CTCF binding, DNMT expression and cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Matthew; Eckstein, Meredith; Eleazer, Rebekah; Smith, Caroline; Fondufe-Mittendorf , Yvonne N.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic low dose inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure leads to changes in gene expression and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation. During this transformation, cells adopt a fibroblast-like phenotype accompanied by profound gene expression changes. While many mechanisms have been implicated in this transformation, studies that focus on the role of epigenetic alterations in this process are just emerging. DNA methylation controls gene expression in physiologic and pathologic states. Several studies show alterations in DNA methylation patterns in iAs-mediated pathogenesis, but these studies focused on single genes. We present a comprehensive genome-wide DNA methylation analysis using methyl-sequencing to measure changes between normal and iAs-transformed cells. Additionally, these differential methylation changes correlated positively with changes in gene expression and alternative splicing. Interestingly, most of these differentially methylated genes function in cell adhesion and communication pathways. To gain insight into how genomic DNA methylation patterns are regulated during iAs-mediated carcinogenesis, we show that iAs probably targets CTCF binding at the promoter of DNA methyltransferases, regulating their expression. These findings reveal how CTCF binding regulates DNA methyltransferase to reprogram the methylome in response to an environmental toxin. PMID:28150704

  5. A gas-phase chemiluminescence-based analyzer for waterborne arsenic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Idowu, A.D.; Dasgupta, P.K.; Genfa, Z.; Toda, K.; Garbarino, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    We show a practical sequential injection/zone fluidics-based analyzer that measures waterborne arsenic. The approach is capable of differentiating between inorganic As(III) and As(V). The principle is based on generating AsH 3 from the sample in a confined chamber by borohydride reduction at controlled pH, sparging the chamber to drive the AsH3 to a small reflective cell located atop a photomultiplier tube, allowing it to react with ozone generated from ambient air, and measuring the intense chemiluminescence that results. Arsine generation and removal from solution results in isolation from the sample matrix, avoiding the pitfalls encountered in some solution-based analysis techniques. The differential determination of As(III) and As(V) is based on the different pH dependence of the reducibility of these species to AsH3. At pH ???1, both As(III) and As(V) are quantitatively converted to arsine in the presence of NaBH4. At a pH of 4-5, only As(III) is converted to arsine. In the present form, the limit of detection (S/N = 3) is 0.05 ??g/L As at pH ???1 and 0.09 ??g/L As(III) at pH ???4-5 for a 3-mL sample. The analyzer is intrinsically automated and requires 4 min per determination. It is also possible to determine As(III) first at pH 4.5 and then determine the remaining As in a sequential manner; this requires 6 min. There are no significant practical interferences. A new borohydride solution formulation permits month-long reagent stability. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  6. Methods of capturing and immobilizing radioactive nuclei with metal fluorite-based inorganic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yifeng; Miller, Andy; Bryan, Charles R; Kruichar, Jessica Nicole

    2015-04-07

    Methods of capturing and immobilizing radioactive nuclei with metal fluorite-based inorganic materials are described. For example, a method of capturing and immobilizing radioactive nuclei includes flowing a gas stream through an exhaust apparatus. The exhaust apparatus includes a metal fluorite-based inorganic material. The gas stream includes a radioactive species. The radioactive species is removed from the gas stream by adsorbing the radioactive species to the metal fluorite-based inorganic material of the exhaust apparatus.

  7. Methods of capturing and immobilizing radioactive nuclei with metal fluorite-based inorganic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yifeng; Miller, Andy; Bryan, Charles R.; Kruichak, Jessica Nicole

    2015-11-17

    Methods of capturing and immobilizing radioactive nuclei with metal fluorite-based inorganic materials are described. For example, a method of capturing and immobilizing radioactive nuclei includes flowing a gas stream through an exhaust apparatus. The exhaust apparatus includes a metal fluorite-based inorganic material. The gas stream includes a radioactive species. The radioactive species is removed from the gas stream by adsorbing the radioactive species to the metal fluorite-based inorganic material of the exhaust apparatus.

  8. SPE HG-AAS method for the determination of inorganic arsenic in rice--results from method validation studies and a survey on rice products.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Rie R; Qian, Yiting; Sloth, Jens J

    2013-09-01

    The present paper describes the development, validation and application of a method for inorganic arsenic (iAs) determination in rice samples. The separation of iAs from organoarsenic compounds was done by off-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS) detection. This approach was earlier developed for seafood samples (Rasmussen et al., Anal Bioanal Chem 403:2825-2834, 2012) and has in the present work been tailored for rice products and further optimised for a higher sample throughput and a lower detection limit. Water bath heating (90 °C, 60 min) of samples with dilute HNO3 and H2O2 solubilised and oxidised all iAs to arsenate (As(V)). Loading of buffered sample extracts (pH 6 ± 1) followed by selective elution of arsenate from a strong anion exchange SPE cartridge enabled the selective iAs quantification by HG-AAS, measuring total arsenic (As) in the SPE eluate. The in-house validation gave mean recoveries of 101-106% for spiked rice samples and in two reference samples. The limit of detection was 0.02 mg kg(-1), and repeatability and intra-laboratory reproducibility were less than 6 and 9%, respectively. The SPE HG-AAS method produced similar results compared to parallel high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis. The SPE separation step was tested collaboratively, where the laboratories (N = 10) used either HG-AAS or ICP-MS for iAs determination in a wholemeal rice powder. The trial gave satisfactory results (HorRat value of 1.6) and did not reveal significant difference (t test, p > 0.05) between HG-AAS and ICP-MS quantification. The iAs concentration in 36 rice samples purchased on the Danish retail market varied (0.03-0.60 mg kg(-1)), with the highest concentration found in a red rice sample.

  9. Development of foamed Inorganic Polymeric Materials based on Perlite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaousi, G.-M.; Douni, I.; Taxiarchou, M.; Panias, D.; Paspaliaris, I.

    2016-04-01

    This work deals with the development of lightweight geopolymeric boards for use in construction sector utilizing a solid perlitic waste as the main raw material. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was used for the foaming of geopolymeric pastes and the production of porous and lightweight inorganic polymeric materials. The effect of geopolymeric synthesis parameters, such as the composition of activator and the curing conditions, on paste's properties that affect the foaming process, such as setting time and viscosity, were studied in detailed. Finally, the effects of H2O2 concentration on the properties (apparent density and % cell volume) and the microstructure of foamed boards were also studied. The produced porous boards have effective densities in-between 540 - 900 Kg/m3 and the thermal conductivity of the optimum product is 0.08 W/mK. Based on their properties, the developed lightweight geopolymeric boards have high potential to be used as building elements in construction industry.

  10. Occurrence and stability of inorganic and organic arsenic species in wines, rice wines and beers from Central European market.

    PubMed

    Huang, J-H; Hu, K-N; Ilgen, J; Ilgen, G

    2012-01-01

    We investigated in total 80 wine samples of different types and seven grape juice and 23 beer samples purchased from markets in Central Europe in order to understand the arsenic (As) speciation and help assess the potential As toxicity via intake of alcoholic beverages. Generally, total As concentrations in most samples investigated were below the drinking water limit 10 µg l(-1) published by the World Health Organization (WHO); ranging from 0.46 to 21.0 µg l(-1) As in red and white wines and from 0.75 to 13.4 µg l(-1) As in beers. In addition, concentrations of total As in rice wine and in rice beer were 0.63-6.07 and 3.69-8.23 µg l(-1) As, respectively. The total As concentrations in ice wine ranged from 7.94 to 18.8 µg l(-1) As, significantly higher than in white and red wine. Arsenite predominated as the As species in most of the wine samples, whereas arsenate was the dominant species in rice wine, beer and rice beer. Methyl As components were usually minor components in all wine and beer samples. Monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid and two additional unknown As species were frequently found in grape juice, late harvest and ice wine with higher sweetness. After air exposure, arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid were stable at 4°C for months, probably due to the acidic conditions of wine and beer samples. The presence of sulfite had little influence on As speciation in wine. Despite the predominance of more toxic arsenite and arsenate in wine and beer, the estimated weekly exposure to As (via consumption of beer, wine and rice wine) is low. The As intake per capita is 6.81 µg from beer, <1.93 µg from wine and 0.88 µg from rice wine, estimated using the median of total As concentration multiplied by the average consumption per capita of the corresponding beverage.

  11. Neuroblastoma cell death is induced by inorganic arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) and inhibited by a normal human bone marrow cell-derived factor.

    PubMed

    Gesundheit, Benjamin; Malach, Lea; Or, Reuven; Hahn, Talia

    2008-12-01

    Three phenotypically distinct cell types are present in human neuroblastomas (NB) and NB cell lines: I-type stem cells, N-type neuroblastic precursors, and S-type Schwannian/melanoblastic precursors. The stimulation of human N-type neuroblastoma cell proliferation by normal human bone marrow monocytic cell conditioned medium (BMCM) has been demonstrated in vitro, a finding consistent with the high frequency of bone marrow (BM) metastases in patients with advanced NB. Inorganic arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)), already clinically approved for the treatment of several hematological malignancies, is currently under investigation for NB. Recent studies show that As(2)O(3) induces apoptosis in NB cells. We examined the impact of BMCM on growth and survival of As(2)O(3)-treated NB cell lines, to evaluate the response of cultured NB cell variants to regulatory agents. We studied the effect of BMCM on survival and clonogenic growth of eleven As(2)O(3)-treated NB cell lines grown in sparsely seeded, non-adherent, semi-solid cultures. As(2)O(3) had a strong inhibitory effect on survival of all tested NB cell lines. BMCM augmented cell growth and survival and reversed the inhibitory action of As(2)O(3) in all tested cell lines, but most strongly in N-type cells(.) While As(2)O(3) effectively reduced survival of all tested NB cell lines, BMCM effectively impacted its inhibitory action. Better understanding of micro-environmental regulators affecting human NB tumor cell growth and survival may be seminal to the development of therapeutic strategies and clinically effective agents for this condition.

  12. A Multiweek Upper-Division Inorganic Laboratory Based on Metallacrowns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirovetz, Brian J.; Walters, Nicole E.; Bender, Collin N.; Lenivy, Christopher M.; Troup, Anna S.; Predecki, Daniel P.; Richardson, John N.; Zaleski, Curtis M.

    2013-01-01

    Metallacrowns are a versatile class of inorganic compounds with uses in several areas of chemistry. Students engage in a multiweek, upper-division inorganic laboratory that explores four different metallacrown compounds: Fe[superscript III](O[subscript 2]CCH[subscript 3])[subscript 3][9-MC[subscript Fe][superscript III][subscript…

  13. An Investigation of Bioaccessibility of Arsenic in Rice using IC-ICP-MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic exposure occurs mainly through drinking water and food; therefore, both aspects should be incorporated into any aggregate exposure assessment. Drinking water exposures are predominately inorganic arsenic while dietary exposures are made up of a diverse set of arsenicals w...

  14. Arsenic Exposure and Toxicology: A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michael F.; Beck, Barbara D.; Chen, Yu; Lewis, Ari S.; Thomas, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The metalloid arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed in food, water, air, and soil. Arsenic has a long history of use as a homicidal agent, but in the past 100 years arsenic, has been used as a pesticide, a chemotherapeutic agent and a constituent of consumer products. In some areas of the world, high levels of arsenic are naturally present in drinking water and are a toxicological concern. There are several structural forms and oxidation states of arsenic because it forms alloys with metals and covalent bonds with hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, and other elements. Environmentally relevant forms of arsenic are inorganic and organic existing in the trivalent or pentavalent state. Metabolism of arsenic, catalyzed by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase, is a sequential process of reduction from pentavalency to trivalency followed by oxidative methylation back to pentavalency. Trivalent arsenic is generally more toxicologically potent than pentavalent arsenic. Acute effects of arsenic range from gastrointestinal distress to death. Depending on the dose, chronic arsenic exposure may affect several major organ systems. A major concern of ingested arsenic is cancer, primarily of skin, bladder, and lung. The mode of action of arsenic for its disease endpoints is currently under study. Two key areas are the interaction of trivalent arsenicals with sulfur in proteins and the ability of arsenic to generate oxidative stress. With advances in technology and the recent development of animal models for arsenic carcinogenicity, understanding of the toxicology of arsenic will continue to improve. PMID:21750349

  15. Arsenic and Environmental Health: State of the Science and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Background: Exposure to inorganic and organic arsenic compounds is a major public health problem that affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Exposure to arsenic is associated with cancer and noncancer effects in nearly every organ in the body, and evidence is mounting for health effects at lower levels of arsenic exposure than previously thought. Building from a tremendous knowledge base with > 1,000 scientific papers published annually with “arsenic” in the title, the question becomes, what questions would best drive future research directions? Objectives: The objective is to discuss emerging issues in arsenic research and identify data gaps across disciplines. Methods: The National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program convened a workshop to identify emerging issues and research needs to address the multi-faceted challenges related to arsenic and environmental health. This review summarizes information captured during the workshop. Discussion: More information about aggregate exposure to arsenic is needed, including the amount and forms of arsenic found in foods. New strategies for mitigating arsenic exposures and related health effects range from engineered filtering systems to phytogenetics and nutritional interventions. Furthermore, integration of omics data with mechanistic and epidemiological data is a key step toward the goal of linking biomarkers of exposure and suscepti

  16. Enhanced urinary bladder and liver carcinogenesis in male CD1 mice exposed to transplacental inorganic arsenic and postnatal diethylstilbestrol or tamoxifen

    SciTech Connect

    Waalkes, Michael P. . E-mail: waalkes@niehs.nih.gov; Liu Jie; Ward, Jerrold M.; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.

    2006-09-15

    Pregnant CD1 mice received 85 ppm arsenite in the drinking water from gestation day 8 to 18, groups (n = 35) of male offspring were subsequently injected on postpartum days 1 through 5 with diethylstilbestrol (DES; 2 {mu}g/pup/day) or tamoxifen (TAM; 10 {mu}g/pup/day), and tumor formation was assessed over 90 weeks. Arsenic alone increased hepatocellular carcinoma (14%), adenoma (23%) and total tumors (31%) compared to control (0, 2 and 2%, respectively). Arsenic alone also increased lung adenocarcinoma, adrenal cortical adenoma and renal cystic tubular hyperplasia compared to control. Compared to arsenic alone, arsenic plus DES increased liver tumor incidence in mice at risk 2.2-fold and increased liver tumor multiplicity (tumors/liver) 1.8-fold. The treatments alone did not impact urinary bladder carcinogenesis, but arsenic plus TAM significantly increased formation of urinary bladder transitional cell tumors (papilloma and carcinoma; 13%) compared to control (0%). Urinary bladder proliferative lesions (combined tumors and hyperplasia) were also increased by arsenic plus TAM (40%) or arsenic plus DES (43%) compared to control (0%) or the treatments alone. Urinary bladder proliferative lesions occurred in the absence of any evidence of uroepithelial cytotoxic lesions. Urinary bladder lesions and hepatocellular carcinoma induced by arsenic plus TAM and/or DES overexpressed estrogen receptor-{alpha}, indicating that aberrant estrogen signaling may have been a factor in the enhanced carcinogenic response. Thus, in male CD1 mice, gestational arsenic exposure alone induced liver adenoma and carcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma, adrenal adenoma and renal cystic hyperplasia. Furthermore, DES enhanced transplacental arsenic-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. In utero arsenic also initiated urinary bladder tumor formation when followed by postnatal TAM and uroepithelial proliferative lesions when followed by TAM or DES.

  17. SILAC-based quantitative proteomic analysis reveals widespread molecular alterations in human skin keratinocytes upon chronic arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Mir, Sartaj Ahmad; Pinto, Sneha M; Paul, Somnath; Raja, Remya; Nanjappa, Vishalakshi; Syed, Nazia; Advani, Jayshree; Renuse, Santosh; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini A; Prasad, T S Keshava; Giri, Ashok K; Gowda, Harsha; Chatterjee, Aditi

    2017-03-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic is associated with dermatological and nondermatological disorders. Consumption of arsenic-contaminated drinking water results in accumulation of arsenic in liver, spleen, kidneys, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract. Although arsenic is cleared from these sites, a substantial amount of residual arsenic is left in keratin-rich tissues including skin. Epidemiological studies suggest the association of skin cancer upon arsenic exposure, however, the mechanism of arsenic-induced carcinogenesis is not completely understood. We developed a cell line based model to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in arsenic-mediated toxicity and carcinogenicity. Human skin keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, was chronically exposed to 100 nM sodium arsenite over a period of 6 months. We observed an increase in basal ROS levels in arsenic-exposed cells. SILAC-based quantitative proteomics approach resulted in identification of 2111 proteins of which 42 proteins were found to be overexpressed and 54 downregulated (twofold) upon chronic arsenic exposure. Our analysis revealed arsenic-induced overexpression of aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C2 (AKR1C2), aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 (AKR1C3), glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase [quinone] 1 (NQO1) among others. We observed downregulation of several members of the plakin family including periplakin (PPL), envoplakin (EVPL), and involucrin (IVL) that are essential for terminal differentiation of keratinocytes. MRM and Western blot analysis confirmed differential expression of several candidate proteins. Our study provides insights into molecular alterations upon chronic arsenic exposure on skin.

  18. Dendrimer-based organic/inorganic hybrid nanoparticles in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Mingwu; Shi, Xiangyang

    2010-09-01

    This review reports some recent advances on the synthesis, self-assembly, and biofunctionalization of various dendrimer-based organic/inorganic hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) for various biomedical applications, including but not limited to protein immobilization, gene delivery, and molecular diagnosis. In particular, targeted molecular imaging of cancer using dendrimer-based organic/inorganic hybrid NPs will be introduced in detail.

  19. Arsenic speciation and fucoxanthin analysis from seaweed dietary supplements using LC-MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inorganic species are considered more toxic to humans than organic arsenic and total arsenic. Analysis of total arsenic in metallic form, organic and inorganic arsenic species from seaweeds and dietary supplements using LC-ICP-MS was developed. Solvent extraction with sonication and microwave extr...

  20. Rice consumption contributes to arsenic exposure in US women

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert-Diamond, Diane; Cottingham, Kathryn L.; Gruber, Joann F.; Punshon, Tracy; Sayarath, Vicki; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Baker, Emily R.; Jackson, Brian P.; Folt, Carol L.; Karagas, Margaret R.

    2011-01-01

    Emerging data indicate that rice consumption may lead to potentially harmful arsenic exposure. However, few human data are available, and virtually none exist for vulnerable periods such as pregnancy. Here we document a positive association between rice consumption and urinary arsenic excretion, a biomarker of recent arsenic exposure, in 229 pregnant women. At a 6-mo prenatal visit, we collected a urine sample and 3-d dietary record for water, fish/seafood, and rice. We also tested women's home tap water for arsenic, which we combined with tap water consumption to estimate arsenic exposure through water. Women who reported rice intake (n = 73) consumed a median of 28.3 g/d, which is ∼0.5 cup of cooked rice each day. In general linear models adjusted for age and urinary dilution, both rice consumption (g, dry mass/d) and arsenic exposure through water (μg/d) were significantly associated with natural log-transformed total urinary arsenic (, , both P < 0.0001), as well as inorganic arsenic, monomethylarsonic acid, and dimethylarsinic acid (each P < 0.005). Based on total arsenic, consumption of 0.56 cup/d of cooked rice was comparable to drinking 1 L/d of 10 μg As/L water, the current US maximum contaminant limit. US rice consumption varies, averaging ∼0.5 cup/d, with Asian Americans consuming an average of >2 cups/d. Rice arsenic content and speciation also vary, with some strains predominated by dimethylarsinic acid, particularly those grown in the United States. Our findings along with others indicate that rice consumption should be considered when designing arsenic reduction strategies in the United States. PMID:22143778

  1. Kinetics of Arsenic Methylation by Freshly Isolated B6C3F1 Mouse Hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kedderis, Gregory L.; Elmore, Amy R.; Crecelius, Eric A.; Yager, Janice W.; Goldsworthy, Thomas L.

    2006-06-10

    The toxic and carcinogenic effects of arsenic may be mediated by both inorganic and methylated arsenic species. The methylation of arsenicIII takes place via sequential oxidative methylation and reduction steps to form monomethylarsenic (MMA) and dimethylarsenic (DMA) species. The kinetics of arsenic methylation were determined in freshly isolated hepatocytes from male B6C3F1 mice. Hepatocytes (>90% viability) were isolated by collagenase perfusion and suspended in Williams Medium E with various concentrations of arsenicIII (sodium m-arsenite). Aliquots of the cell suspension were lysed with 1.0% Triton X-100 and analyzed for arsenic species by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry. The formation of MMAIII from sodium arsenite (1 ?M) was linear with respect to time for >90 min. DMAIII formation did not become significant until 60 min. MMAV and DMAV were not consistently observed in the incubations. These results suggest that the reduction of MMAV to MMAIII is rapid relative to the methylation rate since MMAV was not observed as a major product of arsenicIII metabolism in mouse hepatocytes. Metabolism of arsenicV was not observed in mouse hepatocytes, consistent with inhibition of arsenicV active cellular uptake by phosphate in the medium. The formation of MMAIII increased with increasing arsenicIII concentrations up to approximately 2 ?M and declined thereafter. The concentration dependence is consistent with a saturable methylation reaction accompanied by substrate inhibition of the reaction by arsenicIII. Kinetic analysis of the data suggested an apparent KM of approximately 3.6 ?M arsenicIII, an apparent Vmax of approximately 38.9 ?g MMAIII formed/L/hr/million cells, and an apparent KI of approximately 1.3 ?M arsenicIII. The results of this study can be used in the physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for arsenic disposition in mice to predict the concentration of MMAIII in liver and other tissues.

  2. ARSENIC - SUSCEPTIBILITY & IN UTERO EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic remains a serious public health problem at many locations worldwide. If has often been noted that prevalences of signs and symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning differ among various populations. For example, skin lesions or peripheral vascular dis...

  3. 77 FR 5061 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Inorganic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ...; Inorganic Arsenic Standard ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (DOL) is submitting the..., ``Inorganic Arsenic Standard,'' to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval for... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The purpose of the Inorganic Arsenic Standard is to protect workers from the...

  4. Health importance of arsenic in drinking water and food.

    PubMed

    Otleş, Semih; Cağindi, Ozlem

    2010-08-01

    Arsenic is a toxic metalloid of global concern. It usually originates geogenically but can be intensified by human activities such as applications of pesticides and wood preservatives, mining and smelting operations, and coal combustion. Arsenic-contaminated food is a widespread problem worldwide. Data derived from population-based studies, clinical case series, and case reports relating to ingestion of inorganic arsenic in drinking water, medications, or contaminated food or beverages show the capacity of arsenate and arsenite to adversely affect multiple organ systems. Chronic arsenic poisoning can cause serious health effects including cancers, melanosis (hyperpigmentation or dark spots, and hypopigmentation or white spots), hyperkeratosis (hardened skin), restrictive lung disease, peripheral vascular disease (blackfoot disease), gangrene, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease.

  5. Arsenic and the Epigenome: Linked by Methylation(SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is an environmental toxicant currently poisoning millions of people worldwide, and chronically-exposed individuals are susceptible to arsenic poisoning, or arsenicosis. In some exposed populations arsenicosis susceptibility is dependent in part on the abil...

  6. REPRODUCTIVE AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF ARSENIC IN RODENTS: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is a recognized reproductive toxicant in humans and induces malformations, especially neural tube defects, in laboratory animals. Early studies showed that murine malformations occurred only when a high dose of inorganic arsenic was given by intravenous or intraperitoneal...

  7. Development of a biologically based dose response (BBDR) model for arsenic induced cancer

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are developing a biologically based dose response (BBDR) model for arsenic carcinogenicity in order to reduce uncertainty in estimates of low dose risk by maximizing the use of relevant data on the mode of action. Expert consultation and literature review are being conducted t...

  8. Chitosan bio-based organic-inorganic hybrid aerogel microspheres.

    PubMed

    El Kadib, Abdelkrim; Bousmina, Mosto

    2012-07-02

    Recently, organic-inorganic hybrid materials have attracted tremendous attention thanks to their outstanding properties, their efficiency, versatility and their promising applications in a broad range of areas at the interface of chemistry and biology. This article deals with a new family of surface-reactive organic-inorganic hybrid materials built from chitosan microspheres. The gelation of chitosan (a renewable amino carbohydrate obtained by deacetylation of chitin) by pH inversion affords highly dispersed fibrillar networks shaped as self-standing microspheres. Nanocasting of sol-gel processable monomeric alkoxides inside these natural hydrocolloids and their subsequent CO(2) supercritical drying provide high-surface-area organic-inorganic hybrid materials. Examples including chitosan-SiO(2), chitosan-TiO(2), chitosan-redox-clusters and chitosan-clay-aerogel microspheres are described and discussed on the basis of their textural and structural properties, thermal and chemical stability and their performance in catalysis and adsorption.

  9. Heterostructures based on inorganic and organic van der Waals systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gwan-Hyoung; Lee, Chul-Ho; van der Zande, Arend M.; Han, Minyong; Cui, Xu; Arefe, Ghidewon; Nuckolls, Colin; Heinz, Tony F.; Hone, James; Kim, Philip

    2014-09-01

    The two-dimensional limit of layered materials has recently been realized through the use of van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures composed of weakly interacting layers. In this paper, we describe two different classes of vdW heterostructures: inorganic vdW heterostructures prepared by co-lamination and restacking; and organic-inorganic hetero-epitaxy created by physical vapor deposition of organic molecule crystals on an inorganic vdW substrate. Both types of heterostructures exhibit atomically clean vdW interfaces. Employing such vdW heterostructures, we have demonstrated various novel devices, including graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and MoS2 heterostructures for memory devices; graphene/MoS2/WSe2/graphene vertical p-n junctions for photovoltaic devices, and organic crystals on hBN with graphene electrodes for high-performance transistors.

  10. Mathematical modeling of the effects of glutathione on arsenic methylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arsenic is a major environmental toxin that is detoxified in the liver by biochemical mechanisms that are still under study. In the traditional metabolic pathway, arsenic undergoes two methylation reactions, each followed by a reduction, after which it is exported and released in the urine. Recent experiments show that glutathione plays an important role in arsenic detoxification and an alternative biochemical pathway has been proposed in which arsenic is first conjugated by glutathione after which the conjugates are methylated. In addition, in rats arsenic-glutathione conjugates can be exported into the plasma and removed by the liver in the bile. Methods We have developed a mathematical model for arsenic biochemistry that includes three mechanisms by which glutathione affects arsenic methylation: glutathione increases the speed of the reduction steps; glutathione affects the activity of arsenic methyltranferase; glutathione sequesters inorganic arsenic and its methylated downstream products. The model is based as much as possible on the known biochemistry of arsenic methylation derived from cellular and experimental studies. Results We show that the model predicts and helps explain recent experimental data on the effects of glutathione on arsenic methylation. We explain why the experimental data imply that monomethyl arsonic acid inhibits the second methylation step. The model predicts time course data from recent experimental studies. We explain why increasing glutathione when it is low increases arsenic methylation and that at very high concentrations increasing glutathione decreases methylation. We explain why the possible temporal variation of the glutathione concentration affects the interpretation of experimental studies that last hours. Conclusions The mathematical model aids in the interpretation of data from recent experimental studies and shows that the Challenger pathway of arsenic methylation, supplemented by the glutathione effects

  11. Arsenic biogeochemistry and human health risk assessment in organo-arsenical pesticide-applied acidic and alkaline soils: an incubation study.

    PubMed

    Datta, Rupali; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Sharma, Saurabh; Sand, Kumarswamy

    2006-12-15

    Organo-arsenical compounds are considered non-carcinogenic, and hence, are still allowed by the regulatory agencies for use in agriculture as pesticides. Due to rapid encroachment of suburban areas into former agricultural lands, the potential for human exposure to soil-arsenic has increased tremendously in recent years. However, insufficient data is available on the stability of organo-arsenicals in soils; as to whether they remain in an organic form, or are converted over time to potentially carcinogenic inorganic forms. A static incubation study was conducted to estimate soil speciation and in-vitro bioavailability (i.e., bioaccessibility) of arsenic as a function of soil properties. Two chemically variant soil types were chosen, based on their potential differences with respect to arsenic reactivity: an acid sand with minimal arsenic retention capacity and an alkaline clay loam with relatively high concentrations of Fe/Al and Ca/Mg. The soils were amended with dimethylarsenic acid (DMA) at three rates, 45, 225 and 450 mg/kg, and incubated for 1 year. A sequential extraction scheme was employed to identify the geochemical forms of arsenic in soils, which were correlated with the in-vitro bioavailable fractions of arsenic. Human health risk calculated in terms of excess cancer risk (ECR) showed that risk assessment based on bioaccessible arsenic concentrations instead of the traditional total soil arsenic is a more realistic approach. Results showed that soil properties (such as pH, Fe/Al content and soil texture) of the two soils dictated the geochemical speciation, and hence, bioaccessibility of arsenic from DMA, indicating that the use of organic arsenicals as pesticides in mineral soils may not be a safe practice from a human health risk perspective.

  12. Speciation analysis of inorganic arsenic in river water by Amberlite IRA 910 resin immobilized in a polyacrylamide gel as a selective binding agent for As(V) in diffusive gradient thin film technique.

    PubMed

    Rolisola, Ana M C M; Suárez, Carlos A; Menegário, Amauri A; Gastmans, Didier; Kiang, Chang H; Colaço, Camila D; Garcez, Daniel L; Santelli, Ricardo E

    2014-09-07

    In this study, a method is proposed for the selective retention of As(V) using diffusive gradient in thin film (DGT) samplers containing a strongly basic anion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA 910) supported on a polyacrylamide gel. In addition, the total arsenic content is determined by ferrihydrite gel discs. Subsequently, the concentration of As(III) was obtained by determining the difference between the total As and As(V). DGT experiments showed linear accumulation of As(V) (up to 280 ng) until a deployment time of 8 h deployment (R(2) > 0.99). The retention of As(V) was appropriate (97.9-112.3%) between pH 5 and 9. For a solution with an ionic strength ranging from 0.001 to 0.05 mol L(-1), the As(V) uptake ranged from 90-120%. The proposed method was applied for the speciation of arsenic in river water. For the analysis of spiked samples collected at the Furnas stream, the recoveries of total arsenic content ranged between 103.9% and 118.8%. However, the recoveries of As(III) and As(V) were 43.3-75.2% and 147.3-153.4%, respectively. These differences were probably because of the oxidation of As(III) to As(V) during deployments. For spiked samples collected at the Ribeirão Claro, the recoveries of dissolved As(III), As(V) and As(T) were 103.1%, 108.0% and 106.3%, respectively. Thus, the DGT technique with Amberlite IRA 910 resin as the binding phase can be employed for the in situ redox speciation of inorganic arsenic.

  13. Sequential extraction of inorganic arsenic compounds and methyl arsenate in human urine using mixed-mode monolithic silica spin column coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Namera, Akira; Takeuchi, Akito; Saito, Takeshi; Miyazaki, Shota; Oikawa, Hiroshi; Saruwatari, Tatsuro; Nagao, Masataka

    2012-09-01

    A sequential analytical method was developed for the detection of arsenite, arsenate, and methylarsenate in human urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The combination of a derivatization of trivalent arsenic compounds by 2,3-dithio-1-propanol (British antilewisite; BAL) and a reduction of pentavalent arsenic compounds (arsenate and methylarsenate) were accomplished to carry out the analysis of arsenic compounds in urine. The arsenic derivatives obtained using BAL were extracted in a stepwise manner using a monolithic spin column and analyzed by GC-MS. A linear curve was observed for concentrations of arsenic compounds of 2.0 to 200 ng/mL, where the correlation coefficients of calibration curves were greater than 0.996 (for a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio >10). The detection limits were 1 ng/mL (S/N > 3). Recoveries of the targets in urine were in the range 91.9-106.5%, and RSDs of the intra- and interday assay for urine samples containing 5, 50, and 150 ng/mL of arsenic compounds varied between 2.95 and 13.4%. The results from real samples obtained from a patient suspected of having ingested As containing medications using this proposed method were in good agreement with those obtained using high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

  14. Hybrid organic-inorganic materials based on hydroxyapatite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Sana Ben; Bachouâ, Hassen; Gruselle, Michel; Beaunier, Patricia; Flambard, Alexandrine; Badraoui, Béchir

    2017-04-01

    The present article details the formation of calcium hydroxyapatite synthesized by the hydrothermal way, in presence of glycine or sarcosine. The presence of these amino-acids during the synthetic processes reduces the crystalline growthing through the formation of hybrid organic-inorganic species The crystallite sizes are decreasing and the morphology is modified with the increase of the amino-acid concentration.

  15. Ruby-based inorganic scintillation detectors for 192Ir brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Beddar, Sam

    2016-11-01

    We tested the potential of ruby inorganic scintillation detectors (ISDs) for use in brachytherapy and investigated various unwanted luminescence properties that may compromise their accuracy. The ISDs were composed of a ruby crystal coupled to a poly(methyl methacrylate) fiber-optic cable and a charge-coupled device camera. The ISD also included a long-pass filter that was sandwiched between the ruby crystal and the fiber-optic cable. The long-pass filter prevented the Cerenkov and fluorescence background light (stem signal) induced in the fiber-optic cable from striking the ruby crystal, which generates unwanted photoluminescence rather than the desired radioluminescence. The relative contributions of the radioluminescence signal and the stem signal were quantified by exposing the ruby detectors to a high-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The photoluminescence signal was quantified by irradiating the fiber-optic cable with the detector volume shielded. Other experiments addressed time-dependent luminescence properties and compared the ISDs to commonly used organic scintillator detectors (BCF-12, BCF-60). When the brachytherapy source dwelled 0.5 cm away from the fiber-optic cable, the unwanted photoluminescence was reduced from  >5% to  <1% of the total signal as long as the ISD incorporated the long-pass filter. The stem signal was suppressed with a band-pass filter and was  <3% as long as the source distance from the scintillator was  <7 cm. Some ruby crystals exhibited time-dependent luminescence properties that altered the ruby signal by  >5% within 10 s from the onset of irradiation and after the source had retracted. The ruby-based ISDs generated signals of up to 20 times that of BCF-12-based detectors. The study presents solutions to unwanted luminescence properties of ruby-based ISDs for high-dose-rate brachytherapy. An optic filter should be sandwiched between the ruby crystal and the fiber-optic cable to suppress the

  16. Arsenic pollution sources.

    PubMed

    Garelick, Hemda; Jones, Huw; Dybowska, Agnieszka; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic is a widely dispersed element in the Earth's crust and exists at an average concentration of approximately 5 mg/kg. There are many possible routes of human exposure to arsenic from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Arsenic occurs as a constituent in more than 200 minerals, although it primarily exists as arsenopyrite and as a constituent in several other sulfide minerals. The introduction of arsenic into drinking water can occur as a result of its natural geological presence in local bedrock. Arsenic-containing bedrock formations of this sort are known in Bangladesh, West Bengal (India), and regions of China, and many cases of endemic contamination by arsenic with serious consequences to human health are known from these areas. Significant natural contamination of surface waters and soil can arise when arsenic-rich geothermal fluids come into contact with surface waters. When humans are implicated in causing or exacerbating arsenic pollution, the cause can almost always be traced to mining or mining-related activities. Arsenic exists in many oxidation states, with arsenic (III) and (V) being the most common forms. Similar to many metalloids, the prevalence of particular species of arsenic depends greatly on the pH and redox conditions of the matrix in which it exists. Speciation is also important in determining the toxicity of arsenic. Arsenic minerals exist in the environment principally as sulfides, oxides, and phosphates. In igneous rocks, only those of volcanic origin are implicated in high aqueous arsenic concentrations. Sedimentary rocks tend not to bear high arsenic loads, and common matrices such as sands and sandstones contain lower concentrations owing to the dominance of quartz and feldspars. Groundwater contamination by arsenic arises from sources of arsenopyrite, base metal sulfides, realgar and orpiment, arsenic-rich pyrite, and iron oxyhydroxide. Mechanisms by which arsenic is released from minerals are varied and are accounted for by

  17. Mouse arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase genotype affects metabolism and tissue dosimetry of arsenicals after arsenite administration in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baowei; Arnold, Lora L; Cohen, Samuel M; Thomas, David J; Le, X Chris

    2011-12-01

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) catalyzes methylation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) producing a number of methylated arsenic metabolites. Although methylation has been commonly considered a pathway for detoxification of arsenic, some highly reactive methylated arsenicals may contribute to toxicity associated with exposure to inorganic arsenic. Here, adult female wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice and female As3mt knockout (KO) mice received drinking water that contained 1, 10, or 25 ppm (mg/l) of arsenite for 33 days and blood, liver, kidney, and lung were taken for arsenic speciation. Genotype markedly affected concentrations of arsenicals in tissues. Summed concentrations of arsenicals in plasma were higher in WT than in KO mice; in red blood cells, summed concentrations of arsenicals were higher in KO than in WT mice. In liver, kidney, and lung, summed concentrations of arsenicals were greater in KO than in WT mice. Although capacity for arsenic methylation is much reduced in KO mice, some mono-, di-, and tri-methylated arsenicals were found in tissues of KO mice, likely reflecting the activity of other tissue methyltransferases or preabsorptive metabolism by the microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract. These results show that the genotype for arsenic methylation determines the phenotypes of arsenic retention and distribution and affects the dose- and organ-dependent toxicity associated with exposure to inorganic arsenic.

  18. Genetic Variation in Arsenic (+3 Oxidation State) Methyltransferase (AS3MT), Arsenic Metabolism and Risk of Basal Cell Carcinoma in a European Population

    PubMed Central

    Engström, Karin S; Vahter, Marie; Fletcher, Tony; Leonardi, Giovanni; Goessler, Walter; Gurzau, Eugen; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Rudnai, Peter; Kumar, Rajiv; Broberg, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic increases the risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Arsenic metabolism is a susceptibility factor for arsenic toxicity, and specific haplotypes in arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) have been associated with increased urinary fractions of the most toxic arsenic metabolite, methylarsonic acid (MMA). The aim of this study is to elucidate the association of AS3MT haplotypes with arsenic metabolism and the risk of BCC. Four AS3MT polymorphisms were genotyped in BCC cases (N = 529) and controls (N = 533) from Eastern Europe with low to moderate arsenic exposure (lifetime average drinking water concentration: 1.3 µg/L, range 0.01–167 µg/L). Urinary metabolites [inorganic arsenic (iAs), MMA, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA)] were analyzed by HPLC-ICPMS. Five AS3MT haplotypes (based on rs3740400 A/C, rs3740393 G/C, rs11191439 T/C and rs1046778 T/C) had frequencies >5%. Individuals with the CCTC haplotype had lower %iAs (P = 0.032) and %MMA (P = 0.020) in urine, and higher %DMA (P = 0.033); individuals with the CGCT haplotype had higher %MMA (P < 0.001) and lower %DMA (P < 0.001). All haplotypes showed increased risk of BCC with increasing arsenic exposure through drinking water (ORs 1.1–1.4, P values from <0.001 to 0.082), except for the CCTC haplotype (OR 1.0, CI 0.9–1.2, P value 0.85). The results suggest that carriage of AS3MT haplotypes associated with less-efficient arsenic methylation, or lack of AS3MT haplotypes associated with a more-efficient arsenic methylation, results in higher risk of arsenic-related BCC. The fact that AS3MT haplotype status modified arsenic metabolism, and in turn the arsenic-related BCC risk, supports a causal relationship between low-level arsenic exposure and BCC. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 56:60–69, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society PMID:25156000

  19. Modeling the probability of arsenic in groundwater in New England as a tool for exposure assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, J.D.; Nolan, B.T.; Nuckols, J.R.; Cantor, K.P.; Robinson, G.R.; Baris, D.; Hayes, L.; Karagas, M.; Bress, W.; Silverman, D.T.; Lubin, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    We developed a process-based model to predict the probability of arsenic exceeding 5 ??g/L in drinking water wells in New England bedrock aquifers. The model is being used for exposure assessment in an epidemiologic study of bladder cancer. One important study hypothesis that may explain increased bladder cancer risk is elevated concentrations of inorganic arsenic in drinking water. In eastern New England, 20-30% of private wells exceed the arsenic drinking water standard of 10 micrograms per liter. Our predictive model significantly improves the understanding of factors associated with arsenic contamination in New England. Specific rock types, high arsenic concentrations in stream sediments, geochemical factors related to areas of Pleistocene marine inundation and proximity to intrusive granitic plutons, and hydrologic and landscape variables relating to groundwater residence time increase the probability of arsenic occurrence in groundwater. Previous studies suggest that arsenic in bedrock groundwater may be partly from past arsenical pesticide use. Variables representing historic agricultural inputs do not improve the model, indicating that this source does not significantly contribute to current arsenic concentrations. Due to the complexity of the fractured bedrock aquifers in the region, well depth and related variables also are not significant predictors. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  20. Identifying Affinity Classes of Inorganic Materials Binding Sequences via a Graph-Based Model.

    PubMed

    Du, Nan; Knecht, Marc R; Swihart, Mark T; Tang, Zhenghua; Walsh, Tiffany R; Zhang, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in bionanotechnology have recently generated growing interest in identifying peptides that bind to inorganic materials and classifying them based on their inorganic material affinities. However, there are some distinct characteristics of inorganic materials binding sequence data that limit the performance of many widely-used classification methods when applied to this problem. In this paper, we propose a novel framework to predict the affinity classes of peptide sequences with respect to an associated inorganic material. We first generate a large set of simulated peptide sequences based on an amino acid transition matrix tailored for the specific inorganic material. Then the probability of test sequences belonging to a specific affinity class is calculated by minimizing an objective function. In addition, the objective function is minimized through iterative propagation of probability estimates among sequences and sequence clusters. Results of computational experiments on two real inorganic material binding sequence data sets show that the proposed framework is highly effective for identifying the affinity classes of inorganic material binding sequences. Moreover, the experiments on the structural classification of proteins (SCOP) data set shows that the proposed framework is general and can be applied to traditional protein sequences.

  1. Risk assessment of a former military base contaminated with organoarsenic-based warfare agents: uptake of arsenic by terrestrial plants.

    PubMed

    Pitten, F A; Müller, G; König, P; Schmidt, D; Thurow, K; Kramer, A

    1999-02-09

    Organoarsenic-based chemical warfare agents (CWAs) such as the sternutators diphenylchloroarsine (CLARK I), diphenylcyanoarsine (CLARK II) or phenyldichloroarsine (PFIFFIKUS) still pose a notable risk in countries where former military bases that have stored these weapons have not yet been reclaimed. In fact, this is the case for many countries of Eastern Europe and the CIS. One of the most important military bases of the former Third Reich, the Heeresmunitionsanstalt I and II, is situated close to the German-Polish border at Loecknitz (Fig. 1). The German army stored and decanted different compounds of CWAs at this military base until 1945. When the Soviet Army destroyed the base in 1946, large amounts of CWAs and other organoarsenic compounds polluted the soil. Today up to 250 g (!) of arsenic may be found in 1 kg of soil at some places in this area. Since 1991, a Government Working Group has been working on the risk assessment in order to define the scope of reclamation measures. This study investigates the contamination and the uptake of arsenic by plants because little is known about the bioavailability and metabolism of sternutators and their constituents. The total arsenic concentration of nine different species of terrestrial plants with at least six samples per species is presented. In spite of the considerable arsenic contamination of the soil (mean value 923 mg arsenic/kg soil) the plant contamination remained comparably low. The median value of arsenic contamination of the above-ground organs of velvet grass, Holcus lanatus, was 0.7 mg/kg dry wt. and the mean value was 4.3 mg/kg dry wt. due to some highly contaminated samples. The highest arsenic concentration registered was 26 mg/kg dry wt. in a sample of H. lanatus, which was most probably caused by soil particles adhering to the plant. The chemical structure of the arsenic compounds carried by the above-ground plant organs has been determined by gas chromatographic investigations and showed an uptake

  2. Association of oxidative stress with arsenic methylation in chronic arsenic-exposed children and adults

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yuanyuan; Wang Yi; Zheng Quanmei; Li Xin; Li Bing; Jin Yaping; Sun Xiance; Sun Guifan

    2008-10-01

    Though oxidative stress is recognized as an important pathogenic mechanism of arsenic, and arsenic methylation capacity is suggested to be highly involved in arsenic-related diseases, the association of arsenic methylation capacity with arsenic-induced oxidative stress remains unclear. To explore oxidative stress and its association with arsenic methylation, cross-sectional studies were conducted among 208 high and 59 low arsenic-exposed subjects. Levels of urinary arsenic species [inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylated arsenic (MMA) and dimethylated arsenic (DMA)] were determined by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Proportions of urinary arsenic species, the first methylation ratio (FMR) and the secondary methylation ratio (SMR) were used as indicators for arsenic methylation capacity. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentrations were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in whole blood were determined to reflect anti-oxidative status. The high arsenic-exposed children and adults were significantly increased in urinary 8-OHdG concentrations but decreased in blood GSH levels compared with the low exposed children and adults. In multiple linear regression models, blood GSH levels and urinary 8-OHdG concentrations of arsenic-exposed children and adults showed strong associations with the levels of urinary arsenic species. Arsenic-exposed subjects in the lower and the upper quartiles of proportions of urinary arsenic species, FMR or SMR were significantly different in urinary 8-OHdG, blood GSH and SOD. The associations of arsenic methylation capacity with 8-OHdG, GSH and SOD were also observed in multivariate regression analyses. These results may provide linkage between arsenic methylation capacity and oxidative stress in humans and suggest that adverse health effects induced by arsenic are related to arsenic methylation through oxidative stress.

  3. Plasma-based determination of inorganic contaminants in waste of electric and electronic equipment after microwave-induced combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, Paola A.; Diehl, Lisarb O.; Oliveira, Jussiane S. S.; Muller, Edson I.; Mesko, Marcia F.; Flores, Erico M. M.

    2015-03-01

    A systematic study was performed for the determination of inorganic contaminants in polymeric waste from electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) for achieving an efficient digestion to minimize interferences in determination using plasma-based techniques. The determination of As, Br, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Zn by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and also by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) was carried out after digestion using microwave-induced combustion (MIC). Arsenic and Hg were determined by flow-injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICP-MS). Dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (DRC-ICP-MS) with ammonia was also used for Cr determination. The suitability of MIC for digestion of sample masses up to 400 mg was demonstrated using microcrystalline cellulose as aid for combustion of polymers from waste of EEEs that usually contain flame retardants that impair the combustion. The composition and concentration of acid solutions (HNO3 or HNO3 plus HCl) were evaluated for metals and metalloids and NH4OH solutions were investigated for Br absorption. Accuracy was evaluated by comparison of results with those obtained using high pressure microwave-assisted wet digestion (HP-MAWD) and also by the analysis of certified reference material (CRM) of polymer (EC680k-low-density polyethylene). Bromine determination was only feasible using digestion by MIC once losses were observed when HP-MAWD was used. Lower limits of detection were obtained for all analytes using MIC (from 0.005 μg g- 1 for Co by ICP-MS up to 3.120 μg g-1 for Sb by ICP OES) in comparison to HP-MAWD due to the higher sample mass that can be digested (400 mg) and the use of diluted absorbing solutions. The combination of HNO3 and HCl for digestion showed to be crucial for quantitative recovery of some elements, as Cr and Sb. In addition, suitable agreement of Cr to

  4. Determination of total arsenic and arsenic(III) in phosphate fertilizers by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry after ultrasound-assisted extraction based on a control acid media.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Helen Cristine; Coelho, Nivia Maria Melo

    2014-01-01

    An ultrasound-assisted extraction procedure was developed for determination of inorganic arsenic (As) in phosphate fertilizer by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. The variables that affect the hydride generation step were optimized, including the reducer, acid, sample flow rate, and concentrations of the acid and reducer. The determination of As(lll) was performed through the simple control of solution pH with a 0.5 M citric acid-sodium citrate buffer solution at pH 4.5, and total As was determined after a pre-reduction reaction with 1.0% (w/v) thiourea. Ultrasound-assisted acid extraction was performed, and the parameters sonication time and acid and Triton X-114 concentrations were optimized using a 23 factorial design and central composite design. LODs for As(lll) and total As were 0.029 and 0.022 microg/L, respectively. The accuracy of the method was confirmed with certified reference materials. The method was successfully applied in the determination of inorganic As in phosphate fertilizer samples.

  5. Evaluation and application of the diffusive gradients in thin films technique using a mixed-binding gel layer for measuring inorganic arsenic and metals in mining impacted water and soil.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Trang; Zhang, Hao; Noller, Barry

    2012-11-20

    The diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) equipped with a Chelex or ferrihydrite binding gel has been designed to enable the measurement of either labile metal species or inorganic arsenic, respectively. In the mine impacted environment, metals and metalloids commonly coexist in a variety of species. This study, for the first time reports the performance of the DGT with a mixed-binding layer (MBL), consisting of Chelex and ferrihydrite for measurements of both metals and arsenic in a single assay. The MBL that consists of a combination of Chelex and ferrihydrite at a ratio of 1:2 has the greatest binding capacity for arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn). The elemental concentrations measured by using MBL-DGT (C(DGT)) were comparable (92-104%) with the original test solution concentrations (C(SOL)). The measurement of As by using MBL-DGT was consistent across a wide pH range (3-8) and ionic strength (0.001-0.1 M). At high pH (9), As measurement was slightly affected (∼80%). The measurements of Cd, Pb, and Zn were affected at low pH (<3) and high pH (9). Measurements of Cd, Cu, and Pb were affected at low ionic strength (0.001 M). At high ionic strength (0.1 M), measurements of Cd; Cu and Pb were slightly affected. The capacity of MBL-DGT for quantitative measurement in a multielements solution is effectively limited to 15 μg for As and 70 μg for metals per MBL-DGT device. Good correlations (p < 0.01) between MBL-DGT measurements and ferrihydrite or Chelex DGT were obtained for As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in water and soil with exception for Cd and Cu (p < 0.05) when deployed in soil.

  6. Metabolism and toxicity of arsenicals in mammals.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Adeel; Xie, Shuyu; Hafeez, Mian Abdul; Wang, Xu; Hussain, Hafiz Iftikhar; Iqbal, Zahid; Pan, Yuanhu; Iqbal, Mujahid; Shabbir, Muhammad Abubakr; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-12-01

    Arsenic (As) is a metalloid usually found in organic and inorganic forms with different oxidation states, while inorganic form (arsenite As-III and arsenate As-v) is considered to be more hazardous as compared to organic form (methylarsonate and dimethylarsinate), with mild or no toxicity in mammals. Due to an increasing trend to using arsenicals as growth promoters or for treatment purposes, the understanding of metabolism and toxicity of As gets vital importance. Its toxicity is mainly depends on oxi-reduction states (As-III or As-v) and the level of methylation during the metabolism process. Currently, the exact metabolic pathways of As have yet to be confirmed in humans and food producing animals. Oxidative methylation and glutathione conjugation is believed to be major pathways of As metabolism. Oxidative methylation is based on conversion of Arsenite in to mono-methylarsonic acid and di-methylarsenic acid in mammals. It has been confirmed that As is only methylated in the presence of glutathione or thiol compounds, suggesting that As is being methylated in trivalent states. Subsequently, non-conjugated trivalent arsenicals are highly reactive with thiol which converts the trivalent arsenicals in to less toxic pentavalent forms. The glutathione conjugate stability of As is the most important factor for determining the toxicity. It can lead to DNA damage by alerting enzyme profile and production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which causes the oxidative stress. Moreover, As causes immune-dysfunction by hindering cellular and humeral immune response. The present review discussed different metabolic pathways and toxic outcomes of arsenicals in mammals which will be helpful in health risk assessment and its impact on biological world.

  7. Cleaning of Residues from Equipment Surfaces After Demilitarization of Arsenical-Based Munitions and Fill Materiels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    demilitarization process for the destruction of recovered arsenical-based munitions. Presently, this includes the use of PMNSCM’s Explosive Destruction...as the surfaces must be clean in order to achieve a good seal to prevent leaks during operations. A field-useable process for removing the residues was...data generated from the present study will be used to support operation of a non-stockpile demilitarization process for the destruction of recovered

  8. Arsenic behavior in newly drilled wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, M.-J.; Nriagu, J.; Haack, S.

    2003-01-01

    In the present paper, inorganic arsenic species and chemical parameters in groundwater were determined to investigate the factors related to the distribution of arsenic species and their dissolution from rock into groundwater. For the study, groundwater and core samples were taken at different depths of two newly drilled wells in Huron and Lapeer Counties, Michigan. Results show that total arsenic concentrations in the core samples varied, ranging from 0.8 to 70.7 mg/kg. Iron concentration in rock was about 1800 times higher than that of arsenic, and there was no correlation between arsenic and iron occurrences in the rock samples. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater ranged from <1 to 171 ??g/l. The arsenic concentration in groundwater depended on the amount of arsenic in aquifer rocks, and as well decreased with increasing depth. Over 90% of arsenic existed in the form of As(III), implying that the groundwater systems were in the reduced condition. The results such as high ferrous ion, low redox potential and low dissolved oxygen supported the observed arsenic species distribution. There was no noticeable difference in the total arsenic concentration and arsenic species ratio between unfiltered and filtered (0.45 ??m) waters, indicating that the particulate form of arsenic was negligible in the groundwater samples. There were correlations between water sampling depth and chemical parameters, and between arsenic concentration and chemical parameters, however, the trends were not always consistent in both wells. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The studying of washing of arsenic and sulfur from coals having different ranges of arsenic contents

    SciTech Connect

    Mingshi Wang; Dangyu Song; Baoshan Zheng; R.B. Finkelman

    2008-10-15

    To study the effectiveness of washing in removal of arsenic and sulfur from coals with different ranges of arsenic concentration, coal was divided into three groups on the basis of arsenic content: 0-5.5 mg/kg, 5.5 mg/kg-8.00 mg/kg, and over 8.00 mg/kg. The result shows that the arsenic in coals with higher arsenic content occurs mainly in an inorganic state and can be relatively easily removed. Arsenic removal is very difficult and less complete when the arsenic content is lower than 5.5 mg/kg because most of this arsenic is in an organic state. There is no relationship between washing rate of total sulfur and arsenic content, but the relationship between the washing rate of total sulfur and percent of organic sulfur is very strong.

  10. The studying of washing of arsenic and sulfur from coals having different ranges of arsenic contents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, M.; Song, D.; Zheng, B.; Finkelman, R.B.; ,

    2008-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of washing in removal of arsenic and sulfur from coals with different ranges of arsenic concentration, coal was divided into three groups on the basis of arsenic content: 0-5.5 mg/kg, 5.5 mg/kg-8.00 mg/kg, and over 8.00 mg/kg. The result shows that the arsenic in coals with higher arsenic content occurs mainly in an inorganic state and can be relatively easily removed. Arsenic removal is very difficult and less complete when the arsenic content is lower than 5.5 mg/kg because most of this arsenic is in an organic state. There is no relationship between washing rate of total sulfur and arsenic content, but the relationship between the washing rate of total sulfur and percent of organic sulfur is very strong. ?? 2008 New York Academy of Sciences.

  11. THE ROLE OF PROTEIN BINDING OF TRIVALENT ARSENICALS IN ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS AND TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three of the most plausible biological theories of arsenic carcinogenesis are protein binding, oxidative stress and altered DNA methylation. This review presents the role of trivalent arsenicals binding to proteins in arsenic carcinogenesis. Using vacuum filtration based receptor...

  12. Urinary total arsenic and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine are associated with renal cell carcinoma in an area without obvious arsenic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chao-Yuan; Su, Chien-Tien; Chung, Chi-Jung; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Chu, Jan-Show; Yang, Hsiu-Yuan; Wu, Chia-Chang; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2012-08-01

    8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is one of the most reliable and abundant markers of DNA damage. The study was designed to explore the relationship between urinary 8-OHdG and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to investigate whether individuals with a high level of 8-OHdG would have a modified odds ratio (OR) of arsenic-related RCC. This case–control study was conducted with 132 RCC patients and 245 age- and sex-matched controls from a hospital-based pool between November 2006 and May 2009. Pathological verification of RCC was completed by image-guided biopsy or surgical resection of renal tumors. Urinary 8-OHdG levels were determined using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). Concentrations of urinary arsenic species, including inorganic arsenic, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), were determined by a high performance liquid chromatography-linked hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Level of urinary 8-OHdG was significantly associated with the OR of RCC in a dose–response relationship after multivariate adjustment. Urinary 8-OHdG was significantly related to urinary total arsenic. The greatest OR (3.50) was seen in the individuals with high urinary 8-OHdG and high urinary total arsenic. A trend test indicated that the OR of RCC was increased with one of these factors and was further increased with both (p = 0.002). In conclusion, higher urinary 8-OHdG was a strong predictor of the RCC. High levels of 8-OHdG combined with urinary total arsenic might be indicative of arsenic-induced RCC. -- Highlights: ► Urinary 8-OHdG was significantly related to urinary total arsenic. ► Higher urinary 8-OHdG was a strong predictor of RCC risk. ► Urinary 8-OHdG may modify arsenic related RCC risk.

  13. Poultry Consumption and Arsenic Exposure in the U.S. Population

    PubMed Central

    Nigra, Anne E.; Nachman, Keeve E.; Love, David C.; Grau-Perez, Maria; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Arsenicals (roxarsone and nitarsone) used in poultry production likely increase inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), and roxarsone or nitarsone concentrations in poultry meat. However, the association between poultry intake and exposure to these arsenic species, as reflected in elevated urinary arsenic concentrations, is unknown. Objectives: Our aim was to evaluate the association between 24-hr dietary recall of poultry consumption and arsenic exposure in the U.S. population. We hypothesized first, that poultry intake would be associated with higher urine arsenic concentrations and second, that the association between turkey intake and increased urine arsenic concentrations would be modified by season, reflecting seasonal use of nitarsone. Methods: We evaluated 3,329 participants ≥ 6 years old from the 2003–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) with urine arsenic available and undetectable urine arsenobetaine levels. Geometric mean ratios (GMR) of urine total arsenic and DMA were compared across increasing levels of poultry intake. Results: After adjustment, participants in the highest quartile of poultry consumption had urine total arsenic 1.12 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.22) and DMA 1.13 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.20) times higher than nonconsumers. During the fall/winter, participants in the highest quartile of turkey intake had urine total arsenic and DMA 1.17 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.39; p-trend = 0.02) and 1.13 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.30; p-trend = 0.03) times higher, respectively, than nonconsumers. Consumption of turkey during the past 24 hr was not associated with total arsenic or DMA during the spring/summer. Conclusions: Poultry intake was associated with increased urine total arsenic and DMA in NHANES 2003–2010, reflecting arsenic exposure. Seasonally stratified analyses by poultry type provide strong suggestive evidence that the historical use of arsenic-based poultry drugs contributed to arsenic

  14. COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICALLY RELEVANT ARSENICALS BY PH-SELECTIVE HYDRIDE GENERATION-ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory


    A method based on pH-selective generation and separation of arsines is commonly used for analysis of inorganic, methylated, and dimethylated trivalent and pentavalent arsenicals by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). We have optimized this method to pe...

  15. Ana insect model for assessing arsenic toxicity: Arsenic elevated glutathione content in the musca domestica and trichoplusia ni

    SciTech Connect

    Zaman, K.; Pardini, R.S.

    1995-12-01

    Throughout history, arsenic has acquired an unparalled reputation as a poison. Arsenic was used as a poison as early as 2000 B.C. The toxicity of arsenic (As) extends to mammals, fish, insects, plants and fungi. According to epidemiological evidence, inorganic arsenic compounds have been strongly suggested as human carcinogens. Human exposure to arsenic through various means is correlated with an increased incidence of skin, lung, and possibly liver cancers. Inorganic trivalent arsenic is systematically more poisonous than the pentavalent form and it is possible that pentavalent arsenic is reduced to the trivalent form before exerting any toxic effects. This study focuses on the potential to use two insect species, the housefly, Musca domestica and the cabbage looper moth, Trichoplusia ni, and a model for the study of arsenic toxicity. After 48 hours of exposure to Arsenic, a significant induction of Glutathione level and subsequent decrease in the level of GSSG in both species were observed. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Arsenic-based Life: An active learning assignment for teaching scientific discourse.

    PubMed

    Jeremy Johnson, R

    2017-01-02

    Among recent high profile scientific debates was the proposal that life could exist with arsenic in place of phosphorous in its nucleic acids and other biomolecules. Soon after its initial publication, scientists across diverse disciplines began to question this extraordinary claim. Using the original article, its claims, its scientific support, and the ensuing counterarguments, a two-day, active learning classroom exercise was developed focusing on the presentation, evaluation, and discussion of scientific argumentation and discourse. In this culminating assignment of a first semester biochemistry course, undergraduate students analyze the scientific support from the original research articles and then present and discuss multiple scientific rebuttals in a lively, civil classroom debate. Through this assignment, students develop a sense of skepticism, especially for the original arsenic-based life claims, and learn to clearly articulate their counterarguments with scientific support and critical reasoning. With its direct integration into first-semester biochemistry curriculum and the excitement surrounding arsenic based life, this assignment provides a robust, simple, and stimulating framework for introducing scientific discourse and active learning into the undergraduate molecular science curriculum. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(1):40-45, 2017.

  17. Arsenic speciation in edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Nearing, Michelle M; Koch, Iris; Reimer, Kenneth J

    2014-12-16

    The fruiting bodies, or mushrooms, of terrestrial fungi have been found to contain a high proportion of the nontoxic arsenic compound arsenobetaine (AB), but data gaps include a limited phylogenetic diversity of the fungi for which arsenic speciation is available, a focus on mushrooms with higher total arsenic concentrations, and the unknown formation and role of AB in mushrooms. To address these, the mushrooms of 46 different fungus species (73 samples) over a diverse range of phylogenetic groups were collected from Canadian grocery stores and background and arsenic-contaminated areas. Total arsenic was determined using ICP-MS, and arsenic speciation was determined using HPLC-ICP-MS and complementary X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The major arsenic compounds in mushrooms were found to be similar among phylogenetic groups, and AB was found to be the major compound in the Lycoperdaceae and Agaricaceae families but generally absent in log-growing mushrooms, suggesting the microbial community may influence arsenic speciation in mushrooms. The high proportion of AB in mushrooms with puffball or gilled morphologies may suggest that AB acts as an osmolyte in certain mushrooms to help maintain fruiting body structure. The presence of an As(III)-sulfur compound, for the first time in mushrooms, was identified in the XAS analysis. Except for Agaricus sp. (with predominantly AB), inorganic arsenic predominated in most of the store-bought mushrooms (albeit with low total arsenic concentrations). Should inorganic arsenic predominate in these mushrooms from contaminated areas, the risk to consumers under these circumstances should be considered.

  18. A socio-economic study along with impact assessment for laterite based technology demonstration for arsenic mitigation.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sourav; Roy, Anirban; Mukherjee, Raka; Mondal, Mrinmoy; Karmakar, Sankha; Chatterjee, Somak; Mukherjee, Munmun; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; De, Sirshendu

    2017-04-01

    Arsenic contamination mitigation technologies have been adsorption-based, but the most widely-used and traditionally available adsorbents suffered inherent limitations, including cost infeasibility and problems associated with regeneration and disposal of the spent adsorbent. The present technology is based on indigenously developed activated laterite prepared from the naturally and abundantly available material, and can hence easily be scaled up for community usage and large scale implementation. The total arsenic removal capacity is 32.5mg/g, which is the highest among all naturally occurring arsenic adsorbents. A major issue in earlier adsorbents was that during regeneration, the adsorbed arsenic would be released back into the environment (leaching), and would eventually contaminate the groundwater again. But the adsorbent in this filter does not require regeneration during its five-year lifespan and does not leach upon disposal. An attempt is made to test and demonstrate the practical implementation of the technology - its effectiveness and viability in three community (primary schools - one in Malda and two in north 24 Parganas, West Bengal, India) and 20 household filters, catering to over 5000 people in different areas of West Bengal exposed to high arsenic contamination of groundwater (ranging from 0.05 to 0.5mg/l). The work also focuses on the social impact of the real life technological solution on the lives on the affected people in the worst hit arsenic affected communities, perhaps the greatest public health risk emergency of the decade.

  19. Gene Expression of Normal Human Epidermal Keratinocytes Modulated by Trivalent Arsenicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with the development of benign and malignant human skin lesions including nonmelanoma skin cancers. The precise arsenical form(s) responsible for this carcinogenic effect are unknown, although trivalent inorganic arsenic (...

  20. Natural Antioxidants Against Arsenic-Induced Genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Munesh; Lalit, Minakshi; Thakur, Rajesh

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic is present in water, soil, and air in organic as well as in inorganic forms. However, inorganic arsenic is more toxic than organic and can cause many diseases including cancers in humans. Its genotoxic effect is considered as one of its carcinogenic actions. Arsenic can cause DNA strand breaks, deletion mutations, micronuclei formation, DNA-protein cross-linking, sister chromatid exchange, and DNA repair inhibition. Evidences indicate that arsenic causes DNA damage by generation of reactive free radicals. Nutritional supplementation of antioxidants has been proven highly beneficial against arsenic genotoxicity in experimental animals. Recent studies suggest that antioxidants protect mainly by reducing excess free radicals via restoring the activities of cellular enzymatic as well as non-enzymatic antioxidants and decreasing the oxidation processes such as lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent literature on arsenic-induced genotoxicity and its mitigation by naturally derived antioxidants in various biological systems.

  1. Arsenic ingestion and internal cancers: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, M.N.; Smith, A.H.; Hopenhayn-Rich, C. )

    1992-03-01

    Inorganic arsenic is known to cause skin cancer by ingestion and lung cancer by inhalation. However, whether arsenic ingestion causes internal cancers is still a matter of debate. This paper has reviewed the epidemiologic literature that bears on this question. Published studies of populations who have ingested arsenic in medicines, wine substitutes, or water supplies, as well as workers exposed to arsenic by inhalation, were considered in terms of whether the observed associations might be explained by the presence of biases, the consistency of the evidence, and the biologic plausibility of the associations. Many studies were found to be uninformative because of low statistical power or potential biases. The most informative studies, which were from Taiwan and Japan, involved exposure to arsenic in drinking water. These studies strongly suggest that ingested inorganic arsenic does cause cancers of the bladder, kidney, lung, and liver, and possibly other sites. However, confirmatory studies are needed.82 references.

  2. IDENTIFYING CRITICAL CYSTEINE RESIDUES IN ARSENIC (+3 OXIDATION STATE) METHYLTRANSFERASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) catalyzes methylation of inorganic arsenic to mono, di, and trimethylated arsenicals. Orthologous AS3MT genes in genomes ranging from simple echinoderm to human predict a protein with five conserved cysteine (C) residues. In ...

  3. Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Thiol-ene-Based Photopolymerized Networks

    PubMed Central

    Schreck, Kathleen M.; Leung, Diana; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2011-01-01

    The thiol-ene reaction serves as a more oxygen tolerant alternative to traditional (meth)acrylate chemistry for forming photopolymerized networks with numerous desirable attributes including energy absorption, optical clarity, and reduced shrinkage stress. However, when utilizing commercially available monomers, many thiol-ene networks also exhibit decreases in properties such as glass transition temperature (Tg) and crosslink density. In this study, hybrid organic/inorganic thiol-ene resins incorporating silsesquioxane (SSQ) species into the photopolymerized networks were investigated as a route to improve these properties. Thiol- and ene-functionalized SSQs (SH-SSQ and allyl-SSQ, respectively) were synthesized via alkoxysilane hydrolysis/condensation chemistry, using a photopolymerizable monomer [either pentaerythriol tetrakis(3-mercaptopropionate) (PETMP) or 1,3,5-triallyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (TATATO)] as the reaction solvent. The resulting SSQ-containing solutions (SSQ-PETMP and SSQ-TATATO) were characterized, and their incorporation into photopolymerized networks was evaluated. PMID:21984847

  4. The electrochemical properties of the purine bases : at the interface between biological conjugates to inorganic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Charles C.

    2003-01-01

    The study of the charge transfer and interfacial reactions of the purine bases in physiological solutions provides valuable knowledge, as these processes are relevant to the origins of life. It has been proposed that the adsorption of the adsorption of the purine bases on an inorganic surface could serve as a template for specifying the arrangement of amino acids in peptides.

  5. ASSESSING ARSENIC EXPOSURE AND SKIN HYPERKERATOSIS IN INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is a known human carcinogen. The inorganic forms, especially arsenite (As+3), are believed to be the most toxic species. Methylation is often considered to be the
    detoxification pathway for the metabolism of inorganic arsenic. The ground water in Ba
    Men, Inner Mo...

  6. PROXIMATE OR ULTIMATE GENOTOXIC FORMS OF ARSENIC: METHYLATED ARSENIC(III) SPECIES THAT REACT DIRECTLY WITH DNA

    EPA Science Inventory


    PROXIMATE OR ULTIMATE GENOTOXIC FORMS OF ARSENIC: METHYLATED ARSENIC(III) SPECIES THAT REACT DIRECTL Y WITH DNA.

    Abstract:

    Although inorganic arsenic (iAs), arsenite or arsenate, is genotoxic, there has been no demonstration that iAs or a methylated metabolite...

  7. Comparative Distribution and Retention of Arsenic in Arsenic (+3 Oxidation State) Methyltransferase Knockout and Wild Type Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mouse arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) gene encodes a ~ 43 kDa protein that catalyzes conversion of inorganic arsenic into methylated products. Heterologous expression of AS3MT or its silencing by RNA interference controls arsenic methylation phenotypes...

  8. ARSENIC (III) METHYLATED SPECIES REACT WITH DNA DIRECTLY AND COULD BE PROXIMATED/ULTIMATE GENOTOXIC FORMS OF ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory


    ARSENIC(III) METHYLATED SPECIES REACT WITH DNA DIRECTL Y AND COULD BE PROXIMATE/ULTIMATE GENOTOXIC FORMS OF ARSENIC


    Arsenite and arsenate (iAs, inorganic arsenic) have been thought to act as genotoxicants without reacting directly with DNA; neither iAs nor As(V) m...

  9. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase genotype affects steady-state distribution and clearance of arsenic in arsenate-treated mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) catalyzes formation of mono-, di-, and tri-methylated metabolites of inorganic arsenic. Distribution and retention of arsenic were compared in adult female As3mt knockout mice and wild-type C57BL/6 mice using a regimen in whi...

  10. Urinary arsenic metabolites of subjects exposed to elevated arsenic present in coal in Shaanxi Province, China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jianwei; Yu, Jiangping; Yang, Linsheng

    2011-06-01

    In contrast to arsenic (As) poisoning caused by naturally occurring inorganic arsenic-contaminated water consumption, coal arsenic poisoning (CAP) induced by elevated arsenic exposure from coal combustion has rarely been reported. In this study, the concentrations and distributions of urinary arsenic metabolites in 57 volunteers (36 subjects with skin lesions and 21 subjects without skin lesions), who had been exposed to elevated levels of arsenic present in coal in Changshapu village in the south of Shaanxi Province (China), were reported. The urinary arsenic species, including inorganic arsenic (iAs) [arsenite (iAsIII) and arsenate (iAsV)], monomethylarsonic acid (MMAV) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV), were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The relative distributions of arsenic species, the primary methylation index (PMI=MMAV/iAs) and the secondary methylation index (SMI=DMAV/MMAV) were calculated to assess the metabolism of arsenic. Subjects with skin lesions had a higher concentration of urinary arsenic and a lower arsenic methylation capability than subjects without skin lesions. Women had a significantly higher methylation capability of arsenic than men, as defined by a higher percent DMAV and SMI in urine among women, which was the one possible interpretation of women with a higher concentration of urinary arsenic but lower susceptibility to skin lesions. The findings suggested that not only the dose of arsenic exposure but also the arsenic methylation capability have an impact on the individual susceptibility to skin lesions induced by coal arsenic exposure.

  11. X-ray absorption spectroscopy as a tool investigating arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) sorption by an aluminum-based drinking-water treatment residual.

    PubMed

    Makris, Konstantinos C; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Parsons, Jason G; Datta, Rupali; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2009-11-15

    Historic applications of arsenical pesticides to agricultural land have resulted in accumulation of residual arsenic (As) in such soils. In situ immobilization represents a cost-effective and least ecological disrupting treatment technology for soil As. Earlier work in our laboratory showed that drinking-water treatment residuals (WTRs), a low-cost, waste by-product of the drinking-water treatment process exhibit a high affinity for As. Wet chemical experiments (sorption kinetics and desorption) were coupled with X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements to elucidate the bonding strength and type of As(V) and As(III) sorption by an aluminum-based WTR. A fast (1h), followed by a slower sorption stage resulted in As(V) and As(III) sorption capacities of 96% and 77%, respectively. Arsenic desorption with a 5mM oxalate from the WTR was minimal, being always <4%. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data showed inner-sphere complexation between As and surface hydroxyls. Reaction time (up to 48h) had no effect on the initial As oxidation state for sorbed As(V) and As(III). A combination of inner-sphere bonding types occurred between As and Al on the WTR surface because mixed surface geometries and interatomic distances were observed.

  12. Speciation and Localization of Arsenic in White and Brown Rice Grains

    SciTech Connect

    Meharg, Andrew A.; Lombi, Enzo; Williams, Paul N.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Feldmann, Joerg; Raab, Andrea; Zhu, Yongguan; Islam, Rafiql

    2008-06-30

    Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (S-XRF) was utilized to locate arsenic (As) in polished (white) and unpolished (brown) rice grains from the United States, China, and Bangladesh. In white rice As was generally dispersed throughout the grain, the bulk of which constitutes the endosperm. In brown rice As was found to be preferentially localized at the surface, in the region corresponding to the pericarp and aleurone layer. Copper, iron, manganese, and zinc localization followed that of arsenic in brown rice, while the location for cadmium and nickel was distinctly different, showing relatively even distribution throughout the endosperm. The localization of As in the outer grain of brown rice was confirmed by laser ablation ICP?MS. Arsenic speciation of all grains using spatially resolved X-ray absorption near edge structure (?-XANES) and bulk extraction followed by anion exchange HPLC?ICP?MS revealed the presence of mainly inorganic As and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). However, the two techniques indicated different proportions of inorganic:organic As species. A wider survey of whole grain speciation of white (n = 39) and brown (n = 45) rice samples from numerous sources (field collected, supermarket survey, and pot trials) showed that brown rice had a higher proportion of inorganic arsenic present than white rice. Furthermore, the percentage of DMA present in the grain increased along with total grain arsenic.

  13. The Chemistry and Metabolism of Arsenic

    EPA Science Inventory

    I. IntrodctionA century of study of the process by which many organisms convert inorganic arsenic into an array of methylated metabolites has answered many questions and has posed some new ones. The capacity of microorganisms to. form volatile arsenic compounds was first recogniz...

  14. Questions and Answers: Apple Juice and Arsenic

    MedlinePlus

    ... in its juice than any other company. Does organic apple juice have less arsenic than non-organic apple juice? The FDA is unaware of any ... States. Is the arsenic in apple juice predominantly organic or inorganic? Due to limited data available to ...

  15. Arsenic in freshwater fish in the Chihuahua County water reservoirs (Mexico).

    PubMed

    Nevárez, Myrna; Moreno, Myriam Verónica; Sosa, Manuel; Bundschuh, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Water reservoirs in Chihuahua County, Mexico, are affected by some punctual and non-punctual geogenic and anthropogenic pollution sources; fish are located at the top of the food chain and are good indicators for the ecosystems pollution. The study goal was to: (i) determine arsenic concentration in fish collected from the Chuviscar, Chihuahua, San Marcos and El Rejon water reservoirs; (ii) to assess if the fishes are suitable for human consumption and (iii) link the arsenic contents in fish with those in sediment and water reported in studies made the same year for these water reservoirs. Sampling was done in summer, fall and winter. The highest arsenic concentration in the species varied through the sampling periods: Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) with 0.22 ± 0.15 mg/kg dw in winter and Green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) with 2.00 ± 0.15 mg/kg dw in summer in El Rejon water reservoir. A positive correlation of arsenic contents was found through all sampling seasons in fish samples and the samples of sediment and water. The contribution of the weekly intake of inorganic arsenic, based on the consumption of 0.245 kg fish muscles/body weight/week was found lower than the acceptable weekly intake of 0.015 mg/kg/body weight for inorganic arsenic suggested by FAO/WHO.

  16. Arsenic levels in immigrant children from countries at risk of consuming arsenic polluted water compared to children from Barcelona.

    PubMed

    Piñol, S; Sala, A; Guzman, C; Marcos, S; Joya, X; Puig, C; Velasco, M; Velez, D; Vall, O; Garcia-Algar, O

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic is a highly toxic element that pollutes groundwater, being a major environmental problem worldwide, especially in the Bengal Basin. About 40% of patients in our outpatient clinics come from those countries, and there is no published data about their arsenic exposure. This study compares arsenic exposure between immigrant and native children. A total of 114 children (57 natives, 57 immigrants), aged 2 months to 16 years, were recruited and sociodemographic and environmental exposure data were recorded. Total arsenic in urine, hair, and nails and arsenic-speciated compounds in urine were determined. We did not find significant differences in total and inorganic arsenic levels in urine and hair, but in organic arsenic monomethylarsenic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA) in urine and in total arsenic in nails. However, these values were not in the toxic range. There were significant differences between longer than 5 years exposure and less than 5 years exposure (consumption of water from tube wells), with respect to inorganic and organic MMA arsenic in urine and total arsenic in nails. There was partial correlation between the duration of exposure and inorganic arsenic levels in urine. Immigrant children have higher arsenic levels than native children, but they are not toxic. At present, there is no need for specific arsenic screening or follow-up in immigrant children recently arrived in Spain from exposure high-risk countries.

  17. Arsenic bioaccessibility and speciation in the soils amended with organoarsenicals and drinking-water treatment residuals based on a long-term greenhouse study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagar, Rachana; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Makris, Konstantinos C.; Datta, Rupali

    2014-10-01

    SummaryAlthough organoarsenical pesticides are no longer applied to agricultural fields in the US, their widespread use until recently, toxicity, and potential transformation to inorganic arsenic has raised serious concern. Drinking-water treatment residuals (WTRs) have been proposed as a low-cost amendment for remediation of organoarsenical pesticide contaminated soils. A long-term greenhouse study was initiated to evaluate the effect WTR application on bioaccessibility, geochemical partitioning, and speciation of the Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). Two soils (Immokalee and Orelia series) were spiked with DMA (1500 mg As kg-1) and amended with an Al- and Fe-based WTR at two rates (5% and 10% by wt.). Soil sampling was done immediately after spiking (time zero) and after 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 3 (time final) years of equilibration and subjected to bioaccessibility test and sequential extraction. Results showed that compared to the unamended (no WTR) control, As bioaccessibility in the WTR-amended soils significantly (p < 0.001) decreased by 40-70% in 3 years. The Fe-WTR was more effective than Al-WTR in decreasing soil As bioaccessibility. The in vitro and water-extracted samples were subjected to As speciation at time zero and time final. Results showed transformation of DMA into inorganic As, irrespective of WTR amendments. The Orelia soil showed significantly (p < 0.001) higher transformation than the Immokalee soil.

  18. Monitored Attenuation of Inorganic Contaminants in Ground Water Volume 2 – Assessment for Non-Radionuclides Including Arsenic, Cadmium, Chromium, Copper, Lead, Nickel, Nitrate, Perchlorate, and Selenium

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document represents the second volume of a set of three volumes that address the technical basis and requirements for assessing the potential applicability of MNA as part of a ground-water remedy for plumes with non-radionuclide and/or radionuclide inorganic contaminants. V...

  19. Arsenic exposure from drinking water and dyspnoea risk in Araihazar, Bangladesh: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Pesola, Gene R; Parvez, Faruque; Chen, Yu; Ahmed, Alauddin; Hasan, Rabiul; Ahsan, Habibul

    2012-05-01

    Bangladesh has high well water arsenic exposure. Chronic arsenic ingestion may result in diseases that manifest as dyspnoea, although information is sparse. Baseline values were obtained from an arsenic study. Trained physicians ascertained data on dyspnoea among 11,746 subjects. Data were collected on demographic factors, including smoking, blood pressure and arsenic exposure. Logistic regression models estimated odds ratios and confidence intervals for the association between arsenic exposure and dyspnoea. The adjusted odds of having dyspnoea was 1.32-fold (95% CI 1.15-1.52) greater in those exposed to high well water arsenic concentrations (≥ 50 μg · L(-1)) compared with low-arsenic-exposed nonsmokers (p<0.01). A significant dose-response relationship was found for arsenic (as well as smoking) in relation to dyspnoea. In nonsmokers, the adjusted odds of having dyspnoea were 1.36, 1.96, 2.34 and 1.80-fold greater for arsenic concentrations of 7-38, 39-90, 91-178 and 179-864 μg · L(-1), respectively, compared with the reference arsenic concentration of <7 μg · L(-1) (p<0.01; Chi-squared test for trend). Arsenic exposure through well water is associated with dyspnoea, independently of smoking status. This study suggests that mandated well water testing for arsenic with reduction in exposure may significantly reduce diseases that manifest as dyspnoea, usually cardiac or pulmonary.

  20. Inorganic-organic hybrid antibiocorrosive covers based on polyurethanes and coordination compounds of some transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekishvili, N.; Barbakadze, Kh.; Brostow, W.; Datashvili, T.; Fainleib, A.; Grigorieva, O.

    2012-07-01

    Biodegradation of synthetic and natural materials by various microorganisms affects a wide range of industrial processes and techniques. One of the modern ways to protect of the synthetic and natural materials from the action of aggressive microorganisms is a creation of novel antibiocorrosive covers with high bioactivity and multivectorial and directional action based on inorganic-organic hybrid composites [1, 2].

  1. A Wiki-Based Group Project in an Inorganic Chemistry Foundation Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristian, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    A semester-long group project that utilizes wiki sites to enhance collaboration was developed for a foundation course in inorganic chemistry. Through structured assignments, student groups use metal-based or metal-combating therapeutic agents as a model for applying and understanding course concepts; they also gain proficiency with scientific- and…

  2. THE ROLE OF VALENCE AND METHYLATION STATE ON THE ACTIVITY OF ARSENIC DURING MITOSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trivalent methylated arsenicals are much more potent DNA damaging agents, clastogens, and large deletion mutagens than are their inorganic and pentavalent counterparts. Previously we had noticed that many of the arsenicals induced "c-type" anaphases characteristic of spindle pois...

  3. THE VALENCE AND METHYLATION STATE OF ARSENIC DETERMINES ITS POTENCY IN INTERACTION WITH THE MITOTIC APPARATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that the cytotoxic and genotoxic potency of arsenicals is dependent upon their valence and methylation state. Trivalent methylated arsenicals are much more potent DNA damaging agents than are their inorganic and pentavalent counterparts. Furthermore, thei...

  4. Tissue, Dosimetry, Metabolism and Excretion of Pentavalent and Trivalent Dimethylated Arsenic in Mice after Oral Administration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) is a rat bladder carcinogen and the major urinary metabolite of administered inorganic arsenic in most mammals. This study examined the disposition of pentavalent and trivalent dimethylated arsenic inmice after acute oral administration. Adult fema...

  5. Arsenic and its compounds in mushrooms: A review.

    PubMed

    Falandysz, Jerzy; Rizal, Leela M

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the detail concentration of arsenic in some species of mushrooms as well as organic and inorganic forms of arsenic in the substrates where wild and cultivated edible mushrooms grow. We also briefly review the molecular forms of arsenic in mushrooms. There is still a lack of experimental data from the environment for a variety of species from different habitats and for different levels of geogenic arsenic in soil. This information will be useful for mushrooms consumers, nutritionists, and food regulatory agencies by describing ways to minimize arsenic content in edible mushrooms and arsenic intake from mushroom meals.

  6. Thiolated arsenicals in arsenic metabolism: Occurrence, formation, and biological implications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuzhen; Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong

    2016-11-01

    Arsenic (As) is a notoriously toxic pollutant of health concern worldwide with potential risk of cancer induction, but meanwhile it is used as medicines for the treatment of different conditions including hematological cancers. Arsenic can undergo extensive metabolism in biological systems, and both toxicological and therapeutic effects of arsenic compounds are closely related to their metabolism. Recent studies have identified methylated thioarsenicals as a new class of arsenic metabolites in biological systems after exposure of inorganic and organic arsenicals, including arsenite, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), dimethylarsinous glutathione (DMA(III)GS), and arsenosugars. The increasing detection of thiolated arsenicals, including monomethylmonothioarsonic acid (MMMTA(V)), dimethylmonothioarsinic acid (DMMTA(V)) and its glutathione conjugate (DMMTA(V)GS), and dimethyldithioarsinic acid (DMDTA(V)) suggests that thioarsenicals may be important metabolites and play important roles in arsenic toxicity and therapeutic effects. Here we summarized the reported occurrence of thioarsenicals in biological systems, the possible formation pathways of thioarsenicals, and their toxicity, and discussed the biological implications of thioarsenicals on arsenic metabolism, toxicity, and therapeutic effects.

  7. Arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase genotype affects steady-state distribution and clearance of arsenic in arsenate-treated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Michael F.; Edwards, Brenda C.; Herbin-Davis, Karen M.; Saunders, Jesse; Styblo, Miroslav; Thomas, David J.

    2010-12-15

    Arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) catalyzes formation of mono-, di-, and tri-methylated metabolites of inorganic arsenic. Distribution and retention of arsenic were compared in adult female As3mt knockout mice and wild-type C57BL/6 mice using a regimen in which mice received daily oral doses of 0.5 mg of arsenic as arsenate per kilogram of body weight. Regardless of genotype, arsenic body burdens attained steady state after 10 daily doses. At steady state, arsenic body burdens in As3mt knockout mice were 16 to 20 times greater than in wild-type mice. During the post dosing clearance period, arsenic body burdens declined in As3mt knockout mice to {approx} 35% and in wild-type mice to {approx} 10% of steady-state levels. Urinary concentration of arsenic was significantly lower in As3mt knockout mice than in wild-type mice. At steady state, As3mt knockout mice had significantly higher fractions of the body burden of arsenic in liver, kidney, and urinary bladder than did wild-type mice. These organs and lung had significantly higher arsenic concentrations than did corresponding organs from wild-type mice. Inorganic arsenic was the predominant species in tissues of As3mt knockout mice; tissues from wild-type mice contained mixtures of inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites. Diminished capacity for arsenic methylation in As3mt knockout mice prolongs retention of inorganic arsenic in tissues and affects whole body clearance of arsenic. Altered retention and tissue tropism of arsenic in As3mt knockout mice could affect the toxic or carcinogenic effects associated with exposure to this metalloid or its methylated metabolites.

  8. Public Health Risk of Arsenic Species in Chicken Tissues from Live Poultry Markets of Guangdong Province, China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuanan; Zhang, Wenfeng; Cheng, Hefa; Tao, Shu

    2017-03-21

    Arsenic-based feed additives, such as roxarsone (ROX), are still legally and widely used in food animal production in many countries. This study was conducted to systematically characterize the content and speciation of arsenic in chicken tissues from live poultry markets and in commercial chicken feeds in Guangdong, a major poultry production and consumption province in China, and to assess the corresponding public health risk. The total arsenic contents in the commercial feeds could be modeled as a mixture of two log-normal distributions (geometric means: 0.66 and 17.5 mg/kg), and inorganic arsenic occurred at high levels (0.19-9.7 mg/kg) in those with ROX detected. In general, chicken livers had much higher contents of total arsenic compared to the muscle tissues (breast and drumstick), and chicken muscle from the urban markets contained arsenic at much higher levels than that from the rural markets. The incremental lifetime cancer risk (bladder and lung cancer) from dietary exposure to arsenic contained in chicken meat products on local markets was above the serious or priority level (10(-4)) for 70% and 30% of the adult populations in Guangzhou and Lianzhou, respectively. These findings indicate the significant need to phase out the use of arsenic-based feed additives in China.

  9. The Genetic Architecture of Arsenic Metabolism Efficiency:A SNP-Based Heritability Study of Bangladeshi Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jianjun; Tong, Lin; Argos, Maria; Bryan, Molly Scannell; Ahmed, Alauddin; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Jasmine, Farzana; Slavkovich, Vesna; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Consumption of arsenic-contaminated drinking water adversely affects health. There is interindividual variation in arsenic metabolism efficiency, partially due to genetic variation in the arsenic methyltransferase (AS3MT) gene region. Objectives The goal of this study was to assess the overall contribution of genetic factors to variation in arsenic metabolism efficiency, as measured by the relative concentration of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA%) in urine. Methods Using data on genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and urinary DMA% for 2,053 arsenic-exposed Bangladeshi individuals, we employed various SNP-based approaches for heritability estimation and polygenic modeling. Results Using data on all participants, the percent variance explained (PVE) for DMA% by all measured and imputed SNPs was 16% (p = 0.08), which was reduced to 5% (p = 0.34) after adjusting for AS3MT SNPs. Using information on close relatives only, the PVE was 63% (p = 0.0002), but decreased to 41% (p = 0.01) after adjusting for AS3MT SNPs. Regional heritability analysis confirmed 10q24.32 (AS3MT) as a major arsenic metabolism locus (PVE = 7%, p = 4.4 × 10–10), but revealed no additional regions. We observed a moderate association between a polygenic score reflecting elevated DMA% (composed of thousands of non-AS3MT SNPs) and reduced skin lesion risk in an independent sample (p < 0.05). We observed no associations for SNPs reported in prior candidate gene studies of arsenic metabolism. Conclusions Our results suggest that there are common variants outside of the AS3MT region that influence arsenic metabolism in Bangladeshi individuals, but the effects of these variants are very weak compared with variants near AS3MT. The high heritability estimates observed using family-based heritability approaches suggest substantial effects for rare variants and/or unmeasured environmental factors. Citation Gao J, Tong L, Argos M, Scannell Bryan M, Ahmed A, Rakibuz-Zaman M, Kibriya MG

  10. One step derivatization with British Anti-Lewsite in combination with gas chromatography coupled to triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry for the fast and selective analysis of inorganic arsenic in rice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ju Hui; Jung, Hyun Jeong; Jung, Mun Yhung

    2016-08-31

    We developed a new fast and selective analytical method for the determination of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in rice by a gas chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) in combination with one step derivatization of inorganic arsenic (iAs) with British Anti-Lewsite (BAL). Two step derivatization of iAs with BAL has been previously performed for the GC-MS analysis. In this paper, the quantitative one step derivatization condition was successfully established. The GC-MS/MS was carried out with a short nonpolar capillary column (0.25 mm × 10 m) under the conditions of fast oven temperature ramp rate (4 °C/s) and high linear velocity (108.8 cm/s) of the carrier gas. The established GC-MS/MS method showed an excellent linearity (r(2) > 0.999) in a tested range (0.2-100.0 μg L(-1)), ultra-low limit of detection (LOD, 0.08 pg), and high precision and accuracy. The GC-MS/MS technique showed far greater selectivity (22.5 fold higher signal to noise ratio in rice sample) on iAs than GC-MS method. The gas chromatographic running time was only 2.5 min with the iAs retention time of 1.98 min. The established method was successfully applied to quantify the iAs contents in polished rice. The mean iAs content in the Korean polished rice (n = 27) was 66.1 μg kg(-1) with the range of 37.5-125.0 μg kg(-1). This represents the first report on the GC-tandem mass spectrometry in combination with the one step derivatization with BAL for the iAs speciation in rice. This GC-MS/MS method would be a simple, useful and reliable measure for the iAs analysis in rice in the laboratories in which the expensive and element specific HPLC-ICP-MS is not available.

  11. Response to Comments on Probabilistic Modeling Dietary Arsenic Exposure and Dose and Evaluation with 2003-2004 NHANES Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    In our article (Xue et al. (2010), we cited Boyce et al. (2008) based on their major conclusion, stated at the end of their abstract that. "typical and high-end background exposures to inorganic arsenic in U.S. populations do not present elevated risks of carcinogenicity." We agr...

  12. Response of Rice Genotype to Straighthead Disease as Influenced by Arsenic Level and Water Management Practices in Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arsenic (As) uptake by rice plants and straighthead disease induced by As based herbicide are of concern to rice production. Bioavailability or mobility of inorganic As in soil has been reported being significantly influenced by soil minerals such as iron (hydr) oxide, however, the interactions of ...

  13. Base-Catalyzed Linkage Isomerization: An Undergraduate Inorganic Kinetics Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, W. G.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes kinetics experiments completed in a single two-hour laboratory period at 25 degrees Centigrade of nitrito to nitro rearrangement, based on the recently discovered base-catalysis path. Includes information on synthesis and characterization of linkage isomers, spectrophotometric techniques, and experimental procedures. (SK)

  14. Biological and behavioral factors modify biomarkers of arsenic exposure in a U.S. population.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Rebecca L; Hudgens, Edward E; Carty, Cara; He, Bin; Le, X Chris; Rogers, John; Thomas, David J

    2013-10-01

    Although consumption of drinking water contaminated with inorganic arsenic is usually considered the primary exposure route, aggregate exposure to arsenic depends on direct consumption of water, use of water in food preparation, and the presence in arsenicals in foods. To gain insight into the effects of biological and behavioral factors on arsenic exposure, we determined arsenic concentrations in urine and toenails in a U.S. population that uses public or private water supplies containing inorganic arsenic. Study participants were 904 adult residents of Churchill County, Nevada, whose home tap water supplies contained <3 to about 1200 µg of arsenic per liter. Biomarkers of exposure for this study were summed urinary concentrations of inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites (speciated arsenical), of all urinary arsenicals (total arsenical), and of all toenail arsenicals (total arsenical). Increased tap water arsenic concentration and consumption were associated with significant upward trends for urinary speciated and total and toenail total arsenical concentrations. Significant gender differences in concentrations of speciated and total arsenicals in urine and toenails reflected male-female difference in water intake. Both recent and higher habitual seafood consumption significantly increased urinary total but not speciated arsenical concentration. In a stepwise general linear model, seafood consumption significantly predicted urinary total arsenical but not urinary speciated or toenail total arsenical concentrations. Smoking behavior significantly predicted urinary speciated or total arsenical concentration. Gender, tap water arsenic concentration, and primary drinking water source significantly predicted urinary speciated and total concentrations and toenail total arsenical concentrations. These findings confirm the primacy of home tap water as a determinant of arsenic concentration in urine and toenails. However, biological and behavioral factors can

  15. Factors Affecting Arsenic Methylation in Arsenic-Exposed Humans: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Niu, Qiang; Xu, Mengchuan; Rui, Dongsheng; Xu, Shangzhi; Feng, Gangling; Ding, Yusong; Li, Shugang; Jing, Mingxia

    2016-02-06

    Chronic arsenic exposure is a critical public health issue in many countries. The metabolism of arsenic in vivo is complicated because it can be influenced by many factors. In the present meta-analysis, two researchers independently searched electronic databases, including the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Springer, Embase, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, to analyze factors influencing arsenic methylation. The concentrations of the following arsenic metabolites increase (p< 0.000001) following arsenic exposure: inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethyl arsenic (MMA), dimethyl arsenic (DMA), and total arsenic. Additionally, the percentages of iAs (standard mean difference (SMD): 1.00; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60-1.40; p< 0.00001) and MMA (SMD: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.21-0.77; p = 0.0006) also increase, while the percentage of DMA (SMD: -0.57; 95% CI: -0.80--0.31; p< 0.0001), primary methylation index (SMD: -0.57; 95% CI: -0.94--0.20; p = 0.002), and secondary methylation index (SMD: -0.27; 95% CI: -0.46--0.90; p = 0.004) decrease. Smoking, drinking, and older age can reduce arsenic methylation, and arsenic methylation is more efficient in women than in men. The results of this analysis may provide information regarding the role of arsenic oxidative methylation in the arsenic poisoning process.

  16. Differential Methylation of the Arsenic (III) Methyltransferase Promoter According to Arsenic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Matthew O.; Tang, Wan-yee; Shang, Yan; Pollak, Jonathan; Umans, Jason G.; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Guallar, Eliseo; Cole, Shelley A.; Fallin, M. Daniele; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is methylated in the body by arsenic (III) methyltransferase. Arsenic methylation is thought to play a role in arsenic-related epigenetic phenomena including aberrant DNA and histone methylation. However, it is unclear whether the promoter of the AS3MT gene, which codes for arsenic (III) methyltransferase, is differentially methylated as a function of arsenic exposure. In this study we evaluated AS3MT promoter methylation according to exposure, assessed by urinary arsenic excretion in a stratified random sample of 48 participants from the Strong Heart Study who had urine arsenic measured at baseline and DNA available from 1989–1991 and 1998–1999. For this study, all data are from the 1989–1991 visit. We measured AS3MT promoter methylation at its 48 CpG loci by bisulphite sequencing. We compared mean % methylation at each CpG locus by arsenic exposure group using linear regression adjusted for study centre, age and sex. A hypomethylated region in the AS3MT promoter was associated with higher arsenic exposure. In vitro, arsenic induced AS3MT promoter hypomethylation and it increased AS3MT expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These findings may suggest that arsenic exposure influences the epigenetic regulation of a major arsenic metabolism gene. PMID:24154821

  17. THE ROLE OF ARSENIC (+3 OXIDATION STATE) METHYLTRANSFERASE IN ARSENIC METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (As) is widely distributed in the environment. Epidemiological studies have linked chronic exposures to inorganic As (iAs) to adverse health effects such as skin lesions, peripheral neuropathy, cardiovascular, hepatic and renal disorders, diabetes mellitus, skin cancer,...

  18. Inorganic elemental determinations of marine traditional Chinese Medicine Meretricis concha from Jiaozhou Bay: The construction of inorganic elemental fingerprint based on chemometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Mingying; Li, Xuejie; Zheng, Kang; Jiang, Man; Yan, Cuiwei; Li, Yantuan

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore the relationship between the inorganic elemental fingerprint and the geographical origin identification of Meretricis concha, which is a commonly used marine traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for the treatment of asthma and scald burns. For that, the inorganic elemental contents of Meretricis concha from five sampling points in Jiaozhou Bay have been determined by means of inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, and the comparative investigations based on the contents of 14 inorganic elements (Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se and Zn) of the samples from Jiaozhou Bay and the previous reported Rushan Bay were performed. It has been found that the samples from the two bays are approximately classified into two kinds using hierarchical cluster analysis, and a four-factor model based on principle component analysis could explain approximately 75% of the detection data, also linear discriminant analysis can be used to develop a prediction model to distinguish the samples from Jiaozhou Bay and Rushan Bay with accuracy of about 93%. The results of the present investigation suggested that the inorganic elemental fingerprint based on the combination of the measured elemental content and chemometric analysis is a promising approach for verifying the geographical origin of Meretricis concha, and this strategy should be valuable for the authenticity discrimination of some marine TCM.

  19. Arsenic and Environmental Health: State of the Science and Future Research Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Danielle J.; Naujokas, Marisa F.; Bradham, Karen D.; Cowden, John; Heacock, Michelle; Henry, Heather F.; Lee, Janice S.; Thomas, David J.; Thompson, Claudia; Tokar, Erik J.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Suk, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Exposure to inorganic and organic arsenic compounds is a major public health problem that affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Exposure to arsenic is associated with cancer and noncancer effects in nearly every organ in the body, and evidence is mounting for health effects at lower levels of arsenic exposure than previously thought. Building from a tremendous knowledge base with > 1,000 scientific papers published annually with “arsenic” in the title, the question becomes, what questions would best drive future research directions? Objectives: The objective is to discuss emerging issues in arsenic research and identify data gaps across disciplines. Methods: The National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program convened a workshop to identify emerging issues and research needs to address the multi-faceted challenges related to arsenic and environmental health. This review summarizes information captured during the workshop. Discussion: More information about aggregate exposure to arsenic is needed, including the amount and forms of arsenic found in foods. New strategies for mitigating arsenic exposures and related health effects range from engineered filtering systems to phytogenetics and nutritional interventions. Furthermore, integration of omics data with mechanistic and epidemiological data is a key step toward the goal of linking biomarkers of exposure and susceptibility to disease mechanisms and outcomes. Conclusions: Promising research strategies and technologies for arsenic exposure and adverse health effect mitigation are being pursued, and future research is moving toward deeper collaborations and integration of information across disciplines to address data gaps. Citation: Carlin DJ, Naujokas MF, Bradham KD, Cowden J, Heacock M, Henry HF, Lee JS, Thomas DJ, Thompson C, Tokar EJ, Waalkes MP, Birnbaum LS, Suk WA. 2016. Arsenic and environmental health: state of the

  20. New bio-inorganic photo-electronic devices based on photosynthetic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Nikolai; Spano, Anthony; Trammell, Scott; Griva, Igor; Tsoi, Stanislav; Schnur, Joel M.

    2007-09-01

    Construction of efficient devices for light energy conversion, including photo-electronic and photovoltaic (PV) devices, is a big challenge for the current science and technology that will have important economic consequences. Most of the modern photovoltaic devices are based on silicon. An innovative approach to the construction of photovoltaic devices is the utilization of biological systems and principles designed for similar purposes by Nature. Biological electronic devices, proteins, have extremely high efficiency, precise spatial organization, and are inexpensive in fabrication. They can be fused with inorganic and organic materials such as conductors, semiconductors, conductive polymers, or quantum dots. The photosynthetic reaction center protein (RC) is one of the most advanced photo-electronic devices developed by Nature. It has nearly 100% quantum yield of primary charge separation, an extremely fast operation time (about 10 -9 s, or operation frequency of ~10 9 Hz), and a very efficient stabilization of separated charges (ratio of charge separation rate to that of charge recombination is about 10 4). The charge separation and stabilization takes place in a complex of 7 nm size and leads to the formation of a local electric field of about 10 6 V/cm. A coupling of photosynthetic RC to inorganic electrodes is attractive for the identification of the mechanisms of inter-protein electron transfer (ET) and for the possible applications in the construction of protein-based innovative photoelectronic and photovoltaic devices. In this presentation we describe a new type of hybrid bio-inorganic photoelectronic devices based on photosynthetic proteins and inorganic materials. Using genetically engineered bacterial RCs and specifically synthesized organic linkers, we were able to construct self-assembled and aligned protein complexes with various metals and semiconductors, including gold, indium tin oxide (ITO), nanoporous TiO II, highly ordered pyrolytic graphite

  1. [Studies on markers of exposure and early effect in areas with arsenic pollution: methods and results of the project SEpiAs. Epidemiological studies on population exposed to low-to-moderate arsenic concentration in drinking water].

    PubMed

    Bustaffa, Elisa; Bianchi, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic and its inorganic compounds are classified as human carcinogens. Several epidemiological studies conducted in areas of the world characterized by high arsenic concentration in drinking water, even up to 3,000 μg/l, report associations between arsenic exposure and skin, bladder, lung, liver and kidney cancer as well as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and reproductive and developmental effects. Since general population is not exposed to these high arsenic concentrations in the last years attention focused on adverse health effects that low-to-moderate arsenic concentrations (0-150 μg/l) in drinking water could induce. The World Health Organization recommends a maximum limit of 10 μg/l for arsenic in drinking water. Almost all epidemiological studies conducted on populations exposed to low-to-moderate arsenic concentrations in drinking water are limited due to problems arising from both individual exposure assessment and low subjects number. The aim of the present review is to collect literature-based evidences regarding adverse health effects associated with exposure to low-to-moderate arsenic concentrations in drinking water (10-150 μg/l) in order to obtain a comprehensive picture of the health outcomes that such exposure can have on general population.

  2. Arsenic Methyltransferase

    EPA Science Inventory

    The metalloid arsenic enters the environment by natural processes (volcanic activity, weathering of rocks) and by human activity (mining, smelting, herbicides and pesticides). Although arsenic has been exploited for homicidal and suicidal purposes since antiquity, its significan...

  3. RECENT ADVANCES IN ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS: MODES OF ACTION, ANIMAL MODEL SYSTEMS AND METHYLATED ARSENIC METABOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Abstract:

    Recent advances in our knowledge of arsenic carcinogenesis include the development of rat or mouse models for all human organs in which inorganic arsenic is known to cause cancer -skin, lung, urinary bladder, liver and kidney. Tumors can be produced from eit...

  4. In utero and early childhood exposure to arsenic decreases lung function in children

    PubMed Central

    Recio-Vega, Rogelio; Gonzalez-Cortes, Tania; Olivas-Calderon, Edgar; Lantz, R. Clark; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Gonzalez-De Alba, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Background The lung is a target organ for adverse health outcomes following exposure to arsenic. Several studies have reported a high prevalence of respiratory symptoms and diseases in subjects highly exposed to arsenic through drinking water, however, most studies to date has been performed in exposed adults, with little information on respiratory effects in children. The objective of the study was to evaluate the association between urinary levels of arsenic and its metabolites with lung function in children exposed in utero and in early childhood to high arsenic levels through drinking water. Methods A total of 358 healthy children were included in our study. Individual exposure was assessed based on urinary concentration of inorganic arsenic. Lung function was assessed by spirometry. Results Participants were exposed since pregnancy until early childhood to an average water As concentration of 152.13 μg/L. The mean urinary arsenic level registered in the studied subjects was 141.2 μg/L and only 16.7% had a urinary concentration below the national concern level. Forced vital capacity was significantly decreased in the studied population and it was negatively associated with the percent of inorganic arsenic. More than 57% of the subjects had a restrictive spirometric pattern. The urinary As level was higher in those children with restrictive lung patterns when compared with the levels registered in subjects with normal spirometric patterns. Conclusion Exposure to arsenic through drinking water during in utero and early life was associated with a decrease in FVC and with a restrictive spirometric pattern in the children evaluated. PMID:25131850

  5. Urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and urothelial carcinoma risk in low arsenic exposure area

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.-J.; Huang, C.-J.; Pu, Y.-S.; Su, C.-T.; Huang, Y.-K.; Chen, Y.-T.; Hsueh, Y.-M.

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic is a well-documented human carcinogen and is known to cause oxidative stress in cultured cells and animals. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted to evaluate the relationship among the levels of urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), the arsenic profile, and urothelial carcinoma (UC). Urinary 8-OHdG was measured by using high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. The urinary species of inorganic arsenic and their metabolites were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and hydride generator-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). This study showed that the mean urinary concentration of total arsenics was significantly higher, at 37.67 {+-} 2.98 {mu}g/g creatinine, for UC patients than for healthy controls of 21.10 {+-} 0.79 {mu}g/g creatinine (p < 0.01). Urinary 8-OHdG levels correlated with urinary total arsenic concentrations (r = 0.19, p < 0.01). There were significantly higher 8-OHdG levels, of 7.48 {+-} 0.97 ng/mg creatinine in UC patients, compared to healthy controls of 5.95 {+-} 0.21 ng/mg creatinine. Furthermore, female UC patients had higher 8-OHdG levels of 9.22 {+-} 0.75 than those of males at 5.76 {+-} 0.25 ng/mg creatinine (p < 0.01). Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that high urinary 8-OHdG levels were associated with increased total arsenic concentrations, inorganic arsenite, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsenate (DMA) as well as the primary methylation index (PMI) even after adjusting for age, gender, and UC status. The results suggest that oxidative DNA damage was associated with arsenic exposure, even at low urinary level of arsenic.

  6. Grain Unloading Of Arsenic Species In Rice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is the staple food for over half the world's population yet may represent a significant dietary source of inorganic arsenic (As), a nonthreshold, class 1 human carcinogen. Rice grain As is dominated by the inorganic species, and the organic species dim...

  7. Biomedical Probes Based on Inorganic Nanoparticles for Electrochemical and Optical Spectroscopy Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yakoh, Abdulhadee; Pinyorospathum, Chanika; Siangproh, Weena; Chailapakul, Orawon

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles usually provide novel and unique physical properties as their size approaches nanometer scale dimensions. The unique physical and optical properties of nanoparticles may lead to applications in a variety of areas, including biomedical detection. Therefore, current research is now increasingly focused on the use of the high surface-to-volume ratios of nanoparticles to fabricate superb chemical- or biosensors for various detection applications. This article highlights various kinds of inorganic nanoparticles, including metal nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, nanocomposites, and semiconductor nanoparticles that can be perceived as useful materials for biomedical probes and points to the outstanding results arising from their use in such probes. The progress in the use of inorganic nanoparticle-based electrochemical, colorimetric and spectrophotometric detection in recent applications, especially bioanalysis, and the main functions of inorganic nanoparticles in detection are reviewed. The article begins with a conceptual discussion of nanoparticles according to types, followed by numerous applications to analytes including biomolecules, disease markers, and pharmaceutical substances. Most of the references cited herein, dating from 2010 to 2015, generally mention one or more of the following characteristics: a low detection limit, good signal amplification and simultaneous detection capabilities. PMID:26343676

  8. Photonic applications based on biological/inorganic nano hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Wu, Pengfei; Yelleswarapu, Chandra

    2016-02-01

    Biological Retinal is an effective and efficient photochromic compounds and one of the best candidates for photon conversion, transmission and storage, from the view of bionics and natural selection. We observed large optical nonlinearity by using new fabricated films of photoactive Retinol hybrid materials. Based on reversible photoinduced anisotropy and transient optical characteristics, the Retinol hybrids can be used to design novel photonic devices, such as holographic elements, all-optical switch and spatial light modulator. Also, the study is important for further understanding the photochemical mechanism of vision process.

  9. Arsenic and bladder cancer: observations and suggestions.

    PubMed

    Radosavljević, Vladan; Jakovljević, Branko

    2008-10-01

    Arsenic from drinking water is a well-known risk factor for bladder cancer. The purpose of this paper is to systematize some important yet often overlooked facts considering the relationship between arsenic exposure and the occurrence of bladder cancer. Since the exposure to inorganic arsenic from food, inhaled air, and skin absorption as well as arsenic methylation ability are not fully investigated, our assumption is that the exposure of arsenic only from drinking water is underestimated and its role as a risk factor is highly overestimated. This paper proposes some qualitative and quantitative parameters of arsenic as a risk factor for bladder cancer. The recommended qualitative parameters of arsenic intake are first, pathways of exposure, and second, toxicity and metabolism. The suggested quantitative parameters of arsenic intake include amounts of arsenic absorbed in the body, duration of arsenic exposure, and duration of arsenic presence in the urinary bladder. This approach can be implemented in a systematic classification and explanation of various risk factors and their mutual interactions for other types of cancer or diseases in general.

  10. Chitosan nanocomposites based on distinct inorganic fillers for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Moura, Duarte; Mano, João F; Paiva, Maria C; Alves, Natália M

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan (CHI), a biocompatible and biodegradable polysaccharide with the ability to provide a non-protein matrix for tissue growth, is considered to be an ideal material in the biomedical field. However, the lack of good mechanical properties limits its applications. In order to overcome this drawback, CHI has been combined with different polymers and fillers, leading to a variety of chitosan-based nanocomposites. The extensive research on CHI nanocomposites as well as their main biomedical applications are reviewed in this paper. An overview of the different fillers and assembly techniques available to produce CHI nanocomposites is presented. Finally, the properties of such nanocomposites are discussed with particular focus on bone regeneration, drug delivery, wound healing and biosensing applications.

  11. Chitosan nanocomposites based on distinct inorganic fillers for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Duarte; Mano, João F.; Paiva, Maria C.; Alves, Natália M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chitosan (CHI), a biocompatible and biodegradable polysaccharide with the ability to provide a non-protein matrix for tissue growth, is considered to be an ideal material in the biomedical field. However, the lack of good mechanical properties limits its applications. In order to overcome this drawback, CHI has been combined with different polymers and fillers, leading to a variety of chitosan-based nanocomposites. The extensive research on CHI nanocomposites as well as their main biomedical applications are reviewed in this paper. An overview of the different fillers and assembly techniques available to produce CHI nanocomposites is presented. Finally, the properties of such nanocomposites are discussed with particular focus on bone regeneration, drug delivery, wound healing and biosensing applications. PMID:27877909

  12. Mineral arsenicals in traditional medicines: Orpiment, realgar, and arsenolite

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Yuanfu; Wu, Qin; Goyer, Robert A; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Mineral arsenicals have long been used in traditional medicines for various diseases, yet arsenic can be highly toxic and carcinogenic. Arsenic in traditional medicines typically comes from deliberate addition for therapeutic purposes, mainly in the form of mineral arsenicals including orpiment (As2S3), realgar (As4S4), and arsenolite (contains arsenic trioxide, As2O3). Inorganic arsenic is now accepted in Western medicine as a first line chemotherapeutic agent against certain hematopoietic cancers. This minireview analyzes the pharmacology and toxicology of these arsenicals used in traditional medicines. Orpiment and realgar are less soluble and poorly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, while the bioavailability of arsenic trioxide is similar to inorganic arsenic salts like sodium arsenite. Pharmacological studies show that arsenic trioxide and realgar are effective against certain malignancies. Orpiment and realgar are used externally for various skin diseases. Realgar is frequently included as an ingredient in oral traditional remedies for its antipyretic, antiinflammatory, antiulcer, anticonvulsive and anti-schistosmiasis actions, but the pharmacological basis for this inclusion still remains to be fully justified. Toxicological studies show that cardiovascular toxicity is the major concern for arsenic trioxide, and the gastrointestinal and dermal adverse effects may occur after prolonged use of mineral arsenicals. Little is known about possible secondary cancers resulting from the long-term use of any of these arsenicals. Similar to the safety evaluation of seafood arsenicals, total arsenic content alone appears to be insufficient for mineral arsenical safety evaluation. Arsenic speciation, bioavailability, and toxicity/benefit should be considered in evaluation of mineral arsenical-containing traditional medicines. PMID:18463319

  13. Design of HIV Protease Inhibitors Based on Inorganic Polyhedral Metallacarboranes

    SciTech Connect

    Rezacova, Pavlina; Pokorna, Jana; Brynda, Ji; Kozisek, Milan; Cigler, Petr; Lesik, Martin; Fanfrlik, Jindrich; Rezac, Jan; Saskova, Klara Grantz; Sieglova, Irena; Plesek, Jaromir; Sicha, Vaclav; Gruner, Bohumir; Oberwinkler, Heike; Sedlacek, Juraj; Krausslich, Hans-Georg; Hobza, Pavel; Kral, Vladimir; Konvalinka, Jan

    2010-04-19

    HIV protease (HIV PR) is a primary target for anti-HIV drug design. We have previously identified and characterized substituted metallacarboranes as a new class of HIV protease inhibitors. In a structure-guided drug design effort, we connected the two cobalt bis(dicarbollide) clusters with a linker to substituted ammonium group and obtained a set of compounds based on a lead formula [H{sub 2}N-(8-(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O){sub 2}-1,2-C{sub 2}B{sub 9}H{sub 10})(1',2'-C{sub 2}B{sub 9}H{sub 11})-3,3'-Co){sub 2}]Na. We explored inhibition properties of these compounds with various substitutions, determined the HIV PR:inhibitor crystal structure, and computationally explored the conformational space of the linker. Our results prove the capacity of linker-substituted dual-cage cobalt bis(dicarbollides) as lead compounds for design of more potent inhibitors of HIV PR.

  14. Arsenic Exposure and Epigenetic Alterations: Recent Findings Based on the Illumina 450K DNA Methylation Array.

    PubMed

    Argos, Maria

    2015-06-01

    Arsenic is a major public health concern worldwide. While it is an established carcinogen and associated with a number of other adverse health outcomes, the molecular mechanisms underlying arsenic toxicity are not completely clarified. There is mounting evidence from human studies suggesting that arsenic exposure is associated with epigenetic alterations, including DNA methylation. In this review, we summarize several recent human studies that have evaluated arsenic exposure using the Illumina HumanMethylation 450K BeadChip, which interrogates more than 485,000 methylation sites across the genome. Many of these studies have observed novel regions of the genome associated with arsenic exposure. However, few studies have evaluated the biological and functional relevance of these DNA methylation changes, which are still needed. We emphasize the need for future studies to replicate the identified DNA methylation signals as well as assess whether these markers are associated with risk of arsenic-related diseases.

  15. An artificial muscle model unit based on inorganic nanosheet sliding by photochemical reaction.

    PubMed

    Nabetani, Yu; Takamura, Hazuki; Hayasaka, Yuika; Sasamoto, Shin; Tanamura, Yoshihiko; Shimada, Tetsuya; Masui, Dai; Takagi, Shinsuke; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Tong, Zhiwei; Inoue, Haruo

    2013-04-21

    From the viewpoint of developing photoresponsive supramolecular systems in microenvironments to exhibit more sophisticated photo-functions even at the macroscopic level, inorganic/organic hybrid compounds based on clay or niobate nanosheets as the microenvironments were prepared, characterized, and examined for their photoreactions. We show here a novel type of artificial muscle model unit having much similarity with that in natural muscle fibrils. Upon photoirradiation, the organic/inorganic hybrid nanosheets reversibly slide horizontally on a giant scale, and the interlayer spaces in the layered hybrid structure shrink and expand vertically. In particular, our layered hybrid molecular system exhibits a macroscopic morphological change on a giant scale (~1500 nm) compared with the molecular size of ~1 nm, based on a reversible sliding mechanism.

  16. High Open-Circuit Voltage Solar Cells Based on Organic-Inorganic Lead Bromide Perovskite.

    PubMed

    Edri, Eran; Kirmayer, Saar; Cahen, David; Hodes, Gary

    2013-03-21

    Mesoscopic solar cells, based on solution-processed organic-inorganic perovskite absorbers, are a promising avenue for converting solar to electrical energy. We used solution-processed organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite absorbers, in conjunction with organic hole conductors, to form high voltage solar cells. There is a dire need for low-cost cells of this type, to drive electrochemical reactions or as the high photon energy cell in a system with spectral splitting. These perovskite materials, although spin-coated from solution, form highly crystalline materials. Their simple synthesis, along with high chemical versatility, allows tuning their electronic and optical properties. By judicious selection of the perovskite lead halide-based absorber, matching organic hole conductor, and contacts, a cell with a ∼ 1.3 V open circuit voltage was made. While further study is needed, this achievement provides a general guideline for additional improvement of cell performance.

  17. Inorganic nanoparticle-based drug codelivery nanosystems to overcome the multidrug resistance of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Chen, Hangrong; Shi, Jianlin

    2014-08-04

    Biocompatible inorganic material-based nanosystems provide a novel choice to effectively circumvent the intrinsic drawbacks of traditional organic materials in biomedical applications, especially in overcoming the multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells due to their unique structural and compositional characteristics, for example, high stability, large surface area, tunable compositions, abundant physicochemical multifunctionalities, and specific biological behaviors. In this review, we focus on the recent developments in the construction of inorganic nanoparticles-based drug codelivery nanosystems (mesoporous SiO2, Fe3O4, Au, Ag, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, LDH, etc.) to efficiently circumvent the MDR of cancer cells, including the well-known codelivery of small molecular anticancer drug/macromolecular therapeutic gene and codelivery of small molecular chemosensitizer/anticancer drug, and very recently explored codelivery of targeting ligands/anticancer drug, codelivery of energy/anticancer drug, and codelivery of contrast agent for diagnostic imaging and anticancer drug. The unsolved issues, future developments, and potential clinical translations of these codelivery nanosystems are also discussed. These elaborately designed biocompatible inorganic materials-based nanosystems offer an unprecedented opportunity and show the encouraging bright future for overcoming the MDR of tumors in clinic personalized medicine and the pharmaceutical industry.

  18. Occurrence and distribution of arsenic in soils and plants

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Leo M.; Sumner, Malcolm E.; Keeney, Dennis R.

    1977-01-01

    Inorganic arsenicals have been used in agriculture as pesticides or defoliants for many years and, in localized areas, oxides of arsenic have contaminated soils as a result of fallout from ore-smelting operations and coal-fired power plants. Use of inorganic arsenicals is no longer permitted in most agricultural operations, and recent air pollution controls have markedly reduced contamination from smelters. Thus, this paper will concentrate on the effect of past applications on arsenic accumulation in soil, phytotoxicity to and uptake by plants as influenced by soil properties, and alleviation of the deleterious effects of arsenic. Once incorporated into the soil, inorganic arsenical pesticides and arsenic oxides revert to arsenates, except where the soil is under reducing conditions. The arsenate ion has properties similar to that of orthophosphate, and is readily sorbed by iron and aluminum components. This reaction greatly restricts the downward movement (leaching) of arsenic in soils and the availability of arsenic to plants. Several methods of estimating plant available arsenic in soils have been developed. They involve extraction of the soil with reagents used to estimate phosphorus availability. This extractable arsenic is reasonably well correlated with reduced plant growth by, and plant uptake of arsenic. For most plants, levels of arsenic in the edible portion of the plant are well below the critical concentration for animal or human consumption, even when severe phytotoxicity occurs. Alleviation of arsenic phytotoxicity has been attempted by increasing the soil pH, by use of iron or aluminum sulfate, by desorbing arsenate with phosphate and subsequent leaching, and by cultural practices such as deep plowing. Only limited benefits have accrued from these procedures the cost of which is often prohibitively high. Since attempts to reduce arsenic toxicity have not been very successful, its excessive accumulation in soils should be avoided. PMID:908315

  19. Cellular arsenic transport pathways in mammals.

    PubMed

    Roggenbeck, Barbara A; Banerjee, Mayukh; Leslie, Elaine M

    2016-11-01

    Natural contamination of drinking water with arsenic results in the exposure of millions of people world-wide to unacceptable levels of this metalloid. This is a serious global health problem because arsenic is a Group 1 (proven) human carcinogen and chronic exposure is known to cause skin, lung, and bladder tumors. Furthermore, arsenic exposure can result in a myriad of other adverse health effects including diseases of the cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, reproductive, and endocrine systems. In addition to chronic environmental exposure to arsenic, arsenic trioxide is approved for the clinical treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia, and is in clinical trials for other hematological malignancies as well as solid tumors. Considerable inter-individual variability in susceptibility to arsenic-induced disease and toxicity exists, and the reasons for such differences are incompletely understood. Transport pathways that influence the cellular uptake and export of arsenic contribute to regulating its cellular, tissue, and ultimately body levels. In the current review, membrane proteins (including phosphate transporters, aquaglyceroporin channels, solute carrier proteins, and ATP-binding cassette transporters) shown experimentally to contribute to the passage of inorganic, methylated, and/or glutathionylated arsenic species across cellular membranes are discussed. Furthermore, what is known about arsenic transporters in organs involved in absorption, distribution, and metabolism and how transport pathways contribute to arsenic elimination are described.

  20. Health Effects of Chronic Arsenic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Young-Seoub; Song, Ki-Hoon; Chung, Jin-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a unique element with distinct physical characteristics and toxicity whose importance in public health is well recognized. The toxicity of arsenic varies across its different forms. While the carcinogenicity of arsenic has been confirmed, the mechanisms behind the diseases occurring after acute or chronic exposure to arsenic are not well understood. Inorganic arsenic has been confirmed as a human carcinogen that can induce skin, lung, and bladder cancer. There are also reports of its significant association to liver, prostate, and bladder cancer. Recent studies have also suggested a relationship with diabetes, neurological effects, cardiac disorders, and reproductive organs, but further studies are required to confirm these associations. The majority of research to date has examined cancer incidence after a high exposure to high concentrations of arsenic. However, numerous studies have reported various health effects caused by chronic exposure to low concentrations of arsenic. An assessment of the health effects to arsenic exposure has never been performed in the South Korean population; thus, objective estimates of exposure levels are needed. Data should be collected on the biological exposure level for the total arsenic concentration, and individual arsenic concentration by species. In South Korea, we believe that biological exposure assessment should be the first step, followed by regular health effect assessments. PMID:25284195

  1. Arsenic species extraction of biological marine samples (Periwinkles, Littorina littorea) from a highly contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Whaley-Martin, K J; Koch, I; Reimer, K J

    2012-01-15

    Arsenic is ubiquitous in the tissues of marine organisms and in uncontaminated environments it is dominantly present as the highly soluble and easily extractable non-toxic arsenical, arsenobetaine. However in contaminated environments, higher proportions of inorganic arsenic, which is much less soluble, are accumulated into the tissues of marine organisms, resulting in lower extraction efficiencies (defined as the percent extracted arsenic of the total arsenic). This study carried out a comparative analysis between three different two-step arsenic extraction methods based on Foster et al. [27] from highly contaminated tissue of the marine periwinkle, Littorina littorea. The first extraction step used 100% water, 1:1 methanol-water, or a 9:1 methanol-water as the extraction solvent and the second step consisted of a gently heated dilute nitric acid extraction. The optimized two step extraction method was 1:1 methanol-water extraction followed by a 2% HNO(3) extraction, based on maximum amounts of extracted species, including organoarsenic species.

  2. Urinary arsenic speciation and its correlation with 8-OHdG in Chinese residents exposed to arsenic through coal burning

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Pi, J.B.; Li, B.; Xu, Y.Y.; Jin, Y.P.; Sun, G.F.

    2008-10-15

    In contrast to arsenicosis caused by consumption of water contaminated by naturally occurring inorganic arsenic, human exposure to this metalloid through coal burning has been rarely reported. In this study, arsenic speciation and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels in urine were determined in the Chinese residents exposed to arsenic through coal burning in Guizhou, China, an epidemic area of chronic arsenic poisoning caused by coal burning. The urinary concentrations of inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and total arsenic (tAs) of high-arsenic exposed subjects were significantly higher than those of low-arsenic exposed residents. A biomarker of oxidative DNA damage, urinary 8-OHdG level was significantly higher in high-arsenic exposed subjects than that of low exposed. Significant positive correlations were found between 8-OHdG levels and concentrations of iAs, MMA, DMA and tAs, respectively. In addition, a significant negative correlation was observed between 8-OHdG levels and the secondary methylation ratio (DMA/(MMA + DMA)). The results suggest that chronic arsenic exposure through burning coal rich in arsenic is associated with oxidative DNA damages, and that secondary methylation capacity is potentially related to the susceptibility of individuals to oxidative DNA damage induced by arsenic exposure through coal burning in domestic living.

  3. Acute and chronic arsenic toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ratnaike, R

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic toxicity is a global health problem affecting many millions of people. Contamination is caused by arsenic from natural geological sources leaching into aquifers, contaminating drinking water and may also occur from mining and other industrial processes. Arsenic is present as a contaminant in many traditional remedies. Arsenic trioxide is now used to treat acute promyelocytic leukaemia. Absorption occurs predominantly from ingestion from the small intestine, though minimal absorption occurs from skin contact and inhalation. Arsenic exerts its toxicity by inactivating up to 200 enzymes, especially those involved in cellular energy pathways and DNA synthesis and repair. Acute arsenic poisoning is associated initially with nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and severe diarrhoea. Encephalopathy and peripheral neuropathy are reported. Chronic arsenic toxicity results in multisystem disease. Arsenic is a well documented human carcinogen affecting numerous organs. There are no evidence based treatment regimens to treat chronic arsenic poisoning but antioxidants have been advocated, though benefit is not proven. The focus of management is to reduce arsenic ingestion from drinking water and there is increasing emphasis on using alternative supplies of water. PMID:12897217

  4. Sol-gel based silica electrodes for inorganic membrane direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyea; Kohl, Paul A.

    Inorganic glass electrodes are of interest for use with inorganic proton exchange membranes for direct methanol fuel cells. Platinum-ruthenium glass electrodes (PtRu/C-SiO 2) have been prepared by incorporating the PtRu/C nanoparticles into a silica-based matrix. The SiO 2 matrix was synthesized through the sol-gel reaction of 3-(trihydroxysilyl)-1-propanesulfonic acid (3TPS) and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS). The distribution of the PtRu/C particles can be controlled by changing the properties of the gel matrix. The effect of gelation time, mole fraction of reactants within the sol, curing temperature, and glass ionomer content were investigated. The adhesion of the catalyst layer on the membrane, catalytic activity for methanol oxidation, and inhibition of methanol permeation through the membrane have been characterized and optimized. The electroless deposition of PtRu onto the PtRu/C nanoparticles was performed to increase the sheet conductivity of the electrode. It was found that the electrolessly deposited metal improved the catalytic activity for methanol oxidation and decreased the methanol cross-over. The methanol fuel cell performance using the inorganic membrane electrode assembly was 236 μA cm -2 at 0.4 V and was stable for more than 10 days.

  5. Effectiveness of cement-based systems for stabilization and solidification of spent pot liner inorganic fraction.

    PubMed

    Silveira, B I; Dantas, A E M; Blasques, J E M; Santos, R K P

    2003-03-17

    Approximately 7000 t of spent pot liner (SPL) wastes are generated annually from activities associated with Alumi;nio Brasileiro S.A. (ALBRAS) plant located at Barcarena, Pará state, Brazil. The inorganic fraction of SPL contains high level of toxic compounds like cyanide and fluoride; its safe disposal has been the subject of serious discussions in Brazil. This study evaluated the option of a cement-based stabilization/solidification system as an effective means for safe disposal of SPL inorganic fraction in the field. The studies were carried out with concrete hexagonal blocks manufactured with a constant mass of 10% (w/w) of waste, 20% (w/w) of cement, and varied percentages of water, coarse aggregate, sand, and additives. The concrete matrices porosity and compressive strength were controlled by using microsilica (MS) and superplaticizer (SP). The results showed an average pH values for the SPL inorganic fraction and fragmented blocks of 10.2 and 11.1, respectively. Mixing the waste with concrete ingredients the solidification/stabilization effectiveness for the leachable cyanides and fluorides were of 59.33 and 57.95%, respectively. The results showed that the water/cement (W/C) ratio reduction through superplasticizer addition improved the compressive strength and the required value of 35 MPa was reached with blocks manufactured with 10 and 15% (weight of cement) of microsilica, after 28 days of curing time.

  6. Controlled formation of calcium-phosphate-based hybrid mesocrystals by organic-inorganic co-assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Halei; Chu, Xiaobin; Li, Li; Xu, Xurong; Tang, Ruikang

    2010-11-01

    An understanding of controlled formation of biomimetic mesocrystals is of great importance in materials chemistry and engineering. Here we report that organic-inorganic hybrid plates and even mesocrystals can be conveniently synthesized using a one-pot reaction in a mixed system of protein (bovine serum albumin (BSA)), surfactant (sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)) and supersaturated calcium phosphate solution. The morphologies of calcium-phosphate-based products are analogous to the general inorganic crystals but they have abnormal and interesting substructures. The hybrids are constructed by the alternate stacking of organic layer (thickness of 1.31 nm) and well-crystallized inorganic mineral layer (thickness of 2.13 nm) at the nanoscale. Their morphologies (spindle, rhomboid and round) and sizes (200 nm-2 μm) can be tuned gradually by changing BSA, AOT and calcium phosphate concentrations. This modulation effect can be explained by a competition between the anisotropic and isotropic assembly of the ultrathin plate-like units. The anisotropic assembly confers mesocrystal characteristics on the hybrids while the round ones are the results of isotropic assembly. However, the basic lamellar organic-inorganic substructure remains unchanged during the hybrid formation, which is a key factor to ensure the self-assembly from molecule to micrometre scale. A morphological ternary diagram of BSA-AOT-calcium phosphate is used to describe this controlled formation process, providing a feasible strategy to prepare the required materials. This study highlights the cooperative effect of macromolecule (frame structure), small biomolecule (binding sites) and mineral phase (main component) on the generation and regulation of biomimetic hybrid mesocrystals.

  7. Controlled formation of calcium-phosphate-based hybrid mesocrystals by organic-inorganic co-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Halei; Chu, Xiaobin; Li, Li; Xu, Xurong; Tang, Ruikang

    2010-11-01

    An understanding of controlled formation of biomimetic mesocrystals is of great importance in materials chemistry and engineering. Here we report that organic-inorganic hybrid plates and even mesocrystals can be conveniently synthesized using a one-pot reaction in a mixed system of protein (bovine serum albumin (BSA)), surfactant (sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)) and supersaturated calcium phosphate solution. The morphologies of calcium-phosphate-based products are analogous to the general inorganic crystals but they have abnormal and interesting substructures. The hybrids are constructed by the alternate stacking of organic layer (thickness of 1.31 nm) and well-crystallized inorganic mineral layer (thickness of 2.13 nm) at the nanoscale. Their morphologies (spindle, rhomboid and round) and sizes (200 nm-2 μm) can be tuned gradually by changing BSA, AOT and calcium phosphate concentrations. This modulation effect can be explained by a competition between the anisotropic and isotropic assembly of the ultrathin plate-like units. The anisotropic assembly confers mesocrystal characteristics on the hybrids while the round ones are the results of isotropic assembly. However, the basic lamellar organic-inorganic substructure remains unchanged during the hybrid formation, which is a key factor to ensure the self-assembly from molecule to micrometre scale. A morphological ternary diagram of BSA-AOT-calcium phosphate is used to describe this controlled formation process, providing a feasible strategy to prepare the required materials. This study highlights the cooperative effect of macromolecule (frame structure), small biomolecule (binding sites) and mineral phase (main component) on the generation and regulation of biomimetic hybrid mesocrystals.

  8. Arsenic methylation and lung and bladder cancer in a case-control study in northern Chile

    SciTech Connect

    Melak, Dawit; Ferreccio, Catterina; Kalman, David; Parra, Roxana; Acevedo, Johanna; Pérez, Liliana; Cortés, Sandra; Smith, Allan H.; Yuan, Yan; Liaw, Jane; Steinmaus, Craig

    2014-01-15

    In humans, ingested inorganic arsenic is metabolized to monomethylarsenic (MMA) then to dimethylarsenic (DMA), although this process is not complete in most people. The trivalent form of MMA is highly toxic in vitro and previous studies have identified associations between the proportion of urinary arsenic as MMA (%MMA) and several arsenic-related diseases. To date, however, relatively little is known about its role in lung cancer, the most common cause of arsenic-related death, or about its impacts on people drinking water with lower arsenic concentrations (e.g., < 200 μg/L). In this study, urinary arsenic metabolites were measured in 94 lung and 117 bladder cancer cases and 347 population-based controls from areas in northern Chile with a wide range of drinking water arsenic concentrations. Lung cancer odds ratios adjusted for age, sex, and smoking by increasing tertiles of %MMA were 1.00, 1.91 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.99–3.67), and 3.26 (1.76–6.04) (p-trend < 0.001). Corresponding odds ratios for bladder cancer were 1.00, 1.81 (1.06–3.11), and 2.02 (1.15–3.54) (p-trend < 0.001). In analyses confined to subjects only with arsenic water concentrations < 200 μg/L (median = 60 μg/L), lung and bladder cancer odds ratios for subjects in the upper tertile of %MMA compared to subjects in the lower two tertiles were 2.48 (1.08–5.68) and 2.37 (1.01–5.57), respectively. Overall, these findings provide evidence that inter-individual differences in arsenic metabolism may be an important risk factor for arsenic-related lung cancer, and may play a role in cancer risks among people exposed to relatively low arsenic water concentrations. - Highlights: • Urine arsenic metabolites were measured in cancer cases and controls from Chile. • Higher urine %MMA values were associated with increased lung and bladder cancer. • %MMA-cancer associations were seen at drinking water arsenic levels < 200 μg/L.

  9. Developing inorganic carbon-based radiocarbon chronologies for Holocene lake sediments in arid NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiawu; Ma, Xueyang; Qiang, Mingrui; Huang, Xiaozhong; Li, Shuang; Guo, Xiaoyan; Henderson, Andrew C. G.; Holmes, Jonathan A.; Chen, Fahu

    2016-07-01

    Inorganic carbonates are often used to establish radiocarbon (14C) chronologies for lake sediments when terrestrial plant remains (TPR) are rare or when bulk organic matter is insufficient for dating, a problem that is common for many lakes in arid regions. However, the reservoir effect (RE), as well as old carbon contributed from the lakes catchment make it difficult to establish reliable chronologies. Here we present a systematic study of inorganic 14C ages of two lake-sediment sequences, one from a small-enclosed saline lake - Lake Gahai in Qaidam Basin, and the other from a large freshwater lake - Lake Bosten in Xinjiang. Modern dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of the lakes, paleo-lake sediments exposed in the catchment, and mollusk shells in core sediments from Lake Gahai were dated to assess the RE and the contribution of pre-aged carbon to the old ages in the cores. We propose a statistical regression to assess more than one RE for the 14C carbonate ages within our sedimentary sequences. Old radiocarbon ages contributed by detrital carbonates were assessed by comparing the ages of mollusk shells with those of carbonates at the same sediment depths. We established the RE of the authigenic component and assessed detrital old carbon contributions to our two sites, and this was used to correct the 14C ages. Based on this approach, we developed age models for both cores, and tested them using 210Pb ages in both cores and TPR-based 14C-ages recovered from Lake Bosten. We further tested our age models by comparing carbonate-based oxygen isotope (δ18O) records from both lakes to an independently-dated regional speleothem δ18O record. Our results suggest if sedimentary sequences are densely dated and the RE and the contribution of old carbon from detrital carbonates can be ascertained, robust chronological frameworks based on carbonate-based 14C determinations can be established.

  10. Polymorphisms in cell cycle regulatory genes, urinary arsenic profile and urothelial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.-J.; Huang, C.-J.; Pu, Y.-S.; Su, C.-T.; Huang, Y.-K.; Chen, Y.-T.; Hsueh, Y.-M.

    2008-10-15

    Introduction: Polymorphisms in p53, p21 and CCND1 could regulate the progression of the cell cycle and might increase the susceptibility to inorganic arsenic-related cancer risk. The goal of our study was to evaluate the roles of cell cycle regulatory gene polymorphisms in the carcinogenesis of arsenic-related urothelial carcinoma (UC). Methods: A hospital-based case-controlled study was conducted to explore the relationships among the urinary arsenic profile, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels, p53 codon 72, p21 codon 31 and CCND1 G870A polymorphisms and UC risk. The urinary arsenic profile was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and hydride generator-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). 8-OHdG levels were measured by high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Genotyping was conducted using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymerase (PCR-RFLP). Results: Subjects carrying the p21 Arg/Arg genotype had an increased UC risk (age and gender adjusted OR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.02-2.29). However, there was no association of p53 or CCND1 polymorphisms with UC risk. Significant effects were observed in terms of a combination of the three gene polymorphisms and a cumulative exposure of cigarette smoking, along with the urinary arsenic profile on the UC risk. The higher total arsenic concentration, monomethylarsonic acid percentage (MMA%) and lower dimethylarsinic acid percentage (DMA%), possessed greater gene variant numbers, had a higher UC risk and revealed significant dose-response relationships. However, effects of urinary 8-OHdG levels combined with three gene polymorphisms did not seem to be important for UC risk. Conclusions: The results showed that the variant genotype of p21 might be a predictor of inorganic arsenic-related UC risk.

  11. Differential DNA Methylation in Umbilical Cord Blood of Infants Exposed to Low Levels of Arsenic in Utero

    PubMed Central

    Koestler, Devin C.; Avissar-Whiting, Michele; Houseman, E. Andres; Karagas, Margaret R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is increasing epidemiologic evidence that arsenic exposure in utero, even at low levels found throughout much of the world, is associated with adverse reproductive outcomes and may contribute to long-term health effects. Animal models, in vitro studies, and human cancer data suggest that arsenic may induce epigenetic alterations, specifically by altering patterns of DNA methylation. Objectives: In this study we aimed to identify differences in DNA methylation in cord blood samples of infants with in utero, low-level arsenic exposure. Methods: DNA methylation of cord-blood derived DNA from 134 infants involved in a prospective birth cohort in New Hampshire was profiled using the Illumina Infinium Methylation450K array. In utero arsenic exposure was estimated using maternal urine samples collected at 24–28 weeks gestation. We used a novel cell mixture deconvolution methodology for examining the association between inferred white blood cell mixtures in infant cord blood and in utero arsenic exposure; we also examined the association between methylation at individual CpG loci and arsenic exposure levels. Results: We found an association between urinary inorganic arsenic concentration and the estimated proportion of CD8+ T lymphocytes (1.18; 95% CI: 0.12, 2.23). Among the top 100 CpG loci with the lowest p-values based on their association with urinary arsenic levels, there was a statistically significant enrichment of these loci in CpG islands (p = 0.009). Of those in CpG islands (n = 44), most (75%) exhibited higher methylation levels in the highest exposed group compared with the lowest exposed group. Also, several CpG loci exhibited a linear dose-dependent relationship between methylation and arsenic exposure. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that in utero exposure to low levels of arsenic may affect the epigenome. Long-term follow-up is planned to determine whether the observed changes are associated with health outcomes. PMID:23757598

  12. Arsenic poisoning in dairy cattle from naturally occurring arsenic pyrites.

    PubMed

    Hopkirk, R G

    1987-10-01

    An outbreak of arsenic poisoning occurred in which most of a 200 cow dairy herd were affected and six died. The source of the arsenic was naturally occurring arsenic pyrites from the Waiotapu Stream, near Rotorua. Arsenic levels in the nearby soil were as high as 6618 ppm. There was little evidence to suggest that treatment affected the course of the disease. Haematology was of little use in diagnosis, post-mortem signs were not always consistent and persistence of the element in the liver appeared short. Control of further outbreaks have been based on practical measures to minimise the intake of contaminated soil and free laying water by the stock.

  13. Breast-feeding Protects against Arsenic Exposure in Bangladeshi Infants

    PubMed Central

    Fängström, Britta; Moore, Sophie; Nermell, Barbro; Kuenstl, Linda; Goessler, Walter; Grandér, Margaretha; Kabir, Iqbal; Palm, Brita; Arifeen, Shams El; Vahter, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Background Chronic arsenic exposure causes a wide range of health effects, but little is known about critical windows of exposure. Arsenic readily crosses the placenta, but the few available data on postnatal exposure to arsenic via breast milk are not conclusive. Aim Our goal was to assess the arsenic exposure through breast milk in Bangladeshi infants, living in an area with high prevalence of arsenic-rich tube-well water. Methods We analyzed metabolites of inorganic arsenic in breast milk and infant urine at 3 months of age and compared them with detailed information on breast-feeding practices and maternal arsenic exposure, as measured by concentrations in blood, urine, and saliva. Results Arsenic concentrations in breast-milk samples were low (median, 1 μg/kg; range, 0.25–19 μg/kg), despite high arsenic exposures via drinking water (10–1,100 μg/L in urine and 2–40 μg/L in red blood cells). Accordingly, the arsenic concentrations in urine of infants whose mothers reported exclusive breast-feeding were low (median, 1.1 μg/L; range, 0.3–29 μg/L), whereas concentrations for those whose mothers reported partial breast-feeding ranged from 0.4 to 1,520 μg/L (median 1.9 μg/L). The major part of arsenic in milk was inorganic. Still, the infants had a high fraction (median, 87%) of the dimethylated arsenic metabolite in urine. Arsenic in breast milk was associated with arsenic in maternal blood, urine, and saliva. Conclusion Very little arsenic is excreted in breast milk, even in women with high exposure from drinking water. Thus, exclusive breast-feeding protects the infant from exposure to arsenic. PMID:18629322

  14. Recent Advances in the Measurement of Arsenic, Cadmium, and Mercury in Rice and Other Foods.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Brian P; Punshon, Tracy

    2015-03-01

    Trace element analysis of foods is of increasing importance because of raised consumer awareness and the need to evaluate and establish regulatory guidelines for toxic trace metals and metalloids. This paper reviews recent advances in the analysis of trace elements in food, including challenges, state-of-the-art methods, and use of spatially resolved techniques for localizing the distribution of arsenic and mercury within rice grains. Total elemental analysis of foods is relatively well-established, but the push for ever lower detection limits requires that methods be robust from potential matrix interferences, which can be particularly severe for food. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is the method of choice, allowing for multi-element and highly sensitive analyses. For arsenic, speciation analysis is necessary because the inorganic forms are more likely to be subject to regulatory limits. Chromatographic techniques coupled to ICP-MS are most often used for arsenic speciation, and a range of methods now exist for a variety of different arsenic species in different food matrices. Speciation and spatial analysis of foods, especially rice, can also be achieved with synchrotron techniques. Sensitive analytical techniques and methodological advances provide robust methods for the assessment of several metals in animal- and plant-based foods, particularly for arsenic, cadmium, and mercury in rice and arsenic speciation in foodstuffs.

  15. Direct solid sample analysis with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry—a fast and reliable screening procedure for the determination of inorganic arsenic in fish and seafood.

    PubMed

    Zmozinski, Ariane V; Llorente-Mirandes, Toni; Damin, Isabel C F; López-Sánchez, José F; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard; Silva, Márcia M

    2015-03-01

    Direct solid sample analysis with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-GF AAS) was investigated initially with the intention of developing a method for the determination of total As in fish and other seafood. A mixture of 0.1% Pd+0.06% Mg+0.06% Triton X-100 was used as the chemical modifier, added in solution over the solid samples, making possible the use of pyrolysis and atomization temperatures of 1200 °C and 2400 °C, respectively. The sample mass had to be limited to 0.25 mg, as the integrated absorbance did not increase further with increasing sample mass. Nevertheless, the recovery of As from several certified reference materials was of the order of 50% lower than the certified value. Strong molecular absorption due to the phosphorus monoxide molecule (PO) was observed with high-resolution continuum source AAS (HR CS AAS), which, however, did not cause any spectral interference. A microwave-assisted digestion with HNO3/H2O2 was also investigated to solve the problem; however, the results obtained for several certified reference materials were statistically not different from those found with direct SS-GF AAS. Accurate values were obtained using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to analyze the digested samples, which suggested that organic As compounds are responsible for the low recoveries. HPLC-ICP-MS was used to determine the arsenobetaine (AB) concentration. Accurate results that were not different from the certified values were obtained when the AB concentration was added to the As concentration found by SS-GF AAS for most certified reference materials (CRM) and samples, suggesting that SS-GF AAS could be used as a fast screening procedure for inorganic As determination in fish and seafood.

  16. THE SCENARIOS APPROACH TO ATTENUATION-BASED REMEDIES FOR INORGANIC AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Vangelas, K.; Rysz, M.; Truex, M.; Brady, P.; Newell, C.; Denham, M.

    2011-08-04

    Guidance materials based on use of conceptual model scenarios were developed to assist evaluation and implementation of attenuation-based remedies for groundwater and vadose zones contaminated with inorganic and radionuclide contaminants. The Scenarios approach is intended to complement the comprehensive information provided in the US EPA's Technical Protocol for Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) of Inorganic Contaminants by providing additional information on site conceptual models and extending the evaluation to consideration of Enhanced Attenuation approaches. The conceptual models incorporate the notion of reactive facies, defined as units with hydrogeochemical properties that are different from surrounding units and that react with contaminants in distinct ways. The conceptual models also incorporate consideration of biogeochemical gradients, defined as boundaries between different geochemical conditions that have been induced by waste disposal or other natural phenomena. Gradients can change over time when geochemical conditions from one area migrate into another, potentially affecting contaminant mobility. A recognition of gradients allows the attenuation-affecting conditions of a site to be projected into the future. The Scenarios approach provides a stepwise process to identify an appropriate category of conceptual model and refine it for a specific site. Scenario materials provide links to pertinent sections in the EPA technical protocol and present information about contaminant mobility and important controlling mechanism for attenuation-based remedies based on the categories of conceptual models.

  17. Recent Advances in Inorganic Nanoparticle-Based NIR Luminescence Imaging: Semiconductor Nanoparticles and Lanthanide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dokyoon; Lee, Nohyun; Park, Yong Il; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2017-01-18

    Several types of nanoparticle-based imaging probes have been developed to replace conventional luminescent probes. For luminescence imaging, near-infrared (NIR) probes are useful in that they allow deep tissue penetration and high spatial resolution as a result of reduced light absorption/scattering and negligible autofluorescence in biological media. They rely on either an anti-Stokes or a Stokes shift process to generate luminescence. For example, transition metal-doped semiconductor nanoparticles and lanthanide-doped inorganic nanoparticles have been demonstrated as anti-Stokes shift-based agents that absorb NIR light through two- or three-photon absorption process and upconversion process, respectively. On the other hand, quantum dots (QDs) and lanthanide-doped nanoparticles that emit in NIR-II range (∼1000 to ∼1350 nm) were suggested as promising Stokes shift-based imaging agents. In this topical review, we summarize and discuss the recent progress in the development of inorganic nanoparticle-based luminescence imaging probes working in NIR range.

  18. Monitoring and evaluation of plant and hydrological controls on arsenic transport across the water sediment interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, P. R.; MacDonald, L. H.; Paull, J.

    2009-12-01

    Plants and hydrology influence the transport of arsenic in wetlands by changing the dominant redox chemistry in the subsurface, and different plant and hydrological regimes can serve as effective barriers or promoters of metal transport. Inorganic arsenic, especially arsenate, binds to iron oxides in wetlands. In flooded wetland sediments, organic carbon from plants consumes oxygen and promotes reductive iron dissolution, which leads to arsenic release, while plants simultaneously create microoxic regimes around root hairs that oxidize and precipitate iron, promoting arsenic capture. Hydrology influences arsenic mobility by promoting wetting and drying cycles. Such cycles can lead to rapid shifts from anaerobic to aerobic conditions, and vice versa, with lasting impact on the oxidation state of iron and, by extension, the mobility of arsenic. Remediation strategies should take these competing conditions into account, and to help inform these strategies this study examines the chemistry of an industrially contaminated wetland when the above mechanisms aggregate. The study tests whether, in bulk, plants promote iron reduction or oxidation in intermittently flooded or consistently flooded sediments, and how this impacts arsenic mobility. This research uses a novel dialysis-based monitoring technique to examine the macro-properties of arsenic transport at the sediment water interface and at depth. Dialysis-based monitoring allows long-term seasonal trends in anaerobic porewater and allows active hypothesis testing on the influence of plants on redox chemistry. This study finds that plants promote iron reduction and that iron-reducing zones tend to correlate with zones with mobile arsenic. However, one newly reported and important finding of this study is that a brief summer drought that dried and oxidized sediments with a long history of iron-reduction zone served to effectively halt iron reduction for many months, and this corresponded to a lasting decline in

  19. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF NORMAL HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO TRIVALENT ARSENICALS AND DIMETHYLTHIOARSINIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lung is a major target for arsenic carcinogenesis in humans. However, the carcinogenic mode of action of arsenicals is unknown. We investigated, in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS2B) cells, the effects of inorganic arsenic (iAsIII), monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII), dimethylarsi...

  20. Genomic-wide analysis of BEAS-2B cells exposed to Trivalent Arsenicals and Dimethylthioarsinic acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lung is a major target for arsenic carcinogenesis in humans by both oral and inhalation routes. However, the carcinogenic mode of action of arsenicals is unknown. We investigated the effects of inorganic arsenic (iAsIII), monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII), dimethylarsinous acid (D...

  1. Biological and Behavorial Factors Modify Biomarkers of Arsenic Exposure in a U.S. Population**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although consumption of drinking water contaminated with inorganic arsenic is usually considered the primary exposure route, aggregate exposure to arsenic depends on direct consumption of water, use of water in food preparation, and the presence in arsenicals in foods. To gain in...

  2. METHYLATED ARSENICIII SPECIES ARE POTENTIAL PROXIMATE OR ULTIMATE GENOTOXIC FORMS OF ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    METHYLATED ARSENIC(III) SPECIES ARE POTENTIAL PROXIMATE OR UL TIMA TE GENOTOXIC FORMS OF ARSENIC

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs, arsenite and arsenate) has been thought to act as a genotoxicant without reacting directly with DNA; neither iAs nor As(V) methylated metabolites are e...

  3. EFFECTS OF DIETARY FOLATE ON ARSENIC-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Dietary Folate on Arsenic-induced Gene Expression in Mice

    Arsenic, a drinking water contaminant, is a known carcinogen. Human exposure to inorganic arsenic has been linked to tumors of skin, bladder, lung, and to a lesser extent, kidney and liver. Dietary fola...

  4. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasmid DNA damage caused by methylated arsenicals, ascorbic acid and human liver ferritin.

    Arsenic causes cancer in human skin, urinary bladder, lung, liver and kidney and is a significant world-wide public health problem. Although the metabolism of inorganic arsenic is ...

  5. PROTEOMIC PROFILING OF CULTURED HUMAN BLADDER CELLS AFTER TRIVALENT ARSENICAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been associated with human cancers of the bladder, kidney, lung, liver, and skin. Inorganic arsenic is biotransformed in a stepwise manner via both a reduction and then an oxidative methylation step in which arsenic cycles between +5 and +3 oxidati...

  6. MEETING AT SAN DIEGO, CA: GENE EXPRESSION IN NORMAL HUMAN KERATINOCYTES MODULATED BY TRIVALENT ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic exposure has been correlated with the development of several human cancers including those found in the skin, lung, liver, kidney and urinary bladder. Humans are generally exposed to inorganic forms of arsenic, which may be inhaled or ingested. Arsenic forms mono- and di-...

  7. MEETING AT CAMBRIDGE, MA: GENE EXPRESSION IN NORMAL HUMAN KERATINOCYTES MODULATED BY TRIVALENT ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic exposure has been correlated with the development of several human cancers including those found in the skin, lung, liver, kidney and urinary bladder. Humans are generally exposed to inorganic forms of arsenic, which may be inhaled or ingested. Arsenic forms mono- and d...

  8. IDENTIFICATION OF INTERSPECIES CONCORDANCE OF MECHANISMS OF ARSENIC INDUCED BLADDER CANCER BY GENE EXPRESSION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is a human carcinogen that induces urinary bladder cancer. Several mechanisms have been proposed for arsenic-induced cancer. Although inorganic arsenic (iAs) does not induce tumors in adult rodents, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), a major metabolite of iAs, is a rat bladder c...

  9. PROTEOMIC PROFILING OF CULTURED HUMAN BLADDER CELLS AFTER TRIVALENT ARSENIC EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been associated with human cancers of the bladder, kidney, lung, liver, and skin. Inorganic arsenic is biotransformed in a stepwise manner via both a reduction and then an oxidative methylation step in which arsenic cycles between +5 and +3 oxidati...

  10. PROTEOMIC PROFILING OF CULTURED HUMAN BLADDER CELLS AFTER TRIVALENT ARSENICAL EXPOSURES (SOT 2008)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been associated with human cancers of the bladder, kidney, lung, liver, and skin. Inorganic arsenic is biotransformed in a stepwise manner via both a reduction and then an oxidative methylation step in which arsenic cycles between +5 and +3 oxidati...

  11. Estimating water supply arsenic levels in the New England bladder cancer study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nuckols, J.R.; Beane, Freeman L.E.; Lubin, J.H.; Airola, M.S.; Baris, D.; Ayotte, J.D.; Taylor, A.; Paulu, C.; Karagas, M.R.; Colt, J.; Ward, M.H.; Huang, A.-T.; Bress, W.; Cherala, S.; Silverman, D.T.; Cantor, K.P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Ingestion of inorganic arsenic in drinking water is recognized as a cause of bladder cancer when levels are relatively high (??? 150 ??g/L). The epidemiologic evidence is less clear at the low-to-moderate concentrations typically observed in the United States. Accurate retrospective exposure assessment over a long time period is a major challenge in conducting epidemiologic studies of environmental factors and diseases with long latency, such as cancer. Objective: We estimated arsenic concentrations in the water supplies of 2,611 participants in a population-based case-control study in northern New England. Methods: Estimates covered the lifetimes of most study participants and were based on a combination of arsenic measurements at the homes of the participants and statistical modeling of arsenic concentrations in the water supply of both past and current homes. We assigned a residential water supply arsenic concentration for 165,138 (95%) of the total 173,361 lifetime exposure years (EYs) and a workplace water supply arsenic level for 85,195 EYs (86% of reported occupational years). Results: Three methods accounted for 93% of the residential estimates of arsenic concentration: direct measurement of water samples (27%; median, 0.3 ??g/L; range, 0.1-11.5), statistical models of water utility measurement data (49%; median, 0.4 ??g/L; range, 0.3-3.3), and statistical models of arsenic concentrations in wells using aquifers in New England (17%; median, 1.6 ??g/L; range, 0.6-22.4). Conclusions: We used a different validation procedure for each of the three methods, and found our estimated levels to be comparable with available measured concentrations. This methodology allowed us to calculate potential drinking water exposure over long periods.

  12. Estimating Water Supply Arsenic Levels in the New England Bladder Cancer Study

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Laura E. Beane; Lubin, Jay H.; Airola, Matthew S.; Baris, Dalsu; Ayotte, Joseph D.; Taylor, Anne; Paulu, Chris; Karagas, Margaret R.; Colt, Joanne; Ward, Mary H.; Huang, An-Tsun; Bress, William; Cherala, Sai; Silverman, Debra T.; Cantor, Kenneth P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Ingestion of inorganic arsenic in drinking water is recognized as a cause of bladder cancer when levels are relatively high (≥ 150 µg/L). The epidemiologic evidence is less clear at the low-to-moderate concentrations typically observed in the United States. Accurate retrospective exposure assessment over a long time period is a major challenge in conducting epidemiologic studies of environmental factors and diseases with long latency, such as cancer. Objective: We estimated arsenic concentrations in the water supplies of 2,611 participants in a population-based case–control study in northern New England. Methods: Estimates covered the lifetimes of most study participants and were based on a combination of arsenic measurements at the homes of the participants and statistical modeling of arsenic concentrations in the water supply of both past and current homes. We assigned a residential water supply arsenic concentration for 165,138 (95%) of the total 173,361 lifetime exposure years (EYs) and a workplace water supply arsenic level for 85,195 EYs (86% of reported occupational years). Results: Three methods accounted for 93% of the residential estimates of arsenic concentration: direct measurement of water samples (27%; median, 0.3 µg/L; range, 0.1–11.5), statistical models of water utility measurement data (49%; median, 0.4 µg/L; range, 0.3–3.3), and statistical models of arsenic concentrations in wells using aquifers in New England (17%; median, 1.6 µg/L; range, 0.6–22.4). Conclusions: We used a different validation procedure for each of the three methods, and found our estimated levels to be comparable with available measured concentrations. This methodology allowed us to calculate potential drinking water exposure over long periods. PMID:21421449

  13. Automated atomic absorption spectrometric determination of total arsenic in water and streambed materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, M.

    1977-01-01

    An automated method to determine both inorganic and organic forms of arsenic In water, water-suspended mixtures, and streambed materials Is described. Organic arsenic-containing compounds are decomposed by either ultraviolet radiation or by suHurlc acid-potassium persulfate digestion. The arsenic liberated, with Inorganic arsenic originally present, is reduced to arsine with sodium borohydrlde. The arable Is stripped from the solution with the aid of nitrogen and Is then decomposed In a tube furnace heated to 800 ??C which Is placed in the optical path of an atomic absorption spectrometer. Thirty samples per hour can be analyzed to levels of 1 ??g arsenic per liter.

  14. Inorganic Resists Based On Photo-Doped As-S Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firth, A. P.; Ewen, P. J.; Owen, A. E.; Huntley, C. M.

    1985-04-01

    In recent years there has been considerable interest in inorganic resist systems based on the photo-doping of amorphous chalcogenide films, the majority of the research being devoted to Ge-Se films. This paper presents a detailed investigation of inorganic resists based on the photo-doping of Ag into As-S films. It is shown that high resolution patterns can be produced in such resists using holography or optical lithography and that they are compatible with wet-chemical or plasma etching. Structural studies using Raman spectro-scopy indicate that for best resolution the composition of the As-S film should be close to AS33S67 since on photo-doping it will yield a single-phase homogeneous material. A possible mechanism for the photo-doping process is described based on a tarnishing-type photo-chemical reaction. It is shown that the actinic radiation initiating the photo-dissolution effect is absorbed primarily in the photo-doped layer, close to the interface with the undoped As-S region.

  15. Arsenic methylation patterns before and after changing from high to lower concentrations of arsenic in drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Hopenhayn-Rich, C; Biggs, M L; Kalman, D A; Moore, L E; Smith, A H

    1996-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (In-As), an occupational and environmental human carcinogen, undergoes biomethylation to monomethylarsonate (MMA) and dimethylarsinate (DMA). It has been proposed that saturation of methylation capacity at high exposure levels may lead to a threshold for the carcinogenicity of In-As. The relative distribution of urinary In-As, MMA, and DMA is used as a measure of human methylation capacity. The most common pathway for elevated environmental exposure to In-As worldwide is through drinking water. We conducted a biomarker study in northern Chile of a population chronically exposed to water naturally contaminated with high arsenic content (600 micrograms/l). In this paper we present the results of a prospective follow-up of 73 exposed individuals, who were provided with water of lower arsenic content (45 micrograms/l) for 2 months. The proportions of In-As, MMA, and DMA in urine were compared before and after intervention, and the effect of other factors on the distribution of arsenic metabolites was also analyzed. The findings of this study indicate that the decrease in arsenic exposure was associated with a small decrease in the percent In-As in urine (from 17.8% to 14.6%) and in the MMA/DMA ratio (from 0.23 to 0.18). Other factors such as smoking, gender, age, years of residence, and ethnicity were associated mainly with changes in the MMA/DMA ratio, with smoking having the strongest effect. Nevertheless, the factors investigated accounted for only about 20% of the large interindividual variability observed. Genetic polymorphisms in As-methylating enzymes and other co-factors are likely to contribute to some of the unexplained variation. The changes observed in the percent In-As and in the MMA/DMA ratio do not support an exposure-based threshold for arsenic methylation in humans. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 2. A Figure 2. B PMID:8959409

  16. Coprecipitation of arsenate with iron(III) in aqueous sulfate media: effect of time, lime as base and co-ions on arsenic retention.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yongfeng; Demopoulos, George P

    2008-02-01

    The removal and immobilization of arsenic from industrial mineral-processing effluents typically involves lime neutralization and coprecipitation of arsenate with ferric iron. Despite the wide practice and environmental importance of this technique, no laboratory study has focused on the roles of lime as base and third ions like Ca2+, Ni2+ and SO(2)4(-) on the kinetics of arsenic retention by the coprecipitates. In this work, coprecipitation was performed at 22 degrees C by fast (10 min) neutralization of industrially relevant concentrated arsenate-iron(III) (Fe/As=2, 4) acidic sulfate solutions to different pHs (4, 6, 8) in batch reactors, and the concentration of arsenic was monitored up to 1 year. The tests showed that maximum removal of arsenic was achieved upon neutralization to the target pH. Arsenic was found to be released back into solution from the precipitates upon continuing mild agitation at constant pH. Near-equilibrium was attained at different times depending on the applied pH: 10 days at pH 4, 6 months at pH 6 and 9 months at pH 8. An aging treatment at pH 4 significantly enhanced arsenic retention (arsenic release was reduced by at least 50%) after the system was finally stabilized at pH 8. The retention of arsenic at pH 8 was multifold improved (by a factor x 25) when lime was used instead of NaOH. Similarly, the retention of arsenic was enhanced by the presence of calcium and nickel ions in the starting solution. Finally, evidence of Ca(II)-Fe(III)-As(V) association was found, but not sulfate incorporation at pH 8.

  17. Rapid screening of water soluble arsenic species in edible oils using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    López-García, Ignacio; Briceño, Marisol; Vicente-Martínez, Yesica; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2015-01-15

    A methodology for the non-chromatographic screening of the main arsenic species present in edible oils is discussed. Reverse dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was used to extract water soluble arsenic compounds (inorganic arsenic, methylarsonate, dimethylarsinate and arsenobetaine) from the edible oils into a slightly acidic aqueous medium. The total arsenic content was measured in the extracts by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using palladium as the chemical modifier. By repeating the measurement using cerium instead of palladium, the sum of inorganic arsenic and methylarsonate was obtained. The detection limit was 0.03 ng As per gram of oil. Data for the total and water-soluble arsenic levels of 29 samples of different origin are presented. Inorganic arsenic was not found in any of the samples marketed as edible oils.

  18. Experimental data of inorganic gel based smart window using silica sol-gel process.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dayeon; Choi, Woosuk; Park, Jun-Young; Kim, Ki Buem; Lee, Naesung; Seo, Yongho; Kim, Hyun Sub; Kong, Nak Kyoung

    2016-12-01

    In this article experimental data are presented for inorganic gel based smart window fabricated using silica sol-gel process. Parallel beam transmittances were measured as functions of voltages for samples fabricated with different concentrations of nitric acid. Spectroscopic transmittance data at different driving voltages for samples fabricated with different LC concentrations are shown. Transmittance spectra of the Si-Ti based gel-based-liquid-crystal (GDLC) device measured as different driving voltages were compared with those of PDLC. GDLC showed much lower operating voltages, 10-15 V, for on-state. Formation of the LC droplet in gelation process is illustrated. The methyl organic group surrounds LC droplets. Demonstration of GDLC based smart window showed the successful operation with low driving voltages. GDLC window shows clear color, even at off-state, compared with PDLC.

  19. Optimization of a Non-arsenic Iron-based Superconductor for Wire Fabrication

    DOE PAGES

    Mitchell, Jonathan E; Hillesheim, D A; Bridges, Craig A; ...

    2015-03-13

    Here we report on the optimization of synthesis of iron selenide-based superconducting powders and the fabrication of selenide-based wire. The powders were synthesized by an ammonothermal method, whereby Ba is intercalated between FeSe layers to produce Bax(NH3)yFe2Se2, with tetragonal structure similar to AFe2X2 (X: As, Se), '122', superconductors. The optimal Tc (up to 38 K) and Meissner and shielding superconducting fractions are obtained from the shortest reaction time (t) of reactants in liquid ammonia (30 min). With the increase of t, a second crystalline 122 phase, with a smaller unit cell, emerges. A small amount of NH3 is released frommore » the structure above ~200 °C, which results in loss of superconductivity. However, in the confined space of niobium/Monel tubing, results indicate there is enough pressure for some of NH3 to remain in the crystal lattice, and thermal annealing can be performed at temperatures of up to 780 °C, increasing wire density and yielded a reasonable Tc ≈ 16 K. Here, we report of the first successful wire fabrication of non-arsenic high-Tc iron-based superconductor. We find that although bulk materials are estimated to carry critical current densities >100 kA cm₋2 (4 K, self-field), the current transport within wires need to be optimized (Jc ~ 1 kA cm₋2).« less

  20. Neonatal Metabolomic Profiles Related to Prenatal Arsenic Exposure.

    PubMed

    Laine, Jessica E; Bailey, Kathryn A; Olshan, Andrew F; Smeester, Lisa; Drobná, Zuzana; Stýblo, Miroslav; Douillet, Christelle; García-Vargas, Gonzalo; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela; Pathmasiri, Wimal; McRitchie, Susan; Sumner, Susan J; Fry, Rebecca C

    2017-01-03

    Prenatal inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure is associated with health effects evident at birth and later in life. An understanding of the relationship between prenatal iAs exposure and alterations in the neonatal metabolome could reveal critical molecular modifications, potentially underpinning disease etiologies. In this study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based metabolomic analysis was used to identify metabolites in neonate cord serum associated with prenatal iAs exposure in participants from the Biomarkers of Exposure to ARsenic (BEAR) pregnancy cohort, in Gómez Palacio, Mexico. Through multivariable linear regression, ten cord serum metabolites were identified as significantly associated with total urinary iAs and/or iAs metabolites, measured as %iAs, %monomethylated arsenicals (MMAs), and %dimethylated arsenicals (DMAs). A total of 17 metabolites were identified as significantly associated with total iAs and/or iAs metabolites in cord serum. These metabolites are indicative of changes in important biochemical pathways such as vitamin metabolism, the citric acid (TCA) cycle, and amino acid metabolism. These data highlight that maternal biotransformation of iAs and neonatal levels of iAs and its metabolites are associated with differences in neonate cord metabolomic profiles. The results demonstrate the potential utility of metabolites as biomarkers/indicators of in utero environmental exposure.

  1. THE CELLULAR METABOLISM AND SYSTEMIC TOXICITY OF ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Toxic Consequences of the Metabolism of Arsenic. David J. Thomas, Miroslav Styblo, and Shan Lin. (2001). Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 000, xxx-yyy.
    Although it has been known for decades that humans and many other species metabolize inorganic arsenic to methyl ...

  2. Arsenic-Based Drugs: From Fowler's Solution to Modern Anticancer Chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibaud, Stéphane; Jaouen, Gérard

    Although arsenic is a poison and has a predominantly unfavorable reputation, it has been used as pharmaceutical agent since the first century BC. In 1786, Thomas Fowler reported the effects of arsenic in the cure of agues, remittent fevers, and periodic headaches. From this time on and despite abusive use, some interesting indications began to appear for trypanosomiasis, syphilis, and blood diseases. The first significant organoarsenical drug (atoxyl) was synthesized by Pierre Antoine Béchamp in 1859 by chemically reacting arsenic acid with aniline but additional experimentations on the properties of arsenic led Paul Ehrlich, the founder of chemotherapy, to the discovery of salvarsan in 1910. From the Second World War, Ernst A.H. Friedheim greatly improved the treatment of trypanosomiasis by melaminophenyl arsenicals. Until the 1990s some organoarsenicals were used for intestinal parasite infections but carcinogenic effects were displayed and all the drugs have been withdrawn in USA, in Europe, and elsewhere. In 2003, arsenic trioxide (Trisenox®) was re-introduced for the treatment of very specific hematological malignancies.

  3. Cellular morphology of organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on alkali alumino-silicate matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdolotti, Letizia; Liguori, Barbara; Capasso, Ilaria; Caputo, Domenico; Lavorgna, Marino; Iannace, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on an alkali alumino-silicate matrix were prepared by using different foaming methods. Initially, the synthesis of an inorganic matrix by using aluminosilicate particles, activated through a sodium silicate solution, was performed at room temperature. Subsequently the viscous paste was foamed by using three different methods. In the first method, gaseous hydrogen produced by the oxidization of Si powder in an alkaline media, was used as blowing agent to generate gas bubbles in the paste. In the second method, the porous structure was generated by mixing the paste with a "meringue" type of foam previously prepared by whipping, under vigorous stirring, a water solution containing vegetal proteins as surfactants. In the third method, a combination of these two methods was employed. The foamed systems were consolidated for 24 hours at 40°C and then characterized by FTIR, X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compression tests. Low density foams (˜500 Kg/m3) with good cellular structure and mechanical properties were obtained by combining the "meringue" approach with the use of the chemical blowing agent based on Si.

  4. A room-temperature sodium rechargeable battery using an SO2-based nonflammable inorganic liquid catholyte.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Goojin; Kim, Hansu; Lee, Hyo Sug; Han, Young-Kyu; Park, Jong Hwan; Jeon, Jae Hwan; Song, Juhye; Lee, Keonjoon; Yim, Taeeun; Kim, Ki Jae; Lee, Hyukjae; Kim, Young-Jun; Sohn, Hun-Joon

    2015-08-05

    Sodium rechargeable batteries can be excellent alternatives to replace lithium rechargeable ones because of the high abundance and low cost of sodium; however, there is a need to further improve the battery performance, cost-effectiveness, and safety for practical use. Here we demonstrate a new type of room-temperature and high-energy density sodium rechargeable battery using an SO2-based inorganic molten complex catholyte, which showed a discharge capacity of 153 mAh g(-1) based on the mass of catholyte and carbon electrode with an operating voltage of 3 V, good rate capability and excellent cycle performance over 300 cycles. In particular, non-flammability and intrinsic self-regeneration mechanism of the inorganic liquid electrolyte presented here can accelerate the realization of commercialized Na rechargeable battery system with outstanding reliability. Given that high performance and unique properties of Na-SO2 rechargeable battery, it can be another promising candidate for next generation energy storage system.

  5. Arsenic species and leaching characters in tea (Camellia sinensis).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chungang; Gao, Erle; He, Bin; Jiang, Guibin

    2007-12-01

    Tea is one of the most popular non-alcoholic beverages consumed in the world. Arsenic including species totalling to 47 Chinese tea samples from 18 tea-producing provinces in China were analyzed. By simulating the infusion process, leaching characters, effects of extraction time and temperature on arsenic extraction were investigated. Total amount of arsenic in tea leaf samples was in the range below the detection limit to 4.81 microg/g. Leaching of arsenic was strongly affected by extraction time and temperature. Because arsenic leaching ability by hot water was low and most of the arsenic was left in tea leaf residues after infusion, the concentration of arsenic in tea infusion was low even when some original tea leaf samples contained high level of arsenic. The major species in tea infusion were inorganic arsenic form (arsenite As(III) and arsenate As(V)). Compared with the amount of arsenic in infusion, more organic arsenic species were found in the original tea leaf samples. The contents of extractable inorganic arsenic in tea leaf samples were in the range below the detection limit to 226 ng/g. Considering ingestion dose and assuming one person (60 kg body weight) consumes 10 g of Chinese tea per day, the maximum inorganic arsenic contribution from tea infusion is 2.26 microg, which is equal to 0.038 microg/kg/d excluding water contribution. This value only accounts for 1.8% of provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) (2.1 microg/kg/d) recommended by the Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization [FAO/WHO, 1989. Evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants. Thirty-third Report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives. WHO Technical Report Series No. 776, Geneva, World Health Organization].

  6. A low cost color-based bacterial biosensor for measuring arsenic in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Wei; Wei, Chia-Cheng; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Using arsenic (As) contaminated groundwater for drinking or irrigation has caused major health problems for humans around the world, raising a need to monitor As level efficiently and economically. This study developed a color-based bacterial biosensor which is easy-to-use and inexpensive for measuring As and could be complementary to current As detecting techniques. The arsR-lacZ recombinant gene cassette in nonpathogenic strain Escherichia coli DH5α was used in the color-based biosensor which could be observed by eyes or measured by spectrometer. The developed bacterial biosensor demonstrates a quantitative range from 10 to 500μgL(-1) of As in 3-h reaction time. Furthermore, the biosensor was able to successfully detect and estimate As concentration in groundwater sample by measuring optical density at 595nm (OD595). Among different storage methods used in this study, biosensor in liquid at 4°C showed the longest shelf life about 9d, and liquid storage at RT and cell pellet could also be stored for about 3-5d. In conclusion, this study showed that the As biosensor with reliable color signal and economical preservation methods is useful for rapid screening of As pollutant, providing the potential for large scale screening and better management strategies for environmental quality control.

  7. Whole-house arsenic water treatment provided more effective arsenic exposure reduction than point-of-use water treatment at New Jersey homes with arsenic in well water.

    PubMed

    Spayd, Steven E; Robson, Mark G; Buckley, Brian T

    2015-02-01

    A comparison of the effectiveness of whole house (point-of-entry) and point-of-use arsenic water treatment systems in reducing arsenic exposure from well water was conducted. The non-randomized observational study recruited 49 subjects having elevated arsenic in their residential home well water in New Jersey. The subjects obtained either point-of-entry or point-of-use arsenic water treatment. Prior ingestion exposure to arsenic in well water was calculated by measuring arsenic concentrations in the well water and obtaining water-use histories for each subject, including years of residence with the current well and amount of water consumed from the well per day. A series of urine samples was collected from the subjects, some starting before water treatment was installed and continuing for at least nine months after treatment had begun. Urine samples were analyzed and speciated for inorganic-related arsenic concentrations. A two-phase clearance of inorganic-related arsenic from urine and the likelihood of a significant body burden from chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water were identified. After nine months of water treatment the adjusted mean of the urinary inorganic-related arsenic concentrations was significantly lower (p<0.0005) in the point-of-entry treatment group (2.5 μg/g creatinine) than in the point-of-use treatment group (7.2 μg/g creatinine). The results suggest that whole house arsenic water treatment systems provide a more effective reduction of arsenic exposure from well water than that obtained by point-of-use treatment.

  8. Whole-house arsenic water treatment provided more effective arsenic exposure reduction than point-of-use water treatment at New Jersey homes with arsenic in well water

    PubMed Central

    Spayd, Steven E.; Robson, Mark G.; Buckley, Brian T.

    2014-01-01

    A comparison of the effectiveness of whole house (point-of-entry) and point-of-use arsenic water treatment systems in reducing arsenic exposure from well water was conducted. The non-randomized observational study recruited 49 subjects having elevated arsenic in their residential home well water in New Jersey. The subjects obtained either point-of-entry or point-of-use arsenic water treatment. Prior ingestion exposure to arsenic in well water was calculated by measuring arsenic concentrations in the well water and obtaining water-use histories for each subject, including years of residence with the current well and amount of water consumed from the well per day. A series of urine samples were collected from the subjects, some starting before water treatment was installed and continuing for at least nine months after treatment had begun. Urine samples were analyzed and speciated for inorganic-related arsenic concentrations. A two-phase clearance of inorganic-related arsenic from urine and the likelihood of a significant body burden from chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water were identified. After nine months of water treatment the adjusted mean of the urinary inorganic-related arsenic concentrations were significantly lower (p < 0.0005) in the point-of-entry treatment group (2.5 μg/g creatinine) than in the point-of-use treatment group (7.2 μg/g creatinine). The results suggest that whole house arsenic water treatment systems provide a more effective reduction of arsenic exposure from well water than that obtained by point-of-use treatment. PMID:24975493

  9. Arsenic geochemistry of groundwater in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Chanpiwat, Penradee; Hanh, Hoang Thi; Phan, Kongkea; Sthiannopkao, Suthipong

    2011-12-01

    The occurrence of high concentrations of arsenic in the groundwater of the Southeast Asia region has received much attention in the past decade. This study presents an overview of the arsenic contamination problems in Vietnam, Cambodia, Lao People's Democratic Republic and Thailand. Most groundwater used as a source of drinking water in rural areas has been found to be contaminated with arsenic exceeding the WHO drinking water guideline of 10 μg·L(-1). With the exception of Thailand, groundwater was found to be contaminated with naturally occurring arsenic in the region. Interestingly, high arsenic concentrations (> 10 μg·L(-1)) were generally found in the floodplain areas located along the Mekong River. The source of elevated arsenic concentrations in groundwater is thought to be the release of arsenic from river sediments under highly reducing conditions. In Thailand, arsenic has never been found naturally in groundwater, but originates from tin mining activities. More than 10 million residents in Southeast Asia are estimated to be at risk from consuming arsenic-contaminated groundwater. In Southeast Asia, groundwater has been found to be a significant source of daily inorganic arsenic intake in humans. A positive correlation between groundwater arsenic concentration and arsenic concentration in human hair has been observed in Cambodia and Vietnam. A substantial knowledge gap exists between the epidemiology of arsenicosis and its impact on human health. More collaborative studies particularly on the scope of public health and its epidemiology are needed to conduct to fulfill the knowledge gaps of As as well as to enhance the operational responses to As issue in Southeast Asian countries.

  10. Inorganic-based proton conductive composite membranes for elevated temperature and reduced relative humidity PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunmei

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are regarded as highly promising energy conversion systems for future transportation and stationary power generation and have been under intensive investigations for the last decade. Unfortunately, cutting edge PEM fuel cell design and components still do not allow economically commercial implementation of this technology. The main obstacles are high cost of proton conductive membranes, low-proton conductivity at low relative humidity (RH), and dehydration and degradation of polymer membranes at high temperatures. The objective of this study was to develop a systematic approach to design a high proton conductive composite membrane that can provide a conductivity of approximately 100 mS cm-1 under hot and dry conditions (120°C and 50% RH). The approach was based on fundamental and experimental studies of the proton conductivity of inorganic additives and composite membranes. We synthesized and investigated a variety of organic-inorganic Nafion-based composite membranes. In particular, we analyzed their fundamental properties, which included thermal stability, morphology, the interaction between inorganic network and Nafion clusters, and the effect of inorganic phase on the membrane conductivity. A wide range of inorganic materials was studied in advance in order to select the proton conductive inorganic additives for composite membranes. We developed a conductivity measurement method, with which the proton conductivity characteristics of solid acid materials, zirconium phosphates, sulfated zirconia (S-ZrO2), phosphosilicate gels, and Santa Barbara Amorphous silica (SBA-15) were discussed in detail. Composite membranes containing Nafion and different amounts of functionalized inorganic additives (sulfated inorganics such as S-ZrO2, SBA-15, Mobil Composition of Matter MCM-41, and S-SiO2, and phosphonated inorganic P-SiO2) were synthesized with different methods. We incorporated inorganic particles within Nafion clusters

  11. Behaviour of thermal waters through granite rocks based on residence time and inorganic pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Outeiriño, I.; Araujo-Nespereira, P.; Cid-Fernández, J. A.; Mejuto, J. C.; Martínez-Carballo, E.; Simal-Gándara, J.

    2009-07-01

    SummaryThermal waters are certainly a substantial asset of the Galicia region of Spain. They can be regarded as worth developing because of their human health implications and, if thermal tourism is promoted, their importance to the local economy. In this paper the chemistry of major and trace inorganic elements in about 45 thermal springs and wells discharging in the same hydrographical system are presented and discussed. For handling the results of all measurements, graphical representations of B/Li vs.SO42-/Cl - ratios, Hill-Piper diagram, discriminant analysis (DA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were employed. All this with the intention to classify, based on their inorganic pattern, both thermal springs and wells waters, but also waters circulating through adamellite and granodiorite rocks. The results of the hydrogeochemistry analysis showed three main water families: sulphated, chlorinated and bicarbonated waters. The results show also the presence of saline materials with chloride influence in the deeper aquifer, allowing its classification in deeper and younger/shallow waters.

  12. Linking Microbial Activity with Arsenic Fate during Cow Dung Disposal of Arsenic-Bearing Wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, T. M.; Reddy, R.; Tan, J.; Hayes, K. F.; Raskin, L.

    2014-12-01

    To address widespread arsenic contamination of drinking water sources numerous technologies have been developed to remove arsenic. All technologies result in the production of an arsenic-bearing waste that must be evaluated and disposed in a manner to limit the potential for environmental release and human exposure. One disposal option that is commonly recommended for areas without access to landfills is the mixing of arsenic-bearing wastes with cow dung. These recommendations are made based on the ability of microorganisms to create volatile arsenic species (including mono-, di-, and tri-methylarsine gases) to be diluted in the atmosphere. However, most studies of environmental microbial communities have found only a small fraction (<0.1 %) of the total arsenic present in soils or rice paddies is released via volatilization. Additionally, past studies often have not monitored arsenic release in the aqueous phase. Two main pathways for microbial arsenic volatilization are known and include methylation of arsenic during methanogenesis and methylation by arsenite S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase. In this study, we compare the roles of these two pathways in arsenic volatilization and aqueous mobilization through mesocosm experiments with cow dung and arsenic-bearing wastes produced during drinking water treatment in West Bengal, India. Arsenic in gaseous, aqueous, and solid phases was measured. Consistent with previous reports, less than 0.02% of the total arsenic present was volatilized. A much higher amount (~5%) of the total arsenic was mobilized into the liquid phase. Through the application of molecular tools, including 16S rRNA sequencing and quantification of gene transcripts involved in methanogenesis, this study links microbial community activity with arsenic fate in potential disposal environments. These results illustrate that disposal of arsenic-bearing wastes by mixing with cow dung does not achieve its end goal of promoting arsenic volatilization

  13. A Simple Metallothionein-Based Biosensor for Enhanced Detection of Arsenic and Mercury

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Gordon W.; Tan, Swee Ngin; Stillman, Martin J.

    2017-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a family of cysteine-rich proteins whose biological roles include the regulation of essential metal ions and protection against the harmful effects of toxic metals. Due to its high affinity for many toxic, soft metals, recombinant human MT isoform 1a was incorporated into an electrochemical-based biosensor for the detection of As3+ and Hg2+. A simple design was chosen to maximize its potential in environmental monitoring and MT was physically adsorbed onto paper discs placed on screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs). This system was tested with concentrations of arsenic and mercury typical of contaminated water sources ranging from 5 to 1000 ppb. The analytical performance of the MT-adsorbed paper discs on SPCEs demonstrated a greater than three-fold signal enhancement and a lower detection limit compared to blank SPCEs, 13 ppb for As3+ and 45 ppb for Hg2+. While not being as low as some of the recommended drinking water limits, the sensitivity of the simple MT-biosensor would be potentially useful in monitoring of areas of concern with a known contamination problem. This paper describes the ability of the metal binding protein metallothionein to enhance the effectiveness of a simple, low-cost electrochemical sensor. PMID:28335390

  14. A Simple Metallothionein-Based Biosensor for Enhanced Detection of Arsenic and Mercury.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Gordon W; Tan, Swee Ngin; Stillman, Martin J

    2017-03-13

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a family of cysteine-rich proteins whose biological roles include the regulation of essential metal ions and protection against the harmful effects of toxic metals. Due to its high affinity for many toxic, soft metals, recombinant human MT isoform 1a was incorporated into an electrochemical-based biosensor for the detection of As(3+) and Hg(2+). A simple design was chosen to maximize its potential in environmental monitoring and MT was physically adsorbed onto paper discs placed on screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs). This system was tested with concentrations of arsenic and mercury typical of contaminated water sources ranging from 5 to 1000 ppb. The analytical performance of the MT-adsorbed paper discs on SPCEs demonstrated a greater than three-fold signal enhancement and a lower detection limit compared to blank SPCEs, 13 ppb for As(3+) and 45 ppb for Hg(2+). While not being as low as some of the recommended drinking water limits, the sensitivity of the simple MT-biosensor would be potentially useful in monitoring of areas of concern with a known contamination problem. This paper describes the ability of the metal binding protein metallothionein to enhance the effectiveness of a simple, low-cost electrochemical sensor.

  15. Impact of life stage and duration of exposure on arsenic-induced proliferative lesions, neoplasia, and gene expression in male C3H mice.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have demonstrated increased liver and adrenal tumor incidence in male mice exposed gestationally to 85 ppm inorganic arsenic via the dams’ drinking water. To further characterize age susceptibility to arsenic carcinogenesis we have administered 85 ppm sodium ars...

  16. Transcriptional Modulation of the ERK1/2 MAPK and NF-kB pathways in Human Urothelial cells after trivalent arsenical exposure: Implications for urinary bladder cancer

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic exposure to drinking water contaminated with inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with an increased risk ofurinary bladder (DB) cancers in humans. Rodent models administered particular arsenicals have indicated urothelial necrosis followed by regenerative proliferation i...

  17. Concentration and chemical status of arsenic in the early placentas of arsenate-dosed hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, D.P.; Ferm, V.H.

    1987-04-01

    The authors determined the concentration and chemical status of arsenic in the placentas of hamsters following continuous exposure via the osmotic minipump to minimally and frankly teratogenic doses of arsenate. Close to 70% of the placental arsenic is bound to macromolecules, two-thirds of which is dialyzable. The remaining 30% of arsenic consists of low molecular weight species, predominantly inorganic arsenic. This mix is the same for minimally teratogenic and frankly teratogenic doses of arsenate.

  18. Urinary arsenic profile affects the risk of urothelial carcinoma even at low arsenic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Y.-S.; Yang, S.-M.; Huang, Y.-K.; Chung, C.-J.; Huang, Steven K.; Chiu, Allen Wen-Hsiang; Yang, M.-H.; Chen, C.-J.; Hsueh, Y.-M. . E-mail: ymhsueh@tmu.edu.tw

    2007-01-15

    Arsenic exposure is associated with an increased risk of urothelial carcinoma (UC). To explore the association between individual risk and urinary arsenic profile in subjects without evident exposure, 177 UC cases and 313 age-matched controls were recruited between September 2002 and May 2004 for a case-control study. Urinary arsenic species including the following three categories, inorganic arsenic (As{sup III} + As{sup V}), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA{sup V}) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}), were determined with high-performance liquid chromatography-linked hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Arsenic methylation profile was assessed by percentages of various arsenic species in the sum of the three categories measured. The primary methylation index (PMI) was defined as the ratio between MMA{sup V} and inorganic arsenic. Secondary methylation index (SMI) was determined as the ratio between DMA{sup V} and MMA{sup V}. Smoking is associated with a significant risk of UC in a dose-dependent manner. After multivariate adjustment, UC cases had a significantly higher sum of all the urinary species measured, higher percent MMA{sup V}, lower percent DMA{sup V}, higher PMI and lower SMI values compared with controls. Smoking interacts with the urinary arsenic profile in modifying the UC risk. Differential carcinogenic effects of the urinary arsenic profile, however, were seen more prominently in non-smokers than in smokers, suggesting that smoking is not the only major environmental source of arsenic contamination since the UC risk differs in non-smokers. Subjects who have an unfavorable urinary arsenic profile have an increased UC risk even at low exposure levels.

  19. Arsenic and lead in juice: apple, citrus, and apple-base.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Denise; Hooper, Cassandra; Shi, Xingyi

    2012-12-01

    Exposure limits for arsenic and lead in drinking water have long been established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and new regulations regarding the presence of these contaminants in bottled water went into effect in California in 2009. No comparable exposure limits or regulations are available, however, for juices and other beverages that may contain arsenic and lead. In the study described in this article, 20 apple juices (or ciders), 15 apple-containing juices, one grape, and one citrus juice were analyzed for arsenic and lead. Arsenic was detected in all juices while lead was detected in more than 94% of juices analyzed. Twelve samples (32%) demonstrated arsenic levels nearly at or above the drinking water exposure limit of 10 parts per billion. No juices contained lead above drinking water exposure limits. Expanding drinking water limits to include juices (and other frequently consumed beverages) would better protect consumers while regular testing of these juices would better inform consumers of the risks posed by specific juices and brands.

  20. Da-KGM based GO-reinforced FMBO-loaded aerogels for efficient arsenic removal in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shuxin; Jin, Weiping; Huang, Qing; Hu, Ying; Li, Yan; Li, Jing; Li, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Composites based on deacetylated konjac glucomannan (Da-KGM) and graphene oxide (GO) aerogels with iron and manganese oxides (FMBO) for effective removal of arsenic from contaminated water. Da-KGM, which was used as supporting composite matrix here, were firstly treated with GO and loaded FMBO. The obtained Da-KGM/GO/FMBO composite aerogels were characterized by compression test, thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The characteristic results showed that addition of GO exhibited enhanced mechanical properties towards Da-KGM aerogels. What's more, results of FTIR indicated the strong intermolecular hydrogen bond interaction between KGM and GO. Batch adsorption tests were used to evaluate arsenic removal capacity. Da-KGM/GO loaded FMBO composite aerogels exhibited high adsorption ability for arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)]. The adsorption results showed that the arsenic for both arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] removal process followed a pseudo-second-order rate equation and Langmuir monolayer adsorption. The maximum As(III) and As(V) uptake capacity of Da-KGM/GO(10%)/FMBO composite aerogels reached 30.21mgg(-1) and 12.08mgg(-1) respectively according to Langmuir isotherm at pH 7 and 323K.

  1. Process-based reactive transport model to quantify arsenic mobility during aquifer storage and recovery of potable water.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Ilka; Prommer, Henning; Pichler, Thomas; Post, Vincent; Norton, Stuart B; Annable, Michael D; Simmons, Craig T

    2011-08-15

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is an aquifer recharge technique in which water is injected in an aquifer during periods of surplus and withdrawn from the same well during periods of deficit. It is a critical component of the long-term water supply plan in various regions, including Florida, USA. Here, the viability of ASR as a safe and cost-effective water resource is currently being tested at a number of sites due to elevated arsenic concentrations detected during groundwater recovery. In this study, we developed a process-based reactive transport model of the coupled physical and geochemical mechanisms controlling the fate of arsenic during ASR. We analyzed multicycle hydrochemical data from a well-documented affected southwest Floridan site and evaluated a conceptual/numerical model in which (i) arsenic is initially released during pyrite oxidation triggered by the injection of oxygenated water (ii) then largely complexes to neo-formed hydrous ferric oxides before (iii) being remobilized during recovery as a result of both dissolution of hydrous ferric oxides and displacement from sorption sites by competing anions.

  2. Urinary Arsenic and Insulin Resistance in US Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Qing; Harlow, Siobán D.; Park, Sung Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure has been associated with increased diabetes risk in adults. Insulin resistance (IR) has been proposed as a mechanism of arsenic-related diabetes. Although limited evidence in adults found no association between arsenic and IR, the association in adolescents is largely unknown. We examined the association between urinary arsenic and insulin resistance in US adolescents. Eight hundred thirty five adolescents aged 12-19 years, with complete data on urinary arsenic (total arsenic, inorganic arsenic and dimethylarsenic acid (DMA)), fasting glucose, insulin and key covariates were identified from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cycles 2003/2004 through 2009/2010. Generalized additive mixed models accounting for intra-cluster correlation arising from the complex survey design were used to estimate the association between the updated Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2)-IR and each type of arsenic. After adjusting for potential confounders, including urinary creatinine, sociodemographic factors, BMI, waist circumference, and arsenobetaine, arsenic exposure was not associated with HOMA2-IR. Interquartile range increases in total arsenic, inorganic arsenic and DMA were associated with 1.5% (95% CI: -2.0, 5.2), 1.1% (95% CI: -1.5, 3.8) and 0.25% (95% CI: -2.3, 2.9) increases in HOMA2-IR, respectively. In conclusion, despite arsenic's association with diabetes in adults and potential role in insulin resistance, our findings do not support the hypothesis that arsenic exposure at levels common in the US contributes to insulin resistance in adolescents. Whether higher doses and longer exposure duration are required for appreciable influence on insulin resistance, or that arsenic does not act through insulin resistance to induce diabetes needs further investigation.1 PMID:25845984

  3. Urinary arsenic and insulin resistance in US adolescents.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qing; Harlow, Siobán D; Park, Sung Kyun

    2015-06-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure has been associated with increased diabetes risk in adults. Insulin resistance (IR) has been proposed as a mechanism of arsenic-related diabetes. Although limited evidence in adults found no association between arsenic and IR, the association in adolescents is largely unknown. We examined the association between urinary arsenic and insulin resistance in US adolescents. Eight hundred thirty five adolescents aged 12-19 years, with complete data on urinary arsenic (total arsenic, inorganic arsenic and dimethylarsenic acid (DMA)), fasting glucose, insulin and key covariates were identified from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cycles 2003/2004 through 2009/2010. Generalized additive mixed models accounting for intra-cluster correlation arising from the complex survey design were used to estimate the association between the updated Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2)-IR and each type of arsenic. After adjusting for potential confounders, including urinary creatinine, sociodemographic factors, BMI, waist circumference, and arsenobetaine, arsenic exposure was not associated with HOMA2-IR. Interquartile range increases in total arsenic, inorganic arsenic and DMA were associated with 1.5% (95% CI: -2.0, 5.2), 1.1% (95% CI: -1.5, 3.8) and 0.25% (95% CI: -2.3, 2.9) increases in HOMA2-IR, respectively. In conclusion, despite arsenic's association with diabetes in adults and potential role in insulin resistance, our findings do not support the hypothesis that arsenic exposure at levels common in the US contributes to insulin resistance in adolescents. Whether higher doses and longer exposure duration are required for appreciable influence on insulin resistance, or that arsenic does not act through insulin resistance to induce diabetes needs further investigation.

  4. Both Phosphorus Fertilizers and Indigenous Bacteria Enhance Arsenic Release into Groundwater in Arsenic-Contaminated Aquifers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Wei, Chia-Cheng; Huang, Chi-Wei; Chang, Chun-Han; Hsu, Fu-Lan; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan

    2016-03-23

    Arsenic (As) is a human carcinogen, and arsenic contamination in groundwater is a worldwide public health concern. Arsenic-affected areas are found in many places but are reported mostly in agricultural farmlands, yet the interaction of fertilizers, microorganisms, and arsenic mobilization in arsenic-contaminated aquifers remains uncharacterized. This study investigates the effects of fertilizers and bacteria on the mobilization of arsenic in two arsenic-contaminated aquifers. We performed microcosm experiments using arsenic-contaminated sediments and amended with inorganic nitrogenous or phosphorus fertilizers for 1 and 4 months under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The results show that microcosms amended with 100 mg/L phosphorus fertilizers (dipotassium phosphate), but not nitrogenous fertilizers (ammonium sulfate), significantly increase aqueous As(III) release in arsenic-contaminated sediments under anaerobic condition. We also show that concentrations of iron, manganese, potassium, sodium, calcium, and magnesium are increased in the aqueous phase and that the addition of dipotassium phosphate causes a further increase in aqueous iron, potassium, and sodium, suggesting that multiple metal elements may take part in the arsenic release process. Furthermore, microbial analysis indicates that the dominant microbial phylum is shifted from α-proteobacteria to β- and γ-proteobacteria when the As(III) is increased and phosphate is added in the aquifer. Our results provide evidence that both phosphorus fertilizers and microorganisms can mediate the release of arsenic to groundwater in arsenic-contaminated sediments under anaerobic condition. Our study suggests that agricultural activity such as the use of fertilizers and monitoring phosphate concentration in groundwater should be taken into consideration for the management of arsenic in groundwater.

  5. A comparative study of the sub-chronic toxic effects of three organic arsenical compounds on the urothelium in F344 rats; gender-based differences in response

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jun; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Waalkes, Michael P.; Salim, Elsayed I.; Kinoshita, Anna; Yoshida, Kaoru; Endo, Ginji; Fukushima, Shoji . E-mail: fukuchan@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp

    2006-02-01

    Epidemiological studies indicated that human arsenic exposure can induce urinary bladder cancer. Methylation of inorganic arsenic can generate more reactive and toxic organic arsenical species. In this regard, it was recently reported that the methylated arsenical metabolite, dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)], induced urinary bladder tumors in rats. However, other methylated metabolites, like monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) were not carcinogenic to the urinary bladder. In order to compare the early effects of DMA(V), MMA(V), and TMAO on the urinary bladder transitional cell epithelium at the scanning electron microscope (SEM) level, we investigated the sub-chronic (13 weeks) toxicological effects of MMA(V) (187 ppm), DMA(V) (184 ppm), TMAO (182 ppm) given in the drinking water to male and female F344 rats with a focus on the urinary bladder in this study. Obvious pathological changes, including ropy microridges, pitting, increased separation of epithelial cells, exfoliation, and necrosis, were found in the urinary bladders of both sexes, but particularly in females receiving carcinogenic doses of DMA(V). Urine arsenical metabolic differences were found between males and females, with levels of MMA(III), a potential genotoxic form, higher in females treated with DMA(V) than in males. Thus, this study provides clear evidence that DMA(V) is more toxic to the female urinary bladder, in accord with sensitivity to carcinogenesis. Important gender-related metabolic differences including enhanced presentation of MMA(III) to the urothelial cells might possibly account for heightened sensitivity in females. However, the potential carcinogenic effects of MMA(III) need to be further elucidated.

  6. A Phytoremediation Strategy for Arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, Richard B.

    2005-06-01

    A Phytoremediation Strategy for Arsenic Progress Report May, 2005 Richard B. Meagher Principal Investigator Arsenic pollution affects the health of several hundred millions of people world wide, and an estimated 10 million Americans have unsafe levels of arsenic in their drinking water. However, few environmentally sound remedies for cleaning up arsenic contaminated soil and water have been proposed. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to extract and sequester environmental pollutants, is one new technology that offers an ecologically sound solution to a devastating problem. We propose that it is less disruptive to the environment to harvest and dispose of several thousand pounds per acre of contaminated aboveground plant material, than to excavate and dispose of 1 to 5 million pounds of contaminated soil per acre (assumes contamination runs 3 ft deep). Our objective is to develop a genetics-based phytoremediation strategy for arsenic removal that can be used in any plant species. This strategy requires the enhanced expression of several transgenes from diverse sources. Our working hypothesis is that organ-specific expression of several genes controlling the transport, electrochemical state, and binding of arsenic will result in the efficient extraction and hyperaccumulation of arsenic into aboveground plant tissues. This hypothesis is supported by theoretical arguments and strong preliminary data. We proposed six Specific Aims focused on testing and developing this arsenic phytoremediation strategy. During the first 18 months of the grant we made significant progress on five Specific Aims and began work on the sixth as summarized below. Specific Aim 1: Enhance plant arsenic resistance and greatly expand sinks for arsenite by expressing elevated levels of thiol-rich, arsenic-binding peptides. Hyperaccumulation of arsenic depends upon making plants that are both highly tolerant to arsenic and that have the capacity to store large amounts of arsenic aboveground

  7. Modeling the Detection of Organic and Inorganic Compounds Using Iodide-Based Chemical Ionization.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Siddharth; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe; Lee, Ben H; Thornton, Joel A; Kurtén, Theo

    2016-02-04

    Iodide-based chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) has been used to detect and measure concentrations of several atmospherically relevant organic and inorganic compounds. The significant electronegativity of iodide and the strong acidity of hydroiodic acid makes electron transfer and proton abstraction essentially negligible, and the soft nature of the adduct formation ionization technique reduces the chances of sample fragmentation. In addition, iodide has a large negative mass defect, which, when combined with the high resolving power of a high resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS), provides good selectivity. In this work, we use quantum chemical methods to calculate the binding energies, enthalpies and free energies for clusters of an iodide ion with a number of atmospherically relevant organic and inorganic compounds. Systematic configurational sampling of the free molecules and clusters was carried out at the B3LYP/6-31G* level, followed by subsequent calculations at the PBE/SDD and DLPNO-CCSD(T)/def2-QZVPP//PBE/aug-cc-pVTZ-PP levels. The binding energies, enthalpies, and free energies thus obtained were then compared to the iodide-based University of Washington HR-ToF-CIMS (UW-CIMS) instrument sensitivities for these molecules. We observed a reasonably linear relationship between the cluster binding enthalpies and logarithmic instrument sensitivities already at the PBE/SDD level, which indicates that relatively simple quantum chemical methods can predict the sensitivity of an iodide-based CIMS instrument toward most molecules. However, higher level calculations were needed to treat some outlier molecules, most notably oxalic acid and methylerythritol. Our calculations also corroborated the recent experimental findings that the molecules that the UW-CIMS detects at maximum sensitivity usually have binding enthalpies to iodide which are higher than about 26 kcal/mol, depending slightly on the level of theory.

  8. Spectrophotometric determination of arsenic in concentrates and copper-base alloys by the molybdenum blue method after separations by iron collection and xanthate extraction.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, E M

    1977-02-01

    A method for determining 0.0001-1% of arsenic in copper, nickel, molybdenum, lead and zinc concentrates is described. After sample decomposition, arsenic is separated from most of the matrix elements by co-precipitation with hydrous ferric oxide from an ammoniacal medium. Following reprecipitation of arsenic and iron, the precipitate is dissolved in approximately 2 M hydrochloric acid and the solution is evaporated to a small volume to remove water. Arsenic(V) is reduced to the tervalent state with iron(II) and separated from iron, lead and other co-precipitated elements by chloroform extraction of its xanthate from an 11M hydrochloric acid medium. After oxidation of arsenic(III) in the extract to arsenic(V) with bromine-carbon tetrachloride solution, it is back-extracted into water and determined by the molybdenum blue method. Small amounts of iron, copper and molybdenum, which are co-extracted as xanthates, and antimony, which is co-extracted to a slight extent as the chloro-complex under the proposed conditions, do not interfere. The proposed method is also applicable to copper-base alloys.

  9. Optimization of a Non-arsenic Iron-based Superconductor for Wire Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Jonathan E; Hillesheim, D A; Bridges, Craig A; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Gofryk, Krzysztof; Rindfleisch, M; Tomsic, M; Safa-Sefat, Athena

    2015-03-13

    Here we report on the optimization of synthesis of iron selenide-based superconducting powders and the fabrication of selenide-based wire. The powders were synthesized by an ammonothermal method, whereby Ba is intercalated between FeSe layers to produce Bax(NH3)yFe2Se2, with tetragonal structure similar to AFe2X2 (X: As, Se), '122', superconductors. The optimal Tc (up to 38 K) and Meissner and shielding superconducting fractions are obtained from the shortest reaction time (t) of reactants in liquid ammonia (30 min). With the increase of t, a second crystalline 122 phase, with a smaller unit cell, emerges. A small amount of NH3 is released from the structure above ~200 °C, which results in loss of superconductivity. However, in the confined space of niobium/Monel tubing, results indicate there is enough pressure for some of NH3 to remain in the crystal lattice, and thermal annealing can be performed at temperatures of up to 780 °C, increasing wire density and yielded a reasonable Tc ≈ 16 K. Here, we report of the first successful wire fabrication of non-arsenic high-Tc iron-based superconductor. We find that although bulk materials are estimated to carry critical current densities >100 kA cm₋2 (4 K, self-field), the current transport within wires need to be optimized (Jc ~ 1 kA cm₋2).

  10. Hijacking membrane transporters for arsenic phytoextraction

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Melissa S.; McKinney, Elizabeth C.; Meagher, Richard B.; Smith, Aaron P.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic is a toxic metalloid and recognized carcinogen. Arsenate and arsenite are the most common arsenic species available for uptake by plants. As an inorganic phosphate (Pi) analog, arsenate is acquired by plant roots through endogenous Pi transport systems. Inside the cell, arsenate is reduced to the thiol-reactive form arsenite. Glutathione (GSH)-conjugates of arsenite may be extruded from the cell or sequestered in vacuoles by members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transporters. In the present study we sought to enhance both plant arsenic uptake through Pi transporter overexpression, and plant arsenic tolerance through ABC transporter overexpression. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing the high-affinity Pi transporter family members, AtPht1;1 or AtPht1;7, are hypersensitive to arsenate due to increased arsenate uptake. These plants do not exhibit increased sensitivity to arsenite. Co-overexpression of the yeast ABC transporter YCF1 in combination with AtPht1;1 or AtPht1;7 suppresses the arsenate-sensitive phenotype while further enhancing arsenic uptake. Taken together, our results support an arsenic transport mechanism in which arsenate uptake is increased through Pi transporter overexpression, and arsenic tolerance is enhanced through YCF1-mediated vacuolar sequestration. This work substantiates the viability of coupling enhanced uptake and vacuolar sequestration as a means for developing a prototypical engineered arsenic hyperaccumulator. PMID:23108027

  11. Urinary excretion of arsenic following rice consumption.

    PubMed

    Meharg, A A; Williams, P N; Deacon, C M; Norton, G J; Hossain, M; Louhing, D; Marwa, E; Lawgalwi, Y; Taggart, M; Cascio, C; Haris, P

    2014-11-01

    Patterns of arsenic excretion were followed in a cohort (n = 6) eating a defined rice diet, 300 g per day d.wt. where arsenic speciation was characterized in cooked rice, following a period of abstinence from rice, and other high arsenic containing foods. A control group who did not consume rice were also monitored. The rice consumed in the study contained inorganic arsenic and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) at a ratio of 1:1, yet the urine speciation was dominated by DMA (90%). At steady state (rice consumption/urinary excretion) ∼40% of rice derived arsenic was excreted via urine. By monitoring of each urine pass throughout the day it was observed that there was considerable variation (up to 13-fold) for an individual's total arsenic urine content, and that there was a time dependent variation in urinary total arsenic content. This calls into question the robustness of routinely used first pass/spot check urine sampling for arsenic analysis.

  12. High-Brightness Blue and White LEDs based on Inorganic Perovskite Nanocrystals and their Composites.

    PubMed

    Yao, En-Ping; Yang, Zhanlue; Meng, Lei; Sun, Pengyu; Dong, Shiqi; Yang, Ye; Yang, Yang

    2017-04-10

    Inorganic metal halide perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) have been employed universally in light-emitting applications during the past two years. Here, blue-emission (≈470 nm) Cs-based perovskite NCs are derived by directly mixing synthesized bromide and chloride nanocrystals with a weight ratio of 2:1. High-brightness blue perovskite light-emitting diodes (PeLEDs) are obtained by controlling the grain size of the perovskite films. Moreover, a white PeLED is demonstrated for the first time by blending orange polymer materials with the blue perovskite nanocrystals as the active layer. Exciton transfer from the blue nanocrystals to the orange polymers via Förster or Dexter energy transfer is analyzed through time resolved photoluminescence. By tuning the ratio between the perovskite nanocrystals and polymers, pure white light is achieved with the a CIE coordinate at (0.33,0.34).

  13. Multilayer hybrid LEDs based on colloidal inorganic semiconductors nanocrystal and PIN technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Aurora; Mazzeo, Marco; Gigli, Giuseppe

    2008-04-01

    Light emitting devices (LEDs) based on colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals represent a matter of technological interest for the development of flat panel display and lighting systems. The appealing features of these materials are the high fluorescence efficiency, narrow ban edge emission, potential chemical stability, and tunable light emission across the visible spectrum. However the integration of these materials in the very promising PIN technology is still challenging due to the lack of an appropriate QD deposition technique. So far only wet deposition methods such as spin-coating and drop-casting have been exploited to realize QD thin film. Moreover QD thermal evaporation is not possible because of their high molecular weight. In this scenario we developed a dry, simple, and inexpensive deposition technique to transfer semiconductor QDs on organic semiconductor materials. We exploited this technique to fabricated an organic/inorganic hybrid red emitting device whit a doped hole transport layer.

  14. Human exposure to arsenic from drinking water in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Agusa, Tetsuro; Trang, Pham Thi Kim; Lan, Vi Mai; Anh, Duong Hong; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Viet, Pham Hung; Berg, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Vietnam is an agricultural country with a population of about 88 million, with some 18 million inhabitants living in the Red River Delta in Northern Vietnam. The present study reports the chemical analyses of 68 water and 213 biological (human hair and urine) samples conducted to investigate arsenic contamination in tube well water and human arsenic exposure in four districts (Tu Liem, Dan Phuong, Ly Nhan, and Hoai Duc) in the Red River Delta. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater in these areas were in the range of <1 to 632 μg/L, with severe contamination found in the communities Ly Nhan, Hoai Duc, and Dan Phuong. Arsenic concentrations were markedly lowered in water treated with sand filters, except for groundwater from Hoai Duc. Human hair samples had arsenic levels in the range of 0.07-7.51 μg/g, and among residents exposed to arsenic levels ≥50 μg/L, 64% of them had hair arsenic concentrations higher than 1 μg/g, which is a level that can cause skin lesions. Urinary arsenic concentrations were 4-435 μg/g creatinine. Concentrations of arsenic in hair and urine increased significantly with increasing arsenic content in drinking water, indicating that drinking water is a significant source of arsenic exposure for these residents. The percentage of inorganic arsenic (IA) in urine decreased with age, whereas the opposite trend was observed for monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) in urine. Significant co-interactions of age and arsenic exposure status were also detected for concentrations of arsenic in hair and the sum of IA, MMA, and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in urine and %MMA. In summary, this study demonstrates that a considerable proportion of the Vietnamese population is exposed to arsenic levels of chronic toxicity, even if sand filters reduce exposure in many households. Health problems caused by arsenic ingestion through drinking water are increasingly reported in Vietnam.

  15. Magentite nanoparticle for arsenic remotion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viltres, H.; Odio, O. F.; Borja, R.; Aguilera, Y.; Reguera, E.

    2017-01-01

    Inorganic As (V) and As (III) species are commonly found in groundwater in many countries around the world. It is known that arsenic is highly toxic and carcinogenic, at present exist reports of diverse countries with arsenic concentrations in drinking water higher than those proposed by the World Health Organization (10 μg/L). It has been reported that adsorption strategies using magnetic nanoparticles as magnetite (<20 nm) proved to be very efficient for the removal of arsenic in drinking water. Magnetic nanoparticles (magnetite) were prepared using a co-precipitation method with FeCl3 and FeCl2 as metal source and NaOH aqueous solution as precipitating agent. Magnetite nanoparticles synthesized were put in contact with As2O3 and As2O5 solutions at room temperature to pH 4 and 7. The nanoparticles were characterized by FT-IR, DRX, UV-vis, and XRF. The results showed that synthesized magnetite had an average diameter of 11 nm and a narrow size distribution. The presence of arsenic on magnetite nanoparticles surface was confirmed, which is more remarkable when As (V) is employed. Besides, it is possible to observe that no significant changes in the band gap values after adsorption of arsenic in the nanoparticles.

  16. Arsenic Concentrations and Speciation in Shellfishes from Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, C.; Yoon, H.

    2005-12-01

    Speciation of arsenic has received significant attention over the past 20 years in both mechanistic and exposure assessment research. Because the toxicity of arsenic is related to its oxidation state and its chemical forms, the determination of the total arsenic contents in a sample is not adequate to allow its impact on living organisms to be estimated. The inorganic arsenic species, arsenite (As3+) and arsenate (As5+), have been classified as carcinogenic and the methylated forms, monomethyl arsonic acid (MMA) and dimethyl arsinic acid (DMA) have recently been identified as cancer promoters. The highly methylated compounds like as arsenobetaine (AsB) and arsenocholine (AsC) are considered to be nontoxic. Although organisms in marine environment contain high amounts of total arsenic (ppm level), it is not usually present as inorganic arsenic or simple methylated forms well known as one of the toxic species. Arsenobetaine is the dominant species in marine animals and arsenosugars are most abundant in marine algae. This study aims to clarify those arsenic species present in the whole body of eleven different shellfishes from Korea. And those arsenic species were separated and measured by characterization using high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) coupled system. The separation of arsenic species was achieved on anion exchange column and cation exchange column using phosphate and pyridine eluent, respectively. The ultrasonic extraction was employed for extraction of arsenic from whole body of shellfishes. The method was validated by analyzing three certified reference materials (DORM-2, TORT-2, 1566b). Total arsenic concentrations ranged from 0.1 mg/kg dry mass to 21.7 mg/kg dry mass. Most marine shellfishes contained higher arsenobetaine and arsenocholine with the exception of two shellfishes living in river. The lower amounts of inorganic arsenic species were also found in the some sample extracts

  17. Six new inorganic-organic hybrids based on rigid triangular ligands: Syntheses, structures and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Huang, Rudan

    2016-01-01

    Six new inorganic-organic hybrids based on rigid triangular N-containing ligands, NaCuI2(tib)4(H2O)4[H2PWVWVI11O40][H2PWVI12O40]·6H2O (1), CuII3(tib)4Cl4[H2PWVI12O40]2·4H2O (2), Co(tib)2[PWV3WVI9O38]·5H2O (3), CuII3(tib)2[P2MoVI5O22(O2)]·4H2O (4), Mn(pytpy)2MoVI4O13 (5) and Co(pytpy)2MoVI4O13 (6) (tib=1,3,5-tris(1-imidazolyl)benzene, pytpy=4'-(4"-pyridyl)2,4':6',4"-terpyridine), have been hydrothermally synthesized. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies revealed that compounds 1-4 display two-dimensional (2D) layered structures, and in compounds 1-3, the adjacent Keggin anions link with each other by W-O-W covalent interactions to form 1D inorganic chains. Compounds 5-6 are 3D "pillar-layer" frameworks based on bimetal-oxide layers pillared by the pytpy ligands. The compounds have been characterized by elemental analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analyses. Moreover, the electrochemical and catalytic properties of compound 1 have been investigated as well.

  18. Self-assembled organic–inorganic magnetic hybrid adsorbent ferrite based on cyclodextrin nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Denadai, Ângelo M L; De Sousa, Frederico B; Passos, Joel J; Guatimosim, Fernando C; Barbosa, Kirla D; Burgos, Ana E; de Oliveira, Fernando Castro; da Silva, Jeann C; Neves, Bernardo R A; Mohallem, Nelcy D S

    2012-01-01

    Summary Organic–inorganic magnetic hybrid materials (MHMs) combine a nonmagnetic and a magnetic component by means of electrostatic interactions or covalent bonds, and notable features can be achieved. Herein, we describe an application of a self-assembled material based on ferrite associated with β-cyclodextrin (Fe-Ni/Zn/βCD) at the nanoscale level. This MHM and pure ferrite (Fe-Ni/Zn) were used as an adsorbent system for Cr3+ and Cr2O7 2− ions in aqueous solutions. Prior to the adsorption studies, both ferrites were characterized in order to determine the particle size distribution, morphology and available binding sites on the surface of the materials. Microscopy analysis demonstrated that both ferrites present two different size domains, at the micro- and nanoscale level, with the latter being able to self-assemble into larger particles. Fe-Ni/Zn/βCD presented smaller particles and a more homogeneous particle size distribution. Higher porosity for this MHM compared to Fe-Ni/Zn was observed by Brunauer–Emmett–Teller isotherms and positron-annihilation-lifetime spectroscopy. Based on the pKa values, potentiometric titrations demonstrated the presence of βCD in the inorganic matrix, indicating that the lamellar structures verified by transmission electronic microscopy can be associated with βCD assembled structures. Colloidal stability was inferred as a function of time at different pH values, indicating the sedimentation rate as a function of pH. Zeta potential measurements identified an amphoteric behavior for the Fe-Ni/Zn/βCD, suggesting its better capability to remove ions (cations and anions) from aqueous solutions compared to that of Fe-Ni/Zn. PMID:23209524

  19. [Arsenic - Poison or medicine?].

    PubMed

    Kulik-Kupka, Karolina; Koszowska, Aneta; Brończyk-Puzoń, Anna; Nowak, Justyna; Gwizdek, Katarzyna; Zubelewicz-Szkodzińska, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is commonly known as a poison. Only a few people know that As has also been widely used in medicine. In the past years As and its compounds were used as a medicine for the treatment of such diseases as diabetes, psoriasis, syphilis, skin ulcers and joint diseases. Nowadays As is also used especially in the treatment of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has recognized arsenic as an element with carcinogenic effect evidenced by epidemiological studies, but as previously mentioned it is also used in the treatment of neoplastic diseases. This underlines the specificity of the arsenic effects. Arsenic occurs widely in the natural environment, for example, it is present in soil and water, which contributes to its migration to food products. Long exposure to this element may lead to liver damages and also to changes in myocardium. Bearing in mind that such serious health problems can occur, monitoring of the As presence in the environmental media plays a very important role. In addition, the occupational risk of As exposure in the workplace should be identified and checked. Also the standards for As presence in food should be established. This paper presents a review of the 2015 publications based on the Medical database like PubMed and Polish Medical Bibliography. It includes the most important information about arsenic in both forms, poison and medicine.

  20. Assessment of health risks due to arsenic from iron ore lumps in a beach setting.

    PubMed

    Swartjes, Frank A; Janssen, Paul J C M

    2016-09-01

    In 2011, an artificial hook-shaped peninsula of 128ha beach area was created along the Dutch coast, containing thousands of iron ore lumps, which include arsenic from natural origin. Elemental arsenic and inorganic arsenic induce a range of toxicological effects and has been classified as proven human carcinogens. The combination of easy access to the beach and the presence of arsenic raised concern about possible human health effects by the local authorities. The objective of this study is therefore to investigate human health risks from the presence of arsenic-containing iron ore lumps in a beach setting. The exposure scenarios underlying the human health-based risk limits for contaminated land in The Netherlands, based on soil material ingestion and a residential setting, are not appropriate. Two specific exposure scenarios related to the playing with iron ore lumps on the beach ('sandcastle building') are developed on the basis of expert judgement, relating to children in the age of 2 to 12years, i.e., a worst case exposure scenario and a precautionary scenario. Subsequently, exposure is calculated by the quantification of the following factors: hand loading, soil-mouth transfer effectivity, hand-mouth contact frequency, contact surface, body weight and the relative oral bioavailability factor. By lack of consensus on a universal reference dose for arsenic for use in the stage of risk characterization, three different types of assessments have been evaluated: on the basis of the current Provisional Tolerable Daily Intake (PTWI), on the basis of the Benchmark Dose Lower limit (BMDL), and by a comparison of exposure from the iron ore lumps with background exposure. It is concluded, certainly from the perspective of the conservative exposure assessment, that unacceptable human health risks due to exposure to arsenic from the iron ore lumps are unlikely and there is no need for risk management actions.

  1. Biotransformation and biomethylation of arsenic by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Wu, Mingyin; Lu, Gan; Si, Youbin

    2016-02-01

    The resistance of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to toxic arsenic was investigated by measuring the growth of the bacteria in the presence of As(III) and As(V) in different growth media. The bacteria were shown to biotransform arsenic through the partial methylation of inorganic arsenic into methylated metabolites. This biotransformation of inorganic arsenic by S. oneidensis MR-1 was affected by the methyl donor, the composition of the medium, and the presence of Fe(III). The relative content of methylated arsenic in the medium containing S-adenosyl methionine as the methyl donor was greater than that in the medium containing methylcobalamin. The biotransformation process driven by Fe-reducing bacteria, and occurred in combination with microbially mediated As-Fe reduction in the presence of Fe(III). The results demonstrate that S. oneidensis MR-1 methylates inorganic arsenic into less toxic organoarsenic compounds. This process has potential applications in the bioremediation of environmental arsenic, and the results provide new insights into the control of in situ arsenic pollution.

  2. Using environmental chemistry technologies for the removal of arsenic from drinking water, and fat and oil based phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutterlin, William R.

    The first four chapters of this dissertation involve the removal of arsenic from drinking water. Various forms of a macroporous char prepared by partial gasification of subbituminous coal were studied for removal of arsenic(V) and arsenic(III) from water. In increasing order of effectiveness for arsenic(V) removal were untreated char < acid-washed char < char impregnated with iron(III) and gasified < char impregnated with FeS < char impregnated with iron(III) hydroxide < char coated with zerovalent iron < char impregnated with iron(III) oxide. A mass of 10 g of iron(III) oxide char removed arsenic(V) and arsenic(III) from 10,000 mL of water containing 500 micrograms/L of arsenic to levels below 10 micrograms/L. The capacity of the solid to remove arsenic was significantly diminished in water containing 4 mg/L of phosphate. An electrical current passed over 4 g of iron(III) oxide char in a column enabled removal of arsenic(III) from 14,000 mL of 500 micrograms/L arsenic(III) to below 10 micrograms/liter and at significantly higher flow rates than could be employed without electrolysis. The fifth chapter in this dissertation focused on the retention of organics onto a char/concrete pellet. A mixture of naphthalene, pentachlorophenol, biphenyl, toluene, tetrachloroethane, and chlorobenzene were impregnated into a loose granular char, a char/concrete pellet and a sand/concrete pellet. The results showed that the char/concrete pellet had significant advantages over the other forms. Chapters 6--9 focus on phase change materials (PCMs). These PCMs are made from fats and oils. PCMs are perhaps the only proven method that can provide near 100% thermal energy storage. In chapter 7 a novel HPLC method was developed that could provide quantification and qualification of the resulting products formed after PCM synthesis. In chapter 8 thermal cycling studies were conducted on the fat and oil based PCMs. These thermal cycle demonstrated that these PCMs were capable of going

  3. ARSENIC AND THE EPIGENOME: LINKED BY METHYLATION(Thailand)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is an environmental toxicant currently poisoning millions of people worldwide. The most common route of As exposure in humans is through the consumption of drinking water contaminated with iAs from natural, geologic sources. Inorganic As exists in drinking...

  4. Recent Advances in the Measurement of Arsenic, Cadmium, and Mercury in Rice and Other Foods

    PubMed Central

    Punshon, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Trace element analysis of foods is of increasing importance because of raised consumer awareness and the need to evaluate and establish regulatory guidelines for toxic trace metals and metalloids. This paper reviews recent advances in the analysis of trace elements in food, including challenges, state-of-the art methods, and use of spatially resolved techniques for localizing the distribution of As and Hg within rice grains. Total elemental analysis of foods is relatively well-established but the push for ever lower detection limits requires that methods be robust from potential matrix interferences which can be particularly severe for food. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is the method of choice, allowing for multi-element and highly sensitive analyses. For arsenic, speciation analysis is necessary because the inorganic forms are more likely to be subject to regulatory limits. Chromatographic techniques coupled to ICP-MS are most often used for arsenic speciation and a range of methods now exist for a variety of different arsenic species in different food matrices. Speciation and spatial analysis of foods, especially rice, can also be achieved with synchrotron techniques. Sensitive analytical techniques and methodological advances provide robust methods for the assessment of several metals in animal and plant-based foods, in particular for arsenic, cadmium and mercury in rice and arsenic speciation in foodstuffs. PMID:25938012

  5. ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER SUPPLY WELLS: A MULTI-AGENCY, COMMUNITY-BASED, RESEARCH PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies have indicated that arsenic concentrations greater than the new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) concentration of 10 micrograms per liter (µg/L) occur in numerous aquifers around the United States. One such aquifer is the Central ...

  6. Arsenic-Based Life: An Active Learning Assignment for Teaching Scientif