Science.gov

Sample records for inorganic chemical biology

  1. Applications of Inorganic Photochemistry in the Chemical and Biological Sciences - Contemporary Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanze, Kirk S.; Schmehl, Russell H.

    1997-06-01

    In the early 1980s this Journal published a series of "State of The Art" issues, in which pedagogical articles discussing basic principles and recent advances in a variety of chemical subdisciplines were gathered. One of these dealt with advances in inorganic photochemistry (1). The issue was based upon a symposium organized by Morton Hoffman of Boston University and held at the Seattle meeting of the American Chemical Society in 1983. The articles published in the Journal provide an excellent introduction to the basic principles of spectroscopy and photophysics of inorganic molecules as well as a discussion of the hotochemistry of particular molecular systems being actively investigated at the time. The collection of articles remains to this day an excellent resource to introduce students to the concepts of inorganic photochemistry.

  2. Inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, M.R.; Tavlarides, L.

    1997-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers are developing a technology that combines metal chelation extraction technology and synthesis chemistry. They begin with a ceramic substrate such as alumina, titanium oxide or silica gel because they provide high surface area, high mechanical strength, and radiolytic stability. One preparation method involves silylation to hydrophobize the surface, followed by chemisorption of a suitable chelation agent using vapor deposition. Another route attaches newly designed chelating agents through covalent bonding by the use of coupling agents. These approaches provide stable and selective, inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs) tailored for removal of metals. The technology has the following advantages over ion exchange: (1) higher mechanical strength, (2) higher resistance to radiation fields, (3) higher selectivity for the desired metal ion, (4) no cation exchange, (5) reduced or no interference from accompanying anions, (6) faster kinetics, and (7) easy and selective regeneration. Target waste streams include metal-containing groundwater/process wastewater at ORNL`s Y-12 Plant (multiple metals), Savannah River Site (SRS), Rocky Flats (multiple metals), and Hanford; aqueous mixed wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); and scrubber water generated at SRS and INEL. Focus Areas that will benefit from this research include Mixed Waste, and Subsurface Contaminants.

  3. Computational systems chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Oprea, Tudor I; May, Elebeoba E; Leitão, Andrei; Tropsha, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    There is a critical need for improving the level of chemistry awareness in systems biology. The data and information related to modulation of genes and proteins by small molecules continue to accumulate at the same time as simulation tools in systems biology and whole body physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) continue to evolve. We called this emerging area at the interface between chemical biology and systems biology systems chemical biology (SCB) (Nat Chem Biol 3: 447-450, 2007).The overarching goal of computational SCB is to develop tools for integrated chemical-biological data acquisition, filtering and processing, by taking into account relevant information related to interactions between proteins and small molecules, possible metabolic transformations of small molecules, as well as associated information related to genes, networks, small molecules, and, where applicable, mutants and variants of those proteins. There is yet an unmet need to develop an integrated in silico pharmacology/systems biology continuum that embeds drug-target-clinical outcome (DTCO) triplets, a capability that is vital to the future of chemical biology, pharmacology, and systems biology. Through the development of the SCB approach, scientists will be able to start addressing, in an integrated simulation environment, questions that make the best use of our ever-growing chemical and biological data repositories at the system-wide level. This chapter reviews some of the major research concepts and describes key components that constitute the emerging area of computational systems chemical biology.

  4. Chemical space and biology.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Christopher M

    2004-12-16

    Chemical space--which encompasses all possible small organic molecules, including those present in biological systems--is vast. So vast, in fact, that so far only a tiny fraction of it has been explored. Nevertheless, these explorations have greatly enhanced our understanding of biology, and have led to the development of many of today's drugs. The discovery of new bioactive molecules, facilitated by a deeper understanding of the nature of the regions of chemical space that are relevant to biology, will advance our knowledge of biological processes and lead to new strategies to treat disease.

  5. Biological and Chemical Security

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, P J

    2002-12-19

    The LLNL Chemical & Biological National Security Program (CBNP) provides science, technology and integrated systems for chemical and biological security. Our approach is to develop and field advanced strategies that dramatically improve the nation's capabilities to prevent, prepare for, detect, and respond to terrorist use of chemical or biological weapons. Recent events show the importance of civilian defense against terrorism. The 1995 nerve gas attack in Tokyo's subway served to catalyze and focus the early LLNL program on civilian counter terrorism. In the same year, LLNL began CBNP using Laboratory-Directed R&D investments and a focus on biodetection. The Nunn-Lugar-Domenici Defense Against Weapons of Mass Destruction Act, passed in 1996, initiated a number of U.S. nonproliferation and counter-terrorism programs including the DOE (now NNSA) Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (also known as CBNP). In 2002, the Department of Homeland Security was formed. The NNSA CBNP and many of the LLNL CBNP activities are being transferred as the new Department becomes operational. LLNL has a long history in national security including nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction. In biology, LLNL had a key role in starting and implementing the Human Genome Project and, more recently, the Microbial Genome Program. LLNL has over 1,000 scientists and engineers with relevant expertise in biology, chemistry, decontamination, instrumentation, microtechnologies, atmospheric modeling, and field experimentation. Over 150 LLNL scientists and engineers work full time on chemical and biological national security projects.

  6. A Summary of the Manufacture of Important Inorganic Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenier, Philip J.

    1983-01-01

    Manufacture, properties, uses, and economic aspects of inorganic chemicals are discussed in an industrial chemistry course. Provided and discussed is a flowchart used in the course. The flowchart is a logical method of presenting the important features of inorganic chemicals and a summarizing their method of manufacture. (JN)

  7. Chemical and Biological Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel', N. M.

    1981-10-01

    Examples of the application of the methods and ideas of chemical kinetics in various branches of chemistry and biology are considered and the results of studies on the kinetics and mechanisms of autoxidation and inhibited and catalysed oxidation of organic substances in the liquid phase are surveyed. Problems of the kinetics of the ageing of polymers and the principles of their stabilisation are discussed and certain trends in biological kinetics (kinetics of tumour growth, kinetic criteria of the effectiveness of chemotherapy, problems of gerontology, etc.) are considered. The bibliography includes 281 references.

  8. Morphology-preserving chemical conversion of bioorganic and inorganic templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernon, Jonathan Paul

    The generation of nanostructured assemblies with complex (three-dimensional, 3D) self-assembled morphologies and with complex (multicomponent) tailorable inorganic compositions is of considerable technological and scientific interest. This dissertation demonstrates self-assembled 3D organic templates of biogenic origin can be converted into replicas comprised of numerous other functional nanocrystalline inorganic materials. Nature provides a spectacular variety of biologically-assembled 3D organic structures with intricate, hierarchical (macro-to-micro-to-nanoscale) morphologies. Such processing on readily-available structurally complex templates provides a framework for chemical conversion of synthetic organic templates and, potentially, production of organic/inorganic composites. Four specific research thrusts are detailed in this document. First, chemical conversion of a nanostructured bioorganic template into a multicomponent oxide compound (tetragonal BaTiO3) via SSG coating and subsequent morphology-preserving microwave hydrothermal processing is demonstrated. Second, morphology-preserving chemical conversion of bioorganic templates into hierarchical photoluminescent microparticles is demonstrated to reveal both the dramatic change in properties such processing can provide, and the potential utility of chemically transformed templates in anti-counterfeiting / authentication applications. Third, determination of the reaction mechanism(s) for morphology-preserving microwave hydrothermal conversion of TiO2 to BaTiO3, through Au inert markers on single crystal rutile titania, is detailed. Finally, utilization of constructive coating techniques (SSG) and moderate temperature (< 500°C) heat treatments to modify and replicate structural color is coupled with deconstructive focused ion beam microsurgery to prepare samples for microscale structure interrogation. Specifically, the effects of coating thickness and composition on reflection spectra of structurally

  9. Chemical synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Chiarabelli, Cristiano; Luisi, Pier Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Although both the most popular form of synthetic biology (SB) and chemical synthetic biology (CSB) share the biotechnologically useful aim of making new forms of life, SB does so by using genetic manipulation of extant microorganism, while CSB utilises classic chemical procedures in order to obtain biological structures which are non-existent in nature. The main query concerning CSB is the philosophical question: why did nature do this, and not that? The idea then is to synthesise alternative structures in order to understand why nature operated in such a particular way. We briefly present here some various examples of CSB, including those cases of nucleic acids synthesised with pyranose instead of ribose, and proteins with a reduced alphabet of amino acids; also we report the developing research on the "never born proteins" (NBP) and "never born RNA" (NBRNA), up to the minimal cell project, where the issue is the preparation of semi-synthetic cells that can perform the basic functions of biological cells.

  10. An all-inorganic polyoxometalate-polyoxocation chemical garden.

    PubMed

    Points, Laurie J; Cooper, Geoffrey J T; Dolbecq, Anne; Mialane, Pierre; Cronin, Leroy

    2016-01-31

    Herein, we show it is possible to produce wholly inorganic chemical gardens from a cationic polyoxometalate (POM) seed in an anionic POM solution, demonstrating a wholly POM-based chemical garden system that produces architectures over a wide concentration range. Six concentration dependent growth regimes have been discovered and characterized: clouds, membranes, slugs, tubes, jetting and budding.

  11. Cleavable linkers in chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Leriche, Geoffray; Chisholm, Louise; Wagner, Alain

    2012-01-15

    Interest in cleavable linkers is growing due to the rapid development and expansion of chemical biology. The chemical constrains imposed by the biological conditions cause significant challenges for organic chemists. In this review we will present an overview of the cleavable linkers used in chemical biology classified according to their cleavage conditions by enzymes, nucleophilic/basic reagents, reducing agents, photo-irradiation, electrophilic/acidic reagents, organometallic and metal reagents, oxidizing reagents.

  12. Chemical genomics in plant biology.

    PubMed

    Sadhukhan, Ayan; Sahoo, Lingaraj; Panda, Sanjib Kumar

    2012-06-01

    Chemical genomics is a newly emerged and rapidly progressing field in biology, where small chemical molecules bind specifically and reversibly to protein(s) to modulate their function(s), leading to the delineation and subsequent unravelling of biological processes. This approach overcomes problems like lethality and redundancy of classical genetics. Armed with the powerful techniques of combinatorial synthesis, high-throughput screening and target discovery chemical genomics expands its scope to diverse areas in biology. The well-established genetic system of Arabidopsis model allows chemical genomics to enter into the realm of plant biology exploring signaling pathways of growth regulators, endomembrane signaling cascades, plant defense mechanisms and many more events.

  13. Applications of Inorganic Chemistry in Biology: An Interdisciplinary Graduate Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Nicholas; Ross, Paul; Roat, Rosette M.

    1998-06-01

    Inorganic chemistry faculty at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) are offering an advanced, interdisciplinary, graduate course entitled "Applications of Inorganic Chemistry in Biology". The course utilizes examples from bioinorganic chemistry to introduce advanced topics in synthesis, structural analysis, and analytical methods that are practiced by inorganic chemists. Emphasis is placed on the structure and function of trace and ultratrace transition metals in biological systems and on the use of metals for medicinal purposes. Instrumental techniques such as electron paramagnetic resonance, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography are explained in the detail necessary to familiarize students with their use for analysis of bioinorganic systems and their models. Students have take-home examinations during the term and write a term paper describing a metalloprotein whose X-ray structure data is listed in Brookhaven protein data base. The paper follows the same course pattern of classroom discussion of a bioinorganic system, concentrating on the coordination geometry and nearest neighbor contacts of the metal-binding site in the protein, substrate binding site, and relevance to the metalloprotein or enzyme function, mechanism of action of the enzyme or protein, spectroscopic studies on the metal-binding site, and model studies for the protein's metal-binding site. The instructors conclude that their basic goals for the course - introduction to advanced inorganic chemistry topics using bioinorganic examples with emphasis on primary literature sources and computer-assisted displays - are being accomplished.

  14. Bright ideas for chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Lavis, Luke D; Raines, Ronald T

    2008-03-20

    Small-molecule fluorescent probes embody an essential facet of chemical biology. Although numerous compounds are known, the ensemble of fluorescent probes is based on a modest collection of modular "core" dyes. The elaboration of these dyes with diverse chemical moieties is enabling the precise interrogation of biochemical and biological systems. The importance of fluorescence-based technologies in chemical biology elicits a necessity to understand the major classes of small-molecule fluorophores. Here, we examine the chemical and photophysical properties of oft-used fluorophores and highlight classic and contemporary examples in which utility has been built upon these scaffolds.

  15. Approaches to chemical synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Chiarabelli, Cristiano; Stano, Pasquale; Anella, Fabrizio; Carrara, Paolo; Luisi, Pier Luigi

    2012-07-16

    Synthetic biology is first represented in terms of two complementary aspects, the bio-engineering one, based on the genetic manipulation of extant microbial forms in order to obtain forms of life which do not exist in nature; and the chemical synthetic biology, an approach mostly based on chemical manipulation for the laboratory synthesis of biological structures that do not exist in nature. The paper is mostly devoted to shortly review chemical synthetic biology projects currently carried out in our laboratory. In particular, we describe: the minimal cell project, then the "Never Born Proteins" and lastly the Never Born RNAs. We describe and critically analyze the main results, emphasizing the possible relevance of chemical synthetic biology for the progress in basic science and biotechnology.

  16. Synthetic Biology for Specialty Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Markham, Kelly A; Alper, Hal S

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we address recent advances in the field of synthetic biology and describe how those tools have been applied to produce a wide variety of chemicals in microorganisms. Here we classify the expansion of the synthetic biology toolbox into three different categories based on their primary function in strain engineering-for design, for construction, and for optimization. Next, focusing on recent years, we look at how chemicals have been produced using these new synthetic biology tools. Advances in producing fuels are briefly described, followed by a more thorough treatment of commodity chemicals, specialty chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and nutraceuticals. Throughout this review, an emphasis is placed on how synthetic biology tools are applied to strain engineering. Finally, we discuss organism and host strain diversity and provide a future outlook in the field.

  17. The aesthetics of chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Glenn

    2012-12-01

    Scientists and philosophers have long reflected on the place of aesthetics in science. In this essay, I review these discussions, identifying work of relevance to chemistry and, in particular, to the field of chemical biology. Topics discussed include the role of aesthetics in scientific theory choice, the aesthetics of molecular images, the beauty-making features of molecules, and the relation between the aesthetics of chemical biology and the aesthetics of industrial design.

  18. Thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurjo, A.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

    1994-04-01

    This report describes the results of a literature review to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are being developed to separate gaseous products produced by the gasification or combustion of coal in fixed-, fluidized-, and entrained-bed gasifiers, direct coal-fired turbines, and pressurized-fluidized-bed combustors. Several impurities, such as H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and trace metal compounds are generated during coal conversion, and they must be removed from the coal gas or the combustor flue gas to meet environmental standards. The use of membranes to separate these noxious gases is an attractive alternative to their removal by sorbents such as zinc titanate or calcium oxide. Inorganic membranes that have a high separation efficiency and exhibit both thermal and chemical stability would improve the economics of power generation from coal. The U.S. Department of Energy is supporting investigations to develop inorganic membranes for separating hydrogen from coal gas streams and noxious impurities from hot coal- and flue-gas streams. Membrane materials that have been investigated in the past include glass (silica), alumina, zirconia, carbon, and metals (Pd and Pt).

  19. Chemical aspects of synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Luisi, Pier Luigi

    2007-04-01

    Synthetic biology as a broad and novel field has also a chemical branch: whereas synthetic biology generally has to do with bioengineering of new forms of life (generally bacteria) which do not exist in nature, 'chemical synthetic biology' is concerned with the synthesis of chemical structures such as proteins, nucleic acids, vesicular forms, and other which do not exist in nature. Three examples of this 'chemical synthetic biology' approach are given in this article. The first example deals with the synthesis of proteins that do not exist in nature, and dubbed as 'the never born proteins' (NBPs). This research is related to the question why and how the protein structures existing in our world have been selected out, with the underlying question whether they have something very particular from the structural or thermodynamic point of view (for example, the folding). The NBPs are produced in the laboratory by the modern molecular biology technique, the phage display, so as to produce a very large library of proteins having no homology with known proteins. The second example of chemical synthetic biology has also to do with the laboratory synthesis of proteins, but, this time, adopting a prebiotic synthetic procedure, the fragment condensation of short peptides, where short means that they have a length that can be obtained by prebiotic methods; for example, from the condensation of N-carboxy anhydrides. The scheme is illustrated and discussed, being based on the fragment condensation catalyzed by peptides endowed with proteolitic activity. Selection during chain growth is determined by solubility under the contingent environmental conditions, i.e., the peptides which result insoluble are eliminated from further growth. The scheme is tested preliminarily with a synthetic chemical fragment-condensation method and brings to the synthesis of a 44-residues-long protein, which has no homology with known proteins, and which has a stable tertiary folding. Finally, the third

  20. Environmental and biological monitoring of workers exposed to inorganic lead.

    PubMed

    De Medinilla, J; Espigares, M

    1991-01-01

    A total of 20 workers who were exposed to inorganic lead in two local firms (M and N) were studied. Lead concentrations in the air (PbA) at firm M exceeded the threshold limit value (TLV) of 0.150 mg/m3 established by Spanish and EC legislation, while atmospheric lead at firm N exceeded the action level of 0.075 mg/m3. In the same population, biological exposure indices (BEI) were also determined; these included lead in whole blood (PbB), erythrocyte activity of aminolevulinic acid (ALA-D), urinary excretion of aminolevulinic acid (ALA-U) and zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP). The relationship between the exposure parameters (PbA, PbB) and the biological activity indices (ALA-D, ALA-U, ZPP) were analysed statistically in order to obtain levels of significance, coefficients of correlation and regression equations. The high coefficients of correlation found confirm the usefulness of BEI in evaluating exposure to lead fumes and lead dust.

  1. The chemical biology of sirtuins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Zang, Wenwen; Wang, Juan; Huang, Yajun; He, Yanhua; Yan, Lingling; Liu, Jiajia; Zheng, Weiping

    2015-08-01

    The sirtuin family of enzymes are able to catalyze the N(ε)-acyl-lysine deacylation reaction on histone and non-histone protein substrates. Over the past years since the discovery of its founding member (i.e. the yeast silent information regulator 2 (sir2) protein) in 2000, the sirtuin-catalyzed deacylation reaction has been demonstrated to play an important regulatory role in multiple crucial cellular processes such as transcription, DNA damage repair, and metabolism. This reaction has also been regarded as a current therapeutic target for human diseases such as cancer, and metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases. The unique β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD(+) or NAD(+))-dependent nature of the sirtuin-catalyzed deacylation reaction has also engendered extensive mechanistic studies, resulting in a mechanistic view of the enzyme chemistry supported by several lines of experimental evidence. On the journey toward these knowledge advances, chemical biological means have constituted an important functional arsenal; technically, a variety of chemical probes and modulators (inhibitors and activators) have been developed and some of them have been employed toward an enhanced mechanistic and functional (pharmacological) understanding of the sirtuin-catalyzed deacylation reaction. On the other hand, an enhanced mechanistic understanding has also facilitated the development of a variety of chemical probes and modulators. This article will review the tremendous accomplishments achieved during the past few years in the field of sirtuin chemical biology. It is hoped that this would also help to set a stage for how outstanding mechanistic and functional questions for the sirtuin-catalyzed deacylation reaction could be addressed in the future from the chemical biology perspective.

  2. Chemical Form Matters: Differential Accumulation of Mercury Following Inorganic and Organic Mercury Exposures in Zebrafish Larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Korbas, Malgorzata; MacDonald, Tracy C.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; George, Graham N.; Krone, Patrick H.

    2013-04-08

    Mercury, one of the most toxic elements, exists in various chemical forms each with different toxicities and health implications. Some methylated mercury forms, one of which exists in fish and other seafood products, pose a potential threat, especially during embryonic and early postnatal development. Despite global concerns, little is known about the mechanisms underlying transport and toxicity of different mercury species. To investigate the impact of different mercury chemical forms on vertebrate development, we have successfully combined the zebrafish, a well-established developmental biology model system, with synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence imaging. Our work revealed substantial differences in tissue-specific accumulation patterns of mercury in zebrafish larvae exposed to four different mercury formulations in water. Methylmercury species not only resulted in overall higher mercury burdens but also targeted different cells and tissues than their inorganic counterparts, thus revealing a significant role of speciation in cellular and molecular targeting and mercury sequestration. For methylmercury species, the highest mercury concentrations were in the eye lens epithelial cells, independent of the formulation ligand (chloride versus L-cysteine). For inorganic mercury species, in absence of L-cysteine, the olfactory epithelium and kidney accumulated the greatest amounts of mercury. However, with L-cysteine present in the treatment solution, mercuric bis-L-cysteineate species dominated the treatment, significantly decreasing uptake. Our results clearly demonstrate that the common differentiation between organic and inorganic mercury is not sufficient to determine the toxicity of various mercury species.

  3. Inorganic concepts relevant to metal binding, activity, and toxicity in a biological system

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeschele, J.D. . Parke-Davis Pharmaceutical Research Div.); Turner, J.E.; England, M.W. )

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review selected physical and inorganic concepts and factors which might be important in assessing and/or understanding the fact and disposition of a metal system in a biological environment. Hopefully, such inquiries will ultimately permit us to understand, rationalize, and predict differences and trends in biological effects as a function of the basic nature of a metal system and, in optimal cases, serve as input to a system of guidelines for the notion of Chemical Dosimetry.'' The plan of this paper is to first review, in general terms, the basic principles of the Crystal Field Theory (CFT), a unifying theory of bonding in metal complexes. This will provide the necessary theoretical background for the subsequent discussion of selected concepts and factors. 21 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Ion-selective interactions of biologically relevant inorganic ions with alanine zwitterion: a 3D-RISM study.

    PubMed

    Fedotova, Marina V; Dmitrieva, Olga A

    2015-05-01

    The ion-molecular association between inorganic ions and the charged groups of alanine zwitterion in biologically relevant aqueous salt solutions, namely NaCl(aq), KCl(aq), MgCl2(aq), and CaCl2(aq), has been investigated over a wide range of electrolyte concentration. The influence of salt concentration on the stability of the formed ion-molecular associates is analyzed. The structure of the formed aggregates and its dependence on salt concentration and chemical nature of the inorganic ion are discussed.

  5. Olefin Metathesis for Chemical Biology

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Joseph B; Raines, Ronald T

    2009-01-01

    Summary Chemical biology relies on effective synthetic chemistry for building molecules to probe and modulate biological function. Olefin metathesis in organic solvents is a valuable addition to this armamentarium, and developments during the previous decade are enabling metathesis in aqueous solvents for the manipulation of biomolecules. Functional group-tolerant ruthenium metathesis catalysts modified with charged moieties or hydrophilic polymers are soluble and active in water, enabling ring-opening metathesis polymerization, cross metathesis, and ring-closing metathesis. Alternatively, conventional hydrophobic ruthenium complexes catalyze a similar array of metathesis reactions in mixtures of water and organic solvents. This strategy has enabled cross metathesis on the surface of a protein. Continuing developments in catalyst design and methodology will popularize the bioorthogonal reactivity of metathesis. PMID:18935975

  6. PHOTOELECTROCHEMISTRY AND PHOTOCATALYSIS IN NANOSCALE INORGANIC CHEMICAL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Mallouk

    2007-05-27

    The goal of our DOE-supported research has been to explore the use of solid state materials as organizing media for, and as active components of, artificial photosynthetic systems. In this work we strive to understand how photoinduced electron and energy transfer reactions occur in the solid state, and to elucidate design principles for using nanoscale inorganic materials in photochemical energy conversion schemes. A unifying theme in this project has been to move beyond the study of simple transient charge separation to integrated chemical systems that can effect permanent charge separation in the form of energy-rich chemicals. This project explored the use of zeolites as organizing media for electron donor-acceptor systems and artificial photosynthetic assemblies. Layer-by-layer synthetic methods were developed using lamellar semiconductors, and multi-step, visible light driven energy/electron transfer cascades were studied by transient specroscopic techniques. By combining molecular photosensitizers with lamellar semiconductors and intercalated catalyst particles, the first non-sacrificial systems for visible light driven hydrogen evolution were developed and studied. Oxygen evolving catalyst particles and semiconductor nanowires were also studied with the goal of achieving photocatalytic water splitting using visible light.

  7. 40 CFR 268.36 - Waste specific prohibitions-inorganic chemical wastes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... specific prohibitions—inorganic chemical wastes (a) Effective May 20, 2002, the wastes specified in 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Waste specific prohibitions-inorganic chemical wastes 268.36 Section 268.36 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  8. 40 CFR 268.36 - Waste specific prohibitions-inorganic chemical wastes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... specific prohibitions—inorganic chemical wastes (a) Effective May 20, 2002, the wastes specified in 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Waste specific prohibitions-inorganic chemical wastes 268.36 Section 268.36 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  9. 40 CFR 268.36 - Waste specific prohibitions-inorganic chemical wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... specific prohibitions—inorganic chemical wastes. (a) Effective May 20, 2002, the wastes specified in 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Waste specific prohibitions-inorganic chemical wastes. 268.36 Section 268.36 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  10. 40 CFR 268.36 - Waste specific prohibitions-inorganic chemical wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... specific prohibitions—inorganic chemical wastes. (a) Effective May 20, 2002, the wastes specified in 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Waste specific prohibitions-inorganic chemical wastes. 268.36 Section 268.36 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  11. 40 CFR 268.36 - Waste specific prohibitions-inorganic chemical wastes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... specific prohibitions—inorganic chemical wastes (a) Effective May 20, 2002, the wastes specified in 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Waste specific prohibitions-inorganic chemical wastes 268.36 Section 268.36 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  12. Nanoscale chemical tomography of buried organic-inorganic interfaces in the chiton tooth.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lyle M; Joester, Derk

    2011-01-13

    Biological organisms possess an unparalleled ability to control the structure and properties of mineralized tissues. They are able, for example, to guide the formation of smoothly curving single crystals or tough, lightweight, self-repairing skeletal elements. In many biominerals, an organic matrix interacts with the mineral as it forms, controls its morphology and polymorph, and is occluded during mineralization. The remarkable functional properties of the resulting composites-such as outstanding fracture toughness and wear resistance-can be attributed to buried organic-inorganic interfaces at multiple hierarchical levels. Analysing and controlling such interfaces at the nanometre length scale is critical also in emerging organic electronic and photovoltaic hybrid materials. However, elucidating the structural and chemical complexity of buried organic-inorganic interfaces presents a challenge to state-of-the-art imaging techniques. Here we show that pulsed-laser atom-probe tomography reveals three-dimensional chemical maps of organic fibres with a diameter of 5-10 nm in the surrounding nano-crystalline magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) mineral in the tooth of a marine mollusc, the chiton Chaetopleura apiculata. Remarkably, most fibres co-localize with either sodium or magnesium. Furthermore, clustering of these cations in the fibre indicates a structural level of hierarchy previously undetected. Our results demonstrate that in the chiton tooth, individual organic fibres have different chemical compositions, and therefore probably different functional roles in controlling fibre formation and matrix-mineral interactions. Atom-probe tomography is able to detect this chemical/structural heterogeneity by virtue of its high three-dimensional spatial resolution and sensitivity across the periodic table. We anticipate that the quantitative analysis and visualization of nanometre-scale interfaces by laser-pulsed atom-probe tomography will contribute greatly to our understanding not

  13. Nanoscale chemical tomography of buried organic-inorganic interfaces in the chiton tooth.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lyle M; Joester, Derk

    2011-01-13

    Biological organisms possess an unparalleled ability to control the structure and properties of mineralized tissues. They are able, for example, to guide the formation of smoothly curving single crystals or tough, lightweight, self-repairing skeletal elements. In many biominerals, an organic matrix interacts with the mineral as it forms, controls its morphology and polymorph, and is occluded during mineralization. The remarkable functional properties of the resulting composites-such as outstanding fracture toughness and wear resistance-can be attributed to buried organic-inorganic interfaces at multiple hierarchical levels. Analysing and controlling such interfaces at the nanometre length scale is critical also in emerging organic electronic and photovoltaic hybrid materials. However, elucidating the structural and chemical complexity of buried organic-inorganic interfaces presents a challenge to state-of-the-art imaging techniques. Here we show that pulsed-laser atom-probe tomography reveals three-dimensional chemical maps of organic fibres with a diameter of 5-10 nm in the surrounding nano-crystalline magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) mineral in the tooth of a marine mollusc, the chiton Chaetopleura apiculata. Remarkably, most fibres co-localize with either sodium or magnesium. Furthermore, clustering of these cations in the fibre indicates a structural level of hierarchy previously undetected. Our results demonstrate that in the chiton tooth, individual organic fibres have different chemical compositions, and therefore probably different functional roles in controlling fibre formation and matrix-mineral interactions. Atom-probe tomography is able to detect this chemical/structural heterogeneity by virtue of its high three-dimensional spatial resolution and sensitivity across the periodic table. We anticipate that the quantitative analysis and visualization of nanometre-scale interfaces by laser-pulsed atom-probe tomography will contribute greatly to our understanding not

  14. Diffusion of inorganic chemical species in compacted clay soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shackelford, Charles D.; Daniel, David E.; Liljestrand, Howard M.

    1989-08-01

    This research was conducted to study the diffusion of inorganic chemicals in compacted clay soil for the design of waste containment barriers. The effective diffusion coefficients ( D ∗) of anionic (Cl -, Br -, and I -) and cationic (K +, Cd 2+, and Zn 2+) species in a synthetic leachate were measured. Two clay soils were used in the study. The soils were compacted and pre-soaked to minimize mass transport due to suction in the soil. The results of the diffusion tests were analyzed using two analytical solutions to Fick's second law and a commercially available semi-analytical solution, POLLUTE 3.3. Mass balance calculations were performed to indicate possible sinks/sources in the diffusion system. Errors in mass balance were attributed to problems with the chemical analysis (I -), the inefficiency of the extraction procedure (K +), precipitation (Cd 2+ and Zn 2+), and chemical complexation (Cl - and Br -). The D ∗ values for Cl - reported in this study are in excellent agreement with previous findings for other types of soil. The D ∗ values for the metals (K +, Cd 2+, and Zn 2+) are thought to be high (conservative) due to: (1) Ca 2+ saturation of the exchange complex of the clays; (2) precipitation of Cd 2+ and Zn 2+; and (3) nonlinear adsorption behavior. In general, high D ∗ values and conservative designs of waste containment barriers will result if the procedures described in this study are used to determine D ∗ and the adsorption behavior of the solutes is similar to that described in this study.

  15. Biology Today. Thinking Chemically about Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are applications of biochemistry. Included are designed drugs, clever drugs, carcinogenic structures, sugary wine, caged chemicals, biomaterials, marine chemistry, biopolymers, prospecting bacteria, and plant chemistry. (CW)

  16. Chemiluminescent chemical sensors for inorganic and organic vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, G.E.; Rose-Pehrsson, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    Chemiluminescent, chemical sensors for inorganic and organic vapors are being investigated via the immobilization of 3-aminophthalhydrazide (luminol) within hydrogels and polymeric, sorbent coatings. The films are supported behind a teflon membrane and positioned in front of a photomultiplier tube, permitting the sensitive detection of numerous toxic vapors. Some selectivity has been tailored into these devices by careful selection of the polymer type, pH and metal catalyst incorporated within the film. The incorporation of luminol and Fe(3) within a polyvinylalcohol hydrogel gave a film with superior sensitivity toward NO{sub 2} (detection limit of 0.46 ppb and a response time on the order of seconds). The use of the hydrogel matrix helped eliminate humidity problems associated with other polymeric films. Other chemiluminescent thin films prepared have demonstrated the detection of ppb levels of SO{sub 2}(g) and hydrazine, N{sub 2}H{sub 4}(g). Recently, the authors have begun investigating the incorporation of a heated Pt filament into the inlet line as a pre-oxidative step prior to passage of the gas stream across the teflon membrane. This has permitted the sensitive detection of ppm levels of CCl{sub 4}(g), CHCl{sub 3}(g) and CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(g).

  17. Inorganic sulfur-nitrogen compounds: from gunpowder chemistry to the forefront of biological signaling.

    PubMed

    Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Butler, Anthony R; Woollins, J Derek; Feelisch, Martin

    2016-04-14

    The reactions between inorganic sulfur and nitrogen-bearing compounds to form S-N containing species have a long history and, besides assuming importance in industrial synthetic processes, are of relevance to microbial metabolism; waste water treatment; aquatic, soil and atmospheric chemistry; and combustion processes. The recent discovery that hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide exert often similar, sometimes mutually dependent effects in a variety of biological systems, and that the chemical interaction of these two species leads to formation of S-N compounds brought this chemistry to the attention of physiologists, biochemists and physicians. We here provide a perspective about the potential role of S-N compounds in biological signaling and briefly review their chemical properties and bioactivities in the context of the chronology of their discovery. Studies of the biological role of NO revealed why its chemistry is ideally suited for the tasks Nature has chosen for it; realising how the distinctive properties of sulfur can enrich this bioactivity does much to revive 'die Freude am experimentellen Spiel' of the pioneers in this field.

  18. EMBO conference series: Chemical Biology 2014.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Eileen J

    2014-12-15

    Around 300 people from 18 countries took part in the fourth biennial Chemical Biology conference at The European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, from August 20 to 23, 2014. Many advances in the field of chemical biology were presented in talks and poster sessions. Picture: Petra Riedinger (EMBL).

  19. Electrostatic thin film chemical and biological sensor

    DOEpatents

    Prelas, Mark A.; Ghosh, Tushar K.; Tompson, Jr., Robert V.; Viswanath, Dabir; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

    2010-01-19

    A chemical and biological agent sensor includes an electrostatic thin film supported by a substrate. The film includes an electrostatic charged surface to attract predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A charge collector associated with said electrostatic thin film collects charge associated with surface defects in the electrostatic film induced by the predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A preferred sensing system includes a charge based deep level transient spectroscopy system to read out charges from the film and match responses to data sets regarding the agents of interest. A method for sensing biological and chemical agents includes providing a thin sensing film having a predetermined electrostatic charge. The film is exposed to an environment suspected of containing the biological and chemical agents. Quantum surface effects on the film are measured. Biological and/or chemical agents can be detected, identified and quantified based on the measured quantum surface effects.

  20. Nanoelectromechanics of Inorganic and Biological Systems: From Structural Imaging to Local Functionalities

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Brian; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen; Thompson, G. L.; Vertegel, Alexey; Hohlbauch, Sophia; Proksch, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena is extremely common in inorganic materials, and nearly ubiquitous in biological systems, underpinning phenomena and devices ranging from SONAR to cardiac activity and hearing. This paper briefly summarizes the Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) approach, referred to as Piezoresponse Force Microscopy (PFM), for probing electromechanical coupling on the nanometer scales, and delineates some existing and emerging applications to probe local structure and functionality in inorganic ferroelectrics, calcified and connective tissues, and complex biosystems based on electromechanical detection.

  1. INORGANIC CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF WATER TREATMENT PLANT RESIDUALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study obtained field data on the inorganic contaminants and constituents in residuals produced by Water Treatment Plants (WTPs). Eight WTPs were studied based on treatment technology, contamination or suspected contamination of raw water, and efficiency in the removal of cont...

  2. Virus-based surface patterning of biological molecules, probes, and inorganic materials.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Suji; Jeon, Seongho; Kwak, Eun-A; Kim, Jong-Man; Jaworski, Justyn

    2014-10-01

    An essential requirement for continued technological advancement in many areas of biology, physics, chemistry, and materials science is the growing need to generate custom patterned materials. Building from recent achievements in the site-specific modification of virus for covalent surface tethering, we show in this work that stable 2D virus patterns can be generated in custom geometries over large area glass surfaces to yield templates of biological, biochemical, and inorganic materials in high density. As a nanomaterial building block, filamentous viruses have been extensively used in recent years to produce materials with interesting properties, owing to their ease of genetic and chemical modification. By utilizing un-natural amino acids generated at specific locations on the filamentous fd bacteriophage protein coat, surface immobilization is carried out on APTES patterned glass resulting in precise geometries of covalently linked virus material. This technique facilitated the surface display of a high density of virus that were labeled with biomolecules, fluorescent probes, and gold nanoparticles, thereby opening the possibility of integrating virus as functional components for surface engineering.

  3. Target identification strategies in plant chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Dejonghe, Wim; Russinova, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    The current needs to understand gene function in plant biology increasingly require more dynamic and conditional approaches opposed to classic genetic strategies. Gene redundancy and lethality can substantially complicate research, which might be solved by applying a chemical genetics approach. Now understood as the study of small molecules and their effect on biological systems with subsequent target identification, chemical genetics is a fast developing field with a strong history in pharmaceutical research and drug discovery. In plant biology however, chemical genetics is still largely in the starting blocks, with most studies relying on forward genetics and phenotypic analysis for target identification, whereas studies including direct target identification are limited. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances in chemical genetics in plant biology with a focus on target identification. Furthermore, we discuss different strategies for direct target identification and the possibilities and challenges for plant biology.

  4. Target identification strategies in plant chemical biology

    PubMed Central

    Dejonghe, Wim; Russinova, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    The current needs to understand gene function in plant biology increasingly require more dynamic and conditional approaches opposed to classic genetic strategies. Gene redundancy and lethality can substantially complicate research, which might be solved by applying a chemical genetics approach. Now understood as the study of small molecules and their effect on biological systems with subsequent target identification, chemical genetics is a fast developing field with a strong history in pharmaceutical research and drug discovery. In plant biology however, chemical genetics is still largely in the starting blocks, with most studies relying on forward genetics and phenotypic analysis for target identification, whereas studies including direct target identification are limited. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances in chemical genetics in plant biology with a focus on target identification. Furthermore, we discuss different strategies for direct target identification and the possibilities and challenges for plant biology. PMID:25104953

  5. Leaching Kinetics of Atrazine and Inorganic Chemicals in Tilled and Orchard Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajdak, Lech W.; Lipiec, Jerzy; Siczek, Anna; Nosalewicz, Artur; Majewska, Urszula

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to verify first-order kinetic reaction rate model performance in predicting of leaching of atrazine and inorganic compounds (K+1, Fe+3, Mg+2, Mn+2, NH4 +, NO3 - and PO4 -3) from tilled and orchard silty loam soils. This model provided an excellent fit to the experimental concentration changes of the compounds vs. time data during leaching. Calculated values of the first-order reaction rate constants for the changes of all chemicals were from 3.8 to 19.0 times higher in orchard than in tilled soil. Higher first-order reaction constants for orchard than tilled soil correspond with both higher total porosity and contribution of biological pores in the former. The first order reaction constants for the leaching of chemical compounds enables prediction of the actual compound concentration and the interactions between compound and soil as affected by management system. The study demonstrates the effectiveness of simultaneous chemical and physical analyses as a tool for the understanding of leaching in variously managed soils.

  6. Synthetic biology expands chemical control of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ford, Tyler J; Silver, Pamela A

    2015-10-01

    The tools of synthetic biology allow researchers to change the ways engineered organisms respond to chemical stimuli. Decades of basic biology research and new efforts in computational protein and RNA design have led to the development of small molecule sensors that can be used to alter organism function. These new functions leap beyond the natural propensities of the engineered organisms. They can range from simple fluorescence or growth reporting to pathogen killing, and can involve metabolic coordination among multiple cells or organisms. Herein, we discuss how synthetic biology alters microorganisms' responses to chemical stimuli resulting in the development of microbes as toxicity sensors, disease treatments, and chemical factories.

  7. Chemicals, Cancer and Cancer Biology

    PubMed Central

    Smuckler, Edward A.

    1983-01-01

    Chemicals can cause cancer in humans and animals. Two significant questions are how and how frequently do these neoplasms arise? The first documentation of chemically induced cancer in humans was of the occupationally related “soot wart” in 1775. Since that time various carcinogens have been identified. Some compounds act directly on cell populations, whereas others must be metabolized by a host to produce a “proximate” or “ultimate” carcinogen. Because of the variety in carcinogen structure and the multiplicity of modifications to the cellular macromolecules, a simple explanation for chemical effect is unlikely. Furthermore, true neoplastic growth involves at least two and possibly more steps, some of which are reversible. Evidence suggests that cancer represents an altering of differentiation and that chemical agents may act at the level of DNA or on epigenetic regulatory phenomena. The method for selecting the neoplastic cell from those that are normal is not known. Because we cannot explain the mechanisms for cancer formation or the role of chemicals in the process, prudence is needed in determining the significance of human exposure and in relating this exposure to the risk of neoplastic disease. Images PMID:6624084

  8. Biological and Chemical Impact to Educational Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manicone, Santo

    2002-01-01

    Discusses preparing an educational facility to address the threat of biological or chemical terrorism, including understanding the potential impact, implementing information and communication systems, and improving medical surveillance and awareness. (EV)

  9. Photonic applications based on biological/inorganic nano hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Wu, Pengfei; Yelleswarapu, Chandra

    2016-02-01

    Biological Retinal is an effective and efficient photochromic compounds and one of the best candidates for photon conversion, transmission and storage, from the view of bionics and natural selection. We observed large optical nonlinearity by using new fabricated films of photoactive Retinol hybrid materials. Based on reversible photoinduced anisotropy and transient optical characteristics, the Retinol hybrids can be used to design novel photonic devices, such as holographic elements, all-optical switch and spatial light modulator. Also, the study is important for further understanding the photochemical mechanism of vision process.

  10. Virus Outbreaks in Chemical and Biological Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Inseong

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous bacteriophages have successfully been used to detect chemical and biological analytes with increased selectivity and sensitivity. The enhancement largely originates not only from the ability of viruses to provide a platform for the surface display of a wide range of biological ligands, but also from the geometric morphologies of the viruses that constitute biomimetic structures with larger surface area-to-volume ratio. This review will appraise the mechanism of multivalent display of the viruses that enables surface modification of virions either by chemical or biological methods. The accommodation of functionalized virions to various materials, including polymers, proteins, metals, nanoparticles, and electrodes for sensor applications will also be discussed. PMID:25068866

  11. Discovery of Chemical Toxicity via Biological Networks and Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Habib, Tanwir; Guan, Xin; Escalon, Barbara; Falciani, Francesco; Chipman, J.K.; Antczak, Philipp; Edwards, Stephen; Taylor, Ronald C.; Vulpe, Chris; Loguinov, Alexandre; Van Aggelen, Graham; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Garcia-Reyero, Natalia

    2010-09-30

    Both soldiers and animals are exposed to many chemicals as the result of military activities. Tools are needed to understand the hazards and risks that chemicals and new materials pose to soldiers and the environment. We have investigated the potential of global gene regulatory networks in understanding the impact of chemicals on reproduction. We characterized effects of chemicals on ovaries of the model animal system, the Fathead minnow (Pimopheles promelas) connecting chemical impacts on gene expression to circulating blood levels of the hormones testosterone and estradiol in addition to the egg yolk protein vitellogenin. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional gene expression data to characterize chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis that governs reproduction in fathead minnows. The construction of global gene regulatory networks provides deep insights into how drugs and chemicals effect key organs and biological pathways.

  12. History of chemical and biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Szinicz, L

    2005-10-30

    Chemical and biological warfare agents constitute a low-probability, but high-impact risk both to the military and to the civilian population. The use of hazardous materials of chemical or biological origin as weapons and for homicide has been documented since ancient times. The first use of chemicals in terms of weapons of mass destruction goes back to World War I, when on April 22, 1915 large amounts of chlorine were released by German military forces at Ypres, Belgium. Until around the 1970s of the 20th century, the awareness of the threat by chemical and biological agents had been mainly confined to the military sector. In the following time, the development of increasing range delivery systems by chemical and biological agents possessors sensitised public attention to the threat emanating from these agents. Their proliferation to the terrorists field during the 1990s with the expanding scale and globalisation of terrorist attacks suggested that these agents are becoming an increasing threat to the whole world community. The following article gives a condensed overview on the history of use and development of the more prominent chemical and biological warfare agents.

  13. History of chemical and biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Szinicz, L

    2005-10-30

    Chemical and biological warfare agents constitute a low-probability, but high-impact risk both to the military and to the civilian population. The use of hazardous materials of chemical or biological origin as weapons and for homicide has been documented since ancient times. The first use of chemicals in terms of weapons of mass destruction goes back to World War I, when on April 22, 1915 large amounts of chlorine were released by German military forces at Ypres, Belgium. Until around the 1970s of the 20th century, the awareness of the threat by chemical and biological agents had been mainly confined to the military sector. In the following time, the development of increasing range delivery systems by chemical and biological agents possessors sensitised public attention to the threat emanating from these agents. Their proliferation to the terrorists field during the 1990s with the expanding scale and globalisation of terrorist attacks suggested that these agents are becoming an increasing threat to the whole world community. The following article gives a condensed overview on the history of use and development of the more prominent chemical and biological warfare agents. PMID:16111798

  14. Diversity-oriented approach for chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Seok; Lee, Jae Wook; Kang, Namyoung; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Chang, Young-Tae

    2015-04-01

    Synthetic molecules that modulate and probe biological events are critical tools in chemical biology. Utilizing combinatorial and diversity-oriented synthetic strategies, access to large numbers of small molecules is becoming more and more feasible, and research groups in this field can take advantage of the power of chemical diversity. Since the majority of early studies were focused on the discovery of compounds that perturb protein functions, diversity-based approaches are often considered as therapeutic lead discovery tactics. However, the diversity-oriented approach can also be applied to advance distinct aims, such as target protein identification, or the development of imaging probes and sensors. This review provides a personal perspective of the chemical-diversity-based approach and how this principle can be adapted to various chemical biology studies.

  15. The Chemical Biology of Protein Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, Mary Katherine; Cole, Philip A.

    2011-01-01

    The explosion of scientific interest in protein kinase-mediated signaling networks has led to the infusion of new chemical methods and their applications related to the analysis of phosphorylation pathways. We highlight some of these chemical biology approaches across three areas. First, we discuss the development of chemical tools to modulate the activity of protein kinases to explore kinase mechanisms and their contributions to phosphorylation events and cellular processes. Second, we describe chemical techniques developed in the past few years to dissect the structural and functional effects of phosphate modifications at specific sites in proteins. Third, we cover newly developed molecular imaging approaches to elucidate the spatiotemporal aspects of phosphorylation cascades in live cells. Exciting advances in our understanding of protein phosphorylation have been obtained with these chemical biology approaches, but continuing opportunities for technological innovation remain. PMID:19489734

  16. The chemical biology of protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, Mary Katherine; Cole, Philip A

    2009-01-01

    The explosion of scientific interest in protein kinase-mediated signaling networks has led to the infusion of new chemical methods and their applications related to the analysis of phosphorylation pathways. We highlight some of these chemical biology approaches across three areas. First, we discuss the development of chemical tools to modulate the activity of protein kinases to explore kinase mechanisms and their contributions to phosphorylation events and cellular processes. Second, we describe chemical techniques developed in the past few years to dissect the structural and functional effects of phosphate modifications at specific sites in proteins. Third, we cover newly developed molecular imaging approaches to elucidate the spatiotemporal aspects of phosphorylation cascades in live cells. Exciting advances in our understanding of protein phosphorylation have been obtained with these chemical biology approaches, but continuing opportunities for technological innovation remain.

  17. The chemical biology of methanogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, James G.

    2010-12-01

    Two distinct pathways account for most of the CH 4 produced in the majority of the diverse and vast anaerobic environments of Earth's biosphere by microbes that are classified in the Archaea domain of life: conversion of the methyl group of acetate to CH 4 in the aceticlastic pathway and reduction of CO 2 with electrons derived from H 2, formate or CO in the CO 2 reduction pathway. Minor, albeit ecologically important, amounts of CH 4 are produced by conversion of methylotrophic substrates methanol, methylamines and methyl sulfides. Although all pathways have terminal steps in common, they deviate in the initial steps leading to CH 4 and mechanisms for synthesizing ATP for growth. Hydrogen gas is the major reductant for CO 2-reducing methanogens in the deep subsurface, although H 2 is also utilized by CO 2-reducing microbes from the Bacteria domain that produce acetate for the aceticlastic methanogens. This review presents fundamentals of the two major CH 4-producing pathways with a focus on understanding the potential for biologically-produced CH 4 on Mars.

  18. Organometallic compounds: an opportunity for chemical biology?

    PubMed

    Patra, Malay; Gasser, Gilles

    2012-06-18

    Organometallic compounds are renowned for their remarkable applications in the field of catalysis, but much less is known about their potential in chemical biology. Indeed, such compounds have long been considered to be either unstable under physiological conditions or cytotoxic. As a consequence, little attention has been paid to their possible utilisation for biological purposes. Because of their outstanding physicochemical properties, which include chemical stability, structural diversity and unique photo- and electrochemical properties, however, organometallic compounds have the ability to play a leading role in the field of chemical biology. Indeed, remarkable examples of the use of such compounds-notably as enzyme inhibitors and as luminescent agents-have recently been reported. Here we summarise recent advances in the use of organometallic compounds for chemical biology purposes, an area that we define as "organometallic chemical biology". We also demonstrate that these recent discoveries are only a beginning and that many other organometallic complexes are likely to be found useful in this field of research in the near future.

  19. Perspective: Reaches of chemical physics in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruebele, Martin; Thirumalai, D.

    2013-09-01

    Chemical physics as a discipline contributes many experimental tools, algorithms, and fundamental theoretical models that can be applied to biological problems. This is especially true now as the molecular level and the systems level descriptions begin to connect, and multi-scale approaches are being developed to solve cutting edge problems in biology. In some cases, the concepts and tools got their start in non-biological fields, and migrated over, such as the idea of glassy landscapes, fluorescence spectroscopy, or master equation approaches. In other cases, the tools were specifically developed with biological physics applications in mind, such as modeling of single molecule trajectories or super-resolution laser techniques. In this introduction to the special topic section on chemical physics of biological systems, we consider a wide range of contributions, all the way from the molecular level, to molecular assemblies, chemical physics of the cell, and finally systems-level approaches, based on the contributions to this special issue. Chemical physicists can look forward to an exciting future where computational tools, analytical models, and new instrumentation will push the boundaries of biological inquiry.

  20. Perspective: Reaches of chemical physics in biology.

    PubMed

    Gruebele, Martin; Thirumalai, D

    2013-09-28

    Chemical physics as a discipline contributes many experimental tools, algorithms, and fundamental theoretical models that can be applied to biological problems. This is especially true now as the molecular level and the systems level descriptions begin to connect, and multi-scale approaches are being developed to solve cutting edge problems in biology. In some cases, the concepts and tools got their start in non-biological fields, and migrated over, such as the idea of glassy landscapes, fluorescence spectroscopy, or master equation approaches. In other cases, the tools were specifically developed with biological physics applications in mind, such as modeling of single molecule trajectories or super-resolution laser techniques. In this introduction to the special topic section on chemical physics of biological systems, we consider a wide range of contributions, all the way from the molecular level, to molecular assemblies, chemical physics of the cell, and finally systems-level approaches, based on the contributions to this special issue. Chemical physicists can look forward to an exciting future where computational tools, analytical models, and new instrumentation will push the boundaries of biological inquiry.

  1. A universal bias in inorganic rainwater chemical composition data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayers, Gregory P.; Gillett, Robert W.; Selleck, Paul W.

    2003-07-01

    In the late 1970s, it was recognised that organic acids contributed to the acidity and ionic content of rainwater, but that these acids had not been detected because they were consumed biologically in the period between rainwater collection and subsequent laboratory analysis. Discussion of consequences for measured rainwater composition has been limited to assessment of pH gain that attends organic acid loss. We show that biological effects on rainwater ionic composition are not restricted to pH alone. Ammonium, potassium, nitrate, sulfate, methanesulfonate, and phosphate ions are also removed biologically, but remain in the rainwater in biomass, implying that most previous rainwater composition studies based on ionic analyses will have systematically underestimated nutrient deposition.

  2. Chemical Foundations of Hydrogen Sulfide Biology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Lancaster, Jack R.

    2013-01-01

    Following nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide) and carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide (or its newer systematic name sulfane, H2S) became the third small molecule that can be both toxic and beneficial depending on the concentration. In spite of its impressive therapeutic potential, the underlying mechanisms for its beneficial effects remain unclear. Any novel mechanism has to obey fundamental chemical principles. H2S chemistry was studied long before its biological relevance was discovered, however, with a few exceptions, these past works have received relatively little attention in the path of exploring the mechanistic conundrum of H2S biological functions. This review calls attention to the basic physical and chemical properties of H2S, focuses on the chemistry between H2S and its three potential biological targets: oxidants, metals and thiol derivatives, discusses the applications of these basics into H2S biology and methodology, and introduces the standard terminology to this youthful field. PMID:23850631

  3. Electrochemical approaches for chemical and biological analysis on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    2003-01-01

    Obtaining in situ chemical data from planetary bodies such as Mars or Europa can present significant challenges. The one analytical technique that has many of the requisite characteristics to meet such a challenge is electroanalysis. Described here are three electroanalytical devices designed for in situ geochemical and biological analysis on Mars. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) was built and flight qualified for the now cancelled NASA Mars 2001 Lander. Part of MECA consisted of four "cells" containing arrays of electrochemical based sensors for measuring the ionic species in soil samples. A next-generation MECA, the Robotic Chemical Analysis Laboratory (RCAL), uses a carousel-type system to allow for greater customization of analytical procedures. A second instrument, proposed as part of the 2007 CryoScout mission, consists of a flow-through inorganic chemical analyzer (MICA). CryoScout is a torpedo-like device designed for subsurface investigation of the stratigraphic climate record embedded in Mars' north polar cap. As the CryoScout melts its way through the ice cap, MICA will collect and analyze the meltwater for a variety of inorganics and chemical parameters. By analyzing the chemistry locked in the layers of dust, salt, and ice, geologists will be able to determine the recent history of climate, water, and atmosphere on Mars and link it to the past. Finally, electroanalysis shows its abilities in the detection of possible microorganism on Mars or elsewhere in the solar system. To identify an unknown microorganism, one that may not even use Earth-type biochemistry, requires a detection scheme which makes minimal assumptions and looks for the most general features. Recent work has demonstrated that the use of an array of electrochemical sensors which monitors the changes in a solution via electrical conductivity, pH, and ion selective electrodes, can be used to detect minute chemical perturbations caused by the growth of bacteria and

  4. Electrochemical approaches for chemical and biological analysis on Mars.

    PubMed

    Kounaves, Samuel P

    2003-02-17

    Obtaining in situ chemical data from planetary bodies such as Mars or Europa can present significant challenges. The one analytical technique that has many of the requisite characteristics to meet such a challenge is electroanalysis. Described here are three electroanalytical devices designed for in situ geochemical and biological analysis on Mars. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) was built and flight qualified for the now cancelled NASA Mars 2001 Lander. Part of MECA consisted of four "cells" containing arrays of electrochemical based sensors for measuring the ionic species in soil samples. A next-generation MECA, the Robotic Chemical Analysis Laboratory (RCAL), uses a carousel-type system to allow for greater customization of analytical procedures. A second instrument, proposed as part of the 2007 CryoScout mission, consists of a flow-through inorganic chemical analyzer (MICA). CryoScout is a torpedo-like device designed for subsurface investigation of the stratigraphic climate record embedded in Mars' north polar cap. As the CryoScout melts its way through the ice cap, MICA will collect and analyze the meltwater for a variety of inorganics and chemical parameters. By analyzing the chemistry locked in the layers of dust, salt, and ice, geologists will be able to determine the recent history of climate, water, and atmosphere on Mars and link it to the past. Finally, electroanalysis shows its abilities in the detection of possible microorganism on Mars or elsewhere in the solar system. To identify an unknown microorganism, one that may not even use Earth-type biochemistry, requires a detection scheme which makes minimal assumptions and looks for the most general features. Recent work has demonstrated that the use of an array of electrochemical sensors which monitors the changes in a solution via electrical conductivity, pH, and ion selective electrodes, can be used to detect minute chemical perturbations caused by the growth of bacteria and

  5. Electrochemical approaches for chemical and biological analysis on Mars.

    PubMed

    Kounaves, Samuel P

    2003-02-17

    Obtaining in situ chemical data from planetary bodies such as Mars or Europa can present significant challenges. The one analytical technique that has many of the requisite characteristics to meet such a challenge is electroanalysis. Described here are three electroanalytical devices designed for in situ geochemical and biological analysis on Mars. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) was built and flight qualified for the now cancelled NASA Mars 2001 Lander. Part of MECA consisted of four "cells" containing arrays of electrochemical based sensors for measuring the ionic species in soil samples. A next-generation MECA, the Robotic Chemical Analysis Laboratory (RCAL), uses a carousel-type system to allow for greater customization of analytical procedures. A second instrument, proposed as part of the 2007 CryoScout mission, consists of a flow-through inorganic chemical analyzer (MICA). CryoScout is a torpedo-like device designed for subsurface investigation of the stratigraphic climate record embedded in Mars' north polar cap. As the CryoScout melts its way through the ice cap, MICA will collect and analyze the meltwater for a variety of inorganics and chemical parameters. By analyzing the chemistry locked in the layers of dust, salt, and ice, geologists will be able to determine the recent history of climate, water, and atmosphere on Mars and link it to the past. Finally, electroanalysis shows its abilities in the detection of possible microorganism on Mars or elsewhere in the solar system. To identify an unknown microorganism, one that may not even use Earth-type biochemistry, requires a detection scheme which makes minimal assumptions and looks for the most general features. Recent work has demonstrated that the use of an array of electrochemical sensors which monitors the changes in a solution via electrical conductivity, pH, and ion selective electrodes, can be used to detect minute chemical perturbations caused by the growth of bacteria and

  6. An Alternative Educational Approach for an Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory Course in Industrial and Chemical Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garces, Andres; Sanchez-Barba, Luis Fernando

    2011-01-01

    We describe an alternative educational approach for an inorganic chemistry laboratory module named "Experimentation in Chemistry", which is included in Industrial Engineering and Chemical Engineering courses. The main aims of the new approach were to reduce the high levels of failure and dropout on the module and to make the content match the…

  7. 40 CFR 141.23 - Inorganic chemical sampling and analytical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Monitoring and Analytical Requirements § 141.23 Inorganic chemical sampling and analytical requirements. Community water systems shall... accordance with this section. Non-transient, non-community water systems shall conduct monitoring...

  8. 40 CFR 141.23 - Inorganic chemical sampling and analytical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Monitoring and Analytical Requirements § 141.23 Inorganic chemical sampling and analytical requirements. Community water systems shall... accordance with this section. Non-transient, non-community water systems shall conduct monitoring...

  9. 40 CFR 141.23 - Inorganic chemical sampling and analytical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Monitoring and Analytical Requirements § 141.23 Inorganic chemical sampling and analytical requirements. Community water systems shall... accordance with this section. Non-transient, non-community water systems shall conduct monitoring...

  10. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Is Thioacetamide a Serious Health Hazard in Inorganic Chemistry Laboratories?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elo, Hannu

    1987-01-01

    Describes the potential health hazards of using thioacetamide in introductory courses where students are involved in qualitative inorganic analysis. Describes the chemical as possessing carcinogenic, hepatotoxic, and mutagenic properties. Cautions that thioacetamide has caused various biochemical changes in the liver, and recommends limited uses…

  11. Chemical synthetic biology: a mini-review

    PubMed Central

    Chiarabelli, Cristiano; Stano, Pasquale; Luisi, Pier Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Chemical synthetic biology (CSB) is a branch of synthetic biology (SB) oriented toward the synthesis of chemical structures alternative to those present in nature. Whereas SB combines biology and engineering with the aim of synthesizing biological structures or life forms that do not exist in nature – often based on genome manipulation, CSB uses and assembles biological parts, synthetic or not, to create new and alternative structures. A short epistemological note will introduce the theoretical concepts related to these fields, whereas the text will be largely devoted to introduce and comment two main projects of CSB, carried out in our laboratory in the recent years. The “Never Born Biopolymers” project deals with the construction and the screening of RNA and peptide sequences that are not present in nature, whereas the “Minimal Cell” project focuses on the construction of semi-synthetic compartments (usually liposomes) containing the minimal and sufficient number of components to perform the basic function of a biological cell. These two topics are extremely important for both the general understanding of biology in terms of function, organization, and development, and for applied biotechnology. PMID:24065964

  12. Thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials. Final report, August 1992--May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Damle, A.S.; Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurjo, A.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

    1995-05-01

    SRI International conducted a theoretical and experimental program to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are being developed to separate the gaseous products of coal gasification. A variety of developmental efforts are underway, including a number of projects sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to improve the selectivity and permeability of porous inorganic membranes. DOE is also sponsoring efforts to extend the use of metallic membranes to new applications. Most developmental efforts have focused on hydrogen separation by inorganic membranes, which may be used to maximize hydrogen production from coal gas or to remove H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} contaminants via thermal or catalytic decomposition in integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) systems. Inorganic membranes that have a high separation efficiency and exhibit both thermal and chemical stability would improve the economics of power generation from coal. Membrane materials that have been investigated include glass (silica), alumina, carbon, and metals (Pd and Pt). This report describes inorganic membrane materials, long term membrane exposure tests, membrane permeation tests, coal gasifier exposure tests, conclusions, and recommendations.

  13. Chemical Force Microscopy of Chemical and Biological Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Noy, A

    2006-01-02

    Interactions between chemical functionalities define outcomes of the vast majority of important events in chemistry, biology and materials science. Chemical Force Microscopy (CFM)--a technique that uses direct chemical functionalization of AFM probes with specific functionalities--allows researchers to investigate these important interactions directly. We review the basic principles of CFM, some examples of its application, and theoretical models that provide the basis for understanding the experimental results. We also emphasize application of modern kinetic theory of non-covalent interactions strength to the analysis of CFM data.

  14. The 7th Japan-Korea chemical biology symposium: chemical biology of natural bioactive molecules.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ramesh Prasad; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Ahn, Jong Seog; Osada, Hiroyuki; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2014-05-16

    Natural bioactive molecules possess supreme chemical diversity and drug-like properties and are an important source for drug lead compounds. At the seventh Japan-Korea Chemical Biology Symposium at Jeju Island, Korea, chemical biologists from Korea and Japan highlighted the remarkable features of natural products and their significance.

  15. The Control of Chemical and Biological Weapons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Archibald S.; And Others

    This book is composed of four papers prepared to illuminate the problem areas which might arise if the policies of the 1925 Geneva Protocol and other measures to limit chemical and biological weapons are ratified by the United States Senate. The papers included are: Legal Aspects of the Geneva Protocol of 1925; The Use of Herbicides in War: A…

  16. Protection against radiation (biological, pharmacological, chemical, physical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saksonov, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological protection for astronauts from penetrating radiation on long-term space flights is discussed. The status of pharmacochemical protection, development of protective substances, medical use of protective substances, protection for spacecraft ecologic systems, adaptogens and physical conditioning, bone marrow transplants and local protection are discussed. Combined use of local protection and pharmacochemical substances is also briefly considered.

  17. Thermal Characteristics of Chemical Refrigerating Apparatus using Silica-Gel/ Inorganic-Salt-Solution Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanadori, Michio; Watabe, Yoshihito

    This report deals with chemical refrigerating apparatus using silica-gel / inorganic-salt-solution pair. Experiments are conducted by changing concentration of inorganic-salt solution and adsorbent / refrigerant pair. The following results are obtained. (1) The temperature of refrigerant in evaporator is lowered as decrease of inorganic-salt-solution concentration. (2) The available salt-concentration range as refrigerant are gained by supercooling in restricted temperature range lower than solidification temperature of solution. (3)Difference of minimum temperature among cooled refrigerants are little in low concentration region. (4)In concentration lower than about10wt%, refrigerants supercool and solidify suddenly. Accordingly these salt-solutions are not available in these region as refrigerants.

  18. Biological, chemical, electrochemical, and photochemical fractionation of Fe isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, S.; King, A.; Hutchins, D.; Adkins, J. F.; Fu, F.; Wasson, A.; Hodierne, C.

    2012-12-01

    Iron is an important nutrient for life in the ocean, where low Fe concentrations often limit the growth of marine phytoplankton. Fe stable isotope ratios (δ56Fe) are a potentially valuable new tool for studying the marine biological cycling of Fe. In order to effectively use Fe isotopes as a biological tracer, however, it is important to parameterize the isotope effect for biological uptake. We have therefore measured the biological fractionation of Fe isotopes by the marine diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana, T. oceanica, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum in culture. During biological Fe acquisition, Fe(III) is often first reduced from Fe(III) to Fe(II), either in seawater or at the cell surface. Therefore, we have also measured the isotope effect for Fe(III) reduction by chemical, electrochemical, and photochemical processes. Diatoms were cultured in EDTA or NTA buffered media under varying Fe concentrations from Fe-sufficiency to Fe-limitation. Biological fractionation of Fe isotopes was determined by comparing δ56Fe of phytoplankton to the media. The use of a cell wash allows us to distinguish between isotopic fractionation during extracellular adsorption and intracellular uptake. The biological fractionation of Fe isotopes is highly dependent on culture conditions with Δδ56Fe ranging from +0.6 ‰ to -0.5 ‰ depending on ligand composition, species, and Fe-limitation status. Isotope effects for chemical, electrochemical, and photochemical reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) span an even larger range. For example, chemical reduction of Fe(III)-EDTA with hydroxylamine hydrochloride has an isotope effect of Δδ56Fe = -2.8 ‰. By contrast, photochemical reduction of Fe(III)-EDTA has an isotope effect of Δδ56Fe = +0.9 ‰. Isotope effects for electrochemical reduction of Fe(III) using a rotating disc electrode allow for greater control of experimental conditions, such as differentiating between the effects of electric potential (voltage) and mass transport (diffusion

  19. Bright Building Blocks for Chemical Biology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Small-molecule fluorophores manifest the ability of chemistry to solve problems in biology. As we noted in a previous review (Lavis, L. D.; Raines, R. T. ACS Chem. Biol.2008, 3, 142–155), the extant collection of fluorescent probes is built on a modest set of “core” scaffolds that evolved during a century of academic and industrial research. Here, we survey traditional and modern synthetic routes to small-molecule fluorophores and highlight recent biological insights attained with customized fluorescent probes. Our intent is to inspire the design and creation of new high-precision tools that empower chemical biologists. PMID:24579725

  20. Ion-binding of glycine zwitterion with inorganic ions in biologically relevant aqueous electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Fedotova, Marina V; Kruchinin, Sergey E

    2014-06-01

    The ion-binding between inorganic ions and charged functional groups of glycine zwitter-ion in NaCl(aq), KCl(aq), MgCl2(aq), and CaCl2(aq) has been investigated over a wide salt concentration range by using integral equation theory in the 3D-RISM approach. These systems mimic biological systems where binding of ions to charged residues at protein surfaces is relevant. It has been found that the stability of ion pairs formed by the carboxylate group and added inorganic cations decreases in the sequence Mg(2+)>Ca(2+)>Na(+)>K(+). However, all formed ion pairs are weak and decrease in stability with increasing salt concentration. On the other hand, at a given salt concentration the stability of (-NH3(+):Cl(-))aq ion pairs is similar in all studied systems. The features of ion-binding and the salt concentration effect on this process are discussed.

  1. [Decontamination of chemical and biological warfare agents].

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    Chemical and biological warfare agents (CBWA's) are diverse in nature; volatile acute low-molecular-weight toxic compounds, chemical warfare agents (CWA's, gaseous choking and blood agents, volatile nerve gases and blister agents, nonvolatile vomit agents and lacrymators), biological toxins (nonvolatile low-molecular-weight toxins, proteinous toxins) and microbes (bacteria, viruses, rickettsiae). In the consequence management against chemical and biological terrorism, speedy decontamination of victims, facilities and equipment is required for the minimization of the damage. In the present situation, washing victims and contaminated materials with large volumes of water is the basic way, and additionally hypochlorite salt solution is used for decomposition of CWA's. However, it still remains unsolved how to dispose large volumes of waste water, and the decontamination reagents have serious limitation of high toxicity, despoiling nature against the environments, long finishing time and non-durability in effective decontamination. Namely, the existing decontamination system is not effective, nonspecifically affecting the surrounding non-target materials. Therefore, it is the urgent matter to build up the usable decontamination system surpassing the present technologies. The symposiast presents the on-going joint project of research and development of the novel decontamination system against CBWA's, in the purpose of realizing nontoxic, fast, specific, effective and economical terrorism on-site decontamination. The projects consists of (1) establishment of the decontamination evaluation methods and verification of the existing technologies and adaptation of bacterial organophosphorus hydrolase, (2) development of adsorptive elimination technologies using molecular recognition tools, and (4) development of deactivation technologies using photocatalysis. PMID:19122437

  2. [Decontamination of chemical and biological warfare agents].

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    Chemical and biological warfare agents (CBWA's) are diverse in nature; volatile acute low-molecular-weight toxic compounds, chemical warfare agents (CWA's, gaseous choking and blood agents, volatile nerve gases and blister agents, nonvolatile vomit agents and lacrymators), biological toxins (nonvolatile low-molecular-weight toxins, proteinous toxins) and microbes (bacteria, viruses, rickettsiae). In the consequence management against chemical and biological terrorism, speedy decontamination of victims, facilities and equipment is required for the minimization of the damage. In the present situation, washing victims and contaminated materials with large volumes of water is the basic way, and additionally hypochlorite salt solution is used for decomposition of CWA's. However, it still remains unsolved how to dispose large volumes of waste water, and the decontamination reagents have serious limitation of high toxicity, despoiling nature against the environments, long finishing time and non-durability in effective decontamination. Namely, the existing decontamination system is not effective, nonspecifically affecting the surrounding non-target materials. Therefore, it is the urgent matter to build up the usable decontamination system surpassing the present technologies. The symposiast presents the on-going joint project of research and development of the novel decontamination system against CBWA's, in the purpose of realizing nontoxic, fast, specific, effective and economical terrorism on-site decontamination. The projects consists of (1) establishment of the decontamination evaluation methods and verification of the existing technologies and adaptation of bacterial organophosphorus hydrolase, (2) development of adsorptive elimination technologies using molecular recognition tools, and (4) development of deactivation technologies using photocatalysis.

  3. Chemical and biological sensing using liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Rebecca J.; Hunter, Jacob T.; Miller, Daniel S.; Abbasi, Reza; Mushenheim, Peter C.; Tan, Lie Na; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    The liquid crystalline state of matter arises from orientation-dependent, non-covalent interaction between molecules within condensed phases. Because the balance of intermolecular forces that underlies formation of liquid crystals is delicate, this state of matter can, in general, be easily perturbed by external stimuli (such as an electric field in a display). In this review, we present an overview of recent efforts that have focused on exploiting the responsiveness of liquid crystals as the basis of chemical and biological sensors. In this application of liquid crystals, the challenge is to design liquid crystalline systems that undergo changes in organization when perturbed by targeted chemical and biological species of interest. The approaches described below revolve around the design of interfaces that selectively bind targeted species, thus leading to surface-driven changes in the organization of the liquid crystals. Because liquid crystals possess anisotropic optical and dielectric properties, a range of different methods can be used to read out the changes in organization of liquid crystals that are caused by targeted chemical and biological species. This review focuses on principles for liquid crystal-based sensors that provide an optical output. PMID:24795857

  4. Water in Biological and Chemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Biman

    2013-11-01

    Part I. Bulk Water: 1. Uniqueness of water; 2. Anomalies of water; 3. Dynamics of water: molecular motions and hydrogen bond breaking kinetics; 4. Inherent structures of liquid water; 5. pH of water; Part II. Water in Biology: Dynamical View and Function: 6. Biological water; 7. Explicit role of water in biological functions; 8. Hydration of proteins; 9. Can we understand protein hydration layer: lessons from computer simulations; 10. Water in and around DNA and RNA; 11. Role of water in protein-DNA interaction; 12. Water surrounding lipid bilayers; 13. Water in Darwin's world; Part III. Water in Complex Chemical Systems: 14. Hydrophilic effects; 15. Hydrophobic effects; 16. Aqueous binary mixtures: amphiphilic effect; 17. Water in and around micelles, reverse micelles and microemulsions; 18. Water in carbon nanotubes; Part IV. Bulk Water: Advanced Topics: 19. Entropy of water; 20. Freezing of water into ice; 21. Supercritical water; 22. Microscopic approaches to understand water anomalies.

  5. Surface chemical-modification for engineering the intrinsic physical properties of inorganic two-dimensional nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuqiao; Xu, Kun; Wu, Changzheng; Zhao, Jiyin; Xie, Yi

    2015-02-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, especially the inorganic ultrathin nanosheets with single or few-atomic layers, have been extensively studied due to their special structures and rich physical properties coming from the quantum confinement of electrons. With atomic-scale thickness, 2D nanomaterials have an extremely high specific surface area enabling their surface phase to be as important as bulk counterparts, and therefore provide an alternative way of modifying the surface phase for engineering the intrinsic physical properties of inorganic 2D nanomaterials. In this review, we focus on recent research concerning surface chemical modification strategies to effectively engineer the intrinsic physical properties of inorganic 2D nanomaterials. We highlight the newly developed regulation strategies of surface incorporation, defect engineering, and structure modulation of inorganic 2D nanomaterials, which respectively influence the intrinsic conductivity, band structure, and magnetism while maintaining the primary 2D freestanding structures that are vital for 2D based ultrasensitive electronic response, enhanced catalytic and magnetocaloric capabilities.

  6. Chemical and biological evaluation of Ranunculus muricatus.

    PubMed

    Khan, Farhat Ali; Zahoor, Muhammad; Khan, Ezzat

    2016-03-01

    Ranunculus muricatus is commonly known as spiny fruit buttercup and is used in the treatment of intermittent fevers, gout and asthma. Qualitative analysis of phytochemicals of Ranunculus muricatus indicated the presence of saponins, tannins, phenols, flavonoids and alkaloids. Saponins were present in high amount as compared with other chemicals. Inorganic and heavy metals constituents were determined. Heavy metals estimation in the sample showed that iron was present in high amount followed by zinc even then the concentration of these metals is below acceptable limit. The physical parameters, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the extracts were determined. Acetone extract fraction showed optimal antioxidant activity as compared to ethanol and chloroform fractions of the candidate plant. The antimicrobial and antifungal activities of the crude extract and extract fractions were determined by well agar diffusion method. Highest zone of inhibitions were observed for crude extract followed by acetone extract fraction against Micrococcus luteus. Antifungal activities were high for crude extracts against Candida Albican. Findings of this study show that Ranunculus muricatus has a good medicinal impact. PMID:27087095

  7. Direct-push geochemical profiling for assessment of inorganic chemical heterogeneity in aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulmeister, M.K.; Healey, J.M.; Butler, J.J.; McCall, G.W.

    2004-01-01

    Discrete-depth sampling of inorganic groundwater chemistry is essential for a variety of site characterization activities. Although the mobility and rapid sampling capabilities of direct-push techniques have led to their widespread use for evaluating the distribution of organic contaminants, complementary methods for the characterization of spatial variations in geochemical conditions have not been developed. In this study, a direct-push-based approach for high-resolution inorganic chemical profiling was developed at a site where sharp chemical contrasts and iron-reducing conditions had previously been observed. Existing multilevel samplers (MLSs) that span a fining-upward alluvial sequence were used for comparison with the direct-push profiling. Chemical profiles obtained with a conventional direct-push exposed-screen sampler differed from those obtained with an adjacent MLS because of sampler reactivity and mixing with water from previous sampling levels. The sampler was modified by replacing steel sampling components with stainless-steel and heat-treated parts, and adding an adapter that prevents mixing. Profiles obtained with the modified approach were in excellent agreement with those obtained from an adjacent MLS for all constituents and parameters monitored (Cl, NO3, Fe, Mn, DO, ORP, specific conductance and pH). Interpretations of site redox conditions based on field-measured parameters were supported by laboratory analysis of dissolved Fe. The discrete-depth capability of this approach allows inorganic chemical variations to be described at a level of detail that has rarely been possible. When combined with the mobility afforded by direct-push rigs and on-site methods of chemical analysis, the new approach is well suited for a variety of interactive site-characterization endeavors. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of the biological H2S removal characteristics among four inorganic packing materials.

    PubMed

    Hirai, M; Kamamoto, M; Yani, M; Shoda, M

    2001-01-01

    Four inorganic packing materials were evaluated in terms of their availability as packing materials of a packed tower deodorization apparatus (biofilter) from the viewpoints of biological H2S removal characteristics and some physical properties. Among porous ceramics (A), calcinated cristobalite (B), calcinated and formed obsidian (C), granulated and calcinated soil (D), the superiority of these packing materials determined based on the values of non-biological removal per unit weight or unit volume of packing material, complete removal capacity of H2S per unit weight of packing material per day or unit volume of packing material per day and pressure drop of the packed bed was in the order of A approximately equal to C > D approximately equal to B, which is correlated with the maximum water content, porosity, and mean pore diameter. PMID:16233011

  9. Comparison of the biological NH3 removal characteristics among four inorganic packing materials.

    PubMed

    Hirai, M; Kamamoto, M; Yani, M; Shoda, M

    2001-01-01

    Four inorganic packing materials were evaluated in terms of their availability as a packing material of a packed tower deodorization apparatus (biofilter) from the viewpoints of biological NH3 removal characteristics and some physical properties. Porous ceramics (A), calcinated cristobalite (B), calcinated and formed obsidian (C), granulated and calculated soil (D) were used. The superiority of these packing materials determined based on the values of non-biological removal per unit weight or unit volume of packing material, complete removal capacity of NH3 per unit weight of packing material per day or unit volume of packing material per day and pressure drop of the packed bed was in the order of A approximately = C > B > or = D. Packing materials A and C with high porosity, maximum water content, and suitable mean pore diameter showed excellent removal capacity. PMID:16233018

  10. Comparison of the biological NH3 removal characteristics among four inorganic packing materials.

    PubMed

    Hirai, M; Kamamoto, M; Yani, M; Shoda, M

    2001-01-01

    Four inorganic packing materials were evaluated in terms of their availability as a packing material of a packed tower deodorization apparatus (biofilter) from the viewpoints of biological NH3 removal characteristics and some physical properties. Porous ceramics (A), calcinated cristobalite (B), calcinated and formed obsidian (C), granulated and calculated soil (D) were used. The superiority of these packing materials determined based on the values of non-biological removal per unit weight or unit volume of packing material, complete removal capacity of NH3 per unit weight of packing material per day or unit volume of packing material per day and pressure drop of the packed bed was in the order of A approximately = C > B > or = D. Packing materials A and C with high porosity, maximum water content, and suitable mean pore diameter showed excellent removal capacity.

  11. Comparison of the biological H2S removal characteristics among four inorganic packing materials.

    PubMed

    Hirai, M; Kamamoto, M; Yani, M; Shoda, M

    2001-01-01

    Four inorganic packing materials were evaluated in terms of their availability as packing materials of a packed tower deodorization apparatus (biofilter) from the viewpoints of biological H2S removal characteristics and some physical properties. Among porous ceramics (A), calcinated cristobalite (B), calcinated and formed obsidian (C), granulated and calcinated soil (D), the superiority of these packing materials determined based on the values of non-biological removal per unit weight or unit volume of packing material, complete removal capacity of H2S per unit weight of packing material per day or unit volume of packing material per day and pressure drop of the packed bed was in the order of A approximately equal to C > D approximately equal to B, which is correlated with the maximum water content, porosity, and mean pore diameter.

  12. Arbutus unedo L.: chemical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Maria G; Faleiro, Maria L; Guerreiro, Adriana C; Antunes, Maria D

    2014-01-01

    Arbutus unedo L. (strawberry tree) has a circum-Mediterranean distribution, being found in western, central and southern Europe, north-eastern Africa (excluding Egypt and Libya) and the Canary Islands and western Asia. Fruits of the strawberry tree are generally used for preparing alcoholic drinks (wines, liqueurs and brandies), jams, jellies and marmalades, and less frequently eaten as fresh fruit, despite their pleasing appearance. An overview of the chemical composition of different parts of the plant, strawberry tree honey and strawberry tree brandy will be presented. The biological properties of the different parts of A. unedo and strawberry tree honey will be also overviewed. PMID:25271425

  13. Virus-Based Chemical and Biological Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Chuanbin; Liu, Aihua; Cao, Binrui

    2009-01-01

    Viruses have recently proven useful for the detection of target analytes such as explosives, proteins, bacteria, viruses, spores, and toxins with high selectivity and sensitivity. Bacteriophages (often shortened to phages), viruses that specifically infect bacteria, are currently the most studied viruses, mainly because target-specific nonlytic phages (and the peptides and proteins carried by them) can be identified by using the well-established phage display technique, and lytic phages can specifically break bacteria to release cell-specific marker molecules such as enzymes that can be assayed. In addition, phages have good chemical and thermal stability, and can be conjugated with nanomaterials and immobilized on a transducer surface in an analytical device. This Review focuses on progress made in the use of phages in chemical and biological sensors in combination with traditional analytical techniques. Recent progress in the use of virus—nanomaterial composites and other viruses in sensing applications is also high-lighted. PMID:19662666

  14. Chemical Biology for Understanding Matrix Metalloproteinase Function

    PubMed Central

    Knapinska, Anna; Fields, Gregg B.

    2013-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family has long been associated with normal physiological processes such as embryonic implantation, tissue remodeling, organ development, and wound healing, as well as multiple aspects of cancer initiation and progression, osteoarthritis, inflammatory and vascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases. The development of chemically designed MMP probes has advanced our understanding of the roles of MMPs in disease in addition to shedding considerable light on the mechanisms of MMP action. The first generation of protease-activated agents has demonstrated proof of principle as well as providing impetus for in vivo applications. One common problem has been a lack of agent stability at nontargeted tissues and organs due to activation by multiple proteases. The present review considers how chemical biology has impacted the progress made in understanding the roles of MMPs in disease and the basic mechanisms of MMP action. PMID:22933318

  15. Chemical Biology Strategies for Biofilm Control.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Givskov, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Microbes live as densely populated multicellular surface-attached biofilm communities embedded in self-generated, extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs). EPSs serve as a scaffold for cross-linking biofilm cells and support development of biofilm architecture and functions. Biofilms can have a clear negative impact on humans, where biofilms are a common denominator in many chronic diseases in which they prime development of destructive inflammatory conditions and the failure of our immune system to efficiently cope with them. Our current assortment of antimicrobial agents cannot efficiently eradicate biofilms. For industrial applications, the removal of biofilms within production machinery in the paper and hygienic food packaging industry, cooling water circuits, and drinking water manufacturing systems can be critical for the safety and efficacy of those processes. Biofilm formation is a dynamic process that involves microbial cell migration, cell-to-cell signaling and interactions, EPS synthesis, and cell-EPS interactions. Recent progress of fundamental biofilm research has shed light on novel chemical biology strategies for biofilm control. In this article, chemical biology strategies targeting the bacterial intercellular and intracellular signaling pathways will be discussed.

  16. Chemical and biological production of cyclotides

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yilong; Bi, Tao; Camarero, Julio A.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclotides are fascinating naturally occurring micro-proteins (≈30 residues long) present in several plant families, and display various biological properties such as protease inhibitory, anti-microbial, insecticidal, cytotoxic, anti-HIV and hormone-like activities. Cyclotides share a unique head-to-tail circular knotted topology of three disulfide bridges, with one disulfide penetrating through a macrocycle formed by the two other disulfides and interconnecting peptide backbones, forming what is called a cystine knot topology. This cyclic cystine knot (CCK) framework gives the cyclotides exceptional rigidity, resistance to thermal and chemical denaturation, and enzymatic stability against degradation. Interestingly, cyclotides have been shown to be orally bioavailable, and other cyclotides have been shown to cross the cell membranes. Moreover, recent reports have also shown that engineered cyclotides can be efficiently used to target extracellular and intracellular protein-protein interactions, therefore making cyclotides ideal tools for drug development to selectively target protein-protein interactions. In this work we will review all the available methods for production of these interesting proteins using chemical or biological methods. PMID:27064329

  17. Nanotechnologies and chemical tools for cell biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xing

    This dissertation describes several nanotechnologies and chemical tools that I have developed to probe living cells. Chapter one gives a brief overview on the current status of biomedical and biotechnological applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). In this chapter, strategies for functionalization of CNTs with emphasis on biological applications are reviewed. Representative developments in biosensing, bioimaging, intracellular delivery, and tissue engineering are presented. Recent studies on toxicity of CNTs are also discussed. Chapter two describes the development of a nanoscale cell injector for delivery of cargo to the interior of living cells without physiological harm. A CNT attached to an atomic force microscope tip was functionalized with cargo via a disulfide linker. Penetration of cell membranes with this "nanoneedle", followed by reductive cleavage of the disulfide bonds within the cell's interior, resulted in the release of cargo inside the cells. Chapter three presents a biomimetic functionalization strategy for interfacing CNTs with biological systems. The potential biological applications of CNTs have been limited by their insolubility in aqueous environment and their intrinsic toxicity. We developed a biomimetic surface modification of CNTs using glycosylated polymers designed to mimic natural cell surface mucin glycoproteins interactions. Chapter four further extends the biomimetic strategy for functionalization of CNTs to glycosylated dendrimers. We developed a new class of amphiphilic bifunctional glycodendrimers that comprised carbohydrate units displayed in the periphery and a pyrene tail that bound to SWNT surface via pi-pi interactions. The glycodendrimer-coated CNTs were soluble in water, and noncytotoxic. We also demonstrated that the coated CNTs could interface with biological systems including proteins and cells. Chapter five presents a biosensing application of glycodenderimer-coated CNTs. SWNTN-FETs coated with glycodendrimers were

  18. Reactivity of inorganic nanoparticles in biological environments: insights into nanotoxicity mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casals, E.; Gonzalez, E.; Puntes, V. F.

    2012-11-01

    A deeper understanding of the behaviour of inorganic nanoparticles in biological media is needed not only to fully control and develop the potential of these materials but also to increase knowledge of the physical chemistry of inorganic materials when their morphology approaches that of molecular entities. Although this knowledge and control is not yet entirely acquired, industry and society are already using nanomaterials in greater quantities and in consumer products. As normally happens when something new arrives in society, the interest in the broader implications of this emerging technology has grown together with unfounded ‘nanoeuphoria’ and ‘nanoscares’. In this context, only by understanding the mechanisms of the nano-bio interaction will it be possible to safely develop nanotechnology. In this review, we discuss on how nanoparticles behave once they are naturally or intentionally produced and are exposed to humans and the environment. The response of nanoparticles inside organisms or released to the environment is complex and diverse, and depends on a variety of parameters involved. Mainly, they may (i) be aggregated into microscopic particles or embedded in exposed materials; (ii) the surfaces of the nanoparticles, which determine their bioactivity, experience constant modifications; and (iii) nanoparticles may corrode and dissolve or they can suffer morphological modifications.

  19. Recovery from chemical, biological, and radiological incidents :

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, David Oliver; Yang, Lynn I.; Hammer, Ann E.

    2012-06-01

    To restore regional lifeline services and economic activity as quickly as possible after a chemical, biological or radiological incident, emergency planners and managers will need to prioritize critical infrastructure across many sectors for restoration. In parallel, state and local governments will need to identify and implement measures to promote reoccupation and economy recovery in the region. This document provides guidance on predisaster planning for two of the National Disaster Recovery Framework Recovery Support Functions: Infrastructure Systems and Economic Recovery. It identifies key considerations for infrastructure restoration, outlines a process for prioritizing critical infrastructure for restoration, and identifies critical considerations for promoting regional economic recovery following a widearea disaster. Its goal is to equip members of the emergency preparedness community to systematically prioritize critical infrastructure for restoration, and to develop effective economic recovery plans in preparation for a widearea CBR disaster.

  20. Isotopic Composition of Organic and Inorganic Carbon in Desert Biological Soil Crust Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, K.; Hartnett, H.; Anbar, A.; Beraldi, H.; Garcia-Pichel, F.

    2006-12-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are microbial communities that colonize soil surfaces in many arid regions. BSCs are important sources for fixed carbon and nitrogen in these ecosystems, and they greatly influence the structure, function, and appearance of desert soils. Biological activity of BSCs occurs during pulses of hydration requiring desert crusts to tolerate extremes in UV radiation, temperature, and desiccation. These characteristics make desert crusts unique systems that have received little consideration in the study of biogeochemical processes in extreme environments. This project investigates the impact of BSCs on carbon dynamics within desert soils. Soil cores ranging in depth from 8 to 12 cm were taken in March, 2006 from deserts near Moab, Utah. Two major BSC classes were identified: lichen-dominated (dark and pinnacled) soil crusts and cyanobacteria-dominated (light and flat) soil crusts. These two surface morphologies are related to the different biological communities. Carbon content and stable carbon isotopic composition were determined for the bulk carbon pool, as well as for the organic and inorganic carbon fractions of the soils. Expectedly, there was a net decrease in organic carbon content with depth (0.39-0.27 percent). Stable carbon isotope values for the organic fraction ranged from -5.8 per mil to -24.0 per mil (Avg: -14.4 per mil, S.D: 6.42 per mil). Stable carbon isotope values for the inorganic fraction ranged from 0.3 per mil to -3.6 per mil (Avg: -2.4 per mil, S.D.: 1.05 per mil). The variation in the isotopic composition of the organic carbon was due to a strong depletion below the surface soil value occurring between 3 and 5 cm depth, with an enrichment above the original surface value at depths below 6 to 10 cm. These data suggest that within desert soil crust systems the carbon isotopic signal is complex with both a clear biological imprint (lighter organic carbon) as well as evidence for some mechanism that results in

  1. [Neurological effects of chemical and biological weapons].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Naohide

    2003-11-01

    Neurological manifestations of chemical and biological weapons are reviewed. Nerve agents in current use, storage, or production include tabun, sarin, soman and VX. The initial effects of exposure to a nerve agent depend on the dose and on the route of exposure. Sarin, the agent studied most thoroughly in man in Matumoto and Tokyo attacked by Aum shinrikyo will cause miosis, rhinorrehea and shortness of breath are initial complaints immediately after inhalation exposure of the vapor. The severe cases showed loss of consciousness and convulsions. Respiratory arrest may occur. The most toxic of the nerve agents is VX. It is thought to be 100 times as toxic as sarin for humans by the percutaneous rout. The similar findings to sarin exposure are also observed in cases exposured to VX. Atropin and PAM will be effective in the early stage. BZ (benzilate) is a delayed onset incapacitation agent. It causes severe hallucination. The cyanide compounds are among the most rapidly acting of war gases, resulting in death. Anthrax has been the most attractive biological weapon for a long time. Anthrax is an acute bacterial infection of the skin and lungs in man and animals. Meningoencephalitis has been reported in the terminal stage in anthrax infection. In autopsy, it is really confirmed in the characteristic findings of the meningeal abnormality. The potential weaponization of variola virus continues to pose a military threat because the aerosol infectivity of the virus and the development of susceptible populations. A high rate of lethality, a staunch resistance to treatments and a rapid onset of severe generalised muscle weakness make botulinum toxin a suitable agent for biological warfare particularly by oral administration.

  2. Biologically Inspired Synthesis Route to Three-Dimensionally Structured Inorganic Thin Films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schwenzer, Birgit; Morse, Daniel E.

    2008-01-01

    Inorganic thin films (hydroxide, oxide, and phosphate materials) that are textured on a submicron scale have been prepared from aqueous metal salt solutions at room temperature using vapor-diffusion catalysis. This generic synthesis approach mimics the essential advantages of the catalytic and structure-directing mechanisms observed for the formation of silica skeletons of marine sponges. Chemical composition, crystallinity, and the three-dimensional morphology of films prepared by this method are extremely sensitive to changes in the synthesis conditions, such as concentrations, reaction times, and the presence and nature of substrate materials. Focusing on different materials systems, the reaction mechanism for the formation ofmore » these thin films and the influence of different reaction parameters on the product are explained.« less

  3. Information-collection request for: National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for inorganic chemicals. Phase 2, March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-31

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), under the requirements of the Safe Drinking Water Act Section 1401 and 1412, P.L. 99-339, as amended in 1986, has proposed a National Primary Drinking Water Regulation (NPDWR) pertaining to the contamination of public-water systems by inorganic chemical contaminants. The proposed IOCs Rule includes information collection requirements for eight inorganic chemicals -- asbestos, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, nitrate, nitrite, and selenium. The information collection request analyzes the information burden imposed on public-water systems and States as a result of the regulation. EPA is proposing only to regulate source-related inorganics under this rule, as opposed to inorganics which predominately occur as corrosion by-products and naturally occurring copper and lead are analyzed in the RIA and ICR for lead and corrosion by-products. Note also that EPA has already promulgated a NPDWR for fluoride.

  4. Inorganic chemical composition and chemical reactivity of settled dust generated by the World Trade Center building collapse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Hageman, Philip L.; Lamothe, Paul J.; Ziegler, Thomas L.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Theodorakos, Peter M.; Brownfield, Isabelle; Adams, Monique G.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Taggart, Joseph E.; Clark, Roger N.; Wilson, S.; Sutley, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Samples of dust deposited around lower Manhattan by the September 11, 2001, World Trade Center (WTC) collapse have inorganic chemical compositions that result in part from the variable chemical contributions of concrete, gypsum wallboard, glass fibers, window glass, and other materials contained in the buildings. The dust deposits were also modified chemically by variable interactions with rain water or water used in street washing and fire fighting. Chemical leach tests using deionized water as the extraction fluid show the dust samples can be quite alkaline, due primarily to reactions with calcium hydroxide in concrete particles. Calcium and sulfate are the most soluble components in the dust, but many other elements are also readily leached, including metals such as Al, Sb, Mo Cr, Cu, and Zn. Indoor dust samples produce leachates with higher pH, alkalinity, and dissolved solids than outdoor dust samples, suggesting most outdoor dust had reacted with water and atmospheric carbon dioxide prior to sample collection. Leach tests using simulated lung fluids as the extracting fluid suggest that the dust might also be quite reactive in fluids lining the respiratory tract, resulting in dissolution of some particles and possible precipitation of new phases such as phosphates, carbonates, and silicates. Results of these chemical characterization studies can be used by health scientists as they continue to track and interpret health effects resulting from the short-term exposure to the initial dust cloud and the longer-term exposure to dusts resuspended during cleanup.

  5. Overview of chemical imaging methods to address biological questions.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Marcel Menezes Lyra; Trepout, Sylvain; Messaoudi, Cédric; Wu, Ting-Di; Ortega, Richard; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Marco, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    Chemical imaging offers extensive possibilities for better understanding of biological systems by allowing the identification of chemical components at the tissue, cellular, and subcellular levels. In this review, we introduce modern methods for chemical imaging that can be applied to biological samples. This work is mainly addressed to the biological sciences community and includes the bases of different technologies, some examples of its application, as well as an introduction to approaches on combining multimodal data.

  6. Use of carbonates for biological and chemical synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Rau, Gregory Hudson

    2014-09-09

    A system of using carbonates, especially water-insoluble or sparing soluble mineral carbonates, for maintaining or increasing dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations in aqueous media. In particular, the system generates concentrated dissolve inorganic carbon substrates for photosynthetic, chemosynthetic, or abiotic chemical production of carbonaceous or other compounds in solution. In some embodiments, the invention can also enhance the dissolution and retention of carbon dioxide in aqueous media, and can produce pH buffering capacity, metal ions, and heat, which can be beneficial to the preceding syntheses.

  7. Functionalized apertures for the detection of chemical and biological materials

    DOEpatents

    Letant, Sonia E.; van Buuren, Anthony W.; Terminello, Louis J.; Thelen, Michael P.; Hope-Weeks, Louisa J.; Hart, Bradley R.

    2010-12-14

    Disclosed are nanometer to micron scale functionalized apertures constructed on a substrate made of glass, carbon, semiconductors or polymeric materials that allow for the real time detection of biological materials or chemical moieties. Many apertures can exist on one substrate allowing for the simultaneous detection of numerous chemical and biological molecules. One embodiment features a macrocyclic ring attached to cross-linkers, wherein the macrocyclic ring has a biological or chemical probe extending through the aperture. Another embodiment achieves functionalization by attaching chemical or biological anchors directly to the walls of the apertures via cross-linkers.

  8. Challenges and opportunities in synthetic biology for chemical engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, YZ; Lee, JK; Zhao, HM

    2013-11-15

    Synthetic biology provides numerous great opportunities for chemical engineers in the development of new processes for large-scale production of biofuels, value-added chemicals, and protein therapeutics. However, challenges across all scales abound. In particular, the modularization and standardization of the components in a biological system, so-called biological parts, remain the biggest obstacle in synthetic biology. In this perspective, we will discuss the main challenges and opportunities in the rapidly growing synthetic biology field and the important roles that chemical engineers can play in its advancement. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Challenges and opportunities in synthetic biology for chemical engineers

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yunzi; Lee, Jung-Kul; Zhao, Huimin

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic biology provides numerous great opportunities for chemical engineers in the development of new processes for large-scale production of biofuels, value-added chemicals, and protein therapeutics. However, challenges across all scales abound. In particular, the modularization and standardization of the components in a biological system, so-called biological parts, remain the biggest obstacle in synthetic biology. In this perspective, we will discuss the main challenges and opportunities in the rapidly growing synthetic biology field and the important roles that chemical engineers can play in its advancement. PMID:24222925

  10. 78 FR 55326 - Determinations Regarding Use of Chemical Weapons in Syria Under the Chemical and Biological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... Determinations Regarding Use of Chemical Weapons in Syria Under the Chemical and Biological Weapons Control and... to Section 306(a) of the Chemical and Biological Weapons Control and Warfare Elimination Act of 1991, 22 U.S.C. 5604(a), that the Government of Syria has used chemical weapons in violation...

  11. Integrated chemical and biological systems in nanowire structures towards nano-scale sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Rose M.

    Nanowires composed of metal and conducting polymers with integrated proteins and chemical systems have been investigated as building blocks for next-generation nano-scale sensors and assemblies. These nanowires were fabricated by combining chemical and electrochemical methods of synthesis of gold and conducting polymers in nanopores of anodized alumina membranes. Polymer nanowires were synthesized from buffer solutions as a mean to promote a biocompatible environment for the incorporation of proteins. A variety of proteins were incorporated into the polymer matrix by entrapment during polymerization that imparted the polymer material with biological functionality. Another class of composite nanowires containing electro-active conducting polymer junctions was developed for applications in chemical sensor arrays. The methodologies described in this thesis provide an inexpensive and straightforward approach to the synthesis of anisotropic nanoparticles incorporating a variety of biological and inorganic species that can be integrated to current microelectronic technologies for the development of nano-scale sensor arrays.

  12. Chemical Tumor Biology of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Karthik; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2010-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) play vital roles in every step of tumor progression allowing cancer cells to proliferate, escape from immune response, invade neighboring tissues, and metastasize to distal sites away from the primary site. Several cancers including breast, lung, brain, pancreatic, skin, and colorectal cancers show aberrant modulation of several key HS biosynthetic enzymes such as 3-O Sulfotransferase and 6-O Sulfotransferase, and also catabolic enzymes such as HSulf-1, HSulf-2 and heparanase. The resulting tumor specific HS fine structures assist cancer cells to breakdown ECM to spread, misregulate signaling pathways to facilitate their proliferation, promote angiogenesis to receive nutrients, and protect themselves against natural killer cells. This review focuses on the changes in the expression of HS biosynthetic and catabolic enzymes in several cancers, the resulting changes in HS fine structures, and the effects of these tumor specific HS signatures on promoting invasion, proliferation, and metastasis. It is possible to retard tumor progression by modulating the deregulated biosynthetic and catabolic pathways of HS chains through novel chemical biology approaches. PMID:20596243

  13. Inorganic nitrogen transformations in the bed of the Shingobee River, Minnesota: Integrating hydrologic and biological processes using sediment perfusion cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheibley, R.W.; Duff, J.H.; Jackman, A.P.; Triska, F.J.

    2003-01-01

    Inorganic N transformations were examined in streambed sediments from the Shingobee River using sediment perfusion cores. The experimental design simulated groundwater-stream water mixing within sediment cores, which provided a well-defined one-dimensional representation of in situ hydrologic conditions. Two distinct hydrologic and chemical settings were preserved in the sediment cores: the lowermost sediments, perfused with groundwater, remained anaerobic during the incubations, whereas the uppermost sediments, perfused with oxic water pumped from the overlying water column, simulated stream water penetration into the bed. The maintenance of oxic and anoxic zones formed a biologically active aerobic-anaerobic interface. Ammonium (NH4+) dissolved in groundwater was transported conservatively through the lower core zone but was removed as it mixed with aerated recycle water. Concurrently, a small quantity of nitrate (NO3-) equaling ???25% of the NH4+ loss was produced in the upper sediments. The NH4+ and NO3- profiles in the uppermost sediments resulted from coupled nitrification-denitrification, because assimilation and sorption were negligible. We hypothesize that anaerobic microsites within the aerated upper sediments supported denitrification. Rates of nitrification and denitrification in the perfusion cores ranged 42-209 and 53-160 mg N m-2 day-1, respectively. The use of modified perfusion cores permitted the identification and quantification of N transformations and verified process control by surface water exchange into the shallow hyporheic zone of the Shingobee River.

  14. Inorganic chemical investigation by x-ray fluorescence analysis: The Viking Mars Lander

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toulmin, P.; Baird, A.K.; Clark, B. C.; Keil, Klaus; Rose, H.J.

    1973-01-01

    The inorganic chemical investigation added in August 1972 to the Viking Lander scientific package will utilize an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer in which four sealed, gas-filled proportional counters will detect X-rays emitted from samples of the Martian surface materials irradiated by X-rays from radioisotope sources (55Fe and 109Cd). The output of the proportional counters will be subjected to pulse-height analysis by an on-board step-scanning single-channel analyzer with adjustable counting periods. The data will be returned to Earth, via the Viking Orbiter relay system, and the spectra constructed, calibrated, and interpreted here. The instrument is inside the Lander body, and samples are to be delivered to it by the Viking Lander Surface Sampler. Calibration standards are an integral part of the instrument. The results of the investigation will characterize the surface materials of Mars as to elemental composition with accuracies ranging from a few tens of parts per million (at the trace-element level) to a few percent (for major elements) depending on the element in question. Elements of atomic number 11 or less are determined only as a group, though useful estimates of their individual abundances maybe achieved by indirect means. The expected radiation environment will not seriously hamper the measurements. Based on the results, inferences can be drawn regarding (1) the surface mineralogy and lithology; (2) the nature of weathering processes, past and present, and the question of equilibrium between the atmosphere and the surface; and (3) the extent and type of differentiation that the planet has undergone. The Inorganic Chemical Investigation supports and is supported by most other Viking Science investigations. ?? 1973.

  15. Structural resistance of chemically modified 1-D nanostructured titanates in inorganic acid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Marinkovic, Bojan A.; Fredholm, Yann C.; Morgado, Edisson

    2010-10-15

    Sodium containing one-dimensional nanostructured layered titanates (1-D NSLT) were produced both from commercial anatase powder and Brazilian natural rutile mineral sands by alkali hydrothermal process. The 1-D NSLT were chemically modified with proton, cobalt or iron via ionic exchange and all products were additionally submitted to intensive inorganic acid aging (pH = 0.5) for 28 days. The morphology and crystal structure transformations of chemically modified 1-D NSLT were followed by transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, selected area electron diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. It was found that the original sodium rich 1-D NSLT and cobalt substituted 1-D NSLT were completely converted to rutile nanoparticles, while the protonated form was transformed in a 70%-30% (by weight) anatase-rutile nanoparticles mixture, very similar to that of the well-known TiO{sub 2}-photocatalyst P25 (Degussa). The iron substituted 1-D NSLT presented better acid resistance as 13% of the original structure and morphology remained, the rest being converted in rutile. A significant amount of remaining 1-D NSLT was also observed after the acid treatment of the product obtained from rutile sand. The results showed that phase transformation of NSLT into titanium dioxide polymorph in inorganic acid conditions were controllable by varying the exchanged cations. Finally, the possibility to transform, through acid aging, 1-D NSLT obtained from Brazilian natural rutile sand into TiO{sub 2}-polymorphs was demonstrated for the first time to the best of authors' knowledge, opening path for producing TiO{sub 2}-nanoproducts with different morphologies through a simple process and from a low cost precursor.

  16. Chemical and Biological Terrorism: Current Updates for Nurse Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veenema, Tener Goodwin

    2002-01-01

    Describes eight topics related to chemical/biological terrorism for a standalone nursing course or integration into other courses: surveillance systems; identification, communication, and response; chemical agents; biological agents; recognition of covert exposure; patient decontamination and mass triage; availability and safety of therapies; and…

  17. The method of radioactive tracer for measuring the amount of inorganic nanoparticles in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzulukov, Yu; Antsiferova, A.; Demin, V. A.; Demin, V. F.; Kashkarov, P.

    2015-11-01

    The method to measure the mass of inorganic nanoparticles in biological (or any other samples) using nanoparticles labeled with radioactive tracers is developed and applied to practice. The tracers are produced in original nanoparticles by radioactive activation of some of their atomic nuclei. The method of radioactive tracers demonstrates a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy equal or better than popular methods of optical and mass spectrometry, or electron microscopy and has some specific advantages. The method can be used for study of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion in living organism, as well as in ecological and fundamental research. It was used in practice to study absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of nanoparticles of Ag, Au, Se, ZnO, TiO2 as well as to study transportation of silver nanoparticles through the barriers of blood-brain, placenta and milk gland of rats. Brief descriptions of data obtained in experiments with application of this method included in the article. The method was certified in Russian Federation standard system GOST-R and recommended by the Russian Federation regulation authority ROSPOTREBNADZOR for measuring of toxicokinetic and organotropy parameters of nanoparticles.

  18. Modes of interaction between inorganic engineered nanoparticles and biological and abiotic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaumann, G. E.; Abraham, P. M.; Dabrunz, A.

    2012-04-01

    Engineered nanoparticles aging and transformation pathways in natural environmental systems are linked with their attachment to surfaces of organisms, plant leaves, biofilms, soil or sediment particles. In this study we investigated attachment of nAg0 and nTiO2 to plant leaves and organic and inorganic model surfaces and daphnia with the objective to understand the physicochemistry behind these interactions as well as potential ecological effects linked with this attachment. Surface-nanoparticle interactions were investigated in well-defined sorption studies and compared to conditions in in ecotoxicological test systems. Model surfaces were chosen to cover a wide range of intermolecular interactions considering van-der Waals interactions as well as proton donor and acceptor interactions. The nanoparticle-surface complexes were analysed with microscopic techniques including optical microscopy, environmental scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as with respect to physicochemical interactions. While deposition of nanoparticles in ecotoxicological test systems is often determined by aggregation, and toxicity may be induced by physical effects, sorption of nanoparticle from stable suspensions is controlled by the chemical nature of the model surfaces as well as by the surfaces accessible for the nanoparticles. The current results show that attachment is determined by an intensive interplay between physicochemical nanoparticle-surface interactions, aggregation stability and physical characteristics. This interplay will mutually affect the ecological relevance, including further fate, transport and effects of the nanoparticles in the environment.

  19. Chemical model for Viking biology experiments - Implications for the composition of the Martian regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumb, Robert C.; Tantayanon, Rewat; Libby, Mark; Xu, Wen Wen

    1989-01-01

    The labelled-release and the gas-exchange experiments of the 1976 Mars Viking biology experiment program detected, respectively, C-14 labelled gases and O2 gas. A chemical model is proposed here for these experiments in which the reactants are an inorganic nitrate salt which has been partly photolyzed by ultraviolet light and a sparingly soluble metal carbonate such as calcite. The model reproduces the main effects seen, indicating that nitrates are present in the Martian regolith as well as calcite (or some other carbonate with similar solubility).

  20. Syntheses and Biological Studies of Marine Terpenoids Derived from Inorganic Cyanide

    PubMed Central

    Schnermann, Martin J.; Shenvi, Ryan A.

    2015-01-01

    Isocyanoterpenes (ICTs) are marine natural products biosynthesized through an unusual pathway that adorns terpene scaffolds with nitrogenous functionality derived from cyanide. The appendage of nitrogen functional groups–isonitriles in particular–onto stereochemically-rich carbocyclic ring systems provides enigmatic, bioactive molecules that have required innovative chemical syntheses. This review discusses the challenges inherent to the synthesis of this diverse family and details the development of the field. We also present recent progress in isolation and discuss key aspects of the remarkable biological activity of these compounds. PMID:25514696

  1. Retention of organic and inorganic chemicals by the drainage/supply piping material.

    PubMed

    Li, K; Torello, W A; Xing, B

    2000-06-01

    A critical issue facing the turfgrass industry is the environmental fate and transport of organic and inorganic chemicals used on golf courses. The fate and distribution of those chemicals are strongly influenced by sorptive interactions with soil and sediment. In this study, the drainage and water supply piping material (used for construction of a prototype encapsulated golf green) was utilized to determine its potential sorption of three organic chemicals [2,4-dichloro-phenoxyacetic acid] (2,4-D), naphthalene and toluene and nitrate. Crushed piping material (small-to-large particle sizes) was evaluated. Isotherms were constructed using a batch equilibration technique. The results showed that the drainage/supply piping material at small particle sizes (<2.5 mm) has higher sorptive ability compared to soil (1.7 for 2,4-D and 13.4 for naphthalene). The K(F) value was 44, 253 and 70 for 2,4-D, naphthalene and toluene, respectively. K(oc) values were much higher than those of peat and soil at lower equilibrium concentrations. However, sorption decreased dramatically with increasing particle size (approaching zero at particle size 10 mm), due to reduction of surface areas and sorption sites. Sorption of NO(3)-N by the piping material was negligible. We concluded that sorption by intact drainage/supply piping material would not affect the recycling efficiency of pesticides and nutrients in the constructed encapsulated green. Conversely, drainage/supply piping material particles smaller than 2.5 mm in diameter can effectively be utilized as a filtering material.

  2. Microwave-assisted synthesis of chromenes: biological and chemical importance.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shivaputra A; Patil, Siddappa A; Patil, Renukadevi

    2015-01-01

    Chromenes constitute chemically important class of heterocyclic compounds having diverse biological and chemical importance. Development of environmentally benign, efficient and economical methods for the synthesis of chromenes remains a significant challenge in synthetic chemistry. The synthesis of chromenes, therefore, has attracted enormous attention from medicinal and organic chemists. Researchers have embraced the concepts of microwave (high speed) synthesis to produce biologically and chemically important chromenes in a time sensitive manner. This review will summarize the recent biological applications such as anticancer, antimicrobial, neurodegenerative and insecticidal activity of new chromenes prepared via microwave irradiation. The development of new methodologies for the synthesis of chromenes including green chemistry processes has also been discussed.

  3. Chemical biology: Protein modification in a trice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, Heather

    2015-10-01

    Organometallic reagents have been developed that chemically modify proteins and peptides specifically at cysteine amino-acid residues -- potentially offering a general route to making therapeutically useful compounds. See Letter p.687

  4. Chemical biology: How to minimalize antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rader, Christoph

    2015-02-01

    The success of antibodies as pharmaceuticals has triggered interest in crafting much smaller mimics. A crucial step forward has been taken with the chemical synthesis of small molecules that recruit immune cells to attack cancer cells.

  5. Chemical biology 2012: from drug targets to biological systems and back.

    PubMed

    Socher, Elke; Grossmann, Tom N

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sites sharing a common target: This year's EMBO conference on chemical biology encouraged over 340 researchers to come to Heidelberg, Germany, and discuss the use of diverse chemical strategies and tools to investigate biological questions and better understand cellular processes.

  6. ChemProt: a disease chemical biology database.

    PubMed

    Taboureau, Olivier; Nielsen, Sonny Kim; Audouze, Karine; Weinhold, Nils; Edsgärd, Daniel; Roque, Francisco S; Kouskoumvekaki, Irene; Bora, Alina; Curpan, Ramona; Jensen, Thomas Skøt; Brunak, Søren; Oprea, Tudor I

    2011-01-01

    Systems pharmacology is an emergent area that studies drug action across multiple scales of complexity, from molecular and cellular to tissue and organism levels. There is a critical need to develop network-based approaches to integrate the growing body of chemical biology knowledge with network biology. Here, we report ChemProt, a disease chemical biology database, which is based on a compilation of multiple chemical-protein annotation resources, as well as disease-associated protein-protein interactions (PPIs). We assembled more than 700,000 unique chemicals with biological annotation for 30,578 proteins. We gathered over 2-million chemical-protein interactions, which were integrated in a quality scored human PPI network of 428,429 interactions. The PPI network layer allows for studying disease and tissue specificity through each protein complex. ChemProt can assist in the in silico evaluation of environmental chemicals, natural products and approved drugs, as well as the selection of new compounds based on their activity profile against most known biological targets, including those related to adverse drug events. Results from the disease chemical biology database associate citalopram, an antidepressant, with osteogenesis imperfect and leukemia and bisphenol A, an endocrine disruptor, with certain types of cancer, respectively. The server can be accessed at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/ChemProt/. PMID:20935044

  7. Construction of a Linux based chemical and biological information system.

    PubMed

    Molnár, László; Vágó, István; Fehér, András

    2003-01-01

    A chemical and biological information system with a Web-based easy-to-use interface and corresponding databases has been developed. The constructed system incorporates all chemical, numerical and textual data related to the chemical compounds, including numerical biological screen results. Users can search the database by traditional textual/numerical and/or substructure or similarity queries through the web interface. To build our chemical database management system, we utilized existing IT components such as ORACLE or Tripos SYBYL for database management and Zope application server for the web interface. We chose Linux as the main platform, however, almost every component can be used under various operating systems.

  8. Cutaneous reactions in nuclear, biological and chemical warfare.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sandeep

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear, biological and chemical warfare have in recent times been responsible for an increasing number of otherwise rare dermatoses. Many nations are now maintaining overt and clandestine stockpiles of such arsenal. With increasing terrorist threats, these agents of mass destruction pose a risk to the civilian population. Nuclear and chemical attacks manifest immediately while biological attacks manifest later. Chemical and biological attacks pose a significant risk to the attending medical personnel. The large scale of anticipated casualties in the event of such an occurrence would need the expertise of all physicians, including dermatologists, both military and civilian. Dermatologists are uniquely qualified in this respect. This article aims at presenting a review of the cutaneous manifestations in nuclear, chemical and biological warfare and their management.

  9. Biological and Chemical Complexity of Fusarium proliferatum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The heterothallic ascomycete Fusarium proliferatum (teleomorph Gibberella intermedia) is a genetically diverse biological and phylogenetic species with a worldwide distribution and an unusually broad host range. F. proliferatum is a frequent component of the Fusarium ear rot complexes of maize and ...

  10. Studies on Semantic Systems Chemical Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Current "one disease, one target and one drug" drug development paradigm is under question as relatively few drugs have reached the market in the last two decades. Increasingly research focus is being placed on the study of drug action against biological systems as a whole rather than against a single component (called "Systems…

  11. Biomaterials for mediation of chemical and biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Russell, Alan J; Berberich, Jason A; Drevon, Geraldine F; Koepsel, Richard R

    2003-01-01

    Recent events have emphasized the threat from chemical and biological warfare agents. Within the efforts to counter this threat, the biocatalytic destruction and sensing of chemical and biological weapons has become an important area of focus. The specificity and high catalytic rates of biological catalysts make them appropriate for decommissioning nerve agent stockpiles, counteracting nerve agent attacks, and remediation of organophosphate spills. A number of materials have been prepared containing enzymes for the destruction of and protection against organophosphate nerve agents and biological warfare agents. This review discusses the major chemical and biological warfare agents, decontamination methods, and biomaterials that have potential for the preparation of decontamination wipes, gas filters, column packings, protective wear, and self-decontaminating paints and coatings.

  12. Semi-volatile inorganic species: importance for atmospheric chemical composition on diurnal and seasonal timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Hana; Mann, Graham; Arnold, Stephen; O'Connor, Fiona; Benduhn, Francois; Rumbold, Steven; Pringle, Kirsty

    2016-04-01

    Nitrate aerosol has become an important driver of reduced European air quality and climate forcing, following reductions in sulphate precursor emissions since the 1980s, and is expected to be more influential in future decades. Measurements from the European Integrated Project on Aerosol and Cloud Climate Air Quality Interactions (EUCAARI) field campaign have shown that semi-volatile aerosol species such as ammonium nitrate can comprise a major component of the sub-micron particulate matter, particularly in high pollution episodes. This presentation will assess the contribution of semi-volatile inorganic aerosol to diurnal and seasonal cycles in atmospheric chemical composition over Europe. We use the UM-UKCA composition-climate model, including the GLOMAP interactive aerosol microphysics module and a recently developed 'hybrid' dissolution solver (HyDis) to accurately represent size-resolved partitioning of ammonia and nitric acid to the particle phase. In particular, we evaluate simulated size-resolved composition variations over Europe through the diurnal cycle, comparing hourly model output to Aerosol Mass Spectrometer observations at several sites during 2008. We will present the results of this composition analysis, in addition to model evaluation from comparisons with European Monitoring for Environmental Protection (EMEP) network and EUCAARI field campaign observations.

  13. Chemical and biological sensing using tuning forks

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Nongjian; Boussaad, Salah

    2012-07-10

    A device for sensing a chemical analyte is disclosed. The device is comprised of a vibrating structure having first and second surfaces and having an associated resonant frequency and a wire coupled between the first and second surfaces of the vibrating structure, wherein the analyte interacts with the wire and causes a change in the resonant frequency of the vibrating structure. The vibrating structure can include a tuning fork. The vibrating structure can be comprised of quartz. The wire can be comprised of polymer. A plurality of vibrating structures are arranged in an array to increase confidence by promoting a redundancy of measurement or to detect a plurality of chemical analytes. A method of making a device for sensing a chemical analyte is also disclosed.

  14. Guidelines to improve airport preparedness against chemical and biological terrorism.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Donna M.; Price, Phillip N.; Gordon, Susanna P.; Gadgil, Ashok

    2005-05-01

    Guidelines to Improve Airport Preparedness Against Chemical and Biological Terrorism is a 100-page document that makes concrete recommendations on improving security and assessing vulnerable areas and helps its readers understand the nature of chemical and biological attacks. The report has been turned over to Airports Council International (ACI) and the American Association of Airport Executives (AAAE), two organizations that together represent the interests of thousands of airport personnel and facilities in the U.S. and around the world.

  15. Chemical and biological weapons: new questions, new answers.

    PubMed

    Hood, E

    1999-12-01

    The words "chemical and biological weapons" (CBW) send a shiver down most spines these days. With the end of the Cold War, the possibility of a massive nuclear confrontation appears remote, so today many popular doomsday scenarios center on the aggressive use of chemical or biological warfare by rogue nations or terrorist groups. As exaggerated as some of the accounts are, with CBW cast as the latest unseen, unstoppable enemy, the threat posed by these weapons is all too real, and growing.

  16. SOME CHEMICAL PROPERTIES UNDERLYING ARSENIC'S BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    In this paper some of the chemical properties of arsenicals (atomic
    and molecular orbitals, electronegativity, valence state, changes between
    valence state, nucleophilicity, the hard/soft acid/base principle) that may
    account for some of the b...

  17. Chemical Biological Emergency Management Information System

    2004-06-15

    CB-EMIS is designed to provide information and analysis to transit system operators and emergency responders in the event of a chemical attack on a subway system. The software inforporates detector data, video images, train data, meteorological data, and above- and below-ground plume dispersion models, hight of the liquid level.

  18. Chemical biology: Chromatin chemistry goes cellular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischle, Wolfgang; Schwarzer, Dirk; Mootz, Henning D.

    2015-05-01

    Analysing post-translational modifications of histone proteins as they occur within chromatin is challenging due to their large number and chemical diversity. A major step forward has now been achieved by using split intein chemistry to engineer functionalized histones within cells.

  19. Chemically-functionalized microcantilevers for detection of chemical, biological and explosive material

    DOEpatents

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A [Knoxville, TN; Thundat, Thomas G [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Gilbert M [Knoxville, TN; Hawk, John Eric [Olive Branch, MS; Boiadjiev, Vassil I [Knoxville, TN

    2007-04-24

    A chemically functionalized cantilever system has a cantilever coated on one side thereof with a reagent or biological species which binds to an analyte. The system is of particular value when the analyte is a toxic chemical biological warfare agent or an explosive.

  20. Cysteine-Cystine Photoregeneration for Oxygenic Photosynthesis of Acetic Acid from CO2 by a Tandem Inorganic-Biological Hybrid System.

    PubMed

    Sakimoto, Kelsey K; Zhang, Stephanie J; Yang, Peidong

    2016-09-14

    Tandem "Z-scheme" approaches to solar-to-chemical production afford the ability to independently develop and optimize reductive photocatalysts for CO2 reduction to multicarbon compounds and oxidative photocatalysts for O2 evolution. To connect the two redox processes, molecular redox shuttles, reminiscent of biological electron transfer, offer an additional level of facile chemical tunability that eliminates the need for solid-state semiconductor junction engineering. In this work, we report a tandem inorganic-biological hybrid system capable of oxygenic photosynthesis of acetic acid from CO2. The photoreductive catalyst consists of the bacterium Moorella thermoacetica self-photosensitized with CdS nanoparticles at the expense of the thiol amino acid cysteine (Cys) oxidation to the disulfide form cystine (CySS). To regenerate the CySS/Cys redox shuttle, the photooxidative catalyst, TiO2 loaded with cocatalyst Mn(II) phthalocyanine (MnPc), couples water oxidation to CySS reduction. The combined system M. thermoacetica-CdS + TiO2-MnPc demonstrates a potential biomimetic approach to complete oxygenic solar-to-chemical production. PMID:27537852

  1. The chemical and biological versatility of riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Massey, V

    2000-01-01

    Since their discovery and chemical characterization in the 1930s, flavins have been recognized as being capable of both one- and two-electron transfer processes, and as playing a pivotal role in coupling the two-electron oxidation of most organic substrates to the one-electron transfers of the respiratory chain. In addition, they are now known as versatile compounds that can function as electrophiles and nucleophiles, with covalent intermediates of flavin and substrate frequently being involved in catalysis. Flavins are thought to contribute to oxidative stress through their ability to produce superoxide, but at the same time flavins are frequently involved in the reduction of hydroperoxides, products of oxygen-derived radical reactions. Flavoproteins play an important role in soil detoxification processes via the hydroxylation of many aromatic compounds, and a simple flavoprotein in liver microsomes catalyses many reactions similar to those carried out by cytochrome P450 enzymes. Flavins are involved in the production of light in bioluminescent bacteria, and are intimately connected with light-initiated reactions such as plant phototropism and nucleic acid repair processes. Recent reports also link them to programmed cell death. The chemical versatility of flavoproteins is clearly controlled by specific interactions with the proteins with which they are bound. One of the main thrusts of current research is to try to define the nature of these interactions, and to understand in chemical terms the various steps involved in catalysis by flavoprotein enzymes. PMID:10961912

  2. Air monitoring and detection of chemical and biological agents

    SciTech Connect

    Leonelli, J.; Althouse, M.L.

    1999-06-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of SPIE`s remote sensing symposium which was held November 2--3, 1998 in Boston, Massachusetts. Topics of discussion include the following: system simulations, atmospheric modeling, and performance prediction studies of chemical warfare remote sensing technologies; ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence and aerosol detection methods for remote sensing of biological warfare agents; passive detection methods for remote detection of chemical warfare agents; and lidar-based system performance assessments, demonstrations, and new concepts for chemical warfare/biological warfare detection.

  3. Chemical and Biological Applications of Turing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, Vicenç; Fedotov, Sergei; Horsthemke, Werner

    Turing's paper on diffusion-driven instabilities in nonequilibrium reaction-diffusion systems as a means of biological pattern formation [440] attracted little attention for about two decades, as shown by the citation histogram in Fig. 12.1. One of the first scientists to be intrigued by Turing's ideas was Wardlaw, a botanist who thought about ways to test the mechanism experimentally [468, 470, 469]. By the early 1970s theoretical biologists and biomathematicians began to explore in earnest if Turing instabilities could explain spatial pattern formation in a variety of living systems and a considerable body of theoretical work was produced, see for example [157, 279, 231, 239, 182, 183, 264, 261, 308]. Morphogen-based pattern formation, where the long-range influence of signaling molecules induces structure, is a well-established phenomenon in developmental biology [26]. However, definitive evidence for a Turing mechanism of pattern formation within a morphogen system is still lacking. Several promising candidate systems exist and are discussed in Sect. 12.2.

  4. Application of chemical biology in target identification and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yue; Xiao, Ting; Lei, Saifei; Zhou, Fulai; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2015-09-01

    Drug discovery and development is vital to the well-being of mankind and sustainability of the pharmaceutical industry. Using chemical biology approaches to discover drug leads has become a widely accepted path partially because of the completion of the Human Genome Project. Chemical biology mainly solves biological problems through searching previously unknown targets for pharmacologically active small molecules or finding ligands for well-defined drug targets. It is a powerful tool to study how these small molecules interact with their respective targets, as well as their roles in signal transduction, molecular recognition and cell functions. There have been an increasing number of new therapeutic targets being identified and subsequently validated as a result of advances in functional genomics, which in turn led to the discovery of numerous active small molecules via a variety of high-throughput screening initiatives. In this review, we highlight some applications of chemical biology in the context of drug discovery.

  5. Chemical biology approaches for the study of apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Child, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    Chemical biology and the techniques the field encompasses provide scientists with the means to address biological questions in ever-evolving and technically sophisticated ways. They facilitate the dissection of molecular mechanisms of cell phenomena on timescales not achievable by other means. Libraries of small molecules, bioorthogonal chemistries and technical advances in mass-spectrometry techniques enable the modern chemical biologist to tackle even the most difficult of biological questions. It is because of their broad applicability that these approaches are well suited to systems less tractable to more classical genetic methods. As such, the parasite community has embraced them with great success. Some of these successes and the continuing evolution of chemical biology applied to apicomplexans will be discussed.

  6. Waves and Patterns in Chemical and Biological Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinney, Harry L.; Krinsky, Valentin I.

    1991-12-01

    These 28 contributions by leading researchers - from such diverse disciplines as chemistry, biology, physics, mathematics, and physiology - describe recent experiments, numerical simulations, and theoretical analyses of the formation of spatial patterns in chemical and biological systems. Chemical patterns have been systematically studied since the field was established by Alan Turing's landmark 1952 paper, "The chemical basis for morphogenesis," yet only recently have new experimental techniques and numerical analyses of reaction-diffusion equations opened the way to understanding stationary and traveling wave patterns. This collection summarizes the exciting developments in this rapidly growing field. It shows that some biological patterns have been found to be strikingly similar to patterns found in simple, well-controlled laboratory chemical systems, that new chemical reactor designs make it possible to sustain chemical patterns and to study transitions between different kinds of patterns, and that nearly 40 years after Turing's paper, the patterns predicted by Turing have finally been observed in laboratory experiments. Harry L. Swinney is Sid Richardson Foundation Regents Chair, Department of Physics, and Director of the Center for Nonlinear Dynamics at the University of Texas at Austin. Valentin I. Krinsky is Head of the Autowave Laboratory, Institute of Biological Physics, Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, USSR. Chapters cover: Spiral, Ring, and Scroll Patterns: Experiments. Spiral, Ring, and Scroll Patterns: Theory and Simulations. Fronts and Turing Patterns. Waves and Patterns in Biological Systems.

  7. Enhanced formulations for neutralization of chemical, biological and industrial toxants

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Mark D [Albuqueque, NM

    2008-06-24

    An enhanced formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The enhanced formulation according to the present invention is non-toxic and non-corrosive and can be delivered by a variety of means and in different phases. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator and water.

  8. The electrochemical properties of the purine bases : at the interface between biological conjugates to inorganic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Charles C.

    2003-01-01

    The study of the charge transfer and interfacial reactions of the purine bases in physiological solutions provides valuable knowledge, as these processes are relevant to the origins of life. It has been proposed that the adsorption of the adsorption of the purine bases on an inorganic surface could serve as a template for specifying the arrangement of amino acids in peptides.

  9. The origin of biological macromolecules on the earth. The hypothesis of inorganic template

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, T. S.

    1977-01-01

    Studies about the origin of life are reviewed. The nonrandom organization of organelles is discussed from a structural and functional point of view. After postulating that the origin of biomacromolecules was not a random event, the paper develops the hypothesis that polypeptides and polynucleotides were formed on an inorganic template. Only information-containing structures can pass natural selection and develop through evolution.

  10. The chemical biology of hydropersulfides (RSSH): Chemical stability, reactivity and redox roles.

    PubMed

    Saund, Simran S; Sosa, Victor; Henriquez, Stephanie; Nguyen, Q Nhu N; Bianco, Christopher L; Soeda, Shuhei; Millikin, Robert; White, Corey; Le, Henry; Ono, Katsuhiko; Tantillo, Dean J; Kumagai, Yoshito; Akaike, Takaaki; Lin, Joseph; Fukuto, Jon M

    2015-12-15

    Recent reports indicate the ubiquitous prevalence of hydropersulfides (RSSH) in mammalian systems. The biological utility of these and related species is currently a matter of significant speculation. The function, lifetime and fate of hydropersulfides will be assuredly based on their chemical properties and reactivity. Thus, to serve as the basis for further mechanistic studies regarding hydropersulfide biology, some of the basic chemical properties/reactivity of hydropersulfides was studied. The nucleophilicity, electrophilicity and redox properties of hydropersulfides were examined under biological conditions. These studies indicate that hydropersulfides can be nucleophilic or electrophilic, depending on the pH (i.e. the protonation state) and can act as good one- and two-electron reductants. These diverse chemical properties in a single species make hydropersulfides chemically distinct from other, well-known sulfur containing biological species, giving them unique and potentially important biological function.

  11. Chemical model for Viking biology experiments: implications for the composition of the martian regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, Robert C.; Tantayanon, Rewat; Libby, Mark; Xu, Wen Wen

    1989-04-01

    THE 1976 Mars Viking biology experiments were designed to detect life by observing the products of biochemical reactions. In the labelled-release (LR) experiments1-4, about 25 nmol of 14C-labelled gases evolved when regolith samples were moistened with nutrient solution. About 22% of the products reabsorbed upon second injection. As a biological test the LR results were positive, although the reabsorption was not readily explained. In the gas-exchange (GEX) experiments, up to 800 nmol of O2 gas was evolved when samples were humidified5,6, suggesting that the martian regolith might contain a strong chemical oxidant which caused the LR results. Several chemical models have been proposed7,8 but no self-consistent explanation of all of the observations has been achieved. Here we propose a chemical model for these biology experiments in which the reactants are an inorganic nitrate salt, which has been partly photolysed by ultraviolet light, and a sparingly soluble metal carbonate such as calcite. The model reproduces the main effects seen, indicating that nitrates are present in the martian regolith as well as calcite (or some other carbonate with similar solubility).

  12. Solid-water detoxifying reagents for chemical and biological agents

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Dennis M.; Chiu, Ing Lap

    2006-04-18

    Formation of solid-water detoxifying reagents for chemical and biological agents. Solutions of detoxifying reagent for chemical and biological agents are coated using small quantities of hydrophobic nanoparticles by vigorous agitation or by aerosolization of the solution in the presence of the hydrophobic nanoparticles to form a solid powder. For example, when hydrophobic fumed silica particles are shaken in the presence of IN oxone solution in approximately a 95:5-weight ratio, a dry powder results. The hydrophobic silica forms a porous coating of insoluble fine particles around the solution. Since the chemical or biological agent tends to be hydrophobic on contact with the weakly encapsulated detoxifying solution, the porous coating breaks down and the detoxifying reagent is delivered directly to the chemical or biological agent for maximum concentration at the point of need. The solid-water (coated) detoxifying solutions can be blown into contaminated ventilation ducting or other difficult to reach sites for detoxification of pools of chemical or biological agent. Once the agent has been detoxified, it can be removed by flushing the area with air or other techniques.

  13. Mapping of native inorganic elements and injected nanoparticles in a biological organ with laser-induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motto-Ros, V.; Sancey, L.; Ma, Q. L.; Lux, F.; Bai, X. S.; Wang, X. C.; Yu, Jin; Panczer, G.; Tillement, O.

    2012-11-01

    Emission spectroscopy of laser-induced plasma from a thin section of mouse kidney successfully detected inorganic elements, Na, Ca, Cu, and Gd, naturally contained in the organ or artificially injected in the form of Gd-based nanoparticle. A two-dimensional scan of the sample allowed the laser beam to explore its surface with a resolution of 100 μm, resulting in a quantitative elemental mapping of the organ with sub-mM sensitivity. The compatibility of the setup with standard optical microscopy emphasizes the potential to provide multiple images of a same biological tissue with different types of response which can be elemental, molecular, or cellular.

  14. Formulations for neutralization of chemical and biological toxants

    DOEpatents

    Tadros, Maher E.; Tucker, Mark D.

    2003-05-20

    A formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents. The formulation of the present invention non-toxic and non-corrosive and can be delivered by a variety of means and in different phases. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The at least one reactive compound can be an oxidizing compound, a nucleophilic compound or a mixture of both. The formulation can kill up to 99.99999% of bacterial spores within one hour of exposure.

  15. Physical, chemical, and biological measurements off Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, S.; Fanning, K.; Hopkins, T.; Michel, H.; Vargo, G.; Hartwig, E.; Jones, A.

    1981-06-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological measurements were made during three quarterly sampling cruises at the PROTEC benchmark site on the southeast coast of Puerto Rico. Physical measurements at the site were expendable bathythermographs (XBT), conductivity/temperature/depth (CTD) profiles, and temperature profiles using reversing thermometers. Chemical measurements made at the site were salinity, dissolved oxygen, and nutrients (phosphate, silicate, ammonia, nitrate + nitrite, organic phosphorous, and organic nitrogen). Biological measurements were made on phytoplankton, zooplankton, and micronekton. Both structural (biomass, species abundance, and species composition) and functional (primary production) measurements were made. Measurements indicate that the thermal resource is adequate for OTEC plant operation during all seasons. The physical, chemical, and biological measurements made at the site were generally within values reported for other tropical-subtropical regions. There was considerable seasonal and diurnal variability in the data. (LEW)

  16. Chemical and biological nonproliferation program. FY99 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    2000-03-01

    This document is the first of what will become an annual report documenting the progress made by the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP). It is intended to be a summary of the program's activities that will be of interest to both policy and technical audiences. This report and the annual CBNP Summer Review Meeting are important vehicles for communication with the broader chemical and biological defense and nonproliferation communities. The Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program Strategic Plan is also available and provides additional detail on the program's context and goals. The body of the report consists of an overview of the program's philosophy, goals and recent progress in the major program areas. In addition, an appendix is provided with more detailed project summaries that will be of interest to the technical community.

  17. Persulfides: Current Knowledge and Challenges in Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chung-Min; Weerasinghe, Laksiri; Day, Jacob J.; Fukuto, Jon M.; Xian, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies conducted in hydrogen sulfide (H2S) signaling have revealed potential importance of persulfides (RSSH) in redox biology. The inherent instability of RSSH makes these species difficult to study and sometimes controversial results are reported. In this review article we summarize known knowledge about both small molecule persulfides and protein persulfides. Their fundamental physical and chemical properties such as preparation/formation and reactivity are discussed. The biological implications of persulfides and their detection methods are also discussed. PMID:25969163

  18. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles: chemical, physical and biological methods

    PubMed Central

    Iravani, S.; Korbekandi, H.; Mirmohammadi, S.V.; Zolfaghari, B.

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (NPs) have been the subjects of researchers because of their unique properties (e.g., size and shape depending optical, antimicrobial, and electrical properties). A variety of preparation techniques have been reported for the synthesis of silver NPs; notable examples include, laser ablation, gamma irradiation, electron irradiation, chemical reduction, photochemical methods, microwave processing, and biological synthetic methods. This review presents an overview of silver nanoparticle preparation by physical, chemical, and biological synthesis. The aim of this review article is, therefore, to reflect on the current state and future prospects, especially the potentials and limitations of the above mentioned techniques for industries. PMID:26339255

  19. [Small compounds libraries: a research tool for chemical biology].

    PubMed

    Florent, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Obtaining and screening collections of small molecules remain a challenge for biologists. Recent advances in analytical techniques and instrumentation now make screening possible in academia. The history of the creation of such public or commercial collections and their accessibility is related. It shows that there is interest for an academic laboratory involved in medicinal chemistry, chemogenomics or "chemical biology" to organize its own collection and make it available through existing networks such as the French National chimiothèque or the European partner network "European Infrastructure of open screening platforms for Chemical Biology" EU-OpenScreen under construction.

  20. Concentrated formulations and methods for neutralizing chemical and biological toxants

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Mark D.; Betty, Rita G.; Tadros, Maher E.

    2004-04-20

    A formulation and method of making and using that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological toxants, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents. The aqueous formulation is non-toxic and non-corrosive and can be delivered as a long-lasting foam, spray, or fog. The formulation includes solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the CW or BW toxant susceptible to attack, so that a nucleophillic agent can attack the compound via a hydrolysis or oxidation reaction. The formulation can kill up to 99.99999% of bacterial spores within one hour of exposure.

  1. Chemical and biological weapons: new questions, new answers.

    PubMed Central

    Hood, E

    1999-01-01

    The words "chemical and biological weapons" (CBW) send a shiver down most spines these days. With the end of the Cold War, the possibility of a massive nuclear confrontation appears remote, so today many popular doomsday scenarios center on the aggressive use of chemical or biological warfare by rogue nations or terrorist groups. As exaggerated as some of the accounts are, with CBW cast as the latest unseen, unstoppable enemy, the threat posed by these weapons is all too real, and growing. Images p931-a PMID:10585899

  2. Signal Processing For Chemical Sensing: Statistics or Biological Inspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, Santiago

    2011-09-01

    Current analytical instrumentation and continuous sensing can provide huge amounts of data. Automatic signal processing and information evaluation is needed to overcome drowning in data. Today, statistical techniques are typically used to analyse and extract information from continuous signals. However, it is very interesting to note that biology (insects and vertebrates) has found alternative solutions for chemical sensing and information processing. This is a brief introduction to the developments in the European Project: Bio-ICT NEUROCHEM: Biologically Inspired Computation for Chemical Sensing (grant no. 216916) Fp7 project devoted to biomimetic olfactory systems.

  3. Chemical master equation closure for computer-aided synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Smadbeck, Patrick; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2015-01-01

    With inexpensive DNA synthesis technologies, we can now construct biological systems by quickly piecing together DNA sequences. Synthetic biology is the promising discipline that focuses on the construction of these new biological systems. Synthetic biology is an engineering discipline, and as such, it can benefit from mathematical modeling. This chapter focuses on mathematical models of biological systems. These models take the form of chemical reaction networks. The importance of stochasticity is discussed and methods to simulate stochastic reaction networks are reviewed. A closure scheme solution is also presented for the master equation of chemical reaction networks. The master equation is a complete model of randomly evolving molecular populations. Because of its ambitious character, the master equation remained unsolved for all but the simplest of molecular interaction networks for over 70 years. With the first complete solution of chemical master equations, a wide range of experimental observations of biomolecular interactions may be mathematically conceptualized. We anticipate that models based on the closure scheme described herein may assist in rationally designing synthetic biological systems.

  4. Chemical Master Equation Closure for Computer-Aided Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Smadbeck, Patrick; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY With inexpensive DNA synthesis technologies, we can now construct biological systems by quickly piecing together DNA sequences. Synthetic biology is the promising discipline that focuses on the construction of these new biological systems. Synthetic biology is an engineering discipline, and as such, it can benefit from mathematical modeling. This chapter focuses on mathematical models of biological systems. These models take the form of chemical reaction networks. The importance of stochasticity is discussed and methods to simulate stochastic reaction networks are reviewed. A closure scheme solution is also presented for the master equation of chemical reaction networks. The master equation is a complete model of randomly evolving molecular populations. Because of its ambitious character, the master equation remained unsolved for all but the simplest of molecular interaction networks for over seventy years. With the first complete solution of chemical master equations, a wide range of experimental observations of biomolecular interactions may be mathematically conceptualized. We anticipate that models based on the closure scheme described herein may assist in rationally designing synthetic biological systems. PMID:25487098

  5. Coupling chemical and biological catalysis: a flexible paradigm for producing biobased chemicals.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Thomas J; Shanks, Brent H; Dumesic, James A

    2016-04-01

    Advances in metabolic engineering have allowed for the development of new biological catalysts capable of selectively de-functionalizing biomass to yield platform molecules that can be upgraded to biobased chemicals using high efficiency continuous processing allowed by heterogeneous chemical catalysis. Coupling these disciplines overcomes the difficulties of selectively activating COH bonds by heterogeneous chemical catalysis and producing petroleum analogues by biological catalysis. We show that carboxylic acids, pyrones, and alcohols are highly flexible platforms that can be used to produce biobased chemicals by this approach. More generally, we suggest that molecules with three distinct functionalities may represent a practical upper limit on the extent of functionality present in the platform molecules that serve as the bridge between biological and chemical catalysis.

  6. Modelling biological and chemically induced precipitation of calcium phosphate in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    PubMed

    Barat, R; Montoya, T; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2011-06-01

    The biologically induced precipitation processes can be important in wastewater treatment, in particular treating raw wastewater with high calcium concentration combined with Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal. Currently, there is little information and experience in modelling jointly biological and chemical processes. This paper presents a calcium phosphate precipitation model and its inclusion in the Activated Sludge Model No 2d (ASM2d). The proposed precipitation model considers that aqueous phase reactions quickly achieve the chemical equilibrium and that aqueous-solid change is kinetically governed. The model was calibrated using data from four experiments in a Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) operated for EBPR and finally validated with two experiments. The precipitation model proposed was able to reproduce the dynamics of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) formation and later crystallization to hydroxyapatite (HAP) under different scenarios. The model successfully characterised the EBPR performance of the SBR, including the biological, physical and chemical processes.

  7. Integrated chemical-biological treatment of benzo[a]pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Yu; Hong, P.K.A.; Wavrek, D.A.

    2000-03-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene of natural and anthropogenic sources is one of the toxic, mutagenic, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) listed as priority pollutants. This study focuses on an integrated treatment of benzo[a]pyrene involving sequential chemical oxidation and biological degradation. The objectives are to (1) provide mechanistic details in the ozone-mediated degradation of benzo[a]pyrene in the aqueous phase, (2) test the biodegradability of resultant intermediates, and (3) test the feasibility for the coupled chemical-biological treatment of the five-ring PAH. Batch and packed column reactors were used to examine the degradation pathways of benzo[a]pyrene subject to ozonation in the aqueous phase. After different ozonation times, samples containing reaction intermediates and byproducts from both reactors were collected, identified for organic contents, and further biologically inoculated to determine their biodegradability. The O{sub 3}-pretreated samples were incubated for 5, 10, 15, and 20 days; afterward biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and E. coli toxicity tests were conducted along with qualitative and quantitative determinations of benzo[a]pyrene, intermediates, and reaction products by GC/FID and GC/MS methods. Prevalent intermediates identified at different stages included ring-opened aldehydes, phthalic derivatives, and aliphatics. The degradation of benzo[a]pyrene is primarily initiated via O{sub 3}-mediated ring-opening, followed by O{sub 3} and hydroxyl radical fragmentation, and ultimately brought to complete mineralization primarily via hydroxyl radicals. Intermediates formed during chemical oxidation were biodegradable with a measured first-order rate constant (k{sub 0}) of 0.18 day{sup {minus}1}. The integrated chemical-biological system seems feasible for treating recalcitrant compounds, while pretreatment by chemical oxidation appears useful in promoting soluble intermediates from otherwise highly insoluble

  8. AFLATOXIN B2: CHEMICAL IDENTITY AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY.

    PubMed

    CHANG, S B; ABDEL-KADER, M M; WICK, E L; WOGAN, G N

    1963-11-29

    Aflatoxin B(2), a blue-fluorescent metabolite of Aspergillus flavus, was isolated from cultures grown on crushed wheat. Chemical structure of the compound was elucidated as dihydroaflatoxin B(1). Biological activity was determined in day-old male white Pekin ducklings. The criteria of activity were reduction in growth and liver size and the extent of bile-duct hyperplasia.

  9. Chemical and biological weapons in the 'new wars'.

    PubMed

    Ilchmann, Kai; Revill, James

    2014-09-01

    The strategic use of disease and poison in warfare has been subject to a longstanding and cross-cultural taboo that condemns the hostile exploitation of poisons and disease as the act of a pariah. In short, biological and chemical weapons are simply not fair game. The normative opprobrium is, however, not fixed, but context dependent and, as a social phenomenon, remains subject to erosion by social (or more specifically, antisocial) actors. The cross cultural understanding that fighting with poisons and disease is reprehensible, that they are taboo, is codified through a web of interconnected measures, principal amongst these are the 1925 Geneva Protocol; the Biological Weapons Convention; and the Chemical Weapons Convention. Whilst these treaties have weathered the storm of international events reasonably well, their continued health is premised on their being 'tended to' in the face of contextual changes, particularly facing changes in science and technology, as well as the changed nature and character of conflict. This article looks at the potential for normative erosion of the norm against chemical and biological weapons in the face of these contextual changes and the creeping legitimization of chemical and biological weapons.

  10. Prepare Your School for Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Threats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sechena, Ruth

    2005-01-01

    Recent accidents highlight that chemical, biological, and radiological (CBR) agent exposure risk isn't just about terrorism. In this article, the author, a parent and public health physician, wrestles with the fact that total protection from CBRs is probably not feasible in her son's or in the majority of American schools. Capital investments, for…

  11. A decontamination study of simulated chemical and biological agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Han S.; Lee, Han Y.; Hong, Yong C.; Shin, Dong H.; Park, Yun H.; Hong, Yi F.; Lee, Chong K.

    2007-07-01

    A comprehensive decontamination scheme of the chemical and biological agents, including airborne agents and surface contaminating agents, is presented. When a chemical and biological attack occurs, it is critical to decontaminate facilities or equipments to an acceptable level in a very short time. The plasma flame presented here may provide a rapid and effective elimination of toxic substances in the interior air in isolated spaces. As an example, a reaction chamber, with the dimensions of a 22cm diameter and 30cm length, purifies air with an airflow rate of 5000l/min contaminated with toluene, the simulated chemical agent, and soot from a diesel engine, the simulated aerosol for biological agents. Although the airborne agents in an isolated space are eliminated to an acceptable level by the plasma flame, the decontamination of the chemical and biological agents cannot be completed without cleaning surfaces of the facilities. A simulated sterilization study of micro-organisms was carried out using the electrolyzed ozone water. The electrolyzed ozone water very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372) within 3min. The electrolyzed ozone water also kills the vegetative micro-organisms, fungi, and virus. The electrolyzed ozone water, after the decontamination process, disintegrates into ordinary water and oxygen without any trace of harmful materials to the environment.

  12. A decontamination study of simulated chemical and biological agents

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Lee, Han Y.; Hong, Yong C.; Shin, Dong H.; Park, Yun H.; Hong, Yi F.; Lee, Chong K.

    2007-07-01

    A comprehensive decontamination scheme of the chemical and biological agents, including airborne agents and surface contaminating agents, is presented. When a chemical and biological attack occurs, it is critical to decontaminate facilities or equipments to an acceptable level in a very short time. The plasma flame presented here may provide a rapid and effective elimination of toxic substances in the interior air in isolated spaces. As an example, a reaction chamber, with the dimensions of a 22 cm diameter and 30 cm length, purifies air with an airflow rate of 5000 l/min contaminated with toluene, the simulated chemical agent, and soot from a diesel engine, the simulated aerosol for biological agents. Although the airborne agents in an isolated space are eliminated to an acceptable level by the plasma flame, the decontamination of the chemical and biological agents cannot be completed without cleaning surfaces of the facilities. A simulated sterilization study of micro-organisms was carried out using the electrolyzed ozone water. The electrolyzed ozone water very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372) within 3 min. The electrolyzed ozone water also kills the vegetative micro-organisms, fungi, and virus. The electrolyzed ozone water, after the decontamination process, disintegrates into ordinary water and oxygen without any trace of harmful materials to the environment.

  13. Chemical and biological weapons in the 'new wars'.

    PubMed

    Ilchmann, Kai; Revill, James

    2014-09-01

    The strategic use of disease and poison in warfare has been subject to a longstanding and cross-cultural taboo that condemns the hostile exploitation of poisons and disease as the act of a pariah. In short, biological and chemical weapons are simply not fair game. The normative opprobrium is, however, not fixed, but context dependent and, as a social phenomenon, remains subject to erosion by social (or more specifically, antisocial) actors. The cross cultural understanding that fighting with poisons and disease is reprehensible, that they are taboo, is codified through a web of interconnected measures, principal amongst these are the 1925 Geneva Protocol; the Biological Weapons Convention; and the Chemical Weapons Convention. Whilst these treaties have weathered the storm of international events reasonably well, their continued health is premised on their being 'tended to' in the face of contextual changes, particularly facing changes in science and technology, as well as the changed nature and character of conflict. This article looks at the potential for normative erosion of the norm against chemical and biological weapons in the face of these contextual changes and the creeping legitimization of chemical and biological weapons. PMID:24132385

  14. Chemical industrial wastewater treated by combined biological and chemical oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Guomin, Cao; Guoping, Yang; Mei, Sheng; Yongjian, Wang

    2009-01-01

    Wastewaters from phenol and rubber synthesis were treated by the activated sludge process in a large-scale chemical factory in Shanghai, but the final effluent quality cannot conform with the local discharge limit without using river water for dilution. Therefore, this chemical factory had to upgrade its wastewater treatment plant. To fully use the present buildings and equipment during upgrading of the chemical factory's wastewater treatment plant and to save operation costs, a sequential biological pre-treatement, chemical oxidation, and biological post-treatment (or BCB for short) process had been proposed and investigated in a pilot trial. The pilot trial results showed that about 80% COD in the chemical wastewater could be removed through anoxic and aerobic degradation in the biological pre-treatement section, and the residual COD in the effluent of the biological pre-treatment section belongs to refractory chemicals which cannot be removed by the normal biological process. The refractory chemicals were partial oxidized using Fenton's reagent in the chemical oxidation section to improve their biodegradability; subsequently the wastewater was treated by the SBR process in the biological post-treatment section. The final effluent COD reached the first grade discharge limit (<100 mg l(-1)) of Chinese Notational Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard (GB8978-1996) even if without using any dilution water. Compared with the original dilution and biological process, the operation cost of the BCB process increased by about 0.5 yuan (RMB) per cubic metre wastewater, but about 1,240,000 m(3) a(-1) dilution water could be saved and the COD emission could be cut down by 112 tonne each year.

  15. Removal of Pesticides and Inorganic Contaminants in Anaerobic and Aerobic Biological Contactors

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation contains data on the removal of pesticides (acetochlor, clethodim, dicrotophos), ammonia, nitrate, bromate and perchlorate through aerobic and anaerobic biological treatment processes.

  16. Arsenic, inorganic

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Arsenic , inorganic ; CASRN 7440 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  17. Opportunities for synthetic biology in antibiotics: expanding glycopeptide chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Maulik N; Wright, Gerard D

    2015-03-20

    Synthetic biology offers a new path for the exploitation and improvement of natural products to address the growing crisis in antibiotic resistance. All antibiotics in clinical use are facing eventual obsolesce as a result of the evolution and dissemination of resistance mechanisms, yet there are few new drug leads forthcoming from the pharmaceutical sector. Natural products of microbial origin have proven over the past 70 years to be the wellspring of antimicrobial drugs. Harnessing synthetic biology thinking and strategies can provide new molecules and expand chemical diversity of known antibiotic scaffolds to provide much needed new drug leads. The glycopeptide antibiotics offer paradigmatic scaffolds suitable for such an approach. We review these strategies here using the glycopeptides as an example and demonstrate how synthetic biology can expand antibiotic chemical diversity to help address the growing resistance crisis.

  18. Considerations for designing chemical screening strategies in plant biology.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Mario; Kombrink, Erich; Meesters, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, biologists regularly used classical genetic approaches to characterize and dissect plant processes. However, this strategy is often impaired by redundancy, lethality or pleiotropy of gene functions, which prevent the isolation of viable mutants. The chemical genetic approach has been recognized as an alternative experimental strategy, which has the potential to circumvent these problems. It relies on the capacity of small molecules to modify biological processes by specific binding to protein target(s), thereby conditionally modifying protein function(s), which phenotypically resemble mutation(s) of the encoding gene(s). A successful chemical screening campaign comprises three equally important elements: (1) a reliable, robust, and quantitative bioassay, which allows to distinguish between potent and less potent compounds, (2) a rigorous validation process for candidate compounds to establish their selectivity, and (3) an experimental strategy for elucidating a compound's mode of action and molecular target. In this review we will discuss details of this general strategy and additional aspects that deserve consideration in order to take full advantage of the power provided by the chemical approach to plant biology. In addition, we will highlight some success stories of recent chemical screenings in plant systems, which may serve as teaching examples for the implementation of future chemical biology projects.

  19. Considerations for designing chemical screening strategies in plant biology

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Mario; Kombrink, Erich; Meesters, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, biologists regularly used classical genetic approaches to characterize and dissect plant processes. However, this strategy is often impaired by redundancy, lethality or pleiotropy of gene functions, which prevent the isolation of viable mutants. The chemical genetic approach has been recognized as an alternative experimental strategy, which has the potential to circumvent these problems. It relies on the capacity of small molecules to modify biological processes by specific binding to protein target(s), thereby conditionally modifying protein function(s), which phenotypically resemble mutation(s) of the encoding gene(s). A successful chemical screening campaign comprises three equally important elements: (1) a reliable, robust, and quantitative bioassay, which allows to distinguish between potent and less potent compounds, (2) a rigorous validation process for candidate compounds to establish their selectivity, and (3) an experimental strategy for elucidating a compound's mode of action and molecular target. In this review we will discuss details of this general strategy and additional aspects that deserve consideration in order to take full advantage of the power provided by the chemical approach to plant biology. In addition, we will highlight some success stories of recent chemical screenings in plant systems, which may serve as teaching examples for the implementation of future chemical biology projects. PMID:25904921

  20. Facile fabrication of a rigid and chemically resistant micromixer system from photocurable inorganic polymer by static liquid photolithography (SLP).

    PubMed

    Fang, Qingling; Kim, Dong-Pyo; Li, Xiaodong; Yoon, Tae-Ho; Li, Yihe

    2011-08-21

    Highly effective mixing in microchannels is important for most chemical reactions conducted in microfluidic chips. To obtain a rigid and chemically resistant micromixer system at low cost, we fabricated a Y-shaped microchannel with built-in mixer structures by static liquid photolithography (SLP) from methacrylated polyvinylsilazane (MPVSZ) as an inorganic polymer photoresist which was then converted to a silicate phase by hydrolysis in vaporized ammonia atmosphere at 80 °C. The microchannel incorporating herringbone mixer structures was bonded with a matching polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) open channel which was pre-coated by perhydropolysilazane (PHPS)-based mixture, and finally treated by additional hydrolysis at room temperature to convert the PHPS layer to a silica phase. Finally, the chemical resistance of the microfluidic system with embedded micromixer was confirmed with various solvents, and the excellent mixing performance in a short mixing length of 2.3 cm was demonstrated by injecting two different colored fluids into the microchannel.

  1. New approaches in data integration for systems chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Jose A; López-Campos, Guillermo; Dorado, Julian; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Advances done in "-Omics" technologies in the last 20 years have made available to the researches huge amounts of data spanning a wide variety of biological processes from gene sequences to the metabolites present in a cell at a particular time. The management, analysis and representation of these data have been facilitated by mean of the advances made by biomedical informatics in areas such as data architecture and integration systems. However, despite the efforts done by biologists in this area, research in drug design adds a new level of information by incorporating data related with small molecules, which increases the complexity of these integration systems. Current knowledge in molecular biology has shown that it is possible to use comprehensive and integrative approaches to understand the biological processes from a systems perspective and that pathological processes can be mapped into biological networks. Therefore, current strategies for drug design are focusing on how to interact with or modify those networks to achieve the desired effects on what is called systems chemical biology. In this review several approaches for data integration in systems chemical biology will be analysed and described. Furthermore, because of the increasing relevance of the development and use of nanomaterials and their expected impact in the near future, the requirements of integration systems that incorporate these new data types associated with nanomaterials will also be analysed.

  2. Biological sampling methods and effects of exposure to municipal and chemical landfill leachate on aquatic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Janisz, A.J.; Butterfield, W.S.

    1983-03-01

    Extensive biological sampling on five abandoned hazardous waste sites in New York, New Jersey, and Puerto Rico was undertaken during 1981 and 1982 to determine the impact of priority pollutants on aquatic fauna and, potentially, on human health. The selection criteria for sites, sampling equipment, problems in personnel protection, and sample handling procedures are presented. The effects of the hazardous waste sites were assessed using a wide range of fish and invertebrate species. Tissue specimens from eleven vertebrate and eight invertebrate species were analyzed. Forty samples of these tissue specimens were analyzed for all inorganic priority pollutant parameters; an additional 35 samples were analyzed for organic priority pollutants or an appropriate subset of them. High concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were found in aquatic organisms exposed to chemical landfill leachate; the results of the tissue analyses at other sites were negative.

  3. Prototypes of Newly Conceived Inorganic and Biological Sensors for Health and Environmental Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nicolini, Claudio; Adami, Manuela; Sartore, Marco; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Bavastrello, Valter; Spera, Rosanna; Pechkova, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the optimal implementation of three newly conceived sensors for both health and environmental applications, utilizing a wide range of detection methods and complex nanocomposites. The first one is inorganic and based on matrices of calcium oxide, the second is based on protein arrays and a third one is based on Langmuir-Blodgett laccase multi-layers. Special attention was paid to detecting substances significant to the environment (such as carbon dioxide) and medicine (drug administration, cancer diagnosis and prognosis) by means of amperometric, quartz crystal microbalance with frequency (QCM_F) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM_D) technologies. The resulting three implemented nanosensors are described here along with proofs of principle and their corresponding applications. PMID:23235450

  4. Organic chemistry and biology: chemical biology through the eyes of collaboration.

    PubMed

    Hruby, Victor J

    2009-12-18

    From a scientific perspective, efforts to understand biology including what constitutes health and disease has become a chemical problem. However, chemists and biologists "see" the problems of understanding biology from different perspectives, and this has retarded progress in solving the problems especially as they relate to health and disease. This suggests that close collaboration between chemists and biologists is not only necessary but essential for progress in both the biology and chemistry that will provide solutions to the global questions of biology. This perspective has directed my scientific efforts for the past 45 years, and in this overview I provide my perspective of how the applications of synthetic chemistry, structural design, and numerous other chemical principles have intersected in my collaborations with biologists to provide new tools, new science, and new insights that were only made possible and fruitful by these collaborations.

  5. Organic Chemistry and Biology: Chemical Biology Through the Eyes of Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Hruby, Victor J.

    2011-01-01

    From a scientific perspective, efforts to understand biology including what constitutes health and disease has become a chemical problem. However, chemists and biologists “see” the problems of understanding biology from different perspectives, and this has retarded progress in solving the problems especially as they relate to health and disease. This suggests that close collaboration between chemists and biologists is not only necessary but essential for progress in both the biology and chemistry that will provide solutions to the global questions of biology. This perspective has directed my scientific efforts for the past 45 years, and in this overview I provide my perspective of how the applications of synthetic chemistry, structural design, and numerous other chemical principles have intersected in my collaborations with biologists to provide new tools, new science, and new insights that were only made possible and fruitful by these collaborations. PMID:20000552

  6. Biological effects of inorganic arsenic on primary cultures of rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Irene; Schiera, Gabriella; Sciandrello, Giulia; Barbata, Giusi; Caradonna, Fabio; Proia, Patrizia; Di Liegro, Italia

    2010-10-01

    It is well established that inorganic arsenic induces neurotoxic effects and neurological defects in humans and laboratory animals. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of its actions, however, remain elusive. Herein we report the effects of arsenite (NaAsO2) on primary cultures of rat astrocytes. Cells underwent induction of heat shock protein 70 only at the highest doses of inorganic arsenic (30 and 60 microM), suggesting a high threshold to respond to stress. We also investigated arsenic genotoxicity with the comet assay. Interestingly, although cells treated with 10 microM arsenite for 24 h maintained >70% viability, with respect to untreated cells, high DNA damage was already observed. Since arsenic is not known to be a direct-acting genotoxic agent, we investigated the possibility that its effects are due, in astrocytes as well, to ROS formation, as already described for other cell types. However, FACS analysis after CM-H2DCFDA staining did not evidence any significant increase of ROS production while, on the contrary, at the highest arsenite concentrations used, ROS production decreased. Concordantly, we found that, if most cells in the culture are still alive (i.e. up to 10 microM arsenite), they show a treatment-dependent increase in the concentration of SOD1. On the other hand, SOD2 concentration did not change. Finally, we found that astrocytes also synthesize PIPPin, an RNA-binding protein, the concentration of which was recently reported to change in response to stress induced by cadmium. Here we also report that, in cells exposed to high doses of arsenite, an anti-PIPPin antibody-positive faster migrating protein appears. PMID:20818482

  7. Aum Shinrikyo's Chemical and Biological Weapons: More Than Sarin.

    PubMed

    Tu, A T

    2014-07-01

    The radical religious group Aum Shinrikyo was founded in Japan in the 1980s and grew rapidly in the 1990s. Aum members perpetrated a mass murder in Matsumoto City in 1994, where they used sarin as a chemical weapon to poison approximately 500 civilians. On March 20, 1995, Aum deployed sarin in an even larger terrorist attack on the Tokyo Subway System, which poisoned some 6,000 people. After the Tokyo Subway attack, the Japanese Police arrested the sect's senior members. From 2005 through 2011, 13 of these senior members were sentenced to death. In this article, aspects of Aum's chemical and biological terrorism are reviewed. Sarin production efforts by the sect are described, including how the degradation product of sarin in soil, methylphosphonic acid, enabled the detection of sarin production sites. Also, Aum's chemical-warfare agents other than sarin are described, as are its biological weapons. The author was permitted by the Japanese government to interview Dr. Tomomasa Nakagawa, one of the senior members of Aum Shinrikyo. From Dr. Nakagawa the author obtained valuable inside information about Aum's chemical and biological weapons programs. PMID:26227027

  8. Preparedness for terrorism: managing nuclear, biological and chemical threats.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Kristi L

    2009-12-01

    The management of nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) terrorism events is critical to reducing morbidity and mortality in the next decade; however, initial patient care considerations and protective actions for staff are unfamiliar to most front-line clinicians. High explosive events (bomb and blast) remain the most common type of terrorism and are easy to detect. Conversely, some types of terrorist attacks are more likely to be unsuspected or covert. This paper explains the current threat of terrorism and describes clues for detection that an event has occurred. Specific criteria that should lead to a high suspicion for terrorism are illustrated. The manuscript outlines initial actions and clinical priorities for management and treatment of patients exposed to nuclear/radiological, biological, chemical and combined agents (for example an explosion involving a chemical agent). Examples of terrorist events include: a nuclear explosion, an aerosolised release of anthrax (biological), dissemination of sarin in a subway (chemical), and the detonation of a radiologic dispersion device or "dirty bomb" (combined explosive and radiological). Basic principles of decontamination include potential risks to healthcare providers from secondary exposure and contamination. Unique issues may hinder clinical actions. These include coordination with law enforcement for a crime scene, public health entities for surveillance and monitoring, hazardous materials teams for decontamination, and the media for risk communications. Finally, the importance of personal preparedness is discussed. PMID:20052435

  9. "Good annotation practice" for chemical data in biology.

    PubMed

    Degtyarenko, Kirill; Ennis, Marcus; Garavelli, John S

    2007-01-01

    A structural diagram, in the form of a two-dimensional (2-D) sketch, remains the most effective portrait of a "small molecule" or chemical reaction. However, such structural diagrams, as for any other core data, cannot be used in speech (and should not be used in free text). "Good annotation practice" for biological databases is to use either consistent and widely recognised terminology or unique identifiers from a dedicated database to refer to the molecule of interest. Ideally, scientists should use terminology that is both pronounceable and meaningful. Thus, a viable solution for a bioinformatician is to use a definitive controlled vocabulary of biochemical compounds and reactions, which contains both systematic and common names. In addition, chemical ontologies provide a means for placing entities of interest into wider chemical, biological or medical contexts. We present some challenges and achievements in the standardisation of chemical language in biological databases, with emphasis on three aspects of annotation: 1. good drawing practice: how to draw unambiguous 2-D diagrams; 2. good naming practice: how to give most appropriate names; and 3. good ontology practice: how to link the entity of interest by defined logical relationships to other entities. PMID:17822390

  10. Aum Shinrikyo's Chemical and Biological Weapons: More Than Sarin.

    PubMed

    Tu, A T

    2014-07-01

    The radical religious group Aum Shinrikyo was founded in Japan in the 1980s and grew rapidly in the 1990s. Aum members perpetrated a mass murder in Matsumoto City in 1994, where they used sarin as a chemical weapon to poison approximately 500 civilians. On March 20, 1995, Aum deployed sarin in an even larger terrorist attack on the Tokyo Subway System, which poisoned some 6,000 people. After the Tokyo Subway attack, the Japanese Police arrested the sect's senior members. From 2005 through 2011, 13 of these senior members were sentenced to death. In this article, aspects of Aum's chemical and biological terrorism are reviewed. Sarin production efforts by the sect are described, including how the degradation product of sarin in soil, methylphosphonic acid, enabled the detection of sarin production sites. Also, Aum's chemical-warfare agents other than sarin are described, as are its biological weapons. The author was permitted by the Japanese government to interview Dr. Tomomasa Nakagawa, one of the senior members of Aum Shinrikyo. From Dr. Nakagawa the author obtained valuable inside information about Aum's chemical and biological weapons programs.

  11. Preparedness for terrorism: managing nuclear, biological and chemical threats.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Kristi L

    2009-12-01

    The management of nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) terrorism events is critical to reducing morbidity and mortality in the next decade; however, initial patient care considerations and protective actions for staff are unfamiliar to most front-line clinicians. High explosive events (bomb and blast) remain the most common type of terrorism and are easy to detect. Conversely, some types of terrorist attacks are more likely to be unsuspected or covert. This paper explains the current threat of terrorism and describes clues for detection that an event has occurred. Specific criteria that should lead to a high suspicion for terrorism are illustrated. The manuscript outlines initial actions and clinical priorities for management and treatment of patients exposed to nuclear/radiological, biological, chemical and combined agents (for example an explosion involving a chemical agent). Examples of terrorist events include: a nuclear explosion, an aerosolised release of anthrax (biological), dissemination of sarin in a subway (chemical), and the detonation of a radiologic dispersion device or "dirty bomb" (combined explosive and radiological). Basic principles of decontamination include potential risks to healthcare providers from secondary exposure and contamination. Unique issues may hinder clinical actions. These include coordination with law enforcement for a crime scene, public health entities for surveillance and monitoring, hazardous materials teams for decontamination, and the media for risk communications. Finally, the importance of personal preparedness is discussed.

  12. Regenerative chemical biology: current challenges and future potential.

    PubMed

    Ao, Ada; Hao, Jijun; Hong, Charles C

    2011-04-22

    The enthusiasm surrounding the clinical potential of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is tempered by the fact that key issues regarding their safety, efficacy, and long-term benefits have thus far been suboptimal. Small molecules can potentially relieve these problems at major junctions of stem cell biology and regenerative therapy. In this review we will introduce recent advances in these important areas and the first generation of small molecules used in the regenerative context. Current chemical biology studies will provide the archetype for future interdisciplinary collaborations and improve clinical benefits of cell-based therapies.

  13. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: chemical interactions of Primary Biological Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguillaume, L.; Leriche, M.; Amato, P.; Ariya, P. A.; Delort, A.-M.; Pöschl, U.; Chaumerliac, N.; Bauer, H.; Flossmann, A. I.; Morris, C. E.

    2008-02-01

    This paper discusses the influence of bioaerosols on atmospheric chemistry and vice versa through microbiological and chemical properties and processes. Several studies have shown that biological matter represents a significant fraction of air particulate matter and hence affects the microstructure and water uptake of aerosol particles. Moreover, airborne micro-organisms can transform chemical constituents of the atmosphere by metabolic activity. Recent studies have emphasized the viability of bacteria and metabolic degradation of organic substances in cloud water. On the other hand, the viability and metabolic activity of airborne micro-organisms depend strongly on physical and chemical atmospheric parameters such as temperature, pressure, radiation, pH value and nutrient concentrations. In spite of recent advances, however, our knowledge of the microbiological and chemical interactions of primary biological particles in the atmosphere is rather limited. Further targeted investigations combining laboratory experiments, field measurements, and modelling studies will be required to characterize the chemical feedbacks, microbiological activities at the air/snow/water interface supplied to the atmosphere.

  14. Sonochemical degradation of the pharmaceutical fluoxetine: Effect of parameters, organic and inorganic additives and combination with a biological system.

    PubMed

    Serna-Galvis, Efraím A; Silva-Agredo, Javier; Giraldo-Aguirre, Ana L; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A

    2015-08-15

    Fluoxetine (FLX), one of the most widely used antidepressants in the world, is an emergent pollutant found in natural waters that causes disrupting effects on the endocrine systems of some aquatic species. This work explores the total elimination of FLX by sonochemical treatment coupled to a biological system. The biological process acting alone was shown to be unable to remove the pollutant, even under favourable conditions of pH and temperature. However, sonochemical treatment (600 kHz) was shown to be able to remove the pharmaceutical. Several parameters were evaluated for the ultrasound application: the applied power (20-60 W), dissolved gas (air, Ar and He), pH (3-11) and initial concentration of fluoxetine (2.9-162.0 μmol L(-1)). Additionally, the presence of organic (1-hexanol and 2-propanol) and inorganic (Fe(2+)) compounds in the water matrix and the degradation of FLX in a natural mineral water were evaluated. The sonochemical treatment readily eliminates FLX following a kinetic Langmuir. After 360 min of ultrasonic irradiation, 15% mineralization was achieved. Analysis of the biodegradability provided evidence that the sonochemical process transforms the pollutant into biodegradable substances, which can then be mineralized in a subsequent biological treatment.

  15. Methods for the rapid detection of biological and chemical weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A.; Hemberger, P.H.; Swanson, B.I.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This work undertook the development of technology for the detection of chemical and biological agents. The project consisted of three tasks: (1) modifying a transportable mass spectrometer for the detection of chemical gents; (2) demonstrating the detection of a specific bacterial DNA sequence using a fluorescence-based single- copy gene detector; and (3) upgrading a surface acoustic wave measurement station.

  16. Global analysis of large-scale chemical and biological experiments

    PubMed Central

    Root, David E; Kelley, Brian P

    2005-01-01

    Research in the life sciences is increasingly dominated by high-throughput data collection methods that benefit from a global approach to data analysis. Recent innovations that facilitate such comprehensive analyses are highlighted. Several developments enable the study of the relationships between newly derived experimental information, such as biological activity in chemical screens or gene expression studies, and prior information, such as physical descriptors for small molecules or functional annotation for genes. The way in which global analyses can be applied to both chemical screens and transcription profiling experiments using a set of common machine learning tools is discussed. PMID:12058610

  17. Chemical Biology Approaches to Study Protein Cysteine Sulfenylation1

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jia; Carroll, Kate S.

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation of cysteine thiol side chains by hydrogen peroxide to afford protein sulfenyl modifications is an important mechanism in signal transduction. In addition, aberrant protein sulfenylation contributes to a range of human pathologies, including cancer. Efforts to elucidate the roles of protein sulfenylation in physiology and disease have been hampered by the lack of techniques to probe these modifications in native environments with molecular specificity. In this review, we trace the history of chemical and biological methods that have been developed to detect protein sulfenylation and illustrate how a recent cell-permeable chemical reporter, DYn-2, has been used to detect identify intracellular targets of endogenous H2O2 during growth factor signaling, including the EGF receptor. The array of new tools and methods discussed herein enables the discovery of new biological roles for cysteine sulfenylation in human health and disease. PMID:23576224

  18. Monitoring the inorganic chemical reaction by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: A case of Fe³⁺ to Fe²⁺ conversion.

    PubMed

    Qin, Suhua; Meng, Juan; Tang, Xianghu; Yang, Liangbao

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring the process of organic chemical reactions to study the kinetics by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is currently of immense interest. However, monitoring the inorganic chemical reaction is still an extremely difficulty for researchers. This study exactly focused on the monitor of inorganic chemical reaction. Capillary coated with silver nanoparticles was introduced, which was an efficient platform for monitoring reactions with SERS due to the advantages of sensitivity and excellent reproducibility. The photoreduction of [Fe(phen)3](3+) to [Fe(phen)3](2+) was used as model reaction to demonstrated the feasibility of SERS monitoring inorganic chemical reaction by involving in metal-organic complexes. Moreover, the preliminary implementation demonstrated that the kinetics of photoreduction can be real-time monitored by in situ using the SERS technique on a single constructed capillary, which may be useful for the practical application of SERS technique.

  19. Combined biological-chemical procedure for the mineralization of TNT.

    PubMed

    Kröger, Mario; Fels, Gregor

    2007-08-01

    Contamination of ground and surface water with 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and its biological and chemical transformation products are a persisting problem at former TNT production sites. We have investigated the photochemical degradation of TNT and its aminodinitro-(ADNT) and diaminonitrotoluene (DANT) metabolites using OH-radical generating systems like Fenton and hydrogen peroxide irradiated with UV, in order to compare the degradation and mineralization rate of ADNT- and DANT-isomers with TNT itself. As a result, we find that the aminoderivatives were mineralized much faster than TNT. Consequently, as ADNTs and DANTs are the known dead-end products of biological TNT degradations, we have combined our photochemical procedure with a preceding biological treatment of TNT by a mixed culture from sludge of a sewage plant. This consecutive degradation procedure, however, shows a reduced mineralization rate of the ADNTa and DANTs in the biologically derived supernatant as compared to the pure substances, suggesting that during the biological TNT treatment by sludge competing substrates are released into the solution, and that a more defined biological procedure would be necessary in order to achieve an effective, ecologically and economically acceptable mineralization of TNT from aqueous systems.

  20. Privileged structures: efficient chemical "navigators" toward unexplored biologically relevant chemical spaces.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonghoon; Kim, Heejun; Park, Seung Bum

    2014-10-22

    In the search for new therapeutic agents for currently incurable diseases, attention has turned to traditionally "undruggable" targets, and collections of drug-like small molecules with high diversity and quality have become a prerequisite for new breakthroughs. To generate such collections, the diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) strategy was developed, which aims to populate new chemical space with drug-like compounds containing a high degree of molecular diversity. The resulting DOS-derived libraries have been of great value for the discovery of various bioactive small molecules and therapeutic agents, and thus DOS has emerged as an essential tool in chemical biology and drug discovery. However, the key challenge has become how to design and synthesize drug-like small-molecule libraries with improved biological relevancy as well as maximum molecular diversity. This Perspective presents the development of privileged substructure-based DOS (pDOS), an efficient strategy for the construction of polyheterocyclic compound libraries with high biological relevancy. We envisioned the specific interaction of drug-like small molecules with certain biopolymers via the incorporation of privileged substructures into polyheterocyclic core skeletons. The importance of privileged substructures such as benzopyran, pyrimidine, and oxopiperazine in rigid skeletons was clearly demonstrated through the discovery of bioactive small molecules and the subsequent identification of appropriate target biomolecule using a method called "fluorescence difference in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis". Focusing on examples of pDOS-derived bioactive compounds with exceptional specificity, we discuss the capability of privileged structures to serve as chemical "navigators" toward biologically relevant chemical spaces. We also provide an outlook on chemical biology research and drug discovery using biologically relevant compound libraries constructed by pDOS, biology-oriented synthesis, or

  1. Chemical biology databases: from aggregation, curation to representation.

    PubMed

    Audouze, Karine; Taboureau, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Systems chemical biology offers a novel way of approaching drug discovery by developing models that consider the global physiological environment of protein targets and their perturbations by drugs. However, the integration of all these data needs curation and standardization with an appropriate representation in order to get relevant interpretations. In this mini review, we present some databases and services, which integrated together with computational tools and data standardization, could assist scientists in decision making during the different drug development process.

  2. Biologically produced succinic acid: A new route to chemical intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The national laboratory consortium has undertaken an R&D project with the Michigan Biotechnology Institute (MBI) to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a chemical intermediate, succinic acid, and various derivatives, from renewable agricultural resources. The projects near-term goal is to demonstrate an economically competetive process for producing 1,4-butanediol and other derivatives from biologically produced succinic acid without generating a major salt waste. The competitiveness to the petrochemical process must be demonstrated.

  3. Microscale Procedure for Inorganic Qualitative Analysis with Emphasis on Writing Equations: Chemical Fingerprinting Applied to the "n"-bottle Problem of Matching Samples with Their Formulas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattsangi, Prem D.

    2014-01-01

    A laboratory method for teaching inorganic qualitative analysis and chemical equations is described. The experiment has been designed to focus attention on cations and anions that react to form products. This leads to a logical approach to understand and write chemical equations. The procedure uses 3 mL plastic micropipettes to store and deliver…

  4. Near-field fiber optic chemical sensors and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Weihong; Shi, Zhong-You; Thorsrud, Bjorn A.; Harris, C.; Kopelman, Raoul

    1994-03-01

    Near-field optics has been applied in the nanofabrication of subwavelength optical fiber chemical and biological sensors and their operation in chemical and biological analysis. A thousandfold miniaturization of immobilized optical fiber sensors has been achieved by a near- field photo-nanofabrication technique, which is based on nanofabricated optical fiber tips and near-field photopolymerization. This technique has been further developed by multistep near- field nanofabrication and multidye probe fabrication. Multistep nanofabrication can further miniaturize optical fiber sensors, while multidye fabrication results in multifunctional optic and excitonic probes with extremely small size. These probes emit multiwavelength photons or produce excitons of different energy levels, and may have multiple chemical or biological sensitivities. The nondestructive submicrometer sensor has demonstrated its ability to carry out static and dynamic determinations of pH in intact rat conceptuses of varying gestational ages. The ability of the sensors to measure pH changes, in real time, in the intact rat conceptus, demonstrates their potential applications for dynamic analysis in multicellular organisms and single cells. The near-field interaction of photons with matter is discussed.

  5. Hospital preparedness for victims of chemical or biological terrorism.

    PubMed Central

    Wetter, D C; Daniell, W E; Treser, C D

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined hospital preparedness for incidents involving chemical or biological weapons. METHODS: By using a questionnaire survey of 224 hospital emergency departments in 4 northwestern states, we examined administrative plans, training, physical resources, and representative medication inventories. RESULTS: Responses were received from 186 emergency departments (83%). Fewer than 20% of respondent hospitals had plans for biological or chemical weapons incidents. About half (45%) had an indoor or outdoor decontamination unit with isolated ventilation, shower, and water containment systems, but only 12% had 1 or more self-contained breathing apparatuses or supplied air-line respirators. Only 6% had the minimum recommended physical resources for a hypothetical sarin incident. Of the hospitals providing quantitative answers about medication inventories, 64% reported sufficient ciprofloxacin or doxycycline for 50 hypothetical anthrax victims, and only 29% reported sufficient atropine for 50 hypothetical sarin victims (none had enough pralidoxime). CONCLUSIONS: Hospital emergency departments generally are not prepared in an organized fashion to treat victims of chemical or biological terrorism. The planned federal efforts to improve domestic preparedness will require substantial additional resources at the local level to be truly effective. PMID:11344876

  6. Propolis volatile compounds: chemical diversity and biological activity: a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is a sticky material collected by bees from plants, and used in the hive as building material and defensive substance. It has been popular as a remedy in Europe since ancient times. Nowadays, propolis use in over-the-counter preparations, “bio”-cosmetics and functional foods, etc., increases. Volatile compounds are found in low concentrations in propolis, but their aroma and significant biological activity make them important for propolis characterisation. Propolis is a plant-derived product: its chemical composition depends on the local flora at the site of collection, thus it offers a significant chemical diversity. The role of propolis volatiles in identification of its plant origin is discussed. The available data about chemical composition of propolis volatiles from different geographic regions are reviewed, demonstrating significant chemical variability. The contribution of volatiles and their constituents to the biological activities of propolis is considered. Future perspectives in research on propolis volatiles are outlined, especially in studying activities other than antimicrobial. PMID:24812573

  7. Carbon Nanotube Electrode Arrays For Enhanced Chemical and Biological Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie

    2003-01-01

    Applications of carbon nanotubes for ultra-sensitive electrical sensing of chemical and biological species have been a major focus in NASA Ames Center for Nanotechnology. Great progress has been made toward controlled growth and chemical functionalization of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays and integration into micro-fabricated chip devices. Carbon nanotube electrode arrays devices have been used for sub-attomole detection of DNA molecules. Interdigitated carbon nanotubes arrays devices have been applied to sub ppb (part per billion) level chemical sensing for many molecules at room temperature. Stability and reliability have also been addressed in our device development. These results show order of magnitude improvement in device performance, size and power consumption as compared to micro devices, promising applications of carbon nanotube electrode arrays for clinical molecular diagnostics, personal medical testing and monitoring, and environmental monitoring.

  8. Engineered ion channels as emerging tools for chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Michael; Yang, Jerry

    2013-12-17

    Over the last 25 years, researchers have developed exogenously expressed, genetically engineered, semi-synthetic, and entirely synthetic ion channels. These structures have sufficient fidelity to serve as unique tools that can reveal information about living organisms. One of the most exciting success stories is optogenetics: the use of light-gated channels to trigger action potentials in specific neurons combined with studies of the response from networks of cells or entire live animals. Despite this breakthrough, the use of molecularly engineered ion channels for studies of biological systems is still in its infancy. Historically, researchers studied ion channels in the context of their own function in single cells or in multicellular signaling and regulation. Only recently have researchers considered ion channels and pore-forming peptides as responsive tools to report on the chemical and physical changes produced by other biochemical processes and reactions. This emerging class of molecular probes has a number of useful characteristics. For instance, these structures can greatly amplify the signal of chemical changes: the binding of one molecule to a ligand-gated ion channel can result in flux of millions of ions across a cell membrane. In addition, gating occurs on sub-microsecond time scales, resulting in fast response times. Moreover, the signal is complementary to existing techniques because the output is ionic current rather than fluorescence or radioactivity. And finally, ion channels are also localized at the membrane of cells where essential processes such as signaling and regulation take place. This Account highlights examples, mostly from our own work, of uses of ion channels and pore-forming peptides such as gramicidin in chemical biology. We discuss various strategies for preparing synthetically tailored ion channels that range from de novo designed synthetic molecules to genetically engineered or simply exogenously expressed or reconstituted wild

  9. Autonomous chemical and biological miniature wireless-sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Bar-Giora

    2005-05-01

    The presentation discusses a new concept and a paradigm shift in biological, chemical and explosive sensor system design and deployment. From large, heavy, centralized and expensive systems to distributed wireless sensor networks utilizing miniature platforms (nodes) that are lightweight, low cost and wirelessly connected. These new systems are possible due to the emergence and convergence of new innovative radio, imaging, networking and sensor technologies. Miniature integrated radio-sensor networks, is a technology whose time has come. These network systems are based on large numbers of distributed low cost and short-range wireless platforms that sense and process their environment and communicate data thru a network to a command center. The recent emergence of chemical and explosive sensor technology based on silicon nanostructures, coupled with the fast evolution of low-cost CMOS imagers, low power DSP engines and integrated radio chips, has created an opportunity to realize the vision of autonomous wireless networks. These threat detection networks will perform sophisticated analysis at the sensor node and convey alarm information up the command chain. Sensor networks of this type are expected to revolutionize the ability to detect and locate biological, chemical, or explosive threats. The ability to distribute large numbers of low-cost sensors over large areas enables these devices to be close to the targeted threats and therefore improve detection efficiencies and enable rapid counter responses. These sensor networks will be used for homeland security, shipping container monitoring, and other applications such as laboratory medical analysis, drug discovery, automotive, environmental and/or in-vivo monitoring. Avaak"s system concept is to image a chromatic biological, chemical and/or explosive sensor utilizing a digital imager, analyze the images and distribute alarm or image data wirelessly through the network. All the imaging, processing and communications

  10. Biological, morphological, and chemical characteristics of Wailuku River, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yee, J.J.; Ewart, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    Biological, morphological, and chemical data on Wailuku River were collected to assess its water quality characteristics. Biological measurements included evaluation of benthic invertebrates, periphyton, phytoplankton and coliform bacteria. Morphological measurements consisted of channel surveys and particle size determination of bed materials. Chemical quality measurements, made monthly at two sampling stations, included water temperature, pH, specific conductance, dissolved solids concentration, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus , and minor elements. Biological and chemical data indicated relatively clean water compared to similar streams in conterminous United States. The number and types of benthic organisms are low in Wailuku River. This is due mainly to channel gradient and flow velocities rather than to chemical toxicity. Periphyton data also indicate unpolluted water of low to moderate primary productivity. Diatoms are the dominant organisms observed in the periphyton samples. Coliform bacteria densities are typical of mountain streams in Hawaii that are essentially unaffected by human activities. The streambed is formed of lava flows from Mauna Loa volcano, and the stream channel is characterized by a series of plunge pools and waterfalls. The longitudinal slope ranges from 5% at midreaches to 8% at the headwater regions. There is no broad flood plain at the mouth of the stream. The stream channel is generally a narrow steep-sided trapezoid with an irregular base. Streambanks are composed of fine to very coarse-grained material. Channel depth increases from 6 ft at the headwaters to 40 ft at Hilo. The width also increases from 60 ft at the highest study site to 220 ft at the Hilo site near the mouth of the river. (Author 's abstract)

  11. Free Radicals in Chemical Biology: from Chemical Behavior to Biomarker Development

    PubMed Central

    Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Ferreri, Carla; Masi, Annalisa; Melchiorre, Michele; Sansone, Anna; Terzidis, Michael A.; Torreggiani, Armida

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of free radicals in life sciences has constantly increased with time and has been connected to several physiological and pathological processes. This subject embraces diverse scientific areas, spanning from physical, biological and bioorganic chemistry to biology and medicine, with applications to the amelioration of quality of life, health and aging. Multidisciplinary skills are required for the full investigation of the many facets of radical processes in the biological environment and chemical knowledge plays a crucial role in unveiling basic processes and mechanisms. We developed a chemical biology approach able to connect free radical chemical reactivity with biological processes, providing information on the mechanistic pathways and products. The core of this approach is the design of biomimetic models to study biomolecule behavior (lipids, nucleic acids and proteins) in aqueous systems, obtaining insights of the reaction pathways as well as building up molecular libraries of the free radical reaction products. This context can be successfully used for biomarker discovery and examples are provided with two classes of compounds: mono-trans isomers of cholesteryl esters, which are synthesized and used as references for detection in human plasma, and purine 5',8-cyclo-2'-deoxyribonucleosides, prepared and used as reference in the protocol for detection of such lesions in DNA samples, after ionizing radiations or obtained from different health conditions. PMID:23629513

  12. Chemical and biological flocculation process to treat municipal sewage and analysis of biological function.

    PubMed

    Xia, Si-qing; Yang, Dian-hai; Xu, Bin; Zhao, Jian-fu

    2005-01-01

    The pilot-scale experimental apparatus and the procedure of the chemical and biological flocculation process to verify the feasibility in treating Shanghai municipal sewage were introduced in this paper. In addition, the biological function of the process was discussed. The results of optimal running showed that in the reaction tank, the concentration of mixed liquor suspended solid(MLSS) was 2 g/L, hydraulic retention time(HRT) was 35 min, dosage of liquid polyaluminium chloride(PAC) was 60 mg/L, and the concentration of polyacrylamide(PAM) was 0.5 mg/L. The effluent average concentrations of COD(Cr), TP, SS and BOD5 were 50 mg/L, 0.62 mg/L, 18 mg/L, and 17 mg/L, respectively. These were better than the designed demand. In addition, the existence of biological degradation in this system was proven by several methods. The removal efficiencies of the chemical and biological flocculation process were 20% higher than that of the chemical flocculation process above at the same coagulant dosage. The treatment process under different situations was evaluated on a pilot-scale experiment, and the results provided magnificent parameters and optimal condition for future operation of the plant.

  13. Application of the Raven UAV for chemical and biological detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenbaugh, Ryan; Barton, Jeff; Chiu, Christopher; Fidler, Ken; Hiatt, Dan; Hawthorne, Chad; Marshall, Steven; Mohos, Joe; McHugh, Vince; Nicoloff, Bill

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents the plume tracking algorithms developed for a series of outdoor chemical-stimulant testing conducted at Dugway Proving Ground in 2008 and 2009 employing a Raven UAV equipped with a real-time chemical sensor. The flights were conducted as part of the a program under the sponsorship of the Army JPM NBC Contamination Avoidance and in conjunction with the Army PM-Unmanned Aircraft Systems, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and Edgewood Chemical Biological Center. This test demonstrated the Raven's ability to autonomously detect and track a chemical plume during a variety of atmospheric conditions. During the testing, the Raven conducted over a dozen flights, tracking outdoor releases of simulated chemical weapons over significant distances. The Raven was cued to the releases with standoff detection systems through Cursor on Target messages. Upon reaching the plume, the Raven used on-board sensors and on-board meteorological data to track the plume autonomously and determine the extent of the plume. Results were provided in real-time to the UAV operator.

  14. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: chemical interactions of primary biological aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguillaume, L.; Leriche, M.; Amato, P.; Ariya, P. A.; Delort, A.-M.; Pöschl, U.; Chaumerliac, N.; Bauer, H.; Flossmann, A. I.; Morris, C. E.

    2008-07-01

    This paper discusses the influence of primary biological aerosols (PBA) on atmospheric chemistry and vice versa through microbiological and chemical properties and processes. Several studies have shown that PBA represent a significant fraction of air particulate matter and hence affect the microstructure and water uptake of aerosol particles. Moreover, airborne micro-organisms, namely fungal spores and bacteria, can transform chemical constituents of the atmosphere by metabolic activity. Recent studies have emphasized the viability of bacteria and metabolic degradation of organic substances in cloud water. On the other hand, the viability and metabolic activity of airborne micro-organisms depend strongly on physical and chemical atmospheric parameters such as temperature, pressure, radiation, pH value and nutrient concentrations. In spite of recent advances, however, our knowledge of the microbiological and chemical interactions of PBA in the atmosphere is rather limited. Further targeted investigations combining laboratory experiments, field measurements, and modelling studies will be required to characterize the chemical feedbacks, microbiological activities at the air/snow/water interface supplied to the atmosphere.

  15. [Development of anti-HIV agents based on chemical biology].

    PubMed

    Tamamura, Hirokazu

    2012-01-01

    Recently, highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), which involves a combinational use of reverse transcriptase inhibitors and HIV protease inhibitors, has brought us a great success in the clinical treatment of AIDS patients. However, HAART has several serious clinical problems. These drawbacks encouraged us to find novel drugs and increase repertoires of anti-HIV agents with various action mechanisms. The recent disclosing of the dynamic supramolecular mechanism in HIV-entry has provided potentials to find a new type of drugs. To date, we have synthesized HIV-entry inhibitors, especially coreceptor CXCR4 antagonists. In addition, CD4 mimics in consideration of synergic effects with other entry inhibitors or neutralizing antibodies have been developed. The development of the above anti-HIV agents is based on the concept of reverse chemical genomics, in which target molecules are fixed. On the other hand, based on the concept of forward chemical genomics, in which active compounds are searched according to the screening of random libraries, effective peptide leads such as integrase inhibitors derived from fragment peptides of HIV-1 Vpr have been discovered. As such, from a point of view on chemical biology, anti-HIV leads have been found utilizing reverse and forward chemical genomics. Furthermore, antibody-based therapy or AIDS vaccine is still thought to be a promising treatment. Thus, peptidic antigen molecules based on artificial remodeling of the dynamic structures of a surface protein gp41 in HIV fusion have been developed. The present chemical biology approaches would be essential for discovery of anti-HIV agents in consideration of cocktail therapy of AIDS.

  16. Process of inorganic nitrogen transformation and design of kinetics model in the biological aerated filter reactor.

    PubMed

    Yan, Gang; Xu, Xia; Yao, Lirong; Lu, Liqiao; Zhao, Tingting; Zhang, Wenyi

    2011-04-01

    As one of the plug-flow reactors, biological aerated filter (BAF) reactor was divided into four sampling sectors to understand the characteristics of elemental nitrogen transformation during the reaction process, and then the different characteristics of elemental nitrogen transformation caused by different NH(3)-N loadings, biological quantities and activities in each section were obtained. The results showed that the total transformation ratio in the nitrifying reactor was more than 90% in the absence of any organic carbon resource, at the same time, more than 65% NH(3)-N in the influent were nitrified at the filter height of 70 cm below under the conditions of the influent runoff 9-19 L/h, the gas-water ratio 4-5:1, the dissolved oxygen 3.0-5.8 mg/L and the NH(3)-N load 0.28-0.48 kg NH(3)-N/m(3) d. On the base of the Eckenfelder mode, the kinetics equation of the NH(3)-N transformation along the reactor was S(e)=S(0) exp(-0.0134D/L(1.2612)).

  17. Chemical-biological defense remote sensing: what's happening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrico, John P.

    1998-08-01

    The proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) continues to be a serious threat to the security of the US. Proliferation of chemical and biological (CB) weapons is particularly disturbing, and the threats posed can be devastating. Critical elements of the US efforts to reduce and counter WMD proliferation include: (1) the location and characterization of WMD facilities and capabilities worldwide; (2) the ability to rapidly detect and identify the use of CB weapons for expeditious warning and reporting on the battlefield; and (3) the capability to mitigate deleterious consequences of a CB incident through effective protective and medical treatment measures. Remote sensing has been touted as a key technology in these efforts. Historically, the role of remote sensing in CB defense has been to provide early warning of an attack from an extended distance. However, additional roles for remote sensing in CB defense, as well as applications in related missions, are possible and should be pursued. This paper examines what has been happening in remote sensing over the past decade to address needs in this area. Accomplishments, emerging technologies, programmatic issues, and opportunities for the future are covered. The Department of Defence chemical- biological, the Department of Energy's Chemical Analysis by Laser Interrogation of Proliferation Effluents, and other agency related programs are examined. Also, the status of remote sensing in the commercial market arena for environmental monitoring, its relevance to the WMD counterproliferation program, and opportunities for technology transfer are discussed. A course of action for the future is recommended.

  18. Preparation, characterization, and biological properties of organic-inorganic nanocomposite coatings on titanium substrates prepared by sol-gel.

    PubMed

    Catauro, Michelina; Bollino, Flavia; Papale, Ferdinando

    2014-02-01

    When surface-reactive (bioactive) coatings are applied to medical implants by means of the sol-gel dip-coating technique, the biological proprieties of the surface of the implant can be locally modified to match the properties of the surrounding tissues to provide a firm fixation of the implant. The aim of this study has been to synthesize, via sol-gel, organoinorganic nanoporous materials and to dip-coat a substrate to use in dental applications. Different systems have been prepared consisting of an inorganic zirconium-based matrix, in which a biodegradable polymer, the poly-ε-caprolactone was incorporated in different percentages. The materials synthesized by the sol-gel process, before gelation, when they were still in sol phase, have been used to coat a titanium grade 4 (Ti-4) substrate to change its surface biological properties. Thin films have been obtained by means of the dip-coating technique. A microstructural analysis of the obtained coatings was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The biological proprieties have been investigated by means of tests in vitro. The bone-bonding capability of the nanocomposite films has been evaluated by examining the appearance of apatite on their surface when plunged in a simulated body fluid (SBF) with ion concentrations nearly equal to those of human blood plasma. The examination of apatite formation on the nanocomposites, after immersion in SBF, has been carried out by SEM equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. To evaluate cells-materials interaction, human osteosarcoma cell line (Saos-2) has been seeded on specimens and cell vitality evaluated by WST-8 assay.

  19. Chemical Imaging of Biological Tissue with Synchrotron Infrared Light

    SciTech Connect

    Miller,L.; Dumas, P.

    2006-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (FTIRM) and imaging (FTIRI) have become valuable techniques for examining the chemical makeup of biological materials by probing their vibrational motions on a microscopic scale. Synchrotron infrared (S-IR) light is an ideal source for FTIRM and FTIRI due to the combination of its high brightness (i.e., flux density), also called brilliance, and broadband nature. Through a 10-{mu}m pinhole, the brightness of a synchrotron source is 100-1000 times higher than a conventional thermal (globar) source. Accordingly, the improvement in spatial resolution and in spectral quality to the diffraction limit has led to a plethora of applications that is just being realized. In this review, we describe the development of synchrotron-based FTIRM, illustrate its advantages in many applications to biological systems, and propose some potential future directions for the technique.

  20. Modeling temperature compensation in chemical and biological oscillators.

    PubMed

    Ruoff, P; Rensing, L; Kommedal, R; Mohsenzadeh, S

    1997-09-01

    All physicochemical and biological oscillators maintain a balance between destabilizing reactions (as, for example, intrinsic autocatalytic or amplifying reactions) and stabilizing processes. These two groups of processes tend to influence the period in opposite directions and may lead to temperature compensation whenever their overall influence balances. This principle of "antagonistic balance" has been tested for several chemical and biological oscillators. The Goodwin negative feedback oscillator appears of particular interest for modeling the circadian clocks in Neurospora and Drosophila and their temperature compensation. Remarkably, the Goodwin oscillator not only gives qualitative, correct phase response curves for temperature steps and temperature pulses, but also simulates the temperature behavior of Neurospora frq and Drosophila per mutants almost quantitatively. The Goodwin oscillator predicts that circadian periods are strongly dependent on the turnover of the clock mRNA or clock protein. A more rapid turnover of clock mRNA or clock protein results, in short, a slower turnover in longer period lengths.

  1. The Staudinger ligation-a gift to chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Köhn, Maja; Breinbauer, Rolf

    2004-06-14

    Although the reaction between an azide and a phosphane to form an aza-ylide was discovered by Hermann Staudinger more than 80 years ago and has found widespread application in organic synthesis, its potential as a highly chemoselective ligation method for the preparation of bioconjugates has been recognized only recently. As the two reaction partners are bioorthogonal to almost all functionalities that exist in biological systems and react at room temperature in an aqueous environment, the Staudinger ligation has even found application in the complex environment of living cells. Herein we describe the current state of knowledge on this reaction and its application both for the preparation of bioconjugates and as a ligation method in chemical biology.

  2. Hydrogen Sulfide Chemical Biology: Pathophysiological roles and detection

    PubMed Central

    Kolluru, Gopi K; Shen, Xinggui; Bir, Shyamal C.; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the most recent endogenous gasotransmitter that has been reported to serve many physiological and pathological functions in different tissues. Studies over the past decade have revealed that H2S can be synthesized through numerous pathways and its bioavailability regulated through its conversion into different biochemical forms. H2S exerts its biological effects in various manners including redox regulation of protein and small molecular weight thiols, polysulfides, thiosulfate/sulfite, iron-sulfur cluster proteins, and anti-oxidant properties that affect multiple cellular and molecular responses. However, precise measurement of H2S bioavailability and its associated biochemical and pathophysiological roles remains less well understood. In this review, we discuss recent understanding of H2S chemical biology, its relationship to tissue pathophysiological responses and possible therapeutic uses. PMID:23850632

  3. Electrical and chemical sensors for biological cell research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edell, D. J.; McNeil, V. M.; Curley, M. G.; Wolfe, J. H.

    Electrical and chemical microsensors for biological cell research allow for the continuous study of biological systems under normal physiological conditions. Two sensor technologies which take most advantage of microfabrication technology are discussed. One is being developed for monitoring the environment of cancer cells during radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and hyperthermia treatment. Of current interest is the measurement of temperature and interstitial free oxygen concentration distributions in cancer tissues prior to and during various treatments. The second technology discussed is being developed for monitoring the extracellular ionic currents from electrogenic cells in culture. The ability to build integrated circuits over large areas of a silicon wafer which can impedance transform the signals and multiplex a large array of contacts is being used.

  4. Chemical constituents and biological activities of the genus Linaria (Scrophulariaceae).

    PubMed

    Cheriet, Thamere; Mancini, Ines; Seghiri, Ramdane; Benayache, Fadila; Benayache, Samir

    2015-01-01

    This is a review on 95 references dealing with the genus Linaria (Scrophularioideae-Antirrhineae tribe), a known genus of the Scrophulariaceae family, which comprises about 200 species mainly distributed in Europe, Asia and North Africa. The use of some Linaria species in folk medicine has attracted the attention for chemical and biological studies. This report is aimed to be a comprehensive overview on the isolated or identified known and often new metabolites from the 41 Linaria species so far cited. It is organised presenting first the phytochemical classes of alkaloids, polyphenols including flavonoids, the latter being quite diffused and mostly present as flavones, flavonols and their glycosides, and terpenoids including iridoids and steroids. Second, the results from biological investigation on plant extracts, pure natural products isolated from Linaria species and some synthetic derivatives are reported, with antitumour, anti-acetylcholinesterase, anti-inflammatory and analgesic, antioxidant and antibacterial activities. PMID:25674928

  5. Aromatic rings in chemical and biological recognition: energetics and structures.

    PubMed

    Salonen, Laura M; Ellermann, Manuel; Diederich, François

    2011-05-16

    This review describes a multidimensional treatment of molecular recognition phenomena involving aromatic rings in chemical and biological systems. It summarizes new results reported since the appearance of an earlier review in 2003 in host-guest chemistry, biological affinity assays and biostructural analysis, data base mining in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and the Protein Data Bank (PDB), and advanced computational studies. Topics addressed are arene-arene, perfluoroarene-arene, S⋅⋅⋅aromatic, cation-π, and anion-π interactions, as well as hydrogen bonding to π systems. The generated knowledge benefits, in particular, structure-based hit-to-lead development and lead optimization both in the pharmaceutical and in the crop protection industry. It equally facilitates the development of new advanced materials and supramolecular systems, and should inspire further utilization of interactions with aromatic rings to control the stereochemical outcome of synthetic transformations. PMID:21538733

  6. Dissolved organic matter and inorganic ions in a central Himalayan glacier--insights into chemical composition and atmospheric sources.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xiangying; Ge, Xinlei; Xiao, Cunde; Ren, Jiawen; Qin, Dahe

    2013-06-18

    Melting of Himalayan glaciers can be accelerated by the deposition of airborne black carbon and mineral dust as it leads to significant reductions of the surface albedo of snow and ice. Whereas South Asia has been shown a primary source region to these particles, detailed sources of these aerosol pollutants remain poorly understood. In this study, the chemical compositions of snow pit samples collected from Jima Yangzong glacier in the central Himalayas were analyzed to obtain information of atmospheric aerosols deposited from summer 2009 to spring 2010. Especially, an Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was used for the first time to chemically characterize the dissolved organic and inorganic matter (DOM and DIM) in snow samples. The concentrations of these species varied seasonally, with high levels observed during the winter-spring period and low levels during the summer monsoon period. On average, the dissolved substances was dominated by organics (58%) with important contributions from inorganic species, NO3(-) (12.5%), Ca(2+) (9.1%), NH4(+) (8.7%), and SO(4)(2-) (8.1%). DOM was found more oxidized with an average (± 1σ) atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio (nO/nC) of 0.64 (± 0.14) and organic mass-to-carbon ratio (OM/OC) of 2.01 (± 0.19) during the winter-spring periods compared to the summer season (nO/nC = 0.31 ± 0.09 and OM/OC = 1.58 ± 0.12). In addition, biomass burning particles were found significantly enhanced in snow during the winter-spring periods, consistent with HYSPLIT back trajectory analysis of air mass history, which indicates prevailing atmospheric transport from northwest India and Nepal.

  7. Tying Biological Activity to Changes in Sea Spray Aerosol Chemical Composition via Single Particle Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, C. M.; Lee, C.; Collins, D. B.; Axson, J. L.; Laskina, O.; Grandquist, J. R.; Grassian, V. H.; Prather, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    In remote marine environments, sea spray aerosols (SSA) often represent the greatest aerosol burden, thus having significant impacts on direct radiative interactions and cloud processes. Previous studies have shown that SSA is a complex mixture of inorganic salts and an array of dissolved and particulate organic components. Enrichment of SSA organic content is often correlated to seawater chlorophyll concentrations, a measure of oceanic biological activity. As the physical and chemical properties of aerosols control their radiative effects, recent studies conducted by the Center for Aerosol Impacts on Climate and the Environment have endeavored to further elucidate the ties between marine biological activity and primary SSA chemical composition using highly time resolved single particle analyses. A series of experiments performed in the recently developed Marine Aerosol Reference Tank evaluated the effect of changing marine microbial populations on SSA chemical composition, which was monitored via an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer and a variety of offline spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. Each experiment was initiated using unfiltered and untreated seawater, thus maintaining a high level of biogeochemical complexity. This study is the first of its kind to capture daily changes in the primary SSA mixing state over the growth and death of a natural phytoplankton bloom. Increases in organic aerosol types (0.4-3 μm), internally and externally mixed with sea salt, could not be correlated to chlorophyll concentrations. Maximum production of these populations occurred two to four days after the in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence peaked in intensity. This work is in contrast to the current paradigm of correlating SSA organic content to seawater chlorophyll concentration.

  8. Smart phones: platform enabling modular, chemical, biological, and explosives sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, Amethist S.; Coppock, Matthew; Bickford, Justin R.; Conn, Marvin A.; Proctor, Thomas J.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2013-05-01

    Reliable, robust, and portable technologies are needed for the rapid identification and detection of chemical, biological, and explosive (CBE) materials. A key to addressing the persistent threat to U.S. troops in the current war on terror is the rapid detection and identification of the precursor materials used in development of improvised explosive devices, homemade explosives, and bio-warfare agents. However, a universal methodology for detection and prevention of CBE materials in the use of these devices has proven difficult. Herein, we discuss our efforts towards the development of a modular, robust, inexpensive, pervasive, archival, and compact platform (android based smart phone) enabling the rapid detection of these materials.

  9. Chemical weathering and the Viking biology experiments on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huguenin, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Since the publication of studies describing models that do not require external energy sources, new LR (labeled release) test standards module studies have been reported by Levin and Straat (1981). These studies impose important constraints on the various models, and they offer strong support for the 'frost-weathering' model. These findings are discussed here, and it is proposed that the activity of all three biology experiments can now adequately be explained as a consequence of a single active agent produced by contemporary chemical weathering. Some of the possible consequences and implications of contemporary weathering for the current state and evolution of the regolith and atmosphere are briefly discussed.

  10. Bayesian methods in virtual screening and chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Bender, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The Naïve Bayesian Classifier, as well as related classification and regression approaches based on Bayes' theorem, has experienced increased attention in the cheminformatics world in recent years. In this contribution, we first review the mathematical framework on which Bayes' methods are built, and then continue to discuss implications of this framework as well as practical experience under which conditions Bayes' methods give the best performance in virtual screening settings. Finally, we present an overview of applications of Bayes' methods to both virtual screening and the chemical biology arena, where applications range from bridging phenotypic and mechanistic space of drug action to the prediction of ligand-target interactions.

  11. Rapid method for isolating targeted organic chemicals from biological matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Caton, J.E.; Griest, W.H.; Watson, A.P.; Buchanan, M.V. ); Hazen, K.H. )

    1994-01-01

    The initial development is reported for a novel countercurrent filtration/dialysis and solid phase extractant system for the rapid isolation of low molecular weight target compounds from biological media. Except for piperazine (a highly water-soluble drug), recoveries of 50 - 95% were achieved for chemical warfare agent simulants and anthelmintic drugs extracted from meat, grain, or milk. The results suggest the potential for broad applications to complex samples such as environmental media and physiological specimens which traditionally require extensive fractionation prior to analysis.

  12. Biological and chemical technologies research. FY 1995 annual summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1995 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program. This BCTR program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1995 (ASR 95) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1995; detailed descriptions of individual projects; a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work; patents; and awards arising from work supported by the BCTR.

  13. Chemical approaches to stem cell biology and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenlin; Li, Ke; Wei, Wanguo; Ding, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Small molecules that modulate stem cell fate and function offer significant opportunities that will allow the full realization of the therapeutic potential of stem cells. Rational design and screening for small molecules have identified useful compounds to probe fundamental mechanisms of stem cell self-renewal, differentiation, and reprogramming, and have facilitated the development of cell-based therapies and therapeutic drugs targeting endogenous stem and progenitor cells for repair and regeneration. Here, we will discuss recent scientific and therapeutic progress, as well as new perspectives and future challenges for using chemical approaches in stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. PMID:24012368

  14. Plant chemical biology: are we meeting the promise?

    PubMed

    Hicks, Glenn R; Raikhel, Natasha V

    2014-01-01

    As an early adopter of plant chemical genetics to the study of endomembrane trafficking, we have observed the growth of small molecule approaches. Within the field, we often describe the strengths of the approach in a broad, generic manner, such as the ability to address redundancy and lethality. But, we are now in a much better position to evaluate the demonstrated value of the approach based on examples. In this perspective, we offer an assessment of chemical genetics in plants and where its applications may be of particular utility from the perspective of the cell biologist. Beyond this, we suggest areas to be addressed to provide broader access and enhance the effectiveness of small molecule approaches in plant biology.

  15. Nonlocal reactive transport with physical, chemical, and biological heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bill X.; Cushman, John H.; Deng, Fei-Wen

    When a natural porous medium is viewed from an eulerian perspective, incomplete characterization of the hydraulic conductivity, chemical reactivity, and biological activity leads to nonlocal constitutive theories, irrespective of whether the medium has evolving heterogeneity with fluctuations over all scales. Within this framework a constitutive theory involving nonlocal dispersive and convective fluxes and nonlocal sources/sinks is developed for chemicals undergoing random linear nonequilibrium reactions and random equilibrium first-order decay in a random conductivity field. The resulting transport equations are solved exactly in Fourier-Laplace space and then numerically inverted to real space. Mean concentration contours and various spatial moments are presented graphically for several covariance structures. 1997 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved

  16. Plant chemical biology: are we meeting the promise?

    PubMed

    Hicks, Glenn R; Raikhel, Natasha V

    2014-01-01

    As an early adopter of plant chemical genetics to the study of endomembrane trafficking, we have observed the growth of small molecule approaches. Within the field, we often describe the strengths of the approach in a broad, generic manner, such as the ability to address redundancy and lethality. But, we are now in a much better position to evaluate the demonstrated value of the approach based on examples. In this perspective, we offer an assessment of chemical genetics in plants and where its applications may be of particular utility from the perspective of the cell biologist. Beyond this, we suggest areas to be addressed to provide broader access and enhance the effectiveness of small molecule approaches in plant biology. PMID:25250041

  17. Chemical and biological treatment technologies for leather tannery chemicals and wastewaters: a review.

    PubMed

    Lofrano, Giusy; Meriç, Sureyya; Zengin, Gülsüm Emel; Orhon, Derin

    2013-09-01

    Although the leather tanning industry is known to be one of the leading economic sectors in many countries, there has been an increasing environmental concern regarding the release of various recalcitrant pollutants in tannery wastewater. It has been shown that biological processes are presently known as the most environmental friendly but inefficient for removal of recalcitrant organics and micro-pollutants in tannery wastewater. Hence emerging technologies such as advanced oxidation processes and membrane processes have been attempted as integrative to biological treatment for this sense. This paper, as the-state-of-the-art, attempts to revise the over world trends of treatment technologies and advances for pollution prevention from tannery chemicals and wastewater. It can be elucidated that according to less extent advances in wastewater minimization as well as in leather production technology and chemicals substitution, biological and chemical treatment processes have been progressively studied. However, there has not been a full scale application yet of those emerging technologies using advanced oxidation although some of them proved good achievements to remove xenobiotics present in tannery wastewater. It can be noted that advanced oxidation technologies integrated with biological processes will remain in the agenda of the decision makers and water sector to apply the best prevention solution for the future tanneries.

  18. Methods of information geometry in computational system biology (consistency between chemical and biological evolution).

    PubMed

    Astakhov, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    Interest in simulation of large-scale metabolic networks, species development, and genesis of various diseases requires new simulation techniques to accommodate the high complexity of realistic biological networks. Information geometry and topological formalisms are proposed to analyze information processes. We analyze the complexity of large-scale biological networks as well as transition of the system functionality due to modification in the system architecture, system environment, and system components. The dynamic core model is developed. The term dynamic core is used to define a set of causally related network functions. Delocalization of dynamic core model provides a mathematical formalism to analyze migration of specific functions in biosystems which undergo structure transition induced by the environment. The term delocalization is used to describe these processes of migration. We constructed a holographic model with self-poetic dynamic cores which preserves functional properties under those transitions. Topological constraints such as Ricci flow and Pfaff dimension were found for statistical manifolds which represent biological networks. These constraints can provide insight on processes of degeneration and recovery which take place in large-scale networks. We would like to suggest that therapies which are able to effectively implement estimated constraints, will successfully adjust biological systems and recover altered functionality. Also, we mathematically formulate the hypothesis that there is a direct consistency between biological and chemical evolution. Any set of causal relations within a biological network has its dual reimplementation in the chemistry of the system environment.

  19. Molecular codes in biological and chemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Görlich, Dennis; Dittrich, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Shannon's theory of communication has been very successfully applied for the analysis of biological information. However, the theory neglects semantic and pragmatic aspects and thus cannot directly be applied to distinguish between (bio-) chemical systems able to process "meaningful" information from those that do not. Here, we present a formal method to assess a system's semantic capacity by analyzing a reaction network's capability to implement molecular codes. We analyzed models of chemical systems (martian atmosphere chemistry and various combustion chemistries), biochemical systems (gene expression, gene translation, and phosphorylation signaling cascades), an artificial chemistry, and random reaction networks. Our study suggests that different chemical systems possess different semantic capacities. No semantic capacity was found in the model of the martian atmosphere chemistry, the studied combustion chemistries, and highly connected random networks, i.e. with these chemistries molecular codes cannot be implemented. High semantic capacity was found in the studied biochemical systems and in random reaction networks where the number of second order reactions is twice the number of species. We conclude that our approach can be applied to evaluate the information processing capabilities of a chemical system and may thus be a useful tool to understand the origin and evolution of meaningful information, e.g. in the context of the origin of life.

  20. Molecular Codes in Biological and Chemical Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Görlich, Dennis; Dittrich, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Shannon’s theory of communication has been very successfully applied for the analysis of biological information. However, the theory neglects semantic and pragmatic aspects and thus cannot directly be applied to distinguish between (bio-) chemical systems able to process “meaningful” information from those that do not. Here, we present a formal method to assess a system’s semantic capacity by analyzing a reaction network’s capability to implement molecular codes. We analyzed models of chemical systems (martian atmosphere chemistry and various combustion chemistries), biochemical systems (gene expression, gene translation, and phosphorylation signaling cascades), an artificial chemistry, and random reaction networks. Our study suggests that different chemical systems posses different semantic capacities. No semantic capacity was found in the model of the martian atmosphere chemistry, the studied combustion chemistries, and highly connected random networks, i.e. with these chemistries molecular codes cannot be implemented. High semantic capacity was found in the studied biochemical systems and in random reaction networks where the number of second order reactions is twice the number of species. We conclude that our approach can be applied to evaluate the information processing capabilities of a chemical system and may thus be a useful tool to understand the origin and evolution of meaningful information, e.g. in the context of the origin of life. PMID:23372756

  1. Biological monitoring IX: Concomitant exposure to medications and industrial chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, J.

    1994-05-01

    A significant proportion of workers may be receiving prescription or nonprescription medications. In two surveys, one in the United States and the other in the Netherlands, 15 to 30 percent of workers reported current use of pharmaceuticals. In a viscose rayon factory in Belgium, 31 percent of 129 workers exposed to carbon disulfide and 19.8 percent of 81 control workers from other factories reported use of some medication. Some of the drugs may affect the relationship between the external exposure (dose) of a chemical and the concentration of that chemical or its metabolite(s) in a sampled biological medium (internal dose), and/or the relationship between external exposure and concentration at a receptor site. They may also modulate the response of the receptor, as suggested by the increased reports of neurological symptoms in carbon disulfide-exposed workers taking certain medications. There are two obvious differences between drugs and industrial chemicals: (1) The effects of drugs cover a wider spectrum and include effects not known to be the result of any industrial chemicals. Examples include selective destructive inhibition of hepatic enzymes (monoamine oxidase inhibitors, indomethacin) and alteration of hepatic blood flow (adrenergic agents, cimetidine). (2) Drugs are administered to produce specific therapeutic effects. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Insect-gene-activity detection system for chemical and biological warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackie, Ryan S.; Schilling, Amanda S.; Lopez, Arturo M.; Rayms-Keller, Alfredo

    2002-02-01

    Detection of multiple chemical and biological weapons (CBW) agents and/or complex mixtures of toxic industrial chemicals (TIC) is imperative for both the commercial and military sectors. In a military scenario, a multi-CBW attack would create confusion, thereby delaying decontamination and therapeutic efforts. In the commercial sector, polluted sites invariably contain a mixture of TIC. Novel detection systems capable of detecting CBW and TIC are sorely needed. While it may be impossible to build a detector capable of discriminating all the possible combinations of CBW, a detection system capable of statistically predicting the most likely composition of a given mixture is within the reach of current emerging technologies. Aquatic insect-gene activity may prove to be a sensitive, discriminating, and elegant paradigm for the detection of CBW and TIC. We propose to systematically establish the expression patterns of selected protein markers in insects exposed to specific mixtures of chemical and biological warfare agents to generate a library of biosignatures of exposure. The predicting capabilities of an operational library of biosignatures of exposures will allow the detection of emerging novel or genetically engineered agents, as well as complex mixtures of chemical and biological weapons agents. CBW and TIC are discussed in the context of war, terrorism, and pollution.

  3. Chemical Biology Applied to the Study of Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Anthouard, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, chemical biology and chemical genomics have been increasingly applied to the field of microbiology to uncover new potential therapeutics as well as to probe virulence mechanisms in pathogens. The approach offers some clear advantages, as identified compounds (i) can serve as a proof of principle for the applicability of drugs to specific targets; (ii) can serve as conditional effectors to explore the function of their targets in vitro and in vivo; (iii) can be used to modulate gene expression in otherwise genetically intractable organisms; and (iv) can be tailored to a narrow or broad range of bacteria. This review highlights recent examples from the literature to illustrate how the use of small molecules has advanced discovery of novel potential treatments and has been applied to explore biological mechanisms underlying pathogenicity. We also use these examples to discuss practical considerations that are key to establishing a screening or discovery program. Finally, we discuss the advantages and challenges of different approaches and the methods that are emerging to address these challenges. PMID:25404026

  4. University of Texas countermeasures to biological and chemical threats program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornguth, Steve E.

    2002-07-01

    Developments in the continental US and the international scene have alerted the defense community to the threat of biological and chemical agents on civilian and military populations. The objective of the program will lead to the protection of US and allied forces from biological/chemical threats. The following focus areas are being developed and integrated in our program: (1) scientific validation; (2) medical countermeasures; and (3) communication and integrated conversion of data to knowledge. We are developing binder elements for the sensors and platforms for these sensor systems. To rapidly determine whether individuals have been exposed to threat agents, archival data sets have been established through a partnership with the Texas Department of Health. Large scale, real-time symptomatic diagnoses of patients from emergency medical facilities are being electronically collected and sent to an archival data facility for identification of emergent disease. The ability to diagnose emergent disease can be reduced to twenty-four hours from the week to several weeks currently required.

  5. Laminated plastic microfluidic components for biological and chemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.M.; Matson, D.W.; Bennett, W.D.; Lin, Y.; Hammerstrom, D.J.

    1999-07-01

    Laminated plastic microfluidic components are being developed for biological testing systems and chemical sensors. Applications include a DNA thermal cycler, DNA analytical systems, electrophoretic flow systems, dialysis systems, and metal sensors for ground water. This article describes fabrication processes developed for these plastic microfluidic components, and the fabrication of a chromium metal sensor and a microdialysis device. Most of the components have a stacked architecture. Using this architecture, the fluid flows, or is pumped through, as many as nine laminated functional levels. Functions include pumping, mixing, reaction, detection, reservoirs, separations, and electronics. Polyimide, poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), and polycarbonate materials with thicknesses between 25 and 125 {mu}m are used to construct the components. This makes the components low cost, inert to many biological fluids and chemicals, and disposable. The components are fabricated by excimer laser micromachining the microchannel patterns and microstructures in the various laminates. In some cases, micropumps are integrated into these components to move the fluids. Vias and interconnects are also cut by the laser and integrated with micropumps. The laminates are sealed and bonded by adhesive and thermal processes and are leak tight. The parts withstand pressures as high as 790 kPa. Typical channel widths are 50 to 100 {mu}m, with aspect ratios near 5. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Vacuum Society.}

  6. Potential for portal detection of human chemical and biological contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settles, Gary S.; McGann, William J.

    2001-08-01

    The walk-through metal-detection portal is a paradigm of non-intrusive passenger screening in aviation security. Modern explosive detection portals based on this paradigm will soon appear in airports. This paper suggests that the airborne trace detection technology developed for that purpose can also be adapted to human chemical and biological contamination. The waste heat of the human body produces a rising warm-air sheath of 50-80 liters/sec known as the human thermal plume. Contained within this plume are hundreds of bioeffluents from perspiration and breath, and millions of skin flakes. Since early medicine, the airborne human scent was used in the diagnosis of disease. Recent examples also include toxicity and substance abuse, but this approach has never been quantified. The appearance of new bioeffluents or subtle changes in the steady-state may signal the onset of a chemical/biological attack. Portal sampling of the human thermal plume is suggested, followed by a pre-concentration step and the detection of the attacking agent or the early human response. The ability to detect nanogram levels of explosive trace contamination this way was already demonstrated. Key advantages of the portal approach are its rapidity and non-intrusiveness, and the advantage that it does not require the traditional bodily fluid or tissue sampling.

  7. Biologically active LIL proteins built with minimal chemical diversity

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Erin N.; Marston, Jez L.; Federman, Ross S.; Edwards, Anne P. B.; Karabadzhak, Alexander G.; Petti, Lisa M.; Engelman, Donald M.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We have constructed 26-amino acid transmembrane proteins that specifically transform cells but consist of only two different amino acids. Most proteins are long polymers of amino acids with 20 or more chemically distinct side-chains. The artificial transmembrane proteins reported here are the simplest known proteins with specific biological activity, consisting solely of an initiating methionine followed by specific sequences of leucines and isoleucines, two hydrophobic amino acids that differ only by the position of a methyl group. We designate these proteins containing leucine (L) and isoleucine (I) as LIL proteins. These proteins functionally interact with the transmembrane domain of the platelet-derived growth factor β-receptor and specifically activate the receptor to transform cells. Complete mutagenesis of these proteins identified individual amino acids required for activity, and a protein consisting solely of leucines, except for a single isoleucine at a particular position, transformed cells. These surprisingly simple proteins define the minimal chemical diversity sufficient to construct proteins with specific biological activity and change our view of what can constitute an active protein in a cellular context. PMID:26261320

  8. Inorganic chemical analyses of black shale from wells in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Brosge, W.P.; Tailleur, I.L.

    1989-01-01

    Core samples of Mississippian through Upper Cretaceous black shale, siltstone, and limy mudstone from 24 test wells in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA) have been analyzed for trace elements in order to provide data on regional background concentrations for inorganic geochemical exploration. This study was made because the authors had noticed that several of the rock units cored in the subsurface were associated with surface geochemical anomalies or small mineral deposits in the areas where they crop out. In the southwestern part of the NPRA, the heavy-mineral concentrates from sediments of streams that flow over shale and graywacke of the Lower Cretaceous Fortress Mountain and Torok Formations are unusually rich in lead, arsenic, and silver. Southeast of the NPRA, in the foothills of the Philip Smith Mountains, stream sediments in areas of Permian to Lower Cretaceous shale locally contain anomalously large amounts of zinc and thorium. In addition, the high organic-carbon content of the Shublick Formation, Jurassic (part) Kingak Shale, and lowest Cretaceous pebble shale unit in the subsurface in the Prudhoe Bay area indicate that they may be rich in trace metals. Outcrops of the Shublik in the Brooks Range locally contain much copper, molybdenum, vanadium, and rare-earth elements, and the high gamma-radiation characteristic of the pebble shale unit in the subsurface shows that it is rich in uranium and thorium. The shale section with the most important known metallic deposits is the Mississippian shale and chert now assigned to the Kuna Formation. The distribution of vanadium and nickel may also be of interest in oil exploration. Hughes and others found higher V/Ni ratios in the Prudhoe-Barrow types of oil than in the Umiat-Simpson types and attributed these higher ratios to sources in the Shublik Formation and Jurassic (part) Kingak Shale.

  9. [Chemical, physical and biological risks in law enforcement].

    PubMed

    Magrini, Andrea; Grana, Mario; Vicentini, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chemical, physical and biological risks among public safety and security forces. Law enforcement personnel, involved in routine tasks and in emergency situations, are exposed to numerous and several occupational hazards (chemical, physical and biological) whith likely health and security consequences. These risks are particularly high when the organization and preparation are inadequate, there is a lacking or insufficient coordination, information, education and communication and safety and personal protective equipment are inadequate or insufficient. Despite the objective difficulties, caused by the actual special needs related to the service performed or the organizational peculiarities, the risk identification and assessment is essential for worker health and safety of personnel, as provided for by Legislative Decree no. 81/2008. Chemical risks include airborne pollutants due to vehicular traffic (carbon monoxide, ultrafine particles, benzene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, nitrogen and sulfur oxides, lead), toxic gases generated by combustion process following fires (aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs, dioxins and furans, biphenyls, formaldehyde, metals and cyanides), substances emitted in case of chemical accidents (solvents, pesticides, toxic gases, caustics), drugs (methylamphetamine), riot control agents and self-defence spray, lead at firing ranges, and several materials and reagents used in forensic laboratory. The physical hazards are often caused by activities that induce biomechanical overload aid the onset of musculoskeletal disorders, the use of visual display terminals and work environments that may expose to heat stress and discomfort, high and low pressure, noise, vibrations, ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. The main biological risks are blood-borne diseases (viral hepatitis, AIDS), airborne diseases (eg, tuberculosis, meningitis, SARS, anthrax), MRSA, and vector-borne diseases. Many of these risk factors are unavoidable or are not

  10. The diverse biological properties of the chemically inert noble gases.

    PubMed

    Winkler, David A; Thornton, Aaron; Farjot, Géraldine; Katz, Ira

    2016-04-01

    The noble gases represent an intriguing scientific paradox. They are extremely inert chemically but display a remarkable spectrum of clinically useful biological properties. Despite a relative paucity of knowledge of their mechanisms of action, some of the noble gases have been used successfully in the clinic. Studies with xenon have suggested that the noble gases as a class may exhibit valuable biological properties such as anaesthesia; amelioration of ischemic damage; tissue protection prior to transplantation; analgesic properties; and a potentially wide range of other clinically useful effects. Xenon has been shown to be safe in humans, and has useful pharmacokinetic properties such as rapid onset, fast wash out etc. The main limitations in wider use are that: many of the fundamental biochemical studies are still lacking; the lighter noble gases are likely to manifest their properties only under hyperbaric conditions, impractical in surgery; and administration of xenon using convectional gaseous anaesthesia equipment is inefficient, making its use very expensive. There is nonetheless a significant body of published literature on the biochemical, pharmacological, and clinical properties of noble gases but no comprehensive reviews exist that summarize their properties and the existing knowledge of their models of action at the molecular (atomic) level. This review provides such an up-to-date summary of the extensive, useful biological properties of noble gases as drugs and prospects for wider application of these atoms.

  11. The diverse biological properties of the chemically inert noble gases.

    PubMed

    Winkler, David A; Thornton, Aaron; Farjot, Géraldine; Katz, Ira

    2016-04-01

    The noble gases represent an intriguing scientific paradox. They are extremely inert chemically but display a remarkable spectrum of clinically useful biological properties. Despite a relative paucity of knowledge of their mechanisms of action, some of the noble gases have been used successfully in the clinic. Studies with xenon have suggested that the noble gases as a class may exhibit valuable biological properties such as anaesthesia; amelioration of ischemic damage; tissue protection prior to transplantation; analgesic properties; and a potentially wide range of other clinically useful effects. Xenon has been shown to be safe in humans, and has useful pharmacokinetic properties such as rapid onset, fast wash out etc. The main limitations in wider use are that: many of the fundamental biochemical studies are still lacking; the lighter noble gases are likely to manifest their properties only under hyperbaric conditions, impractical in surgery; and administration of xenon using convectional gaseous anaesthesia equipment is inefficient, making its use very expensive. There is nonetheless a significant body of published literature on the biochemical, pharmacological, and clinical properties of noble gases but no comprehensive reviews exist that summarize their properties and the existing knowledge of their models of action at the molecular (atomic) level. This review provides such an up-to-date summary of the extensive, useful biological properties of noble gases as drugs and prospects for wider application of these atoms. PMID:26896563

  12. How chemistry supports cell biology: the chemical toolbox at your service.

    PubMed

    Wijdeven, Ruud H; Neefjes, Jacques; Ovaa, Huib

    2014-12-01

    Chemical biology is a young and rapidly developing scientific field. In this field, chemistry is inspired by biology to create various tools to monitor and modulate biochemical and cell biological processes. Chemical contributions such as small-molecule inhibitors and activity-based probes (ABPs) can provide new and unique insights into previously unexplored cellular processes. This review provides an overview of recent breakthroughs in chemical biology that are likely to have a significant impact on cell biology. We also discuss the application of several chemical tools in cell biology research.

  13. Innovation in academic chemical screening: filling the gaps in chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Hasson, Samuel A; Inglese, James

    2013-06-01

    Academic screening centers across the world have endeavored to discover small molecules that can modulate biological systems. To increase the reach of functional-genomic and chemical screening programs, universities, research institutes, and governments have followed their industrial counterparts in adopting high-throughput paradigms. As academic screening efforts have steadily grown in scope and complexity, so have the ideas of what is possible with the union of technology and biology. This review addresses the recent conceptual and technological innovation that has been propelling academic screening into its own unique niche. In particular, high-content and whole-organism screening are changing how academics search for novel bioactive compounds. Importantly, we recognize examples of successful chemical probe development that have punctuated the changing technology landscape.

  14. A Mechanistic Study of Chemically Modified Inorganic Membranes for Gas and Liquid Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Way, J Douglas

    2011-01-21

    This final report will summarize the progress made during the period August 1, 1993 - October 31, 2010 with support from DOE grant number DE-FG03-93ER14363. The objectives of the research have been to investigate the transport mechanisms in micro- and mesoporous, metal oxide membranes and to examine the relationship between the microstructure of the membrane, the membrane surface chemistry, and the separation performance of the membrane. Examples of the membrane materials under investigation are the microporous silica hollow fiber membrane manufactured by PPG Industries, chemically modified mesoporous oxide membranes, and polymer membranes containing microporous oxides (mixed matrix membranes). Analytical techniques such as NMR, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and gas adsorption were used to investigate membrane microstructure and to probe the chemical interactions occurring at the gas-membrane interface.

  15. Chemical, Biological, and Explosive Sensors for Field Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Kyle, Manuel Manard, Stephan Weeks

    2009-01-31

    Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) is developing handheld chemical, biological, and explosive (CBE) detection systems and sensor motes for wireless networked field operations. The CBE sensors are capable of detecting and identifying multiple targeted toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and high-explosive vapor components. The CBE devices are based on differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) coupled with fast gas chromatography (GC) or mass spectrometry. The systems all include the concepts of: 1. Direct air/particulate “smart” sampling 2. Selective, continuous real-time (~1 sec) alert monitoring using DMS 3. Highly selective, rapid dual technology separation/verification analysis The biosensor technology is based on Raman aerosol particle flow cytometry for target detection and identification. Monitoring and identifying trace level chemical vapors directly from ambient air will allow First Responders to quickly adapt situational response strategies and personal protective equipment needs to the specific response scenario being encountered. First Responders require great confidence in the measurements and ability of a given system to detect CBE below threshold levels without interferences. The concept of determining the background matrix in near real-time to allow subsequent automated field-programmable method selection and cueing of high-value assets in a wide range of environs will be presented. This provides CBE information for decisions prior to First Responders entering the response site or sending a portable mobile unit for a remote site survey of the hazards. The focus is on real-time information needed by those responsible for emergency response and national security.

  16. Inorganic Nanomaterials as Carriers for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shizhu; Hao, Xiaohong; Liang, Xingjie; Zhang, Qun; Zhang, Cuimiao; Zhou, Guoqiang; Shen, Shigang; Jia, Guang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2016-01-01

    For safe and effective therapy, drugs must be delivered efficiently and with minimal systemic side effects. Nanostructured drug carriers enable the delivery of small-molecule drugs as well as nucleic acids and proteins. Inorganic nanomaterials are ideal for drug delivery platforms due to their unique physicochemical properties, such as facile preparation, good storage stability and biocompatibility. Many inorganic nanostructure-based drug delivery platforms have been prepared. Although there are still many obstacles to overcome, significant advances have been made in recent years. This review focuses on the status and development of inorganic nanostructures, including silica, quantum dots, gold, carbon-based and magnetic iron oxide-based nanostructures, as carriers for chemical and biological drugs. We specifically highlight the extensive use of these inorganic drug carriers for cancer therapy. Finally, we discuss the most important areas in the field that urgently require further study. PMID:27301169

  17. The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, M. D.; Chandler, C. L.; Groman, R. C.; Wiebe, P. H.; Glover, D. M.; Gegg, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    Oceanography and marine ecosystem research are inherently interdisciplinary fields of study that generate and require access to a wide variety of measurements. In late 2006 the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Sections of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Geosciences Directorate Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE) funded the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). In late 2010 additional funding was contributed to support management of research data from the NSF Office of Polar Programs Antarctic Organisms & Ecosystems Program. The BCO-DMO is recognized in the 2011 Division of Ocean Sciences Sample and Data Policy as one of several program specific data offices that support NSF OCE funded researchers. BCO-DMO staff members offer data management support throughout the project life cycle to investigators from large national programs and medium-sized collaborative research projects, as well as researchers from single investigator awards. The office manages and serves all types of oceanographic data and information generated during the research process and contributed by the originating investigators. BCO-DMO has built a data system that includes the legacy data from several large ocean research programs (e.g. United States Joint Global Ocean Flux Study and United States GLOBal Ocean ECosystems Dynamics), to which data have been contributed from recently granted NSF OCE and OPP awards. The BCO-DMO data system can accommodate many different types of data including: in situ and experimental biological, chemical, and physical measurements; modeling results and synthesis data products. The system enables reuse of oceanographic data for new research endeavors, supports synthesis and modeling activities, provides availability of "real data" for K-12 and college level use, and provides decision-support field data for policy-relevant investigations. We will present an overview of the data management system capabilities including: map

  18. Chemical and biological stability of solvent refined coal liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, C.W.; Weimer, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    Stability studies performed on seventeen SRC samples in boiling point from ambient to 850/sup 0/F showed that the major chemical composition of the materials as monitored by high resolution gas chromatography did not change under the storage conditions of the repository, which were 4/sup 0/C, in inert containers, under a nitrogen atmosphere, in the dark. Samples were monitored after two years of storage. It was also found from microbial mutagenicity studies that after four years in the repository there was no significant change in the biological activity of any of the SRC materials. Samples stored under various parameters of air versus nitrogen atmosphere and ambient light versus darkness at room temperature and -20/sup 0/C for one year showed there was no significant differences in the chemical composition of any of the samples. There was evidence, however, that trace components such as amino-PAH degraded at room temperature, in the light, under an air atmosphere since the microbial mutagenicity of samples stored under these conditions for one year decreased significantly. Both the chemical composition and mutagenicity of FOB samples changed when stored diluted in methylene chloride, in the light, under an air atmosphere at room temperature. After one year of storage under these conditions, the microbial mutagenicity was eliminated. Storage of SRC-II FOB at increased temperatures of 60/sup 0/C and 100/sup 0/C showed significant changes in chemical composition due to volatility effects. The microbial mutagenicity of the FOB samples was completely eliminated after storage at 60/sup 0/C for 32 weeks and 100/sup 0/C for 26 weeks. It appears that the amino-PAH and phenolic materials are the most susceptible components to degradation in the complex SRC materials. 23 references, 29 figures, 50 tables.

  19. In-silico identification and characterization of organic and inorganic chemical stress responding genes in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed

    Barozai, Muhammad Younas Khan; Bashir, Farrukh; Muzaffar, Shafia; Afzal, Saba; Behlil, Farida; Khan, Muzaffar

    2014-10-15

    To study the life processes of all eukaryotes, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is a significant model organism. It is also one of the best models to study the responses of genes at transcriptional level. In a living organism, gene expression is changed by chemical stresses. The genes that give response to chemical stresses will provide good source for the strategies in engineering and formulating mechanisms which are chemical stress resistant in the eukaryotic organisms. The data available through microarray under the chemical stresses like lithium chloride, lactic acid, weak organic acids and tomatidine were studied by using computational tools. Out of 9335 yeast genes, 388 chemical stress responding genes were identified and characterized under different chemical stresses. Some of these are: Enolases 1 and 2, heat shock protein-82, Yeast Elongation Factor 3, Beta Glucanase Protein, Histone H2A1 and Histone H2A2 Proteins, Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, ras GTPase activating protein, Establishes Silent Chromatin protein, Mei5 Protein, Nondisjunction Protein and Specific Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase. Characterization of these genes was also made on the basis of their molecular functions, biological processes and cellular components.

  20. Sensitizers on inorganic carriers for decomposition of the chemical warfare agent yperite.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Bogdan; Parvulescu, Vasile I; Preda, Elena; Iepure, Gabriel; Somoghi, Vasile; Carbonell, Esther; Alvaro, Mercedes; García, Hermenegildo

    2008-07-01

    Sulfur-containing compounds, such as mercaptans, alkali sulfides, alkali sulfites, and alkali thiosulfates, are byproducts of industrial processes and pollutants of waste and natural waters. Other sulfur-containing compounds such as yperite are dangerous chemical weapons. Efficient photocatalytic decomposition of these molecules is a process that can find applications in emergency situations or for the controlled destruction of chemical warfare stockpiles. A series of heterogeneous photocatalysts consisting of a metal phthalocyanine or 2,4,6-triphenylpyrylium as photoactive components encapsulated inside the cavities of zeolite Y or the mesoporous channels of MCM-41 or supported on silica or titania-silica was tested for the photocatalytic decomposition of yperite. Two types of photoreactors, either an open reactor naturally aerated or a closed quartz tube with a constant airflow using UV or visible ambient light were used. These tests demonstrated that iron and manganese phthalocyanine and 2,4,6-triphenylpyrylium embedded in NaY or titania-silica can be suitable solid photocatalysts for the degradation of yperite using UV and visible irradiation. PMID:18678025

  1. Chemical reactivity and biological effects of superoxide radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuaqui, C. A.; Petkau, A.

    The chemical reactivity of the superoxide radical is described in terms of its dismutation to oxygen, its basicity and ability to act as a nucleophile in aprotic media, and in its capacity to mediate one electron transfer reactions and undergo conversion to other species of active oxygen. The biological role of the superoxide radical is discussed in terms of its diffusion and reactivity within membranes, its potential to inactivate enzymes and elicit DNA damage in human granulocytes activated by phorbol esters. Mechanisms for reduction of oxygen to the superoxide radical by riboflavin, nitroaromatic compounds, nitrofurazone and oxazolinone are described. Finally, inactivation of bone marrow progenitor cells by superoxide radicals generated photochemically is discussed to emphasize the sensitizing effect of the medium, the sequential toxicity of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, and the protective effects of superoxide dismutase and catalase while acting in their respective time frames.

  2. Synthetic biology to access and expand nature's chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Smanski, Michael J; Zhou, Hui; Claesen, Jan; Shen, Ben; Fischbach, Michael A; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial genomes encode the biosynthetic potential to produce hundreds of thousands of complex molecules with diverse applications, from medicine to agriculture and materials. Accessing these natural products promises to reinvigorate drug discovery pipelines and provide novel routes to synthesize complex chemicals. The pathways leading to the production of these molecules often comprise dozens of genes spanning large areas of the genome and are controlled by complex regulatory networks with some of the most interesting molecules being produced by non-model organisms. In this Review, we discuss how advances in synthetic biology--including novel DNA construction technologies, the use of genetic parts for the precise control of expression and for synthetic regulatory circuits--and multiplexed genome engineering can be used to optimize the design and synthesis of pathways that produce natural products.

  3. Oxidizer gels for detoxification of chemical and biological agents

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Dennis M.; McGuire, Raymond R.

    2002-01-01

    A gel composition containing oxidizing agents and thickening or gelling agents is used to detoxify chemical and biological agents by application directly to a contaminated area. The gelling agent is a colloidal material, such as silica, alumina, or alumino-silicate clays, which forms a viscous gel that does not flow when applied to tilted or contoured surfaces. Aqueous or organic solutions of oxidizing agents can be readily gelled with less than about 30% colloidal material. Gel preparation is simple and suitable for field implementation, as the gels can be prepared at the site of decontamination and applied quickly and uniformly over an area by a sprayer. After decontamination, the residue can be washed away or vacuumed up for disposal.

  4. Advances in the chemical analysis and biological activities of chuanxiong.

    PubMed

    Li, Weixia; Tang, Yuping; Chen, Yanyan; Duan, Jin-Ao

    2012-01-01

    Chuanxiong Rhizoma (Chuan-Xiong, CX), the dried rhizome of Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort. (Umbelliferae), is one of the most popular plant medicines in the World. Modern research indicates that organic acids, phthalides, alkaloids, polysaccharides, ceramides and cerebrosides are main components responsible for the bioactivities and properties of CX. Because of its complex constituents, multidisciplinary techniques are needed to validate the analytical methods that support CX's use worldwide. In the past two decades, rapid development of technology has advanced many aspects of CX research. The aim of this review is to illustrate the recent advances in the chemical analysis and biological activities of CX, and to highlight new applications and challenges. Emphasis is placed on recent trends and emerging techniques. PMID:22955453

  5. The hydrated electron: a seemingly familiar chemical and biological transient.

    PubMed

    Siefermann, Katrin R; Abel, Bernd

    2011-05-27

    Since the discovery of the hydrated electron in bulk water in 1962, the species has been the subject of intense research and speculation. For many decades even the basic features of the simplest of all chemical and biological transients and reactants--such as its structure, binding motifs, lifetimes, and binding energies--remained elusive. Recently, another milestone in the research of the hydrated electron was the determination of its vertical binding energy (VBE). Also a long-lived hydrated electron near the surface of liquid water has been discovered. The present Minireview discusses the implications and consequences of this and other new findings in addition to the emerging complex picture of a solvated electron in water. PMID:21574218

  6. BCTR: Biological and Chemical Technologies Research 1994 annual summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, G.

    1995-02-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1994 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). Although the OIT was reorganized in 1991 and AICD no longer exists, this document reports on efforts conducted under the former structure. The annual summary report for 1994 (ASR 94) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1994; detailed descriptions of individual projects; a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work; patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

  7. Cluster models and ab initio calculations of (19)F NMR isotropic chemical shifts for inorganic fluorides.

    PubMed

    Body, Monique; Silly, Gilles; Legein, Christophe; Buzaré, Jean-Yves

    2005-05-26

    (19)F NMR isotropic chemical shift (delta(iso)) calculations are performed in crystallized compounds using the GIAO method with the B3LYP hybrid functional at DFT level. Clusters centered on the studied fluorine atoms mimic the crystalline structures. The 6-311+G(d) basis set is chosen for the central fluorine atom, and the LanL2DZ basis set for the others. The metal atoms are described by the 3-21G(2d) basis set or, when not available, by the CRENBL basis set with the corresponding ECP, and augmented with 2d polarization functions when existing. First, for high-symmetry systems (MF, MF(2), and MF(3) compounds), a systematization of the cluster building up from coordination spheres is proposed, generalized to fluoroperovskites and fluoroaluminates KAlF(4) and RbAlF(4). When applied to rather low symmetry systems such as barium fluorometalates BaMgF(4), BaZnF(4), and Ba(2)ZnF(6), the definition of the coordination spheres is far from easy. Then, for structures built up from a MF(6) octahedron network, we may define different "starting clusters": [FM(2)F(8)] for the shared fluorine atoms, [FMF(4)] for the unshared ones, and [FBa(4)](7+) for the "free" ones. Analogous "starting clusters" are then tested on compounds from the NaF-AlF(3), BaF(2)-AlF(3), and CaF(2)-AlF(3) binary systems and for alpha-BaCaAlF(7) that are also built up from a MF(6) octahedron network. For each of these corresponding fluorine sites, delta(iso) values are calculated with the "starting clusters" and several larger clusters and compared to the experimental delta(iso) values. For the barium-containing clusters, the RMS deviation is equal to 51 ppm. It is suggested that this result may be related to the poor quality of the barium basis sets for which no polarization functions are available for the moment. In total, chemical shifts were calculated for 122 fluorine sites, in a various range of compounds. For the clusters without barium, the ab initio method leads to a RMS equal to 22 ppm, which is

  8. NSF-Sponsored Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, M. D.; Chandler, C. L.; Copley, N.; Galvarino, C.; Gegg, S. R.; Glover, D. M.; Groman, R. C.; Wiebe, P. H.; Work, T. T.; Biological; Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office

    2010-12-01

    Ocean biogeochemistry and marine ecosystem research projects are inherently interdisciplinary and benefit from improved access to well-documented data. Improved data sharing practices are important to the continued exploration of research themes that are a central focus of the ocean science community and are essential to interdisciplinary and international collaborations that address complex, global research themes. In 2006, the National Science Foundation Division of Ocean Sciences (NSF OCE) funded the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) to serve the data management requirements of scientific investigators funded by the National Science Foundation’s Biological and Chemical Oceanography Sections. BCO-DMO staff members work with investigators to manage marine biogeochemical, ecological, and oceanographic data and information developed in the course of scientific research. These valuable data sets are documented, stored, disseminated, and protected over short and intermediate time frames. One of the goals of the BCO-DMO is to facilitate regional, national, and international data and information exchange through improved data discovery, access, display, downloading, and interoperability. In May 2010, NSF released a statement to the effect that in October 2010, it is planning to require that all proposals include a data management plan in the form of a two-page supplementary document. The data management plan would be an element of the merit review process. NSF has long been committed to making data from NSF-funded research publicly available and the new policy will strengthen this commitment. BCO-DMO is poised to assist in creating the data management plans and in ultimately serving the data and information resulting from NSF OCE funded research. We will present an overview of the data management system capabilities including: geospatial and text-based data discovery and access systems; recent enhancements to data search tools; data

  9. Chemical and biological properties related to toxicity of heated fats.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J C

    1981-01-01

    Heating of fats brings about measurable changes in their chemical and physical characteristics. Heat is applied in processing for food manufacture, such as during hydrogenation of oils with a catalyst, and in frying for meal preparation. Partially hydrogenated products generally contain substantial quantities of geometric and positional isomers of the original unsaturated fatty acids. During deep-fat frying, when the fat is used repeatedly, oxidative and thermal effects result in the formation of many volatile and nonvolatile products, some of which are potentially toxic, depending on the level of intake. Because of concern about the types of changes that take place in fats during oxidative and thermal deterioration and the effects the derivatives could have on the consumer, many chemical and biological studies have been carried out. Experimental findings indicate that any potential danger to the consumer is relative to the severity of the overall treatment of the fat. In some studies we evaluated biological effects on rats of trans fatty acid in the diet and of concentrates of fatty acid derivatives produced in thermally oxidized fats. trans-Octadecenoic acid changed the concentrations of the phospholipid classes in the liver lipids, and interfered with conversion of the essential n - 6 series of fatty acids to higher members. Compared to oleic acid, elaidic acid was preferentially incorporated into the phospholipids instead of the triacylglycerols and was also concentrated in the lipoprotein fractions. Administration of non-urea-adductable concentrates from thermally oxidized fats produced cellular damage in hearts, livers, and kidneys of the animals. Since even practical processing and frying conditions can produce some nutritionally undesirable products, a concerted effort should be made to minimize substantial accumulation of these in our dietary fats.

  10. Target identification for biologically active small molecules using chemical biology approaches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heesu; Lee, Jae Wook

    2016-09-01

    The identification and validation of the targets of biologically active molecules is an important step in the field of chemical biology. While recent advances in proteomic and genomic technology have accelerated this identification process, the discovery of small molecule targets remains the most challenging step. A general method for the identification of these small molecule targets has not yet been established. To overcome the difficulty in target identification, new technology derived from the fields of genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics has been developed. To date, pull-down methods using small molecules immobilized on a solid support followed by mass spectrometry have been the most successful approach. Here, we discuss current procedures for target identification. We also review the most recent target identification approaches and present several examples that illustrate advanced target identification technology.

  11. Fully-drawn carbon-based chemical sensors on organic and inorganic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Kelvin M; Mirica, Katherine A; Walish, Joseph J; Swager, Timothy M

    2014-10-21

    Mechanical abrasion is an extremely simple, rapid, and low-cost method for deposition of carbon-based materials onto a substrate. However, the method is limited in throughput, precision, and surface compatibility for drawing conductive pathways. Selective patterning of surfaces using laser-etching can facilitate substantial improvements to address these current limitations for the abrasive deposition of carbon-based materials. This study demonstrates the successful on-demand fabrication of fully-drawn chemical sensors on a wide variety of substrates (e.g., weighing paper, polymethyl methacrylate, silicon, and adhesive tape) using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as sensing materials and graphite as electrodes. Mechanical mixing of SWCNTs with solid or liquid selectors yields sensors that can detect and discriminate parts-per-million (ppm) quantities of various nitrogen-containing vapors (pyridine, aniline, triethylamine). PMID:25170814

  12. Fully-Drawn Carbon-Based Chemical Sensors on Organic and Inorganic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Kelvin M.; Mirica, Katherine A.; Walish, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical abrasion is an extremely simple, rapid, and low cost method for deposition of carbon-based materials onto a substrate. However, the method is limited in throughput, precision, and surface compatibility for drawing conductive pathways. Selective patterning of surfaces using laser etching can facilitate substantial improvements to address these current limitations for the abrasive deposition of carbon-based materials. This study demonstrates the successful on-demand fabrication of fully-drawn chemical sensors on a wide variety of substrates (e.g., weighing paper, polymethyl methacrylate, silicon, and adhesive tape) using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as sensing materials and graphite as electrodes. Mechanical mixing of SWCNTs with solid or liquid selectors yields sensors that can detect and discriminate parts-per-million (ppm) quantities of various nitrogen-containing vapors (pyridine, aniline, triethylamine). PMID:25170814

  13. Nucleic Acid Nanostructures for Chemical and Biological Sensing.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard; Wady, Heitham; Subramanian, Hari K K

    2016-05-01

    The nanoscale features of DNA have made it a useful molecule for bottom-up construction of nanomaterials, for example, two- and three-dimensional lattices, nanomachines, and nanodevices. One of the emerging applications of such DNA-based nanostructures is in chemical and biological sensing, where they have proven to be cost-effective, sensitive and have shown promise as point-of-care diagnostic tools. DNA is an ideal molecule for sensing not only because of its specificity but also because it is robust and can function under a broad range of biologically relevant temperatures and conditions. DNA nanostructure-based sensors provide biocompatibility and highly specific detection based on the molecular recognition properties of DNA. They can be used for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphism and to sense pH both in solution and in cells. They have also been used to detect clinically relevant tumor biomarkers. In this review, recent advances in DNA-based biosensors for pH, nucleic acids, tumor biomarkers and cancer cell detection are introduced. Some challenges that lie ahead for such biosensors to effectively compete with established technologies are also discussed.

  14. Nucleic Acid Nanostructures for Chemical and Biological Sensing.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard; Wady, Heitham; Subramanian, Hari K K

    2016-05-01

    The nanoscale features of DNA have made it a useful molecule for bottom-up construction of nanomaterials, for example, two- and three-dimensional lattices, nanomachines, and nanodevices. One of the emerging applications of such DNA-based nanostructures is in chemical and biological sensing, where they have proven to be cost-effective, sensitive and have shown promise as point-of-care diagnostic tools. DNA is an ideal molecule for sensing not only because of its specificity but also because it is robust and can function under a broad range of biologically relevant temperatures and conditions. DNA nanostructure-based sensors provide biocompatibility and highly specific detection based on the molecular recognition properties of DNA. They can be used for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphism and to sense pH both in solution and in cells. They have also been used to detect clinically relevant tumor biomarkers. In this review, recent advances in DNA-based biosensors for pH, nucleic acids, tumor biomarkers and cancer cell detection are introduced. Some challenges that lie ahead for such biosensors to effectively compete with established technologies are also discussed. PMID:27040036

  15. Chemical and biological warfare: Biology, chemistry, and toxicology. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the physiological effects, physicochemical effects, and toxicology of chemical and biological warfare agents. Citations discuss toxic chemicals, chemical agent simulants, detoxification and decontamination, environmental toxicity, and land pollution. Detection techniques and warning systems are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  16. Chemical and biological warfare: Biology, chemistry, and toxicology. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the physiological effects, physicochemical effects, and toxicology of chemical and biological warfare agents. Citations discuss toxic chemicals, chemical agent simulants, detoxification and decontamination, environmental toxicity, and land pollution. Detection techniques and warning systems are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  17. Chemical and biological warfare: Biology, chemistry, and toxicology. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the physiological effects, physicochemical effects, and toxicology of chemical and biological warfare agents. Citations discuss toxic chemicals, chemical agent simulants, detoxification and decontamination, environmental toxicity, and land pollution. Detection techniques and warning systems are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  18. Chemical and biological warfare: Biology, chemistry, and toxicology. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the physiological effects, physicochemical effects, and toxicology of chemical and biological warfare agents. Citations discuss toxic chemicals, chemical agent simulants, detoxification and decontamination, environmental toxicity, and land pollution. Detection techniques and warning systems are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 229 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Biological and chemical characteristics of the coral gastric cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Higuchi, T.; Casareto, B. E.; Yoshinaga, K.; Nakano, Y.; Fujimura, H.

    2012-03-01

    All corals have a common structure: two tissue layers enclose a lumen, which forms the gastric cavity. Few studies have described the processes occurring inside the gastric cavity and its chemical and biological characteristics. Here, we show that the coral gastric cavity has distinct chemical characteristics with respect to dissolved O2, pH, alkalinity, and nutrients (vitamin B12, nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, and phosphate) and also harbors a distinct bacterial community. From these results, the gastric cavity can be described as a semi-closed sub-environment within the coral. Dissolved O2 shows very low constant concentrations in the deepest parts of the cavity, creating a compartmentalized, anoxic environment. The pH is lower in the cavity than in the surrounding water and, like alkalinity, shows day/night variations different from those of the surrounding water. Nutrient concentrations in the cavity are greater than the concentrations found in reef waters, especially for phosphate and vitamin B12. The source of these nutrients may be internal production by symbiotic bacteria and/or the remineralization of organic matter ingested or produced by the corals. The importance of the bacteria inhabiting the gastric cavity is supported by the finding of a high bacterial abundance and a specific bacterial community with affiliation to bacteria found in other corals and in the guts of other organisms. The findings presented here open a new area of research that may help us to understand the processes that maintain coral health.

  20. Self-assembly and nanofabrication approaches towards photonics and plasmonics: Part I: Directed assembly of inorganic nanostructures through chemical and biomimetic templating. Part II: Fabrication of plasmon resonant structures for surface-enhanced sensing and fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zin, Melvin T.

    Applications of inorganic nanostructures in sensing and optoelectronics are limited by the methods currently available to spatially organize them into desired configurations on solid supports. To address these challenges, a method combining "top-down" lithography and "bottom-up" self-assembly was employed to fabricate nanostructured systems using organic, inorganic and biological building blocks. Lithographic techniques, such as electron beam, colloidal and soft lithography, were used to pattern functional organic molecules and genetically engineered peptides on Au, SiO2/Si, mica and glass substrates with feature sizes ranging from sub-100nm to microscale over a large surface area (1--5 cm2). These surfaces present chemical functionalities or biomolecular recognition to direct the self-assembly of Au nanoparticles and CdSe-ZnS core-shell quantum dots into well-defined arrays in a site-specific, parallel manner. In addition to the lateral ordering imposed by these templates, placement of quantum dots on patterned Ag and Au nanostructures was controlled vertically through layer-by-layer assembly of molecular spacers. This allowed the construction of tunable arrays of quantum dots with surface-plasmon-enhanced fluorescence. In addition to the directed self-assembly of inorganic nanostructures, a novel nanofabrication technique was also developed to generate a new class of periodically arrayed plasmon resonant structures with unique topographical characteristics for ultra-sensitive surface-enhanced molecular sensing.

  1. The chemical information ontology: provenance and disambiguation for chemical data on the biological semantic web.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Janna; Chepelev, Leonid; Willighagen, Egon; Adams, Nico; Steinbeck, Christoph; Dumontier, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Cheminformatics is the application of informatics techniques to solve chemical problems in silico. There are many areas in biology where cheminformatics plays an important role in computational research, including metabolism, proteomics, and systems biology. One critical aspect in the application of cheminformatics in these fields is the accurate exchange of data, which is increasingly accomplished through the use of ontologies. Ontologies are formal representations of objects and their properties using a logic-based ontology language. Many such ontologies are currently being developed to represent objects across all the domains of science. Ontologies enable the definition, classification, and support for querying objects in a particular domain, enabling intelligent computer applications to be built which support the work of scientists both within the domain of interest and across interrelated neighbouring domains. Modern chemical research relies on computational techniques to filter and organise data to maximise research productivity. The objects which are manipulated in these algorithms and procedures, as well as the algorithms and procedures themselves, enjoy a kind of virtual life within computers. We will call these information entities. Here, we describe our work in developing an ontology of chemical information entities, with a primary focus on data-driven research and the integration of calculated properties (descriptors) of chemical entities within a semantic web context. Our ontology distinguishes algorithmic, or procedural information from declarative, or factual information, and renders of particular importance the annotation of provenance to calculated data. The Chemical Information Ontology is being developed as an open collaborative project. More details, together with a downloadable OWL file, are available at http://code.google.com/p/semanticchemistry/ (license: CC-BY-SA).

  2. Lignin valorization through integrated biological funneling and chemical catalysis.

    PubMed

    Linger, Jeffrey G; Vardon, Derek R; Guarnieri, Michael T; Karp, Eric M; Hunsinger, Glendon B; Franden, Mary Ann; Johnson, Christopher W; Chupka, Gina; Strathmann, Timothy J; Pienkos, Philip T; Beckham, Gregg T

    2014-08-19

    Lignin is an energy-dense, heterogeneous polymer comprised of phenylpropanoid monomers used by plants for structure, water transport, and defense, and it is the second most abundant biopolymer on Earth after cellulose. In production of fuels and chemicals from biomass, lignin is typically underused as a feedstock and burned for process heat because its inherent heterogeneity and recalcitrance make it difficult to selectively valorize. In nature, however, some organisms have evolved metabolic pathways that enable the utilization of lignin-derived aromatic molecules as carbon sources. Aromatic catabolism typically occurs via upper pathways that act as a "biological funnel" to convert heterogeneous substrates to central intermediates, such as protocatechuate or catechol. These intermediates undergo ring cleavage and are further converted via the β-ketoadipate pathway to central carbon metabolism. Here, we use a natural aromatic-catabolizing organism, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, to demonstrate that these aromatic metabolic pathways can be used to convert both aromatic model compounds and heterogeneous, lignin-enriched streams derived from pilot-scale biomass pretreatment into medium chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHAs). mcl-PHAs were then isolated from the cells and demonstrated to be similar in physicochemical properties to conventional carbohydrate-derived mcl-PHAs, which have applications as bioplastics. In a further demonstration of their utility, mcl-PHAs were catalytically converted to both chemical precursors and fuel-range hydrocarbons. Overall, this work demonstrates that the use of aromatic catabolic pathways enables an approach to valorize lignin by overcoming its inherent heterogeneity to produce fuels, chemicals, and materials. PMID:25092344

  3. Lignin valorization through integrated biological funneling and chemical catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Vardon, Derek R.; Guarnieri, Michael T.; Karp, Eric M.; Hunsinger, Glendon B.; Franden, Mary Ann; Johnson, Christopher W.; Chupka, Gina; Strathmann, Timothy J.; Pienkos, Philip T.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is an energy-dense, heterogeneous polymer comprised of phenylpropanoid monomers used by plants for structure, water transport, and defense, and it is the second most abundant biopolymer on Earth after cellulose. In production of fuels and chemicals from biomass, lignin is typically underused as a feedstock and burned for process heat because its inherent heterogeneity and recalcitrance make it difficult to selectively valorize. In nature, however, some organisms have evolved metabolic pathways that enable the utilization of lignin-derived aromatic molecules as carbon sources. Aromatic catabolism typically occurs via upper pathways that act as a “biological funnel” to convert heterogeneous substrates to central intermediates, such as protocatechuate or catechol. These intermediates undergo ring cleavage and are further converted via the β-ketoadipate pathway to central carbon metabolism. Here, we use a natural aromatic-catabolizing organism, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, to demonstrate that these aromatic metabolic pathways can be used to convert both aromatic model compounds and heterogeneous, lignin-enriched streams derived from pilot-scale biomass pretreatment into medium chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHAs). mcl-PHAs were then isolated from the cells and demonstrated to be similar in physicochemical properties to conventional carbohydrate-derived mcl-PHAs, which have applications as bioplastics. In a further demonstration of their utility, mcl-PHAs were catalytically converted to both chemical precursors and fuel-range hydrocarbons. Overall, this work demonstrates that the use of aromatic catabolic pathways enables an approach to valorize lignin by overcoming its inherent heterogeneity to produce fuels, chemicals, and materials. PMID:25092344

  4. Principles of Chemical Bonding and Band Gap Engineering in Hybrid Organic–Inorganic Halide Perovskites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The performance of solar cells based on hybrid halide perovskites has seen an unparalleled rate of progress, while our understanding of the underlying physical chemistry of these materials trails behind. Superficially, CH3NH3PbI3 is similar to other thin-film photovoltaic materials: a semiconductor with an optical band gap in the optimal region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Microscopically, the material is more unconventional. Progress in our understanding of the local and long-range chemical bonding of hybrid perovskites is discussed here, drawing from a series of computational studies involving electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo simulation techniques. The orientational freedom of the dipolar methylammonium ion gives rise to temperature-dependent dielectric screening and the possibility for the formation of polar (ferroelectric) domains. The ability to independently substitute on the A, B, and X lattice sites provides the means to tune the optoelectronic properties. Finally, ten critical challenges and opportunities for physical chemists are highlighted. PMID:25838846

  5. Comparative study of line roughness metrics of chemically amplified and inorganic resists for EUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallica, Roberto; Buitrago, Elizabeth; Ekinci, Yasin

    2016-03-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the roughness metrics of different resists. Dense line/space (L/S) images of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ), different chemically amplified resists (CARs), and metal oxide based resists have been patterned by extreme ultraviolet interference lithography (EUV-IL). The three line width roughness metrics: r.m.s. value σLWR, correlation length ξ and roughness exponent α, were measured by metrological analysis of top down SEM images and compared for the different resists imaged here. It was found, that all metrics are required to fully describe the roughness of each resist. Our measurements indicate that few of the state-of-the- art resists tested here can meet the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) requirements for σLWR. The correlation length ξ has been found to be considerably higher in polymer-based materials in comparison to non-polymers. The roughness exponent α, interpreted using the concept of fractal geometry, is mainly affected by acid diffusion in CARs where it produces line edges with a higher complexity than in non-CAR resists. These results indicate that different resists platforms show very different LWR resist metrics and roughness is not only manifested in the σLWR but in all parameters. Therefore, all roughness metrics should be taken into account in the performance comparison of the resist, since they can have a substantial impact on the device performance.

  6. Future of Chemical Engineering: Integrating Biology into the Undergraduate ChE Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosto, Patricia; Savelski, Mariano; Farrell, Stephanie H.; Hecht, Gregory B.

    2007-01-01

    Integrating biology in the chemical engineering curriculum seems to be the future for chemical engineering programs nation and worldwide. Rowan University's efforts to address this need include a unique chemical engineering curriculum with an intensive biology component integrated throughout from freshman to senior years. Freshman and Sophomore…

  7. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 - Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Biological Weapons No. Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to...—Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons Note: Exports and reexports of items in performance of...: (i) Equipment (for producing chemical weapon precursors and chemical warfare agents) described...

  8. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 - Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Biological Weapons No. Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to...—Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons Note: Exports and reexports of items in performance of...: (i) Equipment (for producing chemical weapon precursors and chemical warfare agents) described...

  9. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 - Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Biological Weapons No. Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to...—Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons Note: Exports and reexports of items in performance of...: (i) Equipment (for producing chemical weapon precursors and chemical warfare agents) described...

  10. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 - Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Biological Weapons No. Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to...—Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons Note: Exports and reexports of items in performance of...: (i) Equipment (for producing chemical weapon precursors and chemical warfare agents) described...

  11. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 - Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Biological Weapons No. Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to...—Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons Note: Exports and reexports of items in performance of...: (i) Equipment (for producing chemical weapon precursors and chemical warfare agents) described...

  12. Influence of extreme pollution on the inorganic chemical composition of some plants.

    PubMed

    Reimann, C; Koller, F; Kashulina, G; Niskavaara, H; Englmaier, P

    2001-01-01

    Leaves of nine different plant species (terrestrial moss: Hylocomium splendens and Pleurozium schreberi, blueberry: Vaccinium myrtillus, cowberry: Vaccinium vitis-idaea, crowberry: Empetrum nigrum, birch: Betula pubescens, willow: Salix spp., pine: Pinus sylvestris, and spruce: Picea abies) have been collected from up to nine catchments (size 14-50 km2) spread over a 1,500,000 km2 area in northern Europe. Additional soil samples were taken from the O-horizon and the C-horizon at each plant sample site. All samples were analysed for 38 elements (Ag, Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Si, Sn, Sr, Th, Tl, U, V, Y, Zn, and Zr) by ICP-MS, ICP-AES or CV-AAS (Hg) techniques. One of the 9 catchments was located directly adjacent (5-10 km S) to the nickel smelter and refinery at Monchegorsk, Kola Peninsula, Russia. The high levels of pollution at this site are reflected in the chemical composition of all plant leaves. However, it appears that each plant enriches (or excludes) different elements. Elements emitted at trace levels, such as Ag, As and Bi, are relatively much more enriched in most plants than the major pollutants Ni, Cu and Co. The very high levels of SO2 emissions are generally not reflected by increases in plant total S-content. Several important macro-(P) and micro-nutrients (Mn, Mg, and Zn) are depleted in most plant leaves collected near Monchegorsk. PMID:11706797

  13. Tribbles pseudokinases: novel targets for chemical biology and drug discovery?

    PubMed

    Foulkes, Daniel M; Byrne, Dominic P; Bailey, Fiona P; Eyers, Patrick A

    2015-10-01

    Tribbles (TRIB) proteins are pseudokinase mediators of eukaryotic signalling that have evolved important roles in lipoprotein metabolism, immune function and cellular differentiation and proliferation. In addition, an evolutionary-conserved modulation of PI3K/AKT signalling pathways highlights them as novel and rather unusual pharmaceutical targets. The three human TRIB family members are uniquely defined by an acidic pseudokinase domain containing a 'broken' α C-helix and a MEK (MAPK/ERK)-binding site at the end of the putative C-lobe and a distinct C-terminal peptide motif that interacts directly with a small subset of cellular E3 ubiquitin ligases. This latter interaction drives proteasomal-dependent degradation of networks of transcription factors, whose rate of turnover determines the biological attributes of individual TRIB family members. Defining the function of individual Tribs has been made possible through evaluation of individual TRIB knockout mice, siRNA/overexpression approaches and genetic screening in flies, where the single TRIB gene was originally described 15 years ago. The rapidly maturing TRIB field is primed to exploit chemical biology approaches to evaluate endogenous TRIB signalling events in intact cells. This will help define how TRIB-driven protein-protein interactions and the atypical TRIB ATP-binding site, fit into cellular signalling modules in experimental scenarios where TRIB-signalling complexes remain unperturbed. In this mini-review, we discuss how small molecules can reveal rate-limiting signalling outputs and functions of Tribs in cells and intact organisms, perhaps serving as guides for the development of new drugs. We predict that appropriate small molecule TRIB ligands will further accelerate the transition of TRIB pseudokinase analysis into the mainstream of cell signalling. PMID:26517930

  14. MECs: "Building Blocks" for Creating Biological and Chemical Instruments.

    PubMed

    Hill, Douglas A; Anderson, Lindsey E; Hill, Casey J; Mostaghim, Afshin; Rodgers, Victor G J; Grover, William H

    2016-01-01

    The development of new biological and chemical instruments for research and diagnostic applications is often slowed by the cost, specialization, and custom nature of these instruments. New instruments are built from components that are drawn from a host of different disciplines and not designed to integrate together, and once built, an instrument typically performs a limited number of tasks and cannot be easily adapted for new applications. Consequently, the process of inventing new instruments is very inefficient, especially for researchers or clinicians in resource-limited settings. To improve this situation, we propose that a family of standardized multidisciplinary components is needed, a set of "building blocks" that perform a wide array of different tasks and are designed to integrate together. Using these components, scientists, engineers, and clinicians would be able to build custom instruments for their own unique needs quickly and easily. In this work we present the foundation of this set of components, a system we call Multifluidic Evolutionary Components (MECs). "Multifluidic" conveys the wide range of fluid volumes MECs operate upon (from nanoliters to milliliters and beyond); "multi" also reflects the multiple disciplines supported by the system (not only fluidics but also electronics, optics, and mechanics). "Evolutionary" refers to the design principles that enable the library of MEC parts to easily grow and adapt to new applications. Each MEC "building block" performs a fundamental function that is commonly found in biological or chemical instruments, functions like valving, pumping, mixing, controlling, and sensing. Each MEC also has a unique symbol linked to a physical definition, which enables instruments to be designed rapidly and efficiently using schematics. As a proof-of-concept, we use MECs to build a variety of instruments, including a fluidic routing and mixing system capable of manipulating fluid volumes over five orders of magnitude, an

  15. MECs: "Building Blocks" for Creating Biological and Chemical Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Douglas A.; Anderson, Lindsey E.; Hill, Casey J.; Mostaghim, Afshin; Rodgers, Victor G. J.

    2016-01-01

    The development of new biological and chemical instruments for research and diagnostic applications is often slowed by the cost, specialization, and custom nature of these instruments. New instruments are built from components that are drawn from a host of different disciplines and not designed to integrate together, and once built, an instrument typically performs a limited number of tasks and cannot be easily adapted for new applications. Consequently, the process of inventing new instruments is very inefficient, especially for researchers or clinicians in resource-limited settings. To improve this situation, we propose that a family of standardized multidisciplinary components is needed, a set of “building blocks” that perform a wide array of different tasks and are designed to integrate together. Using these components, scientists, engineers, and clinicians would be able to build custom instruments for their own unique needs quickly and easily. In this work we present the foundation of this set of components, a system we call Multifluidic Evolutionary Components (MECs). “Multifluidic” conveys the wide range of fluid volumes MECs operate upon (from nanoliters to milliliters and beyond); “multi” also reflects the multiple disciplines supported by the system (not only fluidics but also electronics, optics, and mechanics). “Evolutionary” refers to the design principles that enable the library of MEC parts to easily grow and adapt to new applications. Each MEC “building block” performs a fundamental function that is commonly found in biological or chemical instruments, functions like valving, pumping, mixing, controlling, and sensing. Each MEC also has a unique symbol linked to a physical definition, which enables instruments to be designed rapidly and efficiently using schematics. As a proof-of-concept, we use MECs to build a variety of instruments, including a fluidic routing and mixing system capable of manipulating fluid volumes over five

  16. Biological and chemical monitoring of some major Calabrian (Italy) Rivers.

    PubMed

    Lucadamo, L; De Filippis, A; Mezzotero, A; Vizza, S; Gallo, L

    2008-11-01

    To address the problem of whether hydrographic basins of southern Italian regions such as Calabria are exposed to "ecological stability pressures," we here provide the first results of four chemical and biological (macroinvertebrates) monitoring activities. The data accumulated within four hydrographic basins between May and November of 2002, November of 2005 and May of 2006 showed that about 1/3 of the macrobenthos sampled among a total of 14 rivers in the northern-central part of Calabria region provided optimal environmental quality values of Extended Biotic Index (E.B.I.), 1/3 denoted a slight impairment and the remaining samples exhibited very strong environmental alterations. It is interesting to note that E.B.I. is directly correlated with the taxonomic richness plus abundance, and inversely with the dominating taxon. This suggests that high environmental quality values are rather positively correlated with spatial heterogeneity and taxa eveness. In addition, the more compromised stations were located on plain segments where anthropization is reported to be at its highest level and there the macrobenthic communities seem to be made up of mostly potamon type of taxa with a high abundance of collector euriecious organisms while better quality stations, mostly located at high altitude, are characterized by a considerable presence of E.P.T. taxa. Chemical parameters did not result to be substantially altered underling that the hydrologic and geomorphological alterations may play a primary role in the control of macrobenthic communities and environmental quality. Overall the above results suggest that E.B.I. variations seem to be highly coherent with changes of main biodiversity parameters and their joined application is an efficient tool for detecting ecological state alterations of lotic environments. PMID:18161027

  17. A New Data Management System for Biological and Chemical Oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groman, R. C.; Chandler, C.; Allison, D.; Glover, D. M.; Wiebe, P. H.

    2007-12-01

    The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) was created to serve PIs principally funded by NSF to conduct marine chemical and ecological research. The new office is dedicated to providing open access to data and information developed in the course of scientific research on short and intermediate time-frames. The data management system developed in support of U.S. JGOFS and U.S. GLOBEC programs is being modified to support the larger scope of the BCO-DMO effort, which includes ultimately providing a way to exchange data with other data systems. The open access system is based on a philosophy of data stewardship, support for existing and evolving data standards, and use of public domain software. The DMO staff work closely with originating PIs to manage data gathered as part of their individual programs. In the new BCO-DMO data system, project and data set metadata records designed to support re-use of the data are stored in a relational database (MySQL) and the data are stored in or made accessible by the JGOFS/GLOBEC object- oriented, relational, data management system. Data access will be provided via any standard Web browser client user interface through a GIS application (Open Source, OGC-compliant MapServer), a directory listing from the data holdings catalog, or a custom search engine that facilitates data discovery. In an effort to maximize data system interoperability, data will also be available via Web Services; and data set descriptions will be generated to comply with a variety of metadata content standards. The office is located at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and web access is via http://www.bco-dmo.org.

  18. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) and inorganic ions in a central Himalayan glacier— Insights into chemical composition and atmospheric sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Zhang, Q.; Li, X.; Xiao, C.; Ren, J.; Qin, D.

    2012-12-01

    Glaciers in the Himalayas are important water resource for many prominent Asian rivers. Recent years, these glaciers have being experiencing serious shrinkage and arousing widely concern. It has been proved that the impurities in the glacier from atmospheric sources, such as black carbon (BC) and dust, have made a significant contribution to decrease the albedo of glacier surface and accelerating the snow/glacier melting. Researches have also shown that aerosol from south Asia is an important contribution to this impurity in the Himalayan glaciers but the sources are poorly identified. By examining chemical composition in snow samples of Himalayan glacier, it is possible to determine the chemical characteristics and aerosol sources. During spring 2010, a 1-meter snow pit samples were collected from Jiemayangzong glacier in central Himalayas. Dissolved materials are analyzed using an ion chromatograph (IC), a total organic carbon (TOC) analyzer and a high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS). The inorganic ions varied seasonally, dated from spring 2009 to spring 2010 based on the oxygen isotope. The concentrations of dissolved materials are high during winter-spring and low during summer monsoon period with average chemical composition dominated by organics (54.6%), NO3- (13.7%), SO42- (8.4%), NH4+ (9.5%) and Ca2+ (8.9%). The HR-AMS measurements allow for a direct analysis on DOM. The results show that DOM is composed mainly of oxygenated species with average oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratio of 0.69 (± 0.11) during winter-spring periods. DOM is less oxygenated species with O/C ratio of 0.31 (± 0.11) during summer monsoon period. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the high resolution mass spectra of DOM identifies a hydrocarbon-like component (denoted as HOA) and two oxygenated components (denoted as OOA and BBOA, respectively). The HOA component mainly corresponds to primary organic matter deposited during summer period accounting for 10

  19. Plant polyphenols: chemical properties, biological activities, and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Quideau, Stéphane; Deffieux, Denis; Douat-Casassus, Céline; Pouységu, Laurent

    2011-01-17

    Eating five servings of fruits and vegetables per day! This is what is highly recommended and heavily advertised nowadays to the general public to stay fit and healthy! Drinking green tea on a regular basis, eating chocolate from time to time, as well as savoring a couple of glasses of red wine per day have been claimed to increase life expectancy even further! Why? The answer is in fact still under scientific scrutiny, but a particular class of compounds naturally occurring in fruits and vegetables is considered to be crucial for the expression of such human health benefits: the polyphenols! What are these plant products really? What are their physicochemical properties? How do they express their biological activity? Are they really valuable for disease prevention? Can they be used to develop new pharmaceutical drugs? What recent progress has been made toward their preparation by organic synthesis? This Review gives answers from a chemical perspective, summarizes the state of the art, and highlights the most significant advances in the field of polyphenol research.

  20. Stability and its manifestation in the chemical and biological worlds.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Robert; Pross, Addy

    2015-11-21

    Bridging between the phenomenologically distinct biological and physical worlds has been a major scientific challenge since Boltzmann's probabilistic formulation of the second law of thermodynamics. In this review we summarize our recent theoretical attempts to bridge that divide through analysis of the thermodynamic-kinetic interplay in chemical processes and the manner in which that interplay impacts on material stability. Key findings are that the term 'stability' manifests two facets - time and energy - and that stability's time facet, expressed as persistence, is more general than its energy facet. That idea, together with the proposed existence of a logical law of nature, the persistence principle, leads to the mathematically-based insight that stability can come about through either Boltzmann's probabilistic considerations or Malthusian kinetics. Two mathematically-based forms of material persistence then lead directly to the physical likelihood of two material forms, animate and inanimate. Significantly, the incorporation of kinetic considerations into the stability concept appears to bring us closer to enabling two of the central theories in science - the second law of thermodynamics and Darwin's theory of evolution - to be reconciled within a single conceptual framework.

  1. Pereskia aculeata Muller (Cactaceae) Leaves: Chemical Composition and Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Lucèia Fàtima; Caputo, Lucia; Inchausti De Barros, Ingrid Bergman; Fratianni, Florinda; Nazzaro, Filomena; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this work were to study the chemical composition of the essential oil from the leaves of Pereskia aculeata and to evaluate some biological activities of three leaf extracts. The phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and in vitro antimicrobial and antifungal activities were determined. The methanol extract showed antioxidant activity (EC50 7.09 mg/mL) and high polyphenols content (15.04 ± 0.31 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g). The petroleum ether extract exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, whereas the chloroform extract showed inhibitory activity against Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. The petroleum ether and methanol extracts were more effective in inhibiting the growth of Aspergillus versicolor. The possible cytotoxicity of extracts on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cancer cell line and the influence on adenylate cyclase (ADCY) expression was also studied. P. aculeata chloroform extract showed antiproliferative activity with an IC50 value of 262.83 µg/mL. Treatments of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with 100 µg/mL of methanol extract significantly reduced ADCY1 expression. PMID:27598154

  2. Stability and its manifestation in the chemical and biological worlds.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Robert; Pross, Addy

    2015-11-21

    Bridging between the phenomenologically distinct biological and physical worlds has been a major scientific challenge since Boltzmann's probabilistic formulation of the second law of thermodynamics. In this review we summarize our recent theoretical attempts to bridge that divide through analysis of the thermodynamic-kinetic interplay in chemical processes and the manner in which that interplay impacts on material stability. Key findings are that the term 'stability' manifests two facets - time and energy - and that stability's time facet, expressed as persistence, is more general than its energy facet. That idea, together with the proposed existence of a logical law of nature, the persistence principle, leads to the mathematically-based insight that stability can come about through either Boltzmann's probabilistic considerations or Malthusian kinetics. Two mathematically-based forms of material persistence then lead directly to the physical likelihood of two material forms, animate and inanimate. Significantly, the incorporation of kinetic considerations into the stability concept appears to bring us closer to enabling two of the central theories in science - the second law of thermodynamics and Darwin's theory of evolution - to be reconciled within a single conceptual framework. PMID:26465292

  3. Chemical and biological sensing needs for health effects studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breysse, Patrick N.

    2012-06-01

    Exposure assessment is an integral component of occupational and environmental epidemiology, risk assessment and management, as well as regulatory compliance. For the most part, air sampling and analysis tools used in occupational and environmental exposure assessments are based on technologies that have changed little since the 1970s. In many cases the lack of simple, inexpensive, exposure assessment technologies has limited epidemiologists' and risk assessors' ability to evaluate the environmental and occupational causes of disease. While there have been tremendous investments and advances in medical diagnostic and biomonitoring technologies (e.g., glucose testing, human genetics), there has been less effort invested in advancing the science of exposure assessment. Recent developments in sensor technology have focused on medical and homeland security applications. Developing and applying new sensors to health effects studies can revolutionize the way epidemiologic studies are conducted. Time-series studies that investigate short-term (hours to days) changes in exposure that are linked to changes in health care encounters, symptoms, and biological markers of preclinical disease and/or susceptibility are needed to more fully evaluate the impact of chemicals and other agents on health. Current sampling technology limits our ability to assess time-varying concentrations. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the current state of air sampling and health assessment and the potential application of novel sensor technology for use in health effects studies.

  4. Plant polyphenols: chemical properties, biological activities, and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Quideau, Stéphane; Deffieux, Denis; Douat-Casassus, Céline; Pouységu, Laurent

    2011-01-17

    Eating five servings of fruits and vegetables per day! This is what is highly recommended and heavily advertised nowadays to the general public to stay fit and healthy! Drinking green tea on a regular basis, eating chocolate from time to time, as well as savoring a couple of glasses of red wine per day have been claimed to increase life expectancy even further! Why? The answer is in fact still under scientific scrutiny, but a particular class of compounds naturally occurring in fruits and vegetables is considered to be crucial for the expression of such human health benefits: the polyphenols! What are these plant products really? What are their physicochemical properties? How do they express their biological activity? Are they really valuable for disease prevention? Can they be used to develop new pharmaceutical drugs? What recent progress has been made toward their preparation by organic synthesis? This Review gives answers from a chemical perspective, summarizes the state of the art, and highlights the most significant advances in the field of polyphenol research. PMID:21226137

  5. Pereskia aculeata Muller (Cactaceae) Leaves: Chemical Composition and Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Souza, Lucèia Fàtima; Caputo, Lucia; Inchausti De Barros, Ingrid Bergman; Fratianni, Florinda; Nazzaro, Filomena; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this work were to study the chemical composition of the essential oil from the leaves of Pereskia aculeata and to evaluate some biological activities of three leaf extracts. The phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and in vitro antimicrobial and antifungal activities were determined. The methanol extract showed antioxidant activity (EC50 7.09 mg/mL) and high polyphenols content (15.04 ± 0.31 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g). The petroleum ether extract exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, whereas the chloroform extract showed inhibitory activity against Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. The petroleum ether and methanol extracts were more effective in inhibiting the growth of Aspergillus versicolor. The possible cytotoxicity of extracts on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cancer cell line and the influence on adenylate cyclase (ADCY) expression was also studied. P. aculeata chloroform extract showed antiproliferative activity with an IC50 value of 262.83 µg/mL. Treatments of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with 100 µg/mL of methanol extract significantly reduced ADCY1 expression. PMID:27598154

  6. Very Large Chemical Sensor Array for Mimicking Biological Olfaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccherelli, R.; Zampetti, E.; Pantalei, S.; Bernabei, M.; Persaud, K. C.

    2009-05-01

    Olfactory receptor neurons (ORN) in the mammalian olfactory system, transduce molecular properties of the odorants into electrical signals and project these into the olfactory bulb (OB). In the biological system several millions of receptor neurons of a few hundred types create redundancy and the massive convergence of the ORNs to the OB, is thought to enhance the sensitivity and selectivity of the system. To explore this concept, the NEUROCHEM project will build a polymeric chemical sensor array consisting of 216 (65536) sensors with tens of different types. To interface such a large sensor array, a topological array configuration with n rows and m columns, has been adopted, to reduce the total wiring connections to n+m. A method of addressing a single element in the array in isolation of the rest of the network has been developed. Over the array ten different conductive polymers with different sensing characteristics will be deposited by means of electrodeposition and inkjet printing. A smaller prototype of 64 elements has been investigated and the results are here reported and discussed.

  7. Microbiological, biological, and chemical weapons of warfare and terrorism.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Ronald A; Brown, Brent R; Hutchins, James B; Iandolo, John J; Jackson, Rhett; Slater, Leonard N; Bronze, Michael S

    2002-06-01

    Microbiological, biological, and chemical toxins have been employed in warfare and in terrorist attacks. In this era, it is imperative that health care providers are familiar with illnesses caused by these agents. Botulinum toxin produces a descending flaccid paralysis. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B produces a syndrome of fever, nausea, and diarrhea and may produce a pulmonary syndrome if aerosolized. Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin could possibly be aerosolized to produce acute pulmonary edema. Ricin intoxication can manifest as gastrointestinal hemorrhage after ingestion, severe muscle necrosis after intramuscular injection, and acute pulmonary disease after inhalation. Nerve agents inhibit acetylcholinesterase and thus produce symptoms of increased cholinergic activity. Ammonia, chlorine, vinyl chloride, phosgene, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen dioxide, tear gas, and zinc chloride primarily injure the upper respiratory tract and the lungs. Sulfur mustard (and nitrogen mustard) are vesicant and alkylating agents. Cyanide poisoning ranges from sudden-onset headache and drowsiness to severe hypoxemia, cardiovascular collapse, and death. Health care providers should be familiar with the medical consequences of toxin exposure, and understand the pathophysiology and management of resulting illness.

  8. Chemical-biological terrorism and its impact on children.

    PubMed

    Michael W, Shannon; Julia A, McMillan

    2006-09-01

    Children remain potential victims of chemical or biological terrorism. In recent years, children have even been specific targets of terrorist acts. Consequently, it is necessary to address the needs that children would face after a terrorist incident. A broad range of public health initiatives have occurred since September 11, 2001. Although the needs of children have been addressed in many of them, in many cases, these initiatives have been inadequate in ensuring the protection of children. In addition, public health and health care system preparedness for terrorism has been broadened to the so-called all-hazards approach, in which response plans for terrorism are blended with plans for a public health or health care system response to unintentional disasters (eg, natural events such as earthquakes or pandemic flu or manmade catastrophes such as a hazardous-materials spill). In response to new principles and programs that have appeared over the last 5 years, this policy statement provides an update of the 2000 policy statement. The roles of both the pediatrician and public health agencies continue to be emphasized; only a coordinated effort by pediatricians and public health can ensure that the needs of children, including emergency protocols in schools or child care centers, decontamination protocols, and mental health interventions, will be successful. PMID:16951026

  9. Chemical synthesis and biological evaluation of gallidermin-siderophore conjugates.

    PubMed

    Yoganathan, Sabesan; Sit, Clarissa S; Vederas, John C

    2011-04-01

    The lantibiotic gallidermin was modified at lysine residues by regioselective attachment of derivatives of pyochelin, agrobactin and desferrioxamine B with the objective of having siderophore receptors of Gram-negative bacteria transport the antibiotic-iron chelator conjugate through the outer membrane. All of the conjugates retained activity against the Gram-positive indicator strain, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris HP. However, testing of the conjugates against several Gram-negative strains yielded unexpected results. Bacteria treated with 100 μM of the conjugates complexed with Fe(3+) grew better than bacteria grown in iron-free media but worse than bacteria grown in the same media supplemented with 10 μM FeCl(3). Although these findings indicate that the conjugates are unable to inhibit the growth of Gram-negative bacteria, they indicate penetration of the outer membrane and provide structure-activity information for design of other lantibiotic conjugates. The synthetic strategy is applicable for linking biomarkers or fluorescence probes to gallidermin for studies on its localization and mode of action. As there are many lantibiotics that operate with unknown mechanisms of action, this chemical approach provides a means to modify such peptides with biomarkers for biological investigations. PMID:21290068

  10. Structure and reaction studies of biological organic and inorganic composite materials: Abalone shells, diatoms, and a unique birch bark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaremba, Charlotte Marie

    Biopolymer/calcium carbonate composites grown on inorganic abiotic substrates implanted between the shell and the shell-secreting epithelium of live red abalones (Haliotis rufescens) results in an unusual highly (104)-oriented aggregate of microcrystalline calcite that precedes nacre deposition. Calcite of this orientation has never before been observed in nature. Also with this method, nacre deposition is found to correct for calcite surface roughness and chemically anomalous surfaces. Pole figure X-ray diffraction studies of these "flat pearls" provide comparisons of preferred orientation of the various mineral components of the abalone shell. Complete conversion of the aragonite in abalone nacre to hydroxyapatite in hydrothermal phosphate solution results in an oriented polycrystalline aggregate with ultrastructure preservation and an unexpected preferred orientation different from that of other biominerals and abiogenic CaCO3 samples subjected to this reaction. The new orientation, which increases with reaction time, may result from the organization of the organic matrix in the nacre, which directs the hydrothermal solution through the material. This orientation suggests strongly that the conversion proceeds via a dissolution-recrystallization mechanism, rather than by topotaxy, which was previously proposed. In addition to cellulose I, a highly oriented cellulose-II-like polymer was found in the bark of Prunus serrula, an exceptionally strong, tough, and extensible composite film. The cellulose II polymorph, which has not previously been found in nature, may be accordion-folded in the plane of the bark thickness and contribute to the strength and unusual behavior with plasticization of this natural film. The silica frustule of the diatom Skeletonema costatum has a surface area of 135 mm2/g and contains 1.5--2 wt % occluded organic. This organic includes a water-insoluble scaffolding. When treated with organic oxidizers, the chitin secreted by the diatom

  11. Formation of "Chemically Pure" Magnetite from Mg-Fe-Carbonates Implications for the Exclusively Inorganic Origin of Magnetite and Sulfides in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Morris, R. V.; Trieman, A. H.; McKay, G. A.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetite and sulfides in the black rims of carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been studied extensively because of the claim by McKay et al. that they are biogenic in origin. However, exclusively inorganic (abiotic) processes are able to account for the occurrence of carbonate-sulfide-magnetite assemblages in the meteorite. We have previously precipitated chemically zoned and sulfide-bearing carbonate globules analogous to those in ALH84001 (at less than or equal to 150 C) from multiple fluxes of variable-composition Ca-Mg-Fe-CO2-S-H2O solutions. Brief heating of precipitated globules to approx. 470 C produced magnetite and pyrrhotite within the globules by thermal decomposition of siderite and pyrite, respectively. We have also shown that morphology of magnetite formed by inorganic thermal decomposition of Fe-rich carbonate is similar to the morphology of so-called biogenic magnetite in the carbonate globules of ALH84001. Magnetite crystals in the rims of carbonate globules in ALH84001 are chemically pure [Note: "Chemically pure" is defined here as magnetite with Mg at levels comparable or lower than Mg detected by [8] in ALH84001 magnetite]. A debate continues on whether or not chemically pure magnetite can form by the thermal decomposition of mixed Mg-Fe-carbonates that have formed under abiotic conditions. Thomas-Keprta et al. argue that it is not possible to form Mg-free magnetite from Mg-Fe-carbonate based on thermodynamic data. We previously suggested that chemically pure magnetite could form by the thermal decomposition of relatively pure siderite in the outer rims of the globules. Mg-Fe-carbonates may also thermally decompose under conditions conducive for formation of chemically pure magnetite. In this paper we show through laboratory experiments that chemically pure magnetite can form by an inorganic process from mixed Mg-Fe-carbonates.

  12. Experimental and human studies on antimony metabolism: their relevance for the biological monitoring of workers exposed to inorganic antimony.

    PubMed

    Bailly, R; Lauwerys, R; Buchet, J P; Mahieu, P; Konings, J

    1991-02-01

    Unlike inorganic arsenic, inorganic trivalent antimony (Sb) is not methylated in vivo. It is excreted in the bile after conjugation with glutathione and also in urine. A significant proportion of that excreted in bile undergoes an enterohepatic circulation. In workers exposed to pentavalent Sb, the urinary Sb excretion is related to the intensity of exposure. It has been estimated that after eight hours exposure to 500 micrograms Sb/m3, the increase of urinary Sb concentration at the end of the shift amounts on average to 35 micrograms/g creatinine.

  13. Organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish by chemical vapor generation with collection on a gold gauze and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Fábio Andrei; Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Antes, Fabiane Goldschmidt; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Flores, Érico Marlon de Moraes

    2009-06-01

    A method for organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish tissue has been developed using chemical vapor generation and collection of mercury vapor on a gold gauze inside a graphite tube and further atomization by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. After drying and cryogenic grinding, potassium bromide and hydrochloric acid solution (1 mol L - 1 KBr in 6 mol L - 1 HCl) was added to the samples. After centrifugation, total mercury was determined in the supernatant. Organomercury compounds were selectively extracted from KBr solution using chloroform and the resultant solution was back extracted with 1% m/v L-cysteine. This solution was used for organic Hg determination. Inorganic Hg remaining in KBr solution was directly determined by chemical vapor generation electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Mercury vapor generation from extracts was performed using 1 mol L - 1 HCl and 2.5% m/v NaBH 4 solutions and a batch chemical vapor generation system. Mercury vapor was collected on the gold gauze heated resistively at 80 °C and the atomization temperature was set at 650 °C. The selectivity of extraction was evaluated using liquid chromatography coupled to chemical vapor generation and determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The proposed method was applied for mercury analysis in shark, croaker and tuna fish tissues. Certified reference materials were used to check accuracy and the agreement was better than 95%. The characteristic mass was 60 pg and method limits of detection were 5, 1 and 1 ng g - 1 for organic, inorganic and total mercury, respectively. With the proposed method it was possible to analyze up to 2, 2 and 6 samples per hour for organic, inorganic and total Hg determination, respectively.

  14. Exploration of the central dogma at the interface of chemistry and biology: 2010 Yale Chemical Biology Symposium.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Alice Qinhua

    2010-09-01

    Ever since the term "central dogma" was coined in 1958, researchers have sought to control information flow from nucleic acids to proteins. Talks delivered by Drs. Anna Pyle and Hiroaki Suga at this year's Chemical Biology Symposium at Yale in May 2010 applauded recent advances in this area, at the interface between chemistry and biology.

  15. RESEARCH TOWARD THE DEVELOPMENT OF A BIOLOGICALLY BASED DOSE RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR INORGANIC ARSENIC CARCINOGENICITY: A PROGRESS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer risk assessments for inorganic arsenic have been based on human epidemiological data, assuming a linear dose-response below the range of observation of tumors. Part of the reason for the continued use of the linear approach in arsenic risk assessments is the lack of an ad...

  16. Detection and treatment of chemical weapons and/or biological pathogens

    DOEpatents

    Mariella Jr., Raymond P.

    2004-09-07

    A system for detection and treatment of chemical weapons and/or biological pathogens uses a detector system, an electrostatic precipitator or scrubber, a circulation system, and a control. The precipitator or scrubber is activated in response to a signal from the detector upon the detection of chemical weapons and/or biological pathogens.

  17. 76 FR 68809 - Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation; Termination of Chemical and Biological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... Control Act and Section 11C(a) and (c) of the Export Administration Act. (Volume 59 FR Public Notice 2143... of International Security and Nonproliferation; Termination of Chemical and Biological Weapons (CBW... chemical or biological weapons capability: Gerhard Merz This determination and certification terminates...

  18. PERMANENCE OF BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS IN MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILL LEACHATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this work is to permit EPA/ORD's National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC) and Edgewood Chemical Biological Center to collaborate together to test the permanence of biological and chemical warfare agents in municipal solid waste landfills. Research into ...

  19. Technological advancements for the detection of and protection against biological and chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Lisa M; Dickerson, Tobin J; Janda, Kim D

    2007-03-01

    There is a growing need for technological advancements to combat agents of chemical and biological warfare, particularly in the context of the deliberate use of a chemical and/or biological warfare agent by a terrorist organization. In this tutorial review, we describe methods that have been developed both for the specific detection of biological and chemical warfare agents in a field setting, as well as potential therapeutic approaches for treating exposure to these toxic species. In particular, nerve agents are described as a typical chemical warfare agent, and the two potent biothreat agents, anthrax and botulinum neurotoxin, are used as illustrative examples of potent weapons for which countermeasures are urgently needed.

  20. Considerations of the chemical biology of microbial natural products provide an effective drug discovery strategy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyukjae; Oh, Dong-Chan

    2015-09-01

    Conventional approaches to natural product drug discovery rely mainly on random searches for bioactive compounds using bioassays. These traditional approaches do not incorporate a chemical biology perspective. Searching for bioactive molecules using a chemical and biological rationale constitutes a powerful search paradigm. Here, the authors review recent examples of the discovery of bioactive natural products based on chemical and biological interactions between hosts and symbionts, and propose this method provides a more effective means of exploring natural chemical diversity and eventually of discovering new drugs.

  1. Carbon Nanostructure-Based Field-Effect Transistors for Label-Free Chemical/Biological Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, PingAn; Zhang, Jia; Li, Le; Wang, Zhenlong; O’Neill, William; Estrela, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, electrical detection of chemical and biological species using novel nanostructure-based devices has attracted significant attention for chemical, genomics, biomedical diagnostics, and drug discovery applications. The use of nanostructured devices in chemical/biological sensors in place of conventional sensing technologies has advantages of high sensitivity, low decreased energy consumption and potentially highly miniaturized integration. Owing to their particular structure, excellent electrical properties and high chemical stability, carbon nanotube and graphene based electrical devices have been widely developed for high performance label-free chemical/biological sensors. Here, we review the latest developments of carbon nanostructure-based transistor sensors in ultrasensitive detection of chemical/biological entities, such as poisonous gases, nucleic acids, proteins and cells. PMID:22399927

  2. In situ measurement of the infrared absorption and extinction of chemical and biologically derived aerosols using flow-through photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Gurton, Kristan P; Dahmani, Rachid; Ligon, David; Bronk, Burt V

    2005-07-01

    In an effort to establish a more reliable set of optical cross sections for a variety of chemical and biological aerosol simulants, we have developed a flow-through photoacoustic system that is capable of measuring absolute, mass-normalized extinction and absorption cross sections. By employing a flow-through design we avoid issues associated with closed aerosol photoacoustic systems and improve sensitivity. Although the results shown here were obtained for the tunable CO2 laser waveband region, i.e., 9.20-10.80 microm, application to other wavelengths is easily achievable. The aerosols considered are categorized as biological, chemical, and inorganic in origin, i.e., Bacillus atrophaeus endospores, dimethicone silicone oil (SF-96 grade 50), and kaolin clay powder (alumina and silicate), respectively. Results compare well with spectral extinction measured previously by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Comparisons with Mie theory calculations based on previously published complex indices of refraction and measured size distributions are also presented. PMID:16004057

  3. Biological and geochemical controls on diel dissolved inorganic carbon cycling in a low-order agricultural stream: implications for reach scales and beyond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Tobias, Craig

    2011-01-01

    Movement of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) through the hydrologic cycle is an important component of global carbon budgets, but there is considerable uncertainty about the controls of DIC transmission from landscapes to streams, and through river networks to the oceans. In this study, diel measurements of DIC, d13C-DIC, dissolved oxygen (O2), d18O-O2, alkalinity, pH, and other parameters were used to assess the relative magnitudes of biological and geochemical controls on DIC cycling and flux in a nutrient-rich, net autotrophic stream. Rates of photosynthesis (P), respiration (R), groundwater discharge, air–water exchange of CO2, and carbonate precipitation/dissolution were quantified through a time-stepping chemical/isotope (12C and 13C, 16O and 18O) mass balance model. Groundwater was the major source of DIC to the stream. Primary production and carbonate precipitation were equally important sinks for DIC removed from the water column. The stream was always super-saturated with respect to carbonate minerals, but carbonate precipitation occurred mainly during the day when P increased pH. We estimated more than half (possibly 90%) of the carbonate precipitated during the day was retained in the reach under steady baseflow conditions. The amount of DIC removed from the overlying water through carbonate precipitation was similar to the amount of DIC generated from R. Air–water exchange of CO2 was always from the stream to the atmosphere, but was the smallest component of the DIC budget. Overall, the in-stream DIC reactions reduced the amount of CO2 evasion and the downstream flux of groundwater-derived DIC by about half relative to a hypothetical scenario with groundwater discharge only. Other streams with similar characteristics are widely distributed in the major river basins of North America. Data from USGS water quality monitoring networks from the 1960s to the 1990s indicated that 40% of 652 stream monitoring stations in the contiguous USA were at or above

  4. Biological and geochemical controls on diel dissolved inorganic carbon cycling in a low-order agricultural stream: Implications for reach scales and beyond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tobias, C.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    Movement of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) through the hydrologic cycle is an important component of global carbon budgets, but there is considerable uncertainty about the controls of DIC transmission from landscapes to streams, and through river networks to the oceans. In this study, diel measurements of DIC, ??13C-DIC, dissolved oxygen (O2), ??18O-O2, alkalinity, pH, and other parameters were used to assess the relative magnitudes of biological and geochemical controls on DIC cycling and flux in a nutrient-rich, net autotrophic stream. Rates of photosynthesis (P), respiration (R), groundwater discharge, air-water exchange of CO2, and carbonate precipitation/dissolution were quantified through a time-stepping chemical/isotope (12C and 13C, 16O and 18O) mass balance model. Groundwater was the major source of DIC to the stream. Primary production and carbonate precipitation were equally important sinks for DIC removed from the water column. The stream was always super-saturated with respect to carbonate minerals, but carbonate precipitation occurred mainly during the day when P increased pH. We estimated more than half (possibly 90%) of the carbonate precipitated during the day was retained in the reach under steady baseflow conditions. The amount of DIC removed from the overlying water through carbonate precipitation was similar to the amount of DIC generated from R. Air-water exchange of CO2 was always from the stream to the atmosphere, but was the smallest component of the DIC budget. Overall, the in-stream DIC reactions reduced the amount of CO2 evasion and the downstream flux of groundwater-derived DIC by about half relative to a hypothetical scenario with groundwater discharge only. Other streams with similar characteristics are widely distributed in the major river basins of North America. Data from USGS water quality monitoring networks from the 1960s to the 1990s indicated that 40% of 652 stream monitoring stations in the contiguous USA were at or above

  5. Physical, chemical, and biological data for four wetland habitats in Canaan Valley, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chambers, D.B.

    1996-01-01

    This report contains data collected during 1992 as part of a project designed to identify microenvironmental factors affecting rates of denitrification in wetlands in Canaan Valley, West Virginia. Four wetland habitats were selected for the study--a moss-lichen wetland, a persistent emergent wetland, a scrub-shrub wetland, and a riverine wetland. Physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of each habitat were determined by field measurements and laboratory analyses. Samples were collected in March, June, August, and October. Sediment pH, temperature, and oxidation-reduction potential were measured in the field. Sediment samples were analyzed for concentrations of calcium, sodium, magnesium, potassium, nitrate and nitrite, ammonia, ammonia plus organic nitrogen, phosphorus, inorganic carbon, and total carbon. The most probable number of denitrifying bacteria was determined by a multiple-tube test. The dominant plant species were identified by plant-community analysis. The moss-lichen wetland was characterized by low pH (3.4 to 5.0) and small populations of denitrifying bacteria (70 to 400 per gram of wet soil). The scrub-shrub wetland was also acidic (pH 4.0 to 5.0), but supported larger numbers of denitrifying bacteria (510 to 11,000 per gram of wet soil). The number of denitrifying bacteria in the persistent emergent wetland exceeded 1,000,000 per gram of wet soil in early summer and pH in this habitat was higher (5.1 to 6.6) than in the bogs. Riverine wetland pH ranged from 5.4 to 6.9, and the number of denitrifying bacteria ranged from 200 to 11,000 per gram of wet soil.

  6. Suitability of Gray Water for Hydroponic Crop Production Following Biological and Physical Chemical and Biological Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, David L.; Harper, Lynn D.; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai; Greene, Catherine

    1994-01-01

    The water present in waste streams from a human habitat must be recycled in Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) to limit resupply needs and attain self-sufficiency. Plants play an important role in providing food, regenerating air, and producing purified water via transpiration. However, we have shown that the surfactants present in hygiene waste water have acute toxic effects on plant growth (Bubenheim et al. 1994; Greene et al., 1994). These phytotoxic affects can be mitigated by allowing the microbial population on the root surface to degrade the surfactant, however, a significant suppression (several days) in crop performance is experienced prior to reaching sub-toxic surfactant levels and plant recovery. An effective alternative is to stabilize the microbial population responsible for degradation of the surfactant on an aerobic bioreactor and process the waste water prior to utilization in the hydroponic solution (Wisniewski and Bubenheim, 1993). A sensitive bioassay indicates that the surfactant phytotoxicity is suppressed by more than 90% within 5 hours of introduction of the gray water to the bioreactor; processing for more than 12 hours degrades more than 99% of the phytotoxin. Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) is a physical / chemical method for water purification which employees sequential distillation steps to separate water from solids and to volatilize contaminants. The solids from the waste water are concentrated in a brine and the pure product water (70 - 90% of the total waste water volume depending on operating conditions) retains non of the phytotoxic effects. Results of the bioassay were used to guide evaluations of the suitability of recovered gray water following biological and VCD processing for hydroponic lettuce production in controlled environments. Lettuce crops were grown for 28 days with 100% of the input water supplied with recovered water from the biological processor or VCD. When compared with the growth of plants

  7. Chemical and Biological Sensors Based on Organic Electrochemical Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Peng

    Organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) have been explored for sensing applications for several decades due to their many advantages like easy fabrication, low cost, flexibility, and biocompatibility. Among these OTFTs, organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) have attracted a great deal of interest in recent years since the devices can operate stably in aqueous environment with relatively low working voltages and are suitable for applications in chemical and biological sensing. In this thesis, ion-sensitive properties of OECTs based on poly(3,4- ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonic acid) (PEDOT:PSS) have been systematically studied. It was found that the gate electrode played an important role on the ion-sensitive properties of OECTs. For the devices with Ag/AgCl gate electrode, Nernstian relationships between the shift of gate voltage and the concentrations of cations were obtained. For the devices with Pt and Au gate electrodes, the ion sensitivities were higher than that given by Nernst equation, which could be attributed to the interface between the metal gate electrode and the electrolyte. Moreover, OECTs based on PEDOT:PSS were integrated into flexible microfluidic systems. Then a novel label-free DNA sensor was developed, in which single-stranded DNA probes were immobilized on the surface of Au gate electrode. These devices successfully detected complementary DNA targets at concentrations as low as 1 nM. The detection limit was also extended to 10 pM by pulse-enhanced hybridization process of DNA. OECTs based on PEDOT:PSS were also exploited as cell-based biosensors. Human esophageal squamous epithelial cancer cell lines (KYSE30) and fibroblast cell lines (HFFI) were successfully grown on the surface of PEDOT:PSS film. Then the devices were used for in-vitro monitoring cell activities when the living cells were treated by trypsin and an anti-cancer drug, retinoic acid. It was found that the devices were sensitive to the change of surface charge

  8. Chemical and biological sensing with organic thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabeck, Jeffrey Todd

    Organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) offer a great deal of promise for applications in chemical and biological sensing where there is a demand for small, portable, and inexpensive sensors. OTFTs have many advantages over other types of sensors, including low-cost fabrication, straightforward miniaturization, simple instrumentation, and inherent signal amplification. This dissertation examines two distinct types of OTFTs: organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on pentacene, and organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). The bulk of the previous work on sensing with OFETs has focused on gas sensing, and this dissertation contributes to this body of work by briefly treating the large, reversible response of pentacene OFETs to humidity. However, there are many applications where the analyte of interest must be detected in an aqueous environment rather than a gaseous environment, and very little work has been done in this area for OFETs. Therefore, the integration of pentacene OFETs with microfluidics is treated in detail. Using poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic channels to confine aqueous solutions over the active region of pentacene transistors, it is demonstrated that the current-voltage characteristics remain stable under aqueous flow with a decrease in mobility of ˜30% compared to its value when dry. The operation of PEDOT:PSS transistors is also treated in detail. It is demonstrated that their transistor behavior cannot be attributed solely to a field effect and that ion motion is key to the switching mechanism. It is also demonstrated that simple glucose sensors based on PEDOT:PSS OECTs are sensitive to low glucose concentrations below 1 mM, therefore showing promise for potential application in the field of noninvasive glucose monitoring for diabetic patients using saliva rather than blood samples. Furthermore, a novel microfluidic gating technique has been

  9. Chemical and biological warfare: General studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning federally sponsored and conducted studies into chemical and biological warfare operations and planning. These studies cover areas not addressed in other parts of this series. The topics include production and storage of agents, delivery techniques, training, military and civil defense, general planning studies, psychological reactions to chemical warfare, evaluations of materials exposed to chemical agents, and studies on banning or limiting chemical warfare. Other published searches in this series on chemical warfare cover detection and warning, defoliants, protection, and biological studies, including chemistry and toxicology. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. Chemical and biological warfare: General studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning federally sponsored and conducted studies into chemical and biological warfare operations and planning. These studies cover areas not addressed in other parts of this series. The topics include production and storage of agents, delivery techniques, training, military and civil defense, general planning studies, psychological reactions to chemical warfare, evaluations of materials exposed to chemical agents, and studies on banning or limiting chemical warfare. Other published searches in this series on chemical warfare cover detection and warning, defoliants, protection, and biological studies, including chemistry and toxicology. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  11. Chemical and biological warfare: General studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning federally sponsored and conducted studies into chemical and biological warfare operations and planning. These studies cover areas not addressed in other parts of this series. The topics include production and storage of agents, delivery techniques, training, military and civil defense, general planning studies, psychological reactions to chemical warfare, evaluations of materials exposed to chemical agents, and studies on banning or limiting chemical warfare. Other published searches in this series on chemical warfare cover detection and warning, defoliants, protection, and biological studies, including chemistry and toxicology.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  12. Chemical and biological warfare: General studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning federally sponsored and conducted studies into chemical and biological warfare operations and planning. These studies cover areas not addressed in other parts of this series. The topics include production and storage of agents, delivery techniques, training, military and civil defense, general planning studies, psychological reactions to chemical warfare, evaluations of materials exposed to chemical agents, and studies on banning or limiting chemical warfare. Other published searches in this series on chemical warfare cover detection and warning, defoliants, protection, and biological studies, including chemistry and toxicology.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  13. Chemical and biological warfare: General studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning federally sponsored and conducted studies into chemical and biological warfare operations and planning. These studies cover areas not addressed in other parts of this series. The topics include production and storage of agents, delivery techniques, training, military and civil defense, general planning studies, psychological reactions to chemical warfare, evaluations of materials exposed to chemical agents, and studies on banning or limiting chemical warfare. Other published searches in this series on chemical warfare cover detection and warning, defoliants, protection, and biological studies, including chemistry and toxicology. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Which chemicals drive biological effects in wastewater and recycled water?

    PubMed

    Tang, Janet Y M; Busetti, Francesco; Charrois, Jeffrey W A; Escher, Beate I

    2014-09-01

    Removal of organic micropollutants from wastewater during secondary treatment followed by reverse osmosis and UV disinfection was evaluated by a combination of four in-vitro cell-based bioassays and chemical analysis of 299 organic compounds. Concentrations detected in recycled water were below the Australian Guidelines for Water Recycling. Thus the detected chemicals were considered not to pose any health risk. The detected pesticides in the wastewater treatment plant effluent and partially advanced treated water explained all observed effects on photosynthesis inhibition. In contrast, mixture toxicity experiments with designed mixtures containing all detected chemicals at their measured concentrations demonstrated that the known chemicals explained less than 3% of the observed cytotoxicity and less than 1% of the oxidative stress response. Pesticides followed by pharmaceuticals and personal care products dominated the observed mixture effects. The detected chemicals were not related to the observed genotoxicity. The large proportion of unknown toxicity calls for effect monitoring complementary to chemical monitoring.

  15. Which chemicals drive biological effects in wastewater and recycled water?

    PubMed

    Tang, Janet Y M; Busetti, Francesco; Charrois, Jeffrey W A; Escher, Beate I

    2014-09-01

    Removal of organic micropollutants from wastewater during secondary treatment followed by reverse osmosis and UV disinfection was evaluated by a combination of four in-vitro cell-based bioassays and chemical analysis of 299 organic compounds. Concentrations detected in recycled water were below the Australian Guidelines for Water Recycling. Thus the detected chemicals were considered not to pose any health risk. The detected pesticides in the wastewater treatment plant effluent and partially advanced treated water explained all observed effects on photosynthesis inhibition. In contrast, mixture toxicity experiments with designed mixtures containing all detected chemicals at their measured concentrations demonstrated that the known chemicals explained less than 3% of the observed cytotoxicity and less than 1% of the oxidative stress response. Pesticides followed by pharmaceuticals and personal care products dominated the observed mixture effects. The detected chemicals were not related to the observed genotoxicity. The large proportion of unknown toxicity calls for effect monitoring complementary to chemical monitoring. PMID:24874944

  16. Integrating Biological and Chemical Data for Hepatotoxicity Prediction (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA ToxCastTM program is screening thousands of environmental chemicals for bioactivity using hundreds of high-throughput in vitro assays to build predictive models of toxicity. A set of 677 chemicals were represented by 711 bioactivity descriptors (from ToxCast assays),...

  17. Coumarin heterocyclic derivatives: chemical synthesis and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Medina, Fernanda G; Marrero, Joaquín G; Macías-Alonso, Mariana; González, Magdalena C; Córdova-Guerrero, Iván; Teissier García, Ariana G; Osegueda-Robles, Soraya

    2015-09-23

    This review highlights the broad range of science that has arisen from the synthesis of coumarin-linked and fused heterocycle derivatives. Specific topics include their synthesis and biological activity.

  18. Effects of upwelling, tides and biological processes on the inorganic carbon system of a coastal lagoon in Baja California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribas-Ribas, M.; Hernández-Ayón, J. M.; Camacho-Ibar, V. F.; Cabello-Pasini, A.; Mejia-Trejo, A.; Durazo, R.; Galindo-Bect, S.; Souza, A. J.; Forja, J. M.; Siqueiros-Valencia, A.

    2011-12-01

    The role of coastal lagoons and estuaries as sources or sinks of inorganic carbon in upwelling areas has not been fully understood. During the months of May-July, 2005, we studied the dissolved inorganic carbon system in a coastal lagoon of northwestern Mexico during the strongest period of upwelling events. Along the bay, different scenarios were observed for the distributions of pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) as a result of different combinations of upwelling intensity and tidal amplitude. DIC concentrations in the outer part of the bay were controlled by mixing processes. At the inner part of the bay DIC was as low as 1800 μmol kg -1, most likely due to high water residence times and seagrass CO 2 uptake. It is estimated that 85% of San Quintín Bay, at the oceanic end, acted as a source of CO 2 to the atmosphere due to the inflow of CO 2-rich upwelled waters from the neighboring ocean with high positive fluxes higher than 30 mmol C m -2 d -1. In contrast, there was a net uptake of CO 2 and HCO 3- by the seagrass bed Zostera marina in the inner part of the bay, so the pCO 2 in this zone was below the equilibrium value and slightly negative CO 2 fluxes of -6 mmol C m -2 d -1. Our positive NEP and ΔDIC values indicate that Bahía San Quintín was a net autotrophic system during the upwelling season during 2005.

  19. Use of hyperspectral remote sensing for detection and monitoring of chemical and biological agents: a survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Richard B.; Dasgupta, Swarvanu

    2004-12-01

    This paper surveys the potential use of hyperspectral imaging technology for standoff detection of chemical and biological agents in terrorism defense applications. In particular it focuses on the uses of hyperspectral imaging technology to detect and monitor chemical and biological attacks. In so doing it examines current technologies, their advantages and disadvantages, and investigates the possible role of hyperspectral imaging for homeland security applications. The study also addresses and provides applicable solutions for several of the potential challenges that currently create barriers to the full use of hyperspectral technology in the standoff detection of likely available chemical and biological agents.

  20. Biologically produced succinic acid: A new route to chemical intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Alternative Feedstocks (AF) program is forging new links between the agricultural community and the chemicals industry through support of research and development (R & D) that uses `green` feedstocks to produce chemicals. The program promotes cost-effective industrial use of renewable biomass as feedstocks to manufacture high-volume chemical building blocks. Industrial commercialization of such processes would stimulate the agricultural sector by increasing the demand of agricultural and forestry commodities. New alternatives for American industry may lie in the nation`s forests and fields. The national laboratory consortium has undertaken a joint R&D project with the Michigan Biotechnology Institute to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a chemical intermediate, succinic acid, and various derivatives, from renewable agricultural resources.

  1. Chemical modulators of ribosome biogenesis as biological probes.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jonathan M; Brown, Eric D

    2015-12-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of protein biosynthesis have been instrumental in the dissection of the complexities of ribosome structure and function. Ribosome biogenesis, on the other hand, is a complex and largely enigmatic process for which there is a paucity of chemical probes. Indeed, ribosome biogenesis has been studied almost exclusively using genetic and biochemical approaches without the benefit of small-molecule inhibitors of this process. Here, we provide a perspective on the promise of chemical inhibitors of ribosome assembly for future research. We explore key obstacles that complicate the interpretation of studies aimed at perturbing ribosome biogenesis in vivo using genetic methods, and we argue that chemical inhibitors are especially powerful because they can be used to induce perturbations in a manner that obviates these difficulties. Thus, in combination with leading-edge biochemical and structural methods, chemical probes offer unique advantages toward elucidating the molecular events that define the assembly of ribosomes. PMID:26575239

  2. Biological and Chemical Significance of Surface Microlayers in Aquatic Ecosystems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, B.; Barsom, G.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews methods of study, chemical composition, physical properties and ecology of surface microlayers in marine and fresh water habitats. Relates to problems of air and water pollution. Suggests areas for further research. (EB)

  3. Nature: A Box of Physical, Chemical, and Biological Tricks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinhorst, Sabine; Cannon, Gordon C.

    2008-03-01

    This article summarizes scientific breakthroughs, originally reported in the journal Nature, in the development of wet-dry adhesives, pain-selective anesthetics, enantioselective cyclizations and mechanical stress-induced chemical reactions.

  4. Selectivity on-target of bromodomain chemical probes by structure-guided medicinal chemistry and chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Galdeano, Carles; Ciulli, Alessio

    2016-09-01

    Targeting epigenetic proteins is a rapidly growing area for medicinal chemistry and drug discovery. Recent years have seen an explosion of interest in developing small molecules binding to bromodomains, the readers of acetyl-lysine modifications. A plethora of co-crystal structures has motivated focused fragment-based design and optimization programs within both industry and academia. These efforts have yielded several compounds entering the clinic, and many more are increasingly being used as chemical probes to interrogate bromodomain biology. High selectivity of chemical probes is necessary to ensure biological activity is due to an on-target effect. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of bromodomain-targeting compounds, focusing on the structural basis for their on-target selectivity or lack thereof. We also highlight chemical biology approaches to enhance on-target selectivity.

  5. Prospects for improved detection of chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear threats

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, Craig R.; Hart, Brad; Slezak, Thomas R.

    2012-07-31

    Acquisition and use of Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) weapons continue to be a major focus of concern form the security apparatus of nation states because of their potential for mass casualties when used by a determined adversary.

  6. 77 FR 47117 - Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear (CBRN) Protective Ensemble Standard, Certification...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear (CBRN) Protective Ensemble Standard, Certification Program Requirements, and Selection and Application Guide AGENCY: National Institute of...

  7. Caenorhabditis elegans chemical biology: lessons from small molecules

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    How can we complement Caenorhabditis elegans genomics and proteomics with a comprehensive structural and functional annotation of its metabolome? Several lines of evidence indicate that small molecules of largely undetermined structure play important roles in C. elegans biology, including key pathw...

  8. Pyrazine-derived disulfide-reducing agent for chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Lukesh, John C; Wallin, Kelly K; Raines, Ronald T

    2014-08-28

    For fifty years, dithiothreitol (DTT) has been the preferred reagent for the reduction of disulfide bonds in proteins and other biomolecules. Herein we report on the synthesis and characterization of 2,3-bis(mercaptomethyl)pyrazine (BMMP), a readily accessible disulfide-reducing agent with reactivity under biological conditions that is markedly superior to DTT and other known reagents.

  9. Environmental parameters of the Tennessee River in Alabama. 2: Physical, chemical, and biological parameters. [biological and chemical effects of thermal pollution from nuclear power plants on water quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosing, L. M.

    1976-01-01

    Physical, chemical and biological water quality data from five sites in the Tennessee River, two in Guntersville Reservoir and three in Wheeler Reservoir were correlated with climatological data for three annual cycles. Two of the annual cycles are for the years prior to the Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant operations and one is for the first 14 months of Plant operations. A comparison of the results of the annual cycles indicates that two distinct physical conditions in the reservoirs occur, one during the warm months when the reservoirs are at capacity and one during the colder winter months when the reservoirs have been drawn-down for water storage during the rainy months and for weed control. The wide variations of physical and chemical parameters to which the biological organisms are subjected on an annual basis control the biological organisms and their population levels. A comparison of the parameters of the site below the Power plant indicates that the heated effluent from the plant operating with two of the three reactors has not had any effect on the organisms at this site. Recommendations given include the development of prediction mathematical models (statistical analysis) for the physical and chemical parameters under specific climatological conditions which affect biological organisms. Tabulated data of chemical analysis of water and organism populations studied is given.

  10. Phosphorylation Energy Hypothesis: Open Chemical Systems and Their Biological Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hong

    2007-05-01

    Biochemical systems and processes in living cells generally operate far from equilibrium. This review presents an overview of a statistical thermodynamic treatment for such systems, with examples from several key components in cellular signal transduction. Open-system nonequilibrium steady-state (NESS) models are introduced. The models account quantitatively for the energetics and thermodynamics in phosphorylation-dephosphorylation switches, GTPase timers, and specificity amplification through kinetic proofreading. The chemical energy derived from ATP and GTP hydrolysis establishes the NESS of a cell and makes the cell—a mesoscopic-biochemical reaction system that consists of a collection of thermally driven fluctuating macromolecules—a genetically programmed chemical machine.

  11. Biological and chemical weapons of mass destruction: updated clinical therapeutic countermeasures since 2003.

    PubMed

    Pettineo, Christopher; Aitchison, Robert; Leikin, Scott M; Vogel, Stephen N; Leikin, Jerrold B

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this article is to provide updated treatment options for bioterrorism agents. This updated synopsis includes recent clinical cases and treatment recommendations that have arisen in the last 5 years. The decontamination, treatment, and disposition of these biologic and chemical agents are presented alphabetically by agent type: biologic, chemical, and radiologic/nuclear. The information provided outlines only new treatment options since 2003.

  12. Speciation of inorganic and organometallic compounds in solid biological samples by thermal vaporization and plasma emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hanamura, S.; Smith, B.W.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1983-11-01

    By means of thermal vaporization, inorganic, organic, and metallorganic species are separated and elemental emission in a microwave plasma is detected as a function of vaporization temperature. Solid samples of 250 mg or more are used to avoid problems with sample heterogeneity. The precision of characteristic appearance temperatures is +/-2/sup 0/C. The single electrode atmosphere pressure microwave plasma system is extremely tolerant to the introduction of water, organic solvents, and air. The measurement system contained a repetition wavelength scan device to allow background correction. The plasma temperature was 5500 K. The system was used to measure C, H, N, O, and Hg in orchard leaves and in tuna fish. 9 figures, 5 tables.

  13. Bridging the gap between cell biology and organic chemistry: chemical synthesis and biological application of lipidated peptides and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Carsten; Wagner, Melanie; Völkert, Martin; Waldmann, Herbert

    2002-08-01

    We have developed a basic concept for studying cell biological phenomena using an interdisciplinary approach starting from organic chemistry. Based on structural information available for a given biological phenomenon, unsolved chemical problems are identified. For their solution, new synthetic pathways and methods are developed, which reflect the state of the art in synthesising lipidated peptide conjugates. These compounds are used as molecular probes for the investigation of biological phenomena that involve both the determination of biophysical properties and cell biological studies. The interplay between organic synthesis, biophysics and cell biology in the study of protein lipidation may open up new and alternative opportunities to gain knowledge about the biological phenomenon that could not be obtained by employing biological techniques alone. This fruitful combination is highlighted using the Ras protein as an outstanding example. Included herein is: the development of methods for the synthesis of Ras-derived peptides and fully functional Ras proteins, the determination of the biophysical properties, in particular the ability to bind to model membranes, and finally the use of synthetic Ras peptides and proteins in cell biological experiments.

  14. The Eleventh Plague: The Politics of Biological and Chemical Warfare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovac, Jeffrey

    1997-07-01

    Leonard A. Cole. W. H. Freeman: New York, 1997. 250 pp. ISBN 0-7167-2950-4. $22.95 hc. The Eleventh Plague begins with a recitation of the ten plagues brought down upon Egypt, part of the Passover Seder celebrated each spring by Jews all over the world. Spring is also the anniversary of the first use of chemical weapons. On April 22, 1915, German soldiers released chlorine gas from 5,739 cylinders installed along the battle line at Ypres in southeastern Belgium. Germany achieved complete surprise. The gas drifted across no man's land, causing widespread terror and creating ten thousand serious casualties and five thousand deaths. Chlorine, of course, was a poor weapon, easily neutralized, but German scientists, including future Nobel laureates Fritz Haber, Otto Hahn, and James Franck, and the German chemical industry created ever more dangerous chemical weapons, culminating with the introduction of mustard gas in 1917. Despite cries of moral outrage, the Allies countered with their own chemical weapons efforts. The eleventh plague had been unleashed.

  15. Sampling of vehicle emissions for chemical analysis and biological testing.

    PubMed Central

    Schuetzle, D

    1983-01-01

    Representative dilution tube sampling techniques for particulate and gas phase vehicle emissions are described using Teflon filter media and XAD-2 resin. More than 90% of the total gas (C8-C18) and particulate direct acting Ames assay mutagenicity (TA 98) was found in the particulate phase. The gas and particulate phase material was fractionated by HPLC into nonpolar, moderately polar and highly polar chemical fractions. The moderately polar chemical fraction of the particulates contained more than 50% of the direct acting Ames assay mutagenicity for the total extract. The concentration of oxygenated polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAH) and nitrated PAH (nitro-PAH) identified in the moderately polar particulate fractions are given. Nitro-PAH account for most of the direct-acting (TA 98) Ames assay mutagenicity in these moderately polar fractions. Reactions and kinetic expressions for chemical conversion of PAH are presented. Chemical conversion of PAH to nitro-PAH during dilution tube sampling of particulates on Teflon filters and gases on XAD-2 resin is a minor problem (representing 10-20%, on the average, of the 1-nitropyrene found in extracts) at short (46 min) sampling times, at low sampling temperatures (42 degrees C), and in diluted exhaust containing 3 ppm NO2. Particulate emissions collected from dilution tubes on filter media appear to be representative of what is emitted in the environment as based upon a comparison of highway and laboratory studies. PMID:6186484

  16. Total Chemical Synthesis of Biologically Active Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2011-09-15

    The 204-residue covalent-dimer vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, see picture) with full mitogenic activity was prepared from three unprotected peptide segments by one-pot native chemical ligations. The covalent structure of the synthetic VEGF was confirmed by precise mass measurement, and the three-dimensional structure of the synthetic protein was determined by high-resolution X-ray crystallography.

  17. Physical, chemical, and biological data for detailed study of irrigation drainage in the Klamath Basin, California and Oregon, 1990-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCoy, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological data were collected between 1990 and 1992 as part of a detailed study by the U.S. Department of Interior of the effects of irrigation drainage on aquatic resources in the Klamath Basin of California and Oregon. Most of the sites for data collection were in and around the upper and lower sump of Tule Lake, in the Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge, and along major drains in Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge. The physical and chemical data consist of particle-size determinations and concentrations of carbon, mercury, arsenic, chlorophenoxy acid, and organochlorine, organophosphate, and carbamate pesticides in bottom sediment; and concentrations of organophosphate, carbamate, and pyrethroid pesticides, major and trace inorganic constituents, nitrogen, phosphorus, and organic carbon in water. Continuous dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conduc- tance, and temperature data from selected sites in 1991 and 1992 are presented in graphical form to summarize the diel water-quality conditions. The biological data consists of concentrations of inorganic constituents and organochlorine pesticides in tissue, invertebrate and fish population surveys, fish health surveys, frog call surveys, egg shell thickness of avian eggs, and in situ and static toxicity bioassay data collected in 1991 and 1992 using aquatic bacteria, plants, invertebrates, fish, and bird species as test organisms.

  18. Modeling Dispersion of Chemical-Biological Agents in Three Dimensional Living Space

    SciTech Connect

    William S. Winters

    2002-02-01

    This report documents a series of calculations designed to demonstrate Sandia's capability in modeling the dispersal of chemical and biological agents in complex three-dimensional spaces. The transport of particles representing biological agents is modeled in a single room and in several connected rooms. The influence of particle size, particle weight and injection method are studied.

  19. Incorporating Molecular and Cellular Biology into a Chemical Engineering Degree Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Kim C.

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing need for a workforce that can apply engineering principles to molecular based discovery and product development in the biological sciences. To this end, Tulane University established a degree program that incorporates molecular and cellular biology into the chemical engineering curriculum. In celebration of the tenth anniversary…

  20. Detection of biological molecules using chemical amplification and optical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Van Antwerp, William Peter; Mastrototaro, John Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Methods are provided for the determination of the concentration of biological levels of polyhydroxylated compounds, particularly glucose. The methods utilize an amplification system that is an analyte transducer immobilized in a polymeric matrix, where the system is implantable and biocompatible. Upon interrogation by an optical system, the amplification system produces a signal capable of detection external to the skin of the patient. Quantitation of the analyte of interest is achieved by measurement of the emitted signal.

  1. Detection of biological molecules using chemical amplification and optical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Van Antwerp, William Peter; Mastrototaro, John Joseph

    2004-10-12

    Methods are provided for the determination of the concentration of biological levels of polyhydroxylated compounds, particularly glucose. The methods utilize an amplification system that is an analyte transducer immobilized in a polymeric matrix, where the system is implantable and biocompatible. Upon interrogation by an optical system, the amplification system produces a signal capable of detection external to the skin of the patient. Quantitation of the analyte of interest is achieved by measurement of the emitted signal.

  2. Evolutionary biology and chemical geology: a timely marriage.

    PubMed

    Cintas, Pedro

    2004-07-01

    For more than 150 years natural selection has been perceived to be the overwhelming force in evolution. Only in recent decades have we obtained new insights into environmental and physicochemical factors that participate with selection in a synergic way. Far from denying Darwin's theory, such neglected factors put order to the bewildering range of genotypes and morphologies found in living organisms and, more importantly, they place evolution in a planetary context where biology, geology, and chemistry can easily be integrated.

  3. Integrated assessment of oil pollution using biological monitoring and chemical fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ceri; Guitart, Carlos; Pook, Chris; Scarlett, Alan; Readman, James W; Galloway, Tamara S

    2010-06-01

    A full assessment of the impact of oil and chemical spills at sea requires the identification of both the polluting chemicals and the biological effects they cause. Here, a combination of chemical fingerprinting of surface oils, tissue residue analysis, and biological effects measures was used to explore the relationship between spilled oil and biological impact following the grounding of the MSC Napoli container ship in Lyme Bay, England in January 2007. Initially, oil contamination remained restricted to a surface slick in the vicinity of the wreck, and there was no chemical evidence to link biological impairment of animals (the common limpet, Patella vulgata) on the shore adjacent to the oil spill. Secondary oil contamination associated with salvage activities in July 2007 was also assessed. Chemical analyses of aliphatic hydrocarbons and terpanes in shell swabs taken from limpet shells provided an unequivocal match with the fuel oil carried by the ship. Corresponding chemical analysis of limpet tissues revealed increased concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) dominated by phenanthrene and C1 to C3 phenanthrenes with smaller contributions from heavier molecular weight PAHs. Concurrent ecotoxicological tests indicated impairment of cellular viability (p < 0.001), reduced immune function (p < 0.001), and damage to DNA (Comet assay, p < 0.001) in these animals, whereas antioxidant defenses were elevated relative to un-oiled animals. These results illustrate the value of combining biological monitoring with chemical fingerprinting for the rapid identification of spilled oils and their sublethal impacts on biota in situ.

  4. Electrochemical determination of inorganic mercury and arsenic--A review.

    PubMed

    Zaib, Maria; Athar, Muhammad Makshoof; Saeed, Asma; Farooq, Umar

    2015-12-15

    Inorganic mercury and arsenic encompasses a term which includes As(III), As(V) and Hg(II) species. These metal ions have been extensively studied due to their toxicity related issues. Different analytical methods are used to monitor inorganic mercury and arsenic in a variety of samples at trace level. The present study reviews various analytical techniques available for detection of inorganic mercury and arsenic with particular emphasis on electrochemical methods especially stripping voltammetry. A detailed critical evaluation of methods, advantages of electrochemical methods over other analytical methods, and various electrode materials available for mercury and arsenic analysis is presented in this review study. Modified carbon paste electrode provides better determination due to better deposition with linear and improved response under studied set of conditions. Biological materials may be the potent and economical alternative as compared to macro-electrodes and chemically modified carbon paste electrodes in stripping analysis of inorganic mercury and arsenic.

  5. 78 FR 74218 - Imposition of Additional Sanctions on Syria Under the Chemical and Biological Weapons Control and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... Imposition of Additional Sanctions on Syria Under the Chemical and Biological Weapons Control and Warfare... chemical weapons in violation of international law or lethal chemical weapons against its own nationals... the Chemical and Biological Weapons Control and Warfare Elimination Act of 1991, 22 U.S.C. 5604(a)...

  6. Deciphering Diseases and Biological Targets for Environmental Chemicals using Toxicogenomics Networks

    PubMed Central

    Audouze, Karine; Juncker, Agnieszka Sierakowska; Roque, Francisco J. S. S. A.; Krysiak-Baltyn, Konrad; Weinhold, Nils; Taboureau, Olivier; Jensen, Thomas Skøt; Brunak, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to environmental chemicals and drugs may have a negative effect on human health. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism of such compounds is needed to determine the risk. We present a high confidence human protein-protein association network built upon the integration of chemical toxicology and systems biology. This computational systems chemical biology model reveals uncharacterized connections between compounds and diseases, thus predicting which compounds may be risk factors for human health. Additionally, the network can be used to identify unexpected potential associations between chemicals and proteins. Examples are shown for chemicals associated with breast cancer, lung cancer and necrosis, and potential protein targets for di-ethylhexyl-phthalate, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, pirinixic acid and permethrine. The chemical-protein associations are supported through recent published studies, which illustrate the power of our approach that integrates toxicogenomics data with other data types. PMID:20502671

  7. Detection of biological molecules using chemical amplification and optical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Van Antwerp, William Peter; Mastrototaro, John Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Methods are provided for the determination of the concentration of biological levels of polyhydroxylated compounds, particularly glucose. The methods utilize an amplification system that is an analyte transducer immobilized in a polymeric matrix, where the system is implantable and biocompatible. Upon interrogation by an optical system, the amplification system produces a signal capable of detection external to the skin of the patient. Quantitation of the analyte of interest is achieved by measurement of the emitted signal. Specifically, the analyte transducer immobilized in a polymeric matrix can be a boronic acid moiety.

  8. Indonesian propolis: chemical composition, biological activity and botanical origin.

    PubMed

    Trusheva, Boryana; Popova, Milena; Koendhori, Eko Budi; Tsvetkova, Iva; Naydenski, Christo; Bankova, Vassya

    2011-03-01

    From a biologically active extract of Indonesian propolis from East Java, 11 compounds were isolated and identified: four alk(en)ylresorcinols (obtained as an inseparable mixture) (1-4) were isolated for the first time from propolis, along with four prenylflavanones (6-9) and three cycloartane-type triterpenes (5, 10 and 11). The structures of the components were elucidated based on their spectral properties. All prenylflavanones demonstrated significant radical scavenging activity against diphenylpicrylhydrazyl radicals, and compound 6 showed significant antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. For the first time Macaranga tanarius L. and Mangifera indica L. are shown as plant sources of Indonesian propolis.

  9. A review on biological and chemical diversity in Berberis (Berberidaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sharad; Srivastava, Manjoosha; Misra, Ankita; Pandey, Garima; Rawat, AKS

    2015-01-01

    Berberis is an important genus and well known in the Indian as well as European systems of traditional medicine. It is used since ancient times for curing eye disease, fever, jaundice, rheumatism, vomiting during pregnancy, kidney and gall balder stones and various other ailments due to the presence of biologically active alkaloid berberine. Action of the root extracts of few species are believed to be as powerful as quinine in the treatment of malarial fever. A plethora of literature pertaining to the taxonomy, biology, chemistry, traditional and ethnic uses of Berberis in different countries and indigenous cultures was collected by both offline (library, journals, textbooks etc.) and online mode (electronic search of available databases). In addition to this, books on traditional medicine and ethno pharmacological knowledge were also referred to extract ancient uses of Berberis in different traditional medicine systems. Most of the folklore, traditional and ethno botanical claims about Berberis species were validated by broad spectrum in vitro and vivo pharmacological studies. The present article summarizes its usage in eye and liver disorder, fever, kidney and gall stones along with anticancer activity. This comprehensive review will not only help researchers for further evaluation but also provide substantial information for future exploitation of species to develop novel herbal formulations. PMID:26535033

  10. The bioartificial pancreas (BAP): Biological, chemical and engineering challenges.

    PubMed

    Iacovacci, Veronica; Ricotti, Leonardo; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo

    2016-01-15

    The bioartificial pancreas (BAP) represents a viable solution for the treatment of type 1 diabetes (T1D). By encapsulating pancreatic cells in a semipermeable membrane to allow nutrient, insulin and glucose exchange, the side effects produced by islets and whole organ transplantation-related immunosuppressive therapy can be circumvented. Several factors, mainly related to materials properties, capsule morphology and biological environment, play a key role in optimizing BAP systems. The BAP is an extremely complex delivery system for insulin. Despite considerable efforts, in some instances meeting with limited degree of success, a BAP capable of restoring physiological pancreas functions without the need for immunosuppressive drugs and of controlling blood glucose levels especially in large animal models and a few clinical trials, does not exist. The state of the art in terms of materials, fabrication techniques and cell sources, as well as the current status of commercial devices and clinical trials, are described in this overview from an interdisciplinary viewpoint. In addition, challenges to the creation of effective BAP systems are highlighted including future perspectives in terms of component integration from both a biological and an engineering viewpoint.

  11. A review on biological and chemical diversity in Berberis (Berberidaceae).

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sharad; Srivastava, Manjoosha; Misra, Ankita; Pandey, Garima; Rawat, Aks

    2015-01-01

    Berberis is an important genus and well known in the Indian as well as European systems of traditional medicine. It is used since ancient times for curing eye disease, fever, jaundice, rheumatism, vomiting during pregnancy, kidney and gall balder stones and various other ailments due to the presence of biologically active alkaloid berberine. Action of the root extracts of few species are believed to be as powerful as quinine in the treatment of malarial fever. A plethora of literature pertaining to the taxonomy, biology, chemistry, traditional and ethnic uses of Berberis in different countries and indigenous cultures was collected by both offline (library, journals, textbooks etc.) and online mode (electronic search of available databases). In addition to this, books on traditional medicine and ethno pharmacological knowledge were also referred to extract ancient uses of Berberis in different traditional medicine systems. Most of the folklore, traditional and ethno botanical claims about Berberis species were validated by broad spectrum in vitro and vivo pharmacological studies. The present article summarizes its usage in eye and liver disorder, fever, kidney and gall stones along with anticancer activity. This comprehensive review will not only help researchers for further evaluation but also provide substantial information for future exploitation of species to develop novel herbal formulations.

  12. Mitochondrial Chemical Biology: New Probes Elucidate the Secrets of the Powerhouse of the Cell.

    PubMed

    Wisnovsky, Simon; Lei, Eric K; Jean, Sae Rin; Kelley, Shana O

    2016-08-18

    Mitochondria are energy-producing organelles with essential functions in cell biology, and mitochondrial dysfunction is linked to a wide range of human diseases. Efforts to better understand mitochondrial biology have been limited by the lack of tools for manipulating and detecting processes occurring within the organelle. Here, we highlight recent significant advances in mitochondrial chemical biology that have produced new tools and techniques for studying mitochondria. Specifically, we focus on the development of chemical tools to perturb mitochondrial biochemistry, probes allowing precise measurement of mitochondrial function, and new techniques for high-throughput characterization of the mitochondrial proteome. Taken together, these advances in chemical biology will enable exciting new directions in mitochondrial research.

  13. Clustering and rule-based classifications of chemical structures evaluated in the biological activity space.

    PubMed

    Schuffenhauer, Ansgar; Brown, Nathan; Ertl, Peter; Jenkins, Jeremy L; Selzer, Paul; Hamon, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Classification methods for data sets of molecules according to their chemical structure were evaluated for their biological relevance, including rule-based, scaffold-oriented classification methods and clustering based on molecular descriptors. Three data sets resulting from uniformly determined in vitro biological profiling experiments were classified according to their chemical structures, and the results were compared in a Pareto analysis with the number of classes and their average spread in the profile space as two concurrent objectives which were to be minimized. It has been found that no classification method is overall superior to all other studied methods, but there is a general trend that rule-based, scaffold-oriented methods are the better choice if classes with homogeneous biological activity are required, but a large number of clusters can be tolerated. On the other hand, clustering based on chemical fingerprints is superior if fewer and larger classes are required, and some loss of homogeneity in biological activity can be accepted.

  14. Mitochondrial Chemical Biology: New Probes Elucidate the Secrets of the Powerhouse of the Cell.

    PubMed

    Wisnovsky, Simon; Lei, Eric K; Jean, Sae Rin; Kelley, Shana O

    2016-08-18

    Mitochondria are energy-producing organelles with essential functions in cell biology, and mitochondrial dysfunction is linked to a wide range of human diseases. Efforts to better understand mitochondrial biology have been limited by the lack of tools for manipulating and detecting processes occurring within the organelle. Here, we highlight recent significant advances in mitochondrial chemical biology that have produced new tools and techniques for studying mitochondria. Specifically, we focus on the development of chemical tools to perturb mitochondrial biochemistry, probes allowing precise measurement of mitochondrial function, and new techniques for high-throughput characterization of the mitochondrial proteome. Taken together, these advances in chemical biology will enable exciting new directions in mitochondrial research. PMID:27478157

  15. Biological and chemical removal of Cr(VI) from waste water: cost and benefit analysis.

    PubMed

    Demir, Aynur; Arisoy, Münevver

    2007-08-17

    The objective of the present study is cost and benefit analysis of biological and chemical removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] ions. Cost and benefit analysis were done with refer to two separate studies on removal of Cr(VI), one of heavy metals with a crucial role concerning increase in environmental pollution and disturbance of ecological balance, through biological adsorption and chemical ion-exchange. Methods of biological and chemical removal were compared with regard to their cost and percentage in chrome removal. According to the result of the comparison, cost per unit in chemical removal was calculated 0.24 euros and the ratio of chrome removal was 99.68%, whereas those of biological removal were 0.14 and 59.3% euros. Therefore, it was seen that cost per unit in chemical removal and chrome removal ratio were higher than those of biological removal method. In the current study where chrome removal is seen as immeasurable benefit in terms of human health and the environment, percentages of chrome removal were taken as measurable benefit and cost per unit of the chemicals as measurable cost.

  16. De Novo Fragment Design for Drug Discovery and Chemical Biology.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Tiago; Reker, Daniel; Welin, Martin; Caldera, Michael; Brunner, Cyrill; Gabernet, Gisela; Schneider, Petra; Walse, Björn; Schneider, Gisbert

    2015-12-01

    Automated molecular de novo design led to the discovery of an innovative inhibitor of death-associated protein kinase 3 (DAPK3). An unprecedented crystal structure of the inactive DAPK3 homodimer shows the fragment-like hit bound to the ATP pocket. Target prediction software based on machine learning models correctly identified additional macromolecular targets of the computationally designed compound and the structurally related marketed drug azosemide. The study validates computational de novo design as a prime method for generating chemical probes and starting points for drug discovery.

  17. Biological Kraft Chemical Recycle for Augmentation of Recovery Furnace Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart E. Strand

    2001-12-06

    The chemicals used in pulping of wood by the kraft process are recycled in the mill in the recovery furnace, which oxidizes organics while simultaneously reducing sulfate to sulfide. The recovery furnace is central to the economical operation of kraft pulp mills, but it also causes problems. The total pulp production of many mills is limited by the recovery furnace capacity, which cannot easily be increased. The furnace is one of the largest sources of air pollution (as reduced sulfur compounds) in the kraft pulp mill.

  18. Bacteriorhodopsin protein hybrids for chemical and biological sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winder, Eric Michael

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR), an optoelectric protein found in Halobacterium salinarum, has the potential for use in protein hybrid sensing systems. Bacteriorhodopsin has no intrinsic sensing properties, however molecular and chemical tools permit production of bR protein hybrids with transducing and sensing properties. As a proof of concept, a maltose binding protein-bacteriorhodopsin ([MBP]-bR) hybrid was developed. It was proposed that the energy associated with target molecule binding, maltose, to the hybrid sensor protein would provide a means to directly modulate the electrical output from the MBP-bR bio-nanosensor platform. The bR protein hybrid is produced by linkage between bR (principal component of purified purple membrane [PM]) and MBP, which was produced by use of a plasmid expression vector system in Escherichia coli and purified utilizing an amylose affinity column. These proteins were chemically linked using 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl]carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS), which facilitates formation of an amide bond between a primary carboxylic acid and a primary amine. The presence of novel protein hybrids after chemical linkage was analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Soluble proteins (MBP-only derivatives and unlinked MBP) were separated from insoluble proteins (PM derivatives and unlinked PM) using size exclusion chromatography. The putatively identified MBP-bR protein hybrid, in addition to unlinked bR, was collected. This sample was normalized for bR concentration to native PM and both were deposited onto indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass slides by electrophoretic sedimentation. The photoresponse of both samples, activated using 100 Watt tungsten lamp at 10 cm distance, were equal at 175 mV. Testing of deposited PM with 1 mM sucrose or 1 mM maltose showed no change in the photoresponse of the material, however addition of 1 mM maltose to the deposited MBP-bR linked hybrid material elicited a 57% decrease in photoresponse

  19. Biological and chemical studies on overheated brewed coffee.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Shibamoto, T; Wei, C I; Fernando, S

    1987-03-01

    Vapour formed from overheated decaffeinated coffee was condensed and tested for mutagenicity using the Ames assay in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100. Vapour produced at 73 and 100 degrees C exhibited no mutagenicity. The basic fraction of vapour produced at 350 degrees C showed weak mutagenicity towards strains TA98 with metabolic activation. The chemical analysis of this fraction identified pyridines and pyrazines as the major constituents. None of the compounds identified in this fraction has been reported as mutagenic when tested in the Ames assay. PMID:3570110

  20. Surface modification of Ti-6Al-4V alloy for biomineralization and specific biological response: Part I, inorganic modification.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, S; Spriano, S; Pan, G; Venturello, A; Bianchi, C L; Chiesa, R; Faga, M G; Maina, G; Vernè, E

    2011-03-01

    Titanium and its alloys represent the gold standard for orthopaedic and dental prosthetic devices, because of their good mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Recent research has been focused on surface treatments designed to promote their rapid osteointegration also in case of poor bone quality. A new surface treatment has been investigated in this research work, in order to improve tissue integration of titanium based implants. The surface treatment is able to induce a bioactive behaviour, without the introduction of a coating, and preserving mechanical properties of Ti6Al4V substrates (fatigue resistance). The application of the proposed technique results in a complex surface topography, characterized by the combination of a micro-roughness and a nanotexture, which can be coupled with the conventional macro-roughness induced by blasting. Modified metallic surfaces are rich in hydroxyls groups: this feature is extremely important for inorganic bioactivity (in vitro and in vivo apatite precipitation) and also for further functionalization procedures (grafting of biomolecules). Modified Ti6Al4V induced hydroxyapatite precipitation after 15 days soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF). The process was optimised in order to not induce cracks or damages on the surface. The surface oxide layer presents high scratch resistance.

  1. Mapping the patent landscape of synthetic biology for fine chemical production pathways.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, Pablo; Gök, Abdullah; Shapira, Philip; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2016-09-01

    A goal of synthetic biology bio-foundries is to innovate through an iterative design/build/test/learn pipeline. In assessing the value of new chemical production routes, the intellectual property (IP) novelty of the pathway is important. Exploratory studies can be carried using knowledge of the patent/IP landscape for synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. In this paper, we perform an assessment of pathways as potential targets for chemical production across the full catalogue of reachable chemicals in the extended metabolic space of chassis organisms, as computed by the retrosynthesis-based algorithm RetroPath. Our database for reactions processed by sequences in heterologous pathways was screened against the PatSeq database, a comprehensive collection of more than 150M sequences present in patent grants and applications. We also examine related patent families using Derwent Innovations. This large-scale computational study provides useful insights into the IP landscape of synthetic biology for fine and specialty chemicals production.

  2. Recent Developments in the Application of Biologically Inspired Computation to Chemical Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, S.; Gutierrez-Gálvez, A.

    2009-05-01

    Biological olfaction outperforms chemical instrumentation in specificity, response time, detection limit, coding capacity, time stability, robustness, size, power consumption, and portability. This biological function provides outstanding performance due, to a large extent, to the unique architecture of the olfactory pathway, which combines a high degree of redundancy, an efficient combinatorial coding along with unmatched chemical information processing mechanisms. The last decade has witnessed important advances in the understanding of the computational primitives underlying the functioning of the olfactory system. In this work, the state of the art concerning biologically inspired computation for chemical sensing will be reviewed. Instead of reviewing the whole body of computational neuroscience of olfaction, we restrict this review to the application of models to the processing of real chemical sensor data.

  3. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique for the determination of the chemical composition of complex inorganic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łazarek, Łukasz; Antończak, Arkadiusz J.; Wójcik, Michał R.; Kozioł, Paweł E.; Stepak, Bogusz; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2014-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a fast, fully optical method, that needs little or no sample preparation. In this technique qualitative and quantitative analysis is based on comparison. The determination of composition is generally based on the construction of a calibration curve namely the LIBS signal versus the concentration of the analyte. Typically, to calibrate the system, certified reference materials with known elemental composition are used. Nevertheless, such samples due to differences in the overall composition with respect to the used complex inorganic materials can influence significantly on the accuracy. There are also some intermediate factors which can cause imprecision in measurements, such as optical absorption, surface structure, thermal conductivity etc. This paper presents the calibration procedure performed with especially prepared pellets from the tested materials, which composition was previously defined. We also proposed methods of post-processing which allowed for mitigation of the matrix effects and for a reliable and accurate analysis. This technique was implemented for determination of trace elements in industrial copper concentrates standardized by conventional atomic absorption spectroscopy with a flame atomizer. A series of copper flotation concentrate samples was analyzed for contents of three elements, that is silver, cobalt and vanadium. It has been shown that the described technique can be used to qualitative and quantitative analyses of complex inorganic materials, such as copper flotation concentrates.

  4. Secondary inorganic aerosol evaluation: Application of a transport chemical model in the eastern part of the Po Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecorari, Eliana; Squizzato, Stefania; Longo, Andrea; Visin, Flavia; Rampazzo, Giancarlo

    2014-12-01

    Secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) represents an important component of fine particulate matter in Europe. A photochemical model has been used to assess the distribution of secondary inorganic ions (sulfate, nitrate and ammonium) in the eastern part of the Po Valley, close to Venice. Specific meteorological and environmental conditions and very highly urbanized and industrialized areas make this domain one of the most polluted in Europe. Several studies have been conducted to assess particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) areal distribution. However, SIA formation dynamics are still a research subject especially in the transition environments, where the changes in the orography and in the land-use can affect air mass movements and atmospheric composition. This paper is a first attempt to simulate SIA distribution by using a photochemical model in the sea/land Venice transition area. Moreover, a modeling approach with clean boundary conditions has been used to check local and regional influence on SIA levels in the domain. Results reveal that, despite the importance of regional influences, local formation processes are important in SIA distribution especially during warm periods. SO42- and NH4+ are more linked to emission sources distribution than NO3- that tends to be more diffused in the study area. The use of a photochemical model, suitably tested in a such complex area, can improve air pollution knowledge and can help in air quality decision making.

  5. Chemical and biological insecticides select distinct gene expression patterns in Aedes aegypti mosquito

    PubMed Central

    Després, Laurence; Stalinski, Renaud; Faucon, Frédéric; Navratil, Vincent; Viari, Alain; Paris, Margot; Tetreau, Guillaume; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Riaz, Muhammad Asam; Bonin, Aurélie; Reynaud, Stéphane; David, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide evolution of mosquito resistance to chemical insecticides represents a major challenge for public health, and the future of vector control largely relies on the development of biological insecticides that can be used in combination with chemicals (integrated management), with the expectation that populations already resistant to chemicals will not become readily resistant to biological insecticides. However, little is known about the metabolic pathways affected by selection with chemical or biological insecticides. Here we show that Aedes aegypti, a laboratory mosquito strain selected with a biological insecticide (Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis, Bti) evolved increased transcription of many genes coding for endopeptidases while most genes coding for detoxification enzymes were under-expressed. By contrast, in strains selected with chemicals, genes encoding detoxification enzymes were mostly over-expressed. In all the resistant strains, genes involved in immune response were under-transcribed, suggesting that basal immunity might be a general adjustment variable to compensate metabolic costs caused by insecticide selection. Bioassays generally showed no evidence for an increased susceptibility of selected strains towards the other insecticide type, and all chemical-resistant strains were as susceptible to Bti as the unselected parent strain, which is a good premise for sustainable integrated management of mosquito populations resistant to chemicals. PMID:25540155

  6. Chemical and biological insecticides select distinct gene expression patterns in Aedes aegypti mosquito.

    PubMed

    Després, Laurence; Stalinski, Renaud; Faucon, Frédéric; Navratil, Vincent; Viari, Alain; Paris, Margot; Tetreau, Guillaume; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Riaz, Muhammad Asam; Bonin, Aurélie; Reynaud, Stéphane; David, Jean-Philippe

    2014-12-01

    Worldwide evolution of mosquito resistance to chemical insecticides represents a major challenge for public health, and the future of vector control largely relies on the development of biological insecticides that can be used in combination with chemicals (integrated management), with the expectation that populations already resistant to chemicals will not become readily resistant to biological insecticides. However, little is known about the metabolic pathways affected by selection with chemical or biological insecticides. Here we show that Aedes aegypti, a laboratory mosquito strain selected with a biological insecticide (Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis, Bti) evolved increased transcription of many genes coding for endopeptidases while most genes coding for detoxification enzymes were under-expressed. By contrast, in strains selected with chemicals, genes encoding detoxification enzymes were mostly over-expressed. In all the resistant strains, genes involved in immune response were under-transcribed, suggesting that basal immunity might be a general adjustment variable to compensate metabolic costs caused by insecticide selection. Bioassays generally showed no evidence for an increased susceptibility of selected strains towards the other insecticide type, and all chemical-resistant strains were as susceptible to Bti as the unselected parent strain, which is a good premise for sustainable integrated management of mosquito populations resistant to chemicals.

  7. Capturing Biological Activity in Natural Product Fragments by Chemical Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Erika A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Natural products have had an immense influence on science and have directly led to the introduction of many drugs. Organic chemistry, and its unique ability to tailor natural products through synthesis, provides an extraordinary approach to unlock the full potential of natural products. In this Review, an approach based on natural product derived fragments is presented that can successfully address some of the current challenges in drug discovery. These fragments often display significantly reduced molecular weights, reduced structural complexity, a reduced number of synthetic steps, while retaining or even improving key biological parameters such as potency or selectivity. Examples from various stages of the drug development process up to the clinic are presented. In addition, this process can be leveraged by recent developments such as genome mining, antibody–drug conjugates, and computational approaches. All these concepts have the potential to identify the next generation of drug candidates inspired by natural products. PMID:26833854

  8. Fungal phytotoxins with potential herbicidal activity: chemical and biological characterization.

    PubMed

    Cimmino, Alessio; Masi, Marco; Evidente, Marco; Superchi, Stefano; Evidente, Antonio

    2015-12-19

    Covering: 2007 to 2015 Fungal phytotoxins are secondary metabolites playing an important role in the induction of disease symptoms interfering with host plant physiological processes. Although fungal pathogens represent a heavy constraint for agrarian production and for forest and environmental heritage, they can also represent an ecofriendly alternative to manage weeds. Indeed, the phytotoxins produced by weed pathogenic fungi are an efficient tool to design natural, safe bioherbicides. Their use could avoid that of synthetic pesticides causing resistance in the host plants and the long term impact of residues in agricultural products with a risk to human and animal health. The isolation and structural and biological characterization of phytotoxins produced by pathogenic fungi for weeds, including parasitic plants, are described. Structure activity relationships and mode of action studies for some phytotoxins are also reported to elucidate the herbicide potential of these promising fungal metabolites.

  9. Capturing Biological Activity in Natural Product Fragments by Chemical Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Crane, Erika A; Gademann, Karl

    2016-03-14

    Natural products have had an immense influence on science and have directly led to the introduction of many drugs. Organic chemistry, and its unique ability to tailor natural products through synthesis, provides an extraordinary approach to unlock the full potential of natural products. In this Review, an approach based on natural product derived fragments is presented that can successfully address some of the current challenges in drug discovery. These fragments often display significantly reduced molecular weights, reduced structural complexity, a reduced number of synthetic steps, while retaining or even improving key biological parameters such as potency or selectivity. Examples from various stages of the drug development process up to the clinic are presented. In addition, this process can be leveraged by recent developments such as genome mining, antibody-drug conjugates, and computational approaches. All these concepts have the potential to identify the next generation of drug candidates inspired by natural products.

  10. Fungal phytotoxins with potential herbicidal activity: chemical and biological characterization.

    PubMed

    Cimmino, Alessio; Masi, Marco; Evidente, Marco; Superchi, Stefano; Evidente, Antonio

    2015-12-19

    Covering: 2007 to 2015 Fungal phytotoxins are secondary metabolites playing an important role in the induction of disease symptoms interfering with host plant physiological processes. Although fungal pathogens represent a heavy constraint for agrarian production and for forest and environmental heritage, they can also represent an ecofriendly alternative to manage weeds. Indeed, the phytotoxins produced by weed pathogenic fungi are an efficient tool to design natural, safe bioherbicides. Their use could avoid that of synthetic pesticides causing resistance in the host plants and the long term impact of residues in agricultural products with a risk to human and animal health. The isolation and structural and biological characterization of phytotoxins produced by pathogenic fungi for weeds, including parasitic plants, are described. Structure activity relationships and mode of action studies for some phytotoxins are also reported to elucidate the herbicide potential of these promising fungal metabolites. PMID:26443032

  11. Interfacing ?Soft? and ?Hard? Matter with Exquisite Chemical Control

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Y; Camarero, J A

    2006-01-13

    The present paper reviews the recent development of new chemical and biological technologies for the site-specific immobilization of proteins onto inorganic materials and their potential applications to the fields of micro and nanotechnology.

  12. Effects of mussel shell addition on the chemical and biological properties of a Cambisol.

    PubMed

    Paz-Ferreiro, J; Baez-Bernal, D; Castro Insúa, J; García Pomar, M I

    2012-03-01

    The use of a by-product of the fisheries industry (mussel shell) combined with cattle slurry was evaluated as soil amendment, with special attention to the biological component of soil. A wide number of properties related to soil quality were measured: microbial biomass, soil respiration, net N mineralization, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved organic nitrogen, dissolved inorganic nitrogen, dehydrogenase, β-glucosidase, urease and phosphomonoesterase activities. The amendments showed an enhancement of soil biological activity and a decrease of aluminium held in the cation exchange complex. No adverse effects were observed on soil properties. Given that mussel shells are produced in coastal areas as a by-product and have to be managed as a waste and the fertility constraints in the local soils due to their low pH, our research suggest that there is an opportunity for disposing a residue into the soil and improving soil fertility.

  13. Integration between chemical oxidation and membrane thermophilic biological process.

    PubMed

    Bertanza, G; Collivignarelli, M C; Crotti, B M; Pedrazzani, R

    2010-01-01

    Full scale applications of activated sludge thermophilic aerobic process for treatment of liquid wastes are rare. This experimental work was carried out at a facility, where a thermophilic reactor (1,000 m(3) volume) is operated. In order to improve the global performance of the plant, it was decided to upgrade it, by means of two membrane filtration units (ultrafiltration -UF-, in place of the final sedimentation, and nanofiltration -NF-). Subsequently, the integration with chemical oxidation (O(3) and H(2)O(2)/UV processes) was taken into consideration. Studied solutions dealt with oxidation of both the NF effluents (permeate and concentrate). Based on experimental results and economic evaluation, an algorithm was proposed for defining limits of convenience of this process.

  14. Psychological casualties resulting from chemical and biological weapons.

    PubMed

    Romano, J A; King, J M

    2001-12-01

    This symposium addresses the complications encountered by medical planners when confronted by the use or threat of the use of weapons of mass destruction. The types of chemical warfare agents (CWA), their principal target organs, and physiological effects are discussed. We have reviewed the use of CWA in 20th century warfare and otherwise with emphasis on five cases: (1) use of sulfur mustard during World War I; (2) use by Italy against Ethiopia; (3) use in the Sino-Japanese War; (4) relatively well-studied use in the Iran-Iraq conflict; and (5) the use of sarin in the Tokyo subway terrorist incident. We reviewed the additional physiological and psychological consequences of their use and threat of use. Results from training and simulation are discussed. Finally, we present our conclusions derived from the analysis of these historical situations.

  15. Silicon chip integrated photonic sensors for biological and chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Zou, Yi; Yan, Hai; Tang, Naimei; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate applications of photonic crystal waveguide based devices for on-chip optical absorption spectroscopy for the detection of chemical warfare simulant, triethylphosphate as well as applications with photonic crystal microcavity devices in the detection of biomarkers for pancreatic cancer in patient serum and cadmium metal ions in heavy metal pollution sensing. At mid-infrared wavelengths, we experimentally demonstrate the higher sensitivity of photonic crystal based structures compared to other nanophotonic devices such as strip and slot waveguides with detection down to 10ppm triethylphosphate. We also detected 5ppb (parts per billion) of cadmium metal ions in water at near-infrared wavelengths using established techniques for the detection of specific probe-target biomarker conjugation chemistries.

  16. Functional Nanostructured Platforms for Chemical and Biological Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Letant, S E

    2006-03-20

    The central goal of our work is to combine semiconductor nanotechnology and surface functionalization in order to build platforms for the selective detection of bio-organisms ranging in size from bacteria (micron range) down to viruses, as well as for the detection of chemical agents (nanometer range). We will show on three porous silicon platforms how pore geometry and pore wall chemistry can be combined and optimized to capture and detect specific targets. We developed a synthetic route allowing to directly anchor proteins on silicon surfaces and illustrated the relevance of this technique by immobilizing live enzymes onto electrochemically etched luminescent nano-porous silicon. The powerful association of the specific enzymes with the transducing matrix led to a selective hybrid platform for chemical sensing. We also used light-assisted electrochemistry to produce periodic arrays of through pores on pre-patterned silicon membranes with controlled diameters ranging from many microns down to tens of nanometers. We demonstrated the first covalently functionalized silicon membranes and illustrated their selective capture abilities with antibody-coated micro-beads. These engineered membranes are extremely versatile and could be adapted to specifically recognize the external fingerprints (size and coat composition) of target bio-organisms. Finally, we fabricated locally functionalized single nanopores using a combination of focused ion beam drilling and ion beam assisted oxide deposition. We showed how a silicon oxide ring can be grown around a single nanopore and how it can be functionalized with DNA probes to detect single viral-sized beads. The next step for this platform is the detection of whole viruses and bacteria.

  17. Functional nanostructured platforms for chemical and biological sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Létant, S. E.

    2006-05-01

    The central goal of our work is to combine semiconductor nanotechnology and surface functionalization in order to build platforms for the selective detection of bio-organisms ranging in size from bacteria (micron range) down to viruses, as well as for the detection of chemical agents (nanometer range). We will show on three porous silicon platforms how pore geometry and pore wall chemistry can be combined and optimized to capture and detect specific targets. We developed a synthetic route allowing to directly anchor proteins on silicon surfaces and illustrated the relevance of this technique by immobilizing live enzymes onto electrochemically etched luminescent nano-porous silicon. The powerful association of the specific enzymes with the transducing matrix led to a selective hybrid platform for chemical sensing. We also used light-assisted electrochemistry to produce periodic arrays of through pores on pre-patterned silicon membranes with controlled diameters ranging from many microns down to tens of nanometers. We demonstrated the first covalently functionalized silicon membranes and illustrated their selective capture abilities with antibody-coated micro-beads. These engineered membranes are extremely versatile and could be adapted to specifically recognize the external fingerprints (size and coat composition) of target bio-organisms. Finally, we fabricated locally functionalized single nanopores using a combination of focused ion beam drilling and ion beam assisted oxide deposition. We showed how a silicon oxide ring can be grown around a single nanopore and how it can be functionalized with DNA probes to detect single viral-sized beads. The next step for this platform is the detection of whole viruses and bacteria.

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: Biological and chemical sensors for cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Elfriede

    2010-11-01

    The great challenge for sensor systems to be accepted as a relevant diagnostic and therapeutic tool for cancer detection is the ability to determine the presence of relevant biomarkers or biomarker patterns comparably to or even better than the traditional analytical systems. Biosensor and chemical sensor technologies are already used for several clinical applications such as blood glucose or blood gas measurements. However, up to now not many sensors have been developed for cancer-related tests because only a few of the biomarkers have shown clinical relevance and the performance of the sensor systems is not always satisfactory. New genomic and proteomic tools are used to detect new molecular signatures and identify which combinations of biomarkers may detect best the presence or risk of cancer or monitor cancer therapies. These molecular signatures include genetic and epigenetic signatures, changes in gene expressions, protein biomarker profiles and other metabolite profile changes. They provide new changes in using different sensor technologies for cancer detection especially when complex biomarker patterns have to be analyzed. To address requirements for this complex analysis, there have been recent efforts to develop sensor arrays and new solutions (e.g. lab on a chip) in which sampling, preparation, high-throughput analysis and reporting are integrated. The ability of parallelization, miniaturization and the degree of automation are the focus of new developments and will be supported by nanotechnology approaches. This review recaps some scientific considerations about cancer diagnosis and cancer-related biomarkers, relevant biosensor and chemical sensor technologies, their application as cancer sensors and consideration about future challenges.

  19. Non-Chemical Distant Cellular Interactions as a potential confounder of cell biology experiments.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Ashkan

    2014-01-01

    Distant cells can communicate with each other through a variety of methods. Two such methods involve electrical and/or chemical mechanisms. Non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may be another method of communication that cells can use to modify the behavior of other cells that are mechanically separated. Moreover, non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may explain some cases of confounding effects in Cell Biology experiments. In this article, we review non-chemical, distant cellular interactions studies to try to shed light on the mechanisms in this highly unconventional field of cell biology. Despite the existence of several theories that try to explain the mechanism of non-chemical, distant cellular interactions, this phenomenon is still speculative. Among candidate mechanisms, electromagnetic waves appear to have the most experimental support. In this brief article, we try to answer a few key questions that may further clarify this mechanism.

  20. Chemical speciation of heavy metals by surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy: identification and quantification of inorganic- and methyl-mercury in water.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Luca; Rodriguez-Loureiro, Ignacio; Correa-Duarte, Miguel A; Lee, Yih Hong; Ling, Xing Yi; García de Abajo, F Javier; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A

    2014-07-21

    Chemical speciation of heavy metals has become extremely important in environmental and analytical research because of the strong dependence that toxicity, environmental mobility, persistence and bioavailability of these pollutants have on their specific chemical forms. Novel nano-optical-based detection strategies, capable of overcoming the intrinsic limitations of well-established analytic methods for the quantification of total metal ion content, have been reported, but the speciation of different chemical forms has not yet been achieved. Here, we report the first example of a SERS-based sensor for chemical speciation of toxic metal ions in water at trace levels. Specifically, the inorganic Hg(2+) and the more toxicologically relevant methylmercury (CH₃Hg(+)) are selected as analytical targets. The sensing platform consists of a self-assembled monolayer of 4-mercaptopyridine (MPY) on highly SERS-active and robust hybrid plasmonic materials formed by a dense layer of interacting gold nanoparticles anchored onto polystyrene microbeads. The co-ordination of Hg(2+) and CH₃Hg(+) to the nitrogen atom of the MPY ring yields characteristic changes in the vibrational SERS spectra of the organic chemoreceptor that can be qualitatively and quantitatively correlated to the presence of the two different mercury forms.

  1. Chemical speciation of heavy metals by surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy: identification and quantification of inorganic- and methyl-mercury in water.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Luca; Rodriguez-Loureiro, Ignacio; Correa-Duarte, Miguel A; Lee, Yih Hong; Ling, Xing Yi; García de Abajo, F Javier; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A

    2014-07-21

    Chemical speciation of heavy metals has become extremely important in environmental and analytical research because of the strong dependence that toxicity, environmental mobility, persistence and bioavailability of these pollutants have on their specific chemical forms. Novel nano-optical-based detection strategies, capable of overcoming the intrinsic limitations of well-established analytic methods for the quantification of total metal ion content, have been reported, but the speciation of different chemical forms has not yet been achieved. Here, we report the first example of a SERS-based sensor for chemical speciation of toxic metal ions in water at trace levels. Specifically, the inorganic Hg(2+) and the more toxicologically relevant methylmercury (CH₃Hg(+)) are selected as analytical targets. The sensing platform consists of a self-assembled monolayer of 4-mercaptopyridine (MPY) on highly SERS-active and robust hybrid plasmonic materials formed by a dense layer of interacting gold nanoparticles anchored onto polystyrene microbeads. The co-ordination of Hg(2+) and CH₃Hg(+) to the nitrogen atom of the MPY ring yields characteristic changes in the vibrational SERS spectra of the organic chemoreceptor that can be qualitatively and quantitatively correlated to the presence of the two different mercury forms. PMID:24938410

  2. Chemical constituents and biological activities of two Iranian Cystoseira species.

    PubMed

    Yegdaneh, Afsaneh; Ghannadi, Alireza; Dayani, Ladan

    2016-07-01

    The marine environment represents approximately half of the global biodiversity and could provide unlimited biological resources for the production of therapeutic drugs. Marine seaweeds comprise few thousands of species representing a considerable part of the littoral biomass. Extracts of the Cystoseira indica and Cystoseira merica were subjected to phytochemical and cytotoxicity evaluation. The amount of total phenol was determined with Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Cytotoxicity was characterized by IC50 of human cancer cell lines including MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma), HeLa (cervical carcinoma), and HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma) using Sulforhodamin assay. Antioxidant activities were evaluated using 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. The analysis revealed that tannins, saponins, sterols and triterpenes were the most abundant constituents in these Cystoseira species while cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides were the least ones. C. indica had the higher content of total phenolics and also showed higher antioxidant activity. Cytotoxic results showed that both species inhibited cell growth effectively, especially against MCF-7 cell line. The present findings suggest potential pharmacological applications of selected seaweeds but require further investigation and identification of their bioactive principles. PMID:27651811

  3. Chemical constituents and biological activities of two Iranian Cystoseira species

    PubMed Central

    Yegdaneh, Afsaneh; Ghannadi, Alireza; Dayani, Ladan

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment represents approximately half of the global biodiversity and could provide unlimited biological resources for the production of therapeutic drugs. Marine seaweeds comprise few thousands of species representing a considerable part of the littoral biomass. Extracts of the Cystoseira indica and Cystoseira merica were subjected to phytochemical and cytotoxicity evaluation. The amount of total phenol was determined with Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Cytotoxicity was characterized by IC50 of human cancer cell lines including MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma), HeLa (cervical carcinoma), and HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma) using Sulforhodamin assay. Antioxidant activities were evaluated using 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. The analysis revealed that tannins, saponins, sterols and triterpenes were the most abundant constituents in these Cystoseira species while cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides were the least ones. C. indica had the higher content of total phenolics and also showed higher antioxidant activity. Cytotoxic results showed that both species inhibited cell growth effectively, especially against MCF-7 cell line. The present findings suggest potential pharmacological applications of selected seaweeds but require further investigation and identification of their bioactive principles. PMID:27651811

  4. Chemical constituents and biological activities of two Iranian Cystoseira species

    PubMed Central

    Yegdaneh, Afsaneh; Ghannadi, Alireza; Dayani, Ladan

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment represents approximately half of the global biodiversity and could provide unlimited biological resources for the production of therapeutic drugs. Marine seaweeds comprise few thousands of species representing a considerable part of the littoral biomass. Extracts of the Cystoseira indica and Cystoseira merica were subjected to phytochemical and cytotoxicity evaluation. The amount of total phenol was determined with Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Cytotoxicity was characterized by IC50 of human cancer cell lines including MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma), HeLa (cervical carcinoma), and HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma) using Sulforhodamin assay. Antioxidant activities were evaluated using 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. The analysis revealed that tannins, saponins, sterols and triterpenes were the most abundant constituents in these Cystoseira species while cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides were the least ones. C. indica had the higher content of total phenolics and also showed higher antioxidant activity. Cytotoxic results showed that both species inhibited cell growth effectively, especially against MCF-7 cell line. The present findings suggest potential pharmacological applications of selected seaweeds but require further investigation and identification of their bioactive principles.

  5. Bioturbo similarity searching: combining chemical and biological similarity to discover structurally diverse bioactive molecules.

    PubMed

    Wassermann, Anne Mai; Lounkine, Eugen; Glick, Meir

    2013-03-25

    Virtual screening using bioactivity profiles has become an integral part of currently applied hit finding methods in pharmaceutical industry. However, a significant drawback of this approach is that it is only applicable to compounds that have been biologically tested in the past and have sufficient activity annotations for meaningful profile comparisons. Although bioactivity data generated in pharmaceutical institutions are growing on an unprecedented scale, the number of biologically annotated compounds still covers only a minuscule fraction of chemical space. For a newly synthesized compound or an isolated natural product to be biologically characterized across multiple assays, it may take a considerable amount of time. Consequently, this chemical matter will not be included in virtual screening campaigns based on bioactivity profiles. To overcome this problem, we herein introduce bioturbo similarity searching that uses chemical similarity to map molecules without biological annotations into bioactivity space and then searches for biologically similar compounds in this reference system. In benchmark calculations on primary screening data, we demonstrate that our approach generally achieves higher hit rates and identifies structurally more diverse compounds than approaches using chemical information only. Furthermore, our method is able to discover hits with novel modes of inhibition that traditional 2D and 3D similarity approaches are unlikely to discover. Test calculations on a set of natural products reveal the practical utility of the approach for identifying novel and synthetically more accessible chemical matter.

  6. EU-OPENSCREEN-chemical tools for the study of plant biology and resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Meiners, Torsten; Stechmann, Bahne; Frank, Ronald

    2014-10-01

    EU-OPENSCREEN is an academic research infrastructure initiative in Europe for enabling researchers in all life sciences to take advantage of chemical biology approaches to their projects. In a collaborative effort of national networks in 16 European countries, EU-OPENSCREEN will develop novel chemical compounds with external users to address questions in, among other fields, systems and network biology (directed and selective perturbation of signalling pathways), structural biology (compound-target interactions at atomic resolution), pharmacology (early drug discovery and toxicology) and plant biology (response of wild or crop plants to environmental and agricultural substances). EU-OPENSCREEN supports all stages of a tool development project, including assay adaptation, high-throughput screening and chemical optimisation of the 'hit' compounds. All tool compounds and data will be made available to the scientific community. EU-OPENSCREEN integrates high-capacity screening platforms throughout Europe, which share a rationally selected compound collection comprising up to 300,000 (commercial and proprietary compounds collected from European chemists). By testing systematically this chemical collection in hundreds of assays originating from very different biological themes, the screening process generates enormous amounts of information about the biological activities of the substances and thereby steadily enriches our understanding of how and where they act.

  7. UVA radiation induced ultrafast electron transfer from a food carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene to organic molecules, biological macromolecules, and inorganic nano structures.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Soma; Sarkar, Soumik; Lakshman, Karthik; Dutta, Joydeep; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2013-04-11

    Reactions involving electron transfer (ET) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a pivotal role in carcinogenesis and cancer biochemistry. Our present study emphasizes UVA radiation induced ET reaction as one of the key aspects of a potential carcinogen, benzo[a]pyrene (BP), in the presence of a wide variety of molecules covering organic p-benzoquinone (BQ), biological macromolecules like calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA), human serum albumin (HSA) protein, and inorganic zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs). Steady-state and picosecond-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy have been used to monitor such ET reactions. Physical consequences of BP association with CT-DNA have been investigated through temperature-dependent circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The temperature-dependent steady-state, picosecond-resolved fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy studies reveal the effect of temperature on the perturbation of such ET reactions from BP to biological macromolecules, highlighting their temperature-dependent association. Furthermore, the electron-donating property of BP has been corroborated by measuring wavelength-dependent photocurrent in a BP-anchored ZnO NR-based photodevice, offering new physical insights for the carcinogenic study of BP.

  8. Developing the Biomolecular Screening Facility at the EPFL into the Chemical Biology Screening Platform for Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Turcatti, Gerardo

    2014-05-01

    The Biomolecular Screening Facility (BSF) is a multidisciplinary laboratory created in 2006 at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) to perform medium and high throughput screening in life sciences-related projects. The BSF was conceived and developed to meet the needs of a wide range of researchers, without privileging a particular biological discipline or therapeutic area. The facility has the necessary infrastructure, multidisciplinary expertise and flexibility to perform large screening programs using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and chemical collections in the areas of chemical biology, systems biology and drug discovery. In the framework of the National Centres of Competence in Research (NCCR) Chemical Biology, the BSF is hosting 'ACCESS', the Academic Chemical Screening Platform of Switzerland that provides the scientific community with chemical diversity, screening facilities and know-how in chemical genetics. In addition, the BSF started its own applied research axes that are driven by innovation in thematic areas related to preclinical drug discovery and discovery of bioactive probes.

  9. Chemical and biological characterization of sclerosin, an antifungal lipopeptide.

    PubMed

    Berry, Chrystal L; Brassinga, Ann Karen C; Donald, Lynda J; Fernando, W G Dilantha; Loewen, Peter C; de Kievit, Teresa R

    2012-08-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain DF41 produces a lipopeptide, called sclerosin that inhibits the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum . The aim of the current study was to deduce the chemical structure of this lipopeptide and further characterize its bioactivity. Mass spectrometry analysis determined the structure of sclerosin to be CH(3)-(CH(2))(6)-CH(OH)-CH(2)-CO-Dhb-Pro-Ala-Leu/Ile-Ala-Val-Val-Dhb-Thr-Val-Leu/Ile-Dhp-Ala-Ala-Ala-Val-Dhb-Dhb-Ala-Dab-Ser-Val-OH, similar to corpeptins A and B of the tolaasin group, differing by only 3 amino acids in the peptide chain. Subjecting sclerosin to various ring opening procedures revealed no new ions, suggesting that this molecule is linear. As such, sclerosin represents a new member of the tolaasin lipopeptide group. Incubation of S. sclerotinia ascospores and sclerotia in the presence of sclerosin inhibited the germination of both cell types. Sclerosin also exhibited antimicrobial activity against Bacillus species. Conversely, this lipopeptide demonstrated no zoosporicidal activity against the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans . Next, we assessed the effect of DF41 and a lipopeptide-deficient mutant on the growth and development of Caenorhabditis elegans larvae. We discovered that sclerosin did not protect DF41 from ingestion by and degradation in the C. elegans digestive tract. However, another metabolite produced by this bacterium appeared to shorten the life-span of the nematode compared to C. elegans growing on Escherichia coli OP50. PMID:22838838

  10. Measurements of gas-phase inorganic and organic acids from biomass fires by negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, Patrick; Roberts, James M.; Burling, Ian R.; Warneke, Carsten; de Gouw, Joost; Yokelson, Robert J.

    2010-12-01

    Emissions from 34 laboratory biomass fires were investigated at the combustion facility of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. Gas-phase organic and inorganic acids were quantified using negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS), open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (OP-FTIR), and proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). NI-PT-CIMS is a novel technique that measures the mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) of ions generated from reactions of acetate (CH3C(O)O-) ions with inorganic and organic acids. The emission ratios for various important reactive acids with respect to CO were determined. Emission ratios for isocyanic acid (HNCO), 1,2 and 1,3-benzenediols (catechol, resorcinol), nitrous acid (HONO), acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, propionic acid, formic acid, pyruvic acid, and glycolic acid were measured from biomass burning. Our measurements show that there is a significant amount of HONO in fresh smoke. The NI-PT-CIMS measurements were validated by comparison with OP-FTIR measurements of HONO and formic acid (HCOOH) and with PTR-MS measurements of HCOOH.

  11. Enhancement of activated sludge dewatering performance by combined composite enzymatic lysis and chemical re-flocculation with inorganic coagulants: Kinetics of enzymatic reaction and re-flocculation morphology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhan; Zhang, Weijun; Wang, Dongsheng; Ma, Teng; Bai, Runying

    2015-10-15

    The feasibility of combined process of composite enzymatic treatment and chemical flocculation with inorganic salt coagulants was investigated in this study. The evolution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) distribution, composition and morphological properties were analyzed to unravel the sludge conditioning mechanism. It was found that sludge filtration performance was deteriorated due to release of a large amount of biopolymers after enzymatic treatment. The change in EPS followed the pseudo-first-order kinetic equation well under enzymatic treatment. The feeding modes of enzymes had a significant influence on sludge lysis efficiency under compound enzymes treatment. Alpha amylase + protease was more effective in solubilization than other two addition modes (protease + α-amylase or simultaneous addition). The sludge floc re-formed and macromolecule biopolymers were effectively removed through coagulation process. At the same time, both of filtration rate and cake solid content of sludge treated with enzymes were improved with increasing dosage of coagulants, and ferric iron (FeCl3) had better performance in sludge dewaterability enhancement than polyaluminium chloride (PACl). In addition, sludge filtration property was slightly deteriorated, while the cake moisture reduction was favored at the optimal dosage of inorganic coagulants.

  12. Lead and compounds (inorganic)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Lead and compounds ( inorganic ) ; CASRN 7439 - 92 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  13. Biological treatments affect the chemical composition of coffee pulp.

    PubMed

    Ulloa Rojas, J B; Verreth, J A J; Amato, S; Huisman, E A

    2003-09-01

    Biological treatments were applied to fresh coffee pulp (CoP) to improve its nutritive value for monogastric animals by reducing its content of cellulose and antinutritional factors (ANFs) such as total phenols, tannins and caffeine. Treatments were: (1) ensiling with 0, 50 and 100 gkg(-1) molasses for 2 and 3 months, (2) aerobic decomposition for 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 days, (3) aerobic bacterial inoculation (Bacillus sp.) for 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. Ensiled CoP (E-CoP) showed higher fat and ash contents than oven-dried-CoP (OD-CoP; P<0.05). Similarly, true protein values tended to increase. The cellulose and total phenols levels of E-CoP were lower than OD-CoP (P<0.05). The E-CoP tannins levels tended to be lower than OD-CoP whereas caffeine levels remained unaffected. Improvement in the nutritional quality of E-CoP was associated with higher fat and protein contents and reduction of cellulose, total phenols and tannins. The aerobic decomposition treatment improved the nutritional quality of CoP by increasing true protein and fat contents. In addition, total phenols, tannins, caffeine and cellulose contents were reduced by an increase in treatment time (P<0.05). Bacterial treatment increased the protein content of CoP after 21 days (from 137 to 392 gkg(-1)) and decreased it after 28 days. Cellulose, total phenols, tannins and caffeine contents reduced with an increase in time of bacterial degradation. Bacterial treatment improved the CoP quality by increasing protein content and reducing cellulose and ANFs, especially after 21 days of treatment. Both the aerobic decomposition (after 21-28 days) and the aerobic bacterial degradation of CoP (after 21 days) appeared more suitable to improve the nutritional quality of CoP than the ensiling.

  14. Biological activities and chemical composition of lichens from Serbia

    PubMed Central

    Kosanic, Marijana; Rankovic, Branislav; Stanojkovic, Tatjana; Vasiljevic, Perica; Manojlovic, Nedeljko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate chemical composition of acetone extracts of the lichens Parmelia arseneana and Acarospora fuscata and in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities of these extracts and gyrophoric acid isolated from A. fuscata. The HPLC-UV method was used for the identification of secondary metabolites. Stictic acid, norstictic acid, gyrophoric acid, usnic acid, atranorin and chloroatranorin were identified in the A. fuscata. In P. arseneana, we detected stictic acid, norstictic acid, usnic acid and atranorin, while gyrophoric acid was not identified. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by measuring the scavenging capacity of tested samples on DPPH and superoxide anion radicals, reducing the power of samples and determination of total phenolic compounds in extracts. As a result of the study, gyrophoric acid was found to have the largest DPPH radical scavenging activity with an IC50 value of 105.75 µg/ml. Moreover, the tested samples had an effective superoxide anion radical scavenging and reducing power. The total content of phenol in extracts was determined as pyrocatechol equivalent. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method. The most active was also gyrophoric acid, with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.019 to 1.25 mg/ml. Anticancer activity was tested against LS174 (human colon carcinoma cell line), A549 (human lung carcinoma cell line), Fem-x (malignant melanoma cell line), and a chronic myelogeneous leukaemia K562 cell line using the MTT method. Extract of P. arseneana expressed the strongest anticancer activity against all cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 11.61 to 47.06 µg/ml. PMID:26417336

  15. Biological activities and chemical composition of lichens from Serbia.

    PubMed

    Kosanic, Marijana; Rankovic, Branislav; Stanojkovic, Tatjana; Vasiljevic, Perica; Manojlovic, Nedeljko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate chemical composition of acetone extracts of the lichens Parmelia arseneana and Acarospora fuscata and in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities of these extracts and gyrophoric acid isolated from A. fuscata. The HPLC-UV method was used for the identification of secondary metabolites. Stictic acid, norstictic acid, gyrophoric acid, usnic acid, atranorin and chloroatranorin were identified in the A. fuscata. In P. arseneana, we detected stictic acid, norstictic acid, usnic acid and atranorin, while gyrophoric acid was not identified. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by measuring the scavenging capacity of tested samples on DPPH and superoxide anion radicals, reducing the power of samples and determination of total phenolic compounds in extracts. As a result of the study, gyrophoric acid was found to have the largest DPPH radical scavenging activity with an IC50 value of 105.75 µg/ml. Moreover, the tested samples had an effective superoxide anion radical scavenging and reducing power. The total content of phenol in extracts was determined as pyrocatechol equivalent. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method. The most active was also gyrophoric acid, with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.019 to 1.25 mg/ml. Anticancer activity was tested against LS174 (human colon carcinoma cell line), A549 (human lung carcinoma cell line), Fem-x (malignant melanoma cell line), and a chronic myelogeneous leukaemia K562 cell line using the MTT method. Extract of P. arseneana expressed the strongest anticancer activity against all cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 11.61 to 47.06 µg/ml. PMID:26417336

  16. On-line speciation of inorganic and methyl mercury in waters and fish tissues using polyaniline micro-column and flow injection-chemical vapour generation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICPMS).

    PubMed

    Krishna, M V Balarama; Chandrasekaran, K; Karunasagar, D

    2010-04-15

    A simple and efficient method for the determination of ultra-trace amounts of inorganic mercury (iHg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in waters and fish tissues was developed using a micro-column filled with polyaniline (PANI) coupled online to flow injection-chemical vapour generation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICPMS) system. Preliminary studies indicated that inorganic and methyl mercury species could be separated on PANI column in two different speciation approaches. At pH <3, only iHg could be sorbed and almost no adsorption of MeHg was found (speciation procedure 1). If the sample solution pH is approximately 7, both MeHg and iHg species could be sorbed on the PANI column. Subsequently both the Hg species were selectively eluted with 2% HCl and a mixture of 2% HCl and 0.02% thiourea respectively (speciation procedure 2). The adsorption percentage of iHg on the PANI column was unchanged even with acidity of the sample solution increased to 6 mol L(-1). Therefore, an acidic solution (5 mol L(-1) HCl), used for ultra-sound assisted extraction of the mercury species from biological samples, was used directly to separate MeHg from iHg in the fish tissues (tuna fish ERM-CE 463, ERM-CE 464 and IAEA-350) by PANI column using speciation procedure 1. The determined values were in good agreement with certified values. Under optimal conditions, the limits of detection (LODs) were 2.52 pg and 3.24 pg for iHg and MeHg (as Hg) respectively. The developed method was applied successfully to the direct determination of iHg and MeHg in various waters (tap water, lake water, ground water and sea-water) and the recoveries for the spiked samples were in the range of 96-102% for both the Hg species. PMID:20188947

  17. On-line speciation of inorganic and methyl mercury in waters and fish tissues using polyaniline micro-column and flow injection-chemical vapour generation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICPMS).

    PubMed

    Krishna, M V Balarama; Chandrasekaran, K; Karunasagar, D

    2010-04-15

    A simple and efficient method for the determination of ultra-trace amounts of inorganic mercury (iHg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in waters and fish tissues was developed using a micro-column filled with polyaniline (PANI) coupled online to flow injection-chemical vapour generation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICPMS) system. Preliminary studies indicated that inorganic and methyl mercury species could be separated on PANI column in two different speciation approaches. At pH <3, only iHg could be sorbed and almost no adsorption of MeHg was found (speciation procedure 1). If the sample solution pH is approximately 7, both MeHg and iHg species could be sorbed on the PANI column. Subsequently both the Hg species were selectively eluted with 2% HCl and a mixture of 2% HCl and 0.02% thiourea respectively (speciation procedure 2). The adsorption percentage of iHg on the PANI column was unchanged even with acidity of the sample solution increased to 6 mol L(-1). Therefore, an acidic solution (5 mol L(-1) HCl), used for ultra-sound assisted extraction of the mercury species from biological samples, was used directly to separate MeHg from iHg in the fish tissues (tuna fish ERM-CE 463, ERM-CE 464 and IAEA-350) by PANI column using speciation procedure 1. The determined values were in good agreement with certified values. Under optimal conditions, the limits of detection (LODs) were 2.52 pg and 3.24 pg for iHg and MeHg (as Hg) respectively. The developed method was applied successfully to the direct determination of iHg and MeHg in various waters (tap water, lake water, ground water and sea-water) and the recoveries for the spiked samples were in the range of 96-102% for both the Hg species.

  18. Biological and Chemical Characterization of Endotoxin from Capnocytophaga sputigena

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, R. H.; Sela, M. N.; McArthur, W. P.; Nowotny, A.; Hammond, B. F.

    1980-01-01

    An endotoxin was isolated from Capnocytophaga sputigena strain 4 by a modification of the hot phenol-water method. The extraction procedure yielded a lipopolysaccharide which accounted for approximately 1.5% of the dry weight of the cells. The material was composed of 18.6% lipid (as C15 fatty acid), 46.5% neutral sugar including 9.6% hexose, 18.3% 6-deoxy sugar, 1.0% 2-keto-3-deoxy sugar, and 4.8% heptose. Hexosamine, protein, and phosphorus were found in quantities amounting to 9.0, 2.9, and 2.0% of the dry weight, respectively. No pentose or nucleic acid was detected. Acid hydrolysis resulted in the release of the constituent sugars and the formation of an insoluble precipitate. The lipopolysaccharide was tested for numerous biological activities characteristic of endotoxins. The pyrogenicity was relatively low; the fever index 40 was 17 μg, and 10 μg was required to give the characteristic biphasic fever response. The toxicity of the extract was very low, with a 50% chicken embryo lethal dose of 15.6 μg and a 50% mouse embryo lethal dose of greater than 8 mg. Similarly, the C. sputigena endotoxin had modest effects on leukocytes when compared with endotoxin standards from other organisms. The extract exhibited little or no mitogenicity when tested on mouse spleen lymphocytes. It was not toxic to human peripheral polymorphonuclear leukocytes and caused the release of only a small (13%) portion of lysosomal enzymes. Although the C. sputigena lipopolysaccharide caused significant activation of mouse peritoneal macrophages, the dose required was twice that of an Escherichia coli endotoxic standard. However, the Limulus amoebocyte lysate clotting activity of the lipopolysaccharide was comparable to that of an Serratia marcescens lipopolysaccharide standard, and passive hemagglutination tests revealed that 1 μg of the lipopolysaccharide was capable of sensitizing 1 ml of a 2% sheep erythrocyte suspension for agglutination with an antiserum prepared against C

  19. Remote Detection of Biological Particles and Chemical Plumes Using UV Fluorescence Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiee, J. J.; Hof, D. E.; Karl, R. R.; Martinez, R. J.; Quick, C. R.; Cooper, D. I.; Eichinger, W. E.; Holtkamp, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    A lidar system based on ultraviolet (UV) laser induced fluorescence (LIF) was developed for the remote detection of atmospherically dispersed biological particles and chemical vapors. This UV fluorescence lidar has many potential applications for monitoring environmental pollution, industrial waste emission, agricultural insect control, illicit chemical processing, and military defense operations. The general goal of this work is to investigate the research issues associated with the long range detection and identification of chemicals, e.g. aromatic solvents and chemical precursors, and biological materials, e.g. bacillus thuringiensis (BT) and bacillus globiggi (BG). In the detection of biological particulates, we are particularly interested in extending the detection range of an existing solar-blind 248-nm lidar system. We are investigating the use of longer excitation laser wavelengths (i.e. lambda greater than 280-nm to have more favorable atmospheric light transmission characteristics) for improving detection range to better than 10 km. In the detection of chemical plumes, our main research objectives are to determine how accurately and sensitively a chemical plume can be located at range, and how well spectrally the chemical species can be measured to allow their identification.

  20. Seeking the chemical roots of darwinism: bridging between chemistry and biology.

    PubMed

    Pross, Addy

    2009-08-24

    Chemistry and biology are intimately connected sciences yet the chemistry-biology interface remains problematic and central issues regarding the very essence of living systems remain unresolved. In this essay we build on a kinetic theory of replicating systems that encompasses the idea that there are two distinct kinds of stability in nature-thermodynamic stability, associated with "regular" chemical systems, and dynamic kinetic stability, associated with replicating systems. That fundamental distinction is utilized to bridge between chemistry and biology by demonstrating that within the parallel world of replicating systems there is a second law analogue to the second law of thermodynamics, and that Darwinian theory may, through scientific reductionism, be related to that second law analogue. Possible implications of these ideas to the origin of life problem and the relationship between chemical emergence and biological evolution are discussed.

  1. Recent Progress of Propolis for Its Biological and Chemical Compositions and Its Botanical Origin

    PubMed Central

    Toreti, Viviane Cristina; Sato, Helia Harumi; Pastore, Glaucia Maria; Park, Yong Kun

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is the generic name given to the product obtained from resinous substances, which is gummy and balsamic and which is collected by bees from flowers, buds, and exudates of plants. It is a popular folk medicine possessing a broad spectrum of biological activities. These biological properties are related to its chemical composition and more specifically to the phenolic compounds that vary in their structure and concentration depending on the region of production, availability of sources to collect plant resins, genetic variability of the queen bee, the technique used for production, and the season in which propolis is produced. Many scientific articles are published every year in different international journal, and several groups of researchers have focused their attention on the chemical compounds and biological activity of propolis. This paper presents a review on the publications on propolis and patents of applications and biological constituents of propolis. PMID:23737843

  2. 75 FR 62916 - Re-Delegation by the Under Secretary of State to the Director, Office of Chemical and Biological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ...-Delegation by the Under Secretary of State to the Director, Office of Chemical and Biological Weapons Affairs... Chemical Weapons Convention Implementation Act of 1998, Division I of Pub. L. 105-277, codified at 22 U.S.C..., 2007, I hereby re-delegate to the Director, Office of Chemical and Biological Weapons Affairs,...

  3. Secondary Metabolites from the Marine Algal-Derived Endophytic Fungi: Chemical Diversity and Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Xin; Wang, Bin-Gui

    2016-06-01

    Marine algal-derived endophytic fungi have attracted considerable attention in the most recent two decades due to their prolific production of structurally diverse secondary metabolites with various biological activities. This review summarizes a total of 182 natural products isolated from marine algal-derived endophytic fungi in the past two decades. The emphasis is on the unique chemical diversity of these metabolic products, together with relevant biological activities.

  4. Method and apparatus for the gas phase decontamination of chemical and biological agents

    DOEpatents

    O'Neill, Hugh J.; Brubaker, Kenneth L.

    2003-10-07

    An apparatus and method for decontaminating chemical and biological agents using the reactive properties of both the single atomic oxygen and the hydroxyl radical for the decontamination of chemical and biological agents. The apparatus is self contained and portable and allows for the application of gas reactants directly at the required decontamination point. The system provides for the use of ultraviolet light of a specific spectral range to photolytically break down ozone into molecular oxygen and hydroxyl radicals where some of the molecular oxygen is in the first excited state. The excited molecular oxygen will combine with water vapor to produce two hydroxyl radicals.

  5. The efforts of WHO and Pugwash to eliminate chemical and biological weapons--a memoir.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, M. M.

    1999-01-01

    The World Health Organization and the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs (Nobel Peace Prize 1995) have been involved in questions concerning chemical and biological arms since the early 1950s. This memoir reviews a number of milestones in the efforts of these organizations to achieve the elimination of these weapons through international treaties effectively monitored and enforced for adherence to their provisions. It also highlights a number of outstanding personalities who were involved in the efforts to establish and implement the two major treaties now in effect, the Biological Weapons Convention of 1972 and the Chemical Weapons Convention of 1993. PMID:10083714

  6. Metabolic Engineering for Production of Biorenewable Fuels and Chemicals: Contributions of Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Jarboe, Laura R.; Zhang, Xueli; Wang, Xuan; Moore, Jonathan C.; Shanmugam, K. T.; Ingram, Lonnie O.

    2010-01-01

    Production of fuels and chemicals through microbial fermentation of plant material is a desirable alternative to petrochemical-based production. Fermentative production of biorenewable fuels and chemicals requires the engineering of biocatalysts that can quickly and efficiently convert sugars to target products at a cost that is competitive with existing petrochemical-based processes. It is also important that biocatalysts be robust to extreme fermentation conditions, biomass-derived inhibitors, and their target products. Traditional metabolic engineering has made great advances in this area, but synthetic biology has contributed and will continue to contribute to this field, particularly with next-generation biofuels. This work reviews the use of metabolic engineering and synthetic biology in biocatalyst engineering for biorenewable fuels and chemicals production, such as ethanol, butanol, acetate, lactate, succinate, alanine, and xylitol. We also examine the existing challenges in this area and discuss strategies for improving biocatalyst tolerance to chemical inhibitors. PMID:20414363

  7. Large-Area Chemical and Biological Decontamination Using a High Energy Arc Lamp (HEAL) System.

    SciTech Connect

    Duty, Chad E; Smith, Rob R; Vass, Arpad Alexander; Ilgner, Ralph H; Brown, Gilbert M

    2008-01-01

    Methods for quickly decontaminating large areas exposed to chemical and biological (CB) warfare agents can present significant logistical, manpower, and waste management challenges. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is pursuing an alternate method to decompose CB agents without the use of toxic chemicals or other potentially harmful substances. This process uses a high energy arc lamp (HEAL) system to photochemically decompose CB agents over large areas (12 m2). Preliminary tests indicate that more than 5 decades (99.999%) of an Anthrax spore simulant (Bacillus globigii) were killed in less than 7 seconds of exposure to the HEAL system. When combined with a catalyst material (TiO2) the HEAL system was also effective against a chemical agent simulant, diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP). These results demonstrate the feasibility of a rapid, large-area chemical and biological decontamination method that does not require toxic or corrosive reagents or generate hazardous wastes.

  8. Health Outcomes of Exposure to Biological and Chemical Components of Inhalable and Respirable Particulate Matter.

    PubMed

    Morakinyo, Oyewale Mayowa; Mokgobu, Matlou Ingrid; Mukhola, Murembiwa Stanley; Hunter, Raymond Paul

    2016-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) is a key indicator of air pollution and a significant risk factor for adverse health outcomes in humans. PM is not a self-contained pollutant but a mixture of different compounds including chemical and biological fractions. While several reviews have focused on the chemical components of PM and associated health effects, there is a dearth of review studies that holistically examine the role of biological and chemical components of inhalable and respirable PM in disease causation. A literature search using various search engines and (or) keywords was done. Articles selected for review were chosen following predefined criteria, to extract and analyze data. The results show that the biological and chemical components of inhalable and respirable PM play a significant role in the burden of health effects attributed to PM. These health outcomes include low birth weight, emergency room visit, hospital admission, respiratory and pulmonary diseases, cardiovascular disease, cancer, non-communicable diseases, and premature death, among others. This review justifies the importance of each or synergistic effects of the biological and chemical constituents of PM on health. It also provides information that informs policy on the establishment of exposure limits for PM composition metrics rather than the existing exposure limits of the total mass of PM. This will allow for more effective management strategies for improving outdoor air quality.

  9. Biologically inspired large scale chemical sensor arrays and embedded data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, S.; Gutiérrez-Gálvez, A.; Lansner, A.; Martinez, D.; Rospars, J. P.; Beccherelli, R.; Perera, A.; Pearce, T.; Vershure, P.; Persaud, K.

    2013-05-01

    Biological olfaction outperforms chemical instrumentation in specificity, response time, detection limit, coding capacity, time stability, robustness, size, power consumption, and portability. This biological function provides outstanding performance due, to a large extent, to the unique architecture of the olfactory pathway, which combines a high degree of redundancy, an efficient combinatorial coding along with unmatched chemical information processing mechanisms. The last decade has witnessed important advances in the understanding of the computational primitives underlying the functioning of the olfactory system. EU Funded Project NEUROCHEM (Bio-ICT-FET- 216916) has developed novel computing paradigms and biologically motivated artefacts for chemical sensing taking inspiration from the biological olfactory pathway. To demonstrate this approach, a biomimetic demonstrator has been built featuring a large scale sensor array (65K elements) in conducting polymer technology mimicking the olfactory receptor neuron layer, and abstracted biomimetic algorithms have been implemented in an embedded system that interfaces the chemical sensors. The embedded system integrates computational models of the main anatomic building blocks in the olfactory pathway: the olfactory bulb, and olfactory cortex in vertebrates (alternatively, antennal lobe and mushroom bodies in the insect). For implementation in the embedded processor an abstraction phase has been carried out in which their processing capabilities are captured by algorithmic solutions. Finally, the algorithmic models are tested with an odour robot with navigation capabilities in mixed chemical plumes

  10. Health Outcomes of Exposure to Biological and Chemical Components of Inhalable and Respirable Particulate Matter

    PubMed Central

    Morakinyo, Oyewale Mayowa; Mokgobu, Matlou Ingrid; Mukhola, Murembiwa Stanley; Hunter, Raymond Paul

    2016-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) is a key indicator of air pollution and a significant risk factor for adverse health outcomes in humans. PM is not a self-contained pollutant but a mixture of different compounds including chemical and biological fractions. While several reviews have focused on the chemical components of PM and associated health effects, there is a dearth of review studies that holistically examine the role of biological and chemical components of inhalable and respirable PM in disease causation. A literature search using various search engines and (or) keywords was done. Articles selected for review were chosen following predefined criteria, to extract and analyze data. The results show that the biological and chemical components of inhalable and respirable PM play a significant role in the burden of health effects attributed to PM. These health outcomes include low birth weight, emergency room visit, hospital admission, respiratory and pulmonary diseases, cardiovascular disease, cancer, non-communicable diseases, and premature death, among others. This review justifies the importance of each or synergistic effects of the biological and chemical constituents of PM on health. It also provides information that informs policy on the establishment of exposure limits for PM composition metrics rather than the existing exposure limits of the total mass of PM. This will allow for more effective management strategies for improving outdoor air quality. PMID:27314370

  11. Reconnaissance survey of chemical contamination and biological effects in southern Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The report describes the results of a field survey south of the Tacoma Narrows bridge in southern Puget Sound. Environmental conditions were evaluated in two urban embayments, eight nonurban embayments and three areas of the main channel in the southern Sound. Stations were located in depositional areas where chemical contaminants would be expected to accumulate in the sediments. All stations were located away from known contaminant sources in order to provide integrative assessments of contamination over relatively large areas. Chemical contamination of the south Sound was evaluated by measuring chemical concentrations in subtidal bottom sediments. Bioaccumulation of chemical contaminants was evaluated by measuring chemical concentrations in flatfish muscle tissues and littleneck clam meats. Chemical-related biological effects were evaluated by conducting amphipod sediment bioassays and histopathological analyses on livers of English sole.

  12. The characterization and distribution of inorganic chemicals in tributary waters of the lower Athabasca river, Oilsands region, Canada.

    PubMed

    Headley, J V; Crosley, B; Conly, F M; Quagraine, E K

    2005-01-01

    At present, there are two large industrial plants recovering oil from the lower Athabasca oil sands area and there are plans for several more mines in the area. There are environmental concerns for aquatic life in areas downstream of current and future oil sands activities. To assess and predict potential impacts of industrial activities, it is important to separate impacts from those produced by naturally occurring oil sands deposit. Studies were therefore conducted to determine whether the water quality of tributaries to the Athabasca River, which have not been impacted by anthropogenic activities, is affected by inorganic constituents resulting from flowing through reaches with natural oilsands deposit. Three tributaries, Steepbank River, Mackay River, and Ells River at upstream and downstream locations on each stream were investigated during four surveys from 1998 to 2000. In addition to some physical parameters such as pH, conductance and hardness and the major ions (calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, bicarbonate, chloride, sulfate, and silicates), seventeen trace metals were investigated. Some of these metals, especially iron and manganese, were of high concentrations and in some instances, particularly in a survey conducted during the spring freshets in April 1999, exceeded guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. The observed concentrations of metals seem to be of natural origin and can be used as base-line data for future assessment of anthropogenic activities in the oil sand region.

  13. The characterization and distribution of inorganic chemicals in tributary waters of the lower Athabasca river, Oilsands region, Canada.

    PubMed

    Headley, J V; Crosley, B; Conly, F M; Quagraine, E K

    2005-01-01

    At present, there are two large industrial plants recovering oil from the lower Athabasca oil sands area and there are plans for several more mines in the area. There are environmental concerns for aquatic life in areas downstream of current and future oil sands activities. To assess and predict potential impacts of industrial activities, it is important to separate impacts from those produced by naturally occurring oil sands deposit. Studies were therefore conducted to determine whether the water quality of tributaries to the Athabasca River, which have not been impacted by anthropogenic activities, is affected by inorganic constituents resulting from flowing through reaches with natural oilsands deposit. Three tributaries, Steepbank River, Mackay River, and Ells River at upstream and downstream locations on each stream were investigated during four surveys from 1998 to 2000. In addition to some physical parameters such as pH, conductance and hardness and the major ions (calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, bicarbonate, chloride, sulfate, and silicates), seventeen trace metals were investigated. Some of these metals, especially iron and manganese, were of high concentrations and in some instances, particularly in a survey conducted during the spring freshets in April 1999, exceeded guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. The observed concentrations of metals seem to be of natural origin and can be used as base-line data for future assessment of anthropogenic activities in the oil sand region. PMID:15663297

  14. Incorporating biologically based models into assessments of risk from chemical contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, R. J.; Conolly, R. B.; De Marini, D. M.; MacPhail, R. C.; Ohanian, E. V.; Swenberg, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    The general approach to assessment of risk from chemical contaminants in drinking water involves three steps: hazard identification, exposure assessment, and dose-response assessment. Traditionally, the risks to humans associated with different levels of a chemical have been derived from the toxic responses observed in animals. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that further information is needed if risks to humans are to be assessed accurately. Biologically based models help clarify the dose-response relationship and reduce uncertainty.

  15. [Biological, chemical, and radiation factors in the classification of medical waste].

    PubMed

    Rusakov, N V; Korotkova, G I; Orlov, A Iu; Kadyrov, D E

    2011-01-01

    The current classification of medical waste does not consider the sanitary-and-chemical hazard of epidemiologically dangerous and extremely dangerous medical waste (classes B and C). According to the results of the studies performed, the authors propose the improved classification of medical waste, which makes it possible to take into account not only infectious, radiation, and toxicological, but also sanitary-and-chemical hazards (toxicity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and biological activity) of medical waste. PMID:21901883

  16. Chemical and Biological Profiling Approaches for Exploring Mutagenicity and Carcinogenicity of EPA ToxCast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phase I of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ToxCastTM research project is building on three rich data tiers: 309 unique, structurally diverse chemicals (predominantly pesticides), activity and concentration response data from approximately 500 in vitro (cell-based and cell-...

  17. Molecular building blocks and their architecture in biologically/environmentally compatible soft matter chemical machinery.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Taro; Banno, Taisuke; Nitta, Sachiko; Takinoue, Masahiro; Nomoto, Tomonori; Natsume, Yuno; Matsumura, Shuichi; Fujinami, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    This review briefly summarizes recent developments in the construction of biologically/environmentally compatible chemical machinery composed of soft matter. Since environmental and living systems are open systems, chemical machinery must continuously fulfill its functions not only through the influx and generation of molecules but also via the degradation and dissipation of molecules. If the degradation or dissipation of soft matter molecular building blocks and biomaterial molecules/polymers can be achieved, soft matter particles composed of them can be used to realize chemical machinery such as selfpropelled droplets, drug delivery carriers, tissue regeneration scaffolds, protocell models, cell-/tissuemarkers, and molecular computing systems. PMID:25341502

  18. Influence of physico-chemical treatment on the subsequent biological process treating paper industry wastewater.

    PubMed

    el Khames Saad, Mouhamed; Moussaoui, Younes; Zaghbani, Asma; Mosrati, Imen; Elaloui, Elimame; Ben Salem, Ridha

    2012-01-01

    The present paper presents the main results of the biodegradation study of paper industry wastewater through physico-chemical treatment. Indeed, around 60% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal can be achieved by electroflocculation treatment. Furthermore, a removal efficiency of the COD of almost 91% has been obtained by biological treatment, with activated amount of sludge for 24 h of culture. Concerning the physico-chemical pre-treatment of the untreated, filtered and electroflocculated rejection effluents, it has been investigated through the degradation curve of COD studies. PMID:22678221

  19. Molecular building blocks and their architecture in biologically/environmentally compatible soft matter chemical machinery.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Taro; Banno, Taisuke; Nitta, Sachiko; Takinoue, Masahiro; Nomoto, Tomonori; Natsume, Yuno; Matsumura, Shuichi; Fujinami, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    This review briefly summarizes recent developments in the construction of biologically/environmentally compatible chemical machinery composed of soft matter. Since environmental and living systems are open systems, chemical machinery must continuously fulfill its functions not only through the influx and generation of molecules but also via the degradation and dissipation of molecules. If the degradation or dissipation of soft matter molecular building blocks and biomaterial molecules/polymers can be achieved, soft matter particles composed of them can be used to realize chemical machinery such as selfpropelled droplets, drug delivery carriers, tissue regeneration scaffolds, protocell models, cell-/tissuemarkers, and molecular computing systems.

  20. Chemical speciation of heavy metals by surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy: identification and quantification of inorganic- and methyl-mercury in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrini, Luca; Rodriguez-Loureiro, Ignacio; Correa-Duarte, Miguel A.; Lee, Yih Hong; Ling, Xing Yi; García de Abajo, F. Javier; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A.

    2014-06-01

    Chemical speciation of heavy metals has become extremely important in environmental and analytical research because of the strong dependence that toxicity, environmental mobility, persistence and bioavailability of these pollutants have on their specific chemical forms. Novel nano-optical-based detection strategies, capable of overcoming the intrinsic limitations of well-established analytic methods for the quantification of total metal ion content, have been reported, but the speciation of different chemical forms has not yet been achieved. Here, we report the first example of a SERS-based sensor for chemical speciation of toxic metal ions in water at trace levels. Specifically, the inorganic Hg2+ and the more toxicologically relevant methylmercury (CH3Hg+) are selected as analytical targets. The sensing platform consists of a self-assembled monolayer of 4-mercaptopyridine (MPY) on highly SERS-active and robust hybrid plasmonic materials formed by a dense layer of interacting gold nanoparticles anchored onto polystyrene microbeads. The co-ordination of Hg2+ and CH3Hg+ to the nitrogen atom of the MPY ring yields characteristic changes in the vibrational SERS spectra of the organic chemoreceptor that can be qualitatively and quantitatively correlated to the presence of the two different mercury forms.Chemical speciation of heavy metals has become extremely important in environmental and analytical research because of the strong dependence that toxicity, environmental mobility, persistence and bioavailability of these pollutants have on their specific chemical forms. Novel nano-optical-based detection strategies, capable of overcoming the intrinsic limitations of well-established analytic methods for the quantification of total metal ion content, have been reported, but the speciation of different chemical forms has not yet been achieved. Here, we report the first example of a SERS-based sensor for chemical speciation of toxic metal ions in water at trace levels

  1. Chemical and biological extraction of metals present in E waste: A hybrid technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pant, Deepak; Joshi, Deepika; Upreti, Manoj K.; Kotnala, Ravindra K.

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid methodology for E waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Efficient extraction of metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trace metal extraction is possible. - Abstract: Management of metal pollution associated with E-waste is widespread across the globe. Currently used techniques for the extraction of metals from E-waste by using either chemical or biological leaching have their own limitations. Chemical leaching is much rapid and efficient but has its own environmental consequences, even the future prospects of associated nanoremediation are also uncertain. Biological leaching on the other hand is comparatively a cost effective technique but at the same moment it is time consuming and the complete recovery of the metal, alone by biological leaching is not possible in most of the cases. The current review addresses the individual issues related to chemical and biological extraction techniques and proposes a hybrid-methodology which incorporates both, along with safer chemicals and compatible microbes for better and efficient extraction of metals from the E-waste.

  2. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Albert T

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10(-21)), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents.

  3. Estimating Toxicity-Related Biological Pathway Altering Doses for High-Throughput Chemical Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a framework for estimating the human dose at which a chemical significantly alters a biological pathway in vivo, making use of in vitro assay data and an in vitro derived pharmacokinetic model, coupled with estimates of population variability and uncertainty. The q...

  4. An overview of computational life science databases & exchange formats of relevance to chemical biology research.

    PubMed

    Smalter Hall, Aaron; Shan, Yunfeng; Lushington, Gerald; Visvanathan, Mahesh

    2013-03-01

    Databases and exchange formats describing biological entities such as chemicals and proteins, along with their relationships, are a critical component of research in life sciences disciplines, including chemical biology wherein small information about small molecule properties converges with cellular and molecular biology. Databases for storing biological entities are growing not only in size, but also in type, with many similarities between them and often subtle differences. The data formats available to describe and exchange these entities are numerous as well. In general, each format is optimized for a particular purpose or database, and hence some understanding of these formats is required when choosing one for research purposes. This paper reviews a selection of different databases and data formats with the goal of summarizing their purposes, features, and limitations. Databases are reviewed under the categories of 1) protein interactions, 2) metabolic pathways, 3) chemical interactions, and 4) drug discovery. Representation formats will be discussed according to those describing chemical structures, and those describing genomic/proteomic entities.

  5. NCCR Chemical Biology: Interdisciplinary Research Excellence, Outreach, Education, and New Tools for Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Sturzenegger, Susi; Johnsson, Kai; Riezman, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation to promote cutting edge research as well as the advancement of young researchers and women, technology transfer, outreach and education, the NCCR (Swiss National Centre of Competence in Research) Chemical Biology is co-led by Howard Riezman, University of Geneva and Kai Johnsson, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL).

  6. PERFORMANCE OF NORTH AMERICAN BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS: II. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to examine the performance of five North American bioreactor landfills. This paper represents the second of a two part series and addresses biological and chemical aspects of bioreactor performance including gas production and management, and l...

  7. EVALUATION OF REAL-TIME INNOVATIVE BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL MONITORING SYSTEMS TO PROTECT SOURCE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of Real-Time Innovative Biological and Chemical Monitoring Systems
    To Protect Source Waters

    Drinking water supplies have in recent years come under increasing pressure from regulatory concerns regarding TMDL designations and restoration strategies as well ...

  8. Field Characterization of Potential Reference Sediments in the Gulf of Mexico: Chemical and Biological Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lewis, Michael A., Jed G. Campbell, Peggy S. Harris, Darrin D. Dantin, Steve S. Foss, Robert L. Quarles, James C. Moore and Cynthia A. Chancy. Submitted. Characterization of Potential Reference Areas in the Gulf of Mexico: Near-Coastal Sediment Chemical and Biological Quality. En...

  9. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Albert T. . E-mail: lebedev@org.chem.msu.ru

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10{sup -21}), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents.

  10. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE CHEMICAL EFFECTS IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS (CEBS) TOXICOGENOMICS KNOWLEDGE BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conceptual Framework for the Chemical Effects in Biological Systems (CEBS) T oxicogenomics Knowledge Base

    Abstract
    Toxicogenomics studies how the genome is involved in responses to environmental stressors or toxicants. It combines genetics, genome-scale mRNA expressio...

  11. Comparison of biological and chemical phosphorus removals in continuous and sequencing batch reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, L.H.; Irvine, R.L. Jr.; Breyfogle, R.E.; Manning, J.F. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A full-scale study of phosphorus removal has been conducted at Culver using continuous-flow operation, SBR operation, and several different chemical treatment schemes. A full-scale demonstration of SBR biological phosphorus removal also has been shown to be effective. Four contributing groups of organisms and their roles in biological SBR phosphorus removal have been described: denitrifying organisms, fermentation product-manufacturing organisms, phosphorus- accumulating organisms, and aerobic autotrophs and heterotrophs. The SBR can provide the proper balance of anoxic, anaerobic, and aerobic conditions to allow these group of organisms to successfully remove phosphorus biologically, without chemical addition. Treatment results using various chemicals for phosphorus removal, both during conventional, continuous-flow operation and after the plant was converted for SBR operation, have also been provided for comparison. Effluent phosphorus concentrations were almost identical for each period, except for the period when phosphorus was removed biologically and without any chemical addition when effluent phosphorus concentrations were the lowest. These removals were made as a result of settling alone; no tertiary rapid stand filter was used or required.

  12. The search for life's origins: Progress and future directions in planetary biology and chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The current state is reviewed of the study of chemical evolution and planetary biology and the probable future is discussed of the field, at least for the near term. To this end, the report lists the goals and objectives of future research and makes detailed, comprehensive recommendations for accomplishing them, emphasizing those issues that were inadequately discussed in earlier Space Studies Board reports.

  13. The Army chemical/biological SMART (SMART-CB) team: the nurse's role.

    PubMed

    Barajas, Kenny; Stewart, Warren A; Combs, Elmer W

    2003-06-01

    A chemical or biologic attack probably will be covert, rather than overt. Because presenting signs and symptoms may mimic minor nonspecific illnesses or naturally produced disease syndromes and may not appear for several days, it is likely that nurses in emergency rooms and primary care settings will be among the first to come into contact with victims of a chemical or biologic agent exposure. Early recognition, reporting, decontamination, self-protection, prophylaxis, and treatment are imperative. After the terrorist attack on September 11, 2001, the anthrax incidents, and the heightened publicity of chemical and biologic agent attacks brought on by media coverage, the need for highly trained and well-prepared medical personnel has increased dramatically. Army nurses have led the way in training and expanding the capabilities of specialized medical response teams. Team members require ongoing training, state-of-the-art protective equipment and medical supplies, and constant practice to maintain the high state of readiness required to respond rapidly and effectively to chemical or biologic threats. Army SMART-CB nurses and their team members are well prepared to provide lifesaving care in highly contaminated areas. It is no longer a question of if but rather when and where the next attack will occur.

  14. 40. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #510B, chemical, biological, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #510B, chemical, biological, and radiological (CBR) air filter room no. 1 - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  15. 78 FR 38782 - Lifting of Chemical and Biological Weapons (CBW) Proliferation Sanctions Against Chinese Entities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... These restrictions were imposed on July 9, 2002 (see Volume 67 FR Public Notice 4071). Dated: June 21... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Lifting of Chemical and Biological Weapons (CBW) Proliferation Sanctions Against Chinese Entities...

  16. AN OVERVIEW OF COMPUTATIONAL LIFE SCIENCE DATABASES & EXCHANGE FORMATS OF RELEVANCE TO CHEMICAL BIOLOGY RESEARCH

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Aaron Smalter; Shan, Yunfeng; Lushington, Gerald; Visvanathan, Mahesh

    2016-01-01

    Databases and exchange formats describing biological entities such as chemicals and proteins, along with their relationships, are a critical component of research in life sciences disciplines, including chemical biology wherein small information about small molecule properties converges with cellular and molecular biology. Databases for storing biological entities are growing not only in size, but also in type, with many similarities between them and often subtle differences. The data formats available to describe and exchange these entities are numerous as well. In general, each format is optimized for a particular purpose or database, and hence some understanding of these formats is required when choosing one for research purposes. This paper reviews a selection of different databases and data formats with the goal of summarizing their purposes, features, and limitations. Databases are reviewed under the categories of 1) protein interactions, 2) metabolic pathways, 3) chemical interactions, and 4) drug discovery. Representation formats will be discussed according to those describing chemical structures, and those describing genomic/proteomic entities. PMID:22934944

  17. Weapons of mass destruction: Overview of the CBRNEs (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives).

    PubMed

    Prockop, Leon D

    2006-11-01

    The events of September 11, 2001, made citizens of the world acutely aware of disasters consequent to present-day terrorism. This is a war being waged for reasons obscure to many of its potential victims. The term "NBCs" was coined in reference to terrorist weapons of mass destruction, i.e., nuclear, biological and chemical. The currently accepted acronym is "CBRNE" which includes Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive weapons. Non-nuclear explosives are the most common terrorist weapon now in use. Nuclear and radiological weapons are beyond the scope of this publication, which focuses on the "CBEs", i.e. chemical, biological and explosive weapons. Although neurologists will not be the first responders to CBEs, they must know about the neurological effects in order to provide diagnosis and treatment to survivors. Neurological complications of chemical, biological and explosive weapons which have or may be used by terrorists are reviewed by international experts in this publication. Management and treatment profiles are outlined.

  18. Knowledge and Awareness Concerning Chemical and Biological Terrorism: Continuing Education Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Molly A.; Larrimore, Karen L.

    2002-01-01

    Nurses, physicians, and nursing and medical students (n=291) were surveyed about their awareness of chemical and biological terrorism. Infection control personnel and nurse educators (n=24) were surveyed about terrorism preparation. Fewer than one-quarter of questions were answered correctly, and only about 23% reported confidence in the ability…

  19. Quantifying biological activity in chemical terms: a pharmacology primer to describe drug effect.

    PubMed

    Kenakin, Terry

    2009-04-17

    Drugs can initiate, inhibit, modulate, or potentiate basal activity in cells to produce physiological effects. The interplay between the fundamental affinity and efficacy of drugs with the functional texture imposed on the receptor by the cell (e.g., variation in basal set points or cytosolic signal proteins) generates behaviors for drugs in different tissues that can cause apparently capricious variation between tissues under various physiological conditions. This poses a problem for pharmacologists studying drugs in test systems to predict effects in therapeutic ones. De-emphasis of tissue-specific drug behaviors by reducing drug effects to chemical terms can, to a large extent, reduce the effects of variances in biological systems (changing basal set points, genetic and biochemical variability, etc.). This Perspective discusses the application of four major pharmacodynamic parameters (affinity, efficacy, orthosteric vs allosteric binding, and rate of dissociation of drug from the biological target) to the quantification of biological activity to furnish chemical structure-activity relationships (SARs). These four parameters can be used to quantify effects in test systems and predict subsequent activity in a therapeutic setting. Because at least three different SARs are involved in the drug discovery process (primary therapeutic activity, pharmacokinetics, and safety), with more possible if target selectivity is required, some simple statistical approaches to multivariate structure-activity studies (i.e., primary activity plus selectivity data) also are considered. In total, these data can provide system-independent data to characterize biological activity of molecules in chemical terms that can greatly reduce biologically induced variability.

  20. "No practical capabilities": American biological and chemical warfare programs during the Korean war.

    PubMed

    Crane, Conrad C

    2002-01-01

    Much controversy still surrounds accusations that American forces in the Far East during the Korean War used biological warfare against North Korea and China. An analysis of recently declassified documents reveals that, although the United States attempted to accelerate its development and acquisition of such weapons during that period, its efforts to create a viable biological warfare capability were unsuccessful. Plans to similarly expand chemical warfare stocks and capabilities were also frustrated. Technological difficulties, personnel shortages, bureaucratic battles between the armed services, and policy limitations combined to hold back advances in American chemical and biological warfare. In light of the recent fears of terrorist attacks with such weapons, this analysis highlights the great difficulties involved in developing, acquiring, and delivering such capabilities.

  1. Quantum chemical methods for the investigation of photoinitiated processes in biological systems: theory and applications.

    PubMed

    Dreuw, Andreas

    2006-11-13

    With the advent of modern computers and advances in the development of efficient quantum chemical computer codes, the meaningful computation of large molecular systems at a quantum mechanical level became feasible. Recent experimental effort to understand photoinitiated processes in biological systems, for instance photosynthesis or vision, at a molecular level also triggered theoretical investigations in this field. In this Minireview, standard quantum chemical methods are presented that are applicable and recently used for the calculation of excited states of photoinitiated processes in biological molecular systems. These methods comprise configuration interaction singles, the complete active space self-consistent field method, and time-dependent density functional theory and its variants. Semiempirical approaches are also covered. Their basic theoretical concepts and mathematical equations are briefly outlined, and their properties and limitations are discussed. Recent successful applications of the methods to photoinitiated processes in biological systems are described and theoretical tools for the analysis of excited states are presented.

  2. Using the Viking biology experimental results to obtain chemical information about Martian regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumb, Robert C.

    1992-01-01

    Although initially formulated as biology experiments, most of the results produced by the Viking Labeled Release (LR), Gas Exchange (GEX), and Pyrolytic Release (PR) experiments have been reproduced by chemical means. The experiments do not need more study as 'biological' phenomena, but they do deserve much more careful consideration from a chemical viewpoint. They are the only 'wet-chemical' experiments that scientists have performed on another planet, but they have not found very general use as sources of scientific information. There is a large set of potentially useful chemical observations, e.g., the three resolvable and precisely measured kinetic components of the release of C-14-labeled gases, the thermal sensitivity and magnitudes of the oxidation reaction(s) of the LR experiments, the kinetics and magnitude of the O2 and CO2 release of the GEX experiments, the thermal sensitivity of the GEX results, the differences between the thermal sensitivity of the GEX and the thermal sensitivity of the LR responses, and the kinetics and magnitudes of the LR successive injection reabsorption effect. It should be possible to test many chemical aspects of hypothetical martian phenomena in experiments using the biology experimental configurations and derive much valuable information by comparisons with the Viking observations.

  3. Total, chemical, and biological oxygen consumption of the sediments in the Ziya River watershed, China.

    PubMed

    Rong, Nan; Shan, Baoqing

    2016-07-01

    Sediment oxygen demand (SOD) is a critical dissolved oxygen (DO) sink in many rivers. Understanding the relative contributions of the biological and chemical components of SOD would improve our knowledge of the potential environmental harm SOD could cause and allow appropriate management systems to be developed. A various inhibitors addition technique was conducted to measure the total, chemical, and biological SOD of sediment samples from 13 sites in the Ziya River watershed, a severely polluted and anoxic river system in the north of China. The results showed that the major component of SOD was chemical SOD due to iron predominate. The ferrous SOD accounted for 21.6-78.9 % of the total SOD and 33.26-96.79 % of the chemical SOD. Biological SOD represented 41.13 % of the overall SOD averagely. Sulfide SOD accounted for 1.78-45.71 % of the total SOD and it was the secondary predominate of the chemical SOD. Manganous SOD accounted for 1.2-16.6 % of the total SOD and it was insignificant at many sites. Only four kinds of benthos were collected in the Ziya River watershed, resulting from the low DO concentration in the sediment surface due to SOD. This study would be helpful for understanding and preventing the potential sediment oxygen depletion during river restoration. PMID:27026547

  4. Total, chemical, and biological oxygen consumption of the sediments in the Ziya River watershed, China.

    PubMed

    Rong, Nan; Shan, Baoqing

    2016-07-01

    Sediment oxygen demand (SOD) is a critical dissolved oxygen (DO) sink in many rivers. Understanding the relative contributions of the biological and chemical components of SOD would improve our knowledge of the potential environmental harm SOD could cause and allow appropriate management systems to be developed. A various inhibitors addition technique was conducted to measure the total, chemical, and biological SOD of sediment samples from 13 sites in the Ziya River watershed, a severely polluted and anoxic river system in the north of China. The results showed that the major component of SOD was chemical SOD due to iron predominate. The ferrous SOD accounted for 21.6-78.9 % of the total SOD and 33.26-96.79 % of the chemical SOD. Biological SOD represented 41.13 % of the overall SOD averagely. Sulfide SOD accounted for 1.78-45.71 % of the total SOD and it was the secondary predominate of the chemical SOD. Manganous SOD accounted for 1.2-16.6 % of the total SOD and it was insignificant at many sites. Only four kinds of benthos were collected in the Ziya River watershed, resulting from the low DO concentration in the sediment surface due to SOD. This study would be helpful for understanding and preventing the potential sediment oxygen depletion during river restoration.

  5. Influence of irrigation and organic/inorganic fertilization on chemical quality of almond (Prunus amygdalus cv. Guara).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Bel, P; Egea, I; Martínez-Madrid, M C; Flores, B; Romojaro, F

    2008-11-12

    The chemical quality of almonds variety Guara cultivated in nonirrigated farming (NI) and drip-irrigated farming (DI) conditions with different fertilizing treatments, two organic treatments (T1 and T2) and a mineral treatment (C), all of them with a N-P-K proportion of 1-2-1, is studied. Almonds obtained in irrigated farming showed higher content in sugars and organic acids and a better quality of oil. Among the fertilizing treatments employed, the organic ones have shown the best results related to chemical quality, regardless of the quantity of fertilizer employed (9.5 kg per T1 tree vs 4.5 kg per T2 tree). The organic treatments produced almonds with a higher content of sugar, organic acids and fiber and a similar fat content. These results are interesting from a commercial point of view since the consumers, even under the same conditions of chemical quality, prefer those products cultivated under organic conditions due to their benefits for health and because these practices are environment-friendly. PMID:18847209

  6. Coupling the chemical dynamics of carbonate and dissolved inorganic nitrogen systems in the eutrophic and turbid inner Changjiang (Yangtze River) Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, W.-D.; Yan, X.-L.

    2015-04-01

    To better understand biogeochemical processes controlling CO2 dynamics in those eutrophic large-river estuaries and coastal lagoons, we investigated surface water carbonate system, nutrients, and relevant hydrochemical parameters in the inner Changjiang (Yangtze River) Estuary, covering its channel-like South Branch and the lagoon-like North Branch, shortly after a spring-tide period in April 2010. In the North Branch, with a water residence time of more than 2 months, biogeochemical additions of ammonium (7.4 to 65.7 μmol kg-1) and alkalinity (196 to 695 μmol kg-1) were detected along with high salinity of 4.5 to 17.4. In the South Branch upper-reach, unusual salinity values of 0.20 to 0.67 were detected, indicating spillover waters from the North Branch. The spillover waters enhanced the springtime Changjiang export fluxes of nutrients, dissolved inorganic carbon, and alkalinity. And they affected the biogeochemistry in the South Branch, by lowering water-to-air CO2 flux and continuing the nitrification reaction. In the North Branch, pCO2 was measured from 930 to 1518 μatm at the salinity range between 8 and 16, which was substantially higher than the South Branch pCO2 of 700 to 1100 μatm. Based on field data analyses and simplified stoichiometric equations, we suggest that the North Branch CO2 productions were quantified by biogeochemical processes combining organic matter decomposition, nitrification, CaCO3 dissolution, and acid-base reactions in the estuarine mixing zone. Although our study is subject to limited temporal and spatial coverage of sampling, we have demonstrated a procedure to quantificationally constrain net CO2 productions in eutrophic estuaries and/or coastal lagoons, by coupling the chemical dynamics of carbonate and dissolved inorganic nitrogen systems.

  7. Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-Ray Microanalysis for Chemical and Morphological Characterisation of the Inorganic Component of Gunshot Residue: Selected Problems

    PubMed Central

    Brożek-Mucha, Zuzanna

    2014-01-01

    Chosen aspects of examinations of inorganic gunshot particles by means of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry technique are presented. The research methodology of particles was worked out, which included a precise and repeatable procedure of the automatic detection and identification of particles as well as the representation of the obtained analytical data in the form of the frequencies of occurrence of particles of certain chemical or morphological class within the whole population of particles revealed in a specimen. On this basis, there were established relationships between the chemical and morphological properties of populations of particles and factors, such as the type of ammunition, the distance from the gun muzzle to the target, the type of a substrate the particles sediment on, and the time between shooting and collecting the specimens. Each of these aspects of examinations of particles revealed a great potential of being utilised in casework, while establishing various circumstances of shooting incidents leads to the reconstruction of the course of the studied incident. PMID:25025050

  8. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis for chemical and morphological characterisation of the inorganic component of gunshot residue: selected problems.

    PubMed

    Brożek-Mucha, Zuzanna

    2014-01-01

    Chosen aspects of examinations of inorganic gunshot particles by means of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry technique are presented. The research methodology of particles was worked out, which included a precise and repeatable procedure of the automatic detection and identification of particles as well as the representation of the obtained analytical data in the form of the frequencies of occurrence of particles of certain chemical or morphological class within the whole population of particles revealed in a specimen. On this basis, there were established relationships between the chemical and morphological properties of populations of particles and factors, such as the type of ammunition, the distance from the gun muzzle to the target, the type of a substrate the particles sediment on, and the time between shooting and collecting the specimens. Each of these aspects of examinations of particles revealed a great potential of being utilised in casework, while establishing various circumstances of shooting incidents leads to the reconstruction of the course of the studied incident. PMID:25025050

  9. Next-generation antimicrobials: from chemical biology to first-in-class drugs.

    PubMed

    Ang, Michelle Lay Teng; Murima, Paul; Pethe, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    The global emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria invokes an urgent and imperative necessity for the identification of novel antimicrobials. The general lack of success in progressing novel chemical entities from target-based drug screens have prompted calls for radical and innovative approaches for drug discovery. Recent developments in chemical biology and target deconvolution strategies have revived interests in the utilization of whole-cell phenotypic screens and resulted in several success stories for the discovery and development novel drug candidates and target pathways. In this review, we present and discuss recent chemical biology approaches focusing on the discovery of novel targets and new lead molecules for the treatment of human bacterial and protozoan infections.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection for chemical and biological agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Stokes, David L.; Wabuyele, Musundi B.; Griffin, Guy D.; Vass, Arpad A.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2004-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of chemical agent simulants such as dimethyl methylphonate (DMMP), pinacolyl methylphosphonate (PMP), diethyl phosphoramidate (DEPA), and 2-chloroethyl ethylsulfide (CEES), and biological agent simulants such as bacillus globigii (BG), erwinia herbicola (EH), and bacillus thuringiensis (BT) were obtained from silver oxide film-deposited substrates. Thin AgO films ranging in thickness from 50 nm to 250 nm were produced by chemical bath deposition onto glass slides. Further Raman intensity enhancements were noticed in UV irradiated surfaces due to photo-induced Ag nanocluster formation, which may provide a possible route to producing highly useful plasmonic sensors for the detection of chemical and biological agents upon visible light illumination.

  11. Physical, chemical, and biological data for selected streams in Chester County, Pennsylvania, 1981-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reif, Andrew G.

    1999-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological data were collected at 51 sampling sites in Chester County, Pa., from 1970 through 1994 as part of the Stream Conditions of Chester County Program. This report presents data collected from 1981 through 1994. Physical data include water temperature, instantaneous stream discharge, pH, alkalinity, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen. Chemical data include laboratory determinations of nutrients, major ions, and selected metals in whole water samples and selected metals, pesticides, gross polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB?s), gross polychlorinated napthalenes (PCN?s), and total carbon in stream-bottom sediment samples. The biological data consists of benthic macroinvertebrate population analyses and diversity indices. Chester County is undergoing rapid urbanization as agricultural lands are converted to residential, commercial, and industrial areas. The purpose of the Stream Conditions of Chester County Program is to further the understanding of stream habitat and chemical changes in response to this urbanization.

  12. A convenient first aid kit for chemical and biological agents and for radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, R; Bhaskar, A S B; Gautam, Anshoo; Gopalan, N; Singh, A K; Singh, Beer; Flora, S J S

    2012-05-01

    The chemical and biological warfare agents are extremely toxic in nature. They act rapidly even in very small quantities and death may occur in minutes. Hence, physical and medical protection must be provided immediately to save life or avoid serious injury. A first aid kit has thus been developed for providing immediate relief from chemical and biological warfare agents (FAKCBW) with the objective of easy detection, personal decontamination, antidote for chemical warfare agents (like nerve agents, sulphur mustard, phosgene, cyanide, radiation exposure and bacterial agents), along with basic medication aid for pain, fever and inflammation. The kit box also includes a user friendly handbook with a simple standard operating procedure. In addition, the kit is rugged to withstand normal jerks, vibration and is water-proof. PMID:23029921

  13. Chemical warfare agent and biological toxin-induced pulmonary toxicity: could stem cells provide potential therapies?

    PubMed

    Angelini, Daniel J; Dorsey, Russell M; Willis, Kristen L; Hong, Charles; Moyer, Robert A; Oyler, Jonathan; Jensen, Neil S; Salem, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Chemical warfare agents (CWAs) as well as biological toxins present a significant inhalation injury risk to both deployed warfighters and civilian targets of terrorist attacks. Inhalation of many CWAs and biological toxins can induce severe pulmonary toxicity leading to the development of acute lung injury (ALI) as well as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The therapeutic options currently used to treat these conditions are very limited and mortality rates remain high. Recent evidence suggests that human stem cells may provide significant therapeutic options for ALI and ARDS in the near future. The threat posed by CWAs and biological toxins for both civilian populations and military personnel is growing, thus understanding the mechanisms of toxicity and potential therapies is critical. This review will outline the pulmonary toxic effects of some of the most common CWAs and biological toxins as well as the potential role of stem cells in treating these types of toxic lung injuries.

  14. Chemical or biological terrorist attacks: an analysis of the preparedness of hospitals for managing victims affected by chemical or biological weapons of mass destruction.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Russell L

    2006-03-01

    The possibility of a terrorist attack employing the use of chemical or biological weapons of mass destruction (WMD) on American soil is no longer an empty threat, it has become a reality. A WMD is defined as any weapon with the capacity to inflict death and destruction on such a massive scale that its very presence in the hands of hostile forces is a grievous threat. Events of the past few years including the bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993, the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City in 1995 and the use of planes as guided missiles directed into the Pentagon and New York's Twin Towers in 2001 (9/11) and the tragic incidents involving twentythree people who were infected and five who died as a result of contact with anthrax-laced mail in the Fall of 2001, have well established that the United States can be attacked by both domestic and international terrorists without warning or provocation. In light of these actions, hospitals have been working vigorously to ensure that they would be "ready" in the event of another terrorist attack to provide appropriate medical care to victims. However, according to a recent United States General Accounting Office (GAO) nationwide survey, our nation's hospitals still are not prepared to manage mass causalities resulting from chemical or biological WMD. Therefore, there is a clear need for information about current hospital preparedness in order to provide a foundation for systematic planning and broader discussions about relative cost, probable effectiveness, environmental impact and overall societal priorities. Hence, the aim of this research was to examine the current preparedness of hospitals in the State of Mississippi to manage victims of terrorist attacks involving chemical or biological WMD. All acute care hospitals in the State were selected for inclusion in this study. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were utilized for data collection and analysis. Six hypotheses were tested. Using a questionnaire

  15. Chemical or Biological Terrorist Attacks: An Analysis of the Preparedness of Hospitals for Managing Victims Affected by Chemical or Biological Weapons of Mass Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Russell L.

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of a terrorist attack employing the use of chemical or biological weapons of mass destruction (WMD) on American soil is no longer an empty threat, it has become a reality. A WMD is defined as any weapon with the capacity to inflict death and destruction on such a massive scale that its very presence in the hands of hostile forces is a grievous threat. Events of the past few years including the bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993, the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City in 1995 and the use of planes as guided missiles directed into the Pentagon and New York’s Twin Towers in 2001 (9/11) and the tragic incidents involving twenty-three people who were infected and five who died as a result of contact with anthrax-laced mail in the Fall of 2001, have well established that the United States can be attacked by both domestic and international terrorists without warning or provocation. In light of these actions, hospitals have been working vigorously to ensure that they would be “ready” in the event of another terrorist attack to provide appropriate medical care to victims. However, according to a recent United States General Accounting Office (GAO) nationwide survey, our nation’s hospitals still are not prepared to manage mass causalities resulting from chemical or biological WMD. Therefore, there is a clear need for information about current hospital preparedness in order to provide a foundation for systematic planning and broader discussions about relative cost, probable effectiveness, environmental impact and overall societal priorities. Hence, the aim of this research was to examine the current preparedness of hospitals in the State of Mississippi to manage victims of terrorist attacks involving chemical or biological WMD. All acute care hospitals in the State were selected for inclusion in this study. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were utilized for data collection and analysis. Six hypotheses were tested. Using a

  16. Oxidative decontamination of chemical and biological warfare agents using L-Gel.

    PubMed

    Raber, Ellen; McGuire, Raymond

    2002-08-01

    A decontamination method has been developed using a single reagent that is effective both against chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents. The new reagent, "L-Gel", consists of an aqueous solution of a mild commercial oxidizer, Oxone, together with a commercial fumed silica gelling agent, Cab-O-Sil EH-5. L-Gel is non-toxic, environmentally friendly, relatively non-corrosive, maximizes contact time because of its thixotropic nature, clings to walls and ceilings, and does not harm carpets or painted surfaces. The new reagent also addresses the most demanding requirements for decontamination in the civilian sector, including availability, low maintenance, ease of application and deployment by a variety of dispersal mechanisms, minimal training and acceptable expense. Experiments to test the effectiveness of L-Gel were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and independently at four other locations. L-Gel was tested against all classes of chemical warfare agents and against various biological warfare agent surrogates, including spore-forming bacteria and non-virulent strains of real biological agents. Testing showed that L-Gel is as effective against chemical agents and biological materials, including spores, as the best military decontaminants.

  17. Topological biosignatures: large-scale structure of chemical networks from biology and astrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Jolley, Craig; Douglas, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    The chemical basis of life involves more than simply the presence of biological molecules; biochemical systems embody a complex network of reactions with characteristic topological features. At the same time, chemical complexity is also present in nonbiological contexts, inviting us to clarify the relationship between chemistry and life through comparative studies. This study examines chemical networks from biology (the metabolism of E. coli) and astronomy (gas-phase reactions in dark molecular clouds) to establish common topological features that may be generic for any complex chemical system, as well as clear differences that may be topological signatures of life. The biological and astrochemical networks exhibit different scaling behaviors, and the network motifs found in the two systems show similarities as well as significant differences. The PageRank algorithm was used to quantify the degree to which individual species act primarily as products or reactants; in the metabolic network, these two roles are nearly identical for most species, whereas the astrochemical network shows a clearer partitioning into reactants and products.

  18. Mapping the patent landscape of synthetic biology for fine chemical production pathways.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, Pablo; Gök, Abdullah; Shapira, Philip; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2016-09-01

    A goal of synthetic biology bio-foundries is to innovate through an iterative design/build/test/learn pipeline. In assessing the value of new chemical production routes, the intellectual property (IP) novelty of the pathway is important. Exploratory studies can be carried using knowledge of the patent/IP landscape for synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. In this paper, we perform an assessment of pathways as potential targets for chemical production across the full catalogue of reachable chemicals in the extended metabolic space of chassis organisms, as computed by the retrosynthesis-based algorithm RetroPath. Our database for reactions processed by sequences in heterologous pathways was screened against the PatSeq database, a comprehensive collection of more than 150M sequences present in patent grants and applications. We also examine related patent families using Derwent Innovations. This large-scale computational study provides useful insights into the IP landscape of synthetic biology for fine and specialty chemicals production. PMID:27489206

  19. Chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the EDS coal liquefaction process: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Later, D.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Wilson, B.W.

    1984-05-01

    Representative process materials were obtained from the EDS pilot plant for chemical and biological analyses. These materials were characterized for biological activity and chemical composition using a microbial mutagenicity assay and chromatographic and mass spectrometric analytical techniques. The two highest boiling distillation cuts, as well as process solvent (PS) obtained from the bottoms recycle mode operation, were tested for initiation of mouse skin tumorigenicity. All three materials were active; the crude 800/sup 0 +/F cut was substantially more potent than the crude bottoms recycle PS or 750 to 800/sup 0/F distillate cut. Results from chemical analyses showed the EDS materials, in general, to be more highly alkylated and have higher hydroaromatic content than analogous SRC II process materials (no in-line process hydrogenation) used for comparison. In the microbial mutagenicity assays the N-PAC fractions showed greater activity than did the aliphatic hydrocarbon, hydroxy-PAH, or PAH fractions, although mutagenicity was detected in certain PAH fractions by a modified version of the standard microbial mutagenicity assay. Mutagenic activities for the EDS materials were lower, overall, than those for the corresponding materials from the SRC II process. The EDS materials produced under different operational modes had distinguishable differences in both their chemical constituency and biological activity. The primary differences between the EDS materials studied here and their SRC II counterparts used for comparison are most likely attributable to the incorporation of catalytic hydrogenation in the EDS process. 27 references, 28 figures, 27 tables.

  20. [Most advance on chemical and biological investigations of gorgonian-octocorals].

    PubMed

    Chai, Xingyun; Tang, Liying; Lei, Hui; Bai, Changcai; Sun, Jianfan; Li, Yunqiu; Liu, Yonghong

    2012-03-01

    This review presents the most recent chemical and biological investigations on one of the marine invertebrates, gorgonian octocoral. It summarizes all 432 new compounds published in 2002-2009, which consists of 46 sesquiterpenoids (including 2 new natural products, NNP), 282 diterpenoids (including 4 from Pennatulacea octocoral and one artifact), 76 steroids, and 29 alkaloids or other types (2 NNP included). In this paper, according to the structure division, the new compounds are described in combination with the taxonomy of the investigated animals, and its simultaneous bioactivity results. Novel skeletons and complex structures are paid most emphasis on its features, means of structural elucidation and the proposed biogenesis pathway. The source of all new compounds and the different diterpenoid skeleton types are all listed and analyzed, as well as the commonly used Chinese names or some proposed ones for diterpenoid skeletons. Furthermore, this papers deals with all biological test toward the gorgonian new metabolites, i.e. anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial(against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis etc), anti-malaria, and anti-fouling as well, in which anti-cancer activity and cytotoxicity were additionally, a discussion and prospect are proposed regarding chemical overview on gorgonian. This review, hopefully, can be useful in proving data and references for further chemical and biological research of China sea gorgonian, for the studies on chemical ecology, and for the discovery of new and bioactive compounds or the marine-derived leading targets.

  1. A study of the physical-chemical mechanisms and variables which affect the transport of inorganic and organic heterogeneous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.A.; Zeltner, W.A.

    1990-07-01

    In order to model transport of dissolved ions in subsurface environments, one should understand how these ions interact with solid phase adsorbents. Our primary goal has been investigating the reaction mechanisms which affect microcontaminant partitioning between aqueous solutions and solid phase adsorbents, using goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) as a model adsorbent. Cylindrical internal reflection -- Fourier transform infrared (CIR-FTIR) spectroscopy has been developed as the primary technique for this study. Wet chemical adsorption studies, acoustophoresis and electrophoretic mobility have been used to obtain supporting information as needed. Phenol and o-nitrophenol did not adsorb to goethite. Benzoate, phthalate and p-hydroxybenzoate all adsorbed via a bidentate mechanism to two adjacent iron atoms, while salicylate and 2,4-dihydroxybenzoate formed a chelate complex to single iron atoms. Phosphate adsorption was predominately bidentate.

  2. Peptide and RNA contributions to iron-sulphur chemical gardens as life's first inorganic compartments, catalysts, capacitors and condensers.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Shawn E; Kanik, Isik; Russell, Michael J

    2012-06-28

    Hydrothermal chimneys and compartments comprising transition metal sulphides and associated minerals have been proposed as likely locations for the beginnings of life. In laboratory simulations of off-axis alkaline springs, it is shown that the interaction of a simulated alkaline sulphide-bearing submarine vent solution with a primeval anoxic iron-bearing ocean leads to the formation of chimney structures reminiscent of chemical gardens. These chimneys display periodicity in their deposition and exhibit diverse morphologies and mineralogies, affording the possibilities of catalysis and molecular sequestration. The addition of peptides and RNA to the alkaline solution modifies the elemental stoichiometry of the chimneys-perhaps indicating the very initial stage of the organic takeover on the way to living cells by charged organic polymers potentially synthesized in this same environment.

  3. An overview of biological markers of exposure to chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Black, Robin M

    2008-01-01

    An overview is given of biological markers of exposure to chemical warfare agents. Metabolites, protein, and/or DNA adducts have been identified for most nerve agents and vesicants and validated in experimental animals or in a small number of human exposures. For several agents, metabolites derived from hydrolysis are unsatisfactory biomarkers of exposure because of background levels in the human population. These are assumed to result from environmental exposure to commercial products that contain these hydrolysis products or chemicals that are metabolized to them. In these cases, metabolites derived from glutathione pathways, or covalent adducts with proteins or DNA, provide more definitive biomarkers. Biomarkers for cyanide and phosgene are unsatisfactory as indicators of chemical warfare exposure because of other sources of these chemicals or their metabolites.

  4. Analyzing fission yeast multidrug resistance mechanisms to develop a genetically tractable model system for chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Shigehiro A; Takemoto, Ai; Nurse, Paul; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2012-07-27

    Chemical inhibitors can help analyze dynamic cellular processes, particularly when probes are active in genetically tractable model systems. Although fission yeast has served as an important model system, which shares more cellular processes (e.g., RNAi) with humans than budding yeast, its use for chemical biology has been limited by its multidrug resistance (MDR) response. Using genomics and genetics approaches, we identified the key transcription factors and drug-efflux transporters responsible for fission yeast MDR and designed strains sensitive to a wide-range of chemical inhibitors, including commonly used probes. We used this strain, along with acute chemical inhibition and high-resolution imaging, to examine metaphase spindle organization in a "closed" mitosis. Together, our findings suggest that our fission yeast strains will allow the use of several inhibitors as probes, discovery of new inhibitors, and analysis of drug action.

  5. Natural products-prompted chemical biology: phenotypic screening and a new platform for target identification.

    PubMed

    Kakeya, Hideaki

    2016-05-01

    Covering: 1993 to 2016The exploitation of small molecules from natural sources, such as microbial metabolites, has contributed to the discovery of not only new drugs but also new research tools for chemical biology. My research team has discovered several novel bioactive small molecules using in vivo cell-based phenotypic screening, and has investigated their modes of action using chemical genetics and chemical genomics. This highlight focuses on our recent discoveries and chemical genetics approaches for bioactive microbial metabolites that target cancer cells, the cancer microenvironment and cell membrane signalling. In addition, the development of two new platforms, 5-sulfonyl tetrazole-based and thiourea-modified amphiphilic lipid-based probe technologies, to identify the cellular targets of these molecules is also discussed.

  6. Biological relevance and consequences of chemical- or metal-induced DNA cross-linking

    SciTech Connect

    Paustenbach, D.J.; Finley, B.L.

    1996-03-01

    A vast number of chemicals are known to induce mutagenesis and/or carcinogenesis in mammals. Although disruption of cellular nuclear material resulting ultimately in mutagenesis/carcinogenesis can be accomplished by various mechanisms, the search for biomarkers of chemical-induced toxicity continues. This review focuses on the ability of certain metals or chemicals to bind to DNA in a cross-link fashion in whole animal as well as under in vitro conditions. The methodologies currently used to determine DNA cross-linking are described. The biological relevance of the presence of chemical- or metal-induced DNA cross-linking as a measure of carcinogenesis in humans is still under debate, as there is no clear correlation between the disease and the DNA cross-link reaction. 62 refs., 3 tabs.

  7. Report from the Third Annual Symposium of the RIKEN-Max Planck Joint Research Center for Systems Chemical Biology.

    PubMed

    Brunschweiger, Andreas

    2014-08-15

    The third Annual Symposium of the RIKEN-Max Planck Joint Research Center for Systems Chemical Biology was held at Ringberg castle, May 21-24, 2014. At this meeting 45 scientists from Japan and Germany presented the latest results from their research spanning a broad range of topics in chemical biology and glycobiology.

  8. Chemical and biological warfare: Biochemistry, therapy, and treatment. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning biochemistry, therapy, and treatment of the effects of military chemical and biological warfare agents. References include surveys and studies of immunizing agents and drugs, the efficacy of these drugs, and the effect of the drugs on the patient. Also included are biochemical studies, assay techniques, and antidote development, some of which is supported by animal studies. Citations concerning detection and warning, defoliants, protection, biology and toxicology, and general studies are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains a minimum of 187 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Weber's law for biological responses in autocatalytic networks of chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Masayo; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2011-07-22

    Biological responses often obey Weber's law, according to which the magnitude of the response depends only on the fold change in the external input. In this study, we demonstrate that a system involving a simple autocatalytic reaction shows such a response when a chemical is slowly synthesized by the reaction from a faster influx process. We also show that an autocatalytic reaction process occurring in series or in parallel can obey Weber's law with an oscillatory adaptive response. Considering the simplicity and ubiquity of the autocatalytic process, our proposed mechanism is thought to be commonly observed in biological reactions. PMID:21867048

  10. The biological activities and chemical composition of Pereskia species (Cactaceae)--a review.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Nícolas de Castro Campos; Scio, Elita

    2014-09-01

    The exploration of nature as a source of sustainable, novel bioactive substances continues to grow as natural products play a significant role in the search for new therapeutic and agricultural agents. In this context, plants of the genus Pereskia (Cactaceae) have been studied for their biological activities, and are evolving as an interesting subject in the search for new, bioactive compounds. These species are commonly used as human foodstuffs and in traditional medicine to treat a variety of diseases. This review focuses on the bioactivity and chemical composition of the genus Pereskia, and aims to stimulate further studies on the chemistry and biological potential of the genus.

  11. At the Interface of Chemical and Biological Synthesis: An Expanded Genetic Code.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Han; Schultz, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    The ability to site-specifically incorporate noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) with novel structures into proteins in living cells affords a powerful tool to investigate and manipulate protein structure and function. More than 200 ncAAs with diverse biological, chemical, and physical properties have been genetically encoded in response to nonsense or frameshift codons in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms with high fidelity and efficiency. In this review, recent advances in the technology and its application to problems in protein biochemistry, cellular biology, and medicine are highlighted. PMID:27413101

  12. Chemical biology of mutagenesis and DNA repair: cellular responses to DNA alkylation

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastav, Nidhi; Li, Deyu; Essigmann, John M.

    2010-01-01

    The reaction of DNA-damaging agents with the genome results in a plethora of lesions, commonly referred to as adducts. Adducts may cause DNA to mutate, they may represent the chemical precursors of lethal events and they can disrupt expression of genes. Determination of which adduct is responsible for each of these biological endpoints is difficult, but this task has been accomplished for some carcinogenic DNA-damaging agents. Here, we describe the respective contributions of specific DNA lesions to the biological effects of low molecular weight alkylating agents. PMID:19875697

  13. CyBy(2): a structure-based data management tool for chemical and biological data.

    PubMed

    Höck, Stefan; Riedl, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    We report the development of a powerful data management tool for chemical and biological data: CyBy(2). CyBy(2) is a structure-based information management tool used to store and visualize structural data alongside additional information such as project assignment, physical information, spectroscopic data, biological activity, functional data and synthetic procedures. The application consists of a database, an application server, used to query and update the database, and a client application with a rich graphical user interface (GUI) used to interact with the server.

  14. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry strategies for untargeted systems, synthetic, and chemical biology

    PubMed Central

    May, Jody C.; Goodwin, Cody R.; McLean, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary strategies that concentrate on only one or a handful of molecular targets limits the utility of the information gained for diagnostic and predictive purposes. Recent advances in the sensitivity, speed, and precision of measurements obtained from ion mobility coupled to mass spectrometry (IM-MS) have accelerated the utility of IM-MS in untargeted, discovery-driven studies in biology. Perhaps most evident is the impact that such wide-scale discovery capabilities have yielded in the areas of systems, synthetic, and chemical biology, where the need for comprehensive, hypothesis-driving studies from multidimensional and unbiased data is required. PMID:25462629

  15. Simultaneous determination of inorganic mercury, methylmercury, and total mercury concentrations in cryogenic fresh-frozen and freeze-dried biological reference materials.

    PubMed

    Point, David; Davis, W Clay; Garcia Alonso, J Ignacio; Monperrus, Mathilde; Christopher, Steven J; Donard, Olivier F X; Becker, Paul R; Wise, Stephen A

    2007-10-01

    Two speciated isotope dilution (SID) approaches consisting of a single-spike (SS) method and a double-spike (DS) method including a reaction/transformation model for the correction of inadvertent transformations affecting mercury species were compared in terms of accuracy, method performance, and robustness for the simultaneous determination of methylmercury (MeHg), inorganic mercury (iHg), and total mercury (HgT) concentrations in five biological Standard Reference Materials (SRMs). The SRMs consisted of oyster and mussel tissue materials displaying different mercury species concentration levels and different textural/matrix properties including freeze-dried (FD) materials (SRMs 1566b, 2976, and 2977) and cryogenically prepared and stored fresh-frozen (FF) materials (SRMs 1974a, 1974b). Each sample was spiked with (201)iHg (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ORNL) and Me(202)Hg (Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements. IRMM-670) solutions and analyzed using alkaline microwave digestion, ethylation, and gas chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GC/ICP-MS). The results obtained by the SS-SID method suggested that FF and FD materials are not always commutable for the simultaneous determination of iHg, MeHg, and HgT, due to potential transformation reactions resulting probably from the methodology and/or from the textural/matrix properties of the materials. These transformations can occasionally significantly affect mercury species concentration results obtained by SS-SID, depending on the species investigated and the materials considered. The results obtained by the DS-SID method indicated that the two classes of materials were commutable. The simultaneous and corrected concentrations of iHg, MeHg, and HgT obtained by this technique were not found to be statistically different form the certified and reference concentration together with their expanded uncertainty budgets for the five SRMs investigated, exemplifying the robustness, the

  16. Piggery wastewater treatment in a tropical climate: biological and chemical treatment options.

    PubMed

    Shipin, O V; Lee, S H; Chiemchaisri, C; Wiwattanakom, W; Ghosh, G C; Anceno, A J; Stevens, W F

    2007-03-01

    A novel biological treatment system was developed for the treatment of piggery wastewater under tropical conditions. It consisted of three consecutive sponge-based floating biofilters. The Upflow Anaerobic/Anoxic/Aerobic Floating Filter (UA3FF) system was shown to be effective with carbonaceous and, particularly, nitrogenous matter. The rationale for the processes occurring in anoxic-aerobic reactors was based on the concept of nitritation-denitritation rather than nitrification-denitrification. The N-related microbial communities manipulated by changing DO concentration and hydraulic retention time were able to effect a considerable increase in the total and specific N-removal (70% and 0.6 kg N m(-3) filter media per day, respectively) as compared to data reported elsewhere. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Polymerase Chain Reaction amplification of ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene were used to study interrelationships between N-related microbial groups in the system. Microbiological data was interpreted in terms of operational behavior and performance of the reactors. The N-removal efficiency of the biological UA3FF system was compared with a combined biological/physicochemical system based on (a) biological anaerobic pretreatment followed by (b) a chemical precipitation (CP) and (c) an air stripping. Both systems were scrutinized as to operational advantages and costs. The treatment options could produce effluent of a high quality (202 mg COD l(-1), 126 total-N l(-1) and 89 mg COD l(-1) 48 total-N l(-1) in the biological and combined biological/physico-chemical treatment options, respectively) amenable for the subsequent treatment at the municipal facilities. However, the UA3FF biological treatment system was superior to the combined system by a factor of 20 as far as costs are concerned.

  17. Chemical and Biological Impacts of Ocean Acidification Along the West Coast of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feely, R. A.; Alin, S. R.; Carter, B.; Bednarsek, N.

    2015-12-01

    The continental shelf region off the Washington-Oregon-California coast is seasonally exposed to water with a low aragonite saturation state by coastal upwelling of CO2-rich waters. To date, the spatial and temporal distribution of anthropogenic CO2 (Canth) contribution to the CO2-rich waters is largely unknown. Here we use an adaptation of the linear regression approach described in Feely et al. (2008) to utilize the GO-SHIP Repeat Hydrography data set from the northeast Pacific to establish an annually updated relationship between Canth and potential density. This relationship was then used with the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program West Coast cruise data sets from 2007, 2011, 2012 and 2013 to determine the spatial variations of Canth in the upwelled water. Our results show large spatial differences in Canth in surface waters along the coast with the lowest values (40-45 μmol kg-1) in strong upwelling regions of off northern California and southern Oregon and higher values (50-70 μmol kg-1) to the north and south of this region. Canth contributes an average of about 70 % of the increased amount of dissolved inorganic carbon in the upwelled waters at the surface relative to what would be expected from physical circulation and exchange with a preindustrial atmosphere alone. In contrast, Canth contributes an average of about 31%, and 16% of the increased amount of dissolved inorganic carbon at 50 m depth, and at 100 m depth respectively. The remaining contributions are either due to respiration processes in the water that was upwelled and transported to coastal regions or respiration processes that occurs locally during the course of the upwelling season. The uptake of Canth has caused the aragonite saturation horizon to shoal by approximately 30-50 m since preindustrial period so that the undersaturated waters are well within the regions of the continental shelf that affect the biological communities.

  18. [The chemical action of gun powder gases on biological tissues in a point-blank shot].

    PubMed

    Popov, V L; Isakov, V D; Babakhanian, R V; Karnasevich, Iu A

    1992-01-01

    Chemical effect of gun powder gas on the biologic tissues manifests by red-brown staining of the tissues, mainly at the expense of methemoglobin and sulfhemoglobin. Scarlet staining of the tissues at the edges of gun-shot wounds is not a specific marker of a shot made from a short distance; it may emerge several hours after wounding at the expense of hydroxy-hemoglobin and is not at all related to the chemical effect of gun powder gas. The conditions conducive to scarlet staining are an open wound permitting free oxygenation by air oxygen and hemoglobin transfer from the injured red cells into blood plasma and adjacent tissues.

  19. Poplar-type Propolis: Chemical Composition, Botanical Origin and Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Ristivojević, Petar; Trifković, Jelena; Andrić, Filip; Milojković-Opsenica, Dusanka

    2015-11-01

    Propolis is one of the most used natural products known for centuries for its beneficial effects. Due to significant differences in chemical composition of samples originating from different geographic and climatic zones it is crucial to characterize reliably each type of propolis. This article comprises the latest findings concerning the poplar type propolis, i.e. it gives a cross section of chemical composition, botanical origin and biological activity of poplar type propolis in order to encourage further investigations that would indicate its beneficial effects.

  20. Removal of lipid soluble process chemicals from biological materials by extraction with naturally occurring oils or synthetic substitutes thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, K.R.; Orme, T.W.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes a method of removing lipid soluble process chemicals from biological materials comprising blood plasma and fractions thereof containing the lipid soluble process chemicals. The lipid soluble process chemical is a virus attenuating solvent having a high flash point, a detergent, or a mixture thereof. It comprises bringing the biological materials containing the lipid soluble process chemicals into contact with an effective amount of a naturally occurring oil extracted from a plant or an animal or a synthetic compound of similar chemical structure. Also described is a method of removing lymphokine inducing phorbol esters from lympholkine-containing biological material. It comprises bringing the biological materials containing the phorbol esters into contact with an effective amount of a naturally occurring oil extracted from a plant or an animal or a synthetic compound of similar chemical structure so as to remove 80% or more of the phorbol esters.