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Sample records for inorganic salts

  1. Infrared Spectrometry of Inorganic Salts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackermann, Martin N.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a general chemistry experiment which uses infrared spectroscopy to analyze inorganic ions and thereby serves to introduce an important instrumental method of analysis. Presents a table of eight anions and the ammonium ion with the frequencies of their normal modes, as well as the spectra of three sulfate salts. (RR)

  2. Molten salt battery having inorganic paper separator

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Jr., Robert D.

    1977-01-01

    A high temperature secondary battery comprises an anode containing lithium, a cathode containing a chalcogen or chalcogenide, a molten salt electrolyte containing lithium ions, and a separator comprising a porous sheet comprising a homogenous mixture of 2-20 wt.% chrysotile asbestos fibers and the remainder inorganic material non-reactive with the battery components. The non-reactive material is present as fibers, powder, or a fiber-powder mixture.

  3. Sol-gel processing with inorganic metal salt precursors

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2004-10-19

    Methods for sol-gel processing that generally involve mixing together an inorganic metal salt, water, and a water miscible alcohol or other organic solvent, at room temperature with a macromolecular dispersant material, such as hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) added. The resulting homogenous solution is incubated at a desired temperature and time to result in a desired product. The methods enable production of high quality sols and gels at lower temperatures than standard methods. The methods enable production of nanosize sols from inorganic metal salts. The methods offer sol-gel processing from inorganic metal salts.

  4. Nanostructured YSZ membranes derived from inorganic salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cunlin; Liao, Yang; He, Shuli; Sun, Defeng; Chen, Wen

    2005-01-01

    The nanostuctured YSZ (Yttria Stabilized Zirconia) membranes on Si(110) substrates are successfully prepared by sol-gel technology derived from inorganic salts ZrOCl2"8H2O, H2C2O4"2H2O and Y(NO3)3"6H2O. By means of controlling the supersaturation and diffusion velocity in solution when the zirconyl oxalate xerogels are repeptized, spherical colloidal paricles with different distributions are obtained. we propose that the peptization of xerogels can be considered as a process of nucleation and growth of colloidal particles. The membranes are preparated by spinning the modified sols on Si(110) substrates. After calcining at 800°C for 1 hour, the membranes are crack-free and mirrorlike. The membranes consist of monodisperse fine spherical crystallines in the range of 20~220nm in diameter, which microstructures are controlled by changing the size and distribution of colloidal particles in sols.

  5. SEPARATION OF INORGANIC SALTS FROM ORGANIC SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Katzin, L.I.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1958-06-24

    A process is described for recovering the nitrates of uranium and plutonium from solution in oxygen-containing organic solvents such as ketones or ethers. The solution of such salts dissolved in an oxygen-containing organic compound is contacted with an ion exchange resin whereby sorption of the entire salt on the resin takes place and then the salt-depleted liquid and the resin are separated from each other. The reaction seems to be based on an anion formation of the entire salt by complexing with the anion of the resin. Strong base or quaternary ammonium type resins can be used successfully in this process.

  6. Inorganic salt mixtures as electrolyte media in fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, Charles Austen (Inventor); Belieres, Jean-Philippe (Inventor); Francis-Gervasio, Dominic (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Fuel cell designs and techniques for converting chemical energy into electrical energy uses a fuel cell are disclosed. The designs and techniques include an anode to receive fuel, a cathode to receive oxygen, and an electrolyte chamber in the fuel cell, including an electrolyte medium, where the electrolyte medium includes an inorganic salt mixture in the fuel cell. The salt mixture includes pre-determined quantities of at least two salts chosen from a group consisting of ammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate, ammonium trifluoroacetate, and ammonium nitrate, to conduct charge from the anode to the cathode. The fuel cell includes an electrical circuit operatively coupled to the fuel cell to transport electrons from the cathode.

  7. 40 CFR 721.4680 - Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Metal salts of complex inorganic... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4680 Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids... substances identified generically as metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (PMNs P-89-576 and...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4680 - Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metal salts of complex inorganic... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4680 Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids... substances identified generically as metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (PMNs P-89-576 and...

  9. Low-melting point inorganic nitrate salt heat transfer fluid

    DOEpatents

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Brosseau, Douglas A.

    2009-09-15

    A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid made of a mixture of four inorganic nitrate salts: 9-18 wt % NaNO.sub.3, 40-52 wt % KNO.sub.3, 13-21 wt % LiNO.sub.3, and 20-27 wt % Ca(NO.sub.3).sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures less than 100 C; thermal stability limits greater than 500 C; and viscosity in the range of 5-6 cP at 300 C; and 2-3 cP at 400 C.

  10. Hypertonicity augments bullfrog taste nerve responses to inorganic salts.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Namie; Higure, Yoko; Mashiyama, Kazunori; Ohtubo, Yoshitaka; Kumazawa, Takashi; Yoshii, Kiyonori

    2012-06-01

    The tonicity of taste stimulating solutions has been usually ignored, though taste substances themselves yielded the tonicity. We investigated the effect of hypertonicity on bullfrog taste nerve responses to inorganic salts by adding nonelectrolytes such as urea and sucrose that elicited no taste nerve responses. Here, we show that hypertonicity alters bullfrog taste nerve-response magnitude and firing pattern. The addition of urea or sucrose enhances the taste nerve-response magnitude to NaCl and shifts the concentration-response curve to the left. The effect of hypertonicity on responses to CaCl(2) is bimodal; hypertonicity suppresses CaCl(2) responses at concentrations less than ~30 mM and enhances them at concentrations greater than ~30 mM. The hypertonicity also enhances response magnitude to other monovalent salts. The extent of the enhancing effects depends on the difference between the mobility of the cation and anion in the salt. We quantitatively suggest that both the enhancing and suppressing effects result from the magnitude and direction of local circuit currents generated by diffusion potentials across tight junctions surrounding taste receptor cells. PMID:22422087

  11. Effect of organo and inorganic lithium salt on human blood plasma glutathione- A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Hashmat; Khan, Muhammad Farid; Jan, Syed Umer; Hashmat, Farwa

    2016-03-01

    Investigation of toxicological effect of various metals is the field of interest for toxicological scientists since four to five decades and especially the toxicological effect of those drugs containing metals and there use is common because there is no other choice except to use these metal containing drugs. Inorganic as well as organic salts of lithium are commonly used in prophylaxis and treatments of many psychiatric disorders. The aim of the present study was to see the difference between the effect of organic and inorganic salt of lithium commonly used in psychiatric disorders on the GSH of human blood plasma. It is the scientific fact that ionic dissociation of organic and inorganic salts of any metal is always quite different hence to prove this fact, the effect of lithium citrate (organic salt of lithium) and lithium carbonate (inorganic salt of lithium) was investigated on human blood plasma GSH to find the difference between the effect of two. Ellman's method was used for the quantification of glutathione contents in plasma. It was found that lithium citrate decrease plasma GSH contents less than lithium carbonate indicating that organic salts of lithium are safe than inorganic salts of lithium when are used in psychiatric disorders. Further to analyze the effect of organic and inorganic salt of lithium on blood plasma GSH with the increase in incubation time was also evaluated and was found that both concentration and time dependent effect of organic salt of lithium shows that this salt has decreased plasma GSH contents of human blood less than inorganic salt of lithium either by promoting oxidation of GSH into GSSG or by lithium glutathione complex formation. These results suggest the physicians that the use of organic lithium salts is much safer than inorganic salts of lithium in terms of depletion of blood plasma GSH contents. PMID:27087067

  12. Thermal Characteristics of Chemical Refrigerating Apparatus using Silica-Gel/ Inorganic-Salt-Solution Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanadori, Michio; Watabe, Yoshihito

    This report deals with chemical refrigerating apparatus using silica-gel / inorganic-salt-solution pair. Experiments are conducted by changing concentration of inorganic-salt solution and adsorbent / refrigerant pair. The following results are obtained. (1) The temperature of refrigerant in evaporator is lowered as decrease of inorganic-salt-solution concentration. (2) The available salt-concentration range as refrigerant are gained by supercooling in restricted temperature range lower than solidification temperature of solution. (3)Difference of minimum temperature among cooled refrigerants are little in low concentration region. (4)In concentration lower than about10wt%, refrigerants supercool and solidify suddenly. Accordingly these salt-solutions are not available in these region as refrigerants.

  13. Novel, electrolyte solutions comprising fully inorganic salts with high anodic stability for rechargeable magnesium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Doe, RE; Han, R; Hwang, J; Gmitter, AJ; Shterenberg, I; Yoo, HD; Pour, N; Aurbach, D

    2014-01-01

    Herein the first inorganic magnesium salt solution capable of highly reversible magnesium electrodeposition is presented. Synthesized by acid-base reaction of MgCl2 and Lewis acidic compounds such as AlCl3, this salt class demonstrates upwards of 99% Coulombic efficiency, deposition overpotential of <200 mV, and anodic stability of 3.1 V.

  14. 40 CFR 721.4680 - Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4680 Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Metal salts of complex...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4680 - Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4680 Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Metal salts of complex...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4680 - Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4680 Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Metal salts of complex...

  17. Prediction of heat capacities of solid inorganic salts from group contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Mostafa, A.T.M.G.; Eakman, J.M.; Yarbro, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    A group contribution technique is proposed to predict the coefficients in the heat capacity correlation, C{sub p} = a + bT + c/T{sup 2} + dT{sup 2}, for solid inorganic salts. The results from this work are compared with fits to experimental data from the literature. It is shown to give good predictions for both simple and complex solid inorganic salts. Literature heat capacities for a large number (664) of solid inorganic salts covering a broad range of cations (129), anions (17) and ligands (2) have been used in regressions to obtain group contributions for the parameters in the heat capacity temperature function. A mean error of 3.18% is found when predicted values are compared with literature values for heat capacity at 298{degrees} K. Estimates of the error standard deviation from the regression for each additivity constant are also determined.

  18. Research on the Attenuation Characteristics of Some Inorganic Salts in Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, X.; Peng, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Ma, Z.; Wang, J.

    2015-10-01

    Seawater is a complex multicomponent system, which involves varieties of organic, inorganic, dissolved and suspended substances. However, the main components dissolved in seawater are the inorganic salts such as NaCl, MgCl2, KCl, NaHCO3, and MgSO4. These elements make different contributions to the spectra of absorption and scattering in water. In this paper, the spectra of different aqueous solutions were measured in the region from 200 to 1200 nm; the attenuation characteristics of aqueous solutions were studied at wavelengths of 450, 532, and 633 nm, respectively; the relationships between attenuation coefficient and the conductivity in different concentrations were also studied.

  19. Inorganic salts in atmospheric particulate matter: Raman spectroscopy as an analytical tool.

    PubMed

    Vargas Jentzsch, Paul; Kampe, Bernd; Ciobotă, Valerian; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2013-11-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter is composed of inorganic and organic components of natural and anthropogenic origin. Wind-transport is probably the most important process responsible for the emission of solid particulate matter into the troposphere, but there are also important contributions from chemical reactions due to the interaction of different atmospheric components in presence of water and solar radiation. Sulfate, nitrate and carbonate salts can be both reactants and products in this complex dynamic system, and there is no doubt about their important impact on the climate. Both simple and mixed salts can be produced in atmosphere by dissolution-crystallization processes. The Raman spectra of 45 representative salts of the atmospheric environment were recorded and the bands assigned. The chemometric analysis of the spectroscopic data of these 45 salts demonstrates the suitability of Raman spectroscopy to classify and identify sulfate, nitrate and carbonate salts of atmospheric importance. Salts were classified into three groups: "sulfates", "nitrates or carbonates" and "sulfate-nitrates or sulfate-carbonate". This kind of information is relevant in atmospheric studies because specific characteristics of the salts can provide valuable information about the origin of the salts, the atmospheric chemistry and climate forcing, thus contributing to the evaluation of environmental impacts. PMID:23880412

  20. Use of inorganic dryer-salts in the determination of organic contaminants in air

    SciTech Connect

    Simonov, V.A.

    1985-09-01

    This paper presents results of a study of the adsorptive activity of a number of inorganic salts relative to water vapor and to organic vapors in air under the dynamic conditions which are uses in the indicator tube method. Data are also given on the properties of dryer salts having a surface modified with glycerin. It is shown that lithium chloride on porcelain and potassium carbonate having a surface modified with glycerin can be used to dry air in determining contaminants of nonpolar and polar organic substances in it. Anhydrone on porcelain, calcium chloride, and potassium carbonate absorb some substances which are being determined and therefore are less suitable.

  1. Hydrothermal decomposition of glucose and fructose with inorganic and organic potassium salts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyu; Fu, Jie; Lu, Xiuyang

    2012-09-01

    The effects of 15 inorganic and organic acid potassium salts on hydrothermal decomposition of glucose, fructose and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) were investigated at 180°C. The rate constants for glucose, fructose and 5-HMF decomposition with anions were calculated by a pseudo first-order equation, and the impact factors of the rate constants were calculated, to demonstrate the catalytic effect of the different anions. Compared to the results without added salts, chloride, bromide, iodide and nitrate anions did not significantly accelerate the decomposition rate of glucose or improve the selectivity for 5-HMF, but increased the decomposition rate of fructose from 19% to 44%, and improved the selectivity for 5-HMF by 4-29%. Phosphate, fluoride, sulfate and all organic acid anions increased the decomposition rate of glucose and fructose by 23-2781%, but lowered the selectivity for 5-HMF from 36% to 100% as compared to the results without added salts. These findings provide insights on the reactivity and mechanism of the hydrothermal decomposition of glucose and fructose with inorganic and organic salts. PMID:22728181

  2. Joint effect of organic acids and inorganic salts on cloud droplet activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frosch, M.; Prisle, N. L.; Bilde, M.; Varga, Z.; Kiss, G.

    2011-04-01

    We have investigated CCN properties of internally mixed particles composed of one organic acid (oxalic acid dihydrate, succinic acid, adipic acid, citric acid, cis-pinonic acid, or Nordic reference fulvic acid) and one inorganic salt (sodium chloride or ammonium sulphate). Surface tension and water activity of aqueous model solutions with concentrations relevant for CCN activation were measured using a tensiometer and osmometry, respectively. The measurements were used to calculate Köhler curves and critical supersaturations, which were compared to measured critical supersaturations of particles with the same chemical compositions, determined with a cloud condensation nucleus counter. Surfactant surface partitioning was not accounted for. For the aqueous solutions containing cis-pinonic acid and fulvic acid, a depression of surface tension was observed, but for the remaining solutions the effect on surface tension was negligible at concentrations relevant for cloud droplet activation. The surface tension depression of aqueous solutions containing both organic acid and inorganic salt was approximately the same as or smaller than that of aqueous solutions containing the same mass of the corresponding pure organic acids. Water activity was found to be highly dependent on the type and amount of inorganic salt. Sodium chloride was able to decrease water activity more than ammonium sulphate and both inorganic salts are predicted to have a smaller Raoult term than the studied organic acids. Increasing the mass ratio of the inorganic salt led to a decrease in water activity. Water activity measurements were compared to results from the E-AIM model and values estimated from both constant and variable van't Hoff factors. The correspondence between measurements and estimates was overall good, except for highly concentrated solutions. Critical supersaturations calculated with Köhler theory based on measured water activity and surface tension, but not accounting for surface

  3. Systematization of the mass spectra for speciation of inorganic salts with static secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Van Ham, Rita; Van Vaeck, Luc; Adams, Freddy C; Adriaens, Annemie

    2004-05-01

    The analytical use of mass spectra from static secondary ion mass spectrometry for the molecular identification of inorganic analytes in real life surface layers and microobjects requires an empirical insight in the signals to be expected from a given compound. A comprehensive database comprising over 50 salts has been assembled to complement prior data on oxides. The present study allows the systematic trends in the relationship between the detected signals and molecular composition of the analyte to be delineated. The mass spectra provide diagnostic information by means of atomic ions, structural fragments, molecular ions, and adduct ions of the analyte neutrals. The prediction of mass spectra from a given analyte must account for the charge state of the ions in the salt, the formation of oxide-type neutrals from oxy salts, and the occurrence of oxidation-reduction processes.

  4. Mixtures of the 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ionic liquid with different inorganic salts: insights into their interactions.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Filipe S; Cabrita, Eurico J; Todorovic, Smilja; Bernardes, Carlos E S; Lopes, José N Canongia; Hodgson, Jennifer L; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Rebelo, Luís P N; Marrucho, Isabel M

    2016-01-28

    In this work, we explore the interactions between the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolim acetate and different inorganic salts belonging to two different cation families, those based on ammonium and others based on sodium. NMR and Raman spectroscopy are used to screen for changes in the molecular environment of the ions in the ionic liquid + inorganic salt mixtures as compared to pure ionic liquid. The ion self-diffusion coefficients are determined from NMR data, allowing the discussion of the ionicity values of the ionic liquid + inorganic salt mixtures calculated using different methods. Our data reveal that preferential interactions are established between the ionic liquid and ammonium-based salts, as opposed to sodium-based salts. Computational calculations show the formation of aggregates between the ionic liquid and the inorganic salt, which is consistent with the spectroscopic data, and indicate that the acetate anion of the ionic liquid establishes preferential interactions with the ammonium cation of the inorganic salts, leaving the imidazolium cation less engaged in the media. PMID:26725329

  5. Joint effect of organic acids and inorganic salts on cloud droplet activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frosch, M.; Prisle, N. L.; Bilde, M.; Varga, Z.; Kiss, G.

    2010-07-01

    We have investigated CCN properties of internally mixed particles composed of one organic acid (oxalic acid, succinic acid, adipic acid, citric acid, cis-pinonic acid, or nordic reference fulvic acid) and one inorganic salt (sodium chloride or ammonium sulphate). Surface tension and water activity of aqueous model solutions with concentrations relevant for CCN activation were measured using a tensiometer and osmometry, respectively. The measurements were used to calculate Köhler curves, which were compared to measured critical supersaturations of particles with the same chemical compositions, determined with a cloud condensation nucleus counter. Surfactant surface partitioning was not accounted for. For the mixtures containing cis-pinonic acid or fulvic acid, a depression of surface tension was observed, but for the remaining mixtures the effect on surface tension was negligle at concentrations relevant for cloud droplet activation, and water activity was the more significant term in the Köhler equation. The surface tension depression of aqueous solutions containing both organic acid and inorganic salt was approximately the same as or smaller than that of aqueous solutions containing the same mass of the corresponding pure organic acids. Water activity was found to be highly dependent on the type and amount of inorganic salt. Sodium chloride was able to decrease water activity more than ammonium sulphate and both inorganic compounds had a higher effect on water activity than the studied organic acids, and increasing the mass ratio of the inorganic compound led to a decrease in water activity. Water activity measurements were compared to results from the E-AIM model and values estimated from both constant and variable van't Hoff factors to evaluate the performance of these approaches. The correspondence between measuments and estimates was overall good, except for highly concentrated solutions. Critical supersaturations calculated with Köhler theory based on

  6. Studies of the plasticizing effect of different hydrophilic inorganic salts on starch/poly (vinyl alcohol) films.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiancai; Li, Hongmei; Luo, Yong; Zhao, Yulai; Hou, Linxi

    2016-01-01

    The effects of different inorganic salts LiCl, MgCl2·6H2O, CaCl2, and AlCl3·6H2O on the crystalline, thermal, water vapor barrier, and tensile properties of starch/PVA films were studied. The high plasticizing efficiency of all these four inorganic salts for starch/PVA film was confirmed by the obtained results. These four salts all had a good compatibility with starch/PVA within the content of 15 wt% and starch/PVA became completely miscible with the addition of 15 wt% inorganic salts. All these four salts had a strong destroying effect on the crystals of starch and PVA. Among these four salts, AlCl3·6H2O had the largest negative effect on the thermal stability of starch/PVA and LiCl had the largest improving effect on the water sorption rate of starch/PVA film. On the whole MgCl2·6H2O and CaCl2 were the more suitable plasticizer for starch/PVA film among these four inorganic salts. With the addition of 15 wt% MgCl2·6H2O and CaCl2, the elongation at break of starch/PVA film could reach to 418.83% and 434.80%, respectively.

  7. Safety Assessment of Citric Acid, Inorganic Citrate Salts, and Alkyl Citrate Esters as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Monice M; Heldreth, Bart A; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2014-05-26

    The CIR Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of citric acid, 12 inorganic citrate salts, and 20 alkyl citrate esters as used in cosmetics, concluding that these ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration. Citric acid is reported to function as a pH adjuster, chelating agent, or fragrance ingredient. Some of the salts are also reported to function as chelating agents, and a number of the citrates are reported to function as skin-conditioning agents but other functions are also reported. The Panel reviewed available animal and clinical data, but because citric acid, calcium citrate, ferric citrate, manganese citrate, potassium citrate, sodium citrate, diammonium citrate, isopropyl citrate, stearyl citrate, and triethyl citrate are generally recognized as safe direct food additives, dermal exposure was the focus for these ingredients in this cosmetic ingredient safety assessment.

  8. Archaeal Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Displays Robust Activity under High-Salt Conditions and in Organic Solvents

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Lana J.; Hepowit, Nathaniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases (PPAs) that hydrolyze inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) to orthophosphate (Pi) are commonly used to accelerate and detect biosynthetic reactions that generate PPi as a by-product. Current PPAs are inactivated by high salt concentrations and organic solvents, which limits the extent of their use. Here we report a class A type PPA of the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii (HvPPA) that is thermostable and displays robust PPi-hydrolyzing activity under conditions of 25% (vol/vol) organic solvent and salt concentrations from 25 mM to 3 M. HvPPA was purified to homogeneity as a homohexamer by a rapid two-step method and was found to display non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a Vmax of 465 U · mg−1 for PPi hydrolysis (optimal at 42°C and pH 8.5) and Hill coefficients that indicated cooperative binding to PPi and Mg2+. Similarly to other class A type PPAs, HvPPA was inhibited by sodium fluoride; however, hierarchical clustering and three-dimensional (3D) homology modeling revealed HvPPA to be distinct in structure from characterized PPAs. In particular, HvPPA was highly negative in surface charge, which explained its extreme resistance to organic solvents. To demonstrate that HvPPA could drive thermodynamically unfavorable reactions to completion under conditions of reduced water activity, a novel coupled assay was developed; HvPPA hydrolyzed the PPi by-product generated in 2 M NaCl by UbaA (a “salt-loving” noncanonical E1 enzyme that adenylates ubiquitin-like proteins in the presence of ATP). Overall, we demonstrate HvPPA to be useful for hydrolyzing PPi under conditions of reduced water activity that are a hurdle to current PPA-based technologies. PMID:26546423

  9. Study of fouling and scaling in capacitive deionisation by using dissolved organic and inorganic salts.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Mohamed; Zou, Linda

    2013-01-15

    In this work, fouling, scaling and cleaning of the capacitive deionisation (CDI) with activated carbon electrodes were systematically investigated for the first time. Electrode fouling caused by dissolved organic matter using sodium salt of humic acid as a model foulant (measured by total organic carbon concentration, TOC) and inorganic salt (NaCl, MgCl(2), CaCl(2) and FeCl(3)) in the CDI feed solutions was investigated in a series of controlled fouling experiments. After each CDI experiment, a series of cleaning steps was performed to understand the reversibility of fouling accumulated on the electrode surface by analysing the cleaning solutions. The higher the TOC concentration in the CDI feed solution, the more the reduction of salt removal efficiency, declination in the production rate and energy consumption. Dissolved organic matter is the main cause of electrode fouling, as it blocks the activated carbon pores and reduces their electrosorption capacitance. Ca and Mg have no noticeable effect on the CDI treatment performance. However, Fe seemed to have a greater effect on CDI electrode fouling. Alkaline and acid cleaning solutions were able to restore the recovery of the CDI performance from fouling. Pre-treatment to reduce the dissolved organic matter levels is recommended to achieve sustainable treatment performance. PMID:23274796

  10. Room temperature inorganic ``quasi-molten salts`` as alkali-metal electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, K.; Zhang, S.; Angell, C.A.

    1996-11-01

    Room temperature inorganic liquids of high ionic conductivity have been prepared by reacting Lewis acid AlCl with sulfonyl chlorides. The mechanism is not clear at this time since a crystal structure study of the 1:1 complex with CH{sub 3}SO{sub 2}Cl (T{sub m} = 30 C) is not consistent with a simple chloride transfer to create AlClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} anions. The liquid is in a state somewhere between ionic and molecular. A new term quasi-molten salt is adopted to describe this state. A comparably conducting liquid can be made using BCL{sub 3} in place of AlCl{sub 3}. Unlike their organic counterparts based on ammonium cations (e.g., pyridinium or imidazolium) which reduce in the presence of alkali metals, this inorganic class of cation shows great stability against electrochemical reduction (ca. {minus}1.0 V vs. Li{sup +}/Li), with the useful consequence that reversible lithium and sodium metal deposition/stripping can be supported. The electrochemical window for these quasi-salts with AlCl{sub 3} ranges up to 5.0 V, and their room temperature conductivities exceed 10{sup {minus}4} S/cm. They dissolve lithium and sodium tetrachloroaluminates up to mole fraction {approximately} 0.6 at 100 C and intermediate compositions are permanently stable at ambient. The resultant lithium or sodium salt solutions exhibit electrochemical windows of 4.5--5.0 V vs. Li{sup +}/Li or Na{sup +}/Na and show room temperature conductivities of 10{sup {minus}3.0}--10{sup {minus}2.5} S/cm. In preliminary charge/discharge tests, the cell Li/``quasi-ionic liquid electrolyte``/Li{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} showed a discharge capacity of ca. 110 mAh/(g of cathode) and sustained 80% of the initial capacity after 60 cycles, indicating that these quasi-molten salt-based electrolytes are promising candidates for alkali-metal batteries.

  11. Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Anoop

    2013-08-14

    A key technological issue facing the success of future Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) plants is creating an economical Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. Current TES systems use either sensible heat in fluids such as oil, or molten salts, or use thermal stratification in a dual-media consisting of a solid and a heat-transfer fluid. However, utilizing the heat of fusion in inorganic molten salt mixtures in addition to sensible heat , as in a Phase change material (PCM)-based TES, can significantly increase the energy density of storage requiring less salt and smaller containers. A major issue that is preventing the commercial use of PCM-based TES is that it is difficult to discharge the latent heat stored in the PCM melt. This is because when heat is extracted, the melt solidifies onto the heat exchanger surface decreasing the heat transfer. Even a few millimeters of thickness of solid material on heat transfer surface results in a large drop in heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of solid PCM. Thus, to maintain the desired heat rate, the heat exchange area must be large which increases cost. This project demonstrated that the heat transfer coefficient can be increase ten-fold by using forced convection by pumping a hyper-eutectic salt mixture over specially coated heat exchanger tubes. However,only 15% of the latent heat is used against a goal of 40% resulting in a projected cost savings of only 17% against a goal of 30%. Based on the failure mode effect analysis and experience with pumping salt at near freezing point significant care must be used during operation which can increase the operating costs. Therefore, we conclude the savings are marginal to justify using this concept for PCM-TES over a two-tank TES. The report documents the specialty coatings, the composition and morphology of hypereutectic salt mixtures and the results from the experiment conducted with the active heat exchanger along with the lessons learnt during

  12. Water uptake of multicomponent organic mixtures and their influence on hygroscopicity of inorganic salts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Jing, Bo; Guo, Yucong; Li, Junling; Tong, Shengrui; Zhang, Yunhong; Ge, Maofa

    2016-07-01

    The hygroscopic behaviors of atmospherically relevant multicomponent water soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) and their effects on ammonium sulfate (AS) and sodium chloride were investigated using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) in the relative humidity (RH) range of 5%-90%. The measured hygroscopic growth was compared with predictions from the Extended-Aerosol Inorganics Model (E-AIM) and Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) method. The equal mass multicomponent WSOCs mixture containing levoglucosan, succinic acid, phthalic acid and humic acid showed gradual water uptake without obvious phase change over the whole RH range. It was found that the organic content played an important role in the water uptake of mixed particles. When organic content was dominant in the mixture (75%), the measured hygroscopic growth was higher than predictions from the E-AIM or ZSR relation, especially under high RH conditions. For mass fractions of organics not larger than 50%, the hygroscopic growth of mixtures was in good agreement with model predictions. The influence of interactions between inorganic and organic components on the hygroscopicity of mixed particles was related to the salt type and organic content. These results could contribute to understanding of the hygroscopic behaviors of multicomponent aerosol particles. PMID:27372129

  13. Inorganic and organic sulfur cycling in salt-marsh pore waters

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, G.W. III; Church, T.M.; Scudlark, J.R.; Cosman, M.

    1986-05-09

    Sulfur species in pore waters of the Great Marsh, Delaware, were analyzed seasonally by polarographic methods. The species determined (and their concentrations in micromoles per liter) included inorganic sulfides (less than or equal to3360), polysulfides (less than or equal to326), thiosulfate (less than or equal to104), tetrathionate (less than or equal to302), organic thiols (less than or equal to2411), and organic disulfides (less than or equal to139). Anticipated were bisulfide increases with depth due to sulfate reduction and subsurface sulfate excesses and pH minima, the result of a seasonal redox cycle. Unanticipated was the pervasive presence of thiols (for example, glutathione), particularly during periods of biological production. Salt marshes appear to be unique among marine systems in producing high concentrations of thiols. Polysulfides, thiosulfate, and tetrathionate also exhibited seasonal subsurface maxima. These results suggest a dynamic seasonal cycling of sulfur in salt marshes involving abiological and biological reactions and dissolved and solid sulfur species. The chemosynthetic turnover of pyrite to organic sulfur is a likely pathway for this sulfur cycling. Thus, material, chemical, and energy cycles in wetlands appear to be optimally synergistic.

  14. Enhancing the adsorption of ionic liquids onto activated carbon by the addition of inorganic salts

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Catarina M. S. S.; Lemus, Jesús; Freire, Mara G.; Palomar, Jose; Coutinho, João A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Most ionic liquids (ILs) are either water soluble or present a non-negligible miscibility with water that may cause some harmful effects upon their release into the environment. Among other methods, adsorption of ILs onto activated carbon (AC) has shown to be an effective technique to remove these compounds from aqueous solutions. However, this method has proved to be viable only for hydrophobic ILs rather than for the hydrophilic that, being water soluble, have a larger tendency for contamination. In this context, an alternative approach using the salting-out ability of inorganic salts is here proposed to enhance the adsorption of hydrophilic ILs onto activated carbon. The effect of the concentrations of Na2SO4 on the adsorption of five ILs onto AC was investigated. A wide range of ILs that allow the inspection of the IL cation family (imidazolium- and pyridinium-based) and the anion nature (accounting for its hydrophilicity and fluorination) through the adsorption onto AC was studied. In general, it is shown that the use of Na2SO4 enhances the adsorption of ILs onto AC. In particular, this effect is highly relevant when dealing with hydrophilic ILs that are those that are actually poorly removed by AC. In addition, the COnductor like Screening MOdel for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS) was used aiming at complementing the experimental data obtained. This work contributes with the development of novel methods to remove ILs from water streams aiming at creating “greener” processes. PMID:25516713

  15. Speciation of the major inorganic salts in atmospheric aerosols of Beijing, China: Measurements and comparison with model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Ci, Zhijia; Guo, Jia; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-05-01

    In the winter and summer of 2013-2014, we used a sampling system, which consists of annular denuder, back-up filter and thermal desorption set-up, to measure the speciation of major inorganic salts in aerosols and the associated trace gases in Beijing. This sampling system can separate volatile ammonium salts (NH4NO3 and NH4Cl) from non-volatile ammonium salts ((NH4)2SO4), as well as the non-volatile nitrate and chloride. The measurement data was used as input of a thermodynamic equilibrium model (ISORROPIA II) to investigate the gas-aerosol equilibrium characteristics. Results show that (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3 and NH4Cl were the major inorganic salts in aerosols and mainly existed in the fine particles. The sulfate, nitrate and chloride associated with crustal ions were also important in Beijing where mineral dust concentrations were high. About 19% of sulfate in winter and 11% of sulfate in summer were associated with crustal ions and originated from heterogeneous reactions or direct emissions. The non-volatile nitrate contributed about 33% and 15% of nitrate in winter and summer, respectively. Theoretical thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for NH4NO3 and NH4Cl suggest that the gaseous precursors were sufficient to form stable volatile ammonium salts in winter, whereas the internal mixing with sulfate and crustal species were important for the formation of volatile ammonium salts in summer. The results of the thermodynamic equilibrium model reasonably agreed with the measurements of aerosols and gases, but large discrepancy existed in predicting the speciation of inorganic ammonium salts. This indicates that the assumption on crustal species in the model was important for obtaining better understanding on gas-aerosol partitioning and improving the model prediction.

  16. Efficacy of supplementation of selected medicinal mushrooms with inorganic selenium salts.

    PubMed

    Niedzielski, Przemysław; Mleczek, Mirosław; Siwulski, Marek; Gąsecka, Monika; Kozak, Lidia; Rissmann, Iwona; Mikołajczak, Patrycja

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility of supplementation with inorganic forms of selenium (Na2SeO4 and Na2SeO3) in concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0 and 1.5 mM of three medicinal mushroom species: Agrocybe aegerita, Hericium erinaceus and Ganoderma lucidum. Tested mushroom species grew in Se additions of 0-0.6 mM (A. aegerita and H. erinaceus), while growth of G. lucidum bodies was observed for 0-0.8 mM. For the latter mushroom species, the total Se content was the highest. Content of Seorg was diverse; for control bodies it was the highest for G. lucidum (only organic forms were present), lower for A. aegerita (84% organic forms) and the lowest for H. erinaceus (56% organic forms). Accumulation of Se(IV) was generally significantly higher than Se(VI) for all tested mushroom species. There was no significant decrease of A. aegerita or G. lucidum biomass with the exception of G. lucidum bodies growing under 0.8 mM of Se species addition (15.51 ± 6.53 g). Biomass of H. erinaceus bodies was the highest under 0.2 (197.04 ± 8.73 g), control (191.80 ± 6.06 g) and 0.1 mM (185.04 ± 8.73 g) of both inorganic salts. The addition to the medium of Se salts brought about macroscopic changes in the fruiting bodies of the examined mushrooms. Concentrations exceeding 0.4 mM caused diminution of carpophores or even their total absence. In addition, colour changes of fruiting bodies were also recorded. At Se concentrations of 0.4 and 0.6 mM, A. aegerita fruiting bodies were distinctly lighter and those of H. erinaceus changed colour from purely white to white-pink. PMID:25310808

  17. Efficacy of supplementation of selected medicinal mushrooms with inorganic selenium salts.

    PubMed

    Niedzielski, Przemysław; Mleczek, Mirosław; Siwulski, Marek; Gąsecka, Monika; Kozak, Lidia; Rissmann, Iwona; Mikołajczak, Patrycja

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility of supplementation with inorganic forms of selenium (Na2SeO4 and Na2SeO3) in concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0 and 1.5 mM of three medicinal mushroom species: Agrocybe aegerita, Hericium erinaceus and Ganoderma lucidum. Tested mushroom species grew in Se additions of 0-0.6 mM (A. aegerita and H. erinaceus), while growth of G. lucidum bodies was observed for 0-0.8 mM. For the latter mushroom species, the total Se content was the highest. Content of Seorg was diverse; for control bodies it was the highest for G. lucidum (only organic forms were present), lower for A. aegerita (84% organic forms) and the lowest for H. erinaceus (56% organic forms). Accumulation of Se(IV) was generally significantly higher than Se(VI) for all tested mushroom species. There was no significant decrease of A. aegerita or G. lucidum biomass with the exception of G. lucidum bodies growing under 0.8 mM of Se species addition (15.51 ± 6.53 g). Biomass of H. erinaceus bodies was the highest under 0.2 (197.04 ± 8.73 g), control (191.80 ± 6.06 g) and 0.1 mM (185.04 ± 8.73 g) of both inorganic salts. The addition to the medium of Se salts brought about macroscopic changes in the fruiting bodies of the examined mushrooms. Concentrations exceeding 0.4 mM caused diminution of carpophores or even their total absence. In addition, colour changes of fruiting bodies were also recorded. At Se concentrations of 0.4 and 0.6 mM, A. aegerita fruiting bodies were distinctly lighter and those of H. erinaceus changed colour from purely white to white-pink.

  18. Development of Spheroidal Inorganic Sorbents for Treatment of Acidic Salt-Bearing Liquid Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.L.

    2001-09-07

    A spheroidal composite inorganic sorbent was developed for U.S. Department of Energy-Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (USDOE-ESP) for potential use in removing radioactive cesium isotopes from acidic high-salt waste streams such as those at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The sorbent, zirconium monohydrogen phosphate (ZrHP) embedded with fine powder of ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP), was prepared using a unique internal gelation process which can be used to make porous reproducible microspheres that are structurally strong, have a low tendency for surface erosion, and improve the flow dynamics for column operations. Both ZrHP and AMP are excellent sorbent materials and, being inorganic, are stable in high radiation fields. AMP is a very effective sorbent for removing cesium from salt-bearing waste streams for a wide range of acidity. In the pH range of 2 to 10, ZrHP is also a very effective sorbent for removing Cs, Sr, Th, U(VI), Pu(IV), Am(III), Hg, and Pb from streams of lower ionic concentrations. Crucial to developing the spheroidal AMP-ZrHP sorbent was to determine the ideal weight percentage of AMP that could be embedded in the ZrHP microspheres in order to maintain the structural integrity of the microspheres and also achieve a good cesium separation. A total of 12 preparations were made. The dry weight percentage of AMP ranged from 30 to 60. Overall, the best composite microspheres prepared contained 50% AMP (by dry weight measurement). Another composite microsphere, which was composed of titanium monohydrogen phosphate (TiHP) embedded with 18 wt % (air-dried weight) potassium cobalt hexacyanoferrate (KCoCF) and developed for a different separations application, was also batch tested for comparison. It proved to be as effective in removing,the cesium as the air-dried AMP (50 wt %)-ZrHP. Granular KCoCF was also prepared and was very effective. Large samples of each of these materials were sent to

  19. Intertidal salt marshes as an important source of inorganic carbon to the coastal ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Zhaohui Aleck; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Ganju, Neil K.; Gonneea, Meagan; Chu, Sophie N.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic tidal export of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) to the coastal ocean from highly productive intertidal marshes and its effects on seawater carbonate chemistry are thoroughly evaluated. The study uses a comprehensive approach by combining tidal water sampling of CO2parameters across seasons, continuous in situ measurements of biogeochemically-relevant parameters and water fluxes, with high-resolution modeling in an intertidal salt marsh of the U.S. northeast region. Salt marshes can acidify and alkalize tidal water by injecting CO2 (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA). DIC and TA generation may also be decoupled due to differential effects of marsh aerobic and anaerobic respiration on DIC and TA. As marsh DIC is added to tidal water, the buffering capacity first decreases to a minimum and then increases quickly. Large additions of marsh DIC can result in higher buffering capacity in ebbing tide than incoming tide. Alkalization of tidal water, which mostly occurs in the summer due to anaerobic respiration, can further modify buffering capacity. Marsh exports of DIC and alkalinity may have complex implications for the future, more acidified ocean. Marsh DIC export exhibits high variability over tidal and seasonal cycles, which is modulated by both marsh DIC generation and by water fluxes. The marsh DIC export of 414 g C m−2 yr−1, based on high-resolution measurements and modeling, is more than twice the previous estimates. It is a major term in the marsh carbon budget and translates to one of the largest carbon fluxes along the U.S. East Coast.

  20. Synergistic effects of inorganic salt and surfactant on phenanthrene removal from aqueous solution by sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Yaoguo; Hu, Sihai; Lu, Cong

    2014-01-01

    The economic and effective application of surfactant enhanced remediation (SER) technology in a sediment-freshwater/saline water system was investigated by batch method using the combined effects of inorganic salt (sodium chloride, NaCl) and anionic surfactant (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS)) on phenanthrene (PHE) removal via sorption by sediment. In all cases, PHE sorption followed a linear equation and partition as the main mechanism for PHE removal from aqueous solution. Separate addition of SDBS (2 mmol L(-1)) and NaCl (2-100 mmol L(-1)) moderately enhanced PHE removal, while with their combined addition the enhancement was substantial, and the removal efficiency achieved a peak of 92.8%. The combined effect expressed a synergy, and the sorption enhancement increased by factors of 2.7, 3.2 and 3.4 when compared with the sum of the separate entities at elevated salinity. This was because the sorbed SDBS, with increasing amount and a high packing conformation at elevated salinity, outcompeted aqueous SDBS for PHE partition. Moreover, a combination of 2 mmol L(-1) SDBS and 2 mmol L(-1) NaCl was optimal for PHE removal. Therefore, SER technology appears more effective for PHE removal in saline water than in freshwater, and preliminary water quality monitoring is essential for economic and efficient SER application. PMID:25353936

  1. Effect of inorganic salts, soaps and detergents on dissolution and larvicidal activity of alginate formulation of Bacillus sphaericus.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, V; Balaraman, K

    1995-03-01

    Various inorganic salts and commonly used soaps and detergents were tested in the laboratory for their effect on the dissolution and larvicidal residual activity of a slow-release alginate encapsulated granular formation of Bacillus sphaericus. Fluoride, chloride and sulphate salts and a detergent powder affected the residual activity of this formulation drastically by rupturing it but did not effect its larvicidal activity. Nitrates and phosphates of sodium and potassium also had the same effect but to a moderate level. The safest concentration of these water impurities for effective functioning of the alginate encapsulated B. sphaericus formulation have been determined.

  2. Postharvest application of organic and inorganic salts to control potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) storage soft rot: plant tissue-salt physicochemical interactions.

    PubMed

    Yaganza, E S; Tweddell, R J; Arul, J

    2014-09-24

    Soft rot caused by Pectobacterium sp. is a devastating disease affecting stored potato tubers, and there is a lack of effective means of controlling this disease. In this study, 21 organic and inorganic salts were tested for their ability to control soft rot in potato tubers. In the preventive treatment, significant control of soft rot was observed with AlCl3 (≥66%) and Na2S2O3 (≥57%) and to a lesser extent with Al lactate and Na benzoate (≥34%) and K sorbate and Na propionate (≥27%). However, only a moderate control was achieved by curative treatment with AlCl3 and Na2S2O3 (42%) and sodium benzoate (≥33%). Overall, the in vitro inhibitory activity of salts was attenuated in the presence of plant tissue (in vivo) to different degrees. The inhibitory action of the salts in the preventive treatment, whether effective or otherwise, showed an inverse linear relationship with water ionization capacity (pK') of the salt ions, whereas in the curative treatment, only the effective salts showed this inverse linear relationship. Salt-plant tissue interactions appear to play a central role in the attenuated inhibitory activity of salts in potato tuber through reduction in the availability of the inhibitory ions for salt-bacteria interactions. This study demonstrates that AlCl3, Na2S2O3, and Na benzoate have potential in controlling potato tuber soft rot and provides a general basis for understanding of specific salt-tissue interactions.

  3. Analysis of trace inorganic anions in weak acid salts by single pump cycling-column-switching ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhongping; Ni, Chengzhu; Zhu, Zhuyi; Pan, Zaifa; Wang, Lili; Zhu, Yan

    2015-05-01

    The application of ion chromatography with the single pump cycling-column-switching technique was described for the analysis of trace inorganic anions in weak acid salts within a single run. Due to the hydrogen ions provided by an anion suppressor electrolyzing water, weak acid anions could be transformed into weak acids, existing as molecules, after passing through the suppressor. Therefore, an anion suppressor and ion-exclusion column were adopted to achieve on-line matrix elimination of weak acid anions with high concentration for the analysis of trace inorganic anions in weak acid salts. A series of standard solutions consisting of target anions of various concentrations from 0.005 to 10 mg/L were analyzed, with correlation coefficients r ≥ 0.9990. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.67 to 1.51 μg/L, based on the signal-to-noise ratio of 3 and a 25 μL injection volume. Relative standard deviations for retention time, peak area, and peak height were all less than 2.01%. A spiking study was performed with satisfactory recoveries between 90.3 and 104.4% for all anions. The chromatographic system was successfully applied to the analysis of trace inorganic anions in five weak acid salts.

  4. Effect of inorganic salts on the growth and Cd2+ bioaccumulation of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii cultured under Cd2+ stress.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Xu, Ying; Li, Chunsheng; Lv, Xin; Wang, Dongfeng

    2013-01-01

    Using living cells to remove heavy metals was limited by the sensitivity of living cells to heavy metal ions. Effect of inorganic salts on the growth and Cd(2+) bioaccumulation of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii (Z. rouxii) was studied. Results showed that NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2) and MgCl(2) could markedly reduce the growth inhibition ratio while NaNO(3), KNO(3), Na(2)SO(4) and K(2)SO(4) significantly increased it. Effect of inorganic salts on the Cd(2+) bioaccumulation of Z. rouxii indicated that different inorganic salts could promote or restrain the growth of Z. rouxii under Cd(2+) stress by weakening or enhancing Cd(2+) bioaccumulation. Although NaCl and KCl lowered the Cd(2+) accumulation per unit weight of Z. rouxii biomass, the total Cd(2+) bioaccumulation and Cd(2+) percentage removal both markedly increased. It suggested that NaCl and KCl could be introduced to enhance the growth and Cd(2+) bioaccumulation of Z. rouxii under Cd(2+) stress. PMID:23182039

  5. Electrochemical activation of carbon cloth in aqueous inorganic salt solution for superior capacitive performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dong; Yu, Yao; Tang, Jie; Liu, Lin; Wu, Yue

    2016-05-01

    Carbon cloth (CC) is an inexpensive and highly conductive textile with excellent mechanical flexibility and strength; it holds great promise as an electrode material for flexible supercapacitors. However, pristine CC has such a low surface area and poor electrochemical activity that the energy storage capability is usually very poor. Herein, we report a green method, two-step electrochemical activation in an aqueous solution of inorganic salts, to significantly enhance the capacitance of CC for supercapacitor application. Micro-cracks, exfoliated carbon fiber shells, and oxygen-containing functional groups (OFGs) were introduced onto the surface of the carbon filament. This resulted in an enhancement of over two orders of magnitude in capacitance compared to that of the bare CC electrode, reaching up to a maximum areal capacitance of 505.5 mF cm-2 at the current density of 6 mA cm-2 in aqueous H2SO4 electrolyte. Electrochemical reduction of CC electrodes led to the removal of most electrochemically unstable surface OFGs, resulting in superior charging/discharging rate capability and excellent cycling stability. Although the activated CC electrode contained a high-level of surface oxygen functional groups (~15 at%), it still exhibited a remarkable charging-discharging rate capability, retaining ~88% of the capacitance when the charging rate increased from 6 to 48 mA cm-2. Moreover, the activated CC electrode exhibited excellent cycling stability with ~97% capacitance remaining after 10 000 cycles at a current density of 24 mA cm-2. A symmetrical supercapacitor based on the activated CC exhibited an ideal capacitive behavior and fast charge-discharge properties. Such a simple, environment-friendly, and cost-effective strategy to activate CC shows great potential in the fabrication of high-performance flexible supercapacitors.Carbon cloth (CC) is an inexpensive and highly conductive textile with excellent mechanical flexibility and strength; it holds great promise as

  6. Spatial variation of salt-marsh organic and inorganic deposition and organic carbon accumulation: Inferences from the Venice lagoon, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roner, M.; D'Alpaos, A.; Ghinassi, M.; Marani, M.; Silvestri, S.; Franceschinis, E.; Realdon, N.

    2016-07-01

    Salt marshes are ubiquitous features of the tidal landscape governed by mutual feedbacks among processes of physical and biological nature. Improving our understanding of these feedbacks and of their effects on tidal geomorphological and ecological dynamics is a critical step to address issues related to salt-marsh conservation and response to changes in the environmental forcing. In particular, the spatial variation of organic and inorganic soil production processes at the marsh scale, a key piece of information to understand marsh responses to a changing climate, remains virtually unexplored. In order to characterize the relative importance of organic vs. inorganic deposition as a function of space, we collected 33 shallow soil sediment samples along three transects in the San Felice and Rigà salt marshes located in the Venice lagoon, Italy. The amount of organic matter in each sample was evaluated using Loss On Ignition (LOI), a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment, and a sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) treatment following the H2O2 treatment. The grain size distribution of the inorganic fraction was determined using laser diffraction techniques. Our study marshes exhibit a weakly concave-up profile, with maximum elevations and coarser inorganic grains along their edges. The amount of organic and inorganic matter content in the samples varies with the distance from the marsh edge and is very sensitive to the specific analysis method adopted. The use of a H2O2+NaClO treatment yields an organic matter density value which is more than double the value obtained from LOI. Overall, inorganic contributions to soil formation are greatest near the marsh edges, whereas organic soil production is the main contributor to soil accretion in the inner marsh. We interpret this pattern by considering that while plant biomass productivity is generally lower in the inner part of the marsh, organic soil decomposition rates are highest in the better aerated edge soils. Hence the higher

  7. Contribution and distribution of inorganic ions and organic compounds to the osmotic adjustment in Halostachys caspica response to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Youling; Li, Ling; Yang, Ruirui; Yi, Xiaoya; Zhang, Baohong

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which plants cope with salt stress remains poorly understood. The goal of this study is to systematically investigate the contribution and distribution of inorganic ions and organic compounds to the osmotic adjustment (OA) in the halophyte species Halostachys caspica. The results indicate that 100-200 mM NaCl is optimal for plant growth; the water content and degree of succulence of the assimilating branches are higher in this treatment range than that in other treatments; parenchyma cells are more numerous with 100 mM NaCl treatment than they are in control. Inorganic ions (mainly Na+ and Cl-) may play a more important role than organic compounds in NaCl-induced OA and are the primary contributors in OA in H. caspica. The inorganic ions and organic solutes display a tissue-dependent distribution. Na+ and Cl- are accumulated in the reproductive organs and within assimilating branches, which may represent a mechanism for protecting plant growth by way of salt ion dilution and organ abscission. Additionally, OA via increased accumulation of organic substances also protected plant growth and development. This finding provides additional evidence for plant tolerance to salinity stress which can be used for breeding new cultivars for stress tolerance. PMID:26350977

  8. Contribution and distribution of inorganic ions and organic compounds to the osmotic adjustment in Halostachys caspica response to salt stress

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Youling; Li, Ling; Yang, Ruirui; Yi, Xiaoya; Zhang, Baohong

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which plants cope with salt stress remains poorly understood. The goal of this study is to systematically investigate the contribution and distribution of inorganic ions and organic compounds to the osmotic adjustment (OA) in the halophyte species Halostachys caspica. The results indicate that 100–200 mM NaCl is optimal for plant growth; the water content and degree of succulence of the assimilating branches are higher in this treatment range than that in other treatments; parenchyma cells are more numerous with 100 mM NaCl treatment than they are in control. Inorganic ions (mainly Na+ and Cl-) may play a more important role than organic compounds in NaCl-induced OA and are the primary contributors in OA in H. caspica. The inorganic ions and organic solutes display a tissue-dependent distribution. Na+ and Cl− are accumulated in the reproductive organs and within assimilating branches, which may represent a mechanism for protecting plant growth by way of salt ion dilution and organ abscission. Additionally, OA via increased accumulation of organic substances also protected plant growth and development. This finding provides additional evidence for plant tolerance to salinity stress which can be used for breeding new cultivars for stress tolerance. PMID:26350977

  9. Establishing the interfacial nano-structure and elemental composition of homeopathic medicines based on inorganic salts: a scientific approach.

    PubMed

    Temgire, Mayur Kiran; Suresh, Akkihebbal Krishnamurthy; Kane, Shantaram Govind; Bellare, Jayesh Ramesh

    2016-05-01

    Extremely dilute systems arise in homeopathy, which uses dilution factors 10(60), 10(400) and also higher. These amounts to potencies of 30c, 200c or more, those are far beyond Avogadro's number. There is extreme skepticism among scientists about the possibility of presence of starting materials due to these high dilutions. This has led modern scientists to believe homeopathy may be at its best a placebo effect. However, our recent studies on 30c and 200c metal based homeopathic medicines clearly revealed the presence of nanoparticles of starting metals, which were found to be retained due to the manufacturing processes involved, as published earlier.(9,10) Here, we use HR-TEM and STEM techniques to study medicines arising from inorganic salts as starting materials. We show that the inorganic starting materials are present as nano-scale particles in the medicines even at 1 M potency (having a large dilution factor of 10(2000)). Thus this study has extended our physicochemical studies of metal based medicines to inorganic based medicines, and also to higher dilution. Further, we show that the particles develop a coat of silica: these particles were seen embedded in a meso-microporous silicate layer through interfacial encapsulation. Similar silicate coatings were also seen in metal based medicines. Thus, metal and inorganic salt based homeopathic medicines retain the starting material as nanoparticles encapsulated within a silicate coating. On the basis of these studies, we propose a universal microstructural hypothesis that all types of homeopathic medicines consist of silicate coated nano-structures dispersed in the solvent.

  10. New sol-gel synthetic route to transition and main-group metal oxide aerogels using inorganic salt precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A E; Tillotson, T M; Satcher Jr, J H; Hrubesh, L W; Simpson, R L

    2000-09-12

    We have developed a new sol-gel route to synthesize several transition and main-group metal oxide aerogels. The approach is straightforward, inexpensive, versatile, and it produces monolithic microporous materials with high surface areas. Specifically, we report the use of epoxides as gelation agents for the sol-gel synthesis of chromia aerogels and xerogels from simple Cr(III) inorganic salts. The dependence of both gel formation and its rate was studied by varying the solvent used, the Cr(III) precursor salt, the epoxide/Cr(III) ratio, as well as the type of epoxide employed. All of these variables were shown to affect the rate of gel formation and provide a convenient control of this parameter. Dried chromia aerogels were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analyses, results of which will be presented. Our studies have shown that rigid monolithic gels can be prepared from many different metal ions salts, provided the formal oxidation state of the metal ion is greater than or equal to +3. Conversely, when di-valent transition metal salts are used precipitated solids are the products.

  11. Effect of inorganic salts and glucose additives on dose-response, melting point and mass density of genipin gel dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Al-jarrah, A M; Abdul Rahman, Azhar; Shahrim, Iskandar; Razak, Nik Noor Ashikin Nik Ab; Ababneh, Baker; Tousi, Ehsan Taghizadeh

    2016-01-01

    Genipin gel dosimeters are hydrogels infused with a radiation-sensitive material which yield dosimetric information in three dimensions (3D). The effect of inorganic salts and glucose on the visible absorption dose-response, melting points and mass density of genipin gel dosimeters has been experimentally evaluated using 6-MV LINAC photons. As a result, the addition of glucose with optimum concentration of 10% (w/w) was found to improve the thermal stability of the genipin gel and increase its melting point (Tm) by 6 °C accompanied by a slight decrease of dose-response. Furthermore, glucose helps to adjust the gel mass density to obtain the desired tissue-equivalent properties. A drop of Tm was observed when salts were used as additives. As the salt concentration increased, gel Tm decreased. The mass density and melting point of the genipin gel could be adjusted using different amounts of glucose that improved the genipin gel suitability for 3D dose measurements without introducing additional toxicity to the final gel.

  12. Comparison of the influence of inorganic salts on the NMR dose sensitivity of polyacrylamide-based gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, S.-I.; Kawamura, H.; Usui, S.; Tominaga, T.

    2013-06-01

    On the NMR dose sensitivities of polyacrylamide-based gel dosimeters irradiated by X-ray, the additive effect of various inorganic salts (electrolytes) is investigated. Among the various combination of cations (Li+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+, Zn2+ and Al3+) and anions (Cl-, NO-3 and SO2-4), MgCl2 is shown to be the most effective sensitizer. In the result, it is suggested that the extent of the increase of the dose sensitivity may correlate to the hydration power of cations rather than anions. Contrary to the dose sensitivity enhancement, the depression of melting point caused by the additives is also pointed out.

  13. Inorganic salts interact with organic di-acids in sub-micron particles to form material with low hygroscopicity and volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, G.; Woo, J.; Häkkinen, S. A. K.; Nenes, A.; McNeill, V. F.

    2013-11-01

    Volatility and hygroscopicity are two key properties of organic aerosol components, and both are strongly related to chemical identity. Here we show that inorganic-organic component interactions typically not considered in atmospheric models may strongly affect aerosol volatility and hygroscopicity. In particular, bi-dentate binding of di-carboxylic acids (DCA) to soluble inorganic ions can lead to very strongly bound metal-organic complexes with largely undetermined hygroscopicity and volatility. These reactions profoundly impact particle hygroscopicity, transforming hygroscopic components into irreversibly non-hygroscopic material. While the hygroscopicities of pure salts, DCA, and DCA salts are known, the hygroscopicity of internal mixtures of hygroscopic salts and DCA, as they are typically found in the atmosphere, has not been fully characterized. We have studied the volatility of pure, dry organic salt particles and the hygroscopicity of internal mixtures of oxalic acid (OxA, the dominant DCA in the atmosphere) and a number of salts, both mono- and di-valent. The formation of very low volatility organic salts was confirmed, with minimal evaporation of oxalate salt particles below 75 °C. Dramatic increases in the CCN activation diameter for particles with divalent salts (e.g. CaCl2) and relatively small particle mass fractions of OxA indicate that standard volume additivity rules for hygroscopicity do not apply. Thus small organic compounds with high O:C are capable of forming low volatility and very low hygroscopicity particles. Given current knowledge of the formation mechanisms of OxA and M-Ox salts, surface enrichment of insoluble M-Ox salts is expected. The resulting formation of an insoluble coating of metal-oxalate salts can explain low particle hygroscopicities. The formation of particles with a hard coating could offer an alternative explanation for observations of glass-like particles with very low viscosity.

  14. Inorganic Contaminant Concentrations and Body Condition in Wintering Waterfowl from Great Salt Lake, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vest, J.; Conover, M.; Perschon, C.; Luft, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Great Salt Lake (GSL) is the fourth largest terminal lake in the world and is an important region for migratory and breeding waterbirds. Because the GSL is a closed basin, contaminants associated with industrial and urban development may accumulate in this system. Recently, water and sediment samples from the GSL revealed high concentrations of Hg and Se and methylmercury concentrations in GSL water samples were among the highest ever recorded in surface water by the USGS Mercury Laboratory. Thus, GSL waterbirds are likely exposed to these contaminants and elevated contaminant concentrations may adversely affect survival and reproduction in waterfowl. Our objectives were to 1) estimate mercury (Hg), selenium (Se), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) concentrations in wintering waterfowl from GSL and, 2) evaluate relationships between measures of waterfowl body condition and internal organ masses (hereafter body condition) with trace metal concentrations. We collected common goldeneye (COGO), northern shoveler (NSHO), and American green-winged teal (AGWT) from the GSL during early winter. We used ICP-MS to analyze liver and muscle tissue samples for contaminant concentrations. We developed species specific regression models for each of 5 condition indices, including ingesta-free plucked body mass (IFPBM), abdominal fat mass, spleen, liver, and pancreas masses. Independent variables were comprised of Hg, Se, Cd, Cu, and Zn and we included sex and age as covariates in each regression. We used Akaike's Information Criterion adjusted for small sample size to select best and competing models. Subsequently, we used partial correlations to depict inverse relationships identified in competing models. Hg concentrations in COGO and NSHO muscle tissue generally exceeded or approached the 1 ppm wet weight (ww) threshold considered unsafe for human consumption in fish and game. Hg concentrations in liver tissue exceeded or were among the highest reported in published

  15. Sea salt aerosols as a reactive surface for inorganic and organic acidic gases in the Arctic troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, J. W.; Li, W. J.; Zhang, D. Z.; Zhang, J. C.; Lin, Y. T.; Shen, X. J.; Sun, J. Y.; Chen, J. M.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y. M.; Wang, W. X.

    2015-10-01

    Sea salt aerosols (SSA) are dominant particles in the Arctic atmosphere and determine the polar radiative balance. SSA react with acidic pollutants that lead to changes in physical and chemical properties of their surface, which in turn alter their hygroscopic and optical properties. Transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry was used to analyze morphology, composition, size, and mixing state of individual SSA at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, in summertime. Individual fresh SSA contained cubic NaCl coated by certain amounts of MgCl2 and CaSO4. Individual partially aged SSA contained irregular NaCl coated by a mixture of NaNO3, Na2SO4, Mg(NO3)2, and MgSO4. The comparison suggests the hydrophilic MgCl2 coating in fresh SSA likely intrigued the heterogeneous reactions at the beginning of SSA and acidic gases. Individual fully aged SSA normally had Na2SO4 cores and an amorphous coating of NaNO3. Elemental mappings of individual SSA particles revealed that as the particles ageing Cl gradually decreased, the C, N, O, and S content increased. 12C- mapping from nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry indicates that organic matter increased in the aged SSA compared with the fresh SSA. 12C- line scan further shows that organic matter was mainly concentrated on the aged SSA surface. These new findings indicate that this mixture of organic matter and NaNO3 on particle surfaces likely determines their hygroscopic and optical properties. These abundant SSA as reactive surfaces adsorbing inorganic and organic acidic gases can shorten acidic gas lifetime and influence the possible gaseous reactions in the Arctic atmosphere, which need to be incorporated into atmospheric chemical models in the Arctic troposphere.

  16. Sea salt aerosols as a reactive surface for inorganic and organic acidic gases in the arctic troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, J. W.; Li, W. J.; Zhang, D. Z.; Zhang, J. C.; Lin, Y. T.; Shen, X. J.; Sun, J. Y.; Chen, J. M.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y. M.; Wang, W. X.

    2015-06-01

    Sea salt aerosols (SSA) are dominant particles in the arctic atmosphere and determine the polar radiative balance. SSA react with acidic pollutants that lead to changes of physical and chemical properties of their surface, which in turn alter their hygroscopic and optical properties. Transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry was used to analyze morphology, composition, size, and mixing state of individual SSA at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard in summertime. Individual fresh SSA contained cubic NaCl coated by certain amounts of MgCl2 and CaSO4. Individual partially aged SSA contained irregular NaCl coated by a mixture of NaNO3, Na2SO4, Mg(NO3)2, and MgSO4. The comparison suggests the hydrophilic MgCl2 coating in fresh SSA likely intrigued the heterogeneous reactions at the beginning of SSA and acidic gases. Individual fully aged SSA normally had Na2SO4 cores and an amorphous coating of NaNO3. Elemental mappings of individual SSA particles revealed that as the particles ageing Cl gradually decreased but the C, N, O, and S content increased. 12C14N- mapping from nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry indicates that organic matter increased in the aged SSA compared with the fresh SSA. 12C14N- line scans further show that organic matter was mainly concentrated on the aged SSA surface. These new findings indicate that this mixture of organic matter and NaNO3 on particle surfaces determines their hygroscopic and optical properties. These abundant SSA, whose reactive surfaces absorb inorganic and organic acidic gases in the arctic troposphere, need to be incorporated into atmospheric chemical models.

  17. Effect of Temperature and Pressure on Ionic Conductivity of PAN-Based Polymer Electrolytes Containing Inorganic Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, A.; Isa, K. B. Md.; Osman, Z.

    2010-07-01

    The conducting polymer electrolyte films consisting polyacrylonitrile (PAN) as the host polymer, ethylene carbonate (EC) as a plasticizer, lithium triflate (LiCF3SO3) and sodium triflate (NaCF3SO3) as inorganic salts were prepared by the solution cast technique. The pure PAN film was prepared as a reference. The ionic conductivity for the films is characterized using impedance spectroscopy. The room temperature conductivity for the PAN+24 wt.%EC film, PAN+26 wt.%LiCF3SO3 film, the PAN+24 wt.%NaCF3SO3 film is 3.43×10-11 S cm-1, 3.04×10-4 S cm-1, and 7.13×10-4 S cm-1, respectively. On addition of plasticizer, the room temperature of PAN+LiCF3SO3 and PAN+NaCF3SO3 films increases by one order of magnitude. The conductivity-temperature and conductivity-pressure dependence studies are then performed on the highest conducting film from the unplasticized and plasticized systems in the temperature and pressure range between 303 K and 373 K and 0.01 MPa and 0.09 MPa, respectively. The conductivity-temperature studies indicate the activation energy, Ea for all system decrease with the increase of the conductivity. The activation volume, ΔV* for each system can be determined from the plot of ln σ versus pressure. It can be observed that the ΔV* is decreased as the conductivity increased. This result can be explained in term of free volume.

  18. One of the distinctive properties of ionic liquids over molecular solvents and inorganic salts: enhanced basicity stemming from the electrostatic environment and "free" microstructure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwei; Xing, Huabin; Bao, Zongbi; Su, Baogen; Zhang, Zhiguo; Yang, Yiwen; Dai, Sheng; Ren, Qilong

    2014-04-01

    The basicity of ionic liquids (ILs) underlies many important IL-based processes including the dissolution and conversion of cellulose, the capture of CO2, and metal catalysis. In this work, we have disclosed the nature of the basicity of ILs, i.e., the difference between the basicity of IL and the basicity of the molecular solvent and inorganic salt, through a quantitative electrostatic and electronic analysis of the molecular surface for the first time. The results reveal one of the distinctive properties of ILs (enhanced basicity over molecular solvents and inorganic salts with the same basic site) stemming from their special electrostatic environment and microstructure. The enhancement is significant, from either the electrostatic aspect or the covalent aspect of basicity. The peculiar electrostatic environment of ILs leads to stronger basicity than similar molecular solvents, and the relatively freer microstructure of ILs contributes to the enhancement of basicity over their inorganic analogues. These results are highly instructive for better understanding the unique value of ILs and designing novel ILs to improve the efficiency of basicity-related processes. PMID:24620779

  19. Fast Pyrolysis of Poplar Using a Captive Sample Reactor: Effects of Inorganic Salts on Primary Pyrolysis Products

    SciTech Connect

    Mukarakate, C.; Robichaud, D.; Donohoe, B.; Jarvis, M.; Mino, K.; Bahng, M. K.; Nimlos, M.

    2012-01-01

    We have constructed a captive sample reactor (CSR) to study fast pyrolysis of biomass. The reactor uses a stainless steel wire mesh to surround biomass materials with an isothermal environment by independent controlling of heating rates and pyrolysis temperatures. The vapors produced during pyrolysis are immediately entrained and transported in He carrier gas to a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS). Formation of secondary products is minimized by rapidly quenching the sample support with liquid nitrogen. A range of alkali and alkaline earth metal (AAEM) and transition metal salts were tested to study their effect on composition of primary pyrolysis products. Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) analysis of the MBMS data shows that transition metal salts enhance pyrolysis of carbohydrates and AAEM salts enhances pyrolysis of lignin. This was supported by performing similar separate studies on cellulose, hemicellulose and extracted lignin. The effect of salts on char formation is also discussed.

  20. Chemistry of sea-salt particles and inorganic halogen species in Antarctic regions: Compositional differences between coastal and inland stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Keiichiro; Osada, Kazuo; Kido, Mizuka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Matsunaga, Katsuji; Iwasaka, Yasunobu; Yamanouchi, Takashi; Hashida, Gen; Fukatsu, Toru

    2004-10-01

    Observations of aerosol constituents and acidic gases in the Antarctic area were carried out at Syowa (39.58°E, 69.00°S) in 1997 and 1998 and Dome Fuji stations (39.62°E, 77.37°S) in 1997. Sea-salt concentrations decreased to background levels in the summer at both Syowa (Na+, ≤4 nmol m-3) and Dome Fuji (Na+, ˜0.44 nmol m-3 on average). During the winter, blizzard and strong wind may cause an increase of sea-salt particles at Syowa, whereas long-range transport from the boundary layer at midlatitudes and coastal Antarctic regions may contribute significantly to the increase in sea-salt particles observed at Dome Fuji. Particulate Cl- and Br- are liberated preferentially from sea-salt particles at Syowa and Dome Fuji in the summer. The molar ratio of Cl-/Na+ and Br-/Na+ at Syowa decreased to ˜0.5 and ≈0, respectively, in summer. At Dome Fuji more Cl- tend to be liberated from sea-salt particles thorough heterogeneous NO3- formation. The concentrations of gaseous chlorine species (mostly HCl) and bromine species ranged from 0.2 to 5.3 nmol m-3 and below detection limit (BDL) to 1.5 nmol m-3, respectively, corresponding to sea-salt modification. In the present study, SO42- depletion due to mirabilite formation was observed not only at Syowa but also at Dome Fuji. This evidence suggests that SO42- depletion might occur through sublimation on snow surfaces in addition to seawater freezing. At Syowa, sea-salt fractionation relating to Mg2+, K+, and Ca2+ was also observed mostly under strong wind conditions.

  1. Simple theoretical model for ion cooperativity in aqueous solutions of simple inorganic salts and its effect on water surface tension.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi Qin

    2011-11-01

    Careful analysis of experimental data showed that the salt aqueous solution/air surface tension depends on a rather complicated manner of salt composition and points to the importance of ion cooperativity. In this short article, we include the selective binding of anions over cations at interfaces (as revealed from molecular dynamics simulations, spectroscopic measurements, and Record's analysis of the surface tension data) and the anion-cation association (based on the observation of matching water affinity) in a simple theoretical model to understand salt effects on surface tension. The introduction of the surface effect and ion association provides a qualitative explanation of the experimental data, in particular, the strong anion dependence of the cations' rank according to their ability of increasing water surface tension. We hope that the physical insight provided by this study can be used to point to new directions for more detailed studies. PMID:21958050

  2. Uptake of atmospheric mercury by deionized water and aqueous solutions of inorganic salts at acidic, neutral and alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Waite, D T; Snihura, A D; Liu, Y; Huang, G H

    2002-10-01

    Mercury (Hg) is well known as a toxic environmental pollutant that is among the most highly bioconcentrated trace metals in the human food chain. The atmosphere is one of the most important media for the environmental cycling of mercury, since it not only receives mercury emitted from natural sources such as volcanoes and soil and water surfaces but also from anthropogenic sources such as fossil fuel combustion, mining and metal smelting. Although atmospheric mercury exists in different physical and chemical forms, as much as 90% can occur as elemental vapour Hg0, depending on the geographic location and time of year. Atmospheric mercury can be deposited to aquatic ecosystems through both wet (rain or snow) and dry (vapour adsorption and particulate deposition) processes. The purpose of the present study was to measure, under laboratory conditions, the rate of deposition of gaseous, elemental mercury (Hg0) to deionized water and to solutions of inorganic salt species of varying ionic strengths with a pH range of 2-12. In deionized water the highest deposition rates occurred at both low (pH 2) and high (pH 12). The addition of different species of salt of various concentrations for the most part had only slight effects on the absorption and retention of atmospheric Hg0. The low pH solutions of various salt concentrations and the high pH solutions of high salt concentrations tested in this study generally showed a greater tendency to absorb and retain atmospheric Hg0 than those at a pH closer to neutral.

  3. Modeling wet deposition of inorganics over Northeast Asia with MRI-PM/c and the effects of super large sea salt droplets at near-the-coast stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajino, M.; Deushi, M.; Maki, T.; Oshima, N.; Inomata, Y.; Sato, K.; Ohizumi, T.; Ueda, H.

    2012-06-01

    We conducted a regional-scale simulation (with grid spacing = 60 km) over Northeast Asia for the entire year of 2006 by using an aerosol chemical transport model, the lateral and upper boundary concentrations of which we predicted with a global stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry-climate model, with a horizontal resolution of T42 (grid spacing ~300 km) and a time resolution of 1 h. The present one-way nested global-through-regional-scale model is called the Meteorological Research Institute - Passive-tracers Model system for atmospheric Chemistry (MRI-PM/c). We evaluated the model performance with respect to the major inorganic components in rain and snow measured by stations of the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET). Through statistical analysis, we show that the model successfully reproduced the regional-scale processes of emission, transport, transformation, and wet deposition of major inorganic species derived from anthropogenic and natural sources, including SO42-, NH4+, NO3-, Na+ and Ca2+. Interestingly, the only exception was Na+ in precipitation at near-coastal stations (where the distance from the coast was from 150 to 700 m), concentrations of which were significantly underestimated by the model, by up to a factor of 30. This result suggested that the contribution of short-lived, super-large sea salt droplets (SLSD; D > 10-100 μm) was substantial in precipitation samples at stations near the coast of Japan; thus samples were horizontally representative only within the traveling distances of SLSD (from 1 to 10 km). Nevertheless, the calculated effect of SLSD on precipitation pH was very low, a change of about +0.014 on average, even if the ratio of SLSD to all sea salt in precipitation was assumed to be 90%.

  4. Bioavailability of Cu, Zn and Mn from Mineral Chelates or Blends of Inorganic Salts in Growing Turkeys Fed with Supplemental Riboflavin and/or Pyridoxine.

    PubMed

    Salami, S A; Oluwatosin, O O; Oso, A O; Fafiolu, A O; Sogunle, O M; Jegede, A V; Bello, F A; Pirgozliev, V

    2016-09-01

    An 84-day feeding trial was conducted in growing turkeys to measure the bioavailability of Cu, Zn and Mn from a commercial mineral chelate and corresponding inorganic salts in composite feeds containing supplemental riboflavin (B2) and/or pyridoxine (B6). A total of 320, 28-day-old British United Turkeys (BUT) were assigned to eight dietary treatments in a 2 × 4 factorial arrangement comprising two trace mineral sources: chelated trace mineral blend (CTMB) and its corresponding inorganic trace minerals blend (ITMB) fed solely or with supplements of vitamin B2 (8 ppm) or B6 (7 ppm) or 8 ppm B2 + 7 ppm B6. Each treatment was replicated four times with 10 turkeys each. It was observed that turkeys fed with diets supplemented solely with ITMB elicited higher (P < 0.05) Zn excretion than their counterparts fed with diets containing ITMB with supplements of vitamins B2 and/or B6. Manganese retention was lower (P < 0.05) in turkeys fed with diets supplemented solely with ITMB than those fed with diets containing vitamins B2 and/or B6 additives. Combination of CTMB or ITMB with B6 improved (P < 0.05) the concentration of Mn in the liver and Cu in the bone. It was concluded that the minerals in CTMB were more available to the animals than ITMB. Furthermore, vitamins B2 and/or B6 supplementation improved the bioavailability of the inorganic Cu, Zn and Mn in growing turkeys and tended to reduce the concentration of these trace elements in birds' excreta.

  5. Source indicators of biomass burning associated with inorganic salts and carboxylates in dry season ambient aerosol in Chiang Mai Basin, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ying I.; Sopajaree, Khajornsak; Chotruksa, Auranee; Wu, Hsin-Ching; Kuo, Su-Ching

    2013-10-01

    PM10 aerosol was collected between February and April 2010 at an urban site (CMU) and an industrial site (TOT) in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and characteristics and provenance of water-soluble inorganic species, carboxylates, anhydrosugars and sugar alcohols were investigated with particular reference to air quality, framed as episodic or non-episodic pollution. Sulfate, a product of secondary photochemical reactions, was the major inorganic salt in PM10, comprising 25.9% and 22.3% of inorganic species at CMU and TOT, respectively. Acetate was the most abundant monocarboxylate, followed by formate. Oxalate was the dominant dicarboxylate. A high acetate/formate mass ratio indicated that primary traffic-related and biomass-burning emissions contributed to Chiang Mai aerosols during episodic and non-episodic pollution. During episodic pollution carboxylate peaks indicated sourcing from photochemical reactions and/or directly from traffic-related and biomass burning processes and concentrations of specific biomarkers of biomass burning including water-soluble potassium, glutarate, oxalate and levoglucosan dramatically increased. Levoglucosan, the dominant anhydrosugar, was highly associated with water-soluble potassium (r = 0.75-0.79) and accounted for 93.4% and 93.7% of anhydrosugars at CMU and TOT, respectively, during episodic pollution. Moreover, levoglucosan during episodic pollution was 14.2-21.8 times non-episodic lows, showing clearly that emissions from biomass burning are the major cause of PM10 episodic pollution in Chiang Mai. Additionally, the average levoglucosan/mannosan mass ratio during episodic pollution was 14.1-14.9, higher than the 5.73-7.69 during non-episodic pollution, indicating that there was more hardwood burning during episodic pollution. Higher concentrations of glycerol and erythritol during episodic pollution further indicate that biomass burning activities released soil biota from forest and farmland soils.

  6. Bioavailability of Cu, Zn and Mn from Mineral Chelates or Blends of Inorganic Salts in Growing Turkeys Fed with Supplemental Riboflavin and/or Pyridoxine.

    PubMed

    Salami, S A; Oluwatosin, O O; Oso, A O; Fafiolu, A O; Sogunle, O M; Jegede, A V; Bello, F A; Pirgozliev, V

    2016-09-01

    An 84-day feeding trial was conducted in growing turkeys to measure the bioavailability of Cu, Zn and Mn from a commercial mineral chelate and corresponding inorganic salts in composite feeds containing supplemental riboflavin (B2) and/or pyridoxine (B6). A total of 320, 28-day-old British United Turkeys (BUT) were assigned to eight dietary treatments in a 2 × 4 factorial arrangement comprising two trace mineral sources: chelated trace mineral blend (CTMB) and its corresponding inorganic trace minerals blend (ITMB) fed solely or with supplements of vitamin B2 (8 ppm) or B6 (7 ppm) or 8 ppm B2 + 7 ppm B6. Each treatment was replicated four times with 10 turkeys each. It was observed that turkeys fed with diets supplemented solely with ITMB elicited higher (P < 0.05) Zn excretion than their counterparts fed with diets containing ITMB with supplements of vitamins B2 and/or B6. Manganese retention was lower (P < 0.05) in turkeys fed with diets supplemented solely with ITMB than those fed with diets containing vitamins B2 and/or B6 additives. Combination of CTMB or ITMB with B6 improved (P < 0.05) the concentration of Mn in the liver and Cu in the bone. It was concluded that the minerals in CTMB were more available to the animals than ITMB. Furthermore, vitamins B2 and/or B6 supplementation improved the bioavailability of the inorganic Cu, Zn and Mn in growing turkeys and tended to reduce the concentration of these trace elements in birds' excreta. PMID:26781955

  7. Removal of inorganic mercury and methylmercury from surface waters following coagulation of dissolved organic matter with metal-based salts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henneberry, Y.K.; Kraus, T.E.C.; Fleck, J.A.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Bachand, P.M.; Horwath, W.R.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of inorganic mercury (IHg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in surface waters is a health concern worldwide. This study assessed the removal potential use of metal-based coagulants as a means to remove both dissolved IHg and MeHg from natural waters and provides information regarding the importance of Hg associations with the dissolved organic matter (DOM) fraction and metal hydroxides. Previous research indicated coagulants were not effective at removing Hg from solution; however these studies used high concentrations of Hg and did not reflect naturally occurring concentrations of Hg. In this study, water collected from an agricultural drain in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta was filtered to isolate the dissolved organic matter (DOM) fraction. The DOM was then treated with a range of coagulant doses to determine the efficacy of removing all forms of Hg from solution. Three industrial-grade coagulants were tested: ferric chloride, ferric sulfate, and polyaluminum chloride. Coagulation removed up to 85% of DOM from solution. In the absence of DOM, all three coagulants released IHg into solution, however in the presence of DOM the coagulants removed up to 97% of IHg and 80% of MeHg. Results suggest that the removal of Hg is mediated by DOM-coagulant interactions. There was a preferential association of IHg with the more aromatic, higher molecular weight fraction of DOM but no such relationship was found for MeHg. This study offers new fundamental insights regarding large-scale removal of Hg at environmentally relevant regarding large-scale removal of Hg at environmentally relevant concentrations.

  8. Screening and optimization of some inorganic salts for the production of ergot alkaloids from Penicillium species using surface culture fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Memuna Ghafoor; Nadeem, Muhammad; Baig, Shahjehan; Cheema, Tanzeem Akbar; Atta, Saira; Ghafoor, Gul Zareen

    2016-03-01

    The present study deals with the production of ergot alkaloids from Penicillium commune and Penicillium citrinum, using surface culture fermentation process. Impact of various inorganic salts was tested on the production of ergot alkaloids during the optimization studies of fermentation medium such as impact of various concentration levels of succinic acid, ammonium chloride, MgSO4, FeSO4, ZnSO4, pH and the effect of various incubation time periods was also determined on the production of ergot alkaloids from Penicillium commune and Penicillium citrinum. Highest yield of ergot alkaloids was obtained when Penicillium commune and Penicillium citrinum that were grown on optimum levels of ingredients such as 2 g succinic acid, 1.5 and 2 g NH4Cl, 1.5 g MgSO4, 1 g FeSO4, 1 and 1.5 g ZnSO4 after 21 days of incubation time period using pH 5 at 25(°)C incubation temperature in the fermentation medium. Ergot alkaloids were determined using Spectrophotometry and Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) techniques.

  9. Screening and optimization of some inorganic salts for the production of ergot alkaloids from Penicillium species using surface culture fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Memuna Ghafoor; Nadeem, Muhammad; Baig, Shahjehan; Cheema, Tanzeem Akbar; Atta, Saira; Ghafoor, Gul Zareen

    2016-03-01

    The present study deals with the production of ergot alkaloids from Penicillium commune and Penicillium citrinum, using surface culture fermentation process. Impact of various inorganic salts was tested on the production of ergot alkaloids during the optimization studies of fermentation medium such as impact of various concentration levels of succinic acid, ammonium chloride, MgSO4, FeSO4, ZnSO4, pH and the effect of various incubation time periods was also determined on the production of ergot alkaloids from Penicillium commune and Penicillium citrinum. Highest yield of ergot alkaloids was obtained when Penicillium commune and Penicillium citrinum that were grown on optimum levels of ingredients such as 2 g succinic acid, 1.5 and 2 g NH4Cl, 1.5 g MgSO4, 1 g FeSO4, 1 and 1.5 g ZnSO4 after 21 days of incubation time period using pH 5 at 25(°)C incubation temperature in the fermentation medium. Ergot alkaloids were determined using Spectrophotometry and Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) techniques. PMID:27087069

  10. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen pools and surface flux under different brackish marsh vegetation types, common reed (Phragmites australis) and salt hay (Spartina patens)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windham-Myers, L.

    2005-01-01

    The current expansion of Phragmites australis into the high marsh shortgrass (Spartina patens, Distichlis spicata) communities of eastern U.S. salt marshes provided an opportunity to identify the influence of vegetation types on pools and fluxes of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN). Two brackish tidal marshes of the National Estuarine Research Reserve system were examined, Piermont Marsh of the Hudson River NERR in New York and Hog Island in the Jacques Coustaeu NERR of New Jersey. Pools of DIN in porewater and rates of DIN surface flux were compared in replicated pairs of recently-expanded P. australis and neighboring S. patens-dominated patches on the high marsh surface. Both marshes generally imported nitrate (NO3-) and exported ammonium (NH4+), such that overall DIN was exported. No differences in surface exchange of NO3- or NH4+ were observed between vegetation types. Depth-averaged porewater NH4+ concentrations over the entire growing season were 56% lower under P. australis than under S. patens (average 1.4 vs. 3.2 mg NH4+ L-1) with the most profound differences in November. Porewater profiles showed an accumulation of NH4+ at depth in S. patens and constant low concentrations in P. australis from the soil surface to 50 cm depth, with no significant differences in porewater salinity. Despite these profound differences in porewater, NH 4+ diffusion from soils of P. australis and S. patens were not measurably different, were similar to other published rates, and were well below estimated rates based on passive diffusion alone. Rapid adsorption and uptake by litter and microbes in surface soils of both communities may buffer NH4+ loss to flooding tides in both communities, thereby reducing the impact of P. australis invasion on NH4+ flux to flooding waters. ?? Springer 2005.

  11. Year-round records of sea salt, gaseous, and particulate inorganic bromine in the atmospheric boundary layer at coastal (Dumont d'Urville) and central (Concordia) East Antarctic sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, Michel; Yang, Xin; Preunkert, Susanne; Theys, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Multiple year-round records of bulk and size-segregated compositions of aerosol were obtained at the coastal Dumont d'Urville (DDU) and inland Concordia sites located in East Antarctica. They document the sea-salt aerosol load and composition including, for the first time in Antarctica, the bromide depletion of sea-salt aerosol relative to sodium with respect to seawater. In parallel, measurements of bromide trapped in mist chambers and denuder tubes were done to investigate the concentrations of gaseous inorganic bromine species. These data are compared to simulations done with an off-line chemistry transport model, coupled with a full tropospheric bromine chemistry scheme and a process-based sea-salt production module that includes both sea-ice-sourced and open-ocean-sourced aerosol emissions. Observed and simulated sea-salt concentrations sometime differ by up to a factor of 2 to 3, particularly at DDU possibly due to local wind pattern. In spite of these discrepancies, both at coastal and inland Antarctica, the dominance of sea-ice-related processes with respect to open ocean emissions for the sea-salt aerosol load in winter is confirmed. For summer, observations and simulations point out sea salt as the main source of gaseous inorganic bromine species. Investigations of bromide in snow pit samples do not support the importance of snowpack bromine emissions over the Antarctic Plateau. To evaluate the overall importance of the bromine chemistry over East Antarctica, BrO simulations were also discussed with respect data derived from GOME-2 satellite observations over Antarctica.

  12. Physicochemical Basis for the Inhibitory Effects of Organic and Inorganic Salts on the Growth of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and Pectobacterium atrosepticum▿

    PubMed Central

    Yaganza, Elian-Simplice; Tweddell, Russell J.; Arul, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-one salts were tested for their effects on the growth of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and Pectobacterium atrosepticum. In liquid medium, 11 salts (0.2 M) exhibited strong inhibition of bacterial growth. The inhibitory action of salts relates to the water-ionizing capacity and the lipophilicity of their constituent ions. PMID:19114504

  13. Observations and implications of liquid-liquid phase separation at high relative humidities in secondary organic material produced by α-pinene ozonolysis without inorganic salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Song, Mijung; Marcolli, Claudia; Zhang, Yue; Liu, Pengfei F.; Grayson, James W.; Geiger, Franz M.; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2016-07-01

    Particles consisting of secondary organic material (SOM) are abundant in the atmosphere. To predict the role of these particles in climate, visibility and atmospheric chemistry, information on particle phase state (i.e., single liquid, two liquids and solid) is needed. This paper focuses on the phase state of SOM particles free of inorganic salts produced by the ozonolysis of α-pinene. Phase transitions were investigated in the laboratory using optical microscopy and theoretically using a thermodynamic model at 290 K and for relative humidities ranging from < 0.5 to 100 %. In the laboratory studies, a single phase was observed from 0 to 95 % relative humidity (RH) while two liquid phases were observed above 95 % RH. For increasing RH, the mechanism of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) was spinodal decomposition. The RH range over which two liquid phases were observed did not depend on the direction of RH change. In the modeling studies, the SOM took up very little water and was a single organic-rich phase at low RH values. At high RH, the SOM underwent LLPS to form an organic-rich phase and a water-rich phase, consistent with the laboratory studies. The presence of LLPS at high RH values can have consequences for the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of SOM particles. In the simulated Köhler curves for SOM particles, two local maxima were observed. Depending on the composition of the SOM, the first or second maximum can determine the critical supersaturation for activation. Recently researchers have observed inconsistencies between measured CCN properties of SOM particles and hygroscopic growth measured below water saturation (i.e., hygroscopic parameters measured below water saturation were inconsistent with hygroscopic parameters measured above water saturation). The work presented here illustrates that such inconsistencies are expected for systems with LLPS when the water uptake at subsaturated conditions represents the hygroscopicity of an organic

  14. Kinetics of enzymatic solid-to-solid peptide synthesis: synthesis of Z-aspartame and control of acid-base conditions by using inorganic salts.

    PubMed

    Erbeldinger, M; Ni, X; Halling, P J

    2001-01-01

    Enzymatic peptide synthesis can be carried out efficiently in solid-to-solid reaction mixtures with 10% (w/w) water added to a mixture of substrates. The final reaction mass contains >/=80% (by weight) of product. This article deals with acid-base effects in such reaction mixtures and the consequences for the enzyme. In the Thermoase-catalyzed synthesis of Z-Asp-Phe-OMe, the reaction rate is strongly dependent on the amount of basic salts added to the system. The rate increases 20 times, as the KHCO(3) or K(2)CO(3) added is raised 2.25-fold from an amount equimolar to the Phe-OMe. HCL starting material. With further increases in KHCO(3) addition, the initial rate remains at the maximum, but with K(2)CO(3) it drops sharply. Addition of NaHCO(3) is less effective, but rates are faster if more water is used. With >1.5 equivalents of basic salt, the final yield of the reaction decreases. Similar effects are observed when thermolysin catalyzes the same reaction, or Z-Gln-Leu-NH(2) synthesis. These effects can be rationalized using a model estimating the pH of these systems, taking into account the possible formation of up to ten different solid phases.

  15. Toxicological review of inorganic phosphates.

    PubMed

    Weiner, M L; Salminen, W F; Larson, P R; Barter, R A; Kranetz, J L; Simon, G S

    2001-08-01

    Inorganic phosphate salts are widely used as food ingredients and in a variety of commercial applications. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considers inorganic phosphates "Generally Recognized As Safe" (GRAS) (FDA, 1973a, 1979) [FDA: Food and Drug Administration 1973a. GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) food ingredients-phosphates. NTIS PB-221-224, FDA, Food and Drug Administration, 1979. Phosphates; Proposed Affirmation of and Deletion From GRAS Status as Direct and Human Food Ingredients. Federal Register 44 (244). 74845-74857, 18 December (1979)] and the European Union (EU) allows inorganic phosphates to be added directly to food (EU Directive 95/2/EC as amended by 98/72/EC). In this review, data on the acute, subchronic and chronic toxicity, genotoxicity, teratogenicity and reproductive toxicity from the published literature and from unpublished studies by the manufacturers are reviewed. Based on the toxicity data and similar chemistry, the inorganic phosphates can be separated into four major classes, consisting of monovalent salts, divalent salts, ammonium salts and aluminum salts. The proposed classification scheme supports the use of toxicity data from one compound to assess the toxicity of another compound in the same class. However, in the case of eye and skin irritation, the proposed classification scheme cannot be used because a wide range of responses exists within each class. Therefore, the eye and skin hazards associated with an individual inorganic phosphate should be assessed on a chemical-by-chemical basis. A large amount of toxicity data exists for all four classes of inorganic phosphates. The large and comprehensive database allows an accurate assessment of the toxicity of each class of inorganic phosphate. Overall, all four classes of inorganic phosphates exhibit low oral, inhalation and dermal toxicities. Based on these data, humans are unlikely to experience adverse effects when the daily phosphorus consumption remains

  16. Chromium-free conversion coatings based on inorganic salts (Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo) for aluminum alloys used in aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santa Coloma, P.; Izagirre, U.; Belaustegi, Y.; Jorcin, J. B.; Cano, F. J.; Lapeña, N.

    2015-08-01

    Novel chromium-free conversion coatings based on Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo compounds were developed at a pilot scale to improve the corrosion resistance of the AA2024-T3 and AA7075-T6 aluminum alloys for aircraft applications. The influence of the presence of Zr and Ti in the Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo conversion bath's formulation on the corrosion resistance of the coated alloys was investigated. The corrosion resistance provided by the conversion coatings was evaluated by salt spray exposure and potentiodynamic sweeps. Optical and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) operating in the Kelvin Probe mode (SKPFM) were used to provide microstructural information of the coated samples that achieved the best results in the corrosion tests. The salt spray test evidenced the higher corrosion resistance of the coated samples compared to the bare surfaces for both alloys. The potentiodynamic tests showed that the corrosion current density decreased for coated AA7075-T6 and AA2024-T3 alloys, which indicated an obvious improvement of the corrosion resistance with all the processes for both alloys. Although the corrosion resistance of the coated samples appeared to be higher for the alloy AA7075-T6 than for the alloy AA2024-T3, both alloys achieved the best corrosion protection with the coatings deposited from conversion bath formulations containing no titanium salts. The microscopy analysis on the coated AA7075-T6 samples revealed that a local deposition of Zr compounds and, possibly, an oxidation process occurred in the vicinity of the alloy's intermetallic particles. The amount of the Zr deposits at these locations increased with coating's formulations without Ti, which provided the best corrosion resistance. The Cr-free conversion coatings developed in this study for the AA7075-T6 and AA2024-T3 alloys do not meet yet the strict requirements of the aircraft industry. However, they significantly improved the corrosion

  17. Electrophysical behavior of ion-conductive organic-inorganic polymer system based on aliphatic epoxy resin and salt of lithium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matkovska, Liubov; Iurzhenko, Maksym; Mamunya, Yevgen; Matkovska, Olga; Demchenko, Valeriy; Lebedev, Eugene; Boiteux, Gisele; Serghei, Anatoli

    2014-12-01

    In the present work, ion-conductive hybrid organic-inorganic polymers based on epoxy oligomer of diglycide aliphatic ester of polyethylene glycol (DEG) and lithium perchlorate (LiClO4) were synthesized. The effect of LiClO4 content on the electrophysical properties of epoxy polymers has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS). The effect of LiClO4 content on the structure has been studied by wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). It was found that LiClO4 impacts on the structure of the synthesized hybrid epoxy polymers, probably, by formation of coordinative complexes {ether oxygen-lithium cations-ether oxygen} as evidenced from a significant increase in their glass transition temperatures with increasing LiClO4 concentration and WAXS studies. The presence of ether oxygen in DEG macromolecules provides a transfer mechanism of the lithium cations with the ether oxygen similar to polyethylene oxide (PEO). Thus, the obtained hybrid polymers have high values of ionic conductivity σ' (approximately 10-3 S/cm) and permittivity ɛ' (6 × 105) at elevated temperatures (200°C). On the other hand, DEG has higher heat resistance compared to PEO that makes these systems perspective as solid polymer electrolytes able to operate at high temperature.

  18. Expanding Mg-Zn hybrid chemistry: inorganic salt effects in addition reactions of organozinc reagents to trifluoroacetophenone and the implications for a synergistic lithium-magnesium-zinc activation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, David R; Clegg, William; García-Álvarez, Pablo; Kennedy, Alan R; McCall, Matthew D; Russo, Luca; Hevia, Eva

    2011-07-18

    Numerous organic transformations rely on organozinc compounds made through salt-metathesis (exchange) reactions from organolithium or Grignard reagents with a suitable zinc precursor. By combining X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations, this study sheds new light on the constitution of the organometallic species involved in this important synthetic tool. Investigations into the metathesis reactions of equimolar amounts of Grignard reagents (RMgX) and ZnCl(2) in THF led to the isolation of novel magnesium-zinc hybrids, [{(thf)(2)Mg(μ-Cl)(3)ZnR}(2)] (R=Et, tBu, nBu or o-OMe-C(6)H(4)), which exhibit an unprecedented structural motif in mixed magnesium-zinc chemistry. Furthermore, theoretical modelling of the reaction of EtMgCl with ZnCl(2) reveals that formation of the mixed-metal compound is thermodynamically preferred to that of the expected homometallic products, RZnCl and MgCl(2). This study also assesses the alkylating ability of hybrid 3 towards the sensitive ketone trifluoroacetophenone, revealing a dramatic increase in the chemoselectivity of the reaction when LiCl is introduced as an additive. This observation, combined with recent related breakthroughs in synthesis, points towards the existence of a trilateral Li/Mg/Zn synergistic effect. PMID:21656589

  19. Comparison of microenvironments of aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles in the presence of inorganic and organic salts: a time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy approach.

    PubMed

    Dutt, G B

    2005-11-01

    Microenvironments of aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles was examined in the presence of additives such as sodium chloride and p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC) by monitoring the fluorescence anisotropy decays of two hydrophobic probes, 2,5-dimethyl-1,4-dioxo-3,6-diphenylpyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (DMDPP) and coumarin 6 (C6). It has been well-established that SDS micelles undergo a sphere-to-rod transition and that their mean hydrodynamic radius increases from 19 to 100 A upon the addition of 0.0-0.7 M NaCl at 298 K. A similar size and shape transition is induced by PTHC at concentrations that are 20 times lower compared to that of NaCl. This study was undertaken to find out how the microviscosity of the micelles is influenced under these circumstances. It was noticed that the microviscosity of the SDS/NaCl system increased by approximately 45%, whereas there was a less than 10% variation in the microviscosity of the SDS/PTHC system. The large increase in the microviscosity of the former system with salt concentration has been rationalized on the basis of the high concentration of sodium ions in the headgroup region of the micelles and their ability to strongly coordinate with the water present in this region, which decreases the mobility of the probe molecules.

  20. Comparison of microenvironments of aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles in the presence of inorganic and organic salts: a time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy approach.

    PubMed

    Dutt, G B

    2005-11-01

    Microenvironments of aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles was examined in the presence of additives such as sodium chloride and p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC) by monitoring the fluorescence anisotropy decays of two hydrophobic probes, 2,5-dimethyl-1,4-dioxo-3,6-diphenylpyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (DMDPP) and coumarin 6 (C6). It has been well-established that SDS micelles undergo a sphere-to-rod transition and that their mean hydrodynamic radius increases from 19 to 100 A upon the addition of 0.0-0.7 M NaCl at 298 K. A similar size and shape transition is induced by PTHC at concentrations that are 20 times lower compared to that of NaCl. This study was undertaken to find out how the microviscosity of the micelles is influenced under these circumstances. It was noticed that the microviscosity of the SDS/NaCl system increased by approximately 45%, whereas there was a less than 10% variation in the microviscosity of the SDS/PTHC system. The large increase in the microviscosity of the former system with salt concentration has been rationalized on the basis of the high concentration of sodium ions in the headgroup region of the micelles and their ability to strongly coordinate with the water present in this region, which decreases the mobility of the probe molecules. PMID:16262297

  1. The effectiveness of organic PCM based on lauric acid from coconut oil and inorganic PCM based on salt hydrate CaCl2.6H2o as latent heat energy storage system in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    U, Sri Rahayu A.; Putri, Widya A.; Sutjahja, I. M.; Kurnia, D.; Wonorahardjo, S.

    2016-08-01

    A latent heat energy storage system utilizing phase change materials (PCM) is an alternative strategy to reduce the use of Air Conditioning (AC) system in big cities in Indonesia in order for energy conservation in the future. In this research we used two kinds of materials, namely organic PCM based on lauric acid from coconut oil (CO) and inorganic PCM based on salt hydrate CaCl2.6H2O, because they have thermophysical parameters suitable for human's thermal comfort application in the building. The CO which contained more than 50% lauric acid has the melting temperature (Tm ) of about 26 °C and heat entalphy (ΔH) around 103 kJ/kg, while CaCl2.6H2O has the melting point of 29 °C and heat entalphy of 190 kJ/kg. In this paper we report the effectiveness of those two kinds of PCM in reducing the air temperature as one of some criteria for human's thermal comfort. The experiments were performed in a close and adiabatic room and the time-temperature measurements were done automatically using Arduino microcontroller and LM35 temperature sensor connected to the PC.

  2. Free energetics of carbon nanotube association in aqueous inorganic NaI salt solutions: Temperature effects using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ou, Shu-Ching; Cui, Di; Wezowicz, Matthew; Taufer, Michela; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-06-15

    In this study, we examine the temperature dependence of free energetics of nanotube association using graphical processing unit-enabled all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (FEN ZI) with two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes in 3 m NaI aqueous salt solution. Results suggest that the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes for the association process are all reduced at the high temperature, in agreement with previous investigations using other hydrophobes. Via the decomposition of free energy into individual components, we found that solvent contribution (including water, anion, and cation contributions) is correlated with the spatial distribution of the corresponding species and is influenced distinctly by the temperature. We studied the spatial distribution and the structure of the solvent in different regions: intertube, intratube and the bulk solvent. By calculating the fluctuation of coarse-grained tube-solvent surfaces, we found that tube-water interfacial fluctuation exhibits the strongest temperature dependence. By taking ions to be a solvent-like medium in the absence of water, tube-anion interfacial fluctuation shows similar but weaker dependence on temperature, while tube-cation interfacial fluctuation shows no dependence in general. These characteristics are discussed via the malleability of their corresponding solvation shells relative to the nanotube surface. Hydrogen bonding profiles and tetrahedrality of water arrangement are also computed to compare the structure of solvent in the solvent bulk and intertube region. The hydrophobic confinement induces a relatively lower concentration environment in the intertube region, therefore causing different intertube solvent structures which depend on the tube separation. This study is relevant in the continuing discourse on hydrophobic interactions (as they impact generally a broad class of phenomena in biology, biochemistry, and materials science and soft condensed matter research), and

  3. Free energetics of carbon nanotube association in aqueous inorganic NaI salt solutions: Temperature effects using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ou, Shu-Ching; Cui, Di; Wezowicz, Matthew; Taufer, Michela; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-06-15

    In this study, we examine the temperature dependence of free energetics of nanotube association using graphical processing unit-enabled all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (FEN ZI) with two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes in 3 m NaI aqueous salt solution. Results suggest that the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes for the association process are all reduced at the high temperature, in agreement with previous investigations using other hydrophobes. Via the decomposition of free energy into individual components, we found that solvent contribution (including water, anion, and cation contributions) is correlated with the spatial distribution of the corresponding species and is influenced distinctly by the temperature. We studied the spatial distribution and the structure of the solvent in different regions: intertube, intratube and the bulk solvent. By calculating the fluctuation of coarse-grained tube-solvent surfaces, we found that tube-water interfacial fluctuation exhibits the strongest temperature dependence. By taking ions to be a solvent-like medium in the absence of water, tube-anion interfacial fluctuation shows similar but weaker dependence on temperature, while tube-cation interfacial fluctuation shows no dependence in general. These characteristics are discussed via the malleability of their corresponding solvation shells relative to the nanotube surface. Hydrogen bonding profiles and tetrahedrality of water arrangement are also computed to compare the structure of solvent in the solvent bulk and intertube region. The hydrophobic confinement induces a relatively lower concentration environment in the intertube region, therefore causing different intertube solvent structures which depend on the tube separation. This study is relevant in the continuing discourse on hydrophobic interactions (as they impact generally a broad class of phenomena in biology, biochemistry, and materials science and soft condensed matter research), and

  4. Free Energetics of Carbon Nanotube Association in Aqueous Inorganic NaI Salt Solutions: Temperature Effects using All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Shu-Ching; Cui, Di; Wezowicz, Matthew; Taufer, Michela; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examine the temperature dependence of free energetics of nanotube association by using GPU-enabled all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (FEN ZI) with two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes in 3 m NaI aqueous salt solution. Results suggest that the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes for the association process are all reduced at the high temperature, in agreement with previous investigations using other hydrophobes. Via the decomposition of free energy into individual components, we found that solvent contribution (including water, anion and cation contributions) is correlated with the spatial distribution of the corresponding species and is influenced distinctly by the temperature. We studied the spatial distribution and the structure of the solvent in different regions: intertube, intra-tube and the bulk solvent. By calculating the fluctuation of coarse-grained tube-solvent surfaces, we found that tube-water interfacial fluctuation exhibits the strongest temperature dependence. By taking ions to be a solvent-like medium in the absence of water, tube-anion interfacial fluctuation also shows similar but weaker dependence on temperature, while tube-cation interfacial fluctuation shows no dependence in general. These characteristics are discussed via the malleability of their corresponding solvation shells relative to the nanotube surface. Hydrogen bonding profiles and tetrahedrality of water arrangement are also computed to compare the structure of solvent in the solvent bulk and intertube region. The hydrophobic confinement induces a relatively lower concentration environment in the intertube region, therefore causing different intertube solvent structures which depend on the tube separation. This study is relevant in the continuing discourse on hydrophobic interactions (as they impact generally a broad class of phenomena in biology, biochemistry, and materials science and soft condensed matter research), and interpretations of

  5. Arsenic, inorganic

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Arsenic , inorganic ; CASRN 7440 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  6. Effects of inorganic salts on the morphological, structural, and electrochemical properties of prepared nickel-rich Li[Ni0.6Co0.2Mn0.2]O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki Jae; Jo, Yong Nam; Lee, Won Jong; Subburaj, T.; Prasanna, K.; Lee, Chang Woo

    2014-12-01

    The cathode active materials Li[Ni0.6Co0.2Mn0.2]O2 are synthesized using different inorganic salts, sulfate [NiSO4·6H2O, CoSO4·7H2O, MnSO4·H2O], nitrate [M(NO3)2·6H2O (M = Ni, Co, Mn)] and acetate [M(CH3COO)2·4H2O (M = Ni, Co, Mn)]. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicate that sulfate and nitrate starting materials formed a well-ordered hexagonal α-NaFeO2 layered structure (space group: 166, R 3 bar m). However, acetate starting material is led to a poorly layered structure compared to the other materials. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) images show that sulfate and acetate starting materials formed nano-sized primary particles with a size of about 200-500 nm and 300 nm, and void channels. However, the primary particles with a size of 300 nm from nitrate starting material agglomerate together to form micro-sized secondary particles. The initial discharge capacities of the sulfate, nitrate, and acetate starting materials are 138.3, 142.4, and 135.9 mAh g-1 at 1 C-rate in the voltage range 3.0-4.3 V vs. Li/Li+, respectively. The discharge capacity retentions of sulfate, nitrate, and acetate starting materials are 92.5%, 63.9%, and 78.1% at 1 C-rate after 50 cycles, and 83.2%, 48.0%, and 71.7% at 6 C-rate after 100 cycles, respectively.

  7. Inorganic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Černý, Radovan

    The separation of compounds by inorganic/organic boundary is of less importance for the structure determination by diffraction methods. More important for the diffraction is how the atoms build up larger building units and the crystal itself. A molecular/non-molecular boundary is therefore relevant for the choice of a structure determination method. Non-molecular compounds - also called extended solids - are constructed by bonds that extend "infinitely" in three dimensions through a crystal. These non-molecular crystals usually crystallize with higher symmetries, and atoms often occupy special Wyckoff positions. A review of actual methodology is given first, and then highlights and pitfalls of structure determination from powder diffraction, its problems and their solutions are shown and discussed using selected examples.

  8. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  9. Molten salt spectroelectrochemistry: recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Mamantov, G.; Chapman, D.M.; Harward, B.L.; Klatt, L.N.; Smith, G.P.

    1985-01-01

    Molten salt spectroelectrochemistry will be reviewed in this paper. UV-visible transmission, infrared reflectance, resonance and normal Raman, and electron spin resonance spectroelectrochemistry have been used for molten salt studies. Two recent applications of uv-visible transmission spectroelectrochemistry to studies of organic and inorganic solutes in molten SbCl/sub 3/-AlCl/sub 3/-N-(1-butyl)pyridinium chloride and AlCl/sub 3/-NaCl will be described.

  10. Remote Monitoring, Inorganic Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview of applicability, amenability, and operating parameter ranges for various inorganic parameters:this chapter will also provide a compilation of existing and new online technologies for determining inorganic compounds in water samples. A wide vari...

  11. Effect of Salts on Drainage of Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sett, Soumyadip; Karakashev, Stoyan; Smoukov, Stoyan; Yarin, Alexander

    Gravitational drainage from thin planar vertical sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) films in the presence of inorganic salts was experimentally studied. Strong ion-specific effects of the counter ions were found to affect the stability and the rate of drainage of the planar foam films as a function of concentration of the inorganic salts. The counter-ions can either stabilize (below the critical concentration) or destabilize the foam films. We found that the strongest foam stabilizer salt became the strongest foam destabilizer beyond its critical concentration.

  12. Molten Salt Thermal Energy Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maru, H. C.; Dullea, J. F.; Kardas, A.; Paul, L.; Marianowski, L. G.; Ong, E.; Sampath, V.; Huang, V. M.; Wolak, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of storing thermal energy at temperatures of 450 C to 535 C in the form of latent heat of fusion was examined for over 30 inorganic salts and salt mixtures. Alkali carbonate mixtures were chosen as phase-change storage materials in this temperature range because of their relatively high storage capacity and thermal conductivity, moderate cost, low volumetric expansion upon melting, low corrosivity, and good chemical stability. Means of improving heat conduction through the solid salt were explored.

  13. Inorganic nanolayers: structure, preparation, and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Saifullah, Bullo; Hussein, Mohd Zobir B

    2015-01-01

    Hydrotalcite-like compounds are two-dimensional inorganic nanolayers also known as clay minerals or anionic clays or layered double hydroxides/layered hydroxy salts, and have emerged as a single type of material with numerous biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, gene delivery, cosmetics, and biosensing. Inorganic nanolayers are promising materials due to their fascinating properties, such as ease of preparation, ability to intercalate different type of anions (inorganic, organic, biomolecules, and even genes), high thermal stability, delivery of intercalated anions in a sustained manner, high biocompatibility, and easy biodegradation. Inorganic nanolayers have been the focus for researchers over the last decade, resulting in widening application horizons, especially in the field of biomedical science. These nanolayers have been widely applied in drug and gene delivery. They have also been applied in biosensing technology, and most recently in bioimaging science. The suitability of inorganic nanolayers for application in drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing technology, and bioimaging science makes them ideal materials to be applied for theranostic purposes. In this paper, we review the structure, methods of preparation, and latest advances made by inorganic nanolayers in such biomedical applications as drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing, and bioimaging. PMID:26366081

  14. Inorganic nanolayers: structure, preparation, and biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Saifullah, Bullo; Hussein, Mohd Zobir B

    2015-01-01

    Hydrotalcite-like compounds are two-dimensional inorganic nanolayers also known as clay minerals or anionic clays or layered double hydroxides/layered hydroxy salts, and have emerged as a single type of material with numerous biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, gene delivery, cosmetics, and biosensing. Inorganic nanolayers are promising materials due to their fascinating properties, such as ease of preparation, ability to intercalate different type of anions (inorganic, organic, biomolecules, and even genes), high thermal stability, delivery of intercalated anions in a sustained manner, high biocompatibility, and easy biodegradation. Inorganic nanolayers have been the focus for researchers over the last decade, resulting in widening application horizons, especially in the field of biomedical science. These nanolayers have been widely applied in drug and gene delivery. They have also been applied in biosensing technology, and most recently in bioimaging science. The suitability of inorganic nanolayers for application in drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing technology, and bioimaging science makes them ideal materials to be applied for theranostic purposes. In this paper, we review the structure, methods of preparation, and latest advances made by inorganic nanolayers in such biomedical applications as drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing, and bioimaging. PMID:26366081

  15. Inorganic contents of peats

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Bish, D.L.; Cohen, A.D.

    1988-02-01

    Peat, the precursor of coal, is composed primarily of plant components and secondarily of inorganic matter derived from a variety of sources. The elemental, mineralogic, and petrographic composition of a peat is controlled by a combination of both its botanical and depositional environment. Inorganic contents of peats can vary greatly between geographically separated peat bogs as well as vertially and horizontally within an individual bog. Predicting the form and distribution of inorganic matter in a coal deposit requires understanding the distribution and preservation of inorganic matter in peat-forming environments and diagenetic alterations affecting such material during late-stage peatification and coalification processes. 43 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Organic ionic salt draw solutions for osmotic membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Katie S; Achilli, Andrea; Childress, Amy E

    2012-10-01

    This investigation evaluates the use of organic ionic salt solutions as draw solutions for specific use in osmotic membrane bioreactors. Also, this investigation presents a simple method for determining the diffusion coefficient of ionic salt solutions using only a characterized membrane. A selection of organic ionic draw solutions underwent a desktop screening process before being tested in the laboratory and evaluated for performance using specific salt flux (reverse salt flux per unit water flux), biodegradation potential, and replenishment cost. Two of the salts were found to have specific salt fluxes three to six times lower than two commonly used inorganic draw solutions, NaCl and MgCl(2). All of the salts tested have organic anions with the potential to degrade in the bioreactor as a carbon source and aid in nutrient removal. Results demonstrate the potential benefits of organic ionic salt draw solutions over currently implemented inorganics in osmotic membrane bioreactor systems. PMID:22771022

  17. Thermodynamics and Solubilities of Salts of Dipositive Ions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Gary F.; Eberhardt, William H.

    1979-01-01

    In this general chemistry experiment students calculate changes in free energy of formation of inorganic salts from the free energy of formation of ions. Then they test the conclusions of their calculations by mixing solutions of the ions. (BB)

  18. PEGylated Inorganic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Karakoti, Ajay S.; Das, Soumya; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Seal, Sudipta

    2011-02-25

    Application of inorganic nanoparticles in diagnosis and therapy has become a critical component in targeted treatment of diseases. The surface modification of inorganic oxides is important for providing diversity in size, shape, solubility, long term stability and attachment of selective functional groups. PEGylation of surfaces is a key strategic approach for providing stealth characteristics to nanomaterials otherwise identified as foreign materials by human body. The current review describes the role of surface modification of oxides by polyethylene glycol (PEG) in providing versatile characteristics to inorganic oxide nanoparticles with a focus on their biomedical applications. The role of PEG as structure directing agent in synthesis of oxides is also captured in this short review.

  19. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  20. Alkali Metal Salts with Designable Aryltrifluoroborate Anions.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kazuki; Yoshii, Kazuki; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Matsumoto, Hajime; Tsuda, Tetsuya; Kuwabata, Susumu

    2016-09-01

    Aryltrifluoroborate ([ArBF3](-)) has a designable basic anion structure. Various [ArBF3](-)-based anions were synthesized to create novel alkali metal salts using a simple and safe process. Nearly 40 novel alkali metal salts were successfully obtained, and their physicochemical characteristics, particularly their thermal properties, were elucidated. These salts have lower melting points than those of simple inorganic alkali halide salts, such as KCl and LiCl, because of the weaker interactions between the alkali metal cations and the [ArBF3](-) anions and the anions' larger entropy. Moreover, interestingly, potassium cations were electrochemically reduced in the potassium (meta-ethoxyphenyl)trifluoroborate (K[m-OEtC6H4BF3]) molten salt at 433 K. These findings contribute substantially to furthering molten salt chemistry, ionic liquid chemistry, and electrochemistry. PMID:27510799

  1. Block Coloplyer Nanoreactors for Inorganic Cluster Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Robert E.

    1997-03-01

    We have generalized our work on the spatial confinement of inorganic clusters in block copolymers to a nanoreactor scheme for cluster synthesis. Using this new methodology, a wide range of inorganic clusters can be synthesized from a single block copolymer starting material. Metals are selectively sequestered into domains of the heterogeneous block copolymer morphology, either from aqueous solutions of suitably chosen salts or via vapor permeation of organometallic compounds. Once "loaded", these metal-containing domains serve as localized reaction sites for cluster synthesis. The metal-sequestering sites are rejuvenated, rendering the nanoreactors capable of being reloaded with more of the same metal, or another, for further cluster synthesis. Magnetic and optical properties of free-standing block copolymer films containing various types of nanoclusters will be discussed.

  2. Estimation of inorganic species aquatic toxicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, James P.; Ostrander, Gary K.

    2005-01-01

    The acute aquatic toxicities (narcoses) for a range of organism types may be estimated with LSER for a large number of inorganic and organometal species, many with an accuracy at or within an order of magnitude. Optimum estimations make use of a bioavailable metal fraction and a more accurate structure(s) for the toxic solution species. The estimated toxicities for a number of salts were quite different from the observed values, likely due to a dominant specific toxicity mechanism other than baseline narcosis. The tool still requires fine-tuning.

  3. Improved Arene Fluorination Methodology for I(III) Salts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bijia; Qin, Linlin; Neumann, Kiel D.; Uppaluri, ShriHarsha; Cerny, Ronald L.; DiMagno, Stephen G.

    2010-01-01

    The use of low polarity aromatic solvents (benzene or toluene) and/or the removal of inorganic salts results in dramatically improved yields of fluorinated arenes from diaryliodonium salts. This methodology is shown to “scale down” to the conditions used typically for radiotracer synthesis. PMID:20617820

  4. Inorganic separator technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smatko, J. S.; Weaver, R. D.; Kalhammer, F. R.

    1973-01-01

    Testing and failure analyses of silver zinc cells with largely inorganic separators were performed. The results showed that the wet stand and cycle life objective of the silver-zinc cell development program were essentially accomplished and led to recommendations for cell composition, design, and operation that should yield further improvement in wet and cycle life. A series of advanced inorganic materials was successfully developed and formulated into rigid and semiflexible separator samples. Suitable screening tests for evaluation of largely inorganic separators were selected and modified for application to the separator materials. The results showed that many of these formulations are potentially superior to previously used materials and permitted selection of three promising materials for further evaluation in silver-zinc cells.

  5. Lead and compounds (inorganic)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Lead and compounds ( inorganic ) ; CASRN 7439 - 92 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  6. Geological and Inorganic Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, L. L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents a review focusing on techniques and their application to the analysis of geological and inorganic materials that offer significant changes to research and routine work. Covers geostandards, spectroscopy, plasmas, microbeam techniques, synchrotron X-ray methods, nuclear activation methods, chromatography, and electroanalytical methods.…

  7. Salt, Chlor-Alkali, and Related Heavy Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommaraju, Tilak V.

    The chemical category of inorganic salts encompasses many substances that dissociate completely in water, but only one salt, sodium chloride, is referred to by the common name, salt. Sodium chloride is ubiquitous in both its occurrence and its many uses. To date, there are over 14,000 uses for salt.1 Salt is used as a feedstock for many chemicals including chlorine, caustic soda (sodium hydroxide), synthetic soda ash (sodium carbonate), sodium chlorate, sodium sulfate, and metallic sodium. By indirect methods, sodium chloride is also used to produce hydrochloric acid and many other sodium salts. In its natural mineral form, salt may take on some color from some of the trace elements and other salts present, however, pure sodium chloride is a white to colorless crystalline substance, fairly soluble in water.2 Also known as halite, the substance is an essential nutrient to humans and animals for proper bodily functions.

  8. Inorganic Graphene Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, C. N. R.; Maitra, Urmimala

    2015-07-01

    In the last four to five years, there has been a great resurgence of research on two-dimensional inorganic materials, partly because of the impetus received from graphene research. Unlike graphene, which is a gap-less material, most inorganic layered materials are semiconductors or insulators. Some of them, as exemplified by MoS2, exhibit unexpected properties, not unlike graphene, with possible applications. Thus, layered metal chalcogenides are being explored intensely, and MoS2 is emerging as a wonder material. In this article, we present the synthesis and properties of nanosheets composing single or few layers of these fascinating materials. Besides metal chalcogenides, boron nitride, borocarbonitrides (BxCyNz), metal oxides, and metal-organic frameworks are also discussed.

  9. Supported inorganic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Sehgal, Rakesh; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    Supported inorganic membranes capable of molecular sieving, and methods for their production, are provided. The subject membranes exhibit high flux and high selectivity. The subject membranes are substantially defect free and less than about 100 nm thick. The pores of the subject membranes have an average critical pore radius of less than about 5 .ANG., and have a narrow pore size distribution. The subject membranes are prepared by coating a porous substrate with a polymeric sol, preferably under conditions of low relative pressure of the liquid constituents of the sol. The coated substrate is dried and calcined to produce the subject supported membrane. Also provided are methods of derivatizing the surface of supported inorganic membranes with metal alkoxides. The subject membranes find use in a variety of applications, such as the separation of constituents of gaseous streams, as catalysts and catalyst supports, and the like.

  10. Phosphate salts

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken by mouth or used as enemas. Indigestion. Aluminum phosphate and calcium phosphate are FDA-permitted ingredients ... Phosphate salts containing sodium, potassium, aluminum, or calcium are LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth short-term, when sodium phosphate is inserted into the ...

  11. Salting-out effects in aqueous ionic liquid solutions: cloud-point temperature shifts.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Joana R; Visak, Zoran P; Blesic, Marijana; Marrucho, Isabel M; Coutinho, João A P; Lopes, José N Canongia; Rebelo, Luis P N

    2007-05-10

    The effects of the addition of three inorganic salts, namely, NaCl, Na(2)SO(4), and Na(3)PO(4), on the liquid-liquid (L-L) phase diagram of aqueous solutions containing the model ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, [bmim][BF(4)], were investigated. All three inorganic salts trigger salting-out effects, leading to significant upward shifts of the L-L demixing temperatures of the systems. The magnitude of the shifts depends on both the water-structuring nature of the salt and its concentration; that is, the effects are correlated with the ionic strength of the solution and the Gibbs free energy of hydration of the inorganic salt. The pH effect and the occurrence of salt precipitation in concentrated solutions are also discussed.

  12. Estimation of environmental properties for inorganic compounds using LSER

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, James P.

    1999-01-01

    The Great Lakes Science Center has devised values for inorganic species for use in the environmental property- predictive quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) Linear Solvation Energy Relationship (LSER). Property estimation has been difficult for inorganic species. In this presentation aqueous solubility, bioconcentration and acute aquatic toxicity are estimated for inorganic compounds using existing LSER equations. The best estimations arise from the most accurate description of predominant solution species, many within an order of magnitude. The toxicities also depend on an estimation of the bioactive amount and configuration. A number of anion/cation combinations (salts) still resist accurate property estimation, and the reasons currently are not understood. These new variable values will greatly extend the application and utility of LSER for the estimation of environmental properties.

  13. THE INTRACELLULAR LOCALIZATION OF INORGANIC CATIONS WITH POTASSIUM PYROANTIMONATE

    PubMed Central

    Tandler, Carlos J.; Libanati, César M.; Sanchis, Carlos A.

    1970-01-01

    Potassium pyroantimonate, when used as fixative (saturated or half-saturated, without addition of any conventional fixative) has been demonstrated to produce intracellular precipitates of the insoluble salts of calcium, magnesium, and sodium and to preserve the general cell morphology. In both animal and plant tissues, the electron-opaque antimonate precipitates were found deposited in the nucleus—as well as within the nucleolus—and in the cytoplasm, largely at the site of the ribonucleoprotein particles; the condensed chromatin appeared relatively free of precipitates. The inorganic cations are probably in a loosely bound state since they are not retained by conventional fixatives. The implications of this inorganic cation distribution in the intact cell are discussed in connection with their anionic counterparts, i.e., complexing of cations by fixed anionic charges and the coexistence of a large pool of inorganic orthophosphate anions in the nucleus and nucleolus. PMID:4935442

  14. Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    DOEpatents

    Moens, Luc

    2003-06-24

    A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a solvent selected from the group consisting of water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, acetone, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile, to form a quaternary ammonium salt of the lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate; and b) hydrolyzing the quaternary ammonium salt with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid.

  15. Inorganic: the other mercury.

    PubMed

    Risher, John F; De Rosa, Christopher T

    2007-11-01

    There is a broad array of mercury species to which humans may be exposed. While exposure to methylmercury through fish consumption is widely recognized, the public is less aware of the sources and potential toxicity of inorganic forms of mercury. Some oral and laboratory thermometers, barometers, small batteries, thermostats, gas pressure regulators, light switches, dental amalgam fillings, cosmetic products, medications, cultural/religious practices, and gold mining all represent potential sources of exposure to inorganic forms of mercury. The route of exposure, the extent of absorption, the pharmacokinetics, and the effects all vary with the specific form of mercury and the magnitude and duration of exposure. If exposure is suspected, a number of tissue analyses can be conducted to confirm exposure or to determine whether an exposure might reasonably be expected to be biologically significant. By contrast with determination of exposure to methylmercury, for which hair and blood are credible indicators, urine is the preferred biological medium for the determination of exposure to inorganic mercury, including elemental mercury, with blood normally being of value only if exposure is ongoing. Although treatments are available to help rid the body of mercury in cases of extreme exposure, prevention of exposure will make such treatments unnecessary. Knowing the sources of mercury and avoiding unnecessary exposure are the prudent ways of preventing mercury intoxication. When exposure occurs, it should be kept in mind that not all unwanted exposures will result in adverse health consequences. In all cases, elimination of the source of exposure should be the first priority of public health officials.

  16. Inorganic: the other mercury.

    PubMed

    Risher, John F; De Rosa, Christopher T

    2007-11-01

    There is a broad array of mercury species to which humans may be exposed. While exposure to methylmercury through fish consumption is widely recognized, the public is less aware of the sources and potential toxicity of inorganic forms of mercury. Some oral and laboratory thermometers, barometers, small batteries, thermostats, gas pressure regulators, light switches, dental amalgam fillings, cosmetic products, medications, cultural/religious practices, and gold mining all represent potential sources of exposure to inorganic forms of mercury. The route of exposure, the extent of absorption, the pharmacokinetics, and the effects all vary with the specific form of mercury and the magnitude and duration of exposure. If exposure is suspected, a number of tissue analyses can be conducted to confirm exposure or to determine whether an exposure might reasonably be expected to be biologically significant. By contrast with determination of exposure to methylmercury, for which hair and blood are credible indicators, urine is the preferred biological medium for the determination of exposure to inorganic mercury, including elemental mercury, with blood normally being of value only if exposure is ongoing. Although treatments are available to help rid the body of mercury in cases of extreme exposure, prevention of exposure will make such treatments unnecessary. Knowing the sources of mercury and avoiding unnecessary exposure are the prudent ways of preventing mercury intoxication. When exposure occurs, it should be kept in mind that not all unwanted exposures will result in adverse health consequences. In all cases, elimination of the source of exposure should be the first priority of public health officials. PMID:18044248

  17. Sediment-water partitioning of inorganic mercury in estuaries.

    PubMed

    Turner, A; Millward, G E; Le Roux, S M

    2001-12-01

    The sediment-water partitioning and speciation of inorganic mercury have been studied under simulated estuarine conditions by monitoring the hydrophobicity and uptake of dissolved 203Hg(II) in samples from a variety of estuarine environments. A persistent increase in the distribution coefficientwith increasing salinity is inconsistent with inorganic speciation calculations, which predict an increase in the concentration of the soluble HgCl4(2-) complex (or reduction in sediment-water distribution coefficient) with increasing salinity. Partition data are, however, defined by an empirical equation relating to the salting out of nonelectrolytes via electrostriction and are characterized by salting constants between about 1.4 and 2.0 L mol(-1). Salting out of the neutral, covalent chloro-complex, HgCl2(0), is predicted but cannot account for the magnitude of salting out observed. Since Hg(II) strongly complexes with dissolved (and particulate) organic matter in natural environments, of more significance appears to be the salting out of Hg(II)-organic complexes. Operational measurements of the speciation of dissolved Hg(II) using Sep-Pak C18 columns indicate a reduction in the proportion of hydrophobic (C18-retained) dissolved Hg(II) complexes with increasing salinity, both in the presence and absence of suspended particles. Ratios of hydrophobic Hg(ll) before and after particle addition suggest a coupled salting out-sorption mechanism, with the precise nature of Hg(II) species salted out being determined bythe characteristics and concentrations of dissolved and sediment organic matter. PMID:11770766

  18. Field and Laboratory Studies of Reactions between Atmospheric Water Soluble Organic Acids and Inorganic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Sellon, Rachel E.; Shilling, John E.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-06-25

    Atmospheric inorganic particles undergo complex heterogeneous reactions that change their physicochemical properties. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids [1-2]. Recently, we showed that NaCl can react with water soluble organic acids (WSOA) and release gaseous hydrochloric acid (HCl) resulting in formation of organic salts [3]. A similar mechanism is also applicable to mixed WSOA/nitrate particles where multi-phase reactions are driven by the volatility of nitric acid. Furthermore, secondary organic material, which is a complex mixture of carboxylic acids, exhibits the same reactivity towards chlorides and nitrates. Here, we present a systematic study of reactions between atmospheric relevant WSOA, SOM, and inorganic salts including NaCl, NaNO3, and Ca(NO3)2 using complementary micro-spectroscopy analysis.

  19. Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 84 FIZ/NIST Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) (PC database for purchase)   The Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) is produced cooperatively by the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe(FIZ) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The ICSD is a comprehensive collection of crystal structure data of inorganic compounds containing more than 140,000 entries and covering the literature from 1915 to the present.

  20. DENITRIFICATION IN FRINGING SALT MARSHES OF NARRAGANSETT BAY, RHODE ISLAND, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past century, loading of terrestrial inorganic nitrogen to coastal receiving waters has increased dramatically. Salt marshes, because of their location between upland regions and coastal waters and their recognized role as nutrient transformers, have the potential to ameli...

  1. Ion-selective interactions of biologically relevant inorganic ions with alanine zwitterion: a 3D-RISM study.

    PubMed

    Fedotova, Marina V; Dmitrieva, Olga A

    2015-05-01

    The ion-molecular association between inorganic ions and the charged groups of alanine zwitterion in biologically relevant aqueous salt solutions, namely NaCl(aq), KCl(aq), MgCl2(aq), and CaCl2(aq), has been investigated over a wide range of electrolyte concentration. The influence of salt concentration on the stability of the formed ion-molecular associates is analyzed. The structure of the formed aggregates and its dependence on salt concentration and chemical nature of the inorganic ion are discussed.

  2. Inorganic polymer engineering materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.L.

    1993-06-01

    Phosphazene-based, inorganic-polymer composites have been produced and evaluated as potential engineering materials. The thermal, chemical, and mechanical properties of several different composites made from one polymer formulation have been measured. Measured properties are very good, and the composites show excellent promise for structural applications in harsh environments. Chopped fiberglass, mineral, cellulose, and woodflour filled composites were tested. Chopped fiberglass filled composites showed the best overall properties. The phosphazene composites are very hard and rigid. They have low dielectric constants and typical linear thermal expansion coefficients for polymers. In most cases, the phosphazene materials performed as well or better than analogous, commercially available, filled phenolic composites. After 3 to 5 weeks of exposure, both the phosphazene and phenolics were degraded to aqueous bases and acids. The glass filled phosphazene samples were least affected.

  3. Selective inorganic thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.L.F.; Weisenbach, L.A.; Anderson, M.T.

    1995-05-01

    This project is developing inorganic thin films as membranes for gas separation applications, and as discriminating coatings for liquid-phase chemical sensors. Our goal is to synthesize these coatings with tailored porosity and surface chemistry on porous substrates and on acoustic and optical sensors. Molecular sieve films offer the possibility of performing separations involving hydrogen, air, and natural gas constituents at elevated temperatures with very high separation factors. We are focusing on improving permeability and molecular sieve properties of crystalline zeolitic membranes made by hydrothermally reacting layered multicomponent sol-gel films deposited on mesoporous substrates. We also used acoustic plate mode (APM) oscillator and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor elements as substrates for sol-gel films, and have both used these modified sensors to determine physical properties of the films and have determined the sensitivity and selectivity of these sensors to aqueous chemical species.

  4. PATHWAY OF INORGANIC ARSENIC METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A remarkable aspect of the metabolism of inorganic arsenic in humans is its conversion to methylated metabolites. These metabolites account for most of the arsenic found in urine after exposure to inorganic arsenic. At least some of the adverse health effects attributed to inor...

  5. Ion-binding of glycine zwitterion with inorganic ions in biologically relevant aqueous electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Fedotova, Marina V; Kruchinin, Sergey E

    2014-06-01

    The ion-binding between inorganic ions and charged functional groups of glycine zwitter-ion in NaCl(aq), KCl(aq), MgCl2(aq), and CaCl2(aq) has been investigated over a wide salt concentration range by using integral equation theory in the 3D-RISM approach. These systems mimic biological systems where binding of ions to charged residues at protein surfaces is relevant. It has been found that the stability of ion pairs formed by the carboxylate group and added inorganic cations decreases in the sequence Mg(2+)>Ca(2+)>Na(+)>K(+). However, all formed ion pairs are weak and decrease in stability with increasing salt concentration. On the other hand, at a given salt concentration the stability of (-NH3(+):Cl(-))aq ion pairs is similar in all studied systems. The features of ion-binding and the salt concentration effect on this process are discussed.

  6. Glass formation processes in mixed inorganic/organic aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Dette, Hans P; Koop, Thomas

    2015-05-14

    Recent experiments suggest that organic aerosol particles may transform into a glassy state at room temperature under dry conditions. Information on glass forming processes in mixed inorganic/organic aerosol particles is sparse, however, because inorganic crystal nucleation is usually very likely in such mixtures. Here we investigate the glass transition temperatures Tg of various organics (trehalose, sucrose, citric acid, sorbitol, and glycerol as well as 3-MBTCA) in binary mixtures with either NaNO3 or NH4HSO4 at different mass fractions. The glassy samples were prepared with the MARBLES technique by atomizing dilute aqueous solutions into aerosol particles and subsequent diffusion drying. The resulting aerosol particles were collected and their phase behavior was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry. At small and intermediate inorganic mass fractions salt crystallization did not occur. Instead, the single-phase mixtures remained in an amorphous state upon drying such that determination of their Tg was possible. From these measurements the Tg value of pure NaNO3 and pure NH4HSO4 could be inferred through extrapolation, resulting in values of Tg(NaNO3) ≈ 290 K and Tg(NH4HSO4) ≈ 220 K. Upon drying of NH4HSO4/3-MBTCA mixtures, phase-separated samples formed in which the inorganic-rich and organic-rich phases each show an independent glass transition. Our measurements provide a route toward establishing Tg values of inorganic salts that usually crystallize readily, and they may explain the reported contradicting observations of NaNO3 aerosol particles to either crystallize or remain amorphous upon drying at room temperature. PMID:25490407

  7. Organic/inorganic hybrid coatings for anticorrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhouying

    Compared to organic coatings, organic-inorganic hybrid coatings can potentially improve the anticorrosion performance. The organic phase provides the excellent mechaincal and barrier properties while the inorganic phase acts as an adhesion promoter and corrosion inhibitor. Despite that many studies on alkoxylsilane-based hybrid coatings have been developed and studied, their weatherability and anticorrosion performance has been rarely evaluated. On the other hand, organic-inorganic hybrid coatings based on mixed sol-gel precursors have received much less attention compared to alkoxylsilane-based hybrid coatings. In the first part, polyurethane hybrid coatings with a unique hybrid crosslinked structure as an improved unicoat were successfully prepared. The effect of polyesters on physical properties of the hybrid coatings was studied. Polyurethane coatings derived from cycloaliphatic polyester show comparable properties than those derived from the commercially viable aromatic polyester. Introducing the polysiloxane part into the polyurethane coatings enhanced the crosslinking density, Tg, mechanical properties, and general coating properties. The increased adhesion between the hybrid coating and the substrate make the hybrid coating a good candidate for anticorrosion application, which is shown by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The degradation mechanism of the polyurethane/polysiloxane hybrid coatings under various weathering conditions was shown to be the scission of the urethane and ester groups in the organic phase along with reorganizing and rearranging of the inorganic phase. The anticorrosion performance of the cycloaliphatic hybrid was much better than that of aromatic based hybrid under outdoor weathering based on visual observation and EIS analysis. Acid undercutting is an issue for TEOS based hybrid coating. In the second part, design of experiments (DOEs) was used to statistically investigate on the effect of sol-gel precursors. The

  8. Selective inorganic thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.L.F.; Pohl, P.I.; Brinker, C.J.

    1997-04-01

    Separating light gases using membranes is a technology area for which there exists opportunities for significant energy savings. Examples of industrial needs for gas separation include hydrogen recovery, natural gas purification, and dehydration. A membrane capable of separating H{sub 2} from other gases at high temperatures could recover hydrogen from refinery waste streams, and facilitate catalytic dehydrogenation and the water gas shift (CO + H{sub 2}O {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) reaction. Natural gas purification requires separating CH{sub 4} from mixtures with CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}O, and higher alkanes. A dehydrating membrane would remove water vapor from gas streams in which water is a byproduct or a contaminant, such as refrigeration systems. Molecular sieve films offer the possibility of performing separations involving hydrogen, natural gas constituents, and water vapor at elevated temperatures with very high separation factors. It is in applications such as these that the authors expect inorganic molecular sieve membranes to compete most effectively with current gas separation technologies. Cryogenic separations are very energy intensive. Polymer membranes do not have the thermal stability appropriate for high temperature hydrogen recovery, and tend to swell in the presence of hydrocarbon natural gas constituents. The authors goal is to develop a family of microporous oxide films that offer permeability and selectivity exceeding those of polymer membranes, allowing gas membranes to compete with cryogenic and adsorption technologies for large-scale gas separation applications.

  9. Cancer risk from inorganics

    SciTech Connect

    Swierenga, S.H.; Gilman, J.P.; McLean, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Inorganic metals and minerals for which there is evidence of carcinogenicity are identified. The risk of cancer from contact with them in the work place, the general environment, and under conditions of clinical (medical) exposure is discussed. The evidence indicates that minerals and metals most often influence cancer development through their action as cocarcinogens. The relationship between the physical form of mineral fibers, smoking and carcinogenic risk is emphasized. Metals are categorized as established (As, Be, Cr, Ni), suspected (Cd, Pb) and possible carcinogens, based on the existing in vitro, animal experimental and human epidemiological data. Cancer risk and possible modes of action of elements in each class are discussed. Views on mechanisms that may be responsible for the carcinogenicity of metals are updated and analysed. Some specific examples of cancer risks associated with the clinical use of potentially carcinogenic metals and from radioactive pharmaceuticals used in therapy and diagnosis are presented. Questions are raised as to the effectiveness of conventional dosimetry in accurately measuring risk from radiopharmaceuticals. 302 references.

  10. SEPARATION OF PROTACTINIUM FROM MOLTEN SALT REACTOR FUEL COMPOSITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.H.; Strain, J.E.; Cuneo, D.R.; Kelly, M.J.

    1963-11-12

    A method for selectively precipitating protactinium from a neutron- irradiated fused fluoride salt composition comprising at least one metal fluoride selected from the group consisting of an alkali metal fluoride and an alkaline earth metal fluoride containing dissolved thorium-232 values is presented. An inorganic metal oxide corresponding to any of the metal fluorides of the composition is also added. (AEC)

  11. Influence of Inorganic Ions on Aggregation and Adsorption Behaviors of Human Adenovirus

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we investigated the influence of inorganic ions on the aggregation and deposition (adsorption) behavior of human adenovirus (HAdV). Experiments were conducted to determine the surface charge and size of HAdV and viral adsorption capacity of sand in different salt c...

  12. Effects of inorganic cations on the rheology of aqueous welan, xanthan, gellan solutions and their mixtures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Long; Dong, Mingzhe; Gong, Houjian; Sun, Mengjiao; Li, Yajun

    2015-05-01

    The effects of different inorganic cations (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Al(3+)) on the rheological properties of single and mixture polysaccharide solutions have been systematically investigated. The apparent viscosity and viscoelasticity of welan solutions decrease with the addition of inorganic cations. Meanwhile, the addition of Al(3+) and K(+), respectively, enhances the apparent viscosity and viscoelasticity of xanthan and gellan solutions by promoting the gelation. The viscosity retention rate of welan/xanthan mixtures is higher than that of the single components in Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+) solutions, and the viscosity retention rate of welan/gellan mixtures is higher than that of the single components in Ca(2+) solutions. The salt induced gelation expands the application for polysaccharides, and it is also believed that the method of combining welan and xanthan (or gellan) is an effective strategy to control the rheology and morphology of solutions in the presence of inorganic salts.

  13. Segregation of inorganic ions at surfaces of polar nonaqueous liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Cwiklik, Lukasz; Andersson, Gunther; Dang, Liem X.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2007-07-16

    We present a short review of recent computational and experimental studies of surfaces of inorganic salt solutions with polar non-aqueous solvents. These investigations complement our knowledge about aqueous interfaces, showing that liquids such as formamide, liquid ammonia, or ethylene glycol can also surface segregate large polarizable anions like iodide, albeit less efficiently than water. For liquids, the surface of which is plagued with hydrophobic groups (such as methanol), the surface ion effect all but disappears. Based on the present data, a general picture of inorganic ion solvation at the solution/vapor interface of polar liquids is outlined. This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy, in part by the Chemical Sciences program and in part by the Engineering and Geosciences Division. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. Inorganic metal oxide/organic polymer nanocomposites and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Gash, Alexander E.; Satcher, Joe H.; Simpson, Randy

    2004-03-30

    A synthetic method for preparation of hybrid inorganic/organic energetic nanocomposites is disclosed herein. The method employs the use of stable metal inorganic salts and organic solvents as well as an organic polymer with good solubility in the solvent system to produce novel nanocomposite energetic materials. In addition, fuel metal powders (particularly those that are oxophillic) can be incorporated into composition. This material has been characterized by thermal methods, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), N.sub.2 adsoprtion/desorption methods, and Fourier-Transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy. According to these characterization methods the organic polymer phase fills the nanopores of the composite material, providing superb mixing of the component phases in the energetic nanocomposite.

  15. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-11-28

    Electrolyte salts are disclosed for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts. 2 figs.

  16. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, Narayan; Ingersoll, David

    1995-01-01

    Electrolyte salts for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts.

  17. Nonlinear responses in salt marsh functioning to increased nitrogen addition.

    PubMed

    Vivanco, Lucía; Irvine, Irina C; Martiny, Jennifer B H

    2015-04-01

    Salt marshes provide storm protection to shorelines, sequester carbon (C), and mitigate coastal eutrophication. These valuable coastal ecosystems are confronted with increasing nitrogen (N) inputs from anthropogenic sources, such as agricultural runoff, wastewater, and atmospheric deposition. To inform predictions of salt marsh functioning and sustainability in the future, we characterized the response of a variety of plant, microbial, and sediment responses to a seven-level gradient of N addition in three Californian salt marshes after 7 and 14 months of N addition. The marshes showed variable responses to the experimental N gradient that can be grouped as neutral (root biomass, sediment respiration, potential carbon mineralization, and potential net nitrification), linear (increasing methane flux, decreasing potential net N mineralization, and increasing sediment inorganic N), and nonlinear (saturating aboveground plant biomass and leaf N content, and exponentially increasing sediment inorganic and organic N). The three salt marshes showed quantitative differences in most ecosystem properties and processes rates; however, the form of the response curves to N addition were generally consistent across the three marshes, indicating that the responses observed may be applicable to other marshes in the region. Only for sediment properties (inorganic and organic N pool) did the shape of the response differ significantly between marshes. Overall, the study suggests salt marshes are limited in their ability to sequester C and N with future increases in N, even without further losses in marsh area. PMID:26230015

  18. Tetraalkylphosphonium polyoxometalate ionic liquids: novel, organic-inorganic hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Paul G; Antonio, Mark R; Firestone, Millicent A; Kubatko, Karrie-Ann; Szreder, Tomasz; Wishart, James F; Dietz, Mark L

    2007-05-10

    Pairing of a Keggin or Lindqvist polyoxometalate (POM) anion with an appropriate tetraalkylphosphonium cation is shown to yield the first members of a new family of ionic liquids (ILs). Detailed characterization of one of them, an ambient-temperature "liquid POM" comprising the Lindqvist salt of the trihexyl(tetradecyl) phosphonium cation, by voltammetry, viscometry, conductimetry, and thermal analysis indicates that it exhibits conductivity and viscosity comparable to those of the one previously described inorganic-organic POM-IL hybrid but with substantially improved thermal stability.

  19. Synthesis and electron microscopy of inorganic and hybrid organic-inorganic mesoporous and macroporous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanford, Christopher Francis

    This work describes the creation and analysis of ordered porous inorganic and organic-inorganic hybrid materials with an emphasis on the qualitative and quantitative characterization by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Two major systems were studied: MCM-41-type mesoporous molecular sieves and three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) materials. The microanalysis of mesoporous samples is discussed first. Samples of unmodified siliceous MCM-41, MCM-41 with grafted titanium dioxide species, and MCM-41 with incorporated 3-mercaptopropyl groups were examined in the TEM at three accelerating voltages. The beam stability of all the samples increased with increasing accelerating voltage. The particles were significantly more resistant to beam damage with the surfactant template in place, when the samples were synthesized above room temperature, and when the silicate precursor was hydrolyzed in acid. The samples with organic and inorganic groups were more stable than siliceous analogs. The discussion of 3DOM materials begins with their synthesis and characterization: 3DOM materials were created from colloidal crystals of uniform, sub-micrometer diameter polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) spheres. Metal alkoxides, solutions of metal salts, and mixed salt-alkoxide precursors were employed to create 3DOM metal oxides, silicates with incorporated organic groups and polyoxometalate clusters, metals, and metal alloys. SEM and TEM were used extensively to characterize the morphology, crystallinity, grain size, and phase of the 3DOM products. The formation of 3DOM nickel oxide was studied by heating a nickel oxalate-colloidal crystal composite in an environmental SEM. The growth of the grains in 3DOM cobalt metal and 3DOM iron oxide were observed by high-temperature TEM. The arrangement of the pores in 3DOM materials was studied by analyzing diffractograms of TEM images of single particles tilted into different orientations

  20. Fluorometric quantification of natural inorganic polyphosphate.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Julia M; Ingall, Ellery D

    2010-06-15

    Polyphosphate, a linear polymer of orthophosphate, is abundant in the environment and a key component in wastewater treatment and many bioremediation processes. Despite the broad relevance of polyphosphate, current methods to quantify it possess significant disadvantages. Here, we describe a new approach for the direct quantification of inorganic polyphosphate in complex natural samples. The protocol relies on the interaction between the fluorochrome 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and dissolved polyphosphate. With the DAPI-based approach we describe, polyphosphate can be quantified at concentrations ranging from 0.5-3 microM P in a neutral-buffered freshwater matrix with an accuracy of +/-0.03 microM P. The patterns of polyphosphate concentration versus fluorescence yielded by standards exhibit no chain length dependence across polyphosphates ranging from 15-130 phosphorus units in size. Shorter length polyphosphate molecules (e.g., polyphosphate of three and five phosphorus units in length) contribute little to no signal in this approach, as these molecules react only slightly or not at all with DAPI in the concentration range tested. The presence of salt suppresses fluorescence from intermediate polyphosphate chain lengths (e.g., 15 phosphorus units) at polyphosphate concentrations ranging from 0.5-3 microM P. For longer chain lengths (e.g., 45-130 phosphorus units), this salt interference is not evident at conductivities up to approximately 10mS/cm. Our results indicate that standard polyphosphates should be stored frozen for no longer than 10-15 days to avoid inconsistent results associated with standard degradation. We have applied the fluorometric protocol to the analysis of five well-characterized natural samples to demonstrate the use of the method. PMID:20507063

  1. Protein-inorganic hybrid nanoflowers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jun; Lei, Jiandu; Zare, Richard N.

    2012-07-01

    Flower-shaped inorganic nanocrystals have been used for applications in catalysis and analytical science, but so far there have been no reports of `nanoflowers' made of organic components. Here, we report a method for creating hybrid organic-inorganic nanoflowers using copper (II) ions as the inorganic component and various proteins as the organic component. The protein molecules form complexes with the copper ions, and these complexes become nucleation sites for primary crystals of copper phosphate. Interaction between the protein and copper ions then leads to the growth of micrometre-sized particles that have nanoscale features and that are shaped like flower petals. When an enzyme is used as the protein component of the hybrid nanoflower, it exhibits enhanced enzymatic activity and stability compared with the free enzyme. This is attributed to the high surface area and confinement of the enzymes in the nanoflowers.

  2. Organic waste processing using molten salt oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M. G., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal means of oxidizing (destroying) the organic constituents of mixed wastes, hazardous wastes, and energetic materials while retaining inorganic and radioactive constituents in the salt. For this reason, MSO is considered a promising alternative to incineration for the treatment of a variety of organic wastes. The U. S. Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) is currently funding research that will identify alternatives to incineration for the treatment of organic-based mixed wastes. (Mixed wastes are defined as waste streams which have both hazardous and radioactive properties.) One such project is Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Expedited Technology Demonstration of Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO). The goal of this project is to conduct an integrated demonstration of MSO, including off-gas and spent salt treatment, and the preparation of robust solid final forms. Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has constructed an integrated pilot-scale MSO treatment system in which tests and demonstrations are presently being performed under carefully controlled (experimental) conditions. The system consists of a MSO process vessel with dedicated off-gas treatment, a salt recycle system, feed preparation equipment, and equipment for preparing ceramic final waste forms. In this paper we describe the integrated system and discuss its capabilities as well as preliminary process demonstration data. A primary purpose of these demonstrations is to identify the most suitable waste streams and waste types for MSO treatment.

  3. Principles of Inorganic Materials Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalena, John N.; Cleary, David

    2005-04-01

    A unique interdisciplinary approach to inorganic materials design Textbooks intended for the training of chemists in the inorganic materials field often omit many relevant topics. With its interdisciplinary approach, this book fills that gap by presenting concepts from chemistry, physics, materials science, metallurgy, and ceramics in a unified treatment targeted towards the chemistry audience. Semiconductors, metal alloys and intermetallics, as well as ceramic substances are covered. Accordingly, the book should also be useful to students and working professionals in a variety of other disciplines. This book discusses a number of topics that are pertinent to the design of new inorganic materials but are typically not covered in standard solid-state chemistry books. The authors start with an introduction to structure at the mesoscopic level and progress to smaller-length scales. Next, detailed consideration is given to both phenomenological and atomistic-level descriptions of transport properties, the metal-nonmetal transition, magnetic and dielectric properties, optical properties, and mechanical properties. Finally, the authors present introductions to phase equilibria, synthesis, and nanomaterials. Other features include: Worked examples demonstrating concepts unfamiliar to the chemist Extensive references to related literature, leading readers to more in-depth coverage of particular topics Biographies introducing the reader to great contributors to the field of inorganic materials science in the twentieth century With their interdisciplinary approach, the authors have set the groundwork for communication and understanding among professionals in varied disciplines who are involved with inorganic materials engineering. Armed with this publication, students and researchers in inorganic and physical chemistry, physics, materials science, and engineering will be better equipped to face today's complex design challenges. This textbook is appropriate for senior

  4. Global inorganic source of atmospheric bromine.

    PubMed

    Enami, S; Vecitis, C D; Cheng, J; Hoffmann, M R; Colussi, A J

    2007-09-13

    A few bromine molecules per trillion (ppt) causes the complete destruction of ozone in the lower troposphere during polar spring and about half of the losses associated with the "ozone hole" in the stratosphere. Recent field and aerial measurements of the proxy BrO in the free troposphere suggest an even more pervasive global role for bromine. Models, which quantify ozone trends by assuming atmospheric inorganic bromine (Bry) stems exclusively from long-lived bromoalkane gases, significantly underpredict BrO measurements. This discrepancy effectively implies a ubiquitous tropospheric background level of approximately 4 ppt Bry of unknown origin. Here, we report that I- efficiently catalyzes the oxidation of Br- and Cl- in aqueous nanodroplets exposed to ozone, the everpresent atmospheric oxidizer, under conditions resembling those encountered in marine aerosols. Br- and Cl-, which are rather unreactive toward O3 and were previously deemed unlikely direct precursors of atmospheric halogens, are readily converted into IBr2- and ICl2- en route to Br2(g) and Cl2(g) in the presence of I-. Fine sea salt aerosol particles, which are predictably and demonstrably enriched in I- and Br-, are thus expected to globally release photoactive halogen compounds into the atmosphere, even in the absence of sunlight. PMID:17713895

  5. Salt tectonics on Venus

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, C.A.; Amsbury, D.

    1986-05-01

    The discovery of a surprisingly high deuterium/hydrogen ratio on Venus immediately led to the speculation that Venus may have once had a volume of surface water comparable to that of the terrestrial oceans. The authors propose that the evaporation of this putative ocean may have yielded residual salt deposits that formed various terrain features depicted in Venera 15 and 16 radar images. By analogy with models for the total evaporation of the terrestrial oceans, evaporite deposits on Venus should be at least tens to hundreds of meters thick. From photogeologic evidence and in-situ chemical analyses, it appears that the salt plains were later buried by lava flows. On Earth, salt diapirism leads to the formation of salt domes, anticlines, and elongated salt intrusions - features having dimensions of roughly 1 to 100 km. Due to the rapid erosion of salt by water, surface evaporite landforms are only common in dry regions such as the Zagros Mountains of Iran, where salt plugs and glaciers exist. Venus is far drier than Iran; extruded salt should be preserved, although the high surface temperature (470/sup 0/C) would probably stimulate rapid salt flow. Venus possesses a variety of circular landforms, tens to hundreds of kilometers wide, which could be either megasalt domes or salt intrusions colonizing impact craters. Additionally, arcurate bands seen in the Maxwell area of Venus could be salt intrusions formed in a region of tectonic stress. These large structures may not be salt features; nonetheless, salt features should exist on Venus.

  6. PySALT: SALT science pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, S. M.; Still, M.; Schellart, P.; Balona, L.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Kniazev, A.; Kotze, M.; Loaring, N.; Nordsieck, K. H.; Pickering, T. E.; Potter, S.; Romero Colmenero, E.; Vaisanen, P.; Wiliams, T.; Zietsman, E.

    2012-07-01

    The PySALT user package contains the primary reduction and analysis software tools for the SALT telescope. Currently, these tools include basic data reductions for RSS and SALTICAM in both imaging, spectroscopic, and slot modes. Basic analysis software for slot mode data is also provided. These tools are primarily written in python/PyRAF with some additional IRAF code.

  7. Salt splitting using ceramic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, D.E.

    1997-10-01

    Many radioactive aqueous wastes in the DOE complex have high concentrations of sodium that can negatively affect waste treatment and disposal operations. Sodium can decrease the durability of waste forms such as glass and is the primary contributor to large disposal volumes. Waste treatment processes such as cesium ion exchange, sludge washing, and calcination are made less efficient and more expensive because of the high sodium concentrations. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City UT) are developing an electrochemical salt splitting process based on inorganic ceramic sodium (Na), super-ionic conductor (NaSICON) membranes that shows promise for mitigating the impact of sodium. In this process, the waste is added to the anode compartment, and an electrical potential is applied to the cell. This drives sodium ions through the membrane, but the membrane rejects most other cations (e.g., Sr{sup +2}, Cs{sup +}). The charge balance in the anode compartment is maintained by generating H{sup +} from the electrolysis of water. The charge balance in the cathode is maintained by generating OH{sup {minus}}, either from the electrolysis of water or from oxygen and water using an oxygen cathode. The normal gaseous products of the electrolysis of water are oxygen at the anode and hydrogen at the cathode. Potentially flammable gas mixtures can be prevented by providing adequate volumes of a sweep gas, using an alternative reductant or destruction of the hydrogen as it is generated. As H{sup +} is generated in the anode compartment, the pH drops. The process may be operated with either an alkaline (pH>12) or an acidic anolyte (pH <1). The benefits of salt splitting using ceramic membranes are (1) waste volume reduction and reduced chemical procurement costs by recycling of NaOH; and (2) direct reduction of sodium in process streams, which enhances subsequent operations such as cesium ion exchange, calcination, and vitrification.

  8. Inorganic Fullerenes, Onions, and Tubes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Andrew P. E.

    2004-01-01

    Buckminsterfullerene, which is in the shape of a soccer-ball was first discovered in 1985, has many applications as a good lubricant, or as a new superconductor. The synthesis of these inorganic fullerenes involves a great deal of interdisciplinary research between physicists, material scientists, engineers and chemists from various fields.

  9. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Provides a collection of data on the mechanistic aspects of inorganic chemical reactions. Wherever possible includes procedures for classroom demonstration or student project work. The material covered includes gas phase reactions, reactions in solution, mechanisms of electron transfer, the reaction between iron III and iodine, and hydrolysis. (GS)

  10. Low-salt diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... away from foods that are always high in salt. Some common ones are: Processed foods, such as cured or smoked meats, bacon, hot dogs, sausage, bologna, ham, and salami ... salt with other seasonings. Pepper, garlic, herbs, and lemon ...

  11. The fluids in salt.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of fluid inclusions in salt, the geological processes through which these fluids evolve, and the possible problems such inclusions pose for nuclear waste disposal in salt beds or domes are reviewed.-J.A.Z.

  12. What Are Bath Salts?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are bath salts becoming more popular? Marsha Lopez Hi, Lauren. Nope! Actually quite the opposite! This family ... and how dangerous for your body? Michelle Rankin Hi ParkerPanella - Bath salts are drugs known as synthetic ...

  13. Utah: Salt Lake Region

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Winter and Summer Views of the Salt Lake Region     View Larger Image Magnificent views of the region surrounding Salt Lake City, Utah are captured in these winter and summer images from the ...

  14. Molten salt electrolyte separator

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    A molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication.

  15. Pesticide Removal from Aqueous Solutions by Adding Salting Out Agents

    PubMed Central

    Moscoso, Fátima; Deive, Francisco J.; Esperança, José M. S. S.; Rodríguez, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Phase segregation in aqueous biphasic systems (ABS) composed of four hydrophilic ionic liquids (ILs): 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium methylsulfate and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium methylsulfate (CnC1im C1SO4, n = 2 and 4), tributylmethyl phosphonium methylsulfate (P4441 C1SO4) and methylpyridinium methylsulfate (C1Py C1SO4) and two high charge density potassium inorganic salts (K2CO3 and K2HPO4) were determined by the cloud point method at 298.15 K. The influence of the addition of the selected inorganic salts to aqueous mixtures of ILs was discussed in the light of the Hofmeister series and in terms of molar Gibbs free energy of hydration. The effect of the alkyl chain length of the cation on the methylsulfate-based ILs has been investigated. All the solubility data were satisfactorily correlated to several empirical equations. A pesticide (pentachlorophenol, PCP) extraction process based on the inorganic salt providing a greater salting out effect was tackled. The viability of the proposed process was analyzed in terms of partition coefficients and extraction efficiencies. PMID:24145747

  16. Molten salt technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lovering, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    In this volume, the historical background, scope, problems, economics, and future applications of molten salt technologies are discussed. Topics presented include molten salts in primary production of aluminum, general principles and handling and safety of the alkali metals, first-row transition metals, group VIII metals and B-group elements, solution electrochemistry, transport phenomena, corrosion in different molten salts, cells with molten salt electrolytes and reactants, fuel cell design, hydrocracking and liquefaction, heat storage in phase change materials, and nuclear technologies.

  17. Retrospective salt tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.P.A.

    1996-12-31

    The conceptual breakthroughs in understanding salt tectonics can be recognized by reviewing the history of salt tectonics, which divides naturally into three parts: the pioneering era, the fluid era, and the brittle era. The pioneering era (1856-1933) featured the search for a general hypothesis of salt diapirism, initially dominated by bizarre, erroneous notions of igneous activity, residual islands, in situ crystallization, osmotic pressures, and expansive crystallization. Gradually data from oil exploration constrained speculation. The effects of buoyancy versus orogeny were debated, contact relations were characterized, salt glaciers were discovered, and the concepts of downbuilding and differential loading were proposed as diapiric mechanisms. The fluid era (1933-{approximately}1989) was dominated by the view that salt tectonics resulted from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in which a dense fluid overburden having negligible yield strength sinks into a less dense fluid salt layer, displacing it upward. Density contrasts, viscosity contrasts, and dominant wavelengths were emphasized, whereas strength and faulting of the overburden were ignored. During this era, palinspastic reconstructions were attempted; salt upwelling below thin overburdens was recognized; internal structures of mined diapirs were discovered; peripheral sinks, turtle structures, and diapir families were comprehended; flow laws for dry salt were formulated; and contractional belts on divergent margins and allochthonous salt sheets were recognized. The 1970s revealed the basic driving force of salt allochthons, intrasalt minibasins, finite strains in diapirs, the possibility of thermal convection in salt, direct measurement of salt glacial flow stimulated by rainfall, and the internal structure of convecting evaporites and salt glaciers. The 1980`s revealed salt rollers, subtle traps, flow laws for damp salt, salt canopies, and mushroom diapirs.

  18. Salting Constants of Small Organic Molecules in Aerosol-Relevant Salts and Application to Aerosol Formation in the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxman, E.; Carlton, A. M. G.; Ziemann, P. J.; Volkamer, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from small water-soluble molecules such as glyoxal and methyl glyoxal is a topic of emerging interest. Results from recent field campaigns, e.g. Waxman et al. (2013, GRL) and Knote et al. (2014, ACP), show that these molecules can form significant SOA mass as a result of 'salting-in'. Salting-in happens when a molecule's solubility increases with salt concentration and salting-out is the reverse. Salting effects modify the solubility exponentially with increasing salt concentration, and thus the effective Henry's law constant can strongly modify partitioning, and multiphase chemical reaction rates in aerosol water. Moreover, the solubility in aerosol water cannot easily inferred based on the solubility in cloud water, as the salting effects could change the solubility by a factor of 104 or more. In this work, we have devised and applied a novel experimental setup to measure salting constants using an ion trap mass spectrometer. We focus on small, water soluble molecules like methyl glyoxal and similar compounds and measure salting constants for aerosol-relevant salts including ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, and sodium chloride. The Setschenow salting-constant values are then used to parameterize the effects of salting in CMAQ. We present a series of sensitivity studies of the effects that inorganic aerosols have on the SOA formation from small soluble molecules in the southeastern United States.

  19. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  20. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  1. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  2. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  3. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  4. Recent advances in inorganic materials for LDI-MS analysis of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Shi, C Y; Deng, C H

    2016-05-10

    In this review, various inorganic materials were summarized for the analysis of small molecules by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). Due to its tremendous advantages, such as simplicity, high speed, high throughput, small analyte volumes and tolerance towards salts, LDI-MS has been widely used in various analytes. During the ionization process, a suitable agent is required to assist the ionization, such as an appropriate matrix for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). However, it is normally difficult to analyze small molecules with the MALDI technique because conventional organic matrices may produce matrix-related peaks in the low molecular-weight region, which limits the detection of small molecules (m/z < 700 Da). Therefore, more and more inorganic materials, including carbon-based materials, silicon-based materials and metal-based materials, have been developed to assist the ionization of small molecules. These inorganic materials can transfer energy and improve the ionization efficiency of analytes. In addition, functionalized inorganic materials can act as both an adsorbent and an agent in the enrichment and ionization of small molecules. In this review, we mainly focus on present advances in inorganic materials for the LDI-MS analysis of small molecules in the last five years, which contains the synthetic protocols of novel inorganic materials and the detailed results achieved by inorganic materials. On the other hand, this review also summarizes the application of inorganic materials as adsorbents in the selective enrichment of small molecules, which provides a new field for the application of inorganic materials.

  5. INORGANIC PYROPHOSPHATASE OF DESULFOVIBRIO DESULFURICANS.

    PubMed

    AKAGI, J M; CAMPBELL, L L

    1963-09-01

    Akagi, J. M. (University of Illinois, Urbana) and L. Leon Campbell. Inorganic pyrophosphatase of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. J. Bacteriol. 86:563-568. 1963.-The inorganic pyrophosphatase of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was purified 136-fold by (NH(4))(2)SO(4) and ethanol fractionation and diethylaminoethyl cellulose chromatography. Mg(++) or Mn(++) was required for optimal activity; Co(++) was only 65% as effective as Mg(++). The optimal ratio of Mg(++) to pyrophosphate was 1.0 at pH 8.0. The K(s) for the pyrophosphatase was found to be in the region of 1.9 x 10(-3)m. Sulfhydryl inhibitors and sodium fluoride had no effect on enzyme activity at a concentration of 10(-3)m. The purified enzyme did not hydrolyze adenosine triphosphate, glycerol phosphate, diphenyl phosphate, or p-nitrophenyl phosphate. Thermal stability studies showed that the enzyme is rapidly inactivated at temperatures above 40 C. PMID:14066437

  6. Gas separations using inorganic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Egan, B.Z.; Singh, S.P.N. ); Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E.; White, D.E. )

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the results from a research and development program to develop, fabricate, and evaluate inorganic membranes for separating gases at high temperatures and pressures in hostile process environments encountered in fossil energy conversion processes such as coal gasification. The primary emphasis of the research was on the separation and recovery of hydrogen from synthesis gas. Major aspects of the program included assessment of the worldwide research and development activity related to gas separations using inorganic membranes, identification and selection of candidate membrane materials, fabrication and characterization of membranes using porous membrane technology developed at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, and evaluation of the separations capability of the fabricated membranes in terms of permeabilities and fluxes of gases.

  7. Removal of uranium from spent salt from the moltensalt oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, L.; Hsu, P. C.; Holtz, E. V.; Hipple, D.; Wang, F.; Adamson, M.

    1997-03-01

    Molten salt oxidation (MSO) is a thermal process that has the capability of destroying organic constituents of mixed wastes, hazardous wastes, and energetic materials. In this process, combustible waste and air are introduced into the molten sodium carbonate salt. The organic constituents of the waste materials are oxidized to carbon dioxide and water, while most of the inorganic constituents, including toxic metals, minerals, and radioisotopes, are retained in the molten salt bath. As these impurities accumulate in the salt, the process efficiency drops and the salt must be replaced. An efficient process is needed to separate these toxic metals, minerals, and radioisotopes from the spent carbonate to avoid generating a large volume of secondary waste. Toxic metals such as cadmium, chromium, lead, and zinc etc. are removed by a method described elsewhere. This paper describes a separation strategy developed for radioisotope removal from the mixed spent salt, as well as experimental results, as part of the spent salt cleanup. As the MSO system operates, inorganic products resulting from the reaction of halides, sulfides, phosphates, metals and radionuclides with carbonate accumulate in the salt bath. These must be removed to prevent complete conversion of the sodium carbonate, which would result in eventual losses of destruction efficiency and acid scrubbing capability. There are two operational modes for salt removal: (1) during reactor operation a slip-stream of molten salt is continuously withdrawn with continuous replacement by carbonate, or (2) the spent salt melt is discharged completely and the reactor then refilled with carbonate in batch mode. Because many of the metals and/or radionuclides captured in the salt are hazardous and/or radioactive, spent salt removed from the reactor would create a large secondary waste stream without further treatment. A spent salt clean up/recovery system is necessary to segregate these materials and minimize the amount of

  8. Hybrid polymer-inorganic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomogailo, Anatolii D.

    2000-01-01

    Approaches to the preparation of organic-inorganic nanocomposites are considered from a unified viewpoint for the first time. The major problems in the development of this new line of research in materials technology, which has arisen on the border of the science of polymers, colloid chemistry and physical chemistry of the ultradisperse state, are discussed. The main methods for the formation of composite materials and polymer-inorganic cross-linked hybrids with interpenetrating networks are analysed. Primary attention is given to sol-gel procedures for their preparation, including template processes, which occur under conditions of strict stereochemical orientation of reactants, intercalation of monomers and polymers into porous and layered matrices and their intracrystalline and post-intercalation transformations. Methods for the synthesis and properties of metallopolymeric polymolecular Langmuir-Blodgett films, which are peculiar supramolecular ensembles incorporating nanosized metal-containing particles, are discussed. The generality of the processes of formation of organic-inorganic nanocomposites in living and nonliving natural objects is demonstrated and the major fields of application of nanocomposites are considered. The bibliography includes 566 references.

  9. Modeling the surface tension of complex, reactive organic-inorganic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwier, A. N.; Viglione, G. A.; Li, Z.; McNeill, V. Faye

    2013-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosols can contain thousands of organic compounds which impact aerosol surface tension, affecting aerosol properties such as heterogeneous reactivity, ice nucleation, and cloud droplet formation. We present new experimental data for the surface tension of complex, reactive organic-inorganic aqueous mixtures mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Each solution contained 2-6 organic compounds, including methylglyoxal, glyoxal, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, oxalic acid, succinic acid, leucine, alanine, glycine, and serine, with and without ammonium sulfate. We test two semi-empirical surface tension models and find that most reactive, complex, aqueous organic mixtures which do not contain salt are well described by a weighted Szyszkowski-Langmuir (S-L) model which was first presented by Henning et al. (2005). Two approaches for modeling the effects of salt were tested: (1) the Tuckermann approach (an extension of the Henning model with an additional explicit salt term), and (2) a new implicit method proposed here which employs experimental surface tension data obtained for each organic species in the presence of salt used with the Henning model. We recommend the use of method (2) for surface tension modeling of aerosol systems because the Henning model (using data obtained from organic-inorganic systems) and Tuckermann approach provide similar modeling results and goodness-of-fit (χ2) values, yet the Henning model is a simpler and more physical approach to modeling the effects of salt, requiring less empirically determined parameters.

  10. Modeling the surface tension of complex, reactive organic-inorganic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwier, A. N.; Viglione, G. A.; Li, Z.; McNeill, V. F.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols can contain thousands of organic compounds which impact aerosol surface tension, affecting aerosol properties such as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) ability. We present new experimental data for the surface tension of complex, reactive organic-inorganic aqueous mixtures mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Each solution contained 2-6 organic compounds, including methylglyoxal, glyoxal, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, oxalic acid, succinic acid, leucine, alanine, glycine, and serine, with and without ammonium sulfate. We test two surface tension models and find that most reactive, complex, aqueous organic mixtures which do not contain salt are well-described by a weighted Szyszkowski-Langmuir (S-L) model which was first presented by Henning et al. (2005). Two approaches for modeling the effects of salt were tested: (1) the Tuckermann approach (an extension of the Henning model with an additional explicit salt term), and (2) a new implicit method proposed here which employs experimental surface tension data obtained for each organic species in the presence of salt used with the Henning model. We recommend the use of method (2) for surface tension modeling because the Henning model (using data obtained from organic-inorganic systems) and Tuckermann approach provide similar modeling fits and goodness of fit (χ2) values, yet the Henning model is a simpler and more physical approach to modeling the effects of salt, requiring less empirically determined parameters.

  11. Inorganics

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, M.

    1986-01-01

    This comprehensive handbook is valuable when doing routine analysis or developing new methods of chromatography of organic materials. Section I presents the principles, techniques, quantitative determinations and detection methods used in chromatographic analysis. In the major part of the book, Section II summarizes data in voluminous tabular/graphic form on paper, thin layer, liquid and gas chromatography. Section III lists important books on electrophoresis, gel permeation chromatography, and ion exchange, in addition to the other forms of chromatography mentioned above.

  12. Photochemistry of triarylsulfonium salts

    SciTech Connect

    Dektar, J.L.; Hacker, N.P. )

    1990-08-01

    The photolysis of triphenylsulfonium, tris(4-methylphenyl)sulfonium, tris(4-chlorophenyl)sulfonium, several monosubstituted (4-F, 4-Cl, 4-Me, 4-MeO, 4-PhS, and 4-PhCO), and disubstituted (4,4{prime}-Me{sub 2} and 4,4{prime}-(MeO){sub 2}) triphenylsulfonium salts was examined in solution. It was found that direct irradiation of triphenylsulfonium salts produced new rearrangement products, phenylthiobiphenyls, along with diphenyl sulfide, which had been previously reported. Similarly, the triarylsulfonium salts, with the exception of the (4-(phenylthio)phenyl)diphenylsulfonium salts produced new rearrangement products, phenylthiobiphenyls, along with diphenyl sulfide, which had been previously reported. Similarly, the triarylsulfonium salts, with the exception of the (4-(phenylthio)phenyl)diphenylsulfonium salts, gave the new rearrangement products. The mechanism for direct photolysis is proposed to occur from the singlet excited states to give a predominant heterolytic cleavage along with some homolytic cleavage.

  13. Organic-inorganic nanostructures for luminescent indication in the near-infrared range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratenko, T. S.; Ovchinnikov, O. V.; Grevtseva, I. G.; Smirnov, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    Amplifying and quenching of IR luminescence of colloidal Ag2S quantum dots were revealed to take place when they couple to organic dye molecules of 3,3'-di-(γ-sulfopropyl)-9-ethyl-4,5,4',5'-dibenzothiacarbocyanine betaine and erytrosine pyridinium salts, respectively. The observed effects are explained as due to the formation of organic-inorganic heterostructures with different mutual arrangement of electronic states of the dyes and the quantum dots.

  14. A history of salt.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, M; Capasso, G; Di Leo, V A; De Santo, N G

    1994-01-01

    The medical history of salt begins in ancient times and is closely related to different aspects of human history. Salt may be extracted from sea water, mineral deposits, surface encrustations, saline lakes and brine springs. In many inland areas, wood was used as a fuel source for evaporation of brine and this practice led to major deafforestation in central Europe. Salt played a central role in the economies of many regions, and is often reflected in place names. Salt was also used as a basis for population censuses and taxation, and salt monopolies were practised in many states. Salt was sometimes implicated in the outbreak of conflict, e.g. the French Revolution and the Indian War of Independence. Salt has also been invested with many cultural and religious meanings, from the ancient Egyptians to the Middle Ages. Man's innate appetite for salt may be related to his evolution from predominantly vegetarian anthropoids, and it is noteworthy that those people who live mainly on protein and milk or who drink salty water do not generally salt their food, whereas those who live mainly on vegetables, rice and cereals use much more salt. Medicinal use tended to emphasize the positive aspects of salt, e.g. prevention of putrefaction, reduction of tissue swelling, treatment of diarrhea. Evidence was also available to ancient peoples of its relationship to fertility, particularly in domestic animals. The history of salt thus represents a unique example for studying the impact of a widely used dietary substance on different important aspects of man's life, including medical philosophy.

  15. Iodised salt is safe.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, S

    1995-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorders are prevalent in all the States and Union Territories in India. Under the National Iodine Deficiency Disorders control programme, the Government of India has adopted a strategy to iodisation of all edible salt in the country which is a long term and sustainable preventive solution to eliminate iodine deficiency disorders. The benefits to be derived from universal salt iodisation are more to the population. Iodised salt is safe and does not cause any side effect. PMID:8690505

  16. Dosimetry using silver salts

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.

    2003-06-24

    The present invention provides a method for detecting ionizing radiation. Exposure of silver salt AgX to ionizing radiation results in the partial reduction of the salt to a mixture of silver salt and silver metal. The mixture is further reduced by a reducing agent, which causes the production of acid (HX) and the oxidized form of the reducing agent (R). Detection of HX indicates that the silver salt has been exposed to ionizing radiation. The oxidized form of the reducing agent (R) may also be detected. The invention also includes dosimeters employing the above method for detecting ionizing radiation.

  17. Inorganic Components of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wexler, Anthony Stein

    The inorganic components comprise 15% to 50% of the mass of atmospheric aerosols. For about the past 10 years the mass of these components was predicted assuming thermodynamic equilibrium between the volatile aerosol -phase inorganic species NH_4NO _3 and NH_4Cl and their gas-phase counterparts NH_3, HNO_3, and HCl. In this thesis I examine this assumption and prove that (1) the time scales for equilibration between the gas and aerosol phases are often too long for equilibrium to hold, and (2) even when equilibrium holds, transport considerations often govern the size distribution of these aerosol components. Water can comprise a significant portion of atmospheric aerosols under conditions of high relative humidity, whereas under conditions of sufficiently low relative humidity atmospheric aerosols tend to be dry. The deliquescence point is the relative humidity where the aerosol goes from a solid dry phase to an aqueous or mixed solid-aqueous phase. In this thesis I derive the temperature dependence of the deliquescence point and prove that in multicomponent solutions the deliquescence point is lower than for corresponding single component solutions. These theories of the transport, thermodynamic, and deliquescent properties of atmospheric aerosols are integrated into an aerosol inorganics model, AIM. The predictions of AIM compare well to fundamental thermodynamic measurements. Comparison of the prediction of AIM to those of other aerosol equilibrium models shows substantial disagreement in the predicted water content at lower relative humidities. The disagreement is due the improved treatment in AIM of the deliquescence properties of multicomponent solutions. In the summer and fall of 1987 the California Air Resources Board conducted the Southern California Air Quality Study, SCAQS, during which atmospheric aerosols were measured in Los Angeles. The size and composition of the aerosol and the concentrations of their gas phase counterparts were measured. When the

  18. Plasma chemistry for inorganic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, O.

    1980-01-01

    Practical application of plasma chemistry to the development of inorganic materials using both low temperature and warm plasmas are summarized. Topics cover: the surface nitrification and oxidation of metals; chemical vapor deposition; formation of minute oxide particles; the composition of oxides from chloride vapor; the composition of carbides and nitrides; freezing high temperature phases by plasma arc welding and plasma jet; use of plasma in the development of a substitute for petroleum; the production of silicon for use in solar cell batteries; and insulating the inner surface of nuclear fusion reactor walls.

  19. Inorganic Nanoparticles in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sanjib; Kudgus, Rachel A.; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukherjee, Priyabrata

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an evolving field with enormous potential for biomedical applications. The growing interest to use inorganic nanoparticles in medicine is due to the unique size and shape-dependent optoelectronic properties. Herein, we will focus on gold, silver and platinum nanoparticles, discussing recent developments for therapeutic applications with regard to cancer in terms of nanoparticles being used as a delivery vehicle as well as therapeutic agents. We will also discuss some of the key challenges to be addressed in future studies. PMID:21104301

  20. The inorganic constituents of echinoderms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, F.W.; Wheeler, W.C.

    1915-01-01

    In a recent paper on the composition of crinoid skeletons we showed that crinoids contain large quantities of magnesia, and that its proportion varies with the temperature of the water in which the creatures live. This result was so novel and surprising that it seemed desirable to examine other echinoderms and to ascertain whether they showed the same characteristics and regularity. A number of sea urchins and starfishes were therefore studied, their inorganic constituents being analyzed in the same manner as those of the crinoids

  1. Effects of Salt Stress on Three Ecologically Distinct Plantago Species

    PubMed Central

    Al Hassan, Mohamad; Pacurar, Andrea; López-Gresa, María P.; Donat-Torres, María P.; Llinares, Josep V.; Boscaiu, Monica; Vicente, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Comparative studies on the responses to salt stress of taxonomically related taxa should help to elucidate relevant mechanisms of stress tolerance in plants. We have applied this strategy to three Plantago species adapted to different natural habitats, P. crassifolia and P. coronopus–both halophytes–and P. major, considered as salt-sensitive since it is never found in natural saline habitats. Growth inhibition measurements in controlled salt treatments indicated, however, that P. major is quite resistant to salt stress, although less than its halophytic congeners. The contents of monovalent ions and specific osmolytes were determined in plant leaves after four-week salt treatments. Salt-treated plants of the three taxa accumulated Na+ and Cl- in response to increasing external NaCl concentrations, to a lesser extent in P. major than in the halophytes; the latter species also showed higher ion contents in the non-stressed plants. In the halophytes, K+ concentration decreased at moderate salinity levels, to increase again under high salt conditions, whereas in P. major K+ contents were reduced only above 400 mM NaCl. Sorbitol contents augmented in all plants, roughly in parallel with increasing salinity, but the relative increments and the absolute values reached did not differ much in the three taxa. On the contrary, a strong (relative) accumulation of proline in response to high salt concentrations (600–800 mM NaCl) was observed in the halophytes, but not in P. major. These results indicate that the responses to salt stress triggered specifically in the halophytes, and therefore the most relevant for tolerance in the genus Plantago are: a higher efficiency in the transport of toxic ions to the leaves, the capacity to use inorganic ions as osmotica, even under low salinity conditions, and the activation, in response to very high salt concentrations, of proline accumulation and K+ transport to the leaves of the plants. PMID:27490924

  2. Effects of Salt Stress on Three Ecologically Distinct Plantago Species.

    PubMed

    Al Hassan, Mohamad; Pacurar, Andrea; López-Gresa, María P; Donat-Torres, María P; Llinares, Josep V; Boscaiu, Monica; Vicente, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Comparative studies on the responses to salt stress of taxonomically related taxa should help to elucidate relevant mechanisms of stress tolerance in plants. We have applied this strategy to three Plantago species adapted to different natural habitats, P. crassifolia and P. coronopus-both halophytes-and P. major, considered as salt-sensitive since it is never found in natural saline habitats. Growth inhibition measurements in controlled salt treatments indicated, however, that P. major is quite resistant to salt stress, although less than its halophytic congeners. The contents of monovalent ions and specific osmolytes were determined in plant leaves after four-week salt treatments. Salt-treated plants of the three taxa accumulated Na+ and Cl- in response to increasing external NaCl concentrations, to a lesser extent in P. major than in the halophytes; the latter species also showed higher ion contents in the non-stressed plants. In the halophytes, K+ concentration decreased at moderate salinity levels, to increase again under high salt conditions, whereas in P. major K+ contents were reduced only above 400 mM NaCl. Sorbitol contents augmented in all plants, roughly in parallel with increasing salinity, but the relative increments and the absolute values reached did not differ much in the three taxa. On the contrary, a strong (relative) accumulation of proline in response to high salt concentrations (600-800 mM NaCl) was observed in the halophytes, but not in P. major. These results indicate that the responses to salt stress triggered specifically in the halophytes, and therefore the most relevant for tolerance in the genus Plantago are: a higher efficiency in the transport of toxic ions to the leaves, the capacity to use inorganic ions as osmotica, even under low salinity conditions, and the activation, in response to very high salt concentrations, of proline accumulation and K+ transport to the leaves of the plants.

  3. Effects of Salt Stress on Three Ecologically Distinct Plantago Species.

    PubMed

    Al Hassan, Mohamad; Pacurar, Andrea; López-Gresa, María P; Donat-Torres, María P; Llinares, Josep V; Boscaiu, Monica; Vicente, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Comparative studies on the responses to salt stress of taxonomically related taxa should help to elucidate relevant mechanisms of stress tolerance in plants. We have applied this strategy to three Plantago species adapted to different natural habitats, P. crassifolia and P. coronopus-both halophytes-and P. major, considered as salt-sensitive since it is never found in natural saline habitats. Growth inhibition measurements in controlled salt treatments indicated, however, that P. major is quite resistant to salt stress, although less than its halophytic congeners. The contents of monovalent ions and specific osmolytes were determined in plant leaves after four-week salt treatments. Salt-treated plants of the three taxa accumulated Na+ and Cl- in response to increasing external NaCl concentrations, to a lesser extent in P. major than in the halophytes; the latter species also showed higher ion contents in the non-stressed plants. In the halophytes, K+ concentration decreased at moderate salinity levels, to increase again under high salt conditions, whereas in P. major K+ contents were reduced only above 400 mM NaCl. Sorbitol contents augmented in all plants, roughly in parallel with increasing salinity, but the relative increments and the absolute values reached did not differ much in the three taxa. On the contrary, a strong (relative) accumulation of proline in response to high salt concentrations (600-800 mM NaCl) was observed in the halophytes, but not in P. major. These results indicate that the responses to salt stress triggered specifically in the halophytes, and therefore the most relevant for tolerance in the genus Plantago are: a higher efficiency in the transport of toxic ions to the leaves, the capacity to use inorganic ions as osmotica, even under low salinity conditions, and the activation, in response to very high salt concentrations, of proline accumulation and K+ transport to the leaves of the plants. PMID:27490924

  4. Phases and Phase Changes of Mixed Organic/Inorganic Model Systems of Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolli, C.; Krieger, U. K.; Zardini, A. A.; Zobrist, B.; Zuend, A.; Luo, B. P.; Peter, T.

    2006-12-01

    Knowledge of the physical state of tropospheric aerosols is important for an adequate description of cloud formation, heterogeneous and multiphase chemistry, and the aerosol's radiative properties. We will present and discuss laboratory experiments on bulk aerosol model mixtures and micron-sized particles consisting of polyols, polyethylene glycol or dicarboxylic acids mixed with ammonium sulfate. Depending on the exact composition and relative humidity, these mixtures form liquid-one-phase or two-phase systems plus additional solid phases. Whilst the organic matter in ambient aerosols is expected to be predominantly present in the form of liquid or amorphous phases, the inorganic salts may still undergo deliquescence and efflorescence as a function of relative humidity. Moreover, they may induce phase separations into a predominantly organic and an inorganic aqueous phase. In the absence of solid phases, the water uptake and release of the investigated micron-sized particles was usually well described by the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) approach. However, this model became inaccurate when solid phases were present. Moreover, it is not able to account for liquid-liquid phase separations due to the salting-out effects of the investigated inorganic salts. While most organics participate in liquid phases some organic substances are abundant enough in the particles to form crystalline solids that might act as ice nuclei. We show that this is the case for oxalic acid.

  5. Selected hydrologic data from the vicinity of Rayburns and Vacherie salt domes, northern Louisiana salt-dome basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryals, G.N.; Hosman, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is considering salt domes in northern Louisiana as possible sites for storage of nuclear waste. As part of this National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program, the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a regional study of the geohydrology of the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin. Field studies involving the collection of data began in 1977. Data-collection networks were established for both ground- and surface- water sources, primarily in the vicinity of two salt domes, Rayburns and Vacherie. Groundwater data collection involved measuring water levels and sampling existing production wells and test wells drilled by the Louisiana State University for Environmental Studies. Samples were analyzed for one or more of the following categories of chemical constituents: inorganic, trace metal, and radiochemical. A network of surface-water stations was set up for measuring discharge and collecting periodic samples. Initial sampling was for analysis for inorganic chemical constituents and radioactive elements. Subsequent sampling has been for inorganic chemical constituents. (USGS)

  6. Inorganic Phosphor Materials for Lighting.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan-Chih; Karlsson, Maths; Bettinelli, Marco

    2016-04-01

    This chapter addresses the development of inorganic phosphor materials capable of converting the near UV or blue radiation emitted by a light emitting diode to visible radiation that can be suitably combined to yield white light. These materials are at the core of the new generation of solid-state lighting devices that are emerging as a crucial clean and energy saving technology. The chapter introduces the problem of white light generation using inorganic phosphors and the structure-property relationships in the broad class of phosphor materials, normally containing lanthanide or transition metal ions as dopants. Radiative and non-radiative relaxation mechanisms are briefly described. Phosphors emitting light of different colors (yellow, blue, green, and red) are described and reviewed, classifying them in different chemical families of the host (silicates, phosphates, aluminates, borates, and non-oxide hosts). This research field has grown rapidly and is still growing, but the discovery of new phosphor materials with optimized properties (in terms of emission efficiency, chemical and thermal stability, color, purity, and cost of fabrication) would still be of the utmost importance. PMID:27573146

  7. Biodegradable and Renal Clearable Inorganic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ehlerding, Emily B.; Chen, Feng; Cai, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Personalized treatment plans for cancer therapy have been at the forefront of oncology research for many years. With the advent of many novel nanoplatforms, this goal is closer to realization today than ever before. Inorganic nanoparticles hold immense potential in the field of nano-oncology, but have considerable toxicity concerns that have limited their translation to date. In this review, an overview of emerging biologically safe inorganic nanoplatforms is provided, along with considerations of the challenges that need to be overcome for cancer theranostics with inorganic nanoparticles to become a reality. The clinical and preclinical studies of both biodegradable and renal clearable inorganic nanoparticles are discussed, along with their implications. PMID:27429897

  8. Biodegradable and Renal Clearable Inorganic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ehlerding, Emily B.

    2015-01-01

    Personalized treatment plans for cancer therapy have been at the forefront of oncology research for many years. With the advent of many novel nanoplatforms, this goal is closer to realization today than ever before. Inorganic nanoparticles hold immense potential in the field of nano‐oncology, but have considerable toxicity concerns that have limited their translation to date. In this review, an overview of emerging biologically safe inorganic nanoplatforms is provided, along with considerations of the challenges that need to be overcome for cancer theranostics with inorganic nanoparticles to become a reality. The clinical and preclinical studies of both biodegradable and renal clearable inorganic nanoparticles are discussed, along with their implications. PMID:27429897

  9. Progress in Studying Salt Secretion from the Salt Glands in Recretohalophytes: How Do Plants Secrete Salt?

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fang; Leng, Bingying; Wang, Baoshan

    2016-01-01

    To survive in a saline environment, halophytes have evolved many strategies to resist salt stress. The salt glands of recretohalophytes are exceptional features for directly secreting salt out of a plant. Knowledge of the pathway(s) of salt secretion in relation to the function of salt glands may help us to change the salt-tolerance of crops and to cultivate the extensive saline lands that are available. Recently, ultrastructural studies of salt glands and the mechanism of salt secretion, particularly the candidate genes involved in salt secretion, have been illustrated in detail. In this review, we summarize current researches on salt gland structure, salt secretion mechanism and candidate genes involved, and provide an overview of the salt secretion pathway and the asymmetric ion transport of the salt gland. A new model recretohalophyte is also proposed. PMID:27446195

  10. SALT for Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bancroft, W. Jane

    1996-01-01

    Discusses Schuster's Suggestive-Accelerative Learning Techniques (SALT) Method, which combines Lozanov's Suggestopedia with such American methods as Asher's Total Physical Response and Galyean's Confluent Education. The article argues that students trained with the SALT Method have higher achievement scores and better attitudes than others. (14…

  11. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  12. Utah: Salt Lake City

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... backdrops for the 2002 Winter Olympics, to be held in Salt Lake City, Utah. The mountains surrounding Salt Lake City are renowned for ... western edge of the Rocky Mountains and eastern rim of the Great Basin. This early-winter image pair was acquired by the Multi-angle ...

  13. Molten salt electrolyte separator

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-09

    The patent describes a molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication. 5 figs.

  14. Integrated Salt Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, Janos L.; Kukla, Peter A.

    2015-04-01

    The growing importance of salt in the energy, subsurface storage, and chemical and food industries also increases the challenges with prediction of geometries, kinematics, stress and transport in salt. This requires an approach, which integrates a broader range of knowledge than is traditionally available in the different scientific and engineering disciplines. We aim to provide a starting point for a more integrated understanding of salt, by presenting an overview of the state of the art in a wide range of salt-related topics, from (i) the formation and metamorphism of evaporites, (ii) rheology and transport properties, (iii) salt tectonics and basin evolution, (iv) internal structure of evaporites, (v) fluid flow through salt, to (vi) salt engineering. With selected case studies we show how integration of these domains of knowledge can bring better predictions of (i) sediment architecture and reservoir distribution, (ii) internal structure of salt for optimized drilling and better cavern design, (iii) reliable long-term predictions of deformations and fluid flow in subsurface storage. A fully integrated workflow is based on geomechanical models, which include all laboratory and natural observations and links macro- and micro-scale studies. We present emerging concepts for (i) the initiation dynamics of halokinesis, (ii) the rheology and deformation of the evaporites by brittle and ductile processes, (iii) the coupling of processes in evaporites and the under- and overburden, and (iv) the impact of the layered evaporite rheology on the structural evolution.

  15. Infrared Spectra of Simple Inorganic Ion Pairs in Solid Solution: A Physical Inorganic Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Philip J.; Tong, William G.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a physical inorganic experiment in which large single crystals of the alkali halides doped with divalent ion impurities are prepared easily. Demonstrates the ion pairing of inorganic ions in solid solution. (CS)

  16. Effect of hydrotropic salts on phase relationships involving hydrocarbons, water, and alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, P. C.; Kraus, K. A.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrotropic salts, which can increase the solubility of organic materials in aqueous solutions, are useful to tertiary oil recovery. We have examined effects on solubility of hydrocarbons in water (with and without alcohols) through addition of inorganic hydrotropic salts, such as perchlorates, thiocyanates, and iodides - high in the usual Hofmeister series - and of organic salts such as short chain alkyl benzene sulfonates and other salts based on substituted benzene derivatives. Although the inorganic salts are relatively ineffective in increasing solubility of hydrocarbons in water, many of the organic salts are excellent hydrotropic agents for hydrocarbons. We have examined the phase relationships for several series of aromatic salts such as sulfonates, carboxylates and hydroxycarboxylates, as a function of alkyl-carbon substitution in three-component (hydrocarbon, salt, water) and in four-component (hydrocarbon, salt, alcohol, water) systems. We have also examined miscibility relationships for a given hydrotropic salt as the chain length of alkanes and alkyl benzenes is systematically varied. While miscibilities decrease with increase in chain length of the hydrocarbon, the hydrotropic properties in these systems increase rapidly with the number of alkyl carbons on the benzene ring of the salts and they are relatively insensitive to the type of charged group (sulfonate vs carboxylate) attached to the benzene ring. However, there were significant increases in hydrotropy as one goes from equally substituted sulfonates or carboxylates to salicylates. A number of salts have been identified which have much greater hydrotropic properties for hydrocarbons than such well-known hydrotropic materials as toluene and xylene sulfonates.

  17. [Salt and cancer].

    PubMed

    Strnad, Marija

    2010-05-01

    Besides cardiovascular disease, a high salt intake causes other adverse health effects, i.e., gastric and some other cancers, obesity (risk factor for many cancer sites), Meniere's disease, worsening of renal disease, triggering an asthma attack, osteoporosis, exacerbation of fluid retention, renal calculi, etc. Diets containing high amounts of food preserved by salting and pickling are associated with an increased risk of cancers of the stomach, nose and throat. Because gastric cancer is still the most common cancer in some countries (especially in Japan), its prevention is one of the most important aspects of cancer control strategy. Observations among Japanese immigrants in the U.S.A. and Brazil based on the geographic differences, the trend in cancer incidence with time, and change in the incidence patterns indicate that gastric cancer is closely associated with dietary factors such as the intake of salt and salted food. The findings of many epidemiological studies suggest that high dietary salt intake is a significant risk factor for gastric cancer and this association was found to be strong in the presence of Helicobacter (H.) pylori infection with atrophic gastritis. A high-salt intake strips the lining of the stomach and may make infection with H. pylori more likely or may exacerbate the infection. Salting, pickling and smoking are traditionally popular ways of preparing food in Japan and some parts of Asia. In addition to salt intake, cigarette smoking and low consumption of fruit and vegetables increase the risk of stomach cancer. However, it is not known whether it is specifically the salt in these foods or a combination of salt and other chemicals that can cause cancer. One study identified a mutagen in nitrite-treated Japanese salted fish, and chemical structure of this mutagen suggests that it is derived from methionine and that salt and nitrite are precursors for its formation. Working under conditions of heat stress greatly increased the workers

  18. Multiple DNA architectures with the participation of inorganic metal ions.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guangcheng; Dong, Renhao; Gao, Xuedong; Wang, Dong; Feng, Lei; Song, Shasha; Dong, Shuli; Song, Aixin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2014-09-10

    Here we develop a synthetic protocol for assembling DNA with participating metal ions into multiple shapes. DNA molecules first form coordination complexes with metal ions and these coordination complexes become nucleation sites for primary crystals of metal inorganic salt, and then elementary units of space-filling architectures based on specific geometry form, and finally elementary units assemble into variously larger multiple architectures according to different spatial configurations. We anticipate that our strategy for self-assembling various custom architectures is applicable to most biomolecules possessing donor atoms that can form coordination complexes with metal ions. These multiple architectures provide a general platform for the engineering and assembly of advanced materials possessing features on the micrometer scale and having novel activity.

  19. Inorganic Metal Oxide/Organic Polymer Nanocomposites And Method Thereof

    DOEpatents

    Gash, Alexander E.; Satcher, Joe H.; Simpson, Randy

    2004-11-16

    A synthetic method for preparation of hybrid inorganic/organic energetic nanocomposites is disclosed herein. The method employs the use of stable metal in organic salts and organic solvents as well as an organic polymer with good solubility in the solvent system to produce novel nanocomposite energetic materials. In addition, fuel metal powders (particularly those that are oxophilic) can be incorporated into composition. This material has been characterized by thermal methods, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), N.sub.2 adsoprtion/desorption methods, and Fourier-Transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy. According to these characterization methods the organic polymer phase fills the nanopores of the material, providing superb mixing of the component phases in the energetic nanocomposite.

  20. Reference repository design concept for bedded salt

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, D.W.; Martin, R.W.

    1980-10-08

    A reference design concept is presented for the subsurface portions of a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. General geologic, geotechnical, hydrologic and geochemical data as well as descriptions of the physical systems are provided for use on generic analyses of the pre- and post-sealing performance of repositories in this geologic medium. The geology of bedded salt deposits and the regional and repository horizon stratigraphy are discussed. Structural features of salt beds including discontinuities and dissolution features are presented and their effect on repository performance is discussed. Seismic hazards and the potential effects of earthquakes on underground repositories are presented. The effect on structural stability and worker safety during construction from hydrocarbon and inorganic gases is described. Geohydrologic considerations including regional hydrology, repository scale hydrology and several hydrological failure modes are presented in detail as well as the hydrological considerations that effect repository design. Operational phase performance is discussed with respect to operations, ventilation system, shaft conveyances, waste handling and retrieval systems and receival rates of nuclear waste. Performance analysis of the post sealing period of a nuclear repository is discussed, and parameters to be used in such an analysis are presented along with regulatory constraints. Some judgements are made regarding hydrologic failure scenarios. Finally, the design and licensing process, consistent with the current licensing procedure is described in a format that can be easily understood.

  1. Integrated demonstration of molten salt oxidation with salt recycle for mixed waste treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P.C.

    1997-11-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal, nonflame process that has the inherent capability of completely destroying organic constituents of mixed wastes, hazardous wastes, and energetic materials while retaining inorganic and radioactive constituents in the salt. For this reason, MSO is considered a promising alternative to incineration for the treatment of a variety of organic wastes. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has prepared a facility and constructed an integrated pilot-scale MSO treatment system in which tests and demonstrations are performed under carefully controlled (experimental) conditions. The system consists of a MSO processor with dedicated off-gas treatment, a salt recycle system, feed preparation equipment, and equipment for preparing ceramic final waste forms. This integrated system was designed and engineered based on laboratory experience with a smaller engineering-scale reactor unit and extensive laboratory development on salt recycle and final forms preparation. In this paper we present design and engineering details of the system and discuss its capabilities as well as preliminary process demonstration data. A primary purpose of these demonstrations is identification of the most suitable waste streams and waste types for MSO treatment.

  2. Inorganic compounds for passive solar energy storage: Solid-state dehydration materials and high specific heat materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struble, L. J.; Brown, P. W.

    1986-04-01

    Two classes of hydrated inorganic salts have been studied to assess their potential as materials for passive solar energy storage. The materials are part of the quaternary system CaO-Al2O3-SO3-H2O and related chemical systems, and the two classes are typified by ettringite, a trisubstituted salt, and Friedel's salt, a monosubstituted salt. The trisubstituted salts were studied for their possible application in latent heat storage, utilizing a low-temperature dehydration reaction, and both classes were studies for their application in sensible heat storage. In order to assess their potential for energy storage, the salts have been synthesized, characterized by several analytical techniques, and thermal properties measured. The dehydration data of that the trisubstituted salts vary somewhat with chemical composition, with the temperature of the onset of dehydration ranging from 6(0)C to 33(0)C, and enthalpy changes on dehydration ranging from 60 to 200 cal/g. Heat capacity is less variable with composition; values for the trisubstituted phases are 30 cal/g/(0)C and for the monosubstituted phases between 0.23 and 0.28 cal/g/(0)C. Preliminary experiments indicate that the dehydration is reversible, and suggest that the materials might have additional potential as solar desiccant materials. These thermal data demonstrate the trisubstituted salts have potential as latent heat storage materials, and that both classes of salts have potential as sensible heat storage materials.

  3. Water purification using organic salts

    DOEpatents

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  4. Inorganic polyphosphates in extremophiles and their possible functions.

    PubMed

    Orell, Alvaro; Navarro, Claudio A; Rivero, Matías; Aguilar, Juan S; Jerez, Carlos A

    2012-07-01

    Many extremophilic microorganisms are polyextremophiles, being confronted with more than one stress condition. For instance, some thermoacidophilic microorganisms are in addition capable to resist very high metal concentrations. Most likely, they have developed special adaptations to thrive in their living environments. Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is a molecule considered to be primitive in its origin and ubiquitous in nature. It has many roles besides being a reservoir for inorganic phosphate and energy. Of special interest are those functions related to survival under stressing conditions in all kinds of cells. PolyP may therefore have a fundamental part in extremophilic microorganism's endurance. Evidence for a role of polyP in the continued existence under acidic conditions, high concentrations of toxic heavy metals and elevated salt concentrations are reviewed in the present work. Actual evidence suggests that polyP may provide mechanistic alternatives in tuning microbial fitness for the adaptation under stressful environmental situations and may be of crucial relevance amongst extremophiles. The enzymes involved in polyP metabolism show structure conservation amongst bacteria and archaea. However, the lack of a canonical polyP synthase in Crenarchaea, which greatly accumulate polyP, strongly suggests that in this phylum a different enzyme may be in charge of its synthesis.

  5. Electrodialysis-ion exchange for the separation of dissolved salts

    SciTech Connect

    Baroch, C.J.; Grant, P.J.

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy generates and stores a significant quantity of low level, high level, and mixed wastes. As some of the DOE facilities are decontaminated and decommissioned, additional and possibly different forms of wastes will be generated. A significant portion of these wastes are aqueous streams containing acids, bases, and salts, or are wet solids containing inorganic salts. Some of these wastes are quite dilute solutions, whereas others contain large quantities of nitrates either in the form of dissolved salts or acids. Many of the wastes are also contaminated with heavy metals, radioactive products, or organics. Some of these wastes are in storage because a satisfactory treatment and disposal processes have not been developed. There is considerable interest in developing processes that remove or destroy the nitrate wastes. Electrodialysis-Ion Exchange (EDIX) is a possible process that should be more cost effective in treating aqueous waste steams. This report describes the EDIX process.

  6. Electrodialysis-ion exchange for the separation of dissolved salts

    SciTech Connect

    Baroch, C.J.; Grant, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Department of Energy generates and stores a significant quantity of low level, high level, and mixed wastes. As some of the DOE facilities are decontaminated and decommissioned, additional and possibly different forms of wastes will be generated. A significant portion of these wastes are aqueous streams containing acids, bases, and salts, or are wet solids containing inorganic salts. Some of these wastes are quite dilute solutions, whereas others contain large quantities of nitrates either in the form of dissolved salts or acids. Many of the wastes are also contaminated with heavy metals, radioactive products, or organics. Some of these wastes are in storage because a satisfactory treatment and disposal processes have not been developed. This report describes the process of electrodialysis-ion exchange (EDIX) for treating aqueous wastes streams consisting of nitrates, sodium, organics, heavy metals, and radioactive species.

  7. Salt-induced aggregation of lysozyme: Implications for crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Lori J.

    1994-01-01

    Crystallization of proteins is a prerequisite for structural analysis by x-ray crystallography. While improvements in protein crystals have been obtained in microgravity onboard the U.S. Space Shuttle, attempts to improve the crystal growth process both on the ground and in space have been limited by our lack of understanding of the mechanisms involved. Almost all proteins are crystallized with the aid of a precipitating agent. Many of the common precipitating agents are inorganic salts. An understanding of the role of salts on the aggregation of protein monomers is the key to the elucidation of the mechanisms involved in protein crystallization. In order for crystallization to occur individual molecules must self-associate into aggregates. Detection and characterization of aggregates in supersaturated protein solutions is the first step in understanding salt-induced crystallization.

  8. Crushed Salt Constitutive Model

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, G.D.

    1999-02-01

    The constitutive model used to describe the deformation of crushed salt is presented in this report. Two mechanisms -- dislocation creep and grain boundary diffusional pressure solution -- are combined to form the basis for the constitutive model governing the deformation of crushed salt. The constitutive model is generalized to represent three-dimensional states of stress. Upon complete consolidation, the crushed-salt model reproduces the Multimechanism Deformation (M-D) model typically used for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) host geological formation salt. New shear consolidation tests are combined with an existing database that includes hydrostatic consolidation and shear consolidation tests conducted on WIPP and southeastern New Mexico salt. Nonlinear least-squares model fitting to the database produced two sets of material parameter values for the model -- one for the shear consolidation tests and one for a combination of the shear and hydrostatic consolidation tests. Using the parameter values determined from the fitted database, the constitutive model is validated against constant strain-rate tests. Shaft seal problems are analyzed to demonstrate model-predicted consolidation of the shaft seal crushed-salt component. Based on the fitting statistics, the ability of the model to predict the test data, and the ability of the model to predict load paths and test data outside of the fitted database, the model appears to capture the creep consolidation behavior of crushed salt reasonably well.

  9. Inorganic dual-layer microporous supported membranes

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Tsai, Chung-Yi; Lu, Yungfeng

    2003-03-25

    The present invention provides for a dual-layer inorganic microporous membrane capable of molecular sieving, and methods for production of the membranes. The inorganic microporous supported membrane includes a porous substrate which supports a first inorganic porous membrane having an average pore size of less than about 25 .ANG. and a second inorganic porous membrane coating the first inorganic membrane having an average pore size of less than about 6 .ANG.. The dual-layered membrane is produced by contacting the porous substrate with a surfactant-template polymeric sol, resulting in a surfactant sol coated membrane support. The surfactant sol coated membrane support is dried, producing a surfactant-templated polymer-coated substrate which is calcined to produce an intermediate layer surfactant-templated membrane. The intermediate layer surfactant-templated membrane is then contacted with a second polymeric sol producing a polymeric sol coated substrate which is dried producing an inorganic polymeric coated substrate. The inorganic polymeric coated substrate is then calcined producing an inorganic dual-layered microporous supported membrane in accordance with the present invention.

  10. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are...

  15. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  16. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  17. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  18. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  19. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  20. 46 CFR 153.1045 - Inorganic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inorganic acids. 153.1045 Section 153.1045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING... § 153.1045 Inorganic acids. When Table 1 refers to this section, the person in charge of cargo...

  1. 46 CFR 153.1045 - Inorganic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inorganic acids. 153.1045 Section 153.1045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING... § 153.1045 Inorganic acids. When Table 1 refers to this section, the person in charge of cargo...

  2. 46 CFR 153.1045 - Inorganic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inorganic acids. 153.1045 Section 153.1045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING... § 153.1045 Inorganic acids. When Table 1 refers to this section, the person in charge of cargo...

  3. 46 CFR 153.1045 - Inorganic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inorganic acids. 153.1045 Section 153.1045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING... § 153.1045 Inorganic acids. When Table 1 refers to this section, the person in charge of cargo...

  4. 46 CFR 153.1045 - Inorganic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inorganic acids. 153.1045 Section 153.1045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING... § 153.1045 Inorganic acids. When Table 1 refers to this section, the person in charge of cargo...

  5. Stimulation of a Primary Taste Receptor by Salts

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David R.; Mellon, DeForest

    1962-01-01

    A quantitative study was made of the repetitive response of the salt receptor cell of the blowfly taste receptor. The response begins at a high frequency and declines to a steady frequency during brief stimuli. The initial response was found to be a sigmoid function of the log of stimulus intensity over a short range of intensities. It was shown that a theory (Beidler, 1954; for mammalian salt receptors) that relates the magnitude of the steady response to stimulus intensity applies to this receptor. From the theory, it was calculated that the relative free energy change of the reaction between salt and receptor site was in the range 0 to -1 kcal/mole; and, therefore, the reaction probably involves weak physical forces. Evidence is given that the salt-combining sites of the receptor are anionic and strongly acidic and that consequently the cation of a salt largely dominates stimulation. Preliminary evidence suggests that the receptor has a high degree of specificity toward salts, being stimulated primarily by monovalent inorganic cations. PMID:13890972

  6. Bath salt intoxication causing acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Regunath, Hariharan; Ariyamuthu, Venkatesh Kumar; Dalal, Pranavkumar; Misra, Madhukar

    2012-10-01

    Traditional bath salts contain a combination of inorganic salts like Epsom salts, table salt, baking soda, sodium metaphosphate, and borax that have cleansing properties. Since 2010, there have been rising concerns about a new type of substance abuse in the name of "bath salts." They are beta-ketone amphetamine analogs and are derivates of cathinone, a naturally occurring amphetamine analog found in the "khat" plant (Catha edulis). Effects reported with intake included increased energy, empathy, openness, and increased libido. Serious adverse effects reported with intoxication included cardiac, psychiatric, and neurological signs and symptoms. Not much is known about the toxicology and metabolism of these compounds. They inhibit monoamine reuptake (dopamine, nor epinephrine, etc.) and act as central nervous system stimulants with high additive and abuse potential because of their clinical and biochemical similarities to effects from use of cocaine, amphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine. Deaths associated with use of these compounds have also been reported. We report a case of acute kidney injury associated with the use of "bath salt" pills that improved with hemodialysis. PMID:23036036

  7. Bath salt intoxication causing acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Regunath, Hariharan; Ariyamuthu, Venkatesh Kumar; Dalal, Pranavkumar; Misra, Madhukar

    2012-10-01

    Traditional bath salts contain a combination of inorganic salts like Epsom salts, table salt, baking soda, sodium metaphosphate, and borax that have cleansing properties. Since 2010, there have been rising concerns about a new type of substance abuse in the name of "bath salts." They are beta-ketone amphetamine analogs and are derivates of cathinone, a naturally occurring amphetamine analog found in the "khat" plant (Catha edulis). Effects reported with intake included increased energy, empathy, openness, and increased libido. Serious adverse effects reported with intoxication included cardiac, psychiatric, and neurological signs and symptoms. Not much is known about the toxicology and metabolism of these compounds. They inhibit monoamine reuptake (dopamine, nor epinephrine, etc.) and act as central nervous system stimulants with high additive and abuse potential because of their clinical and biochemical similarities to effects from use of cocaine, amphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine. Deaths associated with use of these compounds have also been reported. We report a case of acute kidney injury associated with the use of "bath salt" pills that improved with hemodialysis.

  8. Molten salt pyrolysis of latex. [synthetic hydrocarbon fuel production using the Guayule shrub

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, A. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Latex-rich plants such as Guayule or extracts thereof are pyrolyzed in an inert nitrogen atmosphere inorganic salt melts such as a LiCl/KCl eutectic at a temperature of about 500 C. The yield is over 60% of a highly aromatic, combustible hydrocarbon oil suitable for use as a synthetic liquid fuel.

  9. Measured and Modeled Humidification Factors of Fresh Smoke Particles From Biomass Burning: Role of Inorganic Constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, Jenny L.; Day, Derek E.; McMeeking, Gavin M.; Levin, Ezra; Carrico, Christian M.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Malm, William C.; Laskin, Alexander; Desyaterik, Yury

    2010-07-09

    During the 2006 FLAME study (Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiment), laboratory burns of biomass fuels were performed to investigate the physico-chemical, optical, and hygroscopic properties of fresh biomass smoke. As part of the experiment, two nephelometers simultaneously measured dry and humidified light scattering coefficients (bsp(dry) and bsp(RH), respectively) in order to explore the role of relative humidity (RH) on the optical properties of biomass smoke aerosols. Results from burns of several biomass fuels showed large variability in the humidification factor (f(RH) = bsp(RH)/bsp(dry)). Values of f(RH) at RH=85-90% ranged from 1.02 to 2.15 depending on fuel type. We incorporated measured chemical composition and size distribution data to model the smoke hygroscopic growth to investigate the role of inorganic and organic compounds on water uptake for these aerosols. By assuming only inorganic constituents were hygroscopic, we were able to model the water uptake within experimental uncertainty, suggesting that inorganic species were responsible for most of the hygroscopic growth. In addition, humidification factors at 85-90% RH increased for smoke with increasing inorganic salt to carbon ratios. Particle morphology as observed from scanning electron microscopy revealed that samples of hygroscopic particles contained soot chains either internally or externally mixed with inorganic potassium salts, while samples of weak to non-hygroscopic particles were dominated by soot and organic constituents. This study provides further understanding of the compounds responsible for water uptake by young biomass smoke, and is important for accurately assessing the role of smoke in climate change studies and visibility regulatory efforts.

  10. Measured and modeled humidification factors of fresh smoke particles from biomass burning: role of inorganic constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, J. L.; Day, D. E.; McMeeking, G. M.; Levin, E. J. T.; Carrico, C. M.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Malm, W. C.; Laskin, A.; Desyaterik, Y.

    2010-02-01

    During the 2006 FLAME study (Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiment), laboratory burns of biomass fuels were performed to investigate the physico-chemical, optical, and hygroscopic properties of fresh biomass smoke. As part of the experiment, two nephelometers simultaneously measured dry and humidified light scattering coefficients (bsp(dry) and bsp(RH), respectively) in order to explore the role of relative humidity (RH) on the optical properties of biomass smoke aerosols. Results from burns of several biomass fuels showed large variability in the humidification factor (f(RH)=bsp(RH)/bsp(dry)). Values of f(RH) at RH=85-90% ranged from 1.02 to 2.15 depending on fuel type. We incorporated measured chemical composition and size distribution data to model the smoke hygroscopic growth to investigate the role of inorganic and organic compounds on water uptake for these aerosols. By assuming only inorganic constituents were hygroscopic, we were able to model the water uptake within experimental uncertainty, suggesting that inorganic species were responsible for most of the hygroscopic growth. In addition, humidification factors at 85-90% RH increased for smoke with increasing inorganic salt to carbon ratios. Particle morphology as observed from scanning electron microscopy revealed that samples of hygroscopic particles contained soot chains either internally or externally mixed with inorganic potassium salts, while samples of weak to non-hygroscopic particles were dominated by soot and organic constituents. This study provides further understanding of the compounds responsible for water uptake by young biomass smoke, and is important for accurately assessing the role of smoke in climate change studies and visibility regulatory efforts.

  11. Measured and modeled humidification factors of fresh smoke particles from biomass burning: role of inorganic constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, J. L.; Day, D. E.; McMeeking, G. M.; Levin, E. J. T.; Carrico, C. M.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Malm, W. C.; Laskin, A.; Desyaterik, Y.

    2010-07-01

    During the 2006 FLAME study (Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiment), laboratory burns of biomass fuels were performed to investigate the physico-chemical, optical, and hygroscopic properties of fresh biomass smoke. As part of the experiment, two nephelometers simultaneously measured dry and humidified light scattering coefficients (bsp(dry) and bsp(RH), respectively) in order to explore the role of relative humidity (RH) on the optical properties of biomass smoke aerosols. Results from burns of several biomass fuels from the west and southeast United States showed large variability in the humidification factor (f(RH)=bsp(RH)/bsp(dry)). Values of f(RH) at RH=80-85% ranged from 0.99 to 1.81 depending on fuel type. We incorporated measured chemical composition and size distribution data to model the smoke hygroscopic growth to investigate the role of inorganic compounds on water uptake for these aerosols. By assuming only inorganic constituents were hygroscopic, we were able to model the water uptake within experimental uncertainty, suggesting that inorganic species were responsible for most of the hygroscopic growth. In addition, humidification factors at 80-85% RH increased for smoke with increasing inorganic salt to carbon ratios. Particle morphology as observed from scanning electron microscopy revealed that samples of hygroscopic particles contained soot chains either internally or externally mixed with inorganic potassium salts, while samples of weak to non-hygroscopic particles were dominated by soot and organic constituents. This study provides further understanding of the compounds responsible for water uptake by young biomass smoke, and is important for accurately assessing the role of smoke in climate change studies and visibility regulatory efforts.

  12. Cooking without salt

    MedlinePlus

    ... flavor and nutrition. Plant-based foods -- carrots, spinach, apples, and peaches -- are naturally salt-free. Sun-dried ... types of pepper, including black, white, green, and red. Experiment with vinegars (white and red wine, rice ...

  13. Molten salt electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, U.F.; Williamson, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this work is to develop preparation and clean-up processes for the fuel and carrier salt used in the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology molten salt nuclear system. The front-end or fuel preparation process focuses on the removal of fission products, uranium, and zirconium from spent nuclear fuel by utilizing electrochemical methods. The same method provide the separation of the transition metal fission products at the back end of the fuel cycle. Molten salts provide a natural medium for the separation of actinides and fission products from one another because they are robust, radiation resistant solvents that can be recycled. The presentation will describe the design of the electrochemistry system, the method used for salt purification, and results of preliminary experiments.

  14. Shaking the Salt Habit

    MedlinePlus

    ... use the pepper shaker or mill. Add fresh lemon juice instead of salt to season fish and ... soups, salads, vegetables, tomatoes, potatoes Ginger: Chicken, fruits Lemon juice: Lean meats, fish, poultry, salads, vegetables Mace: ...

  15. Amine salts of nitroazoles

    DOEpatents

    Kienyin Lee; Stinecipher, M.M.

    1993-10-26

    Compositions of matter, a method of providing chemical energy by burning said compositions, and methods of making said compositions are described. These compositions are amine salts of nitroazoles. 1 figure.

  16. Electrodialysis technology for salt recovery from aluminum salt cake

    SciTech Connect

    Hryn, J. N.; Krumdick, G.; Graziano, D.; Sreenivasarao, K.

    2000-02-02

    Electrodialysis technology for recovering salt from aluminum salt cake is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. Salt cake, a slag-like aluminum-industry waste stream, contains aluminum metal, salt (NaCl and KCl), and nonmetallics (primarily aluminum oxide). Salt cake can be recycled by digesting with water and filtering to recover the metal and oxide values. A major obstacle to widespread salt cake recycling is the cost of recovering salt from the process brine. Electrodialysis technology developed at Argonne appears to be a cost-effective approach to handling the salt brines, compared to evaporation or disposal. In Argonne's technology, the salt brine is concentrated until salt crystals are precipitated in the electrodialysis stack; the crystals are recovered downstream. The technology is being evaluated on the pilot scale using Eurodia's EUR 40-76-5 stack.

  17. Mass transport in bedded salt and salt interbeds

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y.; Pigford, T.H.; Chambre, P.L.; Lee, W.W.L.

    1989-08-01

    Salt is the proposed host rock for geologic repositories of nuclear waste in several nations because it is nearly dry and probably impermeable. Although experiments and experience at potential salt sites indicate that salt may contain brine, the low porosity, creep, and permeability of salt make it still a good choice for geologic isolation. In this paper we summarize several mass-transfer and transport analyses of salt repositories. The mathematical details are given in our technical reports.

  18. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Salt Lake City, Utah, will host the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The city is located on the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake and sits to the west of the Wasatch Mountains, which rise more than 3,500 meters (10,000 feet) above sea level. The city was first settled in 1847 by pioneers seeking relief from religious persecution. Today Salt Lake City, the capital of Utah, is home to more than 170,000 residents. This true-color image of Salt Lake City was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard Landsat 7, on May 26, 2000. The southeastern tip of the Great Salt Lake is visible in the upper left of the image. The furrowed green and brown landscape running north-south is a portion of the Wasatch Mountains, some of which are snow-capped (white pixels). The greyish pixels in the center of the image show the developed areas of the city. A number of water reservoirs can be seen east of the mountain range. Salt Lake City International Airport is visible on the northwestern edge of the city. About 20 miles south of the airport is the Bingham Canyon Copper Mine (tan pixels), the world's largest open pit excavation. See also this MODIS image of Utah. Image courtesy NASA Landsat7 Science Team and USGS Eros Data Center

  19. Shape control of inorganic nanoparticles from solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhaohui; Yang, Shuanglei; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic materials with controllable shapes have been an intensely studied subject in nanoscience over the past decades. Control over novel and anisotropic shapes of inorganic nanomaterials differing from those of bulk materials leads to unique and tunable properties for widespread applications such as biomedicine, catalysis, fuels or solar cells and magnetic data storage. This review presents a comprehensive overview of shape-controlled inorganic nanomaterials via nucleation and growth theory and the control of experimental conditions (including supersaturation, temperature, surfactants and secondary nucleation), providing a brief account of the shape control of inorganic nanoparticles during wet-chemistry synthetic processes. Subsequently, typical mechanisms for shape-controlled inorganic nanoparticles and the general shape of the nanoparticles formed by each mechanism are also expounded. Furthermore, the differences between similar mechanisms for the shape control of inorganic nanoparticles are also clearly described. The authors envision that this review will provide valuable guidance on experimental conditions and process control for the synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles with tunable shapes in the solution state.

  20. Inorganic constituents in American lignites

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M. E.; Jenkins, R. G.; Walker, P. L.

    1980-04-01

    Both the discrete mineral phases and the ion-exchangeable inorganic components of lignites from Texas, North Dakota, and Montana have been studied. The ion-exchangeable cations and the carboxyl groups with which they are associated were characterized by ion exchange methods utilizing ammonium acetate and barium acetate, respectively. Na, K, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba were found to be present in all three coals. It was found that Ca and Mg were the most abundant cations and that 40 to 60% of the carboxyl groups in the raw coals were exchanged with cations. Also, significant variations in the relative and absolute concentrations of all the cations were observed. The discrete mineral phases in these lignites were studied by semiquantitative x-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. The importance of the cations in this analysis was shown when the mineralogical analyses of the low temperature ash of the coals with the cations removed and the raw coals were compared. Results show that up to 50% of the low temperature ash of these raw coals can be attributed to the existence of metal cations and that fixation of sulfur, carbon, and oxygen to form sulfates and carbonates is the major reason for this contribution.

  1. The quest for inorganic fullerenes

    DOE PAGES

    Pietsch, Susanne; Dollinger, Andreas; Strobel, Christoph H.; Park, Eun Ji; Ganteför, Gerd; Seo, Hyun Ook; Kim, Young Dok; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2015-10-02

    Experimental results of the search for inorganic fullerenes are presented. Mo nSm - and WnSm - clusters are generated with a pulsed arc cluster ion source equipped with an annealing stage. This is known to enhance fullerene formation in the case of carbon. Analogous to carbon, the mass spectra of the metal chalcogenide clusters produced in this way exhibit a bimodal structure. Moreover, the species in the first maximum at low mass are known to be platelets. The structure of the species in the second maximum is studied by anion photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and scanning tunneling microcopy.more » All experimental results indicate a two-dimensional structure of these species and disagree with a three-dimensional fullerene-like geometry. A possible explanation for this preference of two-dimensional structures is the ability of a two-element material to saturate the dangling bonds at the edges of a platelet by excess atoms of one element. A platelet consisting of a single element only cannot do this. Likewise, graphite and boron might be the only materials forming nano-spheres because they are the only single element materials assuming two-dimensional structures.« less

  2. The quest for inorganic fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Pietsch, Susanne; Dollinger, Andreas; Strobel, Christoph H.; Park, Eun Ji; Ganteför, Gerd; Seo, Hyun Ook; Kim, Young Dok; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2015-10-02

    Experimental results of the search for inorganic fullerenes are presented. Mo nSm - and WnSm - clusters are generated with a pulsed arc cluster ion source equipped with an annealing stage. This is known to enhance fullerene formation in the case of carbon. Analogous to carbon, the mass spectra of the metal chalcogenide clusters produced in this way exhibit a bimodal structure. Moreover, the species in the first maximum at low mass are known to be platelets. The structure of the species in the second maximum is studied by anion photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and scanning tunneling microcopy. All experimental results indicate a two-dimensional structure of these species and disagree with a three-dimensional fullerene-like geometry. A possible explanation for this preference of two-dimensional structures is the ability of a two-element material to saturate the dangling bonds at the edges of a platelet by excess atoms of one element. A platelet consisting of a single element only cannot do this. Likewise, graphite and boron might be the only materials forming nano-spheres because they are the only single element materials assuming two-dimensional structures.

  3. The quest for inorganic fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, Susanne; Dollinger, Andreas; Strobel, Christoph H.; Park, Eun Ji; Ganteför, Gerd; Seo, Hyun Ook; Kim, Young Dok; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2015-10-01

    Experimental results of the search for inorganic fullerenes are presented. MonSm- and WnSm- clusters are generated with a pulsed arc cluster ion source equipped with an annealing stage. This is known to enhance fullerene formation in the case of carbon. Analogous to carbon, the mass spectra of the metal chalcogenide clusters produced in this way exhibit a bimodal structure. The species in the first maximum at low mass are known to be platelets. Here, the structure of the species in the second maximum is studied by anion photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and scanning tunneling microcopy. All experimental results indicate a two-dimensional structure of these species and disagree with a three-dimensional fullerene-like geometry. A possible explanation for this preference of two-dimensional structures is the ability of a two-element material to saturate the dangling bonds at the edges of a platelet by excess atoms of one element. A platelet consisting of a single element only cannot do this. Accordingly, graphite and boron might be the only materials forming nano-spheres because they are the only single element materials assuming two-dimensional structures.

  4. The quest for inorganic fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Pietsch, Susanne; Dollinger, Andreas; Strobel, Christoph H.; Ganteför, Gerd E-mail: ydkim91@skku.edu; Park, Eun Ji; Kim, Young Dok E-mail: ydkim91@skku.edu; Seo, Hyun Ook; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2015-10-07

    Experimental results of the search for inorganic fullerenes are presented. Mo{sub n}S{sub m}{sup −} and W{sub n}S{sub m}{sup −} clusters are generated with a pulsed arc cluster ion source equipped with an annealing stage. This is known to enhance fullerene formation in the case of carbon. Analogous to carbon, the mass spectra of the metal chalcogenide clusters produced in this way exhibit a bimodal structure. The species in the first maximum at low mass are known to be platelets. Here, the structure of the species in the second maximum is studied by anion photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and scanning tunneling microcopy. All experimental results indicate a two-dimensional structure of these species and disagree with a three-dimensional fullerene-like geometry. A possible explanation for this preference of two-dimensional structures is the ability of a two-element material to saturate the dangling bonds at the edges of a platelet by excess atoms of one element. A platelet consisting of a single element only cannot do this. Accordingly, graphite and boron might be the only materials forming nano-spheres because they are the only single element materials assuming two-dimensional structures.

  5. Inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, M.R.; Tavlarides, L.

    1997-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers are developing a technology that combines metal chelation extraction technology and synthesis chemistry. They begin with a ceramic substrate such as alumina, titanium oxide or silica gel because they provide high surface area, high mechanical strength, and radiolytic stability. One preparation method involves silylation to hydrophobize the surface, followed by chemisorption of a suitable chelation agent using vapor deposition. Another route attaches newly designed chelating agents through covalent bonding by the use of coupling agents. These approaches provide stable and selective, inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs) tailored for removal of metals. The technology has the following advantages over ion exchange: (1) higher mechanical strength, (2) higher resistance to radiation fields, (3) higher selectivity for the desired metal ion, (4) no cation exchange, (5) reduced or no interference from accompanying anions, (6) faster kinetics, and (7) easy and selective regeneration. Target waste streams include metal-containing groundwater/process wastewater at ORNL`s Y-12 Plant (multiple metals), Savannah River Site (SRS), Rocky Flats (multiple metals), and Hanford; aqueous mixed wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); and scrubber water generated at SRS and INEL. Focus Areas that will benefit from this research include Mixed Waste, and Subsurface Contaminants.

  6. What Can We Learn From Laboratory Studies of Inorganic Sea Spray Aerosol?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, M. E.; Zieger, P.; Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Grythe, H.; Kirkevag, A.; Rosati, B.; Riipinen, I.; Nilsson, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2013 we have been operating a temperature-controlled plunging-jet sea spray aerosol chamber at Stockholm University using inorganic artificial seawater. Using size-resolved measurements of the foam bubbles responsible for the aerosol production we were able to show that it is changes to these foam bubbles which drive the observed changes in aerosol production and size distribution as water temperature changes (Salter et al., 2014). Further, by combining size-resolved measurements of aerosol production as a function of water temperature with measurements of air entrainment by the plunging-jet we have developed a temperature-dependent sea spray source function for deployment in large-scale models (Salter et al., 2015). We have also studied the hygroscopicity, morphology, and chemical composition of the inorganic sea spray aerosol produced in the chamber. The sea spray aerosol generated from artificial seawater exhibited lower hygroscopic growth than both pure NaCl and output from the E-AIM aerosol thermodynamics model when all relevant inorganic ions in the sea salt were included. Results from sensitivity tests using a large-scale earth system model suggest that the lower hygroscopicity observed in our laboratory measurements has important implications for calculations of the radiative balance of the Earth. In addition, size-dependent chemical fractionation of several inorganic ions was observed relative to the artificial seawater with potentially important implications for the chemistry of the marine boundary layer. Each of these studies suggest that there is still much to be learned from rigorous experiments using inorganic seawater proxies. Salter et al., (2014), On the seawater temperature dependence of the sea spray aerosol generated by a continuous plunging jet. J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 119, 9052-9072, doi: 10.1002/2013JD021376 Salter et al., (2015), An empirically derived inorganic sea spray source function incorporating sea surface temperature. Atmos

  7. Fundamental Properties of Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Toni Y Gutknecht; Guy L Fredrickson

    2012-11-01

    Thermal properties of molten salt systems are of interest to electrorefining operations, pertaining to both the Fuel Cycle Research & Development Program (FCR&D) and Spent Fuel Treatment Mission, currently being pursued by the Department of Energy (DOE). The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely impacted by the build-up of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided, during electrorefining operations, include (i) fissile elements build up in the salt that might approach the criticality limits specified for the vessel, (ii) electrolyte freezing at the operating temperature of the electrorefiner due to changes in the liquidus temperature, and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution). The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can be monitored by studying the thermal characteristics of the molten salts as a function of impurity concentration. Simulated salt compositions consisting of the selected rare earth and alkaline earth chlorides, with a eutectic mixture of LiCl-KCl as the carrier electrolyte, were studied to determine the melting points (thermal characteristics) using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The experimental data were used to model the liquidus temperature. On the basis of the this data, it became possible to predict a spent fuel treatment processing scenario under which electrorefining could no longer be performed as a result of increasing liquidus temperatures of the electrolyte.

  8. Great Salt Lake, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Gardner, Joe F.

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended as a source of general information and facts about Great Salt Lake, Utah. This U.S. Geological Survey information sheet answers frequently asked questions about Great Salt Lake. Topics include: History, salinity, brine shrimp, brine flies, migratory birds, and recreation. Great Salt Lake, the shrunken remnant of prehistoric Lake Bonneville, has no outlet. Dissolved salts accumulate in the lake by evaporation. Salinity south of the causeway has ranged from 6 percent to 27 percent over a period of 22 years (2 to 7 times saltier than the ocean). The high salinity supports a mineral industry that extracts about 2 million tons of salt from the lake each year. The aquatic ecosystem consists of more than 30 species of organisms. Harvest of its best-known species, the brine shrimp, annually supplies millions of pounds of food for the aquaculture industry worldwide. The lake is used extensively by millions of migratory and nesting birds and is a place of solitude for people. All this occurs in a lake that is located at the bottom of a 35,000-square-mile drainage basin that has a human population of more than 1.5 million.

  9. How Much Inorganic Spectroscopy and Photochemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Harry B.

    1980-01-01

    Describes three levels of courses to treat adequately the ground state electronic structures, the spectroscopy, and the photochemistry of inorganic molecules. Suggests sequences for the courses without repeating material taught in previous courses. (Author/JN)

  10. Inorganic Nanomaterials as Carriers for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shizhu; Hao, Xiaohong; Liang, Xingjie; Zhang, Qun; Zhang, Cuimiao; Zhou, Guoqiang; Shen, Shigang; Jia, Guang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2016-01-01

    For safe and effective therapy, drugs must be delivered efficiently and with minimal systemic side effects. Nanostructured drug carriers enable the delivery of small-molecule drugs as well as nucleic acids and proteins. Inorganic nanomaterials are ideal for drug delivery platforms due to their unique physicochemical properties, such as facile preparation, good storage stability and biocompatibility. Many inorganic nanostructure-based drug delivery platforms have been prepared. Although there are still many obstacles to overcome, significant advances have been made in recent years. This review focuses on the status and development of inorganic nanostructures, including silica, quantum dots, gold, carbon-based and magnetic iron oxide-based nanostructures, as carriers for chemical and biological drugs. We specifically highlight the extensive use of these inorganic drug carriers for cancer therapy. Finally, we discuss the most important areas in the field that urgently require further study. PMID:27301169

  11. Gene delivery by functional inorganic nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Loh, Xian Jun; Lee, Tung-Chun

    2012-08-01

    Gene delivery into cells to elicit cellular response has received a great attention recently. Viruses, lipids, peptides, cationic polymers and certain inorganic nanomaterials have been reported as gene delivery vectors. In this review, we focus on the recent literature on gene delivery using inorganic nanoparticles. This emerging field of study is concisely summarized and illustrated by selected examples and recent patents. New approaches and directions towards the practical use of multifunctional nanocarriers are highlighted.

  12. (Inorganic carbon surveys of oceanic basins)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, R.J.

    1991-04-25

    Measurements were made aboard the F. S. Meteor, along the 19 degree South cruise track of the following chemical parameters: total dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, pCO2, CFC-12, CFC-11, CFC-113, CC14. This was the first cruise of OASD's newly formed CO2 group. The purpose was to survey World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) line A9 for inorganic carbon for the Department of Energy's Office of CO2 Research. 1 fig.

  13. Hygroscopicity of Amine Secondary Aerosol - Mixtures of Organic and Inorganic Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X.; Cocker, D. R.; Purvis-Roberts, K.; Asa-Awuku, A. A.

    2012-12-01

    Aliphatic amines are emitted from both biogenic and anthropogenic sources and contribute to the formation of secondary aerosol in reactions with atmospheric radicals. However, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) ability of amine aerosol has not been explored yet. Here, we study the hygroscopicity of aerosol formed from three aliphatic amines (trimethylamine, diethylamine and butylamine) in the UCR environmental chamber. Amines can react with NO3, a dominant night time oxidant in acid-base and/or oxidation reactions. The mass fraction of organic and inorganic components of formed aerosol was measured by Particle-into-Liquid Sampler coupled to dual ion chromatographs (PILS-ICs) and Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). CCN counter was used to measure the water-uptake ability of these particles. Significantly high hygroscopicity (κ>0.3) was observed for aerosols formed from diethylamine and butylamine with NO3 radicals, which comprised >40% inorganic salt. Compared with amines oxidized by hydroxyl radicals, the presence of aminium salts formed in acid-base reactions greatly improved CCN activity of NO3-initiated aerosol. The effect of water vapor on the formation of aminium salts and aerosol hygroscopicity was also studied. Our results will significantly impact the estimation and role of amines in atmospheric chemistry and global climate models.

  14. Organic-Inorganic Composites Toward Biomaterial Application.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Toshiki; Sugawara-Narutaki, Ayae; Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive ceramics are known to exhibit specific biological affinities and are able to show direct integration with surrounding bone when implanted in bony defects. However, their inadequate mechanical properties, such as low fracture toughness and high Young's modulus in comparison to natural bone, limit their clinical application. Bone is a kind of organic-inorganic composite where apatite nanocrystals are precipitated onto collagen fibre networks. Thus, one way to address these problems is to mimic the natural composition of bone by using bioactive ceramics via material designs based on organic-inorganic composites. In this chapter, the current research on the development of the various organic-inorganic composites designed for biomaterial applications has been reviewed. Various compounds such as calcium phosphate, calcium sulphate and calcium carbonate can be used for the inorganic phases to design composites with the desired mechanical and biological properties of bone. Not only classical mechanical mixing but also coating of the inorganic phase in aqueous conditions is available for the fabrication of such composites. Organic modifications using various polymers enable the control of the crystalline structure of the calcium carbonate in the composites. These approaches on the fabrication of organic-inorganic composites provide important options for biomedical materials with novel functions.

  15. Organic-Inorganic Composites Toward Biomaterial Application.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Toshiki; Sugawara-Narutaki, Ayae; Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive ceramics are known to exhibit specific biological affinities and are able to show direct integration with surrounding bone when implanted in bony defects. However, their inadequate mechanical properties, such as low fracture toughness and high Young's modulus in comparison to natural bone, limit their clinical application. Bone is a kind of organic-inorganic composite where apatite nanocrystals are precipitated onto collagen fibre networks. Thus, one way to address these problems is to mimic the natural composition of bone by using bioactive ceramics via material designs based on organic-inorganic composites. In this chapter, the current research on the development of the various organic-inorganic composites designed for biomaterial applications has been reviewed. Various compounds such as calcium phosphate, calcium sulphate and calcium carbonate can be used for the inorganic phases to design composites with the desired mechanical and biological properties of bone. Not only classical mechanical mixing but also coating of the inorganic phase in aqueous conditions is available for the fabrication of such composites. Organic modifications using various polymers enable the control of the crystalline structure of the calcium carbonate in the composites. These approaches on the fabrication of organic-inorganic composites provide important options for biomedical materials with novel functions. PMID:26201274

  16. Effect of potassium salts and distillery effluent on carbon mineralization in soil.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Suresh; Joshi, H C; Pathak, H; Jain, M C; Kalra, N

    2002-07-01

    Distillery effluent, a rich source of potassium, is used for irrigation at many places in the world. A laboratory experiment was conducted to study the influence of potassium salts present in post-methanation distillery effluent (PME) along with two other salts, KCl and K2SO4, on mineralization of carbon in soil. PME oxidized with H2O2, raw PME, KCl and K2SO4 solutions containing K equivalent to 10%, 20%, 40% and 100% of K present in PME were added to the soil separately, maintaining four replications for each treatment and control. Addition of salts up to a certain concentration stimulated C mineralization but a decline was noticed at higher concentrations. All the levels of salts caused higher CO2 evolution than the control suggesting that the presence of K salts enhanced the microbial activity resulting in increased CO2 evolution. The influence of K2SO4 was significantly higher than KCl in stimulating C mineralization in soil. Oxidized effluent had a higher stimulating effect than inorganic salts, showing the influence of other salts accompanying K in the PME. Raw PME, which contained excess organic C, increased CO2 evolution even at the highest salt level (100% PME) signifying the effect of added C on alleviating the salt stress on microbial activity. PMID:12094803

  17. Mineral resource of the month: salt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kostick, Dennis S.

    2010-01-01

    The article presents information on various types of salt. Rock salt is either found from underground halite deposits or near the surface. Other types of salt include solar salt, salt brine, and vacuum pan salt. The different uses of salt are also given including its use as a flavor enhancer, as a road deicing agent, and to manufacture sodium hydroxide.

  18. Gas releases from salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

    1998-06-01

    The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

  19. Medicinal exploitation of inorganic substances in the Levant in the Medieval and early Ottoman periods.

    PubMed

    Lev, Efraim

    2002-11-01

    Various minerals, metals, clays, and rocks were among the natural medicinal substances used by physicians and pharmacists in early times in different cultures, for example, the ancient civilizations of Egypt and Mesopotamia. Classical physicians such as Hippocrates and Dioscorides mention tens of inorganic medicinal substances in their writings. Many references to minerals and chemicals are also found in the Muslim medical literature of the Eastern and Western Caliphates. The historical research presented in this article focuses on the inorganic substances applied as remedies by the medieval and early Ottoman (7th-17th) inhabitants of the Levant. The article is based upon a literature review covering tens of different historical sources, from the medieval and early Ottoman periods. Relevant information was found in the works of physicians such as al-Tamimi, Benevenutus, Ibn al-Baytar, Daud al-Antaki, and Hayyim Vital. The research revealed evidences of the medicinal uses of fifteen inorganic substances: Alum, Arsenic, Sulphide, Asphalt, Jew's stone, Earth sp., Galena, Haematite, iron, Lead, Pyrite, Salt, Sulphur, Thermal water, Green Vitriol, and Zinc. Inorganic materials comprise 5.2% of the list of medicinal substances. The geographic origin of most of these substances is the Levant, in which two geo-historical centers have been recorded: the Rift Valley and the northern region of the Levant, including upper Galilee, Mount Lebanon and Mount Hermon. A notable tendency to use these substances for treating diseases of the skin, the eyes, the sexual organs, and haemorrhoids was detected. PMID:20329348

  20. The Great Salt Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hassibe, W.R.; Keck, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    The western part of the conterminous United States is often thought of as being a desert without any large bodies of water. In the desert area of western Utah, however, lies Great Salt Lake, which in 1986 covered approximately 2,300 square miles and contained 30 million acre-feet of water (an acre-foot is the amount of water necessary to cover 1 acre of land with water 1 foot in depth or about 326,000 gallons). To emphasize its size, the Great Salt Lake is the largest lake west of the Mississippi River, larger than the states of Rhode Island and Delaware.

  1. Mechanism for salt scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, John J., II

    Salt scaling is superficial damage caused by freezing a saline solution on the surface of a cementitious body. The damage consists of the removal of small chips or flakes of binder. The discovery of this phenomenon in the early 1950's prompted hundreds of experimental studies, which clearly elucidated the characteristics of this damage. In particular it was shown that a pessimum salt concentration exists, where a moderate salt concentration (˜3%) results in the most damage. Despite the numerous studies, the mechanism responsible for salt scaling has not been identified. In this work it is shown that salt scaling is a result of the large thermal expansion mismatch between ice and the cementitious body, and that the mechanism responsible for damage is analogous to glue-spalling. When ice forms on a cementitious body a bi-material composite is formed. The thermal expansion coefficient of the ice is ˜5 times that of the underlying body, so when the temperature of the composite is lowered below the melting point, the ice goes into tension. Once this stress exceeds the strength of the ice, cracks initiate in the ice and propagate into the surface of the cementitious body, removing a flake of material. The glue-spall mechanism accounts for all of the characteristics of salt scaling. In particular, a theoretical analysis is presented which shows that the pessimum concentration is a consequence of the effect of brine pockets on the mechanical properties of ice, and that the damage morphology is accounted for by fracture mechanics. Finally, empirical evidence is presented that proves that the glue-small mechanism is the primary cause of salt scaling. The primary experimental tool used in this study is a novel warping experiment, where a pool of liquid is formed on top of a thin (˜3 mm) plate of cement paste. Stresses in the plate, including thermal expansion mismatch, result in warping of the plate, which is easily detected. This technique revealed the existence of

  2. Multiyear study of the dependence of sea salt aerosol on wind speed and sea ice conditions in the coastal Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, N. W.; Quinn, P. K.; McNamara, S. M.; Pratt, K. A.

    2016-08-01

    Thinning of Arctic sea ice gives rise to ice fracturing and leads (areas of open water surrounded by sea ice) that are a potential source of sea salt aerosol. Atmospheric particle inorganic ion concentrations, local sea ice conditions, and meteorology at Barrow, AK, from 2006 to 2009, were combined to investigate the dependence of submicron (aerodynamic diameter < 1 µm) and supermicron (aerodynamic diameter 1-10 µm) sea salt mass concentrations on sea ice coverage and wind speed. Consistent with a wind-dependent source, supermicron sea salt mass concentrations increased in the presence of nearby leads and wind speeds greater than 4 m s-1. Increased supermicron and submicron sea salt chloride depletion was observed for periods of low winds or a lack of nearby open water, consistent with transported sea salt influence. Sea salt aerosol produced from leads has the potential to alter cloud formation, as well as the chemical composition of the Arctic atmosphere and snowpack.

  3. 21 CFR 862.1580 - Phosphorus (inorganic) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Phosphorus (inorganic) test system. 862.1580... Systems § 862.1580 Phosphorus (inorganic) test system. (a) Identification. A phosphorus (inorganic) test system is a device intended to measure inorganic phosphorus in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1580 - Phosphorus (inorganic) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Phosphorus (inorganic) test system. 862.1580... Systems § 862.1580 Phosphorus (inorganic) test system. (a) Identification. A phosphorus (inorganic) test system is a device intended to measure inorganic phosphorus in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1580 - Phosphorus (inorganic) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Phosphorus (inorganic) test system. 862.1580... Systems § 862.1580 Phosphorus (inorganic) test system. (a) Identification. A phosphorus (inorganic) test system is a device intended to measure inorganic phosphorus in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1580 - Phosphorus (inorganic) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Phosphorus (inorganic) test system. 862.1580... Systems § 862.1580 Phosphorus (inorganic) test system. (a) Identification. A phosphorus (inorganic) test system is a device intended to measure inorganic phosphorus in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements...

  7. Photochemical alkylation of inorganic selenium in the presence of low molecular weight organic acids.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuming; Sturgeon, Ralph E; Mester, Zoltán; Gardner, Graeme J

    2003-12-15

    Using a flow-through photochemical reactor and a low pressure mercury lamp as a UV source, alkyl selenium species are formed from inorganic selenium(IV) in the presence of low molecular weight organic acids (LMW acids). The volatile alkyl Se species were cryogenically trapped and identified by GC-MS and GC-ICP-MS. In the presence of formic, acetic, propionic and malonic acids, inorganic selenium(IV) is converted by UV irradiation to volatile selenium hydride and carbonyl, dimethylselenide and diethylselenide, respectively. Se(IV) was successfully removed from contaminated agricultural drainage waters (California, U.S.A.) using a batch photoreactor system Se. Photochemical alkylation may thus offer a promising means of converting toxic selenium salts, present in contaminated water, to less toxic dimethylselenide. The LMW acids and photochemical alkylation process may also be key to understanding the source of atmospheric selenium and are likely involved in its mobility in the natural anaerobic environment.

  8. A Review of Tidal Salt Marsh Morphodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrichs, C. T.; Perry, J. E.

    2001-05-01

    We now understand that, morphologically, natural tidal marshes are generally near or progressing rapidly toward dynamic equilibrium with sediment supply, vegetative growth and relative sea level, rather than far out of equilibrium on a slow evolution toward geologic maturity. The last fifteen years have been marked by major advances in the observation of sedimentation and accretion patterns in tidal salt marshes which reinforce the above interpretation. This paper reviews and synthesizes advances since the late 1980s in our understanding of tidal salt marsh morphodynamics. Recent work has shown that allochthonous deposition patterns on the marsh are controlled primarily by source concentration, distance from that source, and duration of inundation (in turn determined by marsh elevation). Because deposition is proportional to inundation period, inorganic accretion tends to increase or decrease with accelerated or decelerated sea level rise, allowing the accretion rate to similarly fluctuate. Feedback between proximity to sediment source and duration of inundation causes relatively uniform accretion to be characterized by highest marsh elevations adjacent to tidal creeks. Since physical stress on vegetation increases with inundation, plant density and accretion of organic matter is reduced as inundation period increases, a pattern opposite to allochthonous deposition. Among systems dominated by allochthonous sediment, microtidal marshes are more reliant on storm and flood sedimentation and horizontally expand and retreat more quickly than macrotidal marshes, while the latter are more likely to persist during periods of accelerated sea level rise. The density, width and depth of salt marsh creeks all increase with increased tidal prism. Along barrier coastlines, greater tidal range is associated with more frequent inlet spacing, shallower channels, flood-dominance, and higher marsh elevation at equilibrium. Smaller tidal range results in greater inlet spacing, deeper

  9. Unitized paramagnetic salt thermometer

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, B.M.

    1982-06-01

    The details of construction and assembly of a cerous magnesium nitrate (CMN) paramagnetic thermometer are presented. The thermometer is a small unit consisting of a primary, two secondaries, the salt pill, and thermal links. The thermometer calibration changes very little on successive coolings and is reliable to 35 mK. A typical calibration curve is also presented.

  10. Dalapon, sodium salt

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Dalapon , sodium salt ; CASRN 75 - 99 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  11. Uranium, soluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Uranium , soluble salts ; no CASRN Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  12. Thallium (I), soluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Thallium ( I ) , soluble salts ; CASRN Various Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarc

  13. Nickel, soluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nickel , soluble salts ; CASRN Various Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  14. Chlorite (sodium salt)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlorite ( sodium salt ) ; CASRN 7758 - 19 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarc

  15. SALT and Spelling Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Joan

    A study investigated the effects of suggestopedic accelerative learning and teaching (SALT) on the spelling achievement, attitudes toward school, and memory skills of fourth-grade students. Subjects were 20 male and 28 female students from two self-contained classrooms at Kennedy Elementary School in Rexburg, Idaho. The control classroom and the…

  16. Physiological and proteomic characterization of salt tolerance in a mangrove plant, Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (L.) Lam.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhu; Chen, Juan; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2012-11-01

    Salinity is a major abiotic stress that is responsible for growth reduction in most higher plants. Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (L.) Lam., a mangrove plant, is a halophyte and is one of the most salt-tolerant plant species. Physiological and proteomic characteristics of B. gymnorrhiza were investigated under three NaCl concentrations (0, 200 and 500 mM) in this study. Maximum seedling growth occurred at 200 mM NaCl. Leaf osmotic potential was more negative as salt levels increased further. Physiological results revealed that inorganic ions (especially Na(+) and Cl(-)) played a key role in osmotic adjustment of B. gymnorrhiza leaves under salinity treatments. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed 23 salt-responsive proteins in B. gymnorrhiza leaves, which were differentially expressed under salt treatment compared with control. Ten protein spots were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, leading to identification of proteins involved in photosynthesis, antioxidation, protein folding, cell organization and metabolism. Salt-responsive mechanism was different between 200 and 500 mM NaCl-treated plants on the basis of the physiological and proteomic analyses. Salt tolerance under 200 mM NaCl treatment was due to effective osmotic adjustment, accumulation of inorganic ions (especially Na(+) and Cl(-)) as well as increased expression of photosynthesis-related proteins and antioxidant enzymes, which improved the salt tolerance of B. gymnorrhiza, and furthermore promoted plant growth. On the other hand, 500 mM NaCl reduced the growth of B. gymnorrhiza, which appears to have been caused by the accumulation of NaCl (ionic effect) and energy consumption by organic solute synthesis. Moreover, the repressed expression of photosynthesis-related proteins and antioxidant enzymes led to the reduction of growth. Protein folding and degradation-related proteins and cell organization-related protein were up-regulated and played important roles in salt tolerance of B

  17. Sodium (Salt or Sodium Chloride)

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduce the salt in your diet and for information, strategies, and tools you need to lead a healthier ... reduce the salt in your diet and get information, strategies, and tools you need to lead a healthier ...

  18. Metals removal from spent salts

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Peter C.; Von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Brummond, William A.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

  19. Actinide removal from spent salts

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Peter C.; von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

  20. Foundation Coursework in Undergraduate Inorganic Chemistry: Results from a National Survey of Inorganic Chemistry Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raker, Jeffrey R.; Reisner, Barbara A.; Smith, Sheila R.; Stewart, Joanne L.; Crane, Johanna L.; Pesterfield, Les; Sobel, Sabrina G.

    2015-01-01

    A national survey of inorganic chemists explored the self-reported topics covered in foundation-level courses in inorganic chemistry at the postsecondary level; the American Chemical Society's Committee on Professional Training defines a foundation course as one at the conclusion of which, "a student should have mastered the vocabulary,…

  1. The ACS Inorganic Exam and Its Influence (?) on the Inorganic Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sienko, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes results of a questionnaire asking if the ASC standarized test influences what is taught in inorganic chemistry courses. Chief controlling factors are indicated to be: (1) instructor's preference and (2) textbook content. Suggestions are given to enhance amount of inorganic chemistry in undergraduate curricula. (Author/JN)

  2. Systematic Inorganic Reaction Chemistry: Inorganic Reaction Types, General Methods of Synthesis, and the Periodic Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basolo, Fred

    1980-01-01

    Describes two approaches for teaching inorganic reactions and syntheses without having students memorize specific reactions. Briefly indicates topics which should be covered in a junior-senior level course but not at the expense of eliminating teaching students how to make basic inorganic compounds. (Author/JN)

  3. Tidal day organic and inorganic material flux of ponds in the Liberty Island freshwater tidal wetland.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Peggy W; Mayr, Shawn; Liu, Leji; Tang, Alison

    2015-01-01

    The loss of inorganic and organic material export and habitat produced by freshwater tidal wetlands is hypothesized to be an important contributing factor to the long-term decline in fishery production in San Francisco Estuary. However, due to the absence of freshwater tidal wetlands in the estuary, there is little information on the export of inorganic and organic carbon, nutrient or phytoplankton community biomass and the associated mechanisms. A single-day study was conducted to assess the potential contribution of two small vegetated ponds and one large open-water pond to the inorganic and organic material flux within the freshwater tidal wetland Liberty Island in San Francisco Estuary. The study consisted of an intensive tidal day (25.5 h) sampling program that measured the flux of inorganic and organic material at three ponds using continuous monitoring of flow, chlorophyll a, turbidity and salt combined with discrete measurements of phytoplankton community carbon, total and dissolved organic carbon and nutrient concentration at 1.5 h intervals. Vegetated ponds had greater material concentrations than the open water pond and, despite their small area, contributed up to 81% of the organic and 61% of the inorganic material flux of the wetland. Exchange between ponds was important to wetland flux. The small vegetated pond in the interior of the wetland contributed as much as 72-87% of the total organic carbon and chlorophyll a and 10% of the diatom flux of the wetland. Export of inorganic and organic material from the small vegetated ponds was facilitated by small-scale topography and tidal asymmetry that produced a 40% greater material export on ebb tide. The small vegetated ponds contrasted with the large open water pond, which imported 29-96% of the inorganic and 4-81% of the organic material into the wetland from the adjacent river. This study identified small vegetated ponds as an important source of inorganic and organic material to the wetland and the

  4. Inorganic Janus particles for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Isabel; Lorenz, Steffen; Gehrig, Dominik; Tenzer, Stefan; Storck, Wiebke; Fischer, Karl; Strand, Dennis; Laquai, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Summary Based on recent developments regarding the synthesis and design of Janus nanoparticles, they have attracted increased scientific interest due to their outstanding properties. There are several combinations of multicomponent hetero-nanostructures including either purely organic or inorganic, as well as composite organic–inorganic compounds. Janus particles are interconnected by solid state interfaces and, therefore, are distinguished by two physically or chemically distinct surfaces. They may be, for instance, hydrophilic on one side and hydrophobic on the other, thus, creating giant amphiphiles revealing the endeavor of self-assembly. Novel optical, electronic, magnetic, and superficial properties emerge in inorganic Janus particles from their dimensions and unique morphology at the nanoscale. As a result, inorganic Janus nanoparticles are highly versatile nanomaterials with great potential in different scientific and technological fields. In this paper, we highlight some advances in the synthesis of inorganic Janus nanoparticles, focusing on the heterogeneous nucleation technique and characteristics of the resulting high quality nanoparticles. The properties emphasized in this review range from the monodispersity and size-tunability and, therefore, precise control over size-dependent features, to the biomedical application as theranostic agents. Hence, we show their optical properties based on plasmonic resonance, the two-photon activity, the magnetic properties, as well as their biocompatibility and interaction with human blood serum. PMID:25551063

  5. Effectiveness of compost use in salt-affected soil.

    PubMed

    Lakhdar, Abdelbasset; Rabhi, Mokded; Ghnaya, Tahar; Montemurro, Francesco; Jedidi, Naceur; Abdelly, Chedly

    2009-11-15

    Soil degradation and salinization are two of the utmost threat affecting agricultural areas, derived from the increasing use of low quality water and inappropriate cultural practices. The problem of low productivity of saline soils may be ascribed not only to their salt toxicity or damage caused by excess amounts of soluble salts but also arising from the lack of organic matter and available mineral nutrients especially N, P, and K. Concerns about salinization risk and environmental quality and productivity of agro-ecosystems have emphasized the need to develop management practices that maintain soil resources. Composted municipal solid waste (MSW) was commonly used to enhance soil productivity in the agricultural lands and rebuild fertility. However, their application could be also a promising alternative to alleviate the adverse effects caused by soil salinization. MSW compost, with high organic matter content and low concentrations of inorganic and organic pollutants allow an improvement of physical, chemical and biochemical characteristics and constitute low cost soil recovery.

  6. Inorganic-organic composite nanoengineered films using self-assembled monolayers for directed zeolite film growth

    SciTech Connect

    Dye, R.C.; Hermes, R.E.; Martinez, M.G.; Peachey, N.M.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Zeolites, or molecular sieves, are aluminosilicate cage structures that are typically grown from a heterogeneous mixture of organic template molecules, inorganic salts of alumina and silica, and water. These zeolites are used in industry for catalytic cracking of hydrocarbons (gasoline manufacture from oil), and contaminant removal from chemical production processes. Within one year, we developed a viable method for the deposition of a quaternary ammonium salt amphiphile onto silicon wafer substrates. Using a biomimetic growth process, we were also able to demonstrate the first thin-film formation of a zeolite structure from such an organic template. Additionally, we synthesized the precursor to another amphiphile which was to be for further studies.

  7. Inorganic Nanoparticles for Multimodal Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Swierczewska, Magdalena; Lee, Seulki; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Multimodal molecular imaging can offer a synergistic improvement of diagnostic ability over a single imaging modality. Recent development of hybrid imaging systems has profoundly impacted the pool of available multimodal imaging probes. In particular, much interest has been focused on biocompatible, inorganic nanoparticle–based multimodal probes. Inorganic nanoparticles offer exceptional advantages to the field of multimodal imaging owing to their unique characteristics, such as nanometer dimensions, tunable imaging properties, and multifunctionality. Nanoparticles mainly based on iron oxide, quantum dots, gold, and silica have been applied to various imaging modalities to characterize and image specific biologic processes on a molecular level. A combination of nanoparticles and other materials such as biomolecules, polymers, and radiometals continue to increase functionality for in vivo multimodal imaging and therapeutic agents. In this review, we discuss the unique concepts, characteristics, and applications of the various multimodal imaging probes based on inorganic nanoparticles. PMID:21303611

  8. Inorganic polymers for environmental protection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, K. J. D.

    2011-10-01

    Aluminosilicate inorganic polymers have been proposed as low-energy cements since, unlike Portland cement, their production does not require high temperatures or generate large quantities of greenhouse gases. Other environmental protection applications for inorganic polymers are to encapsulate hazardous mining or radioactive wastes for safe long-term storage and as fireproof components for buildings and vehicles. However, newly developed methods for synthesising these materials have opened up the possibility of other novel environmental protection applications. These include porous cladding material for passive cooling of buildings, cost-effective exchange materials for removing heavy metals from wastewater, bacteriocidal materials for purifying polluted drinking water and materials for photodegrading hazardous organic environmental pollutants. The nature and synthesis of inorganic polymers for these environmental applications will be discussed here.

  9. Salt stress or salt shock: which genes are we studying?

    PubMed

    Shavrukov, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    Depending on the method of NaCl application, whether gradual or in a single step, plants may experience either salt stress or salt shock, respectively. The first phase of salt stress is osmotic stress. However, in the event of salt shock, plants suffer osmotic shock, leading to cell plasmolysis and leakage of osmolytes, phenomena that do not occur with osmotic stress. Patterns of gene expression are different in response to salt stress and salt shock. Salt stress initiates relatively smooth changes in gene expression in response to osmotic stress and a more pronounced change in expression of significant numbers of genes related to the ionic phase of salt stress. There is a considerable time delay between changes in expression of genes related to the osmotic and ionic phases of salt stress. In contrast, osmotic shock results in strong, rapid changes in the expression of genes with osmotic function, and fewer changes in ionic-responsive genes that occur earlier. There are very few studies in which the effects of salt stress and salt shock are described in parallel experiments. However, the patterns of changes in gene expression observed in these studies are consistently as described above, despite the use of diverse plant species. It is concluded that gene expression profiles are very different depending the method of salt application. Imposition of salt stress by gradual exposure to NaCl rather than salt shock with a single application of a high concentration of NaCl is recommended for genetic and molecular studies, because this more closely reflects natural incidences of salinity. PMID:23186621

  10. Hollow silica nanospheres coated with insoluble calcium salts for pH-responsive sustained release of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuming; Fang, Qilong; Li, Han; Shi, Weike; Zhang, Jie; Feng, Jing; Jia, Weili; Yang, Lin

    2016-08-23

    Hollow silica nanospheres coated with biocompatible and pH-sensitive inorganic insoluble calcium salts including calcium carbonate and hydroxyapatite have been successfully prepared. The results indicate that the nanospheres can efficiently load doxorubicin and release it in a pH-responsive and sustained manner, and improve the treatment efficacy significantly. PMID:27501741

  11. NO3 and OH initiated secondary aerosol formation from aliphatic amines - salt formation and effect of water vapor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aliphatic amines enter the atmosphere from a variety of sources, and have been detected existing in gas and particle phases in the atmosphere. Similar to ammonia, amines can form inorganic salt through acid-base reactions. However, the atmospheric behavior of amines with atmospheric oxidants (e.g. n...

  12. Effect of Ammonia on Glyoxal SOA in Inorganic Aqueous Seed Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxman, E.; Volkamer, R. M.; Laskin, A.; Laskin, J.; Koenig, T. K.; Baltensperger, U.; Dommen, J.; Prevot, A. S.; Slowik, J.; Maxut, A.; Noziere, B.; Wang, S.; Yu, J.

    2014-12-01

    Glyoxal (C2H2O2) is a ubiquitous small molecule that is observed in the terrestrial biogenic, urban, marine and arctic atmosphere. It forms secondary organic aerosol (SOA) as a result of multiphase chemical reactions in water. The rate of these reactions is controlled by the effective Henry's law partitioning coefficient (Heff) which is enhanced in the presence of inorganic salts by up to 3 orders of magnitude (Kampf et al., 2013, ES&T). Aerosol particles are among the most concentrated salt solutions on Earth and the SOA formation rate in aerosol water is strongly modified by this 'salting-in' mechanism. We have studied the effect of gas-phase ammonia on the rate of SOA formation in real particles composed of different inorganic salts (sulfate, nitrate, chloride). A series of simulation chamber experiments were conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland during Summer 2013. The SOA formation rate in experiments with added gas-phase ammonia (NH3) was found to be greatly accelerated compared to experiments without added NH3. Product analysis of particles included online HR-ToF-AMS and offline nano-DESI and LC-MS. We find that imidazole-like oligomer compounds dominate the observed products, rather than high-O/C oligomers containing solely C, H, and O. We further employed isotopically labelled di-substituted 13C glyoxal experiments in order to unambiguously link product formation to glyoxal (and separate it from chamber wall contamination). We present a molecular perspective on the reaction pathways and evaluate the effect of environmental parameters (RH, particle pH, seed chemical composition) on the formation of these imidazole-like oligomer compounds. The implications for SOA formation from photosensitized oxidation chemistry is discussed.

  13. Molten salt techniques. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Lovering, D.G.; Gale, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    This collection of five papers on molten salts deals with the following specific topics: the actinides and their salts, including their availability along with techniques and equipment for their handling, preparation, purification, and physical property measurement; cryolite systems and methods for their handling, preparation, and thermodynamic and physicochemical property assessment, as well as the use of electrodes in molten cryolite; the theory, construction, and application of reference electrodes for molten salt electrolytes; neutron diffraction in molten salt systems including isotope exchange methods for sample preparation; and dry boxes and inert atmosphere techniques for molten salt handling and analysis.

  14. SAXS in inorganic and bioinspired research.

    PubMed

    Stawski, Tomasz M; Benning, Liane G

    2013-01-01

    In situ and time-resolved structural information about emergent microstructures that progressively develop during the formation of inorganic or biologically mediated solid phases from solution is fundamental for understanding of the mechanisms driving complex precipitation reactions, for example, during biomineralization. In this brief chapter, we present the use of small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS) techniques and show how SAXS can be used to gather structural information on the nanoscale properties of the de novo-forming entities. We base the discussion on several worked examples of inorganic materials such as calcium carbonate, silica, and perovskite-type titanates.

  15. Inorganic-organic separators for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible separator is reported for use between the electrodes of Ni-Cd and Ni-Zn batteries using alkaline electrolytes. The separator was made by coating a porous substrate with a battery separator composition. The coating material included a rubber-based resin copolymer, a plasticizer and inorganic and organic fillers which comprised 55% by volume or less of the coating as finally dried. One or more of the filler materials, whether organic or inorganic, is preferably active with the alkaline electrolyte to produce pores in the separator coating. The plasticizer was an organic material which is hydrolyzed by the alkaline electrolyte to improve conductivity of the separator coating.

  16. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harrigan, M R

    2001-01-01

    There is significant evidence to show that many patients with hyponatremia and intracranial disease who were previously diagnosed with SIADH actually have CSW. The critical difference between SIADH and CSW is that CSW involves renal salt loss leading to hyponatremia and volume loss, whereas SIADH is a euvolemic or hypervolemic condition. Attention to volume status in patients with hyponatremia is essential. The primary treatment for CSW is water and salt replacement. The mechanisms underlying CSW are not understood but may involve ANP or other natriuretic factors and direct neural influence on renal function. Future investigation is needed to better define the incidence of CSW in patients with intracranial disease, identify other disorders that can lead to CSW, and elucidate the mechanisms underlying this syndrome.

  17. SALT IN AYURVEDA I

    PubMed Central

    Mooss, N S

    1987-01-01

    In basic Ayurveda texts, Susruta, Caraka and Vagbhata, some quite specific Salts (Lavanam) have been described and their properties and actions are enumerated. By comparing those accounts with the present methods of preparation, conclusions have been made and evidently spurious methods are pointed out. The reported properties of Saindhava, Samudra, Vida, Sauvarcha, Romaka, Audbhida, Gutika, the Katu Group, Krsna and Pamsuja Lavanas are discussed in terms of their chemical constituents here and, thus, the authors establish its inter-connections. PMID:22557573

  18. A Trail of Salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph shows the relative abundances of sulfur (in the form of sulfur tri-oxide) and chlorine at three Meridiani Planum sites: soil measured in the small crater where Opportunity landed; the rock dubbed 'McKittrick' in the outcrop lining the inner edge of the crater; and the rock nicknamed 'Guadalupe,' also in the outcrop. The 'McKittrick' data shown here were taken both before and after the rover finished grinding the rock with its rock abrasion tool to expose fresh rock underneath. The 'Guadalupe' data were taken after the rover grounded the rock. After grinding both rocks, the sulfur abundance rose to high levels, nearly five times higher than that of the soil. This very high sulfur concentration reflects the heavy presence of sulfate salts (approximately 30 percent by weight) in the rocks. Chloride and bromide salts are also indicated. Such high levels of salts strongly suggest the rocks contain evaporite deposits, which form when water evaporates or ice sublimes into the atmosphere.

  19. Benthic Primary Production in a Saltmarsh Pond: Insights from Fluxes of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon and Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolewski, J. S.; Stanley, R. H.; Howard, E. M.; Spivak, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Salt marshes are important carbon sinks that exist at continental margins and act as mediators in the exchange of nutrients and carbon between terrestrial and marine environments. Within salt marshes, 10-20% of total surface area is covered by marshtop ponds. The fractional area of marshtop ponds is predicted to increase as sea level rises. Despite their potential importance, the balance between autotrophic and heterotrophic processes within such ponds remain poorly understood. To quantify the balance of metabolic fluxes within salt marsh ponds, chemical fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved oxygen (DO) were measured in July, 2014 in benthic flux chambers inserted into a salt marsh pond in the Plum Island Estuary Long-Term Ecosystem Research (PIE-LTER) site. Light and dark chambers were used to enable separation of rates of photosynthesis and respiration. Separate chambers were used to enclose sediment covered by primarily benthic microalgae and primarily benthic macroalgae. Net ecosystem metabolism in the microalgae was ~10 and in the macroalgae ~15 mmol C/m2/hour. Respiration rates were ~10 mmol C/m2/ hour for both microalgae and macroalgae. The resulting fluxes of net ecosystem production in the ponds will be compared with overall marsh net ecosystem flux as measured by an eddy flux tower that was located 100 meters from the pond. Additionally, concurrent measurements of DIC and DO allow quantification of the C:O ratio during respiration (i.e. respiratory quotient) in this system.

  20. Salt and hypertension: is salt dietary reduction worth the effort?

    PubMed

    Frisoli, Tiberio M; Schmieder, Roland E; Grodzicki, Tomasz; Messerli, Franz H

    2012-05-01

    In numerous epidemiologic, clinical, and experimental studies, dietary sodium intake has been linked to blood pressure, and a reduction in dietary salt intake has been documented to lower blood pressure. In young subjects, salt intake has a programming effect in that blood pressure remains elevated even after a high salt intake has been reduced. Elderly subjects, African Americans, and obese patients are more sensitive to the blood pressure-lowering effects of a decreased salt intake. Depending on the baseline blood pressure and degree of salt intake reduction, systolic blood pressure can be lowered by 4 to 8 mm Hg. A greater decrease in blood pressure is achieved when a reduced salt intake is combined with other lifestyle interventions, such as adherence to Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. A high salt intake has been shown to increase not only blood pressure but also the risk of stroke, left ventricular hypertrophy, and proteinuria. Adverse effects associated with salt intake reduction, unless excessive, seem to be minimal. However, data linking a decreased salt intake to a decrease in morbidity and mortality in hypertensive patients are not unanimous. Dietary salt intake reduction can delay or prevent the incidence of antihypertensive therapy, can facilitate blood pressure reduction in hypertensive patients receiving medical therapy, and may represent a simple cost-saving mediator to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  1. Investigating primary marine aerosol properties: CCN activity of sea salt and mixed particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S. M.; Butcher, A. C.; Rosenoern, T.; Coz, E.; Lieke, K. I.; de Leeuw, G.; Nilsson, E. D.; Bilde, M.

    2012-04-01

    Sea salt particles ejected as a result of bubbles bursting from artificial seawater in a closed stainless steel tank were sampled for size distribution, morphology, and cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity. The two-component artificial seawater consisted of salt, either NaCl or sea salt, and one organic compound in deionized water. Several organic molecules representative of oceanic organic matter were investigated. Bubbles were generated either by aeration through a porous diffuser or by water jet impingement on the surface of the artificial seawater. The effect of bubble lifetime, which was controlled by varying the depth of the diffuser in the water column, on particle size and CCN activity was investigated and was found to be insignificant for the organic compounds studied. The CCN activities of particles produced from diffuser-generated bubbles were generally governed by the high hygroscopicity of salt, such that activation was indistinguishable from that of salt, except in the case of very low mass ratio of salt to organic matter in the seawater solution. There was, however, a considerable decrease in CCN activity for particles produced from jet impingement on seawater that had a salinity of 10‰ and contained 0.45 mM of sodium laurate, an organic surfactant. The production of a thick foam layer from impingement may explain the difference in activation and supports hypotheses that particle production from the two methods of generating bubbles is not similar. Accurate conclusions from observed CCN activities of particles from artificial seawater containing organic matter require knowledge of the CCN activity of the inorganic component, especially as a small amount of the inorganic can heavily influence activation. Therefore, the CCN activity of both artificial sea salt and NaCl were measured and compared. Part of the discrepancy observed between the CCN activities of the two salts may be due to morphological differences, which were investigated using

  2. Conjunctive and mineralization impact of municipal solid waste compost and inorganic fertilizer on lysimeter and pot studies.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Iqbal; Nadeem, Amana; Ahmed, Rauf; Husnain, Anwer

    2014-01-01

    Objectives of the present study were to investigate the physico-chemical properties of municipal solid waste (MSW)-enriched compost and its effect on nutrient mineralization and subsequent plant growth. The enrichment of MSW compost by inorganic salts enhanced the humification rate and reduced the carbon nitrogen (C/N) ratio in less time than control compost. The chemical properties of compost, C/N ratio, humic acid, fulvic acid, degree of polymerization and humification index revealed the significant correlation amid properties. A laboratory-scale experiment evaluated the conjunctive effect of MSW compost and inorganic fertilizer on tomato plants in a pot experiment. In the pot experiment five treatments, Inorganic fertilizer (T1), enriched compost (T2), enriched compost 80% + 20% inorganic fertilizer (T3), enriched compost 60% + 40% inorganic fertilizer (T4) were defined including control (Ts), applied at the rate of 110 kg-N/ha and results revealed that all treatments significantly enhanced horticultural production of tomato plant; however T4 was most effectual as compared with control, T1, T2 and T3. Augmentation in organic matter and available phosphorus (P) potassium (K) and nitrogen (N) were also observed in compost treatments. The leachability and phytoavailability of phosphorus (P), potassium (K) and nitrogen (N) from sandy soil, amended with enriched, control compost and inorganic fertilizer at rates of 200, 400 and 600 kg-N/ha were evaluated in a lysimeter study. Results illustrated that concentration of mineral nitrogen was elevated in the leachate of inorganic fertilizer than enriched and control composts; therefore compost fortifies soil with utmost nutrients for plants' growth.

  3. Structural diversity in hybrid organic-inorganic lead iodide materials.

    PubMed

    Weber, Oliver J; Marshall, Kayleigh L; Dyson, Lewis M; Weller, Mark T

    2015-12-01

    The structural chemistry of hybrid organic-inorganic lead iodide materials has become of increasing significance for energy applications since the discovery and development of perovskite solar cells based on methylammonium lead iodide. Seven new hybrid lead iodide compounds have been synthesized and structurally characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The lead iodide units in materials templated with bipyridyl, 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane, 1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethylene and imidazole adopt one-dimensional chain structures, while crystallization from solutions containing piperazinium cations generates a salt containing isolated [PbI6](4-) octahedral anions. Templating with 4-chlorobenzylammonium lead iodide adopts the well known two-dimensional layered perovskite structure with vertex shared sheets of composition [PbI4](2-) separated by double layers of organic cations. The relationships between the various structures determined, their compositions, stability and hydrogen bonding between the protonated amine and the iodide ions of the PbI6 octahedra are described. PMID:26634723

  4. Salt Effects on the Conformational Stability of the Visual G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Alcaraz, Arfaxad; Martínez-Archundia, Marlet; Ramon, Eva; Garriga, Pere

    2011-01-01

    Membrane protein stability is a key parameter with important physiological and practical implications. Inorganic salts affect protein stability, but the mechanisms of their interactions with membrane proteins are not completely understood. We have undertaken the study of a prototypical G-protein-coupled receptor, the α-helical membrane protein rhodopsin from vertebrate retina, and explored the effects of inorganic salts on the thermal decay properties of both its inactive and photoactivated states. Under high salt concentrations, rhodopsin significantly increased its activation enthalpy change for thermal bleaching, whereas acid denaturation affected the formation of a denatured loose-bundle state for both the active and inactive conformations. This behavior seems to correlate with changes in protonated Schiff-base hydrolysis. However, chromophore regeneration with the 11-cis-retinal chromophore and MetarhodopsinII decay kinetics were slower only in the presence of sodium chloride, suggesting that in this case, the underlying phenomenon may be linked to the activation of rhodopsin and the retinal release processes. Furthermore, the melting temperature, determined by means of circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry measurements, was increased in the presence of high salt concentrations. The observed effects on rhodopsin could indicate that salts favor electrostatic interactions in the retinal binding pocket and indirectly favor hydrophobic interactions at the membrane protein receptor core. These effects can be exploited in applications where the stability of membrane proteins in solution is highly desirable. PMID:22261069

  5. Ion Exchange and Adsorption of Inorganic Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the first part of the chapter, the fundamentals of ion exchange and adsorption processes are explained, with the goal of demonstrating how these principles influence process design for inorganic contaminant removal. In the second part, ion exchange and adsorption processes th...

  6. Inorganic particles in cigars and cigar smoke.

    PubMed

    Langer, A M; Mackler, A D; Rubin, I; Hammond, E C; Selikoff, I J

    1971-11-01

    A number of crystalline and optically isotopic inorganic materials are used in the manufacture of reconstituted tobacco sheets. These sheets, used primarily in inexpensive cigars, often contain diatomaceous earth, which exists in part in the silica mineral form cristobalite, a known fibrogen. Diatom fragments with this crystalline form have been observed in the main smoke stream of cigars made with these tobacco sheets.

  7. INORGANIC ELEMENTS AND DISTRIBUTION OF EASTERN OYSTERS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fisher, William S. In press. Inorganic Elements and Distribution of Eastern Oysters (Abstract). To be presented at the 96th Annual Meeting (Aquaculture 2004) of the National Shellfisheries Association, 1-5 March 2004, Honolulu, HI. 1 p. (ERL,GB R962).

    For over a century w...

  8. Removing dissolved inorganic contaminants from water

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, D.; Subramonian, S.; Sorg, T.J.

    1986-11-01

    This article describes the physicochemical treatment processes typically used to remove the more common inorganic contaminants from water and wastewater. These are precipitation, coprecipitation, adsorption, ion exchange, membrane separations by reverse osmosis and electrodialysis, and combinations of these processes. The general criteria for process selection are discussed, and the processes and their typical applications are described.

  9. YAG:Ce3+ Nanophosphor Synthesized with the Salted Sol-Gel Method

    SciTech Connect

    D. Jia; C. V. Shaffer; J. E. Weyant; A. Goonewardene; X. Guo; Y. Wang; X. Z. Guo; K. K. Li; Y. K. Zou; W. Jia

    2006-05-01

    Nano-phosphors of Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ (YAG:Ce) were synthesized with a novel salted sol-gel method, in which aqueous solution of inorganic salts (yttrium/cerium nitrates) were used along with the metal alkoxide precursor, aluminum sec-butoxide, Al(OC4H9)3. YAG single phase was formed at temperature as low as 800 C. Luminescence of YAG:Ce reached the maximum intensity when calcined above 1350C. The SEM image reveals that the grain sizes of the nano-phosphors calcined at 1100 C are in a range of 50-150 nm.

  10. Dynamics of salt playa polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehring, L.; Fourrière, A.

    2014-12-01

    In natural salt playa or in evaporation pools for the salt extraction industry, one can sometimes see surprising regular structures formed by ridges of salt. These ridges connect together to form a self-organized network of polygons one to two meters in diameter, which we call salt polygons. Here we propose a mechanism based on porous media convection of salty water in soil to explain the formation and the scaling of the salt polygons. Surface evaporation causes a steady upward flow of salty water, which can cause precipitation near the surface. A vertical salt gradient then builds up in the porous soil, with heavy salt-saturated water lying over the less salty source water. This can drive convection when a threshold is reached, given by a critical Rayleigh number of about 7. We suggest that the salt polygons are the surface expression of the porous medium convection, with salt crystallizing along the positions of the convective downwellings. To study this instability directly, we developed a 2D analogue experiment using a Hele-Shaw cell filled with a porous medium saturated with a salt solution and heated from above. We perform a linear stability analysis of this system, and find that it is unstable to convection, with a most unstable wavelength that is set by a balance between salt diffusion and water evaporation. The Rayleigh number in our experiment is controlled by the particle size of our model soil, and the evaporation rate. We obtain results that scale with the observation of natural salt polygons. Using dye, we observe the convective movement of salty water and find downwelling convective plumes underneath the spots where surface salt ridges form, as shown in the attached figure.

  11. Osmotic membrane bioreactor for wastewater treatment and the effect of salt accumulation on system performance and microbial community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guanglei; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2013-12-01

    An osmotic membrane bioreactor was developed for wastewater treatment. The effects of salt accumulation on system performance and microbial community dynamics were investigated. Evident deterioration of biological activity, especially nitrification, was observed, which resulted in significant accumulation of organic matter and NH4(+)-N within the bioreactor. Arising from the elevation of salinity, almost all the dominant species was taken over by high salt-tolerant species. Significant succession among different species of Nitromonas was observed for ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. For nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, Nitrospira was not evidently affected, whereas Nitrobacter was eliminated from the system. Salt accumulation also caused significant shifts in denitrifying bacterial community from α- to γ-Proteobacteria members. Overall, the microbial community adapted to the elevated salinity conditions and brought about a rapid recovery of the biological activity. Membrane fouling occurred but was insignificant. Biofouling and inorganic scaling coexisted, with magnesium/calcium phosphate/carbonate compounds identified as the inorganic foulants.

  12. Biogeochemical drivers of phosphatase activity in salt marsh sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Joana; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel

    2014-10-01

    Although nitrogen has become a major concern for wetlands scientists dealing with eutrophication problems, phosphorous represents another key element, and consequently its biogeochemical cycling has a crucial role in eutrophication processes. Microbial communities are a central component in trophic dynamics and biogeochemical processes on coastal systems, since most of the processes in sediments are microbial-mediated due to enzymatic action, including the mineralization of organic phosphorus carried out by acid phosphatase activity. In the present work, the authors investigate the biogeochemical sediment drivers that control phosphatase activities. Authors also aim to assess biogeochemical factors' influence on the enzyme-mediated phosphorous cycling processes in salt marshes. Plant rhizosediments and bare sediments were collected and biogeochemical features, including phosphatase activities, inorganic and organic phosphorus contents, humic acids content and pH, were assessed. Acid phosphatase was found to give the highest contribution for total phosphatase activity among the three pH-isoforms present in salt marsh sediments, favored by acid pH in colonized sediments. Humic acids also appear to have an important role inhibiting phosphatase activity. A clear relation of phosphatase activity and inorganic phosphorous was also found. The data presented reinforces the role of phosphatase in phosphorous cycling.

  13. Synthetic dye--inorganic salt hybrid colorants for application in thermoplastics.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yan-Ping; Li, Tian; Gao, Hong-Wen

    2011-06-17

    Common synthetic dyes, e.g., Weak Acid Pink Red B (APRB, C.I. 18073), Mordant Blue 9 (MB, C.I.14855) and Acid Brilliant Blue 6B (ABB6B, C.I. 42660), can be removed from water by in situ hybridization with CaCO(3), BaSO(4) and Ca(3)(PO(4))(2) and the resulting hybrids thus prepared used as plastic colorants. All the hybrids can be processed into polypropylene (PP) at 200 °C with good color intensity, color brightness and homogeneous dispersion. The BaSO(4)-MB hybrid exhibits better migration resistance to acid and alkali, and stronger covering power than the BaSO(4)-MB mixture. The thermal stability and UV resistance of the Ca(3)(PO(4))(2)-ABB6B hybrid are better than those of the Ca(3)(PO(4))(2)-ABB6B mixture. The crystallinity of PP is enhanced by incorporation of these hybrids and the use of these hybrids as colorants in PP instead of the dyes alone is determined to be feasible.

  14. Carbon cycling in salt marsh dominated estuaries along the US Atlantic coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, Inke; Nahrawi, Hafsah B.; Wang, Shiyu; Leclerc, Monique; Hopkinson, Charles S.; Giblin, Anne E.; Alber, Merryl; Cai, Wei-Jun

    2016-04-01

    Salt marshes are effective carbon sinks, because they rely on vertical accretion of organic and inorganic matter to keep their relative position to sea level. They are also described as 'carbon pumps' that fix atmospheric carbon but deliver organic and inorganic carbon to estuarine and coastal waters. These fluxes are still highly uncertain due to their temporal and spatial variability. Here, we present observations on atmospheric CO2 exchange and lateral DIC exchange measured at two salt marsh dominated estuaries along the US Atlantic coast. Atmospheric exchange was measured with the eddy covariance method supplemented by measurements of DIC concentrations and discharge in tidal creeks during selected tidal cycles. Together with estimates of long-term carbon burial, this allows us to constrain their export potential. Since the Plum Island Ecosystems LTER and Georgia Coastal Ecosystems LTER are located along a temperature gradient, we will use the data to assess the temperature effect on ecosystem productivity and respiration.

  15. Inorganic markers, carbonaceous components and stable carbon isotope from biomass burning aerosols in northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, F.; Zhang, Y.; Kawamura, K.

    2015-12-01

    To better characterize the sources of fine particulate matter (i.e. PM2.5) in Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China, aerosol chemical composition such total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), and inorganic ions were studied as well as stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of TC. Intensively open biomass burning episodes were identified from late September to early October by satellite fire and aerosol optical depth maps. During the biomass burning episodes, concentrations of PM2.5, OC, EC, and WSOC increased by a factor of 4-12 compared to non-biomass-burning periods. Non-sea-salt potassium is strongly correlated with PM2.5, OC, EC and WSOC, suggesting an important contribution of biomass burning emission. The enrichment in both the non-sea-salt potassium and chlorine is significantly larger than other inorganic species, indicating that biomass burning aerosols in Sanjiang Plain is mostly fresh and less aged. In addition, WSOC to OC ratio is relatively lower compared to that reported in biomass burning aerosols in tropical regions, supporting that biomass burning aerosols in Sanjiang Plain is mostly primary and secondary organic aerosols is not significant. A lower average δ13C value (-26.2‰) is found for the biomass-burning aerosols, suggesting a dominant contribution from combustion of C3 plants in the studied region.

  16. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uygun, M A; Ozkal, E; Acar, O; Erongun, U

    1996-01-01

    Hyponatremia following acute or chronic central nervous system injury which is due to excessive Na+ loss in the urine without an increase in the body fluid, has been described as Cerebral Salt Wasting Syndrome (CSWS). This syndrome is often confused with dilutional hyponatremia secondary to inappropriate ADH secretion. Accurate diagnosis and management are mandatory for to improve the course of the disease. In this study a patient with CSW Syndrome is presented and the treatment and diagnosis of this syndrome are discussed in view of the literature.

  17. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

    1980-07-18

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

  18. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  19. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1982-02-09

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  20. Electrolyte salts for nonaqueous electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Amine, Khalil; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Chen, Zonghai

    2012-10-09

    Metal complex salts may be used in lithium ion batteries. Such metal complex salts not only perform as an electrolyte salt in a lithium ion batteries with high solubility and conductivity, but also can act as redox shuttles that provide overcharge protection of individual cells in a battery pack and/or as electrolyte additives to provide other mechanisms to provide overcharge protection to lithium ion batteries. The metal complex salts have at least one aromatic ring. The aromatic moiety may be reversibly oxidized/reduced at a potential slightly higher than the working potential of the positive electrode in the lithium ion battery. The metal complex salts may also be known as overcharge protection salts.

  1. Speciation of inorganic arsenic and selenium in leachates from landfills in relation to water quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Yusof, A M; Salleh, S; Wood, A K

    1999-01-01

    Speciation of arsenic and selenium was carried out on water samples taken from rivers used as water intake points in the vicinity of landfill areas used for land-based waste disposal system. Leachates from these landfill areas may contaminate the river water through underground seepage or overflowing, especially after a heavy downpour. Preconcentration of the chemical species was done using a mixture of ammonium pyrrolidinethiocarbamate-chloroform (APDTC-CHCl3). Because only the reduced forms of both arsenic and selenium species could be extracted by the preconcentrating mixture, suitable reducing agents such as 25% sodium thiosulfate for As(III) and 6M HCl for Se(IV) were used throughout the studies. Care was taken to exclude the interfering elements such as the alkali and alkali earth metals from the inorganic arsenic and selenium species by introducing 12% EDTA solution as the masking agent. The extracted mixture was irradiated in a thermal neutron flux of 4 x 10(12)/cm/s from a TRIGA Mk.II reactor at the Malaysia Institute of Nuclear Technology Research (MINT). Gamma rays of 559 keV and 297 keV from 76As and 75Se, respectively, were used in the quantitative determination of the inorganic species. Mixed standards of As(III) and Se(IV) used in the percentage efficiency procedure were prepared from salts of Analar grade. The water quality evaluation was viewed from the ratio of the inorganic species present. PMID:10676488

  2. Development of a process for treating red water by organic/inorganic separation and biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Chaiko, D.J.; Reichley-Yinger, L.; Orth, E.R.; Van Deventer, E.H.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Krumpole, M.; Helt, J.E.; Coleman, R.D.; Kakar, S.N.; Tsai, T.S.; Horken, K.; Killian, W.; Sather, N.F.

    1989-01-01

    The final stage of TNT production involves the purification of TNT by selective conversion of the unsymmetrical isomers into water-soluble sulfonates by reaction of the crude TNT with an aqueous sulfite (sellite) solution. This treatment generates an intense, red-colored waste stream commonly referred to as red water,'' which has been listed as a hazardous waste by the EPA. Its composition is primarily soluble organic sulfonates and the sodium salts of sulfate, sulfite, nitrate and nitrite. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing a process for treating red water. This process couples the separation of the organic and inorganic constituents of red water, followed by treatment of the organics by biodegradation to nonhazardous products. Sludge formation in the biotreatment step is further minimized by conversion of the sodium-containing organics to their respective acidic forms during the organic/inorganic separation. The level of separation will be such that the inorganic residues can qualify as nonhazardous byproducts. Initial efforts have been directed towards performing proof-of-concept demonstrations of processes that can achieve these goals. Candidate technologies that are being examined for separating the organic constituents from actual red water samples are (1) flocculation, (2) foam fractionation, and (3) aqueous biphasic solvent extraction. 22 refs.

  3. Methods for predicting properties and tailoring salt solutions for industrial processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ally, Moonis R.

    1993-01-01

    An algorithm developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory accurately and quickly predicts thermodynamic properties of concentrated aqueous salt solutions. This algorithm is much simpler and much faster than other modeling schemes and is unique because it can predict solution behavior at very high concentrations and under varying conditions. Typical industrial applications of this algorithm would be in manufacture of inorganic chemicals by crystallization, thermal storage, refrigeration and cooling, extraction of metals, emissions controls, etc.

  4. Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Warner, Benjamin P.; McClesky, T. Mark

    2008-11-11

    Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

  5. Electrochromic salts, solutions, and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Warner, Benjamin P.; McClesky,7,064,212 T. Mark

    2006-06-20

    Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

  6. Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Warner, Benjamin P.; McClesky, T. Mark

    2008-10-14

    Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

  7. Salt appetite in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Hendi, Khadeja; Leshem, Micah

    2014-11-28

    The present study investigated whether salt appetite in the elderly is impaired similar to thirst because of the commonality of their physiological substrates and whether alterations in salt appetite are related to mood. Elderly (65-85 years, n 30) and middle-aged (45-58 years, n 30) men and women were compared in two test sessions. Thirst, psychophysical ratings of taste solutions, dietary Na and energy intakes, seasoning with salt and sugar, number of salty and sweet snacks consumed, preferred amounts of salt in soup and sugar in tea, and an overall measure of salt appetite and its relationship with mood, nocturia and sleep were measured. Elderly participants were found to be less thirsty and respond less to thirst. In contrast, no impairment of salt appetite was found in them, and although they had a reduced dietary Na intake, it dissipated when corrected for their reduced dietary energy intake. Diet composition and Na intake were found to be similar in middle-aged and elderly participants, despite the lesser intake in elderly participants. There were no age-related differences in the intensity of taste or hedonic profile of Na, in salting habits, in tests of salting soup, or number of salty snacks consumed. No relationship of any measure of salt appetite with mood measured by the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, frequency of nocturia, or sleep duration was observed. The age-related impairment of the physiology of mineralofluid regulation, while compromising thirst and fluid intake, spares salt appetite, suggesting that salt appetite in humans is not regulated physiologically. Intact salt appetite in the elderly might be utilised judiciously to prevent hyponatraemia, increase thirst and improve appetite. PMID:25287294

  8. Batteries using molten salt electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Guidotti, Ronald A.

    2003-04-08

    An electrolyte system suitable for a molten salt electrolyte battery is described where the electrolyte system is a molten nitrate compound, an organic compound containing dissolved lithium salts, or a 1-ethyl-3-methlyimidazolium salt with a melting temperature between approximately room temperature and approximately 250.degree. C. With a compatible anode and cathode, the electrolyte system is utilized in a battery as a power source suitable for oil/gas borehole applications and in heat sensors.

  9. Atmospheric significance of aeolian salts in the sandy deserts of northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B.-Q.

    2016-02-01

    Large sandy deserts in the middle latitudes of northwestern China were investigated for soluble salt variations in modern and ancient aeolian sediments, aiming to explore the environmental significance of "aeolian salts". Results revealed that aeolian salt variations have a clear relationship with the changing meridional and zonal gradients of the desert locations and the aeolian differentiation effect, but are weakly linked to local geological conditions. Atmospheric depositions of water-soluble chemical species are an important process/source contributing to aeolian salt. Sequential variations of soluble salts in sedimentary profiles interbedded with aeolian and non-aeolian deposits and their palaeoenvironmental implications in the hinterland areas of these deserts were further evaluated, based on the constraints of OSL dating and radiocarbon dating data. The results indicate that inorganic salts may be a latent geoproxy in revealing regional palaeoclimatic changes in desert areas for sediments deposited under a single depositional environment, but the interpretation should be more cautious for sediments deposited under diverse depositional conditions. This study presents evidence of the atmospheric origin of aeolian salt in sandy deserts, with limited climatic significance in palaeoenvironmental reconstruction.

  10. [Salt consumption and cerebrovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Demarin, Vida; Morović, Sandra

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death and disability in Croatia. Risk factors for cerebrovascular disease can be divided into evidence-based risk factors and those with supposed relationship. Strong evidence suggests that current salt consumption is one of the most important factors influencing the increase in blood pressure, along with the risk of cerebrovascular disease. Hypertension is an important modifiable risk factor for stroke. Studies on salt have shown that a decrease in blood pressure is in correlation with lower salt intake. Over-consumption of salt carries a higher risk of cerebrovascular disease in overweight individuals. Conservative estimates suggest that salt intake reduction by 3 g/day could reduce the stroke rate by 13%; this percentage would be almost double if salt intake be reduced by 6 g/day and triple with a 9 g/day reduction. Salt intake reduction by 9 g/day could reduce the stroke rate by almost 30%. This corresponds to about 20,500 prevented strokes each year. There is evidence supporting a positive correlation of salt intake and stroke, independent of hypertension. The introduction of salt reduction proposal should be considered in future updates of recommendations for stroke prevention.

  11. Molten salt techniques. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, R.J.; Lovering, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    This is the second volume in a series addressing the practical aspects of molten salt research. The book covers experiments with alkali metal carbonates, oxides, silicates, phosphates and borates. Additional sections cover molten salt spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and automated admittance spectroscopy of the semiconductor/molten salt electrolyte interface. Particular emphasis is given to safety considerations for working with these high temperature, often corrosive materials. Planning of experiments is of interest, and several experiments are described. Attention is given to the selection of materials to be used in this research, including the purification of the salts themselves, and the requirements for laboratory apparatus.

  12. Dietary Salt Intake and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Over the past century, salt has been the subject of intense scientific research related to blood pressure elevation and cardiovascular mortalities. Moderate reduction of dietary salt intake is generally an effective measure to reduce blood pressure. However, recently some in the academic society and lay media dispute the benefits of salt restriction, pointing to inconsistent outcomes noted in some observational studies. A reduction in dietary salt from the current intake of 9-12 g/day to the recommended level of less than 5-6 g/day will have major beneficial effects on cardiovascular health along with major healthcare cost savings around the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) strongly recommended to reduce dietary salt intake as one of the top priority actions to tackle the global non-communicable disease crisis and has urged member nations to take action to reduce population wide dietary salt intake to decrease the number of deaths from hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke. However, some scientists still advocate the possibility of increased risk of CVD morbidity and mortality at extremes of low salt intake. Future research may inform the optimal sodium reduction strategies and intake targets for general populations. Until then, we have to continue to build consensus around the greatest benefits of salt reduction for CVD prevention, and dietary salt intake reduction strategies must remain at the top of the public health agenda. PMID:25061468

  13. How sea level rise affects sedimentation, plant growth, and carbon accumulation on coastal salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudd, S. M.; Howell, S. M.; Morris, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    The rate of accretion on coastal salt marshes depends on feedbacks between flow, macrophyte growth, and sedimentation. Under favourable conditions, marsh accretion rates will keep pace with the local rate of sea level rise. Marsh accretion is driven by both organic and inorganic sedimentation; mineral rich marshes will need less organic sedimentation to keep pace with sea level rise. Here we use a numerical model of marsh accretion, calibrated by sediment cores, to explore the relationship between sea level rise and carbon sequestration on salt marshes in the face of differing supplies of inorganic sediment. The model predicts that changes in carbon storage resulting from changing sediment supply or sea-level rise are strongly dependant on the background sediment supply: if inorganic sediment supply is reduced in an already sediment poor marsh the storage of organic carbon will increase to a far greater extent than in a sediment-rich marsh, provided that the rate of sea-level rise does not exceed a threshold. These results imply that altering sediment supply to estuaries (e.g., by damming upstream rivers or altering littoral sediment transport) could lead to significant changes in the carbon budgets of coastal salt marshes.

  14. Phosphate-Dependent Root System Architecture Responses to Salt Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sommerfeld, Hector Montero; ter Horst, Anneliek; Haring, Michel A.

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient availability and salinity of the soil affect the growth and development of plant roots. Here, we describe how inorganic phosphate (Pi) availability affects the root system architecture (RSA) of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and how Pi levels modulate responses of the root to salt stress. Pi starvation reduced main root length and increased the number of lateral roots of Arabidopsis Columbia-0 seedlings. In combination with salt, low Pi dampened the inhibiting effect of mild salt stress (75 mm) on all measured RSA components. At higher salt concentrations, the Pi deprivation response prevailed over the salt stress only for lateral root elongation. The Pi deprivation response of lateral roots appeared to be oppositely affected by abscisic acid signaling compared with the salt stress response. Natural variation in the response to the combination treatment of salt and Pi starvation within 330 Arabidopsis accessions could be grouped into four response patterns. When exposed to double stress, in general, lateral roots prioritized responses to salt, while the effect on main root traits was additive. Interestingly, these patterns were not identical for all accessions studied, and multiple strategies to integrate the signals from Pi deprivation and salinity were identified. By genome-wide association mapping, 12 genomic loci were identified as putative factors integrating responses to salt stress and Pi starvation. From our experiments, we conclude that Pi starvation interferes with salt responses mainly at the level of lateral roots and that large natural variation exists in the available genetic repertoire of accessions to handle the combination of stresses. PMID:27208277

  15. Salt pretreatment enhance salt tolerance in Zea mays L. seedlings.

    PubMed

    Tajdoost, S; Farboodnia, T; Heidari, R

    2007-06-15

    Recent molecular studies show that genetic factors of salt tolerance in halophytes exist in glycophytes too, but they are not active. If these plants expose to low level salt stress these factors may become active and cause plants acclimation to higher salt stresses. So because of the importance of these findings in this research the effect of salt pretreatment has been examined in Zea mays seedlings. To do the experiment four day old Zea mays seedlings (Var. single cross 704) pretreated with 50 mM NaCl for the period of 20 h. Then they were transferred to 200 and 300 mM NaCl for 48 h. At the end of treatment roots and shoots of seedlings were harvested separately. The changes of K+ -leakage, the amount of malondialdehyde, proline, soluble sugars and the Hill reaction rate were analyzed. The results indicated that the amount of K+ -leakage and malondialdehyde (MDA) have been increased because of salt-induced lipid peroxidation and membrane unstability. Soluble sugars and proline as osmoregulators has been increased in stress condition and in pretreated plants with NaCl were the highest. The rate of Hill reaction was reduced significantly in stressed plants. Therefore we concluded that salt stress causes serious physiological and biochemical damages in plants and salt pretreatment enhances tolerance mechanisms of plants and help them to tolerate salt stress and grow on salty environments. PMID:19093451

  16. Organic and inorganic inputs and losses in an irrigated corn field after inorganic fertilizer or manure application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about inorganic fertilizer or manure effects on organic carbon (OC) and inorganic C (IC) losses from a furrow irrigated field, particularly in the context of other system C gains or losses. In 2003 and 2004, we measured dissolved organic and inorganic C (DOC, DIC), particulate OC an...

  17. Casting inorganic structures with DNA molds

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Boulais, Etienne; Hakobyan, Yera; Wang, Wei Li; Guan, Amy; Bathe, Mark; Yin, Peng

    2014-01-01

    We report a general strategy for designing and synthesizing inorganic nanostructures with arbitrarily prescribed three-dimensional shapes. Computationally designed DNA strands self-assemble into a stiff “nano-mold” that contains a user-specified three-dimensional cavity and encloses a nucleating gold “seed”. Under mild conditions, this seed grows into a larger cast structure that fills and thus replicates the cavity. We synthesized a variety of nanoparticles with three nanometer resolution: three distinct silver cuboids with three independently tunable dimensions, silver and gold nanoparticles with diverse cross sections, and composite structures with homo-/heterogeneous components. The designer equilateral silver triangular and spherical nanoparticles exhibited plasmonic properties consistent with electromagnetism-based simulations. Our framework is generalizable to more complex geometries and diverse inorganic materials, offering a range of applications in biosensing, photonics, and nanoelectronics. PMID:25301973

  18. Electrostatically gated membrane permeability in inorganic protocells.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Harbron, Rachel L; Weaver, Jonathan V M; Binks, Bernard P; Mann, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    Although several strategies are now available to produce functional microcompartments analogous to primitive cell-like structures, little progress has been made in generating protocell constructs with self-controlled membrane permeability. Here we describe the preparation of water-dispersible colloidosomes based on silica nanoparticles and delineated by a continuous semipermeable inorganic membrane capable of self-activated, electrostatically gated permeability. We use crosslinking and covalent grafting of a pH-responsive copolymer to generate an ultrathin elastic membrane that exhibits selective release and uptake of small molecules. This behaviour, which depends on the charge of the copolymer coronal layer, serves to trigger enzymatic dephosphorylation reactions specifically within the protocell aqueous interior. This system represents a step towards the design and construction of alternative types of artificial chemical cells and protocell models based on spontaneous processes of inorganic self-organization. PMID:23695636

  19. Electrostatically gated membrane permeability in inorganic protocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mei; Harbron, Rachel L.; Weaver, Jonathan V. M.; Binks, Bernard P.; Mann, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    Although several strategies are now available to produce functional microcompartments analogous to primitive cell-like structures, little progress has been made in generating protocell constructs with self-controlled membrane permeability. Here we describe the preparation of water-dispersible colloidosomes based on silica nanoparticles and delineated by a continuous semipermeable inorganic membrane capable of self-activated, electrostatically gated permeability. We use crosslinking and covalent grafting of a pH-responsive copolymer to generate an ultrathin elastic membrane that exhibits selective release and uptake of small molecules. This behaviour, which depends on the charge of the copolymer coronal layer, serves to trigger enzymatic dephosphorylation reactions specifically within the protocell aqueous interior. This system represents a step towards the design and construction of alternative types of artificial chemical cells and protocell models based on spontaneous processes of inorganic self-organization.

  20. Theory Of Salt Effects On Protein Solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Yuba; Schmit, Jeremy

    Salt is one of the major factors that effects protein solubility. Often, at low salt concentration regime, protein solubility increases with the salt concentration(salting in) whereas at high salt concentration regime, solubility decreases with the increase in salt concentration(salting out). There are no quantitative theories to explain salting in and salting out. We have developed a model to describe the salting in and salting out. Our model accounts for the electrostatic Coulomb energy, salt entropy and non-electrostatic interaction between proteins. We analytically solve the linearized Poisson Boltzmann equation modelling the protein charge by a first order multipole expansion. In our model, protein charges are modulated by the anion binding. Consideration of only the zeroth order term in protein charge doesn't help to describe salting in phenomenon because of the repulsive interaction. To capture the salting in behaviour, it requires an attractive electrostatic interaction in low salt regime. Our work shows that at low salt concentration, dipole interaction is the cause for salting in and at high salt concentration a salt-dependent depletion interaction dominates and gives the salting out. Our theoretical result is consistent with the experimental result for Chymosin protein NIH Grant No R01GM107487.

  1. Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Raade, Justin; Roark, Thomas; Vaughn, John; Bradshaw, Robert

    2013-07-22

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are comprised of many miles of fluid-filled pipes arranged in large grids with reflective mirrors used to capture radiation from the sun. Solar radiation heats the fluid which is used to produce steam necessary to power large electricity generation turbines. Currently, organic, oil-based fluid in the pipes has a maximum temperature threshold of 400 °C, allowing for the production of electricity at approximately 15 cents per kilowatt hour. The DOE hopes to foster the development of an advanced heat transfer fluid that can operate within higher temperature ranges. The new heat transfer fluid, when used with other advanced technologies, could significantly decrease solar electricity cost. Lower costs would make solar thermal electricity competitive with gas and coal and would offer a clean, renewable source of energy. Molten salts exhibit many desirable heat transfer qualities within the range of the project objectives. Halotechnics developed advanced heat transfer fluids (HTFs) for application in solar thermal power generation. This project focused on complex mixtures of inorganic salts that exhibited a high thermal stability, a low melting point, and other favorable characteristics. A high-throughput combinatorial research and development program was conducted in order to achieve the project objective. Over 19,000 candidate formulations were screened. The workflow developed to screen various chemical systems to discover salt formulations led to mixtures suitable for use as HTFs in both parabolic trough and heliostat CSP plants. Furthermore, salt mixtures which will not interfere with fertilizer based nitrates were discovered. In addition for use in CSP, the discovered salt mixtures can be applied to electricity storage, heat treatment of alloys and other industrial processes.

  2. Ion homeostasis in a salt-secreting halophytic grass

    PubMed Central

    Sanadhya, Payal; Agarwal, Parinita; Agarwal, Pradeep K.

    2015-01-01

    Salinity adversely affects plant growth and development, and disturbs intracellular ion homeostasis, resulting in cellular toxicity. Plants that tolerate salinity, halophytes, do so by manifesting numerous physiological and biochemical processes in coordination to alleviate cellular ionic imbalance. The present study was undertaken to analyse the salt tolerance mechanism in Aeluropus lagopoides (L.) trin. Ex Thw. (Poaceae) at both physiological and molecular levels. Plants secreted salt from glands, which eventually produced pristine salt crystals on leaves and leaf sheaths. The rate of salt secretion increased with increasing salt concentration in the growth medium. Osmotic adjustment was mainly achieved by inorganic osmolytes (Na+) and at 100 mM NaCl no change was observed in organic osmolytes in comparison to control plants. At 300 mM NaCl and with 150 mM NaCl + 150 mM KCl, the concentration of proline, soluble sugars and amino acids was significantly increased. Transcript profiling of transporter genes revealed differential spatial and temporal expressions in both shoot and root tissues in a manner synchronized towards maintaining ion homeostasis. In shoots, AlHKT2;1 transcript up-regulation was observed at 12 and 24 h in all the treatments, whereas in roots, maximum induction was observed at 48 h with K+ starvation. The HAK transcript was relatively abundant in shoot tissue with all the treatments. The plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter, SOS1, and tonoplast Na+/H+ antiporter, NHX1, were found to be significantly up-regulated in shoot tissue. Our data demonstrate that AlHKT2;1, HAK, SOS1, NHX1 and V-ATPase genes play a pivotal role in regulating the ion homeostasis in A. lagopoides. PMID:25990364

  3. Preconceptual design of a salt splitting process using ceramic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, D.E.; Brooks, K.P.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Clemmer, R.; Balagopal, S.; Landro, T.; Sutija, D.P.

    1997-01-01

    Inorganic ceramic membranes for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions are being developed for treating U. S. Department of Energy tank wastes. The process consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON) membranes. The primary NaSICON compositions being investigated are based on rare- earth ions (RE-NaSICON). Potential applications include: caustic recycling for sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes; reducing the volume of low-level wastes volume to be disposed of; adjusting pH and reducing competing cations to enhance cesium ion exchange processes; reducing sodium in high-level-waste sludges; and removing sodium from acidic wastes to facilitate calcining. These applications encompass wastes stored at the Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sites. The overall project objective is to supply a salt splitting process unit that impacts the waste treatment and disposal flowsheets and meets user requirements. The potential flowsheet impacts include improving the efficiency of the waste pretreatment processes, reducing volume, and increasing the quality of the final waste disposal forms. Meeting user requirements implies developing the technology to the point where it is available as standard equipment with predictable and reliable performance. This report presents two preconceptual designs for a full-scale salt splitting process based on the RE-NaSICON membranes to distinguish critical items for testing and to provide a vision that site users can evaluate.

  4. Magnesium, calcium and strontium salts of phenylacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Arlin, Jean Baptiste; Kennedy, Alan R; Shankland, Kenneth

    2012-02-01

    Three alkaline earth metal salts of phenylacetic acid were examined and all were found to have similar structural types to analogous salts of benzoic and halobenzoic acids. Thus, a synchrotron study shows that the cations in catena-poly[[[tetraaquamagnesium(II)]-μ-phenylacetato-κ(2)O:O'] phenylacetate], {[Mg(C(8)H(7)O(2))(H(2)O)(4)](C(8)H(7)O(2))}(n), form a one-dimensional coordination polymer that propagates through Mg-O-C-O-Mg interactions involving both crystallographically independent Mg centres (Z' = 2) and through translation along the a axis. The polymeric chains pack to give alternate inorganic layers and organic bilayers. The Ca and Sr species catena-poly[[[diaqua(phenylacetato-κ(2)O,O')calcium(II)]-μ(3)-phenylacetato-1':1:1''κ(4)O:O,O':O'] monohydrate], {[Ca(C(8)H(7)O(2))(2)(H(2)O)(2)]·H(2)O}(n), and catena-poly[[[diaqua(phenylacetato-κ(2)O,O')strontium(II)]-μ(3)-phenylacetato-1':1:1''κ(4)O:O,O':O'] monohydrate], {[Sr(C(8)H(7)O(2))(2)(H(2)O)(2)]·H(2)O}(n), are essentially isostructural. Both form one-dimensional coordination polymers through a carboxylate group that forms four M-O bonds. The polymeric chains propagate via 2(1) screw axes parallel to the b axis and are further linked in the bc plane by hydrogen bonding involving the non-metal-bound water molecule. Similarly to the Mg salt, both have inorganic layers that alternate with organic bilayers. PMID:22307244

  5. Inorganic rechargeable non-aqueous cell

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, William L.; Dey, Arabinda N.

    1985-05-07

    A totally inorganic non-aqueous rechargeable cell having an alkali or alkaline earth metal anode such as of lithium, a sulfur dioxide containing electrolyte and a discharging metal halide cathode, such as of CuCl.sub.2, CuBr.sub.2 and the like with said metal halide being substantially totally insoluble in SO.sub.2 and admixed with a conductive carbon material.

  6. Ion-Conducting Organic/Inorganic Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinder, James D.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2007-01-01

    Ion-conducting polymers that are hybrids of organic and inorganic moieties and that are suitable for forming into solid-electrolyte membranes have been invented in an effort to improve upon the polymeric materials that have been used previously for such membranes. Examples of the prior materials include perfluorosulfonic acid-based formulations, polybenzimidazoles, sulfonated polyetherketone, sulfonated naphthalenic polyimides, and polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based formulations. Relative to the prior materials, the polymers of the present invention offer greater dimensional stability, greater ease of formation into mechanically resilient films, and acceptably high ionic conductivities over wider temperature ranges. Devices in which films made of these ion-conducting organic/inorganic polymers could be used include fuel cells, lithium batteries, chemical sensors, electrochemical capacitors, electrochromic windows and display devices, and analog memory devices. The synthesis of a polymer of this type (see Figure 1) starts with a reaction between an epoxide-functionalized alkoxysilane and a diamine. The product of this reaction is polymerized by hydrolysis and condensation of the alkoxysilane group, producing a molecular network that contains both organic and inorganic (silica) links. The silica in the network contributes to the ionic conductivity and to the desired thermal and mechanical properties. Examples of other diamines that have been used in the reaction sequence of Figure 1 are shown in Figure 2. One can use any of these diamines or any combination of them in proportions chosen to impart desired properties to the finished product. Alternatively or in addition, one could similarly vary the functionality of the alkoxysilane to obtain desired properties. The variety of available alkoxysilanes and diamines thus affords flexibility to optimize the organic/inorganic polymer for a given application.

  7. Fabrication of Fully Solution Processed Inorganic Nanocrystal Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Troy K; Durastanti, Dario; Heuer, William B; Foos, Edward E; Yoon, Woojun; Tischler, Joseph G

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for the preparation of fully solution processed inorganic solar cells from a spin and spray coating deposition of nanocrystal inks. For the photoactive absorber layer, colloidal CdTe and CdSe nanocrystals (3-5 nm) are synthesized using an inert hot injection technique and cleaned with precipitations to remove excess starting reagents. Similarly, gold nanocrystals (3-5 nm) are synthesized under ambient conditions and dissolved in organic solvents. In addition, precursor solutions for transparent conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) films are prepared from solutions of indium and tin salts paired with a reactive oxidizer. Layer-by-layer, these solutions are deposited onto a glass substrate following annealing (200-400 °C) to build the nanocrystal solar cell (glass/ITO/CdSe/CdTe/Au). Pre-annealing ligand exchange is required for CdSe and CdTe nanocrystals where films are dipped in NH4Cl:methanol to replace long-chain native ligands with small inorganic Cl(-) anions. NH4Cl(s) was found to act as a catalyst for the sintering reaction (as a non-toxic alternative to the conventional CdCl2(s) treatment) leading to grain growth (136±39 nm) during heating. The thickness and roughness of the prepared films are characterized with SEM and optical profilometry. FTIR is used to determine the degree of ligand exchange prior to sintering, and XRD is used to verify the crystallinity and phase of each material. UV/Vis spectra show high visible light transmission through the ITO layer and a red shift in the absorbance of the cadmium chalcogenide nanocrystals after thermal annealing. Current-voltage curves of completed devices are measured under simulated one sun illumination. Small differences in deposition techniques and reagents employed during ligand exchange have been shown to have a profound influence on the device properties. Here, we examine the effects of chemical (sintering and ligand exchange agents) and physical treatments (solution concentration

  8. Inorganic particle analysis of dental impression elastomers.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Hugo Lemes; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Soares, Carlos José; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine quantitatively and qualitatively the inorganic particle fraction of commercially available dental elastomers. The inorganic volumetric fraction of two addition silicones (Reprosil Putty/Fluid and Flexitime Easy Putty/Fluid), three condensation silicones (Clonage Putty/Fluid, Optosil Confort/Xantopren VL and Silon APS Putty/Fluid), one polyether (Impregum Soft Light Body) and one polysulfide (Permlastic Light Body) was accessed by weighing a previously determined mass of each material in water before and after burning samples at 600 ºC, during 3 h. Unsettled material samples were soaked in acetone and chloroform for removal of the organic portion. The remaining filler particles were sputter-coated with gold evaluation of their morphology and size, under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexitime Easy Putty was the material with the highest results for volumetric particle fraction, while Impregum Soft had the lowest values. Silon 2 APS Fluid presented the lowest mean filler size values, while Clonage Putty had the highest values. SEM micrographs of the inorganic particles showed several morphologies - lathe-cut, spherical, spherical-like, sticks, and sticks mixed to lathe-cut powder. The results of this study revealed differences in particle characteristics among the elastometic materials that could lead to different results when testing mechanical properties.

  9. Flexible Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Perovskite Memory.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chungwan; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-05-24

    Active research has been done on hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite materials for application to solar cells with high power conversion efficiency. However, this material often shows hysteresis, which is undesirable, shift in the current-voltage curve. The hysteresis may come from formation of defects and their movement in perovskite materials. Here, we utilize the defects in perovskite materials to be used in memory operations. We demonstrate flexible nonvolatile memory devices based on hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite as the resistive switching layer on a plastic substrate. A uniform perovskite layer is formed on a transparent electrode-coated plastic substrate by solvent engineering. Flexible nonvolatile memory based on the perovskite layer shows reproducible and reliable memory characteristics in terms of program/erase operations, data retention, and endurance properties. The memory devices also show good mechanical flexibility. It is suggested that resistive switching is done by migration of vacancy defects and formation of conducting filaments under the electric field in the perovskite layer. It is believed that organic-inorganic perovskite materials have great potential to be used in high-performance, flexible memory devices. PMID:27093096

  10. Inorganic membranes: The new industrial revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Fain, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    Separation systems are a vital part of most industrial processes. These systems account for a large fraction of the capital equipment used and the operating costs of industrial processes. Inorganic membranes have the potential for providing separation systems that can significantly reduce both the capital equipment and operating costs. These separation processes include waste management and recycle as well as the primary production of raw materials and products. The authors are rapidly learning to understand the effect of physical and chemical properties on the different transport mechanisms that occur in inorganic membranes. Such understanding can be expected to provide the information needed to design, engineer and manufacture inorganic membranes to produce very high separation factors for almost any separation function. To implement such a revolution, the authors need to organize a unique partnership between the national laboratories, and industry. The university can provide research to understand the materials and transport mechanisms that produce various separations, the national laboratories the development of an economical fabrication and manufacturing capability, and industry the practical understanding of the operational problems required to achieve inplementation.

  11. Dermal absorption of inorganic germanium in rats.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Katsuhiko; Kawaai, Takae; Konomi, Aki; Uchida, Yuka

    2008-11-01

    So-called germanium 'health' products including dietary supplements, cosmetics, accessories, and warm bath service containing germanium compounds and metalloid are popular in Japan. Subchronic and chronic oral exposure of germanium dioxide (GeO(2)), popular chemical form of inorganic germanium causes severe germanium toxicosis including death and kidney dysfunction in humans and experimental animals. Intestinal absorption of neutralized GeO(2) or germanate is almost complete in humans and animals. However, it is not known whether germanium is cutaneously absorbed. We tested dermal absorption of neutralized GeO(2) or germanate using male F344/N rats. Three groups of rats were treated with a 3-h topical application of hydrophilic ointment containing graded level of neutralized GeO(2) (pH 7.4): 0, 0.21 and 0.42 mg GeO(2)/g. Germanium concentration in blood and tissues sampled from rats after topical application of inorganic germanium was measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Animals topically applied 0.42 mg GeO(2)/g ointment had significantly higher germanium concentrations in plasma, liver, and kidney than those of rats that received no topical germanium. The results indicate that skin is permeable to inorganic germanium ion or germanate and recurrent exposure of germanium compounds may pose a potential health hazard.

  12. Inorganic particle analysis of dental impression elastomers.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Hugo Lemes; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Soares, Carlos José; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine quantitatively and qualitatively the inorganic particle fraction of commercially available dental elastomers. The inorganic volumetric fraction of two addition silicones (Reprosil Putty/Fluid and Flexitime Easy Putty/Fluid), three condensation silicones (Clonage Putty/Fluid, Optosil Confort/Xantopren VL and Silon APS Putty/Fluid), one polyether (Impregum Soft Light Body) and one polysulfide (Permlastic Light Body) was accessed by weighing a previously determined mass of each material in water before and after burning samples at 600 ºC, during 3 h. Unsettled material samples were soaked in acetone and chloroform for removal of the organic portion. The remaining filler particles were sputter-coated with gold evaluation of their morphology and size, under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexitime Easy Putty was the material with the highest results for volumetric particle fraction, while Impregum Soft had the lowest values. Silon 2 APS Fluid presented the lowest mean filler size values, while Clonage Putty had the highest values. SEM micrographs of the inorganic particles showed several morphologies - lathe-cut, spherical, spherical-like, sticks, and sticks mixed to lathe-cut powder. The results of this study revealed differences in particle characteristics among the elastometic materials that could lead to different results when testing mechanical properties. PMID:21271042

  13. Universal dispersing agent for electrophoretic deposition of inorganic materials with improved adsorption, triggered by chelating monomers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangshuai; Luo, Dan; Ata, Mustafa S; Zhang, Tianshi; Wallar, Cameron J; Zhitomirsky, Igor

    2016-01-15

    Poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylazo)benzenesulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt] (PAZO) is a polymeric functional material with a number of unique physical properties, which attracted significant interest of different scientific communities. Films of PAZO were deposited by anodic electrophoretic deposition (EPD) under constant current and constant voltage conditions. The deposition kinetics was analyzed under different conditions and the deposition mechanism was discussed. New strategy was developed for the EPD of different inorganic materials and composites using PAZO as a dispersing, charging, binding and film forming agent. It was found that PAZO exhibits remarkable adsorption on various inorganic materials due to the presence of chelating salicylate ligands in its molecular structure. The salicylate ligands of PAZO monomers provide multiple adsorption sites by complexation of metal atoms on particle surfaces and allow for efficient electrosteric stabilization of particle suspensions. The remarkable performance of PAZO in its application in EPD have been exemplified by deposition of a wide variety of inorganic materials including the single element oxides (NiO, ZnO, Fe2O3) the complex oxides (Al2TiO5, BaTiO3, ZrSiO4, CoFe2O4) different nitrides (TiN, Si3N4, BN) as well as pure Ni metal and hydrotalcite clay. The use of PAZO can avoid limitation of other dispersing agents in deposition and co-deposition of different materials. Composite films were obtained using PAZO as a co-dispersant for different inorganic materials. The deposit composition, microstructure and deposition yield can be varied. The EPD method offers the advantages of simplicity, high deposition rate, and ability to deposit thin or thick films. PMID:26433084

  14. Osmotic pressure-dependent release profiles of payloads from nanocontainers by co-encapsulation of simple salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzadi, Shahed; Rosenauer, Christine; Kappl, Michael; Mohr, Kristin; Landfester, Katharina; Crespy, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The encapsulation of payloads in micro- to nano-scale capsules allows protection of the payload from the surrounding environment and control of its release profile. Herein, we program the release of hydrophilic payloads from nanocontainers by co-encapsulating simple inorganic salts for adjusting the osmotic pressure. The latter either leads to a burst release at high concentrations of co-encapsulated salts or a sustained release at lower concentrations. Osmotic pressure causes swelling of the nanocapsule's shell and therefore sustained release profiles can be adjusted by crosslinking it. The approach presented allows for programing the release of payloads by co-encapsulating inexpensive salts inside nanocontainers without the help of stimuli-responsive materials.The encapsulation of payloads in micro- to nano-scale capsules allows protection of the payload from the surrounding environment and control of its release profile. Herein, we program the release of hydrophilic payloads from nanocontainers by co-encapsulating simple inorganic salts for adjusting the osmotic pressure. The latter either leads to a burst release at high concentrations of co-encapsulated salts or a sustained release at lower concentrations. Osmotic pressure causes swelling of the nanocapsule's shell and therefore sustained release profiles can be adjusted by crosslinking it. The approach presented allows for programing the release of payloads by co-encapsulating inexpensive salts inside nanocontainers without the help of stimuli-responsive materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01882c

  15. Lowering Salt in Your Diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... needs some salt to function. Also known as sodium chloride, salt helps maintain the body's balance of fluids. ... select foods that provide 5% or less for sodium, per serving. back to ... substitutes contain potassium chloride and can be used by individuals to replace ...

  16. Structure of liquid trivalent salts

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.L.; Saboungi, M.L.; Howells, W.S.; Tosi, M.P.

    1993-04-01

    Total neutron scattering measurements have been made on three trivalent molten salts: InCl{sub 3} (605C), BiCl{sub 3}(300C) and BiI{sub 3} (420C). Results are discussed in the general context of ordering, bonding and macroscopic properties of trivalent molten salts.

  17. Structure of liquid trivalent salts

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.L.; Saboungi, M.L. . Materials Science Div.); Howells, W.S. ); Tosi, M.P. )

    1993-04-01

    Total neutron scattering measurements have been made on three trivalent molten salts: InCl[sub 3] (605C), BiCl[sub 3](300C) and BiI[sub 3] (420C). Results are discussed in the general context of ordering, bonding and macroscopic properties of trivalent molten salts.

  18. Fabricating porous materials using interpenetrating inorganic-organic composite gels

    DOEpatents

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Volosin, Alex

    2016-06-14

    Porous materials are fabricated using interpenetrating inorganic-organic composite gels. A mixture or precursor solution including an inorganic gel precursor, an organic polymer gel precursor, and a solvent is treated to form an inorganic wet gel including the organic polymer gel precursor and the solvent. The inorganic wet gel is then treated to form a composite wet gel including an organic polymer network in the body of the inorganic wet gel, producing an interpenetrating inorganic-organic composite gel. The composite wet gel is dried to form a composite material including the organic polymer network and an inorganic network component. The composite material can be treated further to form a porous composite material, a porous polymer or polymer composite, a porous metal oxide, and other porous materials.

  19. Ammoniated salt heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, W. R.; Jaeger, F. J.; Giordano, T. J.

    A thermochemical heat pump/energy storage system using liquid ammoniate salts is described. The system, which can be used for space heating or cooling, provides energy storage for both functions. The bulk of the energy is stored as chemical energy and thus can be stored indefinitely. The system is well suited to use with a solar energy source or industrial waste heat. Several liquid ammoniates are identified and the critical properties of three of the most promising are presented. Results of small scale (5000 Btu) system tests are discussed and a design concept for a prototype system is given. This system represents a significant improvement over the system using solid ammoniates investigated previously because of the increase in heat transfer rates (5 to 60 Btu/hr sq ft F) and the resulting reduction in heat exchanger size. As a result the concept shows promise of being cost competitive with conventional systems.

  20. History Leaves Salts Behind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    These plots, or spectra, show that a rock dubbed 'McKittrick' near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site at Meridiani Planum, Mars, has higher concentrations of sulfur and bromine than a nearby patch of soil nicknamed 'Tarmac.' These data were taken by Opportunity's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, which uses curium-244 to assess the elemental composition of rocks and soil. Only portions of the targets' full spectra are shown to highlight the significant differences in elemental concentrations between 'McKittrick' and 'Tarmac.' Intensities are plotted on a logarithmic scale.

    A nearby rock named Guadalupe similarly has extremely high concentrations of sulfur, but very little bromine. This 'element fractionation' typically occurs when a watery brine slowly evaporates and various salt compounds are precipitated in sequence.

  1. Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-06-01

    Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selection and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.

  2. Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms

    DOE PAGES

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-06-01

    Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selectionmore » and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.« less

  3. DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSIS OF DIVALENT SALTS

    PubMed Central

    YANG, HEIDI HAI-LING; LAWLESS, HARRY T.

    2005-01-01

    Many divalent salts (e.g., calcium, iron, zinc), have important nutritional value and are used to fortify food or as dietary supplements. Sensory characterization of some divalent salts in aqueous solutions by untrained judges has been reported in the psychophysical literature, but formal sensory evaluation by trained panels is lacking. To provide this information, a trained descriptive panel evaluated the sensory characteristics of 10 divalent salts including ferrous sulfate, chloride and gluconate; calcium chloride, lactate and glycerophosphate; zinc sulfate and chloride; and magnesium sulfate and chloride. Among the compounds tested, iron compounds were highest in metallic taste; zinc compounds had higher astringency and a glutamate-like sensation; and bitterness was pronounced for magnesium and calcium salts. Bitterness was affected by the anion in ferrous and calcium salts. Results from the trained panelists were largely consistent with the psychophysical literature using untrained judges, but provided a more comprehensive set of oral sensory attributes. PMID:16614749

  4. Salt brickwork as long-term sealing in salt formations

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, F.; Yaramanci, U.

    1993-12-31

    Radioactive wastes can be disposed of in deep salt formations. Rock salt is a suitable geologic medium because of its unique characteristics. Open boreholes, shafts and drifts are created to provide physical access to the repository. Long-term seals must be emplaced in these potential pathways to prevent radioactive release into the biosphere. The sealing materials must be mechanically and, most important, geochemically stable within the host rock. Salt bricks made from compressed salt-powder are understood to be the first choice long-term sealing material. Seals built of salt bricks will be ductile. Large sealing systems are built by combining the individual bricks with mortar. Raw materials for mortar are fine-grained halite powder and ground saliferous clay. This provides for the good adhesive strength of the mortar to the bricks and the high shear-strength of the mortar itself. To test the interaction of rock salt with an emplaced long-term seal, experiments will be carried out in situ, in the Asse salt mine in Germany. Simple borehole sealing experiments will be performed in horizontal holes and a complicated drift sealing experiment is planned, to demonstrate the technology of sealing a standard size drift or shaft inside a disturbed rock mass. Especially, the mechanical stability of the sealing system has to be demonstrated.

  5. Molten Salt Promoting Effect in Double Salt CO2 Absorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Keling; Li, Xiaohong S.; Chen, Haobo; Singh, Prabhakar; King, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the concept of molten salts as catalysts for CO2 absorption by MgO, and extend these observations to the MgO-containing double salt oxides. We will show that the phenomena involved with CO2 absorption by MgO and MgO-based double salts are similar and general, but with some important differences. This paper focuses on the following key concepts: i) identification of conditions that favor or disfavor participation of isolated MgO during double salt absorption, and investigation of methods to increase the absorption capacity of double salt systems by including MgO participation; ii) examination of the relationship between CO2 uptake and melting point of the promoter salt, leading to the recognition of the role of pre-melting (surface melting) in these systems; and iii) extension of the reaction pathway model developed for the MgO-NaNO3 system to the double salt systems. This information advances our understanding of MgO-based CO2 absorption systems for application with pre-combustion gas streams.

  6. Low temperature property of Metaphosphatecopper(II/I) salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Trilochan; Brahma, Gouri Sankhar

    2016-04-01

    An inorganically template metaphosphoric acid containing copper salt, nanomaterial, has been synthesized and characterized with different measurement techniques such as Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC), UV-Vis-NIR, HRTEM, VSM, PPMS and X-RD. The thermal property of this salt has been studied at a low temperature up to 223 K from 298 K with DSC. The specific heat capacity of this complex has been measured in atmospheric O2 at a rate of 10 K min-1 from 298 K to 223 K and vice versa in two thermal cycles. The net specific heat capacity of this salt is found -88.28 J/gm.K and - 86.56 J/gm.K in first and second thermal cycles, respectively. There is a discontinuity in the specific heat at 106 s while measuring the specific heat capacity of the above nanomaterial at constant temperature 283 K. This particle size of this nanomaterial is ˜ 10 nm. The paramagnetic Curie temperature (θP) and Curie constant (C) are 18.29 K and 1.35x10-3 respectively. This material founds insulator from PPMS and UV-Vis-NIR measurements. So, it can be used as thermal interface material as a composite component with some organic polymers such as paraffin wax, ethylene-vinyl acetate etc.

  7. Transformation of layered polyoxometallate cluster salts into mesoporous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, B.T.; Isbester, P.K.; Munson, E.J.; Stein, A. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1999-02-01

    A new approach to the formation of mesoporous materials has been developed, based on a two-step salt-gel'' synthesis, in which mesoporous aluminophosphates, galloaluminophosphates, and aluminosilicates have been created. The first step involves pre-organizing charged inorganic clusters (MO[sub 4]Al[sub 12](OH)[sub 24](H[sub 2]O)[sub 12][sup 7+], M = Al or Ga) into a layered mesoscopic material with oppositely charged organic surfactant molecules. In the second step, phosphate or silicate linker molecules are added, which diffuse through the cluster/surfactant salt, react with the clusters, and transform the layered precursor into a non-lamellar mesostructured material. Removal of the surfactant from the alumino- and galloaluminophosphates by anion-exchange and from the aluminosilicates by calcination results in mesoporous materials with BET surface areas up to 630, 455, and 431 m[sup 2]/g, respectively. Direct condensation by calcination of polyoxoaluminate cluster salts without additional linkers produces nanometer-sized one-dimensional strings.

  8. Cold Flow as Versatile Approach for Stable and Highly Luminescent Quantum Dot-Salt Composites.

    PubMed

    Benad, Albrecht; Guhrenz, Chris; Bauer, Christoph; Eichler, Franziska; Adam, Marcus; Ziegler, Christoph; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2016-08-24

    Since the beginning of the 1980s, colloidally synthesized quantum dots (QDs) have been in the focus of interest due to their possible implementation for color conversion, luminescent light concentrators, and lasing. For all these applications, the QDs benefit from being embedded into a host matrix to ensure stability and usability. Many different host materials used for this purpose still have their individual shortcomings. Here, we present a universal, fast, and flexible approach for the direct incorporation of a wide range of QDs into inorganic ionic crystals using cold flow. The QD solution is mixed with a finely milled salt, followed by the removal of the solvent under vacuum. Under high pressure (GPa), the salt powder loaded with QDs transforms into transparent pellets. This effect is well-known for many inorganic salts (e.g., KCl, KBr, KI, NaCl, CsI, AgCl) from, e.g., sample preparation for IR spectroscopy. With this approach, we are able to obtain strongly luminescent QD-salt composites, have precise control over the loading, and provide a chemically robust matrix ensuring long-term stability of the embedded QDs. Furthermore, we show the photo-, chemical, and thermal stability of the composite materials and their use as color conversion layers for a white light-emitting diode (w-LED). The method presented can potentially be used for all kinds of nanoparticles synthesized in organic as well as in aqueous media. PMID:27482755

  9. Great Salt Lake and Bonneville Salt Flats, UT, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This is a view of the Great Salt Lake and nearby Bonneville Salt Flats, UT, (41.0N, 112.5W). A railroad causeway divides the lake with a stark straight line changing the water level and chemistry of the lake as a result. Fresh water runoff enters from the south adding to the depth and reducing the salinity. The north half receives little frsh water and is more saline and shallow. The Bonnieville Salt Flats is the lakebed of a onetime larger lake.

  10. Reactions of inorganic nitrogen species in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Dell`Orco, P.C.

    1994-12-31

    Redox reactions of nitrate salts with NH3 and methanol were studied in near-critical and supercritical water at 350 to 530 C and constant pressure of 302 bar. Sodium nitrate decomposition reactions were investigated at similar conditions. Reactions were conducted in isothermal tubular reactor under plug flow. For kinetic modeling, nitrate and nitrite reactants were lumped into an NO{sub x}{sup -} reactant; kinetic expressions were developed for MNO{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X and sodium nitrate decomposition reactions. The proposed elementary reaction mechanism for MNO{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X reaction indicated that NO{sub 2} was the primary oxidizing species and that N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O selectivities could be determined by the form of MNO{sub 3} used. This suggest a nitrogen control strategy for use in SCWO (supercritical water oxidation) processes; nitrate or NH3 could be used to remove the other, at reaction conditions far less severe than required by other methods. Reactions of nitrate with methanol indicated that nitrate was a better oxidant than oxygen in supercritical water. Nitrogen reaction products included NH3 and nitrite, while inorganic carbon was the major carbon reaction product. Analysis of excess experiments indicated that the reaction at 475 C was first order in methanol concentration and second order in NO{sub x}{sup -} concentration. In order to determine phase regimes for these reactions, solubility of sodium nitrate was determined for some 1:1 nitrate electrolytes. Solubilities were measured at 450 to 525 C, from 248 to 302 bar. A semi-empirical solvation model was shown to adequately describe the experimental sodium nitrate solubilities. Solubilities of Li, Na, and K nitrates revealed with cations with smaller ionic radii had greater solubilities with nitrate.

  11. Iodized Salt Sales in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Maalouf, Joyce; Barron, Jessica; Gunn, Janelle P.; Yuan, Keming; Perrine, Cria G.; Cogswell, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Iodized salt has been an important source of dietary iodine, a trace element important for regulating human growth, development, and metabolic functions. This analysis identified iodized table salt sales as a percentage of retail salt sales using Nielsen ScanTrack. We identified 1117 salt products, including 701 salt blends and 416 other salt products, 57 of which were iodized. When weighted by sales volume in ounces or per item, 53% contained iodized salt. These findings may provide a baseline for future monitoring of sales of iodized salt. PMID:25763528

  12. Organic materials as templates for the formation of mesoporous inorganic materials and ordered inorganic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Christopher R.

    Hierarchically structured inorganic materials are everywhere in nature. From unicellular aquatic algae such as diatoms to the bones and/or cartilage that comprise the skeletal systems of vertebrates. Complex mechanisms involving site-specific chemistries and precision kinetics are responsible for the formation of such structures. In the synthetic realm, reproduction of even the most basic hierarchical structure effortlessly produced in nature is difficult. However, through the utilization of self-assembling structures or "templates", such as polymers or amphiphilic surfactants, combined with some favorable interaction between a chosen inorganic, the potential exists to imprint an inorganic material with a morphology dictated via synthetic molecular self-assembly. In doing so, a very basic hierarchical structure is formed on the angstrom and nanometer scales. The work presented herein utilizes the self-assembly of either surfactants or block copolymers with the desired inorganic or inorganic precursor to form templated inorganic structures. Specifically, mesoporous silica spheres and copolymer directed calcium phosphate-polymer composites were formed through the co-assembly of an organic template and a precursor to form the desired mesostructured inorganic. For the case of the mesoporous silica spheres, a silica precursor was mixed with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and cysteamine, a highly effective biomimetic catalyst for the conversion of alkoxysilanes to silica. Through charge-based interactions between anionic silica species and the micelle-forming cationic surfactant, ordered silica structures resulted. The incorporation of a novel, effective catalyst was found to form highly condensed silica spheres for potential application as catalyst supports or an encapsulation media. Ordered calcium phosphate-polymer composites were formed using two routes. Both routes take advantage of hydrogen bonding and ionic interactions between the calcium and phosphate precursors

  13. Will salt repositories be dry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredehoeft, John D.

    The National Academy of Science committee that considered geologic disposal of nuclear waste in the mid-1950s recommended salt as a repository medium, partly because of its high thermal conductivity and because it was believed to be “dry” (perhaps the appropriate thought is “impermeable”). Certainly, the fact that Paleozoic salt deposits exist in many parts of t h e world is evidence for very low rates of dissolution by moving groundwater. The fact that the dissolution rates were so small led many scientists to the conclusion that the salt beds were nearly impermeable. The major source of brine within the salt beds was thought to be fluid inclusions within salt crystals, which could migrate through differential solution toward a source of high heat. The idea that salt was uniformly “dry” was revised when exploratory drilling in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico encountered brines within the Castile Formation, an evaporite deposit below the Salado Formation. The brine reservoirs were thought to be isolated pockets of brine in an otherwise “impermeable” salt section.

  14. Stability High Salt Content Waste Using Sol Gel Process. Mixed Waste Focus Area. OST Reference Number 0236

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    Mixed waste sludges, soils, and homogeneous solids containing high levels of salt ( ~ greater than 15% by weight ) have proven to be difficult to stabilize due to the soluble nature of the salts. The current stabilization technique for high salt waste, grouting with Portland cement, is limited to low waste loadings. The presence of salts interfere with the hydration and curing of the cement, cause waste form deteriorating mineral expansions, or result in an undesirable separate phase altogether. Improved technologies for the stabilization of salt waste must be able to accommodate higher salt loadings, while maintaining structural integrity, chemical durability, and leach resistance. In a joint collaboration supported by the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Arizona Materials Laboratory (AML) at the University of Arizona have developed a sol-gel (wet-chemical) based, low-temperature-processing route for the stabilization of salt-containing mixed wastes. By blending and reacting liquid precursors at room temperature with salt waste, strong, impermeable “polyceram” matrices have been formed that encapsulate the environmentally hazardous waste components. As depicted by Figure 1, polycerams are hybrid organic/inorganic materials with unique properties derived from the chemical combination of polymer (organic) and ceramic (inorganic) components. For this application, the stabilizing polyceram matrices contain polybutadiene-based polymer components and silicon dioxide (SiO2) as the inorganic component. Polybutadiene (PBD) is a strong, tough, waterresistant plastic and its use in the polyceram promotes these same characteristics in the waste form. The PBD polymer component is modified to increase its reactivity with the SiO2 precursor during sol-gel processing. When combined, the polymer and SiO2 precursors react, gel, solidify, and encapsulate the

  15. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This simulated natural color image presents a late spring view of north central Utah that includes all of the Olympic sites. The image extends from Ogden in the north, to Provo in the south; and includes the snow-capped Wasatch Mountains and the eastern part of the Great Salt Lake.

    This image was acquired on May 28, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution

  16. Sea salt CCN contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Jha, V.; Noble, S.

    2011-12-01

    Volatility measurements (Twomey 1971; Hudson and Da 1996) showed that most CCN over the ocean are not NaCl. However, other reports indicate NaCl as a major CCN component. Here we contrast cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectral volatility (thermal fractionation) measurements from three aircraft field projects to provide insight into the relative contribution of sea salt. The most remote location, PASE (mid-Pacific), had the highest average CCN concentrations (NCCN) probably because it was the least cloudy whereas the less remote, but more cloudy,RICO(Caribbean)had the lowest average NCCN (Hudson and Noble 2009). In RICO particle concentrations in all size ranges larger than 0.3 micrometers were well correlated with wind speed (R ~ 0.87) but uncorrelated with NCCN (Fig. 1A). Smaller particles in RICO were correlated with NCCN but uncorrelated with wind speed. In PASE only particles larger than 10 micrometers were correlated with wind speed and concentrations in these size ranges were uncorrelated with NCCN. Particles smaller than 10 micrometers in PASE were uncorrelated with wind speed but well correlated with NCCN. In both projects particle concentrations smaller than these respective sizes were highly correlated with NCCN, at all S in PASE but mainly with NCCN at high S in RICO. CCN volatility measurements showed high correlations between refractory NCCN and wind speed, especially for low supersaturation (S) NCCN, and no correlation of volatile NCCN at all S with wind speed. In PASE there was only a weak positive correlation between refractory NCCN and wind and also no correlation between volatile NCCN and wind. These results indicate that in clean maritime air the wind originated component of NCCN can be substantial (i.e., > 30% for wind > 14 m/s) but that in maritime air with higher NCCN the wind derived CCN component is probably less than 10%. The contrast in cloudiness between the two projects was responsible for many of the differences noted between them. A

  17. Inorganic-organic composite solid polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, K.M.; Koch, V.R.; Blakley, T.J.

    2000-04-01

    Inorganic-organic composite solid polymer electrolytes (CSPEs) have been prepared from the poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-like electrolytes of the general formula polyvinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene (PVdF-HFP)-PEO{sub n}-LiX and Li{sup +}-conducting ceramic powders. In the PEO-like electrolytes, PVdF-HFP is the copolymer of PVdF and HFP, PEO{sub n} is a nonvolatile oligomeric polyethylene oxide of {approximately}400 g/mol molecular weight, and LiX is lithium bis(trifluoroethylsulfonyl)imide. Two types of inorganic oxide ceramic powders were used: a highly Li{sup +}-conducting material of the composition 14 mol % Li{sub 2}O-9Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-38TiO{sub 2}-39P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and the poorly Li{sup +}-conducting Li-silicates Li{sub 4{minus}x}M{sub x}SiO{sub 4} where M is Ca or Mg and x is 0 or 0.05. The composite electrolytes can be prepared as thin membranes in which the Li{sup +} conductivity and good mechanical strength of the Li{sup +}-conducting inorganic ceramics are complemented by the structural flexibility and high conductivity of organic polymer electrolytes. Excellent electrochemical and thermal stabilities have been demonstrated for the electrolyte films. Li//composite electrolyte//LiCoO{sub 2} rechargeable cells have been fabricated and cycled at room temperature and 50 C.

  18. Performance evaluation of two protective treatments on salt-laden limestones and marble after natural and artificial weathering.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Barbara; Pinna, Daniela; Porcinai, Simone

    2014-02-01

    Salt crystallization is a major damage factor in stone weathering, and the application of inappropriate protective products may amplify its effects. This research focuses on the evaluation of two protective products' performance (organic polydimethylsiloxane and inorganic ammonium oxalate (NH4)2(COO)2·H2O) in the case of a salt load from behind. Experimental laboratory simulations based on salt crystallization cycles and natural weathering in an urban area were carried out. The effects were monitored over time, applying different methods: weight loss evaluation, colorimetric and water absorption by capillarity measurements, stereomicroscope observations, FTIR and SEM-EDS analyses. The results showed minor impact exerted on the short term on stones, particularly those treated with the water repellent, by atmospheric agents compared to salt crystallization. Lithotypes with low salt load (Gioia marble) underwent minor changes than the heavily salt-laden limestones (Lecce and Ançã stones), which were dramatically damaged when treated with polysiloxane. The results suggest that the ammonium oxalate treatment should be preferred to polysiloxane in the presence of soluble salts, even after desalination procedures which might not completely remove them. In addition, the neo-formed calcium oxalate seemed to effectively protect the stone, improving its resistance against salt crystallization without occluding the pores and limiting the superficial erosion caused by atmospheric agents. PMID:23996736

  19. Performance evaluation of two protective treatments on salt-laden limestones and marble after natural and artificial weathering.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Barbara; Pinna, Daniela; Porcinai, Simone

    2014-02-01

    Salt crystallization is a major damage factor in stone weathering, and the application of inappropriate protective products may amplify its effects. This research focuses on the evaluation of two protective products' performance (organic polydimethylsiloxane and inorganic ammonium oxalate (NH4)2(COO)2·H2O) in the case of a salt load from behind. Experimental laboratory simulations based on salt crystallization cycles and natural weathering in an urban area were carried out. The effects were monitored over time, applying different methods: weight loss evaluation, colorimetric and water absorption by capillarity measurements, stereomicroscope observations, FTIR and SEM-EDS analyses. The results showed minor impact exerted on the short term on stones, particularly those treated with the water repellent, by atmospheric agents compared to salt crystallization. Lithotypes with low salt load (Gioia marble) underwent minor changes than the heavily salt-laden limestones (Lecce and Ançã stones), which were dramatically damaged when treated with polysiloxane. The results suggest that the ammonium oxalate treatment should be preferred to polysiloxane in the presence of soluble salts, even after desalination procedures which might not completely remove them. In addition, the neo-formed calcium oxalate seemed to effectively protect the stone, improving its resistance against salt crystallization without occluding the pores and limiting the superficial erosion caused by atmospheric agents.

  20. Alterations in nanoparticle protein corona by biological surfactants: impact of bile salts on β-lactoglobulin-coated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Winuprasith, Thunnalin; Chantarak, Sirinya; Suphantharika, Manop; He, Lili; McClements, David Julian

    2014-07-15

    The impact of biological surfactants (bile salts) on the protein (β-lactoglobulin) corona surrounding gold nanoparticles (200 nm) was studied using a variety of analytical techniques at pH 7: dynamic light scattering (DLS); particle electrophoresis (ζ-potential); UV-visible (UV) spectroscopy; transmission electron microscopy (TEM); and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The bile salts adsorbed to the protein-coated nanoparticle surfaces and altered their interfacial composition, charge, and structure. SERS spectra of protein-coated nanoparticles after bile salt addition contained bands from both protein and bile salts, indicating that the protein was not fully displaced by the bile salts. UV, DLS and TEM techniques also indicated that the protein coating was not fully displaced from the nanoparticle surfaces. The impact of bile salts could be described by an orogenic mechanism: mixed interfaces were formed that consisted of islands of aggregated proteins surrounded by a sea of bile salts. This knowledge is useful for understanding the interactions of bile salts with protein-coated colloidal particles, which may be important for controlling the fate of colloidal delivery systems in the human gastrointestinal tract, or the gastrointestinal fate of ingested inorganic nanoparticles.

  1. Stretchable, curvilinear electronics based on inorganic materials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Xiao, Jianliang; Song, Jizhou; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2010-05-18

    All commercial forms of electronic/optoelectronic technologies use planar, rigid substrates. Device possibilities that exploit bio-inspired designs or require intimate integration with the human body demand curvilinear shapes and/or elastic responses to large strain deformations. This article reviews progress in research designed to accomplish these outcomes with established, high-performance inorganic electronic materials and modest modifications to conventional, planar processing techniques. We outline the most well developed strategies and illustrate their use in demonstrator devices that exploit unique combinations of shape, mechanical properties and electronic performance. We conclude with an outlook on the challenges and opportunities for this emerging area of materials science and engineering.

  2. Inorganic delivery vector for intravenous injection.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Seo-Young; Kriven, Waltraud M; Wallig, Matthew A; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2004-12-01

    Uniform, small-sized (100-200 nm), layered double hydroxides (LDH) were prepared by a conventional, wet chemistry method using different aging times of 1 and 3 days as an inorganic drug or gene delivery carrier. The samples prepared had a hexagonal thin, plate-like shape and TEM/SAD electron microscopy of LDH particles indicated that they were single crystals. In vivo testing of empty LDH administered to adult male Sprague Dawley rats was done to evaluate the possibility of using LDH as an injectable drug delivery vehicle.

  3. Nanoscale investigation of organic - inorganic halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacovich, S.; Divitini, G.; Vrućinić, M.; Sadhanala, A.; Friend, R. H.; Sirringhaus, H.; Deschler, F.; Ducati, C.

    2015-10-01

    Over the last few years organic - inorganic halide perovskite-based solar cells have exhibited a rapid evolution, reaching certified power conversion efficiencies now surpassing 20%. Nevertheless the understanding of the optical and electronic properties of such systems on the nanoscale is still an open problem. In this work we investigate two model perovskite systems (based on iodine - CH3NH3PbI3 and bromine - CH3NH3PbBr3), analysing the local elemental composition and crystallinity and identifying chemical inhomogeneities.

  4. Magnetic field processing of inorganic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Kunerth, D.C.; Peterson, E.S.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate, understand, and demonstrate the use of magnetic field processing (MFP) to modify the properties of inorganic-based polymers and to develop the basic technical knowledge required for industrial implementation. Polyphosphazene membranes for chemical separation applications are being emphasized by this project. Previous work demonstrated that magnetic fields, appropriately applied during processing, can be used to beneficially modify membrane morphology. MFP membranes have significantly increased flux capabilities while maintaining the same chemical selectivity as the unprocessed membranes.

  5. Inorganic pyrophosphatases: structural diversity serving the function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samygina, V. R.

    2016-05-01

    The review is devoted to ubiquitous enzymes, inorganic pyrophosphatases, which are essential in all living organisms. Despite the long history of investigations, these enzymes continue to attract interest. The review focuses on the three-dimensional structures of various representatives of this class of proteins. The structural diversity, the relationship between the structure and some properties of pyrophosphatases and various mechanisms of enzyme action related to the structural diversity of these enzymes are discussed. Interactions of pyrophosphatase with other proteins and possible practical applications are considered. The bibliography includes 56 references.

  6. Single inorganic-organic hybrid photovoltaic nanorod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Sang-Hoon; Liu, Lichun; Ku, Tea-Woong; Hong, Soonchang; Whang, Dongmok; Park, Sungho

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate that single photovoltaic (PV) nanorods can be readily fabricated by electrochemical processing in solution-phase under ambient conditions. A porous Au nanorod electrode in the core of the PV nanorod was central to both its structural formation and superior performance. We examined an intrinsically conducting polymer (polypyrrole) and an inorganic semiconductor (cadmium selenide) as precursor materials. Through an extremely simple and cost-effective fashioning process (solution-phase, room temperature), unadorned PV nanorods with up to 1.1% power conversion efficiency were obtained.

  7. Chiral selection on inorganic crystalline surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazen, Robert M.; Sholl, David S.

    2003-01-01

    From synthetic drugs to biodegradable plastics to the origin of life, the chiral selection of molecules presents both daunting challenges and significant opportunities in materials science. Among the most promising, yet little explored, avenues for chiral molecular discrimination is adsorption on chiral crystalline surfaces - periodic environments that can select, concentrate and possibly even organize molecules into polymers and other macromolecular structures. Here we review experimental and theoretical approaches to chiral selection on inorganic crystalline surfaces - research that is poised to open this new frontier in understanding and exploiting surface-molecule interactions.

  8. Individual Aerosol Particles from Biomass Burning in Southern Africa Compositions and Aging of Inorganic Particles. 2; Compositions and Aging of Inorganic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jia; Posfai, Mihaly; Hobbs, Peter V.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2003-01-01

    Individual aerosol particles collected over southern Africa during the SAFARI 2000 field study were studied using transmission electron microscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The sizes, shapes, compositions, mixing states, surface coatings, and relative abundances of aerosol particles from biomass burning, in boundary layer hazes, and in the free troposphere were compared, with emphasis on aging and reactions of inorganic smoke particles. Potassium salts and organic particles were the predominant species in the smoke, and most were internally mixed. More KCl particles occur in young smoke, whereas more K2SO4 and KNO3 particles were present in aged smoke. This change indicates that with the aging of the smoke, KCl particles from the fires were converted to K2SO4 and KNO3 through reactions with sulfur- and nitrogen- bearing species from biomass burning as well as other sources. More soot was present in smoke from flaming grass fires than bush and wood fires, probably due to the predominance of flaming combustion in grass fires. The high abundance of organic particles and soluble salts can affect the hygroscopic properties of biomass-burning aerosols and therefore influence their role as cloud condensation nuclei. Particles from biomass burning were important constituents of the regional hazes.

  9. Temporal contrast of salt delivery in mouth increases salt perception.

    PubMed

    Busch, Johanneke L H C; Tournier, Carole; Knoop, Janine E; Kooyman, Gonnie; Smit, Gerrit

    2009-05-01

    The impact of salt delivery in mouth on salt perception was investigated. It was hypothesized that fast concentration changes in the delivery to the receptor can reduce sensory adaptation, leading to an increased taste perception. Saltiness ratings were scored by a panel over time during various stimulation conditions involving relative changes in NaCl concentration of 20% and 38%. Changes in salt delivery profile had similar effect on saltiness perception when delivered either by a sipwise method or by a gustometer. The impact of concentration variations and frequency of concentration changes was further investigated with the gustometer method. Five second boosts and 2 s pulses were delivered during 3 sequential 10-s intervals, whereas the delivered total salt content was the same for all conditions. Two second pulses were found to increase saltiness perception, but only when the pulses were delivered during the first seconds of stimulation. Results suggest that the frequency, timing, and concentration differences of salt stimuli can affect saltiness. Specifically, a short and intense stimulus can increase salt perception, possibly through a reduction of adaptation.

  10. Salt intake, plasma sodium, and worldwide salt reduction.

    PubMed

    He, Feng J; Macgregor, Graham A

    2012-06-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that a reduction in salt intake from the current level of approximately 9-12 g/d in most countries of the world to the recommended level of 5-6 g/d lowers blood pressure (BP) in both hypertensive and normotensive individuals. A further reduction to 3-4 g/d has a greater effect. Prospective studies and outcome trials have demonstrated that a lower salt intake is related to a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Cost-effectiveness analyses have documented that salt reduction is more or at the very least just as cost-effective as tobacco control in reducing cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The mechanisms whereby salt raises blood pressure and increases cardiovascular risk are not fully understood. The existing concepts focus on the tendency for an increase in extracellular fluid volume. Increasing evidence suggests that small increases in plasma sodium may have a direct effect on BP and the cardiovascular system, independent of extracellular volume. All countries should adopt a coherent and workable strategy to reduce salt intake in the whole population. Even a modest reduction in population salt intake will have major beneficial effects on health, along with major cost savings.

  11. An empirical correlation between the enthalpy of solution of aqueous salts and their ability to form hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Pandelov, S.; Werhahn, Jasper C.; Pilles, Bert M.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Iglev, H.

    2010-09-30

    The ability of aqueous salt solutions to form hydrates by cooling them at ambient pressure is probed by infrared (IR) spectroscopy by examining the structure of the spectra in the hydrogen-bonding region (3,000 - 3,800 cm-1). A collection of 75 organic and inorganic salts in saturated solutions are examined. We have found a correlation between the enthalpy of solution of the salt and its ability to form a hydrate, namely that the salt’s enthalpy of solution is lower than the standard enthalpy of fusion of ice (6 kJ/mol). This observation can serve as an empirical rule that determines whether a salt will form a hydrate upon cooling from its aqueous solution.

  12. Salting-in and salting-out of water-soluble polymers in aqueous salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Rahmat; Jahani, Farahnaz

    2012-05-01

    To obtain further experimental evidence for the mechanisms of the salting effect produced by the addition of salting-out or sating-in inducing electrolytes to aqueous solutions of water-soluble polymers, systematic studies on the vapor-liquid equilibria and liquid-liquid equilibria of aqueous solutions of several polymers are performed in the presence of a large series of electrolytes. Polymers are polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG400), polyethylene glycol dimethyl ether 250 (PEGDME250), polyethylene glycol dimethyl ether 2000 (PEGDME2000), and polypropylene glycol 400 (PPG400), and the investigated electrolytes are KCl, NH(4)Cl, MgCl(2), (CH(3))(4)NCl, NaCl, NaNO(3), Na(2)CO(3), Na(2)SO(4), and Na(3)Cit (tri-sodium citrate). Aqueous solutions of PPG400 form aqueous two-phase systems with all the investigated salts; however, other investigated polymers form aqueous two-phase systems only with Na(2)CO(3), Na(2)SO(4), and Na(3)Cit. A relation was found between the salting-out or sating-in effects of electrolyte on the polymer aqueous solutions and the slopes of the constant water activity lines of ternary polymer-salt aqueous solutions, so that, in the case of the salting-out effect, the constant water activity lines had a concave slope, but in the case of the salting-in effects, the constant water activity lines had a convex slope. The effect of temperature, anion of electrolyte, cation of electrolyte, and type and molar mass of polymers were studied and the results interpreted in terms of the solute-water and solute-solute interactions. The salting-out effect results from the formation of ion (specially anion)-water hydration complexes, which, in turn, decreases hydration, and hence, the solubility of the polymer and the salting-in effect results from a direct binding of the cations to the ether oxygens of the polymers.

  13. Nucleophilic arylation with tetraarylphosphonium salts

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zuyong; Lin, Jin-Hong; Xiao, Ji-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Organic phosphonium salts have served as important intermediates in synthetic chemistry. But the use of a substituent on the positive phosphorus as a nucleophile to construct C–C bond remains a significant challenge. Here we report an efficient transition-metal-free protocol for the direct nucleophilic arylation of carbonyls and imines with tetraarylphosphonium salts in the presence of caesium carbonate. The aryl nucleophile generated from phosphonium salt shows low basicity and good nucleophilicity, as evidenced by the successful conversion of enolizable aldehydes and ketones. The reaction is not particularly sensitive to water, shows wide substrate scope, and is compatible with a variety of functional groups including cyano and ester groups. Compared with the arylmetallic reagents that are usually moisture sensitive, the phosphonium salts are shelf-stable and can be easily handled. PMID:26822205

  14. Mutagenicity of dimethylated metabolites of inorganic arsenics.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, K; Ohba, H; Hasegawa, A; Sawamura, R; Okada, S

    1989-10-01

    The genotoxic effects of dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA), one of the main metabolites of inorganic arsenics in mammals, and its further metabolites were investigated using Escherichia coli B tester strains. When H/r30R (wild-type; Exc+Rec+) and Hs30R (uvrA-; Exc-Rec+) cells were incubated with DMAA for 3 h in liquid NB medium, many more revertants appeared in sealed tubes than in the control, but this was not the case in unsealed tubes, suggesting that volatile metabolites of DMAA caused the mutagenesis. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), dimethylarsine and trimethylarsine, known to be volatile metabolites in microorganisms, were detected in the gas phase of DMAA-added tester strain cell suspensions in sealed tubes. Among these arsines, dimethylarsine was mutagenic in WP2 (wild-type; Exc+Rec+) and WP2uvrA (uvrA-; Exc-Rec+), while trimethylarsine was not. The mutagenesis induced by dimethylarsine required oxygen gas in the assay system; the number of revertants markedly increased in an oxygen-replaced system and diminished in a nitrogen-replaced one. These results suggest that the reaction product(s) between dimethylarsine and molecular oxygen is responsible for the mutagenesis. The significance of this mutagenesis in the genetoxic action of inorganic arsenics is discussed.

  15. Preparation and screening of crystalline inorganic materials

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Xiang, Xiaodong; Goldwasser, Isy; Brice{hacek over }o, Gabriel; Sun, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Kai-An

    2008-10-28

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  16. Combinatorial synthesis of inorganic or composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Goldwasser, Isy; Ross, Debra A.; Schultz, Peter G.; Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Briceno, Gabriel; Sun, Xian-Dong; Wang, Kai-An

    2010-08-03

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials or, alternatively, allowing the components to interact to form at least two different materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, nonbiological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  17. Combinatorial screening of inorganic and organometallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Xiang, Xiaodong; Goldwasser, Isy

    2002-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  18. Engineered inorganic nanoparticles for drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Ojea-Jiménez, Isaac; Comenge, Joan; García-Fernández, Lorena; Megson, Zoë A; Casals, Eudald; Puntes, Victor F

    2013-06-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) currently have immense potential as drug delivery vectors due to their unique physicochemical properties such as high surface area per unit volume, their optical and magnetic uniqueness and the ability to be functionalized with a large number of ligands to enhance their affinity towards target molecules. These features, together with the therapeutic activity of some drugs, render the combination of these two entities (NP-drug) as an attractive alternative in the area of drug delivery. One of the major advantages of these conjugates is the possibility to have a local delivery of the drug, thus reducing systemic side effects and enabling a higher efficiency of the therapeutic molecule. This review highlights the direct implications of nanoscale particles in the development of drug delivery systems. In more detail, it is also remarked the extensive use of inorganic NPs for targeted cancer therapies. As the range of nanoparticles and their applications continues to increase, human safety concerns are gaining importance, which makes it necessary to better understand the potential toxicity hazards of these materials.

  19. Engineered inorganic nanoparticles for drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Ojea-Jiménez, Isaac; Comenge, Joan; García-Fernández, Lorena; Megson, Zoë A; Casals, Eudald; Puntes, Victor F

    2013-06-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) currently have immense potential as drug delivery vectors due to their unique physicochemical properties such as high surface area per unit volume, their optical and magnetic uniqueness and the ability to be functionalized with a large number of ligands to enhance their affinity towards target molecules. These features, together with the therapeutic activity of some drugs, render the combination of these two entities (NP-drug) as an attractive alternative in the area of drug delivery. One of the major advantages of these conjugates is the possibility to have a local delivery of the drug, thus reducing systemic side effects and enabling a higher efficiency of the therapeutic molecule. This review highlights the direct implications of nanoscale particles in the development of drug delivery systems. In more detail, it is also remarked the extensive use of inorganic NPs for targeted cancer therapies. As the range of nanoparticles and their applications continues to increase, human safety concerns are gaining importance, which makes it necessary to better understand the potential toxicity hazards of these materials. PMID:23116108

  20. Mesostructure Control of Polymer-Inorganic Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaia, R.

    2002-03-01

    Critical to forwarding polymer nanocomposite technology is the development of a detailed understanding of the spatial distribution of the various constituents (inorganic, polymeric and additives), the associated influence on thermodynamic and kinetic (rheological) aspects of the system and techniques to control nano (1-100nm) and meso (100-1000nm) scale morphology. With regard to these issues, in-situ small angle x-ray scattering, associated scattering models, coarse grain simulations, and rheology have been used to examine the phase behavior of organically modified layered silicates (OLS) suspended in pure and binary solvent mixtures. These serve as model systems for examining aspects of morphology development and phase behavior in thermoset and thermoplastic nanocomposites. The phase structure of solvent - OLS system is qualitatively described by Onsager arguments modified to include a crystal-solvate (intercalated phase) and a gelation point. Ternary behavior (binary solvent mixtures) provides evidence for preferential segregation of the polar component to the inorganic surface. The chemical structure of the organic surfactant modifier has a negligible influence on the structure of the intercalated phase, but has a marked effect on the extent and concentration of the dispersed phase. These studies provide insight into the use of polar activators for organosilicate rheolgical control agents and additives to enhance nanocomposite formation (e.g. H20 addition for optimal exfoliated PDMS nanocomposites and incorporation of malic anhydride to produce polypropylene nanocomposites).

  1. Recycling of aluminum salt cake

    SciTech Connect

    Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Bonsignore, P.V.; Karvelas, D.E.

    1991-12-01

    The secondary aluminum industry generates more than 110 {times} 10{sup 3} tons of salt-cake waste every year. This waste stream contains about 3--5% aluminum, 15--30% aluminum oxide, 30--40% sodium chloride, and 20--30% potassium chloride. As much as 50% of the content of this waste is combined salt (sodium and potassium chlorides). Salt-cake waste is currently disposed of in conventional landfills. In addition, over 50 {times} 10{sup 3} tons of black dross that is not economical to reprocess a rotary furnace for aluminum recovery ends up in landfills. The composition of the dross is similar to that of salt cake, except that it contains higher concentrations of aluminum (up to 20%) and correspondingly lower amounts of salts. Because of the high solubility of the salts in water, these residues, when put in landfills, represent a potential source of pollution to surface-water and groundwater supplies. The increasing number of environmental regulations on the generation and disposal of industrial wastes are likely to restrict the disposal of these salt-containing wastes in conventional landfills. Processes exist that employ the dissolution and recovery of the salts from the waste stream. These wet-processing methods are economical only when the aluminum concentration in that waste exceeds about 10%. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a study in which existing technologies were reviewed and new concepts that are potentially more cost-effective than existing processes were developed and evaluated. These include freeze crystallization, solvent/antisolvent extraction, common-ion effect, high-pressure/high-temperature process, and capillary-effect systems. This paper presents some of the technical and economic results of the aforementioned ANL study.

  2. Microbiology of solar salt ponds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javor, B.

    1985-01-01

    Solar salt ponds are shallow ponds of brines that range in salinity from that of normal seawater (3.4 percent) through NaCl saturation. Some salterns evaporate brines to the potash stage of concentration (bitterns). All the brines (except the bitterns, which are devoid of life) harbor high concentrations of microorganisms. The high concentrations of microorganisms and their adaptation to life in the salt pond are discussed.

  3. The Resolution of a Completely Inorganic Coordination Compound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasui, Takaji; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is a technique used by Alfred Werner to resolve inorganic coordination compounds. The materials, procedures and analysis necessary for undergraduates to repeat this procedure are described. (CW)

  4. Salt intake and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Boero, Roberto; Pignataro, Angelo; Quarello, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    We have reviewed the role of salt intake in kidney diseases, particularly in relation to renal hemodynamics, renal excretion of proteins, renal morphological changes and progression of chronic renal failure. High salt intake may have detrimental effects on glomerular hemodynamics, inducing hyperfiltration and increasing the filtration fraction and glomerular pressure. This may be particularly important in elderly, obese, diabetic or black patients, who have a high prevalence of salt-sensitivity. Changes in salt intake may influence urinary excretion of proteins in patients with essential hypertension, or diabetic and non diabetic nephropathies. Moreover, high sodium intake may blunt the antiproteinuric effect of various drugs, including angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors and calcium antagonists. Experimental studies show a direct tissue effect of salt on the kidney, independent of its ability to increase blood pressure, inducing hypertrophy, fibrosis and a decrease in glomerular basement membrane anionic sites. However, no firm conclusion can be drawn about the relationship between salt consumption and progression of chronic renal failure, because most information comes from conflicting, small, retrospective, observational studies. In conclusion, it would appear that restriction of sodium intake is an important preventive and therapeutic measure in patients with chronic renal diseases of various origin, or at risk of renal damage, such as hypertensive or diabetic patients.

  5. Isostacy again: Explanation of salt movements

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrie, A.; Hamiter, R.; Lerche, I.; Petersen, K.; Egloff, J.

    1996-12-31

    The notion of isostacy is applicable to explain vertically-rising salt movements in those situations with large lateral extrusion of salt tongues. A salt tongue may be regarded as occurring at that depth within the earth above which the average density, regardless of lithology, is equal to that of salt, i.e., the salt tongue balances the material above it. The supra-salt tongue section can be salt diapirs or sedimentary sequences. Accumulating sediments compact and increase in their density with depth until equaling the density of the plastic balancing salt tongue. Under the heading of isostacy, with the balancing horizon being the salt tongue, the salt tongue is at the depth range where salt becomes buoyant relative to the overlying sediments. The isostatic depth/buoyancy level could then direct the advancing position depth of the salt tongue in the basin. Computer modeling of excess pressure under moving salt tongues indicates pressure build-ups of some 170 atm. The excess pressure may build up geologically instantaneously as the laterally migrating salt over-rides another column of sediment. Presumably the excess pressure evaporates as a discrete salt tongue leaves a supporting underlying sediment column. A puzzling question concerns how noses of salt tongues approach and even intersect the seafloor. Determining geologic reasons for positioning of salt tongues within terrigenous sediment complexes along passive margins is important due to major changes that salt insertion causes: impermeable barrier to rising hydrocarbons, stress fractures around advancing salt noses, possible regional faulting due to stress couple developed between dynamic salt tongue and stationary basement. Predicting potential stresses and deformation above, in front of, and below, a salt tongue is essential to successful wildcat drilling.

  6. Liking, salt taste perception and use of table salt when consuming reduced-salt chicken stews in light of South Africa's new salt regulations.

    PubMed

    De Kock, H L; Zandstra, E H; Sayed, N; Wentzel-Viljoen, E

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of salt reduction on liking, salt taste perception, and use of table salt when consuming chicken stew in light of South Africa's new salt recommendations. In total, 432 South-African consumers (aged 35.2 ± 12.3 years) consumed a full portion of a chicken stew meal once at a central location. Four stock cube powders varying in salt content were used to prepare chicken stews: 1) no reduction - 2013 Na level; regular salt level as currently available on the South African market (24473 mg Na/100 g), 2) salt reduction smaller than 2016 level, i.e. 10%-reduced (22025 mg Na/100 g), 3) 2016 salt level, as per regulatory prescriptions (18000 mg Na/100 g), 4) 2019 salt level, as per regulatory prescriptions (13000 mg Na/100 g). Consumers were randomly allocated to consume one of the four meals. Liking, salt taste perception, and use of table salt and pepper were measured. Chicken stews prepared with reduced-salt stock powders were equally well-liked as chicken stews with the current salt level. Moreover, a gradual reduction of the salt in the chicken stews resulted in a reduced salt intake, up to an average of 19% for the total group compared to the benchmark 2013 Na level stew. However, 19% of consumers compensated by adding salt back to full compensation in some cases. More salt was added with increased reductions of salt in the meals, even to the point of full compensation. Further investigation into the impacts of nutrition communication and education about salt reduction on salt taste perception and use is needed. This research provides new consumer insights on salt use and emphasises the need for consumer-focused behaviour change approaches, in addition to reformulation of products.

  7. Synthesis of an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    DOEpatents

    Moens, Luc

    1999-01-01

    A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid comprising: dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and an alkali metal diformylamide in an organic solvent selected from the group consisting of acetonitrile, methanol, tetrahydrofuran, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and methylformate or mixtures thereof to form a suspension of an alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate ester; and hydrolyzing said alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-amino levulinic acid.

  8. Synthesis of an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    DOEpatents

    Moens, L.

    1999-05-25

    A process is disclosed for preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid comprising. The process involves dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and an alkali metal diformylamide in an organic solvent selected from the group consisting of acetonitrile, methanol, tetrahydrofuran, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and methylformate or mixtures to form a suspension of an alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate ester; and hydrolyzing the alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-amino levulinic acid.

  9. Preparation and properties of organic-inorganic composite superabsorbent based on xanthan gum and loess.

    PubMed

    Feng, Enke; Ma, Guofu; Wu, Yajuan; Wang, Haiping; Lei, Ziqiang

    2014-10-13

    A new, low-cost, and eco-friendly organic-inorganic composite superabsorbent was successfully synthesized in aqueous solution by polymerization xanthan gum (XG), neutralized acrylic acid (AA) and loess using ammonium persulfate (APS) as initiator and N,N-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) as crosslinker. Structure and morphological characterizations of the composite superabsorbent were investigated by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The loess content, pH values, surfactants, salts and temperature which could affect the swelling and water-retention capabilities of the composite superabsorbent were investigated. The composite superabsorbent exhibits excellent water absorbency (610 g/g in distilled water), pH-stability (pH 5-10), and higher swelling capacity in anionic surfactant solution; on the other hand, the composite superabsorbent can be used for removing multivalent metal ions. PMID:25037376

  10. Biologically Inspired Synthesis Route to Three-Dimensionally Structured Inorganic Thin Films

    DOE PAGES

    Schwenzer, Birgit; Morse, Daniel E.

    2008-01-01

    Inorganic thin films (hydroxide, oxide, and phosphate materials) that are textured on a submicron scale have been prepared from aqueous metal salt solutions at room temperature using vapor-diffusion catalysis. This generic synthesis approach mimics the essential advantages of the catalytic and structure-directing mechanisms observed for the formation of silica skeletons of marine sponges. Chemical composition, crystallinity, and the three-dimensional morphology of films prepared by this method are extremely sensitive to changes in the synthesis conditions, such as concentrations, reaction times, and the presence and nature of substrate materials. Focusing on different materials systems, the reaction mechanism for the formation ofmore » these thin films and the influence of different reaction parameters on the product are explained.« less

  11. In situ studies of a platform for metastable inorganic crystal growth and materials discovery

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, Daniel P.; Hu, Yung-Jin; Chung, Duck Young; Halder, Gregory J.; Chupas, Peter J.; Soderholm, L.; Mitchell, J. F.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid shifts in the energy, technological, and environmental demands of materials science call for focused and efficient expansion of the library of functional inorganic compounds. To achieve the requisite efficiency, we need a materials discovery and optimization paradigm that can rapidly reveal all possible compounds for a given reaction and composition space. Here we provide such a paradigm via in situ X-ray diffraction measurements spanning solid, liquid flux, and recrystallization processes. We identify four new ternary sulfides from reactive salt fluxes in a matter of hours, simultaneously revealing routes for ex situ synthesis and crystal growth. Changing the flux chemistry, here accomplished by increasing sulfur content, permits comparison of the allowable crystalline building blocks in each reaction space. The speed and structural information inherent to this method of in situ synthesis provide an experimental complement to computational efforts to predict new compounds and uncover routes to targeted materials by design. PMID:25024201

  12. Preparation and properties of organic-inorganic composite superabsorbent based on xanthan gum and loess.

    PubMed

    Feng, Enke; Ma, Guofu; Wu, Yajuan; Wang, Haiping; Lei, Ziqiang

    2014-10-13

    A new, low-cost, and eco-friendly organic-inorganic composite superabsorbent was successfully synthesized in aqueous solution by polymerization xanthan gum (XG), neutralized acrylic acid (AA) and loess using ammonium persulfate (APS) as initiator and N,N-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) as crosslinker. Structure and morphological characterizations of the composite superabsorbent were investigated by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The loess content, pH values, surfactants, salts and temperature which could affect the swelling and water-retention capabilities of the composite superabsorbent were investigated. The composite superabsorbent exhibits excellent water absorbency (610 g/g in distilled water), pH-stability (pH 5-10), and higher swelling capacity in anionic surfactant solution; on the other hand, the composite superabsorbent can be used for removing multivalent metal ions.

  13. Electrokinetic remediation of inorganic and organic pollutants in textile effluent contaminated agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Annamalai, Sivasankar; Santhanam, Manikandan; Sundaram, Maruthamuthu; Curras, Marta Pazos

    2014-12-01

    The discharge from the dyeing industries constitutes unfixed dyes, inorganic salts, heavy metal complexes etc., which spoil the surrounding areas of industrial sites. The present article reports the use of direct current electrokinetic technique for the treatment of textile contaminated soil. Impressed direct current voltage of 20 V facilitates the dye/metal ions movement in the naturally available dye contaminated soil towards the opposite electrode by electromigration. IrO2–RuO2–TiO2/Ti was used as anode and Ti used as cathode. UV–Visible spectrum reveals that higher dye intensity was nearer to the anode. Ni, Cr and Pb migration towards the cathode and migration of Cu, SO42− and Cl− towards anode were noticed. Chemical oxygen demand in soil significantly decreased upon employing electrokinetic. This technology may be exploited for faster and eco-friendly removal of dye in soil environment. PMID:25461934

  14. PLAT X41601 EAST (SALT LAKE CITY CEMETERY LOCATER), SALT LAKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PLAT X-4-160-1 EAST (SALT LAKE CITY CEMETERY LOCATER), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT CEMETERY BETWEEN OLIVE STREET (1020 EAST) AND 1000 EAST STREET, REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 12049, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  15. Inorganic Nanoparticle Nucleation on Polymer Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosteleski, Adrian John

    The introduction of inorganic nanoparticles into organic materials enhances both the mechanical and chemical properties of the material. Metallic nanoparticles, like silver and gold, have been introduced into polymers for use as antimicrobial coatings or dielectric materials, respectively. The challenge in creating these materials currently is the difficulty to homogeneously disperse the particles throughout the polymer matrix. The uneven dispersion of nanoparticles can lead to less than optimal quality and undesired properties. By creating a polymer nanocomposite material with well-controlled size inorganic materials that are evenly dispersed throughout the polymer matrix; we can improve the materials performance and properties. The objective for this research is to use polymer networks for the in situ mineralization of silver and other metallic materials to create intricate inorganic structures. The work performed here studied the ability to nucleate silver nanoparticles using poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) as the templating agent. Ionic silver was chemically reduced by sodium borohydride (NaBH4) in the presence of PAA. The effect of varying reactant concentrations of silver, NaBH 4, and PAA on particle size was studied. Reaction conditions in terms of varying temperature and pH levels of the reaction solution were monitored to observe the effect of silver nanoparticle size, shape, and concentration. By monitoring the UV spectra over time the reaction mechanism of the silver reduction process was determined to be an autocatalytic process: a period of slow, continuous nucleation followed by rapid, autocatalytic growth. The reaction kinetics for this autocatalytic process is also reported. PAA was crosslinked both chemically and physically to 3 biopolymers; ELP, an elastin like peptide, cotton fabrics, and calcium alginate hydrogels. Various compositions of PAA were physically crosslinked with calcium alginate gels to design an antimicrobial hydrogel for use in wound

  16. Nanostructured inorganic/polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowrishankar, Vignesh

    The use of polymers in solar cells shows great promise for achieving high power-conversion efficiencies at low cost. Polymers have the distinct advantage of being easily solution-processable, while possibly having larger absorption coefficients than conventional inorganic semiconductors. Thus, small amounts of cheaply-processed polymer can be used to make inexpensive solar cells. However, polymers suffer from poor exciton (electron-hole pair) diffusion lengths which are significantly smaller than the typical thicknesses needed by polymers to absorb a large number of solar photons. While other solutions to this problem exist, one promising solution is the use of an ordered nanostructure comprising an inorganic-semiconductor scaffold with infiltrated polymer, which essentially facilitates strong absorption and efficient exciton harvesting concomitantly. Other advantages of such a nanostructure include improved charge extraction and greater control over charge transfer and other processes occurring at the semiconductor interface. In this thesis, I first present an analysis supporting the need for cheaper solar cells, after which I provide the reader with relevant background on nanostructured inorganic/polymer solar cells. Next, I describe the fabrication process for making suitable nanostructures in silicon and hydrogenated amorphous-silicon (a-Si:H). Nanopillared a-Si:H can be directly used as a scaffold for making polymer-based, nanostructured solar cells. The complete device physics of the a-Si:H/polymer system is then studied. It is found that energy transfer can occur from the polymers to a-Si:H. The nanostructured devices are found to exhibit improved efficiency compared to planar (bilayer) devices. However, even higher efficiencies are expected on switching the scaffold material from a-Si:H to a non-absorber such as titania. The fabrication process for creating a nanostructured scaffold in titania, using soft-lithography, is then described. Solar cells made

  17. Intrarenal distribution of inorganic mercury and albumin after coadministration

    SciTech Connect

    Zalups, R.K. ); Barfuss, D.W. )

    1993-01-01

    The renal disposition and the intrarenal distribution of albumin and mercury were studied simultaneously in rats co-injected with a 0.5-[mu]mol/kg dose of albumin and a 0.25-[mu]mol/kg dose of inorganic mercury at 2, 5, 30, and 180 min after injection. These studies were carried out to test the hypothesis that one of the mechanisms involved in the renal tubular uptake of inorganic mercury is cotransport with albumin. By the end of the first 2 min after injection, the ratio of inorganic mercury to albumin in the renal cortex and outer strip of the outer medulla was approximately 2.6 and 1.6, respectively. Both the cortex and outer stripe contain segments of the proximal tubule, and it is these segments that have been shown to be principally involved in the renal tubular uptake of both albumin and inorganic mercury. The ration increased slightly in these two zones after 5 and 20 min after injection. These data demonstrate that there is a relatively close relationship in the renal content of inorganic mercury and albumin. However, the ratios are significantly greater than the ratio of inorganic mercury of albumin in the injection solution, which was 0.5. After 180 min following co-injection, the ratio increased to about 38 in the cortex and 15 in the outer stripe. This increase in the ratio is probably related to the metabolism of albumin. Based on the ratios of inorganic mercury to albumin in the renal cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla, it appears that some proximal tubular uptake of inorganic mercury occurs by mechanisms other than endocytotic cotransport of inorganic mercury with albumin. However, since the ratios were small during the early times after injection, cotransport of inorganic mercury with albumin cannot be excluded as one of the mechanisms involved in the proximal tubular uptake of inorganic mercury. 32 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Semiconducting organic-inorganic nanocomposites by intimately tethering conjugated polymers to inorganic tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehan; Yoon, Young Jun; Lin, Zhiqun

    2016-04-28

    Semiconducting organic-inorganic nanocomposites were judiciously crafted by placing conjugated polymers in intimate contact with inorganic tetrapods via click reaction. CdSe tetrapods were first synthesized by inducing elongated arms from CdSe zincblende seeds through seed-mediated growth. The subsequent effective inorganic ligand treatment, followed by reacting with short bifunctional ligands, yielded azide-functionalized CdSe tetrapods (i.e., CdSe-N3). Finally, the ethynyl-terminated conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (i.e., P3HT-[triple bond, length as m-dash]) was tethered to CdSe-N3 tetrapods via a catalyst-free alkyne-azide cycloaddition, forming intimate semiconducting P3HT-CdSe tetrapod nanocomposites. Intriguingly, the intimate contact between P3HT and CdSe tetrapod was found to not only render the effective dispersion of CdSe tetrapods in the P3HT matrix, but also facilitate the efficient electronic interaction between these two semiconducting constituents. The successful anchoring of P3HT chains onto CdSe tetrapods was substantiated through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements. Moreover, the absorption and photoluminescence studies further corroborated the intimate tethering between P3HT and CdSe tetrapods. The effect of the type of bifunctional ligands (i.e., aryl vs. aliphatic ligands) and the size of tetrapods on the device performance of hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells was also scrutinized. Interestingly, P3HT-CdSe tetrapod nanocomposites produced via the use of an aryl bifunctional ligand (i.e., 4-azidobenzoic acid) exhibited an improved photovoltaic performance compared to that synthesized with their aliphatic ligand counterpart (i.e., 5-bromovaleric acid). Clearly, the optimal size of CdSe tetrapods ensuring the effective charge transport in conjunction with the good dispersion of CdSe tetrapods rendered an improved device performance. We envision that the click

  19. Salt excretion in Suaeda fruticosa.

    PubMed

    Labidi, Nehla; Ammari, Manel; Mssedi, Dorsaf; Benzerti, Maali; Snoussi, Sana; Abdelly, C

    2010-09-01

    Suaeda fruticosa is a perennial "includer" halophyte devoid of glands or trichomes with a strong ability of accumulating and sequestrating Na(+) and Cl(-). We were interested in determining whether leaf cuticle salt excretion could be involved as a further mechanism in salt response of this species after long-term treatment with high salinity levels. Seedlings had been treated for three months with seawater (SW) diluted with tap water (0, 25, 50 and 75% SW). Leaf scanning electron microscopy revealed a convex adaxial side sculpture and a higher accumulation of saline crystals at the lamina margin, with a large variability on repartition and size between treatments. No salt gland or salt bladder was found. Threedimensional wax decorations were the only structures found on leaf surface. Washing the leaf surface with water indicated that sodium and chloride predominated in excreted salts, and that potassium was poorly represented. Optimal growth of whole plant was recorded at 25% SW, correlating with maximum Na(+) and Cl(-) absolute secretion rate. The leaves of plants treated with SW retained more water than those of plants treated with tap water due to lower solute potential, especially at 25% SW. Analysis of compatible solute, such as proline, total soluble carbohydrates and glycinebetaine disclosed strong relationship between glycinebetaine and osmotic potential (r = 0.92) suggesting that tissue hydration was partly maintained by glycinebetaine accumulation. Thus in S. fruticosa , increased solute accumulation associated with water retention, and steady intracellular ion homeostasis confirms the "includer" strategy of salt tolerance previously demonstrated. However, salt excretion at leaf surface also participated in conferring to this species a capacity in high salinity tolerance.

  20. Effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunde; Zhou, Aiguo; Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the magnitude and variability in isotope fractionation with respect to specific processes is crucial to the application of stable isotopic analysis as a tool to infer and quantify transformation processes. The variability of carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) in the presence of different inorganic ions (nitrate, sulfate, and chloride), was investigated to evaluate the potential effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope enrichment factor (ε value). A comparison of ε values obtained in deionized water, nitrate solution, and sulfate solution demonstrated that the ε values were identical and not affected by the presence of nitrate and sulfate. In the presence of chloride, however, the ε values (ranging from -6.3±0.8 to 10±1.3‰) were variable and depended on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of TCE. Thus, caution should be exercised in selecting appropriate ε values for the field application of stable isotope analysis, as various chloride concentrations may be present due to naturally present or introduced with pH adjustment and iron salts during Fenton-like remediation. Furthermore, the effects of chloride on carbon isotope fractionation may be able to provide new insights about reaction mechanisms of Fenton-like processes.

  1. Self-Assembled Monolayers as Templates for Inorganic Crystallization: a Bio-Inspired Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizenberg, Joanna

    Nature produces a wide variety of exquisite mineralized tissues fulfilling diverse functions, and often from simple inorganic salts. Organisms exercise a level of molecular control over the physico-chemical properties of inorganic crystals that is unparalleled in today’s technology. This reflects directly or indirectly the controlling activity of biological organic surfaces that are involved in the formation of these materials. Biological materials are intrinsically nano-scale. Biomineralization occurs within specific nanoenvironments, which implies stimulation of crystal formation at certain interfacial sites and relative inhibition of the process at all other sites. Our approach to artificial crystallization is based on the combination of the two latter concepts: that is, the use of organized organic surfaces patterned with specific initiation domains on a nano-scale to study and orchestrate the crystallization process. This bio-inspired engineering effort made it possible to achieve a remarkable level of control over various aspects of the crystal nucleation and growth, including the precise localization of particles, nucleation density, crystal sizes, morphology, crystallographic orientation, arbitrary shapes, nanostructure, stability and architecture. The ability to construct large, defect-free, patterned single crystals with controlled nanoporosity; periodic arrays of uniform, oriented nanocrystals or films presenting patterns of nanocrystals offers a new, bioinspired nanotechnology route to materials engineering.

  2. Effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunde; Zhou, Aiguo; Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the magnitude and variability in isotope fractionation with respect to specific processes is crucial to the application of stable isotopic analysis as a tool to infer and quantify transformation processes. The variability of carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) in the presence of different inorganic ions (nitrate, sulfate, and chloride), was investigated to evaluate the potential effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope enrichment factor (ε value). A comparison of ε values obtained in deionized water, nitrate solution, and sulfate solution demonstrated that the ε values were identical and not affected by the presence of nitrate and sulfate. In the presence of chloride, however, the ε values (ranging from -6.3±0.8 to 10±1.3‰) were variable and depended on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of TCE. Thus, caution should be exercised in selecting appropriate ε values for the field application of stable isotope analysis, as various chloride concentrations may be present due to naturally present or introduced with pH adjustment and iron salts during Fenton-like remediation. Furthermore, the effects of chloride on carbon isotope fractionation may be able to provide new insights about reaction mechanisms of Fenton-like processes. PMID:26835895

  3. Is ingested inorganic arsenic a "threshold" carcinogen?

    PubMed

    Abernathy, C O; Chappell, W R; Meek, M E; Gibb, H; Guo, H R

    1996-02-01

    Ingested inorganic arsenic (As) is known to be a human carcinogen. An intriguing question is whether there is a threshold for the carcinogenic effects of As, i.e., is there a level below which it does not induce the development of cancer(s)? This Roundtable will discuss the United States Environmental Protection Agency's As risk assessment using the Taiwan data from different viewpoints. It will also consider the hypothesis that there is a threshold for As and data for or against this hypothesis. For example, some scientists believe that epidemiological data cannot answer this question, while others feel that different study designs and larger sampling will provide adequate data. Reasons for each position are given. This Roundtable discussion demonstrates the controversy surrounding the use of the Taiwan data for risk assessment.

  4. Carbon dioxide removal with inorganic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.; Fain, D.E.

    1993-12-31

    The increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide, in the atmosphere has sparked a great deal of interest in the removal of CO{sub 2} from flue gases of fossil fueled plants. Presently, several techniques for the removal of CO{sub 2} are considered to have potential, but are lacking in practicality. For example, amine scrubbing of flue gas streams is potential, but are lacking in practically. For example, amine scrubbing of flue gas streams is effective in removing CO{sub 2}, but costs are high; efficiency suffers; and other acid gases must be removed prior to amine stripping. Membrane systems for CO{sub 2} removal are held in high regard, and inorganic, particularly ceramic, membranes offer the potential for high temperature, thus energy saving, removal.

  5. Inorganic nanoparticles in porous coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cho Rong; Uemura, Takashi; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2016-07-21

    Porous coordination polymers (PCPs) have been recently highlighted because of their high synthetic designability in structure and functions. Because of their ordered nanoporous structures with a large surface area and tunable pore surface functionality, PCPs have emerged as a significant class of nanoporous materials with potential applications in gas storage, separation, catalysis, and chemical sensing. Recent research has shown the utility of PCPs as host materials for the confinement of nanoparticles of inorganic polymers (IPs), such as metals, metal oxides, and metal chalcogenides. The fabrication of IP nanoparticles in PCPs (PCP⊃IP) has been studied for manifesting specific nanosized-dependent properties and host-guest synergistic functions. In this review, we describe the recent progress in the accommodation of IPs in the nanochannels of PCPs and the remarkable functions of the composite materials. PMID:27051891

  6. Engineering properties of inorganic polymer concretes (IPCs)

    SciTech Connect

    Sofi, M.; Deventer, J.S.J. van . E-mail: jannie@unimelb.edu.au; Mendis, P.A. . E-mail: pamendis@unimelb.edu.au; Lukey, G.C.

    2007-02-15

    This paper presents the engineering properties of inorganic polymer concretes (IPCs) with a compressive strength of 50 MPa. The study includes a determination of the modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, compressive strength, and the splitting tensile strength and flexural strength of IPCs, formulated using three different sources of Class-F fly ash. Six IPC mix designs were adopted to evaluate the effects of the inclusion of coarse aggregates and granulated blast furnace slag into the mixes. A total of 90 cylindrical and 24 small beam specimens were investigated, and all tests were carried out pursuant to the relevant Australian Standards. Although some variability between the mixes was observed, the results show that, in most cases, the engineering properties of IPCs compare favorably to those predicted by the relevant Australian Standards for concrete mixtures.

  7. Ion conducting organic/inorganic hybrid polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Maryann B. (Inventor); Kinder, James D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    This invention relates to a series of organic/inorganic hybrid polymers that are easy to fabricate into dimensionally stable films with good ion-conductivity over a wide range of temperatures for use in a variety of applications. The polymers are prepared by the reaction of amines, preferably diamines and mixtures thereof with monoamines with epoxy-functionalized alkoxysilanes. The products of the reaction are polymerized by hydrolysis of the alkoxysilane groups to produce an organic-containing silica network. Suitable functionality introduced into the amine and alkoxysilane groups produce solid polymeric membranes which conduct ions for use in fuel cells, high-performance solid state batteries, chemical sensors, electrochemical capacitors, electro-chromic windows or displays, analog memory devices and the like.

  8. Recent trends in inorganic mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; Barshick, C.M.; Duckworth, D.C.; Riciputi, L.R.

    1996-10-01

    The field of inorganic mass spectrometry has seen substantial change in the author`s professional lifetime (over 30 years). Techniques in their infancy 30 years ago have matured; some have almost disappeared. New and previously unthought of techniques have come into being; some of these, such as ICP-MS, are reasonably mature now, while others have some distance to go before they can be so considered. Most of these new areas provide fertile fields for researchers, both in the development of new analytical techniques and by allowing fundamental studies to be undertaken that were previously difficult, impossible, or completely unforeseen. As full coverage of the field is manifestly impossible within the framework of this paper, only those areas with which the author has personal contact will be discussed. Most of the work originated in his own laboratory, but that of other laboratories is covered where it seemed appropriate.

  9. Applications of inorganic nanoparticles as therapeutic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeho; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, various functional nanostructured materials with interesting optical, magnetic, mechanical and chemical properties have been extensively applied to biomedical areas including imaging, diagnosis and therapy. In therapeutics, most research has focused on the application of nanoparticles as potential delivery vehicles for drugs and genes, because nanoparticles in the size range of 2-100 nm can interact with biological systems at the molecular level, and allow targeted delivery and passage through biological barriers. Recent investigations have even revealed that several kinds of nanomaterials are intrinsically therapeutic. Not only can they passively interact with cells, but they can also actively mediate molecular processes to regulate cell functions. This can be seen in the treatment of cancer via anti-angiogenic mechanisms as well as the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases by effectively controlling oxidative stress. This review will present recent applications of inorganic nanoparticles as therapeutic agents in the treatment of disease.

  10. Detonation Properties Measurements for Inorganic Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Brent A.; Lopez, Angel

    2005-03-01

    Many commonly available explosive materials have never been quantitatively or theoretically characterized in a manner suitable for use in analytical models. This includes inorganic explosive materials used in spacecraft ordnance, such as zirconium potassium perchlorate (ZPP). Lack of empirical information about these materials impedes the development of computational techniques. We have applied high fidelity measurement techniques to experimentally determine the pressure and velocity characteristics of ZPP, a previously uncharacterized explosive material. Advances in measurement technology now permit the use of very small quantities of material, thus yielding a significant reduction in the cost of conducting these experiments. An empirical determination of the explosive behavior of ZPP derived a Hugoniot for ZPP with an approximate particle velocity (uo) of 1.0 km/s. This result compares favorably with the numerical calculations from the CHEETAH thermochemical code, which predicts uo of approximately 1.2 km/s under ideal conditions.

  11. Blue laser inorganic write-once media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing-Mau; Yeh, Ru-Lin

    2004-09-01

    With the advantages of low cost, portability and compliance with ROM disc, write once disk has become the most popular storage media for computer and audio/video application. In addition, write once media, like CD-R and DVD-/+ R, are used to store permanent or nonalterable information, such as financial data transitions, legal documentation, and medical data. Several write once recording materials, such as TeO[1], TeOPd[2] and Si/Cu [3] have been proposed to realize inorganic write once media. Moreover, we propose AlSi alloy [4] to be used for recording layer of write once media. It had good recording properties in DVD system although the reflectivity is too low to be used for DVD-R disk. In this paper, we report the further results in blue laser system, such as the static and dynamic characteristics of write once media.

  12. Inorganic nanoparticles engineered to attack bacteria.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kristen P; Wang, Lei; Benicewicz, Brian C; Decho, Alan W

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotics were once the golden bullet to constrain infectious bacteria. However, the rapid and continuing emergence of antibiotic resistance (AR) among infectious microbial pathogens has questioned the future utility of antibiotics. This dilemma has recently fueled the marriage of the disparate fields of nanochemistry and antibiotics. Nanoparticles and other types of nanomaterials have been extensively developed for drug delivery to eukaryotic cells. However, bacteria have very different cellular architectures than eukaryotic cells. This review addresses the chemistry of nanoparticle-based antibiotic carriers, and how their technical capabilities are now being re-engineered to attack, kill, but also non-lethally manipulate the physiologies of bacteria. This review also discusses the surface functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles with small ligand molecules, polymers, and charged moieties to achieve drug loading and controllable release.

  13. Inorganic nitrite supplementation for healthy arterial aging

    PubMed Central

    DeVan, Allison E.; Fleenor, Bradley S.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). This is attributable primarily to adverse changes in arteries, notably, increases in large elastic artery stiffness and endothelial dysfunction mediated by inadequate concentrations of the vascular-protective molecule, nitric oxide (NO), and higher levels of oxidative stress and inflammation. Inorganic nitrite is a promising precursor molecule for augmenting circulating and tissue NO bioavailability because it requires only a one-step reduction to NO. Nitrite also acts as an independent signaling molecule, exerting many of the effects previously attributed to NO. Results of recent studies indicate that nitrite may be effective in the treatment of vascular aging. In old mice, short-term oral sodium nitrite supplementation reduces aortic pulse wave velocity, the gold-standard measure of large elastic artery stiffness, and ameliorates endothelial dysfunction, as indicated by normalization of NO-mediated endothelium-dependent dilation. These improvements in age-related vascular dysfunction with nitrite are mediated by reductions in oxidative stress and inflammation, and may be linked to increases in mitochondrial biogenesis and health. Increasing nitrite levels via dietary intake of nitrate appears to have similarly beneficial effects in many of the same physiological and clinical settings. Several clinical trials are being performed to determine the broad therapeutic potential of increasing nitrite bioavailability on human health and disease, including studies related to vascular aging. In summary, inorganic nitrite, as well as dietary nitrate supplementation, represents a promising therapy for treatment of arterial aging and prevention of age-associated CVD in humans. PMID:24408999

  14. Rumen microorganisms decrease bioavailability of inorganic selenium supplements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the availaility of selenium (Se)-enriched trace mineral supplements, we have observed low Se status in cattle and sheep offered traditional inorganic Se supplements. Reasons for this may include inadequate intake or low bioavailability of inorganic Se sources. The objective of this study w...

  15. Organometallic-inorganic hybrid electrodes for lithium-ion batteries

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Qian; Lemmon, John P.; Choi, Daiwon; Cosimbescu, Lelia

    2016-09-13

    Disclosed are embodiments of active materials for organometallic and organometallic-inorganic hybrid electrodes and particularly active materials for organometallic and organometallic-inorganic hybrid cathodes for lithium-ion batteries. In certain embodiments the organometallic material comprises a ferrocene polymer.

  16. 21 CFR 862.1580 - Phosphorus (inorganic) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Phosphorus (inorganic) test system. 862.1580 Section 862.1580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... phosphorus (inorganic) are used in the diagnosis and treatment of various disorders, including...

  17. 46 CFR 151.50-20 - Inorganic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inorganic acids. 151.50-20 Section 151.50-20 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-20 Inorganic acids. (a)(1) Gravity..., but in no case shall the design pressure be less than that indicated as follows: Fluorosilicic...

  18. 46 CFR 151.50-20 - Inorganic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inorganic acids. 151.50-20 Section 151.50-20 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-20 Inorganic acids. (a)(1) Gravity..., but in no case shall the design pressure be less than that indicated as follows: Fluorosilicic...

  19. A Multiweek Upper-Division Inorganic Laboratory Based on Metallacrowns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirovetz, Brian J.; Walters, Nicole E.; Bender, Collin N.; Lenivy, Christopher M.; Troup, Anna S.; Predecki, Daniel P.; Richardson, John N.; Zaleski, Curtis M.

    2013-01-01

    Metallacrowns are a versatile class of inorganic compounds with uses in several areas of chemistry. Students engage in a multiweek, upper-division inorganic laboratory that explores four different metallacrown compounds: Fe[superscript III](O[subscript 2]CCH[subscript 3])[subscript 3][9-MC[subscript Fe][superscript III][subscript…

  20. A Summary of the Manufacture of Important Inorganic Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenier, Philip J.

    1983-01-01

    Manufacture, properties, uses, and economic aspects of inorganic chemicals are discussed in an industrial chemistry course. Provided and discussed is a flowchart used in the course. The flowchart is a logical method of presenting the important features of inorganic chemicals and a summarizing their method of manufacture. (JN)

  1. Inorganic Analyses in Water Quality Control Programs. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This document is a lecture/laboratory manual dealing with the analysis of selected inorganic pollutants. The manual is an instructional aid for classroom presentations to those with little or no experience in the field, but having one year (or equivalent) of college level inorganic chemistry and having basic laboratory skills. Topics include:…

  2. Inorganic Analyses in Water Quality Control Programs. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroner, Audrey; And Others

    This lecture/laboratory manual for a five-day course deals with the analysis of selected inorganic pollutants. The manual is an instructional aid for classroom presentations to those with little or no experience in the field, but having one year (or equivalent) of college level inorganic chemistry, one semester of college level quantitative…

  3. Sedimentation dynamics about salt features

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrie, A.; Blake, D.W.

    1985-02-01

    Detailed side-scan sonar and gridded bathymetric surveys on continental margins reveal the existence of numerous submarine canyons. Recently published compilations of current velocities in submarine canyons indicate that alternating and undirectionaly flows often exceed 20-30 cm/sec with peak velocities ranging from 70 to 100 cm/sec. Current meters attached to the ocean floor have been lost at current velocities of 190 cm/sec. Such velocities are ample to transport sand-size sediments. The results of DSDP Leg 96 show the existence of massive sands and gravels on the Louisiana slope, deposited during the last glacial advance. Thus, present physical oceanographic data may be an analog to conditions during glacially induced lowered sea levels. Salt ridges and domes underlie much of the Louisiana slope, determining morphology. Submarine canyons lace the slope. Given a prograding shelf, the net sediment transport routes will be down the submarine canyons. Sediment deposition patterns around the salt ridges and domes include parallel-bedded foredrifts on the upslope side, lee drifts on the downslope side, and moats along the lateral flanks of the salt features. Major differences exist between the sedimentation patterns around a ridge and a dome. The size and shape of the flow pattern will determine whether there can be a flow over the salt feature with a resulting turbulent wave that may influence sedimentation. Sedimentation patterns about salt features on the present slope should be applicable to similar paleoenvironments.

  4. Fracture and Healing of Rock Salt Related to Salt Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E.

    1999-03-01

    In recent years, serious investigations of potential extension of the useful life of older caverns or of the use of abandoned caverns for waste disposal have been of interest to the technical community. All of the potential applications depend upon understanding the reamer in which older caverns and sealing systems can fail. Such an understanding will require a more detailed knowledge of the fracture of salt than has been necessary to date. Fortunately, the knowledge of the fracture and healing of salt has made significant advances in the last decade, and is in a position to yield meaningful insights to older cavern behavior. In particular, micromechanical mechanisms of fracture and the concept of a fracture mechanism map have been essential guides, as has the utilization of continuum damage mechanics. The Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which is summarized extensively in this work was developed specifically to treat both the creep and fracture of salt, and was later extended to incorporate the fracture healing process known to occur in rock salt. Fracture in salt is based on the formation and evolution of microfractures, which may take the form of wing tip cracks, either in the body or the boundary of the grain. This type of crack deforms under shear to produce a strain, and furthermore, the opening of the wing cracks produce volume strain or dilatancy. In the presence of a confining pressure, microcrack formation may be suppressed, as is often the case for triaxial compression tests or natural underground stress situations. However, if the confining pressure is insufficient to suppress fracture, then the fractures will evolve with time to give the characteristic tertiary creep response. Two first order kinetics processes, closure of cracks and healing of cracks, control the healing process. Significantly, volume strain produced by microfractures may lead to changes in the permeability of the salt, which can become a major concern in

  5. Inorganic-organic composite polymers and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Josowicz, Mira A.; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    1996-01-01

    The invention is a composition of an inorganic-organic polymer composite and a method of making it. The inorganic portion of the fundamental polymer composite polymer repeat is a speciated inorganic heterocyclic compound, and the organic portion of the polymer repeat is a cyclic organic radical anion compound having at least two charged sites. The composition of the present invention is made by combining a cyclic organic radical anion compound with a speciated inorganic heterocyclic compound by a nucleophilic substitution thereby forming a polymer of an inorganic-organic composite. The cyclic organic radical anion compound is preferably generated electrochemically. The nucleophilic substitution is alternately carried out chemically or electrochemically. A preferred embodiment of the present invention includes performing the nucleophilic substitution at the cathode of an electrochemical cell.

  6. Inorganic-organic composite polymers and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Josowicz, M.A.; Exarhos, G.J.

    1996-10-29

    The invention is a composition of an inorganic-organic polymer composite and a method of making it. The inorganic portion of the fundamental polymer composite polymer repeat is a speciated inorganic heterocyclic compound, and the organic portion of the polymer repeat is a cyclic organic radical anion compound having at least two charged sites. The composition of the present invention is made by combining a cyclic organic radical anion compound with a speciated inorganic heterocyclic compound by a nucleophilic substitution thereby forming a polymer of an inorganic-organic composite. The cyclic organic radical anion compound is preferably generated electrochemically. The nucleophilic substitution is alternately carried out chemically or electrochemically. A preferred embodiment of the present invention includes performing the nucleophilic substitution at the cathode of an electrochemical cell. 2 figs.

  7. Semiconducting organic-inorganic nanocomposites by intimately tethering conjugated polymers to inorganic tetrapods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jaehan; Yoon, Young Jun; Lin, Zhiqun

    2016-04-01

    Semiconducting organic-inorganic nanocomposites were judiciously crafted by placing conjugated polymers in intimate contact with inorganic tetrapods via click reaction. CdSe tetrapods were first synthesized by inducing elongated arms from CdSe zincblende seeds through seed-mediated growth. The subsequent effective inorganic ligand treatment, followed by reacting with short bifunctional ligands, yielded azide-functionalized CdSe tetrapods (i.e., CdSe-N3). Finally, the ethynyl-terminated conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (i.e., P3HT-&z.tbd;) was tethered to CdSe-N3 tetrapods via a catalyst-free alkyne-azide cycloaddition, forming intimate semiconducting P3HT-CdSe tetrapod nanocomposites. Intriguingly, the intimate contact between P3HT and CdSe tetrapod was found to not only render the effective dispersion of CdSe tetrapods in the P3HT matrix, but also facilitate the efficient electronic interaction between these two semiconducting constituents. The successful anchoring of P3HT chains onto CdSe tetrapods was substantiated through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements. Moreover, the absorption and photoluminescence studies further corroborated the intimate tethering between P3HT and CdSe tetrapods. The effect of the type of bifunctional ligands (i.e., aryl vs. aliphatic ligands) and the size of tetrapods on the device performance of hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells was also scrutinized. Interestingly, P3HT-CdSe tetrapod nanocomposites produced via the use of an aryl bifunctional ligand (i.e., 4-azidobenzoic acid) exhibited an improved photovoltaic performance compared to that synthesized with their aliphatic ligand counterpart (i.e., 5-bromovaleric acid). Clearly, the optimal size of CdSe tetrapods ensuring the effective charge transport in conjunction with the good dispersion of CdSe tetrapods rendered an improved device performance. We envision that the click-reaction strategy enabled by

  8. Magnesium degradation influenced by buffering salts in concentrations typical of in vitro and in vivo models.

    PubMed

    Agha, Nezha Ahmad; Feyerabend, Frank; Mihailova, Boriana; Heidrich, Stefanie; Bismayer, Ulrich; Willumeit-Römer, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium and its alloys have considerable potential for orthopedic applications. During the degradation process the interface between material and tissue is continuously changing. Moreover, too fast or uncontrolled degradation is detrimental for the outcome in vivo. Therefore in vitro setups utilizing physiological conditions are promising for the material/degradation analysis prior to animal experiments. The aim of this study is to elucidate the influence of inorganic salts contributing to the blood buffering capacity on degradation. Extruded pure magnesium samples were immersed under cell culture conditions for 3 and 10 days. Hank's balanced salt solution without calcium and magnesium (HBSS) plus 10% of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was used as the basic immersion medium. Additionally, different inorganic salts were added with respect to concentration in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM, in vitro model) and human plasma (in vivo model) to form 12 different immersion media. Influences on the surrounding environment were observed by measuring pH and osmolality. The degradation interface was analyzed by electron-induced X-ray emission (EIXE) spectroscopy, including chemical-element mappings and electron microprobe analysis, as well as Fourier transform infrared reflection micro-spectroscopy (FTIR).

  9. Arsenic bioaccessibility upon gastrointestinal digestion is highly determined by its speciation and lipid-bile salt interactions.

    PubMed

    Alava, Pradeep; Du Laing, Gijs; Odhiambo, Moses; Verliefde, Arne; Tack, Filip; Van de Wiele, Tom R

    2013-01-01

    The release of arsenic (As) from a contaminated food matrix during gastrointestinal digestion, i.e., its bioaccessibility, is an important estimator of its bioavailability, and therefore also its health risk. In addition, As toxicity is primarily determined by its speciation and it is not clear how different As species behave during digestion in the upper digestive tract. Here, we evaluated to what extent digestive parameters like gastric pH and bile concentration, but also food matrix constituents affect the bioaccessibility of 8 As species (As(III), As(V), MMA(V), DMA(V), MMA(III), DMA(III), MMMTA(V), DMMTA(V)). Bioaccessibility of all As standards ranged between 85% and 90% under pH 1.8. Bioaccessibility of methylated and thiolated arsenicals was decreased from 85% to 50% with increasing gastric pH to 4, yet an increasing bile salts concentration up to 30 g/L lowered the bioaccessibility of inorganic species from 83% to 70% due to interaction with Fe present in bile salts. With respect to food matrices, we noted that the fiber content did not affect As bioaccessibility, yet the presence of fat resulted in an increased bioaccessibility of both inorganic and organic arsenicals in the presence of bile salts. With respect to inorganic arsenic, the intestinal presence of trivalent Fe appeared to be the predominant factor for bioaccessibility of iAs. These data demonstrate that species dependent bioaccessibility must be considered upon ingestion and gastrointestinal digestion. PMID:23442116

  10. COMPLEX EVOLUTION OF BILE SALTS IN BIRDS.

    PubMed

    Hagey, Lee R; Vidal, Nicolas; Hofmann, Alan F; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2010-10-01

    Bile salts are the major end-metabolites of cholesterol and are important in lipid digestion and shaping of the gut microflora. There have been limited studies of bile-salt variation in birds. The purpose of our study was to determine bile-salt variation among birds and relate this variation to current avian phylogenies and hypotheses on the evolution of bile salt pathways. We determined the biliary bile-salt composition of 405 phylogenetically diverse bird species, including 7 paleognath species. Bile salt profiles were generally stable within bird families. Complex bile-salt profiles were more common in omnivores and herbivores than in carnivores. The structural variation of bile salts in birds is extensive and comparable to that seen in surveys of bile salts in reptiles and mammals. Birds produce many of the bile salts found throughout nonavian vertebrates and some previously uncharacterized bile salts. One difference between birds and other vertebrates is extensive hydroxylation of carbon-16 of bile salts in bird species. Comparison of our data set of bird bile salts with that of other vertebrates, especially reptiles, allowed us to infer evolutionary changes in the bile salt synthetic pathway.

  11. COMPLEX EVOLUTION OF BILE SALTS IN BIRDS

    PubMed Central

    Hagey, Lee R.; Vidal, Nicolas; Hofmann, Alan F.; Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    Bile salts are the major end-metabolites of cholesterol and are important in lipid digestion and shaping of the gut microflora. There have been limited studies of bile-salt variation in birds. The purpose of our study was to determine bile-salt variation among birds and relate this variation to current avian phylogenies and hypotheses on the evolution of bile salt pathways. We determined the biliary bile-salt composition of 405 phylogenetically diverse bird species, including 7 paleognath species. Bile salt profiles were generally stable within bird families. Complex bile-salt profiles were more common in omnivores and herbivores than in carnivores. The structural variation of bile salts in birds is extensive and comparable to that seen in surveys of bile salts in reptiles and mammals. Birds produce many of the bile salts found throughout nonavian vertebrates and some previously uncharacterized bile salts. One difference between birds and other vertebrates is extensive hydroxylation of carbon-16 of bile salts in bird species. Comparison of our data set of bird bile salts with that of other vertebrates, especially reptiles, allowed us to infer evolutionary changes in the bile salt synthetic pathway. PMID:21113274

  12. Protein aggregation in salt solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kastelic, Miha; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V.; Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation is broadly important in diseases and in formulations of biological drugs. Here, we develop a theoretical model for reversible protein–protein aggregation in salt solutions. We treat proteins as hard spheres having square-well-energy binding sites, using Wertheim’s thermodynamic perturbation theory. The necessary condition required for such modeling to be realistic is that proteins in solution during the experiment remain in their compact form. Within this limitation our model gives accurate liquid–liquid coexistence curves for lysozyme and γ IIIa-crystallin solutions in respective buffers. It provides good fits to the cloud-point curves of lysozyme in buffer–salt mixtures as a function of the type and concentration of salt. It than predicts full coexistence curves, osmotic compressibilities, and second virial coefficients under such conditions. This treatment may also be relevant to protein crystallization. PMID:25964322

  13. Salt splitting with ceramic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, D.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop ceramic membrane technologies for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions. This technology has the potential to reduce the low-level waste (LLW) disposal volume, the pH and sodium hydroxide content for subsequent processing steps, the sodium content of interstitial liquid in high-level waste (HLW) sludges, and provide sodium hydroxide free of aluminum for recycle within processing plants at the DOE complex. Potential deployment sites include Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The technical approach consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON). As the name implies, sodium ions are transported rapidly through these ceramic crystals even at room temperatures.

  14. The molten salt reactor adventure

    SciTech Connect

    MacPherson, H.G.

    1985-08-01

    A personal history of the development of molten salt reactors in the United States is presented. The initial goal was an aircraft propulsion reactor, and a molten fluoride-fueled Aircraft Reactor Experiment was operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1954. In 1956, the objective shifted to civilian nuclear power, and reactor concepts were developed using a circulating UF4-ThF4 fuel, graphite moderator, and Hastelloy N pressure boundary. The program culminated in the successful operation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment in 1965 to 1969. By then the Atomic Energy Commission's goals had shifted to breeder development; the molten salt program supported on-site reprocessing development and study of various reactor arrangements that had potential to breed. Some commercial and foreign interest contributed to the program which, however, was terminated by the government in 1976. The current status of the technology and prospects for revived interest are summarized.

  15. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Protein aggregation in salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Kastelic, Miha; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V; Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A; Vlachy, Vojko

    2015-05-26

    Protein aggregation is broadly important in diseases and in formulations of biological drugs. Here, we develop a theoretical model for reversible protein-protein aggregation in salt solutions. We treat proteins as hard spheres having square-well-energy binding sites, using Wertheim's thermodynamic perturbation theory. The necessary condition required for such modeling to be realistic is that proteins in solution during the experiment remain in their compact form. Within this limitation our model gives accurate liquid-liquid coexistence curves for lysozyme and γ IIIa-crystallin solutions in respective buffers. It provides good fits to the cloud-point curves of lysozyme in buffer-salt mixtures as a function of the type and concentration of salt. It than predicts full coexistence curves, osmotic compressibilities, and second virial coefficients under such conditions. This treatment may also be relevant to protein crystallization.

  17. Field-assisted nanopatterning of metals, metal oxides and metal salts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Fu; Miller, Glen P

    2009-02-01

    The tip-based nanofabrication method called field-assisted nanopatterning or FAN has now been extended to the transfer of metals, metal oxides and metal salts onto various receiving substrates including highly ordered pyrolytic graphite, passivated gold and indium-tin oxide. Standard atomic force microscope tips were first dip-coated using suspensions of inorganic compounds in solvent. The films prepared in this manner were non-uniform and contained inorganic nanoparticles. Tip-based nanopatterning on chosen substrates was conducted under high electric field conditions. The same tip was used for both nanofabrication and imaging. Arbitrary patterns were formed with dimensions that ranged from tens of microns to sub-20 nm and were controlled by tuning the tip bias during fabrication. Most tip-based nanopatterning techniques are limited in terms of the type of species that can be deposited and the type of substrates onto which the deposition occurs. With the successful deposition of inorganic species reported here, FAN is demonstrated to be a truly versatile tip-based nanofabrication technique that is useful for the deposition of a wide variety of both organic and inorganic species including small molecules, large molecules and polymers.

  18. In-Depth Coursework in Undergraduate Inorganic Chemistry: Results from a National Survey of Inorganic Chemistry Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raker, Jeffrey R.; Reisner, Barbara A.; Smith, Sheila R.; Stewart, Joanne L.; Crane, Johanna L.; Pesterfield, Les; Sobel, Sabrina G.

    2015-01-01

    A national survey of inorganic chemists explored the self-reported topics covered in in-depth inorganic chemistry courses at the postsecondary level; an in-depth course is defined by the American Chemical Society's Committee on Professional Training as a course that integrates and covers topics that were introduced in introductory and foundation…

  19. Fabrication of a stable inorganic-organic hybrid multilayer film with uniform and dense inorganic nanoparticle deposition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xurong; Han, Joong Tark; Cho, Kilwon

    2003-04-21

    A stable inorganic-organic hybrid multilayer film with homogeneous and dense inorganic nanoparticle deposition was constructed by coating ZrO2 nanoparticles with poly(4-sodium styrenesulfonate) (PSS) and irradiating multilayer film assembled from PSS-coated ZrO2 nanoparticles and a diazo-resin (DR). PMID:12744322

  20. The metabolism of methoxyethylmercury salts

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, J. W.; Gage, J. C.; Lefevre, P. A.

    1971-01-01

    The metabolism of methoxy[14C]ethylmercury chloride in the rat has been investigated. After a single subcutaneous dose a small proportion is excreted unchanged in urine and a larger amount in bile with some resorption from the gut. The greater part of the dose is rapidly broken down in the tissues with a half-time of about 1 day to yield ethylene and inorganic mercury. Ethylene is exhaled in the breath and the mercury migrates to the kidney and is excreted in urine. A small proportion of the dose appears as carbon dioxide in the breath and about 12% in urine as a mercury-free metabolite. It is possible that the breakdown of methoxyethylmercurychloride to ethylene and inorganic mercury is not catalysed by an enzyme system. PMID:5119773

  1. Selective Recovery of Enriched Uranium from Inorganic Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, R. T.

    2003-02-26

    Uranium as U(IV) and U(VI) can be selectively recovered from liquids and sludge containing metal precipitates, inorganic salts, sand and silt fines, debris, other contaminants, and slimes, which are very difficult to de-water. Chemical processes such as fuel manufacturing and uranium mining generate enriched and natural uranium-bearing wastes. This patented Framatome ANP (FANP) uranium recovery process reduces uranium losses, significantly offsets waste disposal costs, produces a solid waste that meets mixed-waste disposal requirements, and does not generate metal-contaminated liquids. At the head end of the process is a floating dredge that retrieves liquids, sludge, and slimes in the form of a slurry directly from the floor of a lined surface impoundment (lagoon). The slurry is transferred to and mixed in a feed tank with a turbine mixer and re-circulated to further break down the particles and enhance dissolution of uranium. This process uses direct steam injection and sodium hypochlorite addition to oxidize and dissolves any U(IV). Cellulose is added as a non-reactive filter aid to help filter slimes by giving body to the slurry. The slurry is pumped into a large recessed-chamber filter press then de-watered by a pressure cycle-controlled double-diaphragm pump. U(VI) captured in the filtrate from this process is then precipitated by conversion to U(IV) in another Framatome ANP-patented process which uses a strong reducing agent to crystallize and settle the U(IV) product. The product is then dewatered in a small filter press. To-date, over 3,000 Kgs of U at 3% U-235 enrichment were recovered from a 8100 m2 hypalon-lined surface impoundment which contained about 10,220 m3 of liquids and about 757 m3 of sludge. A total of 2,175 drums (0.208 m3 or 55 gallon each) of solid mixed-wastes have been packaged, shipped, and disposed. In addition, 9463 m3 of low-U liquids at <0.001 KgU/m3 were also further processed and disposed.

  2. Protic Salt Polymer Membranes: High-Temperature Water-Free Proton-Conducting Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Gervasio, Dominic Francis

    2010-09-30

    This research on proton-containing (protic) salts directly addresses proton conduction at high and low temperatures. This research is unique, because no water is used for proton ionization nor conduction, so the properties of water do not limit proton fuel cells. A protic salt is all that is needed to give rise to ionized proton and to support proton mobility. A protic salt forms when proton transfers from an acid to a base. Protic salts were found to have proton conductivities that are as high as or higher than the best aqueous electrolytes at ambient pressures and comparable temperatures without or with water present. Proton conductivity of the protic salts occurs providing two conditions exist: i) the energy difference is about 0.8 eV between the protic-salt state versus the state in which the acid and base are separated and 2) the chemical constituents rotate freely. The physical state of these proton-conducting salts can be liquid, plastic crystal as well as solid organic and inorganic polymer membranes and their mixtures. Many acids and bases can be used to make a protic salt which allows tailoring of proton conductivity, as well as other properties that affect their use as electrolytes in fuel cells, such as, stability, adsorption on catalysts, environmental impact, etc. During this project, highly proton conducting (~ 0.1S/cm) protic salts were made that are stable under fuel-cell operating conditions and that gave highly efficient fuel cells. The high efficiency is attributed to an improved oxygen electroreduction process on Pt which was found to be virtually reversible in a number of liquid protic salts with low water activity (< 1% water). Solid flexible non-porous composite membranes, made from inorganic polymer (e.g., 10%indium 90%tin pyrophosphate, ITP) and organic polymer (e.g., polyvinyl pyridinium phosphate, PVPP), were found that give conductivity and fuel cell performances similar to phosphoric acid electrolyte with no need for hydration at

  3. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. M.; Del Cul, G. D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D. H.

    1995-01-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior which can be used effectively to reduce the amount of development required for future systems, some significant molten salt chemical questions must still be addressed.

  4. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. M.; Delcul, G. D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D. H.

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior which can be used effectively to reduce the amount of development required for future systems, some significant molten salt chemical questions must still be addressed.

  5. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome: review.

    PubMed

    Cerdà-Esteve, M; Cuadrado-Godia, E; Chillaron, J J; Pont-Sunyer, C; Cucurella, G; Fernández, M; Goday, A; Cano-Pérez, J F; Rodríguez-Campello, A; Roquer, J

    2008-06-01

    Hyponatremia is the most frequent electrolyte disorder in critically neurological patients. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSW) is defined as a renal loss of sodium during intracranial disease leading to hyponatremia and a decrease in extracellular fluid volume. The pathogenesis of this disorder is still not completely understood. Sympathetic responses as well as some natriuretic factors play a role in this syndrome. Distinction between SIADH and CSW might be difficult. The essential point is the volemic state. It is necessary to rule out other intermediate causes. Treatment requires volume replacement and maintenance of a positive salt balance. Mineral corticoids may be useful in complicated cases.

  6. Dynamics of Confined Water Molecules in Aqueous Salt Hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Werhahn, Jasper C.; Pandelov, S.; Yoo, Soohaeng; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Iglev, H.

    2011-04-01

    The unusual properties of water are largely dictated by the dynamics of the H bond network. A single water molecule has more H bonding sites than atoms, hence new experimental and theoretical investigations about this peculiar liquid have not ceased to appear. Confinement of water to nanodroplets or small molecular clusters drastically changes many of the liquid’s properties. Such confined water plays a major role in the solvation of macro molecules such as proteins and can even be essential to their properties. Despite the vast results available on bulk and confined water, discussions about the correlation between spectral and structural properties continue to this day. The fast relaxation of the OH stretching vibration in bulk water, and the variance of sample geometries in the experiments on confined water obfuscate definite interpretation of the spectroscopic results in terms of structural parameters. We present first time-resolved investigations on a new model system that is ideally suited to overcome many of the problems faced in spectroscopical investigation of the H bond network of water. Aqueous hydrates of inorganic salts provide water molecules in a crystal grid, that enables unambiguous correlations of spectroscopic and structural features. Furthermore, the confined water clusters are well isolated from each other in the crystal matrix, so different degrees of confinement can be achieved by selection of the appropriate salt.

  7. Effectiveness of compost use in salt-affected soil.

    PubMed

    Lakhdar, Abdelbasset; Rabhi, Mokded; Ghnaya, Tahar; Montemurro, Francesco; Jedidi, Naceur; Abdelly, Chedly

    2009-11-15

    Soil degradation and salinization are two of the utmost threat affecting agricultural areas, derived from the increasing use of low quality water and inappropriate cultural practices. The problem of low productivity of saline soils may be ascribed not only to their salt toxicity or damage caused by excess amounts of soluble salts but also arising from the lack of organic matter and available mineral nutrients especially N, P, and K. Concerns about salinization risk and environmental quality and productivity of agro-ecosystems have emphasized the need to develop management practices that maintain soil resources. Composted municipal solid waste (MSW) was commonly used to enhance soil productivity in the agricultural lands and rebuild fertility. However, their application could be also a promising alternative to alleviate the adverse effects caused by soil salinization. MSW compost, with high organic matter content and low concentrations of inorganic and organic pollutants allow an improvement of physical, chemical and biochemical characteristics and constitute low cost soil recovery. PMID:19576686

  8. Production of chlorine from chloride salts

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.

    1981-01-01

    A process for converting chloride salts and sulfuric acid to sulfate salts and elemental chlorine is disclosed. A chloride salt and sulfuric acid are combined in a furnace where they react to produce a sulfate salt and hydrogen chloride. Hydrogen chloride from the furnace contacts a molten salt mixture containing an oxygen compound of vanadium, an alkali metal sulfate and an alkali metal pyrosulfate to recover elemental chlorine. In the absence of an oxygen-bearing gas during the contacting, the vanadium is reduced, but is regenerated to its active higher valence state by separately contacting the molten salt mixture with an oxygen-bearing gas.

  9. Inorganic-organic materials incorporating alumoxane nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelson, Cullen Taylor

    Chemically functionalized alumina nanoparticles (carboxylate-alumoxanes) are used as the inorganic component of a new class of inorganic-organic material. Lysine- or para-hydroxybenzoic acid-derivatized alumoxanes are prepared from the reaction of boehmite, [Al(O)(OH)]n, with the appropriate carboxylic acid. The peripheral hydroxides and amines of these alumoxanes react directly with DER 332 epoxide to form a hybrid material, or in the presence of a resin and hardener system, to form a composite material. Solid state NMR spectroscopy demonstrates that the alumoxanes are chemically bound to the resin matrix. The properties and cure times of the alumoxane materials are distinct from both the pure resins and from a physical blend of the resins with traditional fillers. A significant increase in thermal stability and tensile strength is observed for the resin systems. In order to produce molecular coupling layers, epoxides cross-linked with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) grown on the native oxide of aluminum thin films on silicon substrates have been investigated. Specifically, SAMs have been formed by the attachment of different carboxylic acids. In order to investigate the cross-linking reaction between carboxylate monolayers and an epoxide, grown monolayers were reacted with a mono-epoxy resin. In addition to these surface materials, aluminum oxide surfaces supporting carboxylate monolayers were reacted in pairs with DER 332 to form a structural adhesive. These materials have been characterized variously by SEM, AFM, XPS, EDX, and contact angle measurements. The particle size dependence on pH of a series of alumoxanes was investigated. For each of the alumoxanes, PCS particle size measurements were obtained as a function of pH. In all cases, particle size control was afforded by variations in pH. Finally, crystal structures of several model compounds were determined by X-ray crystallography, and shown to form either sheets of dimers or tetrameric units. Through a

  10. Anticorrosive organic/inorganic hybrid coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Tongzhai

    Organic/inorganic hybrid coating system was developed for anticorrosion applications using polyurea, polyurethane or epoxide as the organic phase and polysiloxane, formed by sol-gel process, as the inorganic phase. Polyurea/polysiloxane hybrid coatings were formulated and moisture cured using HDI isocyanurate, alkoxysilane-functionalized HDI isocyanurate, and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) oligomers. Two urethanes were prepared using the same components as abovementioned in addition to the oligoesters derived from either cyclohexane diacids (CHDA) and 2-butyl-2-ethyl-1,3-propanediol (BEPD) or adipic acid (AA), isophthalic acid (IPA), 1,6-hexanediol (HD), and trimethylol propane (TMP). Accelerated weathering and outdoor exposure were performed to study the weatherability of the polyurethane/polysiloxane hybrid coating system. FTIR and solid-state 13C NMR revealed that the degradation of the hybrid coatings occurred at the urethane and ester functionalities of the organic phase. DMA and DSC analyses showed the glass transition temperature increased and broadened after weathering. SEM was employed to observe the change of morphology of the hybrid coatings and correlated with the gloss variation after weathering. Rutile TiO2 was formulated into polyurethane/polysiloxane hybrid coatings in order to investigate the effect of pigmentation on the coating properties and the sol-gel precursor. Chemical interaction between the TiO2 and the sol-gel precursor was investigated using solid-state 29Si NMR and XPS. The morphology, mechanical, viscoelastic, thermal properties of the pigmented coatings were evaluated as a function of pigmentation volume concentration (PVC). Using AFM and SEM, the pigment were observed to be well dispersed in the polymer matrix. The thermal stability, the tensile modulus and strength of the coatings were enhanced with increasing PVC, whereas the pull-off adhesion and flexibility were reduced with increasing PVC. Finally, the pigmented coatings were

  11. Hydrological indications of aeolian salts in mid-latitude deserts of northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bing-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Large sandy deserts in middle latitude of northwestern China were studied on salt variations in modern and ancient aeolian sediments, aiming to explore their hydrological indications at the present and past. Globally, sulphate is rich in arid to semi-arid deserts, including the aeolian loess sediments in China and soils in low-latitude deserts, but is less common in the aeolian sediments from the mid-latitude deserts in this study. The compositional differences between aeolian salts and local natural waters is evident, indicating the chemistry of aeolian salts and the associated parent brines may be significantly different than that predicted for hydrologically closed systems. The formation of aeolian salts in the studied deserts is strongly controlled by earth surface processes in a large scale but not in a local scale. Vertical changes in facies and salinities are abrupt in the studied palaeo-aeolian sediment samples, which were interbedded by lacustrine/fluvial sediments with OSL and 14C ages ranging between 40 and 2 ka BP, reflecting rapid high-amplitude changes in hydrological settings during late Pleistocene to later Holocene in these ancient playa systems. A great difference in salt composition between aeolian and lacustrine sediments suggests that the inorganic salt is a latent geoproxy in revealing local hydrological variations and climate change in the desert areas. But the environmental indications could be amphibolous for the sedimentary sequences with dual/multiple depositional end-members; under this situation an increase in sequence salinity does not always represent an enhanced environmental aridity. Ancient playas are arid or humid at the same time based on several sporadic records is not a valid approach to correlation of salt deposits in adjacent saline playa basin in the studied areas. Effects of earth surface processes including erosion, deposition and other processes on sediment properties will bias the hydrological implications of sediment

  12. Mixed-salt effects on the conformation of a short salt-bridge-forming α helix: A simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hao; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2014-02-01

    The structure of a single alanine-based ACE-AEAAAKEAAAKA-NH2 peptide in explicit aqueous solutions with mixed inorganic salts (NaCl and KCl) is investigated by using molecular simulations. The concentration of Na+, cNa+, varies from 0.0M to 1.0M, whereas the concentration of K+ is 1-cNa+. The simulated peptide is very sensitive to the change of concentration ratio between Na+ and K+. When the concentration ratio between Na+ and K+ is changed from 0.5/0.5, the structure of the peptide becomes loose or disordered. This specific phenomenon is confirmed via checking the changes of helix parameters and mapping the free energy along different coordinates. The higher normalized probability of forming direct and indirect salt bridges between residues Glu7- and Lys11+ and the smallest probability of forming ringlike structures should be responsible for the stabilized helix structure in the 0.5 Na+/0.5 K+ solution. Furthermore, a noticeable conformational transition from an extended helix to an α helix is found in the 0.5 Na+/0.5 K+ solution, where a local ion cloud shows that some Na+ ions in the inner shells are still directly binding with the peptide, while K+ in the outer shells are moving into the inner shells, keeping the peptide in the collapsed state.

  13. Microplastic Pollution in Table Salts from China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongqi; Shi, Huahong; Li, Lan; Li, Jiana; Jabeen, Khalida; Kolandhasamy, Prabhu

    2015-11-17

    Microplastics have been found in seas all over the world. We hypothesize that sea salts might contain microplastics, because they are directly supplied by seawater. To test our hypothesis, we collected 15 brands of sea salts, lake salts, and rock/well salts from supermarkets throughout China. The microplastics content was 550-681 particles/kg in sea salts, 43-364 particles/kg in lake salts, and 7-204 particles/kg in rock/well salts. In sea salts, fragments and fibers were the prevalent types of particles compared with pellets and sheets. Microplastics measuring less than 200 μm represented the majority of the particles, accounting for 55% of the total microplastics, and the most common microplastics were polyethylene terephthalate, followed by polyethylene and cellophane in sea salts. The abundance of microplastics in sea salts was significantly higher than that in lake salts and rock/well salts. This result indicates that sea products, such as sea salts, are contaminated by microplastics. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on microplastic pollution in abiotic sea products.

  14. Iodisation of Salt in Slovenia: Increased Availability of Non-Iodised Salt in the Food Supply

    PubMed Central

    Žmitek, Katja; Pravst, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Salt iodisation is considered a key public health measure for assuring adequate iodine intake in iodine-deficient countries. In Slovenia, the iodisation of all salt was made mandatory in 1953. A considerable regulatory change came in 2003 with the mandatory iodisation of rock and evaporated salt only. In addition, joining the European Union’s free single market in 2004 enabled the import of non-iodised salt. The objective of this study was to investigate the extent of salt iodising in the food supply. We examined both the availability and sale of (non-)iodised salt. Average sales-weighted iodine levels in salt were calculated using the results of a national monitoring of salt quality. Data on the availability and sales of salts were collected in major food retailers in 2014. Iodised salt represented 59.2% of the salt samples, and 95.9% of salt sales, with an average (sales-weighted) level of 24.2 mg KI/kg of salt. The average sales-weighted KI level in non-iodised salts was 3.5 mg KI/kg. We may conclude that the sales-weighted average iodine levels in iodised salt are in line with the regulatory requirements. However, the regulatory changes and the EU single market have considerably affected the availability of non-iodised salt. While sales of non-iodised salt are still low, non-iodised salt represented 33.7% of the salts in our sample. This indicates the existence of a niche market which could pose a risk of inadequate iodine intake in those who deliberately decide to consume non-iodised salt only. Policymakers need to provide efficient salt iodisation intervention to assure sufficient iodine supply in the future. The reported sales-weighting approach enables cost-efficient monitoring of the iodisation of salt in the food supply. PMID:27438852

  15. Iodisation of Salt in Slovenia: Increased Availability of Non-Iodised Salt in the Food Supply.

    PubMed

    Žmitek, Katja; Pravst, Igor

    2016-07-16

    Salt iodisation is considered a key public health measure for assuring adequate iodine intake in iodine-deficient countries. In Slovenia, the iodisation of all salt was made mandatory in 1953. A considerable regulatory change came in 2003 with the mandatory iodisation of rock and evaporated salt only. In addition, joining the European Union's free single market in 2004 enabled the import of non-iodised salt. The objective of this study was to investigate the extent of salt iodising in the food supply. We examined both the availability and sale of (non-)iodised salt. Average sales-weighted iodine levels in salt were calculated using the results of a national monitoring of salt quality. Data on the availability and sales of salts were collected in major food retailers in 2014. Iodised salt represented 59.2% of the salt samples, and 95.9% of salt sales, with an average (sales-weighted) level of 24.2 mg KI/kg of salt. The average sales-weighted KI level in non-iodised salts was 3.5 mg KI/kg. We may conclude that the sales-weighted average iodine levels in iodised salt are in line with the regulatory requirements. However, the regulatory changes and the EU single market have considerably affected the availability of non-iodised salt. While sales of non-iodised salt are still low, non-iodised salt represented 33.7% of the salts in our sample. This indicates the existence of a niche market which could pose a risk of inadequate iodine intake in those who deliberately decide to consume non-iodised salt only. Policymakers need to provide efficient salt iodisation intervention to assure sufficient iodine supply in the future. The reported sales-weighting approach enables cost-efficient monitoring of the iodisation of salt in the food supply.

  16. Iodisation of Salt in Slovenia: Increased Availability of Non-Iodised Salt in the Food Supply.

    PubMed

    Žmitek, Katja; Pravst, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Salt iodisation is considered a key public health measure for assuring adequate iodine intake in iodine-deficient countries. In Slovenia, the iodisation of all salt was made mandatory in 1953. A considerable regulatory change came in 2003 with the mandatory iodisation of rock and evaporated salt only. In addition, joining the European Union's free single market in 2004 enabled the import of non-iodised salt. The objective of this study was to investigate the extent of salt iodising in the food supply. We examined both the availability and sale of (non-)iodised salt. Average sales-weighted iodine levels in salt were calculated using the results of a national monitoring of salt quality. Data on the availability and sales of salts were collected in major food retailers in 2014. Iodised salt represented 59.2% of the salt samples, and 95.9% of salt sales, with an average (sales-weighted) level of 24.2 mg KI/kg of salt. The average sales-weighted KI level in non-iodised salts was 3.5 mg KI/kg. We may conclude that the sales-weighted average iodine levels in iodised salt are in line with the regulatory requirements. However, the regulatory changes and the EU single market have considerably affected the availability of non-iodised salt. While sales of non-iodised salt are still low, non-iodised salt represented 33.7% of the salts in our sample. This indicates the existence of a niche market which could pose a risk of inadequate iodine intake in those who deliberately decide to consume non-iodised salt only. Policymakers need to provide efficient salt iodisation intervention to assure sufficient iodine supply in the future. The reported sales-weighting approach enables cost-efficient monitoring of the iodisation of salt in the food supply. PMID:27438852

  17. Chromium(III), insoluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chromium ( III ) , insoluble salts ; CASRN 16065 - 83 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments

  18. Clean salt process final report

    SciTech Connect

    Herting, D.L.

    1996-09-30

    A process has been demonstrated in the laboratory for separating clean, virtually non-radioactive sodium nitrate from Hanford tank waste using fractional crystallization. The name of the process is the Clean Salt Process. Flowsheet modeling has shown that the process is capable of reducing the volume of vitrified low activity waste (LAW) by 80 to 90 %. Construction of the Clean Salt processing plant would cost less than $1 10 million, and would eliminate the need for building a $2.2 billion large scale vitrification plant planned for Privatization Phase 11. Disposal costs for the vitrified LAW would also be reduced by an estimated $240 million. This report provides a summary of five years of laboratory and engineering development activities, beginning in fiscal year 1992. Topics covered include laboratory testing of a variety of processing options; proof-of-principle demonstrations with actual waste samples from Hanford tanks 241-U-110 (U-110), 241-SY-101 (101-SY), and 241-AN-102 (102-AN); descriptions of the primary solubility phase diagrams that govem the process; a review of environmental regulations governing disposition of the reclaimed salt and an assessment of the potential beneficial uses of the reclaimed salt; preliminary plant design and construction cost estimates. A detailed description is given for the large scale laboratory demonstration of the process using waste from tank 241-AW-101 (101-AW), a candidate waste for 0044vitrification during Phase I Privatization.

  19. Hydrogen Cyanide and Cyanide Salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 08 / 016 F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF HYDROGEN CYANIDE AND CYANIDE SALTS ( CAS No . various ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2010 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This docu

  20. Cathode for molten salt batteries

    DOEpatents

    Mamantov, Gleb; Marassi, Roberto

    1977-01-01

    A molten salt electrochemical system for battery applications comprises tetravalent sulfur as the active cathode material with a molten chloroaluminate solvent comprising a mixture of AlCl.sub.3 and MCl having a molar ratio of AlCl.sub.3 /MCl from greater than 50.0/50.0 to 80/20.

  1. Maternal transfer of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in aquatic and terrestrial arthropods.

    PubMed

    Saxton, Heidi J; Goodman, James R; Collins, Jeffrey N; Black, Frank J

    2013-11-01

    The transfer of mercury from females to their offspring plays an important role in mercury accumulation and toxicity during early development. To quantify the transfer of inorganic mercury and methylmercury from female arthropods to their eggs, the authors collected and analyzed brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana), wolf spiders (Alopecosa spp.), and their attached eggs from aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA. Essentially all of the mercury in both the female brine shrimp and their eggs was methylmercury (94 ± 17% and 90 ± 21%, respectively). The brine shrimp eggs had methylmercury concentrations that were 84 ± 2% lower than in the females, reflecting the fact that females transferred 45 ± 4% of their total body mass but only 11 ± 3% of their methylmercury burden to their eggs. As a result of this sequestration, the concentration of methylmercury in the female brine shrimp increased by 62 ± 8% during egg formation. The percentage of the total mercury that was methylmercury in female wolf spiders (77 ± 21%) was similar to that in their egg masses (81 ± 19%), indicating similar maternal transfer efficiencies for inorganic mercury and methylmercury in these invertebrates. The concentration of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in the female spiders was the same as in their eggs. These arachnids transferred 48 ± 9% of their total body mass, 55 ± 13% of their inorganic mercury, and 50 ± 9% of their methylmercury to their egg masses. Thus, female wolf spiders do not have the ability to reduce the transfer of methylmercury to their eggs, nor does this process represent an important pathway for the depuration of mercury. The present study demonstrates that although some arthropods have mechanisms to minimize the transfer of methylmercury to their eggs and reduce the potential for mercury toxicity during early development, other arthropods do not. PMID:23939924

  2. Inorganic/organic hybrid nanocomposite coating applications: Formulation, characterization, and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyassu, Tsehaye

    Nanotechnology applications in coatings have shown significant growth in recent years. Systematic incorporation of nano-sized inorganic materials into polymer coating enhances optical, electrical, thermal and mechanical properties significantly. The present dissertation will focus on formulation, characterization and evaluation of inorganic/organic hybrid nanocomposite coatings for heat dissipation, corrosion inhibition and ultraviolet (UV) and near infrared (NIR) cut applications. In addition, the dissertation will cover synthesis, characterization and dispersion of functional inorganic fillers. In the first project, we investigated factors that can affect the "Molecular Fan" cooling performance and efficiency. The investigated factors and conditions include types of nanomaterials, size, loading amount, coating thickness, heat sink substrate, substrate surface modification, and power input. Using the optimal factors, MF coating was formulated and applied on commercial HDUs, and cooling efficiencies up to 22% and 23% were achieved using multi-walled carbon nanotube and graphene fillers. The result suggests that molecular fan action can reduce the size and mass of heat-sink module and thus offer a low cost of LED light unit. In the second project, we report the use of thin organic/inorganic hybrid coating as a protection for corrosion and as a thermal management to dissipate heat from galvanized steel. Here, we employed the in-situ phosphatization method for corrosion inhibition and "Molecular fan" technique to dissipate heat from galvanized steel panels and sheets. Salt fog tests reveal successful completion of 72 hours corrosion protection time frame for samples coated with as low as ~0.7microm thickness. Heat dissipation measurement shows 9% and 13% temperature cooling for GI and GL panels with the same coating thickness of ~0.7microm respectively. The effect of different factors, in-situ phosphatization reagent (ISPR), cross-linkers and nanomaterial on corrosion

  3. Maternal transfer of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in aquatic and terrestrial arthropods.

    PubMed

    Saxton, Heidi J; Goodman, James R; Collins, Jeffrey N; Black, Frank J

    2013-11-01

    The transfer of mercury from females to their offspring plays an important role in mercury accumulation and toxicity during early development. To quantify the transfer of inorganic mercury and methylmercury from female arthropods to their eggs, the authors collected and analyzed brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana), wolf spiders (Alopecosa spp.), and their attached eggs from aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA. Essentially all of the mercury in both the female brine shrimp and their eggs was methylmercury (94 ± 17% and 90 ± 21%, respectively). The brine shrimp eggs had methylmercury concentrations that were 84 ± 2% lower than in the females, reflecting the fact that females transferred 45 ± 4% of their total body mass but only 11 ± 3% of their methylmercury burden to their eggs. As a result of this sequestration, the concentration of methylmercury in the female brine shrimp increased by 62 ± 8% during egg formation. The percentage of the total mercury that was methylmercury in female wolf spiders (77 ± 21%) was similar to that in their egg masses (81 ± 19%), indicating similar maternal transfer efficiencies for inorganic mercury and methylmercury in these invertebrates. The concentration of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in the female spiders was the same as in their eggs. These arachnids transferred 48 ± 9% of their total body mass, 55 ± 13% of their inorganic mercury, and 50 ± 9% of their methylmercury to their egg masses. Thus, female wolf spiders do not have the ability to reduce the transfer of methylmercury to their eggs, nor does this process represent an important pathway for the depuration of mercury. The present study demonstrates that although some arthropods have mechanisms to minimize the transfer of methylmercury to their eggs and reduce the potential for mercury toxicity during early development, other arthropods do not.

  4. Inorganic ion composition in Tardigrada: cryptobionts contain a large fraction of unidentified organic solutes.

    PubMed

    Halberg, Kenneth Agerlin; Larsen, Kristine Wulff; Jørgensen, Aslak; Ramløv, Hans; Møbjerg, Nadja

    2013-04-01

    Many species of tardigrades are known to tolerate extreme environmental stress, yet detailed knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the remarkable adaptations of tardigrades is still lacking, as are answers to many questions regarding their basic biology. Here, we present data on the inorganic ion composition and total osmotic concentration of five different species of tardigrades (Echiniscus testudo, Milnesium tardigradum, Richtersius coronifer, Macrobiotus cf. hufelandi and Halobiotus crispae) using high-performance liquid chromatography and nanoliter osmometry. Quantification of the ionic content indicates that Na(+) and Cl(-) are the principal inorganic ions in tardigrade fluids, albeit other ions, i.e. K(+), NH4(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), F(-), SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) were also detected. In limno-terrestrial tardigrades, the respective ions are concentrated by a large factor compared with that of the external medium (Na(+), ×70-800; K(+), ×20-90; Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), ×30-200; F(-), ×160-1040, Cl(-), ×20-50; PO4(3-), ×700-2800; SO4(2-), ×30-150). In contrast, in the marine species H. crispae, Na(+), Cl(-) and SO4(2-) are almost in ionic equilibrium with (brackish) salt water, while K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and F(-) are only slightly concentrated (×2-10). An anion deficit of ~120 mEq l(-1) in M. tardigradum and H. crispae indicates the presence of unidentified ionic components in these species. Body fluid osmolality ranges from 361±49 mOsm kg(-1) in R. coronifer to 961±43 mOsm kg(-1) in H. crispae. Concentrations of most inorganic ions are largely identical between active and dehydrated groups of R. coronifer, suggesting that this tardigrade does not lose large quantities of inorganic ions during dehydration. The large osmotic and ionic gradients maintained by both limno-terrestrial and marine species are indicative of a powerful ion-retentive mechanism in Tardigrada. Moreover, our data indicate that cryptobiotic tardigrades contain a large fraction of unidentified

  5. Inorganic ion composition in Tardigrada: cryptobionts contain a large fraction of unidentified organic solutes.

    PubMed

    Halberg, Kenneth Agerlin; Larsen, Kristine Wulff; Jørgensen, Aslak; Ramløv, Hans; Møbjerg, Nadja

    2013-04-01

    Many species of tardigrades are known to tolerate extreme environmental stress, yet detailed knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the remarkable adaptations of tardigrades is still lacking, as are answers to many questions regarding their basic biology. Here, we present data on the inorganic ion composition and total osmotic concentration of five different species of tardigrades (Echiniscus testudo, Milnesium tardigradum, Richtersius coronifer, Macrobiotus cf. hufelandi and Halobiotus crispae) using high-performance liquid chromatography and nanoliter osmometry. Quantification of the ionic content indicates that Na(+) and Cl(-) are the principal inorganic ions in tardigrade fluids, albeit other ions, i.e. K(+), NH4(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), F(-), SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) were also detected. In limno-terrestrial tardigrades, the respective ions are concentrated by a large factor compared with that of the external medium (Na(+), ×70-800; K(+), ×20-90; Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), ×30-200; F(-), ×160-1040, Cl(-), ×20-50; PO4(3-), ×700-2800; SO4(2-), ×30-150). In contrast, in the marine species H. crispae, Na(+), Cl(-) and SO4(2-) are almost in ionic equilibrium with (brackish) salt water, while K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and F(-) are only slightly concentrated (×2-10). An anion deficit of ~120 mEq l(-1) in M. tardigradum and H. crispae indicates the presence of unidentified ionic components in these species. Body fluid osmolality ranges from 361±49 mOsm kg(-1) in R. coronifer to 961±43 mOsm kg(-1) in H. crispae. Concentrations of most inorganic ions are largely identical between active and dehydrated groups of R. coronifer, suggesting that this tardigrade does not lose large quantities of inorganic ions during dehydration. The large osmotic and ionic gradients maintained by both limno-terrestrial and marine species are indicative of a powerful ion-retentive mechanism in Tardigrada. Moreover, our data indicate that cryptobiotic tardigrades contain a large fraction of unidentified

  6. Evaluating secondary inorganic aerosols in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezuman, Keren; Bauer, Susanne E.; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2016-08-01

    The spatial distribution of aerosols and their chemical composition dictates whether aerosols have a cooling or a warming effect on the climate system. Hence, properly modeling the three-dimensional distribution of aerosols is a crucial step for coherent climate simulations. Since surface measurement networks only give 2-D data, and most satellites supply integrated column information, it is thus important to integrate aircraft measurements in climate model evaluations. In this study, the vertical distribution of secondary inorganic aerosol (i.e., sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate) is evaluated against a collection of 14 AMS flight campaigns and surface measurements from 2000 to 2010 in the USA and Europe. GISS ModelE2 is used with multiple aerosol microphysics (MATRIX, OMA) and thermodynamic (ISORROPIA II, EQSAM) configurations. Our results show that the MATRIX microphysical scheme improves the model performance for sulfate, but that there is a systematic underestimation of ammonium and nitrate over the USA and Europe in all model configurations. In terms of gaseous precursors, nitric acid concentrations are largely underestimated at the surface while overestimated in the higher levels of the model. Heterogeneous reactions on dust surfaces are an important sink for nitric acid, even high in the troposphere. At high altitudes, nitrate formation is calculated to be ammonia limited. The underestimation of ammonium and nitrate in polluted regions is most likely caused by a too simplified treatment of the NH3 / NH4+ partitioning which affects the HNO3 / NO3- partitioning.

  7. Ultrathin inorganic molecular nanowire based on polyoxometalates

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenxin; Murayama, Toru; Sadakane, Masahiro; Ariga, Hiroko; Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Asakura, Kiyotaka; Ueda, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    The development of metal oxide-based molecular wires is important for fundamental research and potential practical applications. However, examples of these materials are rare. Here we report an all-inorganic transition metal oxide molecular wire prepared by disassembly of larger crystals. The wires are comprised of molybdenum(VI) with either tellurium(IV) or selenium(IV): {(NH4)2[XMo6O21]}n (X=tellurium(IV) or selenium(IV)). The ultrathin molecular nanowires with widths of 1.2 nm grow to micrometre-scale crystals and are characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis, Rietveld analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, thermal analysis and elemental analysis. The crystals can be disassembled into individual molecular wires through cation exchange and subsequent ultrasound treatment, as visualized by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The ultrathin molecular wire-based material exhibits high activity as an acid catalyst, and the band gap of the molecular wire-based crystal is tunable by heat treatment. PMID:26139011

  8. Inorganic Polyphosphate Modulates TRPM8 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zakharian, Eleonora; Thyagarajan, Baskaran; French, Robert J.; Pavlov, Evgeny; Rohacs, Tibor

    2009-01-01

    Polyphosphate (polyP) is an inorganic polymer built of tens to hundreds of phosphates, linked by high-energy phosphoanhydride bonds. PolyP forms complexes and modulates activities of many proteins including ion channels. Here we investigated the role of polyP in the function of the transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) channel. Using whole-cell patch-clamp and fluorescent calcium measurements we demonstrate that enzymatic breakdown of polyP by exopolyphosphatase (scPPX1) inhibits channel activity in human embryonic kidney and F-11 neuronal cells expressing TRPM8. We demonstrate that the TRPM8 channel protein is associated with polyP. Furthermore, addition of scPPX1 altered the voltage-dependence and blocked the activity of the purified TRPM8 channels reconstituted into planar lipid bilayers, where the activity of the channel was initiated by cold and menthol in the presence of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2). The biochemical analysis of the TRPM8 protein also uncovered the presence of poly-(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), which is frequently associated with polyP. We conclude that the TRPM8 protein forms a stable complex with polyP and its presence is essential for normal channel activity. PMID:19404398

  9. Tuberculosis: An Inorganic Medicinal Chemistry Perspective.

    PubMed

    Viganor, Livia; Skerry, Ciaran; McCann, Malachy; Devereux, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) which is caused by the resilient pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) has re-emerged to become a leading public health problem in the world. The growing number of multi-drug resistant MTB strains and the more recently emerging problem with the extensively drug resistant strains of the pathogen are greatly undermining conventional anti-TB therapeutic strategies which are lengthy and expose patients to toxicity and other unwanted side effects. The search for new anti-TB drugs essentially involves either the repurposing of existing organic drugs which are now off patent and already FDA approved, the synthesis of modified analogues of existing organic drugs, with the aim of shortening and improving drug treatment for the disease, or the search for novel structures that offer the possibility of new mechanisms of action against the mycobacterium. Inorganic medicinal chemistry offers an alternative to organic drugs through opportunities for the design of therapeutics that target different biochemical pathways. The incorporation of metal ions into the molecular structure of a potential drug offers the medicinal chemist an opportunity to exploit structural diversity, have access to various oxidation states of the metal and also offer the possibility of enhancing the activity of an established organic drug through its coordination to the metal centre. In this review, we summarize what is currently known about the antitubercular capability of metal complexes, their mechanisms of action and speculate on their potential applications in the clinic.

  10. Natural hybrid organic-inorganic photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Padova, Paola; Lucci, Massimiliano; Olivieri, Bruno; Quaresima, Claudio; Priori, Sandro; Francini, Roberto; Grilli, Antonio; Hricovini, Karol; Davoli, Ivan

    2009-06-01

    Natural hybrid organic-inorganic photovoltaic devices based on TiO 2 have been realized. Chlorophyll A (from anacystis nidulans algae), chlorophyll B (from spinach), carmic acid (from insect Coccus cacti L.), synthetic trans- β-carotene, natural fresh picked Morus nigra, and their mixtures have been used as an organic photo active layer to fabricate photovoltaic prototypes. In order to reduce the charge's interfacial recombination, different thicknesses (5-45 nm) of Si layers, subsequently oxidized in air, were inserted between the TiO 2 and chlorophyll B. Scanning electron microscopy of TiO 2 and Si/TiO 2 systems shows the coexistence at least of four classes of nanoparticles of 60, 100, 150 and 250 nm in size. Auger electron spectroscopy of the Si L 2,3V V transition demonstrates the presence of silica and SiO x suboxides. Photocurrent measurements versus radiation wavelength in the range 300-800 nm exhibit different peaks according to the absorption spectra of the organic molecules. All realized photovoltaic devices are suitable for solar light electric energy conversion. Those made of a blend of all organic molecules achieved higher current and voltage output. The Si/TiO 2-based devices containing chlorophyll B exhibited an enhanced photocurrent response with respect to those with TiO 2 only.

  11. Inorganic polymers and materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sneddon, Larry G.

    2001-01-01

    This DOE-sponsored project was focused on the design, synthesis, characterization, and applications of new types of boron and silicon polymers with a goal of attaining processable precursors to advanced ceramic materials of technological importance. This work demonstrated a viable design strategy for the systematic formation of polymeric precursors to ceramics based on the controlled functionalization of preformed polymers with pendant groups of suitable compositions and crosslinking properties. Both the new dipentylamine-polyborazylene and pinacolborane-hydridopolysilazane polymers, unlike the parent polyborazylene and other polyborosilazanes, are stable as melts and can be easily spun into polymer fibers. Subsequent pyrolyses of these polymer fibers then provide excellent routes to BN and SiNCB ceramic fibers. The ease of synthesis of both polymer systems suggests new hybrid polymers with a range of substituents appended to polyborazylene or polysilazane backbones, as well as other types of preceramic polymers, should now be readily achieved, thereby allowing even greater control over polymer and ceramic properties. This control should now enable the systematic tailoring of the polymers and derived ceramics for use in different technological applications. Other major recent achievements include the development of new types of metal-catalyzed methods needed for the polymerization and modification of inorganic monomers and polymers, and the modification studies of polyvinylsiloxane and related polymers with substituents that enable the formation of single source precursors to high-strength, sintered SiC ceramics.

  12. Surface science aspects on inorganic biomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Kasemo, B.; Lausmaa, J.

    1986-01-01

    The chemical interaction between a foreign inorganic material, such as an implant, and living tissue takes place at an interface whose width initially is only about 1 nm. The processes at the interface, such as corrosion, ion diffusion, denaturing of proteins, etc., will eventually widen the interface until, at best, a dynamic quasiequilibrium is established. Since the chemical role of the implant in its interaction with the host tissue is almost exclusively determined by its outermost atomic layers, the characterization of implants on this length scale is necessary for understanding and controlling implant-tissue interactions. In this review, it is shown that modern surface science offers a variety of surface characterization spectroscopies, surface preparation methods, and theoretical concepts that can be directly applied in studies of biocompatible materials and biocompatibility, with particular reference to metallic materials. The general properties of metal surfaces, of oxides on metals, and bonding of molecules to such surfaces are reviewed, as well as the most important chemical and transport processes at solid-liquid interfaces. Several examples are given of how the experimental methods described in the article can be used for a thorough characterization and controlled preparation of titanium (Ti) surfaces. 92 references.

  13. Tuberculosis: An Inorganic Medicinal Chemistry Perspective.

    PubMed

    Viganor, Livia; Skerry, Ciaran; McCann, Malachy; Devereux, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) which is caused by the resilient pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) has re-emerged to become a leading public health problem in the world. The growing number of multi-drug resistant MTB strains and the more recently emerging problem with the extensively drug resistant strains of the pathogen are greatly undermining conventional anti-TB therapeutic strategies which are lengthy and expose patients to toxicity and other unwanted side effects. The search for new anti-TB drugs essentially involves either the repurposing of existing organic drugs which are now off patent and already FDA approved, the synthesis of modified analogues of existing organic drugs, with the aim of shortening and improving drug treatment for the disease, or the search for novel structures that offer the possibility of new mechanisms of action against the mycobacterium. Inorganic medicinal chemistry offers an alternative to organic drugs through opportunities for the design of therapeutics that target different biochemical pathways. The incorporation of metal ions into the molecular structure of a potential drug offers the medicinal chemist an opportunity to exploit structural diversity, have access to various oxidation states of the metal and also offer the possibility of enhancing the activity of an established organic drug through its coordination to the metal centre. In this review, we summarize what is currently known about the antitubercular capability of metal complexes, their mechanisms of action and speculate on their potential applications in the clinic. PMID:25850770

  14. Hydrogen transport in composite inorganic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Gabitto, Jorge; Tsouris, Costas

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical model simulating hydrogen transport through composite inorganic membranes is proposed. This model simulates operation of membranes made of three or more porous or metallic layers. Transport through Pd-alloy metallic layers is simulated using a comprehensive model proposed by Ward and Dao. The model accounts for external mass transfer, surface adsorption and desorption, transport to and from the bulk metal, and diffusion within the metal. Transport through porous ceramic layers is simulated following Burggraaf, who proposed an expression that combines viscous flow, Knudsen diffusion, and transition flow through porous media of complex geometrical structure. The model can also use experimentally determined permeance data when available. The theoretical model has been computationally implemented. Computations show very good agreement with experimental data available in the literature. The proposed model predicts hydrogen fluxes through composite membranes of several layers for standard operating conditions. The model can also predict which of the several layers used in manufacturing the membrane is controlling the total hydrogen flux. This information can be used to determine optimal thickness values for metallic and porous layers.

  15. Development of inorganic membranes for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Egan, B.Z.; Fain, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogen for commercial coal liquefaction processes may be provided by a coal gasification plant operated to maximize hydrogen production. Hydrogen is a major chemical requirement for coal liquefaction, and the use of liquefaction by-products such as mineral ash residue as feed to the gasifier can improve the overall process efficiency and economics. Also, recovery of hydrogen from gaseous streams in the coal liquefaction plant can have a significant impact on coal liquefaction process economics. In these hydrogen production scenarios, there is a need to improve the quality of the hydrogen produced by separating the other impurity gases from it. The DOE-Fossil Energy AR TD Materials Program is presently developing inorganic membranes for gas separation, including the recovery of valuable resources such as hydrogen from hot-gas streams. A summary of efforts to produce alumina membranes with mean pore radii <5 {angstrom} is presented as well as a status report on declassification of this important technology. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Inorganic Chemistry Solutions to Semiconductor Nanocrystal Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, Samuel R.; Guo, Yijun; Ruberu, T. Purnima A.; Tavasoli, Elham; Vela, Javier

    2014-03-15

    The optoelectronic and chemical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals heavily depend on their composition, size, shape and internal structure, surface functionality, etc. Available strategies to alter these properties through traditional colloidal syntheses and ligand exchange methods place a premium on specific reaction conditions and surfactant combinations. In this invited review, we apply a molecular-level understanding of chemical precursor reactivity to reliably control the morphology, composition and intimate architecture (core/shell vs. alloyed) of semiconductor nanocrystals. We also describe our work aimed at achieving highly selective, low-temperature photochemical methods for the synthesis of semiconductor–metal and semiconductor–metal oxide photocatalytic nanocomposites. In addition, we describe our work on surface modification of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots using new approaches and methods that bypass ligand exchange, retaining the nanocrystal's native ligands and original optical properties, as well as on spectroscopic methods of characterization useful in determining surface ligand organization and chemistry. Using recent examples from our group and collaborators, we demonstrate how these efforts have lead to faster, wider and more systematic application of semiconductor nanocrystal-based materials to biological imaging and tracking, and to photocatalysis of unconventional substrates. We believe techniques and methods borrowed from inorganic chemistry (including coordination, organometallic and solid state chemistry) have much to offer in reaching a better understanding of the synthesis, functionalization and real-life application of such exciting materials as semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, rods, tetrapods, etc.).

  17. Inorganic ion exchangers for nuclear waste remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Clearfield, A.; Bortun, A.; Bortun, L.; Behrens, E.

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this work is to provide a broad spectrum of inorganic ion exchangers that can be used for a range of applications and separations involving remediation of groundwater and tank wastes. The authors intend to scale-up the most promising exchangers, through partnership with AlliedSignal Inc., to provide samples for testing at various DOE sites. While much of the focus is on exchangers for removal of Cs{sup +} and Sr{sup 2+} from highly alkaline tank wastes, especially at Hanford, the authors have also synthesized exchangers for acid wastes, alkaline wastes, groundwater, and mercury, cobalt, and chromium removal. These exchangers are now available for use at DOE sites. Many of the ion exchangers described here are new, and others are improved versions of previously known exchangers. They are generally one of three types: (1) layered compounds, (2) framework or tunnel compounds, and (3) amorphous exchangers in which a gel exchanger is used to bind a fine powder into a bead for column use. Most of these exchangers can be regenerated and used again.

  18. Cleanup of plutonium oxide reduction black salts

    SciTech Connect

    Giebel, R.E.; Wing, R.O.

    1986-12-17

    This work describes pyrochemical processes employed to convert direc oxide reduction (DOR) black salts into discardable white salt and plutonium metal. The DOR process utilizes calcium metal as the reductant in a molten calcium chloride solvent salt to convert plutonium oxide to plutonium metal. An insoluble plutonium-rich dispersion called black salt sometimes forms between the metal phase and the salt phase. Black salts accumulated for processing were treated by one of two methods. One method utilized a scrub alloy of 70 wt % magnesium/30 wt % zinc. The other method utilized a pool of plutonium metal to agglomerate the metal phase. The two processes were similar in that calcium metal reductant and calcium chloride solvent salt were used in both cases. Four runs were performed by each method, and each method produced greater than 93% conversion of the black salt.

  19. Plant Zonation in a Salt Marsh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etri, Lawrence R.

    1978-01-01

    The zonation of plants within a salt marsh environment is detailed via illustrations and scientific nomeclature for purposes of encouraging outdoor educators to use the salt marsh environment as a learning laboratory. (JC)

  20. Salt dome discoveries mounting in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Ericksen, R.L.

    1996-06-17

    Exploratory drilling around piercement salt domes in Mississippi has met with a string of successes in recent months. Exploration of these salt features is reported to have been initiated through the review of non-proprietary, 2D seismic data and subsurface control. This preliminary data and work were then selectively upgraded by the acquisition of additional, generally higher quality, conventional 2D seismic lines. This current flurry of successful exploration and ensuing development drilling by Amerada Hess Corp. on the flanks of salt domes in Mississippi has resulted in a number of significant Hosston discoveries/producers at: Carson salt dome in Jefferson Davis County; Dry Creek salt dome in Covington County, Midway salt dome in lamar County, Monticello salt dome in Lawrence County, and Prentiss salt dome in Jefferson Davis County. The resulting production from these fields is gas and condensate, with wells being completed on 640 acre production units.