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Sample records for inorganic stream water

  1. Evaluation of inorganic sorbent treatment for LWR coolant process streams

    SciTech Connect

    Roddy, J.W.

    1984-03-01

    This report presents results of a survey of the literature and of experience at selected nuclear installations to provide information on the feasibility of replacing organic ion exchangers with inorganic sorbents at light-water-cooled nuclear power plants. Radioactive contents of the various streams in boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors were examined. In addition, the methods and performances of current methods used for controlling water quality at these plants were evaluated. The study also includes a brief review of the physical and chemical properties of selected inorganic sorbents. Some attributes of inorganic sorbents would be useful in processing light water reactor (LWR) streams. The inorganic resins are highly resistant to damage from ionizing radiation, and their exchange capacities are generally equivalent to those of organic ion exchangers. However, they are more limited in application, and there are problems with physical integrity, especially in acidic solutions. Research is also needed in the areas of selectivity and anion removal before inorganic sorbents can be considered as replacements for the synthetic organic resins presently used in LWRs. 11 figures, 14 tables.

  2. Elevated stream inorganic nitrogen impacts on a dominant riparian tree species: Results from an experimental riparian stream system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultine, K. R.; Jackson, T. L.; Burtch, K. G.; Schaeffer, S. M.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    The release of inorganic nitrogen from intensive agricultural practices and urbanization has resulted in significant alterations of the aquatic nitrogen cycle in riparian ecosystems. Nevertheless, impacts of stream nitrogen inputs on the terrestrial nitrogen cycle and the water and carbon cycles are unclear. Information on terrestrial ecosystem responses to stream N loading is largely absent in part because of the difficulty in controlling for temporal and spatial variation in streamflow, geomorphology, climate, and vegetation. To address these issues, we constructed a dual-plot artificial stream riparian system within a 10-year-old plantation of a dominant riparian tree species, box elder (Acer negundo). The dual-plot design allowed for different concentrations of stream inorganic nitrogen between plots while controlling for ecohydrologic and geohydrologic variability. The system was used to investigate elevated inorganic stream nitrogen impacts on water use patterns, above-ground productivity, and leaf chemistry of streamside box elder trees over two consecutive growing seasons (2006 and 2007). One plot received inorganic soluble fertilizer that brought the NO3 concentration of stream water from 5 μmol l-1 to about 100 μmol l-1, while the second plot received no additional nitrogen. Relative stem sap flux density (Js) did not vary between plots until near the conclusion of the 2006 growing season, when trees in the fertilized plot showed a steep upswing in Js relative to trees in the control plot. Sap flux in 2007 increased consistently by 0.4% day-1 in the fertilized plot relative to the control plot over a 75-day period, before leveling off near the conclusion of the growing season. At the onset of the experiment, leaf nitrogen per unit mass and leaf nitrogen per unit area were significantly higher in the control plot, and leaf C:N ratios were lower. In 2007, however, differences in leaf chemistry disappeared, suggesting that leaf nitrogen increased in the

  3. Solute-specific scaling of inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus uptake in streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R. O., Jr.; Baker, M. A.; Rosi-Marshall, E. J.; Tank, J. L.; Newbold, J. D.

    2013-11-01

    Stream ecosystem processes such as nutrient cycling may vary with stream position in the network. Using a scaling approach, we examined the relationship between stream size and nutrient uptake length, which represents the mean distance that a dissolved solute travels prior to removal from the water column. Ammonium (NH4+) uptake length increased proportionally with stream size measured as specific discharge (discharge/stream width) with a scaling exponent = 1.01. In contrast, uptake lengths for nitrate (NO3-) and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) increased more rapidly than increases in specific discharge (scaling exponents = 1.19 for NO3- and 1.35 for SRP). Additionally, the ratio of inorganic nitrogen (N) uptake length to SRP uptake length declined with stream size; there was relatively lower demand for SRP compared to N as stream size increased. Finally, we related the scaling of uptake length with specific discharge to that of stream length using Hack's law and downstream hydraulic geometry. Ammonium uptake length increased less than proportionally with distance from the headwaters, suggesting a strong role for larger streams and rivers in regulating nutrient transport.

  4. Inorganic chemicals in an effluent-dominated stream as indicators for chemical reactions and streamflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kangjoo; Lee, Ji Sun; Oh, Chang-Whan; Hwang, Gab-Soo; Kim, Jinsam; Yeo, Sungku; Kim, Yeongkyoo; Park, Seongmin

    2002-07-01

    The chemical behavior of major inorganic ions in the streams of the Mankyung River area (South Korea) was investigated. Mixing with effluent from the Jeonju STP (a municipal sewage treatment plant in Jeonju City) was the most important process in regulating the water chemistry of the streams. The effluent was chemically distinct relative to the stream waters in inorganic composition. Behavior of various ions was evaluated by comparing their concentrations with the concentration of chloride, a conservative chemical species. It was revealed that concentrations of chloride and sulfate, the total concentration of major cations, and electrical conductivity in the stream were controlled only by mixing, indicating their conservative behavior similar to chloride. Alkalinity and concentration of nitrate, however, were regulated by various reactions such as mixing, photosynthesis, respiration, and decomposition of organic matter. Streamflows were estimated by observing chemical composition of the effluent and those of up/downstream waters. Estimated flows based on the conservative chemical parameters were nearly the same as those directly measured using an area-velocity method, indicating the validity of the chemistry-based method.

  5. Linking calcification by exotic snails to stream inorganic carbon cycling.

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, Erin R; Hall, Robert O

    2010-05-01

    Biotic calcification is rarely considered in freshwater C budgets, despite calculations suggesting that calcifying animals can alter inorganic C cycling. Most studies that have quantified biocalcification in aquatic ecosystems have not directly linked CO(2) fluxes from biocalcification with whole-ecosystem rates of inorganic C cycling. The freshwater snail, Melanoides tuberculata, has achieved a high abundance and 37.4 g biomass m(-2) after invading Kelly Warm Springs in Grand Teton National Park. This high biomass suggests that introduced populations of Melanoides may alter ecosystem processes. We measured Melanoides growth rates and biomass to calculate the production of biomass, shell mass, and CO(2). We compared Melanoides biomass and inorganic C production with ecosystem C pools and fluxes, as well as with published rates of CO(2) production by other calcifying organisms. Melanoides calcification in Kelly Warm Springs produced 12.1 mmol CO(2) m(-2) day(-1) during summer months. We measured high rates of gross primary productivity and respiration in Kelly Warm Springs (-378 and 533 mmol CO(2) m(-2) day(-1), respectively); CO(2) produced from biocalcification increased net CO(2) production in Kelly Warm Springs from 155 to 167 mmol CO(2) m(-2) day(-1). This rate of CO(2) production via biocalcification is within the published range of calcification by animals. But these CO(2) fluxes are small when compared to ecosystem C fluxes from stream metabolism. The influence of animals is relative to ecosystem processes, and should always be compared with ecosystem fluxes to quantify the importance of a specific animal in its environment.

  6. Long-term declines in stream and river inorganic nitrogen (N) export correspond to forest change.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Richard W; Sponseller, Ryan A; Gundale, Michael J; Stendahl, Johan; Fridman, Jonas; Högberg, Peter; Laudon, Hjalmar

    2016-03-01

    Human activities have exerted a powerful influence on the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) and drive changes that can be a challenge to predict given the influence of multiple environmental stressors. This study focused on understanding how land management and climate change have together influenced terrestrial N storage and watershed inorganic N export across boreal and sub-arctic landscapes in northern Sweden. Using long-term discharge and nutrient concentration data that have been collected continuously for over three decades, we calculated the hydrologic inorganic N export from nine watersheds in this region. We found a consistent decline in inorganic N export from 1985 to 2011 over the entire region from both small and large watersheds, despite the absence of any long-term trend in river discharge during this period. The steepest declines in inorganic N export were observed during the growing season, consistent with the hypothesis that observed changes are biologically mediated and are not the result of changes in long-term hydrology. Concurrent with the decrease in inorganic N export, we report sustained increases in terrestrial N accumulation in forest biomass and soils across northern Sweden. Given the close communication of nutrient and energy stores between plants, soils, and waters, our results indicate a regional tightening of the N cycle in an already N-limited environment as a result of changes in forest management and climate-mediated growth increases. Our results are consistent with declining inorganic N efflux previously reported from small headwater streams in other ecosystems and shed new light on the mechanisms controlling these patterns by identifying corresponding shifts in the terrestrial N balance, which have been altered by a combination of management activities and climate change.

  7. Lagrangian mass-flow investigations of inorganic contaminants in wastewater-impacted streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber, L.B.; Antweiler, R.C.; Flynn, J.L.; Keefe, S.H.; Kolpin, D.W.; Roth, D.A.; Schnoebelen, D.J.; Taylor, H.E.; Verplanck, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the potential effects of increased reliance on wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents to meet municipal, agricultural, and environmental flow requires an understanding of the complex chemical loading characteristics of the WWTPs and the assimilative capacity of receiving waters. Stream ecosystem effects are linked to proportions of WWTP effluent under low-flow conditions as well as the nature of the effluent chemical mixtures. This study quantifies the loading of 58 inorganic constituents (nutrients to rare earth elements) from WWTP discharges relative to upstream landscape-based sources. Stream assimilation capacity was evaluated by Lagrangian sampling, using flow velocities determined from tracer experiments to track the same parcel of water as it moved downstream. Boulder Creek, Colorado and Fourmile Creek, Iowa, representing two different geologic and hydrologic landscapes, were sampled under low-flow conditions in the summer and spring. One-half of the constituents had greater loads from the WWTP effluents than the upstream drainages, and once introduced into the streams, dilution was the predominant assimilation mechanism. Only ammonium and bismuth had significant decreases in mass load downstream from the WWTPs during all samplings. The link between hydrology and water chemistry inherent in Lagrangian sampling allows quantitative assessment of chemical fate across different landscapes. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  8. Lagrangian mass-flow investigations of inorganic contaminants in wastewater-impacted streams.

    PubMed

    Barber, Larry B; Antweiler, Ronald C; Flynn, Jennifer L; Keefe, Steffanie H; Kolpin, Dana W; Roth, David A; Schnoebelen, Douglas J; Taylor, Howard E; Verplanck, Philip L

    2011-04-01

    Understanding the potential effects of increased reliance on wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents to meet municipal, agricultural, and environmental flow requires an understanding of the complex chemical loading characteristics of the WWTPs and the assimilative capacity of receiving waters. Stream ecosystem effects are linked to proportions of WWTP effluent under low-flow conditions as well as the nature of the effluent chemical mixtures. This study quantifies the loading of 58 inorganic constituents (nutrients to rare earth elements) from WWTP discharges relative to upstream landscape-based sources. Stream assimilation capacity was evaluated by Lagrangian sampling, using flow velocities determined from tracer experiments to track the same parcel of water as it moved downstream. Boulder Creek, Colorado and Fourmile Creek, Iowa, representing two different geologic and hydrologic landscapes, were sampled under low-flow conditions in the summer and spring. One-half of the constituents had greater loads from the WWTP effluents than the upstream drainages, and once introduced into the streams, dilution was the predominant assimilation mechanism. Only ammonium and bismuth had significant decreases in mass load downstream from the WWTPs during all samplings. The link between hydrology and water chemistry inherent in Lagrangian sampling allows quantitative assessment of chemical fate across different landscapes.

  9. Removing dissolved inorganic contaminants from water

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, D.; Subramonian, S.; Sorg, T.J.

    1986-11-01

    This article describes the physicochemical treatment processes typically used to remove the more common inorganic contaminants from water and wastewater. These are precipitation, coprecipitation, adsorption, ion exchange, membrane separations by reverse osmosis and electrodialysis, and combinations of these processes. The general criteria for process selection are discussed, and the processes and their typical applications are described.

  10. Role of microbes associated with organic and inorganic substrates in phosphorus spiralling in a woodland stream

    SciTech Connect

    Elwood, J.W.; Newbold, J.D.; O'Neill, R.V.; Stark, R.W.; Singley, P.T.

    1980-01-01

    Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to determine if nutrient spiralling is primarily a biological process. The experiments were conducted to examine the role of microbial uptake and abiotic sorption onto organic and inorganic substrates in the uptake of PO/sub 4/-P in Walker Branch, a small, first-order woodland stream in east Tennessee, to estimate the total, microbial, and adsorptive pool sizes of exchangeable phosphorus associated with five particulate organic matter from this stream, and to measure the turnover rate of PO/sub 4/-P by live and sterile inorganic substrates in Walker Branch.

  11. Water Stream "Loop-the-Loop"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefimenko, Oleg

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design of a modified loop-the-loop apparatus in which a water stream is used to illustrate centripetal forces and phenomena of high-velocity hydrodynamics. Included are some procedures of carrying out lecture demonstrations. (CC)

  12. Nutrients, Water Temperature, and Dissolved Oxygen: Are Water Quality Standards Achievable for Forest Streams?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ice, G. G.

    2002-12-01

    Water quality standards provide a performance measure for watershed managers. Three of the most important standards for rivers and streams are the key nutrients, nitrogen and phosphorus; water temperature; and dissolved oxygen. The concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus in waterbodies affects primary production and productivity. Too little nutrients and streams are sterile and unproductive. Too much and they are eutrophic. Water temperature is important because it influences chemical reaction rates in streams and metabolic rates in fish. Dissolved oxygen is necessary for respiration. Salmon, the focus of much of the conservation efforts in the Northwest, are known as organisms that require cool, highly oxygenated water to thrive. Still, it is important when setting a performance standard to determine if those standards are achievable. A survey of nutrient data for small forested streams has found that the ecoregion guidelines proposed by EPA are often unachievable, sometimes even for small, unmanaged reference watersheds. A pilot survey of water temperatures in Oregon wilderness areas and least impaired watersheds has found temperatures frequently exceed the state standards. While natural temperature exceedances are addressed in the water quality standards for Oregon for unmanaged watersheds, these temperatures for managed watersheds might be presumed to result from management activities, precipitating an expensive Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) assessment. Less is known about dissolved oxygen for small forest streams because work 20 years ago showed little risk of significant dissolved oxygen concentrations where shade was maintained near the stream and fine slash was kept out of the stream. However, work from the 1970's on intergravel dissolved oxygen also shows that stream with greater large woody debris (LWD) can have lower intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations, presumably due to trapping of fine organic and inorganic materials. Efforts to add LWD to

  13. Solute specific scaling of inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus uptake in streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R. O., Jr.; Baker, M. A.; Rosi-Marshall, E. J.; Tank, J. L.

    2013-04-01

    Stream ecosystem processes such as nutrient cycling may vary with stream position in the watershed. Using a scaling approach, we examined the relationship between stream size and nutrient uptake length, which represents the mean distance that a dissolved solute travels prior to removal from the water column. Ammonium uptake length increased proportionally with stream size measured as specific discharge (discharge/stream width) with a scaling exponent = 1.01. In contrast, the scaling exponent for nitrate (NO3-) was 1.19 and for soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) was 1.35, suggesting that uptake lengths for these nutrients increased more rapidly than increases in specific discharge. Additionally, the ratio of nitrogen (N) uptake length to SRP uptake length declined with stream size; there was lower demand for SRP relative to N as stream size increased. Ammonium and NO3- uptake velocity positively related with stream metabolism, while SRP did not. Finally, we related the scaling of uptake length and specific discharge to that of stream length using Hack's law and downstream hydraulic geometry. Ammonium uptake length increased less than proportionally with distance from the headwaters, suggesting a strong role for larger streams and rivers in regulating nutrient transport.

  14. Carbon isotope fractionation of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) due to outgassing of carbon dioxide from a headwater stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doctor, D.H.; Kendall, C.; Sebestyen, S.D.; Shanley, J.B.; Ohte, N.; Boyer, E.W.

    2008-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (??13C-DIC) was investigated as a potential tracer of streamflow generation processes at the Sleepers River Research Watershed, Vermont, USA. Downstream sampling showed ?? 13C-DIC increased between 3-5??? from the stream source to the outlet weir approximately 0??5 km downstream, concomitant with increasing pH and decreasing PCO2. An increase in ??13C-DIC of 2.4 ?? 0??1??? per log unit decrease of excess PCO2 (stream PCO2 normalized to atmospheric PCO2) was observed from downstream transect data collected during snowmelt. Isotopic fractionation of DIC due to CO2 outgassing rather than exchange with atmospheric CO2 may be the primary cause of increased ?? 13C-DIC values downstream when PCO2 of surface freshwater exceeds twice the atmospheric CO2 concentration. Although CO2 outgassing caused a general increase in stream ??13C-DIC values, points of localized groundwater seepage into the stream were identified by decreases in ??13C-DIC and increases in DIC concentration of the stream water superimposed upon the general downstream trend. In addition, comparison between snowmelt, early spring and summer seasons showed that DIC is flushed from shallow groundwater flowpaths during snowmelt and is replaced by a greater proportion of DIC derived from soil CO2 during the early spring growing season. Thus, in spite of effects from CO2 outgassing, ??13C of DIC can be a useful indicator of groundwater additions to headwater streams and a tracer of carbon dynamics in catchments. Copyright ?? 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Reverse osmosis treatment to remove inorganic contaminants from drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Huxstep, M.R.; Sorg, T.J.

    1987-12-01

    The purpose of the research project was to determine the removal of inorganic contaminants from drinking water using several state-of-the-art reverse osmosis membrane elements. A small 5-KGPD reverse osmosis system was utilized and five different membrane elements were studied individually with the specific inorganic contaminants added to several natural Florida ground waters. Removal data were also collected on naturally occurring substances.

  16. Methylation of inorganic mercury in polar marine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnherr, Igor; St. Louis, Vincent L.; Hintelmann, Holger; Kirk, Jane L.

    2011-05-01

    Monomethylmercury is a neurotoxin that accumulates in marine organisms, with serious implications for human health. The toxin is of particular concern to northern Inuit peoples, for example, whose traditional diets are composed primarily of marine mammals and fish. The ultimate source of monomethylmercury to marine organisms has remained uncertain, although various potential sources have been proposed, including export from coastal and deep-sea sediments and major river systems, atmospheric deposition and water-column production. Here, we report results from incubation experiments in which we added isotopically labelled inorganic mercury and monomethylmercury to seawater samples collected from a range of sites in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Monomethylmercury formed from the methylation of inorganic mercury in all samples. Demethylation of monomethylmercury was also observed in water from all sites. We determined steady-state concentrations of monomethylmercury in marine waters by incorporating the rate constants for monomethylmercury formation and degradation derived from these experiments into a numerical model. We estimate that the conversion of inorganic mercury to monomethylmercury in the water column accounts for around 47% (+/-62%, standard deviation) of the monomethylmercury present in polar marine waters, with site-to-site differences in inorganic mercury and monomethylmercury levels accounting for most of the variability. We suggest that water-column methylation of inorganic mercury is a significant source of monomethylmercury in pelagic marine food webs in the Arctic, and possibly in the world's oceans in general.

  17. Diel variations in stream chemistry and isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon, upper Clark Fork River, Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, Stephen R.; Gammons, Christopher H.; Poulson, Simon R.; DeGrandpre, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    Many rivers undergo diel (24-h) concentration fluctuations of pH, dissolved gases, trace metals, nutrients, and other chemical species. A study conducted in 1994 documented such behavior in the upper Clark Fork River, Montana, a stream whose headwaters have been severely impacted by historic metal mining, milling, and smelting. The purpose of the present investigation was to expand on these earlier findings by conducting simultaneous diel samplings at two sites on the upper Clark Fork River separated by 2.5 h of stream travel time. By monitoring two stations, it was possible to more closely examine the processes that control temporal and spatial gradients in stream chemistry. Another objective was to examine diel changes in the δ13C composition of dissolved inorganic C (DIC) and their relationship to biological activity in the stream. The most important findings of this study include: (1) concentrations of dissolved and particulate heavy metals increased during the night and decreased during the day, in agreement with previous work; (2) these changes were positively correlated to diel changes in pH, dissolved O2, and water temperature; (3) dissolved concentrations increased during the night at the lower site, but showed the opposite behavior at the upper site; and (4) diel changes in δ13C-DIC were noted at both sites, although the timing and magnitudes of the cycles differed. Hypotheses to explain the first two observations include: cyclic co-precipitation of divalent metals with carbonate minerals; pH- and temperature-dependent sorption of metal cations onto the streambed and suspended particles; or photosynthetically enhanced oxidation and removal of Fe and Mn oxides at biofilm surfaces during the daytime. The latter model explains the majority of the field observations, including night-time increases in particulate forms of Fe and other elements.

  18. INORGANIC CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF WATER TREATMENT PLANT RESIDUALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study obtained field data on the inorganic contaminants and constituents in residuals produced by Water Treatment Plants (WTPs). Eight WTPs were studied based on treatment technology, contamination or suspected contamination of raw water, and efficiency in the removal of cont...

  19. Lateral inflows, stream-groundwater exchange, and network geometry influence stream water composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, John; McGlynn, Brian; Covino, Tim

    2014-06-01

    The role of stream networks and their hydrologic interaction with hillslopes and shallow groundwater in modifying and transporting watershed signals is an area of active research. One of the primary ways that stream networks can modify watershed signals is through spatially variable stream gains and losses, described herein as hydrologic turnover. We measured hydrologic gain and loss at the reach scale using tracer experiments throughout the Bull Trout watershed in the Sawtooth Mountains of Idaho. We extended the results of reach scale experiments to the stream network using empirical relationships between (1) watershed area and stream discharge and (2) stream discharge and percent stream water loss to the groundwater system. We thus incorporate linkages between (1) hillslopes and stream networks via lateral inflows and (2) stream networks and shallow groundwater via hydrologic exchange. We implemented these relationships within a concise analytical framework to simulate hydrologic turnover across stream networks and estimate the variable influence exerted by upstream reaches and streamflow source locations on stream water composition across stream networks. Application to six natural Sawtooth watersheds and seven synthetic watersheds with varying topographic structure and stream network geometry indicated that contributions to discharge from any upstream source depend on the magnitude of the initial input, but also on the distribution of hydrologic turnover occurring along the stream network. The evolution of stream water source compositions along stream networks was unique in each watershed due to the combination of watershed structure and stream network geometry. Our results suggest that a distributed representation of hydrologic turnover at the stream network scale can improve understanding of how the stream network can modify source water compositions along the stream.

  20. [Characteristics and Transport Patterns of Ammonia, Nitrites, Nitrates and Inorganic Nitrogen Flux at Epikarst Springs and a Subterranean Stream in Nanshan, Chongqing].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan-zhu; He, Qiu-fang; Jiang, Yong-jun; Li, Yong

    2016-04-15

    In a karst groundwater system, it develops complex multiple flows because of its special geological structure and unique physical patterns of aquifers. In order to investigate the characteristics and transport patterns of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate in epikarst water and subterranean stream, the water samples were collected monthly in a fast-urbanizing karst region. The results showed distinctive characteristics of three forms of inorganic nitrogen. The concentration of inorganic nitrogen was stable in the epikarst water while it was fluctuant in the subterranean stream. Epikarst water was less affected by rainfall and sewage compared with subterranean stream. In epikarst water, the nitrate concentration was much higher than the ammonia concentration. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen, mainly from non-point source pollution related to agricultural activities, passed in and out of the epikarst water based on a series of physical; chemical and biological processes in the epikarst zone, such as ammonification, adsorption and nitrification. On the contrary, subterranean stream showed a result of NH₄⁺-N > NO₃⁻-N in dry seasons and NO₃⁻-N > NH₄⁺-N in rainy seasons. This can be due to the fact that sanitary and industrial sewage flowed into subterranean river through sinkholes, fissures and grikes in dry season. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen in subterranean river was mainly from the non-point source pollution in wet season. Non-point source pollutants entered into subterranean water by two transport ways, one by penetration along with vadose flow through fissures and grikes, and the other by conduit flow through sinkholes from the surface runoff, soil water flow and epikarst flow. The export flux of DIN was 56.05 kg · (hm² · a)⁻¹, and NH₄⁺-N and NO₃⁻-N accounted for 46.03% and 52.51%, respectively. The contributions of point-source pollution and non point-source pollution to the export flux of DIN were 25.08% and 74.92%, respectively, based on run

  1. Key stream/sediment exchanges of water and heat near stream mouths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantz, J. E.; Naranjo, R. C.; Niswonger, R. G.; Neilson, B. T.; Allander, K.; Zamora, C.; Smith, D. W.; Stonestrom, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The section of stream discharging to a lake or other surface-water body is referred to as the stream mouth, a stream reach with rapidly changing hydrologic conditions, leading to unique aquatic and benthic ecology, as well as a visibly active fishery habitat. Of environmental significance, bridges, control structures, channelization and foot traffic are common near stream mouths, warranting comparisons of natural and channelized stream mouths. The present work completes the first investigation focusing specifically on the hydrology of surface-water/sediment exchanges at stream-mouth reaches discharging to lakes and compares these exchanges to those measured along the nearby shoreline in both a qualitative and quantitative manner. Heat and water exchanges for two common types of stream mouths (a natural stream with a summer barrier bar and a channelized stream mouth) are compared with comparable exchanges along the nearby shoreline on the north shore of Lake Tahoe located in the Central Sierra Nevada Mountain Range (CA/NV, US). The study site was selected partially due the abundance of streams discharging into the lake of both a natural and channelized nature (~30 small streams with a large number of both types of stream mouths). Heat and water exchanges were both qualitatively and quantitatively distinct for the three types of hydrologic settings, with (1) cool, low velocity, longitudinal (hyporheic) flowpaths observed below the channelized stream mouth, discharging beneath the warmer, more buoyant lakeshore water, (2) the nearby shoreline receiving relatively warm, higher velocity discharge and (3) for the natural stream mouth, there was strong diurnal temperature pattern in groundwater discharging through the seasonal barrier beach to the lake. Impacts of strong 2013 wave action on exchanges were also distinct for the three settings, with (1) channelization allowing waves to extend well upstream, (2) a lesser invasive impact in the shoreline swash zone exchanges

  2. Scale-dependent temporal variations in stream water geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nagorski, S.A.; Moore, J.N.; McKinnon, T.E.; Smith, D.B.

    2003-01-01

    A year-long study of four western Montana streams (two impacted by mining and two "pristine") evaluated surface water geochemical dynamics on various time scales (monthly, daily, and bi-hourly). Monthly changes were dominated by snowmelt and precipitation dynamics. On the daily scale, post-rain surges in some solute and particulate concentrations were similar to those of early spring runoff flushing characteristics on the monthly scale. On the bi-hourly scale, we observed diel (diurnal-nocturnal) cycling for pH, dissolved oxygen, water temperature, dissolved inorganic carbon, total suspended sediment, and some total recoverable metals at some or all sites. A comparison of the cumulative geochemical variability within each of the temporal groups reveals that for many water quality parameters there were large overlaps of concentration ranges among groups. We found that short-term (daily and bi-hourly) variations of some geochemical parameters covered large proportions of the variations found on a much longer term (monthly) time scale. These results show the importance of nesting short-term studies within long-term geochemical study designs to separate signals of environmental change from natural variability.

  3. Scale-dependent temporal variations in stream water geochemistry.

    PubMed

    Nagorski, Sonia A; Moore, Iohnnie N; McKinnon, Temple E; Smith, David B

    2003-03-01

    A year-long study of four western Montana streams (two impacted by mining and two "pristine") evaluated surface water geochemical dynamics on various time scales (monthly, daily, and bi-hourly). Monthly changes were dominated by snowmelt and precipitation dynamics. On the daily scale, post-rain surges in some solute and particulate concentrations were similar to those of early spring runoff flushing characteristics on the monthly scale. On the bi-hourly scale, we observed diel (diurnal-nocturnal) cycling for pH, dissolved oxygen, water temperature, dissolved inorganic carbon, total suspended sediment, and some total recoverable metals at some or all sites. A comparison of the cumulative geochemical variability within each of the temporal groups reveals that for many water quality parameters there were large overlaps of concentration ranges among groups. We found that short-term (daily and bi-hourly) variations of some geochemical parameters covered large proportions of the variations found on a much longer term (monthly) time scale. These results show the importance of nesting short-term studies within long-term geochemical study designs to separate signals of environmental change from natural variability.

  4. A comparison of product yields and inorganic content in process streams following thermal hydrolysis and hydrothermal processing of microalgae, manure and digestate.

    PubMed

    Ekpo, U; Ross, A B; Camargo-Valero, M A; Williams, P T

    2016-01-01

    Thermal hydrolysis and hydrothermal processing show promise for converting biomass into higher energy density fuels. Both approaches facilitate the extraction of inorganics into the aqueous product. This study compares the behaviour of microalgae, digestate, swine and chicken manure by thermal hydrolysis and hydrothermal processing at increasing process severity. Thermal hydrolysis was performed at 170°C, hydrothermal carbonisation (HTC) was performed at 250°C, hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) was performed at 350°C and supercritical water gasification (SCWG) was performed at 500°C. The level of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in the product streams was measured for each feedstock. Nitrogen is present in the aqueous phase as organic-N and NH3-N. The proportion of organic-N is higher at lower temperatures. Extraction of phosphorus is linked to the presence of inorganics such as Ca, Mg and Fe in the feedstock. Microalgae and chicken manure release phosphorus more easily than other feedstocks.

  5. In-stream Physical Heterogeneity, Rainfall Aided Flushing, and Discharge on Stream Water Quality.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Pattiyage I A; Wai, Onyx W H

    2015-08-01

    Implications of instream physical heterogeneity, rainfall-aided flushing, and stream discharge on water quality control have been investigated in a headwater stream of a climatic region that has contrasting dry and wet seasons. Dry (low flow) season's physical heterogeneity showed a positive correlation with good water quality. However, in the wet season, physical heterogeneity showed minor or no significance on water quality variations. Furthermore, physical heterogeneity appeared to be more complementary with good water quality subsequent to rainfall events. In many cases stream discharge was a reason for poor water quality. For the dry season, graywater inputs to the stream could be held responsible. In the wet season, it was probably the result of catchment level disturbances (e.g., regulation of ephemeral freshwater paths). Overall, this study revealed the importance of catchment-based approaches on water quality improvement in tandem with in-stream approaches framed on a temporal scale.

  6. Salmon carcasses increase stream productivity more than inorganic fertilizer pellets: A test on multiple trophic levels in streamside experimental channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wipfli, Mark S.; Hudson, John P.; Caouette, John P.; Mitchell, N.L.; Lessard, Joanna L.; Heintz, Ron A.; Chaloner, D.T.

    2010-01-01

    Inorganic nutrient amendments to streams are viewed as possible restoration strategies for re-establishing nutrients and stream productivity throughout the western coast of North America, where salmon runs and associated marine-derived nutrient subsidies have declined. In a mesocosm experiment, we examined the short-term (6 weeks) comparative effects of artificial nutrient pellets and salmon carcasses, alone (low and high amounts) and in combination, on stream food webs. Response variables included dissolved nutrient concentrations, biofilm ash-free dry mass (AFDM) and chlorophyll-alevels, macroinvertebrate density, growth and body condition of juvenile coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch, and whole-body lipid content of invertebrates and juvenile coho salmon. Most of the response variables were significantly influenced by carcass treatment; the only response variable significantly influenced by fertilizer pellet treatment was soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentration. Ammonium-nitrogen concentration was the only response variable affected by both (low and high) levels of carcass treatment; all others showed no significant response to the two carcass treatment levels. Significant treatment × time interactions were observed for all responses except nitrate; for most responses, significant treatment effects were detected at certain time periods and not others. For example, significantly higher SRP concentrations were recorded earlier in the experiment, whereas significant fish responses were observed later. These results provide evidence that inorganic nutrient additions do not have the same ecological effects in streams as do salmon carcasses, potentially because inorganic nutrient additions lack carbon-based biochemicals and macromolecules that are sequestered directly or indirectly by consumers. Salmon carcasses, preferably deposited naturally during spawning migrations, appear to be far superior to inorganic nutrient amendments for sustaining and restoring

  7. Impacts by point and diffuse micropollutant sources on the stream water quality at catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, M. F.; Eriksson, E.; Binning, P. J.; Bjerg, P. L.

    2012-04-01

    The water quality of surface waters is threatened by multiple anthropogenic pollutants and the large variety of pollutants challenges the monitoring and assessment of the water quality. The aim of this study was to characterize and quantify both point and diffuse sources of micropollutants impacting the water quality of a stream at catchment scale. Grindsted stream in western Jutland, Denmark was used as a study site. The stream passes both urban and agricultural areas and is impacted by severe groundwater contamination in Grindsted city. Along a 12 km reach of Grindsted stream, the potential pollution sources were identified including a pharmaceutical factory site with a contaminated old drainage ditch, two waste deposits, a wastewater treatment plant, overflow structures, fish farms, industrial discharges and diffuse agricultural and urban sources. Six water samples were collected along the stream and analyzed for general water quality parameters, inorganic constituents, pesticides, sulfonamides, chlorinated solvents, BTEXs, and paracetamol and ibuprofen. The latter two groups were not detected. The general water quality showed typical conditions for a stream in western Jutland. Minor impacts by releases of organic matter and nutrients were found after the fish farms and the waste water treatment plant. Nickel was found at concentrations 5.8 - 8.8 μg/l. Nine pesticides and metabolites of both agricultural and urban use were detected along the stream; among these were the two most frequently detected and some rarely detected pesticides in Danish water courses. The concentrations were generally consistent with other findings in Danish streams and in the range 0.01 - 0.09 μg/l; except for metribuzin-diketo that showed high concentrations up to 0.74 μg/l. The groundwater contamination at the pharmaceutical factory site, the drainage ditch and the waste deposits is similar in composition containing among others sulfonamides and chlorinated solvents (including vinyl

  8. Using water chemistry time series to model dissolved inorganic carbon dynamics in the western Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vihermaa, Leena; Waldron, Susan; Newton, Jason

    2013-04-01

    Two small streams (New Colpita and Main Trail) and two rivers (Tambopata and La Torre), in the Tambopata National Reserve, Madre de Dios, Peru, were sampled for water chemistry (conductivity, pH and dissolved oxygen) and hydrology (stage height and flow velocity). In the small streams water chemistry and hydrology variables were logged at 15 minute intervals from Feb 2011 to November 2012. Water samples were collected from all four channels during field campaigns spanning different seasons and targeting the hydrological extremes. All the samples were analysed for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration and δ13C (sample size ranging from 77 to 172 depending on the drainage system) and a smaller subset for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) concentrations. Strong positive relationships were found between conductivity and both DIC concentration and δ13C in the New Colpita stream and the La Torre river. In Tambopata river the trends were less clear and in the Main Trail stream there was very little change in DIC and isotopic composition. The conductivity data was used to model continuous DIC time series for the New Colpita stream. The modelled DIC data agreed well with the measurements; the concordance correlation coefficients between predicted and measured data were 0.91 and 0.87 for mM-DIC and δ13C-DIC, respectively. The predictions of δ13C-DIC were improved when calendar month was included in the model, which indicates seasonal differences in the δ13C-DIC conductivity relationship. At present, continuous DIC sampling still requires expensive instrumentation. Therefore, modelling DIC from a proxy variable which can be monitored continuously with ease and at relatively low cost, such as conductivity, provides a powerful alternative method of DIC determination.

  9. Slip stream apparatus and method for treating water in a circulating water system

    DOEpatents

    Cleveland, Joe R.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus (10) for treating water in a circulating water system (12) t has a cooling water basin (14) includes a slip stream conduit (16) in flow communication with the circulating water system (12), a source (36) of acid solution in flow communication with the slip stream conduit (16), and a decarbonator (58) in flow communication with the slip stream conduit (16) and the cooling water basin (14). In use, a slip stream of circulating water is drawn from the circulating water system (12) into the slip stream conduit (16) of the apparatus (10). The slip stream pH is lowered by contact with an acid solution provided from the source (36) thereof. The slip stream is then passed through a decarbonator (58) to form a treated slip stream, and the treated slip stream is returned to the cooling water basin (14).

  10. Slip stream apparatus and method for treating water in a circulating water system

    DOEpatents

    Cleveland, J.R.

    1997-03-18

    An apparatus is described for treating water in a circulating water system that has a cooling water basin which includes a slip stream conduit in flow communication with the circulating water system, a source of acid solution in flow communication with the slip stream conduit, and a decarbonator in flow communication with the slip stream conduit and the cooling water basin. In use, a slip stream of circulating water is drawn from the circulating water system into the slip stream conduit of the apparatus. The slip stream pH is lowered by contact with an acid solution provided from the source thereof. The slip stream is then passed through a decarbonator to form a treated slip stream, and the treated slip stream is returned to the cooling water basin. 4 figs.

  11. The role of stream water carbon dynamics and export in the carbon balance of a tropical seasonal rainforest, southwest China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Schaefer, Douglas A; Sha, Li-Qing; Deng, Yun; Deng, Xiao-Bao; Dai, Kai-Jie

    2013-01-01

    A two-year study (2009 ~ 2010) was carried out to investigate the dynamics of different carbon (C) forms, and the role of stream export in the C balance of a 23.4-ha headwater catchment in a tropical seasonal rainforest at Xishuangbanna (XSBN), southwest China. The seasonal volumetric weighted mean (VWM) concentrations of total inorganic C (TIC) and dissolved inorganic C (DIC) were higher, and particulate inorganic C (PIC) and organic C (POC) were lower, in the dry season than the rainy season, while the VWM concentrations of total organic C (TOC) and dissolved organic C (DOC) were similar between seasons. With increased monthly stream discharge and stream water temperature (SWT), only TIC and DIC concentrations decreased significantly. The most important C form in stream export was DIC, accounting for 51.8% of the total C (TC) export; DOC, POC, and PIC accounted for 21.8%, 14.9%, and 11.5% of the TC export, respectively. Dynamics of C flux were closely related to stream discharge, with the greatest export during the rainy season. C export in the headwater stream was 47.1 kg C ha(-1) yr(-1), about 2.85% of the annual net ecosystem exchange. This finding indicates that stream export represented a minor contribution to the C balance in this tropical seasonal rainforest.

  12. Biological and geochemical controls on diel dissolved inorganic carbon cycling in a low-order agricultural stream: implications for reach scales and beyond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Tobias, Craig

    2011-01-01

    Movement of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) through the hydrologic cycle is an important component of global carbon budgets, but there is considerable uncertainty about the controls of DIC transmission from landscapes to streams, and through river networks to the oceans. In this study, diel measurements of DIC, d13C-DIC, dissolved oxygen (O2), d18O-O2, alkalinity, pH, and other parameters were used to assess the relative magnitudes of biological and geochemical controls on DIC cycling and flux in a nutrient-rich, net autotrophic stream. Rates of photosynthesis (P), respiration (R), groundwater discharge, air–water exchange of CO2, and carbonate precipitation/dissolution were quantified through a time-stepping chemical/isotope (12C and 13C, 16O and 18O) mass balance model. Groundwater was the major source of DIC to the stream. Primary production and carbonate precipitation were equally important sinks for DIC removed from the water column. The stream was always super-saturated with respect to carbonate minerals, but carbonate precipitation occurred mainly during the day when P increased pH. We estimated more than half (possibly 90%) of the carbonate precipitated during the day was retained in the reach under steady baseflow conditions. The amount of DIC removed from the overlying water through carbonate precipitation was similar to the amount of DIC generated from R. Air–water exchange of CO2 was always from the stream to the atmosphere, but was the smallest component of the DIC budget. Overall, the in-stream DIC reactions reduced the amount of CO2 evasion and the downstream flux of groundwater-derived DIC by about half relative to a hypothetical scenario with groundwater discharge only. Other streams with similar characteristics are widely distributed in the major river basins of North America. Data from USGS water quality monitoring networks from the 1960s to the 1990s indicated that 40% of 652 stream monitoring stations in the contiguous USA were at or above

  13. Biological and geochemical controls on diel dissolved inorganic carbon cycling in a low-order agricultural stream: Implications for reach scales and beyond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tobias, C.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    Movement of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) through the hydrologic cycle is an important component of global carbon budgets, but there is considerable uncertainty about the controls of DIC transmission from landscapes to streams, and through river networks to the oceans. In this study, diel measurements of DIC, ??13C-DIC, dissolved oxygen (O2), ??18O-O2, alkalinity, pH, and other parameters were used to assess the relative magnitudes of biological and geochemical controls on DIC cycling and flux in a nutrient-rich, net autotrophic stream. Rates of photosynthesis (P), respiration (R), groundwater discharge, air-water exchange of CO2, and carbonate precipitation/dissolution were quantified through a time-stepping chemical/isotope (12C and 13C, 16O and 18O) mass balance model. Groundwater was the major source of DIC to the stream. Primary production and carbonate precipitation were equally important sinks for DIC removed from the water column. The stream was always super-saturated with respect to carbonate minerals, but carbonate precipitation occurred mainly during the day when P increased pH. We estimated more than half (possibly 90%) of the carbonate precipitated during the day was retained in the reach under steady baseflow conditions. The amount of DIC removed from the overlying water through carbonate precipitation was similar to the amount of DIC generated from R. Air-water exchange of CO2 was always from the stream to the atmosphere, but was the smallest component of the DIC budget. Overall, the in-stream DIC reactions reduced the amount of CO2 evasion and the downstream flux of groundwater-derived DIC by about half relative to a hypothetical scenario with groundwater discharge only. Other streams with similar characteristics are widely distributed in the major river basins of North America. Data from USGS water quality monitoring networks from the 1960s to the 1990s indicated that 40% of 652 stream monitoring stations in the contiguous USA were at or above

  14. Influence of Inorganic Substrata Size, Leaf Litter and Woody Debris Removal on Benthic Invertebrates Resistance to Floods in Two Contrasting Headwater Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosco Imbert, J.; Gonzalez, Jose Manuel; Basaguren, Ana; Pozo, Jesus

    2005-02-01

    We studied the influence of inorganic substrata size, leaf litter and woody debris removal on the resistance of benthic invertebrates to floods in two contrasting forested headwater streams of the Agüera basin (northern Spain): Cuchillo stream (stream bed dominated by cobbles and pebbles) and Salderrey stream (stream bed dominated by bedrock and boulders). Generally, floods had a greater effect on benthic invertebrates resistance in the Salderrey stream, apparently due to the high presence of loose substrata overlaying bedrock and the higher scouring of sediment in this stream. Unlike Salderrey stream total number of individuals of Simuliidae, Echinogammarus tarragonensis and Protonemura spp. in riffles greatly increased at the reach scale in the Cuchillo stream after two floods, suggesting that Cuchillo was more retentive than Salderrey. A positive relationship between substrata size and invertebrate resistance to floods was found in the Cuchillo stream but not in the Salderrey stream. It appears that the flood disturbances in the Salderrey stream were too strong to find an increase in resistance as substrata size increased. Invertebrate resistance on leaf litter and resistance predictability were also higher in the Cuchillo stream; the former result suggests that retention of leaf packs was greater in the Cuchillo stream. The lack of a statistically significant effect of woody debris removal may imply that the composition and stability of inorganic substrata have more influence on invertebrate resistance to floods than woody debris at the reach scale in these headwater streams dominated by relatively stable substrata.

  15. Evaluating the reliability of the stream tracer approach to characterize stream-subsurface water exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, J.W.; Wagner, B.J.; Bencala, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    Stream water was locally recharged into shallow groundwater flow paths that returned to the stream (hyporheic exchange) in St. Kevin Gulch, a Rocky Mountain stream in Colorado contaminated by acid mine drainage. Two approaches were used to characterize hyporheic exchange: sub- reach-scale measurement of hydraulic heads and hydraulic conductivity to compute streambed fluxes (hydrometric approach) and reachscale modeling of in- stream solute tracer injections to determine characteristic length and timescales of exchange with storage zones (stream tracer approach). Subsurface data were the standard of comparison used to evaluate the reliability of the stream tracer approach to characterize hyporheic exchange. The reach-averaged hyporheic exchange flux (1.5 mL s-1 m-1), determined by hydrometric methods, was largest when stream base flow was low (10 L s-1); hyporheic exchange persisted when base flow was 10- fold higher, decreasing by approximately 30%. Reliability of the stream tracer approach to detect hyporheic exchange was assessed using first- order uncertainty analysis that considered model parameter sensitivity. The stream tracer approach did not reliably characterize hyporheic exchange at high base flow: the model was apparently more sensitive to exchange with surface water storage zones than with the hyporheic zone. At low base flow the stream tracer approach reliably characterized exchange between the stream and gravel streambed (timescale of hours) but was relatively insensitive to slower exchange with deeper alluvium (timescale of tens of hours) that was detected by subsurface measurements. The stream tracer approach was therefore not equally sensitive to all timescales of hyporheic exchange. We conclude that while the stream tracer approach is an efficient means to characterize surface-subsurface exchange, future studies will need to more routinely consider decreasing sensitivities of tracer methods at higher base flow and a potential bias toward

  16. Migration of induced-infiltrated stream water into nearby aquifers due to seasonal ground water withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Chen, X

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of stream-aquifer interaction due to ground water extraction has traditionally focused on the determination of the amount of water depleted in the stream. Less attention has been paid to the movement of infiltrated stream water inside aquifer, particularly for agricultural areas. This paper presents a method of using particle-tracking techniques to evaluate the transport of the leaked stream water in the nearby aquifers. Simple stream-aquifer conditions are used to demonstrate the usefulness of the analysis. Travel times, pathlines, and influence zones of stream water were determined between a stream and nearby pumping wells for seasonal ground water extraction areas. When water quantity is a concern, the analyses provide additional information about stream depletion; when water quality is an issue, they offer information for wellhead protection. Analyses were conducted for transient conditions, and both pumping and nonpumping periods were considered. According to the results from the simulation examples, migration of infiltrated stream water into the nearby aquifers is generally slow and most infiltrated stream water does not arrive at the pumping well at the end of a 90-day irrigation season. Infiltrated stream water may remain in the aquifer for several years before arriving at the pumping well. For aquifers with a regional hydraulic gradient toward streams, part of the infiltrated stream water may discharge back to streams during a recovery period.

  17. Assessment of selected inorganic constituents in streams in the Central Arizona Basins Study Area, Arizona and northern Mexico, through 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anning, David W.

    2003-01-01

    Stream properties and water-chemistry constituent concentrations from data collected by the National Water-Quality Assessment and other U.S. Geological Survey water-quality programs were analyzed to (1) assess water quality, (2) determine natural and human factors affecting water quality, and (3) compute stream loads for the surface-water resources in the Central Arizona Basins study area. Stream temperature, pH, dissolved-oxygen concentration and percent saturation, and dissolved-solids, suspended-sediment, and nutrient concentration data collected at 41 stream-water quality monitoring stations through water year 1998 were used in this assessment. Water-quality standards applicable to the stream properties and water-chemistry constituent concentration data for the stations investigated in this study generally were met, although there were some exceedences. In a few samples from the White River, the Black River, and the Salt River below Stewart Mountain Dam, the pH in reaches designated as a domestic drinking water source was higher than the State of Arizona standard. More than half of the samples from the Salt River below Stewart Mountain Dam and almost all of the samples from the stations on the Central Arizona Project Canal?two of the three most important surface-water sources used for drinking water in the Central Arizona Basins study area?exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level for dissolved solids. Two reach-specific standards for nutrients established by the State of Arizona were exceeded many times: (1) the annual mean concentration of total phosphorus was exceeded during several years at stations on the main stems of the Salt and Verde Rivers, and (2) the annual mean concentration of total nitrogen was exceeded during several years at the Salt River near Roosevelt and at the Salt River below Stewart Mountain Dam. Stream properties and water-chemistry constituent concentrations were related to

  18. Water quality of North Carolina streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harned, Douglas; Meyer, Dann

    1983-01-01

    Interpretation of water quality data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development, for the Yadkin-Pee Dee River system, has identified water quality variations, characterized the current condition of the river in reference to water quality standards, estimated the degree of pollution caused by man, and evaluated long-term trends in concentrations of major dissolved constituents. Three stations, Yadkin River at Yadkin College (02116500), Rocky River near Norwood (02126000), and Pee Dee River near Rockingham (02129000) have been sampled over different periods of time beginning in 1906. Overall, the ambient water quality of the Yadkin-Pee Dee River system is satisfactory for most water uses. Iron and manganese concentrations are often above desirable levels, but they are not unusually high in comparison to other North Carolina streams. Lead concentrations also periodically rise above the recommended criterion for domestic water use. Mercury concentrations frequently exceed, and pH levels fall below, the recommended criteria for protection of aquatic life. Dissolved oxygen levels, while generally good, are lowest at the Pee Dee near Rockingham, due to the station 's location not far downstream from a lake. Suspended sediment is the most significant water quality problem of the Yadkin-Pee Dee River. The major cation in the river is sodium and the major anions are bicarbonate and carbonate. Eutrophication is currently a problem in the Yadkin-Pee Dee, particularly in High Rock Lake. An estimated nutrient and sediment balance of the system indicates that lakes along the Yadkin-Pee Dee River serve as a sink for sediment, ammonia, and phosphorus. Pollution makes up approximately 59% of the total dissolved solids load of the Yadkin River at Yadkin College, 43% for the Rocky River near Norwood, and 29% for the Pee Dee River near Rockingham. Statistically significant trends show a pattern of increasing

  19. When can inverted water tables occur beneath streams?

    PubMed

    Xie, Yueqing; Cook, Peter G; Brunner, Philip; Irvine, Dylan J; Simmons, Craig T

    2014-01-01

    Decline in regional water tables (RWT) can cause losing streams to disconnect from underlying aquifers. When this occurs, an inverted water table (IWT) will develop beneath the stream, and an unsaturated zone will be present between the IWT and the RWT. The IWT marks the base of the saturated zone beneath the stream. Although a few prior studies have suggested the likelihood of an IWT without a clogging layer, most of them have assumed that a low-permeability streambed is required to reduce infiltration from surface water to groundwater, and that the IWT only occurs at the bottom of the low-permeability layer. In this study, we use numerical simulations to show that the development of an IWT beneath an unclogged stream is theoretically possible under steady-state conditions. For a stream width of 1 m above a homogeneous and isotropic sand aquifer with a 47 m deep RWT (measured in an observation point 20 m away from the center of the stream), an IWT will occur provided that the stream depth is less than a critical value of 4.1 m. This critical stream depth is the maximum water depth in the stream to maintain the occurrence of an IWT. The critical stream depth decreases with stream width. For a stream width of 6 m, the critical stream depth is only 1 mm. Thus while theoretically possible, an IWT is unlikely to occur at steady state without a clogging layer, unless a stream is very narrow or shallow and the RWT is very deep.

  20. UTILITY OF ZEOLITES IN REMOVAL OF INORGANIC AND ORGANIC WATER POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange, adsorption and acid catalysis properties. Different inorganic and organic pollutants have been removed from water at room temperature using various zeolites. Synthetic zeolite Faujasite Y has been used to remove inorganic pollutants...

  1. The effect of broadleaf woodland on aluminium speciation in stream water in an acid-sensitive area in the UK.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Jennifer L; Lynam, Philippa; Heal, Kate V; Palmer, Sheila M

    2012-11-15

    Acidification can result in the mobilisation and release of toxic inorganic monomeric aluminium (Al) species from soils into aquatic ecosystems. Although it is well-established that conifer trees enhance acidic atmospheric deposition and exacerbate soil and water acidification, the effect of broad-leaved woodland on soil and water acidification is less clear. This study investigated the effect of broadleaf woodland cover on the acid-base chemistry and Al species present in stream water, and processes controlling these in the acid-sensitive area around Loch Katrine, in the central Highlands, Scotland, UK, where broadleaf woodland expansion is occurring. A nested sampling approach was used to identify 22 stream sampling locations, in sub-catchments of 3.2-61 ha area and 0-45% broadleaf woodland cover. In addition, soils sampled from 68 locations were analysed to assess the influence of: (i) broadleaf woodland cover on soil characteristics and (ii) soil characteristics on stream water chemistry. Stream water pH was negatively correlated with sub-catchment % woodland cover, indicating that woodland cover is enhancing stream water acidification. Concentrations of all stream water Al species (monomeric total, organic and inorganic) were positively correlated with % woodland cover, although not significantly, but were below levels that are toxic to fish. Soil depth, O horizon depth and soil chemistry, particularly of the A horizon, appeared to be the dominant controls on stream water chemistry rather than woodland cover. There were significant differences in soil acid-base chemistry, with significantly lower O horizon pH and A horizon base saturation and higher A horizon exchangeable Al in the wooded catchments compared to the control. This is evidence that the mobile anion effect is already occurring in the study catchments and suggests that stream water acidification arising from broadleaf woodland expansion could occur, especially where tree density is high and acid

  2. Long-Term Data Reveal Patterns and Controls on Stream Water Chemistry in a Forested Stream: Walker Branch, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Brian D; Mulholland, Patrick J; Bernhardt, Emily

    2012-01-01

    We present 20 years of weekly stream water chemistry, hydrology, and climate data for the Walker Branch watershed in eastern Tennessee, USA. Since 1989, the watershed has experienced a similar to 1.08 degrees C increase in mean annual temperature, a similar to 20% decline in precipitation, and a similar to 30% increase in forest evapotranspiration rates. As a result, stream runoff has declined by similar to 34%. We evaluate long-term trends in stream water concentrations and fluxes for nine solutes and use wet deposition data to calculate approximate watershed input-output budgets. Dissolved constituents were classified as geochemical solutes (Ca2+, Mg2+, and SO42-) or nutrients (NH4+, NO3-, soluble reactive phosphorus [SRP], total soluble nitrogen [TSN], total soluble phosphorus [TSP], and dissolved organic carbon [DOC]). Geochemical solutes are predominantly controlled by discharge, and the long-term changes in catchment hydrology have led to significant trends in the concentrations and fluxes of these solutes. Further, the trends in geochemical solute concentrations indicate shifting soil flowpath contributions to streamflow generation through time, with deep groundwater having a greater proportional contribution in recent years. Despite dramatic changes in watershed runoff, there were no trends in inorganic nutrient concentrations (NH4+, NO3-, and SRP). While most nutrients entering the watershed are retained, stream fluxes of nutrient solutes have declined significantly as a result of decreasing runoff. Nutrient concentrations in the stream exhibit large seasonality controlled by in-stream biological uptake. Stream benthic communities are sensitive to hydrologic disturbance, and changes in the frequency or intensity of storm events through time can affect nutrient fluxes. Stream NO3- concentrations are also sensitive to drought, with concentrations decreasing (increasing) if conditions during the three years prior to the time of sampling were drier (wetter

  3. Effects of flooding and drought on water quality in Gulf Coastal Plain streams in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Golladay, Stephen W; Battle, Juliann

    2002-01-01

    Since 1994, water-quality constituents have been measured monthly in three adjacent Coastal Plain watersheds in southwestern Georgia. During 1994, rainfall was 650 mm above annual average and the highest flows on record were observed. From November 1998 through November 2000, 19 months had below average rainfall. Lowest flows on record were observed during the summer of 2000. The watersheds are human-dominated with row-crop agriculture and managed forestlands being the major land uses. However, one watershed (Chickasawhatchee Creek) had 10 to 13% less agriculture and greater wetland area, especially along the stream. Suspended particles, dissolved organic carbon, NH4-N, and soluble reactive phosphorus concentrations were greater during wet and flood periods compared with dry and drought periods for each stream. Regional hydrologic conditions had little effect on NO3-N or dissolved inorganic carbon. Chickasawhatchee Creek had significantly lower suspended sediment and NO3-N concentrations and greater organic and inorganic carbon concentrations, reflecting greater wetland area and stronger connection to a regional aquifer system. Even though substantial human land use occurred within all watersheds, water quality was generally good and can be attributed to low stream drainage density and relatively intact floodplain forests. Low drainage density minimizes surface run-off into streams. Floodplain forests reduce nonpoint-source pollutants through biological and physical absorption. In addition to preserving water quality, floodplain forests provide important ecological functions through the export of nutrients and organic carbon to streams. Extreme low flows may be disruptive to aquatic life due to both the lack of water and to the scarcity of biologically important materials originating from floodplain forests.

  4. All inorganic semiconductor nanowire mesh for direct solar water splitting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Wu, Cheng-Hao; Miao, Jianwei; Yang, Peidong

    2014-11-25

    The generation of chemical fuels via direct solar-to-fuel conversion from a fully integrated artificial photosynthetic system is an attractive approach for clean and sustainable energy, but so far there has yet to be a system that would have the acceptable efficiency, durability and can be manufactured at a reasonable cost. Here, we show that a semiconductor mesh made from all inorganic nanowires can achieve unassisted solar-driven, overall water-splitting without using any electron mediators. Free-standing nanowire mesh networks could be made in large scales using solution synthesis and vacuum filtration, making this approach attractive for low cost implementation.

  5. Contaminant Sources in Stream Water of a Missouri Claypan Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, G. R.; Liu, F.; Lerch, R. N.; Lee, H.

    2014-12-01

    Elevated concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen and herbicides in stream water have degraded water quality and caused serious problems affecting human and aquatic ecosystem health in the Central Claypan Region of the US Midwest. However, the contribution of specific recharge sources to stream water is not well understood in claypan-dominated watersheds. The purpose of this study was to estimate the recharge sources to Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed (GCEW) in north-central Missouri and investigate their importance to contaminant transport. Samples were collected from 2011 to 2014 from streams, piezometers, seep flows, and groundwater in GCEW and analyzed for major ions (including nitrate and nitrite), trace elements, stable H and O isotopes, total nitrogen (TN) and herbicides. Using an endmember mixing analysis based on conservative tracers, recharge contributions to stream flow were an average of 25% surface runoff, 44% shallow subsurface water, and 31% groundwater. TN concentrations were, on average, <0.05 ppm, 0.5 ppm, and 5 ppm in surface runoff, shallow subsurface water, and groundwater, respectively. Atrazine concentrations were, on average, <0.001 ppb, 0.052 ppb and <0.0001 in surface runoff, shallow subsurface water and groundwater, respectively. The data indicated that TN in stream water was primarily from groundwater, while shallow subsurface water was the dominant source of atrazine in stream water. An improved understanding of claypan hydrology and contaminant transport could lead to crop management practices that better protect surface water and groundwater in claypan-dominated watersheds.

  6. Comparative assessment of water treatment using polymeric and inorganic coagulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manda, Innocent K. M.; Chidya, Russel C. G.; Saka, John D. K.; Biswick, Timothy T.

    2016-06-01

    Portable water plays a vital role in improving human life, particularly in controlling the spread of diseases. However, problems associated with lack of potable water are still common especially in developing countries including Malawi. Until now little information exists on the effectiveness of available commercial coagulants used by national water boards in Malawi. Therefore, this study was undertaken in Southern Region Water Board (SRWB) to investigate the efficiency of polymeric coagulants (sufdfloc 3850 and algaefloc 19s) in turbidity reduction comparative with inorganic coagulant (aluminium sulphate) at Zomba, Liwonde, Mangochi, Chikwawa and Mulanje Treatment plants. The jar test method was used to determine the effectiveness of the water coagulants. The results revealed that sudfloc 3850 was most effective in reducing turbidity at Mangochi (99.4 ± 0.06%) and Liwonde (97.2 ± 0.04%) using 0.4 mg L-1 flocculant dose. The Zomba, Mulanje and Chikwawa plants gave 19.56 ± 0.03%, 29.23 ± 0.02% and 9.43 ± 0.02% total reductions respectively. Algaefloc 19s afforded the highest turbidity reduction at Liwonde and Mangochi plants (98.66 ± 0.06 and 97.48 ± 0.05% at a dose of 0.4 and 0.6 mg L-1 respectively), while Chikwawa provided the lowest (9.52 ± 0.01%). At the Zomba and Mulanje plants 20.5 ± 0.03% and 28.4 ± 0.04% reductions were obtained respectively. The inorganic flocculant, alum provided a 99.0 ± 0.05% and 98.6 ± 0.04% reduction at a dose of 4.0 mg L-1 and 6.0 mg L-1 at Zomba and Liwonde plants respectively. The lowest reductions in turbidity were achieved at Chikwawa (7.50 ± 0.01%), Mangochi (12.97 ± 0.02%) and Mulanje (25.00 ± 0.02). The best and optimum pH ranges for polymeric and inorganic coagulants were 7.20-7.80 and 7.35 to 7.57 respectively. The results further revealed that sudfloc 3850 and algaefloc 19s achieved faster formation of heavy flocs than alum. At 0.4 mg L-1 flocculant dosage sudfloc 3850 and algaefloc 19s required ten times

  7. STREAM NETWORK EXPANSION: A RIPARIAN WATER QUALITY FACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about how active stream network expansion during rainstorms influences the ability of riparian buffers to improve water quality. We used aerial photographs to quantify stream network expansion during the wet winter season in five agricultural watersheds in western...

  8. Waste stream recycling: Its effect on water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Cornwell, D.A. ); Lee, R.G. )

    1994-11-01

    Waste streams recycled to the influent of a water treatment plant typically contain contaminants at concentrations that are of concern. These contaminants may include giardia and Cryptosporidium, trihalomethanes, manganese, and assimilable organic carbon. This research shows that proper management--treatment, equalization, and monitoring--of the waste streams can render them suitable for recycling in many situations.

  9. Distribution, behavior, and transport of inorganic and methylmercury in a high gradient stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flanders, J.R.; Turner, R.R.; Morrison, T.; Jensen, R.; Pizzuto, J.; Skalak, K.; Stahl, R.

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations of Hg remain elevated in physical and biological media of the South River (Virginia, USA), despite the cessation of the industrial use of Hg in its watershed nearly six decades ago, and physical characteristics that would not seem to favor Hg(II)-methylation. A 3-a study of inorganic Hg (IHg) and methylmercury (MeHg) was conducted in physical media (soil, sediment, surface water, porewater and soil/sediment extracts) to identify non-point sources, transport mechanisms, and potential controls on Hg(II)-methylation. Data collected from surface water and sediment indicate that the majority of the non-point sources of IHg to the South River are within the first 14. km downstream from the historic point source. Partitioning data indicate that particle bound IHg is introduced in this reach, releasing dissolved and colloidal bound IHg, which is transported downstream. Extraction experiments revealed that floodplain soils released a higher fraction of their IHg content in aqueous extractions than fine-grained sediment (FGS). Based on ultrafiltration [<5000 nominal molecular weight cutoff (NMWC)] the majority of soil IHg released was colloidal in nature, providing evidence for the continued evolution of IHg for Hg(II)-methylation from soil. Strong seasonal patterns in MeHg concentrations were observed in surface water and sediment. The highest concentrations of MeHg in surface water were observed at moderate temperatures, suggesting that other factors limit net Hg(II)-methylation. Seasonal changes in sediment organic content and the fraction of 1. N KOH-extractable THg were also observed and may be important factors in controlling net Hg(II)-methylation rates. Sulfate concentrations in surface water are low and the evidence suggests that Fe reduction may be an important Hg(II)-methylation process. The highest sediment MeHg concentrations were observed in habitats with large amounts of FGS, which are more prevalent in the upper half of the study area due to

  10. Rethinking Rice Preparation for Highly Efficient Removal of Inorganic Arsenic Using Percolating Cooking Water

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Manus; Jiujin, Xiao; Gomes Farias, Júlia; Meharg, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    A novel way of cooking rice to maximize the removal of the carcinogen inorganic arsenic (Asi) is presented here. In conventional rice cooking water and grain are in continuous contact, and it is known that the larger the water:rice cooking ratio, the more Asi removed by cooking, suggesting that the Asi in the grain is mobile in water. Experiments were designed where rice is cooked in a continual stream of percolating near boiling water, either low in Asi, or Asi free. This has the advantage of not only exposing grain to large volumes of cooking water, but also physically removes any Asi leached from the grain into the water receiving vessel. The relationship between cooking water volume and Asi removal in conventional rice cooking was demonstrated for the rice types under study. At a water-to-rice cooking ratio of 12:1, 57±5% of Asi could be removed, average of 6 wholegrain and 6 polished rice samples. Two types of percolating technology were tested, one where the cooking water was recycled through condensing boiling water steam and passing the freshly distilled hot water through the grain in a laboratory setting, and one where tap water was used to cook the rice held in an off-the-shelf coffee percolator in a domestic setting. Both approaches proved highly effective in removing Asi from the cooking rice, with up to 85% of Asi removed from individual rice types. For the recycled water experiment 59±8% and 69±10% of Asi was removed, on average, compared to uncooked rice for polished (n=27) and wholegrain (n=13) rice, respectively. For coffee percolation there was no difference between wholegrain and polished rice, and the effectiveness of Asi removal was 49±7% across 6 wholegrain and 6 polished rice samples. The manuscript explores the potential applications and further optimization of this percolating cooking water, high Asi removal, discovery. PMID:26200355

  11. Rethinking Rice Preparation for Highly Efficient Removal of Inorganic Arsenic Using Percolating Cooking Water.

    PubMed

    Carey, Manus; Jiujin, Xiao; Gomes Farias, Júlia; Meharg, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    A novel way of cooking rice to maximize the removal of the carcinogen inorganic arsenic (Asi) is presented here. In conventional rice cooking water and grain are in continuous contact, and it is known that the larger the water:rice cooking ratio, the more Asi removed by cooking, suggesting that the Asi in the grain is mobile in water. Experiments were designed where rice is cooked in a continual stream of percolating near boiling water, either low in Asi, or Asi free. This has the advantage of not only exposing grain to large volumes of cooking water, but also physically removes any Asi leached from the grain into the water receiving vessel. The relationship between cooking water volume and Asi removal in conventional rice cooking was demonstrated for the rice types under study. At a water-to-rice cooking ratio of 12:1, 57±5% of Asi could be removed, average of 6 wholegrain and 6 polished rice samples. Two types of percolating technology were tested, one where the cooking water was recycled through condensing boiling water steam and passing the freshly distilled hot water through the grain in a laboratory setting, and one where tap water was used to cook the rice held in an off-the-shelf coffee percolator in a domestic setting. Both approaches proved highly effective in removing Asi from the cooking rice, with up to 85% of Asi removed from individual rice types. For the recycled water experiment 59±8% and 69±10% of Asi was removed, on average, compared to uncooked rice for polished (n=27) and wholegrain (n=13) rice, respectively. For coffee percolation there was no difference between wholegrain and polished rice, and the effectiveness of Asi removal was 49±7% across 6 wholegrain and 6 polished rice samples. The manuscript explores the potential applications and further optimization of this percolating cooking water, high Asi removal, discovery.

  12. Field tests of diffusion samplers for inorganic constituents in wells and at a ground-water discharge zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Petkewich, Matthew D.; Campbell, Ted R.

    2002-01-01

    Field tests were performed on two types of diffusion samplers to collect representative samples of inorganic constituents from ground water in wells and at an arsenic-contaminated ground-water-discharge zone beneath a stream. Nylon-screen samplers and dialysis samplers were tested for the collection of arsenic, calcium, chloride, iron, manganese, sulfate, and dissolved oxygen. The investigations were conducted at the Naval Industrial Reserve Ordnance Plant (NIROP), Fridley, Minnesota, and at the Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base (NAS Fort Worth JRB), Texas. Data indicate that, in general, nylon-screen and dialysis diffusion samplers are capable of obtaining concentrations of inorganic solutes in ground water that correspond to concentrations obtained by low-flow sampling. Diffusion samplers offer a potentially time-saving approach to well sampling. Particular care must be taken, however, when sampling for iron and other metals, because of the potential for iron precipitation by oxygenation and when dealing with chemically stratified sampling intervals. Simple nylon-screen jar samplers buried beneath creekbed sediment appear to be effective tools for locating discharge zones of arsenic contaminated ground water. Although the LDPE samplers have proven to be inexpensive and simple to use in wells, they are limited by their inability to provide a representative sample of ionic solutes. The success of nylon-screen samplers in sediment studies suggests that these simple samplers may be useful for collecting water samples for inorganic constituents in wells. Results using dialysis bags deployed in wells suggest that these types of samplers have the potential to provide a representative sample of both VOCs and ionic solutes from ground water (Kaplan and others, 1991; Theodore A. Ehlke, U.S. Geological Survey, written commun., 2001). The purpose of this report is to provide results of field tests investigating the potential to use diffusion samplers to collect

  13. Summer stream water temperature models for Great Lakes streams: New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Marilyn K.; McKenna, James E.; Butryn, Ryan S.; McDonald, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    Temperature is one of the most important environmental influences on aquatic organisms. It is a primary driver of physiological rates and many abiotic processes. However, despite extensive research and measurements, synoptic estimates of water temperature are not available for most regions, limiting our ability to make systemwide and large-scale assessments of aquatic resources or estimates of aquatic species abundance and biodiversity. We used subwatershed averaging of point temperature measurements and associated multiscale landscape habitat conditions from over 3,300 lotic sites throughout New York State to develop and train artificial neural network models. Separate models predicting water temperature (in cold, cool, and warm temperature classes) within small catchment–stream order groups were developed for four modeling units, which together encompassed the entire state. Water temperature predictions were then made for each stream segment in the state. All models explained more than 90% of data variation. Elevation, riparian forest cover, landscape slope, and growing degree-days were among the most important model predictors of water temperature classes. Geological influences varied among regions. Predicted temperature distributions within stream networks displayed patterns of generally increasing temperature downstream but were patchy due to the averaging of water temperatures within stream size-classes of small drainages. Models predicted coldwater streams to be most numerous and warmwater streams to be generally associated with the largest rivers and relatively flat agricultural areas and urban areas. Model predictions provide a complete, georeferenced map of summer daytime mean stream temperature potential throughout New York State that can be used for planning and assessment at spatial scales from the stream segment class to the entire state.

  14. Indicators: Shallow Water Habitat/In-stream Fish Habitat

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Shallow water habitat, also referred to as in-stream fish habitat, refers to areas that fish and other aquatic organisms need for concealment, breeding and feeding. This includes large woody snags, boulders, rock ledges, and undercut banks.

  15. ASSESSMENT OF NEAR-STREAM GROUND WATER-SURFACE WATER INTERACTION (GSI) OF A DEGRADED STREAM BEFORE RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Fall 2001, EPA undertook an intensive collaborative research effort with the USGS and the Institute of Ecosystem Studies (IES) to evaluate the impact of restoration on water quality at a degraded stream in an urban watershed using a before/after stream restoration study design...

  16. Tundra fire alters stream water chemistry and benthic invertebrate communities, North Slope, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, A. R.; Bowden, W. B.; Kling, G. W.; Schuett, E.; Kostrzewski, J. M.; Kolden Abatzoglou, C.; Findlay, R. H.

    2010-12-01

    Increased fire frequency and severity are potentially important consequences of climate change in high latitude ecosystems. The 2007 Anaktuvuk River fire, which burned from July until October, is the largest recorded tundra fire from Alaska's north slope (≈1,000 km2). The immediate effects of wildfire on water chemistry and biotic assemblages in tundra streams are heretofore unknown. We hypothesized that a tundra fire would increase inorganic nutrient inputs to P-limited tundra streams, increasing primary production and altering benthic macroinvertebrate community structure. We examined linkages among: 1) percentage of riparian zone and overall watershed vegetation burned, 2) physical, chemical and biological stream characteristics, and 3) macroinvertebrate communities in streams draining burned and unburned watersheds during the summers of 2008 and 2009. Streams in burned watersheds contained higher mean concentrations of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), ammonium (NH4+), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). In contrast, stream nitrate (NO3-) concentrations were lower in burned watersheds. The net result was that the tundra fire did not affect concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (NH4+ + NO3-). In spite of increased SRP, benthic chlorophyll-a biomass was not elevated. Macroinvertebrate abundances were 1.5 times higher in streams draining burned watersheds; Chironomidae midges, Nematodes, and Nemoura stoneflies showed the greatest increases in abundance. Multivariate multiple regression identified environmental parameters associated with the observed changes in the macroinvertebrate communities. Since we identified stream latitude as a significant predictor variable, latitude was included in the model as a covariate. After removing the variation associated with latitude, 67.3 % of the variance in macroinvertebrate community structure was explained by a subset of 7 predictor variables; DOC, conductivity, mean temperature, NO3-, mean discharge, SRP and NH

  17. The role of headwater streams in downstream water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, R.B.; Boyer, E.W.; Smith, R.A.; Schwarz, G.E.; Moore, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of headwater influences on the water-quality and flow conditions of downstream waters is essential to water-resource management at all governmental levels; this includes recent court decisions on the jurisdiction of the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) over upland areas that contribute to larger downstream water bodies. We review current watershed research and use a water-quality model to investigate headwater influences on downstream receiving waters. Our evaluations demonstrate the intrinsic connections of headwaters to landscape processes and downstream waters through their influence on the supply, transport, and fate of water and solutes in watersheds. Hydrological processes in headwater catchments control the recharge of subsurface water stores, flow paths, and residence times of water throughout landscapes. The dynamic coupling of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in upland streams further controls the chemical form, timing, and longitudinal distances of solute transport to downstream waters. We apply the spatially explicit, mass-balance watershed model SPARROW to consider transport and transformations of water and nutrients throughout stream networks in the northeastern United States. We simulate fluxes of nitrogen, a primary nutrient that is a water-quality concern for acidification of streams and lakes and eutrophication of coastal waters, and refine the model structure to include literature observations of nitrogen removal in streams and lakes. We quantify nitrogen transport from headwaters to downstream navigable waters, where headwaters are defined within the model as first-order, perennial streams that include flow and nitrogen contributions from smaller, intermittent and ephemeral streams. We find that first-order headwaters contribute approximately 70% of the mean-annual water volume and 65% of the nitrogen flux in second-order streams. Their contributions to mean water volume and nitrogen flux decline only marginally to about 55% and

  18. The Role of Headwater Streams in Downstream Water Quality.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Richard B; Boyer, Elizabeth W; Smith, Richard A; Schwarz, Gregory E; Moore, Richard B

    2007-02-01

    Knowledge of headwater influences on the water-quality and flow conditions of downstream waters is essential to water-resource management at all governmental levels; this includes recent court decisions on the jurisdiction of the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) over upland areas that contribute to larger downstream water bodies. We review current watershed research and use a water-quality model to investigate headwater influences on downstream receiving waters. Our evaluations demonstrate the intrinsic connections of headwaters to landscape processes and downstream waters through their influence on the supply, transport, and fate of water and solutes in watersheds. Hydrological processes in headwater catchments control the recharge of subsurface water stores, flow paths, and residence times of water throughout landscapes. The dynamic coupling of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in upland streams further controls the chemical form, timing, and longitudinal distances of solute transport to downstream waters. We apply the spatially explicit, mass-balance watershed model SPARROW to consider transport and transformations of water and nutrients throughout stream networks in the northeastern United States. We simulate fluxes of nitrogen, a primary nutrient that is a water-quality concern for acidification of streams and lakes and eutrophication of coastal waters, and refine the model structure to include literature observations of nitrogen removal in streams and lakes. We quantify nitrogen transport from headwaters to downstream navigable waters, where headwaters are defined within the model as first-order, perennial streams that include flow and nitrogen contributions from smaller, intermittent and ephemeral streams. We find that first-order headwaters contribute approximately 70% of the mean-annual water volume and 65% of the nitrogen flux in second-order streams. Their contributions to mean water volume and nitrogen flux decline only marginally to about 55% and

  19. The Role of Headwater Streams in Downstream Water Quality1

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Richard B; Boyer, Elizabeth W; Smith, Richard A; Schwarz, Gregory E; Moore, Richard B

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of headwater influences on the water-quality and flow conditions of downstream waters is essential to water-resource management at all governmental levels; this includes recent court decisions on the jurisdiction of the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) over upland areas that contribute to larger downstream water bodies. We review current watershed research and use a water-quality model to investigate headwater influences on downstream receiving waters. Our evaluations demonstrate the intrinsic connections of headwaters to landscape processes and downstream waters through their influence on the supply, transport, and fate of water and solutes in watersheds. Hydrological processes in headwater catchments control the recharge of subsurface water stores, flow paths, and residence times of water throughout landscapes. The dynamic coupling of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in upland streams further controls the chemical form, timing, and longitudinal distances of solute transport to downstream waters. We apply the spatially explicit, mass-balance watershed model SPARROW to consider transport and transformations of water and nutrients throughout stream networks in the northeastern United States. We simulate fluxes of nitrogen, a primary nutrient that is a water-quality concern for acidification of streams and lakes and eutrophication of coastal waters, and refine the model structure to include literature observations of nitrogen removal in streams and lakes. We quantify nitrogen transport from headwaters to downstream navigable waters, where headwaters are defined within the model as first-order, perennial streams that include flow and nitrogen contributions from smaller, intermittent and ephemeral streams. We find that first-order headwaters contribute approximately 70% of the mean-annual water volume and 65% of the nitrogen flux in second-order streams. Their contributions to mean water volume and nitrogen flux decline only marginally to about 55% and

  20. Chemistry of Stream Sediments and Surface Waters in New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson,, Gilpin R.; Kapo, Katherine E.; Grossman, Jeffrey N.

    2004-01-01

    Summary -- This online publication portrays regional data for pH, alkalinity, and specific conductance for stream waters and a multi-element geochemical dataset for stream sediments collected in the New England states of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. A series of interpolation grid maps portray the chemistry of the stream waters and sediments in relation to bedrock geology, lithology, drainage basins, and urban areas. A series of box plots portray the statistical variation of the chemical data grouped by lithology and other features.

  1. Heavy metal accumulations in water, sediment, and some cyprinid species in Porsuk Stream (Turkey).

    PubMed

    Köse, Esengül; Çiçek, Arzu; Uysal, Kazim; Tokatlı, Cem; Emiroğlu, Özgür; Arslan, Naime

    2015-03-01

    Porsuk Stream is one of Turkey's most important river systems and also one of the most important branches of the Sakarya River. It provides drinking and utility water for two Turkish cities (Kütahya and Eskişehir) with a total population of one million. In this study, water, sediment, and some tissues (liver, gill, and muscle) of five cyprinid fish species were collected seasonally (2010-2011) from eight stations on the Porsuk Stream, and the zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and arsenic (As) levels of collected samples were determined. The data observed were evaluated with national and international quality criteria. Based on the data observed, it was determined that the Porsuk Stream is affected by significant inorganic pollution from the Kütahya and Eskişehir Provinces. It was also determined that the Porsuk Dam Lake has an important cleaning capacity and that the water and sediment quality of the Porsuk Stream improves after the output of the dam lake.

  2. Mercury cycling in stream ecosystems. 2. Benthic methylmercury production and bed sediment - Pore water partitioning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M.; Lutz, M.A.; Brigham, M.E.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Aiken, G.R.; Orem, W.H.; Hall, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Mercury speciation, controls on methylmercury (MeHg) production, and bed sediment - pore water partitioning of total Hg (THg) and MeHg were examined in bed sediment from eight geochemically diverse streams where atmospheric deposition was the predominant Hg input. Across all streams, sediment THg concentrations were best described as a combined function of sediment percent fines (%fines; particles < 63 ??m) and organic content. MeHg concentrations were best described as a combined function of organic content and the activity of the Hg(II)-methylating microbial community and were comparable to MeHg concentrations in streams with Hg inputs from industrial and mining sources. Whole sediment tin-reducible inorganic reactive Hg (Hg(II)R) was used as a proxy measure for the Hg(II) pool available for microbial methylation. In conjunction with radiotracer-derived rate constants of 203Hg(II) methylation, Hg(II)R was used to calculate MeHg production potential rates and to explain the spatial variability in MeHg concentration. The %Hg(II)R (of THg) was low (2.1 ?? 5.7%) and was inversely related to both microbial sulfate reduction rates and sediment total reduced sulfur concentration. While sediment THg concentrations were higher in urban streams, %MeHg and %Hg(II)R were higher in nonurban streams. Sediment pore water distribution coefficients (log Kd's) for both THg and MeHg were inversely related to the log-transformed ratio of pore water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to bed sediment %fines. The stream with the highest drainage basin wetland density also had the highest pore water DOC ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  3. Water: Wisconsin lakes, streams and wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wisconsin has a tremendous diversity of aquatic habitat: headwater streams, large rivers, inland lakes, and two Great Lakes. Knowing the fundamentals of aquatic ecosystem science is critical to understand how these ecosystems function and to predict how they will respond to human...

  4. Modelling bacterial water quality in streams draining pastoral land.

    PubMed

    Collins, Rob; Rutherford, Kit

    2004-02-01

    A model has been developed to predict concentrations of the faecal bacteria indicator E. coli in streams draining grazed hill-country in New Zealand. The long-term aim of the modelling is to assess effects of land management upon faecal contamination and, in the short term, to provide a framework for field-based research. A daily record of grazing livestock is used to estimate E. coli inputs to a catchment, and transport of bacteria to the stream network is simulated within surface and subsurface flows. Deposition of E. coli directly to streams is incorporated where cattle have access to them, and areas of permanent saturation ('seepage zones') are also represented. Bacteria are routed down the stream network and in-stream processes of deposition and entrainment are simulated. Die-off, both on land and in water, is simulated as a function of temperature and solar radiation. The model broadly reproduces observed E. coli concentrations in a hill-country catchment grazed by sheep and beef cattle, although uncertainty exists with a number of the processes represented. The model is sensitive to the distance over which surface runoff delivers bacteria to a stream and the amount of excretion direct to streams and onto seepage zones. Scenario analysis suggests that riparian buffer strips may improve bacterial water quality both by eliminating livestock defaecation in and near streams, and by trapping of bacteria by the riparian vegetation.

  5. Indirect gas chromatographic measurement of water for process streams

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, F.A.

    1993-05-01

    This project was conducted to develop a moisture measurement method for process gas streams of fossil fuels. Objective was to from pyrolysis to measure the molar concentration of water in a gas stream without flow measurements. The method developed has been incorporated into the hydrocarbon gas analysis method currently used at Western Research Institute. A literature search of types of direct measuring moisture sensors was conducted, and a list of sensors available is given; most of them could not survive in the environment of the process streams. Indirect methods of measuring water involve changing the water via reaction to a compound that can be more readily measured. These methods react water with various reagents to form hydrogen, acetylene, and acetone. The method chose for this study uses a calcium carbide reaction column to convert the water present in the gas stream to acetylene for analysis. Relative deviation for the daily determination of water varied from 0.5 to 3.4%. The method chosen was tested for linearity over a wide range of gas stream water content. Response over 2 to 15 mole % water appears to be linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.991.

  6. GAINS AND LOSSES OF COMMINGLED WATERS IN A STREAM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mac Nish, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    In a legal dispute in the State of Washington (Colville Confederated Tribes vs. Boyd Walton, Jr. , Farmer), it became necessary to determine the proportion of transmission losses sustained by developed water that was commingled with native water in a natural stream channel. Ground-water pumping and irrigation adjacent to the stream resulted in both gains and losses to flow along the study reach. The identification of the native and developed waters was accomplished by a detailed study of the reach that combined current-meter measurements with an analysis of the dilution of an injected brine.

  7. The effect of variable discharge on the inorganic chemistry downstream of a waste water treatment plant, Boulder Creek, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antweiler, R. C.; Writer, J. H.; Murphy, S. F.

    2012-12-01

    Researchers investigating the effect of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent on streams often assume that the magnitude of this effect is constant over time. However, discharge of WWTP effluent frequently follows a distinctive diel pattern. WWTP effluent discharge into Boulder Creek, Colorado, for example, varies by almost 200% over the course of a day. Due to this variation, downstream concentrations of chloride, boron and gadolinium (commonly used "conservative tracers") exhibit major changes over a 24-hour period. In order to determine how effluent discharge variability affects stream chemistry, we performed an evaluation of discharge and inorganic chemistry of the City of Boulder's WWTP and Boulder Creek upstream and downstream of the WWTP (representing a 5.4-km reach). Sodium bromide and Rhodamine WT were used to confirm that the same parcel of water was sampled as it moved downstream. The behavior of inorganic constituents fell into three distinct categories, showing conservative behavior, in-stream loss, or in-stream gain. Accounting for variable effluent discharge, the following inorganic constituents behaved conservatively: Cl, SO4, HCO3, F, B, Ba, Ca, Gd, K, Mg, Rb, Co, Cu, Mo, NO3, P and PO4, Sb, SiO2, Sr and Zn. Inorganic compounds which showed evidence of in-stream loss were Bi, Cr, Cs, Ga, Ge, Hg, Se, and Sn. For these elements, the typical pattern was an almost immediate loss: by the time the water had traveled to the first downstream sampling site, 2.3-km below the WWTP, in-stream reactions appeared to have ceased, and a constant flux was observed at all subsequent sites. We speculate that the near-immediate rates represent precipitation and/or adsorption caused by the change in pH and temperature of the mixing zone. Inorganic constituents that showed evidence of in-stream gain were: Al, As, Cd, Fe, I, Li, Mn, Nb, Pb, Re, Th, U, V, W, and all the rare-earth elements (except Gd). As with the in-stream loss group, most of the reactions occurred

  8. Stream air temperature relations to classify stream ground water interactions in a karst setting, central Pennsylvania, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Driscoll, Michael A.; DeWalle, David R.

    2006-09-01

    SummaryStream-ground water interactions in karst vary from complete losses through swallow holes, to reemergences from springs. Our study objective was to compare stream-air temperature and energy exchange relationships across various stream-ground water relationships in a carbonate watershed. It was hypothesized that ground water-fed stream segments could be distinguished from perched/losing segments using stream-air temperature relationships. Two types of computations were conducted: (1) comparisons of stream-air temperature relationships for the period of October 1999-September 2002 at 12 sites in the Spring Creek drainage and (2) detailed energy budget computations for the same period for ground water-dominated Thompson Run and Lower Buffalo Run, a stream with negligible ground water inputs. Weekly average air temperatures and stream temperatures were highly correlated, but slopes and intercepts of the relationship varied for the 12 sites. Slopes ranged from 0.19 to 0.67 and intercepts ranged from 3.23 to 9.07 °C. A two-component mixing model with end members of ground water and actual stream temperatures indicated that the slope and intercept of the stream-air temperature relationship was controlled by ground water inputs. Streams with large ground water inputs had greater intercepts and lesser slopes than streams that were seasonally losing, perched, and/or distant from ground water inputs. Energy fluxes across the air-water interface were greatest for the ground water-fed stream due to increased longwave, latent, and sensible heat losses from the stream in winter when large temperature and vapor pressure differences existed between the stream and air. Advection of ground water was an important source and sink for heat in the ground water-fed stream, depending on season. In contrast, along the seasonally losing stream reach, advection was of minimal importance and stream temperatures were dominated by energy exchange across the air- water interface. Overall

  9. Use of arsenic-73 in research supports USEPA's regulatory decisions on inorganic arsenic in drinking water*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inorganic arsenic is a natural contaminant of drinking water in the United States and throughout the world. Long term exposure to inorganic arsenic in drinking water at elevated levels (>100 ug/L) is associated with development of cancer in several organs, cardiovascular disease,...

  10. Stream bottom resistivity tomography to map ground water discharge.

    PubMed

    Nyquist, Jonathan E; Freyer, Paul A; Toran, Laura

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of direct current electrical resistivity as a tool for assessing ground water/surface water interactions within streams. This research has shown that patterns of ground water discharge can be mapped at the meter scale, which is important for understanding stream water quality and ecosystem function. Underwater electrical resistivity surveys along a 107-m stream section within the Burd Run Watershed in South Central Pennsylvania identified three resistivity layers: a resistive (100 to 400 Omega m) surface layer corresponding to the streambed sediments, a conductive (20 to 100 Omega m) middle layer corresponding to residual clay sediments, and a resistive (100 to 450 Omega m) bottom layer corresponding to the carbonate bedrock. Tile probing to determine the depth to the bedrock and resistivity test box analysis of augered sediment samples confirmed these interpretations of the resistivity data. Ground water seeps occurred where the resistivity data showed that the residual clays were thinnest and bedrock was closest to the streambed. Plotting the difference in resistivity between two surveys, one conducted during low-stage and the other during high-stage stream conditions, showed changes in the conductivity of the pore fluids saturating the sediments. Under high-stream stage conditions, the top layer showed increased resistivity values for sections with surface water infiltration but showed nearly constant resistivity in sections with ground water seeps. This was expressed as difference values less than 50 Omega m in the area of the seeps and greater than 50 Omega m change for the streambed sediments saturated by surface water. Thus, electrical resistivity aided in characterizing ground water discharge zones by detecting variations in subsurface resistivity under high- and low-stream stage conditions as well as mapping subsurface heterogeneities that promote these exchanges.

  11. Water table fluctuations near an incised stream, Walnut Creek, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.; Zhang, Y.-K.; Drobney, P.

    2004-01-01

    Incised channels are common features in many agricultural watersheds, but the effects of channel incision on riparian water table conditions have been poorly documented. In this study, we evaluate the water table fluctuations in the floodplain near an incised stream (Walnut Creek, Iowa) and investigate the roles that channel incision and variable recharge play in modifying the water table configuration in the floodplain. Groundwater flows from higher landscape positions towards Walnut Creek under hydraulic gradients that were steepest near the upland/floodplain contact and in the near-stream riparian zone. Annually, water table fluctuations on the floodplain were greatest in wells located 30 m from the creek, midway between the creek and upland. Water levels monitored continuously during a runoff event indicated that bank storage was confined to a narrow zone adjacent to the channel. A steady-state, one-dimensional analytical model was developed to describe the shape of the water table surface near an incised stream and evaluate how variable groundwater recharge and channel bed lowering has affected the shape of the water table surface. Results from this study have implications for managing the riparian buffers of incised streams with successful establishment dependent upon matching buffer vegetation to riparian water table conditions. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment Technology to Meet the Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations for Inorganics: Part 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorg, Thomas J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    This article is the third in a series summarizing existing treatment technology to meet the inorganic National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations. This report deals specifically with treatment methods for removing cadmium, lead, and silver from drinking water. (CS)

  13. ASSESSING THE ROLE OF NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR INORGANIC CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has been applied as a knowledge-based remediation technology for organic contaminants in ground water. The application of this technology is being considered for remediation of inorganic contaminants in ground water at hazardous waste sites. ...

  14. Geochemical results from stream-water and stream-sediment samples collected in Colorado and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hageman, Philip L.; Todd, Andrew S.; Smith, Kathleen S.; DeWitt, Ed; Zeigler, Mathew P.

    2013-01-01

    Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey are studying the relationship between watershed lithology and stream-water chemistry. As part of this effort, 60 stream-water samples and 43 corresponding stream-sediment samples were collected in 2010 and 2011 from locations in Colorado and New Mexico. Sample sites were selected from small to midsize watersheds composed of a high percentage of one rock type or geologic unit. Stream-water and stream-sediment samples were collected, processed, preserved, and analyzed in a consistent manner. This report releases geochemical data for this phase of the study.

  15. Comparison of drinking water treatment process streams for optimal bacteriological water quality.

    PubMed

    Ho, Lionel; Braun, Kalan; Fabris, Rolando; Hoefel, Daniel; Morran, Jim; Monis, Paul; Drikas, Mary

    2012-08-01

    Four pilot-scale treatment process streams (Stream 1 - Conventional treatment (coagulation/flocculation/dual media filtration); Stream 2 - Magnetic ion exchange (MIEX)/Conventional treatment; Stream 3 - MIEX/Conventional treatment/granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration; Stream 4 - Microfiltration/nanofiltration) were commissioned to compare their effectiveness in producing high quality potable water prior to disinfection. Despite receiving highly variable source water quality throughout the investigation, each stream consistently reduced colour and turbidity to below Australian Drinking Water Guideline levels, with the exception of Stream 1 which was difficult to manage due to the reactive nature of coagulation control. Of particular interest was the bacteriological quality of the treated waters where flow cytometry was shown to be the superior monitoring tool in comparison to the traditional heterotrophic plate count method. Based on removal of total and active bacteria, the treatment process streams were ranked in the order: Stream 4 (average log removal of 2.7) > Stream 2 (average log removal of 2.3) > Stream 3 (average log removal of 1.5) > Stream 1 (average log removal of 1.0). The lower removals in Stream 3 were attributed to bacteria detaching from the GAC filter. Bacterial community analysis revealed that the treatments affected the bacteria present, with the communities in streams incorporating conventional treatment clustering with each other, while the community composition of Stream 4 was very different to those of Streams 1, 2 and 3. MIEX treatment was shown to enhance removal of bacteria due to more efficient flocculation which was validated through the novel application of the photometric dispersion analyser.

  16. Water quality of streams in the Neshaminy Creek basin, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarren, Edward F.

    1972-01-01

    The Neshaminy has carved a scenic route on its way to the Delaware River, thereby helping to increase the value of land. The unabated growth of nearby metropolitan areas and the multiplying needs for water and open space for water storage and recreation in southeastern Pennsylvania have become impelling forces that mark the Neshaminy valley watershed for continued development of its land and water resources. Toward this end the Neshaminy Valley Watershed Association, Inc., which came into existence June 13, 1956, is one of several organizations dedicated to land and water-resources development in the Neshaminy Creek basin. The principal objectives of the Neshaminy Valley Watershed Association are (1) to provide for future water-supply and recreation needs, (2) to safeguard against flood and drought damage, (3) to decrease stream pollution, (4) to preserve wildlife and natural beauty, (5) to reduce soil erosion and siltation, 96) to reforest marginal land, and (7) to improve and protect existing woodland. This study shows that there is a wide variance in water quality between the West Branch and the North Branch of the Neshaminy. However, the study shows no significant difference between the chemical composition of the Little Neshaminy Creek and the main stream before they come together at Rushland. Just beyond their confluence the main stream has drained more than half its total drainage area. The average flow of the stream at this location is about 85 percent of the average flow at Langhorne. The continued presence of game fish in most of Neshaminy Creek indicates a degree of water purity that characterizes this stream as suitable for recreation. However, during the summer and early fall, several small streams feeding the Neshaminy go dry. The diminished flow during these periods and during prolonged drought impairs stream quality by causing a greater concentration of dissolved solids in water. The relatively inferior water during low-flow periods, therefore

  17. Inorganic Analyses in Water Quality Control Programs. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This document is a lecture/laboratory manual dealing with the analysis of selected inorganic pollutants. The manual is an instructional aid for classroom presentations to those with little or no experience in the field, but having one year (or equivalent) of college level inorganic chemistry and having basic laboratory skills. Topics include:…

  18. Inorganic Analyses in Water Quality Control Programs. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroner, Audrey; And Others

    This lecture/laboratory manual for a five-day course deals with the analysis of selected inorganic pollutants. The manual is an instructional aid for classroom presentations to those with little or no experience in the field, but having one year (or equivalent) of college level inorganic chemistry, one semester of college level quantitative…

  19. Reactions of inorganic nitrogen species in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Dell`Orco, P.C.

    1994-12-31

    Redox reactions of nitrate salts with NH3 and methanol were studied in near-critical and supercritical water at 350 to 530 C and constant pressure of 302 bar. Sodium nitrate decomposition reactions were investigated at similar conditions. Reactions were conducted in isothermal tubular reactor under plug flow. For kinetic modeling, nitrate and nitrite reactants were lumped into an NO{sub x}{sup -} reactant; kinetic expressions were developed for MNO{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X and sodium nitrate decomposition reactions. The proposed elementary reaction mechanism for MNO{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X reaction indicated that NO{sub 2} was the primary oxidizing species and that N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O selectivities could be determined by the form of MNO{sub 3} used. This suggest a nitrogen control strategy for use in SCWO (supercritical water oxidation) processes; nitrate or NH3 could be used to remove the other, at reaction conditions far less severe than required by other methods. Reactions of nitrate with methanol indicated that nitrate was a better oxidant than oxygen in supercritical water. Nitrogen reaction products included NH3 and nitrite, while inorganic carbon was the major carbon reaction product. Analysis of excess experiments indicated that the reaction at 475 C was first order in methanol concentration and second order in NO{sub x}{sup -} concentration. In order to determine phase regimes for these reactions, solubility of sodium nitrate was determined for some 1:1 nitrate electrolytes. Solubilities were measured at 450 to 525 C, from 248 to 302 bar. A semi-empirical solvation model was shown to adequately describe the experimental sodium nitrate solubilities. Solubilities of Li, Na, and K nitrates revealed with cations with smaller ionic radii had greater solubilities with nitrate.

  20. The effect of in-stream activities on the Njoro River, Kenya. Part I: Stream flow and chemical water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yillia, Paul T.; Kreuzinger, Norbert; Mathooko, Jude M.

    For shallow streams in sub-Saharan Africa, in-stream activities could be described as the actions by people and livestock, which take place within or besides stream channels. This study examined the nature of in-stream activities along a rural stream in Kenya and established the inequality in water allocation for various livelihood needs, as well as the negative impact they have on dry weather stream flow and chemical water quality. Seven locations along the stream were studied in wet and dry weather of 2006. Enumeration consisted of making head counts of people and livestock and tallying visitors at hourly intervals from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. To estimate water abstraction, filled containers of known volume were counted and the stream was sampled to examine the impact on water quality. Water samples were obtained upstream and downstream of in-stream activities before (6 a.m.) and during (11 a.m., 6 p.m.) activities. Samples were analyzed for suspended solids, turbidity, BOD 5, total nitrogen and total phosphorus. The daily total abstraction at the middle reaches during dry weather was 120-150 m 3 day -1. More than 60% of abstraction was done by water vendors. Vended water from the stream was sold at US 3.5-7.5 per m 3 and vendors earned between US 3-6 a day. Abstracted water contributed approximately 40-60% of the total daily consumptive water use in the riparian area during dry weather but >30% of the morning stream flow was abstracted thereby upsetting stream flow in the lower reaches. The daily total water abstraction correlated positively ( R2, 0.98) and significantly ( p < 0.05) with the daily total human visit, which was diurnally periodic with two peaks, occurring between 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. and from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. This diurnal pattern of visits and the corresponding in-stream activities affected water quality. In particular, suspended solids, turbidity and BOD 5 levels increased significantly ( p < 0.05) downstream during in-stream activities. It was concluded

  1. Dynamics of groundwater-surface water interactions in urban streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musolff, A.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    In industrialized countries the majority of streams and rivers have been subject to changes in the hydrological regime and alteration of the channel morphology. Urban streams are typically characterized by “flashier” hydrographs as a result of more direct runoff from impervious surfaces. Channel structure and complexity are often impaired compared to pristine streams. As a consequence the potential for bedform-driven water flow in the streambed is reduced. The downward transport of oxygen by advective flow in the streambed is known to be of great ecological importance for the hyporheic macro and micro fauna and facilitates nutrient cycling and the degradation of organic pollutants. We studied the dynamics of groundwater-surface water exchange of two anthropogenically impacted streams in urban areas to examine the effects of variable hydrologic boundary conditions on water flux and redox conditions in the streambed. The first stream is fed by groundwater as well as storm-water from a large industrial area. Here, we monitored the variability of vertical hydraulic gradients, streambed temperature and redox conditions in the streambed over the course of 5 months. The second stream is frequently polluted by combined sewer overflows (CSO) from an urban watershed. Here, we measured the vertical hydraulic gradients, streambed temperature and electrical conductivity (EC) in the stream, the streambed and in the adjacent aquifer. Both streams are characterized by strong variations in hydraulic gradients due to the dynamic hydrographs as well as the variations in total head in the shallow aquifer. Therefore, magnitude and direction of water flux through the streambed changed significantly over time. At the first site long-term variations of redox conditions in the shallow streambed (0.1 m) were related to the direction of water fluxes. Downward water flow resulted in increased redox potentials. However, the high short-term variability of redox conditions could not be

  2. Ground-water and stream-water interaction in the Owl Creek basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogle, K.M.

    1996-01-01

    Understanding of the interaction of ground-water and surface-water resources is vital to water management when water availability is limited.Inflow of ground water is the primary source ofwater during stream base flow. The water chemistry of streams may substantially be affected by that inflow of ground water. This report is part of a study to examine ground-water and surface-water interaction in the Owl Creek Basin, Wyoming, completed by the U.S. Geological Survey incooperation with the Northern Arapaho Tribe and the Shoshone Tribe. During a low flow period between November\\x1113 - 17, 1991, streamflowmeasurements and water-quality samples were collected at 16 selected sites along major streams and tributaries in the Owl Creek Basin,Wyoming. The data were used to identify stream reaches receiving ground-water inflow and to examine causes of changes in stream chemistry.Streamflow measurements, radon-222 activity load, and dissolved solids load were used to identified stream reaches receiving ground-water inflow.Streamflow measurements identified three stream reaches receiving ground-water inflow. Analysis of radon-222 activity load identified five stream reaches receiving ground-water inflow. Dissolvedsolids load identified six stream reaches receiving ground-water inflow. When these three methods were combined, stream reaches in two areas, theEmbar Area and the Thermopolis Anticline Area, were identified as receiving ground-water inflow.The Embar Area and the Thermopolis Anticline Area were then evaluated to determine the source of increased chemical load in stream water. Three potential sources were analyzed: tributary inflow, surficial geology, and anticlines. Two sources,tributary inflow and surficial geology, were related to changes in isotopic ratios and chemical load in the Embar Area. In two reaches in the Embar Area, isotopic ratios of 18O/16O, D/H, and 34S/32S indicated that tributary inflow affected stream-water chemistry. Increased chemical load of

  3. What causes cooling water temperature gradients in forested stream reaches?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, G.; Malcolm, I. A.; Sadler, J. P.; Hannah, D. M.

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have suggested that shading by riparian vegetation may reduce maximum water temperature and provide refugia for temperature sensitive aquatic organisms. Longitudinal cooling gradients have been observed during the daytime for stream reaches shaded by coniferous trees downstream of clear cuts, or deciduous woodland downstream of open moorland. However, little is known about the energy exchange processes that drive such gradients, especially in semi-natural woodland contexts, and in the absence of potentially confounding cool groundwater inflows. To address this gap, this study quantified and modelled variability in stream temperature and heat fluxes along an upland reach of the Girnock Burn (a tributary of the Aberdeenshire Dee, Scotland) where riparian landuse transitions from open moorland to semi-natural forest. Observations were made along a 1050 m reach using a spatially-distributed network of ten water temperature micro-loggers, three automatic weather stations and >200 hemispherical photographs, which were used to estimate incoming solar radiation. These data parameterised a high-resolution energy flux model, incorporating flow-routing, which predicted spatio-temporal variability in stream temperature. Variability in stream temperature was controlled largely by energy fluxes at the water column-atmosphere interface. Predominantly net energy gains occurred along the reach during daylight hours, and heat exchange across the bed-water column interface accounted for <1% of the net energy budget. For periods when daytime net radiation gains were high (under clear skies), differences between water temperature observations decreased in the streamwise direction; a maximum difference of 2.5 °C was observed between the upstream reach boundary and 1050 m downstream. Furthermore, daily maximum water temperature at 1050 m downstream was ≤1°C cooler than at the upstream reach boundary and lagged the occurrence of daily maximum water temperature

  4. Investigation of the relationship between drinking water quality based on content of inorganic components and landform classes using fuzzy AHP (case study: south of Firozabad, west of Fars province, Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokarram, Marzieh; Sathyamoorthy, Dinesh

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is used to study the relationship between drinking water quality based on content of inorganic components and landform classes in the south of Firozabad, west of Fars province, Iran. For determination of drinking water quality based on content of inorganic components, parameters of calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), magnesium (Mg), thorium (TH), sodium (Na), electrical conductivity (EC), sulfate (SO4), and total dissolved solids (TDS) were used. It was found that 8.29 % of the study area has low water quality; 64.01 %, moderate; 23.33 %, high; and 4.38 %, very high. Areas with suitable drinking water quality based on content of inorganic components are located in parts of the south-eastern and south-western parts of the study area. The relationship between landform class and drinking water quality based on content of inorganic components shows that drinking water quality based on content of inorganic components is high in the stream, valleys, upland drainages, and local ridge classes, and low in the plain small and midslope classes. In fact we can predict water quality using extraction of landform classes from a digital elevation model (DEM) by the Topographic Position Index (TPI) method, so that streams, valleys, upland drainages, and local ridge classes have more water quality than the other classes. In the study we determined that without measurement of water sample characteristics, we can determine water quality by landform classes.

  5. National water summary 1990-91: Hydrologic events and stream water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulson, Richard W.; Chase, Edith B.; Williams, John S.; Moody, David W.

    1993-01-01

    The following discussion is an overview of the three parts of this 1990-91 National Water Summary - "Hydrologic Conditions and Water-Related Events, Water Years 1990-91," "Hydrologic Perspectives on Water Issues," and "State Summaries of Stream Water Quality."

  6. Organic and Inorganic Matter in Louisiana Coastal Waters: Vermilion, Atchafalaya, Terrebonne, Barataria, and Mississippi Regions.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) spectral absorption, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, and the particulate fraction of inorganic (PIM) and organic matter (POM) were measured in Louisiana coastal waters at Vermilion, Atchafalaya, Terrebonne, Barataria, and...

  7. Monitored Natural Attenuation of Inorganic Contaminants in Ground Water – Technical Report Series

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will cover the development and content of new EPA Technical Resource Documents on the application of monitored natural attenuation for inorganic contaminants in ground water. This presentation discusses the various mechanisms that are recognized to result in th...

  8. EFFECTS OF STREAM RESTORATION ON GROUND WATER NITRATE AT MINEBANK RUN, AN URBAN STREAM IN THE CHESAPEAKE BAY WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevated nitrate levels in streams and ground water pose human and ecological threats. Microbial denitrification removes nitrate from ground water but requires anaerobic (saturated) conditions and adequate supply of dissolved organic carbon from detritus and organic soils. Con...

  9. Impacts of labile organic carbon concentration on organic and inorganic nitrogen utilization by a stream biofilm bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Suchismita; Leff, Laura G

    2013-12-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, carbon (C) availability strongly influences nitrogen (N) dynamics. One manifestation of this linkage is the importance in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), which can serve as both a C and an N source, yet our knowledge of how specific properties of DOM influence N dynamics are limited. To empirically examine the impact of labile DOM on the responses of bacteria to DON and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), bacterial abundance and community composition were examined in controlled laboratory microcosms subjected to various combinations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), DON, and DIN treatments. Bacterial communities that had colonized glass beads incubated in a stream were treated with various glucose concentrations and combinations of inorganic and organic N (derived from algal exudate, bacterial protein, and humic matter). The results revealed a strong influence of C availability on bacterial utilization of DON and DIN, with preferential uptake of DON under low C concentrations. Bacterial DON uptake was affected by the concentration and by its chemical nature (labile versus recalcitrant). Labile organic N sources (algal exudate and bacterial protein) were utilized equally well as DIN as an N source, but this was not the case for the recalcitrant humic matter DON treatment. Clear differences in bacterial community composition among treatments were observed based on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (T-RFLP) of 16S rRNA genes. C, DIN, and DON treatments likely drove changes in bacterial community composition that in turn affected the rates of DON and DIN utilization under various C concentrations.

  10. Impacts of Labile Organic Carbon Concentration on Organic and Inorganic Nitrogen Utilization by a Stream Biofilm Bacterial Community

    PubMed Central

    Leff, Laura G.

    2013-01-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, carbon (C) availability strongly influences nitrogen (N) dynamics. One manifestation of this linkage is the importance in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), which can serve as both a C and an N source, yet our knowledge of how specific properties of DOM influence N dynamics are limited. To empirically examine the impact of labile DOM on the responses of bacteria to DON and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), bacterial abundance and community composition were examined in controlled laboratory microcosms subjected to various combinations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), DON, and DIN treatments. Bacterial communities that had colonized glass beads incubated in a stream were treated with various glucose concentrations and combinations of inorganic and organic N (derived from algal exudate, bacterial protein, and humic matter). The results revealed a strong influence of C availability on bacterial utilization of DON and DIN, with preferential uptake of DON under low C concentrations. Bacterial DON uptake was affected by the concentration and by its chemical nature (labile versus recalcitrant). Labile organic N sources (algal exudate and bacterial protein) were utilized equally well as DIN as an N source, but this was not the case for the recalcitrant humic matter DON treatment. Clear differences in bacterial community composition among treatments were observed based on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (T-RFLP) of 16S rRNA genes. C, DIN, and DON treatments likely drove changes in bacterial community composition that in turn affected the rates of DON and DIN utilization under various C concentrations. PMID:24038688

  11. An evaluation of water-quality records for Texas streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakey, J.F.; Hawkinson, R.O.; Steele, T.D.

    1972-01-01

    Chemical data for 12 streamflow-sampling stations in Texas, each having from 8 to 24 years of available historical records, were analyzed to determine functional relationships between concentrations of the major inorganic constituents and specific conductance or stream discharge. Regression equations for each station were derived by using data for an identical 5-year period; the remaining record served as independent test data for checking the adequacy of the functions on the basis of continued specific-conductance determinations as an index variable. Daily solute concentrations and loads at a sampling site were simulated, and monthly and annual averages were computed by using daily records of specific conductance in conjunction with the regression equations. Simulated annual mean concentrations of most individual solutes and dissolved solids averaged within 10-20 percent of comparable concentrations determined from the composited chemical analyses, although systematic biases were detected in results for some of the relationships used in the simulation. Results of the evaluation of the 12 stations indicated that regression equations, using specific conductance as the independent variable, can be used as an alternative to composite analyses for calculation of solute concentrations and loads in Texas streams and is a flexible system that can be applied with sufficient accuracy to satisfy most anticipated needs for data.

  12. Total and inorganic arsenic in fish samples from Norwegian waters.

    PubMed

    Julshamn, Kaare; Nilsen, Bente M; Frantzen, Sylvia; Valdersnes, Stig; Maage, Amund; Nedreaas, Kjell; Sloth, Jens J

    2012-01-01

    The contents of total arsenic and inorganic arsenic were determined in fillet samples of Northeast Artic cod, herring, mackerel, Greenland halibut, tusk, saithe and Atlantic halibut. In total, 923 individual fish samples were analysed. The fish were mostly caught in the open sea off the coast of Norway, from 40 positions. The determination of total arsenic was carried out by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry following microwave-assisted wet digestion. The determination of inorganic arsenic was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography-ICP-MS following microwave-assisted dissolution of the samples. The concentrations found for total arsenic varied greatly between fish species, and ranged from 0.3 to 110 mg kg(-1) wet weight. For inorganic arsenic, the concentrations found were very low (<0.006 mg kg(-1)) in all cases. The obtained results question the assumptions made by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) on the inorganic arsenic level in fish used in the recent EFSA opinion on arsenic in food.

  13. Inorganic Analysis in Water Quality Control Programs. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroner, Audrey

    This two-part instructor's guide was designed for a five-day course for chemists and technicians with little or no experience in inorganic analyses. Part I provides information on course planning and management including course description, staff responsibilities, suggested course plan and agenda, timeline for planning and conducting the course,…

  14. Predicting stream water quality using artificial neural networks (ANN)

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.A.

    2000-05-17

    Predicting point and nonpoint source runoff of dissolved and suspended materials into their receiving streams is important to protecting water quality and traditionally has been modeled using deterministic or statistical methods. The purpose of this study was to predict water quality in small streams using an Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The selected input variables were local precipitation, stream flow rates and turbidity for the initial prediction of suspended solids in the stream. A single hidden-layer feedforward neural network using backpropagation learning algorithms was developed with a detailed analysis of model design of those factors affecting successful implementation of the model. All features of a feedforward neural model were investigated including training set creation, number and layers of neurons, neural activation functions, and backpropagation algorithms. Least-squares regression was used to compare model predictions with test data sets. Most of the model configurations offered excellent predictive capabilities. Using either the logistic or the hyperbolic tangent neural activation function did not significantly affect predicted results. This was also true for the two learning algorithms tested, the Levenberg-Marquardt and Polak-Ribiere conjugate-gradient descent methods. The most important step during model development and training was the representative selection of data records for training of the model.

  15. Streaming Potential In Rocks Saturated With Water And Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarvin, J. A.; Caston, A.

    2011-12-01

    Fluids flowing through porous media generate electrical currents. These currents cause electric potentials, called "streaming potentials." Streaming potential amplitude depends on the applied pressure gradient, on rock and fluid properties, and on the interaction between rock and fluid. Streaming potential has been measured for rocks saturated with water (1) and with water-gas mixtures. (2) Few measurements (3) have been reported for rocks saturated with water-oil mixtures. We measured streaming potential for sandstone and limestone saturated with a mixture of brine and laboratory oil. Cylindrical samples were initially saturated with brine and submerged in oil. Saturation was changed by pumping oil from one end of a sample to the other and then through the sample in the opposite direction. Saturation was estimated from sample resistivity. The final saturation of each sample was determined by heating the sample in a closed container and measuring the pressure. Measurements were made by modulating the pressure difference (of oil) between the ends of a sample at multiple frequencies below 20 Hz. The observed streaming potential is a weak function of the saturation. Since sample conductivity decreases with increasing oil saturation, the electro-kinetic coupling coefficient (Pride's L (4)) decreases with increasing oil saturation. (1) David B. Pengra and Po-zen Wong, Colloids and Surfaces, vol., p. 159 283-292 (1999). (2) Eve S. Sprunt, Tony B. Mercer, and Nizar F. Djabbarah, Geophysics, vol. 59, p. 707-711 (1994). (3) Vinogradov, J., Jackson, M.D., Geophysical Res. L., Vol. 38, Article L01301 (2011). (4) Steve Pride, Phys. Rev. B, vol. 50, pp. 15678-15696 (1994).

  16. Soluble reactive phosphorus levels in rainfall, cloud water, throughfall, stemflow, soil waters, stream waters and groundwaters for the Upper River Severn area, Plynlimon, mid Wales.

    PubMed

    Neal, Colin; Reynolds, Brian; Neal, Margaret; Hughes, Steve; Wickham, Heather; Hill, Linda; Rowland, Philip; Pugh, Bronwen

    2003-10-01

    Soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) data are presented for rainfall, cloud water, soil waters, stream waters and groundwaters at the Plynlimon catchments in mid Wales to examine the hydrochemical functioning of inorganic phosphorus for an acidic and acid sensitive area characteristic of much of the UK uplands. In general, stream water concentrations are low compared to lowland areas. Average concentrations of SRP in rainfall and cloud water (0.3 and 0.9 microM l(-1), respectively) are higher than in stream water with wider ranges in concentration (0-19.3 and 0-20.9 microM l(-1), respectively). Throughfall and stemflow is enriched in SRP compared to rain and cloud water by a factor of approximately twofold and sixfold, respectively: the average concentrations and ranges are 0.73 and 0-6.61 microM l(-1) for throughfall and 2.12 and 0-18.61 microM l(-1) for stemflow. Soil water SRP concentrations measured in the surface layers of representative areas of podzol and gley soils, are further enriched with respect to inputs. Average concentrations and ranges for the L/F and Oh horizons in the podzols are 3.1 microM l(-1) (range: 0.03-17.2 microM l(-1)) and 0.75 microM l(-1) (range: 0.03-2.64 microM l(-1)), respectively. Correspondingly, the average values and ranges for the L/F and Oh horizons in the gley are 2 microM l(-1) (range: 0.03-16.65 microM l(-1)) and 0.4 microM l(-1) (range: 0.03-8.61 microM l(-1)). SRP concentrations in stream and ground water are lower than in atmospheric inputs and surface soil waters and show marked spatial variability. This variability is linked to three catchment features. (1) For streams draining podzolic soils, most of the SRP is retained by the catchment. For this situation, stream and ground waters have average concentrations of approximately 0.05 microM l(-1) with a range of 0-1.47 microM l(-1). There is no clear stream or groundwater SRP response to felling despite a large release of SRP from felling debris (brash) and the forest floor

  17. Nitrogen dynamics at the groundwater-surface water interface of a degraded urban stream (journal)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urbanization degrades stream ecosystems by altering hydrology and nutrient dynamics, yet relatively little effort has been devoted to understanding biogeochemistry of urban streams at the ground water-surface water interface. This zone may be especially important for nitrogen re...

  18. Fragmentation and quench behavior of corium melt streams in water

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.W.; Wang, K.; Blomquist, C.A.; McUmber, L.M.; Schneider, J.P.

    1994-02-01

    The interaction of molten core materials with water has been investigated for the pour stream mixing mode. This interaction plays a crucial role during the later stages of in-vessel core melt progression inside a light water reactor such as during the TMI-2 accident. The key issues which arise during the molten core relocation include: (i) the thermal attack and possible damage to the RPV lower head from the impinging molten fuel stream and/or the debris bed, (ii) the molten fuel relocation pathways including the effects of redistribution due to core support structure and the reactor lower internals, (iii) the quench rate of the molten fuel through the water in the lower plenum, (iv) the steam generation and hydrogen generation during the interaction, (v) the transient pressurization of the primary system, and (vi) the possibility of a steam explosion. In order to understand these issues, a series of six experiments (designated CCM-1 through {minus}6) was performed in which molten corium passed through a deep pool of water in a long, slender pour stream mode. Results discussed include the transient temperatures and pressures, the rate and magnitude of steam/hydrogen generation, and the posttest debris characteristics.

  19. Dry Valley streams in Antarctica: Ecosystems waiting for water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKnight, Diane M.; Niyogi, D.K.; Alger, A.S.; Bomblies, A.; Conovitz, P.A.; Tate, C.M.

    1999-01-01

    An axiom of ecology is: 'Where there is water, there is life.' In dry valley ecosystems of Antarctica, this axiom can be extended to: 'Where there has been and will be water, there is life.' Stream communities in the dry valleys can withstand desiccation on an annual basis and also for longer periods - as much as decades or even centuries. These intact ecosystems, consisting primarily of cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae, spring back to life with the return of water. Soil organisms in the dry valleys also have remarkable survival capabilities (Virginia and Wall 1999), emerging from dormancy with the arrival of water. Streams in the dry valleys carry meltwater from a glacier or ice-field source to the lakes on the valley floors and generally flow for 4-10 weeks during the summer, depending on climatic conditions. Many of these streams contain abundant algal mats that are perennial in the sense that they are in a freeze-dried state during the winter and begin growing again within minutes of becoming wetted by the first flow of the season. The algal species present in the streams are mainly filamentous cyanobacteria (approximately 20 species of the genera Phormidium, Oscillatoria, and Nostoc), two green algal species of the genus Prasiola, and numerous diatom taxa that are characteristic of soil habitats and polar regions. Algal abundances are greatest in those streams in which periglacial processes, acting over periods of perhaps a century, have produced a stable stone pavement in the streambed. This habitat results in a less turbulent flow regime and limits sediment scour from the streambed. Because dry valley glaciers advance and retreat over periods of centuries and millennia and stream networks in the dry valleys evolve through sediment deposition and transport, some of the currently inactive stream channels may receive flow again in the future. Insights- into the process of algal persistence and reactivation will come from long-term experiments that study the

  20. Water absorption by secondary organic aerosol and its effect on inorganic aerosol behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, A.S.; Pandis, S.N.

    2000-01-01

    The hygroscopic nature of atmospheric aerosol has generally been associated with its inorganic fraction. In this study, a group contribution method is used to predict the water absorption of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Compared against growth measurements of mixed inorganic-organic particles, this method appears to provide a first-order approximation in predicting SOA water absorption. The growth of common SOA species is predicted to be significantly less than common atmospheric inorganic salts such as (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaCl. Using this group contribution method as a tool in predicting SOA water absorption, an integrated modeling approach is developed combining available SOA and inorganic aerosol models to predict overall aerosol behavior. The effect of SOA on water absorption and nitrate partitioning between the gas and aerosol phases is determined. On average, it appears that SOA accounts for approximately 7% of total aerosol water and increases aerosol nitrate concentrations by approximately 10%. At high relative humidity and low SOA mass fractions, the role of SOA in nitrate partitioning and its contribution to total aerosol water is negligible. However, the water absorption of SOA appears to be less sensitive to changes in relative humidity than that of inorganic species, and thus at low relative humidity and high SOA mass fraction concentrations, SOA is predicted to account for approximately 20% of total aerosol water and a 50% increase in aerosol nitrate concentrations. These findings could improve the results of modeling studies where aerosol nitrate has often been underpredicted.

  1. Optimal placement of off-stream water sources for ephemeral stream recovery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rigge, Matthew B.; Smart, Alexander; Wylie, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Uneven and/or inefficient livestock distribution is often a product of an inadequate number and distribution of watering points. Placement of off-stream water practices (OSWP) in pastures is a key consideration in rangeland management plans and is critical to achieving riparian recovery by improving grazing evenness, while improving livestock performance. Effective OSWP placement also minimizes the impacts of livestock use radiating from OSWP, known as the “piosphere.” The objective of this study was to provide land managers with recommendations for the optimum placement of OSWP. Specifically, we aimed to provide minimum offset distances of OSWP to streams and assess the effective range of OSWP using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values, an indicator of live standing crop. NDVI values were determined from a time-series of Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) 20-m images of western South Dakota mixed-grass prairie. The NDVI values in ephemeral stream channels (in-channel) and uplands were extracted from pre- and post-OSWP images taken in 1989 and 2010, respectively. NDVI values were normalized to a reference imagine and subsequently by ecological site to produce nNDVI. Our results demonstrate a significant (P 2 = 0.49, P = 0.05) and increased with average distance to OSWP in a pasture (R2 = 0.43, P = 0.07). Piospheric reduction in nNDVI was observed within 200 m of OSWP, occasionally overlapping in-channel areas. The findings of this study suggest placement of OSWP 200 to 1 250 m from streams to achieve optimal results. These results can be used to increase grazing efficiency by effectively placing OSWP and insure that piospheres do not overlap ecologically important in-channel areas.

  2. Water's Journey from Rain to Stream in perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodhe, Allan; Grip, Harald

    2015-04-01

    The International Hydrological Decade (IHD) 1965-1974, sponsored by UNESCO, initiated a research effort for coordinating the fragmented branches of hydrology and for understanding and quantifying the hydrologic cycle on various scales, from continents to small catchments. One important part of the Swedish IHD-program was to quantify the terms of the water budget, including detailed data on soil water and groundwater storage dynamics, of several medium sized to small. As an outcome of these studies and subsequent process oriented studies, a new view of the runoff process in forested till soils was developed in the 1970's, stressing the dominating role of groundwater in delivering water to the streams and the usefulness of subdividing catchments into recharge and discharge areas for groundwater for understanding the flowpaths of water. This view contrasted with the general view among the public, and also among professionals within the field and in text books, according to which overland flow is the main process for runoff. With this latter view it would, for instance, not be possible to understand stream water chemistry, which had become an important question in a time of growing environmental concern. In order to decrease the time lag between research results and practice, the Swedish Natural Science Research Council initiated a text book project for presenting the recent results of hydrologic research on stream flow generation applied to Swedish conditions, and in 1985 our book "Water's Journey from Rain to Stream" was published. Founded on the basic principles for water storage and flow in soils, the book gives a general picture of the water flow through the forested till landscape, with separate chapters for recharge and discharge areas. Chemical processes along the flowpaths of water are treated and the book concludes with a few applications to current issues. The book is written in Swedish and the target audience is those working professionally with water and

  3. Trout production dynamics and water quality in Minnesota streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kwak, T.J.; Waters, T.F.

    1997-01-01

    We sampled fish assemblages and quantified production dynamics of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis, brown trout Salmo trutta, and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in 13 southeastern Minnesota streams during 1988-1990 to examine the influence of water quality on fish populations in fertile trout streams. Fish assemblages in 15 stream reaches were abundant, but low in diversity; 13 species were collected. Parameter means (ranges) over the reaches were species richness, 4.1 (1-8); density, 29,490 (1,247-110,602) fish/ha; and biomass, 253.5 (49.6-568.6) kg/ha. Means (ranges) for salmonids were annual mean density, 2,279 (343-8,096) fish/ha; annual mean biomass, 162.0 (32.5-355.5) kg/ha; and annual production, 155.6 (36.7-279.6) kg/ha. Salmoid production and mean biomass were greater during the spring-fall interval than during fall-spring; young cohorts (ages 0-1) contributed the greatest proprotion to population biomass and production. Salmonid annual production-to-mean-biomass ratio (P/B??) averaged 1.06 (0.64-1.42), and means were significantly different among species (1.03 for brown trout, 1.54 for brook trout, and 1.92 for rainbow trout). A significant linear model was developed that describes P/B?? as an inverse function of population age structure and may be used to improve accuracy in approximations of annual productions from mean biomass. Fish density, biomass, or production were not correlated with eight water quality variables describing ionic and nutrient content in these streams, but when data from other United States streams with a wide range in alkalinity were incorporated, salmonid production was strongly, positively correlated with alkalinity. The wide range in fish population and production statistics and their lack of correlation with water quality suggest that no uniform fish carrying capacity exists among these streams and that factors other than water fertility limit fish density, biomass and productivity at this spatia scale, but the overall

  4. StreamStats: A Water Resources Web Application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ries, Kernell G.; Guthrie, John G.; Rea, Alan H.; Steeves, Peter A.; Stewart, David W.

    2008-01-01

    Streamflow statistics, such as the 1-percent flood, the mean flow, and the 7-day 10-year low flow, are used by engineers, land managers, biologists, and many others to help guide decisions in their everyday work. For example, estimates of the 1-percent flood (the flow that is exceeded, on average, once in 100 years and has a 1-percent chance of being exceeded in any year, sometimes referred to as the 100-year flood) are used to create flood-plain maps that form the basis for setting insurance rates and land-use zoning. This and other streamflow statistics also are used for dam, bridge, and culvert design; water-supply planning and management; water-use appropriations and permitting; wastewater and industrial discharge permitting; hydropower facility design and regulation; and the setting of minimum required streamflows to protect freshwater ecosystems. In addition, researchers, planners, regulators, and others often need to know the physical and climatic characteristics of the drainage basins (basin characteristics) and the influence of human activities, such as dams and water withdrawals, on streamflow upstream from locations of interest to understand the mechanisms that control water availability and quality at those locations. Knowledge of the streamflow network and downstream human activities also is necessary to adequately determine whether an upstream activity, such as a water withdrawal, can be allowed without adversely affecting downstream activities. Streamflow statistics could be needed at any location along a stream. Most often, streamflow statistics are needed at ungaged sites, where no streamflow data are available to compute the statistics. At U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow data-collection stations, which include streamgaging stations, partial-record stations, and miscellaneous-measurement stations, streamflow statistics can be computed from available data for the stations. Streamflow data are collected continuously at streamgaging stations

  5. Heat, chloride, and specific conductance as ground water tracers near streams.

    PubMed

    Cox, Marisa H; Su, Grace W; Constantz, Jim

    2007-01-01

    Commonly measured water quality parameters were compared to heat as tracers of stream water exchange with ground water. Temperature, specific conductance, and chloride were sampled at various frequencies in the stream and adjacent wells over a 2-year period. Strong seasonal variations in stream water were observed for temperature and specific conductance. In observation wells where the temperature response correlated to stream water, chloride and specific conductance values were similar to stream water values as well, indicating significant stream water exchange with ground water. At sites where ground water temperature fluctuations were negligible, chloride and/or specific conductance values did not correlate to stream water values, indicating that ground water was not significantly influenced by exchange with stream water. Best-fit simulation modeling was performed at two sites to derive temperature-based estimates of hydraulic conductivities of the alluvial sediments between the stream and wells. These estimates were used in solute transport simulations for a comparison of measured and simulated values for chloride and specific conductance. Simulation results showed that hydraulic conductivities vary seasonally and annually. This variability was a result of seasonal changes in temperature-dependent hydraulic conductivity and scouring or clogging of the streambed. Specific conductance fits were good, while chloride data were difficult to fit due to the infrequent (quarterly) stream water chloride measurements during the study period. Combined analyses of temperature, chloride, and specific conductance led to improved quantification of the spatial and temporal variability of stream water exchange with shallow ground water in an alluvial system.

  6. Water quality variables and pollution sources shaping stream macroinvertebrate communities.

    PubMed

    Berger, Elisabeth; Haase, Peter; Kuemmerlen, Mathias; Leps, Moritz; Schäfer, Ralf Bernhard; Sundermann, Andrea

    2017-06-01

    In 2015, over 90 percent of German rivers failed to reach a good ecological status as demanded by the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD). Deficits in water quality, mainly from diffuse pollution such as agricultural run-off, but also from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), have been suggested as important drivers of this decline in ecological quality. We modelled six macroinvertebrate based metrics indicating ecological quality for 184 streams in response to a) PCA-derived water quality gradients, b) individual water quality variables and c) catchment land use and wastewater exposure indices as pollution drivers. The aim was to evaluate the relative importance of key water quality variables and their sources. Indicator substances (i.e. carbamazepine and caffeine indicating wastewater exposure; herbicides indicating agricultural run-off) represented micropollutants in the analyses and successfully related water quality variables to pollution sources. Arable and urban catchment land covers were strongly associated with reduced ecological quality. Electric conductivity, oxygen concentration, caffeine, silicate and toxic units with respect to pesticides were identified as the most significant in-stream predictors in this order. Our results underline the importance to manage diffuse pollution, if ecological quality is to be improved. However, we also found a clear impact of wastewater on ecological quality through caffeine. Thus, improvement of WWTPs, especially preventing the release of poorly treated wastewater, will benefit freshwater communities.

  7. Water recovery from saline streams produced by electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Andrade Becheleni, Emily Mayer; Borba, Ricardo Perobelli; Seckler, Marcelo Martins; Ferreira Rocha, Sônia Denise

    2015-01-01

    Advances in technologies to enable water reuse in industry have been the objective of many research efforts, mainly due to the need to reduce the use of natural resources and due to factors related to their availability. This paper evaluates the crystallization of salts from petrochemical saline waste to achieve zero water discharge by the recovery of water and dissolved salts as a solid mixture. In line with process symbiosis, the recovered water should be suitable for use as cooling water in heat exchangers. Vacuum evaporative crystallization, at the batch scale, was used to remove the salts present in the concentrated stream from reverse electrodialysis of pretreated wastewater by a biological process. The partition of organic compounds in the feed solution between the condensate and the mother liquor was obtained from measurements of the total organic carbon and total nitrogen in the solutions. The solid phases formed experimentally are compared with those predicted by chemical modelling by PHREEQC. The recovered water presented almost 50 times less total dissolved solids than the feed stream (from 2100 to 44 mg/L). Calcium sulphate hydrate, calcium sulphate and sodium chloride were the majority crystalline phases formed, in accordance with the modelling by PHREEQC.

  8. System Regulates the Water Contents of Fuel-Cell Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Arturo; Lazaroff, Scott

    2005-01-01

    An assembly of devices provides for both humidification of the reactant gas streams of a fuel cell and removal of the product water (the water generated by operation of the fuel cell). The assembly includes externally-sensing forward-pressure regulators that supply reactant gases (fuel and oxygen) at variable pressures to ejector reactant pumps. The ejector supply pressures depend on the consumption flows. The ejectors develop differential pressures approximately proportional to the consumption flow rates at constant system pressure and with constant flow restriction between the mixer-outlet and suction ports of the ejectors. For removal of product water from the circulating oxygen stream, the assembly includes a water/gas separator that contains hydrophobic and hydrophilic membranes. The water separator imposes an approximately constant flow restriction, regardless of the quality of the two-phase flow that enters it from the fuel cell. The gas leaving the water separator is nearly 100 percent humid. This gas is returned to the inlet of the fuel cell along with a quantity of dry incoming oxygen, via the oxygen ejector, thereby providing some humidification.

  9. Characterizing changing stream water quality in a glacierized tropical watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, B. G.; Eddy, A. M.; Baraer, M.; McKenzie, J. M.; Walsh, E.; Fernandez, A.; Wigmore, O.; Battista, R.; Guittard, A.

    2013-12-01

    Glacier recession in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru has been causing downstream hydrologic transformations, altering the amount, timing and chemical quality of stream water. Increased demand from multiple water resource users, particularly industrial-scale agricultural irrigation along the desert coast, underscores the need for accurate source attribution and treatment of pollutants. Water quality assessment is challenging given natural geologic controls on water chemistry concentrations, and a lack of consistent historical monitoring. Here we present results from an analytical characterization of spatial and temporal variability in the dissolved loads of major ions, isotopes and select trace metals in the Pacific-draining Santa River and tributaries. Our approach incorporates multi-year synoptic sampling of water chemistry and stream discharge along the river course and at tributary pour points, along with weekly sampling at single point along the upper Santa. Samples were taken predominately during the austral winter months of June, July, and August in 2004 - 2009 and 2011 - 2013 at 20-30 stream localities. Digitized maps of geology, land use and hydrography permit geographic visualization and exploratory GIS-based data analysis. Results indicate that the dominant hydrochemical processes throughout the Santa watershed include silicate weathering, coupled pyrite oxidation with silicate weathering, and to a lesser extent, carbonate weathering. Low pH and high concentrations of sulfate are found in the presence of high-silica granitic and metamorphic surface lithology in some sites proximal to receding glaciers, reflecting an environment that is driven by coupled sulfide-oxidation and silicate dissolution. Numerous sites had elevated concentrations of trace metals (such as As, Cd, and Pb) indicating potential local sources of contamination, some in excess of World Health Organization. Weekly sampling show dilution of certain trace metals during the wet season, and

  10. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen composition, transformation, retention, and transport in naturally phosphate-rich and phosphate-poor tropical streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Triska, F.J.; Pringle, C.M.; Zellweger, G.W.; Duff, J.H.; Avanzino, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    In Costa Rica, the Salto River is enriched by geothermal-based soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), which raises the concentration up to 200 ??g/L whereas Pantano Creek, an unimpacted tributary, has an SRP concentration <10 ??g/L. Ammonium concentration in springs adjacent to the Salto and Pantano was typically greater than channel water (13 of 22 locations) whereas nitrate concentration was less (20 of 22 locations). Ground waters were typically high in ammonium relative to nitrate whereas channel waters were high in nitrate relative to ammonium. Sediment slurry studies indicated nitrification potential in two sediment types, firm clay (3.34 ??g N.cm-3.d-1) and uncompacted organic-rich sediment (1.76 ??g N.cm-3.d-1). Ammonium and nitrate amendments to each stream separately resulted in nitrate concentrations in excess of that expected after correlation for dilution using a conservative tracer. SRP concentration was not affected by DIN amendment to either stream. SRP concentration in the Pantano appeared to be regulated by abiotic sediment exchange reactions. DIN composition and concentration were regulated by a combination of biotic and abiotic processes. -from Authors

  11. Removal of Dental Biofilms with an Ultrasonically Activated Water Stream.

    PubMed

    Howlin, R P; Fabbri, S; Offin, D G; Symonds, N; Kiang, K S; Knee, R J; Yoganantham, D C; Webb, J S; Birkin, P R; Leighton, T G; Stoodley, P

    2015-09-01

    Acidogenic bacteria within dental plaque biofilms are the causative agents of caries. Consequently, maintenance of a healthy oral environment with efficient biofilm removal strategies is important to limit caries, as well as halt progression to gingivitis and periodontitis. Recently, a novel cleaning device has been described using an ultrasonically activated stream (UAS) to generate a cavitation cloud of bubbles in a freely flowing water stream that has demonstrated the capacity to be effective at biofilm removal. In this study, UAS was evaluated for its ability to remove biofilms of the cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans UA159, as well as Actinomyces naeslundii ATCC 12104 and Streptococcus oralis ATCC 9811, grown on machine-etched glass slides to generate a reproducible complex surface and artificial teeth from a typodont training model. Biofilm removal was assessed both visually and microscopically using high-speed videography, confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Analysis by CSLM demonstrated a statistically significant 99.9% removal of S. mutans biofilms exposed to the UAS for 10 s, relative to both untreated control biofilms and biofilms exposed to the water stream alone without ultrasonic activation (P < 0.05). The water stream alone showed no statistically significant difference in removal compared with the untreated control (P = 0.24). High-speed videography demonstrated a rapid rate (151 mm(2) in 1 s) of biofilm removal. The UAS was also highly effective at S. mutans, A. naeslundii, and S. oralis biofilm removal from machine-etched glass and S. mutans from typodont surfaces with complex topography. Consequently, UAS technology represents a potentially effective method for biofilm removal and improved oral hygiene.

  12. Hydrological, water-quality, and ecological data for streams in Independence, Missouri, June 2005 through September 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niesen, Shelley L.; Christensen, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Water-quality, hydrological, and ecological data collected from June 2005 through September 2013 from the Little Blue River and smaller streams within the City of Independence, Missouri, are presented in this report. These data were collected as a part of an ongoing cooperative study between the U.S. Geological Survey and the City of Independence Water Pollution Control Department to characterize the water quality and ecological condition of Independence streams. The quantities, sources of selected constituents, and processes affecting water quality and aquatic life were evaluated to determine the resulting ecological condition of streams within Independence. Data collected for this study fulfill the municipal separate sewer system permit requirements for the City of Independence and can be used to provide a baseline with which city managers can determine the effectiveness of current (2014) and future best management practices within Independence. Continuous streamflow and water-quality data, collected during base flow and stormflow, included physical and chemical properties, inorganic constituents, common organic micro-constituents, pesticides in streambed sediment and surface water, fecal indicator bacteria and microbial source tracking data, and suspended sediment. Dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductance, water temperature, and turbidity data were measured continuously at seven sites within Independence. Base-flow and stormflow samples were collected at eight gaged and two ungaged sites. Fecal sources samples were collected for reference for microbial source tracking, and sewage influent samples were collected as additional source samples. Dry-weather screening was done on 11 basins within Independence to identify potential contaminant sources to the streams. Benthic macroinvertebrate community surveys and habitat assessments were done on 10 stream sites and 2 comparison sites outside the city. Sampling and laboratory procedures and quality-assurance and

  13. Water temperatures of California streams, San Francisco Bay subregion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blodgett, J.C.

    1971-01-01

    A summary of water-temperature records is presented for data collected through September 1968 in the San Francisco Bay Subregion of California. This report is one of a series covering the 11 hydrologic subregions of the State and includes data for 87 stream sites. Water temperatures, in degrees Celsius, are summarized by months, years, and for the period of record. A description is included to identify each station where data were collected. A tolerance interval analysis indicated that 99 percent of the point water-temperature observations, determined either with thermograph probes or hand-held thermometers, should be ±0.6°C of the mean water temperature at the 95-percent confidence level. The probable total error ranges from ±0.8°C for periodic data to ±1.4°C for thermograph data.

  14. Lithogenic vs Biogenic Stream Water Chemistry: Following the Solute Flush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, D. J.; Anderson, S.; Bullen, T.; Fitzpatrick, J.; Schulz, M.; Vivit, D.; White, A.

    2005-12-01

    Mediterranean hydrologic systems are driven by strong intra-annual variation in precipitation. Summer drought is followed by a pronounced solute flush at the beginning of the wet season. Solutes accumulate near the soil surface during dry periods via evapoconcentration and dry deposition. In a set of nested watersheds draining the Santa Cruz, California marine terraces, a differentiation between shallow soil water with biogenic solutes (enriched via evapotranspiration and biologic nutrient cycling) and deep soil water with lithogenic solutes (imprinted by chemical weathering) allows interpretation of flow pathways to the stream. The shallow soil waters are more concentrated than deep soil waters at the beginning of the wet season. Stream chemistry is a mixture of lithogenic deep soil water and biogenic shallow soil water; we expect the lithogenic component to increase downstream. However, the composition of the water along a downstream transect shows no clear shift to lithogenic compositions downstream, especially in the early wet season. The lithogenic water influence may be minimal as most flow paths are lateral across a thick argillic horizon and rarely encounter lithogenic zones. However, the continued influence of biogenic solutes seems to result from movement of evapoconcentrated water through the flow system. Simultaneous collection of groundwater and soil water along the transect shows the slow movement of flushed solutes through the system. Soil waters generally are most concentrated during the first precipitation events and become increasingly diluted throughout the remainder of the wet season. Immediately following the flushing of shallow soils, a concentration peak is observed in perched groundwater near the drainage divide. A similar peak appears in perched groundwater sequentially downstream, finally appearing in groundwater near the base of the catchment after several months. This pattern of flushed solutes in perched groundwaters may result from the

  15. SPECIATION AND PRESERVATION OF INORGANIC ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER SUPPLIES WITH IC-ICP-MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The speciation of inorganic arsenic in drinking water supplies is an essential part of devising an appropriate treatment process. Arsenate, because of its anion characteristics at drinking water pHs, is effectively removed by anion exchange treatment while arsenite remains in the...

  16. Connectivity of Streams and Wetlands to Downstream Waters ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Protection Agency – through the independent Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) - is soliciting public comment on a new draft science report titled: Connectivity of Streams and Wetlands to Downstream Waters. A public docket has been opened to receive comments and those comments received by November 6, 2013, will be provided to the SAB Panel for its consideration in advance of their December 16- 18, 2013 meeting. Comments received after November 6, 2013, will be marked late and cannot be guaranteed to be provided to the Panel in advance of their meeting. This draft science report presents a review and synthesis of relevant peer reviewed scientific literature that will inform an upcoming joint USEPA/ Army Corps of Engineers rulemaking to enhance protection of the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of our nation’s waters by clarifying Clean Water Act (CWA) jurisdiction. Recent decisions of the Supreme Court have underscored the need for EPA and the public to better understand the connectivity or isolation of streams and wetlands relative to larger water bodies such as rivers, lakes, estuaries, and oceans, and to use that understanding to underpin regulatory actions and increase certainty among various CWA stakeholders. This report, when finalized, will provide the scientific basis needed to clarify CWA jurisdiction, including a description of the factors that influence connectivity and the mechanisms by which connecte

  17. Assessment of water quality in streams draining coal-producing areas in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pfaff, C.L.; Helsel, D.R.; Johnson, D.P.; Angelo, C.G.

    1981-01-01

    Quality of water in 150 sites in the coal-producing areas of eastern Ohio was studied in a two-phase investigation between May 1975 and August 1976. Results of phase one, a reconnaissance to determine the occurrence of certain inorganic and organic constituents and to relate their occurrence to coal mining, indicated that acid mine drainage generally occurred where abandoned drift or abandoned strip mines were located. Streams affected by such mines contained concentrations of dissolved sulfate and iron greater than 250 milligrams per liter and 5,000 micrograms per liter, respectively, and exhibited pH values less than 4.5. Areas characterized by reclaimed or active strip mines showed few instances of acid drainage (pH values were generally greater than 7.0). Iron concentrations in these regions generally were less than 500 micrograms per liter, with dissolved-sulfate concentrations ranging from 22 to 7,100 milligrams per liter.Phase two was a detailed study of four small basins sampled during the first phase and found to represent different types of mining. The objective was to determine whether water-quality degradation within the basins was due to coal mining. Flows from two basins, one containing abandoned drift mines and the other abandoned strip mines, became increasingly acidic (pH values less than 4.5) downstream, and had high iron and dissolved sulfate concentrations (above 5,000 micrograms per liter and 250 milligrams per liter, respectively). Sources of acidity were tributaries that drained directly from the mines. The other two basins, one containing reclaimed strip mines and the other active strip mines, exhibited no acidic drainage; streams in both basins had pH values greater than 7.0 and iron concentrations below 500 micrograms per liter. Presence of active surface mining seemed to have little effect on dissolved sulfate concentrations, as only streams in the reclaimed basin had high concentrations (usually over 2,000 milligrams per liter).

  18. Effects of Land Use on Stable Carbon Isotopic Composition and Concentration of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (DIC) in Southeastern US Piedmont Headwater Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable carbon isotopic composition (delta 13C) and concentrations of DOC and DIC were measured in stream water samples collected monthly in 15 headwater streams from an area with extensive poultry and cattle production and a rapidly growing human population. Linear regression te...

  19. Temporal dynamics of groundwater-dissolved inorganic carbon beneath a drought-affected braided stream: Platte River case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, Audrey R.; Gates, John B.

    2015-05-01

    Impacts of environmental changes on groundwater carbon cycling are poorly understood despite their potentially high relevance to terrestrial carbon budgets. This study focuses on streambed groundwater chemistry during a period of drought-induced river drying and consequent disconnection between surface water and groundwater. Shallow groundwater underlying vegetated and bare portions of a braided streambed in the Platte River (Nebraska, USA) was monitored during drought conditions in summer 2012. Water temperature and dissolved inorganic carbon (dominated by HCO3-) in streambed groundwater were correlated over a 3 month period coinciding with a decline in river discharge from 35 to 0 m3 s-1. Physical, chemical, and isotopic parameters were monitored to investigate mechanisms affecting the HCO3- trend. Equilibrium thermodynamic modeling suggests that an increase of pCO2 near the water table, coupled with carbonate mineral weathering, can explain the trend. Stronger temporal trends in Ca2+ and Mg2+ compared to Cl- are consistent with carbonate mineral reequilibria rather than evaporative concentration as the primary mechanism of the increased HCO3-. Stable isotope trends are not apparent, providing further evidence of thermodynamic controls rather than evaporation from the water table. A combination of increased temperature and O2 in the dewatered portion of the streambed is the most likely driver of increased pCO2 near the water table. Results of this study highlight potential linkages between surface environmental changes and groundwater chemistry and underscore the need for high-resolution chemical monitoring of alluvial groundwater in order to identify environmental change impacts.

  20. Integrating seasonal information on nutrients and benthic algal biomass into stream water quality monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, Christopher P.; Munn, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Benthic chlorophyll a (BChl a) and environmental factors that influence algal biomass were measured monthly from February through October in 22 streams from three agricultural regions of the United States. At-site maximum BChl a ranged from 14 to 406 mg/m2 and generally varied with dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN): 8 out of 9 sites with at-site median DIN >0.5 mg/L had maximum BChl a >100 mg/m2. BChl aaccrued and persisted at levels within 50% of at-site maximum for only one to three months. No dominant seasonal pattern for algal biomass accrual was observed in any region. A linear model with DIN, water surface gradient, and velocity accounted for most of the cross-site variation in maximum chlorophyll a(adjusted R2 = 0.7), but was no better than a single value of DIN = 0.5 mg/L for distinguishing between low and high-biomass sites. Studies of nutrient enrichment require multiple samples to estimate algal biomass with sufficient precision given the magnitude of temporal variability of algal biomass. An effective strategy for regional stream assessment of nutrient enrichment could be based on a relation between maximum BChl a and DIN based on repeat sampling at sites selected to represent a gradient in nutrients and application of the relation to a larger number of sites with synoptic nutrient information.

  1. Patterns of spatial autocorrelation in stream water chemistry.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Erin E; Merton, Andrew A; Theobald, David M; Urquhart, N Scott

    2006-10-01

    Geostatistical models are typically based on symmetric straight-line distance, which fails to represent the spatial configuration, connectivity, directionality, and relative position of sites in a stream network. Freshwater ecologists have explored spatial patterns in stream networks using hydrologic distance measures and new geostatistical methodologies have recently been developed that enable directional hydrologic distance measures to be considered. The purpose of this study was to quantify patterns of spatial correlation in stream water chemistry using three distance measures: straight-line distance, symmetric hydrologic distance, and weighted asymmetric hydrologic distance. We used a dataset collected in Maryland, USA to develop both general linear models and geostatistical models (based on the three distance measures) for acid neutralizing capacity, conductivity, pH, nitrate, sulfate, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and dissolved organic carbon. The spatial AICC methodology allowed us to fit the autocorrelation and covariate parameters simultaneously and to select the model with the most support in the data. We used the universal kriging algorithm to generate geostatistical model predictions. We found that spatial correlation exists in stream chemistry data at a relatively coarse scale and that geostatistical models consistently improved the accuracy of model predictions. More than one distance measure performed well for most chemical response variables, but straight-line distance appears to be the most suitable distance measure for regional geostatistical modeling. It may be necessary to develop new survey designs that more fully capture spatial correlation at a variety of scales to improve the use of weighted asymmetric hydrologic distance measures in regional geostatistical models.

  2. Organic and Inorganic Species in CBM Produced Water: Implications for Water Management Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharaka, Y. K.; Rice, C. A.

    2003-12-01

    Coal-bed methane (CBM) wells currently produce close to one billion bbl of water annually and deliver about 8% of total natural gas in the USA. The salinity of this produced water generally is lower than that of water from conventional petroleum wells; salinity commonly is 1,000-20,000 mg/L, but ranges from 200 to 150,000 mg/L TDS. Most CBM wells produce Na-HCO3-Cl type water that is low in trace metals and has no reported NORMs. This water generally has no oil and grease and has relatively low (2-10 mg/L) dissolved organic carbon (DOC), but its organic composition has not been characterized in detail. The water is disposed of by injection into saline aquifers, through evaporation and/or percolation in disposal pits, road spreading, and surface discharge. Water that has low (<1,000 mg/L TDS) salinity and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) is considered acceptable for irrigation, surface discharge and for injection into freshwater aquifers. Because groundwater associated with coal, especially with lignite and subbituminous coal, is known to contain a variety of toxic or potentially toxic organics, including hydroxyphenols and PAHs, the organic and inorganic compositions of CBM waters should be systematically characterized and their potential for harm to human health, crops and the environment carefully evaluated prior to its addition to existing water supplies. As an alternative to costly disposal, lower salinity produced water from high-yield CBM wells is being considered for reclamation. The treated water would be a valuable new water resource, especially in the arid western USA. The feasibility and cost of reclaiming produced water to meet irrigation, industrial and drinking water standards was evaluated in a 10 gpm pilot field study. The estimated treatment cost was high at about 0.39/bbl (3,000/acre-ft) for potable water, but would be substantially lower and competitive for irrigation and industrial uses in some arid regions of the USA.

  3. Increasing the water temperature of a 2nd order stream reach: Hydraulic aspects of a whole-stream manipulative experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, João L. M. P.; Canhoto, Cristina

    2015-04-01

    What will happen when water temperatures of streams increases, due to climate changes or in connection with rapidly changing human systems? Trying to answer to this question a whole-stream manipulative experiment was undertaken, where an increase in water temperature was artificially induced on a 2nd order stream reach. The main objective of this poster is to describe this experiment focusing on the design of the hydraulic system. The system maintained a steady flow while allowing natural variation in abiotic factors and was successfully used to evaluate the effects of warming on a stream ecosystem at several levels of biological organization. A constant flow of stream water was controlled by a hydraulic setup (~22m long; ~1.5m width) subdivided into two independent channels. One channel of the study reach received heated water (~3°C above the other), while the other received water at stream ambient temperature. The warming system maintained a steady gravity controlled flow making use of weirs and valves.

  4. Water and Streambed Sediment Quality, and Ecotoxicology of a Stream along the Blue Ridge Parkway, Adjacent to a Closed Landfill, near Roanoke, Virginia: 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebner, Donna Belval; Cherry, Donald S.; Currie, Rebecca J.

    2004-01-01

    A study was done of the effects of a closed landfill on the quality of water and streambed sediment and the benthic macroinvertebrate community of an unnamed stream and its tributary that flow through Blue Ridge Parkway lands in west-central Virginia. The primary water source for the tributary is a 4-inch polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe that protrudes from the slope at the base of the embankment bordering the landfill. An unusual expanse of precipitate was observed in the stream near the PVC pipe. Stream discharge was measured and water and streambed sediment samples were collected at a nearby reference site and at three sites downstream of the landfill in April and September 1999. Water samples were analyzed for major ions, nitrate, total and dissolved metals, total dissolved solids, total organic carbon, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, including organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Streambed sediment samples were analyzed for total metals, total organic carbon, percent moisture, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, including organochlorine pesticides and PCBs. The benthic macroinvertebrate community within the stream channel also was sampled at the four chemical sampling sites and at one additional site in April and September. Each of the five sites was assessed for physical habitat quality. Water collected periodically at the PVC pipe discharge between November 1998 and November 1999 was used to conduct 48-hour acute and 7-day chronic toxicity tests using selected laboratory test organisms. Two 10-day chronic toxicity tests of streambed sediments collected near the discharge pipe also were conducted. Analyses showed that organic and inorganic constituents in water from beneath the landfill were discharged into the sampled tributary. In April, 79 percent of inorganic constituents detected in water had their highest concentrations at the site closest to the landfill; at the same site, 59 percent of inorganic

  5. Fish assemblage responses to water withdrawals and water supply reservoirs in Piedmont streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, Mary C.; Marcinek, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding effects of flow alteration on stream biota is essential to developing ecologically sustainable water supply strategies. We evaluated effects of altering flows via surface water withdrawals and instream reservoirs on stream fish assemblages, and compared effects with other hypothesized drivers of species richness and assemblage composition. We sampled fishes during three years in 28 streams used for municipal water supply in the Piedmont region of Georgia, U.S.A. Study sites had permitted average withdrawal rates that ranged from 13 times the stream?s seven-day, ten-year recurrence low flow (7Q10), and were located directly downstream either from a water supply reservoir or from a withdrawal taken from an unimpounded stream. Ordination analysis of catch data showed a shift in assemblage composition at reservoir sites corresponding to dominance by habitat generalist species. Richness of fluvial specialists averaged about 3 fewer species downstream from reservoirs, and also declined as permitted withdrawal rate increased above about 0.5 to one 7Q10-equivalent of water. Reservoir presence and withdrawal rate, along with drainage area, accounted for 70% of the among-site variance in fluvial specialist richness and were better predictor variables than percent of the catchment in urban land use or average streambed sediment size. Increasing withdrawal rate also increased the odds that a site?s Index of Biotic Integrity score fell below a regulatory threshold indicating biological impairment. Estimates of reservoir and withdrawal effects on stream biota could be used in predictive landscape models to support adaptive water supply planning intended to meet societal needs while conserving biological resources.

  6. A Study on Behavior of Inorganic Impurities in Water-tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumazawa, Takao; Nakagawa, Wataru; Tsurumaru, Hidekazu

    It is well known that water-tree propagation in XLPE cable is significantly influenced by inorganic impurities in water. Therefore, we investigated both changes in concentration and deviation of isotopic content of inorganic elements in XLPE samples by water-tree experiments under clean environment. The concentration of several kinds of elements, e.g., Li, Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Fe, Ni, Pb and Bi, in water-treed sample showed anomalous increase or decrease dependent on cation (K+, Na+ or Ag+) in water solution compared with blank or original sample. Furthermore, the isotopic content of Zn deviated over 6% from natural abundance. These results suggest that water-tree propagation is concerned with unknown physical or electro-chemical reactions.

  7. Testing a community water supply well located near a stream for susceptibility to stream contamination and low-flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart-Maddox, N. S.; Tysor, E. H.; Swanson, J.; Degon, A.; Howard, J.; Tsinnajinnie, L.; Frisbee, M. D.; Wilson, J. L.; Newman, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    A community well is the primary water supply to the town of El Rito. This small rural town in is located in a semi-arid, mountainous portion of northern New Mexico where water is scarce. The well is 72 meters from a nearby intermittent stream. Initial tritium sampling suggests a groundwater connection between the stream and well. The community is concerned with the sustainability and future quality of the well water. If this well is as tightly connected to the stream as the tritium data suggests, then the well is potentially at risk due to upstream contamination and the impacts of extended drought. To examine this, we observed the well over a two-week period performing pump and recovery tests, electrical resistivity surveys, and physical observations of the nearby stream. We also collected general chemistry, stable isotope and radon samples from the well and stream. Despite the large well diameter, our pump test data exhibited behavior similar to a Theis curve, but the rate of drawdown decreased below the Theis curve late in the test. This decrease suggests that the aquifer is being recharged, possibly through delayed yield, upwelling of groundwater, or from the stream. The delayed yield hypothesis is supported by our electrical resistivity surveys, which shows very little change in the saturated zone over the course of the pump test, and by low values of pump-test estimated aquifer storativity. Observations of the nearby stream showed no change in stream-water level throughout the pump test. Together this data suggests that the interaction between the stream and the well is low, but recharge could be occurring through other mechanisms such as delayed yield. Additional pump tests of longer duration are required to determine the exact nature of the aquifer and its communication with the well.

  8. Horses, Cows, and Water Quality: Prioritizing Stream Restoration Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, R. A.; Ambers, R. K.

    2002-05-01

    In order to prioritize sites for a stream restoration project, water quality testing is being done in two small, partly forested watersheds on the Sweet Briar College campus east of the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia. The 1.3 km2 watershed of Dairy Creek contains a former dairy operation (now hayfields) and athletic fields. The 0.7 km2 watershed of Fern Creek contains an actively used horse pasture, riding, and stable area. The goals of this study are: (1) to determine which stream would benefit more from establishing or improving a forested riparian buffer zone and (2) to collect baseline water quality data which can be used in future years to monitor the effectiveness of the restoration project and other land management practices. Ten sites along the main stems and tributary streams in the two watersheds were chosen for water quality measurements. When water samples are collected, discharge is also determined at each site by dilution gauging using a conductivity logger. Water samples are tested in the lab for pH, turbidity, nitrate-nitrogen, orthophosphate, total phosphate, and fecal and total coloform bacteria. Total and orthophosphate and pH show no systematic downstream variation or difference between the two watersheds. In contrast, nitrate increases downstream and is positively correlated with conductivity and the upstream area of non-forested land. Nitrate concentrations in the Dairy Creek watershed are significantly higher than in the Fern Creek watershed. Fecal and total coloform counts also tend to be higher in Dairy than in Fern Creek, but the numbers vary widely. Although discharge increases downstream in a predictable way, it does not correlate well with any of the measured constituents. Despite the fact that the riding center is functioning but the dairy operation is not, these preliminary data suggest that water quality in the Dairy Creek system is poorer than in Fern Creek. Further investigation is needed to identify non-point sources of nutrient

  9. Gas stream purifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adam, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    A gas stream purifier has been developed that is capable of removing corrosive acid, base, solvent, organic, inorganic, and water vapors as well as particulates from an inert mixed gas stream using only solid scrubbing agents. This small, lightweight purifier has demonstrated the ability to remove contaminants from an inert gas stream with a greater than 99 percent removal efficiency. The Gas Stream Purifier has outstanding market and sales potential in manufacturing, laboratory and science industries, medical, automotive, or any commercial industry where pollution, contamination, or gas stream purification is a concern. The purifier was developed under NASA contract NAS9-18200 Schedule A for use in the international Space Station. A patent application for the Gas Stream Purifier is currently on file with the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

  10. Diagnostic tools for mixing models of stream water chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooper, R.P.

    2003-01-01

    Mixing models provide a useful null hypothesis against which to evaluate processes controlling stream water chemical data. Because conservative mixing of end-members with constant concentration is a linear process, a number of simple mathematical and multivariate statistical methods can be applied to this problem. Although mixing models have been most typically used in the context of mixing soil and groundwater end-members, an extension of the mathematics of mixing models is presented that assesses the "fit" of a multivariate data set to a lower dimensional mixing subspace without the need for explicitly identified end-members. Diagnostic tools are developed to determine the approximate rank of the data set and to assess lack of fit of the data. This permits identification of processes that violate the assumptions of the mixing model and can suggest the dominant processes controlling stream water chemical variation. These same diagnostic tools can be used to assess the fit of the chemistry of one site into the mixing subspace of a different site, thereby permitting an assessment of the consistency of controlling end-members across sites. This technique is applied to a number of sites at the Panola Mountain Research Watershed located near Atlanta, Georgia.

  11. Modeling the Thermodynamics of Mixed Organic-Inorganic Aerosols to Predict Water Activities and Phase Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B.; Peter, T.

    2008-12-01

    Tropospheric aerosol particles contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. Interactions between these substances in liquid mixtures lead to discrepancies from ideal thermodynamic behavior. While the thermodynamics of aqueous inorganic systems at atmospheric temperatures are well established, little is known about the physicochemistry of mixed organic-inorganic particles. Salting-out and salting-in effects result from organic-inorganic interactions and are used to improve industrial separation processes. In the atmosphere, they may influence the aerosol phases. Liquid-liquid phase separations into a mainly polar (aqueous) and a less polar organic phase may considerably influence the gas/particle partitioning of semi-volatile substances compared to a single phase estimation. Moreover, the phases present in the aerosol define the reaction medium for heterogeneous and multiphase chemistry occurring in aerosol particles. A correct description of these phases is needed when gas- or cloud-phase reaction schemes are adapted to aerosols. Non-ideal thermodynamic behavior in mixtures is usually described by an expression for the excess Gibbs energy. We present the group-contribution model AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients), which explicitly accounts for molecular interactions between solution constituents, both organic and inorganic, to calculate activities, chemical potentials and the total Gibbs energy of mixed systems. This model allows to compute vapor-liquid (VLE), liquid-liquid (LLE) and solid-liquid (SLE) equilibria within one framework. Focusing on atmospheric applications we considered eight different cations, five anions and a wide range of alcohols/polyols as organic compounds. With AIOMFAC, the activities of the components within an aqueous electrolyte solution are very well represented up to high ionic strength. We show that the semiempirical middle

  12. Modelling inorganic biocide emission from treated wood in water.

    PubMed

    Tiruta-Barna, Ligia; Schiopu, Nicoleta

    2011-09-15

    The objective of this work is to develop a chemical model for explaining the leaching behaviour of inorganic biocides from treated wood. The standard leaching test XP CEN/TS14429 was applied to a commercial construction material made of treated Pinus sylvestris (Copper Boron Azole preservative). The experimental results were used for developing a chemical model under PHREEQC(®) (a geochemical software, with LLNL, MINTEQ data bases) by considering the released species detected in the eluates: main biocides Cu and B, other trace biocides (Cr and Zn), other elements like Ca, K, Cl, SO(4)(-2), dissolved organic matter (DOC). The model is based on chemical phenomena at liquid/solid interfaces (complexation, ion exchange and hydrolysis) and is satisfactory for the leaching behaviour representation. The simulation results confronted with the experiments confirmed the hypotheses of: (1) biocide fixation by surface complexation reactions with wood specific sites (carboxyl and phenol for Cu, Zn, Cr(III), aliphatic hydroxyl for B, ion exchange to a lesser extent) and (2) biocide mobilisation by extractives (DOC) coming from the wood. The maximum of Cu, Cr(III) and Zn fixation occurred at neutral pH (including the natural pH of wood), while B fixation was favoured at alkaline pH.

  13. Effect of boiling regime on melt stream breakup in water

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.W.; Gabor, J.D.; Cassulo, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been performed examining the breakup and mixing behavior of an initially coherent stream of high-density melt as it flows downward through water. This work has application to the quenching of molten core materials as they drain downward during a postulated severe reactor accident. The study has included examination of various models of breakup distances based upon interfacial instabilities dominated either by liquid-liquid contact or by liquid-vapor contact. A series of experiments was performed to provide a data base for assessment of the various modeling approaches. The experiments involved Wood's metal (T/sub m/ = 73/sup 0/C, rho = 9.2 g/cm/sup 3/, d/sub j/ = 20 mm) poured into a deep pool of water. The temperature of the water and wood's metal were varied to span the range from single-phase, liquid-liquid contact to the film boiling regime. Experiment results showed that breakup occurred largely as a result of the spreading and entrainment from the leading edge of the jet. However, for streams of sufficient lengths a breakup length could be discerned at which there was no longer a coherent central core of the jet to feed the leading edge region. The erosion of the vertical trailing column is by Kelvin-Helmoltz instabilities and related disengagement of droplets from the jet into the surrounding fluid. For conditions of liquid-liquid contact, the breakup length has been found to be about 20 jet diameters; when substantial vapor is produced at the interface due to heat transfer from the jet to the water, the breakup distance was found to range to as high as 50 jet diameters. The former values are close to the analytical prediction of Taylor, whereas the latter values are better predicted by the model of Epstein and Fauske.

  14. UTILITY OF SYNTHETIC ZEOLITES IN REMOVAL OF INORGANIC AND ORGANIC WATER POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange and adsorption properties. Different inorganic and organic pollutants have been removed from water at room temperature using various zeolites. Synthetic zeolites like ZSM-5, Ferrierite, Beta and Faujasite Y have been used to remove i...

  15. Modifying Polymer Flocculants for the Removal of Inorganic Phophate from Water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to strong hydrogen bonding interactions, thiourea has been shown to have a high affinity for anions such as inorganic phosphate. The interaction between phosphate and thiourea has been used to develop technologies that can detect and even remove phosphate from water. This research investigates t...

  16. Monitored Natural Attenuation of Inorganic Contaminants in Ground Water Volume 1 – Technical Basis for Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document represents the first volume of a set of three volumes that address the technical basis and requirements for assessing the potential applicability of MNA as part of a ground-water remedy for plumes with non-radionuclide and/or radionuclide inorganic contaminants. Vo...

  17. WORKSHOP ON MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Office of Research and Development (ORD) has developed a one-day seminar to present an overview of site characterization approaches to support evaluation of the potential for Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as a remedy for inorganic contaminants in ground water. These sem...

  18. Heat, chloride, and specific conductance as ground water tracers near streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, M.H.; Su, G.W.; Constantz, J.

    2007-01-01

    Commonly measured water quality parameters were compared to heat as tracers of stream water exchange with ground water. Temperature, specific conductance, and chloride were sampled at various frequencies in the stream and adjacent wells over a 2-year period. Strong seasonal variations in stream water were observed for temperature and specific conductance. In observation wells where the temperature response correlated to stream water, chloride and specific conductance values were similar to stream water values as well, indicating significant stream water exchange with ground water. At sites where ground water temperature fluctuations were negligible, chloride and/or specific conductance values did not correlate to stream water values, indicating that ground water was not significantly influenced by exchange with stream water. Best-fit simulation modeling was performed at two sites to derive temperature-based estimates of hydraulic conductivities of the alluvial sediments between the stream and wells. These estimates were used in solute transport simulations for a comparison of measured and simulated values for chloride and specific conductance. Simulation results showed that hydraulic conductivities vary seasonally and annually. This variability was a result of seasonal changes in temperature-dependent hydraulic conductivity and scouring or clogging of the streambed. Specific conductance fits were good, while chloride data were difficult to fit due to the infrequent (quarterly) stream water chloride measurements during the study period. Combined analyses of temperature, chloride, and specific conductance led to improved quantification of the spatial and temporal variability of stream water exchange with shallow ground water in an alluvial system. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  19. Large-scale penetration of Gulf Stream water onto the continental shelf north of Cape Hatteras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawarkiewicz, Glen; Church, Thomas M.; Luther, George W., III; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Caruso, Michael

    1992-01-01

    The presence of Gulf Stream water on the continental shelf as much as 60 km north of Cape Hatteras was observed during a hydrographic cruise in the summer of 1990. Gulf Stream water was concentrated at mid-depth between 10 and 30 m and penetrated the shelfbreak front which normally separates the shelf water from slope water and Gulf Stream water. Velocities of Gulf Stream water in the upper 110 m of the water column along the 1000 m isobath indicated a flow of 18 to 25 cm/s directed towards the northwest. Gulf Stream water on the shelf is considered to be associated with low values of fluorescence, transmissivity, and nutrient concentrations relative to adjacent shelf water.

  20. Interfacial water thickness at inorganic nanoconstructs and biomolecules: Size matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardellini, Annalisa; Fasano, Matteo; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Asinari, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    Water molecules in the proximity of solid nanostructures influence both the overall properties of liquid and the structure and functionality of solid particles. The study of water dynamics at solid-liquid interfaces has strong implications in energy, environmental and biomedical fields. This article focuses on the hydration layer properties in the proximity of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and biomolecules (proteins, polypeptides and amino acids). Here we show a quantitative relation between the solid surface extension and the characteristic length of water nanolayer (δ), which is confined at solid-liquid interfaces. Specifically, the size dependence is attributed to the limited superposition of nonbonded interactions in case of small molecules. These results may facilitate the design of novel energy or biomedical colloidal nanosuspensions, and a more fundamental understanding of biomolecular processes influenced by nanoscale water dynamics.

  1. The effects of liming an Adirondack lake watershed on downstream water chemistry: Effects of liming on stream chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.

    1996-01-01

    Calcite treatment of chronically acidic lakes has improved fish habitat, but the effects on downstream water quality have not previously been examined. In this study, the spatial and temporal effects of watershed CaCO3 treatment on the chemistry of a lake outlet stream in the Adirondack Mountains of New York were examined. Before CaCO3 treatment, the stream was chronically acidic. During spring snowmelt before treatment, pH and acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) in the outlet stream declined, and NO3- and inorganic monomeric aluminum (AlIM) concentrations increased sharply. During that summer, SO42- and NO3- concentrations decreased downstream, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and ANC increased, in association with the seasonal increase in decomposition of organic matter and the attendant SO42--reduction process. A charge-balance ANC calculation closely matched measured downstream changes in ANC in the summer and indicated that SO42- reduction was the major process contributing to summer increases in ANC. Increases in Ca2+ concentration and ANC began immediately after CaCO3 application, and within 3 months, exceeded their pretreatment values by more than 130 ??eq/L. Within 2 months after treatment, downstream decreases in Ca2+ concentration, ANC, and pH, were noted. Stream mass balances between the lake and the sampling site 1.5 km downstream revealed that the transport of all chemical constituents was dominated by conservative mixing with tributaries and ground water; however, non-conservative processes resulted in significant Ca2+ losses during the 13-month period after CaCO3 treatment. Comparison of substrate samples from the buffered outlet stream with those from its untreated tributaries showed that the percentage of cation-exchange sites occupied by Ca2+, as well as non-exchangeable Ca, were higher in the outlet-stream substrate than in tributary-stream substrate. Mass-balance data for Ca2+, H+, AlIM, and DOC revealed net downstream losses of

  2. Long-term fluctuations in water chemistry for streams located in different physiographic provinces of Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Donahoe, R.J. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The compositional variation of stream water in nine different watersheds has been the subject of a three year study. Three of the nine streams are underlain by sandstone and are located in the Plateau physiographic province of Alabama, three watersheds have phyllite bedrock and are located in the AL Piedmont, and three streams draining carbonate units are located in the Valley and Ridge structural province of AL. These streams all have very similar climatic conditions, and were selected to provide three replicate data sets for streams closely matched in structural setting and bedrock type and to allow comparison between streams in the three different structural settings and bedrock types. Between 24-36 monthly stream water samples were collected for each watershed over the study period and analyzed for cations, anions, pH, and alkalinity. All streams show seasonal variations in major cation and anion concentrations. In general, major cation concentration minima occurred in Winter 1989-90 and late Spring/early Summer 1991 for all streams. This suggests dilution/evaporation as dominant controls on stream water major element chemistry. Comparison of chemical trends with precipitation records and stream stage data is underway to test this hypothesis. Great variation in stream water anion concentration occurs within the large-scale seasonal trends for all streams. These variations are primarily the result of biologic activity. Differences in major element concentration trends exist between streams within a particular bedrock type. Element speciation and mineral saturation indices were calculated using the computerized chemical equilibrium code WATEQ4F. Plots of mineral saturation indices with season show that all stream waters are essentially saturated with quartz, undersaturated with primary silicate minerals, and supersaturated with most clay minerals and ferric iron oxides. Further, carbonate streams are undersaturated with calcite and dolomite.

  3. Biogeochemical characteristics of a polluted urban stream (Anacostia River, Washington DC, USA): inorganic minerals, nutrients and allochthonous vs. autochthonous production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarraino, S.; Frantz, D.; Bushaw-Newton, K.; MacAvoy, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Anacostia River in Washington, D.C. is among the 10 most contaminated rivers in the USA, containing sewage, metals, PAHs, and PCBs. The biogeochemical characteristics of tidal freshwater urban rivers, including the Anacostia, remain largely unstudied. This study examined base-flow geochemistry and nutrients dynamics over a one-year period (April 2010- May 2011), concentrating on inorganics (Ca, Mg, Na, S, K, P, NO3, NH4, PO4, B, Ba, Ni, Co), organic hydrocarbons, sediment and water column particulate C, N and S stable isotopes and total organic carbon. Water and sediment were sampled from three tidal freshwater sites along the Anacostia River approximately every 8 weeks. δ15N values of sediment and water column particulates ranged from +2 to +9%, with the most enriched values occurring downstream (+4 to +9%). While these values may not reflect sewage inputs, an overall enrichment was observed between spring and late summer, which may indicate microbial activity. δ13C values exhibited slightly more variation and ranged from -30 to -25%. All sites showed relative depletion in early summer compared with spring or late summer/fall. C/N ratios were generally between 13-19 in sediments, indicating autochthonous origins. Water nutrients (NO3 and NH4) demonstrated seasonal fluxes; all sites showed a peak in nutrients during early summer (June) and subsequent decline. Overall, NO3 ranged from about 0.2 to 3.3 mg/L and NH4 ranged from 0 to 1.7 μg/L. GC-MS analysis showed notable compounds such as anthraquinone (a possible carcinogen), steroid hormones and several odd-chain and branched fatty acids. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) of the geochemical data suggests the strongest control of water chemistry (25-39%) is a Ca/Mg component that was also strongly associated with nitrate and K at 2 of the 3 sites. The second component (25%) was strongly associated with Na. The possibility that cement influences the geochemistry of this urban river continues to be examined.

  4. Effects of water removal on a Hawaiian stream ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinzie, R. A.; Chong, C.; Devrell, J.; Lindstrom, D.; Wolff, R.

    2006-01-01

    A 3-year study of Wainiha River on Kaua'i, Hawai'i, was carried out to determine the impact that water removal had on key stream ecosystem parameters and functions. The study area included a diversion dam for a hydroelectric plant that removes water at an elevation of 213 m and returns it to the stream about 6 km downstream at an elevation of 30 m. There were two high-elevation sites, one with undiverted flow and one with reduced flow, and two low-elevation sites, one with reduced flow and one with full flow restored. Monthly samples were taken of instream and riparian invertebrates and plants. When samples from similar elevations were compared, dewatered sites had lower concentrations of benthic photosynthetic pigments than full-flow sites, and benthic ash-free dry mass (AFDM) was higher at the two low-elevation sites regardless of flow. Benthic chlorophyll a (chl a) and AFDM were higher in summer months than in the winter. Benthic invertebrate abundance was highest at the full-flow, low-elevation site and benthic invertebrate biomass was highest at the full-flow, high-elevation site. Season had only marginal effects on abundance and biomass of benthic invertebrates. Diversity of benthic invertebrates was higher at the more-downstream sites. Abundance of drifting invertebrates was highest at the site above the diversion dam and generally higher in winter than in summer months. Biomass of drifting invertebrates was also highest at the above-dam site but there was little seasonal difference. Almost all parameters measured were lowest at the site just downstream of the diversion dam. The biotic parameters responded only weakly to flows that had occurred up to 1 month before the measurements were made. Flow, elevation, and season interact in complex ways that impact ecosystem parameters and functions, but water diversion can override all these environmental factors. ?? 2006 by University of Hawai'i Press All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of the Snap Sampler for Sampling Ground Water Monitoring Wells for Inorganic Analytes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    within the well. The slits in the two discs were misaligned to limit water exchange. The discs are attached to the Snap Sampler trigger line with...ER D C/ CR R EL T R -0 8 -2 5 Evaluation of the Snap Sampler for Sampling Ground Water Monitoring Wells for Inorganic Analytes...Louise V. Parker, Nathan D. Mulherin, and Gordon E. Gooch December 2008 Well Screen Baffle Snap Sampler Trigger Line Pump Tubing Top Snap Sampler RGC

  6. Field and Laboratory Studies of Reactions between Atmospheric Water Soluble Organic Acids and Inorganic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Sellon, Rachel E.; Shilling, John E.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-06-25

    Atmospheric inorganic particles undergo complex heterogeneous reactions that change their physicochemical properties. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids [1-2]. Recently, we showed that NaCl can react with water soluble organic acids (WSOA) and release gaseous hydrochloric acid (HCl) resulting in formation of organic salts [3]. A similar mechanism is also applicable to mixed WSOA/nitrate particles where multi-phase reactions are driven by the volatility of nitric acid. Furthermore, secondary organic material, which is a complex mixture of carboxylic acids, exhibits the same reactivity towards chlorides and nitrates. Here, we present a systematic study of reactions between atmospheric relevant WSOA, SOM, and inorganic salts including NaCl, NaNO3, and Ca(NO3)2 using complementary micro-spectroscopy analysis.

  7. Analyzing Conductivity Profiles in Stream Waters Influenced by Mine Water Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räsänen, Teemu; Hämäläinen, Emmy; Hämäläinen, Matias; Turunen, Kaisa; Pajula, Pasi; Backnäs, Soile

    2015-04-01

    Conductivity is useful as a general measure of stream water quality. Each stream inclines to have a quite constant range of conductivity that can be used as a baseline for comparing and detecting influence of contaminant sources. Conductivity in natural streams and rivers is affected primarily by the geology of the watershed. Thus discharges from ditches and streams affect not only the flow rate in the river but also the water quality and conductivity. In natural stream waters, the depth and the shape of the river channel change constantly, which changes also the water flow. Thus, an accurate measuring of conductivity or other water quality indicators is difficult. Reliable measurements are needed in order to have holistic view about amount of contaminants, sources of discharges and seasonal variation in mixing and dilution processes controlling the conductivity changes in river system. We tested the utility of CastAway-CTD measuring device (SonTek Inc) to indicate the influence of mine waters as well as mixing and dilution occurring in the recipient river affected by treated dewatering and process effluent water discharges from a Finnish gold mine. The CastAway-CTD measuring device is a small, rugged and designed for profiling of depths of up to 100m. Device measures temperature, salinity, conductivity and sound of speed using 5 Hz response time. It has also built-in GPS which produces location information. CTD casts are normally used to produce vertical conductivity profile for rather deep waters like seas or lakes. We did seasonal multiple Castaway-CTD measurements during 2013 and 2014 and produced scaled vertical and horizontal profiles of conductivity and water temperature at the river. CastAway-CTD measurement pinpoints how possible contaminants behave and locate in stream waters. The conductivity profiles measured by CastAway-CTD device show the variation in maximum conductivity values vertically in measuring locations and horizontally in measured cross

  8. Release of reduced inorganic selenium species into waters by the green fresh water algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Denina Bobbie Dawn; Wallschläger, Dirk

    2011-03-15

    The common green fresh water algae Chlorella vulgaris was exposed to starting concentrations of 10 μg/L selenium in the form of selenate, selenite, or selenocyanate (SeCN(-)) for nine days in 10% Bold's basal medium. Uptake of selenate was more pronounced than that of selenite, and there was very little uptake of selenocyanate. Upon uptake of selenate, significant quantities of selenite and selenocyanate were produced by the algae and released back into the growth medium; no selenocyanate was released after selenite uptake. Release of the reduced metabolites after selenate exposure appeared to coincide with increasing esterase activity in solution, indicating that cell death (lysis) was the primary emission pathway. This is the first observation of biotic formation of selenocyanate and its release into waters from a nonindustrial source. The potential environmental implications of this laboratory observation are discussed with respect to the fate of selenium in impacted aquatic systems, the ecotoxicology of selenium bioaccumulation, and the interpretation of environmental selenium speciation data generated, using methods incapable of positively identifying reduced inorganic selenium species, such as selenocyanate.

  9. Trends in precipitation and stream-water chemistry in the northeastern United States, water years 1984-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, D.W.; Mast, M. Alisa

    1999-01-01

    Trends in precipitation and stream-water chemistry during water years 1984-96 were examined at eight precipitation monitoring sites and five nearby streams operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in the northeastern United States. The statistical analyses indicate the following: 1)Stream-water sulfate (SO4) concentrations decreased at seven of eight precipitation monitoring sites and in each of five streams. 2)Calcium plus magnesium (Ca + Mg) concentrations decreased at seven of eight precipitation monitoring sites and in three of five streams. 3)Precipitation acidity decreased at five of eight precipitation monitoring sites, but alkalinity increased in only one stream. These results indicate that decreases in atmospheric deposition of SO4 have resulted in decreased precipitation acidity. The chemical response of stream water to changes in precipitation chemistry was complex. Decreases in stream-water SO4 concentrations generally matched decreases of precipitation SO4. In stream water, increases in alkalinity were uncommon because decreases in SO4 concentrations often were accompanied by decreases in Ca + Mg concentrations. The decreases in Ca + Mg concentrations might be related to depletion of base cations from soil caused by long-term exposure to acidic deposition. Increases in streamwater alkalinity might not occur until rates of acidic deposition are reduced to substantially less than the rate of cation resupply by weathering and atmospheric deposition. In areas where forests are aggrading, recovery of stream-water alkalinity will be delayed further because of the acidifying effect of biomass accumulation.

  10. Stream Water and Soil Water Chemistry Following the Table Mountain Wildfire, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roccanova, V. J.; Gazis, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Severe wildfire occurrence in the Western United States increased throughout the 20th century and has continued to increase into the 21st century. Global climate change resulting from natural and anthropogenic sources is considered a contributor to this increase in wildfire severity. Fire suppression techniques developed in the early 20th century are also a factor in increased severe wildfire occurrence as they augment available fuel loads. Biomass burning releases nutrients that are held within trees and plants. Nitrogen, phosphorous, and calcium levels have been documented as increasing in stream waters as a result of wildfire. As severe wildfire occurrence increases, so does the likelihood that stream, and to a lesser extent groundwater, will be loaded with nutrients and sediments as a result of wildfire activity. Increased nutrient loads can cause algal blooms that deplete streams of oxygen, important to aquatic plants and animals that reside in these streams. These changes in water quality can also affect humans who depend on these streams for irrigation and drinking water purposes. The Table Mountain wildfire in Washington State was started by a lightning strike that occurred at approximately 8:00 PM on Saturday September 8th, 2012. The fire burned for approximately one month and was declared to be 100% contained on Friday October 5th, 2012. Over this period the fire burned a total of 171 square kilometers of forest. In this study multiple stream and soil water samples were collected from three types of area in the winter through summer following the fire: severely burned, moderately burned, and unburned. All areas sampled have similar bedrock and vegetation cover. These samples were analyzed for major ions and trace element concentrations. Select samples will also be analyzed for strontium isotope ratios. The results of these geochemical analyses will be presented. Because calcium and strontium have similar properties, their concentrations can be combined

  11. Eighteen Degree Water formation within the Gulf Stream during CLIMODE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Terrence M.; Thomas, Leif N.; Dewar, William K.; Girton, James B.

    2013-07-01

    Analysis of wintertime CLIMODE data for 2007 indicates that a substantial portion of new Eighteen Degree Water (EDW) is likely ventilated within the eastward flowing Gulf Stream (GS) between 67°W and 52°W longitudes, possibly exceeding that formed elsewhere in the northern Sargasso Sea. Use of some global air-sea interaction data sets applied to the study region for Feb/Mar of 2007 indicate that this winter may have been anomalously energetic in air-sea exchange compared to the mean of the prior 19 yr. The largest heat and freshwater fluxes found directly over the meandering warm core of the Gulf Stream are capable of removing most of the subtropical heat anomaly of the GS, but cross-frontal fluxes of salinity are required to account for the observed regional salinity structure. An isopycnal diffusivity of ˜100 m2 s-1 is inferred from the salinity balance. This mixing would also account for the observation that EDW formed in the GS is slightly fresher than that formed in northern Sargasso Sea. The lateral flux of heat across the GS north wall also acts to cool the resulting EDW water, but the heat balance for EDW production is largely determined from GS advection and air-sea fluxes, in contrast to salinity. Based on oxygen saturation data, we estimate that 1.8-3.0 Sv-yr of new EDW is formed in the GS for the winter of 2007. EDW originating from the GS is generated in a separate location from where it is accumulated in the northern Sargasso Sea. This manner of EDW formation will produce unique characteristics of EDW found in the northern Sargasso Sea: ones that differ in T/S properties from that formed south of the GS under the more traditional 1D, cooling-driven convection process.

  12. Hydrogen Bonding Characteristics of Crystalline Water in Inorganic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fangfang; Li, Keyan; Xue, Dongfeng

    From the chemical bond viewpoint, the microscopic characterstatics of hydrogen bonds in Mi—OH2⋯O (M is the metal cation coordinated to water molecule and i is the number of M) systems were comprehensively studied. It is shown that the original O—OH and H⋯O bond lengths of each hydrogen bonding system are evidently influenced by the crystalline environment and strongly dependent on the corresponding average bond lengths of each system, bar d{O - {H}} and bar d{H ... {O}}. Furthermore, the hydrogen bonding capability of water molecules coordinated to various metal cations was properly estimated and found to be related to the ionic electronegativities of these metal cations. The current work provides a useful route to calculating hydrogen bond valences within reasonable accuracy and sheds light on the rational utilization of hydrogen bonds in crystal design.

  13. High Surface Area Inorganic Membrane for Water Removal

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose objective is to demonstrate the fabrication and performance advantages of minichannel planar membrane modules made of porous metallic supports of surface area packing density one order of magnitude higher than the conventional membrane tube. The new, transformational, ceramic/metallic, hybrid membrane technology will be used for water/ethanol separations and reduce energy consumption by >20% over distillation and adsorption.

  14. E. coli transport to stream water column from bottom sediments to the stream water column in base flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachepsky, Yakov; Shelton, Daniel; Stocker, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    E. coli as an indicator bacterium is commonly used to characterize microbiological water quality, to evaluate surface water sources for microbiological impairment, and to assess management practices that lead to the decrease of pathogens and indicator influx in surface water sources for recreation and irrigation. Bottom sediments present a large reservoir of fecal indicator bacteria that are known to be released to water column during high flow events caused by rainstorms and snowmelt. The objective of this work was to see if the influx of E. coli from sediments to water occurs also during base flow periods when groundwater rather than runoff provides the major water input to the stream. The experiment was carried out at the first-order creek in Maryland flowing in the riparian zone in base flow conditions. An inert tracer was released to creek water from the manifold for 5 hours. Streamflow and concentrations of E. coli and tracer were monitored in water 10 m below tracer release location, and at the downstream location at 450 m from the release location. The tracer mass recovered at the downstream location was close to the released tracer mass. We then could directly compare the total numbers of E. coli in volumes of water containing tracer at the upstream (release) location and the downstream location. There was a substantial (3 to 6 times) increase in flow between the upstream and downstream locations as well as the substantial increase in the E. coli total numbers in water (14 to 26 times). The average E. coli influx from the bottom sediment was about 400 cells m-2s-1. Although this value is about 2 to 5 times less than published E. coli release rates during high flow events, it still can substantially change the microbial water quality assessment without any input from animal agriculture or manure application. Interesting research objectives include finding out whether the transport of E. coli from bottom sediment to water column during the base flow periods

  15. Comparison of fish communities in a clean-water stream and an adjacent polluted stream

    SciTech Connect

    Reash, R.J.; Berra, T.M. )

    1987-10-01

    Fish populations were studied in two parallel tributaries of the Mohican River, Ohio: Clear Fork, relatively undisturbed; and Rocky Fork, which receives industrial discharges and sewage effluent. Water quality in Rocky Fork was significantly worse than the control stream with respect to heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Zn) and ammonia concentrations. Fish species richness and diversity increased downstream in Clear Fork but decreased downstream in Rocky Fork. Pollution-intolerant species were present in the headwaters of Rocky Fork and at all sites of Clear Fork. Fish community similarity of fish communities between corresponding headwater sites was significantly greater than similarity of corresponding downstream reaches, using polluted and unpolluted sites for comparison. Both headwater sites were dominated numerically by generalized invertebrate-feeding fish. At downstream sites in Clear Fork benthic insectivores became dominant in Rocky Fork, generalized invertebrate-feeding fish were present. Fish communities at polluted sites had comparatively lower variability of both trophic structure rank and relative abundance. The smaller populations of fish in these sites were dominated by a few pollution-tolerant species.

  16. EFFECTS OF STREAM RESTORATION ON IN-STREAM WATER QUALITY IN AN URBAN WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this on-going project is to provide information to Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4s) operators and states on the performance of selected best management practices (BMPs), specifically, stream restoration techniques, on improving biological and in-stream ...

  17. Evaluating stream water quality through land use analysis in two grassland catchments: impact of wetlands on stream nitrogen concentration.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, A; Shimizu, M; Woli, K P; Kuramochi, K; Hatano, R

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the impacts of natural wetlands and various land uses on stream nitrogen concentration in two grassland-dominated catchments in eastern Hokkaido, Japan. Analyzing land use types in drainage basins, measuring denitrification potential of its soil, and water sampling in all seasons of 2003 were performed. Results showed a highly significant positive correlation between the concentration of stream NO3-N and the proportion of upland area in drainage basins in both catchments. The regression slope, which we assumed to reflect the impact on water quality, was 24% lower for the Akkeshi catchment (0.012 +/- 0.001) than for the Shibetsu catchment (0.016 +/- 0.001). In the Akkeshi catchment, there was a significant negative correlation between the proportion of wetlands in the drainage basins and stream NO3-N concentration. Stream dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and carbon (DOC) concentrations were significantly higher in the Akkeshi catchment. Upland and urban land uses were strongly linked to increases in in-stream N concentrations in both catchments, whereas wetlands and forests tended to mitigate water quality degradation. The denitrification potential of the soils was highest in wetlands, medium in riparian forests, and lowest in grasslands; and was significant in wetlands and riparian forests in the Akkeshi catchment. The solubility of soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil moisture tended to determine the denitrification potential. These results indicate that the water environment within the catchments, which influences denitrification potential and soil organic matter content, could have caused the difference in stream water quality between the two catchments.

  18. Magnetically-enhanced adsorption of inorganic pollutants from water

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, J.D.; Kochen, R.L.; Ritter, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate magnetic effects on adsorptive properties for the removal of metal ions from waste water. Magnetic adsorbent material in a fixed-bed (column) mode was used for the experiments. A typical experiment involved energizing the magnet to create a field strength of approximately 0.3 Tesla, pumping waste water through the column, and monitoring effluents as a function of time. Magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin (MPE) resin was evaluated for plutonium and americium removal; results showed that 325 liters of actinide solution were lowered to 2.77x10{sup -8} g/l plutonium and 7.17x10{sup -10} g/l americium before the plutonium activity in the effluent started to increase. For comparison purpose, the polyamine-epichlorohydrin (PE) resin without magnetite was also evaluated. Minimum concentration observed for plutonium and americium were comparable to the MPE resin; however, breakthrough occurred two orders of magnitude sooner. The results show that the non-magnetic PE resin contributed very little to the adsorption capacity exhibited by the MPE resin, and suggest a synergistic effect between the magnetic field and a porous, magnetic adsorbent material.

  19. Flow Data for Solute Transport Modeling from Tracer Experiments in a Stream Not Continuously Gaining Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencala, K. E.; Kimball, B. A.; Gooseff, M. N.

    2007-12-01

    In-stream tracer experiments are a well-established method for determining flow data to be incorporated in solute transport modeling. For a gaining stream, this method is implemented to provide spatial flow data at scales of minutes and tens of meters without physical disturbance to the flow of water, the streambed, or biota. Of importance for solute transport modeling, solute inflow loading along the stream can be estimated with this spatial data. The tracer information can also be interpreted to characterize hyporheic exchange time-scales for a stream with hyporheic exchange flowpaths (HEFs) that are short relative to the distance over which the stream gains water. The interpretation of tracer data becomes uncertain for a stream that is not gaining water continuously over intended study reach. We demonstrate, with straight-forward mass-balances, uncertainties for solute loading which arise in the analysis of streams locally losing water while predominantly gaining water (and solutes) over a larger scale. With field data from Mineral Creek (Silverton, Colorado) we illustrate the further uncertainty distinguishing HEFs from (locally) losing segments of the stream. Comparison of bromide tracer with ambient sulfate concentrations suggests that subsurface inflows and outflows, concurrent with likely HEFs, occur in a hydrogeochemical setting of multiple, dispersed and mixed, sources of water along a 64 m sub-reach of the predominately gaining, but locally losing, stream. To compute stream-reach mass-balances (the simplest of water quality models) there is a need to quantitatively define the character and source of contaminants entering streams from ground-water pathways, as well as the potential for changes in water chemistry and contaminant concentrations along flow paths crossing the sediment-water interface. Identification of inflow solute mass requires quantifying water gain, loss, and hyporheic exchange in addition to concentration.

  20. Solid phase extraction for the speciation and preconcentration of inorganic selenium in water samples: a review.

    PubMed

    Herrero Latorre, C; Barciela García, J; García Martín, S; Peña Crecente, R M

    2013-12-04

    Selenium is an essential element for the normal cellular function of living organisms. However, selenium is toxic at concentrations of only three to five times higher than the essential concentration. The inorganic forms (mainly selenite and selenate) present in environmental water generally exhibit higher toxicity (up to 40 times) than organic forms. Therefore, the determination of low levels of different inorganic selenium species in water is an analytical challenge. Solid-phase extraction has been used as a separation and/or preconcentration technique prior to the determination of selenium species due to the need for accurate measurements for Se species in water at extremely low levels. The present paper provides a critical review of the published methods for inorganic selenium speciation in water samples using solid phase extraction as a preconcentration procedure. On the basis of more than 75 references, the different speciation strategies used for this task have been highlighted and classified. The solid-phase extraction sorbents and the performance and analytical characteristics of the developed methods for Se speciation are also discussed.

  1. Speciation of inorganic arsenic and selenium in leachates from landfills in relation to water quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Yusof, A M; Salleh, S; Wood, A K

    1999-01-01

    Speciation of arsenic and selenium was carried out on water samples taken from rivers used as water intake points in the vicinity of landfill areas used for land-based waste disposal system. Leachates from these landfill areas may contaminate the river water through underground seepage or overflowing, especially after a heavy downpour. Preconcentration of the chemical species was done using a mixture of ammonium pyrrolidinethiocarbamate-chloroform (APDTC-CHCl3). Because only the reduced forms of both arsenic and selenium species could be extracted by the preconcentrating mixture, suitable reducing agents such as 25% sodium thiosulfate for As(III) and 6M HCl for Se(IV) were used throughout the studies. Care was taken to exclude the interfering elements such as the alkali and alkali earth metals from the inorganic arsenic and selenium species by introducing 12% EDTA solution as the masking agent. The extracted mixture was irradiated in a thermal neutron flux of 4 x 10(12)/cm/s from a TRIGA Mk.II reactor at the Malaysia Institute of Nuclear Technology Research (MINT). Gamma rays of 559 keV and 297 keV from 76As and 75Se, respectively, were used in the quantitative determination of the inorganic species. Mixed standards of As(III) and Se(IV) used in the percentage efficiency procedure were prepared from salts of Analar grade. The water quality evaluation was viewed from the ratio of the inorganic species present.

  2. Towards benchmarking an in-stream water quality model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boorman, D. B.

    2007-01-01

    A method of model evaluation is presented which utilises a comparison with a benchmark model. The proposed benchmarking concept is one that can be applied to many hydrological models but, in this instance, is implemented in the context of an in-stream water quality model. The benchmark model is defined in such a way that it is easily implemented within the framework of the test model, i.e. the approach relies on two applications of the same model code rather than the application of two separate model codes. This is illustrated using two case studies from the UK, the Rivers Aire and Ouse, with the objective of simulating a water quality classification, general quality assessment (GQA), which is based on dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand and ammonium. Comparisons between the benchmark and test models are made based on GQA, as well as a step-wise assessment against the components required in its derivation. The benchmarking process yields a great deal of important information about the performance of the test model and raises issues about a priori definition of the assessment criteria.

  3. Linking nitrogen management, seep chemistry, and stream water quality in two agricultural headwater watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riparian seepage zones in headwater agricultural watersheds represent important sources of nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) to surface waters, often connecting N-rich groundwater systems to streams. In this study, we examined how NO3-N concentrations in seep and stream water were affected by NO3-N processin...

  4. EVALUATION OF STREAMBANK RESTORATION ON IN-STREAM WATER QUALITY IN AN URBAN WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this on-going project are to: investigate the effectiveness of streambank restoration techniques on increasing available biological habitat and improving in-stream water quality in an impaired stream; and, demonstrate the utility of continuous water-quality moni...

  5. A luminescent-water soluble inorganic co-crystal for a selective pico-molar range arsenic(III) sensor in water medium.

    PubMed

    Dey, Biswajit; Saha, Rajat; Mukherjee, Priyanka

    2013-08-14

    The water solution of an intriguing luminescent 'Inorganic Co-crystal' of Cu(II) monomeric and dimeric units shows extremely selective sensing ability towards inorganic arsenic(III) in water medium in the pico-molar concentration range even in the presence of other cations.

  6. Cattle use of off-stream water developments in northeastern Oregon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water developments have been considered a fundamental tool for dispersing livestock distributions and reducing livestock impact on riparian and aquatic habitats associated with perennial streams. Quantifying the efficacy of water development, however, has been difficult. Until recently, it has bee...

  7. Transient streaming potentials under varying pore-water ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malama, B.

    2014-12-01

    Streaming potentials (SP) are generated when polar fluids such as groundwater flow through porous media that have charged mineral surfaces. This is due to the flow-shearing of the diffuse layer of the electric double layer (EDL), which is known to form in the fluid phase at the fluid-rock interface. Previous works have suggested that the EDL vanishes at high pore-fluid ionic strengths resulting in vanishing SP signals. However, recent observations in sea-water intrusion applications by Jackson and coworkers indicate that measurable SP signals are obtainable in flows of fluids with high ionic strengths through silica sand. We demonstrate the repeatability of these observations through a series of laboratory flow experiments performed on 98% silica sand in a falling-head permeameter with brines of concentrations ranging from 0.001M to about 5 M NaCl. The results of the experiments, which clearly show measurable SP signals even at the highest concentration of 5 M NaCl, are reported. They are also used to estimate the hydraulic conductivity and electrokinetic coupling coefficient. The linearity assumption for the relation between pressure and SP differentials is evaluated for high pore-water NaCl concentrations. Additionally, displacement of one brine by another of different NaCl concentration yields dramatic transient SP responses that may be harnessed in the development of early-detection/warning technologies for sea-water intrusion applications. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This research is funded by WIPP programs administered by the Office of Environmental Management (EM) of the U.S Department of Energy.

  8. Air - water temperature relationships in the trout streams of southeastern Minnesota’s carbonate - sandstone landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krider, Lori A.; Magner, Joseph A.; Perry, Jim; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Ferrington, Leonard C.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonate-sandstone geology in southeastern Minnesota creates a heterogeneous landscape of springs, seeps, and sinkholes that supply groundwater into streams. Air temperatures are effective predictors of water temperature in surface-water dominated streams. However, no published work investigates the relationship between air and water temperatures in groundwater-fed streams (GWFS) across watersheds. We used simple linear regressions to examine weekly air-water temperature relationships for 40 GWFS in southeastern Minnesota. A 40-stream, composite linear regression model has a slope of 0.38, an intercept of 6.63, and R2 of 0.83. The regression models for GWFS have lower slopes and higher intercepts in comparison to surface-water dominated streams. Regression models for streams with high R2 values offer promise for use as predictive tools for future climate conditions. Climate change is expected to alter the thermal regime of groundwater-fed systems, but will do so at a slower rate than surface-water dominated systems. A regression model of intercept vs. slope can be used to identify streams for which water temperatures are more meteorologically than groundwater controlled, and thus more vulnerable to climate change. Such relationships can be used to guide restoration vs. management strategies to protect trout streams.

  9. Climate change and water conservation effects on water availability and vegetation patterns in a stream valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Knaap, Yasmijn; de Graaf, Myrjam; van Ek, Remco; Witte, Jan-Philip; Aerts, Rien; Bierkens, Marc; van Bodegom, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Climate change predictions include an increase in global temperature and changes in precipitation patterns at spatial and seasonal scale. The seasonal changes for temperate Europe include a decrease in the amount of precipitation in summer and an increase in winter. This may lead to an increased flooding risk in winter and early spring, while in summer the drought risk is likely to increase. These hydrological changes can have profound effects on vegetation patterns and development, especially for groundwater dependent vegetation. Water conservation measures can be used to combat the potential negative effects of these changes. Conservation measures can include aquifer storage and recovery, damming streams, or creating retention zones for flooding events. The implementation of these measures can contribute to preserving groundwater dependent vegetation patterns. In this study we simulated with an integrated surface- and groundwater model and a climate robust vegetation model, the implementation of water conservation measures in a stream valley catchment in the Netherlands. We modeled the effects on water availability and on vegetation patterns. The conservation measures were simulated for the current climate and for two climate scenarios, with a temperature increase of two degrees Celsius and either an increase or decrease in precipitation. Water tables were increased in stream valley zones, where groundwater dependent vegetation dominates, to ensure suitable abiotic conditions. The results showed that the water conservation measures increased the water table considerably in a future climate, compared to no conservation measures. Groundwater dependent vegetation was positively stimulated with these new hydrological conditions. With these models we successfully tested the effectiveness of the water conservation measures on water availability and vegetation patterns to ameliorate the negative effects of climate change. We therefore argue that water conservation

  10. Methods for determination of inorganic substances in water and fluvial sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, Marvin J.; Friedman, Linda C.

    1989-01-01

    Chapter Al of the laboratory manual contains methods used by the U.S. Geological Survey to analyze samples of water, suspended sediments, and bottom material for their content of inorganic constituents. Included are methods for determining the concentration of dissolved constituents in water, the total recoverable and total of constituents in water-suspended sediment samples, and the recoverable and total concentrations of constituents in samples of bottom material. The introduction to the manual includes essential definitions and a brief discussion of the use of significant figures in calculating and reporting analytical results. Quality control in the water-analysis laboratory is discussed, including the accuracy and precision of analyses, the use of standard-reference water samples, and the operation of an effective quality-assurance program. Methods for sample preparation and pretreatment are given also. A brief discussion of the principles of the analytical techniques involved and their particular application to water and sediment analysis is presented. The analytical methods of these techniques are arranged alphabetically by constituent. For each method, the general topics covered are the application, the principle of the method, the interferences, the apparatus and reagents required, a detailed description of the analytical procedure, reporting results, units and significant figures, and analytical precision data, when available. More than 126 methods are given for the determination of 70 inorganic constituents and physical properties of water, suspended sediment, and bottom material.

  11. Patterns and age distribution of ground-water flow to streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modica, E.; Reilly, T.E.; Pollock, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    Simulations of ground-water flow in a generic aquifer system were made to characterize the topology of ground-water flow in the stream subsystem and to evaluate its relation to deeper ground-water flow. The flow models are patterned after hydraulic characteristics of aquifers of the Atlantic Coastal Plain and are based on numerical solutions to three-dimensional, steady-state, unconfined flow. The models were used to evaluate the effects of aquifer horizontal-to-vertical hydraulic conductivity ratios, aquifer thickness, and areal recharge rates on flow in the stream subsystem. A particle tracker was used to determine flow paths in a stream subsystem, to establish the relation between ground-water seepage to points along a simulated stream and its source area of flow, and to determine ground-water residence time in stream subsystems. In a geometrically simple aquifer system with accretion, the source area of flow to streams resembles an elongated ellipse that tapers in the downgradient direction. Increased recharge causes an expansion of the stream subsystem. The source area of flow to the stream expands predominantly toward the stream headwaters. Baseflow gain is also increased along the reach of the stream. A thin aquifer restricts ground-water flow and causes the source area of flow to expand near stream headwaters and also shifts the start-of-flow to the drainage basin divide. Increased aquifer anisotropy causes a lateral expansion of the source area of flow to streams. Ground-water seepage to the stream channel originates both from near- and far-recharge locations. The range in the lengths of flow paths that terminate at a point on a stream increase in the downstream direction. Consequently, the age distribution of ground water that seeps into the stream is skewed progressively older with distance downstream. Base flow ia an integration of ground water with varying age and potentially different water quality, depending on the source within the drainage basin

  12. Inorganic N and P dynamics of Antarctic glacial meltwater streams as controlled by hyporheic exchange and benthic autotrophic communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKnight, Diane M.; Runkel, R.L.; Tate, C.M.; Duff, J.H.; Moorhead, D.L.

    2004-01-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys of South Victoria Land, Antarctica, contain numerous glacial meltwater streams that drain into lakes on the valley floors. Many of the streams have abundant perennial mats of filamentous cyanobacteria. The algal mats grow during streamflow in the austral summer and are in a dormant freeze-dried state during the rest of the year. NO3 and soluble reactive P (SRP) concentrations were lower in streams with abundant algal mats than in streams with sparse algal mats. NO3 and SRP concentrations were higher in the hyporheic zone of a stream with abundant algal mats than in the stream itself. An experimental injection of LiCl, NaNO3, and K3PO4 was conducted in Green Creek, which has abundant algal mats. Substantial hyporheic exchange occurred. The NO3 and PO4 concentrations at 50 m below the injection were 55 ??M and 18 ??M, respectively, during the experiment. NO3 and PO4 concentrations were below the detection limit of 1 to 2 ??M at a site 497 m below the injection during the Cl tracer arrival, indicating a high capacity for nutrient uptake by algal communities. NO2 and NH4 were present at sites 226 and 327 m below the injection, indicating that, in addition to denitrification and algal uptake, dissimilatory NO3 reduction to NO2 and NH4 may be a NO3 sink during transport. Transport modelling with nutrient uptake represented as a 1st-order process yielded reach-scale parameters of 4.3 ?? 10-5 to 3.9 ?? 10-4/s and 1.4 ?? 10-4 to 3.8 ?? 10 -4/s for uptake of NO3 and PO4, respectively. The best match with the observed data was a model in which PO4 uptake occurred only in the main channel and NO3 uptake occurred in the main channel and in the hyporheic zone. Hyporheic NO3 uptake was 7 to 16% of the total uptake for the different stream reaches. These results demonstrate that nutrient flux to the lakes is controlled by hyporheic exchange and nutrient uptake by algal mats in dry valley streams. Streams without algal mats contribute more nutrients to the

  13. Dry Stream Reaches in Carbonate Terranes: Surface Indicators of Ground-Water Reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brahana, J.V.; Hollyday, E.F.

    1988-01-01

    In areas where dry stream reaches occur, subsurface drainage successfully competes with surface drainage, and sheet-like dissolution openings have developed parallel to bedding creating the ground-water reservoir. Union Hollow in south-central Tennessee is the setting for a case study that illustrates the application of the dry stream reach technique. In this technique, dry stream reach identification is based on two types of readily acquired information: remotely sensed black and white infrared aerial photography; and surface reconnaissance of stream channel characteristics. Test drilling in Union Hollow subsequent to identification of the dry reach proved that a localized ground-water reservoir was present.

  14. Estimation of upstream water use with Ohio’s StreamStats application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koltun, G.F.; Nardi, Mark R.; Shaffer, Kimberly H.

    2016-06-24

    Temporary water-use registrations for hydraulic fracturing are tabulated separately from the other water uses. Water-use indices are computed by dividing average annual net withdrawals (with and without temporary registrations) by the mean October streamflow estimated with StreamStats. The water-use indices are intended to provide metrics of potential consumptive water use.

  15. Tree leaf control on low flow water quality in a small Virginia stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, K.V.; Feltz, H.R.

    1968-01-01

    Impaired water quality in a small stream was related to autumn leaf fall from riparian vegetation. Dissolved oxygen and pH decreased, and water color, specific conductance, iron, manganese, and bicarbonate values increased as the rate of leaf fall increased. Similar quality changes occurred in laboratory cultures of tree leaves in filtered stream water, but the five leaf species studied produced widely differing results. Stream quality improved rapidly following channel flushing by storm flow. Organic loading by tree litter can exert significant control on water composition, especially during low flow.

  16. Behaviour of thermal waters through granite rocks based on residence time and inorganic pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Outeiriño, I.; Araujo-Nespereira, P.; Cid-Fernández, J. A.; Mejuto, J. C.; Martínez-Carballo, E.; Simal-Gándara, J.

    2009-07-01

    SummaryThermal waters are certainly a substantial asset of the Galicia region of Spain. They can be regarded as worth developing because of their human health implications and, if thermal tourism is promoted, their importance to the local economy. In this paper the chemistry of major and trace inorganic elements in about 45 thermal springs and wells discharging in the same hydrographical system are presented and discussed. For handling the results of all measurements, graphical representations of B/Li vs.SO42-/Cl - ratios, Hill-Piper diagram, discriminant analysis (DA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were employed. All this with the intention to classify, based on their inorganic pattern, both thermal springs and wells waters, but also waters circulating through adamellite and granodiorite rocks. The results of the hydrogeochemistry analysis showed three main water families: sulphated, chlorinated and bicarbonated waters. The results show also the presence of saline materials with chloride influence in the deeper aquifer, allowing its classification in deeper and younger/shallow waters.

  17. Effects of inorganic nutrients on the regrowth of heterotrophic bacteria in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chenghwa; Lu, Chungsying; Lee, Chimei

    2005-02-01

    Three laboratory-scale water pipe systems were set up to study the effects of adding three inorganic nutrients (ammonium, nitrate or phosphate) on biofilm formation in water pipes. The results showed that the effects of adding ammonium or nitrate on the biofilm formation were insignificant when levels below 0.1 mg N/l were added. Analogous results were observed when phosphate was added at levels below 0.005 mgP/l. However, as the addition of ammonium increased to 0.5 mgN/l, significant effects on biofilm formation were observed. Similar results were obtained phosphate was added at levels above 0.01 mgP/l. Batch tests were also conducted using water samples collected from a Taiwanese drinking water distribution system. The results indicated that the addition of ammonium, nitrate or phosphate to treatment plant effluent stimulates bacterial growth. In the distributed water of an urban area, the addition of nitrate or phosphate stimulated bacterial growth. The bacterial growth in the distributed water of a suburban area was not stimulated by adding any of these three inorganic nutrients.

  18. Olfactory responses to natal stream water in sockeye salmon by BOLD fMRI.

    PubMed

    Bandoh, Hiroshi; Kida, Ikuhiro; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2011-01-17

    Many studies have shown that juvenile salmon imprint olfactory memory of natal stream odors during downstream migration, and adults recall this stream-specific odor information to discriminate their natal stream during upstream migration for spawning. The odor information processing of the natal stream in the salmon brain, however, has not been clarified. We applied blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the odor information processing of the natal stream in the olfactory bulb and telencephalon of lacustrine sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). The strong responses to the natal stream water were mainly observed in the lateral area of dorsal telencephalon (Dl), which are homologous to the medial pallium (hippocampus) in terrestrial vertebrates. Although the concentration of L-serine (1 mM) in the control water was 20,000-times higher than that of total amino acid in the natal stream water (47.5 nM), the BOLD signals resulting from the natal stream water were stronger than those by L-serine in the Dl. We concluded that sockeye salmon could process the odor information of the natal stream by integrating information in the Dl area of the telencephalon.

  19. Colloids and organic matter complexation control trace metal concentration-discharge relationships in Marshall Gulch stream waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trostle, Kyle D.; Ray Runyon, J.; Pohlmann, Michael A.; Redfield, Shelby E.; Pelletier, Jon; McIntosh, Jennifer; Chorover, Jon

    2016-10-01

    This study combined concentration-discharge analyses (filtration at 0.45 μm), cascade filtrations (at 1.2, 0.4, and 0.025 μm) and asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation (AF4) to probe the influence of colloidal carriers (dissolved organic matter and inorganic nanoparticles) on observed concentration-discharge relationships for trace metals in a 155 ha forested catchment of the Santa Catalina Mountains Critical Zone Observatory (SCM CZO), Arizona. Many major elements (Na, Mg, Si, K, Ca) show no colloidal influence, and concentration-discharge relationships for these species are explained by previous work. However, the majority of trace metals (Al, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Cu, Y, REE, U) show at least some influence of colloids on chemistry when filtered at the standard 0.45 μm cutoff. Concentration-discharge slopes of trace metals with modest colloidal influence are shallow (˜0.3) similar to that measured for dissolved organic carbon (DOC, 0.24), whereas elements with greater colloidal influence have steeper concentration-discharge slopes approaching that of Al (0.76), the element with the largest colloidal influence in this study (on average 68%). These findings are further supported by AF4 measurements that show distinct and resolvable pools of low hydrodynamic diameter DOC-sized material coexistent with larger diameter inorganic colloids, and the ratio of these carriers changes systematically with discharge because the DOC pool has a concentration-discharge relationship with shallower slope than the inorganic colloidal pool. Together these data sets illustrate that positive concentration-discharge slopes of trace metals in stream waters may be explained as the relative partitioning of trace metals between DOC and inorganic colloids, with contributions of the latter likely increasing as a result of increased prevalence of macropore flow.

  20. Tracking inorganic foulants irreversibly accumulated on low-pressure membranes for treating surface water.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Hiroshi; Kimura, Katsuki; Higuchi, Kumiko; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Ding, Qing; Hafuka, Akira

    2015-12-15

    While low-pressure membrane filtration processes (i.e., microfiltration and ultrafiltration) can offer precise filtration than sand filtration, they pose the problem of reduced efficiency due to membrane fouling. Although many studies have examined membrane fouling by organic substances, there is still not enough data available concerning membrane fouling by inorganic substances. The present research investigated changes in the amounts of inorganic components deposited on the surface of membrane filters over time using membrane specimens sampled thirteen times at arbitrary time intervals during pilot testing in order to determine the mechanism by which irreversible fouling by inorganic substances progresses. The experiments showed that the inorganic components that primarily contribute to irreversible fouling vary as filtration continues. It was discovered that, in the initial stage of operation, the main membrane-fouling substance was iron, whereas the primary membrane-fouling substances when operation finished were manganese, calcium, and silica. The amount of iron accumulated on the membrane increased up to the thirtieth day of operation, after which it reached a steady state. After the accumulation of iron became static, subsequent accumulation of manganese was observed. The fact that the removal rates of these inorganic components also increased gradually shows that the size of the exclusion pores of the membrane filter narrows as operation continues. Studying particle size distributions of inorganic components contained in source water revealed that while many iron particles are approximately the same size as membrane pores, the fraction of manganese particles slightly smaller than the pores in diameter was large. From these results, it is surmised that iron particles approximately the same size as the pores block them soon after the start of operation, and as the membrane pores narrow with the development of fouling, they become further blocked by manganese

  1. Bacterial pathogens in Hawaiian coastal streams--associations with fecal indicators, land cover, and water quality.

    PubMed

    Viau, Emily J; Goodwin, Kelly D; Yamahara, Kevan M; Layton, Blythe A; Sassoubre, Lauren M; Burns, Siobhán L; Tong, Hsin-I; Wong, Simon H C; Lu, Yuanan; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2011-05-01

    This work aimed to understand the distribution of five bacterial pathogens in O'ahu coastal streams and relate their presence to microbial indicator concentrations, land cover of the surrounding watersheds, and physical-chemical measures of stream water quality. Twenty-two streams were sampled four times (in December and March, before sunrise and at high noon) to capture seasonal and time of day variation. Salmonella, Campylobacter, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio vulnificus, and V. parahaemolyticus were widespread -12 of 22 O'ahu streams had all five pathogens. All stream waters also had detectable concentrations of four fecal indicators and total vibrio with log mean ± standard deviation densities of 2.2 ± 0.8 enterococci, 2.7 ± 0.7 Escherichia coli, 1.1 ± 0.7 Clostridium perfringens, 1.2 ± 0.8 F(+) coliphages, and 3.6 ± 0.7 total vibrio per 100 ml. Bivariate associations between pathogens and indicators showed enterococci positively associated with the greatest number of bacterial pathogens. Higher concentrations of enterococci and higher incidence of Campylobacter were found in stream waters collected before sunrise, suggesting these organisms are sensitive to sunlight. Multivariate regression models of microbes as a function of land cover and physical-chemical water quality showed positive associations between Salmonella and agricultural and forested land covers, and between S. aureus and urban and agricultural land covers; these results suggested that sources specific to those land covers may contribute these pathogens to streams. Further, significant associations between some microbial targets and physical-chemical stream water quality (i.e., temperature, nutrients, turbidity) suggested that organism persistence may be affected by stream characteristics. Results implicate streams as a source of pathogens to coastal waters. Future work is recommended to determine infectious risks of recreational waterborne illness related to O'ahu stream exposures and to

  2. Considerations for sampling inorganic constituents in ground water using diffusion samplers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Petkewich, M.D.; Campbell, T.R.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Data indicate that nylon-screen and dialysis diffusion samplers are capable of obtaining concentrations of inorganic solutes in ground water from wells that closely correspond to concentrations obtained by low-flow sampling. Conservative solutes, such as chloride, can be sampled by filling the diffusion samplers with oxygenated water. The samplers should be filled with anaerobic water for sampling redoxsensitive solutes. Oxidation of iron within the samplers, either by using aerobic fill water or by in-well oxygenation events, can lead to erroneous iron concentrations. Lithologic and chemical heterogeneity and sampler placement depth can lead to differences between concentrations from diffusion samples and low-flow samples because of mixing during pumping. A disadvantage of regenerated cellulose dialysis samplers is that they can begin to biodegrade within the two weeks of deployment. Nylon-screen samplers buried beneath streambed sediment along the unnamed tributary in a discharge zone of arseniccontaminated ground water were useful in locating the specific discharge zone.

  3. The influence of industrial and agricultural waste on water quality in the Água Boa stream (Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil).

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Monyque Palagano; Dourado, Priscila Leocadia Rosa; de Souza Rodrigues, Mayara; Raposo, Jorge Luiz; Grisolia, Alexeia Barufatti; de Oliveira, Kelly Mari Pires

    2015-07-01

    Water quality monitoring is used to determine the impact of human activities on the environment. We evaluated water quality in the Água Boa stream, located within the municipality of Dourados, State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, by analyzing physico-chemical, chemical, and microbiological parameters, as well as chlorophyll concentrations. Five sets of water samples were collected between December 2012 and November 2013 from three locations within the stream. The results showed the presence of Escherichia coli and antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas spp. strains and high concentrations of organic matter (total dissolved solids), inorganic species (Mg, Ca, and Fe), and agrochemical residues (thiamethoxam). The main stream water contaminants are derived from urban, industrial, and agricultural activities within the watershed. Given the presence of contaminants, it is important that such findings are disseminated in order to highlight the risks that contact with this water may pose to human health. To preserve the environment and improve site conditions, people would need to participate by demanding that normative national and international standards be respected and that the situation be supervised by the competent governmental agencies; this would make it possible to reverse or minimize contamination problems within the Água Boa stream.

  4. Data from selected U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Water-Quality Networks (WQN)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, Richard B.; Slack, J.R.; Ludtke, A.S.; Fitzgerald, K.K.; Schertz, T.L.; Briel, L.I.; Buttleman, K.P.

    1996-01-01

    This CD-ROM set contains data from two USGS national stream water-quality networks, the Hydrologic Benchmark Network (HBN) and the National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN), operated during the past 30 years. These networks were established to provide national and regional descriptions of stream water-quality conditions and trends, based on uniform monitoring of selected watersheds throughout the United States, and to improve our understanding of the effects of the natural environment and human activities on water quality. The HBN, consisting of 63 relatively small, minimally disturbed watersheds, provides data for investigating naturally induced changes in streamflow and water quality and the effects of airborne substances on water quality. NASQAN, consisting of 618 larger, more culturally influenced watersheds, provides information for tracking water-quality conditions in major U.S. rivers and streams.

  5. Stream water bypass through a meander neck, laterally extending the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Eric W.; Sickbert, Timothy B.

    2006-12-01

    A meander lobe neck diverts stream water into a hyporheic flow path adjacent to a low gradient stream, Little Kickapoo Creek, Illinois, USA. Hyporheic processes have been well-documented in surface water-groundwater mixing zones underlying and directly adjacent to streams. Alluvial aquifers underlying meander necks provide a further extension of the hyporheic zone. Hydraulic head and temperature data, collected from a set of wells across a meander neck, show stream water moves through the meander neck. The hydraulic gradient across the meander neck (0.006) is greater than the stream gradient (0.003) between the same points, driving the bypass. Rapid subsurface response to elevated stream stage shows a hydraulic connection between the stream and the alluvial aquifer. Temperature data and a Peclet number (Pe) of 43.1 indicate that thermal transport is dominated by advection from the upstream side to the downstream side of the meander neck. The temperature observed within the alluvial aquifer correlates with seasonal temperature variation. Together, the pressure and temperature data indicate that water moves across the meander neck. The inflow of stream water through the meander neck suggests that the meander system may host biogeochemical hyporheic zone processes.

  6. Chemical speciation of inorganic pollutants in river-estuary-sea water systems.

    PubMed

    Tepavitcharova, Stefka; Todorov, Tihomir; Rabadjieva, Diana; Dassenakis, Manos; Paraskevopoulou, Vasiliki

    2009-02-01

    Monitoring studies and thermodynamic modeling were used to reveal the changes of inorganic chemical species of some water pollutants (nutrients and trace metals such as Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb) inthe river-estuary-sea water system. The case studies were two rivers, Kamchiya and Ropotamo, representing part of the Bulgarian Black Sea water catchment area, and having different flow characteristics. There were no major differences in inorganic chemical species of the two river systems. NO3(-) and NO2(-) chemical species showed no changes along the river-estuary-sea water system. Concerning phosphates six different species were calculated and differences between the three parts of the systems were established. The HPO4(2-) and H2PO4(-) species were found to be dominant in river waters. The H2PO4(-) species quickly decreased at the expense of HPO4(2-) and Ca, Mg and Na phosphate complexes in estuary and seawater. Trace metals showed a great variety of chemical species. Fe(OH)2(+) species prevailed in river waters, and Fe(OH)3(0) species--in sea waters. Me2+ and MeCO3(0) (Me = Cu, Pb) and PbHCO3(+) were dominant in river waters, while Cu(CO3)2(2-) and PbCl(-) species appear also in sea waters. Cd2+ species prevailed in river and estuary waters, and CdCln(2-n) (n = 1-3) species, in seawater. Free Zn2+ species predominated in all systems but downstream their percentage decreased at the expense of Zn phosphates, carbonates,sulfates and chlorides complexes. Only free Mn2+ species were dominant along the systems.

  7. Impact of Mountaintop Mining/Valley Fill on the Stable Carbon Isotopic Composition and Concentration of Dissolved Organic Carbon and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon in Headwater Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Headwater streams are the dominant land-water interface across much of the landscape and provide many important ecological services. Cycling and transport of various carbon fractions, which serve as important food sources for downstream aquatic ecosystems, are among the important...

  8. Influence of Land Use on the Stable Carbon Isotopic Composition and Concentration of Dissolved Organic Carbon and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon in Georgia Piedmont Headwater Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Headwater streams are the dominant land-water interface across much of the landscape and provide many important ecological services. Cycling and transport of various carbon fractions, which serve as important food sources for downstream aquatic ecosystems, are among the important...

  9. Assessing land-use effects on water quality, in-stream habitat, riparian ecosystems and biodiversity in Patagonian northwest streams.

    PubMed

    Miserendino, María Laura; Casaux, Ricardo; Archangelsky, Miguel; Di Prinzio, Cecilia Yanina; Brand, Cecilia; Kutschker, Adriana Mabel

    2011-01-01

    Changes in land-use practices have affected the integrity and quality of water resources worldwide. In Patagonia there is a strong concern about the ecological status of surface waters because these changes are rapidly occurring in the region. To test the hypothesis that greater intensity of land-use will have negative effects on water quality, stream habitat and biodiversity we assessed benthic macroinvertebrates, riparian/littoral invertebrates, fish and birds from the riparian corridor and environmental variables of 15 rivers (Patagonia) subjected to a gradient of land-use practices (non-managed native forest, managed native forest, pine plantations, pasture, urbanization). A total of 158 macroinvertebrate taxa, 105 riparian/littoral invertebrate taxa, 5 fish species, 34 bird species, and 15 aquatic plant species, were recorded considering all sites. Urban land-use produced the most significant changes in streams including physical features, conductivity, nutrients, habitat condition, riparian quality and invertebrate metrics. Pasture and managed native forest sites appeared in an intermediate situation. The highest values of fish and bird abundance and diversity were observed at disturbed sites; this might be explained by the opportunistic behavior displayed by these communities which let them take advantage of increased trophic resources in these environments. As expected, non-managed native forest sites showed the highest integrity of ecological conditions and also great biodiversity of benthic communities. Macroinvertebrate metrics that reflected good water quality were positively related to forest land cover and negatively related to urban and pasture land cover. However, by offering stream edge areas, pasture sites still supported rich communities of riparian/littoral invertebrates, increasing overall biodiversity. Macroinvertebrates were good indicators of land-use impact and water quality conditions and resulted useful tools to early alert of

  10. Stream restoration and sewers impact sources and fluxes of water, carbon, and nutrients in urban watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennino, Michael J.; Kaushal, Sujay S.; Mayer, Paul M.; Utz, Ryan M.; Cooper, Curtis A.

    2016-08-01

    An improved understanding of sources and timing of water, carbon, and nutrient fluxes associated with urban infrastructure and stream restoration is critical for guiding effective watershed management globally. We investigated how sources, fluxes, and flowpaths of water, carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) shift in response to differences in urban stream restoration and sewer infrastructure. We compared an urban restored stream with two urban degraded streams draining varying levels of urban development and one stream with upland stormwater management systems over a 3-year period. We found that there was significantly decreased peak discharge in response to precipitation events following stream restoration. Similarly, we found that the restored stream showed significantly lower (p < 0.05) monthly peak runoff (9.4 ± 1.0 mm day-1) compared with two urban degraded streams (ranging from 44.9 ± 4.5 to 55.4 ± 5.8 mm day-1) draining higher impervious surface cover, and the stream-draining stormwater management systems and less impervious surface cover in its watershed (13.2 ± 1.9 mm day-1). The restored stream exported most carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus at relatively lower streamflow than the two more urban catchments, which exported most carbon and nutrients at higher streamflow. Annual exports of total carbon (6.6 ± 0.5 kg ha-1 yr-1), total nitrogen (4.5 ± 0.3 kg ha-1 yr-1), and total phosphorus (161 ± 15 kg ha-1 yr-1) were significantly lower in the restored stream compared to both urban degraded streams (p < 0.05), but statistically similar to the stream draining stormwater management systems, for N exports. However, nitrate isotope data suggested that 55 ± 1 % of the nitrate in the urban restored stream was derived from leaky sanitary sewers (during baseflow), statistically similar to the urban degraded streams. These isotopic results as well as additional tracers, including fluoride (added to drinking water) and iodide (contained in dietary salt

  11. Organic and inorganic nitrogen pools in talus fields and subtalus water, Green Lakes Valley, Colorado front range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, M.W.; Davinroy, T.; Brooks, P.D.

    1997-01-01

    Organic and inorganic pools of nitrogen (N) were measured in talus fines or 'soils' and subtalus water during the summer of 1995 in the alpine Green Lakes Valley catchment of the Colorado Front Range. Nineteen talus soil samples were divided into four classes: subtalus dry, subtalus wet, surface vegetated and surface bare. The size of the individual talus soil patches ranged from 0.5 to 12.0 m2 in area, with bulk density ranging from 0-98 to 1-71 kg m-3 and soil texture ranging from sandy gravel in the subsurface talus to a loam in the vegetated surface. All samples contained KCl-extractable NH4+ and NO3-, organic N and carbon (C), and 17 of 19 samples contained microbial biomass. The mean subtalus values for KCl-extractable NH4-, of 3.2 mg N kg-1, and NO3-, of 1.0 mg N kg-1, were comparable with developed alpine soils on Niwot Ridge. Average microbial biomass in subtalus soils of 5.4 mg N kg-1 and total N of 1000 mg N kg-1 were about an order of magnitude lower than alpine tundra soils, reflecting the reduced amount of vegetation in talus areas. However, these measurements in surface-vegetated patches of talus were comparable with the well-developed soils on Niwot Ridge. These measurements in talus of microbial biomass, total N and KCl-extractable NH4+ and NO3-, show that there is sufficient biotically conditioned 'soil' within talus fields to influence the solute content of interstitial waters. Mean NO3- concentrations of 20 ??eq 1-1 from 29 samples of subtalus water were significantly higher than the 6-7 ??eq 1-1 in snow, while NH4+ concentrations in subtalus water of 0??7 ??eq 1-1 was significantly lower than in snow at 5??2 ??eq 1-1 (p = 0??001). Nitrate concentrations in subtalus water were significantly (p < 0??0001) correlated with concentrations of geochemica??l weathering products such as Ca2+ (r2 = 0??84) and silica (r2 = 0??49). The correlation of NO3- in subtalus water with geochemical weathering products suggests that NO3- concentrations in subtalus

  12. Assessment of potable water quality including organic, inorganic, and trace metal concentrations.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Mst Shamsun; Zhang, Jing

    2012-02-01

    The quality of drinking water (tap, ground, and spring) in Toyama Prefecture, Japan was assessed by studying quality indicators including major ions, total carbon, and trace metal levels. The physicochemical properties of the water tested were different depending on the water source. Major ion concentrations (Ca(2+), K(+), Si(4+), Mg(2+), Na(+), SO(4)(2-), HCO(3)(-), NO(3)(-), and Cl(-)) were determined by ion chromatography, and the results were used to generate Stiff diagrams in order to visually identify different water masses. Major ion concentrations were higher in ground water than in spring and tap water. The relationship between alkaline metals (Na(+) and K(+)), alkaline-earth metals (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)), and HCO(3)(-) showed little difference between deep and shallow ground water. Toyama ground, spring, and tap water were all the same type of water mass, called Ca-HCO(3). The calculated total dissolved solid values were below 300 mg/L for all water sources and met World Health Organization (WHO) water quality guidelines. Trace levels of As, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mn, Mo, Ni, V, Zn, Sr, and Hg were detected in ground, spring, and tap water sources using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, and their levels were below WHO and Japanese water quality standard limits. Volatile organic carbon compounds were quantified by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the measured concentrations met WHO and Japanese water quality guidelines. Total trihalomethanes (THMs) were the major contaminant detected in all natural drinking water sources, but the concentration was highest in tap water (37.27 ± 0.05 μg/L). Notably, THMs concentrations reached up to 1.1 ± 0.05 μg/L in deep ground water. The proposed model gives an accurate description of the organic, inorganic, and trace heavy metal indicators studied here and may be used in natural clean water quality management.

  13. Effects of urbanization on stream water quality in the city of Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.

    2009-01-01

    A long-term stream water quality monitoring network was established in the city of Atlanta, Georgia during 2003 to assess baseline water quality conditions and the effects of urbanization on stream water quality. Routine hydrologically based manual stream sampling, including several concurrent manual point and equal width increment sampling, was conducted ???12 times annually at 21 stations, with drainage areas ranging from 3.7 to 232 km2. Eleven of the stations are real-time (RT) stations having continuous measures of stream stage/ discharge, pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature and turbidity, and automatic samplers for stormwater collection. Samples were analyzed for field parameters, and a broad suite of water quality and sediment-related constituents. Field parameters and concentrations of major ions, metals, nutrient species and coliform bacteria among stations were evaluated and with respect to watershed characteristics and plausible sources from 2003 through September 2007. Most constituent concentrations are much higher than nearby reference streams. Concentrations are statistically different among stations for several constituents, despite high variability both within and among stations. Routine manual sampling, automatic sampling during stormflows and RT water quality monitoring provided sufficient information about urban stream water quality variability to evaluate causes of water quality differences among streams. Fecal coliform bacteria concentrations of most samples exceeded Georgia's water quality standard for any water-usage class. High chloride concentrations occur at three stations and are hypothesized to be associated with discharges of chlorinated combined sewer overflows, drainage of swimming pool(s) and dissolution and transport during rainstorms of CaCl2, a deicing salt applied to roads during winter storms. One stream was affected by dissolution and transport of ammonium alum [NH4Al(SO4)2] from an alum

  14. Inorganic solute profiles of waters related to Rio Blanco oil shale project retort 1

    SciTech Connect

    Poulson, R.E.; Borg, H.M.

    1986-03-01

    Water samples were taken from the Rio Blanco oil shale project retort 1 site approximately three- and one-half years after the shutdown of the oil recovery phase. Intermittent flooding and pumpdown of the retort occurred in the interval between shutdown and sampling for this study. Waters from within the retort and from downgradient and offsite locations were compared using a battery of analyses for inorganic and general water quality parameters. Inorganic solute species were selected as potential key indicator species if the particular species concentration inside the retort was greater than that outside the retort. Six inorganic parameters were found to qualify as potential key indicators for retort water migration from the site: potassium, lithium, ammonia, fluoride, thiosulfate, and boron. Except for ammonia, these indicators differ from those selected by other researchers at other modified in situ retorting sites. Ion chromatographic techniques were shown to be applicable for five of the six potential key indicators - all except boron which was detected spectroscopically. Low part-per-billion ion chromatographic analyses were demonstrated for lithium and ammonia. Fractional part-per-million ion chromatographic analyses were demonstrated for potassium and fluoride. Thiosulfate detection limits were in the low part-per-million range and only allowed detection of this indicator inside the retort. Five of the indicators (all except thiosulfate) were detected at slightly elevated levels in the Mahogany Zone ''B'' groove completion of the downgradient well. However, insufficient historical baseline data are available at the low detection levels required to allow positive identification of communication between this well and the retort. The potential for enhancement of sensitivity of the ion chromatographic methods beyond that already achieved for the selected indicators is discusses. 11 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

  15. Fresh water balance of the Gulf Stream system in a regional model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdes, R.; Biastoch, A.; Redler, R.

    We investigate the dependence of surface fresh water fluxes in the Gulf Stream and North Atlantic Current (NAC) area on the position of the stream axis which is not well represented in most ocean models. To correct this shortcoming, strong unrealistic surface fresh water fluxes have to be applied that lead to an incorrect salt balance of the current system. The unrealistic surface fluxes required by the oceanic component may force flux adjustments and may cause fictitious long-term variability in coupled climate models. To identify the important points in the correct representation of the salt balance of the Gulf Stream a regional model of the northwestern part of the subtropical gyre has been set up. Sensitivity studies are made where the westward flow north of the Gulf Stream and its properties are varied. Increasing westward volume transport leads to a southward migration of the Gulf Stream separation point along the American coast. The salinity of the inflow is essential for realistic surface fresh water fluxes and the water mass distribution. The subpolar-subtropical connection is important in two ways: The deep dense flow from the deep water mass formation areas sets up the cyclonic circulation cell north of the Gulf Stream. The surface and mid depth flow of fresh water collected at high northern latitudes is mixed into the Gulf Stream and compensates for the net evaporation at the surface.

  16. Impacts of groundwater metal loads from bedrock fractures on water quality of a mountain stream.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Brian S; Dawson, Helen E

    2009-06-01

    Acid mine drainage and metal loads from hardrock mines to surface waters is a significant problem in the western USA and many parts of the world. Mines often occur in mountain environments with fractured bedrock aquifers that serve as pathways for metals transport to streams. This study evaluates impacts from current and potential future groundwater metal (Cd, Cu, and Zn) loads from fractures underlying the Gilt Edge Mine, South Dakota, on concentrations in Strawberry Creek using existing flow and water quality data and simple mixing/dilution mass balance models. Results showed that metal loads from bedrock fractures to the creek currently contribute <1% of total loads. Even if background water quality is achieved upstream in Strawberry Creek, fracture metal loads would be <5%. Fracture loads could increase substantially and cause stream water quality standards exceedances once groundwater with elevated metals concentrations in the aquifer matrix migrates to the fractures and discharges to the stream. Potential future metal loads from an upstream fracture would contribute a small proportion of the total load relative to current loads in the stream. Cd has the highest stream concentrations relative to standards. Even if all stream water was treated to remove 90% of the Cd, the standard would still not be achieved. At a fracture farther downstream, the Cd standard can only be met if the upstream water is treated achieving a 90% reduction in Cd concentrations and the median stream flow is maintained.

  17. Stream Hydrology and Water Quality Impacts of Contrasting Urban Stormwater Mitigation Strategies: Centralized Versus Distributed

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban land cover is commonly associated with degraded stream habitat including flashier hydrology, increased pollutant export, and lower ecological health , collectively termed “urban stream syndrome.” Pollutant export from urban areas can also contribute to water quality issues...

  18. Mixing Hot and Cold Water Streams at a T-Junction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, David; Zhang, Mingqian; Xu, Zhenghe; Ryan, Jim; Wanke, Sieghard; Afacan, Artin

    2008-01-01

    A simple mixing of a hot- and cold-water stream at a T-junction was investigated. The main objective was to use mass and energy balance equations to predict mass low rates and the temperature of the mixed stream after the T-junction, and then compare these with the measured values. Furthermore, the thermocouple location after the T-junction and…

  19. Geology, Streamflow, and Water Chemistry of the Talufofo Stream Basin, Saipan, Northern Mariana Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izuka, Scot K.; Ewart, Charles J.

    1995-01-01

    A study of the geology, streamflow, and water chemistry of Talufofo Stream Basin, Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, was undertaken to determine the flow characteristics of Talufofo Stream and the relation to the geology of the drainage basin. The Commonwealth government is exploring the feasibility of using water from Talufofo Stream to supplement Saipan's stressed municipal water supply. Streamflow records from gaging stations on the principal forks of Talufofo Stream indicate that peak streamflows and long-term average flow are higher at the South Fork gaging station than at the Middle Fork gaging station because the drainage area of the South Fork gaging station is larger, but persistent base flow from ground-water discharge during dry weather is greater in the Middle Fork gaging station. The sum of the average flows at the Middle Fork and South Fork gaging stations, plus an estimate of the average flow at a point in the lower reaches of the North Fork, is about 2.96 cubic feet per second or 1.91 million gallons per day. Although this average represents the theoretical maximum long-term draft rate possible from the Talufofo Stream Basin if an adequate reservoir can be built, the actual amount of surface water available will be less because of evaporation, leaks, induced infiltration, and reservoir-design constraints. Base-flow characteristics, such as stream seepage and spring discharge, are related to geology of the basin. Base flow in the Talufofo Stream Basin originates as discharge from springs near the base of limestones located in the headwaters of Talufofo Stream, flows over low-permeability volcanic rocks in the middle reaches, and seeps back into the high-permeability limestones in the lower reaches. Water sampled from Talufofo Stream during base flow had high dissolved-calcium concentrations (between 35 and 98 milligrams per liter), characteristic of water from a limestone aquifer. Concentrations of potassium, sodium, and chloride

  20. Stream water quality in the context of payments for environmental services in Southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccolo, M. C.; Reis, L. D. C.; Figueiredo, R. D. O.; Camargo, P. B. D.; Costa, C. F. G. D.; Zuccari, M. L.; Green, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    Public policy of payment for environmental services (PES) was established in 2007 to face the challenge of recuperatingwater resources at one of the headwater areas of the Jaguari River Basin, which supplies an important reservoir for the metropolitan region of São Paulo, Brazil. Such effort consists of reforestation of riparian zones and spring lands at the hills of selected catchments, including the Ribeirão das Posses (RP) catchment. Since 2012 the University of São Paulo has developed research at RP to monitor the benefits of these practices on stream water quality, and identified a few parameters as good indicators to follow up the results of this PES program. The present study has the objective to show results of the monthly monitoring in2015,including 13 sampling stations at RP catchment distributed as follows: one in a spring forested area, three in spring areas of different ages of reforestation (3, 5 and 8 years), and nine at reaches of RP streamlocated in a way to contemplate the effects of the first order streams that comes from the studied spring areas entering RP. We established two additional stations at the Jaguari River, upstream and downstream of RP outlet. In situ measurements include temperature, pH, electric conductivity (EC) and dissolved oxygen (DO), and collect water samples to bring to the laboratory for analyses of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (DOC and DIC), total nitrogen (TN) and alkalinity. Also, sediments (fine fraction: >0.45 μm; and coarse fraction: >63 μm) are collected for isotopic carbon analyses. Preliminary results show pH values ranging from 5.5 to 7.8, while DO ranges from 5.8 to 8.9 mg L-1. As for EC, the mean at the spring forested station was 34.6 μS cm-1, while at spring areas of 3, 6 and 8 years of reforestation they were 53.3, 73.8 and 34.8 μS cm-1, respectively. We expected that by the end of this annual monitoring the benefits of reforestation will be affirmed.

  1. Facile fabrication of organic/inorganic nanotube heterojunction arrays for enhanced photoelectrochemical water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingzhi; Li, Aoxiang; Yue, Xiaoqi; Wang, Lu-Ning; Huang, Zheng-Hong; Kang, Feiyu; Volinsky, Alex A.

    2016-07-01

    Organic/inorganic heterojunction photoanodes are appealing for making concurrent use of the highly photoactive organic semiconductors, and the efficient dielectric screening provided by their inorganic counterparts. In the present work, organic/inorganic nanotube heterojunction arrays composed of TiO2 nanotube arrays and a semiconducting N,N-(dicyclohexyl) perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (PDi) layer were fabricated for photoelectrochemical water splitting. In this arrayed architecture, a PDi layer with a tunable thickness was coated on anodic TiO2 nanotube arrays by physical vapor deposition, which is advantageous for the formation of a uniform layer and an adequate interface contact between PDi and TiO2. The obtained PDi/TiO2 junction exhibited broadened visible light absorption, and an effective interface for enhanced photogenerated electron-hole separation, which is supported by the reduced charge transfer resistance and prolonged excitation lifetime via impedance spectroscopy analysis and fluorescence emission decay investigations. Consequently, such a heterojunction photoanode was photoresponsive to a wide visible light region of 400-600 nm, and thus demonstrated a highly enhanced photocurrent density at 1.23 V vs. a reversible hydrogen electrode. Additionally, the durability of such a photoanode can be guaranteed after long-time illumination because of the geometrical restraint imposed by the PDi aggregates. These results pave the way to discover new organic/inorganic assemblies for high-performance photoelectric applications and device integration.Organic/inorganic heterojunction photoanodes are appealing for making concurrent use of the highly photoactive organic semiconductors, and the efficient dielectric screening provided by their inorganic counterparts. In the present work, organic/inorganic nanotube heterojunction arrays composed of TiO2 nanotube arrays and a semiconducting N,N-(dicyclohexyl) perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (PDi

  2. Effects of coal strip mining on stream water quality and biology, southwestern Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuste, L.A.; Meyer, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    Strip mining for coal in southwestern Washington may be affecting the water quality of streams. To investigate these possible effects, five streams were selected for study of water quality in each of the two coal bearing areas: the Centralia-Chehalis coal district, and Kelso-Castle Rock coal area. In the Centralia-Chehalis coal district, three of the streams have drainage basins in which mines are active. Water in streams that drain unmined basins is typical of western Washington streams and is characterized as a mixed water because calcium, magnesium, sodium, and bicarbonate ions predominate. A change in anionic composition from bicarbonate to sulfate in streams draining mined areas was not sufficient to change the general water composition and thus make the streams acidic. The largest downstream changes in water quality in both mined and unmined drainage basins were observed during summer low-flow conditions, when minimal dilution, increased water temperatures, and low dissolved oxygen concentrations occurred. High dissolved solids were found in the mined drainage basins during this period. High concentrations of iron, manganese, and zinc were present in the bottom sediments of the mined basins. Moderate concentrations of chromium, cobalt, copper, and zinc were also found in the bottom sediments of a few unmined basins. Streams with substrates of gravel-cobble or gravel-coarse sand had the most diverse benthic fauna and a higher number of ubiquitous taxa than streams with sand-silt substrates, which had the most dissimilar fauna. Mayflies, stoneflies, and caddisflies were rare at the site most affected by mining. The erosion potential of a basin appears to be related to the average basin slope and the amount of forested areas. Strip mining for coal in steep basins may lead to massive movements of unconsolidated spoils after vegetal cover is removed if the land disturbed is graded to pre-mining slopes. (Lantz-PTT)

  3. DOM in stream water and soil solution in two small, bordering catchments in central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norström, Sara H.; Bylund, Dan

    2013-04-01

    Seasonal variations in dissolved organic matter (DOM) and the influence of wood ash application on DOM were studied in two first order streams draining two small, bordering forested catchments. The catchments, 40 and 50 h respectively, were situated in Bispgården (63°07N, 16°70E), central Sweden with forest consisting of mainly 50 to 80 year-old Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). Seasonal variations in the stream water were measured during 2003-2007, and wood ash was applied in one of the catchments in the fall of 2004. In addition to stream water samples, sampling of soil solution in the riparian zone was made in one of the catchments during 2003-2006. The quantity of DOM differed between the streams, but the seasonal patterns for the two streams were correlated during 2003 and 2004. After wood ash treatment, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) increased significantly in the stream draining the treated catchment. 17 different low molecular mass organic acids (LMMOAs) were measured in the stream water during the whole study period. The most abundant LMMOAs were oxalic- and lactic acid, of which peak concentrations of oxalic acid coincided with those of DOC, while no such relation between the concentrations of DOC and lactic acid could be seen in either of the streams. Some of the most common acids in the soil solution, shikimic acid, citric acid and malic acid were rarely found in the stream water and only then in very low concentrations, thus appearing not to have made the transition from soil to stream water in the same manner as oxalic acid. The wood ash application did not affect the total LMMOA concentration and there was no difference during the investigated period. Of the 17 analysed LMMOAs, only malonic acid appeared affected by wood ash application, with a significant increase during both 2005 and 2006.

  4. Pasture size effects on the ability of off-stream water or restricted stream access to alter the spatial/temporal distribution of grazing beef cows.

    PubMed

    Bisinger, J J; Russell, J R; Morrical, D G; Isenhart, T M

    2014-08-01

    For 2 grazing seasons, effects of pasture size, stream access, and off-stream water on cow distribution relative to a stream were evaluated in six 12.1-ha cool-season grass pastures. Two pasture sizes (small [4.0 ha] and large [12.1 ha]) with 3 management treatments (unrestricted stream access without off-stream water [U], unrestricted stream access with off-stream water [UW], and stream access restricted to a stabilized stream crossing [R]) were alternated between pasture sizes every 2 wk for 5 consecutive 4-wk intervals in each grazing season. Small and large pastures were stocked with 5 and 15 August-calving cows from mid May through mid October. At 10-min intervals, cow location was determined with Global Positioning System collars fitted on 2 to 3 cows in each pasture and identified when observed in the stream (0-10 m from the stream) or riparian (0-33 m from the stream) zones and ambient temperature was recorded with on-site weather stations. Over all intervals, cows were observed more (P ≤ 0.01) frequently in the stream and riparian zones of small than large pastures regardless of management treatment. Cows in R pastures had 24 and 8% less (P < 0.01) observations in the stream and riparian zones than U or UW pastures regardless of pasture size. Off-stream water had little effect on the presence of cows in or near pasture streams regardless of pasture size. In 2011, the probability of cow presence in the stream and riparian zones increased at greater (P < 0.04) rates as ambient temperature increased in U and UW pastures than in 2010. As ambient temperature increased, the probability of cow presence in the stream and riparian zones increased at greater (P < 0.01) rates in small than large pastures. Across pasture sizes, the probability of cow presence in the stream and riparian zone increased less (P < 0.01) with increasing ambient temperatures in R than U and UW pastures. Rates of increase in the probability of cow presence in shade (within 10 m of tree

  5. Stimulation of fecal bacteria in ambient waters by experimental inputs of organic and inorganic phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Chudoba, Elizabeth A; Mallin, Michael A; Cahoon, Lawrence B; Skrabal, Stephen A

    2013-06-15

    Fecal microbial pollution of recreational and shellfishing waters is a major human health and economic issue. Microbial pollution sourced from stormwater runoff is especially widespread, and strongly associated with urbanization. However, non-point source nutrient pollution is also problematic, and may come from sources different from fecal-derived pollution (i.e. fertilization of farm fields, lawns and gardens, and ornamental urban areas). Fecal bacteria require nutrients; thus the impact of such nutrient loading on survival and abundance of fecal coliform bacteria in ambient waters was experimentally investigated in a constructed wetland in coastal North Carolina, USA. A series of nutrient-addition bioassays testing impacts of inorganic and organic nitrogen and phosphorus demonstrated that additions of neither organic nor inorganic nitrogen stimulated fecal coliform bacteria. However, phosphorus additions provided significant stimulation of fecal coliform growth at times; on other occasions such additions did not. Dilution bioassays combined with nutrient additions were subsequently devised to assess potential impacts of microzooplankton grazing on the target fecal bacteria populations. Results demonstrated grazing to be a significant bacterial reduction factor in 63% of tests, potentially obscuring nutrient effects. Thus, combining dilution experiments with nutrient addition bioassays yielded simultaneous information on microzooplankton grazing rates on fecal bacteria, fecal bacterial growth rates, and nutrient limitation. Overall, when tested against a non-amended control, additions of either organic or inorganic phosphorus significantly stimulated fecal coliform bacterial growth on 50% of occasions tested, with organic phosphorus generally providing greater stimulation. The finding of significant phosphorus stimulation of fecal bacteria indicates that extraneous nutrient loading can, at times, augment the impacts of fecal microbial pollution of shellfishing

  6. Rapid Reduction in Breast Cancer Mortality With Inorganic Arsenic in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Allan H.; Marshall, Guillermo; Yuan, Yan; Steinmaus, Craig; Liaw, Jane; Smith, Martyn T.; Wood, Lily; Heirich, Marissa; Fritzemeier, Rebecca M.; Pegram, Mark D.; Ferreccio, Catterina

    2014-01-01

    Background Arsenic trioxide is effective in treating promyelocytic leukemia, and laboratory studies demonstrate that arsenic trioxide causes apoptosis of human breast cancer cells. Region II in northern Chile experienced very high concentrations of inorganic arsenic in drinking water, especially in the main city Antofagasta from 1958 until an arsenic removal plant was installed in 1970. Methods We investigated breast cancer mortality from 1950 to 2010 among women in Region II compared to Region V, which had low arsenic water concentrations. We conducted studies on human breast cancer cell lines and compared arsenic exposure in Antofagasta with concentrations inducing apoptosis in laboratory studies. Findings Before 1958, breast cancer mortality rates were similar, but in 1958–1970 the rates in Region II were half those in Region V (rate ratio RR = 0.51, 95% CI 0.40–0.66; p < 0.0001). Women under the age of 60 experienced a 70% reduction in breast cancer mortality during 1965–1970 (RR = 0.30, 0.17–0.54; p < 0.0001). Breast cancer cell culture studies showed apoptosis at arsenic concentrations close to those estimated to have occurred in people in Region II. Interpretation We found biologically plausible major reductions in breast cancer mortality during high exposure to inorganic arsenic in drinking water which could not be attributed to bias or confounding. We recommend clinical trial assessment of inorganic arsenic in the treatment of advanced breast cancer. PMID:25580451

  7. Photolysis of inorganic chloramines and efficiency of trichloramine abatement by UV treatment of swimming pool water.

    PubMed

    Soltermann, Fabian; Widler, Tobias; Canonica, Silvio; von Gunten, Urs

    2014-06-01

    Trichloramine, one of the three inorganic chloramines (mono-, di- and trichloramine), is a problematic disinfection by-product in recreational pool water since it causes skin and eye irritations as well as irritations of the respiratory tract. The most commonly used chloramine mitigation strategy in pool water is UV treatment. Experiments with membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) confirmed that inorganic chloramines are effectively degraded by UV irradiation with low-pressure (LP) and medium-pressure (MP) mercury lamps (apparent quantum yields (QY): NH2Cl = 0.50 (LP) and 0.31 (MP) mol einstein(-1), NHCl2: 1.06 (LP) and 0.85 (MP) mol einstein(-1)). Trichloramine showed the fastest depletion with a quantum yield slightly above 2 mol einstein(-1) in purified (LP and MP) and pool water (MP). This high quantum yield can partly be explained by reactions involving OH radicals (purified water) and the reaction of trichloramine with moieties formed during UV irradiation of pool water. The presence of free chlorine affects trichloramine degradation (QY: ∼1.5 mol einstein(-1)) since it scavenges OH radicals and competes with trichloramine for reactive species (e.g. organic amines). Measurements in a pool facility revealed that the installed UV reactors degraded trichloramine by 40-50% as expected from laboratory experiments. However, trichloramine reduction in the pools was less pronounced than in the UV reactors. Model calculations combining pool hydraulics with formation/abatement of trichloramine showed that there was a fast trichloramine formation in the pool from the residual chlorine and nitrogenous precursors. The main factors influencing trichloramine concentrations in pool water are the free chlorine concentration and the UV treatment in combination with the recirculation rate through the water treatment system.

  8. Air- and stream-water-temperature trends in the Chesapeake Bay region, 1960-2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jastram, John D.; Rice, Karen C.

    2015-12-14

    Water temperature is a basic, but important, measure of the condition of all aquatic environments, including the flowing waters in the streams that drain our landscape and the receiving waters of those streams. Climatic conditions have a strong influence on water temperature, which is therefore naturally variable both in time and across the landscape. Changes to natural water-temperature regimes, however, can result in a myriad of effects on aquatic organisms, water quality, circulation patterns, recreation, industry, and utility operations. For example, most species of fish, insects, and other organisms, as well as aquatic vegetation, are highly dependent on water temperature. Warming waters can result in shifts in floral and faunal species distributions, including invasive species and pathogens previously unable to inhabit the once cooler streams. Many chemical processes are temperature dependent, with reactions occurring faster in warmer conditions, leading to degraded water quality as contaminants are released into waterways at greater rates. Circulation patterns in receiving waters, such as bays and estuaries, can change as a result of warmer inflows from streams, thereby affecting organisms in those receiving waters. Changes in abundance of some aquatic species and (or) degradation of water quality can reduce the recreational value of water bodies as waters are perceived as less desirable for water-related activities or as sportfish become less available for anglers. Finally, increasing water temperatures can affect industry and utilities as the thermal capacity is reduced, making the water less effective for cooling purposes.Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States. Eutrophication, the enrichment of a water body with excess nutrients, has plagued the bay for decades and has led to extensive restoration efforts throughout the bay watershed. The warming of stream water can exacerbate eutrophication through increased release of nutrients from

  9. Urinary arsenic profiles reveal exposures to inorganic arsenic from private drinking water supplies in Cornwall, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, D. R. S.; Watts, M. J.; Hamilton, E. M.; Ander, E. L.; Close, R. M.; Exley, K. S.; Crabbe, H.; Leonardi, G. S.; Fletcher, T.; Polya, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    Private water supplies (PWS) in Cornwall, South West England exceeded the current WHO guidance value and UK prescribed concentration or value (PCV) for arsenic of 10 μg/L in 5% of properties surveyed (n = 497). In this follow-up study, the first of its kind in the UK, volunteers (n = 207) from 127 households who used their PWS for drinking, provided urine and drinking water samples for total As determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and urinary As speciation by high performance liquid chromatography ICP-MS (HPLC-ICP-MS). Arsenic concentrations exceeding 10 μg/L were found in the PWS of 10% of the volunteers. Unadjusted total urinary As concentrations were poorly correlated (Spearman’s ρ = 0.36 (P < 0.001)) with PWS As largely due to the use of spot urine samples and the dominance of arsenobetaine (AB) from seafood sources. However, the osmolality adjusted sum, U-AsIMM, of urinary inorganic As species, arsenite (AsIII) and arsenate (AsV), and their metabolites, methylarsonate (MA) and dimethylarsinate (DMA), was found to strongly correlate (Spearman’s ρ: 0.62 (P < 0.001)) with PWS As, indicating private water supplies as the dominant source of inorganic As exposure in the study population of PWS users.

  10. Water uptake of multicomponent organic mixtures and their influence on hygroscopicity of inorganic salts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Jing, Bo; Guo, Yucong; Li, Junling; Tong, Shengrui; Zhang, Yunhong; Ge, Maofa

    2016-07-01

    The hygroscopic behaviors of atmospherically relevant multicomponent water soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) and their effects on ammonium sulfate (AS) and sodium chloride were investigated using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) in the relative humidity (RH) range of 5%-90%. The measured hygroscopic growth was compared with predictions from the Extended-Aerosol Inorganics Model (E-AIM) and Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) method. The equal mass multicomponent WSOCs mixture containing levoglucosan, succinic acid, phthalic acid and humic acid showed gradual water uptake without obvious phase change over the whole RH range. It was found that the organic content played an important role in the water uptake of mixed particles. When organic content was dominant in the mixture (75%), the measured hygroscopic growth was higher than predictions from the E-AIM or ZSR relation, especially under high RH conditions. For mass fractions of organics not larger than 50%, the hygroscopic growth of mixtures was in good agreement with model predictions. The influence of interactions between inorganic and organic components on the hygroscopicity of mixed particles was related to the salt type and organic content. These results could contribute to understanding of the hygroscopic behaviors of multicomponent aerosol particles.

  11. Urinary arsenic profiles reveal exposures to inorganic arsenic from private drinking water supplies in Cornwall, UK

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, D. R. S.; Watts, M. J.; Hamilton, E. M.; Ander, E. L.; Close, R. M.; Exley, K. S.; Crabbe, H.; Leonardi, G. S.; Fletcher, T.; Polya, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    Private water supplies (PWS) in Cornwall, South West England exceeded the current WHO guidance value and UK prescribed concentration or value (PCV) for arsenic of 10 μg/L in 5% of properties surveyed (n = 497). In this follow-up study, the first of its kind in the UK, volunteers (n = 207) from 127 households who used their PWS for drinking, provided urine and drinking water samples for total As determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and urinary As speciation by high performance liquid chromatography ICP-MS (HPLC-ICP-MS). Arsenic concentrations exceeding 10 μg/L were found in the PWS of 10% of the volunteers. Unadjusted total urinary As concentrations were poorly correlated (Spearman’s ρ = 0.36 (P < 0.001)) with PWS As largely due to the use of spot urine samples and the dominance of arsenobetaine (AB) from seafood sources. However, the osmolality adjusted sum, U-AsIMM, of urinary inorganic As species, arsenite (AsIII) and arsenate (AsV), and their metabolites, methylarsonate (MA) and dimethylarsinate (DMA), was found to strongly correlate (Spearman’s ρ: 0.62 (P < 0.001)) with PWS As, indicating private water supplies as the dominant source of inorganic As exposure in the study population of PWS users. PMID:27156998

  12. Inorganic arsenic speciation in natural mineral drinking waters by flow-through anodic stripping chronopotentiometry.

    PubMed

    Jedryczko, Dominika; Pohl, Pawel; Welna, Maja

    2016-04-01

    A simple and inexpensive method for chemical speciation of inorganic As in natural mineral drinking waters by using anodic stripping chronopotentiometry (ASCP) in an electrochemical flow-through cell with an Au wire as the working electrode was described in the present work. The presented method is an attractive alternative to laborious and time-consuming procedures requiring pre-separation of various forms of As before their detection by other flow-through and non flow-through stripping methods. The limits of detection were found to be 0.42 µg L(-1) for As(III) and 0.55 µg L(-1) for As(V), obtained at the deposition potentials of -350 mV and -1600 mV, respectively. The accuracy of the method was assessed by the spiking-and-recovery experiments for particular water samples and the recoveries found, being in range from 99% to 105% for As(III) and from 104% to 106% for As(V), respectively, were quantitative. The proposed method was successfully applied to speciation analysis of inorganic As in water samples with a high content of Cu.

  13. Recovery from chronic and snowmelt acidification: Long-term trends in stream and soil water chemistry at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuss, Colin B.; Driscoll, Charles T.; Campbell, John L.

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric acid deposition of sulfate and nitrate has declined markedly in the northeastern United States due to emissions controls. We investigated long-term trends in soil water (1984-2011) and stream water (1982-2011) chemistry along an elevation gradient of a forested watershed to evaluate the progress of recovery of drainage waters from acidic deposition at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, USA. We found slowed losses of base cations from soil and decreased mobilization of dissolved inorganic aluminum. Stream water pH at the watershed outlet increased at a rate of 0.01 units yr-1, and the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) gained 0.88 µeq L-1 yr-1. Dissolved organic carbon generally decreased in stream water and soil solutions, contrary to trends observed at many North American and European sites. We compared whole-year hydrochemical trends with those during snowmelt, which is the highest-flow and lowest ANC period of the year, indicative of episodic acidification. Stream water during snowmelt had long-term trends of increasing ANC and pH at a rate very similar to the whole-year record, with closely related steady decreases in sulfate. A more rapid decline in stream water nitrate during snowmelt compared with the whole-year trend may be due, in part, to the marked decrease in atmospheric nitrate deposition during the last decade. The similarity between the whole-year trends and those of the snowmelt period is an important finding that demonstrates a consistency between recovery from chronic acidification during base flow and abatement of snowmelt acidification.

  14. Drinking Water Disinfection by In-line Electrolysis: Product and Inorganic By-Product Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, M. E. Henry

    This section covers peculiarities of so-called in-line electrolysis when drinking water is electrolysed to produce disinfection species killing microorganisms. Mainly mixed oxide electrodes (MIO) based on IrO2 and/or RuO2 coatings and boron-doped diamond electrodes were used in the studies. Artificial and real drinking water systems were electrolysed in continuous and discontinuous operating mode, varying water composition, current density and electrode materials. Results show, besides the ability of producing active chlorine, risks of inorganic disinfection by-products (DBPs) such as chlorate, perchlorate, nitrite, ammonium, chloramines, hydrogen peroxide and others. DBPs are responsible for analysis errors using DPD method for active chlorine measurements. Geometry may influence by-product yield. As a conclusion, the necessity of developing test routines for practical cell applications must be underlined.

  15. Reclamation of potable water from mixed gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie R.; Bischoff, Brian L.; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya

    2016-07-19

    An apparatus for separating a liquid from a mixed gas stream can include a wall, a mixed gas stream passageway, and a liquid collection assembly. The wall can include a first surface, a second surface, and a plurality of capillary condensation pores. The capillary condensation pores extend through the wall, and have a first opening on the first surface of the wall, and a second opening on the second surface of the wall. The pore size of the pores can be between about 2 nm to about 100 nm. The mixed gas stream passageway can be in fluid communication with the first opening. The liquid collection assembly can collect liquid from the plurality of pores.

  16. Reclamation of potable water from mixed gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, Roddie R; Bischoff, Brian L; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya

    2013-08-20

    An apparatus for separating a liquid from a mixed gas stream can include a wall, a mixed gas stream passageway, and a liquid collection assembly. The wall can include a first surface, a second surface, and a plurality of capillary condensation pores. The capillary condensation pores extend through the wall, and have a first opening on the first surface of the wall, and a second opening on the second surface of the wall. The pore size of the pores can be between about 2 nm to about 100 nm. The mixed gas stream passageway can be in fluid communication with the first opening. The liquid collection assembly can collect liquid from the plurality of pores.

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon isotopic composition of the Gulf of Mexico deep-water masses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanilla-Terminel, J. G.; Herguera, J. C.; Ferreira-Bartrina, V.; Hernández-Ayón, J. M.; Camacho-Ibar, V.

    2014-12-01

    This study provides new data for the establishment of a carbon biogeochemical dynamics baseline in the deep Gulf of Mexico (GM) based on carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon. Water samples from 40 deep-water stations south of 25˚N were collected during XIXIMI-2 cruise, July 2011, aboard BO/Justo Sierra. Vertical profiles of temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen (DO) were further measured in each station. In the Stable Isotopes Laboratory at CICESE we determined the carbon isotopic composition of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (δ13CDIC). Remarkably, density, DO and δ13CCID profiles showed a clear difference between the Loop current and the deep-waters of the GM south of 25˚N. We found the following average δ13CCID values in the Loop current and in the deep-waters of the Gulf: subtropical underwater (SUW): 0.73±0.06‰ and 0.86±0.04‰; 18 degree water (18W): 0.76 ± 0.08‰ and 0.58± 0.06‰; North Atlantic central water (NACW): 0.77 ± 0.05‰ and 0.71 ± 0.09‰; South Atlantic central water (SACW): 0.80 ± 0.08‰ and 0.77 ± 0.07‰; Antartic intermediate water (AAIW): 1.00 ± 0.06‰ and 0.90 ± 0.08‰; North Atlantic deep water (NADW): 1.03 ± 0.06‰ and 1.01 ± 0.10‰. We will discuss how the biological component, δ13CCID-BIO, of subsurface water masses match very closely the apparent oxygen utilization relation described by Kroopnick, 1985, with the exception of SUW, and as a consequence the 18W is probably the water mass most affected by organic carbon remineralization processes in the GM south of 25˚N. We further show how these waters seem to store a larger proportion of anthropogenic carbon than the deeper water masses.

  18. Long-term mortality patterns in a residential cohort exposed to inorganic selenium in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Vinceti, Marco; Ballotari, Paola; Steinmaus, Craig; Malagoli, Carlotta; Luberto, Ferdinando; Malavolti, Marcella; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Selenium (Se) is a metalloid of considerable nutritional and toxicological importance in humans. To date, limited epidemiologic evidence exists about the health effects of exposure to this trace element in drinking water. We investigated the relationship between Se levels in water and mortality in the municipality of Reggio Emilia, Italy, where high levels of Se were previously observed in drinking water. From 1974 to 1985, 2065 residents consumed drinking water with Se levels close to the European standard of 10μg/l, in its inorganic hexavalent form (selenate). Follow-up was conducted for the years 1986-2012 in Reggio Emilia and a lesser exposed comparison group of around 100,000 municipal residents, with comparable socio-demographic characteristics. Overall mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease and cancer showed little evidence of differences. However, excess rate ratios were seen for some site specific cancers such as neoplasms of buccal cavity and pharynx, urinary tract, lymphohematopoietic tissue, melanoma, and two neurodegenerative diseases, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Excess mortality in the exposed cohort for specific outcomes was concentrated in the first period of follow-up (1986-1997), and waned starting 10 years after the high exposure ended. We also found lower mortality from breast cancer in females during the first period of follow-up. When we extended the analysis to include residents who had been consuming the high-selenium drinking water for a shorter period, mortality rate ratios were also increased, but to a lesser extent. Overall, we found that the mortality patterns related to long-term exposure to inorganic hexavalent selenium through drinking water were elevated for several site-specific cancers and neurodegenerative disease.

  19. Nitrogen dynamics at the ground water-surface water interface of a degraded urban stream

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urbanization degrades stream ecosystems by altering hydrology and nutrient dynamics. We investigated temporal and spatial patterns in biogeochemistry and hydrology in and near the stream channel of a geomorphically degraded urban stream of Baltimore County, Maryland, USA. Our o...

  20. Behavioral responses by migratory chum salmon to amino acids in natal stream water.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuzo; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    We propose that amino acids in natal stream water have Important roles in Pacific salmon homing. This study hypothesized that amino acids found in natal stream water have a role in the ability of mature male chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) to home to the Osaru River (OR), Hokkaido, Japan. Behavioral experiments were conducted in a two-choice test tank using various combinations of control water (natural Toya Lake water; NLW and three artificial stream waters using amino acids: 1) artificial OR water (AOR); 2) AOR without L-glutamic acid, the major amino acid in OR water (AOR-E); and 3) artificial water matching another stream (ALS) that had much higher amino acid concentrations than OR. In behavioral tests, the fish did not select between AOR and AOR-E, but still chose AOR over NLW, AOR-E over NLW, and AOR over ALS. These results suggest that migratory male chum salmon respond to amino acid mixtures in their natal stream water and appear to be affected by multiple amino acids.

  1. Geochemical mass-balance relationships for selected ions in precipitation and stream water, Catoctin Mountains, Maryland.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, B.G.; Bricker, O.P.; Kennedy, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Results of a study of input/output mass balances for major ions based on the chemical composition of precipitation and stream-water, geochemical reactions with different loading rates of hydrogen ion, and watershed processes influencing the chemical character of stream-waters in two small watershed areas are reported with a view to predicting the effect of additions of acidic rain to the watershed systems. Geochemical weathering processes account for the observed changes in the chemistry of stream flow. Although present in bedrock in extremely small quantities, calcite plays an important role in neutralization of the total hydrogen-ion input.-M.S.

  2. Pennsylvania StreamStats--A web-based application for obtaining water-resource-related information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckey, Marla H.; Hoffman, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    StreamStats is a national web-based Geographic Information System (GIS) application, developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc., to provide a variety of water-resource-related information. Users can easily obtain descriptive information, basin characteristics, and streamflow statistics for USGS streamgages and ungaged stream locations throughout Pennsylvania. StreamStats also allows users to search upstream and (or) downstream from user-selected points to identify locations of and obtain information for water-resource-related activities, such as dams and streamgages.

  3. Stream water temperature limits occupancy of salamanders in mid-Atlantic protected areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Wiewel, Amber N. M.; Rice, Karen C.

    2014-01-01

    Stream ecosystems are particularly sensitive to urbanization, and tolerance of water-quality parameters is likely important to population persistence of stream salamanders. Forecasted climate and landscape changes may lead to significant changes in stream flow, chemical composition, and temperatures in coming decades. Protected areas where landscape alterations are minimized will therefore become increasingly important for salamander populations. We surveyed 29 streams at three national parks in the highly urbanized greater metropolitan area of Washington, DC. We investigated relationships among water-quality variables and occupancy of three species of stream salamanders (Desmognathus fuscus, Eurycea bislineata, and Pseudotriton ruber). With the use of a set of site-occupancy models, and accounting for imperfect detection, we found that stream-water temperature limits salamander occupancy. There was substantial uncertainty about the effects of the other water-quality variables, although both specific conductance (SC) and pH were included in competitive models. Our estimates of occupancy suggest that temperature, SC, and pH have some importance in structuring stream salamander distribution.

  4. Water Mites (Acari: Hydrachnida) of Ozark Streams - Abundance, Species Richness, and Potential as Environmental Indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwell, A. J.; Brown, A. V.

    2005-05-01

    Because water mites are tightly linked to other stream metazoans through parasitism and predation, they are potentially effective indicators of environmental quality. Meiofauna (80 μm to 1 mm) were sampled from headwater riffles of 11 Ozark streams to determine relative abundance and densities of major meiofauna taxa. Water mites comprised 15.3% of the organisms collected exceeded only by chironomids (50.2%) and oligochaetes (17.8%), and mean water mite density among the 11 streams was 265 organisms per liter. The two streams that differed the most in environmental quality were sampled using techniques suitable for identification of species. An estimated 32 species from 20 genera and 13 families were found in the least disturbed stream; an estimated 19 species from 13 genera and 8 families were found in the most disturbed stream. This preliminary finding supports the notion that water mite species richness declines in response to environmental disturbance. Many species could only be identified as morphospecies of particular genera, but the ongoing taxonomic revision of Hydrachnida is expected to provide needed information. A collaborative effort between those interested in taxonomy/systematics of water mites and ecologists interested in the significance of water mites in aquatic communities could prove mutually beneficial.

  5. Inorganic Nanowires-Assembled Layered Paper as the Valve for Controlling Water Transportation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei-Fei; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Xiong, Zhi-Chao; Sun, Tuan-Wei; Shen, Yue-Qin; Yang, Ri-Long

    2017-03-29

    Layered materials with open interlayer channels enable various applications such as tissue engineering, ionic and molecular sieving, and electrochemical devices. However, most reports focus on the two-dimensional nanosheets-assembled layered materials, whose interlayer spacing is limited at the nanometer scale. Herein, we demonstrate that one-dimensional inorganic nanowires are the ideal building blocks for the construction of layered materials with open interlayer channels as well, which has not aroused much attention before. It is found that the relatively long inorganic nanowires are capable of assembling into free-standing layered paper with open interlayer channels during the filtration process. The spacings of interlayer channels between adjacent layers are up to tens of micrometers, which are much larger than those of the two-dimensional nanosheets-assembled layered materials. But the closed interlayer channels are observed when the relatively short inorganic nanowires are used as building blocks. The mechanism based on the relationship between the structural variation and the nanowires used is proposed, including the surface charge amplified effect, surface charge superimposed effect, and pillarlike supporting effect. According to the proposed mechanism, we have successfully fabricated a series of layered paper sheets whose architectures (including interlayer channels of cross section and pores on the surface) show gradient changes. The as-prepared layered paper sheets are employed as the valves for controlling water transportation. Tunable water transportation is achieved by the synergistic effect between in-plane interlayer channels (horizontal transportation) from the open to the closed states, and through-layer pores (vertical transportation) without surface modification or intercalation of any guest species.

  6. Ecohydrologic separation of water between trees and streams in a Mediterranean climate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water movement in upland humid watersheds from the soil surface to the stream is often described using the concept of translatory flow, which assumes that water entering the soil as precipitation displaces the water that was present previously, pushing it deeper into the soil and...

  7. Cold-water refuges for climate resilience in Oregon coastal stream

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many rivers and streams in the Pacific Northwest are currently listed as impaired under the Clean Water Act as a result of high summer water temperatures. Adverse effects of warm waters include impacts to salmon and steelhead populations that may already be stressed by habitat al...

  8. POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF ORGANIC WASTES ON SMALL STREAM WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We monitored concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved oxygen (DO) and other parameters in 17 small streams of the South Fork Broad River (SFBR) watershed on a monthly basis for 15 months. Our monthly monitoring results showed a strong inverse relationship betwe...

  9. Survival of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus in Stream Water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E. coli and Enterococcus indicate fecal contamination and are used for monitoring of lakes, streams, and rivers. Transport of bacteria from manured or pastured lands can result in large bacterial loads from both small and large runoff events and the persistence of bacteria following these loadings i...

  10. Supercharged Snails for Stream Ecology & Water-Quality Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Arthur J.; Ryon, Michael G.

    2003-01-01

    Gill-breathing freshwater snails (Family "Pleuroceridae") are ecologically important, abundant in many streams in the United States, and easy to collect and maintain under classroom conditions. These snails can be used in classroom tests to demonstrate effects of pollutants on aquatic organisms. In more advanced classes, students can cage the…

  11. Inorganic chemistry of water and bed sediment in selected tributaries of the south Umpqua River, Oregon, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, Stephen R.

    1999-01-01

    Ten sites on small South Umpqua River tributaries were sampled for inorganic constituents in water and streambed sediment. In aqueous samples, high concentrations (concentrations exceeding U.S. Environmental Protection Agency criterion continuous concentration for the protection of aquatic life) of zinc, copper, and cadmium were detected in Middle Creek at Silver Butte, and the concentration of zinc was high at Middle Creek near Riddle. Similar patterns of trace-element occurrence were observed in streambed-sediment samples.The dissolved aqueous load of zinc carried by Middle Creek along the stretch between the upper site (Middle Creek at Silver Butte) and the lower site (Middle Creek near Riddle) decreased by about 0.3 pounds per day. Removal of zinc from solution between the upper and lower sites on Middle Creek evidently was occurring at the time of sampling. However, zinc that leaves the aqueous phase is not necessarily permanently lost from solution. For example, zinc solubility is pH-dependent, and a shift between solid and aqueous phases towards release of zinc to solution in Middle Creek could occur with a perturbation in stream-water pH. Thus, at least two potentially significant sources of zinc may exist in Middle Creek: (1) the upstream source(s) producing the observed high aqueous zinc concentrations and (2) the streambed sediment itself (zinc-bearing solid phases and/or adsorbed zinc). Similar behavior may be exhibited by copper and cadmium because these trace elements also were present at high concentrations in streambed sediment in the Middle Creek Basin.

  12. The seasonal variation for the discharge and water quality of a stream in volcanic island, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, K.; Moon, D.; Park, K.

    2007-12-01

    Assessment of the groundwater resources in a volcanic island is so difficult, because permeable and impermeable layers were formed from lava flows in different times and various lithologies. Jeju island is the largest volcanic island in Korea, and is composed of plateau and shield forming basaltic to trachytic lava flows, numerous tuff rings/cones, scoria cones during its long volcanic history (about 1.8 Ma). Most of streams in Jeju island are dry in normal times. Owing to high permeable geologic features such as clinkers, stream run-off occurs when precipitation is over 40 mm/day. To understand runoff phenomena in Jeju island, some streams are monitored automatically about stream stage, and water quality. Oedocheon (cheon means stream) is monitored during the normal and runoff period. Oedocheon is a permanent stream in Jeju island, and its water quantity and quality is originated by a spring water from lava flow boundaries. The surface limit and watershed parameters for the Oedocheon watershed were created and calculated by WMS software. Stream stages respond very quick during the runoff time, but the duration of the runoff is so short about a few hours. Parameters such as landuse, soil condition, preconditioned rainfall, and vegetables influence runoff phenomena. Periodic stream discharge measurements and chemical analyses of the water were preformed in order to analyze the seasonal variation of the stream water quantity and quality in normal times. Considering water intake quantities, ordinary stream discharge is 2,569~50,415 m3/day, average 21,215m3/day. Water qualities are dependent on each measurement season. Electrical conductivity is 101.7-202.0 ¥ìS/cm, pH is 7.38-8.38, and water temperature is 10.8-23.3¡É. Major ion concentrations also varies seasonally. Mg is 2.39-7.45 mg/l, Ca is 4.11-11.54 mg/l, Na is 4.80-13.24 mg/l, K is 1.64-3.47 mg/l, SO4 is 2.78-8.25 mg/l, HCO3 is 17.78-36.61 mg/l, and Cl is 6.43-22.77 mg/l. The stream discharge and water

  13. Stormwater Management Impacts on Urban Stream Water Quality and Quantity During and After Development in Clarksburg, MD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urbanization and urban land use leads to degradation of local stream habitat generally termed as ‘urban stream syndrome.’ Best Management Practices (BMPs) are often used in an attempt to mitigate water quality and water quantity degradation in urban streams. Traditional developme...

  14. Inorganic Water Repellent Coatings for Thermal Protection Insulation on an Aerospace Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerstenau, D. W.; Huang, P.; Ravikumar, R.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this research was two-fold: first, to identify and test inorganic water-repellent materials that would be hydrophobic even after thermal cycling to temperatures above 600 C and, second, to develop a model that would link hydrophobicity of a material to the chemical properties of its constituent atoms. Four different materials were selected for detailed experimental study, namely, boron nitride, talc, molybdenite, and pyrophyllite, all of which have a layered structure made up of ionic/covalent bonds within the layers but with van der Waals bonds between the layers. The materials tested could be considered hydrophobic for a nonporous surface but none of the observed contact angles exceeded the necessary 90 degrees required for water repellency of porous materials. Boron nitride and talc were observed to retain their water-repellency when heated in air to temperatures that did not exceed 800 C, and molybdenite was found to be retain its hydrophobicity when heated to temperatures up to 600 C. For these three materials, oxidation and decomposition were identified to be the main cause for the breakdown of water repellency after repeated thermal cycling. Pyrophyllite shows the maximum promise as a potential water-repellent inorganic material, which, when treated initially at 900 C, retained its shape and remained hydrophobic for two thermal cycles where the maximum retreatment temperature is 900 C. A model was developed for predicting materials that might exhibit hydrophobicity by linking two chemical properties, namely, that the constituent ions of the compound belong to the soft acid-base category and that the fractional ionic character of the bonds be less than about 20 percent.

  15. Biomimetic artificial inorganic enzyme-free self-propelled microfish robot for selective detection of Pb(2+) in water.

    PubMed

    Moo, James Guo Sheng; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Guanjia; Pumera, Martin

    2014-04-07

    The availability of drinking water is of utmost importance for the world population. Anthropogenic pollutants of water, such as heavy-metal ions, are major problems in water contamination. The toxicity assays used range from cell assays to animal tests. Herein, we replace biological toxicity assays, which use higher organisms, with artificial inorganic self-propelled microtubular robots. The viability and activity of these robots are negatively influenced by heavy metals, such as Pb(2+) , in a similar manner to that of live fish models. This allows the establishment of a lethal dose (LD50 ) of heavy metal for artificial inorganic microfish robots. The self-propelled microfish robots show specific response to Pb(2+) compared to other heavy metals, such as Cd(2+) , and can be used for selective determination of Pb(2+) in water. It is a first step towards replacing the biological toxicity assays with biomimetic inorganic autonomous robotic systems.

  16. Evaluation of USEPA method 1622 for detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in stream waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, O. D.; Sobsey, M.D.; Schaefer, F. W.; Francy, D.S.; Nally, R.A.; Heaney, C.D.

    2001-01-01

    To improve surveillance for Cryptosporidium oocysts in water, the US Environmental Protection Agency developed method 1622, which consists of filtration, concentration, immunomagnetic separation, fluorescent antibody and 4, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) counter-staining, and microscopic evaluation. Two filters were compared for analysis of 11 stream water samples collected throughout the United States. Replicate 10-L stream water samples (unspiked and spiked with 100-250 oocysts) were tested to evaluate matrix effects. Oocyst recoveries from the stream water samples averaged 22% (standard deviation [SD] = ??17%) with a membrane disk and 12% (SD = ??6%) with a capsule filter. Oocyst recoveries from reagent water precision and recovery samples averaged 39% (SD = ??13%) with a membrane disk and 47% (SD = ??19%) with a capsule filter. These results demonstrate that Cryptosporidium oocysts can be recovered from stream waters using method 1622, but recoveries are lower than those from reagent-grade water. This research also evaluated concentrations of indicator bacteria in the stream water samples. Because few samples were oocyst-positive, relationships between detections of oocysts and concentrations of indicator organisms could not be determined.

  17. Heat as a tool for studying the movement of ground water near streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonestrom, David A.; Constantz, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Stream temperature has long been recognized as an important water quality parameter. Temperature plays a key role in the health of a stream?s aquatic life, both in the water column and in the benthic habitat of streambed sediments. Many fish are sensitive to temperature. For example, anadromous salmon require specific temperature ranges to successfully develop, migrate, and spawn [see Halupka and others, 2000]. Metabolic rates, oxygen requirements and availability, predation patterns, and susceptibility of organisms to contaminants are but a few of the many environmental responses regulated by temperature. Hydrologists traditionally treated streams and ground water as distinct, independent resources to be utilized and managed separately. With increasing demands on water supplies, however, hydrologists realized that streams and ground water are parts of a single, interconnected resource [see Winter and others, 1998]. Attempts to distinguish these resources for analytical or regulatory purposes are fraught with difficulty because each domain can supply (or drain) the other, with attendant possibilities for contamination exchange. Sustained depletion of one resource usually results in depletion of the other, propagating adverse effects within the watershed. An understanding of the interconnections between surface water and ground water is therefore essential. This understanding is still incomplete, but receiving growing attention from the research community. Exchanges between streams and shallow ground-water systems play a key role in controlling temperatures not only in streams, but also in their underlying sediments. As a result, analyses of subsurface temperature patterns provide information about surface-water/ground-water interactions. Chemical tracers are commonly used for tracing flow between streams and ground water. Introduction of chemical tracers in near-stream environments is, however, limited by real and perceived issues regarding introduced contamination

  18. Optimization of a GFAAS method for determination of total inorganic arsenic in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Michon, Jérôme; Deluchat, Véronique; Al Shukry, Raad; Dagot, Christophe; Bollinger, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-15

    The new 10mugl(-1) arsenic standard in drinking water has been a spur to the search for reliable routine analytical methods with a limit of detection at the mugl(-1) level. These methods also need to be easy to handle due to the routine analyses that are required in drinking water monitoring. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) meets these requirements, but the limit of detection is generally too high except for methods using a pre-concentration or separation step. The use of a high-intensity boosted discharge hollow-cathode lamp decreases the baseline noise level and therefore allows a lower limit of detection. The temperature program, chemical matrix modifier and thermal stabilizer additives were optimized for total inorganic arsenic determination with GFAAS, without preliminary treatment. The optimal furnace program was validated with a proprietary software. The limit of detection was 0.26mugAsl(-1) for a sample volume of 16mul corresponding to 4.2pgAs. This attractive technique is rapid as 20 samples can be analysed per hour. This method was validated with arsenic reference solutions. Its applicability was verified with artificial and natural groundwaters. Recoveries from 91 to 105% with relative standard deviation <5% can be easily achieved. The effect of interfering anions and cations commonly found in groundwater was studied. Only phosphates and silicates (respectively at 4 and 20mgl(-1)) lead to significant interferences in the determination of total inorganic arsenic at 4mugl(-1).

  19. Ground water stratification and delivery of nitrate to an incised stream under varying flow conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; O'Connell, M. E.; Prestegaard, K.L.

    2007-01-01

    Ground water processes affecting seasonal variations of surface water nitrate concentrations were investigated in an incised first-order stream in an agricultural watershed with a riparian forest in the coastal plain of Maryland. Aquifer characteristics including sediment stratigraphy, geochemistry, and hydraulic properties were examined in combination with chemical and isotopic analyses of ground water, macropore discharge, and stream water. The ground water flow system exhibits vertical stratification of hydraulic properties and redox conditions, with sub-horizontal boundaries that extend beneath the field and adjacent riparian forest. Below the minimum water table position, ground water age gradients indicate low recharge rates (2-5 cm yr-1) and long residence times (years to decades), whereas the transient ground water wedge between the maximum and minimum water table positions has a relatively short residence time (months to years), partly because of an upward increase in hydraulic conductivity. Oxygen reduction and denitrification in recharging ground waters are coupled with pyrite oxidation near the minimum water table elevation in a mottled weathering zone in Tertiary marine glauconitic sediments. The incised stream had high nitrate concentrations during high flow conditions when much of the ground water was transmitted rapidly across the riparian zone in a shallow oxic aquifer wedge with abundant outflow macropores, and low nitrate concentrations during low flow conditions when the oxic wedge was smaller and stream discharge was dominated by upwelling from the deeper denitrified parts of the aquifer. Results from this and similar studies illustrate the importance of near-stream geomorphology and subsurface geology as controls of riparian zone function and delivery of nitrate to streams in agricultural watersheds. ?? ASA, CSSA, SSSA.

  20. Bacterial production in the water column of small streams highly depends on terrestrial dissolved organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeber, Daniel; Poulsen, Jane R.; Rasmussen, Jes J.; Kronvang, Brian; Zak, Dominik; Kamjunke, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    In the recent years it has become clear that the largest part of the terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool is removed on the way from the land to the ocean. Yet it is still unclear, where in the freshwater systems terrestrial DOC is actually taken up, and for streams DOC uptake was assumed to happen mostly at the stream bottom (benthic zone). However, a recent monitoring study implies that water column but not benthic bacteria are strongly affected by the amount and composition of DOM entering streams from the terrestrial zone. We conducted an experiment to compare the reaction of the bacterial production and heterotrophic uptake in the water column and the benthic zone to a standardized source of terrestrial DOC (leaf leachate from Beech litter). In detail, we sampled gravel and water from eight streams with a gradient in stream size and land use. For each stream four different treatments were incubated at 16°C for three days and each stream: filtered stream water with gravel stones (representing benthic zone bacteria) or unfiltered stream water (representing water column bacteria), both either with (n = 5) or, without (n = 3) leaf leachate. We found that the bacterial uptake of leaf litter DOC was higher for the benthic zone likely due to the higher bacterial production compared to the water column. In contrast, the bacterial production per amount of leaf leachate DOC taken up was significantly higher for the bacteria in the water column than for those in the benthic zone. This clearly indicates a higher growth efficiency with the leaf leachate DOC for the bacteria in the water column than in the benthic zone. We found a high variability for the growth efficiency in the water column, which was best explained by a negative correlation of the DOC demand with stream width (R² = 0.86, linear correlation of log-transformed data). This was not the case for the benthic zone bacteria (R² = 0.02). This implies that water column bacteria in very small streams

  1. Effects of Urbanization on Stream Water Quality in the City of Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, N. E.

    2009-05-01

    A long-term stream water-quality monitoring network was established in the City of Atlanta (COA) during 2003 to assess baseline water-quality conditions and the effects of urbanization on stream water quality. Routine hydrologically-based manual stream sampling, including several concurrent manual point and equal width increment sampling, was conducted approximately 12 times per year at 21 stations, with drainage areas ranging from 3.7 to 232 km2. Eleven of the stations are real-time (RT) water-quality stations having continuous measures of stream stage/discharge, pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, and turbidity, and automatic samplers for stormwater collection. Samples were analyzed for field parameters, and a broad suite of water-quality and sediment-related constituents. This paper summarizes an evaluation of field parameters and concentrations of major ions, minor and trace metals, nutrient species (nitrogen and phosphorus), and coliform bacteria among stations and with respect to watershed characteristics and plausible sources from 2003 through September 2007. The concentrations of most constituents in the COA streams are statistically higher than those of two nearby reference streams. Concentrations are statistically different among stations for several constituents, despite high variability both within and among stations. The combination of routine manual sampling, automatic sampling during stormflows, and real-time water-quality monitoring provided sufficient information about the variability of urban stream water quality to develop hypotheses for causes of water-quality differences among COA streams. Fecal coliform bacteria concentrations of most individual samples at each station exceeded Georgia's water-quality standard for any water-usage class. High chloride concentrations occur at three stations and are hypothesized to be associated with discharges of chlorinated combined sewer overflows, drainage of swimming pool(s), and

  2. Changing of water status along a small stream due to urbanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribovszki, Z.; Kalicz, P.; Csáfordi, P.; Szita, R.; Sermaul, K.

    2012-04-01

    Considerable qualitative and quantitative changes can be generally detected in case of urban sections of the streams as the results of strong human interventions along the stream channel or in the drainage basin in urban areas. The water status becomes worse and the water regime becomes more extreme. The negative changes have an effect on the broader environment and they bring usually diminution of the biodiversity. The assessments of the above mentioned combined effects are very important from the viewpoint of the good state of the water systems, which is the main purpose in the European Water Framework Directive. Water status changing are monitored and analysed along different (natural, rural and urbanized) sections of a small stream (Rák Brook in Sopron) taking into account the connection of the hydrological and the water quality monitoring expediently. Seven monitoring points are set up along the stream system of the Rák Brook from the headwaters to the stream mouth, in designation of the points mainly focusing the change of the surface cover and human impacts. Samples were taken on the measurement points fortnightly or for flood-linked between the dates 01.09.2010-01.03.2012. The following features were examined: hydro-morphological (velocity, discharge, stream bed sediment type), physico-chemical (pH, conductivity, suspended sediment), chemical (sulphate, chloride, COD, ammonium, nitrate, total phosphorous), and biological (makrozoobenthos) parameters. Simple and multivariate statistical methods were used for data processing to present the magnitude of the differences between the stream sections. Based on the results the effect of the different degree of urbanization on the drainage basin and the hydro-morphological interventions in the stream bed was well demonstrable.

  3. Regional Geochemical Results from Analyses of Stream-Water, Stream-Sediment, Soil, Soil-Water, Bedrock, and Vegetation Samples, Tangle Lakes District, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Bronwen; Gough, L.P.; Wanty, R.B.; Lee, G.K.; Vohden, James; O'Neill, J. M.; Kerin, L.J.

    2008-01-01

    We report chemical analyses of stream-water, stream-sediment, soil, soil-water, bedrock, and vegetation samples collected from the headwaters of the Delta River (Tangle Lakes District, Mount Hayes 1:250,000-scale quadrangle) in east-central Alaska for the period June 20-25, 2006. Additionally, we present mineralogic analyses of stream sediment, concentrated by panning. The study area includes the southwestward extent of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Delta River Mining District (Bittenbender and others, 2007), including parts of the Delta River Archeological District, and encompasses an area of about 500 km2(approximately bordered by the Denali Highway to the south, near Round Tangle Lake, northward to the foothills of the Alaska Range (fig. 1). The primary focus of this study was the chemical characterization of native materials, especially surface-water and sediment samples, of first-order streams from the headwaters of the Delta River. The impetus for this work was the need, expressed by the Alaska Department of Natural Resources (ADNR), for an inventory of geochemical and hydrogeochemical baseline information about the Delta River Mining District. This information is needed because of a major upturn in exploration, drilling, and general mineral-resources assessments in the region since the late 1990s. Currently, the study area, called the 'MAN Project' area is being explored by Pure Nickel, Inc. (http://www.purenickel.com/s/MAN_Alaska.asp), and includes both Cu-Au-Ag and Ni-Cu-PGE (Pt-Pd-Au-Ag) mining claims. Geochemical data on surface-water, stream-sediment, soil, soil-water, grayleaf willow (Salix glauca L.), and limited bedrock samples are provided along with the analytical methodologies used and panned-concentrate mineralogy. We are releasing the data at this time with only minimal interpretation.

  4. Ground water contamination in the area adjoining zinc smelter effluent stream.

    PubMed

    Garg, V K; Totawat, K L

    2004-01-01

    A preliminary survey of the area adjoining to zinc smelter effluent stream was undertaken to assess ground water contamination. Twenty-five ground water samples from the wells located in the study area were collected and grouped into nine groups based on their lateral and longitudinal position from the stream carrying the effluent discharged from zinc smelter, Debari- Udaipur. The study indicate that waters of wells situated in the vicinity of effluent stream (255m radius) were of medium salinity having higher levels of Ca and Mg and lower values of pH as compared to the waters of the reference wells situated far away from the effluent stream. The Fe, Zn, Cd, Cl, F and SO4 contents ofthe water from the wells located within 80m vicinity of the effluent stream were above the permissible limits for drinking purposes. Furthermore the Zn, Cl and SO4 levels in these waters were so high that they were even not suitable for irrigation, indicating a gradual encroachment of effluent into the native ground water.

  5. Water chemistry-based classification of streams and implications for restoring mined Appalachian watersheds

    SciTech Connect

    Merovich, G.T.; Stiles, J.M.; Petty, J.T.; Ziemkiewicz, P.F.; Fulton, J.B.

    2007-07-15

    We analyzed seasonal water samples from the Cheat and Tygart Valley river basins, West Virginia, USA, in an attempt to classify streams based on water chemistry in this coal-mining region. We also examined temporal variability among water samples. Principal component analysis identified two important dimensions of variation in water chemistry. This variation was determined largely by mining-related factors (elevated metals, sulfates, and conductivity) and an alkalinity-hardness gradient. Cluster analysis grouped water samples into six types that we described as reference, soft, hard, transitional, moderate acid mine drainage, and severe acid mine drainage. These types were statistically distinguishable in multidimensional space. Classification tree analysis confirmed that chemical constituents related to acid mine drainage and acid rain distinguished these six groups. Hard, soft, and severe acid mine drainage type streams were temporally constant compared to streams identified as reference, transitional, and moderate acid mine drainage type, which had a greater tendency to shift to a different water type between seasons. Our research is the first to establish a statistically supported stream classification system in mined watersheds. The results suggest that human-related stressors superimposed on geology are responsible for producing distinct water quality types in this region as opposed to more continuous variation in chemistry that would be expected in an unimpacted setting. These findings provide a basis for simplifying stream monitoring efforts, developing generalized remediation strategies, and identifying specific remediation priorities in mined Appalachian watersheds.

  6. Water chemistry-based classification of streams and implications for restoring mined Appalachian watersheds.

    PubMed

    Merovich, George T; Stiles, James M; Petty, J Todd; Ziemkiewicz, Paul F; Fulton, Jennifer B

    2007-07-01

    We analyzed seasonal water samples from the Cheat and Tygart Valley river basins, West Virginia, USA, in an attempt to classify streams based on water chemistry in this coal-mining region. We also examined temporal variability among water samples. Principal component analysis identified two important dimensions of variation in water chemistry. This variation was determined largely by mining-related factors (elevated metals, sulfates, and conductivity) and an alkalinity-hardness gradient. Cluster analysis grouped water samples into six types that we described as reference, soft, hard, transitional, moderate acid mine drainage, and severe acid mine drainage. These types were statistically distinguishable in multidimensional space. Classification tree analysis confirmed that chemical constituents related to acid mine drainage and acid rain distinguished these six groups. Hard, soft, and severe acid mine drainage type streams were temporally constant compared to streams identified as reference, transitional, and moderate acid mine drainage type, which had a greater tendency to shift to a different water type between seasons. Our research is the first to establish a statistically supported stream classification system in mined watersheds. The results suggest that human-related stressors superimposed on geology are responsible for producing distinct water quality types in this region as opposed to more continuous variation in chemistry that would be expected in an unimpacted setting. These findings provide a basis for simplifying stream monitoring efforts, developing generalized remediation strategies, and identifying specific remediation priorities in mined Appalachian watersheds.

  7. Water quality of streams in Johnson County, Kansas, 2002-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    Water quality of streams in Johnson County, Kansas was evaluated from October 2002 through December 2007 in a cooperative study between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Johnson County Stormwater Management Program. Water quality at 42 stream sites, representing urban and rural basins, was characterized by evaluating benthic macroinvertebrates, water (discrete and continuous data), and/or streambed sediment. Point and nonpoint sources and transport were described for water-quality constituents including suspended sediment, dissolved solids and major ions, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), indicator bacteria, pesticides, and organic wastewater and pharmaceutical compounds. The information obtained from this study is being used by city and county officials to develop effective management plans for protecting and improving stream quality. This fact sheet summarizes important results from three comprehensive reports published as part of the study and available on the World Wide Web at http://ks.water.usgs.gov/Kansas/studies/qw/joco/. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  8. Maine StreamStats: a water-resources web application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Reports referenced in this fact sheet present the regression equations used to estimate the flow statistics, describe the errors associated with the estimates, and describe the methods used to develop the equations and to measure the basin characteristics used in the equations. Limitations of the methods are also described in the reports; for example, all of the equations are appropriate only for ungaged, unregulated, rural streams in Maine.

  9. Factors affecting reservoir and stream-water quality in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area and implications for source-water protection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldron, Marcus C.; Bent, Gardner C.

    2001-01-01

    milligrams per liter), and lowest in Fresh Pond (54 milligrams per liter). Bed sediments in Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Reservoirs were enriched in iron, manganese, and arsenic relative to those in the impounded lower Charles River in Boston, Massachusetts. Trophic state indices, calculated for each reservoir based on nutrient concentrations, water-column transparency, and phytoplankton abundances, indicated that the upper and middle basins of Hobbs Brook Reservoir were moderately to highly productive and likely to produce algal blooms; the lower basin of Hobbs Brook Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir were similar and intermediate in productivity, and Fresh Pond was relatively unproductive and unlikely to produce algal blooms. This pattern is likely due to sedimentation of organic and inorganic particles in the three basins of Hobbs Brook Reservoir and in Stony Brook Reservoir. Molar ratios of nitrogen to phosphorus ranged from 55 in Stony Brook Reservoir to 120 in Hobbs Brook Reservoir, indicating that phytoplankton algae in these water bodies may be phosphorus limited and therefore sensitive to small increases in phosphorus loading from the drainage basin. Nitrogen loads were found to be less important than phosphorus to the trophic condition of the reservoirs. Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook, the two principle streams draining the Cambridge drinking-water source area, differed in their relative contributions to many of the estimated constituent loads. The estimated load of fecal coliform bacteria was more than seven times larger for the mainly residential Stony Brook subbasin upstream from Kendal Green, Mass., than it was for the more commercial and industrial Hobbs Brook subbasin, though the drainage areas of the two subbasins differ only by about 20 percent. The State standard for fecal coliform bacteria in streams in the Cambridge drinking-water source area (20 colony forming units per 100 milliliters) was exceeded at all sampling stations. Estimated s

  10. Formation and reactivity of inorganic and organic chloramines and bromamines during oxidative water treatment.

    PubMed

    Heeb, Michèle B; Kristiana, Ina; Trogolo, Daniela; Arey, J Samuel; von Gunten, Urs

    2017-03-01

    The formation and further reactions of halamines during oxidative water treatment can be relevant for water quality. In this study, we investigated the formation and reactivity of several inorganic and organic halamines (monochloramine, N-chloromethylamine, N-chlorodimethylamine, monobromamine, dibromamine, N-bromomethylamine, N,N-dibromomethylamine, and N-bromodimethylamine) by kinetic experiments, transformation product analysis, and quantum chemical computations. Kinetic model simulations were conducted to evaluate the relevance of halamines for various water treatment scenarios. Halamines were quickly formed from the reaction of chlorine and bromine with ammonia or organic amines. Species-specific second-order rate constants for the reaction of chlorine and bromine with ammonia, methyl- and dimethylamine were in the order of 10(6)-10(8) M(-1)s(-1). The formed halamines were found to be reactive towards phenolic compounds, forming halogenated phenols via electrophilic aromatic substitution (phenol and resorcinol) or quinones via electron transfer (catechol and hydroquinone). At near neutral pH, apparent second-order rate constants for these reactions were in the order of 10(-4)-10(-1) M(-1)s(-1) for chloramines and 10(1)-10(2) M(-1)s(-1) for bromamines. Quantum chemical computations were used to determine previously unknown aqueous pKa values, gas phase bond dissociation energies (BDE) and partial atomic charges of the halamines, allowing a better understanding of their reactivities. Kinetic model simulations, based on the results of this study, showed that during chlorination inorganic and organic chloramines are the main halamines formed. However, their further reactions with organic matter are outcompeted kinetically by chlorine. During ozonation, mainly inorganic bromamines are formed, since ozone quickly oxidizes organic amines. The further reactions of bromamine are typically outcompeted by ozone and thus generally of minor importance. The use of

  11. Assessing effects of water abstraction on fish assemblages in Mediterranean streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benejam, Lluis; Angermeier, Paul L.; Munne, Antoni; García-Berthou, Emili

    2010-01-01

    1. Water abstraction strongly affects streams in arid and semiarid ecosystems, particularly where there is a Mediterranean climate. Excessive abstraction reduces the availability of water for human uses downstream and impairs the capacity of streams to support native biota. 2. We investigated the flow regime and related variables in six river basins of the Iberian Peninsula and show that they have been strongly altered, with declining flows (autoregressive models) and groundwater levels during the 20th century. These streams had lower flows and more frequent droughts than predicted by the official hydrological model used in this region. Three of these rivers were sometimes dry, whereas there were predicted by the model to be permanently flowing. Meanwhile, there has been no decrease in annual precipitation. 3. We also investigated the fish assemblage of a stream in one of these river basins (Tordera) for 6 years and show that sites more affected by water abstraction display significant differences in four fish metrics (catch per unit effort, number of benthic species, number of intolerant species and proportional abundance of intolerant individuals) commonly used to assess the biotic condition of streams. 4. We discuss the utility of these metrics in assessing impacts of water abstraction and point out the need for detailed characterisation of the natural flow regime (and hence drought events) prior to the application of biotic indices in streams severely affected by water abstraction. In particular, in cases of artificially dry streams, it is more appropriate for regulatory agencies to assign index scores that reflect biotic degradation than to assign ‘missing’ scores, as is presently customary in assessments of Iberian streams.

  12. Nitrogen dynamics at the groundwater-surface water interface of a degraded urban stream.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Paul M; Groffman, Peter M; Striz, Elise A; Kaushal, Sujay S

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have quantified the impact of urbanization on the biogeochemistry of streams at the groundwater-surface water interface, a zone that may be critical for managing nitrogen transformations. We investigated the groundwater ecosystem of Minebank Run, a geomorphically degraded urban stream near Baltimore, Maryland in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Our objectives were to identify the spatial and temporal extent of chemical, microbial, and hydrological factors known to influence denitrification, a microbial process that removes nitrate nitrogen (NO(3)(-)). Measurements of denitrification enzyme activity confirmed that subsurface sediments at Minebank Run, especially those with high concentrations of organic carbon, have the capacity to denitrify NO(3)(-). Levels of NO(3)(-) in groundwater were lower where more dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was available, suggesting that denitrification and removal of NO(3)(-) in groundwater were limited by DOC availability. Groundwater NO(3)(-) was highest when groundwater levels were highest, which, in turn, corresponded to high oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), indicative of high groundwater-surface water exchange. Stream flow patterns controlled stream bank and bed infiltration and, subsequently, dictated groundwater levels. Declines in water levels likely increased subsurface mixing, which led to low ORP conditions that sustained NO(3)(-) removal via denitrification. The groundwater-surface water interface is a zone of active nitrogen transformation. Management efforts that increase DOC availability to denitrifiers, reduce stream-flow velocity and flashiness, and increase groundwater residence time will likely improve the nitrogen removal capacity of urban stream channels.

  13. Water Quality Interpolation Using Various In-Stream Distance Weighting Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saia, S. M.; Walter, T.; Sullivan, P.; Christie, R.

    2012-12-01

    Interpolation of water quality samples along the reach of a stream can be used to (1) extend point data to un-sampled locations along the stream network, (2) identify spatial patterns in water quality, and (3) understand how natural and human factors shape these patterns. Kriging, one of the most commonly used geospatial interpolation methods, assumes that nearby sites are spatially auto-correlated; sites closer together have more in common than sites further away. Studies have introduced kriging methods that weight in-stream distance metrics with either landscape attributes (i.e. topography, land use, temperature, and various soil properties) or stream order. Here we present a weighting scheme that combines both surrounding landscape attributes with stream order. We use R, an open-source programming language, to interpolate water quality data collected from the Mianus River in Westchester County, New York. As the major drinking water supply for approximately 100,000 people in Connecticut and New York, the Mianus River watershed community values the cleanliness of its water for recreational activities as well as the sustenance of terrestrial and aquatic wildlife. With the in-stream interpolation results, we can gain a better understanding of factors contributing to water quality issues and observed biogeochemical patterns within the watershed. For example, we can help answer questions such as: How can we target landscape stabilization projects to reduce turbidity? If we find that the most powerful weighting is associated with first order streams and cropland, we know conservation efforts should be focused on agricultural head waters.

  14. Analytical assessment about the simultaneous quantification of releasable pharmaceutical relevant inorganic nanoparticles in tap water and domestic waste water.

    PubMed

    Krystek, Petra; Bäuerlein, Patrick S; Kooij, Pascal J F

    2015-03-15

    For pharmaceutical applications, the use of inorganic engineered nanoparticles is of growing interest while silver (Ag) and gold (Au) are the most relevant elements. A few methods were developed recently but the validation and the application testing were quite limited. Therefore, a routinely suitable multi element method for the identification of nanoparticles of different sizes below 100 nm and elemental composition by applying asymmetric flow field flow fraction (AF4) - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) is developed. A complete validation model of the quantification of releasable pharmaceutical relevant inorganic nanoparticles based on Ag and Au is presented for the most relevant aqueous matrices of tap water and domestic waste water. The samples are originated from locations in the Netherlands and it is of great interest to study the unwanted presence of Ag and Au as nanoparticle residues due to possible health and environmental risks. During method development, instability effects are observed for 60 nm and 70 nm Ag ENPs with different capping agents. These effects are studied more closely in relation to matrix effects. Besides the methodological aspects, the obtained analytical results and relevant performance characteristics (e.g. measuring range, limit of detection, repeatability, reproducibility, trueness, and expanded uncertainty of measurement) are determined and discussed. For the chosen aqueous matrices, the results of the performance characteristics are significantly better for Au ENPs in comparison to Ag ENPs; e.g. repeatability and reproducibility are below 10% for all Au ENPs respectively maximal 27% repeatability for larger Ag ENPs. The method is a promising tool for the simultaneous determination of releasable pharmaceutical relevant inorganic nanoparticles.

  15. Methods for characterizing stream habitat as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meador, Michael R.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Cuffney, Thomas F.; Gurtz, Martin E.

    1993-01-01

    Stream habitat is characterized in the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water-Quality Assessment Program as part of an integrated physical, chemical, and biological assessment of the Nation?s water quality. The goal of stream habitat characterization is to relate habitat to other physical, chemical, and biological factors to describe water-quality conditions. To accomplish this goal, environmental settings are described at sites selected for water-quality assessment. In addition, spatial and temporal patterns in habitat are examined at local, regional, and national levels. Although habitat characterization is an important component of a number of Federal, State, and local water-quality assessment programs, no current set of habitat evaluation procedures meets the objectives of the habitat assessment component of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Evaluation of stream habitat is based on a spatially hierarchical framework that incorporates habitat data at basin, segment, reach, and microhabitat scales. This framework provides a basis for national consistency in collection techniques while allowing flexibility in habitat assessment within individual study units. Procedures are described for collecting habitat data at basin and stream segment scales that include use of geographic information system data bases, maps, and aerial photographs. Data collected at the stream reach scale include more than 34 riparian and instream habitat characteristics evaluated during onetime site visits, and surveys of the channel and riparian area during repeated sampling.

  16. Remote Monitoring, Inorganic Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview of applicability, amenability, and operating parameter ranges for various inorganic parameters:this chapter will also provide a compilation of existing and new online technologies for determining inorganic compounds in water samples. A wide vari...

  17. A coupled surface-water and ground-water flow model (MODBRANCH) for simulation of stream-aquifer interaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric D.; Wexler, Eliezer J.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water and surface-water flow models traditionally have been developed separately, with interaction between subsurface flow and streamflow either not simulated at all or accounted for by simple formulations. In areas with dynamic and hydraulically well-connected ground-water and surface-water systems, stream-aquifer interaction should be simulated using deterministic responses of both systems coupled at the stream-aquifer interface. Accordingly, a new coupled ground-water and surface-water model was developed by combining the U.S. Geological Survey models MODFLOW and BRANCH; the interfacing code is referred to as MODBRANCH. MODFLOW is the widely used modular three-dimensional, finite-difference ground-water model, and BRANCH is a one-dimensional numerical model commonly used to simulate unsteady flow in open- channel networks. MODFLOW was originally written with the River package, which calculates leakage between the aquifer and stream, assuming that the stream's stage remains constant during one model stress period. A simple streamflow routing model has been added to MODFLOW, but is limited to steady flow in rectangular, prismatic channels. To overcome these limitations, the BRANCH model, which simulates unsteady, nonuniform flow by solving the St. Venant equations, was restructured and incorporated into MODFLOW. Terms that describe leakage between stream and aquifer as a function of streambed conductance and differences in aquifer and stream stage were added to the continuity equation in BRANCH. Thus, leakage between the aquifer and stream can be calculated separately in each model, or leakages calculated in BRANCH can be used in MODFLOW. Total mass in the coupled models is accounted for and conserved. The BRANCH model calculates new stream stages for each time interval in a transient simulation based on upstream boundary conditions, stream properties, and initial estimates of aquifer heads. Next, aquifer heads are calculated in MODFLOW based on stream

  18. Changes in Serum Adiponectin in Mice Chronically Exposed to Inorganic Arsenic in Drinking Water.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuanbo; Li, Ying; Liu, Junqiu; Ji, Xiaohong; Zhao, Lijun; Wei, Yudan

    2017-02-11

    Cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus are prominent features of glucose and lipid metabolism disorders. Adiponectin is a key adipokine that is largely involved in glucose and lipid metabolism processes. A growing body of evidence suggests that chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic is associated with cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. We hypothesized that arsenic exposure may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus by affecting the level of adiponectin. In this study, we examined serum adiponectin levels, as well as serum levels of metabolic measures (including fasting blood glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol) in C57BL/6 mice exposed to inorganic arsenic in drinking water (5 and 50 ppm NaAsO2) for 18 weeks. Body mass and adiposity were monitored throughout the study. We found no significant changes in serum insulin and glucose levels in mice treated with arsenic for 18 weeks. However, arsenic exposure decreased serum levels of adiponectin, triglyceride, and HDL-cholesterol. Further, an inverse relationship was observed between urinary concentrations of total arsenic and serum levels of adiponectin. This study suggests that arsenic exposure could disturb the metabolism of lipids and increase the risk of cardiovascular disease by reducing the level of adiponectin.

  19. Surface-Water Exchanges for Streams Entering Lakes Compared with Shoreline Exchanges in General

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, R. C.; Allander, K.; Neilson, B. T.; Niswonger, R. G.; Constantz, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Streamflow and thermal patterns suggest that stream/streambed exchanges are more dynamic than lake/sediment exchanges along the nearby shoreline. A synoptic field program was carried out in September 2012 for Lake Tahoe NV, when baseflow is dominant and diurnal temperature patterns are large as alpine night temperatures cool tributary waters to well below lake water temperatures. Two streams with significant adjoining lakeshores were chosen for thermal and hydraulic instrumentation, with continuous logging and periodic water quality sampling. Due to partial channelization, Incline Creek flows and discharges nearly perpendicular to the shoreline on the lake's north shore, while in a natural setting Marlette Creek forms a summer barrier sandbar at its mouth on the lake's eastern shore. A suite of measurements were gathered, including continuous surface and subsurface water levels and temperatures, as well as periodic samples of nutrients and field parameters. For Incline Creek, the thermal and hydraulic patterns were monitored 1.3 m upstream of the mouth, across the mouth of the stream, and 1.3 m into the lake. These data were compared with data collected at equivalent locations along the shoreline away from the stream. Initial results reveal considerably more dynamic spatial and temporal patterns of exchange associated with the stream. For Marlette Creek, a barrier sandbar forms and spreads across the mouth as baseflow recession extends to the fall, and by September streamflow only directly reaches the lake during predawn hours when evapotranspiration is at a minimum. During September 2012, there was ponding behind the barrier sandbar resulting in stream-originated groundwater rapidly flowing through the sandbar, with high dissolved oxygen gradients approaching the lake. As a result of these synoptic results, a more extensive monitoring program was developed for September 2013, with additional instrumentation including automated seepage meters and infrared imaging

  20. Water Quality, Macroinvertebrates, and Fisheries in Tailwaters and Related Streams. An Annotated Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    occurred. Erratic patterns of water release strongly influenced fisherman use and harvest. During 1971 and 1972, years of below average water release...in numbers of fish caught. Regression equations are presented to describe relations between angling activity and patterns of water release over a wide...their tailwaters are summarized here. The complex flow pattern in many reservoirs has an important influence on down- stream water temperatures. In

  1. Link between DOC in near surface peat and stream water in an upland catchment.

    PubMed

    Clark, Joanna M; Lane, Stuart N; Chapman, Pippa J; Adamson, John K

    2008-10-15

    Hydrologic transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from peat soils may differ to organo-mineral soils in how they responded to changes in flow, because of differences in soil profile and hydrology. In well-drained organo-mineral soils, low flow is through the lower mineral layer where DOC is absorbed and high flow is through the upper organic layer where DOC is produced. DOC concentrations in streams draining organo-mineral soils typically increase with flow. In saturated peat soils, both high and low flows are through an organic layer where DOC is produced. Therefore, DOC in stream water draining peat may not increase in response to changes in flow as there is no switch in flow path between a mineral and organic layer. To verify this, we conducted a high-resolution monitoring study of soil and stream water at an upland peat catchment in northern England. Our data showed a strong positive correlation between DOC concentrations at -1 and -5 cm depth and stream water, and weaker correlations between concentrations at -20 to -50 cm depth and stream water. Although near surface organic material appears to be the key source of stream water DOC in both peat and organo-mineral soils, we observed a negative correlation between stream flow and DOC concentrations instead of a positive correlation as DOC released from organic layers during low and high flow was diluted by rainfall. The differences in DOC transport processes between peat and organo-mineral soils have different implications for our understanding of long-term changes in DOC exports. While increased rainfall may cause an increase in DOC flux from peat due to an increase in water volume, it may cause a decrease in concentrations. This response is contrary to expected changes in DOC exports from organo-mineral soils, where increase rainfall is likely to result in an increase in flux and concentration.

  2. Isotopic variations of dissolved copper and zinc in stream waters affected by historical mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borrok, D.M.; Nimick, D.A.; Wanty, R.B.; Ridley, W.I.

    2008-01-01

    Zinc and Cu play important roles in the biogeochemistry of natural systems, and it is likely that these interactions result in mass-dependent fractionations of their stable isotopes. In this study, we examine the relative abundances of dissolved Zn and Cu isotopes in a variety of stream waters draining six historical mining districts located in the United States and Europe. Our goals were to (1) determine whether streams from different geologic settings have unique or similar Zn and Cu isotopic signatures and (2) to determine whether Zn and Cu isotopic signatures change in response to changes in dissolved metal concentrations over well-defined diel (24-h) cycles. Average ??66Zn and ??65Cu values for streams varied from +0.02??? to +0.46??? and -0.7??? to +1.4???, respectively, demonstrating that Zn and Cu isotopes are heterogeneous among the measured streams. Zinc or Cu isotopic changes were not detected within the resolution of our measurements over diel cycles for most streams. However, diel changes in Zn isotopes were recorded in one stream where the fluctuations of dissolved Zn were the largest. We calculate an apparent separation factor of ???0.3??? (66/64Zn) between the dissolved and solid Zn reservoirs in this stream with the solid taking up the lighter Zn isotope. The preference of the lighter isotope in the solid reservoir may reflect metabolic uptake of Zn by microorganisms. Additional field investigations must evaluate the contributions of soils, rocks, minerals, and anthropogenic components to Cu and Zn isotopic fluxes in natural waters. Moreover, rigorous experimental work is necessary to quantify fractionation factors for the biogeochemical reactions that are likely to impact Cu and Zn isotopes in hydrologic systems. This initial investigation of Cu and Zn isotopes in stream waters suggests that these isotopes may be powerful tools for probing biogeochemical processes in surface waters on a variety of temporal and spatial scales.

  3. Variability and comparison of hyporheic water temperatures and seepage fluxes in a small Atlantic salmon stream.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew D; Caissie, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Ground water discharge is often a significant factor in the quality of fish spawning and rearing habitat and for highly biologically productive streams. In the present study, water temperatures (stream and hyporheic) and seepage fluxes were used to characterize shallow ground water discharge and recharge within thestreambed of Catamaran Brook, a small Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) stream in central New Brunswick, Canada. Three study sites were instrumented using a total of 10 temperature sensors and 18 seepage meters. Highly variable mean seepage fluxes, ranging from 1.7 x 10(-4) to 2.5 cm3 m(-2) sec(-1), and mean hyporheic water temperatures, ranging from 10.5 degrees to 18.0 degrees C, at depths of 20 to 30 cm in the streambed were dependent on streambed location (left versus right stream bank and site location) and time during the summer sampling season. Temperature data were usefulfor determining if an area of the streambed was under discharge (positive flux), recharge (negative flux), or parallel flow (no flux) conditions and seepage meters were used to directly measure the quantity of water flux. Hyporheic water temperature measurements and specific conductance measurements of the seepage meter sample water, mean values ranging from 68.8 to 157.9 microS/cm, provided additional data for determining flux sources. Three stream banks were consistently under discharge conditions, while the other three stream banks showed reversal from discharge to recharge conditions over the sampling season. Results indicate that the majority of the water collected in the seepage meters was composed of surface water. The data obtained suggests that even though a positive seepage flux is often interpreted as ground water discharge, this discharging water may be of stream water origin that has recently entered the hyporheic zone.The measurement of seepage flux in conjunction with hyporheic water temperature or other indicators of water origin should be considered when attempting to

  4. Incorporation of water-use summaries into the StreamStats web application for Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ries, Kernell G.; Horn, Marilee A.; Nardi, Mark R.; Tessler, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 25,000 new households and thousands of new jobs will be established in an area that extends from southwest to northeast of Baltimore, Maryland, as a result of the Federal Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) process, with consequent new demands on the water resources of the area. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Maryland Department of the Environment, has extended the area of implementation and added functionality to an existing map-based Web application named StreamStats to provide an improved tool for planning and managing the water resources in the BRAC-affected areas. StreamStats previously was implemented for only a small area surrounding Baltimore, Maryland, and it was extended to cover all BRAC-affected areas. StreamStats could provide previously published streamflow statistics, such as the 1-percent probability flood and the 7-day, 10-year low flow, for U.S. Geological Survey data-collection stations and estimates of streamflow statistics for any user-selected point on a stream within the implemented area. The application was modified for this study to also provide summaries of water withdrawals and discharges upstream from any user-selected point on a stream. This new functionality was made possible by creating a Web service that accepts a drainage-basin delineation from StreamStats, overlays it on a spatial layer of water withdrawal and discharge points, extracts the water-use data for the identified points, and sends it back to StreamStats, where it is summarized for the user. The underlying water-use data were extracted from the U.S. Geological Survey's Site-Specific Water-Use Database System (SWUDS) and placed into a Microsoft Access database that was created for this study for easy linkage to the Web service and StreamStats. This linkage of StreamStats with water-use information from SWUDS should enable Maryland regulators and planners to make more informed decisions on the use of water resources in the BRAC area, and

  5. Surface and ground water quality in a restored urban stream affected by road salts

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2001 research began in Minebank Run, MD to examine the impact of restoration on water quality. Our research area was to determine if road salts in the surface and ground waters are detrimental to the stream channel restoration. The upstream reach (UP), above the Baltimore I-...

  6. Water quality of selected streams in the coal area of east-central Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKinley, P.W.

    1979-01-01

    In October 1975 the U.S. Geological Survey established a network of nine data-collection stations on eight streams in Montana to monitor water quality in potential coal-mining areas. The report summarizes and evaluates the water-quality data that have been collected during the first 2 years (3 years for 1 station) of network operation. Big Dry Creek, Little Dry Creek, Timber Creek , and Nelson Creek are the principal streams forming the Big Dry Creek basin, which is tributary to the Missouri River. These streams all contain water of the sodium sulfate type. Concentrations were high for dissolved solids (433-4,570 mg/L) and generally low for nutrients and trace elements. Prairie Elk Creek, Sand Creek, and the Redwater River flow directly into the Missouri River. Prairie Elk and Sand Creeks have mainly sodium bicarbonate water, whereas the Redwater River is predominately sodium sulfate water. All three streams contained water of high dissolved-solids concentration (160-3,370 mg/L) and generally low nutrient and trace-element concentrations. Burns Creek is tributary to the Yellowstone River. The water type is generally sodium sulfate during the spring and summer and sodium bicarbonate during the fall and winter. Water from Burns Creek ranged from 382 to 1,420 mg/L dissolved solids. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. The value of off-stream water developments for protecting riparian areas in northeastern Oregon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While off-stream water developments have long been considered a valuable tool for managing rangeland livestock distribution, actually quantifying the efficacy of these developments has been difficult. Continuous monitoring of the timing and intensity of livestock use near water developments has bee...

  8. DETECTION OF HUMAN ENTERIC VIRUSES IN STREAM WATER WITH RT-PCR AND CELL CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multiplex RT-PCR method was used to measure virus occurrence at five stream water sites that span a range of hydroclimatic, water-quality, and land-use characteristics. The performance of the molecular method was evaluated in comparison to traditional cell culture and Escherich...

  9. Submesoscale streamers exchange water on the north wall of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klymak, Jody M.; Shearman, R. Kipp; Gula, Jonathan; Lee, Craig M.; D'Asaro, Eric A.; Thomas, Leif N.; Harcourt, Ramsey R.; Shcherbina, Andrey Y.; Sundermeyer, Miles A.; Molemaker, Jeroen; McWilliams, James C.

    2016-02-01

    The Gulf Stream is a major conduit of warm surface water from the tropics to the subpolar North Atlantic. Here we observe and simulate a submesoscale (<20 km) mechanism by which the Gulf Stream exchanges water with subpolar water to the north. Along isopycnals, the front has a sharp compensated temperature-salinity contrast, with distinct mixed water between the two water masses 2 and 4 km wide. This mixed water does not increase downstream despite substantial energy available for mixing. A series of streamers detrain this water at the crest of meanders. Subpolar water replaces the mixed water and resharpens the front. The water mass exchange accounts for a northward flux of salt of 0.5-2.5 psu m2 s-1, (large-scale diffusivity O (100 m2 s-1)). This is similar to bulk-scale flux estimates of 1.2 psu m2 s-1 and supplies fresher water to the Gulf Stream required for the production of 18° subtropical mode water.

  10. Impact of water abstraction on storage and breakdown of coarse organic matter in mountain streams.

    PubMed

    Arroita, Maite; Aristi, Ibon; Díez, Joserra; Martinez, Miren; Oyarzun, Gorka; Elosegi, Arturo

    2015-01-15

    Water abstraction is a prevalent impact in streams and rivers, which is likely to increase in the near future. Because abstraction reduces discharge, the dimensions of the wetted channel and water depth and velocity, it can have strong influence on stream ecosystem functioning. Although the impacts of large dams on stream and river ecosystems are pretty well known, the effects of diversion schemes associated with low dams are still poorly understood. Furthermore, the remote location of many diversion schemes and the lack of collaboration by power companies often make it difficult to know the volume of water diverted and its environmental consequences. To assess the impact of water abstraction on the storage and breakdown of coarse particulate organic matter in streams we compared reaches upstream and downstream from five low dams that divert water to hydropower plants in mountain streams in N Spain. We measured the storage of organic matter and the breakdown of alder leaves in winter and spring, and calculated the results at the patch (i.e., per square meter of bed) and at the reach scale (i.e., per lineal meter of channel). Water diversion significantly reduced discharge, and the width and depth of the wetted channel, but did not affect water quality. Diversion significantly reduced the storage and breakdown of organic matter in winter but not in spring. The number of shredders colonizing litter bags was also significantly reduced. The results point to an important effect of water abstraction on the storage and breakdown of organic matter in streams at least in some periods, which could affect downstream reaches, global carbon fluxes, and associated ecosystem services.

  11. Using the soil and water assessment tool to estimate dissolved inorganic nitrogen water pollution abatement cost functions in central portugal.

    PubMed

    Roebeling, P C; Rocha, J; Nunes, J P; Fidélis, T; Alves, H; Fonseca, S

    2014-01-01

    Coastal aquatic ecosystems are increasingly affected by diffuse source nutrient water pollution from agricultural activities in coastal catchments, even though these ecosystems are important from a social, environmental and economic perspective. To warrant sustainable economic development of coastal regions, we need to balance marginal costs from coastal catchment water pollution abatement and associated marginal benefits from coastal resource appreciation. Diffuse-source water pollution abatement costs across agricultural sectors are not easily determined given the spatial heterogeneity in biophysical and agro-ecological conditions as well as the available range of best agricultural practices (BAPs) for water quality improvement. We demonstrate how the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) can be used to estimate diffuse-source water pollution abatement cost functions across agricultural land use categories based on a stepwise adoption of identified BAPs for water quality improvement and corresponding SWAT-based estimates for agricultural production, agricultural incomes, and water pollution deliveries. Results for the case of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) surface water pollution by the key agricultural land use categories ("annual crops," "vineyards," and "mixed annual crops & vineyards") in the Vouga catchment in central Portugal show that no win-win agricultural practices are available within the assessed BAPs for DIN water quality improvement. Estimated abatement costs increase quadratically in the rate of water pollution abatement, with largest abatement costs for the "mixed annual crops & vineyards" land use category (between 41,900 and 51,900 € tDIN yr) and fairly similar abatement costs across the "vineyards" and "annual crops" land use categories (between 7300 and 15,200 € tDIN yr).

  12. Simulation of Stream Water Alkalinity Under Scenarios of Changing Acidic Deposition and Changing Climate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, D. L.; Cosby, B.; Hornberger, G. M.

    2003-12-01

    Models of soil and stream water and catchment acidification have typically been applied without consideration of climate change. Soil air CO2 concentrations have potential to increase as climate warms and becomes wetter. We simulate this increase by applying a coupled series of models which simulate soil temperature, soil tension, catchment hydrology, soil air CO2 concentrations, and soil and stream water chemistry to predict daily stream water alkalinity values for a small catchment in the Blue Ridge of Virginia for 60 years into the future given stochastically generated daily climate values. This is done for four different scenarios of climate change and atmospheric deposition change. We find that stream water alkalinity continues to decline for all scenarios except when climate is gradually warming and becoming more moist, indicating the influence of increasing soil air CO2 concentrations on stream water chemistry. In all other scenarios, base cation removal from catchment soils is responsible for limited alkalinity change resulting from climate change. This has strong implications given the extent that models such as MAGIC are used to establish policy and legislation concerning deposition and emissions.

  13. Water quality effects of herded stream crossings by domestic sheep bands.

    PubMed

    Clark, Patrick E; Moffet, Corey A; Lewis, Gregory S; Seyfried, Mark S; Hardegree, Stuart P; Pierson, Fredrick B

    2012-01-01

    Livestock impacts on total suspended solids (TSS) and pathogen (e.g., ) levels in rangeland streams are a serious concern worldwide. Herded stream crossings by domestic sheep () are periodic, necessary managerial events on high-elevation rangelands, but their impacts on stream water quality are largely unknown. We evaluated the effects of herded, one-way crossings by sheep bands (about 2000 individuals) on TSS and concentration and load responses in downstream waters. Crossing trials were conducted during the summers of 2005 and 2006 on two reaches within each of three perennial streams in the Centennial Mountains of eastern Idaho and southwestern Montana. Water samples were collected at 2-min intervals at an upstream background station and at stations 25, 100, 500, and 1500 m downstream just before and during each crossing trial. Crossings produced substantial increases in TSS and concentrations and loads downstream, but these concentration increases were localized and short lived. Maximum TSS concentration was highest 25 m downstream, declined as a function of downstream distance, and at 500 m downstream was similar to background. Post-peak TSS concentrations at all downstream stations decreased to <25 mg L within 24 to 48 min after reaching their maxima. Findings for concentration and load responses were similar to that of TSS but less clear cut. Stream-crossing sheep do affect water quality; therefore, producers and resource managers should continue to evaluate the efficacy of herdsmanship techniques for reducing water quality impact.

  14. Trends in Water Quality of New Jersey Streams, Water Years 1986-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickman, R. Edward; Barringer, Thomas H.

    1999-01-01

    Trend tests were conducted on values of 24 water-quality characteristics measured at 83 surface-water-quality stations on streams in New Jersey during water years 1986-95. Characteristics tested include physical properties and concentrations of nutrients, bacteria, and major dissolved constituents. Seasonal Kendall uncensored tests and tobit regression were used to determine whether unadjusted values of water quality or flow-adjusted values of water quality increased or decreased during this period. Results of tests on instantaneous streamflow measured at the time of water-quality measurements indicate that streamflow decreased during the period of study; 20 of the 81 stations tested showed decreasing values of instantaneous streamflow. No station showed increasing values of instantaneous streamflow. Because the locations of stations with decreasing streamflow are widespread, it is likely that these trends are due to changes in weather patterns rather than to changes in the amount of water withdrawals. Results of tests on nutrients are consistent with the expected effects of upgrades to sewage-treatment plants, which occurred in the State of New Jersey during the period of study. For all nutrients tested other than total nitrate plus nitrite, more stations showed decreasing unadjusted and flow-adjusted values than showed increasing unadjusted and flow-adjusted values. Results for eight major dissolved constituents--specific conductance, total hardness, and dissolved concentrations of solids, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and chloride--of the nine tested showed more stations with increasing values than stations with decreasing values. Only dissolved sulfate did not show more increases than decreases.

  15. E. coli Surface Properties Differ between Stream Water and Sediment Environments.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao; Liao, Chunyu; Thompson, Michael L; Soupir, Michelle L; Jarboe, Laura R; Dixon, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    The importance of E. coli as an indicator organism in fresh water has led to numerous studies focusing on cell properties and transport behavior. However, previous studies have been unable to assess if differences in E. coli cell surface properties and genomic variation are associated with different environmental habitats. In this study, we investigated the variation in characteristics of E. coli obtained from stream water and stream bottom sediments. Cell properties were measured for 77 genomically different E. coli strains (44 strains isolated from sediments and 33 strains isolated from water) under common stream conditions in the Upper Midwestern United States: pH 8.0, ionic strength 10 mM and 22°C. Measured cell properties include hydrophobicity, zeta potential, net charge, total acidity, and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) composition. Our results indicate that stream sediment E. coli had significantly greater hydrophobicity, greater EPS protein content and EPS sugar content, less negative net charge, and higher point of zero charge than stream water E. coli. A significant positive correlation was observed between hydrophobicity and EPS protein for stream sediment E. coli but not for stream water E. coli. Additionally, E. coli surviving in the same habitat tended to have significantly larger (GTG)5 genome similarity. After accounting for the intrinsic impact from the genome, environmental habitat was determined to be a factor influencing some cell surface properties, such as hydrophobicity. The diversity of cell properties and its resulting impact on particle interactions should be considered for environmental fate and transport modeling of aquatic indicator organisms such as E. coli.

  16. E. coli Surface Properties Differ between Stream Water and Sediment Environments

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiao; Liao, Chunyu; Thompson, Michael L.; Soupir, Michelle L.; Jarboe, Laura R.; Dixon, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of E. coli as an indicator organism in fresh water has led to numerous studies focusing on cell properties and transport behavior. However, previous studies have been unable to assess if differences in E. coli cell surface properties and genomic variation are associated with different environmental habitats. In this study, we investigated the variation in characteristics of E. coli obtained from stream water and stream bottom sediments. Cell properties were measured for 77 genomically different E. coli strains (44 strains isolated from sediments and 33 strains isolated from water) under common stream conditions in the Upper Midwestern United States: pH 8.0, ionic strength 10 mM and 22°C. Measured cell properties include hydrophobicity, zeta potential, net charge, total acidity, and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) composition. Our results indicate that stream sediment E. coli had significantly greater hydrophobicity, greater EPS protein content and EPS sugar content, less negative net charge, and higher point of zero charge than stream water E. coli. A significant positive correlation was observed between hydrophobicity and EPS protein for stream sediment E. coli but not for stream water E. coli. Additionally, E. coli surviving in the same habitat tended to have significantly larger (GTG)5 genome similarity. After accounting for the intrinsic impact from the genome, environmental habitat was determined to be a factor influencing some cell surface properties, such as hydrophobicity. The diversity of cell properties and its resulting impact on particle interactions should be considered for environmental fate and transport modeling of aquatic indicator organisms such as E. coli. PMID:27847507

  17. Assessing the suitability of stream water for five different uses and its aquatic environment.

    PubMed

    Fulazzaky, Mohamad Ali

    2013-01-01

    Surface water is one of the essential resources for supporting sustainable development. The suitability of such water for a given use depends both on the available quantity and tolerable quality. Temporary status for a surface water quality has been identified extensively. Still the suitability of the water for different purposes needs to be verified. This study proposes a water quality evaluation system to assess the aptitude of the Selangor River water for aquatic biota, drinking water production, leisure and aquatic sport, irrigation use, livestock watering, and aquaculture use. Aptitude of the water has been classified in many parts of the river segment as unsuitable for aquatic biota, drinking water production, leisure and aquatic sport as well as aquaculture use. The water quality aptitude classes of the stream water for nine locations along the river are evaluated to contribute to decision support system. The suitability of the water for five different uses and its aquatic ecosystem are verified.

  18. Organic and inorganic composition and microbiology of produced waters from Pennsylvania shale gas wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Akob, Denise M.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Dunlap, Darren S.; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Lorah, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulically fractured shales are becoming an increasingly important source of natural gas production in the United States. This process has been known to create up to 420 gallons of produced water (PW) per day, but the volume varies depending on the formation, and the characteristics of individual hydraulic fracture. PW from hydraulic fracturing of shales are comprised of injected fracturing fluids and natural formation waters in proportions that change over time. Across the state of Pennsylvania, shale gas production is booming; therefore, it is important to assess the variability in PW chemistry and microbiology across this geographical span. We quantified the inorganic and organic chemical composition and microbial communities in PW samples from 13 shale gas wells in north central Pennsylvania. Microbial abundance was generally low (66–9400 cells/mL). Non-volatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC) was high (7–31 mg/L) relative to typical shallow groundwater, and the presence of organic acid anions (e.g., acetate, formate, and pyruvate) indicated microbial activity. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were detected in four samples (∼1 to 11.7 μg/L): benzene and toluene in the Burket sample, toluene in two Marcellus samples, and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in one Marcellus sample. VOCs can be either naturally occurring or from industrial activity, making the source of VOCs unclear. Despite the addition of biocides during hydraulic fracturing, H2S-producing, fermenting, and methanogenic bacteria were cultured from PW samples. The presence of culturable bacteria was not associated with salinity or location; although organic compound concentrations and time in production were correlated with microbial activity. Interestingly, we found that unlike the inorganic chemistry, PW organic chemistry and microbial viability were highly variable across the 13 wells sampled, which can have important implications for the reuse and handling of these fluids

  19. Paraoxonase 1 activity in subchronic low-level inorganic arsenic exposure through drinking water.

    PubMed

    Afolabi, Olusegun K; Wusu, Adedoja D; Ogunrinola, Olufunmilayo O; Abam, Esther O; Babayemi, David O; Dosumu, Oluwatosin A; Onunkwor, Okechukwu B; Balogun, Elizabeth A; Odukoya, Olusegun O; Ademuyiwa, Oladipo

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiological evidences indicate close association between inorganic arsenic exposure via drinking water and cardiovascular diseases. While the exact mechanism of this arsenic-mediated increase in cardiovascular risk factors remains enigmatic, epidemiological studies indicate a role for paraoxonase 1 (PON1) in cardiovascular diseases. To investigate the association between inorganic arsenic exposure and cardiovascular diseases, rats were exposed to sodium arsenite (trivalent; 50, 100, and 150 ppm As) and sodium arsenate (pentavalent; 100, 150, and 200 ppm As) in their drinking water for 12 weeks. PON1 activity towards paraoxon (PONase) and phenylacetate (AREase) in plasma, lipoproteins, hepatic, and brain microsomal fractions were determined. Inhibition of PONase and AREase in plasma and HDL characterized the effects of the two arsenicals. While the trivalent arsenite inhibited PONase by 33% (plasma) and 46% (HDL), respectively, the pentavalent arsenate inhibited the enzyme by 41 and 34%, respectively. AREase activity was inhibited by 52 and 48% by arsenite, whereas the inhibition amounted to 72 and 67%, respectively by arsenate. The pattern of inhibition in plasma and HDL indicates that arsenite induced a dose-dependent inhibition of PONase whereas arsenate induced a dose-dependent inhibition of AREase. In the VLDL + LDL, arsenate inhibited PONase and AREase while arsenite inhibited PONase. In the hepatic and brain microsomal fractions, only the PONase enzyme was inhibited by the two arsenicals. The inhibition was more pronounced in the hepatic microsomes where a 70% inhibition was observed at the highest dose of pentavalent arsenic. Microsomal cholesterol was increased by the two arsenicals resulting in increased cholesterol/phospholipid ratios. Our findings indicate that decreased PON1 activity observed in arsenic exposure may be an incipient biochemical event in the cardiovascular effects of arsenic. Modulation of PON1 activity by arsenic may also be

  20. Analytical application of nano-sized titanium dioxide for the determination of trace inorganic antimony in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Hagarová, Ingrid; Matúš, Peter; Bujdoš, Marek; Kubová, Jana

    2012-03-01

    In this work, solid phase extraction (SPE) using nano-sized TiO2 as a solid sorbent was used for separation/preconcentration of total inorganic antimony (iSb) before its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). After adsorption of iSb onto nano-sized TiO2, direct TiO2-slurry sampling was used for sample injection into a graphite tube. The conditions for the reliable slurry sampling together with careful control of the temperature program for the slurry solutions were worked out. Extraction conditions for both inorganic antimony species (Sb(III) and Sb(V)) and interference studies of coexisting ions were studied in detail. The accuracy of the optimized method was checked by the certified reference material (CRM) for trace elements in lake water TMDA-61. Finally, the optimized method was used for the determination of trace inorganic antimony in synthetic and natural waters.

  1. Water quality of urban streams: the Allium cepa seeds/seedlings test as a tool for surface water monitoring.

    PubMed

    Athanásio, Camila Gonçalves; Prá, Daniel; Rieger, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the genotoxic, mutagenic, and cytotoxic potential of surface waters in urban streams using Allium cepa and analyzes the applicability of this assay for environmental monitoring. Water samples were collected from three streams located in the urban area of a municipality in the south of Brazil. For each stream, two samples were collected, one upstream and one downstream of the pollution discharge site. Physicochemical evaluation indicated that all samples had various degrees of environmental impact, but substantial impact was seen for the downstream samples of the Preto and Pedras streams. All samples increased the frequency of chromosome aberrations (P < 0.05). The sample from Pedras downstream site also caused a decrease in mitotic index (P < 0.08) and increase in micronuclei (P < 0.08) frequency, indicating potential cytotoxicity and mutagenicity. The Pedras stream receives mixed industrial and urban wastewater, while the Lajeado and Preto streams receive wastewater predominantly domestic in nature, which may partially explain the difference in toxicity among the samples. Moreover, the Allium cepa seeds/seedlings were shown to be extremely sensitive in detecting the genotoxicity of environmental water samples and can be applied as the first tool for environmental health hazard identification and prediction.

  2. Water Quality of Urban Streams: The Allium cepa Seeds/Seedlings Test as a Tool for Surface Water Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Athanásio, Camila Gonçalves; Prá, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the genotoxic, mutagenic, and cytotoxic potential of surface waters in urban streams using Allium cepa and analyzes the applicability of this assay for environmental monitoring. Water samples were collected from three streams located in the urban area of a municipality in the south of Brazil. For each stream, two samples were collected, one upstream and one downstream of the pollution discharge site. Physicochemical evaluation indicated that all samples had various degrees of environmental impact, but substantial impact was seen for the downstream samples of the Preto and Pedras streams. All samples increased the frequency of chromosome aberrations (P < 0.05). The sample from Pedras downstream site also caused a decrease in mitotic index (P < 0.08) and increase in micronuclei (P < 0.08) frequency, indicating potential cytotoxicity and mutagenicity. The Pedras stream receives mixed industrial and urban wastewater, while the Lajeado and Preto streams receive wastewater predominantly domestic in nature, which may partially explain the difference in toxicity among the samples. Moreover, the Allium cepa seeds/seedlings were shown to be extremely sensitive in detecting the genotoxicity of environmental water samples and can be applied as the first tool for environmental health hazard identification and prediction. PMID:25574484

  3. Impact of transient stream flow on water exchange and reactions in the hyporheic zone of an in-stream gravel bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, Nico; Schmidt, Christian; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater-surface water exchange is an important process that can facilitate the degradation of critical substances like nitrogen-species and contaminants, supporting a healthy status of the aquatic ecosystem. In our study, we simulate water exchange, solute transport and reactions within a natural in-stream gravel bar using a coupled surface and subsurface numerical model. Stream water flow is simulated by computational fluid dynamics software that provides hydraulic head distributions at the streambed, which are used as an upper boundary condition for a groundwater model. In the groundwater model water exchange, solute transport, aerobic respiration and denitrification in the subsurface are simulated. Ambient groundwater flow is introduced by lateral upstream and downstream hydraulic head boundaries that generate neutral, losing or gaining stream conditions. Stream water transports dissolved oxygen, organic carbon (as the dominant electron donor) and nitrate into the subsurface, whereas an additional nitrate source exists in the ambient groundwater. Scenarios of stream flow events varying in duration and stream stage are simulated and compared with steady state scenarios with respect to water fluxes, residence times and the solute turn-over rates. Results show, that water exchange and solute turn-over rates highly depend on the interplay between event characteristics and ambient groundwater levels. For scenarios, where the stream flow event shifts the hydraulic system to a net-neutral hydraulic gradient between the average stream stage and the ambient groundwater level (minimal exchange between ground- and surface water), solute consumption is higher, compared to the steady losing or gaining case. In contrast, events that induce strong losing conditions lead to a lower potential of solute consumption.

  4. Selective inorganic thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.L.F.; Pohl, P.I.; Brinker, C.J.

    1997-04-01

    Separating light gases using membranes is a technology area for which there exists opportunities for significant energy savings. Examples of industrial needs for gas separation include hydrogen recovery, natural gas purification, and dehydration. A membrane capable of separating H{sub 2} from other gases at high temperatures could recover hydrogen from refinery waste streams, and facilitate catalytic dehydrogenation and the water gas shift (CO + H{sub 2}O {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) reaction. Natural gas purification requires separating CH{sub 4} from mixtures with CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}O, and higher alkanes. A dehydrating membrane would remove water vapor from gas streams in which water is a byproduct or a contaminant, such as refrigeration systems. Molecular sieve films offer the possibility of performing separations involving hydrogen, natural gas constituents, and water vapor at elevated temperatures with very high separation factors. It is in applications such as these that the authors expect inorganic molecular sieve membranes to compete most effectively with current gas separation technologies. Cryogenic separations are very energy intensive. Polymer membranes do not have the thermal stability appropriate for high temperature hydrogen recovery, and tend to swell in the presence of hydrocarbon natural gas constituents. The authors goal is to develop a family of microporous oxide films that offer permeability and selectivity exceeding those of polymer membranes, allowing gas membranes to compete with cryogenic and adsorption technologies for large-scale gas separation applications.

  5. Management of surface water and groundwater withdrawals to maintain environmental stream flows in Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeves, Howard W.; Seelbach, Paul W.; Nicholas, James R.; Hamilton, David A.; Potter, Kenneth W.; Frevert, Donald K.

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, the State of Michigan enacted legislation requiring that new or increased high-capacity withdrawals (greater than 100,000 gallons per day) from either surface water or groundwater be reviewed to prevent Adverse Resource Impacts (ARI). Science- based guidance was sought in defining how groundwater or surface-water withdrawals affect streamflow and in quantifying the relation between reduced streamflow and changes in stream ecology. The implementation of the legislation led to a risk-based system based on a gradient of risk, ecological response curves, and estimation of groundwater-surface water interaction. All Michigan streams are included in the legislation, and, accordingly, all Michigan streams were classified into management types defined by size of watershed, stream-water temperature, and predicted fish assemblages. Different streamflow removal percentages define risk-based thresholds allowed for each type. These removal percentages were informed by ecological response curves of characteristic fish populations and finalized through a legislative workgroup process. The assessment process includes an on-line screening tool that may be used to evaluate new or increased withdrawals against the risk-based zones and allows withdrawals that are not likely to cause an ARI to proceed to water-use registration. The system is designed to consider cumulative impacts of high-capacity withdrawals and to promote user involvement in water resource management by the establishment of water-user committees as cumulative withdrawals indicate greater potential for ARI in the watershed.

  6. An innovative index for evaluating water quality in streams.

    PubMed

    Said, Ahmend; Stevens, David K; Sehlke, Gerald

    2004-09-01

    A water quality index expressed as a single number is developed to describe overall water quality conditions using multiple water quality variables. The index consists of water quality variables: dissolved oxygen, specific conductivity, turbidity, total phosphorus, and fecal coliform. The objectives of this study were to describe the preexisting indices and to define a new water quality index that has advantages over these indices. The new index was applied to the Big Lost River Watershed in Idaho, and the results gave a quantitative picture for the water quality situation. If the new water quality index for the impaired water is less than a certain number, remediation-likely in the form of total maximum daily loads or changing the management practices-may be needed. The index can be used to assess water quality for general beneficial uses. Nevertheless, the index cannot be used in making regulatory decisions, indicate water quality for specific beneficial uses, or indicate contamination from trace metals, organic contaminants, and toxic substances.

  7. Draft Scientific Report Connectivity of Streams and Wetlands to Downstream Waters: A Review and Synthesis of the Scientific Evidence

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Synthesizes peer-reviewed scientific literature on the biological, chemical, and hydrologic connectivity of waters and the effects that small streams, wetlands, and open waters have on larger downstream waters such as rivers, lakes, estuaries, and oceans.

  8. Variations in statewide water quality of New Jersey streams, water years 1998-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heckathorn, Heather A.; Deetz, Anna C.

    2012-01-01

    (control stations that are located on reaches of streams relatively unaffected by human activity) during water years 1998-2009. Results of tests on concentrations of total dissolved solids, dissolved chloride, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate, total phosphorus, and total nitrogen indicate a significant difference in water quality at Statewide Status stations but not at Background stations during the study period. Excluding water year 2009, all significant changes that were observed in the median concentrations were ultimately increases, except for total phosphorus, which varied significantly but in an inconsistent pattern during water years 1998-2009. Streamflow data aided in the interpretation of the results for this study. Extreme values of water-quality constituents generally followed inverse patterns of streamflow. Low streamflow conditions helped explain elevated concentrations of several constituents during water years 2001-02. During extreme drought conditions in 2002, maximum concentrations occurred for four of the six water-quality constituents examined in this study at Statewide Status stations (maximum concentration of 4,190 milligrams per liter of total dissolved solids) and three of six constituents at Background stations (maximum concentration of 179 milligrams per liter of total dissolved solids). The changes in water quality observed in this study parallel many of the findings from previous studies of trends in New Jersey.

  9. Environmental setting, water budget, and stream assessment for the Broad Run watershed, Chester County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cinotto, Peter J.; Reif, Andrew G.; Olson, Leif E.

    2005-01-01

    The Broad Run watershed lies almost entirely in West Bradford Township, Chester County, Pa., and drains 7.08 square miles to the West Branch Brandywine Creek. Because of the potential effect of encroaching development and other stresses on the Broad Run watershed, West Bradford Township, the Chester County Water Resources Authority, and the Chester County Health Department entered into a cooperative study with the U.S. Geological Survey to complete an annual water budget and stream assessment of overall conditions. The annual water budget quantified the basic parameters of the hydrologic cycle for the climatic conditions present from April 1, 2003, to March 31, 2004. These water-budget data identified immediate needs and (or) deficits that were present within the hydrologic cycle during that period, if present; however, an annual water budget encompassing a single year does not identify long-term trends. The stream assessment was conducted in two parts and assessed the overall condition of the watershed, an overall assessment of the fluvial-geomorphic conditions within the watershed and an overall assessment of the stream-quality conditions. The data collected will document present (2004) conditions and identify potential vulnerabilities to future disturbances. For the annual period from April 1, 2003, to March 31, 2004, determination of an annual water budget indicated that of the 67.8 inches of precipitation that fell on the Broad Run watershed, 38.8 inches drained by way of streamflow to the West Branch Brandywine Creek. Of this 38.8 inches of streamflow, local-minimum hydrograph separation techniques determined that 7.30 inches originated from direct runoff and 31.5 inches originated from base flow. The remaining precipitation went into ground-water storage (1.71 inches) and was lost to evapotranspiration (27.3 inches). Ground-water recharge for this period-35.2 inches-was based on these values and an estimated ground-water evapotranspiration rate of 2 inches

  10. Mercury cycling in stream ecosystems. 1. Water column chemistry and transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brigham, M.E.; Wentz, D.A.; Aiken, G.R.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    2009-01-01

    We studied total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in eight streams, located in Oregon, Wisconsin, and Florida, that span large ranges in climate, landscape characteristics, atmospheric Hg deposition, and water chemistry. While atmospheric deposition was the source of Hg at each site, basin characteristics appeared to mediate this source by providing controls on methylation and fluvial THg and MeHg transport. Instantaneous concentrations of filtered total mercury (FTHg) and filtered methylmercury (FMeHg) exhibited strong positive correlations with both dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and streamflow for most streams, whereas mean FTHg and FMeHg concentrations were correlated with wetland density of the basins. For all streams combined, whole water concentrations (sum of filtered and particulate forms) of THg and MeHg correlated strongly with DOC and suspended sediment concentrations in the water column. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  11. Effects of golf course construction and operation on water chemistry of headwater streams on the Precambrian Shield.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jennifer G; Dillon, Peter J

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effects of golf course construction and operation on the water chemistry of Shield streams, we compared the water chemistry in streams draining golf courses under construction (2) and in operation (5) to streams in forested reference locations and to upstream sites where available. Streams were more alkaline and higher in base cation and nitrate concentrations downstream of operational golf courses. Levels of these parameters and total phosphorus increased over time in several streams during golf course construction through to operation. There was evidence of inputs of mercury to streams on two of the operational courses. Nutrient (phosphorus and nitrogen) concentrations were significantly related to the area of unmanaged vegetation in a 30 x 30 m area on either side of the sampling sites, and to River Bank Quality Index scores, suggesting that maintaining vegetated buffers along the stream on golf courses will reduce in-stream nutrient concentrations.

  12. Organic and inorganic species in produced water: Implications for water reuse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kharaka, Yousif K.; Rice, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    Currently 20-30 billion barrels of formation water are co-produced annually in the USA with conventional oil and natural gas. The large database on the geochemistry of this produced water shows salinities that vary widely from ~5,000 to >350,000 mg/L TDS. Chloride, Na and Ca are generally the dominant ions, and concentrations of Fe, Mn, B, NH3 and dissolved organics, including, BTEX, phenols and poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may be relatively high. Hazardous concentrations of NORMs, including Ra-226 and Rn-222 have been reported in produced water from several states.Coal-bed methane (CBM) wells currently produce close to a billion barrels of water and deliver ~8% of total natural gas. The salinity of this produced water generally is lower than that of water from petroleum wells; salinity commonly is 1,000-20,000 mg/L, but ranges to150,000 mg/L TDS. Most CBM wells produce Na-HCO3-Cl type water that is low in trace metals and has no reported NORMs. This water commonly has no oil and grease and has relatively low DOC, but its organic composition has not been characterized in detail. The water is disposed of by injection into saline aquifers, through evaporation and/or percolation in disposal pits, road spreading, and surface discharge. Water that has an acceptable salinity and sodium absorption ratio (SAR) is considered acceptable for surface discharge and for injection into freshwater aquifers.As an alternative to costly disposal, low salinity produced water is being considered for reclamation, especially in the arid western USA. The cost of reclaiming this water to meet irrigation, industrial and drinking water standards was evaluated in a 10 gpm pilot field study at Placerita oil field, California. This produced water had a low salinity of ~8,000 mg/L, but high concentration of Si and organics. Removal of B, Si, NH3 and especially organics from this water proved difficult, and the estimated treatment cost was high at $0.08-$0.39/bbl for water treated for

  13. A flow injection analyser conductometric coupled system for the field analysis of free dissolved CO2 and total dissolved inorganic carbon in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Martinotti, Valter; Balordi, Marcella; Ciceri, Giovanni

    2012-05-01

    A flow injection analyser coupled with a gas diffusion membrane and a conductometric microdetector was adapted for the field analysis of natural concentrations of free dissolved CO2 and dissolved inorganic carbon in natural waters and used in a number of field campaigns for marine water monitoring. The dissolved gaseous CO2 presents naturally, or that generated by acidification of the sample, is separated by diffusion using a hydrophobic semipermeable gas porous membrane, and the permeating gas is incorporated into a stream of deionised water and measured by means of an electrical conductometric microdetector. In order to make the system suitable and easy to use for in-field measurements aboard oceanographic ships, the single components of the analyser were compacted into a robust and easy to use system. The calibration of the system is carried out by using standard solutions of potassium bicarbonate at two concentration ranges. Calibration and sample measurements are carried out inside a temperature-constant chamber at 25 °C and in an inert atmosphere (N2). The detection and quantification limits of the method, evaluated as 3 and 10 times the standard deviation of a series of measurements of the matrix solution were 2.9 and 9.6 μmol/kg of CO2, respectively. Data quality for dissolved inorganic carbon was checked with replicate measurements of a certified reference material (A. Dickson, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego), both accuracy and repeatability were -3.3% and 10%, respectively. Optimization, performance qualification of the system and its application in various natural water samples are reported and discussed. In the future, the calibration step will be operated automatically in order to improve the analytical performance and the applicability will be increased in the course of experimental surveys carried out both in marine and freshwater ecosystems. Considering the present stage of development of the method, it

  14. Cultivating Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus quadricauda microalgae to degrade inorganic compounds and pesticides in water.

    PubMed

    Baglieri, Andrea; Sidella, Sarah; Barone, Valeria; Fragalà, Ferdinando; Silkina, Alla; Nègre, Michèle; Gennari, Mara

    2016-09-01

    This work evaluates the possibility of cultivating Scenedesmus quadricauda and Chlorella vulgaris microalgae in wastewater from the hydroponic cultivation of tomatoes with the aim of purifying the water. S. quadricauda and C. vulgaris were also used in purification tests carried out on water contaminated by the following active ingredients: metalaxyl, pyrimethanil, fenhexamid, iprodione, and triclopyr. Fifty-six days after the inoculum was placed, a reduction was found in the concentration of nitric nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen, and soluble and total phosphorus. The decrease was 99, 83, 94, and 94 %, respectively, for C. vulgaris and 99, 5, 88, and 89 %, respectively, for S. quadricauda. When the microalgae were present, all the agrochemicals tested were removed more quickly from the water than from the sterile control (BG11). The increase in the rate of degradation was in the order metalaxyl > fenhexamid > iprodione > triclopyr > pyrimethanil. It was demonstrated that there was a real degradation of fenhexamid, metalaxyl, triclopyr, and iprodione, while in the case of pyrimethanil, the active ingredient removed from the substrate was absorbed onto the cells of the microalgae. It was also found that the agrochemicals used in the tests had no significant effect on the growth of the two microalgae. The experiment highlighted the possibility of using cultivations of C. vulgaris and S. quadricauda as purification systems for agricultural wastewater which contains eutrophic inorganic compounds such as nitrates and phosphates and also different types of pesticides.

  15. Simultaneous determination of inorganic mercury and methylmercury compounds in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Logar, Martina; Horvat, Milena; Akagi, Hirokatsu; Pihlar, Boris

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of the present work was to develop a simple, rapid, sensitive and accurate method for the simultaneous determination of inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) and monomethylmercury compounds (MeHg) in natural water samples at the pg L(-1) level. The method is based on the simultaneous extraction of MeHg and Hg(2+)dithizonates into an organic solvent (toluene) after acidification of about 300 mL of a water sample, followed by back extraction into an aqueous solution of Na(2)S, removal of H(2)S by purging with N(2), subsequent ethylation with sodium tetraethylborate, room temperature precollection on Tenax, isothermal gas chromatographic separation (GC), pyrolysis and cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectrometric detection (CV AFS) of mercury. The limit of detection calculated on the basis of three times the standard deviation of the blank was about 0.006 ng L(-1) for MeHg and 0.06 ng L(-1) for Hg(2+)when 300 mL of water was analysed. The repeatability of the results was about 5% for MeHg and 10% for Hg(2+). Recoveries were 90-110% for both species.

  16. Water quality assessment in streams and wastewater treatment plants of Blantyre, Malawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajidu, S. M. I.; Masamba, W. R. L.; Henry, E. M. T.; Kuyeli, S. M.

    The population of the city of Blantyre has grown rapidly over the past few years without keeping pace with the national economy. The most visibly affected areas of this increase in population are access to adequate clean water, solid waste collection and disposal, sanitary and sewerage facilities. The objective of this study was to evaluate water quality in streams and wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in the City of Blantyre, Malawi. Study locations included Limbe WWTP, Soche WWTP, Limbe, Mudi and Nasolo streams. Water samples were collected by grab sampling technique in February 2005. Phosphates, nitrates and sulphates were determined by vanadomolybdophosphoric acid colorimetric, salicylate colorimetric and turbidimetric methods, respectively. Metals were analysed using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Concentrations of lead, cadmium, iron, manganese, zinc, chromium and nickel were much higher than the World Health safe limits for drinking water in all the sampled streams after they had passed through industrial areas. Nitrates and sulphates concentrations at all sampling points were found to be lower than the safe limits for drinking water of 50 mg/l and 250 mg/l, respectively. However, phosphate concentrations were above the safe limit of 0.5 mg/l. It was also observed that biochemical oxygen demand (BOD 5) levels were above the World Health Organisation limit of 20 mg/l at all sites except Mudi and Limbe streams before passing through industrial areas. This was an indication of pollution in the streams. Values of pH and total dissolved solids (TDS) were within the recommended standards. The results suggest that streams in Blantyre City get polluted by heavy metals and nutrients which could be due to uncontrolled industrial waste disposal, vehicular emissions and agricultural activities. Regular monitoring of the water quality and enforcement of environmental protection laws are needed in order to control pollution in the city.

  17. Quality of Ozark streams and ground water, 1992-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, James C.; Adamski, James C.; Bell, Richard W.; Davis, Jerri V.; Femmer, Suzanne R.; Freiwald, David A.; Joseph, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    This fact sheet summarizes a previous USGS publication, 'Water Quality in the Ozark Plateaus, Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma, 1992' (Circular 1158). The fact sheet describes the effects of some of the major land uses and human activities upon water quality in the Ozarks. Nutrients, bacteria, pesticides, and other organic compounds generally are found in high concentrations or more frequently in agricultural or urban areas than in forested areas. Several metals are found in higher concentrations in water, bed sediment, or biological tissue downstream from mining areas. Nutrient concentrations generally do not make water unsafe for drinking. Bacteria concentrations may be high enough to cause concern in some areas at some times. Pesticides and other organic compounds generally are not of concern. Metal concentrations in some mining areas are of concern to humans and wildlife. Biological communities are being altered by habitat and water-quality changes.

  18. Mineralogical and Anthropogenic Controls of Stream Water Chemistry in Salted Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H.; Alexander, J.; Gove, B.; Chakowski, N.; Husch, J.

    2013-12-01

    Analyses of major cation and anion concentrations in stream water and soil solutions from two salted (regular applications of winter road deicing salt) watersheds located in the northeastern United States indicate that both mineralogical and anthropogenic factors are important in controlling water chemistry. The relatively stable concentrations of calcium and magnesium, as well as their possible weathering paths identified by mass-balance models, indicate that the weathering of feldspars and the dissolution of carbonates are the primary sources for these two cations in the small, salted Centennial Lake Watershed (CLW, 1.95 km 2). However, the relatively stable and lower concentrations of sodium and chloride in soil solutions, and their fluctuating and higher concentrations in stream water from the CLW, indicate that road deicing salt is the primary source for these ions in stream water. Furthermore, positive correlations between calcium and sulfur concentrations and magnesium and sulfur concentrations in soil solutions, as well as positive correlations between sulfur and iron concentrations in soil compositions, indicate that both the dissolution of gypsum and the oxidation of pyrite into hematite are the primary sources of sulfate in the CLW. Analyses of water chemistry from the related and much larger Delaware River Watershed (DRW, 17560 km 2) show that sodium and chloride concentrations have increased steadily due to the regular application of winter deicing salt over the 68 years for which data are available. The more rapid increase of stream water chloride concentrations, relative to the increase in sodium, also results in the steady decline of Na+/Cl-molar ratios in the DRW over that time. In addition, the reduction of sulfate and increase of bicarbonate concentration since 1980 in DRW stream water may be attributed to the decline of sulfate levels in atmospheric deposition resulting from enhanced national and state environmental regulations and a shift in

  19. Water budgets for major streams in the Central Valley, California, 1961-77

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullen, J.R.; Nady, Paul

    1985-01-01

    A compilation of annual streamflow data for 20 major stream systems in the central Valley of California, for water years 1961-77, is presented. The water-budget tables list gaged and ungaged inflow from tributaries and canals, diversions, and gaged outflow. Theoretical outflow and gain or loss in a reach are computed. A schematic diagram and explanation of the data are provided for each water-budget table. (USGS)

  20. Spatial organization of stream water discharge and chemistry in forested headwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egusa, T.; Ohte, N.; Oda, T.; Suzuki, M.

    2013-12-01

    It has long been known that, in small catchments, stream water discharge and chemistry are highly variable but the variability decreases gradually with an increase in the catchment area. Wood et al. (1988) showed that model calculations of infiltration and the runoff rate became constant above a certain threshold area. They defined the threshold area as the representative elementary area (REA) and stated that above the REA only minimum knowledge of the underlying parameters is needed to explain the stream water discharge and chemistry. Subsequently, empirical studies were conducted in several catchments. These studies all verified the existence of an REA in real catchments and indicated that the REA values differed among catchments. The results also suggested that the confluence processes of stream water discharge and chemistry differed among catchments. However, it has not been clarified how the confluence processes behave and why processes differ among catchments. One of the unclear things to resolve is whether the variability of discharge and chemistry among small catchments can be regarded as randomness or if it is organized. Two previous studies examined it and reported the opposite results. Woods et al. (1995) reported that organization was apparent from their observations of specific discharge. However, Asano and Uchida (2010) stated that their results for SiO2 could be regarded as randomness. These studies targeted different observed items and different catchments. Therefore, general knowledge about organization of stream water discharge and chemistry has not been obtained. We observed spatial variability of stream water discharge and chemistry and examined the existence of spatial organization by using the statistical method. Our objective was to elucidate whether the spatial organization exists about stream water discharge and chemistry. Observations were conducted in three forested catchments in Japan. Snapshot samplings of stream water discharge and

  1. Long-term trends in stream water and precipitation chemistry at five headwater basins in the northeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, David W.; Mast, M. Alisa

    1999-01-01

    Stream water data from five headwater basins in the northeastern United States covering water years 1968-1996 and precipitation data from eight nearby precipitation monitoring sites covering water years 1984-1996 were analyzed for temporal trends in chemistry using the nonparametric seasonal Kendall test. Concentrations of SO4 declined at three of five streams during 1968,1996 (p < 0.1), and all of the streams exhibited downward trends in SO4 over the second half of the period (1984-1996). Concentrations of SO4 in precipitation declined at seven of eight sites from 1984 to 1996, and the magnitudes of the declines (-0.7 to -2.0 ??eq L-1 yr-1) generally were similar to those of stream water SO4. These results indicate that changes in precipitation SO4 were of sufficient magnitude to account for changes in stream water SO4. Concentrations of Ca + Mg declined at three of five streams and five of eight precipitation sites from 1984 to 1996. Precipitation acidity decreased at five of eight sites during the same period, but alkalinity increased in only one stream. In most cases the decreases in stream water SO4 were similar in magnitude to declines in stream water Ca + Mg, which is consistent with the theory of leaching by mobile acid anions in soils. In precipitation the magnitudes of SO4 declines were similar to those of hydrogen, and declines in Ca + Mg were much smaller. This indicates that recent decreases in SO4 deposition are now being reflected in reduced precipitation acidity. The lack of widespread increases in stream water alkalinity, despite the prevalence of downward trends in Stream water SO4, suggests that at most sites, increases in stream water pH and acid-neutralizing capacity may be delayed until higher soil base-saturation levels are achieved.

  2. Impact of anthropogenic activities on urban stream water quality: a case study in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Song; Guo, Ling-Chuan; Luo, Xian-Lin; Chen, Fan-Rong; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic activities are increasingly impacting the quality of urban surface water, particularly in regions undergoing intensive urbanization, such as Guangzhou of South China with a large urban stream network. To examine such impacts, we conducted field sampling on December 24, 2010, May 24, 2011, and August 28, 2011, representative of the low-, normal-, and high-flow periods, respectively. The first sampling was timed immediately after the closing of the 16th Asian Games (November 12-27, 2010) and the 10th Asian Para Games (December 12-19, 2010) held in Guangzhou. Assessments based on a pollution index method showed that the urban streams under investigation were extremely polluted, with direct discharge of untreated domestic sewage identified as the main pollution contributor. In addition, stream water quality around urban villages with high population densities was worse than that within business districts away from the urban villages. Pollution control measures implemented in preparation for the Asian Games were effective for urban streams within the business districts, but less effective for those adjacent to the urban villages. However, short-term efforts may not be able to achieve sustainable urban water quality improvements. In the case of Guangzhou, minimizing or even eliminating direct point-source inputs to the urban streams is perhaps the best option.

  3. Development of a River and Stream Water Quality Module

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    released to the water column by scour. Within NSM the governing equations are greatly simplified, as the processes of advection, dispersion, and lateral...nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon water quality models shows step-by-step extensions and increasing complexity. This chapter describes governing ...fraction of the DIC pool, the carbonate buffer system, alkalinity, and pH that govern the subsequent partitioning of DIC between pCO2, bicarbonate

  4. Effects of pasture management and off-stream water on temporal/spatial distribution of cattle and stream bank characteristics in cool-season grass pastures.

    PubMed

    Schwarte, K A; Russell, J R; Morrical, D G

    2011-10-01

    A 2-yr grazing experiment was conducted to assess the effects of grazing management on cattle distribution and pasture and stream bank characteristics. Six 12.1-ha cool-season grass pastures in central Iowa were allotted to 1 of 3 treatments: continuous stocking with unrestricted stream access (CSU), continuous stocking with stream access restricted to 4.9-m-wide stabilized crossings (CSR), or rotational stocking with stream access restricted to a riparian paddock (RP). Pastures were stocked with 15 fall-calving Angus cows (Bos taurus L.) from mid-May to mid-October for 153 d in 2008 and 2009. A global positioning system (GPS) collar recording cow position every 10 min was placed on at least 1 cow per pasture for 2 wk of each month from May through September. Off-stream water was provided to cattle in CSU and CSR treatments during the second of the 2 wk when GPS collars were on the cattle. A black globe temperature relative humidity index (BGTHI) was measured at 10-min intervals to match the time of the GPS measurements. Each month of the grazing season, forage characteristics (sward height, forage mass, and CP, IVDMD, and P concentrations) and bare and fecal-covered ground were measured. Stream bank erosion susceptibility was visually scored in May, August, and October (pre-, mid-, and post-stocking). Cattle in RP and CSR treatments spent less time (P < 0.10) within the stream zone (0 to 3 m from stream center) in June and August and in the streamside zone (0 to 33 m from stream zone) in May through August and May through September, respectively, than cattle in CSU pastures. However, off-stream water had no effect on cattle distribution. Compared with the CSU treatment, the CSR treatment reduced the probability (P < 0.10) that cattle were within the riparian zone (0 to 36 m from stream center) at BGTHI of 50 to 100. Bare ground was greater (P < 0.10) in pastures with the CSU than CSR and RP treatments in the stream and streamside zones in September and October and

  5. Long-term trends of water chemistry in mountain streams in Sweden - slow recovery from acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, H.; Sundbom, M.

    2013-08-01

    The water chemistry of streams and precipitation in the province of Jämtland, northern Sweden has been monitored since the 1980s to study long-term trends, occurrence of acid episodes, and effects of liming. The acidity and sulphur in precipitation increased in the 1970s, followed by a loss of ANC and low pH in the streams. Sulphur deposition begun to decrease in the 1980s, until approximately 2000, after which the decrease levelled out. The stream water sulphate followed the precipitation trend but decreased more slowly and since the late 1990s a subtle increase was observed. The sulphate concentrations in the snow have generally been higher than or equal to the stream sulphate levels. Since 2005, stream sulphate has sometimes exceeded snow sulphate, indicating desorption of stored soil sulphate, possibly because of climate related changes in run-off routes through the soil profiles, following shorter periods of frost. Up to 2000, TOC increased by approximately 0.1 mg L-1 yr-1. The mean trends in sulphate and TOC from approximately 1990 until today are generally opposite. Acidic episodes with pH 4.0 at flow peaks occurred frequently in the unlimed streams, despite relatively well buffered waters at base flow. To evaluate the main causes for the loss of ANC, the changes in major ions during high flow were calculated. The most important contribution resulted from dilution of base cations, with contribution from organic anions. Sulphate also had some influence, as it was somewhat enriched or only slightly diluted during high flow. Wetland liming started in 1985 after which the earlier observed extreme peak values of Fe, Mn and Al, did not return. The studied area is remote from emission sources in Europe, but the critical load of acidity is still exceeded. The long-term recovery observed in the unlimed streams is thus slow, and severe acidic episodes still occur.

  6. Microplate fecal coliform method to monitor stream water pollution.

    PubMed Central

    Maul, A; Block, J C

    1983-01-01

    A study has been carried out on the Moselle River by means of a microtechnique based on the most-probable-number method for fecal coliform enumeration. This microtechnique, in which each serial dilution of a sample is inoculated into all 96 wells of a microplate, was compared with the standard membrane filter method. It showed a marked overestimation of about 14% due, probably, to the lack of absolute specificity of the method. The high precision of the microtechnique (13%, in terms of the coefficient of variation for log most probable number) and its relative independence from the influence of bacterial density allowed the use of analysis of variance to investigate the effects of spatial and temporal bacterial heterogeneity on the estimation of coliforms. Variability among replicate samples, subsamples, handling, and analytical errors were considered as the major sources of variation in bacterial titration. Variances associated with individual components of the sampling procedure were isolated, and optimal replications of each step were determined. Temporal variation was shown to be more influential than the other three components (most probable number, subsample, sample to sample), which were approximately equal in effect. However, the incidence of sample-to-sample variability (16%, in terms of the coefficient of variation for log most probable number) caused by spatial heterogeneity of bacterial populations in the Moselle River is shown and emphasized. Consequently, we recommend that replicate samples be taken on each occasion when conducting a sampling program for a stream pollution survey. PMID:6360044

  7. Indicators of streamflow alteration, habitat fragmentation, impervious cover, and water quality for Massachusetts stream basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiskel, Peter K.; Brandt, Sara L.; DeSimone, Leslie A.; Ostiguy, Lance J.; Archfield, Stacey A.

    2010-01-01

    Massachusetts streams and stream basins have been subjected to a wide variety of human alterations since colonial times. These alterations include water withdrawals, treated wastewater discharges, construction of onsite septic systems and dams, forest clearing, and urbanization—all of which have the potential to affect streamflow regimes, water quality, and habitat integrity for fish and other aquatic biota. Indicators were developed to characterize these types of potential alteration for subbasins and groundwater contributing areas in Massachusetts. The potential alteration of streamflow by the combined effects of withdrawals and discharges was assessed under two water-use scenarios. Water-use scenario 1 incorporated publicly reported groundwater withdrawals and discharges, direct withdrawals from and discharges to streams, and estimated domestic-well withdrawals and septic-system discharges. Surface-water-reservoir withdrawals were excluded from this scenario. Water-use scenario 2 incorporated all the types of withdrawal and discharge included in scenario 1 as well as withdrawals from surface-water reservoirs—all on a long-term, mean annual basis. All withdrawal and discharge data were previously reported to the State for the 2000–2004 period, except domestic-well withdrawals and septic-system discharges, which were estimated for this study. The majority of the state’s subbasins and groundwater contributing areas were estimated to have relatively minor (less than 10 percent) alteration of streamflow under water-use scenario 1 (seasonally varying water use; no surface-water-reservoir withdrawals). However, about 12 percent of subbasins and groundwater contributing areas were estimated to have extensive alteration of streamflows (greater than 40 percent) in August; most of these basins were concentrated in the outer metropolitan Boston region. Potential surcharging of streamflow in August was most commonly indicated for main-stem river subbasins, although

  8. Tracing organic and inorganic pollution sources of agricultural crops and water resources in Güzelhisar Basin of the Aegean Region - Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, Sezin; Colak Esetlili, Bihter; Esetlili, Tolga; Tepecik, Mahmut; Anac, Dilek; Düring, Rolf-Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The study area Güzelhisar Basin is 6 km far from the city Aliaga, Aegean Region in Turkey which represents a rather industrialized area having five large iron and steel factories, but also areas of agriculture. Steel industry in Aliaga is causing metal pollution. Around Güzelhisar Basin and nearby, the dominant crop fields are cotton, maize, vegetables, olive trees and vineyards. Güzelhisar stream and dam water is used for irrigation of the agricultural land. Due to contamination from metal industry in Aliaga, organic farming is not allowed in this region. Industrial activities in the region present a threat on sustainable agriculture. The region is a multi-impacted area in terms of several pollutant sources affecting soil and water quality. The overall objective of the project is to trace back plant nutrients (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, and B), hazardous substances (i. e. persistent organic pollutants), radionuclides (40K, 232Th, 226Ra/238U), and metal contents (As, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) by examining the soils, agricultural crops and natural plants from Güzelhisar Basin and water and sediments from Güzelhisar stream and dam. Spatial distribution of pollution will be evaluated by regionalization methods. For this, an advanced analytical methodology will be applied which provides an understanding of sources and occurrence of the respective substances of concern. An innovative multi-tracer approach comprising organic and inorganic marker substances, will identify and quantitatively assess sources and their impact on water pollution and the pollutant pathways in this agricultural crop production system.

  9. Enhancements to the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System for simulating in-stream water temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markstrom, S. L.; Hay, L.

    2010-12-01

    A stream temperature module has been developed for the U.S. Geological Survey Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) for simulating maximum- and mean-daily stream temperature. This module provides additional simulation capabilities by coupling PRMS with the U.S. Geological Survey Stream Network Temperature (SNTEMP) model. PRMS is a modular, deterministic, distributed-parameter, physical-process watershed model that simulates watershed response to various combinations of climate and land use. Normal and extreme rainfall and snowmelt can be simulated to evaluate changes in water-balance relations, streamflow regimes, soil-water relations, and ground-water recharge. SNTEMP was developed to help aquatic biologists and engineers predict the effects of flow regime changes on water temperatures. This coupling of PRMS with SNTEMP will allow scientists and watershed managers to evaluate the effects of historical climate and projected climate change, landscape evolution, and resource management scenarios on watershed hydrology and in-stream water temperature. The prototype of this coupled model was developed for the U.S. Geological Survey Southeast Regional Assessment Project (SERAP) and tested in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin in the southeastern United States. Preliminary results from the prototype are presented.

  10. Association between Lifetime Exposure to Inorganic Arsenic in Drinking Water and Coronary Heart Disease in Colorado Residents

    PubMed Central

    Byers, Tim; Hokanson, John E.; Meliker, Jaymie R.; Zerbe, Gary O.; Marshall, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic diseases, including coronary heart disease (CHD), have been associated with ingestion of drinking water with high levels of inorganic arsenic (> 1,000 μg/L). However, associations have been inconclusive in populations with lower levels (< 100 μg/L) of inorganic arsenic exposure. Objectives: We conducted a case-cohort study based on individual estimates of lifetime arsenic exposure to examine the relationship between chronic low-level arsenic exposure and risk of CHD. Methods: This study included 555 participants with 96 CHD events diagnosed between 1984 and 1998 for which individual lifetime arsenic exposure estimates were determined using data from structured interviews and secondary data sources to determine lifetime residence, which was linked to a geospatial model of arsenic concentrations in drinking water. These lifetime arsenic exposure estimates were correlated with historically collected urinary arsenic concentrations. A Cox proportional-hazards model with time-dependent CHD risk factors was used to assess the association between time-weighted average (TWA) lifetime exposure to low-level inorganic arsenic in drinking water and incident CHD. Results: We estimated a positive association between low-level inorganic arsenic exposure and CHD risk [hazard ratio (HR): = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.09, 1.78] per 15 μg/L while adjusting for age, sex, first-degree family history of CHD, and serum low-density lipoprotein levels. The risk of CHD increased monotonically with increasing TWAs for inorganic arsenic exposure in water relative to < 20 μg/L (HR = 1.2, 95% CI: 0.6, 2.2 for 20–30 μg/L; HR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.2, 4.0 for 30–45 μg/L; and HR = 3, 95% CI: 1.1, 9.1 for 45–88 μg/L). Conclusions: Lifetime exposure to low-level inorganic arsenic in drinking water was associated with increased risk for CHD in this population. Citation: James KA, Byers T, Hokanson JE, Meliker JR, Zerbe GO, Marshall JA. 2015. Association between lifetime exposure to

  11. Inorganic arsenic in drinking water accelerates N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine-induced bladder tissue damage in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Paul-Yann; Lin, Yung-Lun; Huang, Chin-Chin; Chen, Sin-Syu; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2012-02-15

    Epidemiological studies have revealed that exposure to an arsenic-contaminated environment correlates with the incidence of bladder cancer. Bladder cancer is highly recurrent after intravesical therapy, and most of the deaths from this disease are due to invasive metastasis. In our present study, the role of inorganic arsenic in bladder carcinogenesis is characterized in a mouse model. This work provides the first evidence that inorganic arsenic in drinking water promotes N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN)-induced bladder tissue damage, including the urothelium and submucosal layer. This damage to the bladder epithelium induced by BBN includes thickening of the submucosal layer, the loss of the glycosaminoglycan layer and an increase in both the deoxyguanosine oxidation and cytosine methylation levels in the DNA. Further, when 10 ppm inorganic arsenic is combined with BBN, the number of bladder submucosal capillaries is increased. In addition, inorganic arsenic also increases the deoxyguanosine oxidation level, alters the cytosine methylation state, decreases the activities of glutathione reductase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, decreases the protein expression of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO-1) and increases the protein expression of specific protein 1 (Sp1) in bladder tissues. In summary, our data reveal that inorganic arsenic in drinking water promotes the BBN-induced pre-neoplastic damage of bladder tissue in mice, and that the 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, 5-methylcytosine, NQO-1 protein and Sp1 protein levels may be pre-neoplastic markers of bladder tumors. -- Highlights: ► The role of inorganic arsenic in bladder carcinogenesis is characterized in mice. ► We examine the changes in the histology and biochemistry of bladder tissues. ► Inorganic arsenic enhances BBN-induced DNA oxidation while decreases BBN-induced DNA methylation in the mouse bladder. ► Inorganic arsenic alters the activities of the anti-oxidant enzymes in

  12. Analysis of Water-Quality Trends for Selected Streams in the Water Chemistry Monitoring Program, Michigan, 1998-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoard, C.J.; Fuller, Lori M.; Fogarty, Lisa R.

    2009-01-01

    In 1998, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality and the U.S. Geological Survey began a long-term monitoring program to evaluate the water quality of most watersheds in Michigan. Major goals of this Water-Chemistry Monitoring Program were to identify streams exceeding or not meeting State or Federal water-quality standards and to assess if constituent concentrations reflecting water quality in these streams were increasing or decreasing over time. As part of this program, water-quality data collected from 1998 to 2005 were analyzed to identify potential trends. Sixteen water-quality constituents were analyzed at 31 sites across Michigan, 28 of which had sufficient data to analyze for trends. Trend analysis on the various water-quality data was done using the uncensored Seasonal Kendall test within the computer program ESTREND. The most prevalent trend detected throughout the state was for chloride. Chloride trends were detected at 8 of the 28 sites; trends at 7 sites were increasing and the trend at 1 site was decreasing. Although no trends were detected for various nitrogen species or phosphorus, these constituents were detected at levels greater than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recommendations for nutrients in water. The results of the trend analysis will help to establish a baseline to evaluate future changes in water quality in Michigan streams.

  13. The national stream quality accounting network: A flux-basedapproach to monitoring the water quality of large rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooper, R.P.; Aulenbach, Brent T.; Kelly, V.J.

    2001-01-01

    Estimating the annual mass flux at a network of fixed stations is one approach to characterizing water quality of large rivers. The interpretive context provided by annual flux includes identifying source and sink areas for constituents and estimating the loadings to receiving waters, such as reservoirs or the ocean. Since 1995, the US Geological Survey's National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) has employed this approach at a network of 39 stations in four of the largest river basins of the USA: The Mississippi, the Columbia, the Colorado and the Rio Grande. In this paper, the design of NASQAN is described and its effectiveness at characterizing the water quality of these rivers is evaluated using data from the first 3 years of operation. A broad range of constituents was measured by NASQAN, including trace organic and inorganic chemicals, major ions, sediment and nutrients. Where possible, a regression model relating concentration to discharge and season was used to interpolate between chemical observations for flux estimation. For water-quality network design, the most important finding from NASQAN was the importance of having a specific objective (that is, estimating annual mass flux) and, from that, an explicitly stated data analysis strategy, namely the use of regression models to interpolate between observations. The use of such models aided in the design of sampling strategy and provided a context for data review. The regression models essentially form null hypotheses for concentration variation that can be evaluated by the observed data. The feedback between network operation and data collection established by the hypothesis tests places the water-quality network on a firm scientific footing.

  14. Determination of the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon in water; RSIL lab code 1710

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singleton, Glenda L.; Revesz, Kinga; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 1710 is to present a method to determine the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of water. The DIC of water is precipitated using ammoniacal strontium chloride (SrCl2) solution to form strontium carbonate (SrCO3). The δ13C is analyzed by reacting SrCO3 with 100-percent phosphoric acid (H3PO4) to liberate carbon quantitatively as carbon dioxide (CO2), which is collected, purified by vacuum sublimation, and analyzed by dual inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (DI-IRMS). The DI-IRMS is a DuPont double-focusing mass spectrometer. One ion beam passes through a slit in a forward collector and is collected in the rear collector. The other measurable ion beams are collected in the front collector. By changing the ion-accelerating voltage under computer control, the instrument is capable of measuring mass/charge (m/z) 45 or 46 in the rear collector and m/z 44 and 46 or 44 and 45, respectively, in the front collector. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z 44 = CO2 = 12C16O16O, m/z 45 = CO2 = 13C16O16O primarily, and m/z 46 = CO2 = 12C16O18O primarily. The data acquisition and control software calculates δ13C values.

  15. A sensitive flow-based procedure for spectrophotometric speciation analysis of inorganic bromine in waters.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Diogo L; Machado, Marcos C; Melchert, Wanessa R

    2014-11-01

    A flow-based system with solenoid micro-pumps and long path-length spectrophotometry for bromate and bromide determination in drinking water is proposed. The method is based on the formation of an unstable dye from the reaction between bromate, 2-(5-dibromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-(diethylamino)phenol (5-Br-PADAP) and thiocyanate ions. A multivariate optimization was carried out. A linear response was observed between 5.0 and 100 µg L(-1) BrO3(-) and the detection limit was estimated as 2.0 µg L(-1) (99.7% confidence level). The coefficient of variation (n=20) and sampling rate were estimated as 1.0% and 40 determinations per hour, respectively. Reagent consumption was estimated as 0.17 µg of 5-Br-PADAP and 230 μg of NaSCN per measurement, generating 6.0 mL of waste. Bromide determination was carried out after UV-assisted conversion with K2S2O8 using 300 µL of sample within the range 20-400 µg L(-1) Br(-). The generated bromate was then determined by the proposed flow system. The results for tap and commercial mineral water samples agreed with those obtained with the reference procedure at the 95% confidence level. The proposed procedure is therefore a sensitive, environmentally friendly and reliable alternative for inorganic bromine speciation.

  16. Water-quality characteristics for selected streams in Lawrence County, South Dakota, 1988-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, Joyce E.; Hayes, Timothy Scott

    2000-01-01

    During the 1980?s, significant economic development and population growth began to occur in Lawrence County in the northern part of the Black Hills of western South Dakota. Rising gold prices and heap-leach extraction methods allowed the economic recovery of marginal gold ore deposits, resulting in development of several large-scale, open-pit gold mines in Lawrence County. There was increasing local concern regarding potential impacts on the hydrologic system, especially relating to the quantity and quality of water in the numerous streams and springs of Lawrence County. In order to characterize the water quality of selected streams within Lawrence County, samples were collected from 1988 through 1992 at different times of the year and under variable hydrologic conditions. During the time of this study, the Black Hills area was experiencing a drought; thus, most samples were collected during low-flow conditions.Streamflow and water-quality characteristics in Lawrence County are affected by both geologic conditions and precipitation patterns. Most streams that cross outcrops of the Madison Limestone and Minnelusa Formation lose all or large part of their streamflow to aquifer recharge. Streams that are predominantly spring fed have relatively stable streamflow, varying slightly with dry and wet precipitation cycles.Most streams in Lawrence County generally have calcium magnesium bicarbonate type waters. The sites from the mineralized area of central Lawrence County vary slightly from other streams in Lawrence County by having higher concentrations of sodium, less bicarbonate, and more sulfate. False Bottom Creek near Central City has more sulfate than bicarbonate. Nitrogen, phosphorous, and cyanide concentrations were at or near the laboratory reporting limits for most sites and did not exceed any of the water-quality standards. Nitrite plus nitrate concentrations at Annie Creek near Lead, Whitetail Creek at Lead, Squaw Creek near Spearfish, and Spearfish Creek

  17. What do you mean my stream is clogged? How geology, heat and streambed chemistry define surface water - ground water interactions in a Great Basin mountain stream. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, C. E.; Prudic, D. E.; Jackson, T.; Dotson, K. E.; Tyler, S. W.

    2010-12-01

    In the early 1980’s, water “prospectors” around the state of Nevada applied for groundwater rights on the fringes of large basins, predicting that population growth and diminishing resources from the Colorado River system would soon be insufficient to supply municipal from the south. Owners of senior water rights sought to quantify how groundwater export from these eastern Nevada basins might affect their existing surface or groundwater allotment. Snake Creek is one such locale; a fully-allocated small, mountain stream (with average discharge from 0.03 to 0.5 m3/s) that runs from crystalline and metamorphic rocks high in the southern Snake Range (Great Basin National Park, Nevada), crosses the Southern Snake Range décollement, and continues east into Utah, passing through a structurally complex region containing limestone, quartzite, and cemented alluvial materials. To locate, quantify and understand surface water - groundwater interactions along an experimental reach, we applied a range of independent techniques. A geologic cross-section underlying the channel was constructed to predict gaining and losing sections, streamflows were measured at multiple locations, streambed piezometers were installed at depths up to 1 m along the reach, and were tested for hydraulic conductivity (slug tests), hydraulic gradient (manually and with pressure transducers), and instrumented with temperature loggers. Pairs of thermal time series were used to estimate seepage rates and directions within the streambed sediments, combined with gradient measurements to estimate time series of K. Distributed temperature sensing was used along a 1 km section to assess the character and location of groundwater inflows. Water chemistry was analyzed from stream, spring well and piezometer sites. Finally, numerical (MODLFOW) and chemical (PHREEQC) models simulated observed conditions in the stream. We found that permeable streambed sediments with hydraulic conductivities ranging from K = 10

  18. Li isotopes reflect chemical weathering intensity in streams and ground waters draining basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Rudnick, R. L.; McDonough, W. F.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical weathering has an important influence on continental crust evolution, as weathering of basalt preferentially removes soluble elements, such as Mg, and can shift the crust composition towards more andesitic compositions, thus helping to solve the crustal composition paradox [1]. The isotopic compositions of soluble elements (e.g., Li and Mg) provide a monitor of chemical weathering of the continents. Along with large isotopic fractionations [2], these elements are preferentially transferred to rivers during weathering, and are useful tracers of weathering processes. The chemical and isotopic compositions of streams and ground waters that reside entirely within the Columbia River Basalts (CRBs) reflect the processes associated with basalt weathering. In addition, stream samples from both west and east of the Cascades were collected during summer and late winter to evaluate seasonal changes in Li isotopic compositions. The Li concentrations ([Li]) vary from 0.2 to 4.7 μg/l in dissolved loads of streams for both sampling seasons; in ground waters, [Li] varies from 2 to 21 μg/l. δ7Li varies by up to 20‰ in streams and ground waters, demonstrating that lithology is not the only influence on water chemistry in the catchments. Calculated mineral saturation suggests that most streams and some ground waters were saturated with respect to most secondary minerals, implying that Li isotopic fractionation was influenced by the development of secondary minerals, such as kaolinite and hematite. The δ7Li and Li/Na in dissolved loads of streams are not sensitive to distance from the coast or climate, but likely reflect the local weathering intensity. The correlated variation in δ7Li and Li/Na ratios seem to have global significance, at least in streams that only drain basalts [3, 4, 5], suggesting that the streams within the CRBs cover a wide range of weathering intensity, with low δ7Li and high Li/Na corresponding to higher weathering intensity. In addition

  19. Large transboundary watersheds: Climate, water and streams of thought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulwarty, R. S.

    2001-05-01

    Water is a "fugitive" resource in the sense that it flows naturally from one place to another, from one reserve to another (e.g., groundwater to surface), and from one physical state (solid, liquid and gas) to another. Thus "trans-boundary" can mean many things including: transitions from wet to arid zones, from upstream to downstream, from one country or province to the next etc. The Convention on the Protection and Use of Transboundary Watercourses and International Lakes (1992) defines "transboundary waters" to mean "any surface or ground waters which mark, cross or are located on the boundaries between two or more states". Emerging issues in water resources emanate from three categories of problems; (1) transboundary water availability; (2) transboundary groundwater allocation, management, and conservation; and (3) transboundary water quality. Transboundary fluctuations and changes in river flow can be attributed to (1) climate variations and change on several timescales, and, (2) physical and biological transformations of basin hydrology including increased storage, diversions, and landscape changes. Researchers and practitioners have identified numerous factors underlying international disputes involving river flows, including: the variability and uncertainty of supply, interdependencies among users, increasing over-allocation and rising costs, the increasing vulnerability of water quality and aquatic ecosystems to human activities, ways and means of supplying safe water facilities, and the mobilization of financial resources for water development and management. Many of these issues derive from general concerns in water resources management. How these concerns are met is strongly shaped by the choice of the spatial unit within which studies and management actions are conducted, by the way problems have been defined and changed over time, and by who benefits from defining problems in a particular way. In the following discussion the scales of human activities

  20. Ptaquiloside from bracken in stream water at base flow and during storm events.

    PubMed

    Clauson-Kaas, Frederik; Ramwell, Carmel; Hansen, Hans Chr B; Strobel, Bjarne W

    2016-12-01

    The bracken fern (Pteridium spp.) densely populates both open and woodland vegetation types around the globe. Bracken is toxic to livestock when consumed, and a group of potent illudane-type carcinogens have been identified, of which the compound ptaquiloside (PTA) is the most abundant. The highly water soluble PTA has been shown to be leachable from bracken fronds, and present in the soil and water below bracken stands. This has raised concerns over whether the compound might pose a risk to drinking water sources. We investigated PTA concentrations in a small stream draining a bracken-infested catchment at base flow and in response to storm events during a growth season, and included sampling of the bracken canopy throughfall. Streams in other bracken-dominated areas were also sampled at base flow for comparison, and a controlled pulse experiment was conducted in the field to study the in-stream dynamics of PTA. Ptaquiloside concentrations in the stream never exceeded 61 ng L(-1) in the base flow samples, but peaked at 2.2 μg L(-1) during the studied storm events. The mass of PTA in the stream, per storm event, was 7.5-93 mg from this catchment. A clear temporal connection was observed between rainfall and PTA concentration in the stream, with a reproducible time lag of approx. 1 h from onset of rain to elevated concentrations, and returning rather quickly (about 2 h) to base flow concentration levels. The concentration of PTA behaved similar to an inert tracer (Cl(-)) in the pulse experiment over a relative short time scale (minutes-hours) reflecting no PTA sorption, and dispersion and dilution considerably lowered the observed PTA concentrations downstream. Bracken throughfall revealed a potent and lasting source of PTA during rainfall, with concentrations up to 169 μg L(-1), that did not decrease over the course of the event. In the stream, the throughfall contribution to PTA cannot be separated from a possible below-ground input from litter, rhizomes

  1. tir- and stx-Positive Escherichia coli in Stream Waters in a Metropolitan Area

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, James A.; Belt, Kenneth T.; Karns, Jeffrey S.; Russell-Anelli, Jonathan; Shelton, Daniel R.

    2005-01-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli, which may include the enteropathogenic E. coli and the enterohemorrhagic E. coli, are a significant cause of diarrheal disease among infants and children in both developing and developed areas. Disease outbreaks related to freshwater exposure have been documented, but the presence of these organisms in the urban aquatic environment is not well characterized. From April 2002 through April 2004 we conducted weekly surveys of streams in the metropolitan Baltimore, Md., area for the prevalence of potentially pathogenic E. coli by using PCR assays targeting the tir and stx1 and stx2 genes. Coliforms testing positive for the presence of the tir gene were cultured from 653 of 1,218 samples (53%), with a greater prevalence associated with urban, polluted streams than in suburban and forested watershed streams. Polluted urban streams were also more likely to test positive for the presence of one of the stx genes. Sequence analysis of the tir amplicon, as well as the entire tir gene from three isolates, indicated that the pathogenic E. coli present in the stream waters has a high degree of sequence homology with the E. coli O157:H7 serotype. Our data indicate that pathogenic E. coli are continually deposited into a variety of stream habitats and suggest that this organism may be a permanent member of the gastrointestinal microflora of humans and animals in the metropolitan Baltimore area. PMID:15870341

  2. Evaluation of simplified stream-aquifer depletion models for water rights administration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sophocleous, Marios; Koussis, Antonis; Martin, J.L.; Perkins, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    We assess the predictive accuracy of Glover's (1974) stream-aquifer analytical solutions, which are commonly used in administering water rights, and evaluate the impact of the assumed idealizations on administrative and management decisions. To achieve these objectives, we evaluate the predictive capabilities of the Glover stream-aquifer depletion model against the MODFLOW numerical standard, which, unlike the analytical model, can handle increasing hydrogeologic complexity. We rank-order and quantify the relative importance of the various assumptions on which the analytical model is based, the three most important being: (1) streambed clogging as quantified by streambed-aquifer hydraulic conductivity contrast; (2) degree of stream partial penetration; and (3) aquifer heterogeneity. These three factors relate directly to the multidimensional nature of the aquifer flow conditions. From these considerations, future efforts to reduce the uncertainty in stream depletion-related administrative decisions should primarily address these three factors in characterizing the stream-aquifer process. We also investigate the impact of progressively coarser model grid size on numerically estimating stream leakage and conclude that grid size effects are relatively minor. Therefore, when modeling is required, coarser model grids could be used thus minimizing the input data requirements.

  3. IN-STREAM CONTINUOUS SOURCE WATER QUALITY MONITORING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract:

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Research and Development (ORD) provided the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO) with a grant as part of the Advanced Measurement Initiative (AMI). The objective of AMI is to provide an ...

  4. Determination of inorganic anions in water by ion chromatography: a collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Edgell, K W; Longbottom, J E; Pfaff, J D

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) and the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) conducted a joint collaborative study validating an ion chromatographic method for determination fo inorganic anions (U.S. EPA method 300.0A and the equivalent proposed revision to ASTM method D4327). This study was conducted to determine the mean recovery and precision of analyses for bromide, chloride, fluoride, nitrate, nitrite, orthophosphate, and sulfate in reagent water, drinking water, and wastewater. The study design was based on Youden's nonreplicate plan for collaborative tests of analytical methods. The test waters were spiked with the anions at 6 concentration levels, prepared as 3 Youden pairs. The 22 volunteer laboratories were instructed to dilute 10 mL sample concentrate to 100 mL test water. A measured volume of sample (20-200 microL) was injected into an ion chromatograph equipped with a guard column, anion exchange column, and a chemical micromembrane suppression device. The anions were then separated using 1.7 mM sodium bicarbonate and 1.8 mM sodium carbonate, and measured by a conductivity detector. Submitted data were evaluated using U.S. EPA's IMVS computer program, which follows ASTM D2777-86 statistical guidance. U.S. EPA method 300.0A and ASTM method D4327 were judged acceptable for measurement of the above anions (except sulfate) at concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 25 mg/L and sulfate concentrations from 2.9 to 95 mg/L. Mean recoveries for the 7 anions from all matrixes, as estimated from the linear regression equations, ranged from 95 to 104%. At concentrations above 2-6 mg/L for bromide, fluoride, nitrate, nitrite, and orthophosphate, and above 24 mg/L for sulfate, the overall and single-analyst relative standard deviations were less than 10 and 6%, respectively. As concentrations decreased, precision became more variable. The relative standard deviations of results for chloride were slightly higher than the other anions

  5. Glacial Meltwater Streams of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica: Ecosystems Waiting for Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, D. M.; Gooseff, M.; Cozzetto, K.

    2007-12-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica contain many glacial meltwater streams that flow for 6 to 12 weeks during the austral summer and link the glaciers to the lakes on the valley floors. Dry valley streams gain solutes longitudinally through weathering reactions and microbial processes occurring in the hyporheic zone, evident as a damp area underneath and adjacent to the stream. The lower boundary of the hyporheic zone is determined by the depth to permafrost. On sunny days, stream temperatures can reach 15 °C, and advection of this warm water can erode the frozen lower boundary of the hyporheic zone. In cold summers, streamflow is fed mostly by melt from the faces of the source glaciers and a large portion of this meltwater may be stored in the hyporheic zone and then lost through sublimation, rather than discharged to the lakes. Some streams have thriving microbial mats composed of cyanobacteria and diatoms. These mats are freeze-dried through the winter and begin photosynthesizing with the onset of flow. To evaluate the longer term persistence of cynaobacterial mats, we diverted flow to an abandoned channel, which had not received substantial flow for approximately two decades. We observed that cyanobacterial mats became abundant in the reactivated channel within a week, indicating that the mats had been preserved in a cryptobiotic state in the channel. Over the next several years, these mats had high rates of productivity and nitrogen fixation compared to mats from other streams. These stream-scale experimental results indicate that the cryptobiotic preservation of cyanobacterial mats in abandoned channels in the dry valleys allows for rapid response of stream ecosystems to climatic and geomorphological change.

  6. Land-based sources of marine pollution: Pesticides, PAHs and phthalates in coastal stream water, and heavy metals in coastal stream sediments in American Samoa.

    PubMed

    Polidoro, Beth A; Comeros-Raynal, Mia T; Cahill, Thomas; Clement, Cassandra

    2017-03-15

    The island nations and territories of the South Pacific are facing a number of pressing environmental concerns, including solid waste management and coastal pollution. Here we provide baseline information on the presence and concentration of heavy metals and selected organic contaminants (pesticides, PAHs, phthalates) in 7 coastal streams and in surface waters adjacent to the Futiga landfill in American Samoa. All sampled stream sediments contained high concentrations of lead, and some of mercury. Several coastal stream waters showed relatively high concentrations of diethyl phthalate and of organophosphate pesticides, above chronic toxicity values for fish and other aquatic organisms. Parathion, which has been banned by the US Environmental Protection Agency since 2006, was detected in several stream sites. Increased monitoring and initiatives to limit non-point source land-based pollution will greatly improve the state of freshwater and coastal resources, as well as reduce risks to human health in American Samoa.

  7. Pesticides in the Nation's Streams and Ground Water, 1992-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilliom, Robert J.; Barbash, Jack E.; Crawford, Charles G.; Hamilton, Pixie A.; Martin, Jeffrey D.; Nakagaki, Naomi; Nowell, Lisa H.; Scott, Jonathan C.; Stackelberg, Paul E.; Thelin, Gail P.; Wolock, David M.

    2006-01-01

    This report is one of a series of publications, The Quality of Our Nation's Waters, that describe major findings of the NAWQA Program on water-quality issues of regional and national concern. This report presents evaluations of pesticides in streams and ground water based on findings for the first decadal cycle of NAWQA. 'Pesticides in the Nation's Streams and Ground Water, 1992-2001' greatly expands the analysis of pesticides presented in 'Nutrients and Pesticides,' which was the first report in the series and was based on early results from 1992 to 1995. Other reports in this series cover additional water-quality constituents of concern, such as volatile organic compounds and trace elements, as well as physical and chemical effects on aquatic ecosystems. Each report builds toward a more comprehensive understanding of regional and national water resources. The information in this series is intended primarily for those interested or involved in resource management, conservation, regulation, and policymaking at regional and national levels. In addition, the information might interest those at a local level who wish to know more about the general quality of streams and ground water in areas near where they live and how that quality compares with other areas across the Nation.

  8. Assessing the Effects of Water Rights Purchases on Dissolved Oxygen, Stream Temperatures, and Fish Habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouzon, N. R.; Null, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Human impacts from land and water development have degraded water quality and altered the physical, chemical, and biological integrity of Nevada's Walker River. Reduced instream flows and increased nutrient concentrations affect native fish populations through warm daily stream temperatures and low nightly dissolved oxygen concentrations. Water rights purchases are being considered to maintain instream flows, improve water quality, and enhance habitat for native fish species, such as Lahontan cutthroat trout. This study uses the River Modeling System (RMSv4), an hourly, physically-based hydrodynamic and water quality model, to estimate streamflows, temperatures, and dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Walker River. We simulate thermal and dissolved oxygen changes from increased streamflow to prioritize the time periods and locations that water purchases most enhance native trout habitat. Stream temperatures and dissolved oxygen concentrations are proxies for trout habitat. Monitoring results indicate stream temperature and dissolved oxygen limitations generally exist in the 115 kilometers upstream of Walker Lake (about 37% of the study area) from approximately May through September, and this reach currently acts as a water quality barrier for fish passage.

  9. Influence of instream habitat and water quality on aggressive behavior in crayfish of channelized headwater streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many agricultural drainage ditches that border farm fields of the Midwestern United States are degraded headwater streams that possess communities of crayfish. We hypothesized that crayfish communities at sites with low instream habitat diversity and poor water quality would show greater evidence of...

  10. Acquisition and management of continuous data streams for crop water management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wireless sensor network systems for decision support in crop water management offer many advantages including larger spatial coverage and multiple types of data input. However, collection and management of multiple and continuous data streams for near real-time post analysis can be problematic. Thi...

  11. Mercury concentrations in forest soils and stream waters in northeast and south China.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yao; Duan, Lei; Wang, Long; Xu, Guangyi; Wang, Shuxiao; Hao, Jiming

    2014-10-15

    Atmospheric deposition of mercury (Hg) is generally higher in China than in North America and Europe. Transport and methylation of Hg deposited in forest ecosystems may cause health risks to humans. We collected water samples from 117 small streams, and soil samples from 25 sites in forested areas in northeast and south China during 2011-2013 to investigate the spatial distribution of Hg. Results showed that Hg concentration in surface soil (0-5 cm in depth) was generally higher in south China (97.8 ± 36.0 μg/kg) than that in the northeast (44.0 ± 14.1 μg/kg). In contrast, the Hg concentration in stream water was higher in northeast China (17.2 ± 11.0 ng/L) than that in the south (6.2 ± 6.4 ng/L). Hg concentrations in surface soil were positively correlated with Hg concentrations in the overlying litter Oe/Oa horizon (r(2)=0.84). Hg concentrations in stream water were positively correlated to DOC (dissolved organic carbon) concentrations (r(2)=0.43) and to the Hg concentration in the litter Oe/Oa horizon (r(2)=0.69). Because the litter Oe/Oa horizon represents Hg accumulated by foliage, the positive correlations indicate that atmospheric Hg deposition was an important factor affecting Hg concentrations in soils and stream water.

  12. Stream water quality, Fort Cobb reservoir watershed, November 2004 to May 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Fort Cobb reservoir watershed encompasses about 813 km2 of agricultural land in southwestern Oklahoma. From November 2004 to May 2007, we measured streamflow, nutrient, and sediment concentrations in water samples collected at three USGS stream-gaging stations under high and low flow conditions....

  13. Collecting Stream Samples for Water Quality. Module 16. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on collecting stream samples for water quality. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) using a job aid to…

  14. Chloride dynamics in a restored urban stream and the influence of road salts on water quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the connection between road salts and water quality is essential to assess the implications for human health and ecosystem services from these widely used de-icers. Preliminary analysis identified a probable connection between road salt application and a stream wat...

  15. Stream water chemistry in the arsenic-contaminated Baccu Locci mine watershed (Sardinia, Italy) after remediation.

    PubMed

    Ardau, Carla; Podda, Francesca; Da Pelo, Stefania; Frau, Franco

    2013-11-01

    The abandoned Pb-As Baccu Locci mine represents the first and only case of mine site remediation in Sardinia, Italy. Arsenic is the most relevant environmental concern in the Baccu Locci stream watershed, with concentrations in surface waters up to and sometimes over 1 mg/L. The main remediation action consisted in creation of a "storage site", for the collection of contaminated materials from different waste-rock dumps and most of tailings piles occurring along the Baccu Locci stream. This paper reports preliminary results on the level of contamination in the Baccu Locci stream after the completion of remediation measures. Post-remediation stream water chemistry has not substantially changed compared to the pre-remediation situation. In particular, dissolved As maintains an increasing trend along the Baccu Locci stream, with a concentration of about 400 μg/L measured at a distance of 7 km from the storage site. Future monitoring will provide fundamental information on the effectiveness of remediation actions conducted and their applicability to other mine sites in Sardinia. At the stage of mine site characterisation of future remediation plans, it is recommended to pay more attention to the understanding of mineralogical and geochemical processes responsible for pollution. Moreover, mixing of materials with different composition and reactivity in a storage site should require careful consideration and long-term leaching tests.

  16. The effects of a stannous chloride-based water treatment system in a mercury contaminated stream

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, Teresa J.; Looney, Brian B.; Smith, John G.; Miller, Carrie L.; Peterson, Mark J.; Bryan, A. Lawrence; Southworth, George R.

    2015-06-09

    Remediation of mercury (Hg)-contaminated watersheds is often challenging because of the complex nature of Hg biogeochemistry. Stream ecosystems have been shown to be particularly susceptible to Hg contamination and bioaccumulation in fish. Decreasing total Hg loading to stream systems, however, has shown variable performance in decreasing Hg concentrations in fish tissues. In this study, we assess the impacts of an innovative treatment system in reducing releases of Hg to a small stream system in the southeastern United States. The treatment system, installed in 2007, removes Hg from water using tin (Sn) (II) chloride followed by air stripping. Mercury concentrations in the receiving stream, Tims Branch, decreased from > 100 to ~10 ng/L in the four years following treatment, and Hg body burdens in redfin pickerel (Esox americanus) decreased by 70 % at the most contaminated site. Tin concentrations in water and fish increased significantly in the tributary leading to Tims Branch, but concentrations remain below levels of concern for human health or ecological risks. While other studies have shown that Sn may be environmentally methylated and methyltin can transfer its methyl group to Hg, results from our field studies and sediment incubation experiments suggest that the added Sn to the Tims Branch watershed is not contributing to MeHg production and bioaccumulation. The stannous chloride treatment system installed at Tims Branch was effective at removing Hg inputs and reducing Hg bioaccumulation in the stream with minimal impacts on the environment due to the increased Sn in the system.

  17. Controls of catchments` sub-storage contributions to dynamic water quality patterns in the stream network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Maike Hegenauer, Anja

    2016-04-01

    Water quality is usually observed either continuously at a few stations within a catchment or with few snapshot sampling campaigns throughout the whole stream network. Although we know that the depletion of catchment sub-storages can vary throughout the stream network according to their actual water content (spatial variability of actual storage conditions can be caused amongst others by unevenly distributed rainfall, storage size or spatial differences in soil characteristics and land use), we know little about the impact of this process on spatial water quality patterns. For summer low flow recession periods, when stream water composition can be crucial for aquatic ecosystem conditions and the exceedance of water quality thresholds, knowledge on the controls of the dynamic interplay of catchment storages and stream water composition might improve water quality management and the implementation of corresponding mitigation measures. We studied this process throughout the stream network of a first-order agricultural headwater catchment in south-western Germany during two summer low flow recession periods. The underlying geology of the study area is a deep layer of aeolian loess, whilst the dominating soil is a silty calcaric regosol with gleizations in the colluvium. The land use in the catchment is dominated by viniculture (63 %) and arable crops (18 %). Due to the dense drainpipe network within the catchment we could identify 12 sub-catchments contributing during summer low flow recession periods to total stream discharge. We continuously observed discharge, electrical conductivity and water temperatures for 8 of the sub-catchments and at the catchment outlet. This data set was accomplished by 10 snapshot campaigns where we sampled for water temperatures, electrical conductivity, major ions, pH and O2 throughout the stream network. Using either discharge concentration relationships or time dependent functions, we derived continuous export rates for all measures in

  18. Using Sealed Wells to Measure Water Levels Beneath Streams and Floodplains.

    PubMed

    Noorduijn, Saskia L; Cook, Peter G; Wood, Cameron; White, Nick

    2015-01-01

    The design of wells beneath streams and floodplains has often employed with tall standpipes to prevent incursion of surface water into the well during flood events. Here, an approach has been presented to minimise the infrastructure demands in these environments by sealing the well top (e.g., prevent water entering the well) and monitor the total pressure in the water column using an absolute (non-vented) pressure transducer. The sealed well design was tested using a laboratory experiment where the total pressure responses were monitored in both an unsealed and sealed well, while the water level was varied. It is observed that, whether the well is sealed or not, the total pressure at a given depth in the aquifer will be equal to that within the well. This indicates that the sealed well design is a viable alternative to tall standpipes and also facilitates installation of wells beneath streams and floodplains.

  19. Mercury removal from water streams through the ion exchange membrane bioreactor concept.

    PubMed

    Oehmen, Adrian; Vergel, Dario; Fradinho, Joana; Reis, Maria A M; Crespo, João G; Velizarov, Svetlozar

    2014-01-15

    Mercury is a highly toxic heavy metal that causes human health problems and environmental contamination. In this study, an ion exchange membrane bioreactor (IEMB) process was developed to achieve Hg(II) removal from drinking water and industrial effluents. Hg(II) transport through a cation exchange membrane was coupled with its bioreduction to Hg(0) in order to achieve Hg removal from concentrated streams, with minimal production of contaminated by-products observed. This study involves (1) membrane selection, (2) demonstration of process effectiveness for removing Hg from drinking water to below the 1ppb recommended limit, and (3) process application for treatment of concentrated water streams, where >98% of the Hg was removed, and the throughput of contaminated water was optimised through membrane pre-treatment. The IEMB process represents a novel mercury treatment technology with minimal generation of contaminated waste, thereby reducing the overall environmental impact of the process.

  20. Factors Affecting Nitrate Delivery to Streams from Shallow Ground Water in the North Carolina Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, Stephen L.; Spruill, Timothy B.

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of data collected at five flow-path study sites between 1997 and 2006 was performed to identify the factors needed to formulate a comprehensive program, with a focus on nitrogen, for protecting ground water and surface water in the North Carolina Coastal Plain. Water-quality protection in the Coastal Plain requires the identification of factors that affect the transport of nutrients from recharge areas to streams through the shallow ground-water system. Some basins process or retain nitrogen more readily than others, and the factors that affect nitrogen processing and retention were the focus of this investigation to improve nutrient management in Coastal Plain streams and to reduce nutrient loads to coastal waters. Nitrate reduction in ground water was observed at all five flow-path study sites in the North Carolina Coastal Plain, although the extent of reduction at each site was influenced by various environmental, hydrogeologic, and geochemical factors. Denitrification was the most common factor responsible for decreases in nitrate along the ground-water flow paths. Specific factors, some of which affect denitrification rates, that appeared to influence ground-water nitrate concentrations along the flow paths or in the streams include soil drainage, presence or absence of riparian buffers, evapotranspiration, fertilizer use, ground-water recharge rates and residence times, aquifer properties, subsurface tile drainage, sources and amounts of organic matter, and hyporheic processes. The study data indicate that the nitrate-reducing capacity of the buffer zone combined with that of the hyporheic zone can substantially lower the amount of ground-water nitrate discharged to streams in agricultural settings of the North Carolina Coastal Plain. At the watershed scale, the effects of ground-water discharge on surface-water quality appear to be greatly influenced by streamflow conditions and the presence of extensive riparian vegetation. Streamflow statistics

  1. Characterization of Water Quality in Unmonitored Streams in the Mississippi Alluvial Plain, Northwestern Mississippi, May-June 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bryson, Jeannie R.; Coupe, Richard H.; Manning, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    The Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality is required to develop restoration and remediation plans for water bodies not meeting their designated uses, as stated in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Water Act section 303(d). The majority of streams in northwestern Mississippi are on the 303(d) list of water-quality limited waters. Agricultural effects on streams in northwestern Mississippi have reduced the number of unimpaired streams (reference streams) for water-quality comparisons. As part of an effort to develop an index to assess impairment, the U.S. Geological Survey collected water samples from 52 stream sites on the 303(d) list during May-June 2006, and analyzed the samples for nutrients and chlorophyll. The data were analyzed by trophic group as determined by total nitrogen concentrations. Seven constituents (nitrite plus nitrate, total Kjeldhal nitrogen, total phosphorus, orthophosphorus, total organic carbon, chlorophyll a, and pheophytina) and four physical property measurements (specific conductance, pH, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen) were determined to be significantly different (p < 0.05) between trophic groups. Total Kjeldhal nitrogen, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen were used as indicators of stream productivity with which to infer stream health. Streams having high total Kjeldhal nitrogen values and high turbidity values along with low dissolved oxygen concentrations were typically eutrophic abundant in nutrients), whereas streams having low total Kjeldhal nitrogen values and low turbidity values along with high dissolved oxygen concentrations were typically oligotrophic (deficient in nutrients).

  2. Climatological variations of total alkalinity and total dissolved inorganic carbon in the Mediterranean Sea surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemayel, E.; Hassoun, A. E. R.; Benallal, M. A.; Goyet, C.; Rivaro, P.; Abboud-Abi Saab, M.; Krasakopoulou, E.; Touratier, F.; Ziveri, P.

    2015-12-01

    A compilation of data from several cruises between 1998 and 2013 was used to derive polynomial fits that estimate total alkalinity (AT) and total dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) from measurements of salinity and temperature in the Mediterranean Sea surface waters. The optimal equations were chosen based on the 10-fold cross-validation results and revealed that second- and third-order polynomials fit the AT and CT data respectively. The AT surface fit yielded a root mean square error (RMSE) of ± 10.6 μmol kg-1, and salinity and temperature contribute to 96 % of the variability. Furthermore, we present the first annual mean CT parameterization for the Mediterranean Sea surface waters with a RMSE of ± 14.3 μmol kg-1. Excluding the marginal seas of the Adriatic and the Aegean, these equations can be used to estimate AT and CT in case of the lack of measurements. The identified empirical equations were applied on the 0.25° climatologies of temperature and salinity, available from the World Ocean Atlas 2013. The 7-year averages (2005-2012) showed that AT and CT have similar patterns with an increasing eastward gradient. The variability is influenced by the inflow of cold Atlantic waters through the Strait of Gibraltar and by the oligotrophic and thermohaline gradient that characterize the Mediterranean Sea. The summer-winter seasonality was also mapped and showed different patterns for AT and CT. During the winter, the AT and CT concentrations were higher in the western than in the eastern basin. The opposite was observed in the summer where the eastern basin was marked by higher AT and CT concentrations than in winter. The strong evaporation that takes place in this season along with the ultra-oligotrophy of the eastern basin determines the increase of both AT and CT concentrations.

  3. Water quality time series for Big Melen stream (Turkey): its decomposition analysis and comparison to upstream.

    PubMed

    Karakaya, N; Evrendilek, F

    2010-06-01

    Big Melen stream is one of the major water resources providing 0.268 [corrected] km(3) year(-1) of drinking and municipal water for Istanbul. Monthly time series data between 1991 and 2004 for 25 chemical, biological, and physical water properties of Big Melen stream were separated into linear trend, seasonality, and error components using additive decomposition models. Water quality index (WQI) derived from 17 water quality variables were used to compare Aksu upstream and Big Melen downstream water quality. Twenty-six additive decomposition models of water quality time series data including WQI had R (2) values ranging from 88% for log(water temperature) (P < or = 0.001) to 3% for log(total dissolved solids) (P < or = 0.026). Linear trend models revealed that total hardness, calcium concentration, and log(nitrite concentration) had the highest rate of increase over time. Tukey's multiple comparison pointed to significant decreases in 17 water quality variables including WQI of Big Melen downstream relative to those of Aksu upstream (P < or = 0.001). Monitoring changes in water quality on the basis of watersheds through WQI and decomposition analysis of time series data paves the way for an adaptive management process of water resources that can be tailored in response to effectiveness and dynamics of management practices.

  4. StreamStats in North Carolina: a water-resources Web application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, J. Curtis; Terziotti, Silvia; Kolb, Katharine R.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2012-01-01

    A statewide StreamStats application for North Carolina was developed in cooperation with the North Carolina Department of Transportation following completion of a pilot application for the upper French Broad River basin in western North Carolina (Wagner and others, 2009). StreamStats for North Carolina, available at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/streamstats/north_carolina.html, is a Web-based Geographic Information System (GIS) application developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in consultation with Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (Esri) to provide access to an assortment of analytical tools that are useful for water-resources planning and management (Ries and others, 2008). The StreamStats application provides an accurate and consistent process that allows users to easily obtain streamflow statistics, basin characteristics, and descriptive information for USGS data-collection sites and user-selected ungaged sites. In the North Carolina application, users can compute 47 basin characteristics and peak-flow frequency statistics (Weaver and others, 2009; Robbins and Pope, 1996) for a delineated drainage basin. Selected streamflow statistics and basin characteristics for data-collection sites have been compiled from published reports and also are immediately accessible by querying individual sites from the web interface. Examples of basin characteristics that can be computed in StreamStats include drainage area, stream slope, mean annual precipitation, and percentage of forested area (Ries and others, 2008). Examples of streamflow statistics that were previously available only through published documents include peak-flow frequency, flow-duration, and precipitation data. These data are valuable for making decisions related to bridge design, floodplain delineation, water-supply permitting, and sustainable stream quality and ecology. The StreamStats application also allows users to identify stream reaches upstream and downstream from user-selected sites

  5. A pulsed light system for the disinfection of flow through water in the presence of inorganic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Mary; Rowan, Neil

    2015-06-01

    The use of ultraviolet (UV) light for water disinfection has become increasingly popular due to on-going issues with drinking water and public health. Pulsed UV light has proved to be an effective form of inactivating a range of pathogens including parasite species. However, there are limited data available on the use of pulsed UV light for the disinfection of flowing water in the absence or presence of inorganic contaminants commonly found in water sources. Here, we report on the inactivation of test species including Bacillus endospores following pulsed UV treatment as a flow through system. Significant levels of inactivation were obtained for both retention times tested. The presence of inorganic contaminants iron and/or manganese did affect the rate of disinfection, predominantly resulting in an increase in the levels of inactivation at certain UV doses. The findings of this study suggest that pulsed UV light may provide a method of water disinfection as it successfully inactivated bacterial cells and bacterial endospores in the absence and presence of inorganic contaminants.

  6. Chemical characterization of organic carbon dissolved in natural waters using inorganic adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Y; Kumagai, T

    2001-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in water samples from Lake Biwa was chemically characterized by two inorganic adsorbents with completely different surface characteristics. The two adsorbents were HIO (hydrous iron oxide) and SG (silica gel). Solutions of reference standard materials were analyzed concerning their adsorption behavior to HIO and SG for bovine serum albumin (BSA), fulvic acid extracted from the bottom sediments of Lake Biwa, phthalic acid, and starch. The adsorption of DOC to HIO was mainly controlled by ligand exchange and electrostatic interaction; that of SG was by electrostatic interaction. It was found that in a weak acid solution of around pH 5, BSA adsorbs to both HIO and SG, but that fulvic acid, phthalic acid and starch only show adsorption to HIO. Using these characteristics, DOC samples in natural water samples were characterized into pro-DOC, which adsorbs to both HIO and SG at pH 5, and car-DOC, which only adsorbs to HIO at pH 5. The DOC samples in Lake Biwa on October 7, 1997, at sampling sites Nb-2 and Nb-5 (south basin of Lake Biwa, the depths were about 2 and 4 m), and Ie-1 (north basin of Lake Biwa, the depth was about 75 m) were characterized. The pro-DOC has different values, depending on their sampling sites and depths, and had the maximum value of 0.42 mg C l(-1) at the surface water of Ie-1, and had the lowest values at middle to deeper water depths (0.18-0.27 mg C l(-1)). The car-DOC showed a relatively stable value at Ie-1 regardless of the depth (0.63-0.83 mg C l(-1)), and the maximum value was observed in Nb-2 and Nb-5 (1.2 and 1.3 mg C l(-1)). The ratios between car-DOC and pro-DOC concentrations were 0.2-0.5, and had different values for different sampling sites and depths. The ratios were significantly different for surface water samples where the biological activities are high and for bottom water samples where decomposition predominates.

  7. Guidelines for the collection of continuous stream water-temperature data in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toohey, Ryan C.; Neal, Edward G.; Solin, Gary L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives of stream monitoring programs differ considerably among many of the academic, Federal, state, tribal, and non-profit organizations in the state of Alaska. Broad inclusion of stream-temperature monitoring can provide an opportunity for collaboration in the development of a statewide stream-temperature database. Statewide and regional coordination could reduce overall monitoring cost, while providing better analyses at multiple spatial and temporal scales to improve resource decision-making. Increased adoption of standardized protocols and data-quality standards may allow for validation of historical modeling efforts with better projection calibration. For records of stream water temperature to be generally consistent, unbiased, and reproducible, data must be collected and analyzed according to documented protocols. Collection of water-temperature data requires definition of data-quality objectives, good site selection, proper selection of instrumentation, proper installation of sensors, periodic site visits to maintain sensors and download data, pre- and post-deployment verification against an NIST-certified thermometer, potential data corrections, and proper documentation, review, and approval. A study created to develop a quality-assurance project plan, data-quality objectives, and a database management plan that includes procedures for data archiving and dissemination could provide a means to standardize a statewide stream-temperature database in Alaska. Protocols can be modified depending on desired accuracy or specific needs of data collected. This document is intended to guide users in collecting time series water-temperature data in Alaskan streams and draws extensively on the broader protocols already published by the U.S. Geological Survey.

  8. Wildfire and Salvage Logging Impacts on Stream Water Nitrogen in Southern Alberta's Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bladon, K. D.; Silins, U.; Wagner, M. J.; Stone, M.; Emelko, M. B.; Mendoza, C. A.; Devito, K. J.; Boon, S.

    2008-12-01

    Increased size and frequency of wildfires in North America has been linked to changing climate over the past 2-3 decades, raising concerns over impacts of wildfire on downstream water quality. In 2003, the Lost Creek wildfire burned more than 21,000 ha in the highest water yielding area of the Rocky Mountain region of southwestern Alberta (Crowsnest Pass). The objective of this study was to examine initial effects of the fire and post-fire salvage logging on concentrations, yield, and total export of several nitrogen (N) species, and to explore initial recovery of these effects within the first four years after the fire. Streams draining burned and post-fire salvage logged watersheds produced much higher concentrations of total nitrogen (TN), total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), and nitrate (NO3-) compared to reference streams in the first two years following the fire (p < 0.001). This resulted in average nutrient yields that were considerably greater for TN (6-fold), TDN (6-fold), and NO3- (9-fold) in burned streams than in reference streams. Salvage logging produced generally similar effects on the concentrations and yields for most N species. The temporal trend for TN, TDN, and NO3- in stream water from burned watersheds was a rapid decline in mean watershed exports over the four seasons after the fire to levels similar to those of the reference watersheds. However, exports of TN were still elevated in the fourth post-fire year in watersheds impacted by the additional disturbance of salvage logging. The effects of the burn were most noticeable (i.e., produced the greatest N concentrations, yields, and exports) during or following higher discharge periods (snowmelt freshet and storm flows) (p < 0.001). Small differences were still evident during base-flow periods, emphasizing the importance of groundwater and subsurface contributions to the headwater streams in this study.

  9. Hillslope and stream connections to water tables in montane meadows of the southern Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, M. H.; Lucas, R. G.

    2011-12-01

    Montane meadows are often areas of groundwater discharge. In this study we characterized the groundwater - surface water interactions of two meadow systems and their connectivity to the surrounding catchment . We analyzed groundwater elevation data in 24 wells in two meadows located in the southern Sierra Nevada. Well transects extended from the meadow centers near the stream, to the meadow edged, and into the adjacent forest-where wells were drilled into the weathered granite saprock layer. Water samples were collected from the monitoring wells and from streams associated with the meadow systems and analyzed for major ions and stable water isotopes. Ground water elevations in the monitoring wells were used to calculate daily evapotranspiration (ET) values. These values show that locations on the meadow slopes and near the meadow edges are losing water to the atmosphere at near potential evapotranspiration rates during the height of the growing season. ET signals from wells near the meadow streams are muted, likely due to the vegetation utilizing the available surface water at these locations. Wells installed in the saprock layer, outside of the meadow boundaries, show diurnal fluctuations in sync with fluctuations observed at the meadow edge. This trend persists after the meadow vegetation senesces, indicating that groundwater elevations in the meadow, especially near the meadow edge, are significantly influenced by the adjacent hillslope saprock layer and forest ET. Geochemical sampling results indicate that the meadow streams are predominantly fed by snowmelt in the spring and early summer, moving toward more influence from base flow in the late summer and early fall. Results from the geochemical analysis established the connections of the hillslope to the meadow water tables and of the meadow subsurface waters to the down-gradient streams. Our results indicate that the these meadows are directly connected to the shallow sub-surface processes in the up gradient

  10. Stream restoration and sewers impact sources and fluxes of water,carbon, and nutrients in urban watersheds

    EPA Science Inventory

    An improved understanding of sources and timing of water and nutrient fluxes associated with urban stream restoration is critical for guiding effective watershed management. We investigated how sources, fluxes, and flowpaths of water, carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P)...

  11. Multi-scale analysis of the fluxes between terrestrial water storage, groundwater, and stream discharge in the Columbia River Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    The temporal relationships between the measurements of terrestrial water storage (TWS), groundwater, and stream discharge were analyzed at three different scales in the Columbia River Basin (CRB) for water years 2004 - 2012. Our nested watershed approach examined the Snake River ...

  12. The impacts of NOM from on the water quality of the streams and lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Hee; Lee, Soohyung; Lee, Junbae; Khan, Jong beom; Lee, Seyong; Lee, Yunkyung; Hur, Jin; Lee, Hanseam; Shin, Hyunsang

    2016-04-01

    The COD levels of the Lake Daechung, one of a major source of drinking water, have been increased since 1994 whereas the BOD levels have been decreased. Those increases raise the concerns about the effectiveness of water treatment system or the unmanageable contaminant sources such as ROMs (Refractory Organic Matters). Nine basic water quality factors such as COD, TOC, DOC, T-N, T-P, etc. (every week) and NOM (Natural Organic Matters, every month) in the up and down streams of Juwon and Pumgok and related junction with the Lake Daechung were monitored from June to Nov., 2015 in order to investigate the impacts on the water quality of the Lake Daechung. Resulting from the monitoring, the increases in the COD, TOC and DOC suggested that the heavy rainfall (>50 mm/day) could lead to the influx of ROM to the streams. Furthermore, increases in the EE intensities of EEM in July, Aug., and Sep., suggested that the rainfall would deliver the terrestrial ROM to the streams. However, it is difficult to recognize the similar changes in the lake Daechung due to the larger water capacity. The water samples collected from streams during the rainy period were fractionated using XAD columns and pH adjustment. The DOC composition(%) of humic and fulvic fraction in upstream of which basin was composed by forestry were higher than those in downstream affected by various land uses implying that more organic materials in upstream would be originated from the forestry than those in downstream. and hydrophilic The increases in the DOC of the related fractions, SUVA and EEM of the samples collected during the rainy season implied that heavy rainfall would lead for the terrestrial NOM to enter the streams whereas the concentration of the biopolymer were increased in the streams during the dry season. In summary, this study suggested that the ROM originated from forestry could be entered in the streams and some of anthropogenic chemicals such as biocide and nitrophenols accumulated in the

  13. Assessing the Effects of Corn-Based Ethanol Production on Stream Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, R. B.; Smith, R. A.; Schwarz, G. E.

    2007-12-01

    Corn grain-based ethanol production nearly doubled over the past five years in response to energy security concerns and the use of ethanol as a gasoline additive. Corn prices show similar increases with much of the rise occurring in more recent years. Farmers responded by planting 93 million acres of corn in 2007, a 19 percent increase over 2006, with most of the new acreage converted from lands in soybeans and cotton. The projected doubling of corn-based ethanol production by 2016 is expected to exert a continued demand for increased corn acreage and production. Both the recent and projected increases in corn production have raised concerns about the degradation of stream water quality; these include the water-quality effects of possible conversions of Conservation Reserve Program lands of which 16 million enrolled acres are slated to expire in 2007. However, no studies of the potential water-quality impacts have been conducted to date. Corn-based agriculture is currently recognized as a major source of nitrogen to Midwestern streams and the northern Gulf of Mexico where increased nitrogen has contributed to coastal eutrophication over the last several decades. Phosphorus from agricultural sources, including corn-based crops, is also known to impair the quality of inland streams and rivers. We use the spatially explicit water-quality model SPARROW (Spatially Referenced Regression on Watershed Attributes) to simulate the potential effects of recent and projected ethanol-related corn production on stream nutrient loads and coastal nutrient delivery. We simulate mean-annual total nitrogen and phosphorus loads in major streams of the conterminous United States, based on the use of a previously estimated national model. The model accounts for major sources and inputs of nutrients to watersheds (e.g., agricultural, atmospheric deposition, human wastes); these are mediated in the model by the effects of climate, topography, soils, and aquatic attenuation processes on

  14. UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECT OF DYNAMIC FEED CONDITIONS ON WATER RECOVERY FROM IC ENGINE EXHAUST BY CAPILLARY CONDENSATION WITH INORGANIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    DeBusk, Melanie Moses; Bischoff, Brian L; Hunter, James A; Klett, James William; Nafziger, Eric J; Daw, C Stuart

    2014-01-01

    An inorganic membrane water recovery concept is evaluated as a method to recovering water from the exhaust of an internal combustion engine. Integrating the system on-board a vehicle would create a self-sustaining water supply that would make engine water injection technologies consumer transparent . In laboratory experiments, water recovery from humidified air was measured to evaluate how different operating parameters affect the membrane system s efficiency. The observed impact of transmembrane pressure and gas flow rate suggest that gas residence time is more important than water flux through the membrane. Heat transfer modeling suggests that increasing membrane length can be used to improve efficiency and allow greater flow per membrane, an important parameter for practical applications where space is limited. The membrane water recovery concept was also experimentally validated by extracting water from diesel exhaust coming from a stationary generator. The insight afforded by these studies provides a basis for developing improved membrane designs that balance both efficiency and cost.

  15. Inorganic and organic sulfur cycling in salt-marsh pore waters

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, G.W. III; Church, T.M.; Scudlark, J.R.; Cosman, M.

    1986-05-09

    Sulfur species in pore waters of the Great Marsh, Delaware, were analyzed seasonally by polarographic methods. The species determined (and their concentrations in micromoles per liter) included inorganic sulfides (less than or equal to3360), polysulfides (less than or equal to326), thiosulfate (less than or equal to104), tetrathionate (less than or equal to302), organic thiols (less than or equal to2411), and organic disulfides (less than or equal to139). Anticipated were bisulfide increases with depth due to sulfate reduction and subsurface sulfate excesses and pH minima, the result of a seasonal redox cycle. Unanticipated was the pervasive presence of thiols (for example, glutathione), particularly during periods of biological production. Salt marshes appear to be unique among marine systems in producing high concentrations of thiols. Polysulfides, thiosulfate, and tetrathionate also exhibited seasonal subsurface maxima. These results suggest a dynamic seasonal cycling of sulfur in salt marshes involving abiological and biological reactions and dissolved and solid sulfur species. The chemosynthetic turnover of pyrite to organic sulfur is a likely pathway for this sulfur cycling. Thus, material, chemical, and energy cycles in wetlands appear to be optimally synergistic.

  16. The relation of harvesting intensity to changes in soil, soil water, and stream chemistry in a northern hardwood forest, Catskill Mountains, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siemion, Jason; Burns, Douglas A.; Murdoch, Peter S.; Germain, Rene H.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that clearcutting of northern hardwood forests mobilizes base cations, inorganic monomeric aluminum (Alim), and nitrate (NO3--N) from soils to surface waters, but the effects of partial harvests on NO3--N have been less frequently studied. In this study we describe the effects of a series of partial harvests of varying proportions of basal area removal (22%, 28% and 68%) on Alim, calcium (Ca2+), and NO3--N concentrations in soil extracts, soil water, and surface water in the Catskill Mountains of New York, USA. Increases in NO3--N concentrations relative to pre-harvest values were observed within a few months after harvest in soils, soil water, and stream water for all three harvests. Increases in Alim and Ca2+ concentrations were also evident in soil water and stream water over the same time period for all three harvests. The increases in Alim, Ca2+, and NO3--N concentrations in the 68% harvest were statistically significant as measured by comparing the 18-month pre-harvest period with the 18-month post-harvest period, with fewer significant responses in the two harvests of lowest intensity. All three solutes returned to pre-harvest concentrations in soil water and stream water in the two lowest intensity harvests in 2–3 years compared to a full 3 years in the 68% harvest. When the results of this study were combined with those of a previous nearby clearcut and 40% harvest, the post-harvest increases in NO3--N concentrations in stream water and soil water suggest a harvesting level above which the relation between concentration and harvest intensity changes; there was a greater change in concentration per unit change in harvest intensity when basal area removal was greater than 40%. These results indicate that the deleterious effects on aquatic ecosystems previously demonstrated for intensive harvests in northern hardwood forests of northeastern North America that receive high levels of atmospheric N deposition can be greatly

  17. Trends in the quality of water in New Jersey streams, water years 1971–2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickman, R. Edward; Hirsch, Robert M.

    2017-02-27

    In a study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and the Delaware River Basin Commission, trend tests were conducted on selected water-quality characteristics measured at stations on streams in New Jersey during selected periods over water years 1971‒2011. Tests were conducted on 3 nutrients (total nitrogen, filtered nitrate plus nitrite, and total phosphorus) at 28 water-quality stations. At 4 of these stations, tests were also conducted on 3 measures of major ions (specific conductance, filtered chloride, and total dissolved solids).Two methods were used to identify trends—Weighted Regressions on Time, Discharge, and Season (WRTDS) models and seasonal rank-sum tests. For this report, the use of WRTDS models included the use of the WRTDS Bootstrap Test (WBT). WRTDS models identified trends in flow-normalized annual concentrations and flow-normalized annual fluxes over water years 1980‒2011 and 2000‒11 for each nutrient, filtered chloride, and total dissolved solids. WRTDS models were developed for each nutrient at the 20 or 21 stations at which streamflow was measured or estimated. Trends in nutrient concentration were reported for these stations; trends in nutrient fluxes were reported only for 15–17 of these stations.The results of WRTDS models for water years 1980‒2011 identified more stations with downward trends in concentrations of either total nitrogen or total phosphorus than upward trends. For total nitrogen, there were downward trends at 9 stations and an upward trend at 1 station. For total phosphorus, there were downward trends at 8 stations and an upward trend at 1 station. For filtered nitrate plus nitrite, there were downward trends at 6 stations and upward trends at 6 stations. The result of the trend test in flux for a selected nutrient at a selected station (downward trend, no trend, or upward trend) usually matched the trend result in concentration

  18. Water quality of selected streams in the coal area of southeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knapton, J.R.; McKinley, P.W.

    1977-01-01

    This report summarizes and evaluates water-quality data collected at 35 stream sites the the coal region of southeastern Montana. Sarpy Creek, Armells Creek, and Rosebud Creek sometimes have dissolved-solids concentrations that cause water to be marginal for agricultural purposes. At times of rainfall and snowmelt, the runoff water mixes with the base-flow component to improve the overall quality. Water in the Tongue River generally showed a downstream degradation in which some changes were related to lithology of the aquifers contributing water to streamflow. Water from Pumpkin Creek and Mizpah Creek is used mostly for cattle watering. To some extent water is used for irrigation although the salinity hazard was often high. The chemical quality of the Powder River changed little during flow downstream. High sediment loads of the river acted as transporting agents for many of the plant nutrients and trace-element constituents. (Woodard-USGS)

  19. Ecological impacts of lead mining on Ozark streams: Toxicity of sediment and pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Allert, A.L.; Poulton, B.C.; Schmitt, C.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the toxicity of sediments downstream of lead-zinc mining areas in southeast Missouri, using chronic sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, and pore-water toxicity tests with the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Tests conducted in 2002 documented reduced survival of amphipods in stream sediments collected near mining areas and reduced survival and reproduction of daphnids in most pore waters tested. Additional amphipod tests conducted in 2004 documented significant toxic effects of sediments from three streams downstream of mining areas: Strother Creek, West Fork Black River, and Bee Fork. Greatest toxicity occurred in sediments from a 6-km reach of upper Strother Creek, but significant toxic effects occurred in sediments collected at least 14 km downstream of mining in all three watersheds. Toxic effects were significantly correlated with metal concentrations (nickel, zinc, cadmium, and lead) in sediments and pore waters and were generally consistent with predictions of metal toxicity risks based on sediment quality guidelines, although ammonia and manganese may also have contributed to toxicity at a few sites. Responses of amphipods in sediment toxicity tests were significantly correlated with characteristics of benthic invertebrate communities in study streams. These results indicate that toxicity of metals associated with sediments contributes to adverse ecological effects in streams draining the Viburnum Trend mining district.

  20. Method for separating water soluble organics from a process stream by aqueous biphasic extraction

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.; Mego, William A.

    1999-01-01

    A method for separating water-miscible organic species from a process stream by aqueous biphasic extraction is provided. An aqueous biphase system is generated by contacting a process stream comprised of water, salt, and organic species with an aqueous polymer solution. The organic species transfer from the salt-rich phase to the polymer-rich phase, and the phases are separated. Next, the polymer is recovered from the loaded polymer phase by selectively extracting the polymer into an organic phase at an elevated temperature, while the organic species remain in a substantially salt-free aqueous solution. Alternatively, the polymer is recovered from the loaded polymer by a temperature induced phase separation (cloud point extraction), whereby the polymer and the organic species separate into two distinct solutions. The method for separating water-miscible organic species is applicable to the treatment of industrial wastewater streams, including the extraction and recovery of complexed metal ions from salt solutions, organic contaminants from mineral processing streams, and colorants from spent dye baths.

  1. Method for separating water soluble organics from a process stream by aqueous biphasic extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chaiko, D.J.; Mego, W.A.

    1999-09-07

    A method for separating water-miscible organic species from a process stream by aqueous biphasic extraction is provided. An aqueous biphase system is generated by contacting a process stream comprised of water, salt, and organic species with an aqueous polymer solution. The organic species transfer from the salt-rich phase to the polymer-rich phase, and the phases are separated. Next, the polymer is recovered from the loaded polymer phase by selectively extracting the polymer into an organic phase at an elevated temperature, while the organic species remain in a substantially salt-free aqueous solution. Alternatively, the polymer is recovered from the loaded polymer by a temperature induced phase separation (cloud point extraction), whereby the polymer and the organic species separate into two distinct solutions. The method for separating water-miscible organic species is applicable to the treatment of industrial wastewater streams, including the extraction and recovery of complexed metal ions from salt solutions, organic contaminants from mineral processing streams, and colorants from spent dye baths.

  2. What causes cooling water temperature gradients in a forested stream reach?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, G.; Malcolm, I. A.; Sadler, J. P.; Hannah, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have suggested that shading by riparian vegetation may reduce maximum water temperatures and provide refugia for temperature-sensitive aquatic organisms. Longitudinal cooling gradients have been observed during the daytime for stream reaches shaded by coniferous trees downstream of clear cuts or deciduous woodland downstream of open moorland. However, little is known about the energy exchange processes that drive such gradients, especially in semi-natural woodland contexts without confounding cool groundwater inflows. To address this gap, this study quantified and modelled variability in stream temperature and heat fluxes along an upland reach of the Girnock Burn (a tributary of the Aberdeenshire Dee, Scotland) where riparian land use transitions from open moorland to semi-natural, predominantly deciduous woodland. Observations were made along a 1050 m reach using a spatially distributed network of 10 water temperature data loggers, 3 automatic weather stations and 211 hemispherical photographs that were used to estimate incoming solar radiation. These data parameterised a high-resolution energy flux model incorporating flow routing, which predicted spatio-temporal variability in stream temperature. Variability in stream temperature was controlled largely by energy fluxes at the water-column-atmosphere interface. Net energy gains occurred along the reach, predominantly during daylight hours, and heat exchange across the bed-water-column interface accounted for <1% of the net energy budget. For periods when daytime net radiation gains were high (under clear skies), differences between water temperature observations increased in the streamwise direction; a maximum instantaneous difference of 2.5 °C was observed between the upstream reach boundary and 1050 m downstream. Furthermore, daily maximum water temperature at 1050 m downstream was ≤1 °C cooler than at the upstream reach boundary and lagged by >1 h. Temperature gradients were not generated

  3. Estimation of stream-aquifer exchanges at regional scale using a distributed model: Sensitivity to in-stream water level fluctuations, riverbed elevation and roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratelli, Fulvia; Flipo, Nicolas; Moatar, Florentina

    2016-11-01

    Several studies on stream-aquifer interactions focus on the local scale. However, the estimation of stream-aquifer exchanges for a regional river network remains challenging. This study aims at assessing the sensitivity of distributed stream-aquifer exchanges to in-stream water level fluctuations, riverbed elevation and Manning roughness coefficient. An integrated distributed surface-subsurface model is applied to the Loire river basin (117,480 km2, France), where in-stream water level fluctuations are taken into account with a simplified Manning-Strickler approach. The stream-aquifer exchanges are analyzed at pluri-annual and annual scales, as well as during short-term hydrological events. The model simulates the spatio-temporal variability of in-stream water levels accurately, with Nash coefficients up to 0.96 for the Loire river. The river network mainly drains the aquifer system. The average net exchanged flow is 2 ·10-2 m3 s-1 km-1, which corresponds to 12% of the averaged discharge at the outlet of the basin. The assumption of constant river stages significantly impacts the total infiltration (-70%) and exfiltration (-10%) in the basin, whereas it has a negligible influence on the average net flux. The river fluctuations increase the time variability of the stream-aquifer exchanges and may determine flow reversals during flood events and also more frequently for river stretches at equilibrium with its nearby aquifer. This study highlights the importance of accounting for river stage fluctuations in the modeling of regional hydrosystems. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis indicates that it is mandatory to develop new methodologies to better estimate the riverbed elevation at high resolution for a river network at regional scale. In a lesser extent, errors on Manning coefficient affect the timing of infiltration and exfiltration, leading to temporally localized discrepancies. However it does not affect the estimates of the global net exchanges significantly.

  4. Electro-driven extraction of inorganic anions from water samples and water miscible organic solvents and analysis by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Nojavan, Saeed; Bidarmanesh, Tina; Memarzadeh, Farkhondeh; Chalavi, Soheila

    2014-09-01

    A simple electromembrane extraction (EME) procedure combined with ion chromatography (IC) was developed to quantify inorganic anions in different pure water samples and water miscible organic solvents. The parameters affecting extraction performance, such as supported liquid membrane (SLM) solvent, extraction time, pH of donor and acceptor solutions, and extraction voltage were optimized. The optimized EME conditions were as follows: 1-heptanol was used as the SLM solvent, the extraction time was 10 min, pHs of the acceptor and donor solutions were 10 and 7, respectively, and the extraction voltage was 15 V. The mobile phase used for IC was a combination of 1.8 mM sodium carbonate and 1.7 mM sodium bicarbonate. Under these optimized conditions, all anions had enrichment factors ranging from 67 to 117 with RSDs between 7.3 and 13.5% (n = 5). Good linearity values ranging from 2 to 1200 ng/mL with coefficients of determination (R(2) ) between 0.987 and 0.999 were obtained. The LODs of the EME-IC method ranged from 0.6 to 7.5 ng/mL. The developed method was applied to different samples to evaluate the feasibility of the method for real applications.

  5. One-dimensional steady-state stream water-quality model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauer, Daniel P.; Jennings, Marshall E.; Miller, Jeffrey E.

    1979-01-01

    A computer program, based on a one-dimensional mathematical model which predicts the stream water-quality response characteristics from waste source inputs, is described and documented. Variables predicted include dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, nitrogen forms, total and fecal-coliform bacteria, orthophosphate-phosphorus, and various conservative substances. The model is based primarily on the Streeter-Phelps oxygen-sag equation. Special options of the program include the capability of handling nonpont source waste inputs and anoxic conditions. The model formulation is based on a steady-state assumption which requires constant flow rate of waste and stream discharges and associated parameters. To achieve a problem solution, each reach of a stream system is broken into a given number of subreaches, generally defined by locations of waste or tributary inflow points. All waste constituents are assumed to be completely mixed within any cross section. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. Cold water cleaning of brain proteins, biofilm and bone - harnessing an ultrasonically activated stream.

    PubMed

    Birkin, P R; Offin, D G; Vian, C J B; Howlin, R P; Dawson, J I; Secker, T J; Hervé, R C; Stoodley, P; Oreffo, R O C; Keevil, C W; Leighton, T G

    2015-08-28

    In the absence of sufficient cleaning of medical instruments, contamination and infection can result in serious consequences for the health sector and remains a significant unmet challenge. In this paper we describe a novel cleaning system reliant on cavitation action created in a free flowing fluid stream where ultrasonic transmission to a surface, through the stream, is achieved using careful design and control of the device architecture, sound field and the materials employed. Cleaning was achieved with purified water at room temperature, moderate fluid flow rates and without the need for chemical additives or the high power consumption associated with conventional strategies. This study illustrates the potential in harnessing an ultrasonically activated stream to remove biological contamination including brain tissue from surgical stainless steel substrates, S. epidermidis biofilms from glass, and fat/soft tissue matter from bone structures with considerable basic and clinical applications.

  7. Effects of Surface-Water Diversion and Ground-Water Withdrawal on Streamflow and Habitat, Punaluu Stream, Oahu, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oki, Delwyn S.; Wolff, Reuben H.; Perreault, Jeff A.

    2006-01-01

    The surface- and ground-water resources of the Punaluu area of northeast Oahu, Hawaii, have been and continue to be important for cultural, domestic, agricultural, recreational, and aesthetic purposes. Punaluu Stream flows perennially because rain falls frequently in the area and ground water discharges to the stream. Flow in Punaluu Stream is reduced by the direct diversion of water for off-stream uses and possibly from the withdrawal of ground water near the stream. Punaluu Ditch diverts water from Punaluu Stream near an altitude of 210 feet. During the recent period 1995-2004, discharge in Punaluu Stream that was equaled or exceeded 50 percent of the time (median or Q50 discharge) and discharge that was equaled or exceeded 95 percent of the time (Q95 discharge) measured immediately upstream from the Punaluu Ditch diversion intake, respectively, were 18 and 13 cubic feet per second, whereas the Q50 and Q95 discharges measured immediately downstream from the diversion intake, respectively, were 7.0 and 1.3 cubic feet per second. Thus, near an altitude of 210 feet, diversion of surface water by the Punaluu Ditch caused the Q50 discharge in Punaluu Stream to be reduced to 39 percent of the natural Q50 discharge, and the Q95 discharge was reduced to 10 percent of the natural value. The relative effects of the Punaluu Ditch diversion on flow in Punaluu Stream decreased in a downstream direction, mainly because of the compensating effects of tributary inflows and ditch return flows. At an altitude of 10 feet, the Q50 discharge in Punaluu Stream was 82 percent of the natural Q50 discharge, and the Q95 discharge was 69 percent of the natural value. Changes in streamflow affect the quantity and quality of physical habitat used by native stream fauna. The Physical Habitat Simulation System (PHABSIM) approach was used to evaluate the effects of different diversion scenarios on physical habitat for selected native species in Punaluu Stream. Habitat-suitability criteria

  8. Water column profiles of particulate inorganic carbon in the northeast subarctic Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, J. N.; Bishop, J. K.; Martinez, E. J.; Weiss, G. A.; Weiss, A.; Derr, A.; Strubhar, W.; Robert, M.; Wood, T.

    2013-12-01

    High resolution and real-time measurement of particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) content in seawater is necessary to improve our spatial and temporal understanding of marine carbon flux and the possible effects of ocean acidification on the biological pump. On four occasions since August 2012, we have mapped PIC distribution from surface to bottom at 26 stations along the IOS-Canada Line P transect from western Vancouver Island, BC, Canada to Ocean Station PAPA, 50N 145W using a prototype (PIC001) and a near-commercial quality (PIC008) optical birefringence sensor. The sensors are highly modified 6000m-rated WETLabs C-star transmissometers, which use a polarized laser beam and a cross-polarized receiver to measure photons emitted after passing through birefringent solids. At major stations along Line P (P2, P4, P8, P12, P16, P20, P26), one-liter rosette-collected calibration water samples were filtered through 0.45 μm Supor filters using a small-volume direct filtration system. These samples were analysed for acid-leachable particulate elements (with emphasis on Ca, Na, and Mg) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). ICPMS PIC was calculated as residual Ca after correction for seawater Ca using Na data. Here we report results for late summer (Aug. 2012) and winter (Feb. 2013). As expected, high levels of PIC (> 100 nmol L-1 to > 2000 nmol L-1) were found in surface waters but rapidly declined at depths greater than 200m and increased again in the nepheloid layer (>50 nmol L-1). Striking seasonal differences in PIC content and PIC profile shape were observed particularly at near shore stations P2, P4, P8 and P12. The results from this research, including sensor evolution and calibration performance, will be presented.

  9. A method for separating water soluble organics from a process stream by aqueous biphasic extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chaiko, David J.; Mego, William A.

    1997-12-01

    The present invention relates to a method for separating water-miscible organic species from a process stream by aqueous biphasic extraction. In particular, the method includes extracting the organic species into a polymer-rich phase of an aqueous biphase system in which the process stream comprises the salt-rich phase, and, next, separating the polymer from the extracted organic species by contacting the loaded, polymer-rich phase with a water-immiscible organic phase. Alternatively, the polymer can be separated from the extracted organic species by raising the temperature of the loaded, polymer-rich phase above the cloud point, such that the polymer and the water-soluble organic species separate into two distinct aqueous phases. In either case, a substantially salt-free, concentrated aqueous solution containing the organic species is recovered.

  10. Mine drainage and rock type influences on eastern Ohio stream water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helsel, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    Stream water during fair weather (base flow) is largely ground water discharge, which has been in contact with minerals of the underlying aquifer. Base flow water quality should therefore reflect aquifer mineralogy as well as upstream land use. Three upstream mining categories (unmined lands, abandoned coal mines, and reclaimed coal mines) differed in pH, specific conductance, sulfate, iron, aluminum, and alkalinity for 122 streams in eastern Ohio. Aquifer rock type influenced pH, specific conductance, sulfate, iron, and alkalinity. Reclamation returned many components of acid mine drainage to near unmined levels, although sulfate and specific conductance were not improved. Acid mine drainage problems were less severe in watersheds underlain by the calcareous Monongahela Formation. These results should apply to other Appalachian coal regions having similar rock units. Refs.

  11. Formation of particulate organic carbon in water from a southeastern swamp-stream

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, P.J.

    1981-07-01

    The rate of particulate organic carbon (POC) formation in water from a small North Carolina swamp-stream, low in ionic strength but high in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), was low. Mean POC formation rate, expressed as DOC utilization, was about 0.2% of DOC per day and was primarily the result of microbial activity. When Ca/sup 2 +/ and Hg/sup 2 +/ were added to swamp water, and when swamp water and seawater were mixed, the rate of POC formation increased as a result of a rapid physiochemical flocculation process. Although the DOC load of rivers and streams of the southeastern US represents a substantial energy input to estuarine regions, these results indicate that only about 25 to 30% of it is transformed through flocculation to a form more readily retained and utilized within the estuarine system. The remainder may be transported to the sea.

  12. Formation of particulate organic carbon in water from a southeastern swamp-stream

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    The rate of particulate organic carbon (POC) formation in water from a small North Carolina swamp-stream, low in ionic strength but high in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), was low. Mean POC formation rate, expressed as DOC utilization, was about 0.2% of DOC per day and was primarily the result of microbial activity. When Ca/sup 2 +/ and Hg/sup 2 +/ were added to swamp water, and when swamp water and seawater were mixed, the rate of POC formation increased as a result of a rapid physiochemical flocculation process. Although the DOC load of rivers and streams of the southeastern U.S. represents a substantial energy input to estuarine regions, these results indicate that only about 25-30% of it is transformed through flocculation to a form more readily retained and utilized within the estuarine system. The remainder may be transported to the sea.

  13. Cattle-derived microbial input to source water catchments: An experimental assessment of stream crossing modification.

    PubMed

    Smolders, Andrew; Rolls, Robert J; Ryder, Darren; Watkinson, Andrew; Mackenzie, Mark

    2015-06-01

    The provision of safe drinking water is a global issue, and animal production is recognized as a significant potential origin of human infectious pathogenic microorganisms within source water catchments. On-farm management can be used to mitigate livestock-derived microbial pollution in source water catchments to reduce the risk of contamination to potable water supplies. We applied a modified Before-After Control Impact (BACI) design to test if restricting the access of livestock to direct contact with streams prevented longitudinal increases in the concentrations of faecal indicator bacteria and suspended solids. Significant longitudinal increases in pollutant concentrations were detected between upstream and downstream reaches of the control crossing, whereas such increases were not detected at the treatment crossing. Therefore, while the crossing upgrade was effective in preventing cattle-derived point source pollution by between 112 and 158%, diffuse source pollution to water supplies from livestock is not ameliorated by this intervention alone. Our findings indicate that stream crossings that prevent direct contact between livestock and waterways provide a simple method for reducing pollutant loads in source water catchments, which ultimately minimises the likelihood of pathogenic microorganisms passing through source water catchments and the drinking water supply system. The efficacy of the catchment as a primary barrier to pathogenic risks to drinking water supplies would be improved with the integration of management interventions that minimise direct contact between livestock and waterways, combined with the mitigation of diffuse sources of livestock-derived faecal matter from farmland runoff to the aquatic environment.

  14. Comparison of Heat and Bromide as Tracers of Stream Exchanges With Shallow Ground Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantz, J.; Cox, M. H.; Su, G. W.

    2002-12-01

    Heat and bromide were compared as tracers for examining stream/groundwater exchanges along the middle reaches of the Santa Clara River, CA, during a 10-hour surface-water sodium bromide injection. Three cross-sections comprised of 6 shallow (1 m) piezometers were installed at the upper, middle, and lower sections of a 17 km long study reach to monitor temperatures and bromide concentrations in the shallow ground water beneath the stream. The heat and ground-water transport simulation model, VS2DH, and a closely related solute and ground-water transport simulation model, VS2DT, were matched up for comparison of simulated and observed temperatures and bromide concentrations in the streambed. Simulated sediment temperature were fitted to observed temperature results to yield apparent streambed hydraulic conductivities in each cross-section. Saturated hydraulic conductivities ranged from 1.39 x 10-5 m/s in the upper reach to 5.56 x 10-4 m/s in the lower reach. The temperature-based hydraulic conductivities were inserted into VS2DT to predict sediment bromide concentrations during the sodium bromide injection. The predicted bromide concentration curves in the sediments yielded an excellent match to the observed bromide concentrations, without adjustment of any model parameters. This indicates that for the spatial and temporal scales examined on the Santa Clara River, the use of heat and bromide as tracers provide comparable information with respect to apparent hydraulic conductivities and water fluxes in near-stream environments.

  15. Ice mechanics, basal water and the stagnation of Kamb Ice Stream, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, M.; Hulbe, C. L.; Fahnestock, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Several of the ice streams that move ice from the interior of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) to the Ross Ice Shelf are documented to stagnate and reactivate on multi-century time scales. Once such event may now be underway on the downstream ice plain of the Whillans Ice Stream (WIS), a stream that stopped and started between about 850 and 450 years ago. Kamb Ice Stream (KIS) ceased its rapid flow about 150 years ago in an event that appears to have initiated in the downstream reach of the ice stream. These switches from fast to slow and back again produce major changes in mass balance of the ice sheet and ice shelf system. Ice stream stagnation must in some way involve changes in the basal water that facilitates fast flow. Here, transients in ice thickness and surface slope, which together steer basal water, are examined in the context of the recent stagnation of KIS. Transients have both regional—changes in WIS flux and in Crary Ice Rise, for example—and local causes. A mechanical analysis of high-resolution surface elevation and ice velocity data sets on the now-active WIS is used as a proxy for past conditions on KIS and an ice flow model is used to place those local conditions in a regional context. We argue that thickness transients associated with stagnation of WIS required the KIS grounding line to retreat far upstream of its present location while reactivation of WIS led to regional thickening, grounding of floating ice, and advance of the KIS grounding line toward its present location. The present work examines the role of lateral margins near the grounding line, in particular the broad, flat, "Duckfoot" on the right lateral side of the KIS outlet and Lake Englehardt, which occupies the same postion at the outlet of WIS. Lake Englehardt diverts water away from the main trunk of the ice stream. In the past, the Duckfoot may have played a similar role and that diversion may have been associated with KIS stagnation. Overall, our aim is to understand

  16. Estimates of Median Flows for Streams on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Charles A.; Wolock, David M.; Artman, Joshua C.

    2004-01-01

    The Kansas State Legislature, by enacting Kansas Statute KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., mandated the criteria for determining which Kansas stream segments would be subject to classification by the State. One criterion for the selection as a classified stream segment is based on the statistic of median flow being equal to or greater than 1 cubic foot per second. As specified by KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., median flows were determined from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging-station data by using the most-recent 10 years of gaged data (KSA) for each streamflow-gaging station. Median flows also were determined by using gaged data from the entire period of record (all-available hydrology, AAH). Least-squares multiple regression techniques were used, along with Tobit analyses, to develop equations for estimating median flows for uncontrolled stream segments. The drainage area of the gaging stations on uncontrolled stream segments used in the regression analyses ranged from 2.06 to 12,004 square miles. A logarithmic transformation of the data was needed to develop the best linear relation for computing median flows. In the regression analyses, the significant climatic and basin characteristics, in order of importance, were drainage area, mean annual precipitation, mean basin permeability, and mean basin slope. Tobit analyses of KSA data yielded a model standard error of prediction of 0.285 logarithmic units, and the best equations using Tobit analyses of AAH data had a model standard error of prediction of 0.250 logarithmic units. These regression equations and an interpolation procedure were used to compute median flows for the uncontrolled stream segments on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. Measured median flows from gaging stations were incorporated into the regression-estimated median flows along the stream segments where available. The segments that were uncontrolled were interpolated using gaged data weighted according to the drainage area and the bias between the

  17. Study plan for urban stream indicator sites of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, T.J.; Price, C.V.

    1997-01-01

    Urban Indicator Sites are one component of the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water- Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The objectives of monitoring at the Urban Indicator Sites are to: (1) characterize stream quality from drainage basins with predominantly residential and commercial land use, and (2) determine which selected natural and human factors most strongly affect stream quality. Urban Indicator Sites will be distributed across the United States in settings with statistically different climate and in metropolitan areas that have a population of 250,000 or more. Multiple sites in the same climatic setting will have a range in population density. Ideally, Urban Indicator Sites will monitor drainage basins that have only residential and commercial land use, are 50 square kilometers or larger, are in the same physiographic setting as other Indicator Sites, have sustained flow, and overlap other NAWQA study components. Ideal drainage basins will not have industrial or agricultural land use and will not have point-source-contamination discharges. Stream quality will be characterized by collecting and analyzing samples of streamflow, bed sediment, and tissue of aquatic organisms for selected constituents. Factors affecting stream quality will be determined by statistical analysis of ancillary data associated with Urban Indicator Sites and stream-quality samples.

  18. Water Quality in the Nation's Streams and Aquifers Overview of Selected Findings, 1991-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, Pixie A.; Miller, Timothy L.; Myers, Donna N.

    2004-01-01

    This report accompanies the publication of the last 15 of 51 river basin and aquifer assessments by the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program during 1991?2001. It highlights selected water-quality findings of regional and national interest through examples from river basins and aquifer systems across the Nation. Forthcoming reports in the USGS series ?The Quality of Our Nation?s Waters? will present comprehensive national syntheses of information collected in the 51 study units on pesticides in water, sediment, and fish; volatile organic compounds in major aquifers used for domestic and public supply; nutrients and trace elements in streams and ground water; and aquatic ecology. This report, summaries of the 51 water-quality assessments, and a 1999 national synthesis of information on nutrients and pesticides, are available free of charge as USGS Circulars and on the World Wide Web at http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa/nawqa_sumr.html.

  19. Water temperature of streams in the Cook Inlet basin, Alaska, and implications of climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kyle, Rebecca E.; Brabets, Timothy P.

    2001-10-02

    Water-temperature data from 32 sites in the Cook Inlet Basin, south-central Alaska, indicate various trends that depend on watershed characteristics. Basins with 25 percent or more of their area consisting of glaciers have the coldest water temperatures during the open-water season, mid-May to mid-October. Streams and rivers that drain lowlands have the warmest water temperatures. A model that uses air temperature as input to predict water temperature as output was utilized to simulate future trends in water temperature based on increased air temperatures due to climate warming. Based on the Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient, the model produced acceptable results for 27 sites. For basins with more than 25 percent glacial coverage, the model was not as accurate. Results indicate that 15 sites had a predicted water-temperature change of 3 degrees Celsius or more, a magnitude of change that is considered significant for the incidence of disease in fish populations.

  20. Characterizing storm water dispersion and dilution from small coastal streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Leonel; Siegel, David A.; McWilliams, James C.; Uchiyama, Yusuke; Jones, Charles

    2016-06-01

    Characterizing the dispersion and dilution of storm water from small coastal creeks is important for understanding the importance of land-derived subsidies to nearby ecosystems and the management of anthropogenic pollutants. In Southern California, creek runoff is episodic, intense, and short-lived while the plumes are buoyant, all of which make the field sampling of freshwater plumes challenging. Numerical modeling offers a viable way to characterize these systems. The dilution and dispersion of freshwater from two creeks that discharge into the Santa Barbara Channel, California is investigated using Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) simulations with a horizontal resolution of 100 m. Tight coupling is found among precipitation, hydrologic discharge, wind forcing, and submesoscale flow structures which all contribute to plume evolution. During flooding, plumes are narrow and attached to the coast, due to downwelling/onshore wind forcing and intense vorticity filaments lying parallel to the shelf. As the storm passes, the winds typically shift to offshore/upwelling favorable conditions and the plume is advected offshore which enhances its dilution. Plumes reach the bottom nearshore while they form thin layers a few meters thick offshore. Dilution field of passive tracers released with the runoff is strongly anisotropic with stronger cross-shelf gradients than along-shelf. Dispersion analysis of statistical moments of the passive tracer distribution results in scale-dependent diffusivities consistent with the particle-pair analysis of Romero et al. Model validation, the roles of submesoscale processes, and wind forcing on plume evolution and application to ecological issues and marine resource management are discussed.

  1. Stream water nutrient enrichment in a mixed-use watershed.

    PubMed

    King, K W; Balogh, J C

    2011-03-01

    Eutrophic conditions, in both saline and freshwater systems, result from nutrient export from upstream watersheds. The objective of this study was to quantify the surface runoff losses of nitrate-nitrogen (NO₃-N), total nitrogen (TN), dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP), and total phosphorus (TP) resulting from prevailing practices on a managed golf course. Inflow and outflow discharge waters on a sub-area of Northland Country Club (NCC) located in Duluth, Minnesota were measured for both quantity and quality from April through November from 2003 to 2008. Nutrient losses were detectable throughout the year, had a seasonal trend, and routinely exceeded recommended levels to minimize eutrophication. The median outflow TN concentration (1.04 mg L⁻¹) was significantly greater (p < 0.05) than the median inflow (0.81 mg L⁻¹) concentration. Similarly, the median outflow TP concentration (0.03 mg L⁻¹) was significantly greater (p < 0.05) than the median inflow concentration (0.02 mg L⁻¹). Maximum recorded concentrations during the study period were 1.9 mg L⁻¹ NO₃-N, 3.93 mg L⁻¹ TN, 0.34 mg L⁻¹ DRP, and 1.11 mg L⁻¹ TP. Mean annual export coefficients at NCC were 0.7 kg ha⁻¹ NO₃-N (1.7% of applied), 4.43 kg ha⁻¹ TN (10.7% of applied), 0.14 kg ha⁻¹ DRP (2.6% of applied), and 0.25 kg ha⁻¹ TP (4.6% of applied). The findings of this study highlight the need for adopting conservation practices aimed at reducing offsite nutrient transport.

  2. COLLOIDAL-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN GROUND WATER: PART I. SAMPLING CONSIDERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigations at Pinal Creek, Arizona, evaluated routine sampling procedures for determination of aqueous inorganic geochemistry and assessment of contaminant transport by colloidal mobility. Sampling variables included pump type and flow rate, collection under air or nitrogen,...

  3. Cross-regional prediction of long-term trajectory of stream water DOC response to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudon, Hjalmar; Buttle, Jim; Carey, Sean K.; McDonnell, Jeff; McGuire, Kevin; Seibert, Jan; Shanley, Jamie; Soulsby, Chris; Tetzlaff, Doerthe

    2012-09-01

    There is no scientific consensus about how dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface waters is regulated. Here we combine recent literature data from 49 catchments with detailed stream and catchment process information from nine well established research catchments at mid- to high latitudes to examine the question of how climate controls stream water DOC. We show for the first time that mean annual temperature (MAT) in the range from -3° to +10° C has a strong control over the regional stream water DOC concentration in catchments, with highest concentrations in areas ranging between 0° and +3° C MAT. Although relatively large deviations from this model occur for individual streams, catchment topography appears to explain much of this divergence. These findings suggest that the long-term trajectory of stream water DOC response to climate change may be more predictable than previously thought.

  4. Water quality and ecological condition of urban streams in Independence, Missouri, June 2005 through December 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, D.; Harris, Thomas E.; Niesen, Shelley L.

    2010-01-01

    To identify the sources of selected constituents in urban streams and better understand processes affecting water quality and their effects on the ecological condition of urban streams and the Little Blue River in Independence, Missouri the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the City of Independence Water Pollution Control Department initiated a study in June 2005 to characterize water quality and evaluate the ecological condition of streams within Independence. Base-flow and stormflow samples collected from five sites within Independence, from June 2005 to December 2008, were used to characterize the physical, chemical, and biologic effects of storm runoff on the water quality in Independence streams and the Little Blue River. The streams draining Independence-Rock Creek, Sugar Creek, Mill Creek, Fire Prairie Creek, and the Little Blue River-drain to the north and the Missouri River. Two small predominantly urban streams, Crackerneck Creek [12.9-square kilometer (km2) basin] and Spring Branch Creek (25.4-km2 basin), were monitored that enter into the Little Blue River between upstream and downstream monitoring sites. The Little Blue River above the upstream site is regulated by several reservoirs, but streamflow is largely uncontrolled. The Little Blue River Basin encompasses 585 km2 with about 168 km2 or 29 percent of the basin lying within the city limits of Independence. Water-quality samples also were collected for Rock Creek (24.1-km2 basin) that drains the western part of Independence. Data collection included streamflow, physical properties, dissolved oxygen, chloride, metals, nutrients, common organic micro-constituents, and fecal indicator bacteria. Benthic macroinvertebrate community surveys and habitat assessments were conducted to establish a baseline for evaluating the ecological condition and health of streams within Independence. Additional dry-weather screenings during base flow of all streams draining Independence were conducted to

  5. Enrichment of stream water with fecal indicator organisms during baseflow periods.

    PubMed

    Pachepsky, Yakov; Stocker, Matthew; Saldaña, Manuel Olmeda; Shelton, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) are generally believed to be present in surface waters due solely to direct deposition of feces or through transport in runoff. However, emerging evidence points toward hyporheic exchange between sediment pore water and the overlying water column during baseflow periods as a source of FIOs is surface waters. The objective of this work was to (a) propose a mass balance-based technique for estimating changes of FIO concentrations in the same volume of water (or "slug") from the inlet to outlet of stream reaches in baseflow conditions and (b) to use such enumeration to estimate rate of the FIO release to stream water column. Concentrations of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and enterococci were measured in the slug while simultaneously monitoring the movement of a conservative tracer, Br that labeled the slug. Concentrations of E. coli in the slug were significantly larger (P = 0.035, P = 0.001, and P = 0.001, respectively) at the outlet reach in all three replications, while enterococci concentrations were significantly larger in two of three replications (P = 0.001, P < 0.001, and P = 0.602). When estimated without accounting for die-off in water column, FIO net release rates across replications ranged from 36 to 57 cells m(-2) s(-1) and 43 to 87 cells m(-2) s(-1) for E. coli and enterococci, respectively. These release rates were 5 to 20% higher when the die-off in water column was taken into account. No diurnal trends were observed in indicator concentrations. No FIO sources other than bottom sediment have been observed during the baseflow period. FIOs are released into stream water column through hyporheic exchange during baseflow periods.

  6. Using heat to characterize streambed water flux variability in four stream reaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Essaid, H.I.; Zamora, C.M.; McCarthy, K.A.; Vogel, J.R.; Wilson, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of streambed water flux are needed for the interpretation of streambed chemistry and reactions. Continuous temperature and head monitoring in stream reaches within four agricultural watersheds (Leary Weber Ditch, IN; Maple Creek, NE; DR2 Drain, WA; and Merced River, CA) allowed heat to be used as a tracer to study the temporal and spatial variability of fluxes through the streambed. Synoptic methods (seepage meter and differential discharge measurements) were compared with estimates obtained by using heat as a tracer. Water flux was estimated by modeling one-dimensional vertical flow of water and heat using the model VS2DH. Flux was influenced by physical heterogeneity of the stream channel and temporal variability in stream and ground-water levels. During most of the study period (April-December 2004), flux was upward through the streambeds. At the IN, NE, and CA sites, high-stage events resulted in rapid reversal of flow direction inducing short-term surface-water flow into the streambed. During late summer at the IN site, regional ground-water levels dropped, leading to surface-water loss to ground water that resulted in drying of the ditch. Synoptic measurements of flux generally supported the model flux estimates. Water flow through the streambed was roughly an order of magnitude larger in the humid basins (IN and NE) than in the arid basins (WA and CA). Downward flux, in response to sudden high streamflows, and seasonal variability in flux was most pronounced in the humid basins and in high conductivity zones in the streambed. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  7. Total allowable concentrations of monomeric inorganic aluminum and hydrated aluminum silicates in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Willhite, Calvin C; Ball, Gwendolyn L; McLellan, Clifton J

    2012-05-01

    Maximum contaminant levels are used to control potential health hazards posed by chemicals in drinking water, but no primary national or international limits for aluminum (Al) have been adopted. Given the differences in toxicological profiles, the present evaluation derives total allowable concentrations for certain water-soluble inorganic Al compounds (including chloride, hydroxide, oxide, phosphate and sulfate) and for the hydrated Al silicates (including attapulgite, bentonite/montmorillonite, illite, kaolinite) in drinking water. The chemistry, toxicology and clinical experience with Al materials are extensive and depend upon the particular physical and chemical form. In general, the water solubility of the monomeric Al materials depends on pH and their water solubility and gastrointestinal bioavailability are much greater than that of the hydrated Al silicates. Other than Al-containing antacids and buffered aspirin, food is the primary source of Al exposure for most healthy people. Systemic uptake of Al after ingestion of the monomeric salts is somewhat greater from drinking water (0.28%) than from food (0.1%). Once absorbed, Al accumulates in bone, brain, liver and kidney, with bone as the major site for Al deposition in humans. Oral Al hydroxide is used routinely to bind phosphate salts in the gut to control hyperphosphatemia in people with compromised renal function. Signs of chronic Al toxicity in the musculoskeletal system include a vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia (deranged membranous bone formation characterized by accumulation of the osteoid matrix and reduced mineralization, reduced numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, decreased lamellar and osteoid bands with elevated Al concentrations) presenting as bone pain and proximal myopathy. Aluminum-induced bone disease can progress to stress fractures of the ribs, femur, vertebrae, humerus and metatarsals. Serum Al ≥100 µg/L has a 75-88% positive predictive value for Al bone disease. Chronic Al

  8. Mercury in Fish, Bed Sediment, and Water from Streams Across the United States, 1998-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scudder, Barbara C.; Chasar, Lia C.; Wentz, Dennis A.; Bauch, Nancy J.; Brigham, Mark E.; Moran, Patrick W.; Krabbenhoft, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) was examined in top-predator fish, bed sediment, and water from streams that spanned regional and national gradients of Hg source strength and other factors thought to influence methylmercury (MeHg) bioaccumulation. Sampled settings include stream basins that were agricultural, urbanized, undeveloped (forested, grassland, shrubland, and wetland land cover), and mined (for gold and Hg). Each site was sampled one time during seasonal low flow. Predator fish were targeted for collection, and composited samples of fish (primarily skin-off fillets) were analyzed for total Hg (THg), as most of the Hg found in fish tissue (95-99 percent) is MeHg. Samples of bed sediment and stream water were analyzed for THg, MeHg, and characteristics thought to affect Hg methylation, such as loss-on-ignition (LOI, a measure of organic matter content) and acid-volatile sulfide in bed sediment, and pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and dissolved sulfate in water. Fish-Hg concentrations at 27 percent of sampled sites exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency human-health criterion of 0.3 micrograms per gram wet weight. Exceedances were geographically widespread, although the study design targeted specific sites and fish species and sizes, so results do not represent a true nationwide percentage of exceedances. The highest THg concentrations in fish were from blackwater coastal-plain streams draining forests or wetlands in the eastern and southeastern United States, as well as from streams draining gold- or Hg-mined basins in the western United States (1.80 and 1.95 micrograms THg per gram wet weight, respectively). For unmined basins, length-normalized Hg concentrations in largemouth bass were significantly higher in fish from predominantly undeveloped or mixed-land-use basins compared to urban basins. Hg concentrations in largemouth bass from unmined basins were correlated positively with basin percentages of evergreen forest and also woody wetland, especially with

  9. The atmosphere can be a source of certain water soluble volatile organic compounds in urban streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenner, Scott J.; Bender, David A.; Zogorski, John S.; ,; James F. Pankow,

    2014-01-01

    Surface water and air volatile organic compound (VOC) data from 10 U.S. Geological Survey monitoring sites were used to evaluate the potential for direct transport of VOCs from the atmosphere to urban streams. Analytical results of 87 VOC compounds were screened by evaluating the occurrence and detection levels in both water and air, and equilibrium concentrations in water (Cws) based on the measured air concentrations. Four compounds (acetone, methyl tertiary butyl ether, toluene, and m- & p-xylene) were detected in more than 20% of water samples, in more than 10% of air samples, and more than 10% of detections in air were greater than long-term method detection levels (LTMDL) in water. Benzene was detected in more than 20% of water samples and in more than 10% of air samples. Two percent of benzene detections in air were greater than one-half the LTMDL in water. Six compounds (chloroform, p-isopropyltoluene, methylene chloride, perchloroethene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and trichloroethene) were detected in more than 20% of water samples and in more than 10% of air samples. Five VOCs, toluene, m- & p-xylene, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), acetone, and benzene were identified as having sufficiently high concentrations in the atmosphere to be a source to urban streams. MTBE, acetone, and benzene exhibited behavior that was consistent with equilibrium concentrations in the atmosphere.

  10. Exceptional Isotopic Variability in Stream Waters of the Central Andes: Large-Scale or Local Controls?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorella, R. P.; Poulsen, C. J.; Ehlers, T. A.; Jeffery, M. L.; Pillco Zola, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    Modern precipitation on the Altiplano in central South America shows large seasonal and interannual variability and is dominated by seasonal convection during austral summer. The stable isotopic compositions of oxygen and hydrogen in precipitation and surface waters may be useful in diagnosing atmospheric processes over the Altiplano as they reflect the atmospheric history of the water vapor forming precipitation. Few data exist about the spatial and temporal isotopic variability of precipitation or surface water in the region, however, and therefore, the controls governing isotope distribution over the Altiplano are poorly understood. Samples of stream water were collected from small catchments on the Altiplano and along two elevation transects on the eastern cordillera of the Andes (at 17°30' and 21°15'S) between April 2009 and April 2012. As precipitation over the Altiplano is highly seasonal and the environment is otherwise arid, the isotopic signature of these streams is thought integrate the composition of rainy season precipitation. We limit our analysis to ephemeral streams with no groundwater component. Sampled waters show high spatial and interannual isotopic variability. As expected, stream water becomes increasingly depleted with increased elevation along a transect, but the isotopic lapse rates along the two transects are different and show high interannual variability. The average isotopic lapse rate for the northern transect was 1.09‰/km, but varied from 0.79‰/km in 2010 to 1.36‰/km in 2011 (only collected 2010-2012), while the average isotopic lapse rate for the southern transect was 1.74‰/km and varied between 1.50‰/km in 2010 and 1.92‰/km in 2009. Across the Altiplano itself, stream water varies by over 10‰ (δ18O) within a single season (2011), and by over 13‰ across the entire collection period. The high spatial variability of the stream water isotopic composition on the Altiplano suggests that simple Rayleigh fractionation is

  11. Water-quality and fluvial-sediment characteristics of selected streams in northeast Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bevans, H.E.

    1982-01-01

    In cooperation with the U.S. Soil Conservation Service, an investigation was made of the water-quality and fluvial-sediment characteristics of selected streams in northeast Kansas for which the construction of floodwater-retarding and grade-stabilization structures to control soil erosion is being considered. The predominent chemical type of water in streams draining the study area is calcium bicarbonate. In-stream concentrations of chemical constituents generally decrease with increasing streamflow. Exceptions to this are nitrate and phosphorus, which enter the streams as components of surface runoff. Computed mean annual discharges of dissolved solids ranged from 512 tons for Pony CratkSabetha, Kansas, to 23,900 tons for the Wolf River near Sparks, Kansas. Sediment yields in the study area, predominently silt and clay, are among the largest in the State. Drainage basins in the northern part of the study area yielded the most suspended sediment, with Pony Creek at Sabetha and near Reserve, Kansas, yielding 5,100 tons per square mile per year. Drainage basins in the southern part of the study area yielded less suspended sediment, with Little Grasshopper Creek near Effingham, Kansas, yielding 493 tons per square mile per year and Little Delaware River near Horton, Kansas, yielding 557 tons per square mile per year. (USGS)

  12. Diel changes in water chemistry in an arsenic-rich stream and treatment-pond system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gammons, C.H.; Grant, T.M.; Nimick, D.A.; Parker, S.R.; DeGrandpre, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    Arsenic concentrations are elevated in surface waters of the Warm Springs Ponds Operable Unit (WSPOU), located at the head of the upper Clark Fork River Superfund site, Montana, USA. Arsenic is derived from historical deposition of smelter emissions (Mill and Willow Creeks) and historical mining and milling wastes (Silver Bow Creek). Although long-term monitoring has characterized the general seasonal and flow-related trends in As concentrations in these streams and the pond system used to treat Silver Bow Creek water, little is known about solubility controls and sorption processes that influence diel cycles in As concentrations. Diel (24-h) sampling was conducted in July 2004 and August 2005 at the outlet of the treatment ponds, at two locations along a nearby reconstructed stream channel that diverts tributary water around the ponds, and at Silver Bow Creek 2??km below the ponds. Dissolved As concentration increased up to 51% during the day at most of the stream sites, whereas little or no diel change was displayed at the treatment-pond outlet. The strong cycle in streams is explained by pH- and temperature-dependent sorption of As onto hydrous metal oxides or biofilms on the streambed. Concentrations of dissolved Ca2+ and HCO3- at the stream sites showed a diel temporal pattern opposite to that of As, and geochemical modeling supports the hypothesis that the concentrations of Ca2+ and HCO3- were controlled by precipitation of calcite during the warm afternoon hours when pH rose above 9.0. Nightly increases in dissolved Mn and Fe(II) concentrations were out of phase with concentrations of other divalent cations and are more likely explained by redox phenomena. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Trends in the quality of water in New Jersey streams, water years 1998-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickman, R. Edward; Gray, Bonnie J.

    2010-01-01

    Trends were determined in flow-adjusted values of selected water-quality characteristics measured year-round during water years 1998-2007 (October 1, 1997, through September 30, 2007) at 70 stations on New Jersey streams. Water-quality characteristics included in the analysis are dissolved oxygen, pH, total dissolved solids, total phosphorus, total organic nitrogen plus ammonia, and dissolved nitrate plus nitrite. In addition, trend tests also were conducted on measurements of dissolved oxygen made only during the growing season, April to September. Nearly all the water-quality data analyzed were collected by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Geological Survey as part of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Ambient Surface-Water Quality Monitoring Network. Monotonic trends in flow-adjusted values of water quality were determined by use of procedures in the ESTREND computer program. A 0.05 level of significance was selected to indicate a trend. Results of tests were not reported if there were an insufficient number of measurements or insufficient number of detected concentrations, or if the results of the tests were affected by a change in data-collection methods. Trends in values of dissolved oxygen, pH, and total dissolved solids were identified using the Seasonal Kendall test. Trends or no trends in year-round concentrations of dissolved oxygen were determined for 66 stations; decreases at 4 stations and increases at 0 stations were identified. Trends or no trends in growing-season concentrations of dissolved oxygen were determined for 65 stations; decreases at 4 stations and increases at 4 stations were identified. Tests of pH values determined trends or no trends at 26 stations; decreases at 2 stations and increases at 3 stations were identified. Trends or no trends in total dissolved solids were reported for all 70 stations; decreases at 0 stations and increases at 24 stations were identified. Trends in total

  14. Linking High Frequency Variations in Stream Water DOC to Ages of Water Sources in Peat-Dominated Montane Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunaley, C.; Tetzlaff, D.; Lessels, J. S.; Soulsby, C.

    2015-12-01

    We combined time series of inferred DOC (from optical sensors) and stable isotopes in streams and watershed source areas to assess the link between water age and C fluxes. We monitored temporal dynamics of FDOM for 2 yrs at nested scales (0.9, 3.0 and 30km2) in a montane Scottish watershed. FDOM was strongly correlated (r2 ~ 0.8) with DOC allowing inference of 15 min timeseries. Marked seasonality was observed, with highest DOC concentrations (~25 mg l-1) in summer events and lower concentrations (~5mg l-1) in winter. During events, anticlockwise hysteresis was observed; consistent with expansion of the riparian saturation zone, increasing hydrological connectivity across peat soils and mobilizing DOC. Lag times for peak discharge and DOC were 1-12 hrs depending on event characteristics and antecedent conditions. Isotope time series from precipitation, streams and catchment source waters (overland flow and hillslope drainage) were also generated. These allowed us to model the non-stationary characteristics of their ages. Stream water age ranges from 3 months at high flows when overland flow dominates runoff to 4 yrs under baseflow. Overland flow age was a dominant influence on DOC transport. Highest concentrations occurred in small summer events with relatively young (<1 month old) overland flow waters generated after dry antecedent conditions, reflecting displacement of DOC-rich soil water. With wetting up in late summer/fall, overland flow is younger (< 1 week) diluting soil water DOC. Similar patterns occur across scales, though at 0.9km2 the dominance of a large peatland limits hysteresis, and maintains more constant DOC levels. At larger scales, DOC was more responsive but decreased more rapidly, reflecting a greater, but more transient influence of young overland flow. This shows the importance of riparian wetlands in regulating the quality and age of streams and the need to incorporate these sensitive areas in land management strategies.

  15. High levels of inorganic arsenic in rice in areas where arsenic-contaminated water is used for irrigation and cooking.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Azizur; Hasegawa, H

    2011-10-15

    Rice is the staple food for the people of arsenic endemic South (S) and South-East (SE) Asian countries. In this region, arsenic contaminated groundwater has been used not only for drinking and cooking purposes but also for rice cultivation during dry season. Irrigation of arsenic-contaminated groundwater for rice cultivation has resulted high deposition of arsenic in topsoil and uptake in rice grain posing a serious threat to the sustainable agriculture in this region. In addition, cooking rice with arsenic-contaminated water also increases arsenic burden in cooked rice. Inorganic arsenic is the main species of S and SE Asian rice (80 to 91% of the total arsenic), and the concentration of this toxic species is increased in cooked rice from inorganic arsenic-rich cooking water. The people of Bangladesh and West Bengal (India), the arsenic hot spots in the world, eat an average of 450g rice a day. Therefore, in addition to drinking water, dietary intake of arsenic from rice is supposed to be another potential source of exposure, and to be a new disaster for the population of S and SE Asian countries. Arsenic speciation in raw and cooked rice, its bioavailability and the possible health hazard of inorganic arsenic in rice for the population of S and SE Asia have been discussed in this review.

  16. Revised Methods for Characterizing Stream Habitat in the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, Faith A.; Waite, Ian R.; D'Arconte, Patricia J.; Meador, Michael R.; Maupin, Molly A.; Gurtz, Martin E.

    1998-01-01

    Stream habitat is characterized in the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program as part of an integrated physical, chemical, and biological assessment of the Nation's water quality. The goal of stream habitat characterization is to relate habitat to other physical, chemical, and biological factors that describe water-quality conditions. To accomplish this goal, environmental settings are described at sites selected for water-quality assessment. In addition, spatial and temporal patterns in habitat are examined at local, regional, and national scales. This habitat protocol contains updated methods for evaluating habitat in NAWQA Study Units. Revisions are based on lessons learned after 6 years of applying the original NAWQA habitat protocol to NAWQA Study Unit ecological surveys. Similar to the original protocol, these revised methods for evaluating stream habitat are based on a spatially hierarchical framework that incorporates habitat data at basin, segment, reach, and microhabitat scales. This framework provides a basis for national consistency in collection techniques while allowing flexibility in habitat assessment within individual Study Units. Procedures are described for collecting habitat data at basin and segment scales; these procedures include use of geographic information system data bases, topographic maps, and aerial photographs. Data collected at the reach scale include channel, bank, and riparian characteristics.

  17. Estimating occupancy and abundance of stream amphibians using environmental DNA from filtered water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pilliod, David S.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Arkle, Robert S.; Waits, Lisette P.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) methods for detecting aquatic species are advancing rapidly, but with little evaluation of field protocols or precision of resulting estimates. We compared sampling results from traditional field methods with eDNA methods for two amphibians in 13 streams in central Idaho, USA. We also evaluated three water collection protocols and the influence of sampling location, time of day, and distance from animals on eDNA concentration in the water. We found no difference in detection or amount of eDNA among water collection protocols. eDNA methods had slightly higher detection rates than traditional field methods, particularly when species occurred at low densities. eDNA concentration was positively related to field-measured density, biomass, and proportion of transects occupied. Precision of eDNA-based abundance estimates increased with the amount of eDNA in the water and the number of replicate subsamples collected. eDNA concentration did not vary significantly with sample location in the stream, time of day, or distance downstream from animals. Our results further advance the implementation of eDNA methods for monitoring aquatic vertebrates in stream habitats.

  18. Characteristics of Water-Soluble Inorganic Ions in Aerosol Particles in Jingjinji-Mega Typical Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li

    2013-06-01

    Aerosol has important effects on climate, environment and human health and water-soluble ions are important chemical composition in aerosol. It is important to study concentration levels, sources and size distributions of water-soluble ions in aerosol. In recent years, with the increasing of energy consumption and the amount of automobile, regional pollution has become more serious in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region. Especially since the haze happened frequently in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region, it is an imminent study about water-soluble ions in aerosol.To investigate the concentration levels, sources and size distributions of water soluble inorganic ions (WSI), size-segregated aerosol samples were collected using Andersen cascade sampler from Aug2010to Aug2011in Beijing, Tianjin, Tangshan and Baoding. The WSI were analyzed by ion chromatography(IC).The results indicated that the order of total WSI (TWSI) concentration of TSP in the region was Tianjin-Baoding-Beijing-Tangshan. The order of TWSI of the fine particles in the region was Baoding-Tianjin-Beijing-Tangshan. The annual mean concentrations of TWSI in the coarse mode were 41.36±15.76,48.04±15.79,39.40±11.03,40.49±13.32μg m-3in Beijing, Tianjin, Tangshan and Baoding, respectively. The annual mean concentrations of TWSI in the fine mode were 66.54±47.95,69.12±34.85, 61.80±44.63,71.73±45.12μg m-3in Beijing, Tianjin, Tangshan and Baoding, respectively. All the annual mean concentrations of TWSIin the fine mode in the four sites had exceeded averaged concentration of PM2.5in the environmental quality standards (35μg m-3), which indicated that the pollution of TWSI was serious. Secondary water-soluble ions (SWSI)(SO42-, NO3-and NH4+) and Cl-were the main components, and were mainly found in the fine particles in the four sites of Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region. In the coarse particles, NO3-Ca2+ and SO42-were the dominant contributions to WSI. Almost all water-soluble ions in fine particles are similar

  19. Water Quality of Combined Sewer Overflows, Stormwater, and Streams, Omaha, Nebraska, 2006-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vogel, Jason R.; Frankforter, Jill D.; Rus, David L.; Hobza, Christopher M.; Moser, Matthew T.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Omaha, investigated the water quality of combined sewer overflows, stormwater, and streams in the Omaha, Nebraska, area by collecting and analyzing 1,175 water samples from August 2006 through October 2007. The study area included the drainage area of Papillion Creek at Capeheart Road near Bellevue, Nebraska, which encompasses the tributary drainages of the Big and Little Papillion Creeks and Cole Creek, along with the Missouri River reach that is adjacent to Omaha. Of the 101 constituents analyzed during the study, 100 were detected in at least 1 sample during the study. Spatial and seasonal comparisons were completed for environmental samples. Measured concentrations in stream samples were compared to water-quality criteria for pollutants of concern. Finally, the mass loads of water-quality constituents in the combined sewer overflow discharges, stormwater outfalls, and streams were computed and compared. The results of the study indicate that combined sewer overflow and stormwater discharges are affecting the water quality of the streams in the Omaha area. At the Papillion Creek Basin sites, Escherichia coli densities were greater than 126 units per 100 milliliters in 99 percent of the samples (212 of 213 samples analyzed for Escherichia coli) collected during the recreational-use season from May through September (in 2006 and 2007). Escherichia coli densities in 76 percent of Missouri River samples (39 of 51 samples) were greater than 126 units per 100 milliliters in samples collected from May through September (in 2006 and 2007). None of the constituents with human health criteria for consumption of water, fish, and other aquatic organisms were detected at levels greater than the criteria in any of the samples collected during this study. Total phosphorus concentrations in water samples collected in the Papillion Creek Basin were in excess of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's proposed

  20. The quality of our Nation’s waters--ecological health in the Nation's streams, 1993-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlisle, Daren M.; Meador, Michael R.; Short, Terry M.; Tate, Cathy M.; Gurtz, Martin E.; Bryant, Wade L.; Falcone, James A.; Woodside, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes a national assessment of the ecological health of streams done by the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA). Healthy functioning stream ecosystems provide society with many benefits, including water purification, flood control, nutrient recycling, waste decomposition, fisheries, and aesthetics. The value to society of many of these benefits is substantial; for example, sportfishing in the United States generates an estimated annual economic output of $125 billion, including more than 1 million jobs (National Research Council, 2005; American Sportfishing Association, 2008). Continued monitoring and assessment of the Nation’s streams is needed to support informed decisions that will safeguard this important natural and economic resource. The quality of streams and rivers is often assessed with measures of the chemical or physical properties of water. However, a more comprehensive perspective is obtained if resident biological communities are also assessed. Guidelines to protect human health and aquatic life have been established for specific physical and chemical properties of water and have become useful yardsticks with which to assess water quality. Biological communities provide additional crucial information because they live within streams for weeks to years and therefore integrate through time the effects of changes to their chemical or physical environment. In addition, biological communities are a direct measure of stream health—an indicator of the ability of a stream to support aquatic life. Thus, the condition of biological communities, integrated with key physical and chemical properties, provides a comprehensive assessment of stream health.

  1. PCBs in Rain Water, Streams and a Reservoir in a Small Catchment of NW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Martín, Jordi; Cereijo-Arango, José Luis; García-Morrondo, David; Juncosa-Rivera, Ricardo; Cillero-Castro, Carmen; Muñoz-Ibáñez, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) constitute a significant environmental concern due to its persistence, tendency to bio-accumulate, acknowledged toxicity and ubiquity. In the present study, a small water catchment (~100 km2) inclusive of a two-tailed water supply reservoir (Abegondo-Cecebre) has been monitored between 2009 and 2014. Sampling stations include: a) one precipitation gauge used to collect monthly-integrated bulk precipitation (25 samples); b) seven streams (95 samples); c) five surface and one bottom points within the reservoir (104 samples); d) five points for sediment sampling in two surveys (spring and summer; 10 samples). All the water samples as well as the leachates of sediment washing have been analyzed for their concentration in 6 marker PCB (congeners 28, 52, 101, 138, 153 and 180) and 12 dioxin-like PCB (congeners 77, 81, 105, 114, 118, 123, 126, 156, 157, 167, 169 and 189) compounds. The average concentration of PCBtot in the bulk precipitation during the sampling period is ~406 pg/L although a very significant decrease has occurred since the end of 2011 (~800 pg/L) to the end of 2014 (~60 pg/L). Likewise, the mean concentration of PCBtot in the stream water samples is 174 pg/L and a similar reduction in the concentration of PCBtot is also acknowledged for the same period of time (~250 pg/L before the end of 2011 and ~30 pg/L after then). Reservoir surface water has a PCBtot concentration of ~234 pg/L which, according to its sampling time (2010-2011) is consistent with the measured stream waters. However, deep reservoir water reveals an average concentration which is higher than the corresponding top water (~330 pg/L) but significantly smaller than the water-leached sediments (~860 pg/L). The available data suggest that up to a 30% of PCBs associated with precipitation becomes sequestered by the soil/sediment system while no significant change takes place during the transfer of water from the stream to the reservoir system, at least in

  2. Natural and anthropogenic sources and processes affecting water chemistry in two South Korean streams.

    PubMed

    Shin, Woo-Jin; Ryu, Jong-Sik; Mayer, Bernhard; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Lee, Sin-Woo

    2014-07-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) in a watershed provides potential sources of pollutants for surface and subsurface waters that can deteriorate water quality. Between March and early August 2011, water samples were collected from two streams in South Korea, one dominantly draining a watershed with carbonate bedrock affected by coal mines and another draining a watershed with silicate bedrock and a relatively undisturbed catchment area. The objective of the study was to identify the sources and processes controlling water chemistry, which was dependent on bedrock and land use. In the Odae stream (OS), the stream in the silicate-dominated catchment, Ca, Na, and HCO3 were the dominant ions and total dissolved solids (TDS) was low (26.1-165 mg/L). In the Jijang stream (JS), in the carbonate-dominated watershed, TDS (224-434 mg/L) and ion concentrations were typically higher, and Ca and SO4 were the dominant ions due to carbonate weathering and oxidation of pyrite exposed at coal mines. Dual isotopic compositions of sulfate (δ(34)SSO4 and δ(18)OSO4) verified that the SO4 in JS is derived mainly from sulfide mineral oxidation in coal mines. Cl in JS was highest upstream and decreased progressively downstream, which implies that pollutants from recreational facilities in the uppermost part of the catchment are the major source governing Cl concentrations within the discharge basin. Dual isotopic compositions of nitrate (δ(15)NNO3 and δ(18)ONO3) indicated that NO3 in JS is attributable to nitrification of soil organic matter but that NO3 in OS is derived mostly from manure. Additionally, the contributions of potential anthropogenic sources to the two streams were estimated in more detail by using a plot of δ(34)SSO4 and δ(15)NNO3. This study suggests that the dual isotope approach for sulfate and nitrate is an excellent additional tool for elucidating the sources and processes controlling the water chemistry of streams draining watersheds having different lithologies and

  3. Mercury in stream water at five Czech catchments across a Hg and S deposition gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Navrátil, Tomáš; Shanley, James B.; Rohovec, Jan; Oulehle, Filip; Krám, Pavel; Matoušková, Šárka; Tesař, Miroslav; Hojdová, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The Czech Republic was heavily industrialized in the second half of the 20th century but the associated emissions of Hg and S from coal burning were significantly reduced since the 1990s. We studied dissolved (filtered) stream water mercury (Hg) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations at five catchments with contrasting Hg and S deposition histories in the Bohemian part of the Czech Republic. The median filtered Hg concentrations of stream water samples collected in hydrological years 2012 and 2013 from the five sites varied by an order of magnitude from 1.3 to 18.0 ng L− 1. The Hg concentrations at individual catchments were strongly correlated with DOC concentrations r from 0.64 to 0.93 and with discharge r from 0.48 to 0.75. Annual export fluxes of filtered Hg from individual catchments ranged from 0.11 to 13.3 μg m− 2 yr− 1 and were highest at sites with the highest DOC export fluxes. However, the amount of Hg exported per unit DOC varied widely; the mean Hg/DOC ratio in stream water at the individual sites ranged from 0.28 to 0.90 ng mg− 1. The highest stream Hg/DOC ratios occurred at sites Pluhův Bor and Jezeří which both are in the heavily polluted Black Triangle area. Stream Hg/DOC was inversely related to mineral and total soil pool Hg/C across the five sites. We explain this pattern by greater soil Hg retention due to inhibition of soil organic matter decomposition at the sites with low stream Hg/DOC and/or by precipitation of a metacinnabar (HgS) phase. Thus mobilization of Hg into streams from forest soils likely depends on combined effects of organic matter decomposition dynamics and HgS-like phase precipitation, which were both affected by Hg and S deposition histories.

  4. Long-term trends of water chemistry in mountain streams in Sweden - slow recovery from acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, H.; Sundbom, M.

    2014-01-01

    The water chemistry of streams and precipitation in the province of Jämtland, northern Sweden has been monitored since the 1980s to study long-term trends, occurrence of acid episodes, and effects of liming. The acidity in precipitation increased in the 1970s, followed by a loss of acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and low pH in the streams. Sulfur deposition began to decrease in the 1980s, until approximately 2000, after which the decrease levelled out. Stream water sulfate concentration followed the precipitation trend but decreased more slowly and since the late 1990s a subtle increase was observed. Sulfate concentrations in the snow typically have been higher than or equal to the stream sulfate levels. However, during the period of rapid deposition decrease and also since 2005 stream sulfate has sometimes exceeded snow sulfate, indicating desorption of stored soil sulfate, possibly because of climate-related changes in run-off routes through the soil profiles, following shorter periods of frost. From 1982 to 2000, total organic carbon (TOC) increased by approximately 0.1 mg L-1 yr-1. The mean trends in sulfate and TOC from approximately 1990 until today were generally opposite. Acidic episodes with pH 4.0 at flow peaks occurred frequently in the unlimed streams, despite relatively well-buffered waters at baseflow. To evaluate the main causes for the loss of ANC during episodes, the changes in major ion concentrations during high flow episodes were evaluated. The most important factors contributing to ANC loss were dilution of base cations (Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+), enrichment of organic anions and enrichment of sulfate. Wetland liming started in 1985 after which the earlier observed extreme peak values of iron, manganese and aluminium, did not reoccur. The studied area is remote from emission sources in Europe, but the critical load of acidity is still exceeded. The long-term recovery observed in the unlimed streams is thus slow, and severe acidic episodes still

  5. Inorganic nitrogen, sterols and bacterial source tracking as tools to characterize water quality and possible contamination sources in surface water.

    PubMed

    Furtula, Vesna; Osachoff, Heather; Derksen, George; Juahir, Hafizan; Colodey, Al; Chambers, Patricia

    2012-03-15

    The effects of agricultural activities on stream water quality were assessed by nitrogen analysis, further investigated by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) sterol analysis (including chemometric analysis), and characterized by bacterial source tracking (BST). Surface water samples were collected from five sites, throughout the agriculturally-influenced Nathan Creek watershed, British Columbia, Canada and a nearby control site between October 2005 and March 2006. From a total of 48 samples, Canadian Water Quality Guidelines were exceeded nineteen times for nitrate (NO3-; guideline value: 2.94 mg/L N) and four times for un-ionized ammonia (NH3; guideline value 0.019 mg/L N). Gas chromatography mass spectrometry single ion monitoring (GC-MS SIM) analysis of 18 sterols showed that five fecal sterols (coprostanol, episoprostanol, cholesterol, cholestanol, desmosterol) were detected at all sites except the control site (where only cholesterol, cholestanol and desmosterol were detected). Three phytosterols (campesterol, stigmasterol and β-sitosterol) were also detected at all sites while the hormone estrone was present at one site on two occasions at concentrations of 0.01 and 0.04 μg/L. Chemometric analysis (principal component analysis and cluster analysis) grouped sites based on their similarities in sterol composition. Analysis of ten sterol ratios (seven for identifying human fecal contamination and four for differentiating sources of fecal contamination) showed multiple instances of human and animal contamination for every site but the control site. Application of a Bacteroides-BST method confirmed contamination from ruminant animals, pigs and dogs in varying combinations at all impact sites. Together, these results confirmed the impact of agricultural activities on the Nathan Creek watershed and support a need for better land management practices to protect water quality and aquatic life.

  6. Influences of urban wastewaters on the stream water quality: a case study from Gumushane Province, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Adem; Önsoy, Hızır; Bulut, V Numan; Akinci, Görkem

    2013-02-01

    Urban wastewater in Turkey is primarily discharged without treatment to marine environments, streams and rivers, and natural and artificial lakes. Since it has been well established that untreated effluent in multi-use waters can have acute and chronic impacts to both the environment and human health, it is important to evaluate the consequences of organic enrichment relative to the structure and function of aquatic environment. We investigated the impacts of untreated municipal wastewater discharge from the city of Gumushane in the Eastern Black Sea Region of Turkey on the surface water quality of the stream Harsit. Several key water-quality indicators were measured: chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonium nitrogen (NH (4)(+)-N), nitrite nitrogen (NO(2)(-)-N), nitrate nitrogen (NO(3)(-)-N), total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), total nitrogen (TN), orthophosphate phosphorus (PO(4)(3-)-P), methylene blue active substances (MBAS), water temperature (t), pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), and electrical conductivity (EC). The monitoring and sampling studies were conducted every 15 days from March 2009 to February 2010 at three longitudinally distributed stations. While t, pH, DO, and EC demonstrated relatively little variability over the course of the study, other parameters showed substantial temporal and spatial variations. The most dramatic differences were noted in COD, NH(4)(+)-N, NO(2)(-)-N, TKN, TN, PO(4)(3-) P, and MBAS immediately downstream of the wastewater discharge. Concentration increases of 309 and 418 % for COD, 5,635 and 2,162 % for NH (4)(+)-N, 2,225 and 674 % for NO(2)(-)-N, 283 and 478 % for TKN, 208 and 213 % for PO(4)(3-)-P, and 535 and 1,260 % for MBAS were observed in the summer and autumn, respectively. These changes were associated with greatly diminished seasonal stream flows. Based on NO(2)(-)-N, TKN, PO(4)(3-) P, and MBAS concentrations, it was concluded that Harsit stream water was correctly classified as polluted. The most telling parameter, however

  7. The effect of loading efficiency on the groundwater response to water level changes in shallow lakes and streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Mark

    2016-03-01

    The loading efficiency (sometimes called the tidal efficiency) is often neglected when simulating the head response in an aquifer to water level changes in lakes and streams. This is not appropriate when the lake or stream only partially penetrates the aquifer. In such cases, the aquifer extends below the lake or stream and is hydraulically connected through a semiconfining layer of lower permeability. The loading efficiency is the ratio between the instantaneous head response below a lake or stream and the water level change in the lake or stream. In sand and clay, whose particles are not cemented together, the instantaneous head response below a stream or lake is nearly equal to the stage change, and the loading efficiency is close to 1. New semianalytic solutions are presented for the groundwater response to water level changes in shallow lakes and streams that account for the loading efficiency of the aquifer. It is shown that the loading efficiency may have a significant effect on the head response. The effect is larger for larger values of the vertical resistance of the semiconfining layer and larger width of the stream and is much more pronounced in confined aquifers than in unconfined aquifers. The importance of the loading efficiency declines with time and with distance from the lake or stream. Graphs are presented that may be used to determine whether a certain combination of parameters gives a significant difference in the head at the lake shore or river bank when the loading efficiency is taken into account.

  8. Water-quality characteristics of Montana streams in a statewide monitoring network, 1999-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambing, John H.; Cleasby, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    A statewide monitoring network of 38 sites was operated during 1999-2003 in cooperation with the Montana Department of Environmental Quality to provide a broad geographic base of water-quality information on Montana streams. The purpose of this report is to summarize and describe the water-quality characteristics for those sites. Samples were collected at U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in the Missouri, Yellowstone, and Columbia River basins for stream properties, nutrients, suspended sediment, major ions, and selected trace elements. Mean annual streamflows were below normal during the period, which likely influenced water quality. Continuous water-temperature monitors were operated at 26 sites. The median of daily mean water temperatures for the June-August summer period ranged from 12.5 degC at Kootenai River below Libby Dam to 23.0 degC at Poplar River near Poplar and Tongue River at Miles City. In general, sites in the Missouri River basin commonly had the highest water temperatures. Median daily mean summer water temperatures at four sites (Jefferson River near Three Forks, Missouri River at Toston, Judith River near Winifred, and Poplar River near Poplar) classified as supporting or marginally supporting cold-water biota exceeded the general guideline of 19.4 degC for cold-water biota. Median daily mean temperatures at sites in the network classified as supporting warm-water biota did not exceed the guideline of 26.7 degC for warm-water biota, although several sites exceeded the warm-water guideline on several days during the summer. More...

  9. Environmental water-quality zones for streams: A regional classification scheme

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, D.M.; Saad, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Various approaches have been used to classify large geographical areas into smaller regions of similar water quality or extrapolate water-quality data from a few streams to other unmonitored streams. A combination of some of the strengths of existing techniques is used to develop a new approach for these purposes. In this new approach, referred to here as SPARTA (SPAtial Regression-Tree Analysis), environmental characteristics for each monitored stream are first quantified using a Geographic Information System (GIS) and then regression-tree analysis is used to determine which characteristics are most statistically important in describing the distribution of a specific water-quality constituent. GIS coverages of only the most statistically significant environmental characteristics are then used to subdivide the area of interest into relatively homogeneous environmental water-quality zones. Results from the regression-tree analysis not only define the most important environmental characteristics, but also describe how to subdivide the coverage of the specific characteristic (for example, areas with <26% or ???26% soil clay content). The resulting regionalization scheme is customized for each water-quality constituent based on the environmental characteristics most statistically related to that constituent. SPARTA was used to delineate areas of similar phosphorus, nitrogen, and sediment concentrations (by including land-use characteristics) and areas of similar potential water quality (by excluding land-use characteristics). The SPARTA approach reduced the variability in water-quality concentrations (phosphorus, total nitrogen, Kjeldahl nitrogen, and suspended sediment) within similarly classified zones from that obtained using the US Environmental Protection Agency's nutrient ecoregions.

  10. Organic-inorganic interactions in the system of pyrrole-hematite-water at elevated temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Kangle

    2015-11-01

    The distribution and abundance of pyrrolic compounds in sediments and crude oils are most likely influenced by inorganic sedimentary components. In this paper, thermal simulation experiments on the system pyrrole-hematite-water were carried out at elevated temperatures and pressures in order to investigate the effect of organic-inorganic interactions on the preservation of pyrrolic compounds. Compositions of the reaction products were analyzed with GC-MS and GC-FID methods. In the closed system pyrrole-hematite-water, the nitrogen-oxygen exchange obviously occurred at temperatures above 350ºC in accordance with the thermochemical calculation. Large amounts of furan and ammonia were generated after simulation experiments, indicating that the conversion of pyrrole into furan was the dominant reaction. Thermochemical exchange effect between organic nitrogen and inorganic oxygen was obviously facilitated by elevated temperatures and found to be catalyzed by hematite, but inhibited by the increasing volume of water. Thermodynamically water spontaneously reacts with pyrrole above 300ºC. The reaction of pyrrole-hematite-water is an exothermic process in which the reaction heat positively correlates with temperature. The heat released was estimated as 9.0 KJ/(mol) pyrrole - 15.0 KJ/(mol) pyrrole in typical oil reservoirs (100ºC-150ºC) and 15.0-23.0 KJ/(mol) pyrrole in typical gas reservoirs (150ºC-200ºC). The calculated activation energy of the nitrogen-oxygen atom exchange is about 129.59 kJ/mol. According to the experimental results, a small amount of water may effectively initiate the nitrogen-oxygen exchange. The study would improve our evaluating of the preservation and fate of pyrrolic compounds in deeply buried geologic settings and further understanding of thermochemical processes behind the degradation of petroleum.

  11. Water Velocity as a Driver of Stream Metabolism: a Parallel Application of the Open Water and Eddy Correlation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmans, D.; Berg, P.

    2013-12-01

    Inland waters respire or store a large portion of net terrestrial ecosystem production. As a result their metabolism is significant to the global carbon budget. The proximal drivers of aquatic respiration are organic matter availability, temperature, nutrients, and water velocity. Among these water velocity may be the least quantified. A partial explanation is that the footprint of the open water technique is typically hundreds of meters of river length, while the effect of a change in velocity may be specific to a local benthic environment, e.g., a riffle. With the eddy correlation technique oxygen flux is calculated from the turbulent fluctuation of vertical velocity and the oxygen concentration at a point in the water column. The footprint of the technique scales with the height of the point of measurement allowing an investigation of the in situ oxygen flux at the scale of a riffle. The combination of techniques, then, can be used to investigate the coupling of hydrodynamic conditions and benthic environments in driving aquatic ecosystem metabolism. This parallel approach was applied seasonally to examine the drivers of metabolism in a nutrient-rich, sand-bed coastal stream on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. An ecosystem-scale oxygen flux was calculated with the open water technique while pool-, run-, riffle-, and freshwater tidal-scale oxygen fluxes were calculated with the eddy correlation technique. At the ecosystem scale the stream bed functioned as an effective biocatalytic filter with an average annual net oxygen consumption of 300 mmol m^-2 d^-1. Prior to a stage-discharge shift water velocity explained 90% of the variance in ecosystem respiration (n = 63 days). After the stage-discharge shift water velocity explained 96 % of it (n = 40 days). Hyporheic exchange supported respiration in this system, contributing to its close correlation with water velocity. Among the physically similar benthic environments of the run, riffle, and freshwater tidal sites

  12. The effects of a stannous chloride-based water treatment system in a mercury contaminated stream

    DOE PAGES

    Mathews, Teresa J.; Looney, Brian B.; Smith, John G.; ...

    2015-06-09

    Remediation of mercury (Hg)-contaminated watersheds is often challenging because of the complex nature of Hg biogeochemistry. Stream ecosystems have been shown to be particularly susceptible to Hg contamination and bioaccumulation in fish. Decreasing total Hg loading to stream systems, however, has shown variable performance in decreasing Hg concentrations in fish tissues. In this study, we assess the impacts of an innovative treatment system in reducing releases of Hg to a small stream system in the southeastern United States. The treatment system, installed in 2007, removes Hg from water using tin (Sn) (II) chloride followed by air stripping. Mercury concentrations inmore » the receiving stream, Tims Branch, decreased from > 100 to ~10 ng/L in the four years following treatment, and Hg body burdens in redfin pickerel (Esox americanus) decreased by 70 % at the most contaminated site. Tin concentrations in water and fish increased significantly in the tributary leading to Tims Branch, but concentrations remain below levels of concern for human health or ecological risks. While other studies have shown that Sn may be environmentally methylated and methyltin can transfer its methyl group to Hg, results from our field studies and sediment incubation experiments suggest that the added Sn to the Tims Branch watershed is not contributing to MeHg production and bioaccumulation. The stannous chloride treatment system installed at Tims Branch was effective at removing Hg inputs and reducing Hg bioaccumulation in the stream with minimal impacts on the environment due to the increased Sn in the system.« less

  13. Controls on stream water dissolved mercury in three mid-Appalachian forested headwater catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riscassi, Ami L.; Scanlon, Todd M.

    2011-12-01

    Determining the controls on dissolved mercury (HgD) transport is necessary to improve estimations of export from unmonitored watersheds and to forecast responses to changes in deposition and other environmental forcings. Stream water HgD and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were evaluated over a range of discharge conditions in three streams within Shenandoah National Park, VA. Watersheds are distinguished by stream water pH (ranging from neutral to acidic) and soil size fractioning (ranging from clays to sands). At all sites, discharge was a significant but poor predictor of HgD concentrations (r2 from 0.13-0.52). HgD was strongly coupled with DOC at all sites (r2 from 0.74-0.89). UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV254), a proxy for DOC quantity and quality, slightly improved the predictions of HgD. Mean DOC quality differed between streams, with less aromatic DOC mobilized from the more acidic watershed. The site with less aromatic DOC and sandy soils mobilized more Hg to the stream for the same quantity and quality of DOC, likely due to the reduced capacity of the larger-grained soils to retain Hg, leaving a greater fraction associated with the organic matter. A similar amount of 0.54 ng HgD/mg DOC is transported at all sites, suggesting the less aromatic DOC transports less Hg per unit DOC, offsetting the effects of soil type. This research demonstrates that soil composition and DOC quality influence HgDexport. We also provide evidence that soil organic carbon is a primary control on Hg-DOC ratios (0.12-1.4 ng mg-1) observed across the U.S. and Sweden.

  14. Stormwater management impacts on urban stream water quality and quantity during and after development in Clarksburg, MD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loperfido, J. V.; Noe, G. B.; Jarnagin, S.; Mohamoud, Y. M.; Van Ness, K.; Hogan, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Urbanization and urban land use leads to degradation of local stream habitat and 'urban stream syndrome.' Best Management Practices (BMPs) are often used in an attempt to mitigate the impact of urban land use on stream water quality and quantity. Traditional development has employed stormwater BMPs that were placed in a centralized manner located either in the stream channel or near the riparian zone to treat stormwater runoff from large drainage areas; however, urban streams have largely remained impaired. Recently, distributed placement of BMPs throughout the landscape has been implemented in an attempt to detain, treat, and infiltrate stormwater runoff from smaller drainage areas near its source. Despite increasing implementation of distributed BMPs, little has been reported on the catchment-scale (1-10 km^2) performance of distributed BMPs and how they compare to centralized BMPs. The Clarksburg Special Protection Area (CSPA), located in the Washington, DC exurbs within the larger Chesapeake Bay watershed, is undergoing rapid urbanization and employs distributed BMPs on the landscape that treat small drainage areas with the goal of preserving high-quality stream resources in the area. In addition, the presence of a nearby traditionally developed (centralized BMPs) catchment and an undeveloped forested catchment makes the CSPA an ideal setting to understand how the best available stormwater management technology implemented during and after development affects stream water quality and quantity through a comparative watershed analysis. The Clarksburg Integrated Monitoring Partnership is a consortium of local and federal agencies and universities that conducts research in the CSPA including: monitoring of stream water quality, geomorphology, and biology; analysis of stream hydrological and water quality data; and GIS mapping and analysis of land cover, elevation change and BMP implementation data. Here, the impacts of urbanization on stream water quantity

  15. Nutrient processes at the stream-lake interface for a channelized versus unmodified stream mouth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niswonger, Richard; Naranjo, Ramon C.; Smith, David; Constantz, James E.; Allander, Kip K.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Neilson, Bethany; Rosen, Michael R.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Inorganic forms of nitrogen and phosphorous impact freshwater lakes by stimulating primary production and affecting water quality and ecosystem health. Communities around the world are motivated to sustain and restore freshwater resources and are interested in processes controlling nutrient inputs. We studied the environment where streams flow into lakes, referred to as the stream-lake interface (SLI), for a channelized and unmodified stream outlet. Channelization is done to protect infrastructure or recreational beach areas. We collected hydraulic and nutrient data for surface water and shallow groundwater in two SLIs to develop conceptual models that describe characteristics that are representative of these hydrologic features. Water, heat, and solute transport models were used to evaluate hydrologic conceptualizations and estimate mean residence times of water in the sediment. A nutrient mass balance model is developed to estimate net rates of adsorption and desorption, mineralization, and nitrification along subsurface flow paths. Results indicate that SLIs are dynamic sources of nutrients to lakes and that the common practice of channelizing the stream at the SLI decreases nutrient concentrations in pore water discharging along the lakeshore. This is in contrast to the unmodified SLI that forms a barrier beach that disconnects the stream from the lake and results in higher nutrient concentrations in pore water discharging to the lake. These results are significant because nutrient delivery through pore water seepage at the lakebed from the natural SLI contributes to nearshore algal communities and produces elevated concentrations of inorganic nutrients in the benthic zone where attached algae grow.

  16. Comparison of Hydrologic and Water-Quality Characteristics of Two Native Tallgrass Prairie Streams with Agricultural Streams in Missouri and Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heimann, David C.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, to analyze and compare hydrologic and water-quality characteristics of tallgrass prairie and agricultural basins located within the historical distribution of tallgrass prairie in Missouri and Kansas. Streamflow and water-quality data from two remnant, tallgrass prairie basins (East Drywood Creek at Prairie State Park, Missouri, and Kings Creek near Manhattan, Kansas) were compared to similar data from agricultural basins in Missouri and Kansas. Prairie streams, especially Kings Creek in eastern Kansas, received a higher percentage of base flow and a lower percentage of direct runoff than similar-sized agricultural streams in the region. A larger contribution of direct runoff from the agricultural streams made them much flashier than prairie streams. During 22 years of record, the Kings Creek base-flow component averaged 66 percent of total flow, but base flow was only 16 to 26 percent of flows at agricultural sites of various record periods. The large base-flow component likely is the result of greater infiltration of precipitation in prairie soils and the resulting greater contribution of groundwater to streamflow. The 1- and 3-day annual maximum flows were significantly greater at three agricultural sites than at Kings Creek. The effects of flashier agricultural streams on native aquatic biota are unknown, but may be an important factor in the sustainability of some native aquatic species. There were no significant differences in the distribution of dissolved-oxygen concentrations at prairie and agricultural sites, and some samples from most sites fell below the 5 milligrams per liter Missouri and Kansas standard for the protection of aquatic life. More than 10 percent of samples from the East Drywood Creek prairie stream were less than this standard. These data indicate low dissolved-oxygen concentrations during summer low

  17. Summary of inorganic compositional data for groundwater, soil-water, and surface-water samples collected at the Headgate Draw subsurface drip irrigation site, Johnson County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geboy, Nicholas J.; Engle, Mark A.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Zupancic, John W.

    2011-01-01

    As part of a 5-year project on the impact of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) application of coalbed-methane (CBM) produced waters, water samples were collected from the Headgate Draw SDI site in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA. This research is part of a larger study to understand short- and long-term impacts on both soil and water quality from the beneficial use of CBM waters to grow forage crops through use of SDI. This document provides a summary of the context, sampling methodology, and quality assurance and quality control documentation of samples collected prior to and over the first year of SDI operation at the site (May 2008-October 2009). This report contains an associated database containing inorganic compositional data, water-quality criteria parameters, and calculated geochemical parameters for samples of groundwater, soil water, surface water, treated CBM waters, and as-received CBM waters collected at the Headgate Draw SDI site.

  18. Summary of Inorganic Compositional Data for Groundwater, Soil-Water, and Surface-Water Samples at the Headgate Draw Subsurface Drip Irrigation Site

    SciTech Connect

    Geboy, Nicholas J.; Engle, Mark A.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Zupanic, John W.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a 5-year project on the impact of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) application of coalbed-methane (CBM) produced waters, water samples were collected from the Headgate Draw SDI site in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA. This research is part of a larger study to understand short- and long-term impacts on both soil and water quality from the beneficial use of CBM waters to grow forage crops through use of SDI. This document provides a summary of the context, sampling methodology, and quality assurance and quality control documentation of samples collected prior to and over the first year of SDI operation at the site (May 2008-October 2009). This report contains an associated database containing inorganic compositional data, water-quality criteria parameters, and calculated geochemical parameters for samples of groundwater, soil water, surface water, treated CBM waters, and as-received CBM waters collected at the Headgate Draw SDI site.

  19. Characterization of water-soluble inorganic ions in size-segregated aerosols in coastal city, Xiamen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinping; Zhang, Fuwang; Xu, Ya; Chen, Jinsheng

    2011-03-01

    The samples of water-soluble inorganic ions (WSIs), including anions (F-, Cl-, SO42-, NO3-) and cations (NH4+, K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+) in 8 size-segregated particle matter (PM), were collected using a sampler (with 8 nominal cut-sizes ranged from 0.43 to 9.0 μm) from October 2008 to September 2009 at five sites in both polluted and background regions of a coastal city, Xiamen. The results showed that particulate matters in the fine mode (PM2.1, Dp < 2.1 μm) comprised large part of mass concentrations of aerosols, which accounted for 45.56-51.27%, 40.04-60.81%, 42.02-60.81%, and 40.46-57.07% of the total particulate mass in spring, summer, autumn, and winter, respectively. The water-soluble ionic species in the fine mode at five sampling sites varied from 15.33 to 33.82 (spring), 14.03 to 28.06 (summer), 33.47 to 72.52 (autumn), and 48.39 to 69.75 μg m- 3 (winter), respectively, which accounted for 57.30 ± 6.51% of the PM2.1 mass concentrations. Secondary pollutants of NH4+, SO42- and NO3- were the dominant contributors of WSIs, which suggested that pollutants from anthropogenic activities, such as SO2, NOx were formed in aerosols by photochemical reactions. The size distributions of Na+, Cl-, SO42- and NO3- were bimodal, peaking at 0.43-0.65 μm and 3.3-5.8 μm. Although some ions, such as NH4+ presented bimodal distributions, the coarse mode was insignificant compared to the fine mode. Ca2+ and Mg2+ exhibited unimodal distributions at all sampling sites, peaking at 2.1-3.3 μm, while K+ having a bimodal distributions with a major peak at 0.43-0.65 μm and a minor one at 3.3-4.7 μm, were used in most of samples. Seasonal and spatial variations in the size-distribution profiles suggested that meteorological conditions (seasonal patterns) and sampling locations (geographical patterns) were the main factors determining the formation of secondary aerosols and characteristics of size distributions for WSIs.

  20. Altitudinal effect to the size distribution of water soluble inorganic ions in PM at Huangshan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Yin, Yan; Kong, Shaofei; Wen, Bin; Chen, Kui; Yuan, Liang; Li, Qi

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the vertical variation of water soluble inorganic ions (WSI) in aerosols at a regional background mountainous site, nine size fractions of particles (10.0-9.0, 9.0-5.8, 5.8-4.7, 4.7-3.3, 3.3-2.1, 2.1-1.1, 1.1-0.65, 0.65-0.43 and <0.43 μm) were collected at two different altitudes simultaneously at Huangshan in southeast China, from 14 September to 26 October of 2012. The mass concentrations of PM1.1, PM2.1 and PM10 were 17.07, 21.28 and