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Sample records for inos mediate bacterial

  1. Increases in Calmodulin Abundance and Stabilization of Activated iNOS Mediate Bacterial Killing in RAW 264.7 Macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S.; Shi, Liang; Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-08-01

    The rapid activation of macrophages in response to bacterial antigens is central to the innate immune system that permits the recognition and killing of pathogens to limit infection. To understand regulatory mechanisms underlying macrophage activation, we have investigated changes in the abundance of calmodulin (CaM) and iNOS in response to the bacterial cell wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using RAW 264.7 macrophages. Critical to these measurements was the ability to differentiate free iNOS from the CaM-bound (active) form of iNOS associated with nitric oxide generation. We observe a rapid two-fold increase in CaM abundance during the first 30 minutes that is blocked by inhibition of NF?B nuclear translocation or protein synthesis. A similar two-fold increase in the abundance of the complex between CaM and iNOS is observed with the same time dependence. In contrast, there are no detectable increases in the CaM-free (i.e., inactive) form of iNOS within the first hour; it remains at a very low abundance during the initial phase of macrophage activation. Increasing cellular CaM levels in stably transfected cells results in a corresponding increase in the abundance of the CaM/iNOS complex that promotes effective bacterial killing following challenge by Salmonella typhimurium. Thus, LPS-dependent increases in CaM abundance function in the stabilization and activation of iNOS on the rapid time-scale associated with macrophage activation and bacterial killing. These results explain how CaM and iNOS coordinately function to form a stable complex that is part of a rapid host-response that functions within the first 30 minutes following bacterial infection to up-regulate the innate immune system involving macrophage activation.

  2. Burkholderia pseudomallei rpoS mediates iNOS suppression in human hepatocyte (HC04) cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanongkiet, Sucharat; Ponnikorn, Saranyoo; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular Gram-negative bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis, a widespread disease in Southeast Asia. Reactive nitrogen, in an intermediate form of nitric oxide (NO), is one of the first lines of defense used by host cells to eliminate intracellular pathogens, through the stimulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Studies in phagocytotic cells have shown that the iNOS response is muted in B. pseudomallei infection, and implicated the rpoS sigma factor as a key regulatory factor mediating suppression. The liver is a main visceral organ affected by B. pseudomallei, and there is little knowledge about the interaction of liver cells and B. pseudomallei. This study investigated the induction of iNOS, as well as autophagic flux and light-chain 3 (LC3) localization in human liver (HC04) cells in response to infection with B. pseudomallei and its rpoS deficient mutant. Results showed that the rpoS mutant was unable to suppress iNOS induction and that the mutant showed less induction of autophagy and lower co-localization with LC3, and this was coupled with a lower intracellular growth rate. Combining these results suggest that B. pseudomallei rpoS is an important factor in establishing infection in liver cells. PMID:27324398

  3. Mammalian Ino80 mediates double-strand break repair through its role in DNA end strand resection.

    PubMed

    Gospodinov, Anastas; Vaissiere, Thomas; Krastev, Dragomir B; Legube, Gaëlle; Anachkova, Boyka; Herceg, Zdenko

    2011-12-01

    Chromatin modifications/remodeling are important mechanisms by which cells regulate various functions through providing accessibility to chromatin DNA. Recent studies implicated INO80, a conserved chromatin-remodeling complex, in the process of DNA repair. However, the precise underlying mechanism by which this complex mediates repair in mammalian cells remains enigmatic. Here, we studied the effect of silencing of the Ino80 subunit of the complex on double-strand break repair in mammalian cells. Comet assay and homologous recombination repair reporter system analyses indicated that Ino80 is required for efficient double-strand break repair. Ino80 association with chromatin surrounding double-strand breaks suggested the direct involvement of INO80 in the repair process. Ino80 depletion impaired focal recruitment of 53BP1 but did not impede Rad51 focus formation, suggesting that Ino80 is required for the early steps of repair. Further analysis by using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled single-stranded DNA and replication protein A (RPA) immunofluorescent staining showed that INO80 mediates 5'-3' resection of double-strand break ends.

  4. Role of prostaglandin E2 in peptidoglycan mediated iNOS expression in mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Yogesh; Pandey, Rajeev Kumar; Bhatt, Kunal H; Sodhi, Ajit

    2010-10-08

    Many extracellular stimuli, e.g. microbial products, cytokines etc., result in the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in macrophages. However, it is not known whether expression of the iNOS gene in response to microbial products is a primary response of macrophages, or is the result of paracrine/autocrine signalling induced by endogenous biomolecules that are synthesised as a result of host cell-microbe interaction. In this paper we demonstrate that iNOS expression in mouse peritoneal macrophages in response to bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN) is a secondary effect requiring autocrine signalling of endogenously produced prostaglandin E2, and that PGN stimulation is mandatory, but not sufficient in itself, for induction of iNOS expression.

  5. Effects of levo- and dextrosimendan on NF-κB-mediated transcription, iNOS expression and NO production in response to inflammatory stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Sareila, O; Korhonen, R; Auvinen, H; Hämäläinen, M; Kankaanranta, H; Nissinen, E; Moilanen, E

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Levosimendan is used in the treatment of decompensated heart failure. It increases the contractility of the myocardium by sensitizing troponin C to calcium. In addition, levosimendan has been reported to have beneficial effects in experimental models of septic shock. Because heart failure and sepsis have been associated with excessive nitric oxide (NO) production through inducible NOS (iNOS), we investigated the effects of the simendans on NO production and iNOS expression and on generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Experimental approach: Macrophages and fibroblasts were exposed to inflammatory stimuli to induce iNOS expression. Proteins were measured by western blot and mRNA expression was determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Promoter activity and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the γ-activated site (GAS; binding site for signal transducer and activator of transcription 1; STAT1)-mediated transcription were investigated using luciferase reporter constructs. Cytokines tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured by ELISA. Key results: Levosimendan and dextrosimendan decreased NO production in a dose-dependent manner in cells exposed to inflammatory stimuli. The simendans decreased iNOS protein and mRNA expression but did not affect iNOS mRNA decay. These compounds decreased iNOS promoter activity and inhibited NF-κB-mediated transcription but not that mediated by STAT1/GAS. The simendans reduced IL-6 production slightly but they had no effect on TNF-α synthesis. Conclusions and implications: The simendans downregulated NF-κB-dependent transcription and decreased iNOS promoter activity, iNOS expression and NO production. These mechanisms may contribute to their beneficial clinical effects. PMID:19002103

  6. HIF‑1 signaling pathway involving iNOS, COX‑2 and caspase‑9 mediates the neuroprotection provided by erythropoietin in the retina of chronic ocular hypertension rats.

    PubMed

    Gui, Dongmei; Li, Yanfeng; Chen, Xiaolong; Gao, Dianwen; Yang, Yang; Li, Xun

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impacts of erythropoietin (EPO) on the electroretinogram b‑wave (ERG‑b), and on the mRNA and protein expression levels of hypoxia‑inducible factor‑1α (HIF‑1α), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase‑2 (COX‑2) and caspase‑9 in chronic ocular hypertension rats. Episcleral vein cauterization (EVC) was used to establish the chronic ocular hypertension rat model based on the intraocular pressure (IOP) value. ERG‑b and mRNA and protein expression levels of HIF‑1α, iNOS, COX‑2 and caspase‑9 in normal, EVC‑treated and EVC combined with EPO (EVC+EPO)‑treated rats were measured by electroretinography, RT‑PCR and western blotting, respectively. Moreover, the correlations of HIF‑1α with IOP, ERG‑b, iNOS, COX‑2 and caspase‑9 were evaluated. The mRNA and protein expression levels of HIF‑1α, iNOS, COX‑2 and caspase‑9 in EVC‑treated rats were increased significantly compared with normal rats. The peak expression levels of HIF‑1α, iNOS, COX‑2 and caspase‑9 were respectively obtained 7, 7, 7 and 14 days postoperatively. Compared with EVC‑treated rats, EPO administration weakened the mRNA and protein expression levels of HIF‑1α, iNOS, COX‑2 and caspase‑9. The mRNA expression level of HIF‑1α demonstrated a significant positive correlation with IOP and ERG‑b. HIF‑1α was positively correlated with iNOS, COX‑2 and caspase‑9 at the mRNA and protein levels. The protective effect of EPO on the retina of chronic ocular hypertension rats may be mediated by the HIF‑1 signaling pathway involving iNOS, COX‑2 and caspase‑9.

  7. Attenuation of iNOS and COX2 by blueberry polyphenols is mediated through the suppression of NF-KB activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Treatment of BV2 microglial cells with blueberry extracts has been shown to be effective in reducing lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1Beta), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), and cyclo-...

  8. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) are important mediators of reflux-induced cell signalling in esophageal cells.

    PubMed

    McAdam, E; Haboubi, H N; Forrester, G; Eltahir, Z; Spencer-Harty, S; Davies, C; Griffiths, A P; Baxter, J N; Jenkins, G J S

    2012-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) has been implicated in both DNA damage induction and aberrant cell signalling in various tissue and cell backgrounds. We investigated here the role of iNOS and NO in DNA damage induction and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signalling in esophageal cells in vitro. As esophageal adenocarcinoma develops in a background of Barrett's esophagus secondary to reflux disease, it is possible that inflammatory mediators like NO may be important in esophageal cancer development. We show that reflux components like stomach acid and bile acids [deoxycholic acid (DCA)] can induce iNOS gene and protein expression and produce NO generation in esophageal cells, using real-time PCR, western blotting and NO sensitive fluorescent probes, respectively. This up-regulation of iNOS expression was not dependent on NF-κB activity. DCA-induced DNA damage was independent of NF-κB and only partially dependent on iNOS and NO, as measured by the micronucleus assay. These same reflux constituents also activated the oncogenic transcription factor NF-κB, as measured by transcription factor enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and gene expression studies with NF-κB linked genes (e.g. interleukin-8). Importantly, we show here for the first time that basal levels of NF-κB activity (and possibly acid and DCA-induced NF-κB) are dependent on iNOS/NO and this may lead to a positive feedback loop whereby induced iNOS is upstream of NF-κB, hence prolonging and potentially amplifying this signalling, presumably through NO activation of NF-κB. Furthermore, we confirm increased protein levels of iNOS in esophageal adenocarcinoma and, therefore, in neoplastic development in the esophagus.

  9. iNOS null MRL+/+ mice show attenuation of trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity: contribution of reactive nitrogen species and lipid-derived reactive aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gangduo; Wakamiya, Maki; Wang, Jianling; Ansari, G.A.S.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2015-01-01

    Earlier studies from our laboratory in MRL+/+ mice suggest that free radicals, especially overproduction of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and lipid-derived reactive aldehydes (LDRAs), are associated with trichloroethene (TCE)-mediated autoimmune response. The current study was undertaken to further assess the contribution of RNS and LDRAs in TCE-mediated autoimmunity by using iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice. iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice were obtained by backcrossing iNOS-null mice (B6.129P2-Nos2tm1Lau/J) to MRL +/+ mice. Female MRL+/+ and iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice were given TCE (10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4th day) for 6 weeks; their respective controls received corn oil only. TCE exposure led to significantly increased iNOS mRNA in livers, iNOS protein in livers and sera, increased nitrotyrosine (NT) formation in both livers and sera, induction of MDA-/HNE-protein adducts in livers and their respective antibodies in sera along with significant increases in serum antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and anti-dsDNA in MRL+/+ mice. Even though in iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice, the iNOS and NT levels were negligible in both TCE-treated and untreated groups, TCE treatment still led to significant increases in MDA-/HNE-protein adducts and their respective antibodies along with increases in serum ANA and anti-dsDNA compared to controls. Most remarkably, the increases in serum ANA and anti-dsDNA induced by TCE in the iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice were significantly less pronounced compared to that in MRL+/+ mice. Our results provide further evidence that both RNS and LDRAs contribute to TCE-induced autoimmunity in MRL+/+ mice, and iNOS deficiency attenuates this autoimmune response. PMID:26472195

  10. iNOS null MRL+/+ mice show attenuation of trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity: contribution of reactive nitrogen species and lipid-derived reactive aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gangduo; Wakamiya, Maki; Wang, Jianling; Ansari, G A S; Firoze Khan, M

    2015-12-01

    Earlier studies from our laboratory in MRL+/+ mice suggest that free radicals, especially overproduction of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and lipid-derived reactive aldehydes (LDRAs), are associated with trichloroethene (TCE)-mediated autoimmune response. The current study was undertaken to further assess the contribution of RNS and LDRAs in TCE-mediated autoimmunity by using iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice. iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice were obtained by backcrossing iNOS-null mice (B6.129P2-Nos2(tm1Lau)/J) to MRL +/+ mice. Female MRL+/+ and iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice were given TCE (10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4(th) day) for 6 weeks; their respective controls received corn oil only. TCE exposure led to significantly increased iNOS mRNA in livers, iNOS protein in livers and sera, increased nitrotyrosine (NT) formation in both livers and sera, induction of MDA-/HNE-protein adducts in livers and their respective antibodies in sera along with significant increases in serum antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and anti-dsDNA in MRL+/+ mice. Even though in iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice, the iNOS and NT levels were negligible in both TCE-treated and untreated groups, TCE treatment still led to significant increases in MDA-/HNE-protein adducts and their respective antibodies along with increases in serum ANA and anti-dsDNA compared to controls. Most remarkably, the increases in serum ANA and anti-dsDNA induced by TCE in the iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice were significantly less pronounced compared to that in MRL+/+ mice. Our results provide further evidence that both RNS and LDRAs contribute to TCE-induced autoimmunity in MRL+/+ mice, and iNOS deficiency attenuates this autoimmune response.

  11. Tetramethylpyrazine attenuates TNF-α-induced iNOS expression in human endothelial cells: Involvement of Syk-mediated activation of PI3K-IKK-IκB signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zhen; Li, Zhiliang; Chen, Song; Pan, Jieyi; Ma, Xiaochun

    2013-08-15

    Endothelial cells produce nitric oxide (NO) by activation of constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and transcription of inducible NO synthase (iNOS). We explored the effect of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), a compound derived from chuanxiong, on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced iNOS in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and explored the signal pathways involved by using RT-PCR and Western blot. TMP suppressed TNF-α-induced expression of iNOS by inhibiting IκB kinase (IKK) phosphorylation, IκB degradation and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) nuclear translocation, which were required for NO gene transcription. Exposure to wortmannin abrogated IKK/IκB/NF-κB-mediated iNOS expression, suggesting activation of such a signal pathway might be phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) dependent. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) inhibitor piceatannol significantly inhibited NO production. Furthermore, piceatannol obviously suppressed TNF-α-induced IκB phosphorylation and the downstream NF-κB activation, suggesting that Syk is an upstream key regulator in the activation of PI3K/IKK/IκB-mediated signaling. TMP significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of Syk and PI3K. Our data indicate that TMP might repress iNOS expression, at least in part, through its inhibitory effect of Syk-mediated PI3K phosphorylation in TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. -- Highlights: •TMP suppressed TNF-α-induced expression of iNOS by inhibiting IKK/IκB/NF-κB pathway. •PI3K inhibitor wortmannin abrogated IKK/IκB/NF-κB-mediated iNOS expression. •Syk inhibitor piceatannol repressed PI3K/IKK/IκB mediated NO production. •Syk is an upstream regulator in the activation of PI3K/IKK/IκB-mediated signaling. •TMP might repress iNOS expression through Syk-mediated PI3K pathway.

  12. Thyroid Hormone Enhances Nitric Oxide-Mediated Bacterial Clearance and Promotes Survival after Meningococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Altenbacher, Georg; Hagner, Matthias; Berglund, Pernilla; Gao, Yumin; Lu, Ting; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Sjölinder, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Euthyroid sick syndrome characterized by reduced levels of thyroid hormones (THs) is observed in patients with meningococcal shock. It has been found that the level of THs reflects disease severity and is predictive for mortality. The present study was conducted to investigate the impact of THs on host defense during meningococcal infection. We found that supplementation of thyroxine to mice infected with Neisseria meningitidis enhanced bacterial clearance, attenuated the inflammatory responses and promoted survival. In vitro studies with macrophages revealed that THs enhanced bacteria-cell interaction and intracellular killing of meningococci by stimulating inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNos)-mediated NO production. TH treatment did not activate expression of TH receptors in macrophages. Instead, the observed TH-directed actions were mediated through nongenomic pathways involving the protein kinases PI3K and ERK1/2 and initiated at the membrane receptor integrin αvβ3. Inhibition of nongenomic TH signaling prevented iNos induction, NO production and subsequent intracellular bacterial killing by macrophages. These data demonstrate a beneficial role of THs in macrophage-mediated N. meningitidis clearance. TH replacement might be a novel option to control meningococcal septicemia. PMID:22844479

  13. iNOS as a Driver of Inflammation and Apoptosis in Mouse Skeletal Muscle after Burn Injury: Possible Involvement of Sirt1 S-Nitrosylation-Mediated Acetylation of p65 NF-κB and p53

    PubMed Central

    Yasukawa, Takashi; Ishimaru, Kazuhiro; Yasuhara, Shingo; Yu, Yong-Ming; Martyn, J. A. Jeevendra; Tompkins, Ronald. G.; Shimokado, Kentaro; Kaneki, Masao

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation and apoptosis develop in skeletal muscle after major trauma, including burn injury, and play a pivotal role in insulin resistance and muscle wasting. We and others have shown that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a major mediator of inflammation, plays an important role in stress (e.g., burn)-induced insulin resistance. However, it remains to be determined how iNOS induces insulin resistance. Moreover, the interrelation between inflammatory response and apoptosis is poorly understood, although they often develop simultaneously. Nuclear factor (NF)-κB and p53 are key regulators of inflammation and apoptosis, respectively. Sirt1 inhibits p65 NF-κB and p53 by deacetylating these transcription factors. Recently, we have shown that iNOS induces S-nitrosylation of Sirt1, which inactivates Sirt1 and thereby increases acetylation and activity of p65 NF-κB and p53 in various cell types, including skeletal muscle cells. Here, we show that iNOS enhances burn-induced inflammatory response and apoptotic change in mouse skeletal muscle along with S-nitrosylation of Sirt1. Burn injury induced robust expression of iNOS in skeletal muscle and gene disruption of iNOS significantly inhibited burn-induced increases in inflammatory gene expression and apoptotic change. In parallel, burn increased Sirt1 S-nitrosylation and acetylation and DNA-binding capacity of p65 NF-κB and p53, all of which were reversed or ameliorated by iNOS deficiency. These results indicate that iNOS functions not only as a downstream effector but also as an upstream enhancer of burn-induced inflammatory response, at least in part, by Sirt1 S-nitrosylation-dependent activation (acetylation) of p65 NF-κB. Our data suggest that Sirt1 S-nitrosylation may play a role in iNOS-mediated enhanced inflammatory response and apoptotic change, which, in turn, contribute to muscle wasting and supposedly to insulin resistance after burn injury. PMID:28099528

  14. Bacterial floc mediated rapid streamer formation in creeping flows

    PubMed Central

    Hassanpourfard, Mahtab; Nikakhtari, Zahra; Ghosh, Ranajay; Das, Siddhartha; Thundat, Thomas; Liu, Yang; Kumar, Aloke

    2015-01-01

    One of the central puzzles concerning the interaction of low Reynolds number fluid transport with bacterial biomass is the formation of filamentous structures called streamers. In this manuscript, we report our discovery of a new kind of low Re bacterial streamers, which appear from pre-formed bacterial flocs. In sharp contrast to the biofilm-mediated streamers, these streamers form over extremely small timescales (less than a second). Our experiments, carried out in a microchannel with micropillars rely on fluorescence microscopy techniques to illustrate that floc-mediated streamers form when a freely-moving floc adheres to the micropillar wall and gets rapidly sheared by the background flow. We also show that at their inception the deformation of the flocs is dominated by recoverable large strains indicating significant elasticity. These strains subsequently increase tremendously to produce filamentous streamers. Interestingly, we find that these fully formed streamers are not static structures and show viscous response at time scales larger than their formation time scales. Finally, we show that such novel streamer formation can lead to rapid clogging of microfluidic devices. PMID:26278133

  15. A small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor increases localization of inducible nitric oxide synthase to the macrophage phagosome and enhances bacterial killing.

    PubMed

    Burkholder, Kristin M; Perry, Jeffrey W; Wobus, Christiane E; Donato, Nicholas J; Showalter, Hollis D; Kapuria, Vaibhav; O'Riordan, Mary X D

    2011-12-01

    Macrophages are key mediators of antimicrobial defense and innate immunity. Innate intracellular defense mechanisms can be rapidly regulated at the posttranslational level by the coordinated addition and removal of ubiquitin by ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases (DUBs). While ubiquitin ligases have been extensively studied, the contribution of DUBs to macrophage innate immune function is incompletely defined. We therefore employed a small molecule DUB inhibitor, WP1130, to probe the role of DUBs in the macrophage response to bacterial infection. Treatment of activated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) with WP1130 significantly augmented killing of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. WP1130 also induced killing of phagosome-restricted bacteria, implicating a bactericidal mechanism associated with the phagosome, such as the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). WP1130 had a minimal antimicrobial effect in macrophages lacking iNOS, indicating that iNOS is an effector mechanism for WP1130-mediated bacterial killing. Although overall iNOS levels were not notably different, we found that WP1130 significantly increased colocalization of iNOS with the Listeria-containing phagosome during infection. Taken together, our data indicate that the deubiquitinase inhibitor WP1130 increases bacterial killing in macrophages by enhancing iNOS localization to the phagosome and suggest a potential role for ubiquitin regulation in iNOS trafficking.

  16. Magnesium isotope fractionation in bacterial mediated carbonate precipitation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, I. J.; Pearce, C. R.; Polacskek, T.; Cockell, C.; Hammond, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Magnesium is an essential component of life, with pivotal roles in the generation of cellular energy as well as in plant chlorophyll [1]. The bio-geochemical cycling of Mg is associated with mass dependant fractionation (MDF) of the three stable Mg isotopes [1]. The largest MDF of Mg isotopes has been recorded in carbonates, with foraminiferal tests having δ26Mg compositions up to 5 ‰ lighter than modern seawater [2]. Magnesium isotopes may also be fractionated during bacterially mediated carbonate precipitation and such carbonates are known to have formed in both modern and ancient Earth surface environments [3, 4], with cyanobacteria having a dominant role in carbonate formation during the Archean. In this study, we aim to better constrain the extent to which Mg isotope fractionation occurs during cellular processes, and to identify when, and how, this signal is transferred to carbonates. To this end we have undertaken biologically-mediated carbonate precipitation experiments that were performed in artificial seawater, but with the molar Mg/Ca ratio set to 0.6 and with the solution spiked with 0.4% yeast extract. The bacterial strain used was marine isolate Halomonas sp. (gram-negative). Experiments were run in the dark at 21 degree C for two to three months and produced carbonate spheres of various sizes up to 300 μm in diameter, but with the majority have diameters of ~100 μm. Control experiments run in sterile controls (`empty` medium without bacteria) yielded no precipitates, indicating a bacterial control on the precipitation. The carbonate spheres are produced are amenable to SEM, EMP and Mg isotopic analysis by MC-ICP-MS. Our new data will shed light on tracing bacterial signals in carbonates from the geological record. [1] Young & Galy (2004). Rev. Min. Geochem. 55, p197-230. [2] Pogge von Strandmann (2008). Geochem. Geophys. Geosys. 9 DOI:10.1029/2008GC002209. [3] Castanier, et al. (1999). Sed. Geol. 126, 9-23. [4] Cacchio, et al. (2003

  17. The bacterial chemical repertoire mediates metabolic exchange within gut microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Rath, Christopher M; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2012-04-01

    Microbial communities in the gut have been hypothesized to play key roles in the health of the host organism. Exploring the relationship between these populations and disease states has been a focus of the human microbiome project. However, the biological roles of the compounds produced by the gut bacteria are largely unknown. We hypothesize that these compounds act as metabolic exchange factors-mediating inter-species and intra-species interactions in the microbiome. This view is supported through this review of known bacterial metabolic exchange factors and evidence for uncharacterized metabolic exchange factors in the gut. The impact of model systems and technological developments in exploring this hypothesis are also discussed. Together, these investigations are revolutionizing our understanding of the gut microbiome-presenting the possibility of identifying new strategies for treating disease in the host.

  18. A fragrant neighborhood: volatile mediated bacterial interactions in soil

    PubMed Central

    Schulz-Bohm, Kristin; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play essential roles in communication and competition between soil microorganisms. Here we assessed volatile-mediated interactions of a synthetic microbial community in a model system that mimics the natural conditions in the heterogeneous soil environment along the rhizosphere. Phylogenetic different soil bacterial isolates (Burkholderia sp., Dyella sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Paenibacillus sp.) were inoculated as mixtures or monoculture in organic-poor, sandy soil containing artificial root exudates (ARE) and the volatile profile and growth were analyzed. Additionally, a two-compartment system was used to test if volatiles produced by inter-specific interactions in the rhizosphere can stimulate the activity of starving bacteria in the surrounding, nutrient-depleted soil. The obtained results revealed that both microbial interactions and shifts in microbial community composition had a strong effect on the volatile emission. Interestingly, the presence of a slow-growing, low abundant Paenibacillus strain significantly affected the volatile production by the other abundant members of the bacterial community as well as the growth of the interacting strains. Furthermore, volatiles released by mixtures of root-exudates consuming bacteria stimulated the activity and growth of starved bacteria. Besides growth stimulation, also an inhibition in growth was observed for starving bacteria exposed to microbial volatiles. The current work suggests that volatiles produced during microbial interactions in the rhizosphere have a significant long distance effect on microorganisms in the surrounding, nutrient-depleted soil. PMID:26579111

  19. iNOS signaling interacts with COX-2 pathway in colonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingting; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-10-01

    COX-2 and iNOS are two major inflammatory mediators implicated in colorectal inflammation and cancer. Previously, the role of colorectal fibroblasts involved in regulation of COX-2 and iNOS expression was largely ignored. In addition, the combined interaction of COX-2 and iNOS signalings and their significance in the progression of colorectal inflammation and cancer within the fibroblasts have received little investigation. To address those issues, we investigated the role of colonic fibroblasts in the regulation of COX-2 and iNOS gene expression, and explored possible mechanisms of interaction between COX-2 and iNOS signalings using a colonic CCD-18Co fibroblast line and LPS, a potential stimulator of COX-2 and iNOS. Our results clearly demonstrated that LPS activated COX-2 gene expression and enhanced PGE(2) production, stimulated iNOS gene expression and promoted NO production in the fibroblasts. Interestingly, activation of COX-2 signaling by LPS was not involved in activation of iNOS signaling, while activation of iNOS signaling by LPS contributed in part to activation of COX-2 signaling. Further analysis indicated that PKC plays a major role in the activation and interaction of COX-2 and iNOS signalings induced by LPS in the fibroblasts.

  20. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in microglia of the developing quail retina.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Ana; Navascués, Julio; Cuadros, Miguel A; Calvente, Ruth; Martín-Oliva, David; Ferrer-Martín, Rosa M; Martín-Estebané, María; Carrasco, María-Carmen; Marín-Teva, José L

    2014-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which produce large amounts of nitric oxide (NO), is induced in macrophages and microglia in response to inflammatory mediators such as LPS and cytokines. Although iNOS is mainly expressed by microglia that become activated in different pathological and experimental situations, it was recently reported that undifferentiated amoeboid microglia can also express iNOS during normal development. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of iNOS expression in microglial cells during normal development and after their activation with LPS by using the quail retina as model. iNOS expression was analyzed by iNOS immunolabeling, western-blot, and RT-PCR. NO production was determined by using DAR-4M AM, a reliable fluorescent indicator of subcellular NO production by iNOS. Embryonic, postnatal, and adult in situ quail retinas were used to analyze the pattern of iNOS expression in microglial cells during normal development. iNOS expression and NO production in LPS-treated microglial cells were investigated by an in vitro approach based on organotypic cultures of E8 retinas, in which microglial cell behavior is similar to that of the in situ retina, as previously demonstrated in our laboratory. We show here that amoeboid microglia in the quail retina express iNOS during normal development. This expression is stronger in microglial cells migrating tangentially in the vitreal part of the retina and is downregulated, albeit maintained, when microglia differentiate and become ramified. LPS treatment of retina explants also induces changes in the morphology of amoeboid microglia compatible with their activation, increasing their lysosomal compartment and upregulating iNOS expression with a concomitant production of NO. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that immature microglial cells express iNOS during normal development, suggesting a certain degree of activation. Furthermore, LPS treatment induces overactivation of amoeboid

  1. Curli mediate bacterial adhesion to fibronectin via tensile multiple bonds

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yoo Jin; Hubauer-Brenner, Michael; Gruber, Hermann J.; Cui, Yidan; Traxler, Lukas; Siligan, Christine; Park, Sungsu; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Many enteric bacteria including pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella strains produce curli fibers that bind to host surfaces, leading to bacterial internalization into host cells. By using a nanomechanical force-sensing approach, we obtained real-time information about the distribution of molecular bonds involved in the adhesion of curliated bacteria to fibronectin. We found that curliated E. coli and fibronectin formed dense quantized and multiple specific bonds with high tensile strength, resulting in tight bacterial binding. Nanomechanical recognition measurements revealed that approximately 10 bonds were disrupted either sequentially or simultaneously under force load. Thus the curli formation of bacterial surfaces leads to multi-bond structural components of fibrous nature, which may explain the strong mechanical binding of curliated bacteria to host cells and unveil the functions of these proteins in bacterial internalization and invasion. PMID:27652888

  2. Curli mediate bacterial adhesion to fibronectin via tensile multiple bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Yoo Jin; Hubauer-Brenner, Michael; Gruber, Hermann J.; Cui, Yidan; Traxler, Lukas; Siligan, Christine; Park, Sungsu; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Many enteric bacteria including pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella strains produce curli fibers that bind to host surfaces, leading to bacterial internalization into host cells. By using a nanomechanical force-sensing approach, we obtained real-time information about the distribution of molecular bonds involved in the adhesion of curliated bacteria to fibronectin. We found that curliated E. coli and fibronectin formed dense quantized and multiple specific bonds with high tensile strength, resulting in tight bacterial binding. Nanomechanical recognition measurements revealed that approximately 10 bonds were disrupted either sequentially or simultaneously under force load. Thus the curli formation of bacterial surfaces leads to multi-bond structural components of fibrous nature, which may explain the strong mechanical binding of curliated bacteria to host cells and unveil the functions of these proteins in bacterial internalization and invasion.

  3. A Common Fold Mediates Vertebrate Defense and Bacterial Attack

    SciTech Connect

    Rosado, Carlos J.; Buckle, Ashley M.; Law, Ruby H.P.; Butcher, Rebecca E.; Kan, Wan-Ting; Bird, Catherina H.; Ung, Kheng; Browne, Kylie A.; Baran, Katherine; Bashtannyk-Puhalovich, Tanya A.; Faux, Noel G.; Wong, Wilson; Porter, Corrine J.; Pike, Robert N.; Ellisdon, Andrew M.; Pearce, Mary C.; Bottomley, Stephen P.; Emsley, Jonas; Smith, A. Ian; Rossjohn, Jamie; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Trapani, Joseph A.; Bird, Phillip I.; Dunstone, Michelle A.; Whisstock, James C.

    2008-10-02

    Proteins containing membrane attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domains play important roles in vertebrate immunity, embryonic development, and neural-cell migration. In vertebrates, the ninth component of complement and perforin form oligomeric pores that lyse bacteria and kill virus-infected cells, respectively. However, the mechanism of MACPF function is unknown. We determined the crystal structure of a bacterial MACPF protein, Plu-MACPF from Photorhabdus luminescens, to 2.0 angstrom resolution. The MACPF domain reveals structural similarity with poreforming cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs) from Gram-positive bacteria. This suggests that lytic MACPF proteins may use a CDC-like mechanism to form pores and disrupt cell membranes. Sequence similarity between bacterial and vertebrate MACPF domains suggests that the fold of the CDCs, a family of proteins important for bacterial pathogenesis, is probably used by vertebrates for defense against infection.

  4. TAL effector-mediated susceptibility to bacterial blight of cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial blight of cotton (BBC) caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. malvacearum (Xcm) is a destructive disease that has recently re-emerged in the U.S. Xcm injects transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors that directly induce the expression of host susceptibility (S) or resistance (R) genes. ...

  5. Receptors, Mediators, and Mechanisms Involved in Bacterial Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Van Amersfoort, Edwin S.; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Kuiper, Johan

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis and septic shock result from the overproduction of inflammatory mediators as a consequence of the interaction of the immune system with bacteria and bacterial wall constituents in the body. Bacterial cell wall constituents such as lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycans, and lipoteichoic acid are particularly responsible for the deleterious effects of bacteria. These constituents interact in the body with a large number of proteins and receptors, and this interaction determines the eventual inflammatory effect of the compounds. Within the circulation bacterial constituents interact with proteins such as plasma lipoproteins and lipopolysaccharide binding protein. The interaction of the bacterial constituents with receptors on the surface of mononuclear cells is mainly responsible for the induction of proinflammatory mediators by the bacterial constituents. The role of individual receptors such as the toll-like receptors and CD14 in the induction of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules is discussed in detail. In addition, the roles of a number of other receptors that bind bacterial compounds such as scavenger receptors and their modulating role in inflammation are described. Finally, the therapies for the treatment of bacterial sepsis and septic shock are discussed in relation to the action of the aforementioned receptors and proteins. PMID:12857774

  6. Inhibition of Rho protein stimulates iNOS expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Muniyappa, R; Xu, R; Ram, J L; Sowers, J R

    2000-06-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is upregulated in arterial injury and plays a role in regulating VSMC proliferation and restenosis. Inflammatory cytokines [e.g., interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)] released during vascular injury induce iNOS. Small GTP-binding proteins of the Ras superfamily play a major role in IL-1beta-dependent signaling pathways. In this study, we examined the role of Rho GTPases in regulating iNOS expression in VSMCs. Treatment of VSMCs with mevastatin, which inhibits isoprenylation of Rho and other small GTP-binding proteins, produced significantly higher amounts of IL-1beta-evoked NO and iNOS protein compared with control. Similarly, bacterial toxins [Toxin B from Clostridium difficile and C3 ADP-ribosyl transferase (C3) toxin from Clostridium botulinium] that specifically inactivate Rho proteins increased NOS products (NO and citrulline) and iNOS expression. Toxin B increased the activity of iNOS promoter-reporter construct in VSMCs. Both toxins enhanced IL-1beta-stimulated iNOS expression and NO production. These data demonstrate for the first time that inhibition of Rho induces iNOS and suggest a role for Rho protein in IL-1beta-stimulated NO production in VSMCs.

  7. Bacteriocin-Mediated Competitive Interactions of Bacterial Populations and Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Margaret A.

    Explaining the coexistence of competing species is a major challenge in community ecology. In bacterial systems, competition is often driven by the production of bacteriocins; narrow spectrum proteinaceous toxins that serve to kill closely related species providing the producer better access to limited resources. Bacteriocin producers have been shown to competitively exclude sensitive, nonproducing strains. However, the interaction dynamics between bacteriocin producers, each lethal to its competitor, are largely unknown. Several recent studies have revealed some of the complexity of these interactions, employing a suite of in vitro, in vivo, and in silico bacterial model systems. This chapter describes the current state of knowledge regarding the population and community ecology of this potent family of toxins.

  8. Bacterial mediation, red matrices diagenesis, Devonian, Montagne Noire (southern France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Préat, Alain; Mamet, Bernard; Bernard, Alain; Gillan, David

    1999-07-01

    Two Devonian red carbonate rock sections are studied in the Montagne Noire, at Coumiac (Frasnian/Famennian) and at the Pic de Vissou (Eifelian/Givetian). The sediments are grey-red mudstones and wackestones rich in pelagic fossils. They are characteristic of an outer ramp. The Coumiac sequence is condensed with numerous hardgrounds and hiatuses. The Pic de Vissou succession is more complete and of shallower origin. In both cases, the origin of the red coloration of the micritic matrix is probably linked to bacterial activity which produced submicronic hematite. Both iron and manganese concentrations are low (average 0.2%). Bacteria form ferruginous microstromatolites, blisters, microtufts, `hedgehogs' filling sponge perforations and thin continuous mineralized films (probably biofilms). Hardgrounds are underlined by ferruginous microstromatolites. The origin of the matrix color is probably related to the destruction of these bacterial constructions, the submicronic hematite ultimately coating the crystal faces of the calcite mosaic. During early lithification, microfissures appeared and were invaded by microbial colonies. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that these colonies are composed of spheroidal beads. This suggests continuity of the bacterial activity during early diagenesis. Later on, these early fissures were cut by burrows. Subsequently a secondary fissure network transected all the previously mentioned sedimentary structures. This late fissure network is characterized by diagenetically remobilized hematite and/or calcite. The latest alterations are stylolites and ultimate tectonic fractures.

  9. A simple and novel modification of comet assay for determination of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Krishna; Sanmukh, Swapnil; Chandekar, Rajshree; Paunikar, Waman

    2014-07-01

    The comet assay is the widely used method for in vitro toxicity testing which is also an alternative to the use of animal models for in vivo testing. Since, its inception in 1984 by Ostling and Johansson, it is being modified frequently for a wide range of application. In spite of its wide applicability, unfortunately there is no report of its application in bacteriophages research. In this study, a novel application of comet assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis was described. The conventional methods in bacteriophage research for studying bacterial lysis by bacteriophages are plaque assay method. It is time consuming, laborious and costly. The lytic activity of bacteriophage devours the bacterial cell which results in the release of bacterial genomic material that gets detected by ethidium bromide staining method by the comet assay protocol. The objective of this study was to compare efficacy of comet assay with different assay used to study phage mediated bacterial lysis. The assay was performed on culture isolates (N=80 studies), modified comet assay appear to have relatively higher sensitivity and specificity than other assay. The results of the study showed that the application of comet assay can be an economical, time saving and less laborious alternative to conventional plaque assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

  10. Direct detection of various pathogens by loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays on bacterial culture and bacterial colony.

    PubMed

    Yan, Muxia; Li, Weidong; Zhou, Zhenwen; Peng, Hongxia; Luo, Ziyan; Xu, Ling

    2017-01-01

    In this work, loop-mediated isothermal amplification based detection assay using bacterial culture and bacterial colony for various common pathogens direct detection had been established, evaluated and further applied. A total of five species of common pathogens and nine detection targets (tlh, tdh and trh for V. Parahaemolyticus, rfbE, stx1 and stx2 for E. coli, oprI for P. aeruginosa, invA for Salmonella and hylA for L. monocytogenes) were performed on bacterial culture and bacterial colony LAMP. To evaluate and optimize this assay, a total of 116 standard strains were included. Then, for each detected targets, 20 random selected strains were applied. Results were determined through both visual observation of the changed color by naked eye and electrophoresis, which increased the accuracy of survey. The minimum adding quantity of each primer had been confirmed, and the optimal amplification was obtained under 65 °C for 45 min with 25 μl reaction volume. The detection limit of bacterial culture LAMP and PCR assay were determined to be 10(2) and 10(4) or 10(5) CFU/reaction, respectively. No false positive amplification was observed when subjecting the bacterial -LAMP assay to 116 reference strains. This was the first report of colony-LAMP and culture-LAMP assay, which had been demonstrated to be a fast, reliable, cost-effective and simple method on detection of various common pathogens.

  11. Surface Proteoglycans as Mediators in Bacterial Pathogens Infections

    PubMed Central

    García, Beatriz; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Martin, Carla; Alcalde, Ignacio; Quirós, Luis M.; Vazquez, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases remain an important global health problem. The interaction of a wide range of pathogen bacteria with host cells from many different tissues is frequently mediated by proteoglycans. These compounds are ubiquitous complex molecules which are not only involved in adherence and colonization, but can also participate in other steps of pathogenesis. To overcome the problem of microbial resistance to antibiotics new therapeutic agents could be developed based on the characteristics of the interaction of pathogens with proteoglycans. PMID:26941735

  12. Host plant species determines symbiotic bacterial community mediating suppression of plant defenses.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seung Ho; Scully, Erin D; Peiffer, Michelle; Geib, Scott M; Rosa, Cristina; Hoover, Kelli; Felton, Gary W

    2017-01-03

    Herbivore associated bacteria are vital mediators of plant and insect interactions. Host plants play an important role in shaping the gut bacterial community of insects. Colorado potato beetles (CPB; Leptinotarsa decemlineata) use several Solanum plants as hosts in their natural environment. We previously showed that symbiotic gut bacteria from CPB larvae suppressed jasmonate (JA)-induced defenses in tomato. However, little is known about how changes in the bacterial community may be involved in the manipulation of induced defenses in wild and cultivated Solanum plants of CPB. Here, we examined suppression of JA-mediated defense in wild and cultivated hosts of CPB by chemical elicitors and their symbiotic bacteria. Furthermore, we investigated associations between the gut bacterial community and suppression of plant defenses using 16 S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Symbiotic bacteria decreased plant defenses in all Solanum hosts and there were different gut bacterial communities in CPB fed on different host plants. When larvae were reared on different hosts, defense suppression differed among host plants. These results demonstrate that host plants influence herbivore gut bacterial communities and consequently affect the herbivore's ability to manipulate JA-mediated plant defenses. Thus, the presence of symbiotic bacteria that suppress plant defenses might help CPB adapt to host plants.

  13. Host plant species determines symbiotic bacterial community mediating suppression of plant defenses

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Seung Ho; Scully, Erin D.; Peiffer, Michelle; Geib, Scott M.; Rosa, Cristina; Hoover, Kelli; Felton, Gary W.

    2017-01-01

    Herbivore associated bacteria are vital mediators of plant and insect interactions. Host plants play an important role in shaping the gut bacterial community of insects. Colorado potato beetles (CPB; Leptinotarsa decemlineata) use several Solanum plants as hosts in their natural environment. We previously showed that symbiotic gut bacteria from CPB larvae suppressed jasmonate (JA)-induced defenses in tomato. However, little is known about how changes in the bacterial community may be involved in the manipulation of induced defenses in wild and cultivated Solanum plants of CPB. Here, we examined suppression of JA-mediated defense in wild and cultivated hosts of CPB by chemical elicitors and their symbiotic bacteria. Furthermore, we investigated associations between the gut bacterial community and suppression of plant defenses using 16 S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Symbiotic bacteria decreased plant defenses in all Solanum hosts and there were different gut bacterial communities in CPB fed on different host plants. When larvae were reared on different hosts, defense suppression differed among host plants. These results demonstrate that host plants influence herbivore gut bacterial communities and consequently affect the herbivore’s ability to manipulate JA-mediated plant defenses. Thus, the presence of symbiotic bacteria that suppress plant defenses might help CPB adapt to host plants. PMID:28045052

  14. Host plant species determines symbiotic bacterial community mediating suppression of plant defenses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbivore associated bacteria are vital mediators of plant and insect interactions. Host plants play an important role in shaping the gut bacterial community of insects. Colorado potato beetles (CPB; Leptinotarsa decemlineata) use several Solanum plants as hosts in their natural environment. We prev...

  15. The INO2 and INO4 loci of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are pleiotropic regulatory genes.

    PubMed Central

    Loewy, B S; Henry, S A

    1984-01-01

    We isolated a mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae defective in the formation of phosphatidylcholine via methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine. The mutant synthesized phosphatidylcholine at a reduced rate and accumulated increased amounts of methylated phospholipid intermediates. It was also found to be auxotrophic for inositol and allelic to an existing series of ino4 mutants. The ino2 and ino4 mutants, originally isolated on the basis of an inositol requirement, are unable to derepress the cytoplasmic enzyme inositol-1-phosphate synthase (myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase; EC 5.5.1.4). The INO4 and INO2 genes were, thus, previously identified as regulatory genes whose wild-type product is required for expression of the INO1 gene product inositol-1-phosphate synthase (T. Donahue and S. Henry, J. Biol. Chem. 256:7077-7085, 1981). In addition to the identification of a new ino4-allele, further characterization of the existing series of ino4 and ino2 mutants, reported here, demonstrated that they all have a reduced capacity to convert phosphatidylethanolamine to phosphatidylcholine. The pleiotropic phenotype of the ino2 and ino4 mutants described in this paper suggests that the INO2 and INO4 loci are involved in the regulation of phospholipid methylation in the membrane as well as inositol biosynthesis in the cytoplasm. Images PMID:6392853

  16. Methylene Blue Attenuates iNOS Induction Through Suppression of Transcriptional Factor Binding Amid iNOS mRNA Transcription.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Tong, Lijuan; Lu, Xu; Wang, Jia; Yao, Wenjuan; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) critically contributes to the development of endotoxin-mediated inflammation. It can be induced by cytokines or endotoxins via distinct signaling pathways. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggers iNOS expression through activation of the inhibitor of κB-α (IκB-α)-nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) cascade, whereas interferon-γ (IFN-γ) acts primarily through Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). Methylene blue (MB), an agent used clinically to treat numerous ailments, has been shown to reduce NO accumulation through suppression of iNOS activity. But it remains unclear whether MB affects iNOS induction. This knowledge gap is addressed in the present study using cultured cells and endotoxemic mice. With mouse macrophages, MB treatment prevented the LPS- and/or IFN-γ-stimulated iNOS protein expression. Real-time PCR experiments showed that iNOS mRNA transcription was robustly blocked by MB treatment. The inhibitory effect of MB on iNOS expression was confirmed in vivo in endotoxemic mice. Further analysis showed that MB had no significant effect on IκB-α degradation and NF-κB or STAT1 phosphorylation in LPS/IFN-γ-stimulated cells. The nuclear transport of active NF-κB or STAT1 was also not affected by MB treatment. But MB treatment markedly reduced the binding of NF-κB and STAT1 to their DNA elements. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that MB reduced NF-κB and STAT1 bindings to iNOS promoter inside the cell. These studies show that MB attenuates transcriptional factor binding amid iNOS mRNA transcription, providing further insight into the molecular mechanism of MB in disease therapy.

  17. Epidemiology of bacterial toxin-mediated foodborne gastroenteritis outbreaks in Australia, 2001 to 2013.

    PubMed

    May, Fiona J; Polkinghorne, Benjamin G; Fearnley, Emily J

    2016-12-24

    Bacterial toxin-mediated foodborne outbreaks, such as those caused by Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus, are an important and preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Due to the short incubation period and duration of illness, these outbreaks are often under-reported. This is the first study to describe the epidemiology of bacterial toxin-mediated outbreaks in Australia. Using data collected between 2001 and 2013, we identify high risk groups and risk factors to inform prevention measures. Descriptive analyses of confirmed bacterial toxin-mediated outbreaks between 2001 and 2013 were undertaken using data extracted from the OzFoodNet Outbreak Register, a database of all outbreaks of gastrointestinal disease investigated by public health authorities in Australia. A total of 107 laboratory confirmed bacterial toxin-mediated outbreaks were reported between 2001 and 2013, affecting 2,219 people, including 47 hospitalisations and 13 deaths. Twelve deaths occurred in residents of aged care facilities. Clostridium perfringens was the most commonly reported aetiological agent (81 outbreaks, 76%). The most commonly reported food preparation settings were commercial food preparation services (51 outbreaks, 48%) and aged care facilities (42 outbreaks, 39%). Bacterial toxin outbreaks were rarely associated with food preparation in the home (2 outbreaks, 2%). In all outbreaks, the primary factor contributing to the outbreak was inadequate temperature control of the food. Public health efforts aimed at improving storage and handling practices for pre-cooked and re-heated foods, especially in commercial food preparation services and aged care facilities, could help to reduce the magnitude of bacterial toxin outbreaks.

  18. Bacterially Mediated Breakdown of Cinnabar and Metacinnabar and Environmental Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jew, A. D.; Rogers, S. B.; Rytuba, J.; Spormann, A. M.; Brown, G. E.

    2006-12-01

    Mercury in the forms of cinnabar (α-HgS) and metacinnabar (β-HgS) is considered by the EPA to be unreactive and of little environmental concern because of their relatively low solubilities. To determine if this current belief is valid, a consortium of bacteria (including a Thiomonas intermedia-like bacterium) was taken from the acid mine drainage (AMD) pond at the New Idria Hg Mine, San Benito Co., CA, and inoculated into filter-sterilized AMD pond water containing either ground cinnabar or metacinnabar crystals (<45μm in diameter), with sampling occurring approximately every 3 days. Under aerobic conditions the samples showed a pronounced increase in aqueous Hg concentration over background water concentrations (390(±20)ng/L). Bacteria growing on α-HgS increased the Hg concentration to 297(±10)μg/L, while bacteria growing on β-HgS resulted in levels of 4.6(±0.2)mg/L; both maxima occurred at 18 days incubation. Experiments conducted with (1) α-HgS or β-HgS in the presence of killed bacteria (anaerobic), (2) α-HgS with pond water (abiotic), and (3) β-HgS with pond water (abiotic) showed drops in aqueous Hg to below the detection limit (0.1ng/L) within 12 days. Anaerobic growth of the bacterial consortium showed a pattern similar to those of the water and HgS experiments, except that Hg levels dropped below detection limit within 6 days. These combined results suggest that HgS degradation by this bacterial consortium is an aerobic process. Killed bacteria incubated aerobically showed a slight increase in Hg levels over background water levels (<10x increase) then dropped below detection limit. This observation suggests that enzymes might be involved in the dissolution of HgS and were still viable for ~6 days after sterilization. The New Idria AMD pond consists of an inlet stream and an outlet pipe, separated from each other by ~3m. The Hg concentration in the ferrihydrite-rich sediments at the inlet is 37mg/kg, dry weight, while the concentration at the

  19. Impact of flow on ligand-mediated bacterial flocculation

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, Sarthok; Bortz, David M.

    2013-01-01

    To understand the adhesion-fragmentation dynamics of bacterial aggregates (i.e., flocs), we model the aggregates as two ligand-covered rigid spheres. We develop and investigate a model for the attachment/detachment dynamics in a fluid subject to a homogeneous planar shear-flow. The binding ligands on the surface of the flocs experience attractive and repulsive surface forces in an ionic medium and exhibit finite resistance to rotation (via bond tilting). For certain range of material and fluid parameters, our results predict a nonlinear or hysteretic relationship between the binding/unbinding of the floc surface and the net floc velocity (translational plus rotational velocity). We show that the surface adhesion is promoted by increased fluid flow until a critical value, beyond which the bonds starts to yield. Moreover, adhesion is not promoted in a medium with low ionic strength, or flocs with bigger size or higher binder stiffness. The numerical simulations of floc-aggregate number density studies support these findings. PMID:23917245

  20. Sulfur-mediated electron shuttling during bacterial iron reduction.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Theodore M; O'Loughlin, Edward J; Mishra, Bhoopesh; DiChristina, Thomas J; Kemner, Kenneth M

    2014-05-30

    Microbial reduction of ferric iron [Fe(III)] is an important biogeochemical process in anoxic aquifers. Depending on groundwater pH, dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria can also respire alternative electron acceptors to survive, including elemental sulfur (S(0)). To understand the interplay of Fe/S cycling under alkaline conditions, we combined thermodynamic geochemical modeling with bioreactor experiments using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Under these conditions, S. oneidensis can enzymatically reduce S(0) but not goethite (α-FeOOH). The HS(-) produced subsequently reduces goethite abiotically. Because of the prevalence of alkaline conditions in many aquifers, Fe(III) reduction may thus proceed via S(0)-mediated electron-shuttling pathways.

  1. Host-induced bacterial cell wall decomposition mediates pattern-triggered immunity in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaokun; Grabherr, Heini M; Willmann, Roland; Kolb, Dagmar; Brunner, Frédéric; Bertsche, Ute; Kühner, Daniel; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Amin, Bushra; Felix, Georg; Ongena, Marc; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Gust, Andrea A

    2014-01-01

    Peptidoglycans (PGNs) are immunogenic bacterial surface patterns that trigger immune activation in metazoans and plants. It is generally unknown how complex bacterial structures such as PGNs are perceived by plant pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and whether host hydrolytic activities facilitate decomposition of bacterial matrices and generation of soluble PRR ligands. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana, upon bacterial infection or exposure to microbial patterns, produces a metazoan lysozyme-like hydrolase (lysozyme 1, LYS1). LYS1 activity releases soluble PGN fragments from insoluble bacterial cell walls and cleavage products are able to trigger responses typically associated with plant immunity. Importantly, LYS1 mutant genotypes exhibit super-susceptibility to bacterial infections similar to that observed on PGN receptor mutants. We propose that plants employ hydrolytic activities for the decomposition of complex bacterial structures, and that soluble pattern generation might aid PRR-mediated immune activation in cell layers adjacent to infection sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01990.001 PMID:24957336

  2. Hepcidin-mediated iron sequestration protects against bacterial dissemination during pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Kathryn R.; Zhang, Zhimin; Bettina, Alexandra M.; Cagnina, R. Elaine; Stefanova, Debora; Burdick, Marie D.; Vaulont, Sophie; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2017-01-01

    Gram-negative pneumonia is a dangerous illness, and bacterial dissemination to the bloodstream during the infection is strongly associated with death. Antibiotic resistance among the causative pathogens has resulted in diminishing treatment options against this infection. Hepcidin is the master regulator of extracellular iron availability in vertebrates, but its role in the context of host defense is undefined. We hypothesized that hepcidin-mediated depletion of extracellular iron during Gram-negative pneumonia protects the host by limiting dissemination of bacteria to the bloodstream. During experimental pneumonia, hepcidin was induced in the liver in an IL-6–dependent manner and mediated a rapid decline in plasma iron. In contrast, hepcidin-deficient mice developed a paradoxical increase in plasma iron during infection associated with profound susceptibility to bacteremia. Incubation of bacteria with iron-supplemented plasma enhanced bacterial growth in vitro, and systemic administration of iron to WT mice similarly promoted increased susceptibility to bloodstream infection. Finally, treatment with a hepcidin analogue restored hypoferremia in hepcidin-deficient hosts, mediated bacterial control, and improved outcomes. These data show hepcidin induction during pneumonia to be essential to preventing bacterial dissemination by limiting extracellular iron availability. Hepcidin agonists may represent an effective therapy for Gram-negative infections in patients with impaired hepcidin production or signaling. PMID:28352667

  3. Resolution of experimental lung injury by Monocyte-derived inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessio, Franco R.; Tsushima, Kenji; Aggarwal, Neil R.; Mock, Jason R.; Eto, Yoshiki; Garibaldi, Brian T.; Files, Daniel C.; Avalos, Claudia R.; Rodriguez, Jackie V.; Waickman, Adam T.; Reddy, Sekhar P.; Pearse, David B.; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K.; Hassoun, Paul M.; Crow, Michael T.; King, Landon S.

    2012-01-01

    While early events in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) have been defined, little is known about mechanisms mediating resolution. To search for determinants of resolution, we exposed wild type (WT) mice to intratracheal lipopolysacaccharide (i.t. LPS) and assessed the response at intervals to day 10, when injury had resolved. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was significantly upregulated in the lung at day 4 after LPS. When iNOS−/− mice were exposed to i.t. LPS, early lung injury was attenuated, however recovery was markedly impaired compared to wild type (WT) mice. iNOS−/− mice had increased mortality and sustained increases in markers of lung injury. Adoptive transfer of WT (iNOS+/+) bone marrow-derived monocytes or direct adenoviral gene delivery of iNOS into injured iNOS−/− mice restored resolution of ALI. Irradiated bone marrow chimeras confirmed the protective effects of myeloid-derived iNOS, but not of epithelial iNOS. Alveolar macrophages exhibited sustained expression of co-signalling molecule CD86 in iNOS−/− mice compared to WT mice. Antibody-mediated blockade of CD86 in iNOS−/− mice improved survival and enhanced resolution of lung inflammation. Our findings show that monocyte-derived iNOS plays a pivotal role in mediating resolution of ALI by modulating lung immune responses, thus facilitating clearance of alveolar inflammation and promoting lung repair. PMID:22844117

  4. Hydrogen Peroxide- and Nitric Oxide-mediated Disease Control of Bacterial Wilt in Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Kang, Su Ran; Kim, Yeon Hwa; Yoon, Dong June; Kim, Do Hoon; Kim, Hyeon Ji; Sung, Chang Hyun; Kang, Han Sol; Choi, Chang Won; Kim, Seong Hwan; Kim, Young Shik

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in tomato plants by Ralstonia solanacearum infection and the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide in tomato bacterial wilt control were demonstrated. During disease development of tomato bacterial wilt, accumulation of superoxide anion (O2−) and H2O2 was observed and lipid peroxidation also occurred in the tomato leaf tissues. High doses of H2O2and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) nitric oxide donor showed phytotoxicity to detached tomato leaves 1 day after petiole feeding showing reduced fresh weight. Both H2O2and SNP have in vitro antibacterial activities against R. solanacearum in a dose-dependent manner, as well as plant protection in detached tomato leaves against bacterial wilt by 106 and 107 cfu/ml of R. solanacearum. H2O2- and SNP-mediated protection was also evaluated in pots using soil-drench treatment with the bacterial inoculation, and relative ‘area under the disease progressive curve (AUDPC)’ was calculated to compare disease protection by H2O2 and/or SNP with untreated control. Neither H2O2 nor SNP protect the tomato seedlings from the bacterial wilt, but H2O2+ SNP mixture significantly decreased disease severity with reduced relative AUDPC. These results suggest that H2O2 and SNP could be used together to control bacterial wilt in tomato plants as bactericidal agents. PMID:25288967

  5. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  6. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A.; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  7. The LysM receptor kinase CERK1 mediates bacterial perception in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; Ntoukakis, Vardis

    2009-01-01

    Plants use pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to perceive pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMPs) and initiate defence responses. PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) plays an important role in general resistance, and constrains the growth of most microbes on plants. Despite the importance of PRRs in plant immunity, the vast majority of them remain to be identified. We recently showed that the Arabidopsis LysM receptor kinase CERK1 is required not only for chitin signalling and fungal resistance, but plays an essential role in restricting bacterial growth on plants. We proposed that CERK1 may mediate the perception of a bacterial PAMP, or an endogenous plant cell wall component released during infection, through its extracellular carbohydrate-binding LysM-motifs. Here we report reduced activation of a PAMP-induced defence response on plants lacking the CERK1 gene after treatment with crude bacterial extracts. This demonstrates that CERK1 mediates perception of an unknown bacterial PAMP in Arabidopsis. PMID:19816132

  8. Multiscale modeling of bacterial colonies: how pili mediate the dynamics of single cells and cellular aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pönisch, Wolfram; Weber, Christoph A.; Juckeland, Guido; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2017-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the causative agent of one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, gonorrhea. Over the past two decades there has been an alarming increase of reported gonorrhea cases where the bacteria were resistant to the most commonly used antibiotics thus prompting for alternative antimicrobial treatment strategies. The crucial step in this and many other bacterial infections is the formation of microcolonies, agglomerates consisting of up to several thousands of cells. The attachment and motility of cells on solid substrates as well as the cell-cell interactions are primarily mediated by type IV pili, long polymeric filaments protruding from the surface of cells. While the crucial role of pili in the assembly of microcolonies has been well recognized, the exact mechanisms of how they govern the formation and dynamics of microcolonies are still poorly understood. Here, we present a computational model of individual cells with explicit pili dynamics, force generation and pili-pili interactions. We employ the model to study a wide range of biological processes, such as the motility of individual cells on a surface, the heterogeneous cell motility within the large cell aggregates, and the merging dynamics and the self-assembly of microcolonies. The results of numerical simulations highlight the central role of pili generated forces in the formation of bacterial colonies and are in agreement with the available experimental observations. The model can quantify the behavior of multicellular bacterial colonies on biologically relevant temporal and spatial scales and can be easily adjusted to include the geometry and pili characteristics of various bacterial species. Ultimately, the combination of the microbiological experimental approach with the in silico model of bacterial colonies might provide new qualitative and quantitative insights on the development of bacterial infections and thus pave the way to new antimicrobial treatments.

  9. Advantages of mixing bioinformatics and visualization approaches for analyzing sRNA-mediated regulatory bacterial networks

    PubMed Central

    Bourqui, Romain; Benchimol, William; Gaspin, Christine; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Uricaru, Raluca; Dutour, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The revolution in high-throughput sequencing technologies has enabled the acquisition of gigabytes of RNA sequences in many different conditions and has highlighted an unexpected number of small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria. Ongoing exploitation of these data enables numerous applications for investigating bacterial transacting sRNA-mediated regulation networks. Focusing on sRNAs that regulate mRNA translation in trans, recent works have noted several sRNA-based regulatory pathways that are essential for key cellular processes. Although the number of known bacterial sRNAs is increasing, the experimental validation of their interactions with mRNA targets remains challenging and involves expensive and time-consuming experimental strategies. Hence, bioinformatics is crucial for selecting and prioritizing candidates before designing any experimental work. However, current software for target prediction produces a prohibitive number of candidates because of the lack of biological knowledge regarding the rules governing sRNA–mRNA interactions. Therefore, there is a real need to develop new approaches to help biologists focus on the most promising predicted sRNA–mRNA interactions. In this perspective, this review aims at presenting the advantages of mixing bioinformatics and visualization approaches for analyzing predicted sRNA-mediated regulatory bacterial networks. PMID:25477348

  10. The trafficking of bacterial type rhodopsins into the Chlamydomonas eyespot and flagella is IFT mediated.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Mayanka; Ranjan, Peeyush; Sharma, Komal; Veetil, Sindhu Kandoth; Kateriya, Suneel

    2016-10-03

    The bacterial type rhodopsins are present in all the three domains of life. In contrast to the animal type rhodopsin that performs mainly sensory functions in higher eukaryotes, the bacterial type rhodopsin could function as ion channel, pumps and as sensory proteins. The functioning of rhodopsin in higher eukaryotes requires the transport of rhodopsin from its site of synthesis to the ciliated outer segment of the photoreceptive cells. However, the trafficking of bacterial type rhodopsin from its site of synthesis to the position of action is not characterized. Here we present the first report for the existence of an IFT-interactome mediated trafficking of the bacterial type rhodopsins into eyespot and flagella of the Chlamydomonas. We show that there is a light-dependent, dynamic localization of rhodopsins between flagella and eyespot of Chlamydomonas. The involvement of IFT components in the rhodopsin trafficking was elucidated by the use of conditional IFT mutants. We found that rhodopsin can be co-immunoprecipitated with the components of IFT machinery and with other protein components required for the IFT-cargo complex formation. These findings show that light-regulated localization of rhodopsin is not restricted to animals thereby suggesting that rhodopsin trafficking is an IFT dependent ancient process.

  11. The trafficking of bacterial type rhodopsins into the Chlamydomonas eyespot and flagella is IFT mediated

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Mayanka; Ranjan, Peeyush; Sharma, Komal; Veetil, Sindhu Kandoth; Kateriya, Suneel

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial type rhodopsins are present in all the three domains of life. In contrast to the animal type rhodopsin that performs mainly sensory functions in higher eukaryotes, the bacterial type rhodopsin could function as ion channel, pumps and as sensory proteins. The functioning of rhodopsin in higher eukaryotes requires the transport of rhodopsin from its site of synthesis to the ciliated outer segment of the photoreceptive cells. However, the trafficking of bacterial type rhodopsin from its site of synthesis to the position of action is not characterized. Here we present the first report for the existence of an IFT-interactome mediated trafficking of the bacterial type rhodopsins into eyespot and flagella of the Chlamydomonas. We show that there is a light-dependent, dynamic localization of rhodopsins between flagella and eyespot of Chlamydomonas. The involvement of IFT components in the rhodopsin trafficking was elucidated by the use of conditional IFT mutants. We found that rhodopsin can be co-immunoprecipitated with the components of IFT machinery and with other protein components required for the IFT-cargo complex formation. These findings show that light-regulated localization of rhodopsin is not restricted to animals thereby suggesting that rhodopsin trafficking is an IFT dependent ancient process. PMID:27694882

  12. Effect of viral and bacterial pneumonias on cell-mediated immunity in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Kauffman, C A; Linnemann, C C; Schiff, G M; Phair, J P

    1976-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was assessed during infection and after convalescence in 12 patients with influenza pneumonia and 10 patients with bacterial pneumonia. The patients with influenza pneumonia had a marked impairment of skin test reactivity, and their lymphocytes showed a diminished response to phytohemagglutinin and streptokinase-streptodornase stimulation in vitro. Suppression of CMI was related to the severity of the pneumonia. Patients with bacterial pneumonia showed as great a suppression of the response to phytohemagglutinin and streptokinase-streptodornase as the patients with viral pneumonia. All parameters of CMI returned to normal in both groups after convalescence. The depression of CMI could not be related to a decrease in the number of thymus-derived lymphocytes or to serum-suppressive factors in these patients. PMID:1082445

  13. The methyltransferase Setdb2 mediates virus-induced susceptibility to bacterial superinfection

    PubMed Central

    Schliehe, Christopher; Swaminanthan, Savitha; Bosnjak, Berislav; Bauer, Lisa; Kandasamy, Richard K.; Griesshammer, Isabel M.; Kosack, Lindsay; Schmitz, Frank; Litvak, Vladimir; Sissons, James; Lercher, Alexander; Bhattacharya, Anannya; Khamina, Kseniya; Trivett, Anna L.; Tessarollo, Lino; Mesteri, Ildiko; Hladik, Anastasiya; Merkler, Doron; Kubicek, Stefan; Knapp, Sylvia; Epstein, Michelle M.; Bergthaler, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Immune responses are tightly regulated to ensure efficient pathogen clearance while avoiding tissue damage. Here we report that SET domain bifurcated 2 (Setdb2) was the only protein lysine methyltransferase induced during influenza virus infection. Setdb2 expression depended on type-I interferon signaling and it repressed the expression of the neutrophil attractant Cxcl1 and other NF-κB target genes. This coincided with Setdb2 occupancy at the Cxcl1 promoter, which in the absence of Setdb2 displayed reduced H3K9 tri-methylation. Setdb2 hypomorphic gene-trap mice exhibited increased neutrophil infiltration in sterile lung inflammation and were less sensitive to bacterial superinfection upon influenza virus infection. This suggests that a Setdb2-mediated regulatory crosstalk between the type-I interferon and NF-κB pathways represents an important mechanism for virus-induced susceptibility to bacterial superinfection. PMID:25419628

  14. Characterization of a large human transgene following invasin-mediated delivery in a bacterial artificial chromosome.

    PubMed

    Gillen, Austin E; Lucas, Catherine A; Haussecker, Pei Ling; Kosak, Steven T; Harris, Ann

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are widely used in transgenesis, particularly for the humanization of animal models. Moreover, due to their extensive capacity, BACs provide attractive tools to study distal regulatory elements associated with large gene loci. However, despite their widespread use, little is known about the integration dynamics of these large transgenes in mammalian cells. Here, we investigate the post-integration structure of a ~260 kb BAC carrying the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) locus following delivery by bacterial invasion and compare this to the outcome of a more routine lipid-based delivery method. We find substantial variability in integrated copy number and expression levels of the BAC CFTR transgene after bacterial invasion-mediated delivery. Furthermore, we frequently observed variation in the representation of different regions of the CFTR transgene within individual cell clones, indicative of BAC fragmentation. Finally, using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we observed that the integrated BAC forms extended megabase-scale structures in some clones that are apparently stably maintained at cell division. These data demonstrate that the utility of large BACs to investigate cis-regulatory elements in the genomic context may be limited by recombination events that complicate their use.

  15. Environmental changes affect the assembly of soil bacterial community primarily by mediating stochastic processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ximei; Johnston, Eric R; Liu, Wei; Li, Linghao; Han, Xingguo

    2016-01-01

    Both 'species fitness difference'-based deterministic processes, such as competitive exclusion and environmental filtering, and 'species fitness difference'-independent stochastic processes, such as birth/death and dispersal/colonization, can influence the assembly of soil microbial communities. However, how both types of processes are mediated by anthropogenic environmental changes has rarely been explored. Here we report a novel and general pattern that almost all anthropogenic environmental changes that took place in a grassland ecosystem affected soil bacterial community assembly primarily through promoting or restraining stochastic processes. We performed four experiments mimicking 16 types of environmental changes and separated the compositional variation of soil bacterial communities caused by each environmental change into deterministic and stochastic components, with a recently developed method. Briefly, because the difference between control and treatment communities is primarily caused by deterministic processes, the deterministic change was quantified as (mean compositional variation between treatment and control) - (mean compositional variation within control). The difference among replicate treatment communities is primarily caused by stochastic processes, so the stochastic change was estimated as (mean compositional variation within treatment) - (mean compositional variation within control). The absolute of the stochastic change was greater than that of the deterministic change across almost all environmental changes, which was robust for both taxonomic and functional-based criterion. Although the deterministic change may become more important as environmental changes last longer, our findings showed that changes usually occurred through mediating stochastic processes over 5 years, challenging the traditional determinism-dominated view.

  16. Exposure to diesel exhaust up-regulates iNOS expression in ApoE knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Ni; Kido, Takashi; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Kaufman, Joel D.; Rosenfeld, Michael E.; Breemen, Cornelis van; Eeden, Stephan F. van

    2011-09-01

    Traffic related particulate matter air pollution is a risk factor for cardiovascular events; however, the biological mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that diesel exhaust (DE) inhalation induces up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which is known to contribute to vascular dysfunction, progression of atherosclerosis and ultimately cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Methods: ApoE knockout mice (30-week) were exposed to DE (at 200 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of particulate matter) or filtered-air (control) for 7 weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). iNOS expression in the blood vessels and heart was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting analysis. To examine iNOS activity, thoracic aortae were mounted in a wire myograph, and vasoconstriction stimulated by phenylephrine (PE) was measured with and without the presence of the specific inhibitor for iNOS (1400 W). NF-{kappa}B (p65) activity was examined by ELISA. The mRNA expression of iNOS and NF-{kappa}B (p65) was determined by real-time PCR. Results: DE exposure significantly enhanced iNOS expression in the thoracic aorta (4-fold) and heart (1.5 fold). DE exposure significantly attenuated PE-stimulated vasoconstriction by {approx} 20%, which was partly reversed by 1400 W. The mRNA expression of iNOS and NF-{kappa}B was significantly augmented after DE exposure. NF-{kappa}B activity was enhanced 2-fold after DE inhalation, and the augmented NF-{kappa}B activity was positively correlated with iNOS expression (R{sup 2} = 0.5998). Conclusions: We show that exposure to DE increases iNOS expression and activity possibly via NF-{kappa}B-mediated pathway. We suspect that DE exposure-caused up-regulation of iNOS contributes to vascular dysfunction and atherogenesis, which could ultimately lead to urban air pollution-associated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. - Highlights: > Exposed ApoE knockout mice (30-week) to diesel exhaust (DE) for 7 weeks. > Examine iNOS expression and activity in the

  17. Phytoplankton-bacterial interactions mediate micronutrient colimitation at the coastal Antarctic sea ice edge.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Erin M; McCrow, John P; Moustafa, Ahmed; Zheng, Hong; McQuaid, Jeffrey B; Delmont, Tom O; Post, Anton F; Sipler, Rachel E; Spackeen, Jenna L; Xu, Kai; Bronk, Deborah A; Hutchins, David A; Allen, Andrew E

    2015-08-11

    Southern Ocean primary productivity plays a key role in global ocean biogeochemistry and climate. At the Southern Ocean sea ice edge in coastal McMurdo Sound, we observed simultaneous cobalamin and iron limitation of surface water phytoplankton communities in late Austral summer. Cobalamin is produced only by bacteria and archaea, suggesting phytoplankton-bacterial interactions must play a role in this limitation. To characterize these interactions and investigate the molecular basis of multiple nutrient limitation, we examined transitions in global gene expression over short time scales, induced by shifts in micronutrient availability. Diatoms, the dominant primary producers, exhibited transcriptional patterns indicative of co-occurring iron and cobalamin deprivation. The major contributor to cobalamin biosynthesis gene expression was a gammaproteobacterial population, Oceanospirillaceae ASP10-02a. This group also contributed significantly to metagenomic cobalamin biosynthesis gene abundance throughout Southern Ocean surface waters. Oceanospirillaceae ASP10-02a displayed elevated expression of organic matter acquisition and cell surface attachment-related genes, consistent with a mutualistic relationship in which they are dependent on phytoplankton growth to fuel cobalamin production. Separate bacterial groups, including Methylophaga, appeared to rely on phytoplankton for carbon and energy sources, but displayed gene expression patterns consistent with iron and cobalamin deprivation. This suggests they also compete with phytoplankton and are important cobalamin consumers. Expression patterns of siderophore- related genes offer evidence for bacterial influences on iron availability as well. The nature and degree of this episodic colimitation appear to be mediated by a series of phytoplankton-bacterial interactions in both positive and negative feedback loops.

  18. Phytoplankton–bacterial interactions mediate micronutrient colimitation at the coastal Antarctic sea ice edge

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Erin M.; McCrow, John P.; Moustafa, Ahmed; Zheng, Hong; McQuaid, Jeffrey B.; Delmont, Tom O.; Post, Anton F.; Sipler, Rachel E.; Spackeen, Jenna L.; Xu, Kai; Bronk, Deborah A.; Hutchins, David A.; Allen, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    Southern Ocean primary productivity plays a key role in global ocean biogeochemistry and climate. At the Southern Ocean sea ice edge in coastal McMurdo Sound, we observed simultaneous cobalamin and iron limitation of surface water phytoplankton communities in late Austral summer. Cobalamin is produced only by bacteria and archaea, suggesting phytoplankton–bacterial interactions must play a role in this limitation. To characterize these interactions and investigate the molecular basis of multiple nutrient limitation, we examined transitions in global gene expression over short time scales, induced by shifts in micronutrient availability. Diatoms, the dominant primary producers, exhibited transcriptional patterns indicative of co-occurring iron and cobalamin deprivation. The major contributor to cobalamin biosynthesis gene expression was a gammaproteobacterial population, Oceanospirillaceae ASP10-02a. This group also contributed significantly to metagenomic cobalamin biosynthesis gene abundance throughout Southern Ocean surface waters. Oceanospirillaceae ASP10-02a displayed elevated expression of organic matter acquisition and cell surface attachment-related genes, consistent with a mutualistic relationship in which they are dependent on phytoplankton growth to fuel cobalamin production. Separate bacterial groups, including Methylophaga, appeared to rely on phytoplankton for carbon and energy sources, but displayed gene expression patterns consistent with iron and cobalamin deprivation. This suggests they also compete with phytoplankton and are important cobalamin consumers. Expression patterns of siderophore- related genes offer evidence for bacterial influences on iron availability as well. The nature and degree of this episodic colimitation appear to be mediated by a series of phytoplankton–bacterial interactions in both positive and negative feedback loops. PMID:26221022

  19. Bacterial mediation of carbon fluxes during a diatom bloom in a mesocosm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David C.; Steward, Grieg F.; Long, Richard A.; Azam, Farooq

    Bacteria-diatom interactions were studied during a diatom bloom produced in a mesocosm, in the absence of metazoan grazers, in order to examine the significance of bacterial hydrolytic ectoenzymes in mediating carbon fluxes and influencing diatom aggregation. The abundances of bacteria and protozoa, the production rates and hydrolytic ectoenzyme activities (protease, α and β glucosidase and chitobiase) of attached and free bacteria, were followed as well as the dynamics of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool. An intense diatom bloom occurred with chlorophyll a (chl a) concentrations reaching 132 μg liter 1 prior to aggregation. The diatoms were colonized by bacteria early on in the bloom and remained colonized throughout the bloom, yet they grew rapidly (>1 day -1). Attached bacteria were numerically a small fraction of the total, but they also grew very rapidly (μ = 4-16 day -1) and were generally responsible for the majority of bacterial carbon demand, BCD, (46-92%) and hydrolytic enzyme activities (41-99%). BCD accounted for an estimated 40-60% of the total carbon fixed during the bloom; thus, roughly onehalf of the primary production was channeled, via the DOC pool, into bacteria. The high ectohydrolase activities of bacteria attached to the surface of diatoms suggests that the hydrolysis of diatom surface mucus could be responsible for a major flux into the DOC pool making it a significant, but previously unrecognized, mechanism of DOM production. Enzymatic hydrolysis of surface mucus may also have inhibited diatom aggregation. Addition of purified glucosidase and protease to samples from the mesocosm inhibited diatom aggregation in experiments designed to induce aggregation. It is hypothesized that the action of bacterial ectoenzyme on diatom surfaces inhibited diatom aggregation by reducing stickiness, thus prolonging the bloom and allowing the accumulation of extremely high chl a levels prior to aggregation. Future studies should consider bacterial

  20. A pathogenic bacterium triggers epithelial signals to form a functional bacterial receptor that mediates actin pseudopod formation.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenshine, I; Ruschkowski, S; Stein, M; Reinscheid, D J; Mills, S D; Finlay, B B

    1996-01-01

    Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) belongs to a group of bacterial pathogens that induce actin accumulation beneath adherent bacteria. We found that EPEC adherence to epithelial cells mediates the formation of fingerlike pseudopods (up to 10 microm) beneath bacteria. These actin-rich structures also contain tyrosine phosphorylated host proteins concentrated at the pseudopod tip beneath adherent EPEC. Intimate bacterial adherence (and pseudopod formation) occurred only after prior bacterial induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of an epithelial membrane protein, Hp90, which then associates directly with an EPEC adhesin, intimin. These interactions lead to cytoskeletal nucleation and pseudopod formation. This is the first example of a bacterial pathogen that triggers signals in epithelial cells which activates receptor binding activity to a specific bacterial ligand and subsequent cytoskeletal rearrangement. Images PMID:8654358

  1. Gustatory-mediated avoidance of bacterial lipopolysaccharides via TRPA1 activation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Soldano, Alessia; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Boonen, Brett; Franco, Luis; López-Requena, Alejandro; Liu, Guangda; Mora, Natalia; Yaksi, Emre; Voets, Thomas; Vennekens, Rudi; Hassan, Bassem A; Talavera, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Detecting pathogens and mounting immune responses upon infection is crucial for animal health. However, these responses come at a high metabolic price (McKean and Lazzaro, 2011, Kominsky et al., 2010), and avoiding pathogens before infection may be advantageous. The bacterial endotoxins lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are important immune system infection cues (Abbas et al., 2014), but it remains unknown whether animals possess sensory mechanisms to detect them prior to infection. Here we show that Drosophila melanogaster display strong aversive responses to LPS and that gustatory neurons expressing Gr66a bitter receptors mediate avoidance of LPS in feeding and egg laying assays. We found the expression of the chemosensory cation channel dTRPA1 in these cells to be necessary and sufficient for LPS avoidance. Furthermore, LPS stimulates Drosophila neurons in a TRPA1-dependent manner and activates exogenous dTRPA1 channels in human cells. Our findings demonstrate that flies detect bacterial endotoxins via a gustatory pathway through TRPA1 activation as conserved molecular mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13133.001 PMID:27296646

  2. Gustatory-mediated avoidance of bacterial lipopolysaccharides via TRPA1 activation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Soldano, Alessia; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Boonen, Brett; Franco, Luis; López-Requena, Alejandro; Liu, Guangda; Mora, Natalia; Yaksi, Emre; Voets, Thomas; Vennekens, Rudi; Hassan, Bassem A; Talavera, Karel

    2016-06-14

    Detecting pathogens and mounting immune responses upon infection is crucial for animal health. However, these responses come at a high metabolic price (McKean and Lazzaro, 2011, Kominsky et al., 2010), and avoiding pathogens before infection may be advantageous. The bacterial endotoxins lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are important immune system infection cues (Abbas et al., 2014), but it remains unknown whether animals possess sensory mechanisms to detect them prior to infection. Here we show that Drosophila melanogaster display strong aversive responses to LPS and that gustatory neurons expressing Gr66a bitter receptors mediate avoidance of LPS in feeding and egg laying assays. We found the expression of the chemosensory cation channel dTRPA1 in these cells to be necessary and sufficient for LPS avoidance. Furthermore, LPS stimulates Drosophila neurons in a TRPA1-dependent manner and activates exogenous dTRPA1 channels in human cells. Our findings demonstrate that flies detect bacterial endotoxins via a gustatory pathway through TRPA1 activation as conserved molecular mechanism.

  3. Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-Mediated Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with the Lyme Disease Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Javid, Ashkan; Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Pětrošová, Helena; Tang, Tian Tian; Zhang, Yang; Bansal, Anil K.; Ebady, Rhodaba; Parikh, Maitry; Ahmed, Mijhgan; Sun, Chunxiang; Newbigging, Susan; Kim, Yae Ram; Santana Sosa, Marianna; Glogauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-insufficient type 1 diabetes is associated with attenuated bactericidal function of neutrophils, which are key mediators of innate immune responses to microbes as well as pathological inflammatory processes. Neutrophils are central to immune responses to the Lyme pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. The effect of hyperglycemia on host susceptibility to and outcomes of B. burgdorferi infection has not been examined. The present study investigated the impact of sustained obesity-independent hyperglycemia in mice on bacterial clearance, inflammatory pathology and neutrophil responses to B. burgdorferi. Hyperglycemia was associated with reduced arthritis incidence but more widespread tissue colonization and reduced clearance of bacterial DNA in multiple tissues including brain, heart, liver, lung and knee joint. B. burgdorferi uptake and killing were impaired in neutrophils isolated from hyperglycemic mice. Thus, attenuated neutrophil function in insulin-insufficient hyperglycemia was associated with reduced B. burgdorferi clearance in target organs. These data suggest that investigating the effects of comorbid conditions such as diabetes on outcomes of B. burgdorferi infections in humans may be warranted. PMID:27340827

  4. Contribution of reactive oxygen species to (+)-catechin-mediated bacterial lethality.

    PubMed

    Ajiboye, T O; Aliyu, M; Isiaka, I; Haliru, F Z; Ibitoye, O B; Uwazie, J N; Muritala, H F; Bello, S A; Yusuf, I I; Mohammed, A O

    2016-10-25

    The contribution of reactive oxygen species to (+)-catechin-mediated bacterial lethality was investigated. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of (+)-catechin against E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were investigated using 96-well microtitre plate. MIC and MBC of (+)-catechin against E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus are 600 and 700; 600 and 800; 600 and 800 μg/mL respectively. The optical densities and colony forming units of (+)-catechin-treated bacteria decreased. (+)-Catechin (4× MIC) significantly increased the superoxide anion content of E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus compared to DMSO. Superoxide dismutase and catalase in (+)-catechin treated E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus increased significantly. Conversely, level of reduced glutathione in (+)-catechin-treated E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus decreased significantly while glutathione disulfide increased significantly. Furthermore, malondialdehyde and fragmented DNA increased significantly following exposure to (+)-catechin. From the above findings, (+)-catechin enhanced the generation of reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion radical and hydroxyl radical) in E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus, possibly by autoxidation, Fenton chemistry and inhibiting electron transport chain resulting into lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation and consequentially bacterial cell death.

  5. Interparticle interactions mediated superspin glass to superferromagnetic transition in Ni-bacterial cellulose aerogel nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiruvengadam, V.; Vitta, Satish

    2016-06-01

    The interparticle interactions in the magnetic nanocomposites play a dominant role in controlling phase transitions: superparamagnetic to superspin glass and to superferromagnetic. These interactions can be tuned by controlling the size and number density of nanoparticles. The aerogel composites, 0.3Ni-BC and 0.7Ni-BC, consisting of Ni nanoparticles distributed in the bacterial cellulose have been used as a model system to study these interactions. Contrary to conventional approach, size of Ni-nanoparticles is not controlled and allowed to form naturally in bacterial cellulose template. The uncontrolled growth of Ni results in the formation of nanoparticles with 3 different size distributions - <10 nm particles along the length of fibrils, 50 nm particles in the intermediate spaces between the fibrils, and >100 nm particles in voids formed by reticulate structure. At room temperature, the composites exhibit a weakly ferromagnetic behaviour with a coercivity of 40 Oe, which increases to 160 Oe at 10 K. The transition from weakly ferromagnetic state to superferromagnetic state at low temperatures is mediated by the superspin glass state at intermediate temperatures via the interparticle interactions aided by nanoparticles present along the length of fibres. A temperature dependent microstructural model has been developed to understand the magnetic behaviour of nanocomposite aerogels.

  6. TIR Domain-Containing Adapter-Inducing Beta Interferon (TRIF) Mediates Immunological Memory against Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kanagavelu, Saravana; Flores, Claudia; Termini, J. M.; Romero, Laura; Riveron, Reldy; Ruiz, Jose; Arditi, Moshe; Schesser, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Induction of adaptive immunity leads to the establishment of immunological memory; however, how innate immunity regulates memory T cell function remains obscure. Here we show a previously undefined mechanism in which innate and adaptive immunity are linked by TIR domain-containing adapter-inducing beta interferon (TRIF) during establishment and reactivation of memory T cells against Gram-negative enteropathogens. Absence of TRIF in macrophages (Mϕs) but not dendritic cells led to a predominant generation of CD4+ central memory T cells that express IL-17 during enteric bacterial infection in mice. TRIF-dependent type I interferon (IFN) signaling in T cells was essential to Th1 lineage differentiation and reactivation of memory T cells. TRIF activated memory T cells to facilitate local neutrophil influx and enhance bacterial elimination. These results highlight the importance of TRIF as a mediator of the innate and adaptive immune interactions in achieving the protective properties of memory immunity against Gram-negative bacteria and suggest TRIF as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26351279

  7. TIR Domain-Containing Adapter-Inducing Beta Interferon (TRIF) Mediates Immunological Memory against Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kanagavelu, Saravana; Flores, Claudia; Termini, J M; Romero, Laura; Riveron, Reldy; Ruiz, Jose; Arditi, Moshe; Schesser, Kurt; Fukata, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Induction of adaptive immunity leads to the establishment of immunological memory; however, how innate immunity regulates memory T cell function remains obscure. Here we show a previously undefined mechanism in which innate and adaptive immunity are linked by TIR domain-containing adapter-inducing beta interferon (TRIF) during establishment and reactivation of memory T cells against Gram-negative enteropathogens. Absence of TRIF in macrophages (Mϕs) but not dendritic cells led to a predominant generation of CD4(+) central memory T cells that express IL-17 during enteric bacterial infection in mice. TRIF-dependent type I interferon (IFN) signaling in T cells was essential to Th1 lineage differentiation and reactivation of memory T cells. TRIF activated memory T cells to facilitate local neutrophil influx and enhance bacterial elimination. These results highlight the importance of TRIF as a mediator of the innate and adaptive immune interactions in achieving the protective properties of memory immunity against Gram-negative bacteria and suggest TRIF as a potential therapeutic target.

  8. Negative Regulation of p21Waf1/Cip1 by Human INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Complex Is Implicated in Cell Cycle Phase G2/M Arrest and Abnormal Chromosome Stability

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lingling; Ding, Jian; Dong, Liguo; Zhao, Jiayao; Su, Jiaming; Wang, Lingyao; Sui, Yi; Zhao, Tong; Wang, Fei; Jin, Jingji; Cai, Yong

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified an ATP-dependent human Ino80 (INO80) chromatin remodeling complex which shares a set of core subunits with yeast Ino80 complex. Although research evidence has suggested that INO80 complex functions in gene transcription and genome stability, the precise mechanism remains unclear. Herein, based on gene expression profiles from the INO80 complex-knockdown in HeLa cells, we first demonstrate that INO80 complex negatively regulates the p21Waf1/Cip1 (p21) expression in a p53-mediated mechanism. In chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and a sequential ChIP (Re-ChIP) assays, we determined that the INO80 complex and p53 can bind to the same promoter region of p21 gene (-2.2kb and -1.0kb upstream of the p21 promoter region), and p53 is required for the recruitment of the INO80 complex to the p21 promoter. RNAi knockdown strategies of INO80 not only led to prolonged progression of cell cycle phase G2/M to G1, but it also resulted in abnormal chromosome stability. Interestingly, high expression of p21 was observed in most morphologically-changed cells, suggesting that negative regulation of p21 by INO80 complex might be implicated in maintaining the cell cycle process and chromosome stability. Together, our findings will provide a theoretical basis to further elucidate the cellular mechanisms of the INO80 complex. PMID:26340092

  9. Negative Regulation of p21Waf1/Cip1 by Human INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Complex Is Implicated in Cell Cycle Phase G2/M Arrest and Abnormal Chromosome Stability.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lingling; Ding, Jian; Dong, Liguo; Zhao, Jiayao; Su, Jiaming; Wang, Lingyao; Sui, Yi; Zhao, Tong; Wang, Fei; Jin, Jingji; Cai, Yong

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified an ATP-dependent human Ino80 (INO80) chromatin remodeling complex which shares a set of core subunits with yeast Ino80 complex. Although research evidence has suggested that INO80 complex functions in gene transcription and genome stability, the precise mechanism remains unclear. Herein, based on gene expression profiles from the INO80 complex-knockdown in HeLa cells, we first demonstrate that INO80 complex negatively regulates the p21Waf1/Cip1 (p21) expression in a p53-mediated mechanism. In chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and a sequential ChIP (Re-ChIP) assays, we determined that the INO80 complex and p53 can bind to the same promoter region of p21 gene (-2.2 kb and -1.0 kb upstream of the p21 promoter region), and p53 is required for the recruitment of the INO80 complex to the p21 promoter. RNAi knockdown strategies of INO80 not only led to prolonged progression of cell cycle phase G2/M to G1, but it also resulted in abnormal chromosome stability. Interestingly, high expression of p21 was observed in most morphologically-changed cells, suggesting that negative regulation of p21 by INO80 complex might be implicated in maintaining the cell cycle process and chromosome stability. Together, our findings will provide a theoretical basis to further elucidate the cellular mechanisms of the INO80 complex.

  10. Ino80 promotes cervical cancer tumorigenesis by activating Nanog expression

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Liu, Jie; Chen, Aozheng; Lyu, Jia; Ai, Guihai; Zeng, Qiongjing; Sun, Yi; Chen, Chunxia; Wang, Jinbo; Qiu, Jin; Wu, Yi; Cheng, Jiajing; Shi, Xiujuan; Song, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Ino80 ATPase is an integral component of the INO80 ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, which regulates transcription, DNA repair and replication. We found that Ino80 was highly expressed in cervical cancer cell lines and tumor samples. Ino80 knockdown inhibited cervical cancer cell proliferation, induced G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. However, Ino80 knockdown did not affect cell apoptosis, migration or invasion in vitro. Ino80 overexpression promoted proliferation in the H8 immortalized cervical epithelial cell line, which has low endogenous Ino80 expression as compared to cervical cancer cell lines. Ino80 bound to the Nanog transcription start site (TSS) and enhanced its expression in cervical cancer cells. Nanog overexpression in Ino80 knockdown cell lines promoted cell proliferation. This study demonstrated for the first time that Ino80 was upregulated in cervical cancer and promoted cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Our findings suggest that Ino80 may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:27750218

  11. Review of terahertz technology development at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Denis; Marchese, Linda; Terroux, Marc; Oulachgar, Hassane; Généreux, Francis; Doucet, Michel; Mercier, Luc; Tremblay, Bruno; Alain, Christine; Beaupré, Patrick; Blanchard, Nathalie; Bolduc, Martin; Chevalier, Claude; D'Amato, Dominic; Desroches, Yan; Duchesne, François; Gagnon, Lucie; Ilias, Samir; Jerominek, Hubert; Lagacé, François; Lambert, Julie; Lamontagne, Frédéric; Le Noc, Loïc; Martel, Anne; Pancrati, Ovidiu; Paultre, Jacques-Edmond; Pope, Tim; Provençal, Francis; Topart, Patrice; Vachon, Carl; Verreault, Sonia; Bergeron, Alain

    2015-10-01

    Over the past decade, INO has leveraged its expertise in the development of uncooled microbolometer detectors for infrared imaging to produce terahertz (THz) imaging systems. By modifying its microbolometer-based focal plane arrays to enhance absorption in the THz bands and by developing custom THz imaging lenses, INO has developed a leading-edge THz imaging system, the IRXCAM-THz-384 camera, capable of exploring novel applications in the emerging field of terahertz imaging and sensing. Using appropriate THz sources, results show that the IRXCAM-THz-384 camera is able to image a variety of concealed objects of interest for applications such as non-destructive testing and weapons detections. By using a longer wavelength (94 GHz) source, it is also capable of sensing the signatures of various objects hidden behind a drywall panel. This article, written as a review of THz research at INO over the past decade, describes the technical components that form the IRXCAM-THz-384 camera and the experimental setup used for active THz imaging. Image results for concealed weapons detection experiments, an exploration of wavelength choice on image quality, and the detection of hidden objects behind drywall are also presented.

  12. Monocytes regulate the mechanism of T-cell death by inducing Fas-mediated apoptosis during bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Daigneault, Marc; De Silva, Thushan I; Bewley, Martin A; Preston, Julie A; Marriott, Helen M; Mitchell, Andrea M; Mitchell, Timothy J; Read, Robert C; Whyte, Moira K B; Dockrell, David H

    2012-01-01

    Monocytes and T-cells are critical to the host response to acute bacterial infection but monocytes are primarily viewed as amplifying the inflammatory signal. The mechanisms of cell death regulating T-cell numbers at sites of infection are incompletely characterized. T-cell death in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) showed 'classic' features of apoptosis following exposure to pneumococci. Conversely, purified CD3(+) T-cells cultured with pneumococci demonstrated necrosis with membrane permeabilization. The death of purified CD3(+) T-cells was not inhibited by necrostatin, but required the bacterial toxin pneumolysin. Apoptosis of CD3(+) T-cells in PBMC cultures required 'classical' CD14(+) monocytes, which enhanced T-cell activation. CD3(+) T-cell death was enhanced in HIV-seropositive individuals. Monocyte-mediated CD3(+) T-cell apoptotic death was Fas-dependent both in vitro and in vivo. In the early stages of the T-cell dependent host response to pneumococci reduced Fas ligand mediated T-cell apoptosis was associated with decreased bacterial clearance in the lung and increased bacteremia. In summary monocytes converted pathogen-associated necrosis into Fas-dependent apoptosis and regulated levels of activated T-cells at sites of acute bacterial infection. These changes were associated with enhanced bacterial clearance in the lung and reduced levels of invasive pneumococcal disease.

  13. MEMS/MOEMS foundry services at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Blanco, Sonia; Ilias, Samir; Williamson, Fraser; Généreux, Francis; Le Noc, Loïc; Poirier, Michel; Proulx, Christian; Tremblay, Bruno; Provençal, Francis; Desroches, Yan; Caron, Jean-Sol; Larouche, Carl; Beaupré, Patrick; Fortin, Benoit; Topart, Patrice; Picard, Francis; Alain, Christine; Pope, Timothy; Jerominek, Hubert

    2010-06-01

    In the MEMS manufacturing world, the "fabless" model is getting increasing importance in recent years as a way for MEMS manufactures and startups to minimize equipment costs and initial capital investment. In order for this model to be successful, the fabless company needs to work closely with a MEMS foundry service provider. Due to the lack of standardization in MEMS processes, as opposed to CMOS microfabrication, the experience in MEMS development processes and the flexibility of the MEMS foundry are of vital importance. A multidisciplinary team together with a complete microfabrication toolset allows INO to offer unique MEMS foundry services to fabless companies looking for low to mid-volume production. Companies that benefit from their own microfabrication facilities can also be interested in INO's assistance in conducting their research and development work during periods where production runs keep their whole staff busy. Services include design, prototyping, fabrication, packaging, and testing of various MEMS and MOEMS devices on wafers fully compatible with CMOS integration. Wafer diameters ranging typically from 1 inch to 6 inches can be accepted while 8-inch wafers can be processed in some instances. Standard microfabrication techniques such as metal, dielectric, and semiconductor film deposition and etching as well as photolithographic pattern transfer are available. A stepper permits reduction of the critical dimension to around 0.4 μm. Metals deposited by vacuum deposition methods include Au, Ag, Al, Al alloys, Ti, Cr, Cu, Mo, MoCr, Ni, Pt, and V with thickness varying from 5 nm to 2 μm. Electroplating of several materials including Ni, Au and In is also available. In addition, INO has developed and built a gold black deposition facility to answer customer's needs for broadband microbolometric detectors. The gold black deposited presents specular reflectance of less than 10% in the wavelength range from 0.2 μm to 100 μm with thickness ranging from

  14. Bacterial plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in aquatic environments in China

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lei; Liu, Dan; Wang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Yunkun; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Mingyu; Xu, Hai

    2017-01-01

    Emerging antimicrobial resistance is a major threat to human’s health in the 21st century. Understanding and combating this issue requires a full and unbiased assessment of the current status on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes and their correlation with each other and bacterial groups. In aquatic environments that are known reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance genes, we were able to reach this goal on plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes that lead to resistance to quinolones and possibly also to the co-emergence of resistance to β-lactams. Novel findings were made that qepA and aac-(6′)-Ib genes that were previously regarded as similarly abundant with qnr genes are now dominant among PMQR genes in aquatic environments. Further statistical analysis suggested that the correlation between PMQR and β-lactam resistance genes in the environment is still weak, that the correlations between antimicrobial resistance genes could be weakened by sufficient wastewater treatment, and that the prevalence of PMQR has been implicated in environmental, pathogenic, predatory, anaerobic, and more importantly, human symbiotic bacteria. This work provides a comprehensive analysis of PMQR genes in aquatic environments in Jinan, China, and provides information with which combat with the antimicrobial resistance problem may be fought. PMID:28094345

  15. Enterogenous bacterial glycolipids are required for the generation of natural killer T cells mediated liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yingfeng; Zeng, Benhua; Chen, Jianing; Cui, Guangying; Lu, Chong; Wu, Wei; Yang, Jiezuan; Wei, Hong; Xue, Rufeng; Bai, Li; Chen, Zhi; Li, Lanjuan; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Uede, Toshimitsu; Van Kaer, Luc; Diao, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Glycolipids are potent activator of natural killer T (NKT) cells. The relationship between NKT cells and intestinal bacterial glycolipids in liver disorders remained unclear. We found that, in sharp contrast to specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice, germ-free (GF) mice are resistant to Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced liver injury. ConA treatment failed to trigger the activation of hepatic NKT cells in GF mice. These defects correlated with the sharply reduced levels of CD1d-presented glycolipid antigens in ConA-treated GF mice compared with SPF counterparts. Nevertheless, CD1d expression was similar between these two kinds of mice. The absence of intestinal bacteria did not affect the incidence of αGalCer-induced liver injury in GF mice. Importantly, we found the intestinal bacteria contain glycolipids which can be presented by CD1d and recognized by NKT cells. Furthermore, supplement of killed intestinal bacteria was able to restore ConA-mediated NKT cell activation and liver injury in GF mice. Our results suggest that glycolipid antigens derived from intestinal commensal bacteria are important hepatic NKT cell agonist and these antigens are required for the activation of NKT cells during ConA-induced liver injury. These finding provide a mechanistic explanation for the capacity of intestinal microflora to control liver inflammation. PMID:27821872

  16. Bacterial plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in aquatic environments in China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lei; Liu, Dan; Wang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Yunkun; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Mingyu; Xu, Hai

    2017-01-17

    Emerging antimicrobial resistance is a major threat to human's health in the 21(st) century. Understanding and combating this issue requires a full and unbiased assessment of the current status on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes and their correlation with each other and bacterial groups. In aquatic environments that are known reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance genes, we were able to reach this goal on plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes that lead to resistance to quinolones and possibly also to the co-emergence of resistance to β-lactams. Novel findings were made that qepA and aac-(6')-Ib genes that were previously regarded as similarly abundant with qnr genes are now dominant among PMQR genes in aquatic environments. Further statistical analysis suggested that the correlation between PMQR and β-lactam resistance genes in the environment is still weak, that the correlations between antimicrobial resistance genes could be weakened by sufficient wastewater treatment, and that the prevalence of PMQR has been implicated in environmental, pathogenic, predatory, anaerobic, and more importantly, human symbiotic bacteria. This work provides a comprehensive analysis of PMQR genes in aquatic environments in Jinan, China, and provides information with which combat with the antimicrobial resistance problem may be fought.

  17. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation mediated changes in rhizosphere bacterial community structure while promoting revegetation in a semiarid ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Caballero, G; Caravaca, F; Fernández-González, A J; Alguacil, M M; Fernández-López, M; Roldán, A

    2017-04-15

    The main goal of this study was to assess the effect of the inoculation of four autochthonous shrub species with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus intraradices on the rhizosphere bacterial community and to ascertain whether such an effect is dependent on the host plant species. Additionally, analysis of rhizosphere soil chemical and biochemical properties was performed to find relationships between them and the rhizosphere bacterial communities. Non-metric multidimensional scaling analysis and subsequent permutational multivariate analysis of variance revealed differences in bacterial community composition and structure between non-inoculated and inoculated rhizospheres. Moreover, an influence of the plant species was observed. Different bacterial groups were found to be indicator taxonomic groups of non-inoculated and inoculated rhizospheres, Gemmatimonadetes and Anaerolineaceae, respectively, being the most notable indicators. As shown by distance based redundancy analysis, the shifts in bacterial community composition and structure mediated by the inoculation with the AM fungus were mainly related to changes in plant nutrients and growth parameters, such as the shoot phosphorus content. Our findings suggest that the AM fungal inoculum was able to modify the rhizosphere bacterial community assemblage while improving the host plant performance.

  18. Characterization of iNOS+ Neutrophil-like ring cell in tumor-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    . Tumor biopsies showed large areas with infiltrating ring cells primarily surrounding necrotic areas. Importantly, these cells significantly impaired CD8+ T-cell proliferation and induced apoptotic death. The intratumoral accumulation and suppressive activity of ring cells could be blocked through pharmacologic inhibition of iNOS, demonstrating the critical role of this enzyme in mediating both the differentiation and the activity of these cells. Conclusions In this study, iNOS expression was linked to a homogeneous subset; ring cells with a particular phenotype and immune suppressive function, in a common and well-established murine tumor model; 4T-1. Since the absence of a Gr-1 homolog in humans has made the identification of MDSC much more challenging, use of iNOS as a functional marker of MDSC may also have clinical importance. PMID:22846631

  19. The functional diversity of Drosophila Ino80 in development.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Mohsen; Pawar, Hema; Mishra, Rakesh K; Brahmachari, Vani

    2015-11-01

    Ino80 is well known as a chromatin remodeling protein with the catalytic function of DNA dependent ATPase and is highly conserved across phyla. Ino80 in human and Drosophila is known to form the Ino80 complex in association with the DNA binding protein Ying-Yang 1 (YY1)/Pleiohomeotic (Pho) the Drosophila homologue. We have earlier reported that Ino80 sub-family of proteins has two functional domains, namely, the DNA dependent ATPase and the DNA binding domain. In the background of the essential role of dIno80 in development, we provide evidence of Pho independent function of dIno80 in development and analyze the dual role of dIno80 in activation as well as repression in the context of the homeotic gene Scr (sex combs reduced) in imaginal discs. This differential effect of dIno80 in different imaginal discs suggests the contextual function of dIno80 as an Enhancer of Trithorax and Polycomb (ETP). We speculate on the role of dIno80 as a chromatin remodeler on one hand and a potential recruiter of epigenetic regulatory complexes on the other.

  20. iNOS expression in dystrophinopathies can be reduced by somatic gene transfer of dystrophin or utrophin.

    PubMed Central

    Louboutin, J. P.; Rouger, K.; Tinsley, J. M.; Halldorson, J.; Wilson, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nitric oxide (NO) is an inorganic gas produced by a family of NO synthase (NOS) proteins. The presence and the distribution of inducible-NOS (NOS II or iNOS), and NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d), a marker for NOS catalytic activity, were determined in muscle sections from control, DMD, and BMD patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: NADPH-d reactivity, iNOS- and nNOS (NOS I)-immunolocalization were studied in muscles from mdx mice before and after somatic gene transfer of dystrophin or utrophin. RESULTS: In control patients, few fibers (<2%) demonstrated focal accumulation of iNOS in sarcolemma. In DMD patients, a strong iNOS immunoreactivity was observed in some necrotic muscle fibers as well as in some mononuclear cells, and regenerating muscle fibers had diffusely positive iNOS immunoreactivity. In DMD patients, NADPH-d reactivity was increased and mainly localized in regenerating muscle fibers. In mdx mice quadriceps, iNOS expression was mainly observed in regenerating muscle fibers, but not prior to 4 weeks postnatal, and was still present 8 weeks after birth. The expression of dystrophin and the overexpression of utrophin using adenovirus-mediated constructs reduced the number of iNOS-positive fibers in mdx quadriceps muscles. The correction of some pathology in mdx by dystrophin expression or utrophin overexpression was independent of the presence of nNOS. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that iNOS could play a role in the physiopathology of DMD and that the abnormal expression of iNOS could be corrected by gene therapy. PMID:11474581

  1. Activity of quinolone CP-115,955 against bacterial and human type II topoisomerases is mediated by different interactions.

    PubMed

    Aldred, Katie J; Schwanz, Heidi A; Li, Gangqin; Williamson, Benjamin H; McPherson, Sylvia A; Turnbough, Charles L; Kerns, Robert J; Osheroff, Neil

    2015-02-10

    CP-115,955 is a quinolone with a 4-hydroxyphenyl at C7 that displays high activity against both bacterial and human type II topoisomerases. To determine the basis for quinolone cross-reactivity between bacterial and human enzymes, the activity of CP-115,955 and a series of related quinolones and quinazolinediones against Bacillus anthracis topoisomerase IV and human topoisomerase IIα was analyzed. Results indicate that the activity of CP-115,955 against the bacterial and human enzymes is mediated by different interactions. On the basis of the decreased activity of quinazolinediones against wild-type and resistant mutant topoisomerase IV and the low activity of quinolones against resistant mutant enzymes, it appears that the primary interaction of CP-115,955 with the bacterial system is mediated through the C3/C4 keto acid and the water-metal ion bridge. In contrast, the drug interacts with the human enzyme primarily through the C7 4-hydroxyphenyl ring and has no requirement for a substituent at C8 in order to attain high activity. Despite the fact that the human type II enzyme is unable to utilize the water-metal ion bridge, quinolones in the CP-115,955 series display higher activity against topoisomerase IIα in vitro and in cultured human cells than the corresponding quinazolinediones. Thus, quinolones may be a viable platform for the development of novel drugs with anticancer potential.

  2. The Activity of Quinolone CP-115,955 Against Bacterial and Human Type II Topoisomerases Is Mediated by Different Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aldred, Katie J.; Schwanz, Heidi A.; Li, Gangqin; Williamson, Benjamin H.; McPherson, Sylvia A.; Turnbough, Charles L.; Kerns, Robert J.; Osheroff, Neil

    2015-01-01

    CP-115,955 is a quinolone with a 4-hydroxyphenyl at C7 that displays high activity against both bacterial and human type II topoisomerases. To determine the basis for quinolone cross-reactivity between bacterial and human enzymes, the activity of CP-115,955 and a series of related quinolones and quinazolinediones against Bacillus anthracis topoisomerase IV and human topoisomerase IIα was analyzed. Results indicate that the activity of CP-115,955 against the bacterial and human enzymes is mediated by different interactions. Based on the decreased activity of quinazolinediones against wild-type and resistant mutant topoisomerase IV and the low activity of quinolones against resistant mutant enzymes, it appears that the primary interaction of CP-115,955 with the bacterial system is mediated through the C3/C4 keto acid and the water-metal ion bridge. In contrast, the drug interacts with the human enzyme primarily through the C7 4-hydroxyphenyl ring and has no requirement for a substituent at C8 in order to attain high activity. Despite the fact that the human type II enzyme is unable to utilize the water-metal ion bridge, quinolones in the CP-115,955 series display higher activity against topoisomerase IIα in vitro and in cultured human cells than the corresponding quinazolinediones. Thus, quinolones may be a viable platform for the development of novel drugs with anticancer potential. PMID:25586498

  3. Incorporation of a non-human glycan mediates human susceptibility to a bacterial toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Byres, Emma; Paton, Adrienne W.; Paton, James C.; Löfling, Jonas C.; Smith, David F.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Talbot, Ursula M.; Chong, Damien C.; Yu, Hai; Huang, Shengshu; Chen, Xi; Varki, Nissi M.; Varki, Ajit; Rossjohn, Jamie; Beddoe, Travis

    2009-01-30

    AB{sub 5} toxins comprise an A subunit that corrupts essential eukaryotic cell functions, and pentameric B subunits that direct target-cell uptake after binding surface glycans. Subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB) is an AB{sub 5} toxin secreted by Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC), which causes serious gastrointestinal disease in humans. SubAB causes haemolytic uraemic syndrome-like pathology in mice through SubA-mediated cleavage of BiP/GRP78, an essential endoplasmic reticulum chaperone. Here we show that SubB has a strong preference for glycans terminating in the sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), a monosaccharide not synthesized in humans. Structures of SubB-Neu5Gc complexes revealed the basis for this specificity, and mutagenesis of key SubB residues abrogated in vitro glycan recognition, cell binding and cytotoxicity. SubAB specificity for Neu5Gc was confirmed using mouse tissues with a human-like deficiency of Neu5Gc and human cell lines fed with Neu5Gc. Despite lack of Neu5Gc biosynthesis in humans, assimilation of dietary Neu5Gc creates high-affinity receptors on human gut epithelia and kidney vasculature. This, and the lack of Neu5Gc-containing body fluid competitors in humans, confers susceptibility to the gastrointestinal and systemic toxicities of SubAB. Ironically, foods rich in Neu5Gc are the most common source of STEC contamination. Thus a bacterial toxin's receptor is generated by metabolic incorporation of an exogenous factor derived from food.

  4. Biotransformation of arsenic by bacterial strains mediated by oxido-reductase enzyme system.

    PubMed

    Vishnoi, N; Singh, D P

    2014-12-24

    The present study deals with the enzyme mediated biotransformation of arsenic in five arsenic tolerant strains (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus pumilus, Paenibacillus macerans and Escherichia coli). Biotransformation ability of these isolates was evaluated by monitoring arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. Results showed that arsenic oxidase activity was exclusively present in P. macerans and B. pumilus while B. subtilis, B. megaterium and E. coli strains showed presence of Arsenic oxido-reductase enzyme. The reversible nature of arsenic oxido- reductase suggested that same enzyme can carry out oxidation and reduction of arsenic depending upon the relative concentration of arsenic species. Lineweaver-Burk plot of the arsenite oxidase activity in P. macerans showed highest Km value (Km- 200 μM) and lower Vmax (0.012 μmol mg-1 protein min-1) indicating lowest affinity of the enzyme for arsenite. On the contrary, E. coli showed the lower Km value ( Km- 38.46 μM) and higher Vmax (0.044 μmol mg-1 protein min-1) suggesting for higher affinity for the arsenite. Lineweaver-Burk plot of arsenate reductase activity showed the presence of this enzyme in B. subtilis, B. megaterium and E. coli which were in the range of 200-360 μM Km and Vmax value between 0.256- 0.129 mmol mg-1 protein min-1. These results suggested that affinity of the as reductase enzyme is lowest for arsenate than that for the arsenite. Thus, arsenite oxidase system appears to be a predominant mechanism of cellular defense in these bacterial strains.

  5. Ligand-free palladium-mediated site-specific protein labeling inside gram-negative bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Lin, Shixian; Wang, Jie; Jia, Shang; Yang, Maiyun; Hao, Ziyang; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Peng R

    2013-05-15

    Palladium, a key transition metal in advancing modern organic synthesis, mediates diverse chemical conversions including many carbon-carbon bond formation reactions between organic compounds. However, expanding palladium chemistry for conjugation of biomolecules such as proteins, particularly within their native cellular context, is still in its infancy. Here we report the site-specific protein labeling inside pathogenic Gram-negative bacterial cells via a ligand-free palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction. Two rationally designed pyrrolysine analogues bearing an aliphatic alkyne or an iodophenyl handle were first encoded in different enteric bacteria, which offered two facial handles for palladium-mediated Sonogashira coupling reaction on proteins within these pathogens. A GFP-based bioorthogonal reaction screening system was then developed, allowing evaluation of both the efficiency and the biocompatibilty of various palladium reagents in promoting protein-small molecule conjugation. The identified simple compound-Pd(NO3)2 exhibited high efficiency and biocompatibility for site-specific labeling of proteins in vitro and inside living E. coli cells. This Pd-mediated protein coupling method was further utilized to label and visualize a Type-III Secretion (T3S) toxin-OspF in Shigella cells. Our strategy may be generally applicable for imaging and tracking various virulence proteins within Gram-negative bacterial pathogens.

  6. Anthocyanins from purple sweet potato attenuate dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver injury in rats by inducing Nrf2-mediated antioxidant enzymes and reducing COX-2 and iNOS expression.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Choi, Jae Ho; Yun, Hyo Jeong; Han, Eun Hee; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Kim, Jin Young; Park, Bong Hwan; Khanal, Tilak; Choi, Jun Min; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2011-01-01

    Anthocyanins of the purple sweet potato exhibit antioxidant and hepatoprotective activities via a multitude of biochemical mechanisms. However, the signaling pathways involved in the actions of anthocyanin-induced antioxidant enzymes against chronic liver injury are not fully understood. We examined whether an anthocyanin fraction (AF) from purple sweet potato may prevent dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced liver injury by inducing antioxidants via nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathways and by reducing inflammation. Treatment with AF attenuated the DMN-induced increased serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities. It also prevented the formation of hepatic malondialdehyde and the depletion of glutathione and maintained normal glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity in the livers of DMN-intoxicated rats. Furthermore, AF increased the expression of Nrf2, NADPH:quinine oxidoreductase-1, heme oxygenase-1, and GSTα, which were reduced by DMN, and decreased the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase. An increase in the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) was observed in the DMN-induced liver injury group, but AF inhibited this translocation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AF increases the expression of antioxidant enzymes and Nrf2 and at the same time decreases the expression of inflammatory mediators in DMN-induced liver injury. These data imply that AF induces antioxidant defense via the Nrf2 pathway and reduces inflammation via NF-κB inhibition.

  7. Investigation of antibacterial mechanism and identification of bacterial protein targets mediated by antibacterial medicinal plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ann-Li; Ooh, Keng-Fei; Ong, Hean-Chooi; Chai, Tsun-Thai; Wong, Fai-Chu

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigated the antibacterial mechanism and potential therapeutic targets of three antibacterial medicinal plants. Upon treatment with the plant extracts, bacterial proteins were extracted and resolved using denaturing gel electrophoresis. Differentially-expressed bacterial proteins were excised from the gels and subjected to sequence analysis by MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. From our study, seven differentially expressed bacterial proteins (triacylglycerol lipase, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, flagellin, outer membrane protein A, stringent starvation protein A, 30S ribosomal protein s1 and 60 kDa chaperonin) were identified. Additionally, scanning electron microscope study indicated morphological damages induced on bacterial cell surfaces. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first time these bacterial proteins are being reported, following treatments with the antibacterial plant extracts. Further studies in this direction could lead to the detailed understanding of their inhibition mechanism and discovery of target-specific antibacterial agents.

  8. Eicosanoids mediate nodulation reactions to bacterial infections in adults of two 17-year periodical cicadas, Magicicada septendecim and M. cassini.

    PubMed

    Tunaz, H; Bedick, J C.; Miller, J S.; Hoback, W W.; Rana, R L.; Stanley, D W.

    1999-10-01

    Nodulation is the first and quantitatively most important cellular defense reaction to bacterial infections in insects. Treating adults of the 17-year periodical cicadas, Magicicada septendecim and M. cassini, with eicosanoid biosynthesis inhibitors immediately prior to intrahemocoelic injections of the bacterium, Serratia marcescens, sharply reduced the nodulation response to bacterial challenges. Separate treatments with specific inhibitors of phospholipase A(2), cyclooxygenase, and lipoxygenase reduced nodulation, supporting our view that nodule formation is a multi-step process in which individual steps are separately mediated by lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase products. The inhibitory influence of dexamethasone was apparent by 2 h after injection, and nodulation was significantly reduced, relative to control insects, over the following 14 h. The dexamethasone effects were reversed by treating bacteria-challenged insects with the eicosanoid-precursor polyunsaturated fatty acid, arachidonic acid. Low levels of arachidonic acid were detected in fat body phospholipids. These findings in adults of an exopterygote insect species with an unusual life history pattern broaden our hypothesis that eicosanoids mediate cellular immune reactions to bacterial infections in most, if not all, insects.

  9. The antigen 43 structure reveals a molecular Velcro-like mechanism of autotransporter-mediated bacterial clumping

    PubMed Central

    Heras, Begoña; Totsika, Makrina; Peters, Kate M.; Paxman, Jason J.; Gee, Christine L.; Jarrott, Russell J.; Perugini, Matthew A.; Whitten, Andrew E.; Schembri, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Aggregation and biofilm formation are critical mechanisms for bacterial resistance to host immune factors and antibiotics. Autotransporter (AT) proteins, which represent the largest group of outer-membrane and secreted proteins in Gram-negative bacteria, contribute significantly to these phenotypes. Despite their abundance and role in bacterial pathogenesis, most AT proteins have not been structurally characterized, and there is a paucity of detailed information with regard to their mode of action. Here we report the structure–function relationships of Antigen 43 (Ag43a), a prototypic self-associating AT protein from uropathogenic Escherichia coli. The functional domain of Ag43a displays a twisted L-shaped β-helical structure firmly stabilized by a 3D hydrogen-bonded scaffold. Notably, the distinctive Ag43a L shape facilitates self-association and cell aggregation. Combining all our data, we define a molecular “Velcro-like” mechanism of AT-mediated bacterial clumping, which can be tailored to fit different bacterial lifestyles such as the formation of biofilms. PMID:24335802

  10. Small-plasmid-mediated antibiotic resistance is enhanced by increases in plasmid copy number and bacterial fitness.

    PubMed

    San Millan, Alvaro; Santos-Lopez, Alfonso; Ortega-Huedo, Rafael; Bernabe-Balas, Cristina; Kennedy, Sean P; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids play a key role in the horizontal spread of antibiotic resistance determinants among bacterial pathogens. When an antibiotic resistance plasmid arrives in a new bacterial host, it produces a fitness cost, causing a competitive disadvantage for the plasmid-bearing bacterium in the absence of antibiotics. On the other hand, in the presence of antibiotics, the plasmid promotes the survival of the clone. The adaptations experienced by plasmid and bacterium in the presence of antibiotics during the first generations of coexistence will be crucial for the progress of the infection and the maintenance of plasmid-mediated resistance once the treatment is over. Here we developed a model system using the human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae carrying the small plasmid pB1000 conferring resistance to β-lactam antibiotics to investigate host and plasmid adaptations in the course of a simulated ampicillin therapy. Our results proved that plasmid-bearing clones compensated for the fitness disadvantage during the first 100 generations of plasmid-host adaptation. In addition, ampicillin treatment was associated with an increase in pB1000 copy number. The augmentation in both bacterial fitness and plasmid copy number gave rise to H. influenzae populations with higher ampicillin resistance levels. In conclusion, we show here that the modulations in bacterial fitness and plasmid copy number help a plasmid-bearing bacterium to adapt during antibiotic therapy, promoting both the survival of the host and the spread of the plasmid.

  11. The INO80 Complex Requires the Arp5-Ies6 Subcomplex for Chromatin Remodeling and Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Wei; King, Devin A.; Beckwith, Sean L.; Gowans, Graeme J.; Yen, Kuangyu; Zhou, Coral

    2016-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes are essential for transcription regulation, and yet it is unclear how these multisubunit complexes coordinate their activities to facilitate diverse transcriptional responses. In this study, we found that the conserved Arp5 and Ies6 subunits of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae INO80 chromatin-remodeler form an abundant and distinct subcomplex in vivo and stimulate INO80-mediated activity in vitro. Moreover, our genomic studies reveal that the relative occupancy of Arp5-Ies6 correlates with nucleosome positioning at transcriptional start sites and expression levels of >1,000 INO80-regulated genes. Notably, these genes are significantly enriched in energy metabolism pathways. Specifically, arp5Δ, ies6Δ, and ino80Δ mutants demonstrate decreased expression of genes involved in glycolysis and increased expression of genes in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. Deregulation of these metabolic pathways results in constitutively elevated mitochondrial potential and oxygen consumption. Our results illustrate the dynamic nature of the INO80 complex assembly and demonstrate for the first time that a chromatin remodeler regulates glycolytic and respiratory capacity, thereby maintaining metabolic stability. PMID:26755556

  12. Bilirubin inhibits iNOS expression and NO production in response to endotoxin in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weizheng W; Smith, Darcey L H; Zucker, Stephen D

    2004-08-01

    The inducible isoform of heme oxygenase (HO), HO-1, has been shown to play an important role in attenuating tissue injury. Because HO-1 catalyzes the rate-limiting step in bilirubin synthesis, we examined the hypothesis that bilirubin is a key mediator of HO-1 cytoprotection, employing a rat model of endotoxemia. Bilirubin treatment resulted in improved survival and attenuated liver injury in response to lipopolysaccharide infusion. Serum levels of NO and tumor necrosis factor alpha, key mediators of endotoxemia, and hepatic inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression were significantly lower in bilirubin-treated rodents versus control animals. Both intraperitoneal and local administration of bilirubin also was found to ameliorate hindpaw inflammation induced by the injection of lambda-carrageenan. Consistent with in vivo results, bilirubin significantly inhibited iNOS expression and suppressed NO production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. In contrast, bilirubin treatment induced a threefold increase in LPS-mediated prostaglandin synthesis in the absence of significant changes in cyclooxygenase expression or activity, suggesting that bilirubin enhances substrate availability for eicosanoid synthesis. Bilirubin had no effect on LPS-mediated activation of nuclear factor kappaB or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, consistent with a nuclear factor kappaB-independent mechanism of action. Taken together, these data support a cytoprotective role for bilirubin that is mediated, at least in part, through the inhibition of iNOS expression and, potentially, through stimulation of local prostaglandin E2 production. In conclusion, our findings suggest a role for bilirubin in mollifying tissue injury in response to inflammatory stimuli and support the possibility that the phenomenon of "jaundice of sepsis" represents an adaptive physiological response to endotoxemia. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the

  13. Exposure of Bacterial Biofilms to Electrical Current Leads to Cell Death Mediated in Part by Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, Cassandra L.; Schmidt-Malan, Suzannah M.; Karau, Melissa J.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl; Hassett, Daniel J.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms may form on indwelling medical devices such as prosthetic joints, heart valves and catheters, causing challenging-to-treat infections. We have previously described the ‘electricidal effect’, in which bacterial biofilms are decreased following exposure to direct electrical current. Herein, we sought to determine if the decreased bacterial quantities are due to detachment of biofilms or cell death and to investigate the role that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play in the observed effect. Using confocal and electron microscopy and flow cytometry, we found that direct current (DC) leads to cell death and changes in the architecture of biofilms formed by Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear to play a role in DC-associated cell death, as there was an increase in ROS-production by Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms following exposure to DC. An increase in the production of ROS response enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was observed for S. aureus, S. epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms following exposure to DC. Additionally, biofilms were protected from cell death when supplemented with antioxidants and oxidant scavengers, including catalase, mannitol and Tempol. Knocking out SOD (sodAB) in P. aeruginosa led to an enhanced DC effect. Microarray analysis of P. aeruginosa PAO1 showed transcriptional changes in genes related to the stress response and cell death. In conclusion, the electricidal effect results in death of bacteria in biofilms, mediated, at least in part, by production of ROS. PMID:27992529

  14. Responses of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and bacterial taxa to (fluoro)quinolones-containing manure in arable soil.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wenguang; Sun, Yongxue; Ding, Xueyao; Zhang, Yiming; Zhong, Xiaoxia; Liang, Wenfei; Zeng, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fate of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes and the disturbance of soil bacterial communities posed by (fluoro)quinolones (FQNs)-containing manure in arable soil. Representative FQNs (enrofloxacin (ENR), ciprofloxacin (CIP) and norfloxacin (NOR)), PMQR genes (qepA, oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrS) and bacterial communities in untreated soil, +manure and +manure+FQNs groups were analyzed using culture independent methods. The significantly higher abundance of oqxA, oqxB and aac(6')-Ib-cr, and significantly higher abundance of qnrS in +manure group than those in untreated soil disappeared at day 30 and day 60, respectively. All PMQR genes (oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrS) dissipated 1.5-1.7 times faster in +manure group than those in +manure+FQNs group. The disturbance of soil bacterial communities posed by FQNs-containing manure was also found. The results indicated that significant effects of PMQR genes (oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib and qnrS) on arable soils introduced by manure disappeared 2 month after manure application. FQNs introduced by manure slowed down the dissipation of PMQR genes. The presence of high FQNs provided a selective advantage for species affiliated to the phylum including Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Planctomycetes while suppressing Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria.

  15. Bacterial Photodynamic Inactivation Mediated by Methylene Blue and Red Light Is Enhanced by Synergistic Effect of Potassium Iodide

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, Daniela; Gupta, Asheesh; Huang, Liyi; Landi, Giacomo; Avci, Pinar; Rodas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The inexorable increase of antibiotic resistance occurring in different bacterial species is increasing the interest in developing new antimicrobial treatments that will be equally effective against multidrug-resistant strains and will not themselves induce resistance. One of these alternatives may be photodynamic inactivation (PDI), which uses a combination of nontoxic dyes, called photosensitizers (PS), excited by harmless visible light to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) by type 1 (radical) and type 2 (singlet oxygen) pathways. In this study, we asked whether it was possible to improve the efficacy of PDI in vitro and in vivo by addition of the inert salt potassium iodide (KI) to a commonly investigated PS, the phenothiazinium dye methylene blue (MB). By adding KI, we observed a consistent increase of red light-mediated bacterial killing of Gram-positive and Gram-negative species in vitro and in vivo. In vivo, we also observed less bacterial recurrence in wounds in the days posttreatment. The mechanism of action is probably due to formation of reactive iodine species that are produced quickly with a short lifetime. This finding may have a relevant clinical impact by reducing the risk of amputation and, in some cases, the risk of death, leading to improvement in the care of patients affected by localized infections. PMID:26077247

  16. Bacterial photodynamic inactivation mediated by methylene blue and red light is enhanced by synergistic effect of potassium iodide.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Daniela; Gupta, Asheesh; Huang, Liyi; Landi, Giacomo; Avci, Pinar; Rodas, Andrea; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    The inexorable increase of antibiotic resistance occurring in different bacterial species is increasing the interest in developing new antimicrobial treatments that will be equally effective against multidrug-resistant strains and will not themselves induce resistance. One of these alternatives may be photodynamic inactivation (PDI), which uses a combination of nontoxic dyes, called photosensitizers (PS), excited by harmless visible light to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) by type 1 (radical) and type 2 (singlet oxygen) pathways. In this study, we asked whether it was possible to improve the efficacy of PDI in vitro and in vivo by addition of the inert salt potassium iodide (KI) to a commonly investigated PS, the phenothiazinium dye methylene blue (MB). By adding KI, we observed a consistent increase of red light-mediated bacterial killing of Gram-positive and Gram-negative species in vitro and in vivo. In vivo, we also observed less bacterial recurrence in wounds in the days posttreatment. The mechanism of action is probably due to formation of reactive iodine species that are produced quickly with a short lifetime. This finding may have a relevant clinical impact by reducing the risk of amputation and, in some cases, the risk of death, leading to improvement in the care of patients affected by localized infections.

  17. Rapid and sensitive detection of Citrus Bacterial Canker by loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with simple visual evaluation methods

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Citrus Bacterial Canker (CBC) is a major, highly contagious disease of citrus plants present in many countries in Asia, Africa and America, but not in the Mediterranean area. There are three types of Citrus Bacterial Canker, named A, B, and C that have different genotypes and posses variation in host range within citrus species. The causative agent for type A CBC is Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, while Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. aurantifolii, strain B causes type B CBC and Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. aurantifolii strain C causes CBC type C. The early and accurate identification of those bacteria is essential for the protection of the citrus industry. Detection methods based on bacterial isolation, antibodies or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been developed previously; however, these approaches may be time consuming, laborious and, in the case of PCR, it requires expensive laboratory equipment. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), which is a novel isothermal DNA amplification technique, is sensitive, specific, fast and requires no specialized laboratory equipment. Results A loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for the diagnosis of Citrus Bacterial Canker (CBC-LAMP) was developed and evaluated. DNA samples were obtained from infected plants or cultured bacteria. A typical ladder-like pattern on gel electrophoresis was observed in all positive samples in contrast to the negative controls. In addition, amplification products were detected by visual inspection using SYBRGreen and using a lateral flow dipstick, eliminating the need for gel electrophoresis. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay were evaluated in different conditions and using several sample sources which included purified DNA, bacterium culture and infected plant tissue. The sensitivity of the CBC-LAMP was 10 fg of pure Xcc DNA, 5 CFU in culture samples and 18 CFU in samples of infected plant tissue. No cross reaction was observed with DNA of other phytopathogenic

  18. Identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein PE-PGRS62 as a novel effector that functions to block phagosome maturation and inhibit iNOS expression.

    PubMed

    Thi, Emily P; Hong, Chris Joon Ho; Sanghera, Gaganjit; Reiner, Neil E

    2013-05-01

    Using a genetic screen in yeast we found that Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE-PGRS62 was capable of disrupting yeast vacuolar protein sorting, suggesting effects on endosomal trafficking. To study the impact of PE-PGRS62 on macrophage function, we infected murine macrophages with Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing PE-PGRS62. Infected cells displayed phagosome maturation arrest. Phagosomes acquired Rab5, but displayed a significant defect in Rab7 and LAMP-1 acquisition. Macrophages infected with M. smegmatis expressing PE-PGRS62 also expressed two- to threefold less iNOS protein when compared with cells infected with wild-type bacteria. Consistent with this, cells infected with a Mycobacterium marinum transposon mutant for the PE-PGRS62 orthologue showed greater iNOS protein expression when compared to cells infected with wild-type organisms. Complementation restored the ability of the mutant to inhibit iNOS expression. No differences in iNOS transcript levels were observed, suggesting that PE-PGRS62 effects on iNOS expression occurred post-transcriptionally. Marked differences in colony morphology were also seen in M. smegmatis expressing PE-PGRS62 and in the M. marinum transposon mutant, suggesting that PE-PGRS62 may affect cell wall composition. These findings suggest that PE-PGRS62 supports virulence via inhibition of phagosome maturation and iNOS expression, and these phenotypes may be linked to effects on bacterial cell wall composition.

  19. Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated Bacterial Biofilm Inhibition via Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Statistical Determination

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Wahab, Rizwan; Khan, Farheen; Mishra, Yogendra K.; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of bacterial biofilm is a major challenge in clinical applications. The main aim of this study is to describe the synthesis, characterization and biocidal potential of zinc oxide nanoparticles (NPs) against bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These nanoparticles were synthesized via soft chemical solution process in a very short time and their structural properties have been investigated in detail by using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements. In this work, the potential of synthesized ZnO-NPs (∼10–15 nm) has been assessed in-vitro inhibition of bacteria and the formation of their biofilms was observed using the tissue culture plate assays. The crystal violet staining on biofilm formation and its optical density revealed the effect on biofilm inhibition. The NPs at a concentration of 100 µg/mL significantly inhibited the growth of bacteria and biofilm formation. The biofilm inhibition by ZnO-NPs was also confirmed via bio-transmission electron microscopy (Bio-TEM). The Bio-TEM analysis of ZnO-NPs treated bacteria confirmed the deformation and damage of cells. The bacterial growth in presence of NPs concluded the bactericidal ability of NPs in a concentration dependent manner. It has been speculated that the antibacterial activity of NPs as a surface coating material, could be a feasible approach for controlling the pathogens. Additionally, the obtained bacterial solution data is also in agreement with the results from statistical analytical methods. PMID:25402188

  20. Reactive oxygen species mediated bacterial biofilm inhibition via zinc oxide nanoparticles and their statistical determination.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Wahab, Rizwan; Khan, Farheen; Mishra, Yogendra K; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A

    2014-01-01

    The formation of bacterial biofilm is a major challenge in clinical applications. The main aim of this study is to describe the synthesis, characterization and biocidal potential of zinc oxide nanoparticles (NPs) against bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These nanoparticles were synthesized via soft chemical solution process in a very short time and their structural properties have been investigated in detail by using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements. In this work, the potential of synthesized ZnO-NPs (∼ 10-15 nm) has been assessed in-vitro inhibition of bacteria and the formation of their biofilms was observed using the tissue culture plate assays. The crystal violet staining on biofilm formation and its optical density revealed the effect on biofilm inhibition. The NPs at a concentration of 100 µg/mL significantly inhibited the growth of bacteria and biofilm formation. The biofilm inhibition by ZnO-NPs was also confirmed via bio-transmission electron microscopy (Bio-TEM). The Bio-TEM analysis of ZnO-NPs treated bacteria confirmed the deformation and damage of cells. The bacterial growth in presence of NPs concluded the bactericidal ability of NPs in a concentration dependent manner. It has been speculated that the antibacterial activity of NPs as a surface coating material, could be a feasible approach for controlling the pathogens. Additionally, the obtained bacterial solution data is also in agreement with the results from statistical analytical methods.

  1. Pyramidal Wavefront Sensor Demonstrator at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Olivier; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Anctil, Geneviève; Bourqui, Pascal; Châteauneuf, François; Gauvin, Jonny; Goyette, Philippe; Lagacé, François; Turbide, Simon; Wang, Min

    2014-08-01

    Wavefront sensing is one of the key elements of an Adaptive Optics System. Although Shack-Hartmann WFS are the most commonly used whether for astronomical or biomedical applications, the high-sensitivity and large dynamic-range of the Pyramid-WFS (P-WFS) technology is promising and needs to be further investigated for proper justification in future Extremely Large Telescopes (ELT) applications. At INO, center for applied research in optics and technology transfer in Quebec City, Canada, we have recently set to develop a Pyramid wavefront sensor (P-WFS), an option for which no other research group in Canada had any experience. A first version had been built and tested in 2013 in collaboration with NRC-HIA Victoria. Here we present a second iteration of demonstrator with an extended spectral range, fast modulation capability and low-noise, fast-acquisition EMCCD sensor. The system has been designed with compactness and robustness in mind to allow on-sky testing at Mont Mégantic facility, in parallel with a Shack- Hartmann sensor so as to compare both options.

  2. L-arginine mediated renaturation enhances yield of human, α6 type IV collagen non-collagenous domain from bacterial inclusion bodies

    PubMed Central

    Gunda, Venugopal; Boosani, Chandra Shekhar; Verma, Raj Kumar; Guda, Chittibabu; Akul Sudhakar, Yakkanti

    2012-01-01

    The anti-angiogenic, carboxy terminal non-collagenous domain (NC1) derived from human Collagen type IV alpha 6 chain, [α6(IV)NC1] or hexastatin, was earlier obtained using different recombinant methods of expression in bacterial systems. However, the effect of L-arginine mediated renaturation in enhancing the relative yields of this protein from bacterial inclusion bodies has not been evaluated. In the present study, direct stirring and on-column renaturation methods using L-arginine and different size exclusion chromatography matrices were applied for enhancing the solubility in purifying the recombinant α6(IV)NC1 from bacterial inclusion bodies. This methodology enabled purification of higher quantities of soluble protein from inclusion bodies, which inhibited endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. Thus, the scope for L-arginine mediated renaturation in obtaining higher yields of soluble, biologically active NC1 domain from bacterial inclusion bodies was evaluated. PMID:22512648

  3. L-arginine mediated renaturation enhances yield of human, α6 Type IV collagen non-collagenous domain from bacterial inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Gunda, Venugopal; Boosani, Chandra Shekhar; Verma, Raj Kumar; Guda, Chittibabu; Sudhakar, Yakkanti Akul

    2012-10-01

    The anti-angiogenic, carboxy terminal non-collagenous domain (NC1) derived from human Collagen type IV alpha 6 chain, [α6(IV)NC1] or hexastatin, was earlier obtained using different recombinant methods of expression in bacterial systems. However, the effect of L-arginine mediated renaturation in enhancing the relative yields of this protein from bacterial inclusion bodies has not been evaluated. In the present study, direct stirring and on-column renaturation methods using L-arginine and different size exclusion chromatography matrices were applied for enhancing the solubility in purifying the recombinant α6(IV)NC1 from bacterial inclusion bodies. This methodology enabled purification of higher quantities of soluble protein from inclusion bodies, which inhibited endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. Thus, the scope for L-arginine mediated renaturation in obtaining higher yields of soluble, biologically active NC1 domain from bacterial inclusion bodies was evaluated.

  4. Essential roles for platelets during neutrophil-dependent or lymphocyte-mediated defense against bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Dongxia; Sun, Chengming; Bao, Cuixia; Yi, Maoli; Xing, Li; Luo, Deyan

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence from animal models suggests that platelets may participate in a wide variety of processes including the immune response against infection. More than 200 whole blood samples from patients and healthy controls were run in the System XE-5000 analyzer, and plasma fractions were separated for the following tests by ELISA, Luminex and light scattering. We describe two mechanisms by which platelets may contribute to immune function against various bacterial pathogens based on increased mean platelet volume in gram-positive bacterial infections and increased platelet counts in gram-negative bacterial infections. Gram-negative bacteria activate platelets to recruit neutrophils, which participate in the immune response against infection. During this process, fractalkine, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor-α and platelet-activating factor were higher in patients infected with Escherichia coli; additionally, giant platelets were observed under the microscope. Meanwhile, we found that platelets played a different role in gram-positive bacterial infections. Specifically, they could actively adhere to gram-positive bacteria in circulation and transfer them to immune sites to promote antibacterial lymphocyte expansion. During this process, complement C3 and factor XI were more highly expressed in patients infected with Staphylococcus aureus; additionally, we detected more small platelets under the microscope. Platelets participate in the immune response against both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, although the mechanisms differ. These results will help us understand the complex roles of platelets during infections, and direct our use of antibiotics based on clinical platelet data.

  5. Bacterial discrimination by means of a universal array approach mediated by LDR (ligase detection reaction)

    PubMed Central

    Busti, Elena; Bordoni, Roberta; Castiglioni, Bianca; Monciardini, Paolo; Sosio, Margherita; Donadio, Stefano; Consolandi, Clarissa; Rossi Bernardi, Luigi; Battaglia, Cristina; De Bellis, Gianluca

    2002-01-01

    Background PCR amplification of bacterial 16S rRNA genes provides the most comprehensive and flexible means of sampling bacterial communities. Sequence analysis of these cloned fragments can provide a qualitative and quantitative insight of the microbial population under scrutiny although this approach is not suited to large-scale screenings. Other methods, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, heteroduplex or terminal restriction fragment analysis are rapid and therefore amenable to field-scale experiments. A very recent addition to these analytical tools is represented by microarray technology. Results Here we present our results using a Universal DNA Microarray approach as an analytical tool for bacterial discrimination. The proposed procedure is based on the properties of the DNA ligation reaction and requires the design of two probes specific for each target sequence. One oligo carries a fluorescent label and the other a unique sequence (cZipCode or complementary ZipCode) which identifies a ligation product. Ligated fragments, obtained in presence of a proper template (a PCR amplified fragment of the 16s rRNA gene) contain either the fluorescent label or the unique sequence and therefore are addressed to the location on the microarray where the ZipCode sequence has been spotted. Such an array is therefore "Universal" being unrelated to a specific molecular analysis. Here we present the design of probes specific for some groups of bacteria and their application to bacterial diagnostics. Conclusions The combined use of selective probes, ligation reaction and the Universal Array approach yielded an analytical procedure with a good power of discrimination among bacteria. PMID:12243651

  6. Igg Subclasses Targeting the Flagella of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Can Mediate Phagocytosis and Bacterial Killing.

    PubMed

    Goh, Yun Shan; Armour, Kathryn L; Clark, Michael R; Grant, Andrew J; Mastroeni, Pietro

    2016-05-30

    Invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella are a common cause of invasive disease in immuno-compromised individuals and in children. Multi-drug resistance poses challenges to disease control, with a critical need for effective vaccines. Flagellin is an attractive vaccine candidate due to surface exposure and high epitope copy number, but its potential as a target for opsonophacytic antibodies is unclear. We examined the effect of targeting flagella with different classes of IgG on the interaction between Salmonella Typhimurium and a human phagocyte-like cell line, THP-1. We tagged the FliC flagellar protein with a foreign CD52 mimotope (TSSPSAD) and bacteria were opsonized with a panel of humanised CD52 antibodies with the same antigen-binding V-region, but different constant regions. We found that IgG binding to flagella increases bacterial phagocytosis and reduces viable intracellular bacterial numbers. Opsonisation with IgG3, followed by IgG1, IgG4, and IgG2, resulted in the highest level of bacterial uptake and in the highest reduction in the intracellular load of viable bacteria. Taken together, our data provide proof-of-principle evidence that targeting flagella with antibodies can increase the antibacterial function of host cells, with IgG3 being the most potent subclass. These data will assist the rational design of urgently needed, optimised vaccines against iNTS disease.

  7. Igg Subclasses Targeting the Flagella of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Can Mediate Phagocytosis and Bacterial Killing

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yun Shan; Armour, Kathryn L; Clark, Michael R; Grant, Andrew J; Mastroeni, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella are a common cause of invasive disease in immuno-compromised individuals and in children. Multi-drug resistance poses challenges to disease control, with a critical need for effective vaccines. Flagellin is an attractive vaccine candidate due to surface exposure and high epitope copy number, but its potential as a target for opsonophacytic antibodies is unclear. We examined the effect of targeting flagella with different classes of IgG on the interaction between Salmonella Typhimurium and a human phagocyte-like cell line, THP-1. We tagged the FliC flagellar protein with a foreign CD52 mimotope (TSSPSAD) and bacteria were opsonized with a panel of humanised CD52 antibodies with the same antigen-binding V-region, but different constant regions. We found that IgG binding to flagella increases bacterial phagocytosis and reduces viable intracellular bacterial numbers. Opsonisation with IgG3, followed by IgG1, IgG4, and IgG2, resulted in the highest level of bacterial uptake and in the highest reduction in the intracellular load of viable bacteria. Taken together, our data provide proof-of-principle evidence that targeting flagella with antibodies can increase the antibacterial function of host cells, with IgG3 being the most potent subclass. These data will assist the rational design of urgently needed, optimised vaccines against iNTS disease. PMID:27366588

  8. EDS1 mediates pathogen resistance and virulence function of a bacterial effector in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) and phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4) are well known regulators of both basal and resistance (R) protein-mediated plant defense. We identified two EDS1- (GmEDS1a/b) and one PAD4-like (GmPAD4) protein that are required for resistance signaling in soybean. Consist...

  9. Malaria-Induced NLRP12/NLRP3-Dependent Caspase-1 Activation Mediates Inflammation and Hypersensitivity to Bacterial Superinfection

    PubMed Central

    Ataide, Marco A.; Andrade, Warrison A.; Zamboni, Dario S.; Wang, Donghai; Souza, Maria do Carmo; Franklin, Bernardo S.; Elian, Samir; Martins, Flaviano S.; Pereira, Dhelio; Reed, George; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic paroxysm and high fever are hallmarks of malaria and are associated with high levels of pyrogenic cytokines, including IL-1β. In this report, we describe a signature for the expression of inflammasome-related genes and caspase-1 activation in malaria. Indeed, when we infected mice, Plasmodium infection was sufficient to promote MyD88-mediated caspase-1 activation, dependent on IFN-γ-priming and the expression of inflammasome components ASC, P2X7R, NLRP3 and/or NLRP12. Pro-IL-1β expression required a second stimulation with LPS and was also dependent on IFN-γ-priming and functional TNFR1. As a consequence of Plasmodium-induced caspase-1 activation, mice produced extremely high levels of IL-1β upon a second microbial stimulus, and became hypersensitive to septic shock. Therapeutic intervention with IL-1 receptor antagonist prevented bacterial-induced lethality in rodents. Similar to mice, we observed a significantly increased frequency of circulating CD14+CD16−Caspase-1+ and CD14dimCD16+Caspase-1+ monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from febrile malaria patients. These cells readily produced large amounts of IL-1β after stimulation with LPS. Furthermore, we observed the presence of inflammasome complexes in monocytes from malaria patients containing either NLRP3 or NLRP12 pyroptosomes. We conclude that NLRP12/NLRP3-dependent activation of caspase-1 is likely to be a key event in mediating systemic production of IL-1β and hypersensitivity to secondary bacterial infection during malaria. PMID:24453977

  10. Antibody-Mediated Elimination of the Obligate Intracellular Bacterial Pathogen Ehrlichia chaffeensis during Active Infection

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Gary M.; Yager, Eric; Shilo, Konstantin; Volk, Erin; Reilly, Andrew; Chu, Frederick K.

    2000-01-01

    It is generally accepted that cellular, but not humoral immunity, plays an important role in host defense against intracellular bacteria. However, studies of some of these pathogens have provided evidence that antibodies can provide immunity if present during the initiation of infection. Here, we examined immunity against infection by Ehrlichia chaffeensis, an obligate intracellular bacterium that causes human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Studies with mice have demonstrated that immunocompetent strains are resistant to persistent infection but that SCID mice become persistently and fatally infected. Transfer of immune serum or antibodies obtained from immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice to C57BL/6 scid mice provided significant although transient protection from infection. Bacterial clearance was observed when administration occurred at the time of inoculation or well after infection was established. The effect was dose dependent, occurred within 2 days, and persisted for as long as 2 weeks. Weekly serum administration prolonged the survival of susceptible mice. Although cellular immunity is required for complete bacterial clearance, the data show that antibodies can play a significant role in the elimination of this obligate intracellular bacterium during active infection and thus challenge the paradigm that humoral responses are unimportant for immunity to such organisms. PMID:10722619

  11. Prevalence of plasmid mediated pesticide resistant bacterial assemblages in crop fields.

    PubMed

    Umamaheswari, S; Murali, M

    2010-11-01

    Three crop fields namely paddy sugarcane and tomato exposed to bavistin [Methyl (1H-benzimidazol-2-yl) carbomate], monocrotophos[Dimethyl(E)-1-methyl-2-(methyl-carbamoyl) vinyl phosphate] and kinado plus [(EZ)-2-chloro-3-dimethoxyphosphinoyloxy-X1, X1-diethylbut-2-enamide], respectively were chosen for the present investigation to know the bacterial population and degradation of pesticides. The chemical nature of the soil and water samples from the pesticide contaminated fields was analysed along with counting of the total heterotrophic bacteria (THB), Staphylococci and Enterococcci population. Mean calcium, phosphate and biological oxygen demand were maximum in tomato field water Field water recorded maximum phophate and silicate content, whereas, sugarcane field water elicited maximum dissolved oxygen content. On the other hand, available phosphate and exchangeable potassium were maximum is sugarcane field soil. Significant variations in the bacterial population were evident between the treatments in sugarcane field soil and tomato field water exposed to monocrotophos and kinado plus, respectively In addition, significant variations between THB, Staphlyococci and Enterococci population were also evinced in both the sugarcane andtomato fields. The dominant pesticide resistant bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeuroginosa harboured plasmids and the resistant trait observed were found to be plasmid borne.

  12. Surface-associated fucoxanthin mediates settlement of bacterial epiphytes on the rockweed Fucus vesiculosus.

    PubMed

    Saha, M; Rempt, M; Grosser, K; Pohnert, G; Weinberger, F

    2011-04-01

    The chemical defence against microfouling in the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus was investigated and an inhibitor of bacterial settlement was isolated by bioassay-guided fractionation of non-polar surface extracts. UV-vis and mass spectrometry were used to identify the compound as the carotenoid fucoxanthin. The metabolite was tested at the natural concentration (in a surface volume based assay) against the settlement of four bacterial strains isolated from F. vesiculosus and 11 strains isolated from co-occurring algae and marine sediment. Surface concentrations between 1.4 and 6 μg cm(-2) resulted in 50% inhibition of four of these isolates, which were studied in more detail using a surface area-based assay, while a fifth isolate proved to be less sensitive. The presence of fucoxanthin on the surface of F. vesiculosus was demonstrated with two different surface extraction methods. Fucoxanthin was detected at concentrations between 0.7 and 9 μg cm(-2) on the algal surface. Fucoxanthin was still present at the algal surface after removal of associated diatoms through mechanical cleaning and germanium dioxide treatment and was thus mainly produced by F. vesiculosus rather than by diatoms. Thus, the photosynthetic pigment fucoxanthin appears to be ecologically relevant as a surface-associated antimicrobial agent, acting against the settlement of bacteria on the surface of the macroalga F. vesiculosus.

  13. Bioavailability of hydrocarbons to bacterial consortia during Triton X-100 mediated biodegradation in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Pęziak, Daria; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Marecik, Roman; Lisiecki, Piotr; Woźniak, Marta; Szulc, Alicja; Ławniczak, Łukasz; Chrzanowski, Łukasz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of Triton X-100 on the biodegradation efficiency of hexadecane and phenanthrene carried out by two bacterial consortia. It was established that the tested consortia were not able to directly uptake compounds closed in micelles. It was observed that in micellar systems the nonionic synthetic surfactant was preferentially degraded (the degradation efficiency of Triton X-100 after 21 days was 70% of the initial concentration - 500 mg/l), followed by a lesser decomposition of hydrocarbon released from the micelles (30% for hexadecane and 20% for phenanthrene). However, when hydrocarbons were used as the sole carbon source, 70% of hexadecane and 30% of phenanthrene were degraded. The degradation of the surfactant did not contribute to notable shifts in bacterial community dynamics, as determined by Real-Time PCR. The obtained results suggest that if surfactant-supplementation is to be used as an integral part of a bioremediation process, then possible bioavailability decrease due to entrapment of the contaminant into surfactant micelles should also be taken into consideration, as this phenomenon may have a negative impact on the biodegradation efficiency. Surfactant-induced mobilization of otherwise recalcitrant hydrocarbons may contribute to the spreading of contaminants in the environment and prevent their biodegradation.

  14. Adaptation of the neutral bacterial comet assay to assess antimicrobial-mediated DNA double-strand breaks in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    SOLANKY, DIPESH; HAYDEL, SHELLEY E.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the mechanism of action of a natural antibacterial clay mineral mixture, designated CB, by investigating the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in Escherichia coli. To quantify DNA damage upon exposure to soluble antimicrobial compounds, we modified a bacterial neutral comet assay, which primarily associates the general length of an electrophoresed chromosome, or comet, with the degree of DSB-associated DNA damage. To appropriately account for antimicrobial-mediated strand fragmentation, suitable control reactions consisting of exposures to water, ethanol, kanamycin, and bleomycin were developed and optimized for the assay. Bacterial exposure to the CB clay resulted in significantly longer comet lengths, compared to water and kanamycin exposures, suggesting that the induction of DNA DSBs contributes to the killing activity of this antibacterial clay mineral mixture. The comet assay protocol described herein provides a general technique for evaluating soluble antimicrobial-derived DNA damage and for comparing DNA fragmentation between experimental and control assays. PMID:22940101

  15. Non-classical phase diagram for virus bacterial coevolution mediated by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats.

    PubMed

    Han, Pu; Deem, Michael W

    2017-02-01

    CRISPR is a newly discovered prokaryotic immune system. Bacteria and archaea with this system incorporate genetic material from invading viruses into their genomes, providing protection against future infection by similar viruses. The condition for coexistence of prokaryots and viruses is an interesting problem in evolutionary biology. In this work, we show an intriguing phase diagram of the virus extinction probability, which is more complex than that of the classical predator-prey model. As the CRISPR incorporates genetic material, viruses are under pressure to evolve to escape recognition by CRISPR. When bacteria have a small rate of deleting spacers, a new parameter region in which bacteria and viruses can coexist arises, and it leads to a more complex coexistence patten for bacteria and viruses. For example, when the virus mutation rate is low, the virus extinction probability changes non-montonically with the bacterial exposure rate. The virus and bacteria coevolution not only alters the virus extinction probability, but also changes the bacterial population structure. Additionally, we show that recombination is a successful strategy for viruses to escape from CRISPR recognition when viruses have multiple proto-spacers, providing support for a recombination-mediated escape mechanism suggested experimentally. Finally, we suggest that the re-entrant phase diagram, in which phages can progress through three phases of extinction and two phases of abundance at low spacer deletion rates as a function of exposure rate to bacteria, is an experimentally testable phenomenon.

  16. Role of bacterial virulence proteins in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Aspergillus awamori.

    PubMed

    Michielse, C B; Ram, A F J; Hooykaas, P J J; Hondel, C A M J J van den

    2004-05-01

    The Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Aspergillus awamori was optimized using defined co-cultivation conditions, which resulted in a reproducible and efficient transformation system. Optimal co-cultivation conditions were used to study the role of Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence proteins in T-DNA transfer. This study revealed that inactivation of either of the regulatory proteins (VirA, VirG), any of the transport pore proteins (VirB), proteins involved in generation of the T-strand (VirD, VirC) or T-strand protection and targeting (VirE2) abolishes or severely reduces the formation of transformants. The results indicate that the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of A. awamori requires an intact T-DNA machinery for efficient transformation; however, the plant host range factors, like VirE3, VirH, and VirF, are not important.

  17. Interaction of Uranium with Bacterial Cell Surfaces: Inferences from Phosphatase-Mediated Uranium Precipitation

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Sayali; Misra, Chitra Seetharam; Gupta, Alka; Ballal, Anand

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Deinococcus radiodurans and Escherichia coli expressing either PhoN, a periplasmic acid phosphatase, or PhoK, an extracellular alkaline phosphatase, were evaluated for uranium (U) bioprecipitation under two specific geochemical conditions (GCs): (i) a carbonate-deficient condition at near-neutral pH (GC1), and (ii) a carbonate-abundant condition at alkaline pH (GC2). Transmission electron microscopy revealed that recombinant cells expressing PhoN/PhoK formed cell-associated uranyl phosphate precipitate under GC1, whereas the same cells displayed extracellular precipitation under GC2. These results implied that the cell-bound or extracellular location of the precipitate was governed by the uranyl species prevalent at that particular GC, rather than the location of phosphatase. MINTEQ modeling predicted the formation of predominantly positively charged uranium hydroxide ions under GC1 and negatively charged uranyl carbonate-hydroxide complexes under GC2. Both microbes adsorbed 6- to 10-fold more U under GC1 than under GC2, suggesting that higher biosorption of U to the bacterial cell surface under GC1 may lead to cell-associated U precipitation. In contrast, at alkaline pH and in the presence of excess carbonate under GC2, poor biosorption of negatively charged uranyl carbonate complexes on the cell surface might have resulted in extracellular precipitation. The toxicity of U observed under GC1 being higher than that under GC2 could also be attributed to the preferential adsorption of U on cell surfaces under GC1. This work provides a vivid description of the interaction of U complexes with bacterial cells. The findings have implications for the toxicity of various U species and for developing biological aqueous effluent waste treatment strategies. IMPORTANCE The present study provides illustrative insights into the interaction of uranium (U) complexes with recombinant bacterial cells overexpressing phosphatases. This work demonstrates the effects of aqueous

  18. Global analysis of SUMO-binding proteins identifies SUMOylation as a key regulator of the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex.

    PubMed

    Cox, Eric; Hwang, Woochang; Uzoma, Ijeoma; Hu, Jianfei; Guzzo, Catherine; Jeong, Junseop; Matunis, Michael; Qian, Jiang; Zhu, Heng; Blackshaw, Seth

    2017-03-02

    SUMOylation is a critical regulator of a broad range of cellular processes, and is thought to do so in part by modulation of protein interaction. To comprehensively identify human proteins whose interaction is modulated by SUMOylation, we developed an in vitro binding assay using human proteome microarrays to identify targets of SUMO1 and SUMO2. We then integrated these results with protein SUMOylation and protein-protein interaction data to perform network motif analysis. We focused on a single network motif we termed a SUMOmodPPI (SUMO-modulated Protein-Protein Interaction) that included the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex subunits TFPT and INO80E. We validated the SUMO-binding activity of INO80E, and showed that TFPT is a SUMO substrate both in vitro and in vivo. We then demonstrated a key role for SUMOylation in mediating the interaction between these two proteins, both in vitro and in vivo. By demonstrating a key role for SUMOylation in regulating the INO80 chromatin-remodeling complex, this work illustrates the power of integrated analysis of large datasets in predicting novel biological phenomena.

  19. Inflammatory modulating effects of low level laser therapy on iNOS expression by means of bioluminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, Yumi; Moriyama, Eduardo H.; Blackmore, Kristina; Akens, Margarete K.; Lilge, Lothar

    2005-09-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of low level laser therapy (LLLT) in modulating inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression as molecular marker of the inflammation signaling pathway. LLLT was mediated by different therapeutic wavelengths using transgenic animals with the luciferase gene under control of the iNOS gene expression. Inflammation in 30 transgenic mice (iNOS-luc mice, from FVB strain) was induced by intra-articular injection of Zymosan-A in both knee joints. Four experimental groups were treated with one of four different wavelengths (λ=635, 785, 808 and 905nm) and one not laser-irradiated control group. Laser treatment (25 mW cm-2, 5 J cm-2) was applied to the knees 15 minutes after inflammation induction. Measurements of iNOS expression were performed at multiple times (0, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 24h) post-LLLT by measuring the bioluminescence signal using a highly sensitive charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The responsivity of BLI was sufficient to demonstrate a significant increase in bioluminescence signals after laser irradiation of 635nm when compared to non-irradiated animals and the other LLLT treated groups, showing the wavelength-dependence of LLLT on iNOS expression during the acute inflammatory process.

  20. Two apextrin-like proteins mediate extracellular and intracellular bacterial recognition in amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guangrui; Huang, Shengfeng; Yan, Xinyu; Yang, Ping; Li, Jun; Xu, Weiya; Zhang, Lingling; Wang, Ruihua; Yu, Yingcai; Yuan, Shaochun; Chen, Shangwu; Luo, Guangbin; Xu, Anlong

    2014-09-16

    Animals exploit different germ-line-encoded proteins with various domain structures to detect the signature molecules of pathogenic microbes. These molecules are known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and the host proteins that react with PAMPs are called pattern recognition proteins (PRPs). Here, we present a novel type of protein domain structure capable of binding to bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN) and the minimal PGN motif muramyl dipeptide (MDP). This domain is designated as apextrin C-terminal domain (ApeC), and its presence was confirmed in several invertebrate phyla and subphyla. Two apextrin-like proteins (ALP1 and ALP2) were identified in a basal chordate, the Japanese amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum (bj). bjALP1 is a mucosal effector secreted into the gut lumen to agglutinate the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus via PGN binding. Neutralization of secreted bjALP1 by anti-bjALP1 monoclonal antibodies caused serious damage to the gut epithelium and rapid death of the animals after bacterial infection. bjALP2 is an intracellular PGN sensor that binds to TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and prevents TRAF6 from self-ubiquitination and hence from NF-κB activation. MDP was found to compete with TRAF6 for bjALP2, which released TRAF6 to activate the NF-κB pathway. BjALP1 and bjALP2 therefore play distinct and complementary functions in amphioxus gut mucosal immunity. In conclusion, discovery of the ApeC domain and the functional analyses of amphioxus ALP1 and ALP2 allowed us to define a previously undocumented type of PRP that is represented across different animal phyla.

  1. Characterization of rhizosphere fungi that mediate resistance in tomato against bacterial wilt disease.

    PubMed

    Jogaiah, Sudisha; Abdelrahman, Mostafa; Tran, Lam-Son Phan; Shin-ichi, Ito

    2013-09-01

    Plant immunization for resistance against a wide variety of phytopathogens is an effective strategy for plant disease management. Seventy-nine plant growth-promoting fungi (PGPFs) were isolated from rhizosphere soil of India. Among them, nine revealed saprophytic ability, root colonization, phosphate solubilization, IAA production, and plant growth promotion. Seed priming with four PGPFs exhibited early seedling emergence and enhanced vigour of a tomato cultivar susceptible to the bacterial wilt pathogen compared to untreated controls. Under greenhouse conditions, TriH_JSB27 and PenC_JSB41 treatments remarkably enhanced the vegetative and reproductive growth parameters. Maximum NPK uptake was noticed in TriH_JSB27-treated plants. A significant disease reduction of 57.3% against Ralstonia solanacearum was observed in tomato plants pretreated with TriH_JSB27. Furthermore, induction of defence-related enzymes and genes was observed in plants pretreated with PGPFs or inoculated with pathogen. The maximum phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity (111U) was observed at 24h in seedlings treated with TriH_JSB27 and this activity was slightly reduced (99U) after pathogen inoculation. Activities of peroxidase (POX, 54U) and β-1,3-glucanase (GLU, 15U) were significantly higher in control plants inoculated with pathogen after 24h and remained constant at all time points. A similar trend in gene induction for PAL was evident in PGPFs-treated tomato seedlings with or without pathogen inoculation, whereas POX and GLU were upregulated in control plus pathogen-inoculated tomato seedlings. These results determine that the susceptible tomato cultivar is triggered after perception of potent PGPFs to synthesize PAL, POX, and GLU, which activate defence resistance against bacterial wilt disease, thereby contributing to plant health improvement.

  2. Resveratrol suppresses calcium-mediated microglial activation and rescues hippocampal neurons of adult rats following acute bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Ji-Nan; Liao, Wen-Chieh; Wu, Un-In; Shyu, Ling-Yuh; Mai, Fu-Der; Chen, Li-You; Chen, Mei-Jung; Youn, Su-Chung; Chang, Hung-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is a serious disease with severe neurological sequelae. The intense calcium-mediated microglial activation and subsequently pro-inflammatory cytokine release plays an important role in eliciting ABM-related oxidative damage. Considering resveratrol possesses significant anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties, the present study aims to determine whether resveratrol would exert beneficial effects on hippocampal neurons following ABM. ABM was induced by inoculating Klebsiella pneumoniae into adult rats intraventricularly. The time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin-B4 (GSA-IB4) and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) immunohistochemistry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as well as malondialdehyde (MDA) measurement were used to examine the calcium expression, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine level, and extent of oxidative stress, respectively. In ABM rats, strong calcium signaling associated with enhanced microglial activation was observed in hippocampus. Increased microglial expression was coincided with intense production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative damage. However, in rats receiving resveratrol after ABM, the calcium intensity, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine and MDA levels were all significantly decreased. Quantitative data showed that much more hippocampal neurons were survived in resveratrol-treated rats following ABM. As resveratrol successfully rescues hippocampal neurons from ABM by suppressing the calcium-mediated microglial activation, therapeutic use of resveratrol may act as a promising strategy to counteract the ABM-induced neurological damage.

  3. Identification of the bacterial protein FtsX as a unique target of chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity against Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Matthew A.; Lowe, David E.; Fisher, Debra J.; Stibitz, Scott; Plaut, Roger D.; Beaber, John W.; Zemansky, Jason; Mehrad, Borna; Glomski, Ian J.; Strieter, Robert M.; Hughes, Molly A.

    2011-01-01

    Chemokines are a family of chemotactic cytokines that function in host defense by orchestrating cellular movement during infection. In addition to this function, many chemokines have also been found to mediate the direct killing of a range of pathogenic microorganisms through an as-yet-undefined mechanism. As an understanding of the molecular mechanism and microbial targets of chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity is likely to lead to the identification of unique, broad-spectrum therapeutic targets for effectively treating infection, we sought to investigate the mechanism by which the chemokine CXCL10 mediates bactericidal activity against the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax. Here, we report that disruption of the gene ftsX, which encodes the transmembrane domain of a putative ATP-binding cassette transporter, affords resistance to CXCL10-mediated antimicrobial effects against vegetative B. anthracis bacilli. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in the absence of FtsX, CXCL10 is unable to localize to its presumed site of action at the bacterial cell membrane, suggesting that chemokines interact with specific, identifiable bacterial components to mediate direct microbial killing. These findings provide unique insight into the mechanism of CXCL10-mediated bactericidal activity and establish, to our knowledge, the first description of a bacterial component critically involved in the ability of host chemokines to target and kill a bacterial pathogen. These observations also support the notion of chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity as an important foundation for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies for treating infections caused by pathogenic, potentially multidrug-resistant microorganisms. PMID:21949405

  4. Identification of the bacterial protein FtsX as a unique target of chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity against Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Matthew A; Lowe, David E; Fisher, Debra J; Stibitz, Scott; Plaut, Roger D; Beaber, John W; Zemansky, Jason; Mehrad, Borna; Glomski, Ian J; Strieter, Robert M; Hughes, Molly A

    2011-10-11

    Chemokines are a family of chemotactic cytokines that function in host defense by orchestrating cellular movement during infection. In addition to this function, many chemokines have also been found to mediate the direct killing of a range of pathogenic microorganisms through an as-yet-undefined mechanism. As an understanding of the molecular mechanism and microbial targets of chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity is likely to lead to the identification of unique, broad-spectrum therapeutic targets for effectively treating infection, we sought to investigate the mechanism by which the chemokine CXCL10 mediates bactericidal activity against the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax. Here, we report that disruption of the gene ftsX, which encodes the transmembrane domain of a putative ATP-binding cassette transporter, affords resistance to CXCL10-mediated antimicrobial effects against vegetative B. anthracis bacilli. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in the absence of FtsX, CXCL10 is unable to localize to its presumed site of action at the bacterial cell membrane, suggesting that chemokines interact with specific, identifiable bacterial components to mediate direct microbial killing. These findings provide unique insight into the mechanism of CXCL10-mediated bactericidal activity and establish, to our knowledge, the first description of a bacterial component critically involved in the ability of host chemokines to target and kill a bacterial pathogen. These observations also support the notion of chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity as an important foundation for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies for treating infections caused by pathogenic, potentially multidrug-resistant microorganisms.

  5. Type III chaperones & Co in bacterial plant pathogens: a set of specialized bodyguards mediating effector delivery.

    PubMed

    Lohou, David; Lonjon, Fabien; Genin, Stéphane; Vailleau, Fabienne

    2013-11-22

    Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacteria possess a type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject bacterial proteins, called type III effectors (T3Es), into host cells through a specialized syringe structure. T3Es are virulence factors that can suppress plant immunity but they can also conversely be recognized by the plant and trigger specific resistance mechanisms. The T3SS and injected T3Es play a central role in determining the outcome of a host-pathogen interaction. Still little is known in plant pathogens on the assembly of the T3SS and the regulatory mechanisms involved in the temporal control of its biosynthesis and T3E translocation. However, recent insights point out the role of several proteins as prime candidates in the role of regulators of the type III secretion (T3S) process. In this review we report on the most recent advances on the regulation of the T3S by focusing on protein players involved in secretion/translocation regulations, including type III chaperones (T3Cs), type III secretion substrate specificity switch (T3S4) proteins and other T3S orchestrators.

  6. Ankyrin-mediated self-protection during cell invasion by the bacterial predator Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Carey; Cadby, Ian T.; Till, Rob; Bui, Nhat Khai; Lerner, Thomas R.; Hughes, William S.; Lee, David J.; Alderwick, Luke J.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Sockett, Elizabeth R.; Lovering, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    Predatory Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus are natural antimicrobial organisms, killing other bacteria by whole-cell invasion. Self-protection against prey-metabolizing enzymes is important for the evolution of predation. Initial prey entry involves the predator's peptidoglycan DD-endopeptidases, which decrosslink cell walls and prevent wasteful entry by a second predator. Here we identify and characterize a self-protection protein from B. bacteriovorus, Bd3460, which displays an ankyrin-based fold common to intracellular pathogens of eukaryotes. Co-crystal structures reveal Bd3460 complexation of dual targets, binding a conserved epitope of each of the Bd3459 and Bd0816 endopeptidases. Complexation inhibits endopeptidase activity and cell wall decrosslinking in vitro. Self-protection is vital — ΔBd3460 Bdellovibrio deleteriously decrosslink self-peptidoglycan upon invasion, adopt a round morphology, and lose predatory capacity and cellular integrity. Our analysis provides the first mechanistic examination of self-protection in Bdellovibrio, documents protection-multiplicity for products of two different genomic loci, and reveals an important evolutionary adaptation to an invasive predatory bacterial lifestyle. PMID:26626559

  7. Ankyrin-mediated self-protection during cell invasion by the bacterial predator Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Carey; Cadby, Ian T; Till, Rob; Bui, Nhat Khai; Lerner, Thomas R; Hughes, William S; Lee, David J; Alderwick, Luke J; Vollmer, Waldemar; Sockett, R Elizabeth; Sockett, Elizabeth R; Lovering, Andrew L

    2015-12-02

    Predatory Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus are natural antimicrobial organisms, killing other bacteria by whole-cell invasion. Self-protection against prey-metabolizing enzymes is important for the evolution of predation. Initial prey entry involves the predator's peptidoglycan DD-endopeptidases, which decrosslink cell walls and prevent wasteful entry by a second predator. Here we identify and characterize a self-protection protein from B. bacteriovorus, Bd3460, which displays an ankyrin-based fold common to intracellular pathogens of eukaryotes. Co-crystal structures reveal Bd3460 complexation of dual targets, binding a conserved epitope of each of the Bd3459 and Bd0816 endopeptidases. Complexation inhibits endopeptidase activity and cell wall decrosslinking in vitro. Self-protection is vital - ΔBd3460 Bdellovibrio deleteriously decrosslink self-peptidoglycan upon invasion, adopt a round morphology, and lose predatory capacity and cellular integrity. Our analysis provides the first mechanistic examination of self-protection in Bdellovibrio, documents protection-multiplicity for products of two different genomic loci, and reveals an important evolutionary adaptation to an invasive predatory bacterial lifestyle.

  8. Structure and primase-mediated activation of a bacterial dodecameric replicative helicase

    PubMed Central

    Bazin, Alexandre; Cherrier, Mickaël V.; Gutsche, Irina; Timmins, Joanna; Terradot, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Replicative helicases are essential ATPases that unwind DNA to initiate chromosomal replication. While bacterial replicative DnaB helicases are hexameric, Helicobacter pylori DnaB (HpDnaB) was found to form double hexamers, similar to some archaeal and eukaryotic replicative helicases. Here we present a structural and functional analysis of HpDnaB protein during primosome formation. The crystal structure of the HpDnaB at 6.7 Å resolution reveals a dodecameric organization consisting of two hexamers assembled via their N-terminal rings in a stack-twisted mode. Using fluorescence anisotropy we show that HpDnaB dodecamer interacts with single-stranded DNA in the presence of ATP but has a low DNA unwinding activity. Multi-angle light scattering and small angle X-ray scattering demonstrate that interaction with the DnaG primase helicase-binding domain dissociates the helicase dodecamer into single ringed primosomes. Functional assays on the proteins and associated complexes indicate that these single ringed primosomes are the most active form of the helicase for ATP hydrolysis, DNA binding and unwinding. These findings shed light onto an activation mechanism of HpDnaB by the primase that might be relevant in other bacteria and possibly other organisms exploiting dodecameric helicases for DNA replication. PMID:26264665

  9. Cooperative role for tetraspanins in adhesin-mediated attachment of bacterial species to human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Green, Luke R; Monk, Peter N; Partridge, Lynda J; Morris, Paul; Gorringe, Andrew R; Read, Robert C

    2011-06-01

    The tetraspanins are a superfamily of transmembrane proteins with diverse functions and can form extended microdomains within the plasma membrane in conjunction with partner proteins, which probably includes receptors for bacterial adhesins. Neisseria meningitidis, the causative agent of meningococcal disease, attaches to host nasopharyngeal epithelial cells via type IV pili and opacity (Opa) proteins. We examined the role of tetraspanin function in Neisseria meningitidis adherence to epithelial cells. Tetraspanins CD9, CD63, and CD151 were expressed by HEC-1-B and DETROIT 562 cells. Coincubation of cells with antibodies against all three tetraspanin molecules used individually or in combination, with recombinant tetraspanin extracellular domains (EC2), or with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) significantly reduced adherence of Neisseria meningitidis. In contrast, recombinant CD81, a different tetraspanin, had no effect on meningococcal adherence. Antitetraspanin antibodies reduced the adherence to epithelial cells of Neisseria meningitidis strain derivatives expressing Opa and pili significantly more than isogenic strains lacking these determinants. Adherence to epithelial cells of strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Neisseria lactamica, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus pneumoniae was also reduced by pretreatment of cells with tetraspanin antibodies and recombinant proteins. These data suggest that tetraspanins are required for optimal function of epithelial adhesion platforms containing specific receptors for Neisseria meningitidis and potentially for multiple species of bacteria.

  10. Bacterial Cell Enlargement Requires Control of Cell Wall Stiffness Mediated by Peptidoglycan Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Richard; Turner, Robert D.; Bailey, Richard G.; Salamaga, Bartłomiej; Mesnage, Stéphane; Mohamad, Sharifah A. S.; Hayhurst, Emma J.; Horsburgh, Malcolm; Hobbs, Jamie K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most bacterial cells are enclosed in a single macromolecule of the cell wall polymer, peptidoglycan, which is required for shape determination and maintenance of viability, while peptidoglycan biosynthesis is an important antibiotic target. It is hypothesized that cellular enlargement requires regional expansion of the cell wall through coordinated insertion and hydrolysis of peptidoglycan. Here, a group of (apparent glucosaminidase) peptidoglycan hydrolases are identified that are together required for cell enlargement and correct cellular morphology of Staphylococcus aureus, demonstrating the overall importance of this enzyme activity. These are Atl, SagA, ScaH, and SagB. The major advance here is the explanation of the observed morphological defects in terms of the mechanical and biochemical properties of peptidoglycan. It was shown that cells lacking groups of these hydrolases have increased surface stiffness and, in the absence of SagB, substantially increased glycan chain length. This indicates that, beyond their established roles (for example in cell separation), some hydrolases enable cellular enlargement by making peptidoglycan easier to stretch, providing the first direct evidence demonstrating that cellular enlargement occurs via modulation of the mechanical properties of peptidoglycan. PMID:26220963

  11. Bacterial cell wall biogenesis is mediated by SEDS and PBP polymerase families functioning semi-autonomously

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hongbaek; Wivagg, Carl N.; Kapoor, Mrinal; Barry, Zachary; Rohs, Patricia D.A.; Suh, Hyunsuk; Marto, Jarrod A.; Garner, Ethan C.; Bernhardt, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-protein complexes organized by cytoskeletal proteins are essential for cell wall biogenesis in most bacteria. Current models of the wall assembly mechanism assume class A penicillin-binding proteins (aPBPs), the targets of penicillin-like drugs, function as the primary cell wall polymerases within these machineries. Here, we use an in vivo cell wall polymerase assay in Escherichia coli combined with measurements of the localization dynamics of synthesis proteins to investigate this hypothesis. We find that aPBP activity is not necessary for glycan polymerization by the cell elongation machinery as is commonly believed. Instead, our results indicate that cell wall synthesis is mediated by two distinct polymerase systems, SEDS-family proteins working within the cytoskeletal machines and aPBP enzymes functioning outside of these complexes. These findings thus necessitate a fundamental change in our conception of the cell wall assembly process in bacteria. PMID:27643381

  12. Bacterial Synthesis of Unusual Sulfonamide and Sulfone Antibiotics by Flavoenzyme-Mediated Sulfur Dioxide Capture.

    PubMed

    Baunach, Martin; Ding, Ling; Willing, Karsten; Hertweck, Christian

    2015-11-02

    Sulfa drugs, such as sulfonilamide and dapsone, are classical antibiotics that have been in clinical use worldwide. Despite the relatively simple architectures, practically no natural products are known to feature such aromatic sulfonamide or diarylsulfone substructures. We report the unexpected discovery of three fully unprecedented, sulfonyl-bridged alkaloid dimers (sulfadixiamycins A-C) from recombinant Streptomyces species harboring the entire xiamycin biosynthesis gene cluster. Sulfadixiamycins exhibit moderate antimycobacterial activities and potent antibiotic activities even against multidrug-resistant bacteria. Gene inactivation, complementation, and biotransformation experiments revealed that a flavin-dependent enzyme (XiaH) plays a key role in sulfadixiamycin biosynthesis. XiaH mediates a radical-based, three-component reaction involving two equivalents of xiamycin and sulfur dioxide, which is reminiscent of radical styrene/SO2 copolymerization.

  13. RPC detector characteristics and performance for INO-ICAL experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Gaur, A.; Hasbuddin, Md.; Naimuddin, Md.

    2016-03-01

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is an approved multi-institutional collaboration neutrino physics project, aimed at building an underground laboratory in the southern India. INO will utilize a large magnetized Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector to study the atmospheric neutrinos, and to explore the unresolved issues related to neutrinos. The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs), interleaved in between iron absorber layers, are going to be used as the active signal readouts for the ICAL experiment at INO. The research and development is carried out to find structural quality and electrical response for RPC electrode materials available within local domain. The assembled 2 mm gap RPCs are tested using cosmic muons for their detection performance. The study also incorporates preliminary results on detector timing and signal induced charge measurements.

  14. INO340 telescope control system: software architecture and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanmehr, Reza; Jafarzadeh, Asghar

    2014-07-01

    The Iranian National Observatory telescope (INO340) is a 3.4m Alt-Az reflecting optical telescope under design and development. It is f/11 Ritchey-Chretien with a 0.3° field-of-view. INO340 telescope control system utilizes a distributed control system paradigm that includes four major systems: Telescope Control System (TCS), Observation System Supervisor (OSS), Interlock System (ILS) and Observatory Monitoring System (OMS). The control system software also employs 3-tiered hierarchical architecture. In this paper, after presenting the fundamental concepts and operations of the INO340 control system, we propose the distributed control system software architecture including technical and functional architecture, middleware and infrastructure design and finally the software development process.

  15. Inclusion of GENIE as neutrino event generator for INO ICAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajmi, Ali; Majumder, Gobinda

    2017-03-01

    The iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector is the proposed underground neutrino-physics experiment in the INO cavern. Its main goal is the determination of sign of 2-3 mass-squared difference, {Δ } m_{32}2 ({=} {m23} - {m22}) in the presence of matter effects, apart from the precise measurement of other neutrino parameters. Like all other neutrino experiments, the INO Collaboration is going to interface its main software code with a neutrino event generator. The GENIE software is best suited for the ICAL experiment. But, it requires a few modifications before being incorporated in ICAL simulation to have better representation of the neutrino flux and to be more user friendly to the INO user. This paper reports all these modifications.

  16. [TREATMENT OF EXTREMELY PREMATURE NEWBORN INFANT WITH INO. CLINICAL CASE].

    PubMed

    Radulova, P; Slancheva, B; Marinov, R

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) from birth in preterm neonates with BPD improves endogenous surfactant function as well as lung growth, angiogenesis, and alveologenesis. As a result there is a reduction in the frequency of the "new" form of BPD in neonates under 28 weeks of gestation and birth weight under 1000 gr. Delivery of inhaled nitric oxide is a new method of prevention of chronic lung disease. According to a large number of randomized trials iNO in premature neonates reduces pulmonary morbidity and leads to a reduction of the mortality in this population of patients. This new therapy does not have serious side effects. We represent a clinical case of extremely premature newborn infant with BPD treated with iNO.

  17. Protein-Adsorbed Magnetic-Nanoparticle-Mediated Assay for Rapid Detection of Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Cowger, Taku A; Yang, Yaping; Rink, David E; Todd, Trever; Chen, Hongmin; Shen, Ye; Yan, Yajun; Xie, Jin

    2017-02-17

    Antibiotic susceptibility tests have been used for years as a crucial diagnostic tool against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, due to a lack of biomarkers specific to resistant types, these approaches are often time-consuming, inaccurate, and inflexible in drug selections. Here, we present a novel susceptibility test method named protein-adsorbed nanoparticle-mediated matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry, or PANMS. Briefly, we adsorb five different proteins (β-casein, α-lactalbumin, human serum albumin, fibrinogen, and avidin) onto the surface of Fe3O4. Upon interaction with bacteria surface, proteins were displaced from the nanoparticle surface, the amounts of which were quantified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. We find that the protein displacement profile was different distinctive among different bacteria strains and, in particular, between wild-type and drug-resistant strains. More excitingly, we observe bacteria resistant to drugs of the same mechanisms share similar displacement profiles on a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) map. This suggests the possibility of using PANMS to identify the type of mechanism behind antibiotic resistance, which was confirmed in a blind test. Given that PANMS is free of drug incubation and the whole procedure takes less than 50 min, it holds great potential as a high-throughput, low-cost, and accurate drug susceptibility test in the clinic.

  18. Bacterial DNA segregation dynamics mediated by the polymerizing protein ParF

    PubMed Central

    Barillà, Daniela; Rosenberg, Mark F; Nobbmann, Ulf; Hayes, Finbarr

    2005-01-01

    Prokaryotic DNA segregation most commonly involves members of the Walker-type ParA superfamily. Here we show that the ParF partition protein specified by the TP228 plasmid is a ParA ATPase that assembles into extensive filaments in vitro. Polymerization is potentiated by ATP binding and does not require nucleotide hydrolysis. Analysis of mutations in conserved residues of the Walker A motif established a functional coupling between filament dynamics and DNA partitioning. The partner partition protein ParG plays two separable roles in the ParF polymerization process. ParF is unrelated to prokaryotic polymerizing proteins of the actin or tubulin families, but is a homologue of the MinD cell division protein, which also assembles into filaments. The ultrastructures of the ParF and MinD polymers are remarkably similar. This points to an evolutionary parallel between DNA segregation and cytokinesis in prokaryotic cells, and reveals a potential molecular mechanism for plasmid and chromosome segregation mediated by the ubiquitous ParA-type proteins. PMID:15775965

  19. Modeling and validation of autoinducer-mediated bacterial gene expression in microfluidic environments

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Caitlin M.; Stoy, William; Su, Peter; Harber, Marie C.; Bardill, J. Patrick; Hammer, Brian K.; Forest, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    Biosensors exploiting communication within genetically engineered bacteria are becoming increasingly important for monitoring environmental changes. Currently, there are a variety of mathematical models for understanding and predicting how genetically engineered bacteria respond to molecular stimuli in these environments, but as sensors have miniaturized towards microfluidics and are subjected to complex time-varying inputs, the shortcomings of these models have become apparent. The effects of microfluidic environments such as low oxygen concentration, increased biofilm encapsulation, diffusion limited molecular distribution, and higher population densities strongly affect rate constants for gene expression not accounted for in previous models. We report a mathematical model that accurately predicts the biological response of the autoinducer N-acyl homoserine lactone-mediated green fluorescent protein expression in reporter bacteria in microfluidic environments by accommodating these rate constants. This generalized mass action model considers a chain of biomolecular events from input autoinducer chemical to fluorescent protein expression through a series of six chemical species. We have validated this model against experimental data from our own apparatus as well as prior published experimental results. Results indicate accurate prediction of dynamics (e.g., 14% peak time error from a pulse input) and with reduced mean-squared error with pulse or step inputs for a range of concentrations (10 μM–30 μM). This model can help advance the design of genetically engineered bacteria sensors and molecular communication devices. PMID:25379076

  20. Glycoconjugates as Mediators of Nitric Oxide Production upon Exposure to Bacterial Spores by Macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiani, Mohamed; Soderberg, Lee; Tarasenko, Olga

    2011-06-01

    Phagocytes generate nitric oxide (NO) in large quantities to combat bacteria. The spore-producing Gram-positive organisms of Bacillus cereus family are causative agents from mild to a life threatening infection in humans and domestic animals. Our group have shown that glycoconjugates (GCs) activate macrophages and enhance killing of Bacillus spores. In this investigation, we will explore the effect of different GCs structures on NO production. The objective of this study is to study effects of GCs 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 on NO release upon exposure to B. cereus and Bacillus anthracis spores by macrophages. Our results demonstrated that GCs activated macrophages and increased NO production using studied GCs ligands compared to macrophage only (p<0.001). GC2 and GC8 were able to further increase NO production in macrophages compared to the B. anthracis spores treated macrophages (p<0.001). Our finding suggests that GCs could be used as potential mediators of NO production in macrophages to fight B. anthracis and other pathogens.

  1. Actin Family Proteins in the Human INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Complex Exhibit Functional Roles in the Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 with Hemin.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuichiro; Murakami, Hirokazu; Akiyama, Yusuke; Katoh, Yasutake; Oma, Yukako; Nishijima, Hitoshi; Shibahara, Kei-Ichi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Harata, Masahiko

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear actin family proteins, comprising of actin and actin-related proteins (Arps), are essential functional components of the multiple chromatin remodeling complexes. The INO80 chromatin remodeling complex, which is evolutionarily conserved and has roles in transcription, DNA replication and repair, consists of actin and actin-related proteins Arp4, Arp5, and Arp8. We generated Arp5 knockout (KO) and Arp8 KO cells from the human Nalm-6 pre-B cell line and used these KO cells to examine the roles of Arp5 and Arp8 in the transcriptional regulation mediated by the INO80 complex. In both of Arp5 KO and Arp8 KO cells, the oxidative stress-induced expression of HMOX1 gene, encoding for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), was significantly impaired. Consistent with these observations, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed that oxidative stress caused an increase in the binding of the INO80 complex to the regulatory sites of HMOX1 in wild-type cells. The binding of INO80 complex to chromatin was reduced in Arp8 KO cells compared to that in the wild-type cells. On the other hand, the binding of INO80 complex to chromatin in Arp5 KO cells was similar to that in the wild-type cells even under the oxidative stress condition. However, both remodeling of chromatin at the HMOX1 regulatory sites and binding of a transcriptional activator to these sites were impaired in Arp5 KO cells, indicating that Arp5 is required for the activation of the INO80 complex. Collectively, these results suggested that these nuclear Arps play indispensable roles in the function of the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex.

  2. Actin Family Proteins in the Human INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Complex Exhibit Functional Roles in the Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 with Hemin

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yuichiro; Murakami, Hirokazu; Akiyama, Yusuke; Katoh, Yasutake; Oma, Yukako; Nishijima, Hitoshi; Shibahara, Kei-ichi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Harata, Masahiko

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear actin family proteins, comprising of actin and actin-related proteins (Arps), are essential functional components of the multiple chromatin remodeling complexes. The INO80 chromatin remodeling complex, which is evolutionarily conserved and has roles in transcription, DNA replication and repair, consists of actin and actin-related proteins Arp4, Arp5, and Arp8. We generated Arp5 knockout (KO) and Arp8 KO cells from the human Nalm-6 pre-B cell line and used these KO cells to examine the roles of Arp5 and Arp8 in the transcriptional regulation mediated by the INO80 complex. In both of Arp5 KO and Arp8 KO cells, the oxidative stress-induced expression of HMOX1 gene, encoding for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), was significantly impaired. Consistent with these observations, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed that oxidative stress caused an increase in the binding of the INO80 complex to the regulatory sites of HMOX1 in wild-type cells. The binding of INO80 complex to chromatin was reduced in Arp8 KO cells compared to that in the wild-type cells. On the other hand, the binding of INO80 complex to chromatin in Arp5 KO cells was similar to that in the wild-type cells even under the oxidative stress condition. However, both remodeling of chromatin at the HMOX1 regulatory sites and binding of a transcriptional activator to these sites were impaired in Arp5 KO cells, indicating that Arp5 is required for the activation of the INO80 complex. Collectively, these results suggested that these nuclear Arps play indispensable roles in the function of the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex. PMID:28270832

  3. A Bacterial Parasite Effector Mediates Insect Vector Attraction in Host Plants Independently of Developmental Changes

    PubMed Central

    Orlovskis, Zigmunds; Hogenhout, Saskia A.

    2016-01-01

    Parasites can take over their hosts and trigger dramatic changes in host appearance and behavior that are typically interpreted as extended phenotypes that promote parasite survival and fitness. For example, Toxoplasma gondii is thought to manipulate the behaviors of infected rodents to aid transmission to cats and parasitic trematodes of the genus Ribeiroia alter limb development in their amphibian hosts to facilitate predation of the latter by birds. Plant parasites and pathogens also reprogram host development and morphology. However, whereas some parasite-induced morphological alterations may have a direct benefit to the fitness of the parasite and may therefore be adaptive, other host alterations may be side effects of parasite infections having no adaptive effects on parasite fitness. Phytoplasma parasites of plants often induce the development of leaf-like flowers (phyllody) in their host plants, and we previously found that the phytoplasma effector SAP54 generates these leaf-like flowers via the degradation of plant MADS-box transcription factors (MTFs), which regulate all major aspects of development in plants. Leafhoppers prefer to reproduce on phytoplasma-infected and SAP54-trangenic plants leading to the hypothesis that leafhopper vectors are attracted to plants with leaf-like flowers. Surprisingly, here we show that leafhopper attraction occurs independently of the presence of leaf-like flowers. First, the leafhoppers were also attracted to SAP54 transgenic plants without leaf-like flowers and to single leaves of these plants. Moreover, leafhoppers were not attracted to leaf-like flowers of MTF-mutant plants without the presence of SAP54. Thus, the primary role of SAP54 is to attract leafhopper vectors, which spread the phytoplasmas, and the generation of leaf-like flowers may be secondary or a side effect of the SAP54-mediated degradation of MTFs. PMID:27446117

  4. Cigarette smoke exposure impairs pulmonary bacterial clearance and alveolar macrophage complement-mediated phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Phipps, John C; Aronoff, David M; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Goel, Deepti; O'Brien, Edmund; Mancuso, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure increases the risk of pulmonary and invasive infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, the most commonly isolated organism from patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Despite this association, the mechanisms by which cigarette smoke exposure diminishes host defense against S. pneumoniae infections are poorly understood. In this study, we compared the responses of BALB/c mice following an intratracheal challenge with S. pneumoniae after 5 weeks of exposure to room air or cigarette smoke in a whole-body exposure chamber in vivo and the effects of cigarette smoke on alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae in vitro. Bacterial burdens in cigarette smoke-exposed mice were increased at 24 and 48 h postinfection, and this was accompanied by a more pronounced clinical appearance of illness, hypothermia, and increased lung homogenate cytokines interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). We also found greater numbers of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid recovered from cigarette smoke-exposed mice following a challenge with heat-killed S. pneumoniae. Interestingly, overnight culture of alveolar macrophages with 1% cigarette smoke extract, a level that did not affect alveolar macrophage viability, reduced complement-mediated phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae, while the ingestion of unopsonized bacteria or IgG-coated microspheres was not affected. This murine model provides robust additional support to the hypothesis that cigarette smoke exposure increases the risk of pneumococcal pneumonia and defines a novel cellular mechanism to help explain this immunosuppressive effect.

  5. Selective Infection of Antigen-Specific B Lymphocytes by Salmonella Mediates Bacterial Survival and Systemic Spreading of Infection

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, Jelle; Martinoli, Chiara; Zagato, Elena; Janssen, Hans; Jorritsma, Tineke; Bar-Ephraïm, Yotam E.; Rescigno, Maria; Neefjes, Jacques; van Ham, S. Marieke

    2012-01-01

    Background The bacterial pathogen Salmonella causes worldwide disease. A major route of intestinal entry involves M cells, providing access to B cell-rich Peyer’s Patches. Primary human B cells phagocytose Salmonella typhimurium upon recognition by the specific surface Ig receptor (BCR). As it is unclear how Salmonella disseminates systemically, we studied whether Salmonella can use B cells as a transport device for spreading. Methodology/Principal Findings Human primary B cells or Ramos cell line were incubated with GFP-expressing Salmonella. Intracellular survival and escape was studied in vitro by live cell imaging, flow cytometry and flow imaging. HEL-specific B cells were transferred into C57BL/6 mice and HEL-expressing Salmonella spreading in vivo was analyzed investigating mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen and blood. After phagocytosis by B cells, Salmonella survives intracellularly in a non-replicative state which is actively maintained by the B cell. Salmonella is later excreted followed by reproductive infection of other cell types. Salmonella-specific B cells thus act both as a survival niche and a reservoir for reinfection. Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific B cells before oral infection of mice showed that these B cells mediate in vivo systemic spreading of Salmonella to spleen and blood. Conclusions/Significance This is a first example of a pathogenic bacterium that abuses the antigen-specific cells of the adaptive immune system for systemic spreading for dissemination of infection. PMID:23209805

  6. Overexpression of bacterial γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase mediates changes in cadmium influx, allocation and detoxification in poplar.

    PubMed

    He, Jiali; Li, Hong; Ma, Chaofeng; Zhang, Yanli; Polle, Andrea; Rennenberg, Heinz; Cheng, Xingqi; Luo, Zhi-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of bacterial γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase in the cytosol of Populus tremula × P. alba produces higher glutathione (GSH) concentrations in leaves, thereby indicating the potential for cadmium (Cd) phytoremediation. However, the net Cd(2+) influx in association with H(+) /Ca(2+) , Cd tolerance, and the underlying molecular and physiological mechanisms are uncharacterized in these poplars. We assessed net Cd(2+) influx, Cd tolerance and the transcriptional regulation of several genes involved in Cd(2+) transport and detoxification in wild-type and transgenic poplars. Poplars exhibited highest net Cd(2+) influxes into roots at pH 5.5 and 0.1 mM Ca(2+) . Transgenics had higher Cd(2+) uptake rates and elevated transcript levels of several genes involved in Cd(2+) transport and detoxification compared with wild-type poplars. Transgenics exhibited greater Cd accumulation in the aerial parts than wild-type plants in response to Cd(2+) exposure. Moreover, transgenic poplars had lower concentrations of O2 ˙(-) and H2 O2 ; higher concentrations of total thiols, GSH and oxidized GSH in roots and/or leaves; and stimulated foliar GSH reductase activity compared with wild-type plants. These results indicate that transgenics are more tolerant of 100 μM Cd(2+) than wild-type plants, probably due to the GSH-mediated induction of the transcription of genes involved in Cd(2+) transport and detoxification.

  7. Highly Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Homologous Recombination Promotes the Rapid Generation of Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes of Pseudorabies Virus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jin-Chao; Tang, Yan-Dong; Zhao, Kuan; Wang, Tong-Yun; Liu, Ji-Ting; Gao, Jia-Cong; Chang, Xiao-Bo; Cui, Hong-Yu; Tian, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Xue-Hui; An, Tong-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are powerful tools for the manipulation of the large genomes of DNA viruses, such as herpesviruses. However, the methods currently used to construct the recombinant viruses, an important intermediate link in the generation of BACs, involve the laborious process of multiple plaque purifications. Moreover, some fastidious viruses may be lost or damaged during these processes, making it impossible to generate BACs from these large-genome DNA viruses. Here, we introduce the CRISPR/Cas9 as a site-specific gene knock-in instrument that promotes the homologs recombination of a linearized transfer vector and the Pseudorabies virus genome through double incisions. The efficiency of recombination is as high as 86%. To our knowledge, this is the highest efficiency ever reported for Pseudorabies virus recombination. We also demonstrate that the positions and distances of the CRISPR/Cas9 single guide RNAs from the homology arms correlate with the efficiency of homologous recombination. Our work show a simple and fast cloning method of BACs with large genome inserted by greatly enhancing the HR efficiencies through CRISPR/Cas9-mediated homology-directed repair mechanism, and this method could be of helpful for manipulating large DNA viruses, and will provide a successful model for insertion of large DNA fragments into other viruses. PMID:28066407

  8. Low-Concentration Ciprofloxacin Selects Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Encoding Genes and Affects Bacterial Taxa in Soil Containing Manure

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ting; Xu, Ying; Zeng, Jie; Zhao, Dong-Hao; Li, Liang; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong; Sun, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The spread of antimicrobial resistance in environment is promoted at least in part by the inappropriate use of antibiotics in animals and humans. The present study was designed to investigate the impact of different concentrations of ciprofloxacin in soil containing manure on the development of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) – encoding genes and the abundance of soil bacterial communities. For these studies, high-throughput next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA, real-time polymerase chain reaction and standard microbiologic culture methods were utilized. We demonstrated that the dissipate rate of relative abundances of some of PMQR-encoding genes, such as qnrS, oqxA and aac(6′)-Ib-cr, were significantly lower with ciprofloxacin 0.04 and 0.4 mg/kg exposure as compared to no-ciprofloxacin control and ciprofloxacin 4 mg/kg exposure during 2 month. Also, the number of ciprofloxacin resistant bacteria was significantly greater in ciprofloxacin 0.04 and 0.4 mg/kg exposure as compared with no-ciprofloxacin control and the ciprofloxacin 4 mg/kg exposure. In addition, lower ciprofloxacin concentration provided a selective advantage for the populations of Xanthomonadales and Bacillales in orders while Agrobacterium, Bacillus, Enterococcus, and Burkholderia in genera. These findings suggest that lower concentration of ciprofloxacin resulted in a slower rate of PMQR-encoding genes dissipation and selected development of ciprofloxacin-resistant bacteria in soil amended with manure. PMID:27847506

  9. iNOS Activation Regulates β-catenin Association with Its Partners in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Deyarina; Rojas, Armando; Herrera, Maria Beatriz; Conlan, R. Steven

    2012-01-01

    Background Signals that disrupt β-catenin association to cadherins may influence the translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus to regulate transcription. Post-translational modification of proteins is a signalling event that may lead to changes in structural conformation, association or function of the target proteins. NO and its derivatives induce nitration of proteins during inflammation. It has been described that animals treated with NO donors showed increased permeability due to modulation of VE-cadherin/catenin complex. We, therefore, aim to evaluate the effect of iNOS activation on the expression, nuclear localisation and function of β-catenin in endothelial cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Expression, nuclear localisation, post-translational modifications and function of β-catenin was analysed by cell fractionation, immunoprecipitation, immunoblots, QRT-PCR and permeability assays in murine endothelial cells (H5V). Influence of macrophage activation on expression of VE-cadherin/p120-catenin/β-catenin complex in co-cultured H5V cells was also assessed. Activation of macrophages to produce NO provoked a decrease in VE-cadherin/p120-catenin/β-catenin expression in H5V cells. Phosphorylation of β-catenin, p120-catenin and VE-cadherin, and reduction in the barrier properties of the cell monolayer was associated with iNOS induction. Moreover, high NO levels provoked nitration of β-catenin, and induced its translocation to the nucleus. In the nucleus of NOS activated cells, nitration levels of β-catenin influenced its association with TCF4 and p65 proteins. High levels of NO altered β-catenin mediated gene expression of NFκB and Wnt target genes without affecting cell viability. Conclusions NOS activity modulates β-catenin post-translational modifications, function and its association with different partners to promote endothelial cell survival. Therapeutic manipulation of iNOS levels may remove a critical cytoprotective mechanism of importance in

  10. ER stress upregulated PGE2/IFNγ-induced IL-6 expression and down-regulated iNOS expression in glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoi, Toru; Honda, Miya; Oba, Tatsuya; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2013-12-01

    The disruption of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function can lead to neurodegenerative disorders, in which inflammation has also been implicated. We investigated the possible correlation between ER stress and immune function using glial cells. We demonstrated that ER stress synergistically enhanced prostaglandin (PG) E2 + interferon (IFN) γ-induced interleukin (IL)-6 production. This effect was mediated through cAMP. Immune-activated glial cells produced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Interestingly, ER stress inhibited PGE2 + IFNγ-induced iNOS expression. Similar results were obtained when cells were treated with dbcAMP + IFNγ. Thus, cAMP has a dual effect on immune reactions; cAMP up-regulated IL-6 expression, but down-regulated iNOS expression under ER stress. Therefore, our results suggest a link between ER stress and immune reactions in neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Mec1, INO80, and the PAF1 complex cooperate to limit transcription replication conflicts through RNAPII removal during replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Jérôme; Gerhold, Christian-Benedikt; Tosi, Alessandro; Hustedt, Nicole; Seeber, Andrew; Sack, Ragna; Herzog, Franz; Pasero, Philippe; Shimada, Kenji; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Gasser, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how cells ensure DNA replication in the face of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII)-mediated transcription, especially under conditions of replicative stress. Here we present genetic and proteomic analyses from budding yeast that uncover links between the DNA replication checkpoint sensor Mec1–Ddc2 (ATR–ATRIP), the chromatin remodeling complex INO80C (INO80 complex), and the transcription complex PAF1C (PAF1 complex). We found that a subset of chromatin-bound RNAPII is degraded in a manner dependent on Mec1, INO80, and PAF1 complexes in cells exposed to hydroxyurea (HU). On HU, Mec1 triggers the efficient removal of PAF1C and RNAPII from transcribed genes near early firing origins. Failure to evict RNAPII correlates inversely with recovery from replication stress: paf1Δ cells, like ino80 and mec1 mutants, fail to restart forks efficiently after stalling. Our data reveal unexpected synergies between INO80C, Mec1, and PAF1C in the maintenance of genome integrity and suggest a mechanism of RNAPII degradation that reduces transcription–replication fork collision. PMID:26798134

  12. HLH-30/TFEB-mediated autophagy functions in a cell-autonomous manner for epithelium intrinsic cellular defense against bacterial pore-forming toxin in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan-Da; Kao, Cheng-Yuan; Liu, Bang-Yu; Huang, Shin-Whei; Kuo, Cheng-Ju; Ruan, Jhen-Wei; Lin, Yen-Hung; Huang, Cheng-Rung; Chen, Yu-Hung; Wang, Horng-Dar; Aroian, Raffi V; Chen, Chang-Shi

    2017-02-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular system that maintains cellular homeostasis by degrading and recycling damaged cellular components. The transcription factor HLH-30/TFEB-mediated autophagy has been reported to regulate tolerance to bacterial infection, but less is known about the bona fide bacterial effector that activates HLH-30 and autophagy. Here, we reveal that bacterial membrane pore-forming toxin (PFT) induces autophagy in an HLH-30-dependent manner in Caenorhabditis elegans. Moreover, autophagy controls the susceptibility of animals to PFT toxicity through xenophagic degradation of PFT and repair of membrane-pore cell-autonomously in the PFT-targeted intestinal cells in C. elegans. These results demonstrate that autophagic pathways and autophagy are induced partly at the transcriptional level through HLH-30 activation and are required to protect metazoan upon PFT intoxication. Together, our data show a new and powerful connection between HLH-30-mediated autophagy and epithelium intrinsic cellular defense against the single most common mode of bacterial attack in vivo.

  13. HLH-30/TFEB-mediated autophagy functions in a cell-autonomous manner for epithelium intrinsic cellular defense against bacterial pore-forming toxin in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan-Da; Kao, Cheng-Yuan; Liu, Bang-Yu; Huang, Shin-Whei; Kuo, Cheng-Ju; Ruan, Jhen-Wei; Lin, Yen-Hung; Huang, Cheng-Rung; Chen, Yu-Hung; Wang, Horng-Dar; Aroian, Raffi V.; Chen, Chang-Shi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular system that maintains cellular homeostasis by degrading and recycling damaged cellular components. The transcription factor HLH-30/TFEB-mediated autophagy has been reported to regulate tolerance to bacterial infection, but less is known about the bona fide bacterial effector that activates HLH-30 and autophagy. Here, we reveal that bacterial membrane pore-forming toxin (PFT) induces autophagy in an HLH-30-dependent manner in Caenorhabditis elegans. Moreover, autophagy controls the susceptibility of animals to PFT toxicity through xenophagic degradation of PFT and repair of membrane-pore cell-autonomously in the PFT-targeted intestinal cells in C. elegans. These results demonstrate that autophagic pathways and autophagy are induced partly at the transcriptional level through HLH-30 activation and are required to protect metazoan upon PFT intoxication. Together, our data show a new and powerful connection between HLH-30-mediated autophagy and epithelium intrinsic cellular defense against the single most common mode of bacterial attack in vivo. PMID:27875098

  14. PR-13/Thionin but not PR-1 mediates bacterial resistance in Nicotiana attenuata in nature, and neither influences herbivore resistance.

    PubMed

    Rayapuram, Cbgowda; Wu, Jianqiang; Haas, Christiane; Baldwin, Ian T

    2008-07-01

    Increases in pathogenesis-related (PR) transcripts are commonly interpreted as evidence of plants' resistance responses to pathogens; however, few studies have examined whether increases in PR proteins protect plants growing under natural conditions. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3,000, which is virulent and causes disease in Arabidopsis, is also pathogenic to the native tobacco Nicotiana attenuata. N. attenuata responds to P. syringae pv. tomato DC3,000's challenges with increases in salicylic acid and transcripts of at least two PR genes, PR-1 and PR13/Thionin. To determine if either of these PR proteins functions in bacterial resistance, we independently silenced both genes by RNAi and found that only PR-13/Thionin mediates resistance to P. syringae pv. tomato DC3,000 in glasshouse experiments. When NaPR-1- and NaThionin-silenced plants were transplanted into the plant's native habitat in the Great Basin Desert of Utah, opportunistic Pseudomonas spp. performed better on NaThionin-silenced plants compared with NaPR-1-silenced and wild-type (WT) plants, and accounted for increased plant mortality. The native herbivore community of N. attenuata attacked both NaPR-1- and PR-13/NaThionin-silenced plants to the same degree as it did in WT plants, indicating that neither PR protein provides resistance to herbivores. Although PR-1 is generally considered a marker gene of disease resistance, we found no evidence that it has an antimicrobial function. In contrast, PR-13/NaThionin is clearly an ecologically relevant defense protein involved in resisting pathogens in N. attenuata.

  15. Stimulation of Microbially Mediated Arsenic Release in Bangladesh Aquifers by Young Carbon Indicated by Radiocarbon Analysis of Sedimentary Bacterial Lipids.

    PubMed

    Whaley-Martin, K J; Mailloux, B J; van Geen, A; Bostick, B C; Silvern, R F; Kim, C; Ahmed, K M; Choudhury, I; Slater, G F

    2016-07-19

    The sources of reduced carbon driving the microbially mediated release of arsenic to shallow groundwater in Bangladesh remain poorly understood. Using radiocarbon analysis of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and potential carbon pools, the abundance and carbon sources of the active, sediment-associated, in situ bacterial communities inhabiting shallow aquifers (<30 m) at two sites in Araihazar, Bangladesh, were investigated. At both sites, sedimentary organic carbon (SOC) Δ(14)C signatures of -631 ± 54‰ (n = 12) were significantly depleted relative to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of +24 ± 30‰ and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of -230 ± 100‰. Sediment-associated PLFA Δ(14)C signatures (n = 10) at Site F (-167‰ to +20‰) and Site B (-163‰ to +21‰) were highly consistent and indicated utilization of carbon sources younger than the SOC, likely from the DOC pool. Sediment-associated PLFA Δ(14)C signatures were consistent with previously determined Δ(14)C signatures of microbial DNA sampled from groundwater at Site F indicating that the carbon source for these two components of the subsurface microbial community is consistent and is temporally stable over the two years between studies. These results demonstrate that the utilization of relatively young carbon sources by the subsurface microbial community occurs at sites with varying hydrology. Further they indicate that these young carbon sources drive the metabolism of the more abundant sediment-associated microbial communities that are presumably more capable of Fe reduction and associated release of As. This implies that an introduction of younger carbon to as of yet unaffected sediments (such as those comprising the deeper Pleistocene aquifer) could stimulate microbial communities and result in arsenic release.

  16. Interaction of the Chromatin Remodeling Protein hINO80 with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shruti; Kaur, Taniya; Brahmachari, Vani

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a highly conserved DNA binding domain in INO80 subfamily predicted that INO80 directly interacts with DNA and we demonstrated its DNA binding activity in vitro. Here we report the consensus motif recognized by the DBINO domain identified by SELEX method and demonstrate the specific interaction of INO80 with the consensus motif. We show that INO80 significantly down regulates the reporter gene expression through its binding motif, and the repression is dependent on the presence of INO80 but not YY1 in the cell. The interaction is lost if specific residues within the consensus motif are altered. We identify a large number of potential target sites of INO80 in the human genome through in silico analysis that can grouped into three classes; sites that contain the recognition sequence for INO80 and YY1, only YY1 and only INO80. We demonstrate the binding of INO80 to a representative set of sites in HEK cells and the correlated repressive histone modifications around the binding motif. In the light of the role of INO80 in homeotic gene regulation in Drosophila as an Enhancer of trithorax and polycomb protein (ETP) that can modify the effect of both repressive complexes like polycomb as well as the activating complex like trithorax, it remains to be seen if INO80 can act as a recruiter of chromatin modifying complexes. PMID:27428271

  17. Posttranscriptional regulation of human iNOS by the NO/cGMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sala, D; Cernuda-Morollón, E; Díaz-Cazorla, M; Rodríguez-Pascual, F; Lamas, S

    2001-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP may exert positive or negative effects on inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression. We have explored the influence of the NO/cGMP pathway on iNOS levels in human mesangial cells. Inhibition of NOS activity during an 8-h stimulation with IL-1beta plus tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha reduced iNOS levels, while NO donors amplified iNOS induction threefold. However, time-course studies revealed a subsequent inhibitory effect of NO donors on iNOS protein and mRNA levels. This suggests that NO may contribute both to iNOS induction and downregulation. Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) activation may be involved in these effects. Inhibition of sGC attenuated IL-1beta/TNF-alpha-elicited iNOS induction and reduced NO-driven amplification. Interestingly, cGMP analogs also modulated iNOS protein and mRNA levels in a biphasic manner. Inhibition of transcription unveiled a negative posttranscriptional modulation of the iNOS transcript by NO and cGMP at late times of induction. Supplementation with 8-bromo-cGMP (8-BrcGMP) reduced iNOS mRNA stability by 50%. These observations evidence a complex feedback regulation of iNOS expression, in which posttranscriptional mechanisms may play an important role.

  18. The dual role of iNOS in cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Vanini, Frederica; Kashfi, Khosrow; Nath, Niharika

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the 10 smallest molecules found in nature. It is a simple gaseous free radical whose predominant functions is that of a messenger through cGMP. In mammals, NO is synthesized by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) of which there are three isoforms. Neuronal (nNOS, NOS1) and endothelial (eNOS, NOS3) are constitutive calcium-dependent forms of the enzyme that regulate neural and vascular function respectively. The third isoform (iNOS, NOS2), is calcium-independent and is inducible. In many tumors, iNOS expression is high, however, the role of iNOS during tumor development is very complex and quite perplexing, with both promoting and inhibiting actions having been described. This review will aim to summarize the dual actions of iNOS-derived NO showing that the microenvironment of the tumor is a contributing factor to these observations and ultimately to cellular outcomes. PMID:26335399

  19. Phosphorylation of human INO80 is involved in DNA damage tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Dai; Waki, Mayumi; Umezawa, Masaki; Aoki, Yuka; Utsugi, Takahiko; Ohtsu, Masaya; Murakami, Yasufumi

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of hINO80 significantly reduced PCNA ubiquitination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of hINO80 significantly reduced nuclear dots intensity of RAD18 after UV irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Western blot analyses showed phosphorylated hINO80 C-terminus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of phosphorylation mutant hINO80 reduced PCNA ubiquitination. -- Abstract: Double strand breaks (DSBs) are the most serious type of DNA damage. DSBs can be generated directly by exposure to ionizing radiation or indirectly by replication fork collapse. The DNA damage tolerance pathway, which is conserved from bacteria to humans, prevents this collapse by overcoming replication blockages. The INO80 chromatin remodeling complex plays an important role in the DNA damage response. The yeast INO80 complex participates in the DNA damage tolerance pathway. The mechanisms regulating yINO80 complex are not fully understood, but yeast INO80 complex are necessary for efficient proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) ubiquitination and for recruitment of Rad18 to replication forks. In contrast, the function of the mammalian INO80 complex in DNA damage tolerance is less clear. Here, we show that human INO80 was necessary for PCNA ubiquitination and recruitment of Rad18 to DNA damage sites. Moreover, the C-terminal region of human INO80 was phosphorylated, and overexpression of a phosphorylation-deficient mutant of human INO80 resulted in decreased ubiquitination of PCNA during DNA replication. These results suggest that the human INO80 complex, like the yeast complex, was involved in the DNA damage tolerance pathway and that phosphorylation of human INO80 was involved in the DNA damage tolerance pathway. These findings provide new insights into the DNA damage tolerance pathway in mammalian cells.

  20. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) drives mTOR pathway activation and proliferation of human melanoma by reversible nitrosylation of TSC2

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Rivera, Esther; Jayaraman, Padmini; Parikh, Falguni; Davies, Michael A.; Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Izadmehr, Sudeh; Milton, Denái R.; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Grimm, Elizabeth A.; Estrada, Yeriel; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio; Sikora, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the cancers of fastest-rising incidence in the world. iNOS is overexpressed in melanoma and other cancers, and previous data suggest that iNOS and nitric oxide (NO) drive survival and proliferation of human melanoma cells. However, specific mechanisms through which this occurs are poorly defined. One candidate is the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, which plays a major role in proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis of melanoma and other cancers. We used the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay to test the hypothesis that melanoma growth is regulated by iNOS-dependent mTOR pathway activation. Both pharmacologic inhibition and siRNA-mediated gene silencing of iNOS suppressed melanoma proliferation and in vivo growth on the CAM in human melanoma models. This was associated with strong downregulation of mTOR pathway activation by Western blot analysis of p-mTOR, p-P70S6K, p-S6RP, and p-4EBP1. iNOS expression and NO were associated with reversible nitrosylation of TSC2, and inhibited dimerization of TSC2 with its inhibitory partner TSC1, enhancing GTPase activity of its target Rheb, a critical activator of mTOR signaling. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor specimens from stage III melanoma patients showed a significant correlation between iNOS expression levels and expression of mTOR pathway members. Exogenously-supplied NO was also sufficient to reverse mTOR pathway inhibition by the B-Raf inhibitor Vemurafenib. In summary, covalent modification of TSC2 by iNOS-derived NO is associated with impaired TSC2/TSC1 dimerization, mTOR pathway activation, and proliferation of human melanoma. This model is consistent with the known association of iNOS overexpression and poor prognosis in melanoma and other cancers. PMID:24398473

  1. Inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticular function by chronic interleukin-6 exposure via iNOS in adult ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin-Wen; Chen, Qian; Kennedy, Richard H; Liu, Shi J

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 has been shown to decrease cardiac contractility via a nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent pathway during acute exposure. We previously reported that IL-6 decreases contractility and increases inducible NOS (iNOS) in adult rat ventricular myocytes (ARVM) after 2 h exposure. The goal of this study was to investigate the cellular mechanism underlying this chronic IL-6-induced negative inotropy and the role of iNOS. Pretreatment for 2 h with 10 ng ml−1 IL-6 decreased the kinetics of cell shortening (CS) and contractile responsiveness to Ca2+o ([Ca2+]o from 0 to 2 mm) in ARVM. We first examined whether IL-6 reduced Ca2+ influx via L-type Ca2+-channel current (ICa,L). Whole-cell ICa,L in ARVM was measured under conditions similar to those used for CS measurements, and it was found to be unaltered by IL-6. The sarcoplasmic reticular (SR) function was then assessed by examining postrest potentiation (PRP) and caffeine responsiveness of CS. Results showed that treatment with IL-6 for 2 h significantly decreased PRP, which was concomitant with a decrease in the phosphorylation of phospholamban. Following removal of IL-6, PRP and responsiveness to 10 mm caffeine were also reduced. Meanwhile, the IL-6-induced increase in nitric oxide (NO) production after 2 h (but not 1 h) was abolished by NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA) and 2-amino-5,6-dihydro-6-methyl-4H-1,3-thiazine (AMT; a selective inhibitor of iNOS). Furthermore, IL-6-elicited suppressions of PRP and responsiveness to caffeine and Ca2+o were abolished by L-NMMA and AMT. Thus, these results suggest that activation of iNOS mediates IL-6-induced inhibition of SR function in ARVM during chronic exposure. PMID:15845578

  2. Pathogenesis of Streptococcus urinary tract infection depends on bacterial strain and β-hemolysin/cytolysin that mediates cytotoxicity, cytokine synthesis, inflammation and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Sophie Y.; Sullivan, Matthew J.; Ipe, Deepak S.; Smith, Joshua P.; Cripps, Allan W.; Ulett, Glen C.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae can cause urinary tract infection (UTI) including cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). The early host-pathogen interactions that occur during S. agalactiae UTI and subsequent mechanisms of disease pathogenesis are poorly defined. Here, we define the early interactions between human bladder urothelial cells, monocyte-derived macrophages, and mouse bladder using uropathogenic S. agalactiae (UPSA) 807 and ABU-causing S. agalactiae (ABSA) 834 strains. UPSA 807 adhered, invaded and killed bladder urothelial cells more efficiently compared to ABSA 834 via mechanisms including low-level caspase-3 activation, and cytolysis, according to lactate dehydrogenase release measures and cell viability. Severe UPSA 807-induced cytotoxicity was mediated entirely by the bacterial β-hemolysin/cytolysin (β-H/C) because an β-H/C-deficient UPSA 807 isogenic mutant, UPSA 807ΔcylE, was not cytotoxic in vitro; the mutant was also significantly attenuated for colonization in the bladder in vivo. Analysis of infection-induced cytokines, including IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in vitro and in vivo revealed that cytokine and chemokine responses were dependent on expression of β-H/C that also elicited severe bladder neutrophilia. Thus, virulence of UPSA 807 encompasses adhesion to, invasion of and killing of bladder cells, pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine responses that elicit neutrophil infiltration, and β-H/C-mediated subversion of innate immune-mediated bacterial clearance from the bladder. PMID:27383371

  3. Comparative metabolomic analysis highlights the involvement of sugars and glycerol in melatonin-mediated innate immunity against bacterial pathogen in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yongqiang; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J; Shi, Haitao

    2015-10-28

    Melatonin is an important secondary messenger in plant innate immunity against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringe pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 in the salicylic acid (SA)- and nitric oxide (NO)-dependent pathway. However, the metabolic homeostasis in melatonin-mediated innate immunity is unknown. In this study, comparative metabolomic analysis found that the endogenous levels of both soluble sugars (fructose, glucose, melibose, sucrose, maltose, galatose, tagatofuranose and turanose) and glycerol were commonly increased after both melatonin treatment and Pst DC3000 infection in Arabidopsis. Further studies showed that exogenous pre-treatment with fructose, glucose, sucrose, or glycerol increased innate immunity against Pst DC3000 infection in wild type (Col-0) Arabidopsis plants, but largely alleviated their effects on the innate immunity in SA-deficient NahG plants and NO-deficient mutants. This indicated that SA and NO are also essential for sugars and glycerol-mediated disease resistance. Moreover, exogenous fructose, glucose, sucrose and glycerol pre-treatments remarkably increased endogenous NO level, but had no significant effect on the endogenous melatonin level. Taken together, this study highlights the involvement of sugars and glycerol in melatonin-mediated innate immunity against bacterial pathogen in SA and NO-dependent pathway in Arabidopsis.

  4. New evidence for Cu-decorated binary-oxides mediating bacterial inactivation/mineralization in aerobic media.

    PubMed

    Rtimi, S; Pulgarin, C; Bensimon, M; Kiwi, J

    2016-08-01

    Binary oxide semiconductors TiO2-ZrO2 and Cu-decorated TiO2-ZrO2 (TiO2-ZrO2-Cu) uniform films were sputtered on polyester (PES). These films were irradiated under low intensity solar simulated light and led to bacterial inactivation in aerobic and anaerobic media as evaluated by CFU-plate counting. But bacterial mineralization was only induced by TiO2-ZrO2-Cu in aerobic media. The highly oxidative radicals generated on the films surface under light were identified by the use of appropriate scavengers. The hole generated on the TiO2-ZrO2 films is shown to be the main specie leading to bacterial inactivation. TiO2-ZrO2 and Cu-decorated TiO2-ZrO2 films release Zr and Ti <1ppb and Cu 4.6ppb/cm(2) as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) This level is far below the citotoxicity permitted level allowed for mammalian cells suggesting that bacterial disinfection proceeds through an oligodynamic effect. By Fourier transform attenuated infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) the systematic shift of the predominating νs(CH2) vibrational-rotational peak making up most of the bacterial cell-wall content in C was monitored. Based on this evidence a mechanism suggested leading to CH bond stretching followed by cell lysis and cell death. Bacterial inactivation cycling was observed on TiO2-ZrO2-Cu showing the stability of these films leading to bacterial inactivation.

  5. SIV Infection-Mediated Changes in Gastrointestinal Bacterial Microbiome and Virome Are Associated with Immunodeficiency and Prevented by Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Handley, Scott A; Desai, Chandni; Zhao, Guoyan; Droit, Lindsay; Monaco, Cynthia L; Schroeder, Andrew C; Nkolola, Joseph P; Norman, Megan E; Miller, Andrew D; Wang, David; Barouch, Dan H; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-09

    AIDS caused by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection is associated with gastrointestinal disease, systemic immune activation, and, in cross-sectional studies, changes in the enteric virome. Here we performed a longitudinal study of a vaccine cohort to define the natural history of changes in the fecal metagenome in SIV-infected monkeys. Matched rhesus macaques were either uninfected or intrarectally challenged with SIV, with a subset receiving the Ad26 vaccine, an adenovirus vector expressing the viral Env/Gag/Pol antigens. Progression of SIV infection to AIDS was associated with increased detection of potentially pathogenic viruses and bacterial enteropathogens. Specifically, adenoviruses were associated with an increased incidence of gastrointestinal disease and AIDS-related mortality. Viral and bacterial enteropathogens were largely absent from animals protected by the vaccine. These data suggest that the SIV-associated gastrointestinal disease is associated with the presence of both viral and bacterial enteropathogens and that protection against SIV infection by vaccination prevents enteropathogen emergence.

  6. Bacterial Diversity in Ships' Ballast Water, Ballast-Water Exchange, and Implications for Ship-Mediated Dispersal of Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Lymperopoulou, Despoina S; Dobbs, Fred C

    2017-02-21

    Using next-generation DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we analyzed the composition and diversity of bacterial assemblages in ballast water from tanks of 17 commercial ships arriving to Hampton Roads, Virginia (USA) following voyages in the North Atlantic Ocean. Amplicon sequencing analysis showed the heterogeneous assemblages were (1) dominated by Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and unclassified Bacteria; (2) temporally distinct (June vs August/September); and (3) highly fidelitous among replicate samples. Whether tanks were exchanged at sea or not, their bacterial assemblages differed from those of local, coastal water. Compositional data suggested at-sea exchange did not fully flush coastal Bacteria from all tanks; there were several instances of a genetic geographic signal. Quantitative PCR yielded no Escherichia coli and few instances of Vibrio species. Salinity, but not ballast-water age or temperature, contributed significantly to bacterial diversity. Whether anthropogenic mixing of marine Bacteria restructures their biogeography remains to be tested.

  7. Acacia ferruginea inhibits inflammation by regulating inflammatory iNOS and COX-2.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan; Guruvayoorappan, Chandrasekaran

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a local defensive reaction of a host to cellular injury or infection. Prolonged inflammation can contribute to pathogenesis of many disorders. Identification of naturally occurring phytoconstituents that can suppress inflammatory mediators can lead to the discovery of anti-inflammatory therapeutics. Acacia ferruginea is used traditionally to treat numerous ailments including hemorrhage, irritable bowel syndrome and leprosy. The present study evaluated the anti-inflammatory activity of A. ferruginea extract against acute (carrageenan) and chronic (formaldehyde) inflammation in Balb/c mice. Pre-treatment with A. ferruginea extract (10 mg/kg BW) for 5 consecutive days via intraperitonial (IP) administration significantly inhibited subsequent induction of paw edema in both models; the effects were comparable to that of the standard drug indomethacin. The results also showed the A. ferruginea extract significantly inhibited nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and iNOS expression (as measured in serum), diminished inflammation in - and neutrophil infiltration to - the paw tissues and led to a reduction in the number of COX-2(+) immunoreative cells (as evidenced by histologic and immunohistochemical analyses) in the paws relative to those in paws of mice that received the irritants only. Further, in vitro studies showed the extract could significantly scavenge free radicals generated as in DPPH and NO radical generating assays. Taken together, the results showed that A. ferruginea extract imparted potent anti-oxidant and -inflammatory effects, in part by maintaining oxidative homeostasis, inhibiting NO synthesis and suppressing iNOS and COX-2 expression and so could potentially be exploited as a potential plant-based medication against inflammatory disorders.

  8. Nitrosyl iodide, INO: A combined ab initio and high-resolution spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailleux, S.; Duflot, D.; Aiba, S.; Nakahama, S.; Ozeki, H.

    2016-04-01

    In the nitrosyl halides series (XNO, where X = F, Cl, Br, I), INO is the only chemical species whose rotational spectrum has not been reported. Nitrosyl iodide, together with the nitryl (INO2), nitrite (IONO) and nitrate (IONO2) iodides, is believed to impact tropospheric ozone levels. Guided by our quantum chemical calculations, we report the detection of INO in the gas phase by high-resolution spectroscopy for the first time. INO was generated by mixing continuously I2 and NO. The measurement and least-squares analysis of 173 a-type rotational transitions resulted in the accurate determination of molecular parameters.

  9. PEX7 and EBP50 Target iNOS to the Peroxisome in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Loughran, Patricia A.; Stolz, Donna B.; Barrick, Stacey R.; Wheeler, David S.; Friedman, Peter A.; Rachubinski, Richard A.; Watkins, Simon C.; Billiar, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    iNOS localizes to both the cytosol and peroxisomes in hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. The structural determinants for iNOS localization are not known. One plausible mechanism for iNOS localization to the peroxisome is through the interaction with peroxisomal import proteins PEX5 or PEX7. siRNA knockdown of PEX7 reduced iNOS colocalization with the peroxisomal protein PMP70. Proteomic studies using MALDI-MS identified iNOS association with the 50-kD ezrin binding PDZ protein (EBP50). Confocal microscopy studies and immunoelectron microscopy confirmed iNOS association with EBP50, with greatest colocalization occurring at 8 hours of cytokine exposure. EBP50 associated with peroxisomes in a PEX5 and PEX7-dependent manner. iNOS localization to peroxisomes was contingent on EBP50 expression in LPS-treated mice. Thus, iNOS targeting to peroxisomes in hepatocytes involves interaction with PEX7 and EBP50. The targeting of iNOS protein to the peroxisome may shift the balance of metabolic processes that rely on heme proteins susceptible to modification by radical oxygen and nitrogen radicals. PMID:23474170

  10. Isolated thallus-associated compounds from the macroalga Fucus vesiculosus mediate bacterial surface colonization in the field similar to that on the natural alga.

    PubMed

    Lachnit, Tim; Wahl, Martin; Harder, Tilmann

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether surface-associated compounds isolated from the macroalga Fucus vesiculosus had the potential to mediate microbial and/or macrobial epibiosis similar to that on the natural alga. To selectively yield thallus-associated compounds and avoid contamination by intracellular algal compounds, cell lysis was monitored by surface microscopy of algal cells and chemical profiling of algal surface extracts by coupled gas chromatography mass spectroscopy. The optimized extraction resulted in polar and non-polar algal surface extracts. The non-polar surface extract was immobilized in hydrogel, the polar surface extract was homogeneously perfused through the gel to ensure a temporally constant delivery of polar extract components. During a 7 day field trial, bacterial biofilms were formed on control gels and gels featuring polar and/or non-polar extract components. PERMANOVA revealed that bacterial community profiles on controls and on gels featuring polar or non-polar extract were significantly different from the profile on F. vesiculosus, while the profile on the gels bearing both polar and non-polar extracts was not. Moreover, the polar surface extracts inhibited the settlement of barnacle cyprids. Considering the pronounced effects of bacterial biofilms on invertebrate larval settlement, these results suggest that algal surface chemistry affects macrofouling not only directly but also indirectly, via its control of biofilm formation and composition.

  11. Prophage-mediated dynamics of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ populations, the destructive bacterial pathogens of Citrus Huanglongbing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prophages are highly dynamic components in the bacterial genome and play an important role in intraspecies variations. There are at least two prophages in the chromosomes of Floridian ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las) isolates. In this study, seven additional types of variants were identifie...

  12. Endothelial glutathione-S-transferase A4-4 protects against oxidative stress and modulates iNOS expression through NF-{kappa}B translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yongzhen; Yang Yusong; Xu Ya; Lick, Scott D.; Awasthi, Yogesh C.; Boor, Paul J.

    2008-07-15

    Our recent work in endothelial cells and human atherosclerotic plaque showed that overexpression of glutathione-S-tranferases (GSTs) in endothelium protects against oxidative damage from aldehydes such as 4-HNE. Nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B plays a crucial role during inflammation and immune responses by regulating the expression of inducible genes such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). 4-HNE induces apoptosis and affects NF-{kappa}B mediated gene expression, but conflicting results on 4-HNE's effect on NF-{kappa}B have been reported. We compared the effect of 4-HNE on iNOS and the NF-{kappa}B pathway in control mouse pancreatic islet endothelial (MS1) cells and those transfected with mGSTA4, a {alpha}-class GST with highest activity toward 4-HNE. When treated with 4-HNE, mGSTA4-transfected cells showed significant upregulation of iNOS and nitric oxide (NO) through (NF)-{kappa}B (p65) translocation in comparison with wild-type or vector-transfected cells. Immunohistochemical studies of early human plaques showed lower 4-HNE content and upregulation of iNOS, which we take to indicate that GSTA4-4 induction acts as an enzymatic defense against high levels of 4-HNE, since 4-HNE accumulated in more advanced plaques, when detoxification and exocytotic mechanisms are likely to be overwhelmed. These studies suggest that GSTA4-4 may play an important defensive role against atherogenesis through detoxification of 4-HNE and upregulation of iNOS.

  13. Opa+ Neisseria gonorrhoeae Exhibits Reduced Survival in Human Neutrophils Via Src Family Kinase-Mediated Bacterial Trafficking Into Mature Phagolysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. Brittany; Ball, Louise M.; Daily, Kylene P.; Martin, Jennifer N.; Columbus, Linda; Criss, Alison K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary During gonorrheal infection, there is a heterogeneous population of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) varied in their expression of opacity-associated (Opa) proteins. While Opa proteins are important for bacterial attachment and invasion of epithelial cells, Opa+ Gc has a survival defect after exposure to neutrophils. Here, we use constitutively Opa- and OpaD+ Gc in strain background FA1090 to show that Opa+ Gc is more sensitive to killing inside adherent, chemokine-treated primary human neutrophils due to increased bacterial residence in mature, degradative phagolysosomes that contain primary and secondary granule antimicrobial content. Although Opa+ Gc stimulates a potent oxidative burst, neutrophil killing of Opa+ Gc was instead attributable to non-oxidative components, particularly neutrophil proteases and the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein. Blocking interaction of Opa+ Gc with carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) or inhibiting Src family kinase signaling, which is downstream of CEACAM activation, enhanced the survival of Opa+ Gc in neutrophils. Src family kinase signaling was required for fusion of Gc phagosomes with primary granules to generate mature phagolysosomes. Conversely, ectopic activation of Src family kinases or coinfection with Opa+ Gc resulted in decreased survival of Opa- Gc in neutrophils. From these results, we conclude that Opa protein expression is an important modulator of Gc survival characteristics in neutrophils by influencing phagosome dynamics and thus bacterial exposure to neutrophils’ full antimicrobial arsenal. PMID:25346239

  14. NK cells modulate the lung dendritic cell-mediated Th1/Th17 immunity during intracellular bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Sudhanshu; Peng, Ying; Gao, Xiaoling; Joyee, Antony G; Wang, Shuhe; Bai, Hong; Zhao, Lei; Yang, Jie; Yang, Xi

    2015-10-01

    The impact of the interaction between NK cells and lung dendritic cells (LDCs) on the outcome of respiratory infections is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect and mechanism of NK cells on the function of LDCs during intracellular bacterial lung infection of Chlamydia muridarum in mice. We found that the naive mice receiving LDCs from C. muridarum-infected NK-cell-depleted mice (NK-LDCs) showed more serious body weight loss, bacterial burden, and pathology upon chlamydial challenge when compared with the recipients of LDCs from infected sham-treated mice (NK+LDCs). Cytokine analysis of the local tissues of the former compared with the latter exhibited lower levels of Th1 (IFN-γ) and Th17 (IL-17), but higher levels of Th2 (IL-4), cytokines. Consistently, NK-LDCs were less efficient in directing C. muridarum-specific Th1 and Th17 responses than NK+LDCs when cocultured with CD4(+) T cells. In NK cell/LDC coculture experiments, the blockade of NKG2D receptor reduced the production of IL-12p70, IL-6, and IL-23 by LDCs. The neutralization of IFN-γ in the culture decreased the production of IL-12p70 by LDCs, whereas the blockade of TNF-α resulted in diminished IL-6 production. Our findings demonstrate that NK cells modulate LDC function to elicit Th1/Th17 immunity during intracellular bacterial infection.

  15. Chlamydia trachomatis Intercepts Golgi-Derived Sphingolipids through a Rab14-Mediated Transport Required for Bacterial Development and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Capmany, Anahí; Damiani, María Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis are obligate intracellular bacteria that survive and replicate in a bacterial-modified phagosome called inclusion. As other intracellular parasites, these bacteria subvert the phagocytic pathway to avoid degradation in phagolysosomes and exploit trafficking pathways to acquire both energy and nutrients essential for their survival. Rabs are host proteins that control intracellular vesicular trafficking. Rab14, a Golgi-related Rab, controls Golgi to endosomes transport. Since Chlamydia establish a close relationship with the Golgi apparatus, the recruitment and participation of Rab14 on inclusion development and bacteria growth were analyzed. Time course analysis revealed that Rab14 associated with inclusions by 10 h post infection and was maintained throughout the entire developmental cycle. The recruitment was bacterial protein synthesis-dependent but independent of microtubules and Golgi integrity. Overexpression of Rab14 dominant negative mutants delayed inclusion enlargement, and impaired bacteria replication as determined by IFU. Silencing of Rab14 by siRNA also decreased bacteria multiplication and infectivity. By electron microscopy, aberrant bacteria were observed in cells overexpressing the cytosolic negative Rab14 mutant. Our results showed that Rab14 facilitates the delivery of sphingolipids required for bacterial development and replication from the Golgi to chlamydial inclusions. Novel anti-chlamydial therapies could be developed based on the knowledge of how bacteria subvert host vesicular transport events through Rabs manipulation. PMID:21124879

  16. Microbubble-mediated ultrasound promotes accumulation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell to the prostate for treating chronic bacterial prostatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Shanhong; Han, Guangwei; Shang, Yonggang; Liu, Chengcheng; Cui, Dong; Yu, Shuangjiang; Liao, Bin; Ao, Xiang; Li, Guangzhi; Li, Longkun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) is an intractable disease. Although bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) are able to regulate inflammation in CBP, the effect of microbubble-mediated ultrasound- induced accumulation of BMMSCs on CBP remains unclear. To address this gap, a model of CBP was established in SD rats, which were then treated with BMMSCs alone (BMMSC group), BMMSCs with ultrasound (ultrasound group), BMMSCs with microbubble-mediated ultrasound (MMUS group) and compared with a healthy control group. A therapeutic-ultrasound apparatus was used to treat the prostate in the presence of circulating microbubbles and BMMSCs. The BMMSC distribution was assessed with in vivo imaging, and the prostate structure with light microscopy. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR, ELISA, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the expressions of TNF-α and IL-1β. More BMMSCs were found in the prostate in the MMUS group than in the CBP, ultrasound, and BMMSC groups. Inflammatory cell infiltration, fibrous tissue hyperplasia, and tumor-like epithelial proliferation were significantly reduced in the MMUS group, as were the mRNA and protein expressions of TNF-α and IL-1β. Microbubble-mediated ultrasound-induced accumulation of BMMSCs can inhibit inflammation and decrease TNF-α and IL-1β expressions in the prostate of CBP rats, suggesting that this method may be therapeutic for CPB. PMID:26797392

  17. The RNA binding protein TIAR is involved in the regulation of human iNOS expression.

    PubMed

    Fechir, M; Linker, K; Pautz, A; Hubrich, T; Kleinert, H

    2005-09-05

    Human inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression is regulated by post-transcriptional mechanisms. The 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the human iNOS mRNA contains AU-rich elements (ARE), which are known to be important for the regulation of mRNA stability. The 3'-UTR of the human iNOS mRNA has been shown to regulate human iNOS mRNA expression post-transcriptionally. One RNA-binding protein known to interact with AREs and to regulate mRNA stability is the T cell intracellular antigen-1-related protein (TIAR). In RNA binding studies TIAR displayed high affinity binding to the human iNOS 3'-UTR sequence. In RNase protection experiments, the cytokine incubation needed for iNOS expression did not change TIAR expression in DLD-1 cells. However, overexpression of TIAR in human DLD-1 colon carcinoma cells resulted in enhanced cytokine-induced iNOS expression. In conclusion, TIAR seems to be involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of human iNOS expression.

  18. Evaluation of a multi-functional nanocarrier for targeted breast cancer iNOS gene therapy.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Helen O; Zholobenko, Alek V; Wang, Yuhua; Canine, Brenda; Robson, Tracy; Hirst, David G; Hatefi, Arash

    2011-02-28

    The present study determines whether the novel designer biomimetic vector (DBV) can condense and deliver the cytotoxic iNOS gene to breast cancer cells to achieve a therapeutic effect. We have previously shown the benefits of iNOS for cancer gene therapy but the stumbling block to future development has been the delivery system. The DBV was expressed, purified and complexed with the iNOS gene. The particle size and charge were determined via dynamic light scattering techniques. The toxicity of the DBV/iNOS nanoparticles was quantified using the cell toxicity and clonogenic assays. Over expression of iNOS was confirmed via Western blotting and Griess test. The DBV delivery system fully condensed the iNOS gene with nanoparticles less than 100nm. Transfection with the DBV/iNOS nanoparticles resulted in a maximum of 62% cell killing and less than 20% clonogenicity. INOS overexpression was confirmed and total nitrite levels were in the range of 18μM. We report for the first time that the DBV can successfully deliver iNOS and achieve a therapeutic effect. There is significant cytotoxicity coupled with evidence of a bystander effect. We conclude that the success of the DBV fusion protein in the delivery of iNOS in vitro is worthy of future in vivo experiments.

  19. Software architecture of INO340 telescope control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanmehr, Reza; Khosroshahi, Habib

    2016-08-01

    The software architecture plays an important role in distributed control system of astronomical projects because many subsystems and components must work together in a consistent and reliable way. We have utilized a customized architecture design approach based on "4+1 view model" in order to design INOCS software architecture. In this paper, after reviewing the top level INOCS architecture, we present the software architecture model of INOCS inspired by "4+1 model", for this purpose we provide logical, process, development, physical, and scenario views of our architecture using different UML diagrams and other illustrative visual charts. Each view presents INOCS software architecture from a different perspective. We finish the paper by science data operation of INO340 and the concluding remarks.

  20. INO340 telescope control system: middleware requirements, design, and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalchian, Hengameh; Ravanmehr, Reza

    2016-07-01

    The INO340 Control System (INOCS) is being designed in terms of a distributed real-time architecture. The real-time (soft and firm) nature of many processes inside INOCS causes the communication paradigm between its different components to be time-critical and sensitive. For this purpose, we have chosen the Data Distribution Service (DDS) standard as the communications middleware which is itself based on the publish-subscribe paradigm. In this paper, we review and compare the main middleware types, and then we illustrate the middleware architecture of INOCS and its specific requirements. Finally, we present the experimental results, performed to evaluate our middleware in order to ensure that it meets our requirements.

  1. INO80 is Required for Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chenchen; Zou, Jing; Zou, Shujuan; Li, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a great source in bone tissue engineering. However, how to improve the efficiency of MSC osteogenesis remains a big challenge in bone regenerative medicine. Here, we characterized the role of INO80 chromatin remodeling complex in osteogenic differentiation of MSC. We showed that silencing of subunits of INO80 reduced the mineral deposition of MSC in osteogenic condition. Moreover, INO80-silencing MSC cultured in osteogenic condition expressed lower mRNA levels of osteoblast-specific genes, including Runx2, Osx, Col1α1 and OCN. INO80 can interact with Wdr5 in MSC and positively regulates the canonical Wnt signaling transduction. Importantly, the mice implanted with INO80-silencing MSC displayed less bone formation. Overall, our study provides a new mechanism regarding osteogenic differentiation of MSC and could potentially be applied in clinical tissue engineering and treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27804957

  2. Highly selective detection of bacterial alarmone ppGpp with an off-on fluorescent probe of copper-mediated silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pu; Wang, Yi; Chang, Yong; Xiong, Zu Hong; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2013-11-15

    In this study, a facile strategy for highly selective and sensitive detection of bacterial alarmone, ppGpp, which is generated when bacteria face stress circumstances such as nutritional deprivation, has been established by developing an off-on fluorescent probe of Cu(2+)-mediated silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs). This work not only achieves highly selective detection of ppGpp in a broad range concentration of 2-200 μM, but also improves our understanding of the specific recognitions among DNA-Ag NCs, Cu(2+), and ppGpp. The present strategy, together with other reports on the Ag NCs-related analytical methods, has also identified that Ag NCs functionalized with different molecules on their surfaces can be engineered fluorescent probes for a wide range of applications such as biosensing and bioimaging.

  3. 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside-mediated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation induces protective innate responses in bacterial endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Giri, Shailendra; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-12-01

    The retina is considered to be the most metabolically active tissue in the body. However, the link between energy metabolism and retinal inflammation, as incited by microbial infection such as endophthalmitis, remains unexplored. In this study, using a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) endophthalmitis, we demonstrate that the activity (phosphorylation) of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase alpha (AMPKα), a cellular energy sensor and its endogenous substrate; acetyl-CoA carboxylase is down-regulated in the SA-infected retina. Intravitreal administration of an AMPK activator, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR), restored AMPKα and acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylation. AICAR treatment reduced both the bacterial burden and intraocular inflammation in SA-infected eyes by inhibiting NF-kB and MAP kinases (p38 and JNK) signalling. The anti-inflammatory effects of AICAR were diminished in eyes pretreated with AMPK inhibitor, Compound C. The bioenergetics (Seahorse) analysis of SA-infected microglia and bone marrow-derived macrophages revealed an increase in glycolysis, which was reinstated by AICAR treatment. AICAR also reduced the expression of SA-induced glycolytic genes, including hexokinase 2 and glucose transporter 1 in microglia, bone marrow-derived macrophages and the mouse retina. Interestingly, AICAR treatment enhanced the bacterial phagocytic and intracellular killing activities of cultured microglia, macrophages and neutrophils. Furthermore, AMPKα1 global knockout mice exhibited increased susceptibility towards SA endophthalmitis, as evidenced by increased inflammatory mediators and bacterial burden and reduced retinal function. Together, these findings provide the first evidence that AMPK activation promotes retinal innate defence in endophthalmitis by modulating energy metabolism and that it can be targeted therapeutically to treat ocular infections.

  4. Siderophore-Mediated Iron Acquisition Influences Motility and Is Required for Full Virulence of the Xylem-Dwelling Bacterial Phytopathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii

    PubMed Central

    Burbank, Lindsey; Mohammadi, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Iron is a key micronutrient for microbial growth but is often present in low concentrations or in biologically unavailable forms. Many microorganisms overcome this challenge by producing siderophores, which are ferric-iron chelating compounds that enable the solubilization and acquisition of iron in a bioactive form. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, the causal agent of Stewart's wilt of sweet corn, produces a siderophore under iron-limiting conditions. The proteins involved in the biosynthesis and export of this siderophore are encoded by the iucABCD-iutA operon, which is homologous to the aerobactin biosynthetic gene cluster found in a number of enteric pathogens. Mutations in iucA and iutA resulted in a decrease in surface-based motility that P. stewartii utilizes during the early stages of biofilm formation, indicating that active iron acquisition impacts surface motility for P. stewartii. Furthermore, bacterial movement in planta is also dependent on a functional siderophore biosynthesis and uptake pathway. Most notably, siderophore-mediated iron acquisition is required for full virulence in the sweet corn host, indicating that active iron acquisition is essential for pathogenic fitness for this important xylem-dwelling bacterial pathogen. PMID:25326304

  5. Siderophore-mediated iron acquisition influences motility and is required for full virulence of the xylem-dwelling bacterial phytopathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii.

    PubMed

    Burbank, Lindsey; Mohammadi, Mojtaba; Roper, M Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Iron is a key micronutrient for microbial growth but is often present in low concentrations or in biologically unavailable forms. Many microorganisms overcome this challenge by producing siderophores, which are ferric-iron chelating compounds that enable the solubilization and acquisition of iron in a bioactive form. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, the causal agent of Stewart's wilt of sweet corn, produces a siderophore under iron-limiting conditions. The proteins involved in the biosynthesis and export of this siderophore are encoded by the iucABCD-iutA operon, which is homologous to the aerobactin biosynthetic gene cluster found in a number of enteric pathogens. Mutations in iucA and iutA resulted in a decrease in surface-based motility that P. stewartii utilizes during the early stages of biofilm formation, indicating that active iron acquisition impacts surface motility for P. stewartii. Furthermore, bacterial movement in planta is also dependent on a functional siderophore biosynthesis and uptake pathway. Most notably, siderophore-mediated iron acquisition is required for full virulence in the sweet corn host, indicating that active iron acquisition is essential for pathogenic fitness for this important xylem-dwelling bacterial pathogen.

  6. Dissecting Bacterial Cell Wall Entry and Signaling in Eukaryotic Cells: an Actin-Dependent Pathway Parallels Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Gram-positive bacterial cell wall (CW) peptidoglycan-teichoic acid complex is released into the host environment during bacterial metabolism or death. It is a highly inflammatory Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) ligand, and previous in vivo studies have demonstrated its ability to recapitulate pathological features of pneumonia and meningitis. We report that an actin-dependent pathway is involved in the internalization of the CW by epithelial and endothelial cells, in addition to the previously described platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr)-dependent uptake pathway. Unlike the PAFr-dependent pathway, which is mediated by clathrin and dynamin and does not lead to signaling, the alternative pathway is sensitive to 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA) and engenders Rac1, Cdc42, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Upon internalization by this macropinocytosis-like pathway, CW is trafficked to lysosomes. Intracellular CW trafficking is more complex than previously recognized and suggests multiple points of interaction with and without innate immune signaling. PMID:28049146

  7. Systematic Analysis of Mycobacterial Acylation Reveals First Example of Acylation-mediated Regulation of Enzyme Activity of a Bacterial Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Anshika; Arora, Gunjan; Virmani, Richa; Kundu, Parijat; Khanna, Tanya; Sajid, Andaleeb; Misra, Richa; Joshi, Jayadev; Yadav, Vikas; Samanta, Sintu; Saini, Neeru; Pandey, Amit K; Visweswariah, Sandhya S; Hentschker, Christian; Becher, Dörte; Gerth, Ulf; Singh, Yogendra

    2015-10-23

    Protein lysine acetylation is known to regulate multiple aspects of bacterial metabolism. However, its presence in mycobacterial signal transduction and virulence-associated proteins has not been studied. In this study, analysis of mycobacterial proteins from different cellular fractions indicated dynamic and widespread occurrence of lysine acetylation. Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins regulating diverse physiological processes were then selected and expressed in the surrogate host Mycobacterium smegmatis. The purified proteins were analyzed for the presence of lysine acetylation, leading to the identification of 24 acetylated proteins. In addition, novel lysine succinylation and propionylation events were found to co-occur with acetylation on several proteins. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase B (PtpB), a secretory phosphatase that regulates phosphorylation of host proteins and plays a critical role in Mycobacterium infection, is modified by acetylation and succinylation at Lys-224. This residue is situated in a lid region that covers the enzyme's active site. Consequently, acetylation and succinylation negatively regulate the activity of PtpB.

  8. Use of recombination-mediated genetic engineering for construction of rescue human cytomegalovirus bacterial artificial chromosome clones.

    PubMed

    Dulal, Kalpana; Silver, Benjamin; Zhu, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology has contributed immensely to manipulation of larger genomes in many organisms including large DNA viruses like human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The HCMV BAC clone propagated and maintained inside E. coli allows for accurate recombinant virus generation. Using this system, we have generated a panel of HCMV deletion mutants and their rescue clones. In this paper, we describe the construction of HCMV BAC mutants using a homologous recombination system. A gene capture method, or gap repair cloning, to seize large fragments of DNA from the virus BAC in order to generate rescue viruses, is described in detail. Construction of rescue clones using gap repair cloning is highly efficient and provides a novel use of the homologous recombination-based method in E. coli for molecular cloning, known colloquially as recombineering, when rescuing large BAC deletions. This method of excising large fragments of DNA provides important prospects for in vitro homologous recombination for genetic cloning.

  9. The mammalian INO80 chromatin remodeling complex is required for replication stress recovery

    PubMed Central

    Vassileva, Ivelina; Yanakieva, Iskra; Peycheva, Michaela; Gospodinov, Anastas; Anachkova, Boyka

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies have implicated the yeast INO80 chromatin remodeling complex in DNA replication, but the function of the human INO80 complex during S phase remains poorly understood. Here, we have systematically investigated the involvement of the catalytic subunit of the human INO80 complex during unchallenged replication and under replication stress by following the effects of its depletion on cell survival, S-phase checkpoint activation, the fate of individual replication forks, and the consequences of fork collapse. We report that INO80 was specifically needed for efficient replication elongation, while it was not required for initiation of replication. In the absence of the Ino80 protein, cells became hypersensitive to hydroxyurea and displayed hyperactive ATR-Chk1 signaling. Using bulk and fiber labeling of DNA, we found that cells deficient for Ino80 and Arp8 had impaired replication restart after treatment with replication inhibitors and accumulated double-strand breaks as evidenced by the formation of γ-H2AX and Rad51 foci. These data indicate that under conditions of replication stress mammalian INO80 protects stalled forks from collapsing and allows their subsequent restart. PMID:25016522

  10. The Ino80 chromatin-remodeling complex restores chromatin structure during UV DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sovan; Kiely, Rhian

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin structure is modulated during deoxyribonucleic acid excision repair, but how this is achieved is unclear. Loss of the yeast Ino80 chromatin-remodeling complex (Ino80-C) moderately sensitizes cells to ultraviolet (UV) light. In this paper, we show that INO80 acts in the same genetic pathway as nucleotide excision repair (NER) and that the Ino80-C contributes to efficient UV photoproduct removal in a region of high nucleosome occupancy. Moreover, Ino80 interacts with the early NER damage recognition complex Rad4–Rad23 and is recruited to chromatin by Rad4 in a UV damage–dependent manner. Using a modified chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we find that chromatin disruption during UV lesion repair is normal, whereas the restoration of nucleosome structure is defective in ino80 mutant cells. Collectively, our work suggests that Ino80 is recruited to sites of UV lesion repair through interactions with the NER apparatus and is required for the restoration of chromatin structure after repair. PMID:21135142

  11. A2B adenosine receptor blockade enhances macrophage-mediated bacterial phagocytosis and improves polymicrobial sepsis survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Belikoff, Bryan G; Hatfield, Stephen; Georgiev, Peter; Ohta, Akio; Lukashev, Dmitriy; Buras, Jon A; Remick, Daniel G; Sitkovsky, Michail

    2011-02-15

    Antimicrobial treatment strategies must improve to reduce the high mortality rates in septic patients. In noninfectious models of acute inflammation, activation of A2B adenosine receptors (A2BR) in extracellular adenosine-rich microenvironments causes immunosuppression. We examined A2BR in antibacterial responses in the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis. Antagonism of A2BR significantly increased survival, enhanced bacterial phagocytosis, and decreased IL-6 and MIP-2 (a CXC chemokine) levels after CLP in outbred (ICR/CD-1) mice. During the CLP-induced septic response in A2BR knockout mice, hemodynamic parameters were improved compared with wild-type mice in addition to better survival and decreased plasma IL-6 levels. A2BR deficiency resulted in a dramatic 4-log reduction in peritoneal bacteria. The mechanism of these improvements was due to enhanced macrophage phagocytic activity without augmenting neutrophil phagocytosis of bacteria. Following ex vivo LPS stimulation, septic macrophages from A2BR knockout mice had increased IL-6 and TNF-α secretion compared with wild-type mice. A therapeutic intervention with A2BR blockade was studied by using a plasma biomarker to direct therapy to those mice predicted to die. Pharmacological blockade of A2BR even 32 h after the onset of sepsis increased survival by 65% in those mice predicted to die. Thus, even the late treatment with an A2BR antagonist significantly improved survival of mice (ICR/CD-1) that were otherwise determined to die according to plasma IL-6 levels. Our findings of enhanced bacterial clearance and host survival suggest that antagonism of A2BRs offers a therapeutic target to improve macrophage function in a late treatment protocol that improves sepsis survival.

  12. Rapid and efficient introduction of a foreign gene into bacterial artificial chromosome-cloned varicella vaccine by Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition

    SciTech Connect

    Somboonthum, Pranee; Koshizuka, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Shigefumi; Matsuura, Masaaki; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Michiaki; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2010-06-20

    Using a rapid and reliable system based on Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition, we have successfully constructed a recombinant Oka varicella vaccine (vOka) expressing the mumps virus (MuV) fusion protein (F). The backbone of the vector was our previously reported vOka-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) genome. We inserted the transposon Tn7 attachment sequence, LacZ{alpha}-mini-attTn7, into the region between ORF12 and ORF13 to generate a vOka-BAC-Tn genome. The MuV-F expressing cassette was transposed into the vOka-BAC genome at the mini-attTn7 transposition site. MuV-F protein was expressed in recombinant virus, rvOka-F infected cells. In addition, the MuV-F protein was cleaved in the rvOka-F infected cells as in MuV-infected cells. The growth of rvOka-F was similar to that of the original recombinant vOka without the F gene. Thus, we show that Tn7-mediated transposition is an efficient method for introducing a foreign gene expression cassette into the vOka-BAC genome as a live virus vector.

  13. The peroxidase-mediated biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a H2O2-induced SBR using in-situ production of peroxidase: Biodegradation experiments and bacterial identification.

    PubMed

    Shekoohiyan, Sakine; Moussavi, Gholamreza; Naddafi, Kazem

    2016-08-05

    A bacterial peroxidase-mediated oxidizing process was developed for biodegrading total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). Almost complete biodegradation (>99%) of high TPH concentrations (4g/L) was attained in the bioreactor with a low amount (0.6mM) of H2O2 at a reaction time of 22h. A specific TPH biodegradation rate as high as 44.3mgTPH/gbiomass×h was obtained with this process. The reaction times required for complete biodegradation of TPH concentrations of 1, 2, 3, and 4g/L were 21, 22, 28, and 30h, respectively. The catalytic activity of hydrocarbon catalyzing peroxidase was determined to be 1.48U/mL biomass. The biodegradation of TPH in seawater was similar to that in fresh media (no salt). A mixture of bacteria capable of peroxidase synthesis and hydrocarbon biodegradation including Pseudomonas spp. and Bacillus spp. were identified in the bioreactor. The GC/MS analysis of the effluent indicated that all classes of hydrocarbons could be well-degraded in the H2O2-induced SBR. Accordingly, the peroxidase-mediated process is a promising method for efficiently biodegrading concentrated TPH-laden saline wastewater.

  14. India-based neutrino observatory (INO): Physics reach and status report

    SciTech Connect

    Indumathi, D.

    2015-07-15

    We present a review of the physics reach and current status of the proposed India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). We briefly outline details of the INO location and the present status of detector development. We then present the physics goals and simulation studies of the main detector, the magnetised Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector, to be housed in INO. The ICAL detector would make precision measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters with atmospheric neutrinos including a measurement of the neutrino mass hierarchy. Additional synergies with other experiments due to the complete insensitivity of ICAL to the CP phase are also discussed.

  15. Identification of efflux-mediated multi-drug resistance in bacterial clinical isolates by two simple methods.

    PubMed

    Martins, Marta; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Amaral, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    Two simple, instrument-free, user-friendly methods that can readily be implemented by a routine microbiology laboratory are described for the detection of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) isolates that overexpress efflux pump (EP) systems responsible for the MDR phenotype. The first method employs the universal EP substrate ethidium bromide (EB) at varying concentrations in agar-containing plates upon which the contents of an overnight culture are swabbed as spokes of a wheel. In this method, named the EB-agar cartwheel method, it is assumed that the smallest concentration of EB that produces fluorescence of the bacterial mass represents the highest concentration of EB that the bacteria can exclude. Consequently, as the efflux system(s) of a given MDR clinical bacterial isolate is overexpressed relative to that of a reference strain, the minimal concentration of EB producing fluorescence is significantly greater. A simple formula is provided which affords the ranking of MDR clinical isolates with respect to the degree of their efflux capacity. The second method, which can be used after the first one, determines whether the MDR phenotype is based upon an overexpressed efflux system. This method employs a 24-well microplate with separate wells containing or lacking an efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) and Kirby-Bauer discs that correspond to the antibiotics to which the MDR strain is resistant. After the wells are inoculated with the MDR clinical isolate, the plate is incubated overnight and each well is evaluated by eye for evidence of growth. Comparison of growth to the relevant control enables the observer to determine the following outcomes: no growth produced by the EPI-antibiotic combination (i.e., reversal of antibiotic resistance); reduced growth produced by the EPI-antibiotic combination; no difference in growth, i.e., EPI does not affect the resistance to the given antibiotic. If the first method showed that there was a significant difference between the minimum

  16. Interferon gamma and interleukin 4 stimulate prolonged expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in human airway epithelium through synthesis of soluble mediators.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, F H; Uetani, K; Haque, S J; Williams, B R; Dweik, R A; Thunnissen, F B; Calhoun, W; Erzurum, S C

    1997-01-01

    Human respiratory epithelium expresses inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) continuously in vivo, however mechanisms responsible for maintenance of expression are not known. We show that IFNgamma is sufficient for induction of iNOS in primary human airway epithelial cells (HAEC) in vitro, and IL-4 potentiates IFNgamma-induced iNOS expression in HAEC through stabilization of iNOS mRNA. IFNgamma/IL-4- induced iNOS expression in HAEC was delayed in onset and prolonged with expression up to 1 wk. Removal of overlying culture media resulted in loss of expression, while transfer of conditioned media induced iNOS mRNA in other HAEC. IFNgamma and IL-4 stimulation activated STAT1 and STAT6 in HAEC, but conditioned media transfer to HAEC produced even higher levels of STAT1 activation than achieved by direct addition of cytokines. Although cytokine induction of iNOS was dependent on new protein synthesis, conditioned media induction of iNOS in HAEC was not. Further, removal of overlying culture media from cells at different times after cytokine stimulation demonstrated that mediator synthesis and/or secretion important for induction and maintenance of iNOS occurs early after cytokine stimulation. In conclusion, a combination of IFNgamma/ IL-4, which occurs naturally in the lung epithelial lining fluid, leads to maintenance of iNOS expression in human airway epithelium through production of soluble mediators and stabilization of mRNA. PMID:9259582

  17. Cooperative Role for Tetraspanins in Adhesin-Mediated Attachment of Bacterial Species to Human Epithelial Cells ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Green, Luke R.; Monk, Peter N.; Partridge, Lynda J.; Morris, Paul; Gorringe, Andrew R.; Read, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    The tetraspanins are a superfamily of transmembrane proteins with diverse functions and can form extended microdomains within the plasma membrane in conjunction with partner proteins, which probably includes receptors for bacterial adhesins. Neisseria meningitidis, the causative agent of meningococcal disease, attaches to host nasopharyngeal epithelial cells via type IV pili and opacity (Opa) proteins. We examined the role of tetraspanin function in Neisseria meningitidis adherence to epithelial cells. Tetraspanins CD9, CD63, and CD151 were expressed by HEC-1-B and DETROIT 562 cells. Coincubation of cells with antibodies against all three tetraspanin molecules used individually or in combination, with recombinant tetraspanin extracellular domains (EC2), or with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) significantly reduced adherence of Neisseria meningitidis. In contrast, recombinant CD81, a different tetraspanin, had no effect on meningococcal adherence. Antitetraspanin antibodies reduced the adherence to epithelial cells of Neisseria meningitidis strain derivatives expressing Opa and pili significantly more than isogenic strains lacking these determinants. Adherence to epithelial cells of strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Neisseria lactamica, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus pneumoniae was also reduced by pretreatment of cells with tetraspanin antibodies and recombinant proteins. These data suggest that tetraspanins are required for optimal function of epithelial adhesion platforms containing specific receptors for Neisseria meningitidis and potentially for multiple species of bacteria. PMID:21464080

  18. Anethum graveloens flower extracts inhibited a lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response by blocking iNOS expression and NF-κB activity in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Jae; Shin, Yusu; Lee, Kwang Ho; Kim, Tack-Joong

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a system used by a host to defend against the presence of bacteria, viruses, or yeasts. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the plasma membranes of macrophages are activated when they recognize the molecular structure of a virus or bacterium. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an outer cell-wall component of Gram-negative bacteria, initiates an inflammatory process via TLR4. We investigated the effect of the extract of Anethum graveloens flowers (AGFs) on LPS-mediated inflammation in RAW 264.7 cells. The extract markedly suppressed nitric oxide generation in a concentration-dependent manner in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. It inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the mRNA expression of cytokines such as interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-6 in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. It also inhibited iNOS protein levels in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. In addition, AGF decreased the LPS-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. AGF inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt, an upstream molecule of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway, and thus inhibited NF-κB activity in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest that AGF exerts an anti-inflammatory effect in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells by inhibiting iNOS expression and blocking the NF-κB pathway.

  19. Triclosan Resistance in a Bacterial Fish Pathogen, Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, is Mediated by an Enoyl Reductase, FabV.

    PubMed

    Khan, Raees; Lee, Myung Hwan; Joo, Hae-Jin; Jung, Yong-Hoon; Ahmad, Shabir; Choi, Jin-Hee; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2015-04-01

    Triclosan, the widely used biocide, specifically targets enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) in the bacterial fatty acid synthesis system. Although the fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida exhibits triclosan resistance, the nature of this resistance has not been elucidated. Here, we aimed to characterize the triclosan resistance of A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida causing furunculosis. The fosmid library of triclosan-resistant A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida was constructed to select a fosmid clone showing triclosan resistance. With the fosmid clone showing triclosan resistance, a subsequent secondary library search resulted in the selection of subclone pTSR-1. DNA sequence analysis of pTSR-1 revealed the presence of a chromosomal-borne fabV-encoding ENR homolog. The ENR of A. salmonicida (FabVas) exhibited significant homology with previously known FabV, including the catalytic domain YX(8)K. fabVas introduction into E. coli dramatically increased its resistance to triclosan. Heterologous expression of FabVas might functionally replace the triclosan-sensitive FabI in vivo to confer E. coli with triclosan resistance. A genome-wide search for fabVas homologs revealed the presence of an additional fabV gene (fabVas2) paralog in A. salmonicida strains and the fabVas orthologs from other gram-negative fish pathogens. Both of the potential FabV ENRs expressed similarly with or without triclosan supplement. This is the first report about the presence of two potential FabV ENRs in a single pathogenic bacterium. Our result suggests that triclosan-resistant ENRs are widely distributed in various bacteria in nature, and the wide use of this biocide can spread these triclosan-tolerant ENRs among fish pathogens and other pathogenic bacteria.

  20. Inositoylated platelet-activating factor (Ino-C2-PAF) modulates dynamic lymphocyte-endothelial cell interactions and alleviates psoriasis-like skin inflammation in two complementary mouse models.

    PubMed

    Forkel, Susann; Schön, Margarete; Hildmann, Annette; Claßen, Anna; John, Swen-Malte; Danker, Kerstin; Schön, Michael P

    2014-10-01

    Psoriasis, a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)-governed inflammatory disorder with prominent dysregulation of cutaneous vascular functions, has evolved into a model disorder for studying anti-inflammatory therapies. We present experimental in vitro and in vivo data on 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-(2-(myo-inositolyl)-ethyl)-sn-glycero-3-(R/S)-phosphatidyl-choline (Ino-C2-PAF), the lead compound of a class of synthetic glycosylated phospholipids, in anti-inflammatory therapy. Ino-C2-PAF strongly induced apoptosis only in TNFα-stimulated, but not in untreated human vascular endothelial cells. Moreover, TNFα-induced endothelial adhesion molecules that mediated the rolling and firm adhesion of leukocytes (vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (VCAM-1), E-selectin, and ICAM-1) were selectively downregulated by Ino-C2-PAF. Similarly, expression of L-selectin, VCAM-1 receptor α4β1 integrin , and lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells was reduced without induction of apoptosis. Functionally, these changes were accompanied by significant impairment of rolling and adhesion of human peripheral blood lymphocytes on TNFα-activated endothelial cells in a dynamic flow chamber system. When the therapeutic potential of Ino-C2-PAF was assessed in two complementary mouse models of psoriasis, K5.hTGFβ1 transgenic and JunB/c-Jun-deficient mice, Ino-C2-PAF led to significant alleviation of the clinical symptoms and normalized the pathological cutaneous changes including vascularization. There were no overt adverse effects. These findings suggested that Ino-C2-PAF is a potential candidate in the therapy of inflammatory skin diseases that include abnormal vascular functions.

  1. A Methanol Extract of Adansonia digitata L. Leaves Inhibits Pro-Inflammatory iNOS Possibly via the Inhibition of NF-κB Activation.

    PubMed

    Ayele, Yihunie; Kim, Jung-Ah; Park, Eunhee; Kim, Ye-Jung; Retta, Negussie; Dessie, Gulelat; Rhee, Sang-Ki; Koh, Kwangoh; Nam, Kung-Woo; Kim, Hee Seon

    2013-03-01

    This study examined the total polyphenol content of eight wild edible plants from Ethiopia and their effect on NO production in Raw264.7 cells. Owing to its relatively high polyphenol concentration and inhibition of NO production, the methanol extract of Adansonia digitata L. leaf (MEAD) was subjected to detailed evaluation of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Antioxidant effects were assessed by measuring free-radical-scavenging activity using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and oxygen-radical-absorbance capacity (ORAC) assays, while anti-inflammatory effects were assessed by measuring inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. In the ORAC assay, MEAD was 10.2 times more potent than vitamin C at eliminating peroxyl radicals. In DPPH assay, MEAD also showed a strong ROS scavenging effect. MEAD significantly inhibited iNOS activity (IC50=28.6 μg/ml) of LPS-stimulated Raw264.7 cells. We also investigated the relationship between iNOS expression and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. MEAD inhibited IκBα degradation and NF-κB translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus in LPS-induced RAW264.7 cells without significant cytotoxic effects, as confirmed by MTT assay. These results suggest that MEAD inhibits anti-inflammatory iNOS expression, which might be related to the elimination of peroxyl radicals and thus the inhibition of IκBα-mediated NF-κB signal transduction.

  2. A Methanol Extract of Adansonia digitata L. Leaves Inhibits Pro-Inflammatory iNOS Possibly via the Inhibition of NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ayele, Yihunie; Kim, Jung-Ah; Park, Eunhee; Kim, Ye-Jung; Retta, Negussie; Dessie, Gulelat; Rhee, Sang-Ki; Koh, Kwangoh; Nam, Kung-Woo; Kim, Hee Seon

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the total polyphenol content of eight wild edible plants from Ethiopia and their effect on NO production in Raw264.7 cells. Owing to its relatively high polyphenol concentration and inhibition of NO production, the methanol extract of Adansonia digitata L. leaf (MEAD) was subjected to detailed evaluation of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Antioxidant effects were assessed by measuring free-radical-scavenging activity using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and oxygen-radical-absorbance capacity (ORAC) assays, while anti-inflammatory effects were assessed by measuring inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. In the ORAC assay, MEAD was 10.2 times more potent than vitamin C at eliminating peroxyl radicals. In DPPH assay, MEAD also showed a strong ROS scavenging effect. MEAD significantly inhibited iNOS activity (IC50=28.6 μg/ml) of LPS-stimulated Raw264.7 cells. We also investigated the relationship between iNOS expression and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. MEAD inhibited IκBα degradation and NF-κB translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus in LPS-induced RAW264.7 cells without significant cytotoxic effects, as confirmed by MTT assay. These results suggest that MEAD inhibits anti-inflammatory iNOS expression, which might be related to the elimination of peroxyl radicals and thus the inhibition of IκBα-mediated NF-κB signal transduction. PMID:24009873

  3. Investigating the role of tumour cell derived iNOS on tumour growth and vasculature in vivo using a tetracycline regulated expression system.

    PubMed

    Papaevangelou, Efthymia; Whitley, Guy S; Johnstone, Alan P; Robinson, Simon P; Howe, Franklyn A

    2016-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical signalling molecule involved in various physiological and pathological processes, including cancer. Both tumouricidal and tumour promoting effects have been attributed to NO, making its role in cancer biology controversial and unclear. To investigate the specific role of tumour-derived NO in vascular development, C6 glioma cells were genetically modified to include a doxycycline regulated gene expression system that controls the expression of an antisense RNA to inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) to manipulate endogenous iNOS expression. Xenografts of these cells were propagated in the presence or absence of doxycycline. Susceptibility magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), initially with a carbogen (95% O2/5% CO2) breathing challenge and subsequently an intravascular blood pool contrast agent, was used to assess haemodynamic vasculature (ΔR2*) and fractional blood volume (fBV), and correlated with histopathological assessment of tumour vascular density, maturation and function. Inhibition of NO production in C6 gliomas led to significant growth delay and inhibition of vessel maturation. Parametric fBV maps were used to identify vascularised regions from which the carbogen-induced ΔR2* was measured and found to be positively correlated with vessel maturation, quantified ex vivo using fluorescence microscopy for endothelial and perivascular cell staining. These data suggest that tumour-derived iNOS is an important mediator of tumour growth and vessel maturation, hence a promising target for anti-vascular cancer therapies. The combination of ΔR2* response to carbogen and fBV MRI can provide a marker of tumour vessel maturation that could be applied to non-invasively monitor treatment response to iNOS inhibitors.

  4. Mechanism for dynamic regulation of iNOS expression after UVB-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Wu, Shiyong

    2013-08-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) induces an immediate activation of cNOSs, which contributes to the early release of nitric oxide after irradiation. UVB also induces the expression of iNOS, which peaks at both the mRNA and protein level near 24 h post-irradiation. The induced expression of iNOS contributes largely to the late elevation of nitric oxide after UVB irradiation. However, the regulation of iNOS expression in the early stages of UVB irradiation is not well studied. We previously reported that the UVB-induced early release of nitric oxide leads to the activation of PERK and GCN2, which phosphorylate the alpha-subunit of eIF2 and inhibit protein synthesis. In this report, we demonstrate that eIF2 phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulation of iNOS expression in the early-phase (with in 12 h) of UVB irradiation. Our data shows that with an increased phosphorylation of eIF2, the iNOS protein expression was reduced even though the iNOS mRNA expression was linearly increased in HaCaT and MEF cells after UVB irradiation. The UVB-induced dynamic up- and down-regulation of iNOS expression was almost completely lost in MEF(A/A) cells, which contain a nonphosphorylatable S51A mutation on eIF2. Our results suggest that the UVB-induced eIF2 phosphorylation does not only regulate iNOS expression at the translational level, but at the transcriptional level as well.

  5. Green synthesis of bacterial mediated anti-proliferative gold nanoparticles: inducing mitotic arrest (G2/M phase) and apoptosis (intrinsic pathway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh Kumar, C.; Poornachandra, Y.; Chandrasekhar, Cheemalamarri

    2015-11-01

    The physiochemical and biological properties of microbial derived gold nanoparticles have potential applications in various biomedical domains as well as in cancer therapy. We have fabricated anti-proliferative bacterial mediated gold nanoparticles (b-Au NPs) using a culture supernatant of Streptomyces clavuligerus and later characterized them by UV-visible, TEM, DLS, XRD and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. The capping agent responsible for the nanoparticle formation was characterized based on SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses. They were tested for anticancer activity in A549, HeLa and DU145 cell lines. The biocompatibility and non-toxic nature of the nanoparticles were tested on normal human lung cell line (MRC-5). The b-Au NPs induced the cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and also inhibited the microtubule assembly in DU145 cells. Mechanistic studies, such as ROS, MMP, Cyt-c, GSH, caspases 9, 8 and 3 activation and the Annexin V-FITC staining, along with the above parameters tested provided sufficient evidence that the b-Au NPs induced apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway. The results supported the use of b-Au NPs for future therapeutic application in cancer therapy and other biomedical applications.The physiochemical and biological properties of microbial derived gold nanoparticles have potential applications in various biomedical domains as well as in cancer therapy. We have fabricated anti-proliferative bacterial mediated gold nanoparticles (b-Au NPs) using a culture supernatant of Streptomyces clavuligerus and later characterized them by UV-visible, TEM, DLS, XRD and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. The capping agent responsible for the nanoparticle formation was characterized based on SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses. They were tested for anticancer activity in A549, HeLa and DU145 cell lines. The biocompatibility and non-toxic nature of the nanoparticles were tested on normal human lung cell line (MRC-5). The b-Au NPs induced the cell cycle arrest in G2

  6. Rutin-Mediated Priming of Plant Resistance to Three Bacterial Pathogens Initiating the Early SA Signal Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Xu, Xiaonan; Li, Yang; Wang, Yingzi; Li, Ming; Wang, Yong; Ding, Xinhua; Chu, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are ubiquitous in the plant kingdom and have many diverse functions, including UV protection, auxin transport inhibition, allelopathy, flower coloring and insect resistance. Here we show that rutin, a proud member of the flavonoid family, could be functional as an activator to improve plant disease resistances. Three plant species pretreated with 2 mM rutin were found to enhance resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Ralstonia solanacearum, and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 in rice, tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana respectively. While they were normally propagated on the cultural medium supplemented with 2 mM rutin for those pathogenic bacteria. The enhanced resistance was associated with primed expression of several pathogenesis-related genes. We also demonstrated that the rutin-mediated priming resistance was attenuated in npr1, eds1, eds5, pad4-1, ndr1 mutants, and NahG transgenic Arabidopsis plant, while not in either snc1-11, ein2-5 or jar1 mutants. We concluded that the rutin-priming defense signal was modulated by the salicylic acid (SA)-dependent pathway from an early stage upstream of NDR1 and EDS1.

  7. Studying human telomerase gene transcription by a chromatinized reporter generated by recombinase-mediated targeting of a bacterial artificial chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuwen; Zhao, Yuanjun; Leiby, Melanie A.; Zhu, Jiyue

    2009-01-01

    The endogenous human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene is repressed in somatic cells. To study the mechanisms of its repression, we developed a strategy of retrovirus-directed Cre recombinase-mediated BAC targeting, or RMBT, to generate single-copy integrations of BAC at pre-engineered chromosomal sites. This technique involved retroviral transduction of acceptor loci, containing an HSV thymidine kinase marker, and subsequent integration of BAC constructs into the acceptor sites, utilizing the loxP and lox511 sites present in the vector backbones. The BAC reporter, with a Renilla luciferase cassette inserted downstream of the hTERT promoter, was retrofitted with a puromycin marker. Through puromycin selection and ganciclovir counter-selection, a targeting efficiency of over 50% was achieved. We demonstrated that the activity and chromatin structures of the hTERT promoter in chromosomally integrated BAC reporter recapitulated its endogenous counterpart of the host cells. Therefore, we have established a genetically amendable platform to study chromatin and epigenetic regulation of the hTERT gene. The highly efficient and versatile RMBT technique has general applicability for studying largely unexplored chromatin-dependent mechanisms of promoter regulation of various genes. PMID:19528078

  8. INO80-dependent regression of ecdysone-induced transcriptional responses regulates developmental timing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Sarah D; Ihry, Robert J; Gruetzmacher, Kelly M; Bashirullah, Arash

    2014-03-15

    Sequential pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone regulate the major developmental transitions in Drosophila, and the duration of each developmental stage is determined by the length of time between ecdysone pulses. Ecdysone regulates biological responses by directly initiating target gene transcription. In turn, these transcriptional responses are known to be self-limiting, with mechanisms in place to ensure regression of hormone-dependent transcription. However, the biological significance of these transcriptional repression mechanisms remains unclear. Here we show that the chromatin remodeling protein INO80 facilitates transcriptional repression of ecdysone-regulated genes during prepupal development. In ino80 mutant animals, inefficient repression of transcriptional responses to the late larval ecdysone pulse delays the onset of the subsequent prepupal ecdysone pulse, resulting in a significantly longer prepupal stage. Conversely, increased expression of ino80 is sufficient to shorten the prepupal stage by increasing the rate of transcriptional repression. Furthermore, we demonstrate that enhancing the rate of regression of the mid-prepupal competence factor βFTZ-F1 is sufficient to determine the timing of head eversion and thus the duration of prepupal development. Although ino80 is conserved from yeast to humans, this study represents the first characterization of a bona fide ino80 mutation in any metazoan, raising the possibility that the functions of ino80 in transcriptional repression and developmental timing are evolutionarily conserved.

  9. iNOS inhibition improves autonomic dysfunction and oxidative status in hypertensive obese rats.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Natalia Veronez; Lopes, Fernanda Novi Cortegoso; Panis, Carolina; Cecchini, Rubens; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Martins-Pinge, Marli Cardoso

    2017-01-01

    It has been suggested that nitric oxide (NO) from iNOS source is involved in inflammation and oxidative stress, and hypertension in obese subjects involves an inflammatory process. However, no study evaluated the participation of iNOS inhibition on cardiovascular, autonomic, and inflammatory parameters in obese rats. Obesity was induced by the administration of 4 mg/g body weight of monosodium glutamate (MSG) or equimolar saline (CTR) in newborn rats. On the 60th day, treatment with aminoguanidine (Amino, 50 mg/kg), an iNOS inhibitor, or 0.9% saline, was started. On the 90th day, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded in conscious rats and autonomic modulation was conducted with the CardioSeries software. Plasma samples were collected to assess lipid peroxidation and prostaglandins (PGE2). In addition, iNOS immunohistochemistry in cardiac tissue was evaluated. MSG rats showed hypertension compared to CTR, and Amino treatment did not reverse it. Obese rats presented increased sympathetic and decreased parasympathetic modulation to the heart, reverted by Amino treatment. Plasma PGE2 was increased in obese rats, and Amino treatment decreased. Obese rats presented increased plasma lipoperoxidation, which was decreased after Amino treatment. Also, cardiac iNOS immunohistochemistry was decreased after Amino treatment. Our data suggest that iNOS activation is involved in the systemic and cardiac mechanisms of oxidative stress, inflammation, and autonomic dysfunction derived from obesity.

  10. Mulberry leaf extract mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles and its anti-bacterial activity against human pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adavallan, K.; Krishnakumar, N.

    2014-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) were synthesized at room temperature using Morus alba (mulberry) leaf extract as reducing and stabilizing agent. The development of plant mediated synthesis of nanoparticles is gaining importance due to its simplicity, low cost, non-toxicity, eco-friendliness, long term stability and reproducible aqueous synthesis method to obtain a self-assembly of nearly monodispersed Au-NPs. The formation and morphology of biosynthesized nanoparticles are investigated with the help of UV-Vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques. Au-NPs formation was screened by UV-Vis spectroscopy through color conversion due to surface plasmon resonance band at 538 nm for Au-NPs. DLS studies revealed that the average size of Au-NPs was 50 nm. TEM studies showed the particles to be nearly spherical with few irregular shapes and particle size ranges 15-53 nm. The AFM image clearly shows the surface morphology of the well-dispersed Au-NPs with less than 50 nm. The high crystallinity of nanoparticles is evident from bright circular spots in the selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern. X-ray diffraction pattern showed high purity and face-centered cubic structure of Au-NPs. The FT-IR results indicate the presence of different functional groups present in the biomolecule capping the nanoparticles. Further, biosynthesized Au-NPs show strong zone of inhibition against Vibrio cholera (gram-negative) and Staphylococcus aureus (gram-positive) whereas, chemically synthesized Au-NPs and mulberry leaf extract exhibit a fair zone of inhibition.

  11. Enzyme-mediated bacterial biodegradation of an azo dye (C.I. Acid blue 113): reuse of treated dye wastewater in post-tanning operations.

    PubMed

    Senthilvelan, T; Kanagaraj, J; Panda, R C

    2014-11-01

    "Dyeing" is a common practice used to color the hides during the post-tanning operations in leather processing generating plenty of wastewater. The waste stream containing dye as pollutant is severely harmful to living beings. An azo dye (C.I. Acid Blue 113) has been biodegraded effectively by bacterial culture mediated with azoreductase enzyme to reduce the pollution load in the present investigation. The maximum rate of dye degradation was found to be 96 ± 4 and 92 ± 4 % for the initial concentrations of 100 and 200 mg/l, respectively. The enzyme activity was measured using NADH as a substrate. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis was confirmed that the transformation of azo linkage could be transformed into N2 or NH3 or incorporated into complete biomass. Breaking down of dye molecules to various metabolites (such as aniline, naphthalene-1,4-diamine, 3-aminobenzenesulfonic acid, naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid, 8-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid, 5,8-diaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) was confirmed by gas chromatography and mass spectra (GC-MS) and mass (electrospray ionization (ESI)) spectra analysis. The treated wastewater could be reused for dyeing operation in the leather processing, and the properties of produced leather were evaluated by conventional methods that revealed to have improved dye penetration into the grain layer of experimental leather sample and resulted in high levelness of dyeing, which helps to obtain the desired smoothness and soft leather properties.

  12. Arabidopsis wat1 (walls are thin1)-mediated resistance to the bacterial vascular pathogen, Ralstonia solanacearum, is accompanied by cross-regulation of salicylic acid and tryptophan metabolism.

    PubMed

    Denancé, Nicolas; Ranocha, Philippe; Oria, Nicolas; Barlet, Xavier; Rivière, Marie-Pierre; Yadeta, Koste A; Hoffmann, Laurent; Perreau, François; Clément, Gilles; Maia-Grondard, Alessandra; van den Berg, Grardy C M; Savelli, Bruno; Fournier, Sylvie; Aubert, Yann; Pelletier, Sandra; Thomma, Bart P H J; Molina, Antonio; Jouanin, Lise; Marco, Yves; Goffner, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Inactivation of Arabidopsis WAT1 (Walls Are Thin1), a gene required for secondary cell-wall deposition, conferred broad-spectrum resistance to vascular pathogens, including the bacteria Ralstonia solanacearum and Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, and the fungi Verticillium dahliae and Verticillium albo-atrum. Introduction of NahG, the bacterial salicylic acid (SA)-degrading salicylate hydroxylase gene, into the wat1 mutant restored full susceptibility to both R. solanacearum and X. campestris pv. campestris. Moreover, SA content was constitutively higher in wat1 roots, further supporting a role for SA in wat1-mediated resistance to vascular pathogens. By combining transcriptomic and metabolomic data, we demonstrated a general repression of indole metabolism in wat1-1 roots as shown by constitutive down-regulation of several genes encoding proteins of the indole glucosinolate biosynthetic pathway and reduced amounts of tryptophan (Trp), indole-3-acetic acid and neoglucobrassicin, the major form of indole glucosinolate in roots. Furthermore, the susceptibility of the wat1 mutant to R. solanacearum was partially restored when crossed with either the trp5 mutant, an over-accumulator of Trp, or Pro35S:AFB1-myc, in which indole-3-acetic acid signaling is constitutively activated. Our original hypothesis placed cell-wall modifications at the heart of the wat1 resistance phenotype. However, the results presented here suggest a mechanism involving root-localized metabolic channeling away from indole metabolites to SA as a central feature of wat1 resistance to R. solanacearum.

  13. Green synthesis of bacterial mediated anti-proliferative gold nanoparticles: inducing mitotic arrest (G2/M phase) and apoptosis (intrinsic pathway).

    PubMed

    Kumar, C Ganesh; Poornachandra, Y; Chandrasekhar, Cheemalamarri

    2015-11-28

    The physiochemical and biological properties of microbial derived gold nanoparticles have potential applications in various biomedical domains as well as in cancer therapy. We have fabricated anti-proliferative bacterial mediated gold nanoparticles (b-Au NPs) using a culture supernatant of Streptomyces clavuligerus and later characterized them by UV-visible, TEM, DLS, XRD and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. The capping agent responsible for the nanoparticle formation was characterized based on SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses. They were tested for anticancer activity in A549, HeLa and DU145 cell lines. The biocompatibility and non-toxic nature of the nanoparticles were tested on normal human lung cell line (MRC-5). The b-Au NPs induced the cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and also inhibited the microtubule assembly in DU145 cells. Mechanistic studies, such as ROS, MMP, Cyt-c, GSH, caspases 9, 8 and 3 activation and the Annexin V-FITC staining, along with the above parameters tested provided sufficient evidence that the b-Au NPs induced apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway. The results supported the use of b-Au NPs for future therapeutic application in cancer therapy and other biomedical applications.

  14. The role of different strain backgrounds in bacterial endotoxin-mediated sensitization to neonatal hypoxic–ischemic brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Ferreira, E.; Phillips, E.; Francesch-Domenech, E.; Thei, L.; Peebles, D.M.; Raivich, G.; Hristova, M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic background is known to influence the outcome in mouse models of human disease, and previous experimental studies have shown strain variability in the neonatal mouse model of hypoxia–ischemia. To further map out this variability, we compared five commonly used mouse strains: C57BL/6, 129SVJ, BALB/c, CD1 and FVB in a pure hypoxic–ischemic setup and following pre-sensitization with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Postnatal day 7 pups were subjected to unilateral carotid artery occlusion followed by continuous 30 min 8% oxygen exposure at 36 °C. Twelve hours prior, a third of the pups received a single intraperitoneal LPS (0.6 μg/g) or a saline (vehicle) administration, respectively; a further third underwent hypoxia–ischemia alone without preceding injection. Both C57BL/6 and 129SVJ strains showed minimal response to 30 min hypoxia–ischemia alone, BALB/c demonstrated a moderate response, and both CD1 and FVB revealed the highest brain damage. LPS pre-sensitization led to substantial increase in overall brain infarction, microglial and astrocyte response and cell death in four of the five strains, with exception of BALB/c that only showed a significant effect with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Saline administration prior to hypoxia–ischemia resulted in an increase in inflammatory-associated markers, particularly in the astroglial activation of C57BL/6 mice, and in combined microglial activation and neuronal cell loss in FVB mice. Finally, two of the four strongly affected strains – C57BL/6 and CD1 – revealed pronounced contralateral astrogliosis with a neuroanatomical localization similar to that observed on the occluded hemisphere. Overall, the current findings demonstrate strain differences in response to hypoxia–ischemia alone, to stress associated with vehicle injection, and to LPS-mediated pre-sensitization, which partially explains the high variability seen in the neonatal mouse models of hypoxia

  15. Coexpression of COX-2 and iNOS in Angiogenesis of Superficial Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Youichi; Sobajima, Jun; Higashi, Morihiro; Ishiguro, Toru; Fukuchi, Minoru; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Mochiki, Erito; Yakabi, Koji; Kawano, Tatsuyuki; Tamaru, Jun-ichi; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2015-04-01

    Using immunohistochemical staining, the present study was conducted to examine whether cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) affect angiogenesis in early-stage esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). We also analyzed the correlation between these two factors. Cyclooxygenase 2, iNOS, and angiogenesis in early-stage ESCC are unclear. Using 10 samples of normal squamous epithelium, 7 samples of low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (LGIN), and 45 samples of superficial esophageal cancer, we observed the expression of COX-2 and iNOS. We then investigated the COX-2 and iNOS immunoreactivity scores and the correlation between COX-2 or iNOS scores and microvessel density (MVD) using CD34 or CD105. The intensity of COX-2 or iNOS expression differed significantly according to histological type (P < 0.001). The scores of COX-2 and iNOS were lowest for normal squamous epithelium, followed in ascending order by LGIN, carcinoma in situ and tumor invading the lamina propria mucosae (M1-M2 cancer); and tumor invading the muscularis mucosa (M3) or deeper cancer. The differences were significant (P < 0.001). Cancers classified M1-M2 (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively); M3; or deeper cancer (P < 0.01) had significantly higher COX-2 and iNOS scores than normal squamous epithelium. There was a significant correlation between COX-2 and iNOS scores (P < 0.001, rs = 0.51). Correlations between COX-2 score and CD34-positive MVD or CD105-positive MVD were significant (rs = 0.53, P < 0.001; rs = 0.62, P < 0.001, respectively). Inducible nitric oxide synthase score was also significantly correlated with CD34 MVD and CD105 MVD (rs = 0.45, P < 0.001; rs = 0.60, P < 0.001, respectively). Chemoprevention of COX-2 or iNOS activity may blunt the development of ESCC from precancerous lesions.

  16. Increased intracellular Ca(2+) decreases cisplatin resistance by regulating iNOS expression in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Xie, Qi; Liu, Weimin; Guo, Yuting; Xu, Na; Xu, Lu; Liu, Shibing; Li, Songyan; Xu, Ye; Sun, Liankun

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have reported that intracellular Ca(2+) signals and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) are involved in cell apoptosis. However, the role of iNOS in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that SKOV3/DDP ovarian cancer cells were more resistant to cisplatin than were SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. The expression of intracellular Ca(2+) and iNOS was more strongly induced by cisplatin in SKOV3 cells than in SKOV3/DDP cells. TAT-conjugated IP3R-derived peptide (TAT-IDP(S)) increased cisplatin-induced iNOS expression and apoptosis in SKOV3/DDP cells. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) decreased cisplatin-induced iNOS expression and apoptosis in SKOV3 cells. Thus, iNOS induction may be a valuable strategy for improving the anti-tumor efficacy of cisplatin in ovarian cancer.

  17. Expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae inositol-1-phosphate synthase (INO1) gene is regulated by factors that affect phospholipid synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, J P; Henry, S A

    1986-01-01

    The INO1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the regulated enzyme inositol-1-phosphate synthase, which catalyzes the first committed step in the synthesis of inositol-containing phospholipids. The expression of this gene was analyzed under conditions known to regulate phospholipid synthesis. RNA blot hybridization with a genomic clone for INO1 detected two RNA species of 1.8 and 0.6 kb. The abundance of the 1.8-kb RNA was greatly decreased when the cells were grown in the presence of the phospholipid precursor inositol, as was the enzyme activity of the synthase. Complementation analysis showed that this transcript encoded the INO1 gene product. The level of INO1 RNA was repressed 12-fold when the cells were grown in medium containing inositol, and it was repressed 33-fold when the cells were grown in the presence of inositol and choline together. The INO1 transcript was present at a very low level in cells containing mutations (ino2 and ino4) in regulatory genes unlinked to INO1 that result in inositol auxotrophy. The transcript was constitutively overproduced in cells containing a mutation (opi1) that causes constitutive expression of inositol-1-phosphate synthase and results in excretion of inositol. The expression of INO1 RNA was also examined in cells containing a mutation (cho2) affecting the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine. In contrast to what was observed in wild-type cells, growth of cho2 cells in medium containing inositol did not result in a significant decrease in INO1 RNA abundance. Inositol and choline together were required for repression of the INO1 transcript in these cells, providing evidence for a regulatory link between the synthesis of inositol- and choline-containing lipids. The level of the 0.6-kb RNA was affected, although to a lesser degree, by many of the same factors that influence INO1 expression. Images PMID:3025587

  18. Control of TMEM16A by INO-4995 and other inositolphosphates

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuemin; Schreiber, Rainer; Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Kongsuphol, Patthara; Sousa, Marisa; Uliyakina, Inna; Palma, Marta; Faria, Diana; Traynor-Kaplan, Alexis E; Fragata, José I; Amaral, Margarida D; Kunzelmann, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Background And Purpose Ca2+-dependent Cl− secretion (CaCC) in airways and other tissues is due to activation of the Cl− channel TMEM16A (anoctamin 1). Earlier studies suggested that Ca2+-activated Cl− channels are regulated by membrane lipid inositol phosphates, and that 1-O-octyl-2-O-butyryl-myo-inositol 3,4,5,6-tetrakisphosphate octakis(propionoxymethyl) ester (INO-4995) augments CaCC. Here we examined whether TMEM16A is the target for INO-4995 and if the channel is regulated by inositol phosphates. Experimental Approach The effects of INO-4995 on CaCC were examined in overexpressing HEK293, colonic and primary airway epithelial cells as well as Xenopus oocytes. We used patch clamping, double electrode voltage clamp and Ussing chamber techniques. Key Results We found that INO-4995 directly activates a TMEM16A whole cell conductance of 6.1 ± 0.9 nS pF–1 in overexpressing cells. The tetrakisphosphates Ins(3,4,5,6)P4 or Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 and enzymes controlling levels of InsP4 or PIP2 and PIP3 had no effects on the magnitude or kinetics of TMEM16A currents. In contrast in Xenopus oocytes, human airways and colonic cells, which all express TMEM16A endogenously, Cl− currents were not acutely activated by INO-4995. However incubation with INO-4995 augmented 1.6- to 4-fold TMEM16A-dependent Cl− currents activated by ionomycin or ATP, while intracellular Ca2+ signals were not affected. The potentiating effect of INO-4995 on transient ATP-activated TMEM16A-currents in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways was twice of that observed in non-CF airways. Conclusions And Implications These data indicate that TMEM16A is the target for INO-4995, although the mode of action appears different for overexpressed and endogenous channels. INO-4995 may be useful for the treatment of CF lung disease. PMID:22946960

  19. Cloning of iNOS in the small spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula).

    PubMed

    Reddick, Jennifer I; Goostrey, Anna; Secombes, Chris J

    2006-01-01

    The first cartilaginous fish iNOS gene has been cloned in the small spotted catshark, Scyliorhinus canicula. The cDNA was 4568 bp long, with a 3375 bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 1125 amino acids and a predicted molecular mass of 127.8 kDa. The catshark translation had 77% amino acid similarity with chicken iNOS and 70-73% similarity with known teleost i NOS molecules. The various co-factor binding sites were well conserved, with the calmodulin site hydrophobicity profile noticeable more similar to tetrapod molecules than teleost molecules. The catshark iNOS transcript was not typically expressed constitutively, with the exception of the gills. Clear induction of the gene was seen in splenocytes after exposure to Vibrio anguillarum in vivo, and after stimulation with LPS in vitro. iNOS message was first seen 2 h after stimulation, and was still apparent 24 h post-stimulation, the last timing studies. Poly I:C was also able to induce iNOS transcript expression in splenocytes, albeit at a later timing (i.e.24 h). Such findings suggest a role for this molecule in the non-specific defences of cartilaginous fish as seen in other vertebrate groups.

  20. iNOS Activity Modulates Inflammation, Angiogenesis, and Tissue Fibrosis in Polyether-Polyurethane Synthetic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Cassini-Vieira, Puebla; Araújo, Fernanda Assis; da Costa Dias, Filipi Leles; Russo, Remo Castro; Andrade, Silvia Passos; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Barcelos, Luciola Silva

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable interest in implantation techniques and scaffolds for tissue engineering and, for safety and biocompatibility reasons, inflammation, angiogenesis, and fibrosis need to be determined. The contribution of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the regulation of the foreign body reaction induced by subcutaneous implantation of a synthetic matrix was never investigated. Here, we examined the role of iNOS in angiogenesis, inflammation, and collagen deposition induced by polyether-polyurethane synthetic implants, using mice with targeted disruption of the iNOS gene (iNOS−/−) and wild-type (WT) mice. The hemoglobin content and number of vessels were decreased in the implants of iNOS−/− mice compared to WT mice 14 days after implantation. VEGF levels were also reduced in the implants of iNOS−/− mice. In contrast, the iNOS−/− implants exhibited an increased neutrophil and macrophage infiltration. However, no alterations were observed in levels of CXCL1 and CCL2, chemokines related to neutrophil and macrophage migration, respectively. Furthermore, the implants of iNOS−/− mice showed boosted collagen deposition. These data suggest that iNOS activity controls inflammation, angiogenesis, and fibrogenesis in polyether-polyurethane synthetic implants and that lack of iNOS expression increases foreign body reaction to implants in mice. PMID:26106257

  1. The Mouse INO80 Chromatin-Remodeling Complex Is an Essential Meiotic Factor for Spermatogenesis1

    PubMed Central

    Serber, Daniel W.; Runge, John S.; Menon, Debashish U.; Magnuson, Terry

    2015-01-01

    The ability to faithfully transmit genetic information across generations via the germ cells is a critical aspect of mammalian reproduction. The process of germ cell development requires a number of large-scale modulations of chromatin within the nucleus. One such occasion arises during meiotic recombination, when hundreds of DNA double-strand breaks are induced and subsequently repaired, enabling the transfer of genetic information between homologous chromosomes. The inability to properly repair DNA damage is known to lead to an arrest in the developing germ cells and sterility within the animal. Chromatin-remodeling activity, and in particular the BRG1 subunit of the SWI/SNF complex, has been shown to be required for successful completion of meiosis. In contrast, remodeling complexes of the ISWI and CHD families are required for postmeiotic processes. Little is known regarding the contribution of the INO80 family of chromatin-remodeling complexes, which is a particularly interesting candidate due to its well described functions during DNA double-strand break repair. Here we show that INO80 is expressed in developing spermatocytes during the early stages of meiotic prophase I. Based on this information, we used a conditional allele to delete the INO80 core ATPase subunit, thereby eliminating INO80 chromatin-remodeling activity in this lineage. The loss of INO80 resulted in an arrest during meiosis associated with a failure to repair DNA damage during meiotic recombination. PMID:26607718

  2. Anti-inflammatory effects of flavonoids: genistein, kaempferol, quercetin, and daidzein inhibit STAT-1 and NF-kappaB activations, whereas flavone, isorhamnetin, naringenin, and pelargonidin inhibit only NF-kappaB activation along with their inhibitory effect on iNOS expression and NO production in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, Mari; Nieminen, Riina; Vuorela, Pia; Heinonen, Marina; Moilanen, Eeva

    2007-01-01

    In inflammation, bacterial products and proinflammatory cytokines induce the formation of large amounts of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and compounds that inhibit NO production have anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, we systematically investigated the effects of 36 naturally occurring flavonoids and related compounds on NO production in macrophages exposed to an inflammatory stimulus (lipopolysaccharide, LPS), and evaluated the mechanisms of action of the effective compounds. Flavone, the isoflavones daidzein and genistein, the flavonols isorhamnetin, kaempferol and quercetin, the flavanone naringenin, and the anthocyanin pelargonidin inhibited iNOS protein and mRNA expression and also NO production in a dose-dependent manner. All eight active compounds inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), which is a significant transcription factor for iNOS. Genistein, kaempferol, quercetin, and daidzein also inhibited the activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1), another important transcription factor for iNOS. The present study characterises the effects and mechanisms of naturally occurring phenolic compounds on iNOS expression and NO production in activated macrophages. The results partially explain the pharmacological efficacy of flavonoids as anti-inflammatory compounds.

  3. Evolution of INO Uncooled Infrared Cameras Towards Very High Resolution Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Alain; Jerominek, Hubert; Chevalier, Claude; Le Noc, Loïc; Tremblay, Bruno; Alain, Christine; Martel, Anne; Blanchard, Nathalie; Morissette, Martin; Mercier, Luc; Gagnon, Lucie; Couture, Patrick; Desnoyers, Nichola; Demers, Mathieu; Lamontagne, Frédéric; Lévesque, Frédéric; Verreault, Sonia; Duchesne, François; Lambert, Julie; Girard, Marc; Savard, Maxime; Châteauneuf, François

    2011-02-01

    Along the years INO has been involved in development of various uncooled infrared devices. Todays, the infrared imagers exhibit good resolutions and find their niche in numerous applications. Nevertheless, there is still a trend toward high resolution imaging for demanding applications. At the same time, low-resolution for mass market applications are sought for low-cost imaging solutions. These two opposite requirements reflect the evolution of infrared cameras from the origin, when only few pixel-count FPAs were available, to megapixel-count FPA of the recent years. This paper reviews the evolution of infrared camera technologies at INO from the uncooled bolometer detector capability up to the recent achievement of 1280×960 pixels infrared camera core using INO's patented microscan technology.

  4. Association of INOS, TRAIL, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, and IgL genes with response to Salmonella enteritidis in poultry

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Several candidate genes were selected, based on their critical roles in the host's response to intracellular bacteria, to study the genetic control of the chicken response to Salmonella enteritidis (SE). The candidate genes were: inducible nitric oxide synthase (INOS), tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2), transforming growth factor β3 (TGF-β3), and immunoglobulin G light chain (IgL). Responses to pathogenic SE colonization or to SE vaccination were measured in the Iowa Salmonella response resource population (ISRRP). Outbred broiler sires and three diverse, highly inbred dam lines produced 508 F1 progeny, which were evaluated as young chicks for either bacterial load isolated from spleen or cecum contents after pathogenic SE inoculation, or the circulating antibody level after SE vaccination. Fragments of each gene were sequenced from the founder lines of the resource population to identify genomic sequence variation. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were identified, then PCR-RFLP techniques were developed to genotype the F1 resource population. Linear mixed models were used for statistical analyses. Because the inbred dam lines always contributed one copy of the same allele, the heterozygous sire allele effects could be assessed in the F1 generation. Association analyses revealed significant effects of the sire allele of TRAIL-StyI on the spleen (P < 0.07) and cecum (P < 0.0002) SE bacterial load. Significant effects (P < 0.04) were found on the cecum bacterial load for TGF-β3-BsrI. Varied and moderate association was found for SE vaccine antibody response for all genes. This is the first reported study on the association of SNP in INOS, TRAIL, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, and IgL with the chicken response to SE. Identification of candidate genes to improve the immune response may be useful for marker-assisted selection to enhance disease resistance. PMID:12927083

  5. TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma-induced iNOS expression increased by prostaglandin E2 in rat primary astrocytes via EP2-evoked cAMP/PKA and intracellular calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Han-Yun; Mak, Oi-Tong; Yang, Chung-Shi; Liu, Yu-Peng; Fang, Kuan-Ming; Tzeng, Shun-Fen

    2007-01-15

    Astrocytes, the most abundant glia in the central nervous system (CNS), produce a large amount of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in response to proinflammatory mediators after CNS injury. However, it is unclear whether PGE(2) has a regulatory role in astrocytic activity under the inflamed condition. In the present work, we showed that PGE(2) increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) production by tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma (T/I) in astrocytes. Pharmacological and RNA interference approaches further indicated the involvement of the receptor EP2 in PGE(2)-induced iNOS upregulation in T/I-treated astrocytes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and gel mobility shift assays also demonstrated that PGE(2) increased iNOS transcription through EP2-induced cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathway. Consistently, the effect of EP2 was significantly attenuated by the PKA inhibitor KT-5720 and partially suppressed by the inhibitor (SB203580) of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), which serves as one of the downstream components of the PKA-dependent pathway. Interestingly, EP2-mediated PKA signaling appeared to increase intracellular Ca(2+) release through inositol triphosphate (IP3) receptor activation, which might in turn stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) activation to promote iNOS production in T/I-primed astrocytes. By analyzing the expression of astrocytic glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), we found that PGE(2) alone only triggered the EP2-induced cAMP/PKA/p38MAPK signaling pathway in astrocytes. Collectively, PGE(2) may enhance T/I-induced astrocytic activation by augmenting iNOS/NO production through EP2-mediated cross-talk between cAMP/PKA and IP3/Ca(2+) signaling pathways.

  6. Development of Antisense Therapeutic and Imaging Agents to Detect and Suppress Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) Expression in Acute Lung Injury (ALI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuefei

    This dissertation focuses on the development and investigation of antisense imaging and therapeutic agents, combined with nanotechnology, to detect and suppress inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression for the diagnosis and treatment of acute lung injury (ALI). To achieve this goal, several efforts were made. The first effort was the identification and characterization of high binding affinity antisense peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and shell-crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticle (SCK)-PNA conjugates to the iNOS mRNA. Antisense binding sites on the iNOS mRNA were first mapped by a procedure for rapidly generating a library of antisense accessible sites on native mRNAs (MASL) which involves reverse transcription of whole cell mRNA extracts with a random oligodeoxynucleotide primer followed by mRNA-specific PCR. Antisense PNAs against the antisense accessible sites were accordingly synthesized and characterized. The second effort was the investigation of cationic shell crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticle (cSCK)-mediated siRNA delivery to suppress iNOS expression for the treatment of ALI. siRNA with its unique gene-specific properties could serve as a promising therapeutic agent, however success in this area has been challenged by a lack of efficient biocompatible transfection agents. cSCK with its nanometer size and positive charge previously showed efficient cellular delivery of phosphorothioate ODNs (oligodeoxynucleotides), plasmid DNA and PNA. Herein, cSCK showed good siRNA binding and facilitated efficient siRNA transfection in HeLa, a mouse macrophage cell line and other human cell lines. cSCK led to greater silencing efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000 in HeLa cells as determined by the viability following transfection with cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic siRNAs, as well in 293T and HEK cells, and was comparable in BEAS-2B and MCF10a cells. The third effort was the preparation of an iNOS imaging probe through electrostatic complexation between a radiolabeled

  7. I. Development of Metal-Mediated SPOT-Synthesis Methods for the Efficient Construction of Small-Molecule Macroarrays. II. Design and Synthesis of Novel Bacterial Biofilm Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, Reto

    I. The use of small molecule probes to explore biological phenomena has become a valuable tool in chemical biology. As a result, methods that permit the rapid synthesis and biological evaluation of such compounds are highly sought-after. The small molecule macroarray represents one such approach for the synthesis and identification of novel bioactive agents. Macroarrays are readily constructed via the SPOT-synthesis technique on planar cellulose membranes, yielding spatially addressed libraries of ˜10-1000 unique compounds. We sought to expand the arsenal of chemical reactions compatible with this solid-phase platform, and developed highly efficient SPOT-synthesis protocols for the Mizoroki-Heck, Suzuki-Miyaura, and copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. We demonstrated that these metal-mediated reactions can be implemented, either individually or sequentially, for the efficient construction of small molecules in high purity on rapid time scales. Utilizing these powerful C-C and C-N bond forming coupling reactions, we constructed a series of macroarrays based on novel stilbene, phenyl-naphthalene, and triazole scaliblds. Subsequent biological testing of the stilbene and phenyl-naphthalene libraries revealed several potent antagonists and agonists, respectively, of the quorum sensing (QS) receptor LuxR in Vibrio fischeri. II. Bacteria living within biofilms are notorious for their resistance to known antibiotic agents, and constitute a major human health threat. Methods to attenuate biofilm growth would have a significant impact on the management of bacterial infections. Despite intense research efforts, small molecules capable of either inhibiting or dispersing biolilms remain scarce. We utilized natural products with purported anti-biofilm or QS inhibitory activity as sources of structural insight to guide the synthesis of novel biofilm modulators with improved activities. These studies revealed 2-aminobenzimidazole derivatives as highly potent

  8. Inhibitory Effect of a Callophycin A Derivative on iNOS Expression via Inhibition of Akt in Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Jung; Shen, Li; Sun, Dianqing; Pezzuto, John M.

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, (R)-2-isobutyl 3-methyl 3,4-dihydro-1H-pyrido[3,4-b] indole-2,3(9H)-dicarboxylate (1), a callophycin A derivative, was found to strongly inhibit nitrite production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, while (R)- or (S)-callophycin A showed only weak inhibition. We currently report additional studies to define the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory action of 1. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was reduced at both protein and mRNA levels. Major upstream signaling molecules and transcription factors regulating iNOS expression were examined, but it was found that 1 did not affect the phosphorylated and total protein levels of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signalregulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), nor did it mediate the degradation of the inhibitor of nuclear factor-κBα-isoform (IκBα). However, starting at early time points, 1 consistently inhibited the phosphorylation of protein kinase B/Akt at serine 473. In addition, 1 suppressed the protein expression of octamer-binding transcription factor-2 (Oct-2) and the expression of microRNA 155 (miR-155). In sum, compound 1 inhibits LPS-induced nitrite production by a unique and complex mechanism. Reduction of iNOS expression is accompanied by inhibition of Akt activation, Oct-2 protein expression, and miR-155 expression. PMID:24299616

  9. Induction of expression of iNOS by N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak-Wrona, Wioletta; Jablonska, Ewa; Jablonski, Jakub; Marcinczyk, Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) on expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), as well as production of nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) by human neutrophils (PMN) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and the participation of the p38 MAPK kinase in this process. Furthermore, the ability of neutrophils to release superoxide anion was determined. The influence of N-nitrosodimethylamine on iNOS expression was determined in isolated PMN and PBMC cells from peripheral blood of healthy individuals. The mononuclear cells showed higher sensitivity to NDMA. Moreover, cytotoxic effect of NDMA can be influenced in some way by the impact of this xenobiotic on nitric oxide and superoxide anion release from human leukocytes. Furthermore, increased generation of these radicals by human leukocytes suggest that neutrophils and mononuclear cells that are exposed to NDMA activity can play a key role in endogenous NDMA generation. However the relationship between iNOS expression and phospho-p38 MAPK in neutrophils and mononuclear cells shows that p38 MAPK pathway participates in induction of iNOS expression in the presence of NDMA.

  10. Structural analyses of the chromatin remodeling enzymes INO80-C and SWR-C

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinya; Tan, Dongyan; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Washburn, Michael P.; Hong, Eun-Jin Erica; Walz, Thomas; Peterson, Craig L.

    2015-01-01

    INO80-C and SWR-C are conserved members of a subfamily of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes that function in transcription and genome-maintenance pathways. A crucial role for these enzymes is to control chromosomal distribution of the H2A.Z histone variant. Here we use electron microscopy (EM) and two-dimensional (2D) class averaging to demonstrate that these remodeling enzymes have similar overall architectures. Each enzyme is characterized by a dynamic ‘tail’ domain and a compact ‘head’ that contains Rvb1/Rvb2 subunits organized as hexameric rings. EM class averages and mass spectrometry support the existence of single heterohexameric rings in both SWR-C and INO80-C. EM studies define the position of the Arp8/Arp4/Act1 module within INO80-C, and we find that this module enhances nucleosome binding affinity but is largely dispensable for remodeling activities. In contrast, the Ies6/Arp5 module is essential for INO80-C remodeling, and furthermore this module controls conformational changes that may couple nucleosome binding to remodeling. PMID:25964121

  11. Role of iNOS in Bystander Signaling Between Macrophages and Lymphoma Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Somnath; Maurya, Dharmendra Kumar; Krishna, Malini

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: The present report describes the bystander effects of radiation between similar and dissimilar cells and the role of iNOS in such communication. Materials and Methods: EL-4 and RAW 264.7 cells were exposed to 5 Gy {gamma}-irradiation. The medium from irradiated cells was transferred to unirradiated cells. Results: Irradiated EL-4 cells as well as those cultured in the presence of medium from {gamma}-irradiated EL-4 cells showed an upregulation of NF-{kappa}B, iNOS, p53, and p21/waf1 genes. The directly irradiated and the bystander EL-4 cells showed an increase in DNA damage, apoptosis, and NO production. Bystander signaling was also found to exist between RAW 264.7 (macrophage) and EL-4 (lymphoma) cells. Unstimulated or irradiated RAW 264.7 cells did not induce bystander effect in unirradiated EL-4 cells, but LPS stimulated and irradiated RAW 264.7 cells induced an upregulation of NF-{kappa}B and iNOS genes and increased the DNA damage in bystander EL-4 cells. Treatment of EL-4 or RAW 264.7 cells with L-NAME significantly reduced the induction of gene expression and DNA damage in the bystander EL-4 cells, whereas treatment with cPTIO only partially reduced the induction of gene expression and DNA damage in the bystander EL-4 cells. Conclusions: It was concluded that active iNOS in the irradiated cells was essential for bystander response.

  12. Synergy and antagonism in regulation of recombinant human INO80 chromatin remodeling complex

    PubMed Central

    Willhoft, Oliver; Bythell-Douglas, Rohan; McCormack, Elizabeth A.; Wigley, Dale B.

    2016-01-01

    We have purified a minimal core human Ino80 complex from recombinant protein expressed in insect cells. The complex comprises one subunit each of an N-terminally truncated Ino80, actin, Arp4, Arp5, Arp8, Ies2 and Ies6, together with a single heterohexamer of the Tip49a and Tip49b proteins. This core complex has nucleosome sliding activity that is similar to that of endogenous human and yeast Ino80 complexes and is also inhibited by inositol hexaphosphate (IP6). We show that IP6 is a non-competitive inhibitor that acts by blocking the stimulatory effect of nucleosomes on the ATPase activity. The IP6 binding site is located within the C-terminal region of the Ino80 subunit. We have also prepared complexes lacking combinations of Ies2 and Arp5/Ies6 subunits that reveal regulation imposed by each of them individually and synergistically that couples ATP hydrolysis to nucleosome sliding. This coupling between Ies2 and Arp5/Ies6 can be overcome in a bypass mutation of the Arp5 subunit that is active in the absence of Ies2. These studies reveal several underlying mechanisms for regulation of ATPase activity involving a complex interplay between these protein subunits and IP6 that in turn controls nucleosome sliding. PMID:27257055

  13. Antioxidative effects of cinnamomi cortex: A potential role of iNOS and COX-II

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jin-Won; Kim, Jeong-Jun; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Cinnamomi cortex has wide varieties of pharmacological actions such as anti-inflammatory action, anti-platelet aggregation, and improving blood circulation. In this study, we tested to determine whether the Cinnamomi cortex extract has antioxidant activities. Materials and Methods: Antioxidative actions were explored by measuring free radical scavenging activity, NO levels, and reducing power. The mechanism of antioxidative action of Cinnamomi cortex was determined by measuring iNOS and COX-II expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated Raw cells. Results: Seventy percent methanolic extract of Cinnamomi cortex exerted significant 1,1-diphenyl--2--picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals and NO scavenging activities in a dose-dependent manner. More strikingly, the Cinnamomi cortex extract exerted dramatic reducing power activity (13-fold over control). Production of iNOS induced by LPS was significantly inhibited by the Cinnamomi cortex extract, suggesting that it inhibits NO production by suppressing iNOS expression. Additionally, COX-2 induced by LPS was dramatically inhibited by the Cinnamomi cortex extract. Conclusion: These results suggest that 70% methanolic extract of Cinnamomi cortex exerts significant antioxidant activity via inhibiting iNOS and COX-II induction. PMID:22262934

  14. Nitrosyl Iodide, Ino: Millimeter-Wave Spectroscopy Guided by AB Initio Quantum Chemical Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailleux, Stephane; Duflot, Denis; Aiba, Shohei; Ozeki, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    In the series of the nitrosyl halides, XNO (where X = {F, Cl, Br, I}), the millimeter-wave spectrum of INO remains so far unknown. We report our investigation on the first high-resolution rotational spectroscopy of nitrosyl iodide, INO. One of the motivation for this work comes from the growing need in developing a more complete understanding of atmospheric chemistry, especially halogen and nitrogen oxides chemistry that adversely impacts ozone levels. In the family of the nitrogen oxyhalides such as nitrosyl (XNO), nitryl (XNO), nitrite (XONO), and nitrate (XON0_2) halides, those with X = {F, Cl, Br} have been well studied, both theoretically and experimentally. However, relatively little is known about the iodine-containing analogues, although they also are of potential importance in tropospheric chemistry. In 1991, the Fourier-transform IR spectroscopic detection of INO, INO_2 and IONO_2 in the gas phase has been reported The INO molecule was generated by in situ mixing continuously I_2 and NO in a 50-cm long reaction glass tube whose outlet was connected to the absorption cell using a teflon tube. At the time of writing this abstract, 68 μ_a-type transitions (K_a = 0-10), all weak, have been successfully assigned. The hyperfine structures due to both I and N nuclei will also be presented. S.B. and D.D. acknowledge support from the Laboratoire d'Excellence CaPPA (Chemical and Physical Properties of the Atmosphere) through contract ANR-10-LABX-005 of the Programme d'Investissement d'Avenir. I. Barnes, K. H. Becker and J. Starcke, J. Phys. Chem. 1991, 95, 9736-9740.

  15. Prodigiosin inhibits gp91{sup phox} and iNOS expression to protect mice against the oxidative/nitrosative brain injury induced by hypoxia-ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chia-Che; Wang, Yea-Hwey; Chern, Chang-Ming; Liou, Kuo-Tong; Hou, Yu-Chang; Peng, Yu-Ta; Shen, Yuh-Chiang

    2011-11-15

    This study aimed to explore the mechanisms by which prodigiosin protects against hypoxia-induced oxidative/nitrosative brain injury induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion (MCAo/r) injury in mice. Hypoxia in vitro was modeled using oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) followed by reoxygenation of BV-2 microglial cells. Our results showed that treatment of mice that have undergone MCAo/r injury with prodigiosin (10 and 100 {mu}g/kg, i.v.) at 1 h after hypoxia ameliorated MCAo/r-induced oxidative/nitrosative stress, brain infarction, and neurological deficits in the mice, and enhanced their survival rate. MCAo/r induced a remarkable production in the mouse brains of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a significant increase in protein nitrosylation; this primarily resulted from enhanced expression of NADPH oxidase 2 (gp91{sup phox}), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and the infiltration of CD11b leukocytes due to breakdown of blood-brain barrier (BBB) by activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). All these changes were significantly diminished by prodigiosin. In BV-2 cells, OGD induced ROS and nitric oxide production by up-regulating gp91{sup phox} and iNOS via activation of the NF-{kappa}B pathway, and these changes were suppressed by prodigiosin. In conclusion, our results indicate that prodigiosin reduces gp91{sup phox} and iNOS expression possibly by impairing NF-{kappa}B activation. This compromises the activation of microglial and/or inflammatory cells, which then, in turn, mediates prodigiosin's protective effect in the MCAo/r mice. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prodigiosin ameliorated brain infarction and deficits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prodigiosin protected against hypoxia/reperfusion-induced brain injury. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prodigiosin diminished oxidative/nitrosativestress and leukocytes infiltration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prodigiosin reduced BBB breakdown. Black

  16. Distant effects of unilateral renal ischemia/reperfusion on contralateral kidney but not lung in rats: the roles of ROS and iNOS.

    PubMed

    Fatemikia, Hossein; Ketabchi, Farzaneh; Karimi, Zynab; Moosavi, Seyed Mostafa Shid

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury is usually associated with distant organ dysfunction. The roles of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in this phenomenon were investigated following 2 h unilateral renal ischemia and 24 h reperfusion. There were 3 groups of rats subjected to either unilateral ischemia/reperfusion (UIR group), unilateral nephrectomy (UNX group), or sham operation. Two further groups were given α-tocopherol and aminoguanidine with UIR (treated-UIR group) and UNX (treated-UNX group). Plasma nitrite/nitrate and malondialdehyde were elevated only in the UIR group. Creatinine clearance and blood flow increased in non-ischemic kidney of the UIR, but not to the same extent as remnant kidney of the UNX group, while they had equal compensatory rises in absolute Na(+) and K(+) excretion and urine flow. Non-ischemic kidney of the treated-UIR group, but not remnant kidney of the treated-UNX group, showed more elevation in blood flow, whereas both kidneys had reductions in absolute Na(+) excretion and urine flow. Respiratory functional variable were not different between all groups. Therefore, 2 h unilateral renal ischemia and 24 h reperfusion did not affect lung but had distant effects on contralateral kidney partly mediated by ROS and NO-derived from iNOS to dampen compensatory increases in renal hemodynamics and to decrease tubular reabsorption.

  17. Arctigenin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced iNOS expression in RAW264.7 cells through suppressing JAK-STAT signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Kou, Xianjuan; Qi, Shimei; Dai, Wuxing; Luo, Lan; Yin, Zhimin

    2011-08-01

    Arctigenin has been demonstrated to have an anti-inflammatory function, but the precise mechanisms of its action remain to be fully defined. In the present study, we determined the effects of arctigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of proinflammatory mediators and the underlying mechanisms involved in RAW264.7 cells. Our results indicated that arctigenin exerted its anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting ROS-dependent STAT signaling through its antioxidant activity. Arctigenin also significantly reduced the phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT 3 as well as JAK2 in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. The inhibitions of STAT1 and STAT 3 by arctigenin prevented their translocation to the nucleus and consequently inhibited expression of iNOS, thereby suppressing the expression of inflammation-associated genes, such as IL-1β, IL-6 and MCP-1, whose promoters contain STAT-binding elements. However, COX-2 expression was slightly inhibited at higher drug concentrations (50 μM). Our data demonstrate that arctigenin inhibits iNOS expression via suppressing JAK-STAT signaling pathway in macrophages.

  18. Sinomenine reduces iNOS expression via inhibiting the T-bet IFN-γ pathway in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Bingjie; Zeng, Yanying; Yin, Cheng; Wang, Huijiuan; Yang, Xiaofan; Wang, Song; Ji, Xiaohui

    2012-01-01

    Sinomenine is a bioactive alkaloid isolated from the Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum. It is widely used as an immunosuppressive drug for treating rheumatic and arthritic diseases. In our previous studies, we found that sinomenine reduced cellular infiltration within the spinal cord and alleviated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats. In this study, we further investigated the mechanisms of sinomenine treatment in EAE rats. In EAE rats, treatment with sinomenine exerted an anti-inducible NO synthase (anti-iNOS) effect, which is related to the reductions of Th1 cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and its transcription factor, T-bet, in spinal cords. Moreover, sinomenine treatment of splenocytes stimulated with anti-CD3 antibody and recombinant rat interleukin 12 reduced the expression of T-bet and IFN-γ in vitro and also reduced the capability of supernatants of splenocyte culture to induce iNOS expression by primary astrocytes. However, sinomenine had no direct inhibitory effect on iNOS produced by astrocytes cultured with IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor α in vitro. In conclusion, the anti-iNOS effect of sinomenine on EAE is mediated via the suppression of T-bet /IFN-γ pathway. PMID:23554784

  19. Sinomenine reduces iNOS expression via inhibiting the T-bet IFN-γ pathway in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bingjie; Zeng, Yanying; Yin, Cheng; Wang, Huijiuan; Yang, Xiaofan; Wang, Song; Ji, Xiaohui

    2012-11-01

    Sinomenine is a bioactive alkaloid isolated from the Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum. It is widely used as an immunosuppressive drug for treating rheumatic and arthritic diseases. In our previous studies, we found that sinomenine reduced cellular infiltration within the spinal cord and alleviated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats. In this study, we further investigated the mechanisms of sinomenine treatment in EAE rats. In EAE rats, treatment with sinomenine exerted an anti-inducible NO synthase (anti-iNOS) effect, which is related to the reductions of Th1 cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and its transcription factor, T-bet, in spinal cords. Moreover, sinomenine treatment of splenocytes stimulated with anti-CD3 antibody and recombinant rat interleukin 12 reduced the expression of T-bet and IFN-γ in vitro and also reduced the capability of supernatants of splenocyte culture to induce iNOS expression by primary astrocytes. However, sinomenine had no direct inhibitory effect on iNOS produced by astrocytes cultured with IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor α in vitro. In conclusion, the anti-iNOS effect of sinomenine on EAE is mediated via the suppression of T-bet /IFN-γ pathway.

  20. Sterile-α- and armadillo motif-containing protein inhibits the TRIF-dependent downregulation of signal regulatory protein α to interfere with intracellular bacterial elimination in Burkholderia pseudomallei-infected mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Baral, Pankaj; Utaisincharoen, Pongsak

    2013-09-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, evades macrophage killing by suppressing the TRIF-dependent pathway, leading to inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. We previously demonstrated that virulent wild-type B. pseudomallei inhibits the TRIF-dependent pathway by upregulating sterile-α- and armadillo motif-containing protein (SARM) and by inhibiting downregulation of signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα); both molecules are negative regulators of Toll-like receptor signaling. In contrast, the less virulent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutant of B. pseudomallei is unable to exhibit these features and is susceptible to macrophage killing. However, the functional relationship of these two negative regulators in the evasion of macrophage defense has not been elucidated. We demonstrated here that SIRPα downregulation was observed after inhibition of SARM expression by small interfering RNA in wild-type-infected macrophages, indicating that SIRPα downregulation is regulated by SARM. Furthermore, this downregulation requires activation of the TRIF signaling pathway, as we observed abrogation of SIRPα downregulation as well as restricted bacterial growth in LPS mutant-infected TRIF-depleted macrophages. Although inhibition of SARM expression is correlated to SIRPα downregulation and iNOS upregulation in gamma interferon-activated wild-type-infected macrophages, these phenomena appear to bypass the TRIF-dependent pathway. Similar to live bacteria, the wild-type LPS is able to upregulate SARM and to prevent SIRPα downregulation, implying that the LPS of B. pseudomallei may play a crucial role in regulating the expression of these two negative regulators. Altogether, our findings show a previously unrecognized role of B. pseudomallei-induced SARM in inhibiting SIRPα downregulation-mediated iNOS upregulation, facilitating the ability of the bacterium to multiply in macrophages.

  1. Qualitative and quantitative immunohistochemical evaluation of iNOS expression in the spleen of dogs naturally infected with Leishmania chagasi.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Fernando Rocha; Vieira, Paula Melo Abreu; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Giunchetti, Rodolfo Cordeiro; Carneiro, Claudia Martins; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme Cotta

    2011-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), the product of the nitric oxide synthase enzymes has been detected in Leishmania-infected animals. Besides its role on the immunity to infection, the role of NO and the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the pathogenesis of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) is not well understood. This study aimed at evaluating immunohistochemically the iNOS expression in the spleen of dogs naturally infected (ID) with Leishmania (L.) chagasi compared with non-infected dogs (NID). The ID was grouped according to the clinical form and the parasite load. Symptomatic dogs (SD) presented higher parasite load in relation to oligosymptomatic (OD) and asymptomatic (AD). The qualitative expression of iNOS was observed only in ID. SD presented strong and prominent labeling of iNOS, followed by OD and AD. Quantitatively, the results showed that the median expression of iNOS was higher in SD and OD compared to NID. Also, dog spleens with high parasitism load showed marked iNOS expression. Taken together, the results suggest that the expression of iNOS in the spleen of infected dogs with CVL was associated with clinical worsening of the disease and with high parasitism.

  2. IL-17A induces hypo-contraction of intestinal smooth muscle via induction of iNOS in muscularis macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mori, Daisuke; Watanabe, Nobumasa; Kaminuma, Osamu; Murata, Takahisa; Hiroi, Takachika; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Hori, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation causes disorder in bowel motility. Th17 cytokines are involved in intestinal inflammation. To understand the role of interleukin (IL)-17 in intestinal motility, we examined effects of IL-17A on contractile activities of organ-cultured ileum. Rat ileal smooth muscle strips were organ cultured with IL-17A. Muscle contraction was measured, and cells expressing inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were identified with immunohistochemistry. Creating Th17-transferred colitis model mice, in vivo effects of IL-17 on contractile activities, and iNOS mRNA expression in colonic smooth muscle were investigated. Treatment with IL-17A for 12 h and 3 days attenuated carbachol- and membrane depolarization-induced contractions in organ-cultured rat ileum. N(G)-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (100 μM), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, completely reversed the IL-17A-induced inhibition of contractile force. Ileal tissue cultured in the presence of IL-17A showed increased expression of iNOS mRNA and protein. Immunohistochemical analysis using an iNOS antibody revealed that iNOS protein was expressed on ED2-positive muscularis macrophages. The level of iNOS mRNA was also increased in inflamed colonic smooth muscle of Th17-transferred colitis model mice. In intestinal inflammation, IL-17A induces an intestinal motility disorder through iNOS expression in muscularis macrophages.

  3. The effect of aspirin nanoemulsion on TNFα and iNOS in gastric tissue in comparison with conventional aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Fatma Abd Elhalim; Hashem, Khalid S; Hussein Elkelawy, Asmaa Mohammed M

    2015-01-01

    aspirin, indicated by significant decreases in TNFα, iNOS, prostaglandin E2, and malondialdehyde levels, and also significant increases in glutathione, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase. The biochemical results were confirmed by histopathological studies. Conclusion Aspirin nanoemulsion has less toxic effect on the gastric mucosa compared to ordinary aspirin. This can be indicated by the increase of the antioxidant activity and the decrease of the inflammatory mediators in the gastric tissue. PMID:26345150

  4. Bacterial Sialidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Data shows that elevated sialidase in bacterial vaginosis patients correlates to premature births in women. Bacterial sialidase also plays a significant role in the unusual colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Crystals of Salmonella sialidase have been reproduced and are used for studying the inhibitor-enzyme complexes. These inhibitors may also be used to inhibit a trans-sialidase of Trypanosome cruzi, a very similar enzyme to bacterial sialidase, therefore preventing T. cruzi infection, the causitive agent of Chagas' disease. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography suggests that inhibitors of bacterial sialidases can be used as prophylactic drugs to prevent bacterial infections in these critical cases.

  5. Development and commissioning of the HARDROC based readout for the INO-ICAL experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashok; Gaur, Ankit; Phogat, Aman; Rafik, Md.; Naimuddin, Md.

    2016-10-01

    Glass based Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are going to be used as an active element in the Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) experiment at the India based Neutrino Observatory (INO), which is being constructed to study atmospheric neutrinos. Though the RPC detector operational parameters are more or less finalized, the readout electronics is being developed using various technologies. The ICAL experiment will consist of about 29,000 RPC detectors of 2 m × 2 m in size with each detector having 64 readout channels both in the X and Y directions. The present study focusses on multi-channel electronics based on SiGe 350 nm technology as an option for the INO-ICAL RPC detectors. The study includes commissioning and usage of frontend application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) HARDROC chip in which 64 channels are handled independently to perform zero suppression. We present first testbench results using the HARDROC chip with the aim to use it finally in the ICAL experiment.

  6. Effects of titanium dioxide mediated dairy waste activated sludge deflocculation on the efficiency of bacterial disintegration and cost of sludge management.

    PubMed

    Godvin Sharmila, V; Kavitha, S; Rajashankar, K; Yeom, Ick Tae; Rajesh Banu, J

    2015-12-01

    This investigation explores the influence of titanium dioxide (TiO2) in deflocculating (removal of extracellular polymeric substance - EPS) the sludge and subsequent biomass disintegration by bacterial pretreatment. The EPS removed at an optimized TiO2 dosage of 0.03g/g of SS of TiO2 and a solar radiation exposure time of 15min to enhance the subsequent bacterial disintegration. The outcomes of the bacterial pretreatment reveal SS reduction and COD solubilization for the deflocculated (EPS removed and bacterially pretreated) sludge was observed to be 22.8% and 22.9% which was comparatively greater than flocculated (raw sludge inoculated with bacteria) and control (raw) sludge. The higher methane production potential of about 0.43(gCOD/gVSS) was obtained in deflocculated sludge than the flocculated (0.20gCOD/gVSS) and control (0.073gCOD/gVSS). Economic assessment of this study provides a net profit of about 131.9USD/Ton in deflocculated sludge.

  7. Orostachys japonicus Inhibits Expression of the TLR4, NOD2, iNOS, and COX-2 Genes in LPS-Stimulated Human PMA-Differentiated THP-1 Cells by Inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Hong-Jung; Kim, Youngchul

    2015-01-01

    Orostachys japonicus is traditionally used as an inflammatory agent. In this report, we investigated the effects of O. japonicus extract on the expression of genes encoding pathogen-recognition receptors (TLR2, TLR4, NOD1, and NOD2) and proinflammatory factors (iNOS, COX-2, and cytokines) in LPS-stimulated PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells and the NF-κB and MAPK pathways. O. japonicus induced toxicity at high concentrations but had no effect at concentrations lower than 25 μg/mL. O. japonicus inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 and NOD2 mRNA levels, suppressed LPS-induced iNOS and COX-2 transcription and translocation, and downregulated LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α) mRNA levels. In addition, O. japonicus inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB activation and IκBα degradation and suppressed LPS-induced JNK, p38 MAPK, and ERK phosphorylation. Overall, our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of O. japonicus are mediated by suppression of NF-κB and MAPK signaling, resulting in reduced TLR4, NOD2, iNOS, and COX-2 expression and inhibition of inflammatory cytokine expression. PMID:25810745

  8. The Influence of Vitamin D Treatment on the Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (INOS) Expression in Primary Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    DURSUN, Erdinç; GEZEN-AK, Duygu; YILMAZER, Selma

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Neurodegeneration is a process that is characterized by the loss of neuronal structure and function and eventually ends with neuronal death. An elevated level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is suggested to accompany this process by inducing oxidative and nitrosative damage. Vitamin D is reported to protect glial cells against neurotoxicity via suppressing iNOS synthesis. Though there was no data about whether iNOS is regulated by vitamin D in hippocampal neurons. In this study our aim was to determine any alteration in iNOS expression of hippocampal neurons in response to vitamin D treatment. Method Twenty four and 48 hours of vitamin D treatments were performed on primary hippocampal neuron cultures that were prepared from Sprague dawley rat embryos (E18). The alterations in the iNOS mRNA expression were determined with quantative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The cytotoxicity levels of each group were investigated by the measurement of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) that is released to culture medium. Results No difference was observed between groups in 24 hours of treatment regarding the iNOS expression. Though the iNOS mRNA level of vitamin D treated group was significantly lower than that of control group on the 48th hours of treatment (p<.001). Vitamin D treatment also attenuated the LDH release which is an indicator of cytotoxicity (p<.001). Conclusion Our results indicated that vitamin D has the potential to prevent oxidative damage by suppressing iNOS expression.

  9. INO-4995 Therapeutic Efficacy Is Enhanced with Repeat Dosing in Cystic Fibrosis Knockout Mice and Human Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Traynor-Kaplan, Alexis E.; Moody, Mark; Nur, Magda; Gabriel, Sherif; Majerus, Philip W.; Drumm, Mitchell L.; Langton-Webster, Beatrice

    2010-01-01

    Progressive lung damage in cystic fibrosis (CF) has been linked to inadequate airway mucosal hydration. We previously demonstrated that an inositol tetrakisphosphate analog, 1-O-octyl-2-O-butyryl-myo-inositol 3,4,5,6-tetrakisphosphate octakis(propionoxymethyl)ester (INO-4995), regulates airway secretory and absorptive processes, affecting mucosal hydration by prolonged (24 h) inhibition of Na+ and fluid absorption in CF human nasal epithelia (CFHNE). The objectives of this study were to further assess clinical potential of INO-4995 in CF through ascertaining in vivo activity in mice with CF, determining the effects of repeated administration on potency and determining cytoplasmic half-life. Uptake and metabolism of [3H]INO-4995 was monitored with HPLC to calculate intracellular half-life. INO-4995 was administered in vitro repeatedly over 4 to 8 days to CFHNE. Fluid absorption was assessed by blue dextran exclusion, and basal short-circuit current was measured in Ussing chambers. INO-4995 (1–100 μg/kg) was dosed intranasally either as a single dose or once per day over 4 days to gut-corrected CF mice. [3H]INO-4995 was rapidly taken up by epithelial cultures and converted to the active drug, which had a half-life of 40 hours. Repeated daily application of INO-4995 to CFHNE lowered the effective concentration for inhibition of fluid absorption and amiloride-sensitive short-circuit current in cultured CFHNE, and reduced nasal potential difference to nearly control levels in gut-corrected CF mice. Ca2+-activated Cl− channel activity was also boosted in cultures. Mouse nasal levels fell from abnormal levels to within 2 μA of normal with repeated exposure to 0.8 μg/kg over 4 days. These data support further development of INO-4995 for the treatment of CF. PMID:19346319

  10. The prostacyclin agonist iloprost aggravates fibrosis and enhances viral replication in enteroviral myocarditis by modulation of ERK signaling and increase of iNOS expression.

    PubMed

    Gruhle, Stefan; Sauter, Martina; Szalay, Gudrun; Ettischer, Nicole; Kandolf, Reinhard; Klingel, Karin

    2012-09-01

    Enteroviruses, such as coxsackieviruses of group B (CVB), are able to induce a chronic inflammation of the myocardium, which may finally lead to the loss of functional tissue, remodeling processes and the development of fibrosis, thus affecting the proper contractile function of the heart. In other fibrotic diseases like scleroderma, the prostacyclin agonist iloprost was found to inhibit the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, p44/42 MAPK), a mitogen-activated protein kinase, and consecutively, the expression of the profibrotic cytokine connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), thereby preventing the development of fibrosis. As CTGF was found to mediate fibrosis in chronic CVB3 myocarditis as well, we evaluated whether the in vivo application of iloprost is capable to reduce the development of ERK/CTGF-mediated fibrosis in enteroviral myocarditis. Unexpectedly, the application of iloprost resulted in a prolonged myocardial inflammation and an aggravated fibrosis and failed to reduce activation of ERK and expression of CTGF at later stages of the disease. In addition, viral replication was found to be increased in iloprost-treated mice. Notably, the expression of cardiac inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which is known to aggravate myocardial damage in CVB3-infected mice, was strongly enhanced by iloprost. Using cultivated bone marrow macrophages (BMM), we confirmed these results, proving that iloprost potentiates the expression of iNOS mRNA and protein in CVB3-infected and IFN-gamma stimulated BMM. In conclusion, these results suggest a critical reflection of the clinical use of iloprost, especially in patients possibly suffering from an enteroviral myocarditis.

  11. Association between inflammatory mediators and response to inhaled nitric oxide in a model of endotoxin-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Trachsel, Sebastien; Deby-Dupont, Ginette; Maurenbrecher, Edwige; Nys, Monique; Lamy, Maurice; Hedenstierna, Göran

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) allows selective pulmonary vasodilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome and improves PaO2 by redistribution of pulmonary blood flow towards better ventilated parenchyma. One-third of patients are nonresponders to INO, however, and it is difficult to predict who will respond. The aim of the present study was to identify, within a panel of inflammatory mediators released during endotoxin-induced lung injury, specific mediators that are associated with a PaO2 response to INO. Methods After animal ethics committee approval, pigs were anesthetized and exposed to 2 hours of endotoxin infusion. Levels of cytokines, prostanoid, leucotriene and endothelin-1 (ET-1) were sampled prior to endotoxin exposure and hourly thereafter. All animals were exposed to 40 ppm INO: 28 animals were exposed at either 4 hours or 6 hours and a subgroup of nine animals was exposed both at 4 hours and 6 hours after onset of endotoxin infusion. Results Based on the response to INO, the animals were retrospectively placed into a responder group (increase in PaO2 ≥ 20%) or a nonresponder group. All mediators increased with endotoxin infusion although no significant differences were seen between responders and nonresponders. There was a mean difference in ET-1, however, with lower levels in the nonresponder group than in the responder group, 0.1 pg/ml versus 3.0 pg/ml. Moreover, five animals in the group exposed twice to INO switched from responder to nonresponder and had decreased ET-1 levels (3.0 (2.5 to 7.5) pg/ml versus 0.1 (0.1 to 2.1) pg/ml, P < 0.05). The pulmonary artery pressure and ET-1 level were higher in future responders to INO. Conclusions ET-1 may therefore be involved in mediating the response to INO. PMID:18954441

  12. Trunk kidney of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) mediates immune responses against GCRV and viral/bacterial PAMPs in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijun; Li, Qingmei; Su, Jianguo; Yang, Chunrong; Li, Yinqian; Rao, Youliang

    2013-03-01

    Trunk kidney is a vital organ for excretion in teleosts. There have been sporadic reports of processing pathogens for the immune function in trunk kidney. However, molecular processes of pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs) responding to virus and viral/bacterial pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) are poorly elucidated in trunk kidney. In the present study, we investigated transcriptional profiles of twelve representative immune-related genes (TLRs (TLR3, TLR7 and TLR22); RLRs (RIG-I, MDA5 and LGP2); NLRs (NOD1 and NOD2); adapter molecules (MyD88 and IPS-1); effector molecule type I interferon (IFN-I) and immunoglobulin M (IgM)) in trunk kidney tissue of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) (designated as Ci) injection of grass carp reovirus (GCRV) utilizing quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Furthermore, mRNA expression patterns of these genes (IgM excepted) were examined post GCRV infection and polyinosine-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or peptidoglycan (PGN) stimulation in primary trunk kidney cells of grass carp. The relative values of CiTLR3, CiTLR22 and CiMyD88 were increased post GCRV challenge and viral/bacterial PAMPs stimulation. The mRNA transcriptions of CiTLR7 were obviously activated with GCRV challenge. Remarkably, the mRNA expressions of CiRIG-I, CiMDA5, CiLGP2 and CiIPS-1 were largely up-regulated with GCRV challenge and viral/bacterial PAMPs stimulation. Interestingly, the expression tendencies of CiNOD1 and CiNOD2 were differential not only in GCRV challenge and poly(I:C) stimulation, but also in LPS and PGN stimulation. It was demonstrated that CiIFN-I induced powerful anti-viral and anti-bacterial effects in trunk kidney. In addition, the expression of CiIgM was induced at 72 h post GCRV injection in vivo. Collectively, these results suggest that trunk kidney of grass carp serves as an important immune organ, and plays crucial roles in triggering anti-viral and anti-bacterial immune responses both

  13. Delineation and mutational analysis of the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis YopE domains which mediate translocation across bacterial and eukaryotic cellular membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Schesser, K; Frithz-Lindsten, E; Wolf-Watz, H

    1996-01-01

    Pathogenic yersiniae deliver a number of different effector molecules, which are referred to as Yops, into the cytosol of eukaryotic cells via a type III secretion system. To identify the regions of YopE from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis that are necessary for its translocation across the bacterial and eukaryotic cellular membranes, we constructed a series of hybrid genes which consisted of various amounts of yopE fused to the adenylate cyclase-encoding domain of the cyclolysin gene (cyaA) of Bordetella pertussis. By assaying intact cells for adenylate cyclase activity, we show that a YopE-Cya protein containing just the 11 amino-terminal residues of YopE is efficiently exported to the exterior surface of the bacterial cell. Single amino acid replacements of the first seven YopE residues significantly decreased the amount of reporter protein detected on the cell surface, suggesting that the extreme amino-terminal region of YopE is recognized by the secretion machinery. As has recently been shown for the Y. enterocolitica YopE protein (M.-P. Sory, A. Boland, I. Lambermont, and G. R. Cornelis, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92:11998-12002, 1995), we found that export to the cell surface was not sufficient for YopE-Cya proteins to be delivered into the eukaryotic cytoplasm. For traversing the HeLa cell membrane, at least 49 yopE-encoded residues were required. Replacement of leucine 43 of YopE with glycine severely affected the delivery of the reporter protein into HeLa cells. Surprisingly, export from the bacterial cell was also not sufficient for YopE-Cya proteins to be released from the bacterial cell surface into the culture supernatant. At least 75 residues of YopE were required to detect activity of the corresponding reporter protein in the culture supernatant, suggesting that a release domain exists in this region of YopE. We also show that the chaperone-like protein YerA required at least 75 YopE residues to form a stable complex in vitro with YopE-Cya proteins and

  14. Evaluation of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for rapid detection of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus important bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus infected with Edwardsiella ictaluri results in $40 - 50 million annual losses in profits to catfish producers. Early detection of this pathogen is necessary for disease control and reduction of economic loss. In this communication, the loop-mediated isothermal a...

  15. Bacterial exopolysaccharide based magnetic nanoparticles: a versatile nanotool for cancer cell imaging, targeted drug delivery and synergistic effect of drug and hyperthermia mediated cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Balasubramanian; Aswathy, Ravindran Girija; Sreejith, Raveendran; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Iwai, Seiki; Suzuki, Masashi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Hasumura, Takashi; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthikumar, Dasappan Nair

    2014-06-01

    Microbial exopolysaccharides (EPSs) are highly heterogeneous polymers produced by fungi and bacteria that have garnered considerable attention and have remarkable potential in various fields, including biomedical research. The necessity of biocompatible materials to coat and stabilize nanoparticles is highly recommended for successful application of the same in biomedical regime. In our study we have coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with two bacterial EPS-mauran (MR) and gellan gum (GG). The biocompatibility of EPS coated MNPs was enhanced and we have made it multifunctional by attaching targeting moiety, folate and with encapsulation of a potent anticancerous drug, 5FU. We have conjugated an imaging moiety along with nanocomposite to study the effective uptake of nanoparticles. It was also observed that the dye labeled folate targeted nanoparticles could effectively enter into cancer cells and the fate of nanoparticles was tracked with Lysotracker. The biocompatibility of EPS coated MNPs and synergistic effect of magnetic hyperthermia and drug for enhanced antiproliferation of cancer cells was also evaluated. More than 80% of cancer cells was killed within a period of 60 min when magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) was applied along with drug loaded EPS coated MNPs, thus signifying the combined effect of drug loaded MNPs and MHT. Our results suggests that MR and GG coated MNPs exhibited excellent biocompatibility with low cell cytotoxicity, high therapeutic potential, and superparamagnetic behavior that can be employed as prospective candidates for bacterial EPS based targeted drug delivery, cancer cell imaging and for MHT for killing cancer cells within short period of time.

  16. Temperature-mediated differences in bacterial kidney disease expression and survival in Renibacterium salmoninarum-challenged bull trout and other salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, D.T.; Moffitt, C.M.; Peters, K.K.

    2007-01-01

    Resource managers considering restoration and reconnection of watersheds to protect and enhance threatened populations of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus have little information about the consequences of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum. To better understand the response of bull trout to R. salmoninarum challenge, we conducted several laboratory experiments at two water temperatures. The extent, severity, and lethality of BKD in bull trout were compared with those of similarly challenged lake trout S. namaycush, Arctic char S. alpinus, Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and rainbow trout O. mykiss. The lethal dose of bacterial cells necessary to induce 50% mortality (LD50) was 10-fold lower at the 15??C challenge than at the 9??C challenge. Of the species tested, bull trout were relatively resistant to BKD, Arctic char were the most susceptible among Salvelinus species, and Chinook salmon were the most susceptible among Oncorhynchus species tested. Mean time to death was more rapid for all fish tested at 15??C than for fish challenged at 9??C. These results suggest that infection of bull trout with BKD likely poses a low risk to successful restoration of threatened populations. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  17. Clathrin, AP-2, and the NPXY-binding subset of alternate endocytic adaptors facilitate FimH-mediated bacterial invasion of host cells.

    PubMed

    Eto, Danelle S; Gordon, Hannah B; Dhakal, Bijaya K; Jones, Tiffani A; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2008-12-01

    The FimH adhesin, localized at the distal tips of type 1 pili, binds mannose-containing glycoprotein receptors like alpha3beta1 integrins and stimulates bacterial entry into target host cells. Strains of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the major cause of urinary tract infections, utilize FimH to invade bladder epithelial cells. Here we set out to define the mechanism by which UPEC enters host cells by investigating four of the major entry routes known to be exploited by invasive pathogens: caveolae, clathrin, macropinocytosis and secretory lysosomes. Using pharmacological inhibitors in combination with RNA interference against specific endocytic pathway components, mutant host cell lines and a mouse infection model system, we found that type 1 pili-dependent bacterial invasion of host cells occurs via a cholesterol- and dynamin-dependent phagocytosis-like mechanism. This process did not require caveolae or secretory lysosomes, but was modulated by calcium levels, clathrin, and cooperative input from the primary clathrin adaptor AP-2 and a subset of alternate adaptors comprised of Numb, ARH and Dab2. These alternate clathrin adaptors recognize NPXY motifs, as found within the cytosolic tail of beta1 integrin, suggesting a functional link between the engagement of integrin receptors by FimH and the clathrin-dependent uptake of type 1-piliated bacteria.

  18. Performance of the prototype gas recirculation system with built-in RGA for INO RPC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, M.; Datar, V. M.; Joshi, A.; Kalmani, S. D.; Mondal, N. K.; Rahman, M. A.; Satyanarayana, B.; Verma, P.

    2012-01-01

    An open loop gas recovery and recirculation system has been developed for the INO RPC system. The gas mixture coming from RPC exhaust is first desiccated by passing through molecular sieve (3 Å+4 Å). Subsequent scrubbing over basic active alumina removes toxic and acidic contaminants. The Isobutane and Freon are then separated by diffusion and liquefied by fractional condensation by cooling up to -26C. A Residual Gas Analyser (RGA) is being used in the loop to study the performance of the recirculation system. The results of the RGA analysis will be discussed.

  19. The human Ino80 binds to microtubule via the E-hook of tubulin: Implications for the role in spindle assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Eun-Jung; Hur, Shin-Kyoung; Lee, Han-Sae; Lee, Shin-Ai; Kwon, Jongbum

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The N-terminal domain of hIno80 is important for binding to the spindle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hIno80 N-terminal domain binds to tubulin and microtubule in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The E-hook of tubulin is critical for hIno80 binding to tubulin and microtubule. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tip49a does not bind to microtubule and dispensable for spindle formation. -- Abstract: The human INO80 chromatin remodeling complex, comprising the Ino80 ATPase (hIno80) and the associated proteins such as Tip49a, has been implicated in a variety of nuclear processes other than transcription. We previously have found that hIno80 interacts with tubulin and co-localizes with the mitotic spindle and is required for spindle formation. To better understand the role of hIno80 in spindle formation, we further investigated the interaction between hIno80 and microtubule. Here, we show that the N-terminal domain, dispensable for the nucleosome remodeling activity, is important for hIno80 to interact with tubulin and co-localize with the spindle. The hIno80 N-terminal domain binds to monomeric tubulin and polymerized microtubule in vitro, and the E-hook of tubulin, involved in the polymerization of microtubule, is critical for this binding. Tip49a, which has been reported to associate with the spindle, does not bind to microtubule in vitro and dispensable for spindle formation in vivo. These results suggest that hIno80 can play a direct role in the spindle assembly independent of its chromatin remodeling activity.

  20. Melatonin enhances the anti-tumor effect of fisetin by inhibiting COX-2/iNOS and NF-κB/p300 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Yi, Canhui; Zhang, Yong; Yu, Zhenlong; Xiao, Yao; Wang, Jingshu; Qiu, Huijuan; Yu, Wendan; Tang, Ranran; Yuan, Yuhui; Guo, Wei; Deng, Wuguo

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is a hormone identified in plants and pineal glands of mammals and possesses diverse physiological functions. Fisetin is a bio-flavonoid widely found in plants and exerts antitumor activity in several types of human cancers. However, the combinational effect of melatonin and fisetin on antitumor activity, especially in melanoma treatment, remains unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that melatonin could enhance the antitumor activity of fisetin in melanoma cells and identified the underlying molecular mechanisms. The combinational treatment of melanoma cells with fisetin and melatonin significantly enhanced the inhibitions of cell viability, cell migration and clone formation, and the induction of apoptosis when compared with the treatment of fisetin alone. Moreover, such enhancement of antitumor effect by melatonin was found to be mediated through the modulation of the multiply signaling pathways in melanoma cells. The combinational treatment of fisetin with melatonin increased the cleavage of PARP proteins, triggered more release of cytochrome-c from the mitochondrial inter-membrane, enhanced the inhibition of COX-2 and iNOS expression, repressed the nuclear localization of p300 and NF-κB proteins, and abrogated the binding of NF-κB on COX-2 promoter. Thus, these results demonstrated that melatonin potentiated the anti-tumor effect of fisetin in melanoma cells by activating cytochrome-c-dependent apoptotic pathway and inhibiting COX-2/iNOS and NF-κB/p300 signaling pathways, and our study suggests the potential of such a combinational treatment of natural products in melanoma therapy.

  1. Association evidence of CCTTT repeat polymorphism in the iNOS promoter and the risk of atrial fibrillation in Taiwanese

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Lung-An; Yeh, Yung-Hsin; Chen, Wei-Jan; Kuo, Chi-Tai; Tsai, Feng-Chun; Chan, Yi-Hsin; Wang, Chun-Li; Chang, Chi-Jen; Tsai, Hsin-Yi

    2017-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation (AF). The iNOS promoter has a CCTTT-repeat length polymorphism that can determine the level of gene transcription. This study enrolled 200 AF patients and 240 controls. The length of CCTTT-repeat polymorphism in the iNOS promoter region was examined by polymerase chain reactions, with the alleles with ≤11 repeats designated as S and alleles with ≥12 repeats designated as L alleles. AF patients carried significantly higher frequencies of the LL genotype than control subjects (40.0% versus 28.3%, P = 0.010). Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of LL genotype was significantly associated with AF (odds ratio: 1.87, 95% CI = 1.10–3.17, P = 0.021). In vitro, transient transfection assay in HL-1 atrial myocytes showed that the responsiveness of iNOS transcriptional activity to tachypacing was correlated with the length of the CCTTT-repeats. Right atrial tissues from patients with chronic AF were investigated with immunoconfocal microscopy. Patients with LL genotype exhibited greater oxidative stress and substrate remodeling in their atria than those with non-LL genotypes. Our results suggest that the iNOS microsatellite polymorphism may contribute to the genetic background of AF in Chinese-Taiwanese patients. PMID:28205526

  2. INO80 and gamma-H2AX interaction links ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling to DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Ashby J; Highland, Jessica; Krogan, Nevan J; Arbel-Eden, Ayelet; Greenblatt, Jack F; Haber, James E; Shen, Xuetong

    2004-12-17

    While the role of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in transcription is well established, a link between chromatin remodeling and DNA repair has remained elusive. We have found that the evolutionarily conserved INO80 chromatin remodeling complex directly participates in the repair of a double-strand break (DSB) in yeast. The INO80 complex is recruited to a HO endonuclease-induced DSB through a specific interaction with the DNA damage-induced phosphorylated histone H2A (gamma-H2AX). This interaction requires Nhp10, an HMG-like subunit of the INO80 complex. The loss of Nhp10 or gamma-H2AX results in reduced INO80 recruitment to the DSB. Finally, components of the INO80 complex show synthetic genetic interactions with the RAD52 DNA repair pathway, the main pathway for DSB repair in yeast. Our findings reveal a new role of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in nuclear processes and suggest that an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex can read a DNA repair histone code.

  3. Distinct roles for SWR1 and INO80 chromatin remodeling complexes at chromosomal double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    van Attikum, Haico; Fritsch, Olivier; Gasser, Susan M

    2007-01-01

    INO80 and SWR1 are two closely related ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes that share several subunits. Ino80 was reported to be recruited to the HO endonuclease-induced double-strand break (DSB) at the budding yeast mating-type locus, MAT. We find Swr1 similarly recruited in a manner dependent on the phosphorylation of H2A (γH2AX). This is not unique to cleavage at MAT; both Swr1 and Ino80 bind near an induced DSB on chromosome XV. Whereas Swr1 incorporates the histone variant H2A.Z into chromatin at promoters, H2A.Z levels do not increase at DSBs. Instead, H2A.Z, γH2AX and core histones are coordinately removed near the break in an INO80-dependent, but SWR1-independent, manner. Mutations in INO80-specific subunits Arp8 or Nhp10 impair the binding of Mre11 nuclease, yKu80 and ATR-related Mec1 kinase at the DSB, resulting in defective end-processing and checkpoint activation. In contrast, Mre11 binding, end-resection and checkpoint activation were normal in the swr1 strain, but yKu80 loading and error-free end-joining were impaired. Thus, these two related chromatin remodelers have distinct roles in DSB repair and checkpoint activation. PMID:17762868

  4. Cytoplasmic bacterial lipopolysaccharide does not induce NFkappaB activation or NFkappaB mediated activation signals in human macrophages and an LPS reporter cell line.

    PubMed

    Seitzer, Ulrike; Gerdes, Johannes

    2003-01-01

    Although many membrane components have been described to be involved in the activation of cells by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the question remains whether LPS, once internalized by target cells, is also capable of interacting with cytoplasmic elements in such a way that activation of cells results independently of receptor engagement. This is an important aspect to consider with respect to the development of strategies aimed at attenuating adverse effects of LPS in the framework of bacterial infections. In this study, human monocyte derived macrophages as representatives of one of the primary target cells activated by LPS, were microinjected with LPS to circumvent exogenous LPS stimulation. Parameters correlating to cytoplasmic activation of the nuclear transcription factor NFkappaB (intracellular calcium mobilization), to nuclear translocation of the NFkappaB p65 subunit and to mRNA-transcription of inflammatory cytokines known to be expressed upon exogenous LPS-stimulation and to require NFkappaB activation (interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha) were investigated. In addition, the LPS-reporter cell line 3E10, which contains a reporter gene under the control of an NFkappaB-inducible promoter was analyzed with respect to NFkappaB nuclear translocation and reporter gene expression. None of the cellular systems used and none of the parameters investigated led to the observation that intracellular LPS leads to activation of the cells in comparison to external LPS stimulation. These experiments allow the conclusion that LPS in the cytoplasmic compartment does not lead to NFkappaB translocation, cytokine mRNA transcription, and NFkappaB dependent protein expression and suggest that these activation parameters require the interaction of LPS with external membrane components.

  5. Bacterial Tracheitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a complication of croup (see Croup ) or endotracheal intubation (insertion of a plastic breathing tube through the ... irregularities that distinguish bacterial tracheitis from croup. Treatment Endotracheal intubation Antibiotics With treatment, most children recover completely. Very ...

  6. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormones of iNOS origin play important roles in the allergic reactions of atopic dermatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Orita, Kumi; Hiramoto, Keiichi; Kobayashi, Hiromi; Ishii, Masamitsu; Sekiyama, Atsuo; Inoue, Masayasu

    2011-11-01

    To elucidate the possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) derived from inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in the pathogenesis of patients with allergic rhinitis, we used an animal model of atopic dermatitis (AD) induced by epicutaneous sensitization and analysed the differences in ear thickness, the frequency of scratching and plasma levels of ovalbumin-specific immunoglobulin E (OVA-IgE), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) between control and iNOS(-/-) mice. Eight-week-old control and iNOS(-/-) male C57BL/6j mice were sensitized three times with OVA antigen. Before and after the last skin sensitization, the number of scratching incidents and the thickness of the ear were examined, and the plasma levels of OVA-IgE, α-MSH, ACTH, TGF-β and TNF-α were analysed by ELISA. Sensitization of mice with OVA resulted in increased plasma levels of OVA-IgE, α-MSH, ACTH, TGF-β and TNF-α in control, but not in iNOS(-/-) mice. The administration of l-nitro-arginine-methyl ester (l-NAME) abolished all the above changes that occurred in the control mice. In addition, iNOS(-/-) mice given α-MSH exhibited a change similar to that seen in the control, whereas iNOS(-/-) mice given ACTH, TGF-β or TNF-α did not demonstrate any changes. These results indicate that symptoms of AD such as scratching can be exacerbated by α-MSH, which is induced by iNOS-derived NO.

  7. Characterization of the Proximal Ligand in the P420 Form of iNOS

    PubMed Central

    Sabat, Joseph; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L.

    2010-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO) produced by inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) up-regulates the expression of heme oxygenase (HO), which in turn produces carbon monoxide (CO) that down-regulates iNOS activity by reducing its expression level or by inhibiting its activity by converting it to an inactive P420 form (iNOSP420). Accordingly, CO has been considered as a potentially important attenuator of inflammation. Despite its importance, the nature of the proximal heme ligand of the iNOSP420 species remains elusive. Here we show that the 221 cm−1 mode of the photoproduct of iNOSP420 does not exhibit any H2O-D2O solvent isotope shift such as that found in the iron-histidine stretching mode of myoglobin, indicating that the proximal ligand of iNOSP420 is not a histidine. The νFe-CO and νC-O data reveal that the proximal heme ligand of iNOSP420 is consistent with a protonated thiol, instead of a thiolate anion. Furthermore, the optical absorption properties of iNOSP420 are similar to those of a neutral thiol-heme model complex, but not myoglobin. Together the data support the scenario that iNOSP420 is inactivated by protonation of the native proximal thiolate ligand to a neutral thiol, instead of by ligand switching to a histidine, as prior studies have suggested. PMID:19658411

  8. Flavonoids inhibit iNOS production via mitogen activated proteins in lipoteichoic acid stimulated cardiomyoblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Ventura-Arroyo, Jairo Agustín; Arreguín-Cano, Juan Antonio; Ostoa-Pérez, María Fernanda

    2014-08-01

    Infective endocarditis is caused by oral commensal bacteria which are important etiologic agents in this disease and can induce release of nitric oxide (NO), promoting an inflammatory response in the endocardium. In this study, we investigated the properties of kaempherol, epigallocatechin, apigenin, and naringin in embryonic mouse heart cells (H9c2) treated with lipoteichoic acid (LTA) obtained from Streptococcus sanguinis. NO production was measured with the Griess method. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In addition, western blot assays and immunofluorescence staining were used to assess translocation of nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-κB), degradation of IκB, and activity of the mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2), p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). And the effects of these flavonoids on cell viability were also assessed. Our results showed that flavonoids blocked activation of ERK, JNK, and p38 in cardiomyocytes treated with LTA. Moreover, the flavonoids showed no cytotoxic effects and blocked NF-κB translocation and IκB degradation and inhibited LTA-induced NF-κB promoter activity, iNOS expression and NO production. In conclusion these effects are consistent with some of the observed anti-inflammatory properties of other flavonoids.

  9. Performance study of glass RPC detectors for INO-ICAL experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Ankit; Kumar, Ashok; Naimuddin, Md.

    2017-02-01

    Resistive plate chamber (RPC) detectors are known for their excellent timing and good spatial resolution which make them favorable candidate for tracking and triggering in many high energy physics experiments. The Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector at India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is one such experiment which will use RPCs as an active detector element. The ICAL experiment is designed to study atmospheric neutrinos and various issues related with neutrino physics. The INO-ICAL has geometry that utilizes about 29,000 RPCs of 2×2 m2 in size, interleaved between thick iron plates, producing muons via the interaction of atmospheric neutrinos with iron. The tracking information of the muons will be extracted from the two-dimensional readout of the RPCs and its position in respective layers along with the upward and downward directionality determined from the timing information. As a result, a precise measurement of timing response of these RPC detectors is quite important. Furthermore, to design readout system for the ICAL detector, induced signal study and charge information is needed as well. In this paper, we present a detailed timing and charge spectra study for various glass RPC candidates. We also report the effect of various gas compositions on the timing and charge spectra of these RPC detectors.

  10. Low fucose containing bacterial polysaccharide facilitate mitochondria-dependent ROS-induced apoptosis of human lung epithelial carcinoma via controlled regulation of MAPKs-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 homeostasis signaling.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Sougata Roy; Sengupta, Suman; Biswas, Subir; Sen, Ramkrishna; Sinha, Tridib Kumar; Basak, Ratan Kumar; Adhikari, Basudam; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), the key mediators of cellular oxidative stress and redox dysregulation involved in cancer initiation and progression, have recently emerged as promising targets for anticancer drug discovery. Continuous free radical assault upsets homeostasis in cellular redox system and regulates the associated signaling pathways to mediate stress-induced cell death. This study investigates the dose-specific pro-oxidative behavior of a bacterial fucose polysaccharide, which attenuated proliferation of different cancer cells. In the fermentation process, Bacillus megaterium RB-05 [GenBank Accession Number HM371417] was found to biosynthesize a polysaccharide with low-fucose content (4.9%), which conferred the maximum anti-proliferative activity (750 µg/mL) against human lung cancer epithelial cells (A549) during preliminary screening. Structural elucidation and morphological characterization of the duly purified polysaccharide was done using HPLC, GC-MS, (1)H/(13)C NMR, and microscopy. The polysaccharide exhibited concentration- and time-dependent anti-proliferative effects against A549 cells by inducing intracellular ROS level and regulating the mitochondrial membrane-permeability following the apoptotic pathway. This process encompasses activation of caspase-8/9/3/7, increase in the ratio of Bax/Bcl2 ratio, translocation of Bcl2-associated X protein (Bax) and cytochrome c, decrease in expression of anti-apoptotic members of Bcl2 family, and phosphorylation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Apoptosis was attenuated upon pretreatment with specific caspase-inhibitors. Simultaneously, during apoptosis, the ROS-mediated stress as well as activated MAPKs triggered nuclear translocation of transcription factors like nuclear factor (erythroid-derived)-like 2 (Nrf2) and promoted further transcription of downstream cytoprotective genes, which somehow perturbed the chemotherapeutic efficacy of the polysaccharide, although using CuPP, a chemical

  11. Discovery of a Natural Product-Like iNOS Inhibitor by Molecular Docking with Potential Neuroprotective Effects In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Cheong-Meng; Lu, Lihua; Wang, Modi; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Chan, Philip Wai Hong; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we applied structure-based virtual screening techniques to identify natural product or natural product-like inhibitors of iNOS. The iNOS inhibitory activity of the hit compounds was characterized using cellular assays and an in vivo zebrafish larvae model. The natural product-like compound 1 inhibited NO production in LPS-stimulated Raw264.7 macrophages, without exerting cytotoxic effects on the cells. Significantly, compound 1 was able to reverse MPTP-induced locomotion deficiency and neurotoxicity in an in vivo zebrafish larval model. Hence, compound 1 could be considered as a scaffold for the further development of iNOS inhibitors for potential anti-inflammatory or anti-neurodegenerative applications. PMID:24690920

  12. Dexamethasone suppresses iNOS yet induces GTPCH and CAT-2 mRNA expression in rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Skimming, Jeffrey W; Nasiroglu, Omer; Huang, Chun-Jen; Wood, Charles E; Stevens, Bruce R; Haque, Ikram U L; Scumpia, Philip O; Sarcia, Paul J

    2003-08-01

    The in vivo mechanisms by which glucocorticoids inhibit nitric oxide expression await detailed investigation. In cell culture experiments, glucocorticoids have been shown to inhibit inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) formation and activity. Glucocorticoids can inhibit iNOS activity in cultured cells by blocking arginine transport and inhibiting tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis. We recently reported that changes in intrapulmonary formation of nitric oxide in endotoxemic rats correspond with changes in transcription of the predominant arginine transporter cationic amino acid transporter (CAT)-2. Realizing that hemorrhagic shock induces nitric oxide overproduction in intact animals, we sought to explore whether glucocorticoids attenuate hemorrhagic shock-induced increases in intrapulmonary nitric oxide formation and whether they might do so by inhibiting the formation of tetrahydrobiopterin, iNOS protein, and CAT-2. We randomly assigned 10 male Sprague-Dawley rats to receive dexamethasone or normal saline. Bleeding the animals to a mean systemic blood pressure of between 40 and 45 mmHg created the hemorrhagic shock. Dexamethasone abrogated the increase in exhaled nitric oxide concentrations caused by hemorrhagic shock. At the end of the experiment, plasma nitrate/nitrite values were lower in the dexamethasone group than in the control group. The iNOS protein concentrations were also lower in the dexamethasone group than in the control group. Dexamethasone decreased the intrapulmonary iNOS mRNA concentrations yet increased both guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I mRNA and CAT-2 mRNA. Our results support the idea that dexamethasone inhibits nitric oxide formation in a manner that is independent of tetrahydrobiopterin and arginine transport yet dependent on downregulation of iNOS mRNA expression.

  13. Delayed myocardial preconditioning induced by cobalt chloride in the rat: HIF-1α and iNOS involvement.

    PubMed

    Belaidi, Elise; Beguin, Pauline C; Levy, Patrick; Ribuot, Christophe; Godin-Ribuot, Diane

    2012-08-01

    We previously reported that acute exposure to intermittent hypoxia results in delayed cardioprotection against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and that the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, a transcriptional factor stabilized by hypoxia, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) play a key role in this form of preconditioning. As cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)) is known to promote HIF-1α stabilization by inhibiting prolyl hydroxylase activity, we hypothesized that CoCl(2) could mimic the cardioprotective effects of hypoxia. Two groups of rats were administered 30 mg/kg twice of CoCl(2) or sterile water. Twenty-four hours later, hearts were perfused in Langendorff mode and subjected to an I/R protocol. Infarct size and functional recovery were studied. The role of iNOS was assessed by measuring myocardial iNOS content and by observing the effects of the iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (Ag, 100 μm, prior to ischemia). The role of HIF-1α was investigated by preventing its stabilization using cadmium chloride (CdCl(2), 1 mg/kg), administered 1 h before cobalt treatment. Treatment by CoCl(2) significantly reduced myocardial infarction by 33% and increased coronary flow (CF) at reperfusion by 27% compared with control rats, and this was accompanied by a threefold increase in myocardial iNOS content. CdCl(2) pretreatment and Ag perfusion abolished the beneficial effects on both infarct size and CF. Thus, the hypoxia-sensitive transcription factor HIF-1α and iNOS appear to play a pivotal role in the delayed pharmacological myocardial preconditioning induced by cobalt, thus mimicking the effects of hypoxic preconditioning. These results underscore the importance of prolyl hydroxylases as potential therapeutic targets for cardioprotection.

  14. Bacterial cytosine deaminase mutants created by molecular engineering show improved 5-fluorocytosine-mediated cell killing in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fuchita, Michi; Ardiani, Andressa; Zhao, Lei; Serve, Kinta; Stoddard, Barry L; Black, Margaret E

    2009-06-01

    Cytosine deaminase is used in combination with 5-fluorocytosine as an enzyme-prodrug combination for targeted genetic cancer treatment. This approach is limited by inefficient gene delivery and poor prodrug conversion activities. Previously, we reported individual point mutations within the substrate binding pocket of bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) that result in marginal improvements in the ability to sensitize cells to 5-fluorocytosine (5FC). Here, we describe an expanded random mutagenesis and selection experiment that yielded enzyme variants, which provide significant improvement in prodrug sensitization. Three of these mutants were evaluated using enzyme kinetic analyses and then assayed in three cancer cell lines for 5FC sensitization, bystander effects, and formation of 5-fluorouracil metabolites. All variants displayed 18- to 19-fold shifts in substrate preference toward 5FC, a significant reduction in IC(50) values and improved bystander effect compared with wild-type bCD. In a xenograft tumor model, the best enzyme mutant was shown to prevent tumor growth at much lower doses of 5FC than is observed when tumor cells express wild-type bCD. Crystallographic analyses of this construct show the basis for improved activity toward 5FC, and also how two different mutagenesis strategies yield closely related but mutually exclusive mutations that each result in a significant alteration of enzyme specificity.

  15. Inflammatory Mediators in Tracheal Aspirates of Preterm Infants Participating in a Randomized Trial of Inhaled Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Elena; Uhlig, Ulrike; Yang, Yang; Fuchs, Hans W.; Zemlin, Michael; Mercier, Jean-Christophe; Maier, Rolf F.; Hummler, Helmut D.; Uhlig, Stefan; Thome, Ulrich H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Ventilated preterm infants frequently develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) which is associated with elevated inflammatory mediators in their tracheal aspirates (TA). In animal models of BPD, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has been shown to reduce lung inflammation, but data for human preterm infants is missing. Methods Within a European multicenter trial of NO inhalation for preterm infants to prevent BPD (EUNO), TA was collected to determine the effects of iNO on pulmonary inflammation. TA was collected from 43 premature infants randomly assigned to receive either iNO or placebo gas (birth weight 530–1230 g, median 800 g, gestational age 24 to 28 2/7 weeks, median 26 weeks). Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, interferon γ-induced protein 10 (IP-10), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, acid sphingomyelinase (ASM), neuropeptide Y and leukotriene B4 were measured in serial TA samples from postnatal day 2 to 14. Furthermore, TA levels of nitrotyrosine and nitrite were determined under iNO therapy. Results The TA levels of IP-10, IL-6, IL-8, MIP-1α, IL-1β, ASM and albumin increased with advancing postnatal age in critically ill preterm infants, whereas nitrotyrosine TA levels declined in both, iNO-treated and placebo-treated infants. The iNO treatment generally increased nitrite TA levels, whereas nitrotyrosine TA levels were not affected by iNO treatment. Furthermore, iNO treatment transiently reduced early inflammatory and fibrotic markers associated with BPD development including TGF-β1, IP-10 and IL-8, but induced a delayed increase of ASM TA levels. Conclusion Treatment with iNO may have played a role in reducing several inflammatory and fibrotic mediators in TA of preterm infants compared to placebo-treated infants. However, survival without BPD was not affected in the main EUNO trial. Trial registration NCT00551642 PMID:28046032

  16. Bacterial rheotaxis.

    PubMed

    Marcos; Fu, Henry C; Powers, Thomas R; Stocker, Roman

    2012-03-27

    The motility of organisms is often directed in response to environmental stimuli. Rheotaxis is the directed movement resulting from fluid velocity gradients, long studied in fish, aquatic invertebrates, and spermatozoa. Using carefully controlled microfluidic flows, we show that rheotaxis also occurs in bacteria. Excellent quantitative agreement between experiments with Bacillus subtilis and a mathematical model reveals that bacterial rheotaxis is a purely physical phenomenon, in contrast to fish rheotaxis but in the same way as sperm rheotaxis. This previously unrecognized bacterial taxis results from a subtle interplay between velocity gradients and the helical shape of flagella, which together generate a torque that alters a bacterium's swimming direction. Because this torque is independent of the presence of a nearby surface, bacterial rheotaxis is not limited to the immediate neighborhood of liquid-solid interfaces, but also takes place in the bulk fluid. We predict that rheotaxis occurs in a wide range of bacterial habitats, from the natural environment to the human body, and can interfere with chemotaxis, suggesting that the fitness benefit conferred by bacterial motility may be sharply reduced in some hydrodynamic conditions.

  17. Bacterial toxin HigB associates with ribosomes and mediates translation-dependent mRNA cleavage at A-rich sites.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Jennifer M; Woychik, Nancy A

    2009-07-10

    Most pathogenic Proteus species are primarily associated with urinary tract infections, especially in persons with indwelling catheters or functional/anatomic abnormalities of the urinary tract. Urinary tract infections caused by Proteus vulgaris typically form biofilms and are resistant to commonly used antibiotics. The Rts1 conjugative plasmid from a clinical isolate of P. vulgaris carries over 300 predicted open reading frames, including antibiotic resistance genes. The maintenance of the Rts1 plasmid is ensured in part by the HigBA toxin-antitoxin system. We determined the precise mechanism of action of the HigB toxin in vivo, which is distinct from other known toxins. We demonstrate that HigB is an endoribonuclease whose enzymatic activity is dependent on association with ribosomes through the 50 S subunit. Using primer extension analysis of several test mRNAs, we showed that HigB cleaved extensively across the entire length of coding regions only at specific recognition sequences. HigB mediated cleavage of 100% of both in-frame and out-of-frame AAA sequences. In addition, HigB cleaved approximately 20% of AA sequences in coding regions and occasionally cut single As. Remarkably, the cleavage specificity of HigB coincided with one of the most frequently used codons in the AT-rich Proteus spp., AAA (lysine). Therefore, the HigB-mediated plasmid maintenance system for the Rts1 plasmid highlights the intimate relationship between host cells and extrachromosomal DNA that enables the dynamic acquisition of genes that impart a spectrum of survival advantages, including those encoding multidrug resistance and virulence factors.

  18. Bacterial Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, Elise

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial genomes are remarkably stable from one generation to the next but are plastic on an evolutionary time scale, substantially shaped by horizontal gene transfer, genome rearrangement, and the activities of mobile DNA elements. This implies the existence of a delicate balance between the maintenance of genome stability and the tolerance of genome instability. In this review, we describe the specialized genetic elements and the endogenous processes that contribute to genome instability. We then discuss the consequences of genome instability at the physiological level, where cells have harnessed instability to mediate phase and antigenic variation, and at the evolutionary level, where horizontal gene transfer has played an important role. Indeed, this ability to share DNA sequences has played a major part in the evolution of life on Earth. The evolutionary plasticity of bacterial genomes, coupled with the vast numbers of bacteria on the planet, substantially limits our ability to control disease. PMID:24600039

  19. Supernatural supersymmetry: Phenomenological implications of anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jonathan L.; Moroi, Takeo

    2000-05-01

    We discuss the phenomenology of supersymmetric models in which supersymmetry breaking terms are induced by the super-Weyl anomaly. Such a scenario is envisioned to arise when supersymmetry breaking takes place in another world, i.e., on another brane. We review the anomaly-mediated framework and study in detail the minimal anomaly-mediated model parametrized by only 3+1 parameters: Maux, m0, tan β, and sgn(μ). The renormalization group equations exhibit a novel ``focus point'' (as opposed to fixed point) behavior, which allows squark and slepton masses far above their usual naturalness bounds. We present the superparticle spectrum and highlight several implications for high energy colliders. Three lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) candidates exist: the W-ino, the stau, and the tau sneutrino. For the W-ino LSP scenario, light W-ino triplets with the smallest possible mass splittings are preferred; such W-inos are within reach of run II Fermilab Tevatron searches. Finally, we study a variety of sensitive low energy probes, including b-->sγ, the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and the electric dipole moments of the electron and neutron.

  20. Central nervous action of interleukin-1 mediates activation of limbic structures and behavioural depression in response to peripheral administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Konsman, J P; Veeneman, J; Combe, C; Poole, S; Luheshi, G N; Dantzer, R

    2008-12-01

    Although receptors for the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 have long been known to be expressed in the brain, their role in fever and behavioural depression observed during the acute phase response (APR) to tissue infection remains unclear. This may in part be due to the fact that interleukin-1 in the brain is bioactive only several hours after peripheral administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To study the role of cerebral interleukin-1 action in temperature and behavioural changes, and activation of brain structures during the APR, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra; 100 microg) was infused into the lateral brain ventricle 4 h after intraperitoneal (i.p.) LPS injection (250 microg/kg) in rats. I.p. LPS administration induced interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) production in systemic circulation as well as in brain circumventricular organs and the choroid plexus. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion of IL-1ra 4 h after i.p. LPS injection attenuated the reduction in social interaction, a cardinal sign of behavioural depression during sickness, and c-Fos expression in the amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. However, LPS-induced fever, rises in plasma corticosterone, body weight loss and c-Fos expression in the hypothalamus and caudal brainstem were not altered by i.c.v. infusion of IL-1ra. These findings, together with our previous observations showing that i.c.v. infused IL-1ra diffuses throughout perivascular spaces, where macrophages express interleukin-1 receptors, can be interpreted to suggest that circulating or locally produced brain IL-1beta acts on these cells to bring about behavioural depression and activation of limbic structures during the APR after peripheral LPS administration.

  1. Bacterial Fucose-Rich Polysaccharide Stabilizes MAPK-Mediated Nrf2/Keap1 Signaling by Directly Scavenging Reactive Oxygen Species during Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis of Human Lung Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roy Chowdhury, Sougata; Sinha, Tridib Kumar; Sen, Ramkrishna; Basak, Ratan Kumar; Adhikari, Basudam; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Continuous free radical assault upsets cellular homeostasis and dysregulates associated signaling pathways to promote stress-induced cell death. In spite of the continuous development and implementation of effective therapeutic strategies, limitations in treatments for stress-induced toxicities remain. The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential therapeutic efficacy of bacterial fucose polysaccharides against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress in human lung fibroblast (WI38) cells and to understand the associated molecular mechanisms. In two different fermentation processes, Bacillus megaterium RB-05 biosynthesized two non-identical fucose polysaccharides; of these, the polysaccharide having a high-fucose content (∼42%) conferred the maximum free radical scavenging efficiency in vitro. Structural characterizations of the purified polysaccharides were performed using HPLC, GC-MS, and 1H/13C/2D-COSY NMR. H2O2 (300 µM) insult to WI38 cells showed anti-proliferative effects by inducing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by disrupting mitochondrial membrane permeability, followed by apoptosis. The polysaccharide (250 µg/mL) attenuated the cell death process by directly scavenging intracellular ROS rather than activating endogenous antioxidant enzymes. This process encompasses inhibition of caspase-9/3/7, a decrease in the ratio of Bax/Bcl2, relocalization of translocated Bax and cytochrome c, upregulation of anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl2 family and a decrease in the phosphorylation of MAPKs (mitogen activated protein kinases). Furthermore, cellular homeostasis was re-established via stabilization of MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling and transcription of downstream cytoprotective genes. This molecular study uniquely introduces a fucose-rich bacterial polysaccharide as a potential inhibitor of H2O2-induced stress and toxicities. PMID:25412177

  2. Bacterial fucose-rich polysaccharide stabilizes MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling by directly scavenging reactive oxygen species during hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of human lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Roy Chowdhury, Sougata; Sengupta, Suman; Biswas, Subir; Sinha, Tridib Kumar; Sen, Ramkrishna; Basak, Ratan Kumar; Adhikari, Basudam; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Continuous free radical assault upsets cellular homeostasis and dysregulates associated signaling pathways to promote stress-induced cell death. In spite of the continuous development and implementation of effective therapeutic strategies, limitations in treatments for stress-induced toxicities remain. The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential therapeutic efficacy of bacterial fucose polysaccharides against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress in human lung fibroblast (WI38) cells and to understand the associated molecular mechanisms. In two different fermentation processes, Bacillus megaterium RB-05 biosynthesized two non-identical fucose polysaccharides; of these, the polysaccharide having a high-fucose content (∼ 42%) conferred the maximum free radical scavenging efficiency in vitro. Structural characterizations of the purified polysaccharides were performed using HPLC, GC-MS, and (1)H/(13)C/2D-COSY NMR. H2O2 (300 µM) insult to WI38 cells showed anti-proliferative effects by inducing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by disrupting mitochondrial membrane permeability, followed by apoptosis. The polysaccharide (250 µg/mL) attenuated the cell death process by directly scavenging intracellular ROS rather than activating endogenous antioxidant enzymes. This process encompasses inhibition of caspase-9/3/7, a decrease in the ratio of Bax/Bcl2, relocalization of translocated Bax and cytochrome c, upregulation of anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl2 family and a decrease in the phosphorylation of MAPKs (mitogen activated protein kinases). Furthermore, cellular homeostasis was re-established via stabilization of MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling and transcription of downstream cytoprotective genes. This molecular study uniquely introduces a fucose-rich bacterial polysaccharide as a potential inhibitor of H2O2-induced stress and toxicities.

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of iNOS are responsible for the palmitate-induced decrease in adiponectin synthesis in 3T3L1 adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Min Jae; Leem, Jaechan; Ko, Myoung Seok; Jang, Jung Eun; Park, Hye-Sun; Kim, Hyun Sik; Kim, Mina; Kim, Eun Hee; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Lee, Chul-Ho; Park, In-Sun; Lee, Ki-Up

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are considered the key determinants of insulin resistance. Impaired mitochondrial function in obese animals was shown to induce the ER stress response, resulting in reduced adiponectin synthesis in adipocytes. The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is increased in adipose tissues in genetic and dietary models of obesity. In this study, we examined whether activation of iNOS is responsible for palmitate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, ER stress, and decreased adiponectin synthesis in 3T3L1 adipocytes. As expected, palmitate increased the expression levels of iNOS and ER stress response markers, and decreased mitochondrial contents. Treatment with iNOS inhibitor increased adiponectin synthesis and reversed the palmitate-induced ER stress response. However, the iNOS inhibitor did not affect the palmitate-induced decrease in mitochondrial contents. Chemicals that inhibit mitochondrial function increased iNOS expression and the ER stress response, whereas measures that increase mitochondrial biogenesis (rosiglitazone and adenoviral overexpression of nuclear respiratory factor-1) reversed them. Inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis prevented the rosiglitazone-induced decrease in iNOS expression and increase in adiponectin synthesis. These results suggest that palmitate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction is the primary event that leads to iNOS induction, ER stress, and decreased adiponectin synthesis in cultured adipocytes. PMID:22809900

  4. Verapamil, and its metabolite norverapamil, inhibit macrophage-induced, bacterial efflux pump-mediated tolerance to multiple anti-tubercular drugs.

    PubMed

    Adams, Kristin N; Szumowski, John D; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2014-08-01

    Drug tolerance likely represents an important barrier to tuberculosis treatment shortening. We previously implicated the Mycobacterium tuberculosis efflux pump Rv1258c as mediating macrophage-induced tolerance to rifampicin and intracellular growth. In this study, we infected the human macrophage-like cell line THP-1 with drug-sensitive and drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains and found that tolerance developed to most antituberculosis drugs, including the newer agents moxifloxacin, PA-824, linezolid, and bedaquiline. Multiple efflux pump inhibitors in clinical use for other indications reversed tolerance to isoniazid and rifampicin and slowed intracellular growth. Moreover, verapamil reduced tolerance to bedaquiline and moxifloxacin. Verapamil's R isomer and its metabolite norverapamil have substantially less calcium channel blocking activity yet were similarly active as verapamil at inhibiting macrophage-induced drug tolerance. Our finding that verapamil inhibits intracellular M. tuberculosis growth and tolerance suggests its potential for treatment shortening. Norverapamil, R-verapamil, and potentially other derivatives present attractive alternatives that may have improved tolerability.

  5. Sodium houttuyfonate, a potential phytoanticipin derivative of antibacterial agent, inhibits bacterial attachment and pyocyanine secretion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by attenuating flagella-mediated swimming motility.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jing; Cheng, Huijuan; Wang, Changzhong; Wu, Daqiang; Zhu, Xiaoli; Zhu, Lingling; Sun, Zhenxin

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a well-known clinical pathogen for its recalcitrant infection caused by biofilm formation which are initiated by flagella-mediated attachment. Sodium houttuyfonate (SH) is a natural phytoanticipin derivative of houttuynin and has anti-pathogenic effect on P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. In this paper, when using 1/2 × MIC SH, the diameter of P. aeruginosa swimming motility was sharply shortened to 36 % in 24 h incubation, and the fold changes of fliC required for swimming motility was 0.36 in 24 h cultivation, the adherence inhibition accounted for about 46 %, and the pyocyanin production decreased to 47 % after 1-day treatment and 56 % after 3-day treatment with obvious visual changes from dark green to light green, compared with the negative control. With the help of mass spectra and scanning electronic microscope, 1/2 × MIC SH was further testified to be enough to eradicate flagella and inhibit pyocyanin secretion of P. aeruginosa. The results do not only re-affirm the close interplay of attachment and virulence (i.e. swimming motility and pyocyanin), but also unravel the potential mechanism of SH on anti-biofilm of P. aeruginosa.

  6. Evaluation of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for rapid detection of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus important bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Shoemaker, Craig A; Klesius, Phillip H

    2005-10-01

    Channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus infected with Edwardsiella ictaluri results in 40--50 million dollars annual losses in profits to catfish producers. Early detection of this pathogen is necessary for disease control and reduction of economic loss. In this communication, the loop-mediated isothermal amplification method (LAMP) that amplifies DNA with high specificity and rapidity at an isothermal condition was evaluated for rapid detection of E. ictaluri. A set of four primers, two outer and two inner, was designed specifically to recognize the eip 18 gene of this pathogen. The LAMP reaction mix was optimized. Reaction temperature and time of the LAMP assay for the eip 18 gene were also optimized at 65 degrees C for 60 min, respectively. Our results show that the ladder-like pattern of bands sizes from 234 bp specifically to the E. ictaluri gene was amplified. The detection limit of this LAMP assay was about 20 colony forming units. In addition, this optimized LAMP assay was used to detect the E. ictaluri eip 18 gene in brains of experimentally challenged channel catfish. Thus, we concluded that the LAMP assay can potentially be used for rapid diagnosis in hatcheries and ponds.

  7. Effects of dietary menadione on the activity of antioxidant enzymes in abalone, Haliotis discus hannai Ino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jinghua; Xu, Wei; Mai, Kangsen; Zhang, Wenbing; Feng, Xiuni; Liufu, Zhiguo

    2012-01-01

    A 240-day growth experiment in a re-circulating water system was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary menadione on the growth and antioxidant responses of abalone Haliotis discus hannai Ino. Triplicate groups of juvenile abalone (initial weight: 1.19 ± 0.01 g; shell length: 19.23 ± 0.01 mm) were fed to satiation with 3 semi-purified diets containing 0, 10, and 1 000 mg menadione sodium bisulfite (MSB)/kg, respectively. Results show that there were no significant differences in the rate of weight gain or in the daily increment in shell length of abalone among different treatments. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GR) in viscera were significantly decreased with dietary menadione. However, activities of these enzymes except for GPX in muscle were increased. Therefore, antioxidant responses of abalone were increased in muscle and decreased in viscera by dietary menadione.

  8. Role of ERK1/2 kinase in the expression of iNOS by NDMA in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak-Wrona, Wioletta; Jablonska, Ewa; Garley, Marzena; Jablonski, Jakub; Radziwon, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Potential role of ERK1/2 kinase in conjunction with p38 in the regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production, and superoxide anion generation by human neutrophils (PMNs) exposed to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) was determined. Increased synthesis of NO due to the involvement of iNOS in neutrophils exposed to NDMA was observed. In addition, intensified activation of ERK1/2 and p38 kinases was determined in these cells. Inhibition of kinase regulated by extracellular signals (ERK1/2) pathway, in contrast to p38 pathway, led to an increased production of NO and expression of iNOS in PMNs. Moreover, as a result of inhibition of ERK1/2 pathway, a decreased activation of p38 kinase was observed in neutrophils, while inhibition of p38 kinase did not affect activation of ERK1/2 pathway in these cells. An increased ability to release superoxide anion by the studied PMNs was observed, which decreased after ERK1/2 pathway inhibition. In conclusion, in human neutrophils, ERK1/2 kinase is not directly involved in the regulation of iNOS and NO production induced by NDMA; however, the kinase participates in superoxide anion production in these cells.

  9. The Circadian Deadenylase Nocturnin Is Necessary for Stabilization of the iNOS mRNA in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Garbarino-Pico, Eduardo; Kojima, Shihoko; Gilbert, Misty; Green, Carla B.

    2011-01-01

    Nocturnin is a member of the CCR4 deadenylase family, and its expression is under circadian control with peak levels at night. Because it can remove poly(A) tails from mRNAs, it is presumed to play a role in post-transcriptional control of circadian gene expression, but its target mRNAs are not known. Here we demonstrate that Nocturnin expression is acutely induced by the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking Nocturnin exhibit normal patterns of acute induction of TNFα and iNOS mRNAs during the first three hours following LPS treatment, but by 24 hours, while TNFα mRNA levels are indistinguishable from WT cells, iNOS message is significantly reduced 20-fold. Accordingly, analysis of the stability of the mRNAs showed that loss of Nocturnin causes a significant decrease in the half-life of the iNOS mRNA (t1/2 = 3.3 hours in Nocturnin knockout MEFs vs. 12.4 hours in wild type MEFs), while having no effect on the TNFα message. Furthermore, mice lacking Nocturnin lose the normal nighttime peak of hepatic iNOS mRNA, and have improved survival following LPS injection. These data suggest that Nocturnin has a novel stabilizing activity that plays an important role in the circadian response to inflammatory signals. PMID:22073225

  10. P2Y(6) agonist uridine 5'-diphosphate promotes host defense against bacterial infection via monocyte chemoattractant protein-1-mediated monocytes/macrophages recruitment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi; Wang, Ziqiang; Ren, Hua; Yue, Miaomiao; Huang, Kan; Gu, Hongjie; Liu, Mingyao; Du, Bing; Qian, Min

    2011-05-01

    Extracellular nucleotides are important messengers involved in series crucial physiological functions through the activation of P2 purinergic receptors. The detailed function and mechanism of the P2Y family in regulating immune response against invaded pathogens still remains unknown. In this study, the activation of purinoreceptor P2Y(6) by UDP was found to play a crucial role in promoting host defense against invaded bacteria through monocytes/macrophages recruitment. The expression level of P2Y(6) was much higher than other purinoreceptors in RAW264.7 cells, bone marrow macrophages, and peritoneal macrophages determined by real-time PCR. The supernatant of UDP (P2Y(6)-specific agonist)-treated RAW264.7 cells exhibited direct chemotaxis to monocytes/macrophages in vitro through Boyden Chambers assay. Meanwhile, the releasing of MCP-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) was enhanced obviously by UDP both in mRNA and protein level. Furthermore, the activation of P2Y(6) receptor by UDP also promotes ERK phosphorylation and AP-1 activation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in RAW264.7 cells. This UDP-induced activation could be inhibited by P2Y(6) selectivity antagonist (MRS2578), MEK inhibitor (U0126), and MCP-1 blocking Ab, respectively. Moreover, i.p. injection with UDP resulted in a more efficacious clearance of invaded Escherichia coli and lower mortality in peritonitis mouse model. Together, our studies demonstrate that P2Y(6) receptor could be a novel mediator in upregulating innate immune response against the invaded pathogens through recruiting monocytes/macrophages.

  11. Human INO80/YY1 chromatin remodeling complex transcriptionally regulates the BRCA2- and CDKN1A-interacting protein (BCCIP) in cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Jiaming; Sui, Yi; Ding, Jian; Li, Fuqiang; Shen, Shuang; Yang, Yang; Lu, Zeming; Wang, Fei; Cao, Lingling; Liu, Xiaoxia; Jin, Jingji; Cai, Yong

    2016-10-01

    The BCCIP (BRCA2- and CDKN1A-interacting protein) is an important cofactor for BRCA2 in tumor suppression. Although the low expression of BCCIP is observed in multiple clinically diagnosed primary tumor tissues such as ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma and colorectal carcinoma, the mechanism of how BCCIP is regulated in cells is still unclear. The human INO80/YY1 chromatin remodeling complex composed of 15 subunits catalyzes ATP-dependent sliding of nucleosomes along DNA. Here, we first report that BCCIP is a novel target gene of the INO80/YY1 complex by presenting a series of experimental evidence. Gene expression studies combined with siRNA knockdown data locked candidate genes including BCCIP of the INO80/YY1 complex. Silencing or over-expressing the subunits of the INO80/YY1 complex regulates the expression level of BCCIP both in mRNA and proteins in cells. Also, the functions of INO80/YY1 complex in regulating the transactivation of BCCIP were confirmed by luciferase reporter assays. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments clarify the enrichment of INO80 and YY1 at +0.17 kb downstream of the BCCIP transcriptional start site. However, this enrichment is significantly inhibited by either knocking down INO80 or YY1, suggesting the existence of both INO80 and YY1 is required for recruiting the INO80/YY1 complex to BCCIP promoter region. Our findings strongly indicate that BCCIP is a potential target gene of the INO80/YY1 complex.

  12. Human INO80 chromatin-remodelling complex contributes to DNA double-strand break repair via the expression of Rad54B and XRCC3 genes.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Hur, Shin-Kyoung; Kwon, Jongbum

    2010-10-15

    Recent studies have shown that the SWI/SNF family of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodelling complexes play important roles in DNA repair as well as in transcription. The INO80 complex, the most recently described member of this family, has been shown in yeast to play direct role in DNA DSB (double-strand break) repair without affecting the expression of the genes involved in this process. However, whether this function of the INO80 complex is conserved in higher eukaryotes has not been investigated. In the present study, we found that knockdown of hINO80 (human INO80) confers DNA-damage hypersensitivity and inefficient DSB repair. Microarray analysis and other experiments have identified the Rad54B and XRCC3 (X-ray repair complementing defective repair in Chinese-hamster cells 3) genes, implicated in DSB repair, to be repressed by hINO80 deficiency. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies have shown that hINO80 binds to the promoters of the Rad54B and XRCC3 genes. Re-expression of the Rad54B and XRCC3 genes rescues the DSB repair defect in hINO80-deficient cells. These results suggest that hINO80 assists DSB repair by positively regulating the expression of the Rad54B and XRCC3 genes. Therefore, unlike yeast INO80, hINO80 can contribute to DSB repair indirectly via gene expression, suggesting that the mechanistic role of this chromatin remodeller in DSB repair is evolutionarily diversified.

  13. Endothelin-1 inhibits TNF alpha-induced iNOS expression in 3T3-F442A adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Mérial-Kieny, Christelle; Lonchampt, Michel; Cogé, Francis; Verwaerde, Patrick; Galizzi, Jean-Pierre; Boutin, Jean A; Lafontan, Max; Levens, Nigel; Galitzky, Jean; Félétou, Michel

    2003-07-01

    1. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) by their action on adipocytes have been independently linked to the pathogenesis of insulino-resistance. In isolated adipocytes, TNFalpha induces the expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). The purpose of the present work was, in the 3T3-F442A adipocyte cell line, to characterise TNFalpha-induced iNOS expression and to determine whether or not ET-1 could influence TNFalpha-induced iNOS expression and NO production. 2. In differentiated 3T3-F442A, treatment with TNFalpha (20 ng ml(-1)) induced the expression of a functional iNOS as demonstrated by nitrite assay, Western blot, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Northern blot analysis. TNFalpha-induced iNOS expression requires nuclear factor kappaB activation, but does not necessitate the activation of the PI-3 kinase/Akt and P38-MAP kinase pathways. 3. ET-1, but not ET-3, inhibited the TNFalpha-induced expression of iNOS protein and mRNA as well as nitrite production. The effects of ET-1 were blocked by a specific ETA (BQ123, pA(2) 7.4) but not by a specific ETB receptor antagonist (BQ788). 3T3-F442A adipocytes express the mRNAs for prepro-ET-1 and the ET-A receptor subtype, but not for the ET-B subtype. 4. The inhibitory effect of ET-1 was not affected by bisindolylmaleimide, SB 203580 or indomethacin, inhibitors of protein kinase C, p38-MAP kinase and cyclooxygenase, respectively, and was not associated with cAMP production. However, the effect of ET-1 was partially reversed by wortmannin, suggesting the involvement of PI3 kinase in the transduction signal of ET-1. 5. Differentiated 3T3-F442A adipocytes did not release ET-1 with or without exposure to TNFalpha, although the mRNA for preproET-1 was detected in both pre- and differentiated adipocytes. 6. Thus, these results confirm that adipocytes are a target for circulating ET-1 and demonstrate that the activation of the ETA receptor subtype can prevent TNFalpha

  14. Role of AP-1 family proteins in regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak-Wrona, Wioletta; Jablonska, Ewa; Garley, Marzena; Jablonski, Jakub; Radziwon, Piotr; Iwaniuk, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the activity of AP-1 family proteins, e.g. Fra-1, Fra-2, JunB, JunD, and FosB, engaged in the regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and the production of NO by neutrophils (PMN) exposed to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) xenobiotic. Isolated human PMN were incubated in the presence of NDMA. iNOS mRNA expression was then analyzed using Northern blot and the expression of other proteins in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions were assessed using Western blot. The obtained results indicate that NDMA increased iNOS mRNA and protein expression in human PMN. Furthermore, it increased the expression of Fra-1, Fra-2, JunB, and JunD in the cytoplasmic fraction, and FosB expression in the fractions of analyzed cells. As a consequence of inhibiting p38 pathway and JNK, reduced iNOS expression and NO production was noted in PMN exposed to NDMA. Inhibition of the p38 pathway resulted in reduced expression of all analyzed proteins in the cytoplasmic fraction of PMN exposed to NDMA. Furthermore, increased Fra-2 expression and reduced FosB expression were found in the nuclear fraction of those cells. Inhibiting ERK5 pathway resulted in increased JunB expression in both fractions of the analyzed cells. Therefore, no changes in the expression of analyzed proteins in the presence of NDMA were observed in PMN pre-incubated with JNK pathway inhibitor. In conclusion, the results here indicate a role of Fra-1, Fra-2, JunB, JunD, and FosB transcription factors in the regulation of iNOS expression and NO production by human neutrophils exposed to NDMA.

  15. Aloe vera toxic effects: expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in testis of Wistar rat

    PubMed Central

    Asgharzade, Samira; Rafieian-kopaei, Mahmoud; Mirzaeian, Amin; Reiisi, Somaye; Salimzadeh, Loghman

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Nitric oxide (NO), a product of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), contributes in germ cell apoptosis. This study was aimed to evaluate the effects of Aloe vera gel (AVG) on male Wistar rat reproductive organ, serum NO level, and expression of iNOS gene in leydig cells. Materials and Methods: Adult male Wistar rats (n=36) were used for experiments in three groups. The experimental groups were orally administered with the AVG extract solution once-daily as follow: 150 mg.kg-1; group A, 300 mg.kg-1; group B, and only normal saline; group C (control group). They were mated with untreated females and the reproductive and chemical parameters were assessed for each group, including semen quality, serum testosterone, sperm fertility, gonad and body weight, serum NO concentration (by the Griess method), and iNOS gene expression (using RT-PCR). Results: The testes weight, serum testosterone, as well as sperm count and fertility of the AVG treated groups were significantly reduced when compared to the control (P<0.001). Concentration of serum NO was significantly increased (37.1±4.63 µM) in the administrated group with higher AVG concentration, compared to the control group (P<0.001; 10.19±0.87 µM); however, iNOS mRNA expression was increased in the treated animals (P<0.001). Conclusion: iNOS may play a functional role in spermatogenesis via apoptosis, reducing sperm count, but further studies are needed to illustrate the mechanisms by which AVG exerts its negative effects on spermatogenesis and sperm quality. PMID:26730330

  16. Differential roles of iNOS and nNOS at rostral ventrolateral medulla during experimental endotoxemia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Chan, J Y; Wang, S H; Chan, S H

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the differential contribution of inducible and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and nNOS) at the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) to endotoxemia induced by E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In Sprague-Dawley rats maintained under propofol anesthesia, i.v. administration of LPS (15, 30, or 45 mg/kg) induced a reduction (phase I), followed by an augmentation (phase II) and a secondary decrease (phase III) in the power density of the vasomotor components (0-0.8 Hz) in systemic arterial pressure (SAP) signals. LPS also induced an immediate hypotension, followed by a rebound increase and a secondary decrease in SAP. In addition, the level of iNOS mRNA exhibited a significant surge that began with phase I endotoxemia, reaching progressively its peak at phase III. Discernible down-regulation of nNOS mRNA was not detected until the last phase of endotoxemia. Pretreatment with microinjection of the selective iNOS inhibitor, aminoguanidine (250 pmol), into the bilateral RVLM significantly prolonged phases II and III endotoxemia, blunted the initial and secondary hypotension, and antagonized the upregulation of iNOS mRNA. Similar pretreatment with the selective nNOS inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (1 pmol), on the other hand, discernibly shortened phase II and prolonged phase III endotoxemia, and induced progressive hypotension by antagonizing the rebound increase in SAP. We conclude that the relative prevalence of functional expression and molecular synthesis of iNOS over nNOS in the RVLM may be a crucial determinant for the reduction or loss in power density of the vasomotor components of SAP signals during experimental endotoxemia.

  17. Vasa vasorum anti-angiogenesis through H2O2, HIF-1α, NF-κB, and iNOS inhibition by mangosteen pericarp ethanolic extract (Garcinia mangostana Linn) in hypercholesterol-diet-given Rattus norvegicus Wistar strain

    PubMed Central

    Wihastuti, Titin Andri; Sargowo, Djanggan; Tjokroprawiro, Askandar; Permatasari, Nur; Widodo, Mohammad Aris; Soeharto, Setyowati

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress in atherosclerosis produces H2O2 and triggers the activation of nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-κB) and increase of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). The formation of vasa vasorum occurs in atherosclerosis. Vasa vasorum angiogenesis is mediated by VEGFR-1 and upregulated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). The newly formed vasa vasorum are fragile and immature and thus increase plaque instability. It is necessary to control vasa vasorum angiogenesis by using mangosteen pericarp antioxidant. This study aims to demonstrate that mangosteen pericarp ethanolic extract can act as vasa vasorum anti-angiogenesis through H2O2, HIF-1α, NF-κB, and iNOS inhibition in rats given a hypercholesterol diet. Methods This was a true experimental laboratory, in vivo posttest with control group design, with 20 Rattus norvegicus Wistar strain rats divided into five groups (normal group, hypercholesterol group, and hypercholesterol groups with certain doses of mangosteen pericarp ethanolic extract: 200, 400, and 800 mg/kg body weight). The parameters of this study were H2O2 measured by using colorimetric analysis, as well as NF-κB, iNOS, and HIF-1α, which were measured by using immunofluorescence double staining and observed with a confocal laser scanning microscope in aortic smooth muscle cell. The angiogenesis of vasa vasorum was quantified from VEGFR-1 level in aortic tissue and confirmed with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results Analysis of variance test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient showed mangosteen pericarp ethanolic extract had a significant effect (P<0.05) in decreasing vasa vasorum angiogenesis through H2O2, HIF-1α, NF-κB, and iNOS inhibition in hypercholesterol-diet-given R. norvegicus Wistar strain. Conclusion Mangosteen pericarp ethanolic extract 800 mg/kg body weight is proven to decrease vasa vasorum angiogenesis. Similar studies with other inflammatory parameters are encouraged to clarify the mechanism of vasa

  18. Akt as a mediator of secretory phospholipase A2 receptor-involved inducible nitric oxide synthase expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae-Won; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Kim, Seong-Yong; Sonn, Jong-Kyung; Bang, Ok-Sun; Kang, Shin-Sung; Kim, Jung-Hye; Baek, Suk-Hwan

    2003-02-15

    The induction of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) by group IIA phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) involves the stimulation of a novel signaling cascade. In this study, we demonstrate that group IIA PLA(2) up-regulates the expression of iNOS through a novel pathway that includes M-type secretory PLA(2) receptor (sPLA(2)R), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and Akt. Group IIA PLA(2) stimulated iNOS expression and promoted nitrite production in a dose- and time-dependent manner in Raw264.7 cells. Upon treating with group IIA PLA(2), Akt is phosphorylated in a PI3K-dependent manner. Pretreatment with LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, strongly suppressed group IIA PLA(2)-induced iNOS expression and PI3K/Akt activation. The promoter activity of iNOS was stimulated by group IIA PLA(2), and this was suppressed by LY294002. Transfection with Akt cDNA resulted in Akt protein overexpression in Raw264.7 cells and effectively enhanced the group IIA PLA(2)-induced reporter activity of the iNOS promoter. M-type sPLA(2)R was highly expressed in Raw264.7 cells. Overexpression of M-type sPLA(2)R enhanced group IIA PLA(2)-induced promoter activity and iNOS protein expression, and these effects were abolished by LY294002. However, site-directed mutation in residue responsible for PLA(2) catalytic activity markedly reduced their ability to production of nitrites and expression of iNOS. These results suggest that group IIA PLA(2) induces nitrite production by involving of M-type sPLA(2)R, which then mediates signal transduction events that lead to PI3K/Akt activation.

  19. Autophagy and bacterial clearance: a not so clear picture.

    PubMed

    Mostowy, Serge

    2013-03-01

    Autophagy, an intracellular degradation process highly conserved from yeast to humans, is viewed as an important defence mechanism to clear intracellular bacteria. However, recent work has shown that autophagy may have different roles during different bacterial infections that restrict bacterial replication (antibacterial autophagy), act in cell autonomous signalling (non-bacterial autophagy) or support bacterial replication (pro-bacterial autophagy). This review will focus on newfound interactions of autophagy and pathogenic bacteria, highlighting that, in addition to delivering bacteria to the lysosome, autophagy responding to bacterial invasion may have a much broader role in mediating disease outcome.

  20. SWR-C and INO80 chromatin remodelers recognize nucleosome-free regions near +1 nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Yen, Kuangyu; Vinayachandran, Vinesh; Pugh, B Franklin

    2013-09-12

    SWR-C/SWR1 and INO80 are multisubunit complexes that catalyze the deposition and removal, respectively, of histone variant H2A.Z from the first nucleosome at the start of genes. How they target and engage these +1 nucleosomes is unclear. Using ChIP-exo, we identified the subnucleosomal placement of 20 of their subunits across the yeast genome. The Swc2 subunit of SWR-C bound a narrowly defined region in the adjacent nucleosome-free region (NFR), where it positioned the Swr1 subunit over one of two sites of H2A.Z deposition at +1. The genomic binding maps suggest that many subunits have a rather plastic organization that allows subunits to exchange between the two complexes. One outcome of promoting H2A/H2A.Z exchange was an enhanced turnover of entire nucleosomes, thereby creating dynamic chromatin at the start of genes. Our findings provide unifying concepts on how these two opposing chromatin remodeling complexes function selectively at the +1 nucleosome of nearly all genes.

  1. New constituents with iNOS inhibitory activity from mycelium of Antrodia camphorata.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sien-Sing; Wang, Guei-Jane; Wang, Shiang-Yi; Lin, Yu-Ying; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lee, Tzong-Huei

    2009-04-01

    In continuing our investigation on the bioactive constituents of mycelium of Antrodia camphorata, antroquinonol B (1), 4-acetyl-antroquinonol B (2), 2,3-(methylenedioxy)-6-methylbenzene-1,4-diol (3) and 2,4-dimethoxy-6-methylbenzene-1,3-diol (4) along with antrodin D (5) were isolated by the guidance of an inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitory assay and identified on the basis of their spectroscopic analysis. The effect of these compounds on the inhibition of NO production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine macrophages was further evaluated. Compounds 4 and 5 significantly inhibited NO production without any cytotoxicity, the IC(50) values being 32.2 +/- 0.1 and 26.3 +/- 1.6 microg/mL, respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 possessed greater effects on NO inhibition, with IC(50) values of 16.2 +/- 0.8 and 14.7 +/- 2.8 microg/mL, respectively, but displayed cytotoxicity at considerably higher concentrations. Compound 3 showed the lowest percent cell viability of 45.5 +/- 1.8 % as observed in treated cells at a concentration of 16.8 microg/mL.

  2. Inhibitory effects of Euterpe oleracea Mart. on nitric oxide production and iNOS expression.

    PubMed

    Matheus, Maria Eline; de Oliveira Fernandes, Sidnei Bessa; Silveira, Cristiane Silva; Rodrigues, Verônica Pinto; de Sousa Menezes, Fabio; Fernandes, Patricia Dias

    2006-09-19

    The palm Euterpe oleracea is a plant of great economic value in Brazil. Although the heart of palm extracted from its trunk is considered a delicacy the world over, its fruits are popular only among Brazilians. In some poor regions of Brazil, there are reports on the popular use of its juice in the treatment of several disorders, mainly those of oxidative onset as cardiovascular ones. Because of its wide utilization; because there are very few scientific studies of this species, and to discover if its use in folk medicine for problems related with oxidation is in fact justifiable, we decided, in this study, to evaluate the effects of Euterpe oleracea flowers, fruits and spikes fractions on: nitric oxide (NO) production, NO scavenger capacity, and on the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase enzyme, as well. Results showed that the fractions obtained from fruits were the most potent in inhibiting NO production, followed by those from flowers and spikes. Only in high doses, did some fractions reduce cell viability. Reduction on NO production was not due to NO scavenger activity. These results were accompanied by inhibition of iNOS expression. The more pronounced effect was observed in the fractions in which the concentration of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside and cyanidin-3-O-rhamnoside were higher. To sum up, our results indicate that fractions from Euterpe oleracea inhibits NO production by reducing the levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression.

  3. Metabolic responses to dietary cholecalciferol and phosphorus in abalone Haliotis discus hannai ino.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenbing; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Ma, Hongming

    2003-10-01

    Metabolic responses of cholecalciferol (VD(3)) and minerals (Ca, P and Mg) in abalone Haliotis discus hannai Ino to dietary VD(3) and phosphorus (P) were investigated. Based on a 2 x 2 factorial design, four casein-gelatin-based diets were formulated. The basal diet was supplemented with either 0 or 2000 IU VD(3)/kg diet and 0 or 10 g P/kg diet. The abalone was reared in P-free artificial seawater for 55 days. Results showed that dietary VD(3) was hydroxylated to 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) [25(OH)D(3)] and 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1 alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)] in abalone, and subsequently raised the serum levels of these two VD(3) metabolites. Dietary P deficiency elevated serum 1 alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) level only when the dietary VD(3) supplementation was sufficient. The supplementations of either dietary VD(3) or P significantly increased the levels of P in serum, mantle and hepatopancreas, and only the addition of VD(3) significantly raised the concentrations of Ca in serum and mantle (P<0.05). Interaction between dietary VD(3) and P was only found significant on the concentrations of P and Mg in mantle (P<0.05). The concentrations of Ca, P and Mg in muscle were not significantly influenced by these dietary treatments. Hence, the metabolic responses in serum, muscle, mantle and hepatopancreas of abalone to dietary VD(3) and P were in different manners.

  4. The effect of high protein diet and exercise on irisin, eNOS, and iNOS expressions in kidney.

    PubMed

    Tastekin, Ebru; Palabiyik, Orkide; Ulucam, Enis; Uzgur, Selda; Karaca, Aziz; Vardar, Selma Arzu; Yilmaz, Ali; Aydogdu, Nurettin

    2016-08-01

    Long-term effects of high protein diets (HPDs) on kidneys are still not sufficiently studied. Irisin which increases oxygen consumption and thermogenesis in white fat cells was shown in skeletal muscles and many tissues. Nitric oxide synthases (NOS) are a family of enzymes catalyzing the production of nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine. We aimed to investigate the effects of HPD, irisin and NO expression in kidney and relation of them with exercise and among themselves. Animals were grouped as control, exercise, HPD and exercise combined with HPD (exercise-HPD). Rats were kept on a HPD for 5 weeks and an exercise program was given them as 5 exercise and 2 rest days per week exercising on a treadmill with increasing speed and angle. In our study, while HPD group had similar total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels with control group, exercise and exercise-HPD groups had lower levels (p < 0.05). Kidneys of exercising rats had no change in irisin or eNOS expression but their iNOS expression had increased (p < 0.001). HPD-E group has not been observed to cause kidney damage and not have a significant effect on rat kidney irisin, eNOS, or iNOS expression. Localization of irisin, eNOS, and iNOS staining in kidney is highly selective and quite clear in this study. Effects of exercise and HPD on kidney should be evaluated with different exercise protocols and contents of the diet. İrisin, eNOS, and iNOS staining localizations should be supported with various research studies.

  5. Possible involvement of iNOS and TNF-α in nutritional intervention against nicotine-induced pancreatic islet cell damage.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Ankita; Prasad, Shilpi Kumari; Pal, Swagata; Maji, Bithin; Banerjee, Arnab; Das, Debasmita; Bose, Ananya; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Mukherjee, Sandip

    2016-12-01

    Nicotine is the more abundant and most significant components of cigarette smoke. Epidemiological evidence strongly suggests an association between cigarette smoking and pancreatic injury. Although effects of smoking on endocrine pancreas are still controversial Here, we examined the impact and underlying mechanisms of action of folic acid and vitamin B12 on nicotine induced damage in pancreatic islets of rats. Male Wistar rats were treated with nicotine (3mg/kg body weight/day, intraperitonealy) with or without folic acid (36μg/kg body weight/day, orally) and vitamin B12 (0.63μg/kg body weight/day, orally) for 21days. Supplementation with folic acid and vitamin B12 suppressed the nicotine induced changes in HbA1c, insulin, TNF-α, IL-6, generation of reactive oxygen species, and attenuated the changes in markers of oxidative stress. Moreover, folic acid and vitamin B12 also counteracted the increased expression of protein and mRNA contents of TNF-α and iNOS produced by nicotine. Further, folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination limits the nicotine induced changes in cell cycle and excessive apoptosis of the pancreatic β-cells and also successfully blunted the nicotine induced alteration in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, data demonstrate that folic acid and vitamin B12 may be possible nutritional intervention against cellular oxidative stress, which is a critical step in nicotine-mediated islet injury, and improves islet cell functional status by scavenging free radicals and by inhibiting the generation of pro-inflammatory mediators.

  6. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  7. Role of the unfolded protein response pathway in regulation of INO1 and in the sec14 bypass mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hak J; Jones, Elizabeth W; Henry, Susan A

    2002-01-01

    INO1, encoding inositol 1-phosphate synthase, is the most highly regulated of a class of genes containing the repeated element, UAS(INO), in their promoters. Transcription of UAS(INO)-containing genes is modulated by the availability of exogenous inositol and by signals generated by alteration of phospholipid metabolism. The unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway also is involved in INO1 expression and the ire1Delta and hac1Delta mutants are inositol auxotrophs. We examined the role of the UPR in transmitting a signal generated in response to inositol deprivation and to alteration of phospholipid biosynthesis created in the sec14(ts) cki1Delta genetic background. We report that the UPR is required for sustained high-level INO1 expression in wild-type strains, but not for transient derepression in response to inositol deprivation. Moreover, the UPR is not required for expression or regulation of INO1 in response to the change in lipid metabolism that occurs in the sec14(ts) cki1Delta genetic background. Thus, the UPR signal transduction pathway is not involved directly in transcriptional regulation of INO1 and other UAS(INO)-containing genes. However, we discovered that inactivation of Sec14p leads to activation of the UPR, and that sec14 cki1 strains exhibit defective vacuolar morphology, suggesting that the mechanism by which the cki1Delta mutation suppresses the growth and secretory defect of sec14 does not fully restore wild-type morphology. Finally, synthetic lethality involving sec14 and UPR mutations suggests that the UPR plays an essential role in survival of sec14 cki1 strains. PMID:12242221

  8. Interaction of AR and iNOS in lens epithelial cell: A new pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets of diabetic cataract.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Liu, Wenping; Huang, Xinduo; Xiong, Jianping; Wei, Xiaoyong

    2017-02-01

    Although there is significant interest in revealing the role of aldose reductase (AR) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in diabetic cataract (DC), the interaction of AR and iNOS remains unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the pathogenesis mechanisms and explore as a new potential therapeutic targets for DC. This study investigated the interaction of AR-iNOS through the methods of enzyme kinetics, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation, co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The IC50 of AR for inhibition of iNOS activity is 0.04 μM, and the IC50 of iNOS for inhibition of AR activity is 0.042 μM through enzyme kinetics; the interface showed that ARG99 on AR and GLU317 on iNOS played the key roles in the interaction of AR-iNOS predicted by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation. Co-immunoprecipitation of protein complexes in human lens epithelial cell (HLEC) demonstrated that AR could association with iNOS in cell; and the interaction distance of AR-iNOS was 6.50 ± 0.22 nm detected by FRET. This study exhibited a direct inhibition interaction between AR and iNOS in HLECs. It is the first report of inhibition interaction between AR and iNOS, suggesting a new pathophysiological mechanism and providing a new insight into the therapeutic mechanism of DC.

  9. Effects of dietary carbohydrates sources on lipids compositions in abalone, Haliotis discus hannai Ino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weifang; Mai, Kangsen; Zhang, Wenbing; Xu, Wei; Ai, Qinghui; Yao, Chunfeng; Li, Huitao

    2009-09-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary carbohydrates on triglyceride, cholesterol and fatty acid concentrations in abalone, Haliotis discus hannai Ino. Six semi-purified diets with different carbohydrates (dextrin, heat-treated wheat starch, wheat starch, corn starch, tapioca starch and potato starch, respectively), all containing a carbohydrate level of 33.5%, were fed to abalone (initial shell length: 29.98 mm ± 0.09 mm; initial weight: 3.42 g ± 0.02 g) for 24 weeks in a recirculation system. The results indicate that serum triglyceride concentrations were significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in the abalone fed with dextrin, heat-treated wheat starch and wheat starch than those fed with corn starch, and serum cholesterol concentrations were significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in the abalone fed with dextrin, heat-treated wheat starch than those fed with corn starch. Fatty acid C20:4n-6 in the foot muscles were significantly ( P < 0.05) lower in the abalone fed with dextrin than those fed with wheat starch, corn starch, tapioca starch and potato starch. Fatty acid C20:4n-6 in hepatopancreas was significantly ( P < 0.05) lower in abalone fed with heat-treated wheat starch than those fed with corn starch, tapioca starch and potato starch. Fatty acid C22:6n-3 in the foot muscles were significantly ( P < 0.05) lower in the abalone fed with dextrin and heat-treated wheat starch than those fed with wheat starch and potato starch.

  10. Effect of ambient pressure variation on closed loop gas system for India based Neutrino Observatory (INO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayana, B.; Majumder, G.; Mondal, N. K.; Kalmani, S. D.; Shinde, R. R.; Joshi, A.

    2014-10-01

    Pilot unit of a closed loop gas mixing and distribution system for the INO project was designed and is being operated with 1.8meters × 1.9meters RPCs for about two years. A number of studies on controlling the flow and optimisation of the gas mixture through the RPC stack were carried out during this period. The gas system essentially measures and attempts to maintain absolute pressure inside the RPC gas volume. During typical Mumbai monsoon seasons, the barometric pressure changes rather rapidly, due to which the gas system fails to maintain the set differential pressure between the ambience and the RPC gas volume. As the safety bubblers on the RPC gas input lines are set to work on fixed pressure differentials, the ambient pressure changes lead to either venting out and thus wasting gas through safety bubblers or over pressuring the RPCs gas volume and thus degrading its performance. The above problem also leads to gas mixture contamination through minute leaks in gas gap. The problem stated above was solved by including the ambient barometric pressure as an input parameter in the closed loop. Using this, it is now possible to maintain any set differential pressure between the ambience and RPC gas volumes between 0 to 20mm of water column, thus always ensuring a positive pressure inside the RPC gas volume with respect to the ambience. This has resulted in improved performance of the gas system by maintaining the constant gas flow and reducing the gas toping up frequency. In this paper, we will highlight the design features and improvements of the closed loop gas system. We will present some of the performance studies and considerations for scaling up the system to be used with the engineering module and then followed by Iron Calorimeter detector (ICAL), which is designed to deploy about 30,000 RPCs of 1.8meters × 1.9 meters in area.

  11. Bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, C A

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common of the vaginitides affecting women of reproductive age. It appears to be due to an alteration in the vaginal ecology by which Lactobacillus spp., the predominant organisms in the healthy vagina, are replaced by a mixed flora including Prevotella bivia, Prevotella disiens, Porphyromonas spp., Mobiluncus spp., and Peptostreptococcus spp. All of these organisms except Mobiluncus spp. are also members of the endogenous vaginal flora. While evidence from treatment trials does not support the notion that BV is sexually transmitted, recent studies have shown an increased risk associated with multiple sexual partners. It has also been suggested that the pathogenesis of BV may be similar to that of urinary tract infections, with the rectum serving as a reservoir for some BV-associated flora. The organisms associated with BV have also been recognized as agents of female upper genital tract infection, including pelvic inflammatory disease, and the syndrome BV has been associated with adverse outcome of pregnancy, including premature rupture of membranes, chorioamnionitis, and fetal loss; postpartum endometritis; cuff cellulitis; and urinary tract infections. The mechanisms by which the BV-associated flora causes the signs of BV are not well understood, but a role for H2O2-producing Lactobacillus spp. in protecting against colonization by catalase-negative anaerobic bacteria has been recognized. These and other aspects of BV are reviewed. PMID:1747864

  12. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    MedlinePlus

    Overgrowth - intestinal bacteria; Bacterial overgrowth - intestine; Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth; SIBO ... intestine does not have a high number of bacteria. Excess bacteria in the small intestine may use ...

  13. IFN-γ regulates xanthine oxidase-mediated iNOS-independent oxidative stress in maneb- and paraquat-treated rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepali; Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Chetna

    2017-03-01

    Maneb (MB) and paraquat (PQ) provoke oxidative stress-mediated cell damage. Role of xanthine oxidase (XO) in oxidative stress and its association with nitric oxide (NO)/NO synthase (NOS) have been widely reported. While inducible NOS (iNOS) is implicated in MB+PQ-induced toxicity in rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), role of XO and its alliance with iNOS have not yet been established. The study investigated the role of XO in MB+PQ-induced oxidative stress in rat PMNs and its regulation by iNOS and inflammatory cytokines. MB+PQ-augmented reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide, nitro-tyrosine, lipid peroxidation (LPO), and nitrite levels along with the catalytic activity of iNOS, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and XO. XO inhibitor, allopurinol (AP), alleviated MB+PQ-induced changes except nitrite content and iNOS activity. Conversely, an iNOS inhibitor, aminoguanidine, mitigated MB+PQ-induced LPO, nitrite, iNOS, and nitro-tyrosine levels; however, no change was observed in ROS, SOD, and XO. Nuclear factor-κB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitor, pentoxyfylline, and an anti-inflammatory agent, dexamethasone, attenuated MB+PQ-induced increase in XO, superoxide, and ROS with parallel reduction in the expression of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), TNF-α, and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in rat PMNs. Exogenous IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-1β enhanced superoxide, ROS, and XO in the PMNs of control and MB+PQ-treated rats; however, IFN- γ was found to be the most potent inducer. Moreover, AP ameliorated cytokine-induced free radical generation and restored XO activity towards normalcy. The results thus demonstrate that XO mediates oxidative stress in MB+PQ-treated rat PMNs via iNOS-independent but cytokine (predominantly IFN-γ)-dependent mechanism.

  14. iNOS participates in apoptosis of spinal cord neurons via p-BAD dephosphorylation following ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming; Gu, Jun; Liu, Yuwen; Long, Hao; Wang, Guannan; Yin, Guoyong; Fan, Jin

    2013-06-17

    The pro-apoptotic effect of nitric oxide (NO) has been reported both in vivo and in vitro. Previous studies have revealed that NO, especially which produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), has an important effect on apoptosis of neurons in spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. To investigate the role of iNOS in this process, a randomized, controlled study was designed using a classical rat model of ischemic spinal cord injury. Fifty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three different groups: a sham-operated group (n=6), a vehicle group (I/R, n=24), and an iNOS inhibitor (aminoguanidine: AG) group (I/R+AG, n=24). Rats were sacrificed 6, 12, 24 and 72 h after reperfusion. We examined neurological motor function evaluated by 'Tarlov's score', assessed alterations in the morphology of spinal cord neurons by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), analyzed expression of iNOS at the levels of mRNA and protein, evaluated local concentrations and cellular locations of other key regulatory proteins, and investigated protein-protein interactions. In the vehicle group, iNOS expression, dephosphorylation of p-BAD (Ser 136), disassociation of BAD from p-BAD/14-3-3 dimers, and release of cytochrome c were all increased compared with the sham group. But in the AG group, all the performances above were decreased compared with the vehicle group. Similarly, rats in the sham group got a maximum score of 5 by Tarlov's motor scores evaluation. While the scores were higher in the AG group compared to the vehicle group because iNOS was inhibited. These results indicate that the activity of iNOS plays a critical role in the apoptosis of spinal cord neurons by influencing the dephosphorylation of p-BAD (Ser 136) and the interaction between BAD and 14-3-3.

  15. Investigating the Role of TNF-α and IFN-γ Activation on the Dynamics of iNOS Gene Expression in LPS Stimulated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Taha; Sershen, Cheryl L.; May, Elebeoba E.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage produced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is known to play a critical role in the proinflammatory response against intracellular pathogens by promoting the generation of bactericidal reactive nitrogen species. Robust and timely production of nitric oxide (NO) by iNOS and analogous production of reactive oxygen species are critical components of an effective immune response. In addition to pathogen associated lipopolysaccharides (LPS), iNOS gene expression is dependent on numerous proinflammatory cytokines in the cellular microenvironment of the macrophage, two of which include interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). To understand the synergistic effect of IFN-γ and TNF-α activation, and LPS stimulation on iNOS expression dynamics and NO production, we developed a systems biology based mathematical model. Using our model, we investigated the impact of pre-infection cytokine exposure, or priming, on the system. We explored the essentiality of IFN-γ priming to the robustness of initial proinflammatory response with respect to the ability of macrophages to produce reactive species needed for pathogen clearance. Results from our theoretical studies indicated that IFN-γ and subsequent activation of IRF1 are essential in consequential production of iNOS upon LPS stimulation. We showed that IFN-γ priming at low concentrations greatly increases the effector response of macrophages against intracellular pathogens. Ultimately the model demonstrated that although TNF-α contributed towards a more rapid response time, measured as time to reach maximum iNOS production, IFN-γ stimulation was significantly more significant in terms of the maximum expression of iNOS and the concentration of NO produced. PMID:27276061

  16. Development of a pyramidal wavefront sensor test-bench at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbide, Simon; Wang, Min; Gauvin, Jonny; Martin, Olivier; Savard, Maxime; Bourqui, Pascal; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Deschenes, William; Anctil, Genevieve; Chateauneuf, François

    2013-12-01

    The key technical element of the adaptive optics in astronomy is the wavefront sensing (WFS). One of the advantages of the pyramid wavefront sensor (P-WFS) over the widely used Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor seems to be the increased sensitivity in closed-loop applications. A high-sensitivity and large dynamic-range WFS, such as P-WFS technology, still needs to be further investigated for proper justification in future Extremely Large Telescopes application. At INO, we have recently carried out the optical design, testing and performance evaluation of a P-WFS bench setup. The optical design of the bench setup mainly consists of the super-LED fiber source, source collimator, spatial light modulator (SLM), relay lenses, tip-tilt mirror, Fourier-transforming lens, and a four-faceted glass pyramid with a large vertex angle as well as pupil re-imaged optics. The phase-only SLM has been introduced in the bench setup to generate atmospheric turbulence with a maximum phase shift of more than 2π at each pixel (256 grey levels). Like a modified Foucault knife-edge test, the refractive pyramid element is used to produce four images of the entrance pupil on a CCD camera. The Fourier-transforming lens, which is used before the pyramid prism, is designed for telecentric output to allow dynamic modulation (rotation of the beam around the pyramid-prism center) from a tip-tilt mirror. Furthermore, a P-WFS diffraction-based model has been developed. This model includes most of the system limitations such as the SLM discrete voltage steps and the CCD pixel pitch. The pyramid effects (edges and tip) are considered as well. The modal wavefront reconstruction algorithm relies on the construction of an interaction matrix (one for each modulation's amplitude). Each column of the interaction matrix represents the combination of the four pupil images for a given wavefront aberration. The nice agreement between the data and the model suggest that the limitation of the system is not the P

  17. Activated Macrophages as a Novel Determinant of Tumor Cell Radioresponse: The Role of Nitric Oxide-Mediated Inhibition of Cellular Respiration and Oxygen Sparing

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Heng; De Ridder, Mark; Verovski, Valeri N.; Sonveaux, Pierre; Jordan, Benedicte F.; Law, Kalun; Monsaert, Christinne; Van den Berge, Dirk L.; Verellen, Dirk; Feron, Olivier; Gallez, Bernard; Storme, Guy A.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), is known to inhibit metabolic oxygen consumption because of interference with mitochondrial respiratory activity. This study examined whether activation of iNOS (a) directly in tumor cells or (b) in bystander macrophages may improve radioresponse through sparing of oxygen. Methods and Materials: EMT-6 tumor cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages were exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-gamma, and examined for iNOS expression by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting and enzymatic activity. Tumor cells alone, or combined with macrophages were subjected to metabolic hypoxia and analyzed for radiosensitivity by clonogenic assay, and for oxygen consumption by electron paramagnetic resonance and a Clark-type electrode. Results: Both tumor cells and macrophages displayed a coherent picture of iNOS induction at transcriptional/translational levels and NO/nitrite production, whereas macrophages showed also co-induction of the inducible heme oxygenase-1, which is associated with carbon monoxide (CO) and bilirubin production. Activation of iNOS in tumor cells resulted in a profound oxygen sparing and a 2.3-fold radiosensitization. Bystander NO-producing, but not CO-producing, macrophages were able to block oxygen consumption by 1.9-fold and to radiosensitize tumor cells by 2.2-fold. Both effects could be neutralized by aminoguanidine, a metabolic iNOS inhibitor. An improved radioresponse was clearly observed at macrophages to tumor cells ratios ranging between 1:16 to 1:1. Conclusions: Our study is the first, as far as we are aware, to provide evidence that iNOS may induce radiosensitization through oxygen sparing, and illuminates NO-producing macrophages as a novel determinant of tumor cell radioresponse within the hypoxic tumor microenvironment.

  18. The Heme Oxygenase-1 Inducer THI-56 Negatively Regulates iNOS Expression and HMGB1 Release in LPS-Activated RAW 264.7 Cells and CLP-Induced Septic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Min; Park, Sang Won; Kim, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear DNA binding protein high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has recently been suggested to act as a late mediator of septic shock. The effect of ((S)-6,7-dihydroxy-1-(4-hydroxynaphthylmethyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid, also known as THI-56, in an experimental model of sepsis was investigated. THI-56 exhibited potent anti-inflammatory properties in response to LPS in RAW 264.7 cells. In particular, THI-56 significantly inhibited the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the release of HMGB1 in activated macrophages. THI-56 activated NE-F2-regulated factor 2 (Nrf-2)/heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). The specific knockdown of the HO-1 gene by HO-1 siRNA significantly reversed the inhibitory effects of THI-56 on iNOS expression and HMGB1 release in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Importantly, THI-56 administration protected animals from death induced by either a lethal dose of LPS or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Furthermore, the ALT, AST, BUN, creatinine, and HMGB1 levels in the blood were significantly increased in CLP-induced septic mice, and the administration of THI-56 reduced these levels in a concentration-dependent and zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX)-sensitive manner. In addition, the administration of THI-56 significantly ameliorated not only lung damage but also macrophage infiltration in the livers of CLP-induced septic mice, and these effects were also abrogated in the presence of ZnPPIX. Thus, we conclude that THI-56 significantly attenuates the proinflammatory response induced by LPS and reduces organ damage in a CLP-induced sepsis model through the upregulation of Nrf-2/HO-1. PMID:24098466

  19. Pravastatin inhibits fibrinogen- and FDP-induced inflammatory response via reducing the production of IL-6, TNF-α and iNOS in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Peipei; Liu, Juntian; Pang, Xiaoming

    2015-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory response of the arterial wall to pro‑atherosclerotic factors. As an inflammatory marker, fibrinogen directly participates in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Our previous study demonstrated that fibrinogen and fibrin degradation products (FDP) produce a pro‑inflammatory effect on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) through inducing the production of interleukin‑6 (IL‑6), tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In the present study, the effects of pravastatin on fibrinogen‑ and FDP‑induced expression of IL‑6, TNF‑α and iNOS were observed in VSMCs. The results showed that pravastatin dose‑dependently inhibited fibrinogen‑ and FDP‑stimulated expression of IL‑6, TNF‑α and iNOS in VSMCs at the mRNA and protein level. The maximal inhibition of protein expression of IL‑6, TNF‑α and iNOS was 46.9, 42.7 and 49.2% in fibrinogen‑stimulated VSMCs, and 50.2, 49.8 and 53.6% in FDP‑stimulated VSMCs, respectively. This suggests that pravastatin has the ability to relieve vascular inflammation via inhibiting the generation of IL‑6, TNF‑α and iNOS. The results of the present study may aid in further explaining the beneficial effects of pravastatin on atherosclerosis and related cardiovascular diseases. In addition, they suggest that application of pravastatin may be beneficial for prevention of atherosclerosis formation in hyperfibrinogenemia.

  20. Echinocystic Acid Inhibits IL-1β-Induced COX-2 and iNOS Expression in Human Osteoarthritis Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yanlong; Piao, Taikui; Liu, Jianyu

    2016-04-01

    Echinocystic acid (EA), a pentacyclic triterpene isolated from the fruits of Gleditsia sinensis Lam, displays a range of pharmacological activities including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. However, the effect of EA on IL-1β-stimulated osteoarthritis chondrocyte has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of EA on IL-1β-stimulated human osteoarthritis chondrocyte. Chondrocytes were stimulated with IL-1β in the absence or presence of EA. NO and PGE2 production were measured by Griess reagent and ELISA. The expression of COX-2, iNOS, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), inhibitory kappa B (IκBα), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were detected by Western blot analysis. The results showed that EA suppressed IL-1β-induced collagenase-3 (MMP-13), NO, and PGE2 production in a dose-dependent manner. IL-1β up-regulated the expression of COX-2 and iNOS, and the increase was inhibited by EA. Furthermore, IL-1β-induced NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation were inhibited by EA. In conclusion, EA effectively attenuated IL-1β-induced inflammatory response in osteoarthritis chondrocyte which suggesting that EA may be a potential agent in the treatment of osteoarthritis.

  1. Measurement of characteristic impedance of silicon fiber sheet based readout strip panel for RPC detector in INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. K.; Kumar, A.; Marimuthu, N.; Singh, V.; Subrahmanyam, V. S.

    2017-01-01

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is a mega science project of India, which is going to use about 30,000 Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) as active detector elements for the study of atmoshpheric neutrino oscillations. Each RPC detector will consist of two orthogonally placed readout strip panel for picking the signals generated in the gas chamber. The area of RPC detector in INO-ICAL (Iron Calorimeter) experiment will be 2 m × 2 m, therefore the dimensions of readout strip panel should also be 2 m × 2 m. To get undistorted signals pass through the readout strip panel to front-end electronics, their characteristic impedance should be matched with each other. In the present paper, we describe the need and search of new dielectric material for the fabrication of flame resistant, waterproof and flexible readout strip panel. We will also describe the measurement of characteristic impedance of Plastic Honeycomb (PH) based readout strip panel and Silicon Fiber Sheet (SFS) based readout strip panel in a comparative way, and its variation under loading and with time. Based on this study, we found that a 5 mm thick SFS-based readout strip panel has a minimum signal reflection at 49.5 ohm characteristic impedance value. Our study shows that SFS is a good dielectric material for the purpose.

  2. Effect of Progesterone Therapy on TNF-α and iNOS Gene Expression in Spinal Cord Injury Model.

    PubMed

    Farahabadi, Akram; Akbari, Mohammad; Amini Pishva, Akram; Zendedel, Adib; Arabkheradmand, Ali; Beyer, Cordian; Dashti, Nasrin; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza

    2016-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) as a destructive crash result in neurons degeneration. The SCI lead to the onset of biochemical and molecular cascades such as inflammation that in turn has a key role in neurodegeneration development. The previous studies demonstrated the role of TNF-α and iNOS genes in intensifying the process after SCI. As a consequence, these genes overexpression intensify the inflammation and neuron degeneration process. In the present study, 32 male Wistar rats were chased and divided into four groups of eight. The SCI were induced in three groups and another group used as a sham. The progesterone hormone used as a therapeutic agent in rats with SCI. The results showed that injection of 10 μg/kg/12h progesterone hormone reduced the TNF-α and iNOS gene expression significantly and confirmed the role of progesterone in the reduction of inflammation. Also, the numbers of intact neurons in progesterone group were higher than other groups that demonstrated the protective effects of progesterone on neuron death. The BBB test was performed and demonstrated that progesterone is an effective factor to the improvement of locomotor response. These results of the study confirmed the anti-inflammatory activity of progesterone hormone and suggested that it can be used as a therapeutic factor for SCI.

  3. Inhibitory effect of Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb. on inflammation by suppression of iNOS and ROS production.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chang Hwa; Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Park, SunJu; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2010-01-01

    Herbal medicines including Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb. (APL) have been traditionally used to treat inflammations including allergic disease as valuable medicinal properties. To investigate the attenuating ability of APL on inflammation, the NO release and ROS production, which play a key role in inflammatory and immune responses, was first tested using in vitro assay. The 80% ethanol extract of APL showed a significant activity to inhibit NO release and ROS production. In additional extracts from 80% ethanol extract of APL, n-butanol (BuOH) extract displayed the most potent anti-inflammatory effects based on in vitro assay. The extract also significantly reduced nitric oxide in lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells (p < 0.05), and suppressed the nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, whereas the extract showed no inhibitory effect on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, suggesting that the BuOH extract of APL could reduce the NO production through suppression of iNOS, but not COX-2. The BuOH extract also showed a significant effect in a carrageenan-induced rat paw edema in vivo model, consistent with our in vitro results. Our findings suggest that the BuOH extract of APL shows a potential anti-inflammatory activity, substantiating its traditional use in medicine.

  4. Sildenafil Ameliorates Gentamicin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats: Role of iNOS and eNOS

    PubMed Central

    Morsy, Mohamed A.; Ibrahim, Salwa A.; Amin, Entesar F.; Kamel, Maha Y.; Rifaai, Rehab A.; Hassan, Magdy K.

    2014-01-01

    Gentamicin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic, is used for the treatment of serious Gram-negative infections. However, its usefulness is limited by its nephrotoxicity. Sildenafil, a selective phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, was reported to prevent or decrease tissue injury. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential protective effects of sildenafil on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Male Wistar rats were injected with gentamicin (100 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for 6 days with and without sildenafil. Sildenafil administration resulted in nephroprotective effect in gentamicin-intoxicated rats as it significantly decreased serum creatinine and urea, urinary albumin, and renal malondialdehyde and nitrite/nitrate levels, with a concomitant increase in renal catalase and superoxide dismutase activities compared to gentamicin-treated rats. Moreover, immunohistochemical examination revealed that sildenafil treatment markedly reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, while expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was markedly enhanced. The protective effects of sildenafil were verified histopathologically. In conclusion, sildenafil protects rats against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity possibly, in part, through its antioxidant activity, inhibition of iNOS expression, and induction of eNOS production. PMID:25120567

  5. Eleutherococcus senticosus extract attenuates LPS-induced iNOS expression through the inhibition of Akt and JNK pathways in murine macrophage.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chang Hwa; Jung, Hee; Shin, Yong-Cheol; Park, Jong-Hyeong; Jun, Chan-Yong; Kim, Hyung-Min; Yim, Hee-Sun; Shin, Min-Gyu; Bae, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2007-08-15

    Eleutherococcus senticosus (Araliaceae) is immunological modulator which has been successfully used for anti-inflammatory effectors on anti-rheumatic diseases in oriental medicine. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and Akt modulate the transcription of many genes involved in the inflammatory process. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of Eleutherococcus senticosus on the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-activated macrophages. Finally, we studied the involvement of MAPKs and Akt signaling in the protective effect of Eleutherococcus senticosus in LPS-activated macrophages. Eleutherococcus senticosus significantly attenuated LPS-induced iNOS expression but not COX-2 expression. In using the standard inhibitors (MAPKs and Akt), our results show that Eleutherococcus senticosus downregulates inflammatory iNOS expression by blocking JNK and Akt activation.

  6. High TNF-alpha plasma levels and macrophages iNOS and TNF-alpha expression as risk factors for painful diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Purwata, Thomas Eko

    2011-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is one of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus. Recently it has become clear that nitric oxide (NO) and proinflammatory cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of PDN. We investigated whether the cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and NO play a role in PDN pathogenesis by performing a cross-sectional and a case–control study in 110 type 2 diabetic patients. Of 110 subjects, 59 patients suffered from PDN (cases) and the remaining were painless DN (controls). Cross-sectionally, plasma TNF-α levels and immunoreactivity for inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and TNF-α were higher in patients with more severe pain on the visual analog scale. There were statistically significant differences between mild and severe pain for TNF-α levels, iNOS immunoreactivity, and TNF-α immunoreactivity. There were statistically significant differences between mild and severe pain for TNF-α levels (mean 15.24 pg/mL ± 5.42 vs 20.44 ± 10.34), iNOS immunoreactivity (9.76% ± 8.60% vs 15.48% ± 11.56%), and TNF-α immunoreactivity (13.0% ± 9.48% vs 20.44% ± 11.75%). The case–control study showed that TNF-α had an odds ratio of 5.053 (P < 0.001), TNF-α immunoreactivity of 4.125 (P < 0.001), and iNOS immunoreactivity of 3.546 (P = 0.002). DN patients with high TNF-α levels, and high iNOS and TNF-α expression in macrophages are at risk of suffering from pain. The higher the TNF-α level, and iNOS and TNF-α immunoreactivity, the more severe the pain. These findings could form the basis of further research into better management of PDN. PMID:21811392

  7. Downregulation of iNOS expression in rat mesangial cells by special extracts of Harpagophytum procumbens derives from harpagoside-dependent and independent effects.

    PubMed

    Kaszkin, M; Beck, K F; Koch, E; Erdelmeier, C; Kusch, S; Pfeilschifter, J; Loew, D

    2004-11-01

    Special extracts from the roots of Harpagophytum procumbens (Devil's Claw) are used in the supportive treatment of inflammatory diseases, and the iridoid derivative harpagoside is thought to be the active principle. To investigate, whether Harpagophytum extracts may also be useful therapeutics in the treatment of inflammatory kidney diseases, we studied the effects of two different extracts containing 8.9% (extract 1) and 27% harpagoside (extract 2), respectively, on IL-1beta-induced nitric oxide (NO) formation as well as transcriptional regulation of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in rat renal mesangial cells. We observed a concentration-dependent suppression of nitrite formation by about 80%, which was due to an inhibition of iNOS expression. Moreover, a reduction of iNOS promoter activity and nuclear NF-kappaB translocation was observed, indicating that the extracts interfere with the transcriptional activation of iNOS. Three further Harpagophytum extracts containing about 2% harpagoside did not inhibit NO formation suggesting, that only extracts with a high harpagoside content elicit iNOS inhibition. However, pure harpagoside was only inhibitory at concentrations between 0.3 and 1 mg/ml, which is much higher than the harpagoside content present in an effective concentration of the total extracts. Moreover, a harpagoside-free extract 1 also markedly inhibited iNOS expression, indicating that other extract constituents are involved in this effect. Extract 1 exerted a strong antioxidative effect, whereas no such effect could be demonstrated for harpagoside. Together, these data show that special Harpagophytum extracts may represent potential antiinflammatory drugs in the treatment of glomerular inflammatory diseases.

  8. Linking of mPGES-1 and iNOS activates stem-like phenotype in EGFR-driven epithelial tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Terzuoli, Erika; Finetti, Federica; Costanza, Filomena; Giachetti, Antonio; Ziche, Marina; Donnini, Sandra

    2017-03-01

    Inflammatory prostaglandin E-2 (PGE-2) favors cancer progression in epithelial tumors characterized by persistent oncogene input. However, its effects on tumor cell stemness are poorly understood at molecular level. Here we describe two epithelial tumor cells A431 and A459, originating from human lung and skin tumors, in which epithelial growth factor (EGF) induces sequential up-regulation of mPGES-1 and iNOS enzymes, producing an inflammatory intracellular milieu. We demonstrated that concerted action of EGF, mPGES-1 and iNOS causes sharp changes in cell phenotype demonstrated by acquisition of stem-cell features and activation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). When primed with EGF, epithelial tumor cells transfected with mPGES-1 or iNOS to ensure steady enzyme levels display major stem-like and EMT markers, such as reduction in E-cadherin with a concomitant rise in vimentin, ALDH-1, CD133 and ALDH activity. Tumorsphere studies with these cells show increased sphere number and size, enhanced migratory and clonogenic capacity and sharp changes in EMT markers, indicating activation of this process. The concerted action of the enzymes forms a well-orchestrated cascade where expression of iNOS depends on overexpression of mPGES-1. Indeed, we show that through its downstream effectors (PGE-2, PKA, PI3K/Akt), mPGES-1 recruits non-canonical transcription factors, thus facilitating iNOS production. In conclusion, we propose that the initial event leading to tumor stem-cell activation may be a leveraged intrinsic mechanism in which all players are either inherent constituents (EGF) or highly inducible proteins (mPGES-1, iNOS) of tumor cells. We suggest that incipient tumor aggressiveness may be moderated by reducing pivotal input of mPGES-1.

  9. Lipopolysaccharide-induced overproduction of nitric oxide and overexpression of iNOS and interleukin-1β proteins in zinc-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takashi; Takenaka, Tsuneo; Inoue, Tsutomu; Sato, Makiko; Miyajima, Yuka; Nodera, Makoto; Hanyu, Mayuko; Ohno, Yoichi; Shibazaki, Satomi; Suzuki, Hiromichi

    2012-03-01

    Zinc deficiency leads to decreased cellular immune responses. The overproduction of nitrogen species derived from inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), its enzyme, and interleukine-1 beta (IL-1β), and inflammatory cytokine have been implicated in immune responses. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced changes in NO metabolites, iNOS, and IL-1β protein expression in the lungs of zinc-deficient rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (body weight, 100 g) were divided into two groups and were fed either a zinc-deficient diet (ZnD) or a zinc-containing diet (Cont). After 4 weeks on these diets, rats received a 10-mg/kg dose of LPS injected via the tail vein and were then maintained for an additional 72 h. To determine total NO concentrations in the blood, serum zinc concentration, iNOS protein expression, IL-1β, and iNOS immunohistochemistry, blood and lung samples were obtained at pre-LPS injection, 5, 24, and 72 h after injection. Total NO levels were significantly increased at 5, at 24, and at 72 h after LPS injection compared with pre-LPS injection level in ZnD group; significant changes in total NO levels was elevated at 5 h from at pre-LPS level but not significant changes from basal level at 24 and 72 h in the control group. Based on western blot analyses and immunohistochemistry, clear bands indicating iNOS and IL-1β protein expression and iNOS antibody-stained inflammatory cells were detected at 5 and 24 h in the ZnD group and 5 h in the Cont group, not observed at 24 and 72 h in the control group. These results suggest that zinc deficiency induces overexpression of iNOS and IL-1β proteins from inflammatory cells around the alveolar blood vessels, resulting in overproduction of total NO and persisted inflammatory response in the zinc-deficient rat lung. Taken together, overexpression of LPS-induced iNOS, overproduction of iNOS-derived NO, and overexpression of IL-1β may induce nitrosative and oxidative

  10. Pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Tunkel, A R; Scheld, W M

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis remains a disease with associated unacceptable morbidity and mortality rates despite the availability of effective bactericidal antimicrobial therapy. Through the use of experimental animal models of infection, a great deal of information has been gleaned concerning the pathogenic and pathophysiologic mechanisms operable in bacterial meningitis. Most cases of bacterial meningitis begin with host acquisition of a new organism by nasopharyngeal colonization followed by systemic invasion and development of a high-grade bacteremia. Bacterial encapsulation contributes to this bacteremia by inhibiting neutrophil phagocytosis and resisting classic complement-mediated bactericidal activity. Central nervous system invasion then occurs, although the exact site of bacterial traversal into the central nervous system is unknown. By production and/or release of virulence factors into and stimulation of formation of inflammatory cytokines within the central nervous system, meningeal pathogens increase permeability of the blood-brain barrier, thus allowing protein and neutrophils to move into the subarachnoid space. There is then an intense subarachnoid space inflammatory response, which leads to many of the pathophysiologic consequences of bacterial meningitis, including cerebral edema and increased intracranial pressure. Attenuation of this inflammatory response with adjunctive dexamethasone therapy is associated with reduced concentrations of tumor necrosis factor in the cerebrospinal fluid, with diminished cerebrospinal fluid leukocytosis, and perhaps with improvement of morbidity, as demonstrated in recent clinical trials. Further information on the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis should lead to the development of more innovative treatment and/or preventive strategies for this disorder. Images PMID:8472245

  11. Polishing and testing of the 3.4 m diameter f/1.5 primary mirror of the INO telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Tapio; Keinänen, Perttu; Pasanen, Mikko; Darudi, Ahmad; Maxwell, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Polishing and testing methods used in the manufacture of the 3.4 m primary mirror of the Iranian National Observatory (INO) telescope are described and the test results of the finished mirror are presented. Mirror lapping and polishing was performed using several rectangular non-rotating tools arranged in a linear array across the mirror radius. Each tool is equipped with two computer controlled force actuators for regulating the surface pressure and removal efficiency during the lapping and polishing operations. The same tool system was used from the lapping phase to the end of the final polishing. The principal optical test method was the interferometric Hartmann test with the aid of a two component null lens in the mirror center of curvature. Mirror measurements were made also with pentaprism test to verify its correct conic constant. The mirror was finished to extremely good surface accuracy and smoothness.

  12. SWR1 and INO80 chromatin remodelers contribute to DNA double-strand break perinuclear anchorage site choice.

    PubMed

    Horigome, Chihiro; Oma, Yukako; Konishi, Tatsunori; Schmid, Roger; Marcomini, Isabella; Hauer, Michael H; Dion, Vincent; Harata, Masahiko; Gasser, Susan M

    2014-08-21

    Persistent DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are recruited to the nuclear periphery in budding yeast. Both the Nup84 pore subcomplex and Mps3, an inner nuclear membrane (INM) SUN domain protein, have been implicated in DSB binding. It was unclear what, if anything, distinguishes the two potential sites of repair. Here, we characterize and distinguish the two binding sites. First, DSB-pore interaction occurs independently of cell-cycle phase and requires neither the chromatin remodeler INO80 nor recombinase Rad51 activity. In contrast, Mps3 binding is S and G2 phase specific and requires both factors. SWR1-dependent incorporation of Htz1 (H2A.Z) is necessary for break relocation to either site in both G1- and S-phase cells. Importantly, functional assays indicate that mutations in the two sites have additive repair defects, arguing that the two perinuclear anchorage sites define distinct survival pathways.

  13. The Effect of Selenium on the Cd-Induced Apoptosis via NO-Mediated Mitochondrial Apoptosis Pathway in Chicken Liver.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Runxiang; Yi, Ran; Bi, Yanju; Xing, Lu; Bao, Jun; Li, Jianhong

    2017-01-06

    Cd-induced apoptosis and the protective effects of Se against Cd-induced injury have been reported in previous studies. However, little is known regarding the effects of Cd-induced apoptosis in hepatic cells and the antagonistic effects of Se on Cd in poultry. In the present study, 128 healthy 31-week-old laying hens were randomly divided into four groups, which were fed basic diets, with the addition of Se (Na2SeO3, 2 mg/kg), Cd (CdCl2, 150 mg/kg), or Se + Cd (150 mg/kg of CdCl2 and 2 mg/kg of Na2SeO3) for 90 days. Ultrastructural changes, nitric oxide (NO) concentrations, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activities, results of the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay of apoptosis, and the expression of iNOS and apoptosis-related genes in livers were determined. It was observed that Cd treatment significantly increased the concentrations of NO and iNOS activity in chicken livers. The production of excessive NO initiated the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Exposure to Cd increased the mRNA and the protein expression levels of iNOS, caspase-3, Bax, p53, and Cyt-c. Furthermore, the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 increased, while the expression of Bcl-2 decreased. Treatment with Se significantly alleviated Cd-induced apoptosis in chicken livers, as evidenced by a reduction in the production of NO, iNOS activity, the number of apoptotic cells, and mRNA and protein expression levels of iNOS, caspase-3, Bax, and Cyt-c. It indicated that Cd induced NO-mediated apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and Se exerted antagonizing effects. The present study provides new insights as to how Se affects Cd-induced toxicity in the chicken liver.

  14. Ginsenoside Rg3 regulates S-nitrosylation of the NLRP3 inflammasome via suppression of iNOS

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sung-Jin; Park, Jun-Young; Choi, Song; Lee, Jin-Bong; Jung, Haiyoung; Kim, Tae-Don; Yoon, Suk Ran; Choi, Inpyo; Shim, Sungbo; Park, Young-Jun

    2015-08-07

    Ginsenoside Rg3, a specific biological effector, is well-known as a major bioactive ingredient of Panax ginseng. However, its role in the inflammasome activation process remains unclear. In this report, we demonstrate that ginsenosides 20(R)-Rg3 and 20(S)-Rg3 are capable of suppressing both lethal endotoxic shock and the S-nitrosylation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by inhibiting nitric oxide (NO) production through the regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. In response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the reducing effect of 20(S)-Rg3 and 20(R)-Rg3 on nitric oxide led to an increase in the survival time of mice after lethal endotoxin-induced shock, and excess levels of NO inhibited IL-1β production via the S-nitrosylation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. In addition, ginsenosides 20(R)-Rg3 and 20(S)-Rg3 had suppressive effects on the LPS- or UV-irradiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in macrophage and HaCaT cells and thereby prevented apoptosis of spleen cells in mice. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ginsenoside 20(R)-Rg3 and 20(S)-Rg3, a naturally occurring compound, might act as a dual therapeutic regulator for the treatment of inflammatory and oxidative stress-related diseases. - Highlights: • Ginsenosides Rg3 inhibits NO production through the regulation of iNOS expression. • Ginsenosides Rg3 inhibits the S-nitrosylation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. • Ginsenosides Rg3 suppress on the LPS- or UV-irradiation-induced ROS levels in cells.

  15. Expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and iNOS in pregnant women with periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Otenio, C C M; Fonseca, I; Martins, M F; Ribeiro, L C; Assis, N M S P; Ferreira, A P; Ribeiro, R A

    2012-12-17

    Periodontal disease is one of the most prevalent oral diseases. An association between this disease and pregnancy has been suggested, but available findings are controversial. We evaluated the expression levels of interleukins (IL-1β and IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in pregnant women with and without periodontal disease in comparison with non-pregnant women with and without periodontal disease since studies have suggested a relationship between periodontitis and the expression levels of these genes. The women in the sample were distributed into four groups: pregnant and non-pregnant women, with or without periodontal disease, a total of 32 women. The periodontal condition was evaluated according to the probing depth, clinical attachment level and bleeding on probing. Analysis of gene expression was performed by real-time PCR. Comparisons were made of the level of gene expression among the four groups. Expression of IL-1β in the non-pregnant women with periodontal disease was 12.6 times higher than in the non-pregnant women without periodontal disease (P < 0.01), while expression of TNF-α in the non-pregnant women without periodontal disease was 3.5 times higher than in the pregnant women with periodontal disease (P < 0.05). Despite these differences, our overall findings indicate no differences in the expression levels of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and iNOS in pregnant women with and without periodontal disease in comparison with expression of the same genes in non-pregnant women with and without periodontal disease, suggesting that periodontal disease is not influenced by pregnancy.

  16. Mediation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, David P.; Fairchild, Amanda J.; Fritz, Matthew S.

    2010-01-01

    Mediating variables are prominent in psychological theory and research. A mediating variable transmits the effect of an independent variable on a dependent variable. Differences between mediating variables and confounders, moderators, and covariates are outlined. Statistical methods to assess mediation and modern comprehensive approaches are described. Future directions for mediation analysis are discussed. PMID:16968208

  17. Set1/COMPASS and Mediator are repurposed to promote epigenetic transcriptional memory

    PubMed Central

    D'Urso, Agustina; Takahashi, Yoh-hei; Xiong, Bin; Marone, Jessica; Coukos, Robert; Randise-Hinchliff, Carlo; Wang, Ji-Ping; Shilatifard, Ali; Brickner, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    In yeast and humans, previous experiences can lead to epigenetic transcriptional memory: repressed genes that exhibit mitotically heritable changes in chromatin structure and promoter recruitment of poised RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex (RNAPII PIC), which enhances future reactivation. Here, we show that INO1 memory in yeast is initiated by binding of the Sfl1 transcription factor to the cis-acting Memory Recruitment Sequence, targeting INO1 to the nuclear periphery. Memory requires a remodeled form of the Set1/COMPASS methyltransferase lacking Spp1, which dimethylates histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me2). H3K4me2 recruits the SET3C complex, which plays an essential role in maintaining this mark. Finally, while active INO1 is associated with Cdk8- Mediator, during memory, Cdk8+ Mediator recruits poised RNAPII PIC lacking the Kin28 CTD kinase. Aspects of this mechanism are generalizable to yeast and conserved in human cells. Thus, COMPASS and Mediator are repurposed to promote epigenetic transcriptional poising by a highly conserved mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16691.001 PMID:27336723

  18. Ferulic acid ameliorates TNBS-induced ulcerative colitis through modulation of cytokines, oxidative stress, iNOs, COX-2, and apoptosis in laboratory rats

    PubMed Central

    Sadar, Smeeta S.; Vyawahare, Niraj S.; Bodhankar, Subhash L.

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic immune-inflammatory disorder characterized by oxido-nitrosative stress, the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and apoptosis. Ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic compound is considered to possess potent antioxidant, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory activities. The aim is to evaluate possible mechanism of action of FA against trinitrobenzensulfonic acid (TNBS) induced ulcerative colitis (UC) in rats. UC was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats (150-200 g) by intrarectal administration of TNBS (100 mg/kg). FA was administered (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, p.o.) for 14 days after colitis was induced. Various biochemical, molecular and histological changes were assessed in the colon. Intrarectal administration of TNBS caused significant induction of ulcer in the colon with an elevation of oxido-nitrosative stress, myeloperoxidase and hydroxyproline activity in the colon. Administration of FA (20 and 40 mg/kg) significantly decrease oxido-nitrosative stress, myeloperoxidase, and hydroxyproline activities. Up-regulated mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2, and iNOs, as well as down-regulated IL-10 mRNA expressions after TNBS administration, were significantly inhibited by FA (20 and 40 mg/kg) treatment. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that intrarectal administration of TNBS-induced significantly enhanced the colonic apoptosis whereas administration of FA (20 and 40 mg/kg) significantly restored the elevated apoptosis. FA administration also significantly restored the histopathological aberration induced by TNBS. The findings of the present study demonstrated that FA ameliorates TNBS-induced colitis via inhibition of oxido-nitrosative stress, apoptosis, proinflammatory cytokines production, and down- regulation of COX-2 synthesis. Graphical Abstract: TNBS caused activation of T cells which interact with CD40 on antigen presenting cells i.e. dendritic cells (DC) that induce the key Interleukin 12 (IL-12)-mediated Th1 T cell immune

  19. Ferulic acid ameliorates TNBS-induced ulcerative colitis through modulation of cytokines, oxidative stress, iNOs, COX-2, and apoptosis in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Sadar, Smeeta S; Vyawahare, Niraj S; Bodhankar, Subhash L

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic immune-inflammatory disorder characterized by oxido-nitrosative stress, the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and apoptosis. Ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic compound is considered to possess potent antioxidant, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory activities. The aim is to evaluate possible mechanism of action of FA against trinitrobenzensulfonic acid (TNBS) induced ulcerative colitis (UC) in rats. UC was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats (150-200 g) by intrarectal administration of TNBS (100 mg/kg). FA was administered (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, p.o.) for 14 days after colitis was induced. Various biochemical, molecular and histological changes were assessed in the colon. Intrarectal administration of TNBS caused significant induction of ulcer in the colon with an elevation of oxido-nitrosative stress, myeloperoxidase and hydroxyproline activity in the colon. Administration of FA (20 and 40 mg/kg) significantly decrease oxido-nitrosative stress, myeloperoxidase, and hydroxyproline activities. Up-regulated mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2, and iNOs, as well as down-regulated IL-10 mRNA expressions after TNBS administration, were significantly inhibited by FA (20 and 40 mg/kg) treatment. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that intrarectal administration of TNBS-induced significantly enhanced the colonic apoptosis whereas administration of FA (20 and 40 mg/kg) significantly restored the elevated apoptosis. FA administration also significantly restored the histopathological aberration induced by TNBS. The findings of the present study demonstrated that FA ameliorates TNBS-induced colitis via inhibition of oxido-nitrosative stress, apoptosis, proinflammatory cytokines production, and down- regulation of COX-2 synthesis.Graphical Abstract: TNBS caused activation of T cells which interact with CD40 on antigen presenting cells i.e. dendritic cells (DC) that induce the key Interleukin 12 (IL-12)-mediated Th1 T cell immune

  20. Role of nitric oxide produced by iNOS through NF-κB pathway in migration of cerebellar granule neurons induced by Lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Arias-Salvatierra, Daniela; Silbergeld, Ellen K; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C; Calderon-Aranda, Emma S

    2011-02-01

    Inflammatory stimulus during development increases the risk for adverse neurologic outcome. One possible mechanism is disrupting neuronal migration. Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treatment to assess inflammatory stimulus on neuronal migration of cerebellar granule neurons, we previously found that LPS-activation increased the neuronal migration. The precise mechanisms behind these effects have not been investigated. Independently, it was shown that nitric oxide (NO(•-)) regulates neuronal migration during development, that NO(•-) is produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in response to LPS through the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, and that LPS induce the expression of genes under the transcriptional control of NF-κB in primary cultures from developing mouse cerebellum. To investigate the relationship between these events, we used this culture model to study the role of NO(•-) produced by iNOS through NF-κB signaling pathway, in the effect of LPS on neuron migration. LPS increased NO(•-) production, iNOS protein levels and NF-κB nuclear levels; concomitantly with NO(•-) production, LPS increased the neuronal migration as compared to non stimulated cultures. The necessary roles of the NO(•-) and iNOS were demonstrated by chelating of NO(•-) with hemoglobin and the inhibition of iNOS by 1400W. Each of these treatments reduced neuronal migration induced by LPS. The role of NF-κB was showed by using the inhibitor JSH-23, which decreased NO(•-) production and neuronal migration in LPS activated cultures. These results suggest that neuronal migration during development is susceptible to be modified by pro-inflammatory stimulus such as LPS through intracellular pathways associated with their receptors.

  1. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Characterization of Tetrahydrobiopterin Radical Formation in Bacterial Nitric Oxide Synthase Compared to Mammalian Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Brunel, Albane; Santolini, Jérôme; Dorlet, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    H4B is an essential catalytic cofactor of the mNOSs. It acts as an electron donor and activates the ferrous heme-oxygen complex intermediate during Arg oxidation (first step) and NOHA oxidation (second step) leading to nitric oxide and citrulline as final products. However, its role as a proton donor is still debated. Furthermore, its exact involvement has never been explored for other NOSs such as NOS-like proteins from bacteria. This article proposes a comparative study of the role of H4B between iNOS and bsNOS. In this work, we have used freeze-quench to stop the arginine and NOHA oxidation reactions and trap reaction intermediates. We have characterized these intermediates using multifrequency electron paramagnetic resonance. For the first time, to our knowledge, we report a radical formation for a nonmammalian NOS. The results indicate that bsNOS, like iNOS, has the capacity to generate a pterin radical during Arg oxidation. Our current electron paramagnetic resonance data suggest that this radical is protonated indicating that H4B may not transfer any proton. In the 2nd step, the radical trapped for iNOS is also suggested to be protonated as in the 1st step, whereas it was not possible to trap a radical for the bsNOS 2nd step. Our data highlight potential differences for the catalytic mechanism of NOHA oxidation between mammalian and bacterial NOSs. PMID:22828337

  2. Small molecule control of bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Roberta J.; Richards, Justin J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are defined as a surface attached community of bacteria embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances that they have produced. When in the biofilm state, bacteria are more resistant to antibiotics and the host immune response than are their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are increasingly recognized as being significant in human disease, accounting for 80% of bacterial infections in the body and diseases associated with bacterial biofilms include: lung infections of cystic fibrosis, colitis, urethritis, conjunctivitis, otitis, endocarditis and periodontitis. Additionally, biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are of particular concern, as once the device is colonized infection is virtually impossible to eradicate. Given the prominence of biofilms in infectious diseases, there has been an increased effort toward the development of small molecules that will modulate bacterial biofilm development and maintenance. In this review, we highlight the development of small molecules that inhibit and/or disperse bacterial biofilms through non-microbicidal mechanisms. The review discuses the numerous approaches that have been applied to the discovery of lead small molecules that mediate biofilm development. These approaches are grouped into: 1) the identification and development of small molecules that target one of the bacterial signaling pathways involved in biofilm regulation, 2) chemical library screening for compounds with anti-biofilm activity, and 3) the identification of natural products that possess anti-biofilm activity, and the chemical manipulation of these natural products to obtain analogues with increased activity. PMID:22733439

  3. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  4. Oleifolioside A, a New Active Compound, Attenuates LPS-Stimulated iNOS and COX-2 Expression through the Downregulation of NF-κB and MAPK Activities in RAW 264.7 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai Yang; Kim, Kyoung-Sook; Lee, Young-Choon; Moon, Hyung-In; Lee, Jai-Heon

    2012-01-01

    Oleifolioside A, a new triterpenoid compound isolated from Dendropanax morbifera Leveille (D. morbifera), was shown in this study to have potent inhibitory effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS-)stimulated nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Consistent with these findings, oleifolioside A was further shown to suppress the expression of LPS-stimulated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxigenase-2 (COX-2) in a dose-dependent manner at both the protein and mRNA levels and to significantly inhibit the DNA-binding activity and transcriptional activity of NF-κB in response to LPS. These results were found to be associated with the inhibition of the degradation and phosphorylation of IκB-α and subsequent translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit to the nucleus. Inhibition of NF-κB activation by oleifolioside A was also shown to be mediated through the prevention of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Taken together, our results suggest that oleifolioside A has the potential to be a novel anti-inflammatory agent capable of targeting both the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways.

  5. Inhibition of iNOS alleviates cognitive deficits and depression in diabetic mice through downregulating the NO/sGC/cGMP/PKG signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao Yan; Zhang, Fang; Ying, Chang Jiang; Chen, Jing; Chen, Ling; Dong, Jing; Shi, Yue; Tang, Mang; Hu, Xiao Tong; Pan, Zhi Hua; Xu, Na Na; Zheng, Kui Yang; Tang, Ren Xian; Song, Yuan Jian

    2017-03-30

    Diabetes mellitus often results in a number of complications involving impaired brain function, including cognitive deficits and depression. However, the potential mechanisms for diabetes-related cognitive deficits and depression are not fully understood. Neurons in the hippocampal, cortical and amygdala functional regions are more susceptible to damage during hyperglycemia. Neuroprotection in the brain can rescue cognitive deficits and depression induced by hyperglycemia. This study investigated the potential mechanisms underlying diabetes-related congnitive deficits and depression, determined whether the inflammatory factor inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the nitric oxide (NO)/soluble guanylyl cyclases (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)/protein kinase G (PKG) pathway, play key roles in cognitive deficits and depression associated. In the present study, diabetic animal models were induced by streptozotocin (STZ, 150mg/kg) in mice, and aminoguanidine (AG), a selective inhibitor of iNOS, was given by intraperitoneal injection for 10 weeks. Blood glucose, activities of NOS and the levels of NO in serum and brain regions were measured. The spatial memory was detected using the Morris water maze test, depressive behavior was evaluated by the tail suspension test (TST), forced swimming test (FST), closed field test (CFT) and open field test (OFT). We also detected neuronal survival and cleaved caspase-3 positive ratios in three brain regions and the levels of iNOS, sGC, cGMP and PKG in hippocampus and frontal cortex. Data indicated that diabetic mice exerted impairments in spatial memory, decreased locomotor activity and increased immobile time in diabetic mice. In addition, diabetic mice had significantly decreased surviving neuronal density and showed signs of obvious neuronal injury in the hippocampus, frontal cortex and amygdala. iNOS overexpression and its associated signaling pathway NO/sGC/cGMP/PKG in the hippocampus and frontal cortex were

  6. Additive microglia-mediated neuronal injury caused by amyloid-β and bacterial TLR agonists in murine neuron-microglia co-cultures quantified by an automated image analysis using cognition network technology.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Sandra; Loleit, Tobias; Zeretzke, Moritz; Bunkowski, Stephanie; Brück, Wolfgang; Ribes, Sandra; Nau, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Activated microglia is considered to be involved in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the effect of amyloid-β(1-40) (Aβ(40) and exogenous agonists of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 1/2 (Pam(3)CSK(4)) and TLR4 (LPS) on neurons in primary murine neuron-microglia co-cultures. Neuronal viability, assessed by quantifying the number of intact neuronal extensions and their crossings using a newly developed Definiens Cognition Network Technology-based method, was significantly decreased after treatment with Pam(3)CSK(4), LPS, and Aβ(40). Combined treatment with Aβ(40) and Pam(3)CSK(4) or LPS had an additive effect. Hence, in patients with AD, synergistic microglial activation by Aβ and bacterial products during infections might contribute to disease progression.

  7. Bacterial IgA protease-mediated degradation of agIgA1 and agIgA1 immune complexes as a potential therapy for IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Li, Xueying; Shen, Hongchun; Mao, Nan; Wang, Honglian; Cui, Luke; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Junming

    2016-08-03

    Mesangial deposition of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 (agIgA1) and its immune complexes is a key pathogenic mechanism of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, treatment of IgAN remains ineffective. We report here that bacteria-derived IgA proteases are capable of degrading these pathogenic agIgA1 and derived immune complexes in vitro and in vivo. By screening 14 different bacterial strains (6 species), we found that 4 bacterial IgA proteases from H. influenzae, N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis exhibited high cleaving activities on serum agIgA1 and artificial galactose-depleted IgA1 in vitro and the deposited agIgA1-containing immune complexes in the mesangium of renal biopsy from IgAN patients and in a passive mouse model of IgAN in vitro. In the modified mouse model of passive IgAN with abundant in situ mesangial deposition of the agIgA-IgG immune complexes, a single intravenous delivery of IgA protease from H. influenzae was able to effectively degrade the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the glomerulus, demonstrating a therapeutic potential for IgAN. In conclusion, the bacteria-derived IgA proteases are biologically active enzymes capable of cleaving the circulating agIgA and the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the kidney of IgAN. Thus, the use of such IgA proteases may represent a novel therapy for IgAN.

  8. Bacterial IgA protease-mediated degradation of agIgA1 and agIgA1 immune complexes as a potential therapy for IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Li, Xueying; Shen, Hongchun; Mao, Nan; Wang, Honglian; Cui, Luke; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Mesangial deposition of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 (agIgA1) and its immune complexes is a key pathogenic mechanism of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, treatment of IgAN remains ineffective. We report here that bacteria-derived IgA proteases are capable of degrading these pathogenic agIgA1 and derived immune complexes in vitro and in vivo. By screening 14 different bacterial strains (6 species), we found that 4 bacterial IgA proteases from H. influenzae, N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis exhibited high cleaving activities on serum agIgA1 and artificial galactose-depleted IgA1 in vitro and the deposited agIgA1-containing immune complexes in the mesangium of renal biopsy from IgAN patients and in a passive mouse model of IgAN in vitro. In the modified mouse model of passive IgAN with abundant in situ mesangial deposition of the agIgA-IgG immune complexes, a single intravenous delivery of IgA protease from H. influenzae was able to effectively degrade the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the glomerulus, demonstrating a therapeutic potential for IgAN. In conclusion, the bacteria-derived IgA proteases are biologically active enzymes capable of cleaving the circulating agIgA and the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the kidney of IgAN. Thus, the use of such IgA proteases may represent a novel therapy for IgAN. PMID:27485391

  9. Contribution of bacterial outer membrane vesicles to innate bacterial defense

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are constitutively produced by Gram-negative bacteria throughout growth and have proposed roles in virulence, inflammation, and the response to envelope stress. Here we investigate outer membrane vesiculation as a bacterial mechanism for immediate short-term protection against outer membrane acting stressors. Antimicrobial peptides as well as bacteriophage were used to examine the effectiveness of OMV protection. Results We found that a hyper-vesiculating mutant of Escherichia coli survived treatment by antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) polymyxin B and colistin better than the wild-type. Supplementation of E. coli cultures with purified outer membrane vesicles provided substantial protection against AMPs, and AMPs significantly induced vesiculation. Vesicle-mediated protection and induction of vesiculation were also observed for a human pathogen, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), challenged with polymyxin B. When ETEC with was incubated with low concentrations of vesicles concomitant with polymyxin B treatment, bacterial survival increased immediately, and the culture gained resistance to polymyxin B. By contrast, high levels of vesicles also provided immediate protection but prevented acquisition of resistance. Co-incubation of T4 bacteriophage and OMVs showed fast, irreversible binding. The efficiency of T4 infection was significantly reduced by the formation of complexes with the OMVs. Conclusions These data reveal a role for OMVs in contributing to innate bacterial defense by adsorption of antimicrobial peptides and bacteriophage. Given the increase in vesiculation in response to the antimicrobial peptides, and loss in efficiency of infection with the T4-OMV complex, we conclude that OMV production may be an important factor in neutralizing environmental agents that target the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:22133164

  10. Cytokine-induced iNOS and ERK1/2 inhibit adenylyl cyclase type 5/6 activity and stimulate phosphodiesterase 4D5 activity in intestinal longitudinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Mahavadi, Sunila; Nalli, Ancy D; Kumar, Divya P; Hu, Wenhui; Kuemmerle, John F; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S

    2014-08-15

    This study identified a distinctive pattern of expression and activity of adenylyl cyclase (AC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoforms in mouse colonic longitudinal smooth muscle cells and determined the changes in their expression and/or activity in response to proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α) in vitro and 2,4,6 trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colonic inflammation in vivo. AC5/6 and PDE4D5, expressed in circular muscle cells, were also expressed in longitudinal smooth muscle. cAMP formation was tightly regulated via feedback phosphorylation of AC5/6 and PDE4D5 by PKA. Inhibition of PKA activity by myristoylated PKI blocked phosphorylation of AC5/6 and PDE4D5 and enhanced cAMP formation. TNBS treatment in vivo and IL-1β and TNF-α in vitro induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, stimulated ERK1/2 activity, caused iNOS-mediated S-nitrosylation and inhibition of AC5/6, and induced phosphorylation of PDE4D5 and stimulated its activity. The resultant decrease in AC5/6 activity and increase in PDE4D5 activity decreased cAMP formation and smooth muscle relaxation. S-nitrosylation and inhibition of AC5/6 activity were reversed by the iNOS inhibitor 1400W, whereas phosphorylation and activation of PDE4D5 were reversed by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 and the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059. The effects of IL-1β or TNF-α on forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation and smooth muscle relaxation reflected inhibition of AC5/6 activity and activation of PDE4D5 and were partly reversed by 1400W or PD98059 and completely reversed by a combination of the two inhibitors. The changes in the cAMP/PKA signaling and smooth muscle relaxation contribute to colonic dysmotility during inflammation.

  11. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Tim N.; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  12. The role of macrophage mediators in respirable quartz-elicited inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Berlo, D.; Albrecht, C.; Knaapen, A. M.; van Schooten, F. J.; Schins, R. P. F.

    2009-02-01

    The instigation and persistence of an inflammatory response is widely considered to be critically important in quartz-induced lung cancer and fibrosis. Macrophages have been long recognised as a crucial player in pulmonary inflammation, but evidence for the role of type II epithelial cells is accumulating. Investigations were performed in the rat lung type II cell line RLE and the rat alveolar macrophage cell line NR8383 using Western blotting, NF-κB immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR of the pro-inflammatory genes iNOS and COX-2, as well as the cellular stress gene HO-1. The direct effect of quartz on pro-inflammatory signalling cascades and gene expression in RLE cells was compared to the effect of conditioned media derived from quartz-treated NR8383 cells. Conditioned media activated the NF-κB signalling pathway and induced a far stronger upregulation of iNOS mRNA than quartz itself. Quartz elicited a stronger, progressive induction of COX-2 and HO-1 mRNA. Our results suggest a differentially mediated inflammatory response, in which reactive particles themselves induce oxidative stress and activation of COX-2, while mediators released from particle-activated macrophages trigger NF-κB activation and iNOS expression in type II cells.

  13. Septins and Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Torraca, Vincenzo; Mostowy, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Septins, a unique cytoskeletal component associated with cellular membranes, are increasingly recognized as having important roles in host defense against bacterial infection. A role for septins during invasion of Listeria monocytogenes into host cells was first proposed in 2002. Since then, work has shown that septins assemble in response to a wide variety of invasive bacterial pathogens, and septin assemblies can have different roles during the bacterial infection process. Here we review the interplay between septins and bacterial pathogens, highlighting septins as a structural determinant of host defense. We also discuss how investigation of septin assembly in response to bacterial infection can yield insight into basic cellular processes including phagocytosis, autophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. PMID:27891501

  14. Identification of a novel compound that inhibits iNOS and COX-2 expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages from Schisandra chinensis.

    PubMed

    Lee, You Jin; Park, Sun Young; Kim, Sun Gun; Park, Da Jung; Kang, Jum Soon; Lee, Sang Joon; Yoon, Sik; Kim, Young Hun; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Choi, Young-Whan

    2010-01-22

    A novel alpha-iso-cubebenol, which has anti-inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages, was isolated from the fruits of Schisandra chinensis. alpha-iso-cubebenolinhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production. Consistent with these findings, alpha-iso-cubebenol also reduced the LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 at the protein and mRNA levels in a concentration-dependent manner. alpha-iso-cubebenol also inhibited LPS-induced nuclear translocation of the NF-kappaB p65 subunit. Furthermore, alpha-iso-cubebenol suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, and p38 kinase induced by LPS. Since the novel alpha-iso-cubebenol blocked the production of several pro-inflammatory mediators induced by LPS in macrophages, the molecule can be useful material for the development of anti-inflammatory agents against bacterial infections or endotoxin.

  15. Bacterial Influences on Animal Origins

    PubMed Central

    Alegado, Rosanna A.; King, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Animals evolved in seas teeming with bacteria, yet the influences of bacteria on animal origins are poorly understood. Comparisons among modern animals and their closest living relatives, the choanoflagellates, suggest that the first animals used flagellated collar cells to capture bacterial prey. The cell biology of prey capture, such as cell adhesion between predator and prey, involves mechanisms that may have been co-opted to mediate intercellular interactions during the evolution of animal multicellularity. Moreover, a history of bacterivory may have influenced the evolution of animal genomes by driving the evolution of genetic pathways for immunity and facilitating lateral gene transfer. Understanding the interactions between bacteria and the progenitors of animals may help to explain the myriad ways in which bacteria shape the biology of modern animals, including ourselves. PMID:25280764

  16. Heterosis and combining ability: a diallel cross of three geographically isolated populations of Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai Ino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yuewen; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Guofan; Wu, Fucun

    2010-11-01

    We conducted a complete diallel cross among three geographically isolated populations of Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai Ino to determine the heterosis and the combining ability of growth traits at the spat stage. The three populations were collected from Qingdao (Q) and Dalian (D) in China, and Miyagi (M) in Japan. We measured the shell length, shell width, and total weight. The magnitude of the general combining ability (GCA) variance was more pronounced than the specific combining ability (SCA) variance, which is evidenced by both the ratio of the genetic component in total variation and the GCA/SCA values. The component variances of GCA and SCA were significant for all three traits ( P<0.05), indicating the importance of additive and non-additive genetic effects in determining the expression of these traits. The reciprocal maternal effects (RE) were also significant for these traits ( P<0.05). Our results suggest that population D was the best general combiner in breeding programs to improve growth traits. The DM cross had the highest heterosis values for all three traits.

  17. Position Paper of INoEA Working Group on Long-Gap Esophageal Atresia: For Better Care

    PubMed Central

    van der Zee, David C.; Bagolan, Pietro; Faure, Christophe; Gottrand, Frederic; Jennings, Russell; Laberge, Jean-Martin; Martinez Ferro, Marcela Hernan; Parmentier, Benoît; Sfeir, Rony; Teague, Warwick

    2017-01-01

    INoEA is the International Network of Esophageal Atresia and consists of a broad spectrum of pediatric specialties and patient societies. The working group on long-gap esophageal atresia (LGEA) set out to develop guidelines regarding the definition of LGEA, the best diagnostic and treatment strategies, and highlight the necessity of experience and communication in the management of these challenging patients. Review of the literature and expert discussion concluded that LGEA should be defined as any esophageal atresia (EA) that has no intra-abdominal air, realizing that this defines EA with no distal tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF). LGEA is considerably more complex than EA with distal TEFs and should be referred to a center of expertise. The first choice is to preserve the native esophagus and pursue primary repair, delayed primary anastomosis, or traction/growth techniques to achieve anastomosis. A cervical esophagostomy should be avoided if possible. Only if primary anastomosis is not possible, replacement techniques should be used. Jejunal interposition is proposed as the best option among the major EA centers. In light of the infrequent occurrence of LGEA and the technically demanding techniques involved to achieve esophageal continuity, it is strongly advised to develop regional or national centers of expertise for the management and follow-up of these very complex patients.

  18. Lectin purified from Musca domestica pupa up-regulates NO and iNOS production via TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaohong; Zhou, Minghui; Wang, Chunling; Hou, Lihua; Zeng, Bin

    2011-04-01

    The present study reported that nitric oxide (NO) was up-regulated by the induction of lectin purified from Musca domestica pupa (MPL) in macrophages without cytotoxicity. The mRNA expression and protein secretion of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were strongly induced by MPL treatments. Subsequent investigation revealed that the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitory κB (IκB) in endochylema was inhibited and NF-κB translocated into the nucleus after MPL treatment. Meanwhile, the IKKβ was strongly induced and the production of the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) was significantly up-regulated. Moreover, MPL increased NO production via inducing the expression of iNOS through the activation of NF-κB, which suggested that MPL probably acted as an activating agent of the NF-κB activation.

  19. Gamma-decanolactone inhibits iNOS and TNF-alpha production by lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia in N9 cells.

    PubMed

    Pflüger, Pricila; Viau, Cassiana Macagnan; Coelho, Vanessa Rodrigues; Berwig, Natália Alice; Staub, Renata Bartolomeu; Pereira, Patrícia; Saffi, Jenifer

    2016-06-05

    Activated microglia that produce reactive nitrogen species (RNS), inflammatory factors, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and other neurovirulent factors may lead to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Certain compounds can inhibit the activation of microglia. However, these mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of Gamma-decanolactone (GD) on the production of reactive oxygen species and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) - stimulated N9 murine microglial cells through the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. The results showed that GD attenuated the activation of N9 cells and inhibited intracellular reactive oxygen species and the expression of iNOS and TNF-α induced by LPS in the cells. In addition, GD blocked the phosphorylation of p38 and inhibited cleaved caspase-9 and DNA damage. These data indicate that GD has therapeutic potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, and that it exerts its effects by inhibiting inflammation.

  20. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase mediates expression of arginase II but not inducible nitric-oxide synthase in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yi; Liu, Yusen; Nelin, Leif D

    2015-01-23

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) have been shown to participate in iNOS induction following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, while the role of MAPKs in the regulation of arginase remains unclear. We hypothesized that different MAPK family members are involved in iNOS and arginase expression following LPS stimulation. LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells exhibited increased protein and mRNA levels for iNOS, arginase I, and arginase II; although the induction of arginase II was more robust than that for arginase I. A p38 inhibitor completely prevented iNOS expression while it only attenuated arginase II induction. In contrast, a MEK1/2 inhibitor (ERK pathway) completely abolished arginase II expression while actually enhancing iNOS induction in LPS-stimulated cells. Arginase II promoter activity was increased by ∼4-fold following LPS-stimulation, which was prevented by the ERK pathway inhibitor. Arginase II promoter activity was unaffected by a p38 inhibitor or JNK pathway interference. Transfection with a construct expressing a constitutively active RAS mutant increased LPS-induced arginase II promoter activity, while transfection with a vector expressing a dominant negative ERK2 mutant or a vector expressing MKP-3 inhibited the arginase II promoter activity. LPS-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production was increased following siRNA-mediated knockdown of arginase II and decreased when arginase II was overexpressed. Our results demonstrate that while both the ERK and p38 pathways regulate arginase II induction in LPS-stimulated macrophages, iNOS induction by LPS is dependent on p38 activation. These results suggest that differential inhibition of the MAPK pathway may be a potential therapeutic strategy to regulate macrophage phenotype.

  1. Nqrs Data for C3H12INO7 [C3H7NO2·HIO3·2(H2O)] (Subst. No. 0646)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Substances Containing Ag … C10H15' of Volume 48 `Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III `Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section `3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter `3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C3H12INO7 [C3H7NO2·HIO3·2(H2O)] (Subst. No. 0646)

  2. Anti-inflammatory effects of liquiritigenin as a consequence of the inhibition of NF-κB-dependent iNOS and proinflammatory cytokines production

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y W; Zhao, R J; Park, S J; Lee, J R; Cho, I J; Yang, C H; Kim, S G; Kim, S C

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Glycyrrhizae radix has been widely used as a cytoprotective, plant-derived medicine. We have identified a flavanoid, liquiritigenin, as an active component in extracts of Glycyrrhizae radix. This research investigated the effects of liquiritigenin on the induction of inducible NOS (iNOS) and proinflammatory cytokines by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in Raw264.7 cells, and on paw oedema in rats. Experimental approach: iNOS expression was determined by western blotting, real-time reverse transcription-PCR and reporter gene analyses. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 were assayed by ELISA. Gel shift assay and immunoblotting were used to assess NF-κB activation. The effect of liquiritigenin on acute inflammation in vivo was evaluated using carrageenan-induced paw oedema. Key results: Treatment of Raw264.7 cells with liquiritigenin caused inhibition of LPS-induced NF-κB DNA binding activity, due to repression of I-κBα phosphorylation and degradation. Liquiritigenin treatment prevented LPS from increasing the levels of iNOS protein and mRNA in a concentration-dependent manner. Liquiritigenin also suppressed the production of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 from Raw264.7 cells after LPS. In rats, liquiritigenin treatment inhibited formation of paw oedema induced by carrageenan. Conclusion and implications: These results demonstrate that liquiritigenin exerts anti-inflammatory effects, which results from the inhibition of NF-κB activation in macrophages, thereby decreasing production of iNOS and proinflammatory cytokines. Our findings showing inhibition by liquiritigenin of paw oedema as well as inflammatory gene induction will help to understand the pharmacology and mode of action of liquiritigenin, and of the anti-inflammatory use of Glycyrrhizae radix. PMID:18332856

  3. NF-κB activation and iNOS upregulation in skeletal muscle of patients with COPD and low body weight

    PubMed Central

    Agusti, A; Morla, M; Sauleda, J; Saus, C; Busquets, X

    2004-01-01

    Background: Weight loss, mostly due to skeletal muscle atrophy, is a frequent and clinically relevant problem in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are unclear. This study sought to investigate whether activation of the nuclear transcription factor NF-κB and upregulation of the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) occur in the skeletal muscle of patients with COPD and low body weight as potential molecular mechanisms leading to cachexia Methods: NF-κB DNA binding activity was determined by electromobility shift assay and the immunoreactivity of its inhibitory subunit IκB-κ and that of iNOS by Western blot analysis in biopsy specimens of the quadriceps femoris muscle of seven COPD patients with normal body mass index (BMI, 27.5 (1) kg/m2) and seven patients with low BMI (18.5 (1) kg/m2). Results: Compared with patients with normal body weight, those with low BMI showed a 30% increase in NF-κB DNA binding activity, a lower expression of IκB-α (3.37 (0.47) IOD v 5.96 (0.75) IOD, p<0.05; mean difference 2.59; 95% CI –4.53 to –0.65) and higher iNOS expression (1.51 (0.29) IOD v 0.78 (0.11) IOD, p<0.05; mean difference 0.74; 95% CI 0.04 to 1.42). Conclusions: NF-κB activation and iNOS induction occur in skeletal muscle of COPD patients with low body weight. These changes might contribute to the molecular pathogenesis of cachexia in COPD. PMID:15170030

  4. LPS-induced iNOS expression in N9 microglial cells is suppressed by geniposide via ERK, p38 and nuclear factor-κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gu; He, Jun-Lin; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Yu, Chao

    2012-09-01

    Activated microglia producing reactive nitrogen species, inflammatory factors, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other neurovirulent factors, can lead to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Certain compounds can inhibit the activation of microglia. However, the mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of geniposide on the production of ROS and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated N9 murine microglial cells through the p38, ERK1/2 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways. After the N9 cells were pre-treated with the vehicle or geniposide and exposed to LPS for the time indicated, the MTT conversion test was used to assess cell viability. Suitable concentrations were chosen and adjusted according to the experiments. Extracellular nitric oxide (NO) release was measured by Griess reaction. The formation of ROS and intracellular NO was evaluated by fluorescence imaging. NOS activities were determined using commercially available kits. The morphology of the N9 cells was examined by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The expression of iNOS mRNA was examined by RT-PCR. The protein levels of iNOS, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), ERK1/2 and NF-κB, inhibitory factor-κB-α (IκB-α) were determined by western blot analysis. The results showed that geniposide attenuated the activation of N9 cells and inhibited the overproduction of NO, intracellular ROS and the expression of iNOS induced by LPS in the cells. In addition, geniposide blocked the phosphorylation of p38, ERK1/2 and inhibited the drop-off of IκB induced by LPS in the cells. These data indicate that geniposide has therapeutic potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, and that it exerts its effects by inhibiting inflammation.

  5. Inhibition of iNOS activity enhances the anti-tumor effects of alpha-galactosylceramide in established murine cancer model.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroyasu; Ando, Tatsuya; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2015-12-08

    Alpha-garactosylceramide (GalCer) has been shown to have anti-tumor effect in the basic research and clinical studies. However, anti-tumor effect of GalCer is limited. The administration of GalCer increases the production of IFN-γ which is involved in the suppression of tumor growth. On the other hand, the enhancement of IFN-γ production increases immunosuppressive factors such as nitric oxide. This suppressive action might impair the anti-tumor effect of GalCer. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-tumor effect of GalCer in the absence of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In lung metastatic model, the number of tumor nodules in the lung of iNOS-KO mice treated with GalCer was significantly reduced compared with that of WT mice treated with GalCer. Moreover, L-NAME, which is the inhibitor for iNOS, enhanced the anti-tumor effect of GalCer in lung metastatic model. The frequency of CD8+ cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid increased in iNOS-KO mice treated with GalCer. The administration of GalCer increased the frequency of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in the lung from tumor-bearing WT mice, but the increase of MDSCs in the lung was not induced in iNOS-KO mice. The subcutaneous tumor experiments revealed that the administration of GalCer in the absence of iNOS expression significantly enhanced the induction of tumor antigen-specific response. Finally, our results indicated that the inhibition of iNOS expression could enhance the therapeutic efficacy of GalCer via the increase of tumor antigen-specific immune response and the suppression of MDSCs.

  6. Macrophages From Irradiated Tumors Express Higher Levels of iNOS, Arginase-I and COX-2, and Promote Tumor Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.-S.; Chen, F.-H.; Wang, C.-C.; Huang, H.-L.; Jung, Shih-Ming; Wu, C.-J.; Lee, C.-C.; McBride, William H.; Chiang, C.-S.; Hong, J.-H. . E-mail: jihong@adm.cgmh.org.tw

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of single and fractionated doses of radiation on tumors and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), and to elucidate the potential of TAMs to influence tumor growth. Methods and Materials: A murine prostate cell line, TRAMP-C1, was grown in C57Bl/6J mice to 4-mm tumor diameter and irradiated with either 25 Gy in a single dose, or 60 Gy in 15 fractions. The tumors were removed at the indicated times and assessed for a variety of markers related to TAM content, activation status, and function. Results: In tumors receiving a single radiation dose, arginase (Arg-I), and cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA expression increased as a small transient wave within 24 h and a larger persistent wave starting after 3 days. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA was elevated only after 3 days and continued to increase up to 3 weeks. After fractionated irradiation, Arg-1 and COX-2 mRNA levels increased within 5 days, whereas iNOS was increased only after 10 fractions of irradiation had been given. Increased levels of Arg-I, COX-2, and, to a lesser extent, iNOS protein were found to associate with TAMs 1-2 weeks after tumor irradiation. Function of TAMs were compared by mixing them with TRAMP-C1 cells and injecting them into mice; TRAMP-C1 cells mixed with TAMs from irradiated tumors appeared earlier and grew significantly faster than those mixed with TAMs from unirradiated tumors or TRAMP-C1 alone. Conclusions: Tumor-associated macrophages in the postirradiated tumor microenvironment express higher levels of Arg-1, COX-2, and iNOS, and promote early tumor growth in vivo.

  7. Protection by taurine against INOS-dependent DNA damage in heavily exercised skeletal muscle by inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Hiromichi; Okita, Shinya; Kato, Toshihiro; Naka, Toru; Kawanishi, Shosuke; Ohnishi, Shiho; Oshida, Yoshiharu; Ma, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Taurine protects against tissue damage in a variety of models involving inflammation, especially the muscle. We set up a heavy exercise bout protocol for rats consisting of climbing ran on a treadmill to examine the effect of an intraabdominal dose of taurine (300 mg/kg/day) administered 1 h before heavy exercise for ten consecutive days. Each group ran on the treadmill at 20 m/min, 25% grade, for 20 min or until exhaustion within 20 min once each 10 days. Exhaustion was the point when an animal was unable to right itself when placed on its side. The muscle damage was associated with an increased accumulation of 8-nitroguanine and 8-OHdG in the nuclei of skeletal muscle cells. The immunoreactivities for NF-κB and iNOS were also increased in the exercise group. Taurine ameliorated heavy exercise-induced muscle DNA damage to a significant extent since it reduced the accumulation of 8-nitroguanine and 8-OHdG, possibly by down-regulating the expression of iNOS through a modulatory action on NF-κB signaling pathway. This study demonstrates for the first time that taurine can protect against intense exercise-induced nitrosative inflammation and ensuing DNA damage in the skeletal muscle of rats by preventing iNOS expression and the nitrosative stress generated by heavy exercise.

  8. Diesel Particulate Exposed Macrophages Alter Endothelial Cell Expression of eNOS, iNOS, MCP1, and Glutathione Synthesis Genes

    PubMed Central

    Weldy, Chad S.; Wilkerson, Hui-Wen; Larson, Timothy V.; Stewart, James A.; Kavanagh, Terrance J.

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable debate regarding inhaled diesel exhaust particulate (DEP) causing impairments in vascular reactivity. Although there is evidence that inhaled particles can translocate from the lung into the systemic circulation, it has been suggested that inflammatory factors produced in the lung following macrophage particle engulfment also pass into the circulation. To investigate these differing hypotheses, we used in vitro systems to model each exposure. By using a direct exposure system and a macrophage-endothelial cell co-culture model, we compared the effects of direct DEP exposure and exposure to inflammatory factors produced by DEP-treated macrophages, on endothelial cell mRNA levels for eNOS, iNOS, endothelin-1, and endothelin-converting-enzyme-1. As markers of oxidative stress, we measured the effects of DEP treatment on glutathione (GSH) synthesis genes and on total GSH. In addition, we analyzed the effect of DEP treatment on monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1. Direct DEP exposure increased endothelial GCLC and GCLM as well as total GSH in addition to increased eNOS, iNOS and Mcp1 mRNA. Alternatively, inflammatory factors released from DEP-exposed macrophages markedly up-regulated endothelial iNOS and Mcp1 while modestly down-regulating eNOS. These data support both direct exposure to DEP and the release of inflammatory cytokines as explanations for DEP-induced impairments in vascular reactivity. PMID:21920430

  9. ABC transporters: bacterial exporters.

    PubMed Central

    Fath, M J; Kolter, R

    1993-01-01

    The ABC transporters (also called traffic ATPases) make up a large superfamily of proteins which share a common function and a common ATP-binding domain. ABC transporters are classified into three major groups: bacterial importers (the periplasmic permeases), eukaryotic transporters, and bacterial exporters. We present a comprehensive review of the bacterial ABC exporter group, which currently includes over 40 systems. The bacterial ABC exporter systems are functionally subdivided on the basis of the type of substrate that each translocates. We describe three main groups: protein exporters, peptide exporters, and systems that transport nonprotein substrates. Prototype exporters from each group are described in detail to illustrate our current understanding of this protein family. The prototype systems include the alpha-hemolysin, colicin V, and capsular polysaccharide exporters from Escherichia coli, the protease exporter from Erwinia chrysanthemi, and the glucan exporters from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding domains from 29 bacterial ABC exporters indicates that the bacterial ABC exporters can be divided into two primary branches. One branch contains the transport systems where the ATP-binding domain and the membrane-spanning domain are present on the same polypeptide, and the other branch contains the systems where these domains are found on separate polypeptides. Differences in substrate specificity do not correlate with evolutionary relatedness. A complete survey of the known and putative bacterial ABC exporters is included at the end of the review. PMID:8302219

  10. NG2, a member of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans family mediates the inflammatory response of activated microglia.

    PubMed

    Gao, Q; Lu, J; Huo, Y; Baby, N; Ling, E A; Dheen, S T

    2010-01-20

    Activation of microglial cells, the resident immune cells of the CNS causes neurotoxicity through the release of a wide array of inflammatory mediators including proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines and reactive oxygen species. In this study, we have investigated the expression of NG2 (also known as CSPG4), one of the members of transmembrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans family, in microglial cells and its role on inflammatory reaction of microglia by analyzing the expression of the proinflammation cytokines (interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)), chemokines (stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha and monocyte chemotactic protein-1) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). NG2 expression was not detectable in microglial cells expressing OX-42 in the brains of 1-day old postnatal rat pups and adult rats; it was, however, induced in activated microglial cells in pups and adult rats injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In vitro analysis further confirmed that LPS induced the expression of NG2 in primary microglial cells and this was inhibited by dexamethasone. It has been well demonstrated that LPS induces the expression of iNOS and proinflammatory cytokines in microglia. However in this study, LPS did not induce the mRNA expression of iNOS and cytokines including IL-1beta, and TNF-alpha in microglial cells transfected with CSPG4 siRNA. On the contrary, mRNA expression of chemokines such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha) was significantly increased in LPS-activated microglial cells after CSPG4 siRNA transfection in comparison with the control. The above results indicate that NG2 mediates the induction of iNOS and inflammatory cytokine expression, but not the chemokine expression in activated microglia.

  11. Notochordal Cells Influence Gene Expression of Inflammatory Mediators of Annulus Fibrosus Cells in Proinflammatory Cytokines Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hong Joo; Joe, Hoon; Kwon, Taek Hyun; Choi, Hye-Kyoung; Park, Youn Kwan

    2010-01-01

    Objective Notochordal cells in the intervertebral disc interact with nucleus pulposus (NP) cells and support the maintenance of disc homeostasis by regulation of matrix production. However, the influence of notochordal cells has not been evaluated in the annulus fibrosus (AF), which is the primary pain generator in the disc. We hypothesized that the notochordal cell has the capacity to modulate inflammatory mediators secreted by AF cells secondary to stimulation. Methods Notochordal and AF cells were isolated from adult New Zealand white rabbits. AF pellets were cultured with notochordal cell clusters or in notochordal cell-conditioned media (NCCM) for 24 or 48 hours with proinflammatory cytokines at varying concentrations. Gene expression in AF pellets were assayed for nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2, and interleukin (IL)-6 by real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results AF pellet in NCCM significantly decreased the iNOS and COX-2 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels compared to AF pellets alone and AF pellets with notochordal cells (p < 0.05). AF pellet resulted in dose-dependent iNOS and COX-2 expression in response to IL-1β, stimulation, demonstrating that 1 ng/ml for 24 hours yielded a maximal response. AF pellet in NCCM significantly decreased the expression of iNOS and COX-2 in response to 1ng/ml IL-1β, stimulation at 24 hours (p < 0.05). There was no difference in IL-6 expression compared to AF pellets alone or AF pellets with notochordal cell clusters. Conclusion We conclude that soluble factors from notochordal cells mitigate the gene expression of inflammatory mediators in stimulated AF, as expected after annular injury, suggesting that notochordal cells could serve as a novel therapeutic approach in symptomatic disc development. PMID:20717505

  12. Calpains promote neutrophil recruitment and bacterial clearance in an acute bacterial peritonitis model.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Everingham, Stephanie; Hall, Christine; Greer, Peter A; Craig, Andrew W B

    2014-03-01

    Activation of the innate immune system is critical for clearance of bacterial pathogens to limit systemic infections and host tissue damage. Here, we report a key role for calpain proteases in bacterial clearance in mice with acute peritonitis. Using transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase primarily in innate immune cells (fes-Cre), we generated conditional capns1 knockout mice. Consistent with capns1 being essential for stability and function of the ubiquitous calpains (calpain-1, calpain-2), peritoneal cells from these mice had reduced levels of calpain-2/capns1, and reduced proteolysis of their substrate selenoprotein K. Using an acute bacterial peritonitis model, we observed impaired bacterial killing within the peritoneum and development of bacteremia in calpain knockout mice. These defects correlated with significant reductions in IL-1α release, neutrophil recruitment, and generation of reactive oxygen species in calpain knockout mice with acute bacterial peritonitis. Peritoneal macrophages from calpain knockout mice infected with enterobacteria ex vivo, were competent in phagocytosis of bacteria, but showed impaired clearance of intracellular bacteria compared with control macrophages. Together, these results implicate calpains as key mediators of effective innate immune responses to acute bacterial infections, to prevent systemic dissemination of bacteria that can lead to sepsis.

  13. Bacterial cell division as a target for new antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Sass, Peter; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial resistance to currently applied antibiotics complicates the treatment of infections and demands the evaluation of new strategies to counteract multidrug-resistant bacteria. In recent years, the inhibition of the bacterial divisome, mainly by targeting the central cell division mediator FtsZ, has been recognized as a promising strategy for antibiotic attack. New antibiotics were shown to either interfere with the natural dynamics and functions of FtsZ during the cell cycle or to activate a bacterial protease to degrade FtsZ and thus bring about bacterial death in a suicidal manner. Their efficacy in animal models of infection together with resistance-breaking properties prove the potential of such drugs and validate the inhibition of bacterial cell division as an attractive approach for antibiotic intervention.

  14. Laboratory silo type and inoculation effects on nutritional composition, fermentation, and bacterial and fungal communities of oat silage.

    PubMed

    Romero, J J; Zhao, Y; Balseca-Paredes, M A; Tiezzi, F; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, E; Castillo, M S

    2017-03-01

    The objectives were to evaluate (1) the use of 2 types of experimental silos (S) to characterize whole-crop oat (Avena sativa L.) silage with or without addition of an inoculant (I), and (2) the effect of inoculation on the microbial community structure of oats ensiled using only plastic bucket silos (BKT). From each of 6 sections in a field, oats were harvested, treated (INO) or not (CON) with inoculant, packed into 19-L BKT or vacuum bags (BG), and ensiled for 217 d. The inoculant added contained Lactobacillus buchneri and Pediococcus pentosaceus (4 × 10(5) and 1 × 10(5) cfu/g of fresh oats, respectively). The experimental design was a complete randomized design replicated 6 times. Treatment design was the factorial combination of 2 S × 2 I. Some differences existed between BG versus BKT at silo opening (217 d), including a decreased CP (7.73 vs. 7.04 ± 0.247% of DM) and ethanol (1.93 vs. 1.55 ± 0.155) and increased lactic acid (4.28 vs. 3.65 ± 0.241), respectively. Also, WSC and mold counts were reduced in BG versus BKT for CON (1.78 vs. 2.70 ± 0.162% of DM and 0.8 vs. 2.82 ± 0.409 log cfu/fresh g) but not for INO (∼1.53 and 1.55), respectively. Application of INO increased DM recovery (96.1 vs. 92.9 ± 0.63%), aerobic stability (565 vs. 133 ± 29.2 h), acetic acid (2.38 vs. 1.22 ± 0.116% of DM), and reduced NDF (65.0 vs. 67.0 ± 0.57), ADF (36.7 vs. 38.1 ± 0.60), ethanol (0.63 vs. 2.85 ± 0.155), and yeast counts (1.10 vs. 4.13 ± 0.484 log cfu/fresh g) in INO versus CON, respectively. At d 0, no differences were found for S and I on the nutritional composition and background microbial counts. Leuconostocaceae (82.9 ± 4.27%) and Enterobacteriaceae (15.2 ± 3.52) were the predominant bacterial families and unidentified sequences were predominant for fungi. A higher relative abundance of the Davidiellaceae fungal family (34.3 vs. 19.6 ± 4.47) was observed in INO versus CON. At opening (217 d), INO had a lower relative abundance of Leuconostocaceae

  15. Obesity, Inflammation, and Exercise Training: Relative Contribution of iNOS and eNOS in the Modulation of Vascular Function in the Mouse Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Josiane F.; Correa, Izabella C.; Diniz, Thiago F.; Lima, Paulo M.; Santos, Roger L.; Cortes, Steyner F.; Coimbra, Cândido C.; Lemos, Virginia S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The understanding of obsesity-related vascular dysfunction remains controversial mainly because of the diseases associated with vascular injury. Exercise training is known to prevent vascular dysfunction. Using an obesity model without comorbidities, we aimed at investigating the underlying mechanism of vascular dysfunction and how exercise interferes with this process. Methods: High-sugar diet was used to induce obesity in mice. Exercise training was performed 5 days/week. Body weight, energy intake, and adipose tissues were assessed; blood metabolic and hormonal parameters were determined; and serum TNFα was measured. Blood pressure and heart rate were assessed by plethysmography. Changes in aortic isometric tension were recorded on myograph. Western blot was used to analyze protein expression. Nitric oxide (NO) was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides were used for inducible nitric oxide synthase isoform (iNOS) knockdown. Results: Body weight, fat mass, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction, insulin, and leptin were higher in the sedentary obese group (SD) than in the sedentary control animals (SS). Exercise training prevented these changes. No difference in glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, and heart rate was found. Decreased vascular relaxation and reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) functioning in the SD group were prevented by exercise. Contractile response to phenylephrine was decreased in the aortas of the wild SD mice, compared with that of the SS group; however, no alteration was noted in the SD iNOS−/− animals. The decreased contractility was endothelium-dependent, and was reverted by iNOS inhibition or iNOS silencing. The aortas from the SD group showed increased basal NO production, serum TNFα, TNF receptor-1, and phospho-IκB. Exercise training attenuated iNOS-dependent reduction in contractile response in high-sugar diet–fed animals

  16. Oct-2 forms a complex with Oct-1 on the iNOS promoter and represses transcription by interfering with recruitment of RNA PolII by Oct-1

    PubMed Central

    Bentrari, Fatima; Chantôme, Aurelie; Knights, Andrew; Jeannin, Jean-François; Pance, Alena

    2015-01-01

    Oct-1 (POU2f1) and Oct-2 (POU2f2) are members of the POU family of transcription factors. They recognize the same DNA sequence but fulfil distinct functions: Oct-1 is ubiquitous and regulates a variety of genes while Oct-2 is restricted to B-cells and neurones. Here we examine the interplay and regulatory mechanisms of these factors to control the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, NOS2). Using two breast cancer cell lines as a comparative model, we found that MCF-7 express iNOS upon cytokine stimulation while MDA-MB-231 do not. Oct-1 is present in both cell lines but MDA-MB-231also express high levels of Oct-2. Manipulation of Oct-2 expression in these cell lines demonstrates that it is directly responsible for the repression of iNOS in MDA-MB-231. In MCF-7 cells Oct-1 binds the iNOS promoter, recruits RNA PolII and triggers initiation of transcription. In MDA-MB-231 cells, both Oct-1 and Oct-2 bind the iNOS promoter, forming a higher-order complex which fails to recruit RNA PolII, and as a consequence iNOS transcription does not proceed. Unravelling the mechanisms of transcription factor activity is paramount to the understanding of gene expression patterns that determine cell behaviour. PMID:26271992

  17. Bacterial surface adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utada, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are structured multi-cellular communities that are fundamental to the biology and ecology of bacteria. Parasitic bacterial biofilms can cause lethal infections and biofouling, but commensal bacterial biofilms, such as those found in the gut, can break down otherwise indigestible plant polysaccharides and allow us to enjoy vegetables. The first step in biofilm formation, adaptation to life on a surface, requires a working knowledge of low Reynolds number fluid physics, and the coordination of biochemical signaling, polysaccharide production, and molecular motility motors. These crucial early stages of biofilm formation are at present poorly understood. By adapting methods from soft matter physics, we dissect bacterial social behavior at the single cell level for several prototypical bacterial species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

  18. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  19. Macrophage-mediated inflammatory response decreases mycobacterial survival in mouse MSCs by augmenting NO production

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Wu, Yongjian; Xie, Heping; Li, Miao; Ming, Siqi; Li, Liyan; Li, Meiyu; Wu, Minhao; Gong, Sitang; Huang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a hard-to-eradicate intracellular microbe, which escapes host immune attack during latent infection. Recent studies reveal that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide a protective niche for MTB to maintain latency. However, the regulation of mycobacterial residency in MSCs in the infectious microenvironment remains largely unknown. Here, we found that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during MTB infection facilitated the clearance of bacilli residing in mouse MSCs. Higher inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production were observed in mouse MSCs under macrophage-mediated inflammatory circumstance. Blocking NO production in MSCs increased the survival of intracellular mycobacteria, indicating NO-mediated antimycobacterial activity. Moreover, both nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathways were involved in iNOS expression and NO production in inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β could trigger NO production in MSCs and exert anti-mycobacterial activity via NF-κB signaling pathway. Neutralization of interleukin-1β in macrophage-mediated inflammatory microenvironment dampened the ability of mouse MSCs to produce NO. Together, our findings demonstrated that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during mycobacterial infection promotes the clearance of bacilli in mouse MSCs by increasing NO production, which may provide a better understanding of latent MTB infection. PMID:27251437

  20. Experimental Bacterial Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Durack, David T.; Beeson, Paul B.

    1972-01-01

    A method has been developed for assessing metabolic activity of bacteria in the vegetations of bacterial endocarditis using a labelled metabolite and autoradiography. Evidence provided by this technique suggests that there are different degrees of activity between superficial and more deeply placed bacterial colonies, and that variations in activity also exist within a single group of organisms. The possible relevance of these findings to the antibiotic therapy of endocarditis is discussed. ImagesFigs. 1-3Figs. 4-5 PMID:4111329

  1. [Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Djukić, Slobodanka; Ćirković, Ivana; Arsić, Biljana; Garalejić, Eliana

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2-producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent's scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up-to-date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short-term and long-term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  2. L-arginine stimulates CAT-1-mediated arginine uptake and regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase for the growth of chick intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chao; Zhang, Xiaoyun; He, Qiang; Li, Junming; Lu, Jianjun; Zou, Xiaoting

    2015-01-01

    L-arginine (L-Arg) uptake is mediated by members of cationic amino acid transporter (CAT) family and may coincide with the induction of nitric oxide synthases (NOS). The present study was conducted to investigate the extracellular concentrations of L-Arg regulating the CAT-1, CAT-4 and inducible NOS (iNOS) in chick intestinal epithelial cells. The cells were cultured for 4 days in Arg-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium containing 10, 100, 200, 400, or 600 μM L-Arg. Cell viability, nitric oxide (NO) concentrations, uptake and metabolism of L-[3H]-Arg as well as expression of CAT-1, CAT-4, and iNOS were determined. Our results showed that L-Arg enhances cell growth with a maximal response at 10-400 μM. Addition of 100, 200, or 400 μM L-Arg increased the L-[3H]-Arg uptake, which was associated with greater conversion of L-[3H]-citrulline and NO production in comparison with 10 μM L-Arg group. Increasing extracellular concentrations of L-Arg from 10 to 400 μM dose dependently increased the levels of CAT-1 mRNA and protein, while no effect on CAT-4 mRNA abundance was found. Furthermore, supplementation of 100, 200, or 400 μM L-Arg upregulated the expression of iNOS mRNA, and the relative protein levels for iNOS in 200 and 400 μM L-Arg groups were higher than those in 10 and 100 μM L-Arg groups. Collectively, we conclude that the CAT-1 isoform plays a role in L-Arg uptake, and L-Arg-mediated elevation of NO via iNOS promotes the growth of chick intestinal epithelial cells.

  3. Nitric oxide-mediated antitumor activity induced by the extract from Grifola frondosa (Maitake mushroom) in a macrophage cell line, RAW264.7.

    PubMed

    Sanzen, I; Imanishi, N; Takamatsu, N; Konosu, S; Mantani, N; Terasawa, K; Tazawa, K; Odaira, Y; Watanabe, M; Takeyama, M; Ochiai, H

    2001-12-01

    We have investigated D-fraction (MDF) extracted from Grifola frondosa (Maitake mushroom) on the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-mediated nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW264.7 (RAW) cells, a murine monocyte/macrophage cell line, with special reference to antitumor activity of MDF against human hepatoma-derived huH-1 cells. MDF could induce iNOS mRNA expression in RAW cells in a dose range of more than 30 microg/ml, but the effect of 10 microg/ml of MDF was negligible. The iNOS mRNA expression induced by 100 microg/ml of MDF was 6 hrs later, but lasted for a longer time than that of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a representative iNOS inducer. Although iNOS mRNA levels in MDF-stimulated cells were almost equal to LPS-stimulated cells at the peak time, the cumulative amount of nitrite was only about 50% compared with that of LPS-treated cells. When huH-I cells were cultured in MDF containing media in a 24-well plate with inserted porous bottom in the presence or absence of RAW cells, the viability of huH-1 cells decreased significantly only in the presence of RAW cells in MDF dose-dependent manner. This antitumor activity of RAW cells in the presence of MDF was abolished or attenuated by the addition of L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor, confirming that this phenomenon is due to iNOS-mediated NO production by RAW cells, but not direct cytotoxic activity of MDF against huH-1 cells. These data suggest that MDF is a novel inducer for iNOS which contributes at least in part to antitumor activity of MDF.

  4. Integrated Analysis of COX-2 and iNOS Derived Inflammatory Mediators in LPS-Stimulated RAW Macrophages Pre-Exposed to Echium plantagineum L. Bee Pollen Extract

    PubMed Central

    Moita, Eduarda; Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Sousa, Carla; Ferreres, Federico; Silva, Luís R.; Valentão, Patrícia; Domínguez-Perles, Raúl; Baenas, Nieves; Andrade, Paula B.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation play important roles in disease development. This study intended to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant potential of Echium plantagineum L. bee pollen to support its claimed health beneficial effects. The hydromethanol extract efficiently scavenged nitric oxide (•NO) although against superoxide (O2•−) it behaved as antioxidant at lower concentrations and as pro-oxidant at higher concentrations. The anti-inflammatory potential was evaluated in LPS-stimulated macrophages. The levels of •NO and L-citrulline decreased for all extract concentrations tested, while the levels of prostaglandins, their metabolites and isoprostanes, evaluated by UPLC-MS, decreased with low extract concentrations. So, E. plantagineum bee pollen extract can exert anti-inflammatory activity by reducing •NO and prostaglandins. The extract is able to scavenge the reactive species •NO and O2•− and reduce markers of oxidative stress in cells at low concentrations. PMID:23520554

  5. Engineering nanoparticles to silence bacterial communication

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kristen P.; Wang, Lei; Chen, Yung-Pin; Pellechia, Perry J.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Decho, Alan W.

    2015-01-01

    The alarming spread of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has warranted the study of alternative antimicrobial agents. Quorum sensing (QS) is a chemical cell-to-cell communication mechanism utilized by bacteria to coordinate group behaviors and establish infections. QS is integral to bacterial survival, and therefore provides a unique target for antimicrobial therapy. In this study, silicon dioxide nanoparticles (Si-NP) were engineered to target the signaling molecules [i.e., acylhomoserine lactones (HSLs)] used for QS in order to halt bacterial communication. Specifically, when Si-NP were surface functionalized with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), then added to cultures of bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), whose luminous output depends upon HSL-mediated QS, the cell-to-cell communication was dramatically reduced. Reductions in luminescence were further verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses of luminescence genes. Binding of HSLs to Si-NPs was examined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The results indicated that by delivering high concentrations of engineered NPs with associated quenching compounds, the chemical signals were removed from the immediate bacterial environment. In actively-metabolizing cultures, this treatment blocked the ability of bacteria to communicate and regulate QS, effectively silencing and isolating the cells. Si-NPs provide a scaffold and critical stepping-stone for more pointed developments in antimicrobial therapy, especially with regard to QS—a target that will reduce resistance pressures imposed by traditional antibiotics. PMID:25806030

  6. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in murine AIDS inhibit B-cell responses in part via soluble mediators including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Rastad, Jessica L; Green, William R

    2016-12-01

    Monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSCs) were increased during LP-BM5 retroviral infection, and were capable of suppressing not only T-cell, but also B-cell responses. In addition to previously demonstrating iNOS- and VISTA-dependent M-MDSC mechanisms, in this paper, we detail how M-MDSCs utilized soluble mediators, including the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species superoxide, peroxynitrite, and nitric oxide, and TGF-β, to suppress B cells in a predominantly contact-independent manner. Suppression was independent of cysteine-depletion and hydrogen peroxide production. When two major mechanisms of suppression (iNOS and VISTA) were eliminated in double knockout mice, M-MDSCs from LP-BM5-infected mice were able to compensate using other, soluble mechanisms in order to maintain suppression of B cells. The IL-10 producing regulatory B-cell compartment was among the targets of M-MDSC-mediated suppression.

  7. Supplementation with Angelica keiskei inhibits expression of inflammatory mediators in the gastric mucosa of Helicobacter pylori-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Aryoung; Lim, Joo Weon; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-05-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric ulceration and carcinogenesis. The oxidant-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), regulates expression of inflammatory mediators such as interferon γ (IFN-γ), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). These inflammatory mediators increased in gastric mucosal tissues from patients infected with H pylori. Angelica keiskei (AK), a green leafy vegetable, is rich in carotenoids and flavonoids and shows antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Therefore, we hypothesized that AK may protect the gastric mucosa of H pylori-infected mice against inflammation. We determined lipid peroxide abundance, myeloperoxidase activity, expression levels of inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ, COX-2, and iNOS), NF-κB-DNA binding activity, and histologic changes in gastric mucosal tissues. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine served as the positive control treatment. Supplementation with AK suppressed increases in lipid peroxide abundance, myeloperoxidase activity, induction of inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ, COX-2, and iNOS), activation of NF-κB, and degradation of nuclear factor of κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor α in gastric mucosal tissue from H pylori-infected mice. Inhibition of H pylori-induced alterations by AK was similar to that by N-acetylcysteine. Taken together, these results suggest that supplementation with AK may prevent H pylori-induced gastric inflammation by inhibiting NF-κB-mediated induction of inflammatory mediators in the gastric mucosa of patients infected with H pylori.

  8. Bacterial Respiratory Infections Complicating Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Charles; Anderson, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    Opportunistic bacterial and fungal infections of the lower respiratory tract, most commonly those caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Pneumocystis jirovecii, remain the major causes of mortality in those infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Bacterial respiratory pathogens most prevalent in those infected with HIV, other than M. tuberculosis, represent the primary focus of the current review with particular emphasis on the pneumococcus, the leading cause of mortality due to HIV infection in the developed world. Additional themes include (1) risk factors; (2) the predisposing effects of HIV-mediated suppression on pulmonary host defenses, possibly intensified by smoking; (3) clinical and laboratory diagnosis, encompassing assessment of disease severity and outcome; and (4) antibiotic therapy. The final section addresses current recommendations with respect to pneumococcal immunization in the context of HIV infection, including an overview of the rationale underpinning the current "prime-boost" immunization strategy based on sequential administration of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13 and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine 23.

  9. Bithionol blocks pathogenicity of bacterial toxins, ricin, and Zika virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease pathways form overlapping networks, and hub proteins represent attractive targets for broad-spectrum drugs. Using bacterial toxins as a proof of concept, we describe a new approach of discovering broad-spectrum therapies capable of inhibiting host proteins that mediate multiple pathogenic pa...

  10. The Transport of Carbohydrates by a Bacterial Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Roseman, Saul

    1969-01-01

    The components and properties of a phosphoenolpyruvate: glucose phosphotransferase system are reviewed, along with the evidence implicating this system in sugar transport across bacterial membranes. Some possible physiological implications of sugar transport mediated by the phosphotransferase system are also considered. PMID:19873641

  11. Bacterial transfer RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jennifer; Ibba, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Transfer RNA is an essential adapter molecule that is found across all three domains of life. The primary role of transfer RNA resides in its critical involvement in the accurate translation of messenger RNA codons during protein synthesis and, therefore, ultimately in the determination of cellular gene expression. This review aims to bring together the results of intensive investigations into the synthesis, maturation, modification, aminoacylation, editing and recycling of bacterial transfer RNAs. Codon recognition at the ribosome as well as the ever-increasing number of alternative roles for transfer RNA outside of translation will be discussed in the specific context of bacterial cells. PMID:25796611

  12. The beneficial effects of melatonin against heart mitochondrial impairment during sepsis: inhibition of iNOS and preservation of nNOS.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Francisco; García, José A; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Doerrier, Carolina; López, Ana; Venegas, Carmen; Volt, Huayqui; Luna-Sánchez, Marta; López, Luis C; Escames, Germaine

    2014-01-01

    While it is accepted that the high production of nitric oxide (NO˙) by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) impairs cardiac mitochondrial function during sepsis, the role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) may be protective. During sepsis, there is a significantly increase in the expression and activity of mitochondrial iNOS (i-mtNOS), which parallels the changes in cytosolic iNOS. The existence of a constitutive NOS form (c-mtNOS) in heart mitochondria has been also described, but its role in the heart failure during sepsis remains unclear. Herein, we analyzed the changes in mitochondrial oxidative stress and bioenergetics in wild-type and nNOS-deficient mice during sepsis, and the role of melatonin, a known antioxidant, in these changes. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture, and heart mitochondria were analyzed for NOS expression and activity, nitrites, lipid peroxidation, glutathione and glutathione redox enzymes, oxidized proteins, and respiratory chain activity in vehicle- and melatonin-treated mice. Our data show that sepsis produced a similar induction of iNOS/i-mtNOS and comparable inhibition of the respiratory chain activity in wild-type and in nNOS-deficient mice. Sepsis also increased mitochondrial oxidative/nitrosative stress to a similar extent in both mice strains. Melatonin administration inhibited iNOS/i-mtNOS induction, restored mitochondrial homeostasis in septic mice, and preserved the activity of nNOS/c-mtNOS. The effects of melatonin were unrelated to the presence or the absence of nNOS. Our observations show a lack of effect of nNOS on heart bioenergetic impairment during sepsis and further support the beneficial actions of melatonin in sepsis.

  13. Evidences for a progressive microglial activation and increase in iNOS expression in rats submitted to a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia: reversal by clozapine.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Bruna Mara Machado; do Carmo, Marta Regina Santos; Freire, Rosemayre Souza; Rocha, Nayrton Flávio Moura; Borella, Vládia Célia Moreira; de Menezes, Antonio Teles; Monte, Aline Santos; Gomes, Patrícia Xavier Lima; de Sousa, Francisca Cléa Florenço; Vale, Mariana Lima; de Lucena, David Freitas; Gama, Clarissa Severino; Macêdo, Danielle

    2013-12-01

    Schizophrenia was proposed as a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder. In this regard herein we attempted to determine progressive inflammatory and oxidative alterations induced by a neonatal immune challenge and its possible reversal by clozapine administration. For this end, Wistar rats at postnatal day (PN) 5-7 were administered the viral mimetic polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid (polyI:C) or saline. A distinct group of animals additionally received the antipsychotic drug clozapine (25mg/kg) from PN60 to 74. At PN35 (periadolescence), 60 (adult) and 74 (adulthood) the animals were submitted to behavioral determinations of prepulse inhibition of the startle (PPI) and Y maze task for working memory evaluation. At PN35 and 74 the animals were sacrificed and the hippocampus (HC), prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum (ST) immunostained for Iba-1, a microglial marker, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). At PN74 oxidative stress parameters, such as, reduced glutathione levels (GSH) and lipid peroxidation were determined. The results showed a progressive increase of microglial activation and iNOS immunostaining from PN35 to PN74 mainly in the CA2 and CA3 regions of the HC and in the ST. At PN74 neonatal challenge also induced an oxidative imbalance. These inflammatory alterations were accompanied by deficits in PPI and working memory only in adult life that were reversed by clozapine. Clozapine administration reversed microglial activation and iNOS increase, but not the alterations of oxidative stress parameters. Taken together these results give further evidences for a neuroprogressive etiology and course of schizophrenia and that clozapine may partly alleviate this process.

  14. Oxidative stress induced by Cremophor EL is not accompanied by changes in NF-kappaB activation or iNOS expression.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, María Belén; Miguel, Beatriz San; Villares, Carmen; Gallego, Javier González; Tuñón, María Jesús

    2006-05-01

    The effects of polyoxyethylenglycerol triricinoleate 35 (Cremophor EL, CrEL) on markers of oxidative stress, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activation and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression were studied in the liver of male Wistar rats. Animals were randomly divided into three groups. Group Cr1 received, i.p., CrEL at 0.046ml/kg daily for 7 days, group Cr2 received CrEL at 0.33ml/kg and the controls were injected with CrEL vehicle (saline solution with 25% ethanol). Both alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) serum activities were significantly increased in the Cr2 group (+16% and +25%, respectively). AST activity was also higher in the Cr1 group when compared to control animals (+20%). The cytosolic concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) increased in both groups of rats receiving CrEL (Cr1: +24%; Cr2: +33%). Reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration was not significantly modified at any of the CrEL doses, but both the hepatic concentration of oxidised glutathione (GSSG) (Cr1: +37%; Cr2: +84%) and the GSH/GSSG ratio (Cr1: -21%; Cr2: -45%) were significantly modified. CrEL induced no significant NF-kappaB activation, changes in p50 and p65 NF-kappaB subunits or induction of iNOS protein. Data obtained indicate that although high doses of CrEL cause oxidative stress, this is not enough to induce changes in NF-kappaB activation or iNOS expression.

  15. Pharmacological inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, convalesce behavior and biochemistry of hypertension induced vascular dementia in rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhupesh; Singh, Nirmal

    2013-02-01

    Cognitive disorders are likely to increase over the coming years (5-10). Vascular dementia (VaD) has heterogeneous pathology and is a challenge for clinicians. Current Alzheimer's disease drugs have had limited clinical efficacy in treating VaD and none have been approved by major regulatory authorities specifically for this disease. Role of iNOS and NADPH-oxidase has been reported in various pathological conditions but there role in hypertension (Hypt) induced VaD is still unclear. This research work investigates the salutiferous effect of aminoguanidine (AG), an iNOS inhibitor and 4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxyacetophenone (HMAP), a NADPH oxidase inhibitor in Hypt induced VaD in rats. Deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt (DOCA-S) hypertension has been used for development of VaD in rats. Morris water-maze was used for testing learning and memory. Vascular system assessment was done by testing endothelial function. Mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), oxidative stress [aortic superoxide anion, serum and brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) and brain glutathione (GSH)], nitric oxide levels (serum nitrite/nitrate) and cholinergic activity (brain acetyl cholinesterase activity-AChE) were also measured. DOCA-S treated rats have shown increased MABP with impairment of endothelial function, learning and memory, reduction in serum nitrite/nitrate & brain GSH levels along with increase in serum & brain TBARS, and brain AChE activity. AG as well as HMAP significantly convalesce Hypt induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, and alterations in various biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that AG, an iNOS inhibitor and HMAP, a NADPH-oxidase inhibitor may be considered as potential agents for the management of Hypt induced VaD.

  16. Extended recombinant bacterial ghost system.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, W; Witte, A; Eko, F O; Kamal, M; Jechlinger, W; Brand, E; Marchart, J; Haidinger, W; Huter, V; Felnerova, D; Stralis-Alves, N; Lechleitner, S; Melzer, H; Szostak, M P; Resch, S; Mader, H; Kuen, B; Mayr, B; Mayrhofer, P; Geretschläger, R; Haslberger, A; Hensel, A

    1999-08-20

    Controlled expression of cloned PhiX174 gene E in Gram-negative bacteria results in lysis of the bacteria by formation of an E-specific transmembrane tunnel structure built through the cell envelope complex. Bacterial ghosts from a variety of bacteria are used as non-living candidate vaccines. In the recombinant ghost system, foreign proteins are attached on the inside of the inner membrane as fusions with specific anchor sequences. Ghosts have a sealed periplasmic space and the export of proteins into this space vastly extends the capacity of ghosts or recombinant ghosts to function as carriers of foreign antigens. In addition, S-layer proteins forming shell-like self assembly structures can be expressed in candidate vaccine strains prior to E-mediated lysis. Such recombinant S-layer proteins carrying foreign epitopes further extend the possibilities of ghosts as carriers of foreign epitopes. As ghosts have inherent adjuvant properties, they can be used as adjuvants in combination with subunit vaccines. Subunits or other ligands can also be coupled to matrixes like dextran which are used to fill the internal lumen of ghosts. Oral, aerogenic or parenteral immunization of experimental animals with recombinant ghosts induced specific humoral and cellular immune responses against bacterial and target components including protective mucosal immunity. The most relevant advantage of recombinant bacterial ghosts as immunogens is that no inactivation procedures that denature relevant immunogenic determinants are employed in this production. This fact explains the superior quality of ghosts when compared to other inactivated vaccines. The endotoxic component of the outer membrane does not limit the use of ghosts as vaccine candidates but triggers the release of several potent immunoregulatory cytokines. As carriers, there is no limitation in the size of foreign antigens that can be inserted in the membrane and the capacity of all spaces including the membranes, peri

  17. Mediating Ebonics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Robin R. Means; Daniel, Jack L.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that Ebonics has been mediated in ways that clearly reveal American racial politics, which remain hostile to African Americans, describing the dominant strategies used to mediate Ebonics and locating those media strategies within the cultural context of racist circumstances, the racist political history of African Americans, and African…

  18. HIV-Enhancing Factors Are Secreted by Reproductive Epithelia upon Inoculation with Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Eade, Colleen R; Diaz, Camila; Chen, Sixue; Cole, Amy L; Cole, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common reproductive infection in which commensal vaginal lactobacilli are displaced by a mixed population of pathogenic bacteria. Bacterial vaginosis increases susceptibility to HIV, and it has been suggested that host innate immune responses to pathogenic bacteria contribute to enhanced infection, yet the cellular mechanisms mediating the increased HIV susceptibility remain uncharacterized. We evaluated the HIV-enhancing effects of bacterial vaginosis by inoculating endocervical epithelia with Atopobium vaginae, a bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria, and assaying secreted factors for HIV-enhancing activity. When epithelia and A. vaginae were cocultured, we observed increased HIV-enhancing activity mediated by secreted low molecular weight factors. From this complex mixture we identified several upregulated host proteins, which functioned in combination to enhance HIV infection. These studies suggest that the host immune response to bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria results in the release of HIV-enhancing factors. The combined activity of bacterial vaginosis-induced proteins likely mediates HIV enhancement.

  19. Bacterial contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI)

    PubMed Central

    Ruhe, Zachary C.; Low, David A.; Hayes, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria cooperate to form multicellular communities and compete against one another for environmental resources. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of bacterial competition mediated by contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) systems. Different CDI+ bacteria deploy a variety of toxins to inhibit neighboring cells and protect themselves from autoinhibition by producing specific immunity proteins. The genes encoding CDI toxin–immunity pairs appear to be exchanged between cdi loci and are often associated with other toxin-delivery systems in diverse bacteria. CDI also appears to facilitate cooperative behavior between kin, suggesting that these systems may have other roles beyond competition. PMID:23473845

  20. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  1. Bacterial microflora of nectarines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microflora of fruit surfaces has been the best source of antagonists against fungi causing postharvest decays of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grapes, apples, and citrus fruit. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine f...

  2. Bacterial leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot has been reported in Australia (Queensland), Egypt, El Salvador, India, Japan, Nicaragua, Sudan, and the United States (Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, and Wisconsin). It occasionally causes locally severe defoliation and post-emergence damping-off and stunting. The disease is...

  3. Bacterial inclusion body purification.

    PubMed

    Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Peternel, Spela; Cano-Garrido, Olivia; Villaverde, Antonio; García-Fruitós, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Purification of bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) is gaining importance due to the raising of novel applications for this type of submicron particulate protein clusters, with potential uses in the biomedical field among others. Here, we present two optimized methods to purify IBs adapting classical procedures to the material nature as well as the requirements of its final application.

  4. Proteases in bacterial pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ingmer, Hanne; Brøndsted, Lone

    2009-11-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for protein quality control under adverse conditions experienced in the host, as well as for the timely degradation of central virulence regulators. We have focused on the contribution of the conserved Lon, Clp, HtrA and FtsH proteases to pathogenesis and have highlighted common biological processes for which their activities are important for virulence.

  5. BACTERIAL WATERBORNE PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial pathogens are examples of classical etiological agents of waterborne disease. While these agents no longer serve as major threats to U.S. water supplies, they are still important pathogens in areas with substandard sanitation and poor water treatment facilities. In th...

  6. The Bacterial Growth Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulton, Richard J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure that allows students to view an entire bacterial growth curve during a two- to three-hour student laboratory period is described. Observations of the lag phase, logarithmic phase, maximum stationary phase, and phase of decline are possible. A nonpathogenic, marine bacterium is used in the investigation. (KR)

  7. Identification of a novel compound that inhibits iNOS and COX-2 expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages from Schisandra chinensis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, You Jin; Park, Sun Young; Kim, Sun Gun; Park, Da Jung; Kang, Jum Soon; Lee, Sang Joon; Yoon, Sik; Kim, Young Hun; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Choi, Young-Whan

    2010-01-22

    A novel {alpha}-iso-cubebenol, which has anti-inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages, was isolated from the fruits of Schisandra chinensis. {alpha}-iso-cubebenol inhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) production. Consistent with these findings, {alpha}-iso-cubebenol also reduced the LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 at the protein and mRNA levels in a concentration-dependent manner. {alpha}-iso-cubebenol also inhibited LPS-induced nuclear translocation of the NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit. Furthermore, {alpha}-iso-cubebenol suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, and p38 kinase induced by LPS. Since the novel {alpha}-iso-cubebenol blocked the production of several pro-inflammatory mediators induced by LPS in macrophages, the molecule can be useful material for the development of anti-inflammatory agents against bacterial infections or endotoxin.

  8. Phenotypic plasticity in bacterial plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Paul E

    2004-01-01

    Plasmid pB15 was previously shown to evolve increased horizontal (infectious) transfer at the expense of reduced vertical (intergenerational) transfer and vice versa, a key trade-off assumed in theories of parasite virulence. Whereas the models predict that susceptible host abundance should determine which mode of transfer is selectively favored, host density failed to mediate the trade-off in pB15. One possibility is that the plasmid's transfer deviates from the assumption that horizontal spread (conjugation) occurs in direct proportion to cell density. I tested this hypothesis using Escherichia coli/pB15 associations in laboratory serial culture. Contrary to most models of plasmid transfer kinetics, my data show that pB15 invades static (nonshaking) bacterial cultures only at intermediate densities. The results can be explained by phenotypic plasticity in traits governing plasmid transfer. As cells become more numerous, the plasmid's conjugative transfer unexpectedly declines, while the trade-off between transmission routes causes vertical transfer to increase. Thus, at intermediate densities the plasmid's horizontal transfer can offset selection against plasmid-bearing cells, but at high densities pB15 conjugates so poorly that it cannot invade. I discuss adaptive vs. nonadaptive causes for the phenotypic plasticity, as well as potential mechanisms that may lead to complex transfer dynamics of plasmids in liquid environments. PMID:15166133

  9. Arctigenin Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Pulmonary Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in a Mouse Model via Suppression of MAPK, HO-1, and iNOS Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-zhou; Jiang, Zheng-kui; He, Bao-xia; Liu, Xian-ben

    2015-08-01

    Arctigenin, a bioactive component of Arctium lappa (Nubang), has anti-inflammatory activity. Here, we investigated the effects of arctigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. Mice were divided into four groups: control, LPS, LPS + DMSO, and LPS + Arctigenin. Mice in the LPS + Arctigenin group were injected intraperitoneally with 50 mg/kg of arctigenin 1 h before an intratracheal administration of LPS (5 mg/kg). Lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) were collected. Histological changes of the lung were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Arctigenin decreased LPS-induced acute lung inflammation, infiltration of inflammatory cells into BALF, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, arctigenin pretreatment reduced the malondialdehyde level and increased superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and glutathione peroxidase/glutathione disulfide ratio in the lung. Mechanically, arctigenin significantly reduced the production of nitric oxygen and inducible nitric oxygen synthase (iNOS) expression, enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, and decreased the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Arctigenin has anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects on LPS-induced acute lung injury, which are associated with modulation of MAPK, HO-1, and iNOS signaling.

  10. Transition from two to one integument in Prunus species: expression pattern of INNER NO OUTER (INO), ABERRANT TESTA SHAPE (ATS) and ETTIN (ETT).

    PubMed

    Lora, Jorge; Hormaza, José I; Herrero, Maria

    2015-10-01

    While gymnosperm ovules have one integument, in most angiosperms two integuments surround the ovules. Unitegmic ovules have arisen independently several times during the evolution of angiosperms, but the ultimate genetic cause of the presence of a single integument remains elusive. We compared species of the genus Prunus that have different numbers of integuments: bitegmic species, such as Prunus armeniaca (apricot) and Prunus persica (peach), and unitegmic species, such as Prunus incisa, analyzing the expression pattern of genes that are involved in integument development in Arabidopsis thaliana: INNER NO OUTER (INO), ABERRANT TESTA SHAPE (ATS) and ETTIN (ETT). Bitegmic and unitegmic species showed similar INO expression patterns, indicative of the conservation of an outer integument. However, expression of ETT, which occurs in the boundary of the outer and inner integuments, was altered in unitegmic ovules, which showed lack of ETT expression. These results strongly suggest that the presence of a single integument could be attributable to the amalgamation of two integuments and support the role of ETT in the fusion of the outer and inner integuments in unitegmic ovules, a situation that could be widespread in other unitegmic species of angiosperms.

  11. Dental pulp in mature replanted human teeth: morphological alterations and metalloproteineses-2 and -9, Annexin-5, BCL-2 and iNOS modulation.

    PubMed

    Leone, A; Angelova Volponi, A; Uzzo, M L; Spatola, G F; Jurjus, A; Vandevska-Radunovic, V

    2015-01-01

    Tooth replantation, as a treatment concept, has been subject to controversies regarding the mechanism as well as the various parameters underlying this process. This work aimed to study time-related changes in the pulp of replanted mature human premolars through the changes in the levels of certain factors involved in the underlying mechanisms of pulpal tissue healing after replantation. Eleven experimental mature teeth were extracted, immediately replanted in the original socket and left without any other intervention for 1, 2, 3 and 12 weeks before re-extraction. Three premolars served as control. All specimens were subject to histological analysis and the levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, Annexin V, iNOS and BCL-2 (anti-apoptotic family) were analyzed employing immunohistochemistry. The results showed degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM), inflammatory cell infiltrate, loss in pulpo-dentine interface and loss of odontoblasts in the dental pulp tissue. This was accompanied by increase over time of MMP-9, Annexin V, iNOS and a decrease of BCL-2 and MMP-2, suggesting that apoptosis increased throughout the experimental period.

  12. Apoptosis in testicular tissue of rats after vasectomy: evaluation of eNOS, iNOS immunoreactivities and the effects of ozone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alpcan, Serhan; Başar, Halil; Aydos, Tolga Reşat; Kul, Oğuz; Kısa, Üçler; Başar, Murad Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate the changes in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and apoptotic index in rat testicular tissue, as well as serum and seminal plasma sex hormone levels after vasectomy, and the effect of ozone therapy (OT). Material and methods: Adult male Wistar rats were used (n=6 per group). Control (G1), sham for 4 weeks (G2) or 6 weeks (G3), orchiectomy at the 4th (G4) or 6th (G5) week after left vasectomy, orchiectomy at the 4th (G6) or 6th (G7) week after bilateral vasectomy, orchiectomy after 6 weeks OT following left (G8) or bilateral (G9) vasectomy, orchiectomy after 6 weeks OT (G10). Results: In the left testes, while there were increases in eNOS and iNOS immunoreactivity and apoptotic indexes in G4 and G5, no changes were observed in contralateral testis. These values increased in G6 and G7, while OT inhibited these parameters in the left testis of G8 and both testes of G9. Sex hormone levels did not show any changes after vasectomy and ozone therapy. Conclusion: While OT was found to be protective against some parameters mentioned above under stress conditions, it seemed to cause some harmful effects when used in healthy conditions. PMID:26328178

  13. Fermented guava leaf extract inhibits LPS-induced COX-2 and iNOS expression in Mouse macrophage cells by inhibition of transcription factor NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Youn; Hwang, Joon-Ho; Park, Soo-Young; Jin, Yeong-Jun; Ko, Hee-Chul; Moon, Sang-Wook; Kim, Se-Jae

    2008-08-01

    The goal of this study was to elucidate the antiinflammatory activities of Psidium guajava L. (guava) leaf. To improve the functionality of guava leaf, it was fermented with Phellinus linteus mycelia, Lactobacillus plantarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The ethanol extract from fermented guava leaf inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production. Western blot analysis showed that fermented guava leaf extract decreased LPS-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein level in RAW 264.7 cells. To investigate the mechanism involved, the study examined the effect of fermented guava leaf extract on LPS-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation. Fermented guava leaf extract significantly inhibited LPS-induced NF-kappaB transcriptional activity. Immunochemical analysis revealed that fermented guava leaf extract suppressed LPS-induced degradation of I-kappaBalpha. Taken together, the data indicate that fermented guava leaf extract is involved in the inhibition of iNOS and COX-2 via the down-regulation of NF-kappaB pathway, revealing a partial molecular basis for the antiinflammatory properties of fermented guava leaf extract.

  14. Revisiting the Val/Ile Mutation in Mammalian and Bacterial Nitric Oxide Synthases: A Spectroscopic and Kinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Weisslocker-Schaetzel, Marine; Lembrouk, Mehdi; Santolini, Jérôme; Dorlet, Pierre

    2017-02-07

    Nitric oxide is produced in mammals by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms at a catalytic site comprising a heme associated with a biopterin cofactor. Through genome sequencing, proteins that are highly homologous to the oxygenase domain of NOSs have been identified, in particular in bacteria. The active site is highly conserved except for a valine residue in the distal pocket that is replaced with an isoleucine in bacteria. This switch was previously reported to influence the kinetics of the reaction. We have used the V346I mutant of the mouse inducible NOS (iNOS) as well as the I224V mutant of the NOS from Bacillus subtilis (bsNOS) to study their spectroscopic signatures in solution and look for potential structural differences compared to their respective wild types. Both mutants seem destabilized in the absence of substrate and cofactor. When both substrate and cofactor are present, small differences can be detected with N(ω)-hydroxy-l-arginine compared to arginine, which is likely due to the differences in the hydrogen bonding network of the distal pocket. Stopped-flow experiments evidence significant changes in the kinetics of the reaction due to the mutation as was already known. We found these effects particularly marked for iNOS. On the basis of these results, we performed rapid freeze-quench experiments to trap the biopterin radical and found the same results that we had obtained for the wild types. Despite differences in kinetics, a radical could be trapped in both steps for the iNOS mutant but only for the first step in the mutant of bsNOS. This strengthens the hypothesis that mammalian and bacterial NOSs may have a different mechanism during the second catalytic step.

  15. Formation of bacterial nanocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Mikhail; Kudryashova, Ekaterina; Suzina, Natalia; Ariskina, Elena; Voronkov, Vadim

    1998-07-01

    Existence of nanobacteria received increasing attention both in environmental microbiology/geomicro-biology and in medical microbiology. In order to study a production of nanoforms by typical bacterial cells. Effects of different physical factors were investigated. Treatment of bacterial cultures with microwave radiation, or culturing in field of electric current resulted in formation a few types of nanocells. The number and type of nanoforms were determined with type and dose of the treatment. The produced nanoforms were: i) globules, ii) clusters of the globules--probably produced by liaison, iii) nanocells coated with membrane. The viability of the globules is an object opened for doubts. The nanocells discovered multiplication and growth on solidified nutrient media. The authors suggest that formation of nanocells is a common response of bacteria to stress-actions produced by different agents.

  16. Flagella and bacterial pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Duan, Qiangde; Zhou, Mingxu; Zhu, Liqian; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    As locomotive organelles, flagella allow bacteria to move toward favorable environments. A flagellum consists of three parts: the basal structure (rotary motor), the hook (universal joint), and the filament (helical propeller). For ages, flagella have been generally regarded as important virulence factors, mainly because of their motility property. However, flagella are getting recognized to play multiple roles with more functions besides motility and chemotaxis. Recent evidence has pinpointed that the bacterial flagella participate in many additional processes including adhesion, biofilm formation, virulence factor secretion, and modulation of the immune system of eukaryotic cells. This mini-review summarizes data from recent studies that elucidated how flagella, as a virulence factor, contribute to bacterial pathogenicity.

  17. Bacterial ratchet motors

    PubMed Central

    Di Leonardo, R.; Angelani, L.; Dell’Arciprete, D.; Ruocco, G.; Iebba, V.; Schippa, S.; Conte, M. P.; Mecarini, F.; De Angelis, F.; Di Fabrizio, E.

    2010-01-01

    Self-propelling bacteria are a nanotechnology dream. These unicellular organisms are not just capable of living and reproducing, but they can swim very efficiently, sense the environment, and look for food, all packaged in a body measuring a few microns. Before such perfect machines can be artificially assembled, researchers are beginning to explore new ways to harness bacteria as propelling units for microdevices. Proposed strategies require the careful task of aligning and binding bacterial cells on synthetic surfaces in order to have them work cooperatively. Here we show that asymmetric environments can produce a spontaneous and unidirectional rotation of nanofabricated objects immersed in an active bacterial bath. The propulsion mechanism is provided by the self-assembly of motile Escherichia coli cells along the rotor boundaries. Our results highlight the technological implications of active matter’s ability to overcome the restrictions imposed by the second law of thermodynamics on equilibrium passive fluids. PMID:20457936

  18. Isobutyrylshikonin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 production in BV2 microglial cells by suppressing the PI3K/Akt-mediated nuclear transcription factor-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Jayasooriya, Rajapaksha Gedara Prasad Tharanga; Lee, Kyoung-Tae; Kang, Chang-Hee; Dilshara, Matharage Gayani; Lee, Hak-Ju; Choi, Yung Hyun; Choi, Il-Whan; Kim, Gi-Young

    2014-12-01

    Microglia are important macrophages to defend against pathogens in the central nervous system (CNS); however, persistent or acute inflammation of microglia lead to CNS disorders via neuronal cell death. Therefore, we theorized that a good strategy for the treatment of CNS disorders would be to target inflammatory mediators from microglia in disease. Consequently, we investigated whether isobutyrylshikonin (IBS) attenuates the production of proinflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. Treatment with IBS inhibited the secretion of NO and prostaglandin E2 (as well as the expression of their key regulatory genes), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Isobutyrylshikonin also suppressed LPS-induced DNA-binding activity of nuclear transcription factor-κB (NF-κB), by inhibiting the nuclear translocation of p50 and p65 in addition to blocking the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. Pretreatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a specific NF-κB inhibitor, showed the down-regulation of LPS-induced iNOS and COX-2 messenger RNA by suppressing NF-κB activity. This indirectly suggests that IBS-mediated NF-κB inhibition is the main signaling pathway involved in the inhibition of iNOS and COX-2 expression. In addition, IBS attenuated LPS-induced phosphorylation of PI3K and Akt, which are upstream molecules of NF-κB, in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. The functional aspects of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway were analyzed with LY294002, which is a specific PI3K/Akt inhibitor that attenuated LPS-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression by suppressing NF-κB activity. These data suggest that an IBS-mediated anti-inflammatory effect may be involved in suppressing the PI3K/Akt-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway.

  19. Bacterial transformation of terpenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishko, V. V.; Nogovitsina, Y. M.; Ivshina, I. B.

    2014-04-01

    Data on the bacterial transformation of terpenoids published in the literature in the past decade are analyzed. Possible pathways for chemo-, regio- and stereoselective modifications of terpenoids are discussed. Considerable attention is given to new technological approaches to the synthesis of terpenoid derivatives suitable for the use in the perfume and food industry and promising as drugs and chiral intermediates for fine organic synthesis. The bibliography includes 246 references.

  20. The effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on liver and renal tissue inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and tissue lipid peroxidation in obstructive jaundice stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

    PubMed

    Cağlikülekci, Mehmet; Pata, Cengiz; Apa, Duygu Dusmez; Dirlik, Musa; Tamer, Lulufer; Yaylak, Faik; Kanik, Arzu; Aydin, Suha

    2004-03-01

    Morbidity and mortality rates are very high in obstructive jaundice when it is associated with sepsis and multiple organ failure. Nitric oxide (NO) formation and increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) also take place in obstructive jaundice (OJ). N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) has a beneficial effect by demonstrating anti-inflammatory activity such as inhibits cytokine expression/release, inhibiting the adhesion molecule expression and inhibiting nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of NAC on liver and renal tissue iNOS, and liver tissue lipid peroxidation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced obstructive jaundice. We randomized 48 rats into six groups. Group A: Sham group; group B: OJ group; group C: OJ+NAC; group D: OJ+LPS (Escherichia coli LPS serotype L-2630, 100mg, Sigma) group E: OJ+NAC+LPS; group F: OJ+LPS+NAC. NAC was started subcutaneously 100mg/kg. LPS was injected intraperitoneally and then at the tenth day we sacrificed the rats. Liver malondialdehyde (MDA) increased and liver ATPase decreased in groups B-D when compared to group A. After the administration of NAC (groups C-E), liver MDA levels decreased, tissue ATPase levels increased as compared to other groups. The liver and renal tissue iNOS expression was increased in groups B, D, and F. After the administration of NAC (groups C-E) the liver and renal tissue iNOS expression were decreased. Our results indicated that NAC prevented the deleterious effects of LPS in OJ by reducing iNOS expression via lipid peroxidation in liver and renal tissue; if it was administrated before LPS. But NAC failed to prevent the iNOS expression and lipid peroxidation if there was established endotoxemia in OJ.

  1. Lipid-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ewers, Helge; Helenius, Ari

    2011-01-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis is used by a number of viruses and toxins to gain entry into cells. Some have evolved to use specific lipids in the plasma membrane as their receptors. They include bacterial toxins such as Shiga and Cholera toxin and viruses such as mouse polyoma virus and simian virus 40. Through multivalent binding to glycosphingolipids, they induce lipid clustering and changes in membrane properties. Internalization occurs by unusual endocytic mechanisms involving lipid rafts, induction of membrane curvature, trans-bilayer coupling, and activation of signaling pathways. Once delivered to early endosomes, they follow diverse intracellular routes to the lumen of the ER, from which they penetrate into the cytosol. The role of the lipid receptors is central in these well-studied processes. PMID:21576253

  2. Bacterial nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Crane, Brian R; Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Patel, Bhumit A

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) are multidomain metalloproteins first identified in mammals as being responsible for the synthesis of the wide-spread signaling and protective agent nitric oxide (NO). Over the past 10 years, prokaryotic proteins that are homologous to animal NOSs have been identified and characterized, both in terms of enzymology and biological function. Despite some interesting differences in cofactor utilization and redox partners, the bacterial enzymes are in many ways similar to their mammalian NOS (mNOS) counterparts and, as such, have provided insight into the structural and catalytic properties of the NOS family. In particular, spectroscopic studies of thermostable bacterial NOSs have revealed key oxyheme intermediates involved in the oxidation of substrate L-arginine (Arg) to product NO. The biological functions of some bacterial NOSs have only more recently come to light. These studies disclose new roles for NO in biology, such as taking part in toxin biosynthesis, protection against oxidative stress, and regulation of recovery from radiation damage.

  3. Bacterial infections in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2004-06-01

    Hospitalized patients with cirrhosis are at increased risk of developing bacterial infections, the most common being spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) and urinary tract infections. Independent predictors of the development of bacterial infections in hospitalized cirrhotic patients are poor liver synthetic function and admission for gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Short term (seven-day) prophylaxis with norfloxacin reduces the rate of infections and improves survival and should therefore be administered to all patients with cirrhosis and variceal hemorrhage. Cirrhotic patients who develop abdominal pain, tenderness, fever, renal failure or hepatic encephalopathy should undergo diagnostic paracentesis, and those who meet the criterion for SBP (eg, an ascites neutrophil count greater than 250/mm3) should receive antibiotics, preferably a third-generation cephalosporin. In addition to antibiotic therapy, albumin infusions have been shown to reduce the risk of renal failure and mortality in patients with SBP, particularly in those with renal dysfunction and hyperbilirubinemia at the time of diagnosis. Patients who recover from an episode of SBP should be given long term prophylaxis with norfloxacin and should be assessed for liver transplantation.

  4. Neglected bacterial zoonoses.

    PubMed

    Chikeka, I; Dumler, J S

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial zoonoses comprise a group of diseases in humans or animals acquired by direct contact with or by oral consumption of contaminated animal materials, or via arthropod vectors. Among neglected infections, bacterial zoonoses are among the most neglected given emerging data on incidence and prevalence as causes of acute febrile illness, even in areas where recognized neglected tropical diseases occur frequently. Although many other bacterial infections could also be considered in this neglected category, five distinct infections stand out because they are globally distributed, are acute febrile diseases, have high rates of morbidity and case fatality, and are reported as commonly as malaria, typhoid or dengue virus infections in carefully designed studies in which broad-spectrum diagnoses are actively sought. This review will focus attention on leptospirosis, relapsing fever borreliosis and rickettsioses, including scrub typhus, murine typhus and spotted fever group rickettsiosis. Of greatest interest is the lack of distinguishing clinical features among these infections when in humans, which confounds diagnosis where laboratory confirmation is lacking, and in regions where clinical diagnosis is often attributed to one of several perceived more common threats. As diseases such as malaria come under improved control, the real impact of these common and under-recognized infections will become evident, as will the requirement for the strategies and allocation of resources for their control.

  5. Neglected Bacterial Zoonoses

    PubMed Central

    Chikeka, Ijeuru; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial zoonoses comprise a group of diseases in humans or animals acquired by direct contact with or by oral consumption of contaminated animal materials, or via arthropod vectors. Among neglected infections, bacterial zoonoses are among the most neglected given emerging data on incidence and prevalence as causes of acute febrile illness, even in areas where recognized neglected tropical diseases occur frequently. While many other bacterial infections could also be considered in this neglected category, five distinct infections stand out because they are globally distributed, are acute febrile diseases, have high rates of morbidity and case fatality, and are reported as commonly as malaria, typhoid or dengue virus infections in carefully designed studies in which a broad spectrum diagnoses are actively sought. Thus, this review will focus attention on leptospirosis, relapsing fever borreliosis, and rickettsioses, including scrub typhus, murine typhus and spotted fever group rickettsiosis. Of greatest interest is the lack of distinguishing clinical features among these infections when in humans, which confounds diagnosis where laboratory confirmation is lacking, and in regions where clinical diagnosis is often attributed to one of several perceived more common threats. As diseases such as malaria come under improved control, the real impact of these common and under-recognized infections will become evident, as will the requirement for the strategies and allocation of resources for their control. PMID:25964152

  6. Insights into bacterial protein glycosylation in human microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fan; Wu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    The study of human microbiota is an emerging research topic. The past efforts have mainly centered on studying the composition and genomic landscape of bacterial species within the targeted communities. The interaction between bacteria and hosts is the pivotal event in the initiation and progression of infectious diseases. There is a great need to identify and characterize the molecules that mediate the bacteria-host interaction. Bacterial surface exposed proteins play an important role in the bacteria-host interaction. Numerous surface proteins are glycosylated, and the glycosylation is crucial for their function in mediating the bacterial interaction with hosts. Here we present an overview of surface glycoproteins from bacteria that inhabit three major mucosal environments across human body: oral, gut and skin. We describe the important enzymes involved in the process of protein glycosylation, and discuss how the process impacts the bacteria-host interaction. Emerging molecular details underlying glycosylation of bacterial surface proteins may lead to new opportunities for designing anti-infective small molecules, and developing novel vaccines in order to treat or prevent bacterial infection. PMID:26712033

  7. Insights into bacterial protein glycosylation in human microbiota.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The study of human microbiota is an emerging research topic. The past efforts have mainly centered on studying the composition and genomic landscape of bacterial species within the targeted communities. The interaction between bacteria and hosts is the pivotal event in the initiation and progression of infectious diseases. There is a great need to identify and characterize the molecules that mediate the bacteria-host interaction. Bacterial surface exposed proteins play an important role in the bacteria- host interaction. Numerous surface proteins are glycosylated, and the glycosylation is crucial for their function in mediating the bacterial interaction with hosts. Here we present an overview of surface glycoproteins from bacteria that inhabit three major mucosal environments across human body: oral, gut and skin. We describe the important enzymes involved in the process of protein glycosylation, and discuss how the process impacts the bacteria-host interaction. Emerging molecular details underlying glycosylation of bacterial surface proteins may lead to new opportunities for designing anti-infective small molecules, and developing novel vaccines in order to treat or prevent bacterial infection.

  8. Carbohydrate Receptors of Bacterial Adhesins: Implications and Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlsen, K.; Oelschlaeger, T. A.; Hacker, J.; Khan, A. S.

    Bacteria entering a host depend on adhesins to achieve colonization. Adhesins are bacterial surface structures mediating binding to host surficial areas. Most adhesins are composed of one or several proteins. Usually a single bacterial strain is able to express various adhesins. The adhesion type expressed may influence host-, tissue or even cell tropism of Gram-negative and of Gram-positive bacteria. The binding of fimbrial as well as of afimbrial adhesins of Gram-negative bacteria to host carbohydrate structures (=receptors) has been elucidated in great detail. In contrast, in Gram-positives, most well studied adhesins bind to proteinaceous partners. Nevertheless, for both bacterial groups the binding of bacterial adhesins to eukaryotic carbohydrate receptors is essential for establishing colonization or infection. The characterization of this interaction down to the submolecular level provides the basis for strategies to interfere with this early step of infection which should lead to the prevention of subsequent disease. However, this goal will not be achieved easily because bacterial adherence is not a monocausal event but rather mediated by a variety of adhesins.

  9. Model of Bacterial Band Formation in Aerotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Mazzag, B. C.; Zhulin, I. B.; Mogilner, A.

    2003-01-01

    Aerotaxis is a particular form of “energy taxis”. It is based on a largely elusive signal transduction machinery. In aerotaxis, oxygen dissolved in water plays the role of both attractant (at moderate concentrations) and repellent (at high and low concentrations). Cells swimming from favorable oxygen concentrations into regions with unfavorable concentrations increase the frequency of reversals, turn back into the favorable domain, and become effectively trapped there. At the same time, bacteria consume oxygen, creating an oxygen gradient. This behavior leads to a pattern formation phenomenon: bacteria self-organize into a dense band at a certain distance from the air-water interface. We incorporate experimental observations of the aerotactic bacterium, Azospirillum brasilense, into a mathematical model. The model consists of a system of differential equations describing swimming bacterial cells and diffusing oxygen. The cells' frequency of reversals depends on the concentration of oxygen and its time derivative while oxygen is depleted by the bacteria. We suggest a hypothetical model of energy sensing mediated by aerotactic receptors Aer and Tsr. Computer simulations and analysis of the model equations allow comparisons of theoretical and experimental results and provide insight into the mechanisms of bacterial pattern formation and underlying signal transduction machinery. We make testable predictions about position and density of the bacterial band. PMID:14645050

  10. 3D printing of microscopic bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Jodi L.; Ritschdorff, Eric T.; Whiteley, Marvin; Shear, Jason B.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria communicate via short-range physical and chemical signals, interactions known to mediate quorum sensing, sporulation, and other adaptive phenotypes. Although most in vitro studies examine bacterial properties averaged over large populations, the levels of key molecular determinants of bacterial fitness and pathogenicity (e.g., oxygen, quorum-sensing signals) may vary over micrometer scales within small, dense cellular aggregates believed to play key roles in disease transmission. A detailed understanding of how cell–cell interactions contribute to pathogenicity in natural, complex environments will require a new level of control in constructing more relevant cellular models for assessing bacterial phenotypes. Here, we describe a microscopic three-dimensional (3D) printing strategy that enables multiple populations of bacteria to be organized within essentially any 3D geometry, including adjacent, nested, and free-floating colonies. In this laser-based lithographic technique, microscopic containers are formed around selected bacteria suspended in gelatin via focal cross-linking of polypeptide molecules. After excess reagent is removed, trapped bacteria are localized within sealed cavities formed by the cross-linked gelatin, a highly porous material that supports rapid growth of fully enclosed cellular populations and readily transmits numerous biologically active species, including polypeptides, antibiotics, and quorum-sensing signals. Using this approach, we show that a picoliter-volume aggregate of Staphylococcus aureus can display substantial resistance to β-lactam antibiotics by enclosure within a shell composed of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:24101503

  11. Bacterial, Fungal, Parasitic, and Viral Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.

    2008-01-01

    Infectious myositis may be caused by a broad range of bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and viral agents. Infectious myositis is overall uncommon given the relative resistance of the musculature to infection. For example, inciting events, including trauma, surgery, or the presence of foreign bodies or devitalized tissue, are often present in cases of bacterial myositis. Bacterial causes are categorized by clinical presentation, anatomic location, and causative organisms into the categories of pyomyositis, psoas abscess, Staphylococcus aureus myositis, group A streptococcal necrotizing myositis, group B streptococcal myositis, clostridial gas gangrene, and nonclostridial myositis. Fungal myositis is rare and usually occurs among immunocompromised hosts. Parasitic myositis is most commonly a result of trichinosis or cystericercosis, but other protozoa or helminths may be involved. A parasitic cause of myositis is suggested by the travel history and presence of eosinophilia. Viruses may cause diffuse muscle involvement with clinical manifestations, such as benign acute myositis (most commonly due to influenza virus), pleurodynia (coxsackievirus B), acute rhabdomyolysis, or an immune-mediated polymyositis. The diagnosis of myositis is suggested by the clinical picture and radiologic imaging, and the etiologic agent is confirmed by microbiologic or serologic testing. Therapy is based on the clinical presentation and the underlying pathogen. PMID:18625683

  12. Interfaces between bacterial and eukaryotic "neuroecology".

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Peter D; Rice, Scott A; Campbell, Alexandra H; McDougald, Diane; Harder, Tilmann

    2011-11-01

    The sensory capacity of bacteria and macroalgae (seaweeds) is limited with respect to many modalities (visual, auditory) common in "higher" organisms such as animals. Thus, we expect that other modalities, such as chemical signaling and sensing, would play particularly important roles in their sensory ecology. Here, we discuss two examples of chemical signaling in bacteria and seaweeds: (1) the role of chemical defenses and quorum-sensing (QS) regulatory systems in bacterial colonization and infection of the red alga Delisea pulchra and their ecological consequences, and (2) the regulation of dispersal and differentiation by nitric oxide (NO) in bacterial biofilms. Consistent with the goals of neuroecology, in both cases, we investigate the links between specific signal-mediated molecular mechanisms, and ecological outcomes, for populations or assemblages of bacteria or seaweeds. We conclude by suggesting that because of the fundamental role played by chemical signaling in bacteria, bacterial systems, either by themselves or in interactions with other organisms, have much to offer for understanding general issues in neuroecology. Thus, further integration of microbiology with the biology of eukaryotes would seem warranted and is likely to prove illuminating.

  13. Bacterial Evasion of Host Antimicrobial Peptide Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Jason N.; Nizet, Victor

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), also known as host defense peptides, are small naturally occurring microbicidal molecules produced by the host innate immune response that function as a first line of defense to kill pathogenic microorganisms by inducing deleterious cell membrane damage. AMPs also possess signaling and chemoattractant activities and can modulate the innate immune response to enhance protective immunity or suppress inflammation. Human pathogens have evolved defense molecules and strategies to counter and survive the AMPs released by host immune cells such as neutrophils and macrophages. Here, we review the various mechanisms used by human bacterial pathogens to resist AMP-mediated killing, including surface charge modification, active efflux, alteration of membrane fluidity, inactivation by proteolytic digestion, and entrapment by surface proteins and polysaccharides. Enhanced understanding of AMP resistance at the molecular level may offer insight into the mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis and augment the discovery of novel therapeutic targets and drug design for the treatment of recalcitrant multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. PMID:26999396

  14. Role of iNOS gene expression in the anti-inflammatory and tissue protective mechanisms of continuous wave at 630-905nm and 905nm superpulsed laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Arkady; Moriyama, Yumi; Fong, Jamie; Dumoulin-White, Roger; Lilge, Lothar

    2012-03-01

    Up regulation of iNOS gene expression is playing a role in the initiation of the anti-inflammatory and tissue protective mechanisms related to nitric oxide (NO) for continuous wave red and infrared as well as 905nm superpulsed laser therapy (SPLT). The iNOS expression before and after laser therapy was evaluated in a zymosan-induced acute arthritis model, in knee joints of young (<15 weeks), middle aged (>15 weeks and < 35 weeks) and old (> 35 weeks) FVB/N-Tg (iNOS-luc) mice by bioluminescence imaging.

  15. Using community analysis to explore bacterial indicators for disease suppression of tobacco bacterial wilt

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojiao; Zhang, Shuting; Jiang, Qipeng; Bai, Yani; Shen, Guihua; Li, Shili; Ding, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Although bacterial communities play important roles in the suppression of pathogenic diseases and crop production, little is known about the bacterial communities associated with bacterial wilt. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, statistical analyses of microbial communities in disease-suppressive and disease-conducive soils from three districts during the vegetation period of tobacco showed that Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum, followed by Acidobacteria. Only samples from September were significantly correlated to disease factors. Fifteen indicators from taxa found in September (1 class, 2 orders, 3 families and 9 genera) were identified in the screen as being associated with disease suppression, and 10 of those were verified for potential disease suppression in March. Kaistobacter appeared to be the genus with the most potential for disease suppression. Elucidating microbially mediated natural disease suppression is fundamental to understanding microecosystem responses to sustainable farming and provides a possible approach for modeling disease-suppressive indicators. Here, using cluster analysis, MRPP testing, LEfSe and specific filters for a Venn diagram, we provide insight into identifying possible indicators of disease suppression of tobacco bacterial wilt. PMID:27857159

  16. Probing prokaryotic social behaviors with bacterial "lobster traps".

    PubMed

    Connell, Jodi L; Wessel, Aimee K; Parsek, Matthew R; Ellington, Andrew D; Whiteley, Marvin; Shear, Jason B

    2010-10-12

    Bacteria are social organisms that display distinct behaviors/phenotypes when present in groups. These behaviors include the abilities to construct antibiotic-resistant sessile biofilm communities and to communicate with small signaling molecules (quorum sensing [QS]). Our understanding of biofilms and QS arises primarily from in vitro studies of bacterial communities containing large numbers of cells, often greater than 10(8) bacteria; however, in nature, bacteria often reside in dense clusters (aggregates) consisting of significantly fewer cells. Indeed, bacterial clusters containing 10(1) to 10(5) cells are important for transmission of many bacterial pathogens. Here, we describe a versatile strategy for conducting mechanistic studies to interrogate the molecular processes controlling antibiotic resistance and QS-mediated virulence factor production in high-density bacterial clusters. This strategy involves enclosing a single bacterium within three-dimensional picoliter-scale microcavities (referred to as bacterial "lobster traps") defined by walls that are permeable to nutrients, waste products, and other bioactive small molecules. Within these traps, bacteria divide normally into extremely dense (10(12) cells/ml) clonal populations with final population sizes similar to that observed in naturally occurring bacterial clusters. Using these traps, we provide strong evidence that within low-cell-number/high-density bacterial clusters, QS is modulated not only by bacterial density but also by population size and flow rate of the surrounding medium. We also demonstrate that antibiotic resistance develops as cell density increases, with as few as ~150 confined bacteria exhibiting an antibiotic-resistant phenotype similar to biofilm bacteria. Together, these findings provide key insights into clinically relevant phenotypes in low-cell-number/high-density bacterial populations.

  17. Bacterial endophyte-mediated naphthalene phytoprotection and phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Germaine, Kieran J; Keogh, Elaine; Ryan, David; Dowling, David N

    2009-06-01

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are major and recalcitrant pollutants of the environment and their removal presents a significant problem. Phytoremediation has shown much promise in PAH removal from contaminated soil, but may be inhibited because the plant experiences phytotoxic effects from low-molecular-weight PAHs such as naphthalene. This paper describes the construction of a naphthalene-degrading endophytic strain designated Pseudomonas putida VM1441(pNAH7). This strain was found to be an efficient colonizer of plants, colonizing both the rhizosphere and interior root tissues. The inoculation of plants with P. putida VM1441(pNAH7) resulted in the protection of the host plant from the phytotoxic effects of naphthalene. When inoculated plants were exposed to naphthalene, both seed germination and plant transpiration rates were higher than those of the uninoculated controls. The inoculation of plants with this strain also facilitated higher (40%) naphthalene degradation rates compared with uninoculated plants in artificially contaminated soil.

  18. Perivascular macrophages mediate neutrophil recruitment during bacterial skin infection

    PubMed Central

    Abtin, Arby; Jain, Rohit; Mitchell, Andrew J.; Roediger, Ben; Brzoska, Anthony J.; Tikoo, Shweta; Cheng, Qiang; Ng, Lai Guan; Cavanagh, Lois L.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Hickey, Michael J.; Firth, Neville; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils in post-capillary venules is a key event in the inflammatory response against pathogens and tissue damage. The precise regulation of this process is incompletely understood. We report that perivascular macrophages are critical for neutrophil migration into skin infected with the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Using multiphoton intravital microscopy we show that neutrophils extravasate from inflamed dermal venules in close proximity to perivascular macrophages, which are a major source of neutrophil chemoattractants. The virulence factor alpha-hemolysin lyses perivascular macrophages leading to decreased neutrophil transmigration. Our data illustrate a previously unrecognized role for perivascular macrophages in neutrophil recruitment to inflamed skin, and indicate that Staphylococcus aureus uses hemolysin-dependent killing of these cells as an immune evasion strategy. PMID:24270515

  19. BACTERIALLY-MEDIATED DEGRADATION OF A CHIRAL DISINFECTION BYPRODUCT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection of drinking and waste waters, through chlorination, can result in the production of chlorinated organic compounds, many of which are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Among these regulated compounds are the haloacetic acids, which exhibit toxic e...

  20. Dentigerumycin: a bacterial mediator of an ant-fungus symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dong-Chan; Poulsen, Michael; Currie, Cameron R; Clardy, Jon

    2009-06-01

    Fungus-growing ants engage in mutualistic associations with both the fungus they cultivate for food and actinobacteria (Pseudonocardia spp.) that produce selective antibiotics to defend that fungus from specialized fungal parasites. We have analyzed one such system at the molecular level and found that the bacterium associated with the ant Apterostigma dentigerum produces dentigerumycin, a cyclic depsipeptide with highly modified amino acids, to selectively inhibit the associated parasitic fungus (Escovopsis sp.).

  1. Mediator deathwork.

    PubMed

    Walter, Tony

    2005-06-01

    The most discussed and analyzed form of deathwork is the dyadic therapist--client relationship, but this far from exhausts the various types of professional work involving the dead. Mediator deathwork is where the professional gleans or constructs information about the dead, edits and polishes it, and publicly presents the edited version in a public rite; this entails a triadic flow of information: the dead--the mediator--public rite. Examples include pathologists, coroners, American funeral directors, funeral celebrants, obituary writers, spiritualist mediums, and museum curators. Other types include barrier deathwork (in which the professional insulates the living from the dead--the dead | the living--as in British funeral directing), and intercessory deathwork in which priests send prayers the other way, from the living to, or on behalf of, the dead: mourner--priest--the dead. The article focuses on mediator deathwork because, though it is the most widespread form of deathwork, it is the least discussed and analyzed.

  2. Zinc protoporphyrin inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-, lipoteichoic acid-, and peptidoglycan-induced nitric oxide production through stimulating iNOS protein ubiquitination

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, J.-M.; Lin, H.-Y.; Shen, S.-C.; Wu, M.-S.; Lin, C.-W.; Chiu, W.-T.; Lin, C.-H. Chen, Y.-C.

    2009-06-15

    In the present study, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), but not ferric protoporphyrin (FePP), tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), or zinc chloride (ZnCl{sub 2}), at the doses of 0.5, 1, and 2 {mu}M, dose-dependently inhibited lipopolysaccharide- (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and peptidoglycan (PGN)-induced inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) production with an increase in heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) protein in RAW264.7 macrophages in a serum-free condition. NO inhibition and HO-1 induction by ZnPP were blocked by the separate addition of fetal bovine serum (FBS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). A decrease in the iNOS/NO ratio and an increase in HO-1 protein by ZnPP were identified in three different conditions including ZnPP pretreatment, ZnPP co-treatment, and ZnPP post-treatment with LPS and LTA. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) and extracellular regulated kinases (ERKs) were detected in LPS-, LTA-, and PGN-treated RAW264.7 cells, and iNOS/NO production was blocked by adding the JNK inhibitor, SP600125, but not the ERK inhibitor, PD98059. However, ZnPP addition potentiated ERK and JNK protein phosphorylation stimulated by LPS, LTA, and PGN. Increases in total protein ubiquitination and ubiquitinated iNOS proteins were detected in ZnPP-treated macrophages elicited by LPS according to Western and immunoprecipitation/Western blotting assays, respectively. The decrease in LPS-induced iNOS protein by ZnPP was reversed by adding the proteasome inhibitors MG132 and lactacystin. The reduction in HO-1 protein induced by ZnPP via transfection of HO-1 small interfering RNA did not affect the inhibitory effect of ZnPP against LPS-induced iNOS/NO production and protein ubiquitination induced by ZnPP in macrophages. Data of the present study provide the first evidence to support ZnPP effectively inhibiting inflammatory iNOS/NO production through activation of protein ubiquitination in a HO-1-independent manner in macrophages.

  3. Zinc protoporphyrin inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-, lipoteichoic acid-, and peptidoglycan-induced nitric oxide production through stimulating iNOS protein ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Chow, Jyh-Ming; Lin, Hui-Yi; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Wu, Ming-Shun; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Lin, Chien-Huang; Chen, Yen-Chou

    2009-06-15

    In the present study, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), but not ferric protoporphyrin (FePP), tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), or zinc chloride (ZnCl(2)), at the doses of 0.5, 1, and 2 microM, dose-dependently inhibited lipopolysaccharide- (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and peptidoglycan (PGN)-induced inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) production with an increase in heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) protein in RAW264.7 macrophages in a serum-free condition. NO inhibition and HO-1 induction by ZnPP were blocked by the separate addition of fetal bovine serum (FBS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). A decrease in the iNOS/NO ratio and an increase in HO-1 protein by ZnPP were identified in three different conditions including ZnPP pretreatment, ZnPP co-treatment, and ZnPP post-treatment with LPS and LTA. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) and extracellular regulated kinases (ERKs) were detected in LPS-, LTA-, and PGN-treated RAW264.7 cells, and iNOS/NO production was blocked by adding the JNK inhibitor, SP600125, but not the ERK inhibitor, PD98059. However, ZnPP addition potentiated ERK and JNK protein phosphorylation stimulated by LPS, LTA, and PGN. Increases in total protein ubiquitination and ubiquitinated iNOS proteins were detected in ZnPP-treated macrophages elicited by LPS according to Western and immunoprecipitation/Western blotting assays, respectively. The decrease in LPS-induced iNOS protein by ZnPP was reversed by adding the proteasome inhibitors MG132 and lactacystin. The reduction in HO-1 protein induced by ZnPP via transfection of HO-1 small interfering RNA did not affect the inhibitory effect of ZnPP against LPS-induced iNOS/NO production and protein ubiquitination induced by ZnPP in macrophages. Data of the present study provide the first evidence to support ZnPP effectively inhibiting inflammatory iNOS/NO production through activation of protein ubiquitination in a HO-1-independent manner in macrophages.

  4. Chemotherapy of Bacterial Plasmids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-29

    multiresistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, mediated drug resistance are the emergence of strains determined by R-plasmids, causes treatment failures of Haemophilus ... influenzae , resistant to ampicillin [8] of hospital infections, foremost in patients with a or chloramphenicol [9] and of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

  5. Metamorphosis of a butterfly-associated bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Tobin J; McMillan, W Owen; Fierer, Noah

    2014-01-01

    Butterflies are charismatic insects that have long been a focus of biological research. They are also habitats for microorganisms, yet these microbial symbionts are little-studied, despite their likely importance to butterfly ecology and evolution. In particular, the diversity and composition of the microbial communities inhabiting adult butterflies remain uncharacterized, and it is unknown how the larval (caterpillar) and adult microbiota compare. To address these knowledge gaps, we used Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from internal bacterial communities associated with multiple life stages of the neotropical butterfly Heliconius erato. We found that the leaf-chewing larvae and nectar- and pollen-feeding adults of H. erato contain markedly distinct bacterial communities, a pattern presumably rooted in their distinct diets. Larvae and adult butterflies host relatively small and similar numbers of bacterial phylotypes, but few are common to both stages. The larval microbiota clearly simplifies and reorganizes during metamorphosis; thus, structural changes in a butterfly's bacterial community parallel those in its own morphology. We furthermore identify specific bacterial taxa that may mediate larval and adult feeding biology in Heliconius and other butterflies. Although male and female Heliconius adults differ in reproductive physiology and degree of pollen feeding, bacterial communities associated with H. erato are not sexually dimorphic. Lastly, we show that captive and wild individuals host different microbiota, a finding that may have important implications for the relevance of experimental studies using captive butterflies.

  6. Metamorphosis of a Butterfly-Associated Bacterial Community

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Tobin J.; McMillan, W. Owen; Fierer, Noah

    2014-01-01

    Butterflies are charismatic insects that have long been a focus of biological research. They are also habitats for microorganisms, yet these microbial symbionts are little-studied, despite their likely importance to butterfly ecology and evolution. In particular, the diversity and composition of the microbial communities inhabiting adult butterflies remain uncharacterized, and it is unknown how the larval (caterpillar) and adult microbiota compare. To address these knowledge gaps, we used Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from internal bacterial communities associated with multiple life stages of the neotropical butterfly Heliconius erato. We found that the leaf-chewing larvae and nectar- and pollen-feeding adults of H. erato contain markedly distinct bacterial communities, a pattern presumably rooted in their distinct diets. Larvae and adult butterflies host relatively small and similar numbers of bacterial phylotypes, but few are common to both stages. The larval microbiota clearly simplifies and reorganizes during metamorphosis; thus, structural changes in a butterfly's bacterial community parallel those in its own morphology. We furthermore identify specific bacterial taxa that may mediate larval and adult feeding biology in Heliconius and other butterflies. Although male and female Heliconius adults differ in reproductive physiology and degree of pollen feeding, bacterial communities associated with H. erato are not sexually dimorphic. Lastly, we show that captive and wild individuals host different microbiota, a finding that may have important implications for the relevance of experimental studies using captive butterflies. PMID:24466308

  7. Bundling of bacterial flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Thomas R.; van Parys, Annemarie J.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2002-03-01

    In bacterial chemotaxis, cells such as E. coli drift up chemical gradients by means of a directed random walk. Near the beginning of each step of a walk, the rotating helical flagella which propel the cell form a bundle. Using macroscopic experiments and numerical calculations, we study the viscous flows set up by two rotating helices. Our work illustrates the importance of geometry; for example, left-handed helices rotating counter-clockwise when viewed from the distal ends will inter-penetrate and synchronize when the pitch is shorter than the circumference. When the same helices turn clockwise, they fail to inter-penetrate.

  8. Nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis of neutrophils through caspase-8 and caspase-3-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Megha; Nagarkoti, Sheela; Awasthi, Deepika; Singh, Abhishek K; Chandra, Tulika; Kumaravelu, J; Barthwal, Manoj K; Dikshit, Madhu

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils play an indispensable role in killing of invading pathogens by enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NO generation, and subsequently undergoing apoptosis. Unlike ROS/NOX2, role of NO/NOS still remains undefined in the apoptosis of neutrophils (PMNs) and the present study attempts to decipher the importance of NO/NOS in the neutrophil apoptosis. Prolonged treatment of human PMNs or mice bone marrow derived neutrophils (BMDN) with NO led to enhanced ROS generation, caspase-8/caspase-3 cleavage, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and finally cellular apoptosis. NO-induced ROS generation led to caspase-8 deglutathionylation and activation, which subsequently activated mitochondrial death pathway via BID (Bcl-2 family protein) cleavage. NO-mediated augmentation of caspase-8 and BID cleavage was significantly prevented in BMDN from neutrophil cytosolic factor-1 (NCF-1) knockout (KO) mice, implying the involvement of NOX2 in NO-induced apoptosis of PMNs. Furthermore, ROS, NO generation and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression were enhanced in a time-dependent manner in human PMNs and mice BMDN undergoing spontaneous apoptosis. Pharmacological and genetic ablation of iNOS in human PMNs and mice BMDN significantly reduced the levels of apoptosis. Impaired apoptosis of BMDN from iNOS KO mice was due to reduced caspase-8 activity which subsequently prevented caspase-3 and -9 activation. Altogether, our results suggest a crucial role of NO/iNOS in neutrophil apoptosis via enhanced ROS generation and caspase-8 mediated activation of mitochondrial death pathway. PMID:27584786

  9. Mediator Deathwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Tony

    2005-01-01

    The most discussed and analyzed form of deathwork is the dyadic "therapist" [double arrow] "client" relationship, but this far from exhausts the various types of professional work involving the dead. Mediator deathwork is where the professional gleans or constructs information about the dead, edits and polishes it, and publicly…

  10. Dietary cardamom inhibits the formation of azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci in mice and reduces COX-2 and iNOS expression in the colon.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Archana; Ghosh, Samit; Bhattacharjee, Shamee

    2005-01-01

    Recently, considerable attention has been focused on identifying naturally occurring chemopreventive compounds capable of inhibiting, retarding, or reversing the multi-step carcinogenesis. The primary aim of the present study was to identify the effects of a commonly consumed spice, viz., cardamom against azoxymethane (AOM) induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in Swiss Albino mice. The secondary aim, was to explore the ability of cardamom to modulate the status of proliferation and apoptosis, and to understand its role in altering cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. Male Swiss albino mice were injected with AOM (dose: 5mg/Kg body weight) or saline (Group 1) weekly once for two weeks. The AOM-injected mice were randomly assigned to two groups (Groups 2 and 3). While all the groups were on standard lab chow, Group 3 received oral doses of 0.5% cardamom, in aqueous suspension, daily for 8 weeks. Following treatment, significant reduction in the incidences of aberrant crypt foci (p<0.05) was observed. This reduction in ACF was accompanied by suppression of cell proliferation (mean Brdu LI in carcinogen control =13.91+/-3.31, and 0.5% cardamom =2.723+/-0.830) and induction of apoptosis (mean AI in carcinogen control=1.547+/-0.42 and 0.5% cardamom = 6.61+/-0.55). Moreover, reduction of both COX-2 and iNOS expression was also observed. These results suggest that aqueous suspensions of cardamom have protective effects on experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis. Cardamom as a whole and its active components require further attention if the use of this spice is to be recommended for cancer prevention.

  11. Folic Acid Protects Against Glutamate-Induced Excitotoxicity in Hippocampal Slices Through a Mechanism that Implicates Inhibition of GSK-3β and iNOS.

    PubMed

    Budni, Josiane; Molz, Simone; Dal-Cim, Tharine; Martín-de-Saavedra, Maria Dolores; Egea, Javier; Lopéz, Manuela G; Tasca, Carla Ines; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia Severo

    2017-02-10

    Folic acid (folate) is a vitamin of the B-complex group crucial for neurological function. Considering that excitotoxicity and cell death induced by glutamate are involved in many disorders, the potential protective effect of folic acid on glutamate-induced cell damage in rat hippocampal slices and the possible intracellular signaling pathway involved in such effect were investigated. The treatment of hippocampal slices with folic acid (100 μM) significantly abrogated glutamate (1 mM)-induced reduction of cell viability measured by MTT reduction assay and inhibited glutamate-induced D-[(3)H]-aspartate release. To investigate the putative intracellular signaling pathways implicated in the protective effect of folic acid, we used a PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, which abolished the protective effects of folic acid against glutamate-induced cell damage and D-[(3)H] aspartate release. Moreover, hippocampal slices incubated with folic acid alone for 30 min presented increased phosphorylation of GSK-3β at Ser9, indicating an inhibition of the activity of this enzyme. Furthermore, folic acid in the presence of glutamate insult in hippocampal slices maintained for an additional period of 6 h in fresh culture medium without glutamate and/or folic acid induced phosphorylation of GSK-3β and β-catenin expression. In addition, glutamate-treated hippocampal slices showed increased iNOS expression that was reversed by folic acid. In conclusion, the results of this study show that the protective effect of folic acid against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity may involve the modulation of PI3K/GSK-3β/β-catenin pathway and iNOS inhibition.

  12. High-Resolution Global Analysis of the Influences of Bas1 and Ino4 Transcription Factors on Meiotic DNA Break Distributions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuan; Keeney, Scott

    2015-10-01

    Meiotic recombination initiates with DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) made by Spo11. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, many DSBs occur in "hotspots" coinciding with nucleosome-depleted gene promoters. Transcription factors (TFs) stimulate DSB formation in some hotspots, but TF roles are complex and variable between locations. Until now, available data for TF effects on global DSB patterns were of low spatial resolution and confined to a single TF. Here, we examine at high resolution the contributions of two TFs to genome-wide DSB distributions: Bas1, which was known to regulate DSB activity at some loci, and Ino4, for which some binding sites were known to be within strong DSB hotspots. We examined fine-scale DSB distributions in TF mutant strains by deep sequencing oligonucleotides that remain covalently bound to Spo11 as a byproduct of DSB formation, mapped Bas1 and Ino4 binding sites in meiotic cells, evaluated chromatin structure around DSB hotspots, and measured changes in global messenger RNA levels. Our findings show that binding of these TFs has essentially no predictive power for DSB hotspot activity and definitively support the hypothesis that TF control of DSB numbers is context dependent and frequently indirect. TFs often affected the fine-scale distributions of DSBs within hotspots, and when seen, these effects paralleled effects on local chromatin structure. In contrast, changes in DSB frequencies in hotspots did not correlate with quantitative measures of chromatin accessibility, histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, or transcript levels. We also ruled out hotspot competition as a major source of indirect TF effects on DSB distributions. Thus, counter to prevailing models, roles of these TFs on DSB hotspot strength cannot be simply explained via chromatin "openness," histone modification, or compensatory interactions between adjacent hotspots.

  13. Momordin Ic induces HepG2 cell apoptosis through MAPK and PI3K/Akt-mediated mitochondrial pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Yuan, Li; Xiao, Haifang; Xiao, Chunxia; Wang, Yutang; Liu, Xuebo

    2013-06-01

    Momordin Ic is a natural triterpenoid saponin enriched in various Chinese and Japanese natural medicines such as the fruit of Kochia scoparia (L.) Schrad. So far, there is little scientific evidence for momordin Ic with regard to the anti-tumor activities. The aim of this work was to elucidate the anti-tumor effect of momordin Ic and the signal transduction pathways involved. We found that momordin Ic induced apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells, which were supported by DNA fragmentation, caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage. Meanwhile, momordin Ic triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) production together with collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, down-regulation of Bcl-2 and up-regulation of Bax expression. The activation of p38 and JNK, inactivation of Erk1/2 and Akt were also demonstrated. Although ROS production rather than NO was stimulated, the expression of iNOS and HO-1 were altered after momordin Ic treatment for 4 h. Furthermore, the cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, Bax/Bcl-2 expression and PARP cleavage were promoted with LY294002 and U0126 intervention but were blocked by SB203580, SP600125, PI3K activator, NAC and 1,400 W pretreatment, demonstrating the mitochondrial disruption. Furthermore, momordin Ic combination with NAC influenced MAPK, PI3K/Akt and HO-1, iNOS pathways, MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways also regulated the expression of HO-1 and iNOS. These results indicated that momordin Ic induced apoptosis through oxidative stress-regulated mitochondrial dysfunction involving the MAPK and PI3K-mediated iNOS and HO-1 pathways. Thus, momordin Ic might represent a potential source of anticancer candidate.

  14. Bacterial proteases and virulence.

    PubMed

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing tolerance to adverse conditions such as those experienced in the host. In the membrane, HtrA performs similar functions whereas the extracellular proteases, in close contact with host components, pave the way for spreading infections by degrading host matrix components or interfering with host cell signalling to short-circuit host cell processes. Common to both intra- and extracellular proteases is the tight control of their proteolytic activities. In general, substrate recognition by the intracellular proteases is highly selective which is, in part, attributed to the chaperone activity associated with the proteases either encoded within the same polypeptide or on separate subunits. In